Science.gov

Sample records for coli cell surface

  1. DETOXIFICATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES BY IMMOBILIZED ESCHERICHIA COLI EXPRESSING ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE ON CELL SURFACE. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved whole-cell technology for detoxifying organophosphate nerve agents was recently developed based on genetically engineered Escherichia coli with organophosphorus hydrolase anchored on the surface. This article reports the immobilization of these novel biocatalys...

  2. Programming Controlled Adhesion of E. coli to Target Surfaces, Cells, and Tumors with Synthetic Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work we report synthetic adhesins (SAs) enabling the rational design of the adhesion properties of E. coli. SAs have a modular structure comprising a stable β-domain for outer membrane anchoring and surface-exposed immunoglobulin domains with high affinity and specificity that can be selected from large repertoires. SAs are constitutively and stably expressed in an E. coli strain lacking a conserved set of natural adhesins, directing a robust, fast, and specific adhesion of bacteria to target antigenic surfaces and cells. We demonstrate the functionality of SAs in vivo, showing that, compared to wild type E. coli, lower doses of engineered E. coli are sufficient to colonize solid tumors expressing an antigen recognized by the SA. In addition, lower levels of engineered bacteria were found in non-target tissues. Therefore, SAs provide stable and specific adhesion capabilities to E. coli against target surfaces of interest for diverse applications using live bacteria. PMID:25045780

  3. Programming controlled adhesion of E. coli to target surfaces, cells, and tumors with synthetic adhesins.

    PubMed

    Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Bodelón, Gustavo; Fernández-Periáñez, Rodrigo; Cuesta, Angel M; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-04-17

    In this work we report synthetic adhesins (SAs) enabling the rational design of the adhesion properties of E. coli. SAs have a modular structure comprising a stable β-domain for outer membrane anchoring and surface-exposed immunoglobulin domains with high affinity and specificity that can be selected from large repertoires. SAs are constitutively and stably expressed in an E. coli strain lacking a conserved set of natural adhesins, directing a robust, fast, and specific adhesion of bacteria to target antigenic surfaces and cells. We demonstrate the functionality of SAs in vivo, showing that, compared to wild type E. coli, lower doses of engineered E. coli are sufficient to colonize solid tumors expressing an antigen recognized by the SA. In addition, lower levels of engineered bacteria were found in non-target tissues. Therefore, SAs provide stable and specific adhesion capabilities to E. coli against target surfaces of interest for diverse applications using live bacteria. PMID:25045780

  4. Fixation and stabilization of Escherichia coli cells displaying genetically engineered cell surface proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, A.; Abramov, S.; Georgiou, G.

    1996-12-05

    A large biotechnological potential is inherent in the display of proteins. Applications such as immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts or cellular adsorbents require cell fixation to prevent disintegration, stabilization of the anchored protein from leakage, denaturation or proteolysis, and total loss of cell viability, preventing medium and potential product contamination with cells. In this article the authors describe the adaptation of a simple two-stage chemical crosslinking procedure based on bi-layer encagement for stabilizing Escherichia coli cells expressing an Lpp-OmpA-{beta}-lactamase fusion that displays {beta}-lactamase on the cell surface. Bilayer crosslinking and coating the bacteria with a polymeric matrix is accomplished by treating the cells first with either glutaraldehyde or polyglutaraldehyde, followed by secondary crosslinking with polyacrylamide hydrazide. These treatments resulted in a 5- to 25-fold reduction of the thermal inactivation rate constant at 55 C of surface anchored {beta}-lactamase and completely prevented the deterioration of the cells for at least a week of storage at 4 C. The stabilization procedure developed paves the way to scalable biotechnological applications of E. coli displaying surface anchored proteins as whole-cell biocatalysts and adsorbents.

  5. Cell preparation methods influence Escherichia coli D21g surface chemistry and transport in saturated sand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of cell preparation methods on the surface chemistry and deposition of Escherichia coli D21g was investigated over a range of ionic strength conditions. The cell preparation methods, which were considered, included filtration and centrifugation (at various speeds and for different duratio...

  6. Changes in cell surface properties of shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli by Quercus infectoria G. Olivier.

    PubMed

    Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan; Suwalak, Sakol

    2009-08-01

    The effects of Quercus infectoria (family Fagaceae) nutgalls on cell surface properties of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) were investigated with an assay of microbial adhesion to hydrocarbon. The surface of bacterial cells treated with Q. infectoria exhibited a higher level of cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) toward toluene than did the surface of untreated cells. With 50% ethanolic extract, the CSH of the three strains of STEC O157:H7 treated with 4X MIC of the extract resulted in moderate or strong hydrophobicity, whereas at 2x MIC and MIC, the CSH of only one strain of E. coli O157:H7 was significantly affected. The 95% ethanolic extract had a significant effect on CSH of all three strains at both 4X MIC and 2X MIC but not at the MIC. The effect on bacterial CSH was less pronounced with the other STEC strains. At 4X MIC, the 50% ethanolic extract increased the CSH of all non-O157 STEC strains significantly. At 2X MIC and 4X MIC, the 95% ethanolic extract affected the CSH of E. coli O26:H11 significantly but did not affect E. coli O111 :NM or E. coli O22. Electro microscopic examination revealed the loss of pili in the treated cells. The ability of Q. infectoria extract to modify hydrophobic domains enables this extract to partition the lipids of the bacterial cell membrane, rendering the membrane more permeable and allowing leakage of ions and other cell contents, which leads to cell death. Further studies are required to evaluate the effects of Q. infectoria extract in food systems or in vivo and provide support for the use of this extract as a food additive for control of these STEC pathogens. PMID:19722403

  7. Impacts of hematite nanoparticle exposure on biomechanical, adhesive, and surface electrical properties of Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Hughes, Joseph; Chen, Yongsheng

    2012-06-01

    Despite a wealth of studies examining the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials, current knowledge on their cytotoxic mechanisms (particularly from a physical perspective) remains limited. In this work, we imaged and quantitatively characterized the biomechanical (hardness and elasticity), adhesive, and surface electrical properties of Escherichia coli cells with and without exposure to hematite nanoparticles (NPs) in an effort to advance our understanding of the cytotoxic impacts of nanomaterials. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that E. coli cells had noticeable deformation with hematite treatment for 45 min with a statistical significance. The hematite-treated cells became significantly harder or stiffer than untreated ones, as evidenced by indentation and spring constant measurements. The average indentation of the hematite-treated E. coli cells was 120 nm, which is significantly lower (P < 0.01) than that of the untreated cells (approximately 400 nm). The spring constant of hematite-treated E. coli cells (0.28 ± 0.11 nN/nm) was about 20 times higher than that of untreated ones (0.01 ± 0.01 nN/nm). The zeta potential of E. coli cells, measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS), was shown to shift from -4 ± 2 mV to -27 ± 8 mV with progressive surface adsorption of hematite NPs, a finding which is consistent with the local surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Overall, the reported findings quantitatively revealed the adverse impacts of nanomaterial exposure on physical properties of bacterial cells and should provide insight into the toxicity mechanisms of nanomaterials. PMID:22467500

  8. Impacts of Hematite Nanoparticle Exposure on Biomechanical, Adhesive, and Surface Electrical Properties of Escherichia coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Hughes, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Despite a wealth of studies examining the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials, current knowledge on their cytotoxic mechanisms (particularly from a physical perspective) remains limited. In this work, we imaged and quantitatively characterized the biomechanical (hardness and elasticity), adhesive, and surface electrical properties of Escherichia coli cells with and without exposure to hematite nanoparticles (NPs) in an effort to advance our understanding of the cytotoxic impacts of nanomaterials. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that E. coli cells had noticeable deformation with hematite treatment for 45 min with a statistical significance. The hematite-treated cells became significantly harder or stiffer than untreated ones, as evidenced by indentation and spring constant measurements. The average indentation of the hematite-treated E. coli cells was 120 nm, which is significantly lower (P < 0.01) than that of the untreated cells (approximately 400 nm). The spring constant of hematite-treated E. coli cells (0.28 ± 0.11 nN/nm) was about 20 times higher than that of untreated ones (0.01 ± 0.01 nN/nm). The zeta potential of E. coli cells, measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS), was shown to shift from −4 ± 2 mV to −27 ± 8 mV with progressive surface adsorption of hematite NPs, a finding which is consistent with the local surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Overall, the reported findings quantitatively revealed the adverse impacts of nanomaterial exposure on physical properties of bacterial cells and should provide insight into the toxicity mechanisms of nanomaterials. PMID:22467500

  9. Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 1a directs cell surface display of tick BM95 immunogenic peptides on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Canales, Mario; Almazán, Consuelo; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; de la Fuente, José

    2008-07-31

    The surface display of heterologous proteins on live Escherichia coli using anchoring motifs from outer membranes proteins has impacted on many areas of biochemistry, molecular biology and biotechnology. The Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 1a (MSP1a) contains N-terminal surface-exposed repeated peptides (28-289 amino acids) that are involved in pathogen interaction with host cell receptors and is surface-displayed when the recombinant protein is expressed in E. coli. Therefore, it was predicted that MSP1a would surface display on E. coli peptides inserted in the N-terminal repeats region of the protein. The Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus BM86 and BM95 glycoproteins are homologous proteins that protect cattle against tick infestations. In this study, we demonstrated that a recombinant protein comprising tick BM95 immunogenic peptides fused to the A. marginale MSP1a N-terminal region is displayed on the E. coli surface and is recognized by anti-BM86 and anti-MSP1a antibodies. This system provides a novel approach to the surface display of heterologous antigenic proteins on live E. coli and suggests the possibility to use the recombinant bacteria for immunization studies against cattle tick infestations. PMID:18582976

  10. Survival of Escherichia coli cells on solid copper surfaces is increased by glutathione.

    PubMed

    Große, Cornelia; Schleuder, Grit; Schmole, Christin; Nies, Dietrich H

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria are rapidly killed on solid copper surfaces, so this material could be useful to limit the spread of multiple-drug-resistant bacteria in hospitals. In Escherichia coli, the DNA-protecting Dps protein and the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase II Ndh were not involved in tolerance to copper ions or survival on solid copper surfaces. Decreased copper tolerance under anaerobic growth conditions in the presence of ascorbate and with melibiose as the carbon source indicated that sodium-dependent symport systems may provide an import route for Cu(I) into the cytoplasm. Glutathione-free ΔcopA ΔgshA double mutants of E. coli were more rapidly inactivated on solid copper surfaces than glutathione-containing wild-type cells. Therefore, while DNA protection by Dps was not required, glutathione was needed to protect the cytoplasm and the DNA against damage mediated by solid copper surfaces, which may explain the differences in the molecular mechanisms of killing between glutathione-containing Gram-negative and glutathione-free Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:25192999

  11. Survival of Escherichia coli Cells on Solid Copper Surfaces Is Increased by Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Große, Cornelia; Schleuder, Grit; Schmole, Christin

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria are rapidly killed on solid copper surfaces, so this material could be useful to limit the spread of multiple-drug-resistant bacteria in hospitals. In Escherichia coli, the DNA-protecting Dps protein and the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase II Ndh were not involved in tolerance to copper ions or survival on solid copper surfaces. Decreased copper tolerance under anaerobic growth conditions in the presence of ascorbate and with melibiose as the carbon source indicated that sodium-dependent symport systems may provide an import route for CuI into the cytoplasm. Glutathione-free ΔcopA ΔgshA double mutants of E. coli were more rapidly inactivated on solid copper surfaces than glutathione-containing wild-type cells. Therefore, while DNA protection by Dps was not required, glutathione was needed to protect the cytoplasm and the DNA against damage mediated by solid copper surfaces, which may explain the differences in the molecular mechanisms of killing between glutathione-containing Gram-negative and glutathione-free Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:25192999

  12. Cell surface display of carbonic anhydrase on Escherichia coli using ice nucleation protein for CO₂ sequestration.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Hai; Liu, Ning; Yu, Ming-Rui; Yang, Shang-Tian; Chen, Huan-Lin

    2011-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) has recently gained renewed interests for its potential as a mass-transfer facilitator for CO(2) sequestration. However, the low stability and high price severely limit its applications. In this work, the expression of α-CA from Helicobacter pylori on the outer membrane of Escherichia coli using a surface-anchoring system derived from ice nucleation protein (INP) from Pseudomonas syringae was developed. To find the best surface anchoring motif, full-length INP (114 kDa), truncated INP (INP-NC, 33 kDa), and INP's N-domain with first two subunits (INP-N, 22 kDa) were evaluated. Two vectors, pKK223-3 and pET22b(+), with different promoters (T7 and Tac) were used to construct the fusion genes, and for each vector, three recombinant strains, each expressing a different length of the fusion protein, were obtained. SDS-PAGE, Western blot, immunofluorescence microscopy, FACS, and whole-cell ELISA confirmed the expression of fusion proteins on the surface of E. coli. The smallest fusion protein with INP-N as the anchoring motif had the highest expression level and CA activity, suggesting that INP-N is the best carrying protein due to its smaller size. Also, the T7 promoter in pET22b(+) induced with 0.2 mM IPTG gave high protein expression levels, whereas the Tac promoter in pKK223-3 gave low expression levels. The surface displayed CA was at least twofold more stable than that of the free form, and did not show any adverse effect on cell growth and outer membrane integrity. Cells with surface displayed CA were successfully used to facilitate CO(2) sequestration in contained liquid membrane (CLM). PMID:21732326

  13. Escherichia coli expressing single-chain Fv on the cell surface as a potential prophylactic of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Hyun-Mi; Kim, In-Joong; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Cho, Soo-Dong; Cho, In-Soo; Hyun, Bang-Hun

    2009-03-23

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a causative agent of severe diarrhea which leads to death in piglets. Because of the high mortality which is up to 100% in suckling piglets, PED is an important porcine disease in Korea. In this study, we developed a prophylactic candidate using single-chain Fvs to prevent the PEDV infection. ScFvs of mouse monoclonal antibody which was verified to neutralize PEDV was expressed in Escherichia coli expression system. After the confirmation of PEDV neutralizing activity of purified recombinant scFvs by VN test, scFvs were expressed on the surface of E. coli cells. The signal sequence and autotransporter beta domain of protease IgA (IgAP) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae were introduced to endow scFvs with the direction to the cell surface and the support as a transmembrane domain. 5x10(6)CFU of E. coli expressing scFvs against PEDV showed promising result of 94% foci reduction compared to wild type E. coli. This result demonstrated that E. coli expressing scFvs on the cell surface retained functional potency of parent antibody and therefore blocked PEDV infection into target cells in vitro. This in vitro assay result proposes the perspective of recombinant E. coli cells expressing scFvs as a novel prophylactic against PEDV infection. PMID:19428826

  14. A mutant Escherichia coli that attaches peptidoglycan to lipopolysaccharide and displays cell wall on its surface

    PubMed Central

    Grabowicz, Marcin; Andres, Dorothee; Lebar, Matthew D; Malojčić, Goran; Kahne, Daniel; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) forms the surface-exposed leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, an organelle that shields the underlying peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall. Both LPS and PG are essential cell envelope components that are synthesized independently and assembled by dedicated transenvelope multiprotein complexes. We have identified a point-mutation in the gene for O-antigen ligase (WaaL) in Escherichia coli that causes LPS to be modified with PG subunits, intersecting these two pathways. Synthesis of the PG-modified LPS (LPS*) requires ready access to the small PG precursor pool but does not weaken cell wall integrity, challenging models of precursor sequestration at PG assembly machinery. LPS* is efficiently transported to the cell surface without impairing OM function. Because LPS* contains the canonical vancomycin binding site, these surface-exposed molecules confer increased vancomycin-resistance by functioning as molecular decoys that titrate the antibiotic away from its intracellular target. This unexpected LPS glycosylation fuses two potent pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05334.001 PMID:25551294

  15. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Stack, Andrew G; Chen, Yongsheng

    2011-02-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)) and corundum (α-Al(2)O(3)) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3±0.7nN to 0.8±0.4nN as hematite NPs increased from 26nm to 98nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed. PMID:20932723

  16. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yongsheng

    2011-01-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite ( -Fe2 O3 ) and corundum ( -Al2 O3 ) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3 0.7 nN to 0.8 0.4 nN as hematite NPs increased from 26 nm to 98 nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson Kendall Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed.

  17. How Escherichia coli lands and forms cell clusters on a surface: a new role of surface topography

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huan; Chen, Aaron; Song, Xinran; Brasch, Megan E.; Henderson, James H.; Ren, Dacheng

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial response to surface topography during biofilm formation was studied using 5 μm tall line patterns of poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Escherichia coli cells attached on top of protruding line patterns were found to align more perpendicularly to the orientation of line patterns when the pattern narrowed. Consistently, cell cluster formation per unit area on 5 μm wide line patterns was reduced by 14-fold compared to flat PDMS. Contrasting the reduced colony formation, cells attached on narrow patterns were longer and had higher transcriptional activities, suggesting that such unfavorable topography may present a stress to attached cells. Results of mutant studies indicate that flagellar motility is involved in the observed preference in cell orientation on narrow patterns, which was corroborated by the changes in cell rotation pattern before settling on different surface topographies. These findings led to a set of new design principles for creating antifouling topographies, which was validated using 10 μm tall hexagonal patterns. PMID:27412365

  18. How Escherichia coli lands and forms cell clusters on a surface: a new role of surface topography.

    PubMed

    Gu, Huan; Chen, Aaron; Song, Xinran; Brasch, Megan E; Henderson, James H; Ren, Dacheng

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial response to surface topography during biofilm formation was studied using 5 μm tall line patterns of poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Escherichia coli cells attached on top of protruding line patterns were found to align more perpendicularly to the orientation of line patterns when the pattern narrowed. Consistently, cell cluster formation per unit area on 5 μm wide line patterns was reduced by 14-fold compared to flat PDMS. Contrasting the reduced colony formation, cells attached on narrow patterns were longer and had higher transcriptional activities, suggesting that such unfavorable topography may present a stress to attached cells. Results of mutant studies indicate that flagellar motility is involved in the observed preference in cell orientation on narrow patterns, which was corroborated by the changes in cell rotation pattern before settling on different surface topographies. These findings led to a set of new design principles for creating antifouling topographies, which was validated using 10 μm tall hexagonal patterns. PMID:27412365

  19. Brucella outer membrane lipoprotein shares antigenic determinants with Escherichia coli Braun lipoprotein and is exposed on the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Miguel, M J; Moriyón, I; López, J

    1987-01-01

    In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), purified Brucella abortus and Escherichia coli peptidoglycan-linked lipoproteins gave a strong cross-reaction with sera from rabbits hyperimmunized with the heterologous lipoprotein. When smooth E. coli cells were used as ELISA antigens, the immunological cross-reaction was not observed unless the cells were treated to remove lipopolysaccharide and other outer membrane components. In contrast, intact cells from smooth strains of B. abortus and Brucella melitensis bound anti-lipoprotein immunoglobulin G, and the controls performed by ELISA showed that this reaction was not due to antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide, group 3 outer membrane proteins, or porins. Electron microscopy of cells labeled with antilipoprotein serum and protein A-colloidal gold showed specific labeling of smooth cells from both B. abortus and B. melitensis, even though unspecific labeling by nonimmune serum was observed with rough B. abortus. These results confirm the close similarity between E. coli and Brucella peptidoglycan-linked lipoproteins and show that, in contrast to E. coli, the lipoprotein of B. abortus and B. melitensis is partially exposed on the surface of smooth cells. Images PMID:2432014

  20. Influence of the Plant Defense Response to Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cell Surface Structures on Survival of That Enteric Pathogen on Plant Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Suengwook

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 has resulted in hundreds of cases of illness and, in some instances, death. In this study, the influence of cell surface structures of E. coli O157:H7, such as flagella, curli fimbriae, lipopolysaccharides, or exopolysaccharides, on plant defense responses and on survival or colonization on the plant was investigated. The population of the E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43895 wild-type strain was significantly lower on wild-type Arabidopsis plants than that of the 43895 flagellum-deficient mutant. The population of the E. coli O157:H7 43895 flagellum mutant was greater on both wild-type and npr1-1 mutant (nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related [PR] genes) plants and resulted in less PR gene induction, estimated based on a weak β-glucuronidase (GUS) signal, than did the 43895 wild-type strain. These results suggest that the flagella, among the other pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), made a substantial contribution to the induction of plant defense response and contributed to the decreased numbers of the E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43895 wild-type strain on the wild-type Arabidopsis plant. A curli-deficient E. coli O157:H7 86-24 strain survived better on wild-type Arabidopsis plants than the curli-producing wild-type 86-24 strain did. The curli-deficient E. coli O157:H7 86-24 strain exhibited a GUS signal at a level substantially lower than that of the curli-producing wild-type strain. Curli were recognized by plant defense systems, consequently affecting bacterial survival. The cell surface structures of E. coli O157:H7 have a significant impact on the induction of differential plant defense responses, thereby impacting persistence or survival of the pathogen on plants. PMID:22706044

  1. Enhanced colonization of rpoS-deficient Escherichia coli cells on solid surfaces by reinforced csgA gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Hong; Ojima, Yoshihiro; Taya, Masahito

    2014-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the rpoS-deficient cells of E. coli K-12 BW25113 (ΔrpoS) increased the number of flagella on the cell surfaces. However, the quantitative analysis of cell colonization showed that the increased number of flagella on ΔrpoS cell surfaces did not cause the enhancement of cell colonization on the surfaces of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP) and polystyrene (PS) after 24 h of incubation at 37℃. To facilitate the enhanced expression of curli, the csgA gene was introduced into the ΔrpoS cells. The transformed cells rich in flagella and curli on the cell surfaces were found to make colonies 2-3 times larger than both the wild type and ΔrpoS cells on the PVC, PP and PS surfaces at 37℃. It was thus verified that the reinforcement of csgA gene in the ΔrpoS cells induced the enhanced colonization on the solid surfaces with the increased flagellum and curli expressions. PMID:25252647

  2. The 32-kilodalton envelope protein of vaccinia virus synthesized in Escherichia coli binds with specificity to cell surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, C F; Gong, S C; Esteban, M

    1991-01-01

    The nature of interaction between vaccinia virus and the surface of host cells as the first step in virus infection is undefined. A 32-kDa virus envelope protein has been identified as a cell surface binding protein (J.-S. Maa, J. F. Rodriguez, and M. Esteban, J. Biol. Chem. 265:1569-1577, 1990). To carry out studies on the structure-function relationship of this protein, the 32-kDa protein was obtained from Escherichia coli cells harboring the expression plasmid pT7Ek32. The recombinant polypeptide was found to have structural properties similar to those of the native virus envelope protein. Binding studies of 125I-labeled 32-kDa protein to cultured cells of various origins revealed that the E. coli-produced 32-kDa protein exhibited selectivity, specificity, and saturability. Scatchard analysis indicated about 4.5 x 10(4) sites per cell with a high affinity (Kd = 1.8 x 10(-9) M), suggesting interaction of the 32-kDa protein with a specific receptor. The availability of large quantities of the 32-kDa virus protein in bacteria will permit further structural and functional studies of this virus envelope protein and facilitate identification of the specific cell surface receptor. Images PMID:1985213

  3. Creation of a Cellooligosaccharide-Assimilating Escherichia coli Strain by Displaying Active Beta-Glucosidase on the Cell Surface via a Novel Anchor Protein ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kawabata, Hitomi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated direct assimilation of cellooligosaccharide using Escherichia coli displaying beta-glucosidase (BGL). BGL from Thermobifida fusca YX (Tfu0937) was displayed on the E. coli cell surface using a novel anchor protein named Blc. This strain was grown successfully on 0.2% cellobiose, and the optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was 1.05 after 20 h. PMID:21742905

  4. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction chromatography for estimating changes in cell surface charge of Escherichia coli cells treated with pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Ukuku, Dike O; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun; Zhang, Howard

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) treatments, a nonthermal process, have been reported to injure and inactivate bacteria in liquid foods. However, the effect of this treatment on bacterial cell surface charge and hydrophobicity has not been investigated. Apple juice (pH 3.8) purchased from a wholesale distributor was inoculated with cocktail of Escherichia coli O157:H7 at 7.4 log CFU/mL, processed with a PEF at a field strength of 18.4 kV/cm and 32.2 kV/cm at 25°C, 35°C, and 45°C with a treatment time of 160 μs and a flow rate of 120 mL/min. Bacterial cell surface charge and hydrophobicity of untreated and PEF-treated E. coli O157:H7 were determined immediately and after storage at 5°C and 23°C using hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction chromatography. Similarly, the populations surviving the PEF treatments including injured cells were determined by plating 0.1 mL of the sample on sorbitol MacConkey agar and tryptic soy agar (TSA) plates. The surviving populations of E. coli cells after PEF treatment varied depending on field strength and treatment temperature used. Percent injury in the surviving populations was high immediately after PEF treatment and varied among treatment temperatures. Cell surface charge of E. coli bacteria before PEF treatment averaged 32.10±8.12. PEF treatments at 25°C, 35°C, and 45°C reduced the above surface charge to 26.34±1.24, 14.24±3.30, and 6.72±2.82, respectively. Similarly, the surface hydrophobicity of untreated E. coli cells at 0.194±0.034 was increased to an average of 0.268±0.022, 0.320±0.124, and 0.586±0.123 after PEF treatments at 25°C, 35°C, and 45°C, respectively. The results of this study indicate that PEF treatment affects the outer cell envelope of E. coli bacteria as evidenced by the changes in surface hydrophobicity and cell surface charge leading to injury and subsequent inactivation of the cells. PMID:21668373

  5. Strain level differences in E. coli transport, cell surface and adhesion characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Given the importance of E. coli as an indicator of fecal contamination, it is imperative that genotypic and phenotypic variability among strains of E. coli from the same host and/or environmental niche are understood. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of strain level differences on t...

  6. Strain level differences in Escherichia coli transport, cell surface and adhesion characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Given the importance of Escherichia coli as both an indicator of fecal contamination and a potential pathogen, it is imperative that genotypic and phenotypic variability among strains of E. coli from the same host and/or environmental niche are understood. Strain survival and variation are regulated...

  7. Bacterial Surface Appendages Strongly Impact Nanomechanical and Electrokinetic Properties of Escherichia coli Cells Subjected to Osmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Francius, Grégory; Polyakov, Pavel; Merlin, Jenny; Abe, Yumiko; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Merlin, Christophe; Beloin, Christophe; Duval, Jérôme F. L.

    2011-01-01

    The physicochemical properties and dynamics of bacterial envelope, play a major role in bacterial activity. In this study, the morphological, nanomechanical and electrohydrodynamic properties of Escherichia coli K-12 mutant cells were thoroughly investigated as a function of bulk medium ionic strength using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrokinetics (electrophoresis). Bacteria were differing according to genetic alterations controlling the production of different surface appendages (short and rigid Ag43 adhesins, longer and more flexible type 1 fimbriae and F pilus). From the analysis of the spatially resolved force curves, it is shown that cells elasticity and turgor pressure are not only depending on bulk salt concentration but also on the presence/absence and nature of surface appendage. In 1 mM KNO3, cells without appendages or cells surrounded by Ag43 exhibit large Young moduli and turgor pressures (∼700–900 kPa and ∼100–300 kPa respectively). Under similar ionic strength condition, a dramatic ∼50% to ∼70% decrease of these nanomechanical parameters was evidenced for cells with appendages. Qualitatively, such dependence of nanomechanical behavior on surface organization remains when increasing medium salt content to 100 mM, even though, quantitatively, differences are marked to a much smaller extent. Additionally, for a given surface appendage, the magnitude of the nanomechanical parameters decreases significantly when increasing bulk salt concentration. This effect is ascribed to a bacterial exoosmotic water loss resulting in a combined contraction of bacterial cytoplasm together with an electrostatically-driven shrinkage of the surface appendages. The former process is demonstrated upon AFM analysis, while the latter, inaccessible upon AFM imaging, is inferred from electrophoretic data interpreted according to advanced soft particle electrokinetic theory. Altogether, AFM and electrokinetic results clearly demonstrate the intimate

  8. Inactivation of stressed Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells on the surfaces of rocket salad leaves by chlorine and peroxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Osaili, Tareq M; Obaidat, Heba M; Shaker, Reyad R; Awaisheh, Saddam S; Holley, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Because Escherichia coli O157:H7 has been frequently associated with many foodborne outbreaks caused by consumption of leafy greens (lettuce, spinach, and celery), this study investigated the ability of deionized water, chlorine, and peroxyacetic acid to detach or inactivate stressed and unstressed cells of E. coli O157:H7 contaminating the surfaces of rocket salad leaves. E. coli O157:H7 cells stressed by acid, cold, starvation, or NaCl exposure, as well as unstressed cells, were inoculated on the surfaces of rocket salad leaves at 4°C. The effectiveness of two sanitizers (200 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of peroxyacetic acid) and deionized water for decontaminating the leaves treated with stressed and unstressed E. coli O157:H7 were evaluated during storage at 10 or 25°C for 0.5, 1, 3, and 7 days. It was found that washing with 80 ppm of peroxyacetic acid was more effective and reduced unstressed and stressed cells of E. coli O157:H7 by about 1 log CFU per leaf on the leaves. There was no apparent difference in the ability of stressed and unstressed cells to survive surface disinfection with the tested agents. Treatments to reduce viable E. coli O157:H7 cells on rocket leaves stored at 25°C were more effective than when used on those stored at 10°C. Washing with peroxyacetic acid or chlorine solution did not ensure the safety of rocket leaves, but such treatments could reduce the likelihood of water-mediated transfer of E. coli O157:H7 during washing and subsequent processing. PMID:24405996

  9. Display of active enzymes on the cell surface of Escherichia coli using PgsA anchor protein and their application to bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Narita, Junya; Okano, Kenji; Tateno, Toshihiro; Tanino, Takanori; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Sung, Moon-Hee; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2006-05-01

    We have developed a novel Escherichia coli cell surface display system by employing PgsA as an anchoring motif. In our display system, C-terminal fusion to PgsA anchor protein from Bacillus subtilis was used. The enzymes selected for display were alpha-amylase (AmyA) from Streptococcus bovis 148 and lipase B (CALB) from Candida antarctica. The molecular mass values of AmyA and CALB are approximately 77 and 34 kDa, respectively. The enzymes were displayed on the surface as a fusion protein with a FLAG peptide tag at the C terminus. Both the PgsA-AmyA-FLAG and PgsA-CALB-FLAG fusion proteins were shown to be displayed by immunofluorescence labeling using anti-FLAG antibody. The displayed enzymes were active forms, and AmyA and CALB activities reached 990 U/g (dry cell weight) and 4.6 U/g (dry cell weight), respectively. AmyA-displaying E. coli cells grew utilizing cornstarch as the sole carbon source, while CALB-displaying E. coli cells catalyzed enantioselective transesterification, indicating that they are effective whole-cell biocatalysts. Since a target enzyme with a size of 77 kDa and an industrially useful lipase have been successfully displayed on the cell surface of E. coli for the first time, PgsA protein is probably a useful anchoring motif to display various enzymes. PMID:16133338

  10. Single-cell Characterization of Autotransporter-mediated Escherichia coli Surface Display of Disulfide Bond-containing Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Balakrishnan; Sendra, Victor G; Cirino, Patrick C; Varadarajan, Navin

    2012-01-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are a family of bacterial proteins containing a C-terminal β-barrel-forming domain that facilitates the translocation of N-terminal passenger domain whose functions range from adhesion to proteolysis. Genetic replacement of the native passenger domain with heterologous proteins is an attractive strategy not only for applications such as biocatalysis, live-cell vaccines, and protein engineering but also for gaining mechanistic insights toward understanding AT translocation. The ability of ATs to efficiently display functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides has remained largely controversial. By employing high-throughput single-cell flow cytometry, we have systematically investigated the ability of the Escherichia coli AT Antigen 43 (Ag43) to display two different recombinant reporter proteins, a single-chain antibody (M18 scFv) that contains two disulfides and chymotrypsin that contains four disulfides, by varying the signal peptide and deleting the different domains of the native protein. Our results indicate that only the C-terminal β-barrel and the threaded α-helix are essential for efficient surface display of functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides. These results imply that there are no inherent constraints for functional translocation and display of disulfide bond-containing proteins mediated by the AT system and should open new avenues for protein display and engineering. PMID:23019324

  11. Single-cell characterization of autotransporter-mediated Escherichia coli surface display of disulfide bond-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Balakrishnan; Sendra, Victor G; Cirino, Patrick C; Varadarajan, Navin

    2012-11-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are a family of bacterial proteins containing a C-terminal β-barrel-forming domain that facilitates the translocation of N-terminal passenger domain whose functions range from adhesion to proteolysis. Genetic replacement of the native passenger domain with heterologous proteins is an attractive strategy not only for applications such as biocatalysis, live-cell vaccines, and protein engineering but also for gaining mechanistic insights toward understanding AT translocation. The ability of ATs to efficiently display functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides has remained largely controversial. By employing high-throughput single-cell flow cytometry, we have systematically investigated the ability of the Escherichia coli AT Antigen 43 (Ag43) to display two different recombinant reporter proteins, a single-chain antibody (M18 scFv) that contains two disulfides and chymotrypsin that contains four disulfides, by varying the signal peptide and deleting the different domains of the native protein. Our results indicate that only the C-terminal β-barrel and the threaded α-helix are essential for efficient surface display of functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides. These results imply that there are no inherent constraints for functional translocation and display of disulfide bond-containing proteins mediated by the AT system and should open new avenues for protein display and engineering. PMID:23019324

  12. Real-Time Sensing of Enteropathogenic E. coli-Induced Effects on Epithelial Host Cell Height, Cell-Substrate Interactions, and Endocytic Processes by Infrared Surface Plasmon Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zlotkin-Rivkin, Efrat; Rund, David; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Zahavi, Eitan Erez; Perlson, Eran; Mercone, Silvana; Golosovsky, Michael; Davidov, Dan; Aroeti, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is an important, generally non-invasive, bacterial pathogen that causes diarrhea in humans. The microbe infects mainly the enterocytes of the small intestine. Here we have applied our newly developed infrared surface plasmon resonance (IR-SPR) spectroscopy approach to study how EPEC infection affects epithelial host cells. The IR-SPR experiments showed that EPEC infection results in a robust reduction in the refractive index of the infected cells. Assisted by confocal and total internal reflection microscopy, we discovered that the microbe dilates the intercellular gaps and induces the appearance of fluid-phase-filled pinocytic vesicles in the lower basolateral regions of the host epithelial cells. Partial cell detachment from the underlying substratum was also observed. Finally, the waveguide mode observed by our IR-SPR analyses showed that EPEC infection decreases the host cell's height to some extent. Together, these observations reveal novel impacts of the pathogen on the host cell architecture and endocytic functions. We suggest that these changes may induce the infiltration of a watery environment into the host cell, and potentially lead to failure of the epithelium barrier functions. Our findings also indicate the great potential of the label-free IR-SPR approach to study the dynamics of host-pathogen interactions with high spatiotemporal sensitivity. PMID:24194932

  13. Effects of cell surface characteristics and manure-application practices on Escherichia coli populations in the subsurface: A three-farm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvucci, A. E.; Elton, M.; Siler, J. D.; Zhang, W.; Richards, B. K.; Geohring, L. D.; Warnick, L. D.; Hay, A. G.; Steenhuis, T.

    2010-12-01

    The introduction of microbial pathogens into the environment from untreated manure represents a threat to water quality and human health. Thus, understanding the effect of manure management strategies is imperative to effectively mitigate the inadvertent release of pathogens, particularly in subsurface environments where they can be transported through macropores to the groundwater or through agricultural tile line to open water bodies. The production of cell-surface biomolecules is also suspected to play an important role in the environmental survival and transport of enterobacterial pathogens. This study collected Escherichia coli samples from three dairy farms with artificial tile drainage systems and active manure spreading in the Central New York region over a three-month period. Sampling targeted four potential source locations on each farm: (i) cow housing, (ii) manure storage facilities, (iii) field soil, and (iv) subsurface drainage effluent. Over 2800 E. coli isolates were recovered and consequently analyzed for the cell surface components, cellulose and curli, traits associated with increased environmental survival, altered transport and pathogenicity. The E. coli isolates from locations i-iii displayed highly variable curli and cellulose-producing communities, while isolates collected from subsurface runoff on each farm had stable curli and cellulose production communities over all sampling dates. Furthermore, the method of manure application to the fields influenced the population characteristics found in drainage effluent isolates. Incorporation of manure into the soil was correlated to isolate populations largely deficient of curli and cellulose; whereas farms that only surface-applied manure were correlated to isolate populations of high curli and cellulose production. The production of curli and cellulose has previously been shown to be a response to environmental stress on the cell. Therefore, incorporation of manure directly into the soil appears

  14. Surface Characteristics and Adhesion Behavior of Escherichia coli O157:H7: Role of Extracellular Macromolecules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface macromolecule cleavage experiments were conducted on enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells to investigate the influence of these macromolecules on cell surface properties. Electrophoretic mobility, hydrophobicity, and titration experiments were carried out on proteinase K treate...

  15. The Escherichia coli Subtilase Cytotoxin A Subunit Specifically Cleaves Cell-surface GRP78 Protein and Abolishes COOH-terminal-dependent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Rupa; de Ridder, Gustaaf G.; Eu, Jerry P.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Pizzo, Salvatore V.

    2012-01-01

    GRP78, a molecular chaperone with critical endoplasmic reticulum functions, is aberrantly expressed on the surface of cancer cells, including prostate and melanoma. Here it functions as a pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic signaling receptor via NH2-terminal domain ligation. Auto-antibodies to this domain may appear in cancer patient serum where they are a poor prognostic indicator. Conversely, GRP78 COOH-terminal domain ligation is pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative. There is no method to disrupt cell-surface GRP78 without compromising the total GRP78 pool, making it difficult to study cell-surface GRP78 function. We studied six cell lines representing three cancer types. One cell line per group expresses high levels of cell-surface GRP78, and the other expresses low levels (human hepatoma: Hep3B and HepG2; human prostate cancer: PC3 and 1-LN; murine melanoma: B16F0 and B16F1). We investigated the effect of Escherichia coli subtilase cytoxin catalytic subunit (SubA) on GRP78. We report that SubA specifically cleaves cell-surface GRP78 on HepG2, 1-LN, and B16F1 cells without affecting intracellular GRP78. B16F0 cells (GRP78low) have lower amounts of cleaved cell-surface GRP78. SubA has no effect on Hep3B and PC3 cells. The predicted 28-kDa GRP78 COOH-terminal fragment is released into the culture medium by SubA treatment, and COOH-terminal domain signal transduction is abrogated, whereas pro-proliferative signaling mediated through NH2-terminal domain ligation is unaffected. These experiments clarify cell-surface GRP78 topology and demonstrate that the COOH-terminal domain is necessary for pro-apoptotic signal transduction occurring upon COOH-terminal antibody ligation. SubA is a powerful tool to specifically probe the functions of cell-surface GRP78. PMID:22851173

  16. A bioluminescence ATP assay for estimating surface hydrophobicity and membrane damage of Escherichia coli cells treated with pulsed electric fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulse Electric Field (PEF) treatments, a non-thermal process have been reported to injure and inactivate bacteria in liquid foods. However, the effect of this treatment on bacterial cell surface charge and hydrophobicity has not been investigated. Apple juice (AJ, pH 3.8) purchased from a wholesale ...

  17. Inactivation of Escherichia coli planktonic cells by multi-walled carbon nanotubes in suspensions: Effect of surface functionalization coupled with medium nutrition level.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mu-Fan; Wu, Wei-Ling; Du, Yuchin; Chin, Ching-Ju M; Lin, Chu-Ching

    2016-11-15

    While earlier studies have identified the antibacterial activity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and proposed that cell membrane damage by direct contact with CNTs is likely the main toxicity mechanism, the relative importance of chemical versus physical properties of CNTs in controlling their bacterial cytotoxicity is understudied. Given that CNT is commonly modified via acid treatment to enhance its dispersivity and surface chemistry, in this study commercially available multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with high purity were processed carefully by acid reflux, resulting in differences in surface charge of MWCNTs without altering their physical properties. The surface condition of MWCNTs was also modified by adsorption of organic matter to compare bacterial toxicity of functionalized and non-functionalized MWCNTs in suspensions. Results show that although overall electrostatic repulsion and steric obstruction resulted from surface modifications led to elevated dispersivity of MWCNTs and mitigated toxicity on planktonic Escherichia coli cultures, no correlation between the dispersivity and bacterial toxicity of MWCNTs was observed, suggesting that dispersity alone may not be a proper index to estimate the CNT antibacterial effect on planktonic cells in the aqueous phase. In addition, viability recovery of MWCNT-treated cells was observed to be nutrition level-dependent, implying that availability of proper nutrients may be another important factor to be considered when assessing the ecotoxicity of CNTs in the aquatic system. PMID:27450343

  18. Surface expression of ω-transaminase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Martin; Muraleedharan, Madhu Nair; Larsson, Gen

    2014-04-01

    Chiral amines are important for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, and there is rapidly growing interest to use transaminases for their synthesis. Since the cost of the enzyme is an important factor for process economy, the use of whole-cell biocatalysts is attractive, since expensive purification and immobilization steps can be avoided. Display of the protein on the cell surface provides a possible way to reduce the mass transfer limitations of such biocatalysts. However, transaminases need to dimerize in order to become active, and furthermore, they require the cofactor pyridoxal phosphate; consequently, successful transaminase surface expression has not been reported thus far. In this work, we produced an Arthrobacter citreus ω-transaminase in Escherichia coli using a surface display vector based on the autotransporter adhesin involved in diffuse adherence (AIDA-I), which has previously been used for display of dimeric proteins. The correct localization of the transaminase in the E. coli outer membrane and its orientation toward the cell exterior were verified. Furthermore, transaminase activity was detected exclusively in the outer membrane protein fraction, showing that successful dimerization had occurred. The transaminase was found to be present in both full-length and proteolytically degraded forms. The removal of this proteolysis is considered to be the main obstacle to achieving sufficient whole-cell transaminase activity. PMID:24487538

  19. Preparation of Sticky Escherichia coli through Surface Display of an Adhesive Catecholamine Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joseph P.; Choi, Min-Jung; Kim, Se Hun

    2014-01-01

    Mussels attach to virtually all types of inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments, and catecholamines composed of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), lysine, and histidine in mussel adhesive proteins play a key role in the robust adhesion. DOPA is an unusual catecholic amino acid, and its side chain is called catechol. In this study, we displayed the adhesive moiety of DOPA-histidine on Escherichia coli surfaces using outer membrane protein W as an anchoring motif for the first time. Localization of catecholamines on the cell surface was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, cell-to-cell cohesion (i.e., cellular aggregation) induced by the displayed catecholamine and synthesis of gold nanoparticles on the cell surface support functional display of adhesive catecholamines. The engineered E. coli exhibited significant adhesion onto various material surfaces, including silica and glass microparticles, gold, titanium, silicon, poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(urethane), and poly(dimethylsiloxane). The uniqueness of this approach utilizing the engineered sticky E. coli is that no chemistry for cell attachment are necessary, and the ability of spontaneous E. coli attachment allows one to immobilize the cells on challenging material surfaces such as synthetic polymers. Therefore, we envision that mussel-inspired catecholamine yielded sticky E. coli that can be used as a new type of engineered microbe for various emerging fields, such as whole living cell attachment on versatile material surfaces, cell-to-cell communication systems, and many others. PMID:24123747

  20. Preparation of sticky Escherichia coli through surface display of an adhesive catecholamine moiety.

    PubMed

    Park, Joseph P; Choi, Min-Jung; Kim, Se Hun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Haeshin

    2014-01-01

    Mussels attach to virtually all types of inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments, and catecholamines composed of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), lysine, and histidine in mussel adhesive proteins play a key role in the robust adhesion. DOPA is an unusual catecholic amino acid, and its side chain is called catechol. In this study, we displayed the adhesive moiety of DOPA-histidine on Escherichia coli surfaces using outer membrane protein W as an anchoring motif for the first time. Localization of catecholamines on the cell surface was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, cell-to-cell cohesion (i.e., cellular aggregation) induced by the displayed catecholamine and synthesis of gold nanoparticles on the cell surface support functional display of adhesive catecholamines. The engineered E. coli exhibited significant adhesion onto various material surfaces, including silica and glass microparticles, gold, titanium, silicon, poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(urethane), and poly(dimethylsiloxane). The uniqueness of this approach utilizing the engineered sticky E. coli is that no chemistry for cell attachment are necessary, and the ability of spontaneous E. coli attachment allows one to immobilize the cells on challenging material surfaces such as synthetic polymers. Therefore, we envision that mussel-inspired catecholamine yielded sticky E. coli that can be used as a new type of engineered microbe for various emerging fields, such as whole living cell attachment on versatile material surfaces, cell-to-cell communication systems, and many others. PMID:24123747

  1. Identification of surface-exposed linear B-cell epitopes of the nonfimbrial adhesin CS31A of Escherichia coli by using overlapping peptides and antipeptide antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Méchin, M C; Rousset, E; Girardeau, J P

    1996-01-01

    As a first step toward the design of an epitope vaccine, by using the nonfimbrial adhesin CS31A of Escherichia coli as a carrier, a low-resolution topological and epitope map of the CS31A subunit was developed by using solid-phase peptide synthesis and polyclonal rabbit antibodies raised against both native and denatured proteins. Peptides constituting antigenic epitopes on the major subunit (ClpG) of the multimeric CS31A antigen were identified by examining the binding of the antibodies to 249 overlapping nonapeptides covering the amino acid sequence of ClpG. With antibodies raised against denatured ClpG subunit, seven major epitope regions, corresponding to residues 10 to 18, 45 to 58, 88 to 107, 148 to 172, 187 to 196, 212 to 219, and 235 to 241, were located. Most of the epitopes were hydrophilic and were located in variable regions, residing largely in loop regions at the boundaries of secondary structural elements of ClpG. In contrast, antibodies raised against native CS31A antigen reacted only with the peptide AVNPNA (positions 179 to 184), demonstrating that this peptide was the only linear B-cell epitope of the native protein. The different immunogenic profiles of native CS31A antigen and denatured ClpG indicated that the denaturation process resulted in marked conformational changes in the protein, which could expose epitopes hidden or absent in native CS31A. To identify the surface-exposed epitopes, nine peptides covering the dominant antigenic regions of ClpG were synthesized and used to prepare site-specific antibodies. Antipeptide antibodies were tested, in a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), for cross-reactivity with native CS31A and denatured ClpG subunit. Four of these antipeptide antibodies bound to the native protein in an accessibility ELISA, indicating that residues 44 to 56, 174 to 190, 185 to 199, and 235 to 249 were surface exposed on CS31A. These data indicate that an immunodominant surface-exposed linear epitope was

  2. Functional Cell Surface Display and Controlled Secretion of Diverse Agarolytic Enzymes by Escherichia coli with a Novel Ligation-Independent Cloning Vector Based on the Autotransporter YfaL

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Park, Eunhye; Song, Joseph; Yang, Taek Ho; Lee, Hee Jong; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2012-01-01

    Autotransporters have been employed as the anchoring scaffold for cell surface display by replacing their passenger domains with heterologous proteins to be displayed. We adopted an autotransporter (YfaL) of Escherichia coli for the cell surface display system. The critical regions in YfaL for surface display were identified for the construction of a ligation-independent cloning (LIC)-based display system. The designed system showed no detrimental effect on either the growth of the host cell or overexpressing heterologous proteins on the cell surface. We functionally displayed monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1) as a reporter protein and diverse agarolytic enzymes from Saccharophagus degradans 2-40, including Aga86C and Aga86E, which previously had failed to be functional expressed. The system could display different sizes of proteins ranging from 25.3 to 143 kDa. We also attempted controlled release of the displayed proteins by incorporating a tobacco etch virus protease cleavage site into the C termini of the displayed proteins. The maximum level of the displayed protein was 6.1 × 104 molecules per a single cell, which corresponds to 5.6% of the entire cell surface of actively growing E. coli. PMID:22344647

  3. Bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity properties in the mediation of in vitro adhesion by the rabbit enteric pathogen Escherichia coli strain RDEC-1.

    PubMed Central

    Drumm, B; Neumann, A W; Policova, Z; Sherman, P M

    1989-01-01

    The role of hydrophobicity in the attachment of enteropathogens to gastrointestinal mucosa is controversial. In vitro binding of Escherichia coli RDEC-1 to rabbit intestine is dependent on the expression of pili. We examined in vitro adherence of piliated RDEC-1 after altering either the hydrophobicity of the organisms, the hydrophobicity of the substrate for attachment, or the surface tension of the suspending liquid. Hydrophobicity of RDEC-1 was determined using four complementary methods. In each assay piliated RDEC-1 demonstrated relatively more hydrophobic properties compared with both organisms grown to suppress pilus expression and a mutant that cannot express mannose-resistant pili. When piliated RDEC-1 were pretreated with tetramethyl urea to disrupt hydrophobic bonds surface hydrophobicity decreased. Concurrently, bacterial adherence to rabbit ileal microvillus membranes, mucus and mucin was reduced. Binding of piliated organisms to hydrophobic surfaces was significantly higher compared to both nonpiliated bacteria and the adherence of piliated RDEC-1 to relatively hydrophilic surfaces. Addition of propanol reduced the surface tension of the suspending liquid, and decreased adhesion of piliated RDEC-1 to polystyrene by 80%. Conversely, adherence of piliated organisms to a hydrophilic surface increased 12-fold after lowering the surface tension of the suspending liquid. We conclude that hydrophobic properties have a role in mediating in vitro adherence of this E. coli enteric pathogen. Images PMID:2572606

  4. Identification of Coli Surface Antigen 23, a novel adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Del Canto, Felipe; Botkin, Douglas J; Valenzuela, Patricio; Popov, Vsevolod; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P; Levine, Myron M; Stine, O Colin; Pop, Mihai; Torres, Alfredo G; Vidal, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea, mainly in developing countries. Although there are 25 different ETEC adhesins described in strains affecting humans, between 15% and 50% of the clinical isolates from different geographical regions are negative for these adhesins, suggesting that additional unidentified adhesion determinants might be present. Here, we report the discovery of Coli Surface Antigen 23 (CS23), a novel adhesin expressed by an ETEC serogroup O4 strain (ETEC 1766a), which was negative for the previously known ETEC adhesins, albeit it has the ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells. CS23 is encoded by an 8.8-kb locus which contains 9 open reading frames (ORFs), 7 of them sharing significant identity with genes required for assembly of K88-related fimbriae. This gene locus, named aal (adhesion-associated locus), is required for the adhesion ability of ETEC 1766a and was able to confer this adhesive phenotype to a nonadherent E. coli HB101 strain. The CS23 major structural subunit, AalE, shares limited identity with known pilin proteins, and it is more closely related to the CS13 pilin protein CshE, carried by human ETEC strains. Our data indicate that CS23 is a new member of the diverse adhesin repertoire used by ETEC strains. PMID:22645287

  5. Identification of Coli Surface Antigen 23, a Novel Adhesin of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Del Canto, Felipe; Botkin, Douglas J.; Valenzuela, Patricio; Popov, Vsevolod; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P.; Levine, Myron M.; Stine, O. Colin; Pop, Mihai

    2012-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea, mainly in developing countries. Although there are 25 different ETEC adhesins described in strains affecting humans, between 15% and 50% of the clinical isolates from different geographical regions are negative for these adhesins, suggesting that additional unidentified adhesion determinants might be present. Here, we report the discovery of Coli Surface Antigen 23 (CS23), a novel adhesin expressed by an ETEC serogroup O4 strain (ETEC 1766a), which was negative for the previously known ETEC adhesins, albeit it has the ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells. CS23 is encoded by an 8.8-kb locus which contains 9 open reading frames (ORFs), 7 of them sharing significant identity with genes required for assembly of K88-related fimbriae. This gene locus, named aal (adhesion-associated locus), is required for the adhesion ability of ETEC 1766a and was able to confer this adhesive phenotype to a nonadherent E. coli HB101 strain. The CS23 major structural subunit, AalE, shares limited identity with known pilin proteins, and it is more closely related to the CS13 pilin protein CshE, carried by human ETEC strains. Our data indicate that CS23 is a new member of the diverse adhesin repertoire used by ETEC strains. PMID:22645287

  6. The DNA protection during starvation protein (Dps) influences attachment of Escherichia coli to abiotic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goulter-Thorsen, Rebecca M; Gentle, Ian R; Gobius, Kari S; Dykes, Gary A

    2011-08-01

    The attachment of bacterial species such as Escherichia coli to abiotic materials is of concern to the food industry. This study investigated the role of DNA protection during starvation protein (Dps) in cell surface hydrophobicity and attachment of E. coli to glass, stainless steel, and Teflon surfaces. The Dps was not found to influence hydrophobicity, but did have a putative role in attachment in a strain- and substrate-dependent manner. PMID:21438764

  7. A Whole-Cell Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor Based on a Leucine Auxotroph of Escherichia coli Displaying a Gold-Binding Protein: Usefulness for Diagnosis of Maple Syrup Urine Disease.

    PubMed

    Woo, Min-Ah; Park, Jung Hun; Cho, Daeyeon; Sim, Sang Jun; Kim, Moon Il; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2016-03-01

    We developed a whole-cell surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on a leucine auxotroph of Escherichia coli displaying a gold-binding protein (GBP) in response to cell growth and applied this sensor to the diagnosis of maple syrup urine disease, which is represented by the elevated leucine level in blood. The leucine auxotroph was genetically engineered to grow displaying GBP in a proportion to the concentration of target amino acid leucine. The GBP expressed on the surface of the auxotrophs directly bound to the golden surface of an SPR chip without the need for any additional treatment or reagents, which consequently produced SPR signals used to determine leucine levels in a test sample. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were further applied to the SPR system, which significantly enhanced the signal intensity up to 10-fold by specifically binding to GBP expressed on the cell surface. Finally, the diagnostic utility of our system was demonstrated by its employment in reliably determining different statuses of maple syrup urine disease based on a known cutoff level of leucine. This new approach based on an amino acid-auxotrophic E. coli strain expressing a GBP that binds to an SPR sensor holds great promise for detection of other metabolic diseases of newborn babies including homocystinuria and phenylketonuria, which are also associated with abnormal levels of amino acids. PMID:26828904

  8. Biofouling on polymeric heat exchanger surfaces with E. coli and native biofilms.

    PubMed

    Pohl, S; Madzgalla, M; Manz, W; Bart, H J

    2015-01-01

    The biofouling affinity of different polymeric surfaces (polypropylene, polysulfone, polyethylene terephthalate, and polyether ether ketone) in comparison to stainless steel (SS) was studied for the model bacterium Escherichia coli K12 DSM 498 and native biofilms originating from Rhine water. The biofilm mass deposited on the polymer surfaces was minimized by several magnitudes compared to SS. The cell count and the accumulated biomass of E. coli on the polymer surfaces showed an opposing linear trend. The promising low biofilm formation on the polymers is attributed to the combination of inherent surface properties (roughness, surface energy and hydrophobicity) when compared to SS. The fouling characteristics of E. coli biofilms show good conformity with the more complex native biofilms investigated. The results can be utilized for the development of new polymer heat exchangers when using untreated river water as coolant or for other processes needing antifouling materials. PMID:26479780

  9. Development of functionalised polyelectrolyte capsules using filamentous Escherichia coli cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is one of the best studied microorganisms and finds multiple applications especially as tool in the heterologous production of interesting proteins of other organisms. The heterologous expression of special surface (S-) layer proteins caused the formation of extremely long E. coli cells which leave transparent tubes when they divide into single E. coli cells. Such natural structures are of high value as bio-templates for the development of bio-inorganic composites for many applications. In this study we used genetically modified filamentous Escherichia coli cells as template for the design of polyelectrolyte tubes that can be used as carrier for functional molecules or particles. Diversity of structures of biogenic materials has the potential to be used to construct inorganic or polymeric superior hybrid materials that reflect the form of the bio-template. Such bio-inspired materials are of great interest in diverse scientific fields like Biology, Chemistry and Material Science and can find application for the construction of functional materials or the bio-inspired synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles. Results Genetically modified filamentous E. coli cells were fixed in 2% glutaraldehyde and coated with alternating six layers of the polyanion polyelectrolyte poly(sodium-4styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and polycation polyelectrolyte poly(allylamine-hydrochloride) (PAH). Afterwards we dissolved the E. coli cells with 1.2% sodium hypochlorite, thus obtaining hollow polyelectrolyte tubes of 0.7 μm in diameter and 5–50 μm in length. For functionalisation the polyelectrolyte tubes were coated with S-layer protein polymers followed by metallisation with Pd(0) particles. These assemblies were analysed with light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Conclusion The thus constructed new material offers possibilities for diverse applications like novel catalysts or metal

  10. Epithelial cell invasion by bovine septicemic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Korth, M J; Lara, J C; Moseley, S L

    1994-01-01

    Little is known regarding the pathogenesis of Escherichia coli-induced septicemic colibacillosis of calves. To understand the mechanism by which these strains penetrate the intestinal epithelium and gain access to the bloodstream, we examined the potential of bovine septicemic E. coli to invade cultured epithelial cells. By using a gentamicin survival assay, we demonstrated bacterial invasion of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Transcytosis of polarized MDCK cell monolayers was also observed, but only when bacteria were added to the basolateral surface. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of intracellular organisms which appeared to be within membrane-bound vacuoles. The bovine septicemic isolate used in this study expressed the fimbrial adhesion CS31A. To examine the role of CS31A-mediated adherence in invasion and transcytosis of MDCK cell monolayers, a CS31A-deficient mutant was constructed by suicide vector-mediated insertional mutagenesis. Although nonadherent, the mutant showed a level of invasion similar to that of the wild-type parent. E. coli DH5 alpha carrying the cloned CS31A determinant was noninvasive. These findings suggest that expression of CS31A is neither required nor sufficient to mediate invasion. Images PMID:7903284

  11. Subnanometric Roughness Affects the Deposition and Mobile Adhesion of Escherichia coli on Silanized Glass Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sumedha; Jaimes-Lizcano, Yuly Andrea; McLay, Ryan B; Cirino, Patrick C; Conrad, Jacinta C

    2016-05-31

    We investigate the deposition and transient adhesion of Escherichia coli on alkyl and fluoroalkyl silanized glass surfaces of different carbon chain lengths. The rate at which bacteria deposit onto these surfaces decreases as the shear stress is increased from 3 to 67 mPa, but trends in the deposition rate across all surfaces cannot be predicted from extended DLVO calculations of the interaction potential. As the surface root-mean-square (rms) roughness increases, the deposition rate increases and the percentage of motile tethered cells decreases. Furthermore, on surfaces of root-mean-square roughness of less than 0.2 nm, bacteria exhibit mobile adhesion, for which surface-associated cells linearly translate distances greater than approximately 1.5 times their average body length along the flow direction. E. coli bacteria with and without flagella exhibit mobile adhesion, indicating that this behavior is not driven by these appendages. Cells that express fimbriae do not exhibit mobile adhesion. These results suggest that even subnanoscale roughness can influence the deposition and transient adhesion of bacteria and imply that strategies to reduce frictional interactions by making cells or surfaces smoother may help to control the initial fouling of surfaces by E. coli bacteria. PMID:27158837

  12. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel M; Boinett, Christine J; Madé, Laure F; Ouko, Tom T; Fèvre, Eric M; Thomson, Nicholas R; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described. PMID:26187892

  13. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Njoroge, Samuel M.; Boinett, Christine J.; Madé, Laure F.; Ouko, Tom T.; Fèvre, Eric M.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described. PMID:26187892

  14. Expression and morphology of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli surface antigen CS31A in E. coli K12 and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Kuehni-Boghenbor, Kathrin; Jordi, Helene A; Frey, Joachim; Vilei, Edy M; Favre, Didier; Stoffel, Michael H

    2012-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is known as a worldwide cause of diarrheal disease. The pathogenesis involves the attachment of the microorganisms to the mucosa and the production of enterotoxins. Surface expression of CS31A fimbriae was assessed by Western blots, dot blots, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy using negative staining and immunogold labeling. These investigations revealed significant differences in both the morphology of the wild-type and recombinant strains and the antigen exposure of CS31A in the wild-type and recombinant strains. In the wild-type ETEC strain, expression of CS31A was subject to phase variation. The recombinant E. coli strain produced CS31A but was prone to epitope shedding. In Vibrio cholerae vaccine strain CVD 103-HgR, the recombinant CS31A antigen was expressed but was only found intracellularly. Thus, E. coli strains seem to lend themselves better to the development of recombinant vaccines expressing ETEC-specific antigens at the cell's surface than strains from other orders or genera such as V. cholerae. PMID:22607531

  15. Cell Surface Analysis Techniques: What Do Cell Preparation Protocols Do to Cell Surface Properties?

    PubMed Central

    Pembrey, Richard S.; Marshall, Kevin C.; Schneider, René P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell surface analysis often requires manipulation of cells prior to examination. The most commonly employed procedures are centrifugation at different speeds, changes of media during washing or final resuspension, desiccation (either air drying for contact angle measurements or freeze-drying for sensitive spectroscopic analysis, such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), and contact with hydrocarbon (hydrophobicity assays). The effects of these procedures on electrophoretic mobility, adhesion to solid substrata, affinity to a number of Sepharose columns, structural integrity, and cell viability were systematically investigated for a range of model organisms, including carbon- and nitrogen-limited Psychrobacter sp. strain SW8 (glycocalyx-bearing cells), Escherichia coli (gram-negative cells without a glycocalyx), and Staphylococcus epidermidis (gram-positive cells without a glycocalyx). All of the cell manipulation procedures severely modified the physicochemical properties of cells, but with each procedure some organisms were more susceptible than others. Considerable disruption of cell surfaces occurred when organisms were placed in contact with a hydrocarbon (hexadecane). The majority of cells became nonculturable after air drying and freeze-drying. Centrifugation at a high speed (15,000 × g) modified many cell surface parameters significantly, although cell viability was considerably affected only in E. coli. The type of washing or resuspension medium had a strong influence on the values of cell surface parameters, particularly when high-salt solutions were compared with low-salt buffers. The values for parameters obtained with different methods that allegedly measure similar cell surface properties did not correlate for most cells. These results demonstrate that the methods used to prepare cells for cell surface analysis need to be critically investigated for each microorganism so that the final results obtained reflect the nature of the in situ microbial cell

  16. Correlating attachment behavior with cell properties for eight Porcine Escherichia coli Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we investigate how growth stage and depositional environment affect variability of cell properties and transport behavior of eight porcine E. coli isolates. We compared the surface properties and transport behavior for cells harvested at two different growth stages (exponential and sta...

  17. Correlating Transport Behavior with Cell Properties for Eight Porcine Escherichia coli Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we investigate how growth stage and depositional environment affect variability of cell properties and transport behavior of eight porcine E. coli isolates. We compared the surface properties and transport behavior for cells harvested at two different growth stages (exponential and sta...

  18. An Escherichia coli Mutant That Makes Exceptionally Long Cells

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Elaine B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although Escherichia coli is a very small (1- to 2-μm) rod-shaped cell, here we describe an E. coli mutant that forms enormously long cells in rich media such as Luria broth, as long indeed as 750 μm. These extremely elongated (eel) cells are as long as the longest bacteria known and have no internal subdivisions. They are metabolically competent, elongate rapidly, synthesize DNA, and distribute cell contents along this length. They lack only the ability to divide. The concentration of the essential cell division protein FtsZ is reduced in these eel cells, and increasing this concentration restores division. IMPORTANCE Escherichia coli is usually a very small bacterium, 1 to 2 μm long. We have isolated a mutant that forms enormously long cells, 700 times longer than the usual E. coli cell. E. coli filaments that form under other conditions usually die within a few hours, whereas our mutant is fully viable even when it reaches such lengths. This mutant provides a useful tool for the study of aspects of E. coli physiology that are difficult to investigate with small cells. PMID:25691528

  19. Soil solarization reduces Escherichia coli O157:H7 and total Escherichia coli on cattle feedlot pen surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feedlot pen soils are a source for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and therefore a target for preharvest strategies to reduce this pathogen in cattle. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of soil solarization to reduce E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot surface material (FSM)....

  20. Tsr Chemoreceptor Interacts With IL-8 Provoking E. coli Transmigration Across Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bing; Li, Manshu; Xu, Yonghao; Islam, Diana; Khang, Julie; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Lee, Warren; Szaszi, Katalin; Zhong, Nanshan; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Li, Yimin; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of epithelial surfaces and subsequent transmigration across the mucosal barrier are essential for the development of infection. We hypothesized that the methyl-accepting proteins (MCPs), known as chemoreceptors expressed on Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterial surface, play an important role in mediating bacterial transmigration. We demonstrated a direct interaction between human interleukin-8 (IL-8) and Tsr receptor, a major MCP chemoreceptor. Stimulation of human lung epithelial cell monolayer with IL-8 resulted in increased E. coli adhesion and transmigration of the native strain (RP437) and a strain expressing only Tsr (UU2373), as compared to a strain (UU2599) with Tsr truncation. The augmented E. coli adhesion and migration was associated with a higher expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 and production of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, and a lower expression of the tight junction protein claudin-1 and the plasma membrane protein caveolin-1 in lung epithelial cells. An increased E. coli colonization and pulmonary cytokine production induced by the RP437 and UU2373 strains was attenuated in mice challenged with the UU2599 strain. Our results suggest a critical role of the E. coli Tsr chemoreceptor in mediating bacterial colonization and transmigration across human lung epithelium during development of pulmonary infections. PMID:27506372

  1. Tsr Chemoreceptor Interacts With IL-8 Provoking E. coli Transmigration Across Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Li, Manshu; Xu, Yonghao; Islam, Diana; Khang, Julie; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Lee, Warren; Szaszi, Katalin; Zhong, Nanshan; Slutsky, Arthur S; Li, Yimin; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of epithelial surfaces and subsequent transmigration across the mucosal barrier are essential for the development of infection. We hypothesized that the methyl-accepting proteins (MCPs), known as chemoreceptors expressed on Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterial surface, play an important role in mediating bacterial transmigration. We demonstrated a direct interaction between human interleukin-8 (IL-8) and Tsr receptor, a major MCP chemoreceptor. Stimulation of human lung epithelial cell monolayer with IL-8 resulted in increased E. coli adhesion and transmigration of the native strain (RP437) and a strain expressing only Tsr (UU2373), as compared to a strain (UU2599) with Tsr truncation. The augmented E. coli adhesion and migration was associated with a higher expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 and production of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, and a lower expression of the tight junction protein claudin-1 and the plasma membrane protein caveolin-1 in lung epithelial cells. An increased E. coli colonization and pulmonary cytokine production induced by the RP437 and UU2373 strains was attenuated in mice challenged with the UU2599 strain. Our results suggest a critical role of the E. coli Tsr chemoreceptor in mediating bacterial colonization and transmigration across human lung epithelium during development of pulmonary infections. PMID:27506372

  2. Inactivation of Escherichia coli on PTFE surfaces by diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tučeková, Zlata; Koval'ová, Zuzana; Zahoranová, Anna; Machala, Zdenko; Černák, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    The non-equilibrium plasma of diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge (DCSBD) was tested for decontamination of bacteria Escherichia coli on polymer surfaces. We investigated the optical parameters of DCSBD plasma generated in synthetic air with different relative humidity. Our study was provided to estimate the main plasma components active during the DCSBD plasma degradation of E. coli contamination prepared on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon) surface, in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. The DCSBD plasma was characterized by means of electrical measurements and optical emission spectroscopy. The inactivation of E. coli bacteria was evaluated by standard microbiological cultivation (CFU plate counting). The experimental results of the germicidal efficiency obtained for short plasma exposure times proved the effectiveness of DCSBD plasma for the polymer surface decontamination. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  3. Quantum dot enabled detection of Escherichia coli using a cell-phone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Sikora, Uzair; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-06-01

    We report a cell-phone based Escherichia coli (E. coli) detection platform for screening of liquid samples. In this compact and cost-effective design attached to a cell-phone, we utilize anti-E. coli O157:H7 antibody functionalized glass capillaries as solid substrates to perform a quantum dot based sandwich assay for specific detection of E. coli O157:H7 in liquid samples. Using battery-powered inexpensive light-emitting-diodes (LEDs) we excite/pump these labelled E. coli particles captured on the capillary surface, where the emission from the quantum dots is then imaged using the cell-phone camera unit through an additional lens that is inserted between the capillary and the cell-phone. By quantifying the fluorescent light emission from each capillary tube, the concentration of E. coli in the sample is determined. We experimentally confirmed the detection limit of this cell-phone based fluorescent imaging and sensing platform as ∼5 to 10 cfu mL(-1) in buffer solution. We also tested the specificity of this E. coli detection platform by spiking samples with different species (e.g., Salmonella) to confirm that non-specific binding/detection is negligible. We further demonstrated the proof-of-concept of our approach in a complex food matrix, e.g., fat-free milk, where a similar detection limit of ∼5 to 10 cfu mL(-1) was achieved despite challenges associated with the density of proteins that exist in milk. Our results reveal the promising potential of this cell-phone enabled field-portable and cost-effective E. coli detection platform for e.g., screening of water and food samples even in resource limited environments. The presented platform can also be applicable to other pathogens of interest through the use of different antibodies. PMID:22396952

  4. Quantum dot enabled detection of Escherichia coli using a cell-phone†

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongying; Sikora, Uzair; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    We report a cell-phone based Escherichia coli (E. coli) detection platform for screening of liquid samples. In this compact and cost-effective design attached to a cell-phone, we utilize anti-E. coli O157:H7 antibody functionalized glass capillaries as solid substrates to perform a quantum dot based sandwich assay for specific detection of E. coli O157:H7 in liquid samples. Using battery-powered inexpensive light-emitting-diodes (LEDs) we excite/pump these labelled E. coli particles captured on the capillary surface, where the emission from the quantum dots is then imaged using the cell-phone camera unit through an additional lens that is inserted between the capillary and the cell-phone. By quantifying the fluorescent light emission from each capillary tube, the concentration of E. coli in the sample is determined. We experimentally confirmed the detection limit of this cell-phone based fluorescent imaging and sensing platform as ~5 to 10 cfu mL−1 in buffer solution. We also tested the specificity of this E. coli detection platform by spiking samples with different species (e.g., Salmonella) to confirm that non-specific binding/detection is negligible. We further demonstrated the proof-of-concept of our approach in a complex food matrix, e.g., fat-free milk, where a similar detection limit of ~5 to 10 cfu mL−1 was achieved despite challenges associated with the density of proteins that exist in milk. Our results reveal the promising potential of this cell-phone enabled field-portable and cost-effective E. coli detection platform for e.g., screening of water and food samples even in resource limited environments. The presented platform can also be applicable to other pathogens of interest through the use of different antibodies. PMID:22396952

  5. Cell cycle-specific replication of Escherichia coli minichromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A C; Helmstetter, C E

    1986-01-01

    The timing of Escherichia coli minichromosome replication in the cell division cycle was examined using an improved procedure for studying plasmid replication frequency. Cultures growing exponentially in glucose/Casamino acids minimal medium were pulse-labeled with [3H]thymidine, and the radioactivity incorporated into plasmid DNA in cells of different ages was analyzed. At the end of the labeling period the bacteria were bound to the surface of a nitrocellulose membrane filter, and the radioactivity in new daughter cells, which eluted continuously from the membrane, was quantitated following agarose gel electrophoresis. The minichromosomes replicated during a discrete interval in the cell division cycle that appeared to coincide with initiation of chromosome replication. In contrast, plasmid pBR322 replicated throughout the division cycle at a rate that increased gradually as a function of cell age. The difference in minichromosome and pBR322 replication was clearly discernible in cells harboring both plasmids. It was also found that the 16 kD gene adjacent to oriC was not a determinant of the timing of minichromosome replication during the division cycle. The results are consistent with the conclusion that minichromosome replication frequency is governed by the same mechanism that controls chromosome replication. Images PMID:3523483

  6. Characterizing pilus-mediated adhesion of biofilm-forming E. coli to chemically diverse surfaces using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, He; Murdaugh, Anne E; Chen, Wei; Aidala, Katherine E; Ferguson, Megan A; Spain, Eileen M; Núñez, Megan E

    2013-03-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms living together at an interface. Because biofilms are often associated with contamination and infection, it is critical to understand how bacterial cells adhere to surfaces in the early stages of biofilm formation. Even harmless commensal Escherichia coli naturally forms biofilms in the human digestive tract by adhering to epithelial cells, a trait that presents major concerns in the case of pathogenic E. coli strains. The laboratory strain E. coli ZK1056 provides an intriguing model system for pathogenic E. coli strains because it forms biofilms robustly on a wide range of surfaces.E. coli ZK1056 cells spontaneously form living biofilms on polylysine-coated AFM cantilevers, allowing us to measure quantitatively by AFM the adhesion between native biofilm cells and substrates of our choice. We use these biofilm-covered cantilevers to probe E. coli ZK1056 adhesion to five substrates with distinct and well-characterized surface chemistries, including fluorinated, amine-terminated, and PEG-like monolayers, as well as unmodified silicon wafer and mica. Notably, after only 0-10 s of contact time, the biofilms adhere strongly to fluorinated and amine-terminated monolayers as well as to mica and weakly to "antifouling" PEG monolayers, despite the wide variation in hydrophobicity and charge of these substrates. In each case the AFM retraction curves display distinct adhesion profiles in terms of both force and distance, highlighting the cells' ability to adapt their adhesive properties to disparate surfaces. Specific inhibition of the pilus protein FimH by a nonhydrolyzable mannose analogue leads to diminished adhesion in all cases, demonstrating the critical role of type I pili in adhesion by this strain to surfaces bearing widely different functional groups. The strong and adaptable binding of FimH to diverse surfaces has unexpected implications for the design of antifouling surfaces and antiadhesion therapies. PMID

  7. Characterizing Pilus-Mediated Adhesion of Biofilm-Forming E. coli to Chemically Diverse Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms living together at an interface. Because biofilms are often associated with contamination and infection, it is critical to understand how bacterial cells adhere to surfaces in the early stages of biofilm formation. Even harmless commensal Escherichia coli naturally forms biofilms in the human digestive tract by adhering to epithelial cells, a trait that presents major concerns in the case of pathogenic E. coli strains. The laboratory strain E. coli ZK1056 provides an intriguing model system for pathogenic E. coli strains because it forms biofilms robustly on a wide range of surfaces.E. coli ZK1056 cells spontaneously form living biofilms on polylysine-coated AFM cantilevers, allowing us to measure quantitatively by AFM the adhesion between native biofilm cells and substrates of our choice. We use these biofilm-covered cantilevers to probe E. coli ZK1056 adhesion to five substrates with distinct and well-characterized surface chemistries, including fluorinated, amine-terminated, and PEG-like monolayers, as well as unmodified silicon wafer and mica. Notably, after only 0–10 s of contact time, the biofilms adhere strongly to fluorinated and amine-terminated monolayers as well as to mica and weakly to “antifouling” PEG monolayers, despite the wide variation in hydrophobicity and charge of these substrates. In each case the AFM retraction curves display distinct adhesion profiles in terms of both force and distance, highlighting the cells’ ability to adapt their adhesive properties to disparate surfaces. Specific inhibition of the pilus protein FimH by a nonhydrolyzable mannose analogue leads to diminished adhesion in all cases, demonstrating the critical role of type I pili in adhesion by this strain to surfaces bearing widely different functional groups. The strong and adaptable binding of FimH to diverse surfaces has unexpected implications for the design of antifouling surfaces and antiadhesion therapies

  8. Binding studies of antimicrobial peptides to Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Concetta; D'Andrea, Luca D; Saviano, Michele; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is pivotal to the design of new and more active peptides. In the last few years it has become clear that the behavior of antimicrobial peptides on membrane model systems does not always translate to cells; therefore the need to develop methods aimed at capturing details of the interactions of peptides with bacterial cells is compelling. In this work we analyzed binding of two peptides, namely temporin B and TB_KKG6A, to Escherichia coli cells and to Escherichia coli LPS. Temporin B is a natural peptide active against Gram positive bacteria but inactive against Gram negative bacteria, TB_KKG6A is an analogue of temporin B showing activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. We found that binding to cells occurs only for the active peptide TB_KKG6A; stoichiometry and affinity constant of this peptide toward Escherichia coli cells were determined. PMID:27450805

  9. Bactericidal activity of chlorine dioxide against Escherichia coli in water and on hard surfaces.

    PubMed

    Foschino, R; Nervegna, I; Motta, A; Galli, A

    1998-06-01

    The efficacy of chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant was evaluated against cells of Escherichia coli ATCC 11229 in aqueous suspension and adhering to the surfaces of stainless steel AISI 304 and PVC. The concentrations tested ranged from 0.7 to 14 mg/liter; the exposure times investigated were 30 s and 1, 2, 4, and 8 min. When the bacteria were suspended in water with 1.4 mg/liter of chlorine dioxide, a 10(5)-fold reduction of the initial viable count occurred within 30 s; when cells were attached to the steel surface, the same rate of inactivation took place only after 6 min with 7 mg/liter or 4 min with 14 mg/liter of chlorine dioxide. A 5-log reduction was not obtained when organisms were adhered to polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Scanning electron microscope micrographs of contaminated surfaces revealed that the PVC was very rough with pores much larger in diameter than the cells. Time values determining a 90% reduction of the E. coli population (90% killing time) were calculated for each concentration of disinfectant tested in suspension and on the steel surface. If the same experimental conditions were strictly adopted, linear functions of the log of bacterial inactivation could be plotted (log 90% killing time versus log concentration of disinfectant). This work showed that results obtained with suspension tests could not be used to estimate disinfection of hard surfaces. PMID:9709246

  10. Soil solarization reduces Escherichia coli O157:H7 and total Escherichia coli on cattle feedlot pen surfaces.

    PubMed

    Berry, Elaine D; Wells, James E

    2012-01-01

    Feedlot pen soil is a source for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and therefore a target for preharvest strategies to reduce this pathogen in cattle. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of soil solarization to reduce E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot surface material (FSM). A feedlot pen was identified in which naturally occurring E. coli O157:H7 was prevalent and evenly distributed in the FSM. Forty plots 3 by 3 m were randomly assigned such that five plots of each of the solarization times of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks were examined. Temperature loggers were placed 7.5 cm below the surface of each plot, and plots to be solarized were covered with clear 6-mil polyethylene. At each sampling time, five FSM samples were collected from each of five solarized and five unsolarized plots. E. coli concentrations and E. coli O157:H7 presence by immunomagnetic separation and plating were determined for each FSM sample. Initial percentages of E. coli O157:H7-positive samples in control and solarized FSM were 84 and 80%, respectively, and did not differ (P > 0.05). E. coli O157:H7 was no longer detectable by 8 weeks of solarization, but was still detected in unsolarized FSM at 10 weeks. The average initial concentration of E. coli in FSM was 5.56 log CFU/g and did not differ between treatments (P > 0.05). There was a 2.0-log decrease of E. coli after 1 week of solarization, and a >3.0-log reduction of E. coli by week 6 of solarization (P, 0.05). E. coli levels remained unchanged in unsolarized FSM (P > 0.05). Daily peak FSM temperatures were on average 8.7°C higher for solarized FSM compared with unsolarized FSM, and reached temperatures as high as 57°C. Because soil solarization reduces E. coli O157:H7, this technique may be useful for reduction of persistence and transmission of this pathogen in cattle production, in addition to remediation of E. coli O157:H7-contaminated soil used to grow food crops. PMID:22221349

  11. Functionalized electrospun poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibers for on-chip concentration of E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Matlock-Colangelo, Lauren; Coon, Barbara; Pitner, Christine L; Frey, Margaret W; Baeumner, Antje J

    2016-02-01

    Positively and negatively charged electrospun poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibers were incorporated into poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microchannels in order to facilitate on-chip concentration of Escherichia coli K12 cells. The effects of fiber distribution and fiber mat height on analyte retention were investigated. The 3D morphology of the mats was optimized to prevent size-related retention of the E. coli cells while also providing a large enough surface area for analyte concentration. Positively charged nanofibers produced an 87% retention and over 80-fold concentration of the bacterial cells by mere electrostatic interaction, while negatively charged nanofibers reduced nonspecific analyte retention when compared to an empty microfluidic channel. In order to take advantage of this reduction in nonspecific retention, these negatively charged nanofibers were then modified with anti-E. coli antibodies. These proof-of-principle experiments showed that antibody-functionalized negatively charged nanofiber mats were capable of the specific capture of 72% of the E. coli cells while also significantly reducing nonspecific analyte retention within the channel as expected. The ease of fabrication and immense surface area of the functionalized electrospun nanofibers make them a promising alternative for on-chip concentration of analytes. The pore size and fiber mat morphology, as well as surface functionality of the fibers, can be tailored to allow for specific capture and concentration of a wide range of analytes. PMID:26493980

  12. Nanorough titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus via nano adhesion points.

    PubMed

    Lüdecke, Claudia; Roth, Martin; Yu, Wenqi; Horn, Uwe; Bossert, Jörg; Jandt, Klaus D

    2016-09-01

    Microbial adhesion to natural and synthetic materials surfaces is a key issue e.g. in food industry, sewage treatment and most importantly in the biomedical field. The current development and progress in nanoscale structuring of materials surfaces to control microbial adhesion requires an advanced understanding of the microbe-material-interaction. This study aimed to investigate the nanostructure of the microbe-material-interface and link it to microbial adhesion kinetics as function of titanium surface nanoroughness to gain new insight into controlling microbial adhesion via materials' surface nanoroughness. Adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was statistically significantly reduced (p≤0.05) by 55.6 % and 40.5 %, respectively, on physical vapor deposited titanium thin films with a nanoroughness of 6nm and the lowest surface peak density compared to 2nm with the highest surface peak density. Cross-sectioning of the microbial cells with a focused ion beam (FIB) and SEM imaging provided for the first time direct insight into the titanium-microbe-interface. High resolution SEM micrographs gave evidence that the surface peaks are the loci of initial contact between the microbial cells and the material's surface. In a qualitative model we propose that the initial microbial adhesion on nanorough surfaces is controlled by the titanium surface peak density via nano adhesion points. This new understanding will help towards the design of materials surfaces for controlling microbial adhesion. PMID:27288816

  13. Effect of curli expression and hydrophobicity of E. coli O157:H7 on attachment to fresh produce surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aim: To investigate the effect of curli expression on cell hydrophobicity, biofilm formation, and attachment to cut and intact fresh produce surfaces. Methods and Results: Five E. coli O157:H7 strains were evaluated for curli expression, hydrophobicity, biofilm formation, and attachment of E. co...

  14. Immunogenicity of viral B-cell epitopes inserted into two surface loops of the Escherichia coli K12 LamB protein and expressed in an attenuated aroA strain of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Michel, V; Leclerc, C; Hofnung, M; Charbit, A

    1999-01-01

    We previously developed a general procedure which allows the genetic coupling of a chosen foreign linear epitope in different 'permissive' sites of a carrier protein. By using the outer membrane protein LamB of Escherichia coli K12 as a carrier, we were able to express a number of different foreign epitopes at the bacterial surface. In the present work, taking advantage of the recent determination of the crystal structure of LamB, we inserted two model B-cell epitopes i.e.--the C3 epitope from poliovirus (residues 93 to 103 of VP1) and the preS2 epitope from hepatitis B virus, (residues 132 to 145)--at the tip of the most distal and largest surface exposed region of LamB (after residues 386, into loop L9). We also used two previously constructed LamB hybrids, corresponding to the insertion of the C3B or preSB epitope into permissive site 153 (lying in the middle of the fourth surface loop of LamB), to construct two LamB proteins corresponding to the simultaneous insertion of the two different epitopes (with one epitope per site). The LamB hybrids were placed under the control of the anaerobically inducible pnirB promoter and expressed in a LamB-negative derivative of the aroA attenuated strain of S. typhimurium, SL3261. In vitro, the recombinant proteins were expressed at a high level (up to 10% of whole cell proteins) and in vivo the recombinant plasmids were stably maintained. For both epitopes, genetic coupling at site 386 appeared to be more favorable for the induction of anti-epitope antibodies than coupling at site 153. Moreover, the LamB hybrid corresponding to the simultaneous insertion of the preSB epitope at site 153 and of the C3B epitope at site 386 allowed the induction of both anti-poliovirus and anti-hepatitis B antibodies. PMID:10078601

  15. Attachment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to abiotic surfaces of cooking utensils.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Makiko; Yokoigawa, Kumio

    2012-04-01

    We examined the attachment of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 to abiotic surfaces of cooking utensils. When the cell suspension in 0.85% NaCl (about 100 cells/mL, 10 mL) was contacted with various abiotic surfaces (square pieces, 25 cm²) at 25 °C for 20 min, the number of attached cells varied depending on the types of abiotic materials. The pathogen well attached to stainless steel (about 50 cells/25 cm²), pure titanium (35 to 45 cells/25 cm²), and glass (about 20 cells/25 cm²), but little attached to aluminum foil and plastics, irrespective of strains used. Fewer cells (below 10 cells/25 cm²) attached to stainless steel, pure titanium, and glass surfaces conditioned with aseptically sliced beef (sirloin) and autoclaved beef tallow at 25 °C for 20 min, but bovine serum albumin did not reduce the number of attached cells. The cells grown at 15 °C to the stationary phase (OD660 = about 2.8) less attached to the abiotic surfaces than those grown at 25 °C and 37 °C. When we pretreated the cells at 37 °C for 2 h with 50 μM N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (HHL), the number of cells attached to stainless steel was reduced by 70%. The number of cells attached to cooking utensils seemed to change depending on types of abiotic materials, adhesion of beef tallow to abiotic surfaces, growth temperature of the pathogen, and HHL-producing bacteria. PMID:22515247

  16. How much territory can a single E. coli cell control?

    PubMed Central

    El-Hajj, Ziad W.; Newman, Elaine B.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have been traditionally classified in terms of size and shape and are best known for their very small size. Escherichia coli cells in particular are small rods, each 1–2 μ. However, the size varies with the medium, and faster growing cells are larger because they must have more ribosomes to make more protoplasm per unit time, and ribosomes take up space. Indeed, Maaløe’s experiments on how E. coli establishes its size began with shifts between rich and poor media. Recently much larger bacteria have been described, including Epulopiscium fishelsoni at 700 μm and Thiomargarita namibiensis at 750 μm. These are not only much longer than E. coli cells but also much wider, necessitating considerable intracellular organization. Epulopiscium cells for instance, at 80 μm wide, enclose a large enough volume of cytoplasm to present it with major transport problems. This review surveys E. coli cells much longer than those which grow in nature and in usual lab cultures. These include cells mutated in a single gene (metK) which are 2–4 × longer than their non-mutated parent. This metK mutant stops dividing when slowly starved of S-adenosylmethionine but continues to elongate to 50 μm and more. FtsZ mutants have been routinely isolated as long cells which form during growth at 42°C. The SOS response is a well-characterized regulatory network that is activated in response to DNA damage and also results in cell elongation. Our champion elongated E. coli is a metK strain with a further, as yet unidentified mutation, which reaches 750 μm with no internal divisions and no increase in width. PMID:25954251

  17. Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli inhibits recycling endosome function and trafficking of surface receptors

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Abigail; Stoneham, Charlotte A; Furniss, R Christopher D; Frankel, Gad

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC/EHEC) manipulate many cell processes by injecting effector proteins from the bacteria into the host cell via a Type III secretion system. In this paper we report that the effector protein EspG disrupts recycling endosome function. In particular, we found that following transferrin binding and endocytosis EspG reduces recycling of the transferrin receptor (TfR), the prototypical recycling protein, from an intracellular location to the cell surface, resulting in an accumulation of TfR within the cell. The surface levels of three receptors [TfR, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and β1 integrin] were tested and found to be reduced dependent on EspG translocation. Furthermore, disruption of recycling endosome function and the reduced surface presentation of receptors was dependent on the previously reported RabGAP activity and ARF binding ability of EspG. This paper therefore supports the previous hypothesis that EspG acts as an enzyme scaffold perturbing cell signalling events, in this case altering recycling endosome function and cell surface receptor levels during infection. PMID:24898821

  18. Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Janjaroen, Dao; Ling, Fangqiong; Monroy, Guillermo; Derlon, Nicolas; Mogenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were investigated. Biofilms were grown in CDC reactors using groundwater as feed solution over a period up to 27 weeks. Biofilm physical structure was characterized at the micro- and meso-scales using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), respectively. Microbial community diversity was analyzed with Terminal Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP). Both physical structure and microbial community diversity of the biofilms were shown to be changing from 2 weeks to 14 weeks, and became relatively stable after 16 weeks. A parallel plate flow chamber coupled with an inverted fluorescent microscope was also used to monitor the attachment of fluorescent microspheres and E. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E. coli attachment were identified. The adhesion rate coefficients (kd) of E. coli on nascent PVC surfaces and 2-week biofilms increased with ionic strength. However, after biofilms grew for 8 weeks, the adhesion was found to be independent of solution chemistry. Instead, a positive correlation between kd and biofilm roughness as determined by OCT was obtained, indicating that the physical structure of biofilms could play an important role in facilitating the adhesion of E. coli cells. PMID:23497979

  19. Attachment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to lettuce leaf surface and bacterial viability in response to chlorine treatment as demonstrated by using confocal scanning laser microscopy.

    PubMed

    Seo, K H; Frank, J F

    1999-01-01

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy was used to observe the location of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on and within lettuce leaves. Sections of leaves (ca. 0.5 by 0.5 cm) were inoculated by submersion in a suspension of E. coli O157:H7 (ca. 10(7) to 10(8) CFU/ml) overnight at 7 degrees C. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled antibody was used to visualize the attached bacteria. E. coli O157:H7 was found attached to the surface, trichomes, stomata, and cut edges. Three-dimensional volume reconstruction of interior portions of leaves showed that E. coli O157:H7 was entrapped 20 to 100 microm below the surface in stomata and cut edges. Agar plate culturing and microscopic observation indicated that E. coli O157:H7 preferentially attached to cut edges, as opposed to the intact leaf surface. Dual staining with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled antibody and propidium iodide was used to determine viability of cells on artificially contaminated lettuce leaves after treatment with 20 mg/liter chlorine solution for 5 min. Many live cells were found in stomata and on cut edges following chlorine treatment. E. coli O157:H7 did not preferentially adhere to biofilm produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens on the leaf surface. In contrast to E. coli O157:H7, Pseudomonas adhered to and grew mainly on the intact leaf surface rather than on the cut edges. PMID:9921820

  20. Perpendicular planes of FtsZ arcs in spheroidal Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Pas, E; Einav, M; Woldringh, C L; Zaritsky, A

    2001-01-01

    Division planes in Escherichia coli, usually restricted to one dimension of the rod-shaped cell, were induced at all possible planes by transforming the cells to spheroids with mecillinam (inactivating PbpA). Such cells displayed many nucleoids and arcs of FtsZ, genetically tagged to green fluorescent protein, that developed to rings at constriction sites all around their surface. These observations are consistent with the view (Woldringh et al., J. Bacteriol. 176 (1994) 6030-6038) that nucleoids, forced during replication to segregate in the length axis of the cell by the rigid bacillary envelope, induce assembly of FtsZ to division rings in between them. PMID:11254985

  1. B cells Using Calcium Signaling for Specific and Rapid Detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Ronghui; Kong, Byung-Whi; Jin, Sha; Ye, Kaiming; Fang, Weihuan; Li, Yanbin

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive detection technology is highly desirable for specific detection of E. coli O157:H7, one of the leading bacterial pathogens causing foodborne illness. In this study, we reported the rapid detection of E. coli O157:H7 by using calcium signaling of the B cell upon cellular membrane anchors anti-E. coli O157:H7 IgM. The binding of E. coli O157:H7 to the IgM on B cell surface activates the B cell receptor (BCR)-induced Ca(2+) signaling pathway and results in the release of Ca(2+) within seconds. The elevated intracellular Ca(2+) triggers Fura-2, a fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator, for reporting the presence of pathogens. The Fura-2 is transferred to B cells before detection. The study demonstrated that the developed B cell based biosensor was able to specifically detect E. coli O157:H7 at the low concentration within 10 min in pure culture samples. Finally, the B cell based biosensor was used for the detection of E. coli O157:H7 in ground beef samples. With its short detection time and high sensitivity at the low concentration of the target bacteria, this B cell biosensor shows promise in future application of the high throughput and rapid food detection, biosafety and environmental monitoring. PMID:26034978

  2. B cells Using Calcium Signaling for Specific and Rapid Detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Ronghui; Kong, Byung-Whi; Jin, Sha; Ye, Kaiming; Fang, Weihuan; Li, Yanbin

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive detection technology is highly desirable for specific detection of E. coli O157:H7, one of the leading bacterial pathogens causing foodborne illness. In this study, we reported the rapid detection of E. coli O157:H7 by using calcium signaling of the B cell upon cellular membrane anchors anti-E. coli O157:H7 IgM. The binding of E. coli O157:H7 to the IgM on B cell surface activates the B cell receptor (BCR)-induced Ca2+ signaling pathway and results in the release of Ca2+ within seconds. The elevated intracellular Ca2+ triggers Fura-2, a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, for reporting the presence of pathogens. The Fura-2 is transferred to B cells before detection. The study demonstrated that the developed B cell based biosensor was able to specifically detect E. coli O157:H7 at the low concentration within 10 min in pure culture samples. Finally, the B cell based biosensor was used for the detection of E. coli O157:H7 in ground beef samples. With its short detection time and high sensitivity at the low concentration of the target bacteria, this B cell biosensor shows promise in future application of the high throughput and rapid food detection, biosafety and environmental monitoring. PMID:26034978

  3. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum surface antigens in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshir, F; Flint, J E; Reese, R T

    1985-01-01

    The asexual blood stages of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum produce many antigens, only some of which are important for protective immunity. Most of the putative protective antigens are believed to be expressed in schizonts and merozoites, the late stages of the asexual cycle. With the aim of cloning and characterizing genes for important parasite antigens, we used late-stage P. falciparum mRNA to construct a library of cDNA sequences inserted in the Escherichia coli expression vector pUC8. Nine thousand clones from the expression library were immunologically screened in situ with serum from Aotus monkeys immune to P. falciparum, and 95 clones expressing parasite antigens were identified. Mice were immunized with lysates from 49 of the bacterial clones that reacted with Aotus sera, and the mouse sera were tested for their reactivity with parasite antigens by indirect immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblotting assays. Several different P. falciparum antigens were identified by these assays. Indirect immunofluorescence studies of extracellular merozoites showed that three of these antigens appear to be located on the merozoite surface. Thus, we have identified cDNA clones to three different P. falciparum antigens that may be important in protective immunity. Images PMID:3887406

  4. Comparison of temperature effects on E. coli, Salmonella, and Enterococcus survival in surface waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare the dependencies of survival rates on temperature for indicator organisms E. coli and Enterococcus and the pathogen Salmonella in surface waters. A database consisting of 86 survival datasets from peer-reviewed papers on inactivation of E. coli, Salmonella...

  5. Variability of Surface Characteristics and Transport Behavior of Escherichia coli Isolates from Different Host

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli is a commonly used indicator organism for detecting the presence of fecal-borne pathogenic microorganisms in water supplies. The importance of E. coli as an indicator organism has led to numerous studies looking at surface characteristics and transport behavior of this important mic...

  6. Comparing Temperature Effects on E. Coli, Salmonella, and Enterococcus Survival in Surface Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to compare dependency of survival rates on temperature for indicator organisms E. coli and Enterococcus and the pathogen Salmonella in surface waters. A database of 86 survival datasets from peer-reviewed papers on inactivation of E. coli, Salmonel...

  7. Influence of curli expression by Escherichia coli 0157:H7 on the cell's overall hydrophobicity, charge, and ability to attach to lettuce.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Renee R; Sumner, Susan S; Williams, Robert C; Pierson, Merle D; Popham, David L; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2007-06-01

    Curli fibers are produced by some Escherichia coli cells in response to environmental stimuli. These extracellular proteins enhance the cell's ability to form biofilms on various abiotic surfaces. E. coli 0157:H7 cells readily attach to a variety of fruit and vegetable surfaces. It is not known whether the expression of curli influences the cell's ability to attach to produce surfaces. In this study, the effect of curli expression on the cell's overall hydrophobicity, charge, and ability to attach to cut and whole iceberg lettuce surfaces was examined. All strains, regardless of curli expression, attached preferentially to the cut edges of lettuce (P < 0.05). The curli-producing cells of E. coli 0157:H7 strain E0018 attached in significantly greater numbers to both cut and whole lettuce pieces than did the non-curli-producing E0018 cells (P < 0.05); however, no significant attachment differences were observed between the curli-producing and non-curli-producing cells of E. coli 0157:H7 strains 43894 and 43895. All curli-producing E. coli 0157:H7 strains were significantly more hydrophobic (P < 0.01); however, no association between the cells' hydrophobic characteristics and lettuce attachment was observed. Overall surface charge of the cells did not differ among strains or curli phenotypes. Results indicate that overall hydrophobicity and cell charge in E. coli 0157:H7 strains do not influence attachment to iceberg lettuce surfaces. The presence of curli may not have any influence on attachment of E. coli 0157:H7 cells to produce items. Additional factorsmay influence the attachment of E. coli 0157:H7 to plant surfaces and should be further examined. PMID:17612061

  8. Exchange of E. coli from the foreshore reservoir to surface waters during intensified wave conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malott, S. S.; Vogel, L. J.; Edge, T.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Robinson, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years a number of studies have suggested that foreshore sand and porewater can act as a non-point source of microbial contamination to adjacent surface waters. Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) can be released from the sand into the surface water through sand erosion or wave-induced porewater flows leading to FIB detachment. Although regression models often show that there is a strong correlation between wave events and high E. coli in surface waters, there is limited understanding of the mechanisms by which E. coli is transported from the subsurface foreshore reservoir (sand and porewater) to surface waters during wave events. An improved understanding of the transport mechanisms will facilitate the development of better water quality exceedences predictions. Detailed groundwater flow, sand level and E. coli measurements were conducted at Ipperwash Beach, Lake Huron (Ontario) for three wave events during the 2014 bathing season to evaluate the relative contribution of sand erosion and wave-induced pore water flow in transporting E. coli from the subsurface reservoir to the shallow waters. As expected, results indicate increased E. coli concentrations in ankle and waist deep surface water during periods of increased wave activity (wave height > 0.5m). Considerable sand erosion from the foreshore may have contributed to these increased surface water concentrations. The E. coli concentrations in the foreshore reservoir generally decreased as the wave height intensified, while E. coli concentrations in upshore sand and porewater locations increased.

  9. Escherichia coli surface display of single-chain antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Xu; Mellon, Michael; Bowder, Dane; Quinn, Meghan; Shea, Danielle; Wood, Charles; Xiang, Shi-Hua

    2015-01-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission and infection occur mainly via the mucosal surfaces. The commensal bacteria residing in these surfaces can potentially be employed as a vehicle for delivering inhibitors to prevent HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have employed a bacteria-based strategy to display a broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01, which could potentially be used to prevent HIV-1 infection. The VRC01 antibody mimics CD4-binding to gp120 and has broadly neutralization activities against HIV-1. We have designed a construct that can express the fusion peptide of the scFv-VRC01 antibody together with the autotransporter β-barrel domain of IgAP gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which enabled surface display of the antibody molecule. Our results indicate that the scFv-VRC01 antibody molecule was displayed on the surface of the bacteria as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. The engineered bacteria can capture HIV-1 particles via surface-binding and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell culture. - Highlights: • Designed single-chain VRC01 antibody was demonstrated to bind HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Single-chain VRC01 antibody was successfully displayed on the surface of E. coli. • Engineered bacteria can absorb HIV-1 particles and prevent HIV-1 infection in cell culture.

  10. E. coli as a biological model for cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, David; Lambert, Guillaume; Austin, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Uninhibited growth and invasion of healthy tissue characterize cancer. We co-cultured two strains of E. coli bacteria in a microfabricated environment to model cancer. During starvation, growth-advantage-in-stationary-phase, or GASP, cells grew to a higher population than wild-type cells. GASP cells also displaced wild-type cells from nutrient-rich chambers. When we repeated the experiment with medium depleted by wild-type cells, the peak GASP population density increased 54%, and the ``invasion,'' or displacement of wild-type cells from nutrient-rich chambers, occurred 5 hours earlier. We mathematically modeled both this increase in GASP population and this acceleration of spatial invasion by assuming that GASP cells consume detritus secreted by wild-type cells. Our experimental and model results corroborate recent caution against using tumor starvation as a cancer therapy.

  11. Adherence of streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to fibronectin-coated and uncoated epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, S N; Beachey, E H; Simpson, W A

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between the variability in the fibronectin (Fn) content on human buccal epithelial cells and the capacity of the cells to bind gram-positive (Streptococcus pyogenes) or gram-negative (Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria was investigated. Adhesion experiments performed with mixtures of epithelial cells and mixed suspensions of either S. pyogenes and E. coli or S. pyogenes and P. aeruginosa exhibited three major populations of buccal cells: one of these was able to bind S. pyogenes (gram positive) but neither of the gram-negative bacteria; a second population was able to bind the gram-negative but not the gram-positive bacteria; and a third was able to bind various numbers of both types of organisms. Further adhesion experiments performed with a mixture of epithelial cells and a mixed suspension of S. pyrogens, E. coli, and fluoresceinconjugated methacrylate beads coated with immune immunoglobulin G directed against Fn revealed that the epithelial cells recognizing the gram-positive bacteria were rich in Fn, whereas those recognizing the gram-negative organisms were poor in Fn. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that cells of S. pyogenes bound to epithelial cells coated with Fn, whereas cells of E. coli bound to epithelial cells lacking Fn. These results suggest that Fn on the surfaces of epithelial cells may modulate the ecology of the human oropharyngeal cavity, especially with respect to the colonization of these surfaces by pathogenic gram-negative or gram-positive bacteria. Images PMID:6411621

  12. Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Attila; Xu, Yunfeng; Bauchan, Gary R; Shelton, Daniel R; Nou, Xiangwu

    2016-07-16

    The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 isolated during the 2011 European outbreak expresses Shiga toxin 2a and possess virulence genes associated with the enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) pathotype. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga-toxin adsorption, but it is not clear whether the AAF/I fimbriae are involved in the colonization and biofilm formation on food and environmental matrices such as the surface of fresh produce. We deleted the gene encoding for the AAF/I fimbriae main subunit (AggA) from an outbreak associated E. coli O104:H4 strain, and evaluated the role of AAF/I fimbriae in the adherence and colonization of E. coli O104:H4 to spinach and abiotic surfaces. The deletion of aggA did not affect the adherence of E. coli O104:H4 to these surfaces. However, it severely diminished the colonization and biofilm formation of E. coli O104:H4 on these surfaces. Strong aggregation and biofilm formation on spinach and abiotic surfaces were observed with the wild type strain but not the isogenic aggA deletion mutant, suggesting that AAF/I fimbriae play a crucial role in persistence of O104:H4 cells outside of the intestines of host species, such as on the surface of fresh produce. PMID:27099984

  13. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  14. RNA-Based Detection Does not Accurately Enumerate Living Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells on Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Wenting; Moyne, Anne-Laure; Marco, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to distinguish between living and dead cells is an important, but often unrealized, attribute of rapid detection methods for foodborne pathogens. In this study, the numbers of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 after inoculation onto Romaine lettuce plants and on plastic (abiotic) surfaces were measured over time by culturing, and quantitative PCR (qPCR), propidium monoazide (PMA)-qPCR, and reverse transcriptase (RT)-qPCR targeting E. coli O157:H7 gapA, rfbE, eae, and lpfA genes and gene transcripts. On Romaine lettuce plants incubated at low relative humidity, E. coli O157:H7 cell numbers declined 107-fold within 96 h according to culture-based assessments. In contrast, there were no reductions in E. coli levels according to qPCR and only 100- and 1000-fold lower numbers per leaf by RT-qPCR and PMA-qPCR, respectively. Similar results were obtained upon exposure of E. coli O157:H7 to desiccation conditions on a sterile plastic surface. Subsequent investigation of mixtures of living and dead E. coli O157:H7 cells strongly indicated that PMA-qPCR detection was subject to false-positive enumerations of viable targets when in the presence of 100-fold higher numbers of dead cells. RT-qPCR measurements of killed E. coli O157:H7 as well as for RNaseA-treated E. coli RNA confirmed that transcripts from dead cells and highly degraded RNA were also amplified by RT-qPCR. These findings show that neither PMA-qPCR nor RT-qPCR provide accurate estimates of bacterial viability in environments where growth and survival is limited. PMID:26955370

  15. RNA-Based Detection Does not Accurately Enumerate Living Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells on Plants.

    PubMed

    Ju, Wenting; Moyne, Anne-Laure; Marco, Maria L

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to distinguish between living and dead cells is an important, but often unrealized, attribute of rapid detection methods for foodborne pathogens. In this study, the numbers of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 after inoculation onto Romaine lettuce plants and on plastic (abiotic) surfaces were measured over time by culturing, and quantitative PCR (qPCR), propidium monoazide (PMA)-qPCR, and reverse transcriptase (RT)-qPCR targeting E. coli O157:H7 gapA, rfbE, eae, and lpfA genes and gene transcripts. On Romaine lettuce plants incubated at low relative humidity, E. coli O157:H7 cell numbers declined 10(7)-fold within 96 h according to culture-based assessments. In contrast, there were no reductions in E. coli levels according to qPCR and only 100- and 1000-fold lower numbers per leaf by RT-qPCR and PMA-qPCR, respectively. Similar results were obtained upon exposure of E. coli O157:H7 to desiccation conditions on a sterile plastic surface. Subsequent investigation of mixtures of living and dead E. coli O157:H7 cells strongly indicated that PMA-qPCR detection was subject to false-positive enumerations of viable targets when in the presence of 100-fold higher numbers of dead cells. RT-qPCR measurements of killed E. coli O157:H7 as well as for RNaseA-treated E. coli RNA confirmed that transcripts from dead cells and highly degraded RNA were also amplified by RT-qPCR. These findings show that neither PMA-qPCR nor RT-qPCR provide accurate estimates of bacterial viability in environments where growth and survival is limited. PMID:26955370

  16. Contribution of the highly conserved EaeH surface protein to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Alaullah; Luo, Qingwei; Roy, Koushik; Shabaan, Salwa; Kumar, Pardeep; Qadri, Firdausi; Fleckenstein, James M

    2014-09-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are among the most common causes of diarrheal illness worldwide. These pathogens disproportionately afflict children in developing countries, where they cause substantial morbidity and are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths each year. Although these organisms are important targets for enteric vaccines, most development efforts to date have centered on a subset of plasmid-encoded fimbrial adhesins known as colonization factors and heat-labile toxin (LT). Emerging data suggest that ETEC undergoes considerable changes in its surface architecture, sequentially deploying a number of putative adhesins during its interactions with the host. We demonstrate here that one putative highly conserved, chromosomally encoded adhesin, EaeH, engages the surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells and contributes to bacterial adhesion, LT delivery, and colonization of the small intestine. PMID:24935979

  17. Production of immunologically active surface antigens of hepatitis B virus by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, P; Pasek, M; Magazin, M; Kovacic, R T; Allet, B; Stahl, S; Gilbert, W; Schaller, H; Bruce, S A; Murray, K

    1981-01-01

    Several plasmids have been constructed which direct the synthesis of hepatitis B virus surface antigens in Escherichia coli either as the native polypeptide or fused to other plasmid encoded polypeptides. When injected into rabbits, extracts from bacteria carrying some of these plasmids induced the synthesis of antibodies to the antigens even though the extracts did not give satisfactory positive results in radioimmunoassay for them. Either the NH2-terminal segment or the COOH-terminal segment of the surface antigens alone was sufficient to elicit the immune response, but antibodies against the two segments showed different specificities. The results emphasize the value of an in vivo assay for the presence of antigens in crude cell extracts and illustrate the feasibility of this type of screening with laboratory animals. PMID:6170067

  18. Immobilization of Escherichia coli cells with penicillin-amidohydrolase activity on solid polymeric carriers.

    PubMed

    Zurková, E; Drobník, J; Kálal, J; Svec, F; Tyrácková, V; Vojtísek, V; Zeman, R

    1983-09-01

    Whole cells of Escherichia coli containing the enzyme penicillinamidohydrolase EC 3.5.1.11 were immobilized on the surface of modified macroporous copolymers of glycidylmethacrylate with ethylenedimethacrylate and of copolymers of methacrylaldehyde (MA) with divinylbenzene (DVB) by means of glutaraldehyde. These polymeric carriers were modified before cell binding by using ammonia or polyamines, especially ethylenediamine and hexamethylenediamine (HMDA). The highest specific activity and the largest yield in cell immobilization were achieved with the macroporous copolymer of MA and DVB modified with HMDA. The material thus obtained was used in repeated conversions of benzylpenicillin to 6-aminopenicillanic acid in a stirred batch reactor. PMID:18574818

  19. Effect of surface roughness on retention and removal of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on surfaces of selected fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of surface roughness on the attachment and removal of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on selected fruit surfaces. A new method to determine surface roughness was developed using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). A series of 2-D layered images were t...

  20. Study of DNA uptake locations in single E. coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. Shan; Meadow Anderson, L.; Yang, Haw

    2006-03-01

    Artificial gene transfer of bacteria, such as E. coli, has become the main stream technique in genetic engineering and molecular cell biology studies. In spite of the great improvements in transformation efficiency, some fundamental questions remained to be answered. For instance, what are the DNA uptake channels and how do they form and function under external stimuli? Furthermore, where are these channels located on the cell membrane? Here we report a study aimed at DNA uptake locations in the two widely used gene transformation techniques: electroporation and heat shock. A direct visualization of the settling location of single DNA molecules inside individual E. coli cells was obtained by fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. Electroporation and heat shock exhibit two distinct characteristics of DNA uptake locations. A preferential distribution toward cell poles during electroporation is consistent with earlier experiments and previously proposed models. However, the result from heat shock is unanticipated in which the majority of DNA enters the cell near the center. Such observation suggests that uptake channels form preferentially where newly-synthesized membrane is located under cation and low temperature treatment

  1. The effect of enterohemorrhagic E. coli infection on the cell mechanics of host cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-Quan; Su, Pin-Tzu; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Huang, Chien-Hsiu; Osterday, Kathryn; del Álamo, Juan C; Syu, Wan-Jr; Chiou, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) is a type of human pathogenic bacteria. The main virulence characteristics of EHEC include the formation of attaching and effacing lesions (A/E lesions) and the production of one or more Shiga-like toxins, which may induce human uremic complications. When EHEC infects host cells, it releases translocated intimin receptor (Tir) and effector proteins inside the host cells, inducing the rearrangement and accumulation of the F-actin cytoskeleton, a phenotype leading to the formation of pedestals in the apical cell surface, and the growth of stress fibers at the base of the cells. To examine the effect of EHEC infection on cell mechanics, we carried out a series of experiments to examine HeLa cells with and without EHEC infection to quantify the changes in (1) focal adhesion area, visualized by anti-vinculin staining; (2) the distribution and orientation of stress fibers; and (3) the intracellular viscoelasticity, via directional video particle tracking microrheology. Our results indicated that in EHEC-infected HeLa cells, the focal adhesion area increased and the actin stress fibers became thicker and more aligned. The cytoskeletal reorganization induced by EHEC infection mediated a dramatic increase in the cytoplasmic elastic shear modulus of the infected cells, and a transition in the viscoelastic behavior of the cells from viscous-like to elastic-like. These changes in mechanobiological characteristics might modulate the attachments between EHEC and the host cell to withstand exfoliation, and between the host cell and the extracellular matrix, and might also alter epithelial integrity. PMID:25369259

  2. Antibiotic-resistant E. coli in surface water and groundwater in dairy operations in Northern California.

    PubMed

    Li, Xunde; Watanabe, Naoko; Xiao, Chengling; Harter, Thomas; McCowan, Brenda; Liu, Yingjia; Atwill, Edward R

    2014-02-01

    Generic Escherichia coli was isolated from surface water and groundwater samples from two dairies in Northern California and tested for susceptibility to antibiotics. Surface samples were collected from flush water, lagoon water, and manure solids, and groundwater samples were collected from monitoring wells. Although E. coli was ubiquitous in surface samples with concentrations ranging from several hundred thousand to over a million colony-forming units per 100 mL of surface water or per gram of surface solids, groundwater under the influence of these high surface microbial loadings had substantially fewer bacteria (3- to 7-log10 reduction). Among 80 isolates of E. coli tested, 34 (42.5%) were resistant to one or more antibiotics and 22 (27.5%) were multi-antibiotic resistant (resistant to ≥3 antibiotics), with resistance to tetracycline, cefoxitin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and ampicillin being the most common. E. coli isolates from the calf hutch area exhibited the highest levels of multi-antibiotic resistance, much higher than isolates in surface soil solids from heifer and cow pens, flush alleys, manure storage lagoons, and irrigated fields. Among E. coli isolates from four groundwater samples, only one sample exhibited resistance to ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline, indicating the potential of groundwater contamination with antibiotic-resistant bacteria from dairy operations. PMID:24097011

  3. Peptidoglycan biosynthesis in stationary-phase cells of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Blasco, B; Pisabarro, A G; de Pedro, M A

    1988-01-01

    The ability of stationary-phase cells of Escherichia coli W7 to incorporate radioactive precursors into macromolecular murein has been studied. During the initial 6 h of the stationary phase, resting cells incorporated meso-[3H]diaminopimelic acid at a rate corresponding to the insertion of 1.3 X 10(4) disaccharide units min-1 cell-1. Afterwards, the rate of incorporation dropped drastically (90%) to a low but still detectable level. Incorporation during stationary phase did not result in an increased amount of total murein in the culture, suggesting that it was related to a turnover process. Analysis of the effects of a number of beta-lactam antibiotics indicated that incorporation of murein precursors in stationary-phase cells was mediated by penicillin-binding proteins, suggesting that the activity of penicillin-binding protein 2 was particularly relevant to this process. PMID:3141382

  4. Cloning and expression of the major 47-kilodalton surface immunogen of Treponema pallidum in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Norgard, M V; Chamberlain, N R; Swancutt, M A; Goldberg, M S

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against the 47-kilodalton (kDa) major outer membrane surface immunogen of virulent Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum were used to select Escherichia coli recombinant clones expressing the 47-kDa immunogen. The phenotype of the clones was dependent on the presence of recombinant plasmid in the host cell. Southern hybridization revealed that the cloned T. pallidum subsp. pallidum DNA sequence was an accurate representation of the T. pallidum subsp. pallidum genomic DNA arrangement. Purified immunoglobulin G from rabbits experimentally infected with T. pallidum subsp. pallidum and human secondary syphilitic sera specifically reacted with the clones, while normal human serum or immunoglobulin G from normal rabbit serum did not. Results of Southern hybridization indicated that a homologous 47-kDa immunogen gene was absent in at least four species of nonpathogenic treponemes tested, as well as from total rabbit genomic DNA. Rabbit anti-T. phagedenis biotype Reiter (treponemal nonpathogen) antiserum and a monoclonal antibody directed against a common treponemal determinant were unreactive with the clones. Western blotting and radioimmunoprecipitation experiments with specific monoclonal antibodies revealed that the recombinant (E. coli) and native (T. pallidum subsp. pallidum) forms of the antigen had identical electrophoretic mobilities. The availability of recombinant 47-kDa immunogen provides a new opportunity for biochemical analysis of the protein, structure-function studies, examination of its role in microbial pathogenesis, and assessment of its diagnostic and vaccinogenic potentials. Images PMID:3021631

  5. Crystal structure of the cell-binding B oligomer of verotoxin-1 from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Stein, P E; Boodhoo, A; Tyrrell, G J; Brunton, J L; Read, R J

    1992-02-20

    The Shiga toxin family, a group of cytotoxins associated with diarrhoeal diseases and the haemolytic uraemic syndrome, includes Shiga toxin from Shigella dysenteriae type 1 and verotoxins produced by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. The family belongs to the A-B class of bacterial toxins, which includes the cholera toxin family, pertussis and diphtheria toxins. These toxins all have bipartite structures consisting of an enzymatic A subunit associated with a B oligomer which binds to specific cell-surface receptors, but their amino-acid sequences and pathogenic mechanisms differ. We have determined the crystal structure of the B oligomer of verotoxin-1 from E. coli. The structure unexpectedly resembles that of the B oligomer of the cholera toxin-like heat-labile enterotoxin from E. coli, despite the absence of detectable sequence similarity between these two proteins. This result implies a distant evolutionary relationship between the Shiga toxin and cholera toxin families. We suggest that the cell surface receptor-binding site lies in a cleft between adjacent subunits of the B pentamer, providing a potential target for drugs and vaccines to prevent toxin binding and effect. PMID:1741063

  6. Estimation of the adhesive force distribution for the flagellar adhesion of Escherichia coli on a glass surface.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Akinori; Nobuhira, Noritaka; Narahara, Hisaya; Toyoda, Syunsuke; Tokumoto, Hayato; Konishi, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Toshiyuki

    2015-07-01

    The effects of the presence or absence of microbial flagella and the microbial motility on the colloidal behaviors of microbial cells were quantitatively evaluated. The microbial cell attachment and detachment processes on a glass surface were observed directly using a parallel-plate flow chamber. Wild-type, flagellar paralyzed, and nonflagellated Escherichia coli strains were used as model microbial cells. In the cell attachment tests, the microbial adhesion rate in a 160mM NaCl solution was approximately 10 times higher than that in a 10mM solution, for all E. coli strains. The colloidal behavior of the microbial cells agreed well with the predictions of the DLVO theory. In addition, the microbial flagella and motility did not significantly affect the cell attachment, regardless of the existence of a potential barrier between the cell and the glass substratum. In the cell detachment tests, the cumulative number of microbial cells detached from the glass substratum with increasing flow rate was fit well with the Weibull distribution function. The list of strains arranged in order of increasing median drag force required to remove them was nonflagellated strain, flagellar paralyzed strain, and wild-type strain. These results indicated that the flagella and the flagellar motility inhibited the cell detachment from the glass substratum. Furthermore, a large external force would likely be required to inhibit the microbial adhesion in the early stage of the biofilm formation. PMID:25956746

  7. Pathogenic Escherichia coli producing Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases isolated from surface water and wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Eelco; Veenman, Christiaan; van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Husman, Ana de Roda; Blaak, Hetty

    2015-01-01

    To assess public health risks from environmental exposure to Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases (ESBL)-producing bacteria, it is necessary to have insight in the proportion of relative harmless commensal variants and potentially pathogenic ones (which may directly cause disease). In the current study, 170 ESBL-producing E. coli from Dutch wastewater (n = 82) and surface water (n = 88) were characterized with respect to ESBL-genotype, phylogenetic group, resistance phenotype and virulence markers associated with enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), extraintesinal E. coli (ExPEC), and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Overall, 17.1% of all ESBL-producing E. coli were suspected pathogenic variants. Suspected ExPECs constituted 8.8% of all ESBL-producing variants and 8.3% were potential gastrointestinal pathogens (4.1% EAEC, 1.8% EPEC, 1.2% EIEC, 1.2% ETEC, no STEC). Suspected pathogens were significantly associated with ESBL-genotype CTX-M-15 (X2 = 14.7, P < 0.001) and phylogenetic group B2 (X2 = 23.5, P < 0.001). Finally, 84% of the pathogenic ESBL-producing E. coli isolates were resistant to three or more different classes of antibiotics. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the aquatic environment is a potential reservoir of E. coli variants that combine ESBL-genes, a high level of multi-drug resistance and virulence factors, and therewith pose a health risk to humans upon exposure. PMID:26399418

  8. Pathogenic Escherichia coli producing Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases isolated from surface water and wastewater.

    PubMed

    Franz, Eelco; Veenman, Christiaan; van Hoek, Angela H A M; de Roda Husman, Ana; Blaak, Hetty

    2015-01-01

    To assess public health risks from environmental exposure to Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases (ESBL)-producing bacteria, it is necessary to have insight in the proportion of relative harmless commensal variants and potentially pathogenic ones (which may directly cause disease). In the current study, 170 ESBL-producing E. coli from Dutch wastewater (n = 82) and surface water (n = 88) were characterized with respect to ESBL-genotype, phylogenetic group, resistance phenotype and virulence markers associated with enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), extraintesinal E. coli (ExPEC), and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Overall, 17.1% of all ESBL-producing E. coli were suspected pathogenic variants. Suspected ExPECs constituted 8.8% of all ESBL-producing variants and 8.3% were potential gastrointestinal pathogens (4.1% EAEC, 1.8% EPEC, 1.2% EIEC, 1.2% ETEC, no STEC). Suspected pathogens were significantly associated with ESBL-genotype CTX-M-15 (X(2) = 14.7, P < 0.001) and phylogenetic group B2 (X(2) = 23.5, P < 0.001). Finally, 84% of the pathogenic ESBL-producing E. coli isolates were resistant to three or more different classes of antibiotics. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the aquatic environment is a potential reservoir of E. coli variants that combine ESBL-genes, a high level of multi-drug resistance and virulence factors, and therewith pose a health risk to humans upon exposure. PMID:26399418

  9. Coordination between chromosome replication and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, M S; Helmstetter, C E

    1980-01-01

    Cell division properties of Escherichia coli B/r containing either a dnaC or a dnaI mutation were examined. Incubation at nonpermissive temperature resulted in the eventual production of cells of approximately normal size, or slightly smaller, which lacked chromosomal DNA. The cell division patterns in cultures which were grown at permissive temperature and then shifted to nonpermissive temperature were consistent with: first, division and equipartition of chromosomes by cells which were in the C and D periods at the time of the shift; second, an apparent delay in cell division; and third, commencement of the formation of chromosomeless cells. In glucose-grown cultures of the dnaI mutant, production of chromosomeless cells continued for at least 120 min, whereas in the dnaC mutant chromosomeless cells were formed during a single interval between 110 and 130 min after the temperature shift. The results are discussed in light of the hypothesis that replication of a specific chromosomal region is not an obligatory requirement for the initiation and completion of the processes leading to division in a cell which contains at least one functioning chromosome. PMID:6988405

  10. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic; Vesel, Alenka; Marinšek, Marjan; Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona

    2014-11-01

    Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor® and Topas®.

  11. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection induces intestinal epithelial cell autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulong; Li, Fengna; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Kong, Xiangfeng; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2014-06-25

    The morbidity and mortality in piglets caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) results in large economic losses to the swine industry, but the precise pathogenesis of ETEC-associated diseases remains unknown. Intestinal epithelial cell autophagy serves as a host defense against pathogens. We found that ETEC induced autophagy, as measured by both the increased punctae distribution of GFP-LC3 and the enhanced conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II. Inhibiting autophagy resulted in decreased survival of IPEC-1 cells infected with ETEC. ETEC triggered autophagy in IPEC-1 cells through a pathway involving the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). PMID:24742948

  12. Tumbling and quasi-tumbling motions of E.coli over a solid surface under shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Flow shear is known to alter bacterial motility by inducing Jeffery Orbit, rheotaxis, and trapping cells in the high shear region. Over a solid surface flow shear Interferes with hydrodynamic interaction of cells with solid surface. Our previous study shows that in the quiescent condition the tumbles of wild E.coli are suppressed and tumbling reorientation of cells is restricted to the surface parallel direction. In the current study, we exposed bacteria to the well controlled shear flows inside a microchannel and applying Digital Holography Microscopy to track them over time. The results show that flow shear promotes tumbling of E.coli and preserve reorientation of the cells during tumbles. Our hydrodynamic model indicates that in the low shear levels the tumble enhancement is due to shear induced flagella unbundling, while in the high shear flow regime, Jeffery Orbit causes rapid cell re-orientation which causes quasi-tumbles with similar angular displacement one would expect during a tumbling. NIH, GoMRI.

  13. Autodisplay for the co-expression of lipase and foldase on the surface of E. coli: washing with designer bugs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipases including the lipase from Burkholderia cepacia are in a main focus in biotechnology research since many years because of their manifold possibilities for application in industrial processes. The application of Burkholderia cepacia lipase for these processes appears complicated because of the need for support by a chaperone, the lipase specific foldase. Purification and reconstitution protocols therefore interfere with an economic implementation of such enzymes in industry. Autodisplay is a convenient method to express a variety of passenger proteins on the surface of E. coli. This method makes subsequent purification steps to obtain the protein of interest unnecessary. If enzymes are used as passengers, the corresponding cells can simply be applied as whole cell biocatalysts. Furthermore, enzymes surface displayed in this manner often acquire stabilization by anchoring within the outer membrane of E. coli. Results The lipase and its chaperone foldase from B. cepacia were co-expressed on the surface of E. coli via autodisplay. The whole cell biocatalyst obtained thereby exhibited an enzymatic activity of 2.73 mU mL-1 towards the substrate p-nitrophenyl palmitate when applied in an OD578 =1. Outer membrane fractions prepared from the same culture volume showed a lipase activity of 4.01 mU mL-1. The lipase-whole cell biocatalyst as well as outer membrane preparations thereof were used in a standardized laundry test, usually adopted to determine the power of washing agents. In this test, the lipase whole cell biocatalyst and the membrane preparation derived thereof exhibited the same lipolytic activity as the purified lipase from B. cepacia and a lipase preparation which is already applied in commercial washing agents. Conclusions Co-expression of both the lipase and its chaperone foldase on the surface of E. coli yields a lipid degrading whole cell biocatalyst. Therefore the chaperone supported folding process, absolutely required for the lipolytic

  14. Ferritinophagy drives uropathogenic Escherichia coli persistence in bladder epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bauckman, Kyle A; Mysorekar, Indira U

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling pathway, which in many cases, protects host cells from infections by degrading pathogens. However, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs), persist within the urinary tract epithelium (urothelium) by forming reservoirs within autophagosomes. Iron is a critical nutrient for both host and pathogen, and regulation of iron availability is a key host defense against pathogens. Iron homeostasis depends on the shuttling of iron-bound ferritin to the lysosome for recycling, a process termed ferritinophagy (a form of selective autophagy). Here, we demonstrate for the first time that UPEC shuttles with ferritin-bound iron into the autophagosomal and lysosomal compartments within the urothelium. Iron overload in urothelial cells induces ferritinophagy in an NCOA4-dependent manner causing increased iron availability for UPEC, triggering bacterial overproliferation and host cell death. Addition of even moderate levels of iron is sufficient to increase and prolong bacterial burden. Furthermore, we show that lysosomal damage due to iron overload is the specific mechanism causing host cell death. Significantly, we demonstrate that host cell death and bacterial burden can be reversed by inhibition of autophagy or inhibition of iron-regulatory proteins, or chelation of iron. Together, our findings suggest that UPEC persist in host cells by taking advantage of ferritinophagy. Thus, modulation of iron levels in the bladder may provide a therapeutic avenue to controlling UPEC persistence, epithelial cell death, and recurrent UTIs. PMID:27002654

  15. Green biosynthesis of biocompatible CdSe quantum dots in living Escherichia coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhengyu; Qian, Jing; Gu, Yueqing; Su, Yilong; Ai, Xiaoxia; Wu, Shengmei

    2014-03-01

    A green and efficient biosynthesis method to prepare fluorescence-tunable biocompatible cadmium selenide quantum dots using Escherichia coli cells as biological matrix was proposed. Decisive factors in biosynthesis of cadmium selenide quantum dots in a designed route in Escherichia coli cells were elaborately investigated, including the influence of the biological matrix growth stage, the working concentration of inorganic reactants, and the co-incubation duration of inorganic metals to biomatrix. Ultraviolet-visible, photoluminescence, and inverted fluorescence microscope analysis confirmed the unique optical properties of the biosynthesized cadmium selenide quantum dots. The size distribution of the nanocrystals extracted from cells and the location of nanocrystals foci in vivo were also detected seriously by transmission electron microscopy. A surface protein capping layer outside the nanocrystals was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements, which were supposed to contribute to reducing cytotoxicity and maintain a high viability of cells when incubating with quantum dots at concentrations as high as 2 μM. Cell morphology observation indicated an effective labeling of living cells by the biosynthesized quantum dots after a 48 h co-incubation. The present work demonstrated an economical and environmentally friendly approach to fabricating highly fluorescent quantum dots which were expected to be an excellent fluorescent dye for broad bio-imaging and labeling.

  16. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Epigenetically Manipulate Host Cell Death Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengguo; Wang, Ming; Eisel, Florian; Tchatalbachev, Svetlin; Chakraborty, Trinad; Meinhardt, Andreas; Bhushan, Sudhanshu

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) pathovars belong to the most frequent infections in human. It is well established that UPEC can subvert innate immune responses, but the role of UPEC in interfering with host cell death pathways is not known. Here, we show that UPEC abrogates activation of the host cell prosurvival protein kinase B signaling pathway, which results in the activation of mammalian forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors. Although FOXOs were localized in the nucleus and showed increased DNA-binding activity, no change in the expression levels of FOXO target genes were observed. UPEC can suppress BIM expression induced by LY249002, which results in attenuation of caspase 3 activation and blockage of apoptosis. Mechanistically, BIM expression appears to be epigenetically silenced by a decrease in histone 4 acetylation at the BIM promoter site. Taken together, these results suggest that UPEC can epigenetically silence BIM expression, a molecular switch that prevents apoptosis. PMID:26621912

  17. Coli surface antigens 1 and 3 of colonization factor antigen II-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: morphology, purification, and immune responses in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, M M; Ristaino, P; Marley, G; Smyth, C; Knutton, S; Boedeker, E; Black, R; Young, C; Clements, M L; Cheney, C

    1984-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) of serotype O6:H16, biotype A, bearing colonization factor antigen II (CFA/II) possesses two distinct coli surface antigens, CS1 and CS3, whereas CFA/II-positive ETEC of serotype O8:H9 manifests only CS3. CS1 has been shown to be fimbrial in nature, but heretofore the morphology of CS3 has not been described. Accordingly, by immune electron microscopy we investigated the morphological characteristics of CS3 on bacterial cells and after purification. CS3 was found to consist of thin (2-nm), flexible, wiry, "fibrillar" fimbriae, visible both on bacteria (O6:H16, biotype A, and O8:H9 strains) and in the pure state. In contrast, CS1 exists as wider (6-nm), rigid fimbriae on the surface of O6:H16, biotype A, strains. By the use of antisera to CS1 and CS3 in immune electron microscopy, immunodiffusion in gel, and immunoblotting techniques, CS1 and CS3 were found to be immunologically as well as morphologically distinct. Six of nine volunteers who developed diarrhea after challenge with an O139:H28 ETEC strain bearing CS1 and CS3 had significant serological rises to purified CS1 and CS3 antigens, suggesting that both antigens are elaborated in vivo, play a role in pathogenesis, and stimulate an immune response. Images PMID:6370866

  18. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in biofilm on food-contact surfaces by sequential treatments of aqueous chlorine dioxide and drying.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jihyun; Hong, Ayoung; Kim, Hoikyung; Beuchat, Larry R; Rhee, Min Suk; Kim, Younghoon; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2014-11-17

    We investigated the efficacy of sequential treatments of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide and drying in killing Escherichia coli O157:H7 in biofilms formed on stainless steel, glass, plastic, and wooden surfaces. Cells attached to and formed a biofilm on wooden surfaces at significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher levels compared with other surface types. The lethal activities of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and aqueous chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) against E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on various food-contact surfaces were compared. Chlorine dioxide generally showed greater lethal activity than NaOCl against E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on the same type of surface. The resistance of E. coli O157:H7 to both sanitizers increased in the order of wood>plastic>glass>stainless steel. The synergistic lethal effects of sequential ClO₂ and drying treatments on E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on wooden surfaces were evaluated. When wooden surfaces harboring E. coli O157:H7 biofilm were treated with ClO₂ (200 μg/ml, 10 min), rinsed with water, and subsequently dried at 43% relative humidity and 22 °C, the number of E. coli O157:H7 on the surface decreased by an additional 6.4 CFU/coupon within 6 h of drying. However, when the wooden surface was treated with water or NaOCl and dried under the same conditions, the pathogen decreased by only 0.4 or 1.0 log CFU/coupon, respectively, after 12 h of drying. This indicates that ClO₂ treatment of food-contact surfaces results in residual lethality to E. coli O157:H7 during the drying process. These observations will be useful when selecting an appropriate type of food-contact surfaces, determining a proper sanitizer for decontamination, and designing an effective sanitization program to eliminate E. coli O157:H7 on food-contact surfaces in food processing, distribution, and preparation environments. PMID:25261831

  19. Preliminary Characterization of the Transcriptional Response of the Porcine Intestinal Cell Line IPEC-J2 to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli, and E. coli Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Geens, Marisa M.; Niewold, Theo A.

    2010-01-01

    IPEC-J2, a promising in vitro model system, is not well characterized especially on the transcriptional level, in contrast to human counterparts. The aim of this study was to characterize the gene expression in IPEC-J2 cells when coincubated with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), nonpathogenic E. coli, and E. coli endotoxin. Apical infection of polarized IPEC-J2 monolayers caused a time-dependent decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). Microarray analysis showed up-regulation of interleukins when IPEC-J2 were cocultured with E. coli strains this has so far never been measured in this cell line. Highest IL8 expression was found with the ETEC strain possessing the F4 fimbrium, suggesting IPEC-J2 cells to be F4 receptor positive, confirmed in a brush border membrane adhesion assay. It is concluded that the innate immune responses to pathogens and LPS makes the IPEC-J2 cell line a suitable model for research on intestinal host pathogen interaction. PMID:21318186

  20. Measuring cell wall elasticity on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli wild type and dispersin mutant by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Beckmann, Melissa; Venkataraman, Sankar; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Nataro, James P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P

    2006-07-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is pathogenic and produces severe diarrhea in humans. A mutant of EAEC that does not produce dispersin, a cell surface protein, is not pathogenic. It has been proposed that dispersin imparts a positive charge to the bacterial cell surface allowing the bacteria to colonize on the negatively charged intestinal mucosa. However, physical properties of the bacterial cell surface, such as rigidity, may be influenced by the presence of dispersin and may contribute to pathogenicity. Using the system developed in our laboratory for mounting and imaging bacterial cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM), in liquid, on gelatin coated mica surfaces, studies were initiated to measure cell surface elasticity. This was carried out in both wild type EAEC, that produces dispersin, and the mutant that does not produce dispersin. This was accomplished using AFM force-distance (FD) spectroscopy on the wild type and mutant grown in liquid or on solid medium. Images in liquid and in air of both the wild-type and mutant grown in liquid and on solid media are presented. This work represents an initial step in efforts to understand the pathogenic role of the dispersin protein in the wild-type bacteria.

  1. Medicinal plant extracts as anti-Escherichia coli O157:H7 agents and their effects on bacterial cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan; Limsuwan, Surasak

    2006-10-01

    Ethanolic extracts of eight Thai medicinal plants (representing five families) that are used as traditional remedies for treating diarrhea were examined with a salt aggregation test for their ability to modulate cell surface hydrophobicity of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains, including E. coli O157:H7. Four of these medicinal plants, Acacia catechu, Peltophorum pterocarpum, Punica granatum, and Quercus infectoria, have high bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities. The ethanolic extract of Q. infectoria was the most effective against all strains of E. coli, with MICs of 0.12 to 0.98 mg/ml and MBCs of 0.98 to 3.91 mg/ml. The ethanolic extract of P. granatum had MICs of 0.49 to 1.95 mg/ml and MBCs of 1.95 to 3.91 mg/ml. Ethanolic extracts of Q. infectoria, P. pterocarpum, and P. granatum were among the most effective extracts against the two strains of E. coli O157:H7. The other four plants, Andrographis paniculata, Pluchia indica, Tamarindus indica, and Walsura robusta, did not have high bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities but were able to affect hydrophobicity characteristics on their outermost surface. All plants except Q. infectoria had some ability to increase cell surface hydrophobicity. There appears to be no correlation between antibacterial activity and cell aggregative properties. PMID:17066910

  2. Localization of Anionic Phospholipids in Escherichia coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Piercen M.; Crooks, John A.; Leidl, Mathias; Yoon, Earl J.; Saghatelian, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is an anionic phospholipid with a characteristically large curvature and is of growing interest for two primary reasons: (i) it binds to and regulates many peripheral membrane proteins in bacteria and mitochondria, and (ii) it is distributed asymmetrically in rod-shaped cells and is concentrated at the poles and division septum. Despite the growing number of studies of CL, its function in bacteria remains unknown. 10-N-Nonyl acridine orange (NAO) is widely used to image CL in bacteria and mitochondria, as its interaction with CL is reported to produce a characteristic red-shifted fluorescence emission. Using a suite of biophysical techniques, we quantitatively studied the interaction of NAO with anionic phospholipids under physiologically relevant conditions. We found that NAO is promiscuous in its binding and has photophysical properties that are largely insensitive to the structure of diverse anionic phospholipids to which it binds. Being unable to rely solely on NAO to characterize the localization of CL in Escherichia coli cells, we instead used quantitative fluorescence microscopy, mass spectrometry, and mutants deficient in specific classes of anionic phospholipids. We found CL and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) concentrated in the polar regions of E. coli cell membranes; depletion of CL by genetic approaches increased the concentration of PG at the poles. Previous studies suggested that some CL-binding proteins also have a high affinity for PG and display a pattern of cellular localization that is not influenced by depletion of CL. Framed within the context of these previous experiments, our results suggest that PG may play an essential role in bacterial physiology by maintaining the anionic character of polar membranes. PMID:25002539

  3. Host cell death due to enteropathogenic Escherichia coli has features of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Crane, J K; Majumdar, S; Pickhardt, D F

    1999-05-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a cause of prolonged watery diarrhea in children in developing countries. The ability of EPEC to kill host cells was investigated in vitro in assays using two human cultured cell lines, HeLa (cervical) and T84 (colonic). EPEC killed epithelial cells as assessed by permeability to the vital dyes trypan blue and propidium iodide. In addition, EPEC triggered changes in the host cell, suggesting apoptosis as the mode of death; such changes included early expression of phosphatidylserine on the host cell surface and internucleosomal cleavage of host cell DNA. Genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, and wortmannin, an inhibitor of host phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, markedly increased EPEC-induced cell death and enhanced the features of apoptosis. EPEC-induced cell death was contact dependent and required adherence of live bacteria to the host cell. A quantitative assay for EPEC-induced cell death was developed by using the propidium iodide uptake method adapted to a fluorescence plate reader. With EPEC, the rate and extent of host cell death were less that what has been reported for Salmonella, Shigella, and Yersinia, three other genera of enteric bacteria known to cause apoptosis. However, rapid apoptosis of the host cell may not favor the pathogenic strategy of EPEC, a mucosa-adhering, noninvasive pathogen. PMID:10225923

  4. Protein folding in the cell envelope of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    De Geyter, Jozefien; Tsirigotaki, Alexandra; Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Zorzini, Valentina; Economou, Anastassios; Karamanou, Spyridoula

    2016-01-01

    While the entire proteome is synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes, almost half associates with, localizes in or crosses the bacterial cell envelope. In Escherichia coli a variety of mechanisms are important for taking these polypeptides into or across the plasma membrane, maintaining them in soluble form, trafficking them to their correct cell envelope locations and then folding them into the right structures. The fidelity of these processes must be maintained under various environmental conditions including during stress; if this fails, proteases are called in to degrade mislocalized or aggregated proteins. Various soluble, diffusible chaperones (acting as holdases, foldases or pilotins) and folding catalysts are also utilized to restore proteostasis. These responses can be general, dealing with multiple polypeptides, with functional overlaps and operating within redundant networks. Other chaperones are specialized factors, dealing only with a few exported proteins. Several complex machineries have evolved to deal with binding to, integration in and crossing of the outer membrane. This complex protein network is responsible for fundamental cellular processes such as cell wall biogenesis; cell division; the export, uptake and degradation of molecules; and resistance against exogenous toxic factors. The underlying processes, contributing to our fundamental understanding of proteostasis, are a treasure trove for the development of novel antibiotics, biopharmaceuticals and vaccines. PMID:27573113

  5. Role of Extracellular Structures of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Initial Attachment to Biotic and Abiotic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Attila; Mowery, Joseph; Bauchan, Gary R.; Wang, Lili; Nichols-Russell, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Infection by human pathogens through the consumption of fresh, minimally processed produce and solid plant-derived foods is a major concern of the U.S. and global food industries and of public health services. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a frequent and potent foodborne pathogen that causes severe disease in humans. Biofilms formed by E. coli O157:H7 facilitate cross-contamination by sheltering pathogens and protecting them from cleaning and sanitation operations. The objective of this research was to determine the role that several surface structures of E. coli O157:H7 play in adherence to biotic and abiotic surfaces. A set of isogenic deletion mutants lacking major surface structures was generated. The mutant strains were inoculated onto fresh spinach and glass surfaces, and their capability to adhere was assessed by adherence assays and fluorescence microscopy methods. Our results showed that filament-deficient mutants bound to the spinach leaves and glass surfaces less strongly than the wild-type strain did. We mimicked the switch to the external environment—during which bacteria leave the host organism and adapt to lower ambient temperatures of cultivation or food processing—by decreasing the temperature from 37°C to 25°C and 4°C. We concluded that flagella and some other cell surface proteins are important factors in the process of initial attachment and in the establishment of biofilms. A better understanding of the specific roles of these structures in early stages of biofilm formation can help to prevent cross-contaminations and foodborne disease outbreaks. PMID:25956766

  6. Effect of serogroup, surface material and disinfectant on biofilm formation by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Oosterik, Leon H; Tuntufye, Huruma N; Butaye, Patrick; Goddeeris, Bruno M

    2014-12-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) are responsible for significant economic losses in the poultry industry and are difficult to eradicate. Biofilm formation by APEC has the potential to reduce the efficacy of cleaning and disinfection. In this study, biofilm formation on materials used in poultry facilities by APEC strains from laying hens was determined. APEC strains were analysed for an association between biofilm forming capacity and O serogroup. The abilities of two routinely used disinfectants, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and a quaternary ammonium compound (QAC), to kill adherent cells of two strong APEC biofilm producers (05/503 and 04/40) and a non-biofilm producer (05/293) on polystyrene (PS) and polyvinylchloride (PVC) surfaces were tested. Most APEC strains were moderate (PS) or strong biofilm producers (polypropylene, PP, and PVC). Strains in serogroup O2 more often belonged to the moderate (PS) or strong (PP and PVC) biofilm producers than to other groups, while most O78 strains were weak biofilm producers. O78 strains were stronger biofilm producers on stainless steel than on PP and PVC, while O2 strains were stronger biofilm producers on PP and PVC. A concentration of 1% H2O2 killed all adherent bacteria of strains 05/503 and 04/40 on PP and PVC, while 0.5% H2O2 killed all adherent bacteria of strain 05/293. QAC at a concentration of 0.01% killed all adherent cells of strains 05/503, 04/40 and 05/293 under equal conditions. In conclusion, biofilm formation by APEC was affected by serogroup and surface material, and inactivation of APEC was dependent on the disinfectant and surface material. PMID:25455385

  7. Soil solarization reduces Escherichia coli O157:H7 on cattle feedlot pen surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Soils at the feedlot pen surface are a source for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and therefore a target for control measures to reduce this pathogen in cattle. Soil solarization is a preplanting technique used in food and ornamental crop production, which utilizes solar en...

  8. Rapid detection of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lan; Zhang, Ping; Zheng, Da-wei; Wang, Yang-jun-qi; Zhong, Ru-gang

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is used as an analytical tool for the detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium). Compared with normal Raman signal, the intensity of SERS signal is greatly enhanced. After processing all SERS data, the obvious differences between the SERS spectra of two species are determined. And applying the chemometric tools of principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis (PCA-HCA), the SERS spectra of two species are distinguished more accurately. The results indicate that SERS analysis can provide a rapid and sensitive method for the detection of pathogenic bacteria.

  9. Sterilization of E. coli bacterium with an atmospheric pressure surface barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Peng; Ding, Li-Li; Zhan, Ru-Juan

    2004-06-01

    The atmospheric pressure surface barrier discharge (APSBD) in air has been used in killing Escherichia coli (E. coli). There is almost no bacterial colony in the sample after treatment by discharge plasma for 2 min. A diagnostic technique based on mass spectrum has been applied to the discharge gas and the mechanism of killing is discussed. Ozone and monatomic oxide are considered to be the major antimicrobial active species. There is almost no harmful by-product. The experiment proves that APSBD plasma is a very simple, effective and innocuous tool for sterilization.

  10. Reduction of Adherence of E. coli O157:H7 to HEp-2 Cells and to Bovine Large Intestinal Mucosal Explants by Colicinogenic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Etcheverría, A. I.; Arroyo, G. H.; Alzola, R.; Parma, A. E.

    2011-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli strains (EHEC) had emerged as foodborne pathogens and cause in human diarrhea and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Because of the widespread distribution of EHEC serotypes and O157 and non-O157 in cattle population, its control will require interventions at the farm level such as the administration of probiotics that produce inhibitory metabolites. E. coli O157:H7 shows tissue tropisms for the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of cattle. The aim of this study was to test the ability of a colicinogenic E. coli (isolated from bovine) to reduce the adherence of E. coli O157:H7 to HEp-2 cells and to GIT of cattle. We inoculated HEp-2 cells and bovine colon explants with both kinds of strains. Colicinogenic E. coli was able to reduce the adherence of E. coli O157:H7 to HEp-2 cells and to bovine tissues. PMID:23724308

  11. Diversity of Cell Properties and Transport Behavior Among 12 Enviromental Escherichia Coli Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli is a commonly used indicator organism for detecting the presence of fecal-borne pathogenic microorganisms in water supplies. The importance of E. coli as an indicator organism has led to numerous studies looking at surface characteristics and transport behavior of this important mi...

  12. Pathogenic potential of Escherichia coli clinical strains from orthopedic implant infections towards human osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Crémet, Lise; Broquet, Alexis; Brulin, Bénédicte; Jacqueline, Cédric; Dauvergne, Sandie; Brion, Régis; Asehnoune, Karim; Corvec, Stéphane; Heymann, Dominique; Caroff, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the first causes of Gram-negative orthopedic implant infections (OII), but little is known about the pathogenicity of this species in such infections that are increasing due to the ageing of the population. We report how this pathogen interacts with human osteoblastic MG-63 cells in vitro, by comparing 20 OII E. coli strains to two Staphylococcus aureus and two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. LDH release assay revealed that 6/20 (30%) OII E. coli induced MG-63 cell lysis whereas none of the four control strains was cytotoxic after 4 h of coculture. This high cytotoxicity was associated with hemolytic properties and linked to hlyA gene expression. We further showed by gentamicin protection assay and confocal microscopy that the non-cytotoxic E. coli were not able to invade MG-63 cells unlike S. aureus strains (internalization rate <0.01% for the non-cytotoxic E. coli versus 8.88 ± 2.31% and 4.60 ± 0.42% for both S. aureus). The non-cytotoxic E. coli also demonstrated low adherence rates (<7%), the most adherent E. coli eliciting higher IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression in the osteoblastic cells. Either highly cytotoxic or slightly invasive OII E. coli do not show the same infection strategies as S. aureus towards osteoblasts. PMID:26333570

  13. The Stringent Response and Cell Cycle Arrest in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ferullo, Daniel J.; Lovett, Susan T.

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response, triggered by nutritional deprivation, causes an accumulation of the signaling nucleotides pppGpp and ppGpp. We characterize the replication arrest that occurs during the stringent response in Escherichia coli. Wild type cells undergo a RelA-dependent arrest after treatment with serine hydroxamate to contain an integer number of chromosomes and a replication origin-to-terminus ratio of 1. The growth rate prior to starvation determines the number of chromosomes upon arrest. Nucleoids of these cells are decondensed; in the absence of the ability to synthesize ppGpp, nucleoids become highly condensed, similar to that seen after treatment with the translational inhibitor chloramphenicol. After induction of the stringent response, while regions corresponding to the origins of replication segregate, the termini remain colocalized in wild-type cells. In contrast, cells arrested by rifampicin and cephalexin do not show colocalized termini, suggesting that the stringent response arrests chromosome segregation at a specific point. Release from starvation causes rapid nucleoid reorganization, chromosome segregation, and resumption of replication. Arrest of replication and inhibition of colony formation by ppGpp accumulation is relieved in seqA and dam mutants, although other aspects of the stringent response appear to be intact. We propose that DNA methylation and SeqA binding to non-origin loci is necessary to enforce a full stringent arrest, affecting both initiation of replication and chromosome segregation. This is the first indication that bacterial chromosome segregation, whose mechanism is not understood, is a step that may be regulated in response to environmental conditions. PMID:19079575

  14. The stringent response and cell cycle arrest in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ferullo, Daniel J; Lovett, Susan T

    2008-12-01

    The bacterial stringent response, triggered by nutritional deprivation, causes an accumulation of the signaling nucleotides pppGpp and ppGpp. We characterize the replication arrest that occurs during the stringent response in Escherichia coli. Wild type cells undergo a RelA-dependent arrest after treatment with serine hydroxamate to contain an integer number of chromosomes and a replication origin-to-terminus ratio of 1. The growth rate prior to starvation determines the number of chromosomes upon arrest. Nucleoids of these cells are decondensed; in the absence of the ability to synthesize ppGpp, nucleoids become highly condensed, similar to that seen after treatment with the translational inhibitor chloramphenicol. After induction of the stringent response, while regions corresponding to the origins of replication segregate, the termini remain colocalized in wild-type cells. In contrast, cells arrested by rifampicin and cephalexin do not show colocalized termini, suggesting that the stringent response arrests chromosome segregation at a specific point. Release from starvation causes rapid nucleoid reorganization, chromosome segregation, and resumption of replication. Arrest of replication and inhibition of colony formation by ppGpp accumulation is relieved in seqA and dam mutants, although other aspects of the stringent response appear to be intact. We propose that DNA methylation and SeqA binding to non-origin loci is necessary to enforce a full stringent arrest, affecting both initiation of replication and chromosome segregation. This is the first indication that bacterial chromosome segregation, whose mechanism is not understood, is a step that may be regulated in response to environmental conditions. PMID:19079575

  15. Inhibition of T-cell Response by Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxin-Treated Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Luciene M.; Maroof, Asher; Dougan, Gordon; Chain, Benjamin M.

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) is an extensively studied adjuvant of mucosal responses. Nevertheless, its mode of action as an adjuvant remains incompletely understood. In this study, we describe a simplified in vitro model with which to look at some aspects of immunoregulation by LT. The interaction of LT with the apical surface of a monolayer of CaCo-2 epithelial cells induces the release of a soluble factor which inhibits the antigen-induced release of interleukin-2 by T cells cultured at the basolateral side of the cells. The release of this factor requires the ADP-ribosylating activity of LT since the isolated B subunit, as well as an enzymatically silent LT mutant, loses biological activity in this model. The inhibitory activity is likely to be due to prostaglandin release, since it is blocked by indomethacin. The contribution of LT-induced prostaglandin release to the complex immunoregulatory activity of LT is discussed. PMID:11083810

  16. Biosorption of nonpolar hydrophobic organic compounds to Escherichia coli facilitated by metal and proton surface binding.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Qu, Xiaolei; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2007-04-15

    We observed that the presence of transition metal ion, Ag+, Cu2+, or Fe3+, at a concentration of 3 mg L(-1) increases sorption of two nonpolar hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), phenanthrene (PHEN), and 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene (TeCB) by 1.5-4 times to Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli. Complexation of transition metals with the deprotonated functional groups (mainly carboxyl) of bacterial cell walls neutralizes the negative charge, making the bacterial surface less hydrophilic and enhancing hydrophobic partition of HOCs. This is evidenced by the fact that the zeta potential (zeta) value of bacteria becomes less negative when a transition metal is present. Furthermore, the observed higher sorption of PHEN than TeCB at low pH (3.8) cannot be fully explained by the pH-dependent hydrophobic effects. The results led us to propose two specific sorption mechanisms for pi-donor compounds: cation-pi interactions with protonated amines and pi H-bonding with protonated carboxyls. The biosorption of PHEN was best described as pi-donor compared to the biosorption of TeCB considered non-pi-donor. Results of the present study highlight that the presence of coexisting transition metals and changes on pH have a major effect on the biosorption of nonpolar HOCs. PMID:17533834

  17. Morphological and nanostructural surface changes in Escherichia coli over time, monitored by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gammoudi, Ibtissem; Mathelie-Guinlet, Marion; Morote, Fabien; Beven, Laure; Moynet, Daniel; Grauby-Heywang, Christine; Cohen-Bouhacina, Touria

    2016-05-01

    The present study aims at evaluating intrinsic changes in Escherichia coli (E. coli) surface over time, by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). For that purpose, bacteria were immobilized on mica or on mica previously functionalized by the deposition of a polyelectrolyte multilayer cushion. AFM images reveal that E. coli population goes through different stages. Firstly, after a week, the number of healthy bacteria decreases resulting in a release of cellular components which likely become, in turn, a nutrition source for increasing the healthy population after around two weeks. Finally, after one month, most of the bacteria is dead. Our study shows a transition of a healthy rod-shaped bacterium to a dead collapsed one. Most importantly, along with the morphological evolution of bacteria, are the structure changes and the mechanical properties of their outer membrane, emphasized by AFM phase images with very high resolution. Indeed, the surface of healthy bacteria is characterized by a phase separation pattern, thereafter mentioned as "ripples". Bacterial ageing goes along with the loss of this organized structure, turning into circular areas with irregular boundaries. These changes are likely caused by a re-organization, due to external stress, of mainly lipopolysaccharides (LPS) present in the outer membrane of E. coli. PMID:26878286

  18. Surfacing of domestic wastewater applied to soil through drip tubing and reduction in numbers of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Franti, J M; Weaver, R W; McInnes, K J

    2002-09-01

    Drip tubing is a technology that is increasing in use. The effectiveness of such systems in distributing the wastewater uniformly through the soil matrix, providing adequate removal of bacteria from wastewater, and keeping wastewater from reaching the soil surface has not been adequately evaluated. Experiments were conducted at two sites that had used drip tubing for approximately 3 years. This 3-year-old drip tubing and newly installed tubing were used in this investigation. A solution containing Brilliant Blue FCF dye and Escherichia coli, at an approximate concentration of 1 x 10(6) cells ml(-1), was applied to the sites through drip emitters. Reduction i n Escherichia coli populations reaching the soil surface was generally less than 10%. The route of travel for the solution reaching the soil surface was consistently along preferential flow paths and not uniformly through the soil matrix. Instances of water reaching the soil surface for drip tubing installed at 15 cm was nearly 50%. Increasing burial of the drip tubing from 15 to 30 cm nearly eliminated water surfacing. A 31 per emitter dose of water, immediately following drip line installation later increased instances of water reaching the soil surface for drip tubing buried at 30 cm. The volume of water applied per dose had little effect on the number of times water reached the soil surface. Inherent soil structural characteristics limited the drip tubing's ability to uniformly distribute water and adsorb bacteria. Drip tubing installation to 30 cm may be an important practice to reduce public health hazards from the likelihood of wastewater surfacing. PMID:12361375

  19. Sorption of heavy metals by prepared bacterial cell surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, S.A.; Walters, J.V.; Churchill, P.F.

    1995-10-01

    Prepared biomass from two Gram-negative and one Gram-positive bacterial strains was examined for single, binary, and quaternary mixtures of polyvalent metal cation binding to cell surfaces. The biosorption of {sub 24}Cr{sup 3+}, {sub 27}Co{sup 2+}, {sub 28}Ni{sup 2+}, and {sub 29}Cu{sup 2+} for each bacterial cell type was evaluated using a batch equilibrium method. The binding of each metal by all three bacterial cells could be described by the Freundlich sorption model. The isotherm binding constants suggest that E. coli cells are the most efficient at binding copper, chromium, and nickel; and M. luteus adsorbs cobalt most efficiently. The K-values for copper bound to P. aeruginosa and E. coli are > 2-fold and > 8-fold greater, respectively, than previous reported for intact cells. The general metal-affinity series observed was Cr{sup 3+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Ni{sup 2+} > Co{sup 2+}. There was a marked lower affinity of all biosorbents for Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}. M. luteus and E. coli had a strong preference for Co{sup 2+} over Ni{sup 2+}. Metal-binding enhancement could be ascribed to increased cell barrier surface porosity to metal-bearing solutions.

  20. Penicillin-binding site on the Escherichia coli cell envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, L.; Lee, Y.; Schwarz, U.; Lorian, V.

    1986-08-01

    The binding of /sup 35/S-labeled penicillin to distinct penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of the cell envelope obtained from the sonication of Escherichia coli was studied at different pHs ranging from 4 to 11. Experiments distinguishing the effect of pH on penicillin binding by PBP 5/6 from its effect on beta-lactamase activity indicated that although substantial binding occurred at the lowest pH, the amount of binding increased with pH, reaching a maximum at pH 10. Based on earlier studies, it is proposed that the binding at high pH involves the formation of a covalent bond between the C-7 of penicillin and free epsilon amino groups of the PBPs. At pHs ranging from 4 to 8, position 1 of penicillin, occupied by sulfur, is considered to be the site that establishes a covalent bond with the sulfhydryl groups of PBP 5. The use of specific blockers of free epsilon amino groups or sulfhydryl groups indicated that wherever the presence of each had little or no effect on the binding of penicillin by PBP 5, the presence of both completely prevented binding. The specific blocker of the hydroxyl group of serine did not affect the binding of penicillin.

  1. Relation Between Excreted Lipopolysaccharide Complexes and Surface Structures of a Lysine-Limited Culture of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Knox, K. W.; Vesk, Maret; Work, Elizabeth

    1966-01-01

    Knox, K. W. (Twyford Laboratories, London, England), Maret Vesk, and Elizabeth Work. Relation between excreted lipopolysaccharide complexes and surface structures of a lysine-limited culture of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 92:1206–1217. 1966.—The lysine-requiring mutant Escherichia coli 12408, when grown in 15 liters of defined medium containing a suboptimal amount of lysine, showed a biphasic type of growth. During a long stationary phase of 15 hr, there was a steady accumulation of diaminopimelic acid (DAP) and an antigenic complex of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoprotein; the accumulation continued unchanged until the end of the second growth phase. The rapid rate of DAP excretion suggested that it was the result of a derepressed state of a biosynthetic pathway. LPS excretion was such that the amount in the culture fluid was doubled during a period corresponding to the normal generation time for the organism; this suggested that the LPS-lipoprotein complex was a product of unbalanced growth. Surface defects were suggested by the action of lysozyme, which, in low concentrations (10 μg/ml), lysed the lysine-limited cells even in the absence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, but had no effect at 10 μg/ml on cells grown with adequate lysine. Electron microscopy of cells excreting the LPS complex showed them to be surrounded by a mass of stacked leaflets and globules, some of which were bounded by triple membranes. Sections showed no lysis but changes in cell surfaces; outer layers of the walls had numerous blebs whose outer membranes were sometimes continuous with the outer triple membrane of the wall. LPS-lipoprotein probably originates from these blebs. Images PMID:4959044

  2. Mechanisms of DRA recycling in intestinal epithelial cells: effect of enteropathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Tarunmeet; Kumar, Anoop; Priyamvada, Shubha; Saksena, Seema; Gill, Ravinder K; Hodges, Kim; Alrefai, Waddah A; Hecht, Gail A; Dudeja, Pradeep K

    2015-12-15

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a food-borne pathogen that causes infantile diarrhea worldwide. EPEC decreases the activity and surface expression of the key intestinal Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger SLC26A3 [downregulated in adenoma (DRA)], contributing to the pathophysiology of early diarrhea. Little is known about the mechanisms governing membrane recycling of DRA. In the current study, Caco-2 cells were used to investigate DRA trafficking under basal conditions and in response to EPEC. Apical Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange activity was measured as DIDS-sensitive (125)I(-) uptake. Cell surface biotinylation was performed to assess DRA endocytosis and exocytosis. Inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis by chlorpromazine (60 μM) increased apical Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange activity. Dynasore, a dynamin inhibitor, also increased function and surface levels of DRA via decreased endocytosis. Perturbation of microtubules by nocodazole revealed that intact microtubules are essential for basal exocytic (but not endocytic) DRA recycling. Mice treated with colchicine showed a decrease in DRA surface levels as visualized by confocal microscopy. In response to EPEC infection, DRA surface expression was reduced partly via an increase in DRA endocytosis and a decrease in exocytosis. These effects were dependent on the EPEC virulence genes espG1 and espG2. Intriguingly, the EPEC-induced decrease in DRA function was unaltered in the presence of dynasore, suggesting a clathrin-independent internalization of surface DRA. In conclusion, these studies establish the role of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and microtubules in the basal surface expression of DRA and demonstrate that the EPEC-mediated decrease in DRA function and apical expression in Caco-2 cells involves decreased exocytosis. PMID:26447204

  3. Ability of Escherichia coli isolates that cause meningitis in newborns to invade epithelial and endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Meier, C; Oelschlaeger, T A; Merkert, H; Korhonen, T K; Hacker, J

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates that cause meningitis in newborns are able to invade the circulation and subsequently cross the blood-brain barrier. One mechanism for traversing the blood-brain barrier might involve transcytosis through the endothelial cells. The ability of the meningitis isolate E. coli IHE3034, of serotype 018:K1:H7, to invade epithelial (T24) and endothelial (EA-hy926) cells was investigated by the standard gentamicin survival assay and by electron microscopy. Human bladder epithelial and endothelial cells were efficiently invaded by strain IHE3034, whereas epithelial human colon Caco-2 cells, canine kidney MDCK cells, and the opossum [correction of opposum] epithelial kidney cell line OK were not invaded. The ability to invade human epithelial cells of the bladder could also be demonstrated for several other newborn meningitis E. coli strains and one septicemic E. coli strain. Studies utilizing inhibitors which act on eukaryotic cells revealed a dependence on microfilaments as well as on microtubules in the process of E. coli IHE3034 entry into T24 and EA-hy926 cells. These results indicated that cell cytoskeletal rearrangements are involved in bacterial uptake and suggest that there are either two pathways (microtubule dependent and microfilament dependent) or one complex pathway involving both microtubules and microfilaments. The intracellular IHE3034 organisms were contained in a host-membrane-confined compartment mainly as single microorganisms. Intracellular replication of 1HE3034 was not detected, nor did the number of intracellular bacteria decrease significantly during a 48-h period. The ability of E. coli O18:K1 to invade and survive within certain eukaryotic cells may be another virulence factor of meningitis-associated E. coli. PMID:8698457

  4. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 Distinctively Modulates T-Cell Cycling and Expansion via Toll-Like Receptor 2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Andreas; Rilling, Klaus; Baumgart, Daniel C.; Gargas, Konstantinos; Abou-Ghazalé, Tay; Raupach, Bärbel; Eckert, Jana; Schumann, Ralf. R.; Enders, Corinne; Sonnenborn, Ulrich; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Dignass, Axel U.

    2005-01-01

    Although the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 has been proven to be efficacious for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, the underlying mechanisms of action still remain elusive. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of E. coli Nissle 1917 on cell cycling and apoptosis of peripheral blood and lamina propria T cells (PBT and LPT, respectively). Anti-CD3-stimulated PBT and LPT were treated with E. coli Nissle 1917-conditioned medium (E. coli Nissle 1917-CM) or heat-inactivated E. coli Nissle 1917. Cyclin B1, DNA content, and caspase 3 expression were measured by flow cytometry to assess cell cycle kinetics and apoptosis. Protein levels of several cell cycle and apoptosis modulators were determined by immunoblotting, and cytokine profiles were determined by cytometric bead array. E. coli Nissle 1917-CM inhibits cell cycling and expansion of peripheral blood but not mucosal T cells. Bacterial lipoproteins mimicked the effect of E. coli Nissle 1917-CM; in contrast, heat-inactivated E. coli Nissle 1917, lipopolysaccharide, or CpG DNA did not alter PBT cell cycling. E. coli Nissle 1917-CM decreased cyclin D2, B1, and retinoblastoma protein expression, contributing to the reduction of T-cell proliferation. E. coli Nissle 1917 significantly inhibited the expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor α, and gamma interferon but increased IL-10 production in PBT. Using Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) knockout mice, we further demonstrate that the inhibition of PBT proliferation by E. coli Nissle 1917-CM is TLR-2 dependent. The differential reaction of circulating and tissue-bound T cells towards E. coli Nissle 1917 may explain the beneficial effect of E. coli Nissle 1917 in intestinal inflammation. E. coli Nissle 1917 may downregulate the expansion of newly recruited T cells into the mucosa and limit intestinal inflammation, while already activated tissue-bound T cells may eliminate deleterious antigens in order to maintain

  5. Modulation of host cell signalling by enteropathogenic and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kresse, A U; Guzmán, C A; Ebel, F

    2001-09-01

    The majority of Escherichia coli strains are harmless symbionts in the intestinal tract. However, there are several pathogenic forms, which are responsible for various diseases in humans and live stock. In this review we discuss the interactions between Shiga toxin-producing E. coli and enteropathogenic E. coli and their target host cells, describing their strategies to activate specific cellular signalling pathways which lead to subversion of critical physiological functions. We mainly concentrate on those pathogenic mechanisms that are dependent on a functional type III secretion system, but we also briefly discuss additional factors that contribute to the specific pathogenic profiles of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli and enreropathogenic E. coli. PMID:11680788

  6. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Escherichia coli Isolated from Untreated Surface Waters

    PubMed Central

    Janezic, Kristopher J; Ferry, Blake; Hendricks, Eric W; Janiga, Brian A; Johnson, Tiffany; Murphy, Samantha; Roberts, Morgan E; Scott, Sarah M; Theisen, Alexandra N; Hung, Kai F; Daniel, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    A common member of the intestinal microbiota in humans and animals is Escherichia coli. Based on the presence of virulence factors, E. coli can be potentially pathogenic. The focus of this study was to isolate E. coli from untreated surface waters (37 sites) in Illinois and Missouri and determine phenotypic and genotypic diversity among isolates. Water samples positive for fecal coliforms based on the Colisure® test were streaked directly onto Eosin Methylene Blue (EMB) agar (37°C) or transferred to EC broth (44.5°C). EC broth cultures producing gas were then streaked onto EMB agar. Forty-five isolates were identified as E. coli using API 20E and Enterotube II identification systems, and some phenotypic variation was observed in metabolism and fermentation. Antibiotic susceptibility of each isolate was also determined using the Kirby-Bauer Method. Differential responses to 10 antimicrobial agents were seen with 7, 16, 2, and 9 of the isolates resistant to ampicillin, cephalothin, tetracycline, and triple sulfonamide, respectively. All of the isolates were susceptible or intermediate to amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, polymyxin B, gentamicin, imipenem, and nalidixic acid. Genotypic variation was assessed through multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction for four virulence genes (stx1 and stx2 [shiga toxin], eaeA [intimin]; and hlyA [enterohemolysin]) and one housekeeping gene (uidA [β-D-glucuronidase]). Genotypic variation was observed with two of the isolates possessing the virulence gene (eaeA) for intimin. These findings increase our understanding of the diversity of E. coli in the environment which will ultimately help in the assessment of this organism and its role in public health. PMID:23539437

  7. Following Drug Uptake and Reactions inside Escherichia coli Cells by Raman Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy combined with Raman difference spectroscopy reveals the details of chemical reactions within bacterial cells. The method provides direct quantitative data on penetration of druglike molecules into Escherichia coli cells in situ along with the details of drug–target reactions. With this label-free technique, clavulanic acid and tazobactam can be observed as they penetrate into E. coli cells and subsequently inhibit β-lactamase enzymes produced within these cells. When E. coli cells contain a β-lactamase that forms a stable complex with an inhibitor, the Raman signature of the known enamine acyl–enzyme complex is detected. From Raman intensities it is facile to measure semiquantitatively the number of clavulanic acid molecules taken up by the lactamase-free cells during growth. PMID:24901294

  8. The cell-surface interaction.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J S; Czekanska, E M; Richards, R G

    2012-01-01

    The realm of surface-dependent cell and tissue responses is the foundation of orthopaedic-device-related research. However, to design materials that elicit specific responses from tissues is a complex proposition mainly because the vast majority of the biological principles controlling the interaction of cells with implants remain largely ambiguous. Nevertheless, many surface properties, such as chemistry and topography, can be manipulated in an effort to selectively control the cell-material interaction. On the basis of this information there has been much research in this area, including studies focusing on the structure and composition of the implant interface, optimization of biological and chemical coatings and elucidation of the mechanisms involved in the subsequent cell-material interactions. Although a wealth of information has emerged, it also advocates the complexity and dynamism of the cell-material interaction. Therefore, this chapter aims to provide the reader with an introduction to the basic concepts of the cell-material interaction and to provide an insight into the factors involved in determining the cell and tissue response to specific surface features, with specific emphasis on surface microtopography. PMID:21984613

  9. Transcriptional Modulation of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Virulence Genes in Response to Epithelial Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, Rita; Rasko, David A.; Sahl, Jason W.; Munson, George P.; Roy, Koushik; Luo, Qingwei; Sheikh, Alaullah; Kuhne, Kurt J.

    2013-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality due to diarrheal illness in developing countries. There is currently no effective vaccine against these important pathogens. Because genes modulated by pathogen-host interactions potentially encode putative vaccine targets, we investigated changes in gene expression and surface morphology of ETEC upon interaction with intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Pan-genome microarrays, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR), and transcriptional reporter fusions of selected promoters were used to study changes in ETEC transcriptomes. Flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate alterations in surface antigen expression and morphology following pathogen-host interactions. Following host cell contact, genes for motility, adhesion, toxin production, immunodominant peptides, and key regulatory molecules, including cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) and c-di-GMP, were substantially modulated. These changes were accompanied by visible changes in both ETEC architecture and the expression of surface antigens, including a novel highly conserved adhesin molecule, EaeH. The studies reported here suggest that pathogen-host interactions are finely orchestrated by ETEC and are characterized by coordinated responses involving the sequential deployment of multiple virulence molecules. Elucidation of the molecular details of these interactions could highlight novel strategies for development of vaccines for these important pathogens. PMID:23115039

  10. Transcriptional modulation of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli virulence genes in response to epithelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Rita; Rasko, David A; Sahl, Jason W; Munson, George P; Roy, Koushik; Luo, Qingwei; Sheikh, Alaullah; Kuhne, Kurt J; Fleckenstein, James M

    2013-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality due to diarrheal illness in developing countries. There is currently no effective vaccine against these important pathogens. Because genes modulated by pathogen-host interactions potentially encode putative vaccine targets, we investigated changes in gene expression and surface morphology of ETEC upon interaction with intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Pan-genome microarrays, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR), and transcriptional reporter fusions of selected promoters were used to study changes in ETEC transcriptomes. Flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate alterations in surface antigen expression and morphology following pathogen-host interactions. Following host cell contact, genes for motility, adhesion, toxin production, immunodominant peptides, and key regulatory molecules, including cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) and c-di-GMP, were substantially modulated. These changes were accompanied by visible changes in both ETEC architecture and the expression of surface antigens, including a novel highly conserved adhesin molecule, EaeH. The studies reported here suggest that pathogen-host interactions are finely orchestrated by ETEC and are characterized by coordinated responses involving the sequential deployment of multiple virulence molecules. Elucidation of the molecular details of these interactions could highlight novel strategies for development of vaccines for these important pathogens. PMID:23115039

  11. Surface Immobilization of Human Arginase-1 with an Engineered Ice Nucleation Protein Display System in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Tang, Rongxin; Bian, Lu; Mei, Meng; Li, Chunhua; Ma, Xiangdong; Yi, Li; Ma, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleation protein (INP) is frequently used as a surface anchor for protein display in gram-negative bacteria. Here, MalE and TorA signal peptides, and three charged polypeptides, 6×Lys, 6×Glu and 6×Asp, were anchored to the N-terminus of truncated INP (InaK-N) to improve its surface display efficiency for human Arginase1 (ARG1). Our results indicated that the TorA signal peptide increased the surface translocation of non-protein fused InaK-N and human ARG1 fused InaK-N (InaK-N/ARG1) by 80.7% and 122.4%, respectively. Comparably, the MalE signal peptide decreased the display efficiencies of both the non-protein fused InaK-N and InaK-N/ARG1. Our results also suggested that the 6×Lys polypeptide significantly increased the surface display efficiency of K6-InaK-N/ARG1 by almost 2-fold, while also practically abolishing the surface translocation of non-protein fused InaK-N, indicating the interesting roles of charged polypeptides in bacteria surface display systems. Cell surface-immobilized K6-InaK-N/ARG1 presented an arginase activity of 10.7 U/OD600 under the optimized conditions of 40°C, pH 10.0 and 1 mM Mn2+, which could convert more than 95% of L-Arginine (L-Arg) to L-Ornithine (L-Orn) in 16 hours. The engineered InaK-Ns expanded the INP surface display system, which aided in the surface immobilization of human ARG1 in E. coli cells. PMID:27479442

  12. Flocculation of Escherichia coli Cells in Association with Enhanced Production of Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh Hong; Yajima, Reiki; Taya, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Microbial flocculation is a phenomenon of aggregation of dispersed bacterial cells in the form of flocs or flakes. In this study, the mechanism of spontaneous flocculation of Escherichia coli cells by overexpression of the bcsB gene was investigated. The flocculation induced by overexpression of bcsB was consistent among the various E. coli strains examined, including the K-12, B, and O strains, with flocs that resembled paper scraps in structure being about 1 to 2 mm. The distribution of green fluorescent protein-labeled E. coli cells within the floc structure was investigated by three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy. Flocs were sensitive to proteinase K, indicating that the main component of the flocs was proteinous. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analyses of the flocs strongly suggested the involvement of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in E. coli flocculation. The involvement of OMVs in flocculation was supported by transmission electron microscopy observation of flocs. Furthermore, bcsB-induced E. coli flocculation was greatly suppressed in strains with hypovesiculation phenotypes (ΔdsbA and ΔdsbB strains). Thus, our results demonstrate the strong correlation between spontaneous flocculation and enhanced OMV production of E. coli cells. PMID:26092467

  13. Flocculation of Escherichia coli Cells in Association with Enhanced Production of Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Yoshihiro; Nguyen, Minh Hong; Yajima, Reiki; Taya, Masahito

    2015-09-01

    Microbial flocculation is a phenomenon of aggregation of dispersed bacterial cells in the form of flocs or flakes. In this study, the mechanism of spontaneous flocculation of Escherichia coli cells by overexpression of the bcsB gene was investigated. The flocculation induced by overexpression of bcsB was consistent among the various E. coli strains examined, including the K-12, B, and O strains, with flocs that resembled paper scraps in structure being about 1 to 2 mm. The distribution of green fluorescent protein-labeled E. coli cells within the floc structure was investigated by three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy. Flocs were sensitive to proteinase K, indicating that the main component of the flocs was proteinous. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analyses of the flocs strongly suggested the involvement of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in E. coli flocculation. The involvement of OMVs in flocculation was supported by transmission electron microscopy observation of flocs. Furthermore, bcsB-induced E. coli flocculation was greatly suppressed in strains with hypovesiculation phenotypes (ΔdsbA and ΔdsbB strains). Thus, our results demonstrate the strong correlation between spontaneous flocculation and enhanced OMV production of E. coli cells. PMID:26092467

  14. Autolysis of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis cells in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacena, M. A.; Smith, E. E.; Todd, P.

    1999-01-01

    The role of gravity in the autolysis of Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli was studied by growing cells on Earth and in microgravity on Space Station Mir. Autolysis analysis was completed by examining the death phase or exponential decay of cells for approximately 4 months following the stationary phase. Consistent with published findings, the stationary-phase cell population was 170% and 90% higher in flight B. subtilis and E. coli cultures, respectively, than in ground cultures. Although both flight autolysis curves began at higher cell densities than control curves, the rate of autolysis in flight cultures was identical to that of their respective ground control rates.

  15. Detection of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli with Formalin-Preserved HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miqdady, Mohamad S.; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Nataro, James P.; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2002-01-01

    Formalin-stored HEp-2 cells were used to assay Escherichia coli for adherence. Cells refrigerated in formalin for up to 28 days and used in a wet assay format demonstrated an assay sensitivity ranging from 94 to 98% to detect enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC). HEp-2 cells first fixed and stored with formalin and then stored dry in ambient conditions for 6 weeks demonstrated an assay sensitivity of 92% to detect EAEC. Using formalin-fixed HEp-2 cells will improve the efficiency of EAEC identification. PMID:12149382

  16. The CsgA and Lpp proteins affect motility and cell invasion in a strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain ATCC 43895, a guanine to thymine transversion in the csgD promoter created strain 43895OR. Strain 43895OR produces an abundant extracellular matrix rich in curli fibers, forms biofilm on solid surfaces, invades cultured epithelial cells, and is more virulent in a m...

  17. The CsgA and Lpp proteins affect HEp-2 cell invasion, motility, and biofilm formation in a strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain ATCC 43895, a guanine to thymine transversion in the csgD promoter created strain 43895OR. Strain 43895OR produces an abundant extracellular matrix rich in curli fibers, forms biofilm on solid surfaces, invades cultured epithelial cells, and is more virulent in mic...

  18. Fast detection and quantification of Escherichia coli using the base principle of the microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taegyu; Han, Jong-In

    2013-11-30

    Escherichia coli is an important microbial indicator of fecal contamination, making accurate quantitative detection of E. coli a key to ensuring public health. In this study, a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was used as a detection unit of an E. coli sensor, and specific enzymes expressed in E. coli, such as β-D-galactosidase (GAL) and β-D-glucuronidase (GUS), were exploited as biological detection elements. As substrates, 4-aminophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (4-APGal) were used for GAL detection, whereas 8-hydroxyquinoline glucuronide (8-HQG) and 4-nitrophenyl β-D-glucuronide (PNPG) were used for GUS detection. Once these substrates were hydrolyzed by GAL or GUS, they became electrochemically active products, which were, in turn, oxidized on the anode of the MFC reactor. The power output of the MFC reactor increased sharply when E. coli in the reactor reached the critical concentration. Accordingly, the time required to reach the highest voltage output was recorded as a detection time (DT), and a negative linear relationship was established between DT and the logarithm of the initial concentration of E. coli in the samples studied. The DTs of laboratory samples were 140 min and 560 min for initial concentrations of 1.9 × 10(7) CFU/mL and 42 CFU/mL at 44.5 °C. Moreover, the DTs for GUS assays were further shortened by induction with methyl β-D-glucuronide sodium salt (MetGlu). The quantitative relationship between DTs and initial E. coli concentrations established from replicate laboratory sample assays allowed estimation of the E. coli concentration in environmental samples, but with approximately 100 min of lag time. The lag time was also observed with E. coli samples that were prepared by starving cells in a laboratory. PMID:24095789

  19. Adhesion of E. coli to silver- or copper-coated porous clay ceramic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakub, I.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2012-06-01

    Porous ceramic water filters (CWFs), produced by sintering a mixture of clay and a combustible material (such as woodchips), are often used in point-of-use water filtration systems that occlude microbes by size exclusion. They are also coated with colloidal silver, which serves as a microbial disinfectant. However, the adhesion of microbes to porous clay surfaces and colloidal silver coated clay surfaces has not been studied. This paper presents the results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of the adhesion force between Escherichia coli bacteria, colloidal silver, and porous clay-based ceramic surfaces. The adhesion of silver and copper nanoparticles is also studied in control experiments on these alternative disinfectant materials. The adhesive force between the wide range of possible bi-materials was measured using pull-off measurements during force microscopy. These were combined with measurements of AFM tip radii/substrate roughness that were incorporated into adhesion models to obtain the adhesion energies for the pair wise interaction. Of the three antimicrobial metals studied, the colloidal silver had the highest affinity for porous ceramic surface (125 ± 32 nN and ˜0.29 J/m2) while the silver nanoparticles had the highest affinity for E. coli bacteria (133 ± 21 nN and ˜0.39 J/m2). The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of ceramic water filter that can purify water by adsorption and size exclusion.

  20. Thermal inactivation of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli cells within veal cordon bleu

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the fate of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) within mechanically tenderized veal cordon bleu steaks following cooking on a flat-surface, non-stick griddle. Pre-flattened veal cutlets (ca. 75 g; ca. 0.34 cm thick) were purchased from a local vendor and both faces were surfac...

  1. A rapid detection method of Escherichia coli by surface enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Feifei; Peng, Yankun; Xu, Tianfeng

    2015-05-01

    Conventional microbiological detection and enumeration methods are time-consuming, labor-intensive, and giving retrospective information. The objectives of the present work are to study the capability of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to detect Escherichia coli (E. coli) using the presented silver colloidal substrate. The obtained results showed that the adaptive iteratively reweighed Penalized Least Squares (airPLS) algorithm could effectively remove the fluorescent background from original Raman spectra, and Raman characteristic peaks of 558, 682, 726, 1128, 1210 and 1328 cm-1 could be observed stably in the baseline corrected SERS spectra of all studied bacterial concentrations. The detection limit of SERS could be determined to be as low as 0.73 log CFU/ml for E. coli with the prepared silver colloidal substrate. The quantitative prediction results using the intensity values of characteristic peaks were not good, with the correlation coefficients of calibration set and cross validation set of 0.99 and 0.64, respectively.

  2. Comparative Study of Various E. coli Strains for Biohydrogen Production Applying Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Bakonyi, Péter; Nemestóthy, Nándor; Bélafi-Bakó, Katalin

    2012-01-01

    The proper strategy to establish efficient hydrogen-producing biosystems is the biochemical, physiological characterization of hydrogen-producing microbes followed by metabolic engineering in order to give extraordinary properties to the strains and, finally, bioprocess optimization to realize enhanced hydrogen fermentation capability. In present paper, it was aimed to show the utility both of strain engineering and process optimization through a comparative study of wild-type and genetically modified E. coli strains, where the effect of two major operational factors (substrate concentration and pH) on bioH2 production was investigated by experimental design and response surface methodology (RSM) was used to determine the suitable conditions in order to obtain maximum yields. The results revealed that by employing the genetically engineered E. coli (DJT 135) strain under optimized conditions (pH: 6.5; Formate conc.: 1.25 g/L), 0.63 mol H2/mol formate could be attained, which was 1.5 times higher compared to the wild-type E. coli (XL1-BLUE) that produced 0.42 mol H2/mol formate (pH: 6.4; Formate conc.: 1.3 g/L). PMID:22666156

  3. Enhanced detection sensitivity of Escherichia coli O157:H7 using surface-modified gold nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Mohankandhasamy; Yi, Dong Kee; An, Seong Soo A

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) is a Gram negative and highly virulent bacteria found in food and water sources, and is a leading cause of chronic diseases worldwide. Diagnosis and prevention from the infection require simple and rapid analysis methods for the detection of pathogens, including O157. Endogenous membrane peroxidase, an enzyme present on the surface of O157, was used for the colorimetric detection of bacteria by catalytic oxidation of the peroxidase substrate. In this study, we have analyzed the impact of the synthesized bare gold nanorods (AuNRs) and silica-coated AuNRs on the growth of E. coli O157. Along with the membrane peroxidase activity of O157, other bacteria strains were analyzed. Different concentrations of nanorods were used to analyze the growth responses, enzymatic changes, and morphological alterations of bacteria by measuring optical density, 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine assay, flow cytometry analysis, and microscopy studies. The results revealed that O157 showed higher and continuous membrane peroxidase activity than other bacteria. Furthermore, O157 treated with bare AuNRs showed a decreased growth rate in comparison with the bacteria with surface modified AuNRs. Interestingly, silica-coated AuNRs favored the growth of bacteria and also increased membrane peroxidase activity. This result can be particularly important for the enzymatic analysis of surface treated AuNRs in various microbiological applicants. PMID:26347081

  4. Enhanced detection sensitivity of Escherichia coli O157:H7 using surface-modified gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Mohankandhasamy; Yi, Dong Kee; An, Seong Soo A

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) is a Gram negative and highly virulent bacteria found in food and water sources, and is a leading cause of chronic diseases worldwide. Diagnosis and prevention from the infection require simple and rapid analysis methods for the detection of pathogens, including O157. Endogenous membrane peroxidase, an enzyme present on the surface of O157, was used for the colorimetric detection of bacteria by catalytic oxidation of the peroxidase substrate. In this study, we have analyzed the impact of the synthesized bare gold nanorods (AuNRs) and silica-coated AuNRs on the growth of E. coli O157. Along with the membrane peroxidase activity of O157, other bacteria strains were analyzed. Different concentrations of nanorods were used to analyze the growth responses, enzymatic changes, and morphological alterations of bacteria by measuring optical density, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine assay, flow cytometry analysis, and microscopy studies. The results revealed that O157 showed higher and continuous membrane peroxidase activity than other bacteria. Furthermore, O157 treated with bare AuNRs showed a decreased growth rate in comparison with the bacteria with surface modified AuNRs. Interestingly, silica-coated AuNRs favored the growth of bacteria and also increased membrane peroxidase activity. This result can be particularly important for the enzymatic analysis of surface treated AuNRs in various microbiological applicants. PMID:26347081

  5. Multidrug-Resistant and Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Dutch Surface Water and Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Blaak, Hetty; Lynch, Gretta; Italiaander, Ronald; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A.; Schets, Franciska M.; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of the current study was to gain insight into the prevalence and concentrations of antimicrobial resistant (AMR) Escherichia coli in Dutch surface water, and to explore the role of wastewater as AMR contamination source. Methods The prevalence of AMR E. coli was determined in 113 surface water samples obtained from 30 different water bodies, and in 33 wastewater samples obtained at five health care institutions (HCIs), seven municipal wastewater treatment plants (mWWTPs), and an airport WWTP. Overall, 846 surface water and 313 wastewater E. coli isolates were analysed with respect to susceptibility to eight antimicrobials (representing seven different classes): ampicillin, cefotaxime, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and chloramphenicol. Results Among surface water isolates, 26% were resistant to at least one class of antimicrobials, and 11% were multidrug-resistant (MDR). In wastewater, the proportions of AMR/MDR E. coli were 76%/62% at HCIs, 69%/19% at the airport WWTP, and 37%/27% and 31%/20% in mWWTP influents and effluents, respectively. Median concentrations of MDR E. coli were 2.2×102, 4.0×104, 1.8×107, and 4.1×107 cfu/l in surface water, WWTP effluents, WWTP influents and HCI wastewater, respectively. The different resistance types occurred with similar frequencies among E. coli from surface water and E. coli from municipal wastewater. By contrast, among E. coli from HCI wastewater, resistance to cefotaxime and resistance to ciprofloxacin were significantly overrepresented compared to E. coli from municipal wastewater and surface water. Most cefotaxime-resistant E. coliisolates produced ESBL. In two of the mWWTP, ESBL-producing variants were detected that were identical with respect to phylogenetic group, sequence type, AMR-profile, and ESBL-genotype to variants from HCI wastewater discharged onto the same sewer and sampled on the same day (A1/ST23/CTX-M-1, B23/ST131/CTX-M-15, D2/ST405/CTX

  6. Mechanical damage to Escherichia coli cells in a model of amino-acid crystal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Okutani, Satoshi; Iwai, Takayoshi; Iwatani, Shintaro; Kondo, Kazuya; Osumi, Tsuyoshi; Tsujimoto, Nobuharu; Matsuno, Kiyoshi

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the mechanical damage to the Escherichia coli cell caused by polyvinyl chloride particles as a model of amino-acid crystal fermentation. Our results indicated that the glucose-consumption rate and the intracellular ATP concentration temporarily increased by the mechanical damage, and decreased after considerable damage had occurred on cell membrane. PMID:22153714

  7. Enhancement of invasiveness of Yersinia enterocolitica and Escherichia coli in HEp-2 cells by centrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Vesikari, T; Bromirska, J; Mäki, M

    1982-01-01

    Centrifugation enhanced the infectivity of invasive Escherichia coli and Yersinia enterocolitica for HEp-2 cells. Noninvasive bacteria were not endocytosed after centrifugation. The centrifugation procedure may increase the sensitivity of testing for bacterial invasiveness in cell culture without causing false-positive results. PMID:7044978

  8. Inhibition of experimental ascending urinary tract infection by an epithelial cell-surface receptor analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edén, C. Svanborg; Freter, R.; Hagberg, L.; Hull, R.; Hull, S.; Leffler, H.; Schoolnik, G.

    1982-08-01

    It has been shown that the establishment of urinary tract infection by Escherichia coli is dependent on attachment of the bacteria to epithelial cells1-4. The attachment involves specific epithelial cell receptors, which have been characterized as glycolipids5-10. Reversible binding to cell-surface mannosides may also be important4,11-13. This suggests an approach to the treatment of infections-that of blocking bacterial attachment with cell membrane receptor analogues. Using E. coli mutants lacking one or other of the two binding specificities (glycolipid and mannose), we show here that glycolipid analogues can block in vitro adhesion and in vivo urinary tract infection.

  9. Adherence to abiotic surface induces SOS response in Escherichia coli K-12 strains under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Costa, Suelen B; Campos, Ana Carolina C; Pereira, Ana Claudia M; de Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza; Júnior, Raphael Hirata; Rosa, Ana Cláudia P; Asad, Lídia M B O

    2014-09-01

    During the colonization of surfaces, Escherichia coli bacteria often encounter DNA-damaging agents and these agents can induce several defence mechanisms. Base excision repair (BER) is dedicated to the repair of oxidative DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chemical and physical agents or by metabolism. In this work, we have evaluated whether the interaction with an abiotic surface by mutants derived from E. coli K-12 deficient in some enzymes that are part of BER causes DNA damage and associated filamentation. Moreover, we studied the role of endonuclease V (nfi gene; 1506 mutant strain) in biofilm formation. Endonuclease V is an enzyme that is involved in DNA repair of nitrosative lesions. We verified that endonuclease V is involved in biofilm formation. Our results showed more filamentation in the xthA mutant (BW9091) and triple xthA nfo nth mutant (BW535) than in the wild-type strain (AB1157). By contrast, the mutant nfi did not present filamentation in biofilm, although its wild-type strain (1466) showed rare filaments in biofilm. The filamentation of bacterial cells attaching to a surface was a consequence of SOS induction measured by the SOS chromotest. However, biofilm formation depended on the ability of the bacteria to induce the SOS response since the mutant lexA Ind(-) did not induce the SOS response and did not form any biofilm. Oxygen tension was an important factor for the interaction of the BER mutants, since these mutants exhibited decreased quantitative adherence under anaerobic conditions. However, our results showed that the presence or absence of oxygen did not affect the viability of BW9091 and BW535 strains. The nfi mutant and its wild-type did not exhibit decreased biofilm formation under anaerobic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy was also performed on the E. coli K-12 strains that had adhered to the glass, and we observed the presence of a structure similar to an extracellular matrix that depended on the

  10. E. coli fate and transport in the Happel sphere-in-cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, K. E.; Massoudieh, A.; Ginn, T. R.

    2007-06-01

    Rates of mass and gene transfer reactions involving biotic phases are often expressed as proportional to local number densities of bacteria. When the reactions involve attached bacteria, reaction rates depend on local densities of bacteria attached to surfaces. Such may be the case with microbially-facilitated redox reactions involving mineral electron donors and mineral electron receivers (e.g., Sani RK, Peyton BM, Amonette JE, Dohnalkova A. Reoxidation of uranium in the presence of iron(III)-(hydr)oxides under sulfate reducing conditions. Environ Sci Technol 2005;39:2059-66), biofilm formation induced by quorum sensing (Purevdorj B, Costerton JW, Stoodley P. Influence of hydrodynamics and cell signaling on the structure and behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms. Appl Environ Microbiol 2002;68(9):4457-64) and horizontal gene transfer among attached phase bacteria (Beaudoin DL, Bryers JD, Cunningham AB, Peretti SW. Mobilization of broad host range plasmid from Pseudomonas putida to established biofilm of Bacillus azotoformans. I. Experiments. Biotech Bioeng 1998a;57(3):272-79; Beaudoin DL, Bryers JD, Cunningham AB, Peretti SW. Mobilization of broad host range plasmid from Pseudomonas putida to established biofilm of Bacillus azotoformans. II. Modeling Biotech Bioeng 1998b;57(3):280-86). Here we use the conceptual Happel sphere-in-cell model to determine the microscopic distribution of attached bacteria on idealized spherical grains of porous media, assuming azimuthal symmetry. We extend a Lagrangian model of colloid filtration to investigate the effects of motility of Escherichia coli on attachment rate and on the attachment distribution as a function of location on grain surface. The hydrodynamics of the Happel model is implicitly 3D and represented in 2D polar coordinates under the assumption of axisymmetric flow, while the motility of the E. coli cells is explicitly 3D. The model incorporates the fate and transport processes of colloid filtration theory in

  11. Engineering Escherichia coli Cell Factories for n-Butanol Production.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongjun; Zhao, Chunhua; Zhang, Tianrui; Lin, Zhao; Li, Yin; Zhang, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    The production of n-butanol, as a widely applied solvent and potential fuel, is attracting much attention. The fermentative production of butanol coupled with the production of acetone and ethanol by Clostridium (ABE fermentation) was once one of the oldest biotechnological processes, ranking second in scale behind ethanol fermentation. However, there remain problems with butanol production by Clostridium, especially the difficulty in genetically manipulating clostridial strains. In recent years, many efforts have been made to produce butanol using non-native strains. Until now, the most advanced effort was the engineering of the user-friendly and widely studied Escherichia coli for butanol production. This paper reviews the current progress and problems relating to butanol production by engineered E. coli in terms of prediction using mathematical models, pathway construction, novel enzyme replacement, butanol toxicity, and tolerance engineering strategies. PMID:25662903

  12. Construction of Escherichia Coli Cell Factories for Production of Organic Acids and Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingping; Zhu, Xinna; Tan, Zaigao; Zhang, Xueli; Ma, Yanhe

    2016-01-01

    Production of bulk chemicals from renewable biomass has been proved to be sustainable and environmentally friendly. Escherichia coli is the most commonly used host strain for constructing cell factories for production of bulk chemicals since it has clear physiological and genetic characteristics, grows fast in minimal salts medium, uses a wide range of substrates, and can be genetically modified easily. With the development of metabolic engineering, systems biology, and synthetic biology, a technology platform has been established to construct E. coli cell factories for bulk chemicals production. In this chapter, we will introduce this technology platform, as well as E. coli cell factories successfully constructed for production of organic acids and alcohols. PMID:25577396

  13. Effect of surface characteristics on retention and removal of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on surfaces of spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The topography and the spatial heterogeneity of produce surfaces may impact the attachment of microbial cells onto produce surfaces and affect disinfection efficacy. In this study, the effects of produce surface characteristics on the removal of bacteria were studied. Fresh spinach leaves were sp...

  14. Integration of AI-2 Based Cell-Cell Signaling with Metabolic Cues in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Arindam; Herren, Christopher D.; Patel, Isha R.; Coleman, Adam; Mukhopadhyay, Suman

    2016-01-01

    The quorum sensing molecule Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is generated as a byproduct of activated methyl cycle by the action of LuxS in Escherichia coli. AI-2 is synthesized, released and later internalized in a cell-density dependent manner. Here, by mutational analysis of the genes, uvrY and csrA, we describe a regulatory circuit of accumulation and uptake of AI-2. We constructed a single-copy chromosomal luxS-lacZ fusion in a luxS + merodiploid strain and evaluated its relative expression in uvrY and csrA mutants. At the entry of stationary phase, the expression of the fusion and AI-2 accumulation was positively regulated by uvrY and negatively regulated by csrA respectively. A deletion of csrA altered message stability of the luxS transcript and CsrA protein exhibited weak binding to 5’ luxS regulatory region. DNA protein interaction and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed direct interaction of UvrY with the luxS promoter. Additionally, reduced expression of the fusion in hfq deletion mutant suggested involvement of small RNA interactions in luxS regulation. In contrast, the expression of lsrA operon involved in AI-2 uptake, is negatively regulated by uvrY and positively by csrA in a cell-density dependent manner. The dual role of csrA in AI-2 synthesis and uptake suggested a regulatory crosstalk of cell signaling with carbon regulation in Escherichia coli. We found that the cAMP-CRP mediated catabolite repression of luxS expression was uvrY dependent. This study suggests that luxS expression is complex and regulated at the level of transcription and translation. The multifactorial regulation supports the notion that cell-cell communication requires interaction and integration of multiple metabolic signals. PMID:27362507

  15. Attachment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to the Surfaces and Internal Structures of Apples as Detected by Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Scott L.; Chen, Jinru; Beuchat, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) was used to demonstrate the attachment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 transformed with a plasmid encoding for green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the surface and within the internal structures of nonwaxed Red Delicious cv. apples. Apples at 2 or 25°C were inoculated with an E. coli O157:H7 cell suspension at 2 or 25°C. The effect of a negative temperature differential (cold inoculum, warm apple), a positive differential (warm inoculum, cold apple), and no differential (warm inoculum, warm apple), in combination with a pressure differential (atmospheric versus 10,130 Pa), on the attachment and infiltration of cells was determined. CSLM stereo images of external surfaces of apples subjected to all combinations of test parameters showed preferential cellular attachment to discontinuities in the waxy cuticle on the surface and to damaged tissue surrounding puncture wounds, where the pathogen was observed at depths up to 70 μm below the skin surface. Attachment to lenticels was sporadic but was occasionally observed at depths of up to 40 μm. Infiltration through the floral tube and attachment to seeds, cartilaginous pericarp, and internal trichomes were observed in all apples examined, regardless of temperature differential during inoculation. The pressure differential had no effect on infiltration or attachment of E. coli O157:H7. Image analysis to count cells at various depths within tissues was used to quantitatively compare the extent of infiltration into various apple structures as well as the effects of the temperature differential. Puncture wounds harbored greater numbers of the pathogen at greater depths than did other sites examined. Attachment or infiltration of cells was greater on the intact skin and in lenticels, russet areas, and the floral tube of apples inoculated under a negative temperature differential compared to those inoculated under no temperature differential. The results suggest that E. coli O157:H7

  16. Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor Type 1 of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Kills Cultured Human Uroepithelial 5637 Cells by an Apoptotic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Melody; Meysick, Karen C.; O'Brien, Alison D.

    2000-01-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli associated with urinary tract infections (UTIs) in otherwise healthy individuals frequently produce cytotoxic necrotizing factor type 1 (CNF1), a member of the family of bacterial toxins that target the Rho family of small GTP-binding proteins. To gain insight into the function of CNF1 in the development of E. coli-mediated UTIs, we examined the effects of CNF1 intoxication on a panel of human cell lines derived from physiologically relevant sites (bladder, ureters, and kidneys). We identified one uroepithelial cell line that exhibited a distinctly different CNF1 intoxication phenotype from the prototypic one of multinucleation without cell death that is seen when HEp-2 or other epithelial cells are treated with CNF1. The 5637 bladder cell line detached from the growth surface within 72 h of CNF1 intoxication, a finding that suggested frank cytotoxicity. To determine the basis for the unexpected toxic effect of CNF1 on 5637 cells, we compared the degree of toxin binding, actin fiber formation, and Rho modification with those CNF1-induced events in HEp-2 cells. We found no apparent difference in the amount of CNF1 bound to 5637 cells and HEp-2 cells. Moreover, CNF1 modified Rho, in vivo and in vitro, in both cell types. In contrast, one of the classic responses to CNF1 in HEp-2 and other epithelial cell lines, the formation of actin stress fibers, was markedly absent in 5637 cells. Indeed, actin stress fiber induction by CNF1 did not occur in any of the other human bladder cell lines that we tested (J82, SV-HUC-1, or T24). Furthermore, the appearance of lamellipodia and filopodia in 5637 cells suggested that CNF1 activated the Cdc42 and Rac proteins. Finally, apoptosis was observed in CNF1-intoxicated 5637 cells. If our results with 5637 cells reflect the interaction of CNF1 with the transitional uroepithelium in the human bladder, then CNF1 may be involved in the exfoliative process that occurs in that organ after infection with

  17. Human MAIT-cell responses to Escherichia coli: activation, cytokine production, proliferation, and cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Joana; Sobkowiak, Michał J.; Sandberg, Johan K.; Leeansyah, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T cells are a large and relatively recently described innate-like antimicrobial T-cell subset in humans. These cells recognize riboflavin metabolites from a range of microbes presented by evolutionarily conserved major histocompatibility complex, class I-related molecules. Given the innate-like characteristics of mucosa-associated invariant T cells and the novel type of antigens they recognize, new methodology must be developed and existing methods refined to allow comprehensive studies of their role in human immune defense against microbial infection. In this study, we established protocols to examine a range of mucosa-associated invariant T-cell functions as they respond to antigen produced by Escherichia coli. These improved and dose- and time-optimized experimental protocols allow detailed studies of MR1-dependent mucosa-associated invariant T-cell responses to Escherichia coli pulsed antigen-presenting cells, as assessed by expression of activation markers and cytokines, by proliferation, and by induction of apoptosis and death in major histocompatibility complex, class I-related–expressing target cells. The novel and optimized protocols establish a framework of methods and open new possibilities to study mucosa-associated invariant T-cell immunobiology, using Escherichia coli as a model antigen. Furthermore, we propose that these robust experimental systems can also be adapted to study mucosa-associated invariant T-cell responses to other microbes and types of antigen-presenting cells. PMID:27034405

  18. Assessment of the effects of holding time and temperature on Escherichia coli densities in surface water samples.

    PubMed

    Pope, Misty L; Bussen, Michelle; Feige, Mary Ann; Shadix, Lois; Gonder, Sharon; Rodgers, Crystal; Chambers, Yildiz; Pulz, Jessica; Miller, Ken; Connell, Kevin; Standridge, Jon

    2003-10-01

    Escherichia coli is a routinely used microbiological indicator of water quality. To determine whether holding time and storage conditions had an effect on E. coli densities in surface water, studies were conducted in three phases, encompassing 24 sites across the United States and four commonly used monitoring methods. During all three phases of the study, E. coli samples were analyzed at time 0 and at 8, 24, 30, and 48 h after sample collection. During phase 1, when 4 degrees C samples were evaluated by Colilert or by placing a membrane onto mFC medium followed by transfer to nutrient agar containing 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide (mFC/NA-MUG), three of four sites showed no significant differences throughout the 48-h study. During phase 2, five of seven sites showed no significant difference between time 0 and 24 h by membrane filtration (mFC/NA-MUG). When evaluated by the Colilert method, five of seven sites showed no significant difference in E. coli density between time 0 and 48 h. During phase 3, 8 of 13 sites showed no significant differences in E. coli densities between time 0 and the 48-h holding time, regardless of method. Based on the results of these studies, it appears that if samples are held below 10 degrees C and are not allowed to freeze, most surface water E. coli samples analyzed by commonly used methods beyond 8 h after sample collection can generate E. coli data comparable to those generated within 8 h of sample collection. Notwithstanding this conclusion, E. coli samples collected from surface waters should always be analyzed as soon as possible. PMID:14532081

  19. Assessment of the Effects of Holding Time and Temperature on Escherichia coli Densities in Surface Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Misty L.; Bussen, Michelle; Feige, Mary Ann; Shadix, Lois; Gonder, Sharon; Rodgers, Crystal; Chambers, Yildiz; Pulz, Jessica; Miller, Ken; Connell, Kevin; Standridge, Jon

    2003-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a routinely used microbiological indicator of water quality. To determine whether holding time and storage conditions had an effect on E. coli densities in surface water, studies were conducted in three phases, encompassing 24 sites across the United States and four commonly used monitoring methods. During all three phases of the study, E. coli samples were analyzed at time 0 and at 8, 24, 30, and 48 h after sample collection. During phase 1, when 4°C samples were evaluated by Colilert or by placing a membrane onto mFC medium followed by transfer to nutrient agar containing 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide (mFC/NA-MUG), three of four sites showed no significant differences throughout the 48-h study. During phase 2, five of seven sites showed no significant difference between time 0 and 24 h by membrane filtration (mFC/NA-MUG). When evaluated by the Colilert method, five of seven sites showed no significant difference in E. coli density between time 0 and 48 h. During phase 3, 8 of 13 sites showed no significant differences in E. coli densities between time 0 and the 48-h holding time, regardless of method. Based on the results of these studies, it appears that if samples are held below 10°C and are not allowed to freeze, most surface water E. coli samples analyzed by commonly used methods beyond 8 h after sample collection can generate E. coli data comparable to those generated within 8 h of sample collection. Notwithstanding this conclusion, E. coli samples collected from surface waters should always be analyzed as soon as possible. PMID:14532081

  20. Domain swapping oligomerization of thermostable c-type cytochrome in E. coli cells

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yugo; Yamanaka, Masaru; Nagao, Satoshi; Komori, Hirofumi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge on domain swapping in vitro is increasing, but domain swapping may not occur regularly in vivo, and its information in cells is limited. Herein, we show that domain-swapped oligomers of a thermostable c-type cytochrome, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cyt c552, are formed in E. coli which expresses cyt c552. The region containing the N-terminal α-helix and heme was domain-swapped between protomers in the dimer formed in E. coli. The amount of cyt c552 oligomers increased in E. coli as the cyt c552 concentration was increased, whereas that of high-order oligomers decreased in the order of decrease in protein stability, indicating that domain swapping decreases in cells when the protein stability decreases. Apo cyt c552 was detected in the cyt c552 oligomer formed in E. coli, but not in that of the A5F/M11V/Y32F/Y41E/I76V mutant. The cyt c552 oligomer containing its apo protein may form at the periplasm, since the apo protein detected by mass measurements did not contain the signal peptide. These results show that domain-swapped cyt c552 oligomers were formed in E. coli, owing to the stability of the transient oligomer containing the apo protein before heme attachment. This is an indication that exceedingly stable proteins may have disadvantages forming domain-swapped oligomers in cells. PMID:26838805

  1. Membrane-based electrochemical nanobiosensor for Escherichia coli detection and analysis of cells viability.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming Soon; Lau, Suk Hiang; Chow, Vincent T; Toh, Chee-Seng

    2011-08-01

    A sensitive and selective membrane-based electrochemical nanobiosensor is developed for specific quantitative label-free detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells and analysis of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) E. coli cells which remain mostly undetected using current methods. The sensing mechanism relies on the blocking of nanochannels of a nanoporous alumina-membrane modified electrode, upon the formation of immune complexes at the nanoporous membrane. The resulting obstacle to diffusive mass transfer of a redox probe in the analysis solution to the underlying platinum electrode reduces the Faradaic signal response of the biosensor, measured using cyclic voltammetry. Antibody loading under conditions of varying antibody concentrations and pHs are optimized. The biosensor gives a low detection limit of 22 cfu mL(-1) (R(2) = 0.999) over a wide linear working range of 10 to 10(6) cfu mL(-1). It is specific toward E. coli with minimal cross-reactivity to two other pathogenic bacteria (commonly found in waters). Relative standard deviation (RSD) for triplicate measurements of 2.5% indicates reasonably useful level of reproducibility. Differentiation of live, VBNC, and dead cells are carried out after the cell capture and quantitation step, by simple monitoring of the cells' enzyme activity using the same redox probe in the analysis solution, in the presence of glucose. PMID:21688778

  2. DamX Controls Reversible Cell Morphology Switching in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Khandige, Surabhi; Asferg, Cecilie Antoinette; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Overgaard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to change cell morphology is an advantageous characteristic adopted by multiple pathogenic bacteria in order to evade host immune detection and assault during infection. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) exhibits such cellular dynamics and has been shown to transition through a series of distinct morphological phenotypes during a urinary tract infection. Here, we report the first systematic spatio-temporal gene expression analysis of the UPEC transition through these phenotypes by using a flow chamber-based in vitro infection model that simulates conditions in the bladder. This analysis revealed a novel association between the cell division gene damX and reversible UPEC filamentation. We demonstrate a lack of reversible bacterial filamentation in a damX deletion mutant in vitro and absence of a filamentous response by this mutant in a murine model of cystitis. While deletion of damX abrogated UPEC filamentation and secondary surface colonization in tissue culture and in mouse infections, transient overexpression of damX resulted in reversible UPEC filamentation. In this study, we identify a hitherto-unknown damX-mediated mechanism underlying UPEC morphotypical switching. Murine infection studies showed that DamX is essential for establishment of a robust urinary tract infection, thus emphasizing its role as a mediator of virulence. Our study demonstrates the value of an in vitro methodology, in which uroepithelium infection is closely simulated, when undertaking targeted investigations that are challenging to perform in animal infection models. PMID:27486187

  3. Genetically engineered Escherichia coli FBR5: Part I. Comparison of high cell density bioreactors for enhanced ethanol production from xylose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five reactor systems (free cell batch, free cell continuous, entrapped cell immobilized, adsorbed cell packed bed, and cell recycle membrane reactors) were compared for ethanol production from xylose employing Escherichia coli FBR5. In the free cell batch and free cell continuous reactors (continuo...

  4. Surface water disinfection by chlorination and advanced oxidation processes: Inactivation of an antibiotic resistant E. coli strain and cytotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Andreza Costa; Lepretti, Marilena; Rizzo, Luigi; Caputo, Ivana; Vaiano, Vincenzo; Sacco, Olga; Lopes, Wilton Silva; Sannino, Diana

    2016-06-01

    The release of antibiotics into the environment can result in antibiotic resistance (AR) spread, which in turn can seriously affect human health. Antibiotic resistant bacteria have been detected in different aquatic environments used as drinking water source. Water disinfection may be a possible solution to minimize AR spread but conventional processes, such as chlorination, result in the formation of dangerous disinfection by-products. In this study advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), namely H2O2/UV, TiO2/UV and N-TiO2/UV, have been compared with chlorination in the inactivation of an AR Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain in surface water. TiO2 P25 and nitrogen doped TiO2 (N-TiO2), prepared by sol-gel method at two different synthesis temperatures (0 and -20°C), were investigated in heterogeneous photocatalysis experiments. Under the investigated conditions, chlorination (1.0mgL(-1)) was the faster process (2.5min) to achieve total inactivation (6 Log). Among AOPs, H2O2/UV resulted in the best inactivation rate: total inactivation (6 Log) was achieved in 45min treatment. Total inactivation was not observed (4.5 Log), also after 120min treatment, only for N-doped TiO2 synthesized at 0°C. Moreover, H2O2/UV and chlorination processes were evaluated in terms of cytotoxicity potential by means of 3-(4,5-dime-thylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenylte-trazolium colorimetric test on a human-derived cell line and they similarly affected HepG2 cells viability. PMID:26945469

  5. Comparative Analysis of UV Irradiation Effects on Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacterial Cells Utilizing Biological and Computational Approaches.

    PubMed

    Margaryan, A; Badalyan, H; Trchounian, A

    2016-09-01

    Microorganisms have a large number of tools to withstand different, and sometimes strong, environmental stresses, including irradiation, but this ability should be further evaluated for certain applications. Growth inhibition and morphological alterations of Escherichia coli M-17 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa GRP3 wild-type cells caused by UV-A irradiation have been detected in the present study. Comparative analysis was carried out using well-established microbiological methods (determination of specific growth rate, growth lag phase duration, and colony-forming unit number-CFU) and computational approaches, employing light microscopy and digital image analysis to evaluate bacterial cell morphology. Decreases in the specific growth rate, prolonged lag-phases, and lowered CFUs were observed after 5 and 10 min of UV irradiation (approx. 40 Gy) compared to the control (nonirradiated) cells. Accordingly, two computational parameters-the average bacterial cell surface area and the bacterial cell perimeter (i.e., of the 2D projection of bacterial cells in microscopy image)-were reduced. The ratio of bacterial cell surface area (S) to the square of the perimeter (p (2) ) was reduced after 5 min of irradiation, but after 10 min of irradiation the studied bacterial cells became flat cylinders. The revealed findings are concluded to be highly useful in developing new, rapid analysis methods to monitor environmental and UV irradiation effects on bacteria and to detect bacterial cell morphology alterations. PMID:27334536

  6. Bacterial Ghosts of Escherichia coli Drive Efficient Maturation of Bovine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hajam, Irshad Ahmed; Dar, Pervaiz Ahmad; Appavoo, Elamurugan; Kishore, Subodh; Bhanuprakash, Veerakyathappa; Ganesh, Kondabattula

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial ghosts (BGs) are empty cell envelopes derived from Gram-negative bacteria. They not only represent a potential platform for development of novel vaccines but also provide a tool for efficient adjuvant and antigen delivery system. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between BGs of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and bovine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). MoDCs are highly potent antigen-presenting cells and have the potential to act as a powerful tool for manipulating the immune system. We generated bovine MoDCs in vitro from blood monocytes using E. coli expressed bovine GM-CSF and IL-4 cytokines. These MoDCs displayed typical morphology and functions similar to DCs. We further investigated the E. coli BGs to induce maturation of bovine MoDCs in comparison to E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We observed the maturation marker molecules such as MHC-II, CD80 and CD86 were induced early and at higher levels in BG stimulated MoDCs as compared to the LPS stimulated MoDCs. BG mediated stimulation induced significantly higher levels of cytokine expression in bovine MoDCs than LPS. Both pro-inflammatory (IL-12 and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines were induced in MoDCs after BGs stimulation. We further analysed the effects of BGs on the bovine MoDCs in an allogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). We found the BG-treated bovine MoDCs had significantly (p<0.05) higher capacity to stimulate allogenic T cell proliferation in MLR as compared to the LPS. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the E. coli BGs induce a strong activation and maturation of bovine MoDCs. PMID:26669936

  7. Inactivation of Escherichia coli Cells in Aqueous Solution by Atmospheric-Pressure N2, He, Air, and O2 Microplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhang, Xianhui; Bi, Zhenhua; Zong, Zichao; Niu, Jinhai; Song, Ying; Yang, Size

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure N2, He, air, and O2 microplasma arrays have been used to inactivate Escherichia coli cells suspended in aqueous solution. Measurements show that the efficiency of inactivation of E. coli cells is strongly dependent on the feed gases used, the plasma treatment time, and the discharge power. Compared to atmospheric-pressure N2 and He microplasma arrays, air and O2 microplasma arrays may be utilized to more efficiently kill E. coli cells in aqueous solution. The efficiencies of inactivation of E. coli cells in water can be well described by using the chemical reaction rate model, where reactive oxygen species play a crucial role in the inactivation process. Analysis indicates that plasma-generated reactive species can react with E. coli cells in water by direct or indirect interactions. PMID:26025895

  8. Isolation of a new human scFv antibody recognizing a cell surface binding site to CEACAM1. Large yield production, purification and characterization in E. coli expression system.

    PubMed

    Moricoli, Diego; Laguardia, Maria Elena; Carbonella, Damiano Cosimo; Balducci, Maria Cristina; Dominici, Sabrina; Fiori, Valentina; Serafini, Giordano; Flego, Michela; Cianfriglia, Maurizio; Magnani, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The CEACAM1 cell adhesion molecule has recently received considerable interest as a tumour target antigen since its re-expression often occurs in the advanced stages of multiple malignancies including malignant melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and other types of solid tumors. In this study, we describe the expression-purification and characterization of the new single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody named DIATHIS1, that recognizes the N-terminal IgV-like domain present in CEACAM1. Three validation batches show that the production process is robust and reproducible. The scFv DIATHIS1 is formulated as a naturally occurring mixture of monomer and dimer. The antibody is biophysically stable at low temperature (-80°C), different concentrations and remains biologically active for at least 24months. The thermal stability of scFv DIATHIS1 at 37°C shows important features for its activity in vivo. The dimer behaves as a reservoir converting slowly into monomer. The monomer and dimer forms of scFv DIATHIS1 were isolated and characterized, showing high reactivity for CEACAM1. This new composition of antibody could have advantageous pharmacokinetics parameters over conventional scFv for in vivo applications. PMID:24184403

  9. Effect of surface roughness on performance of magnetoelastic biosensors for the detection of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Possan, A L; Menti, C; Beltrami, M; Santos, A D; Roesch-Ely, M; Missell, F P

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli are bacteria that must be controlled in the food industry and the hospital sector. Magnetoelastic biosensors offer the promise of rapid identification of these and other harmful antigens. In this work, strips of amorphous Metglas 2826MB3 were cut to size (5 mm × 1 mm) with a microdicing saw and were then coated with thin layers of Cr and Au, as verified by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). Several sensor surfaces were studied: 1) as-cast strip, wheel side; 2) as-cast strip, free surface; and 3) thinned and polished surface. A layer of cystamine was applied to the Au-covered magnetoelastic substrate, forming a self-assembledmonolayer (SAM), followed by antibodies, using a modified Hermanson protocol. The cystamine layer growth was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electronmicroscopy (SEM). The biosensors were exposed to solutions of bacteria and the resonant frequency of the sensors was measured with an impedance analyzer for times up to 100 min. Reductions in the resonant frequency, corresponding to bacteria capture, were measured after optimizing the signal amplitude. For times up to 40 min, high capture rates were observed and thereafter saturation occurred. Saturation values of the frequency shifts were compared with the number of bacteria observed on the sensor using fluorescence microscopy. Parameters associated with capture kinetics were studied for different sensor surfaces. The rough surfaces were found to show a faster response, while the thinned and polished sensors showed the largest frequency shift. PMID:26478342

  10. Integrating artificial with natural cells to translate chemical messages that direct E. coli behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lentini, Roberta; Santero, Silvia Perez; Chizzolini, Fabio; Cecchi, Dario; Fontana, Jason; Marchioretto, Marta; Del Bianco, Cristina; Terrell, Jessica L; Spencer, Amy C; Martini, Laura; Forlin, Michele; Assfalg, Michael; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Bentley, William E; Mansy, Sheref S

    2014-01-01

    Previous efforts to control cellular behaviour have largely relied upon various forms of genetic engineering. Once the genetic content of a living cell is modified, the behaviour of that cell typically changes as well. However, other methods of cellular control are possible. All cells sense and respond to their environment. Therefore, artificial, non-living cellular mimics could be engineered to activate or repress already existing natural sensory pathways of living cells through chemical communication. Here we describe the construction of such a system. The artificial cells expand the senses of Escherichia coli by translating a chemical message that E. coli cannot sense on its own to a molecule that activates a natural cellular response. This methodology could open new opportunities in engineering cellular behaviour without exploiting genetically modified organisms. PMID:24874202

  11. Optimization of a single-chain antibody fragment overexpression in Escherichia coli using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Akbari, V; Sadeghi, H Mir Mohammad; Jafarian-Dehkordi, A; Chou, C Perry; Abedi, D

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family plays an important role in various types of cancers. As a result, antibodies against HER and the mechanism of antigen-antibody binding action are under active investigation. We previously constructed a single-chain variable fragment (ScFv) against HER2, i.e. anti-Her2 ScFv, for expressing in the Escherichia coli. In the present study, we report the optimization of anti-Her2 ScFv expression in an E. coli host of BL21 (DE3) pLysS using response surface methodology based on tuning of three cultivation variables, including isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) concentration, temperature and post-induction time. A model for protein expression according to the Box-Behnken design predicted a maximal anti-Her2 ScFv expression at 37 °C, a post-induction time of 10.45 h and 0.75 mM IPTG. In addition, strategies based on inclusion body isolation and affinity chromatography were applied to purify anti-Her2 ScFv. The purity of the final product for inclusion bodies isolation and purification by Ni-NTA resin were 70 % and 95 %, respectively. The solubilization of the inclusion bodies was carried out using two denaturant agents, guanidine hydrochloride and urea. The present study showed that guanidine hydrochloride was more effective than urea in solubilizing the inclusion bodies. PMID:26430460

  12. Problem-Solving Test: RNA and Protein Synthesis in Bacteriophage-Infected "E. coli" Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    The classic experiment presented in this problem-solving test was designed to identify the template molecules of translation by analyzing the synthesis of phage proteins in "Escherichia coli" cells infected with bacteriophage T4. The work described in this test led to one of the most seminal discoveries of early molecular biology: it dealt a…

  13. Influenza A Virus Infection of Intestinal Epithelial Cells Enhances the Adhesion Ability of Crohn’s Disease Associated Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Aleandri, Marta; Conte, Maria Pia; Simonetti, Giovanna; Panella, Simona; Celestino, Ignacio; Checconi, Paola; Marazzato, Massimiliano; Longhi, Catia; Goldoni, Paola; Nicoletti, Mauro; Barnich, Nicolas; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Schippa, Serena; Nencioni, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of intestinal glycoreceptors expression, in particular CEACAM6, typically found in ileal Crohn's disease (CD), favor, among the commensal species of microbiota, the enrichment in Escherichia coli. Removal of protein glycosidic residues by neuraminidase, a sialidase typical of influenza virus, increases adhesion ability of Escherichia coli to Caco-2 intestinal cells. In this study we investigated whether influenza virus infection of human intestinal epithelial cells could influence the adhesiveness of different Escherichia coli strains isolated from CD patients by altering surface glycoreceptors. Influenza virus infection of intestinal cells increased exposure of galactose and mannose residues on the cell surface. In particular, glycoreceptors Thomsen-Friedenreich and CEACAM6 were over-expressed in influenza virus infected cells. In the same experimental conditions, a significant increase in bacterial adhesiveness was observed, independently of their own adhesive ability. The increase was reverted by treatment with anti-TF and anti-CEACAM6 antibodies. Interestingly, influenza virus was able to efficiently replicate in human primary intestinal cells leading to TF exposure. Finally, intestinal infected cells produced high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to control. Overall these data suggest that influenza virus infection, could constitute an additional risk factor in CD patients. PMID:25706391

  14. Effect of progesterone on the in vitro response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated by Escherichia coli in mares.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yousuke; Ohtsuka, Hiromichi; Tomioka, Michiko; Tanabe, Taishi; Nambo, Yasuo; Uematsu, Haruki; Oikawa, Masa-aki

    2012-05-01

    Escherichia coli(E. coli) isolated from the uterus of a Thoroughbred mare with bacterial endometritis was used to evaluate the effect of progesterone (P(4)) on the immune response of mares. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected from 10 nonpregnant clinically healthy adult mares (range, 4-12 years) during diestrus, four Thoroughbreds and six Hokkaido native horses. Cell proliferation and expression of cytokine mRNA, including interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-10, of PBMCs stimulated with E. coli and P(4) were examined in vitro. P(4) was shown to have significantly inhibited E. coli induced proliferation and expression of IFN-γ in PBMCs. These results indicate that P(4) inhibits the immune response to E. coli in mares. PMID:22167103

  15. Antibacterial Effects of Biosynthesized Silver Nanoparticles on Surface Ultrastructure and Nanomechanical Properties of Gram-Negative Bacteria viz. Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Baskaran; Parandhaman, Thanusu; Das, Sujoy K

    2016-02-24

    Understanding the interactions of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with the cell surface is crucial for the evaluation of bactericidal activity and for advanced biomedical and environmental applications. Biosynthesis of AgNPs was carried out through in situ reduction of silver nitrate (AgNO3) by cell free protein of Rhizopus oryzae and the synthesized AgNPs was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), ζ-potential analysis, and FTIR spectroscopy. The HRTEM measurement confirmed the formation of 7.1 ± 1.2 nm AgNPs, whereas DLS study demonstrated average hydrodynamic size of AgNPs as 9.1 ± 1.6 nm. The antibacterial activity of the biosynthesized AgNPs (ζ = -17.1 ± 1.2 mV) was evaluated against Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results showed that AgNPs exhibited concentration dependent antibacterial activity and 100% killing of E. coli and P. aeruginosa achieved when the cells were treated with 4.5 and 2.7 μg/mL AgNPs, respectively for 4 h. Furthermore, the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production suppressed the antioxidant defense and exerted mechanical damage to the membrane. AgNPs also induced surface charge neutralization and altered of the cell membrane permeability causing nonviability of the cells. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies depicted alteration of ultrastructural and nanomechanical properties of the cell surface following interaction with AgNPs, whereas FTIR spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that cell membrane of the treated cells underwent an order-to-disorder transition during the killing process and chemical composition of the cell membrane including fatty acids, proteins, and carbohydrates was decomposed following interaction with AgNPs. PMID:26829373

  16. Transport and viability of Escherichia coli cells in clean and iron oxide coated sand following coating with silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, Bryne T; Curry, Philip; Kapetas, Leon

    2015-08-01

    A mechanistic understanding of processes controlling the transport and viability of bacteria in porous media is critical for designing in situ bioremediation and microbiological water decontamination programs. We investigated the combined influence of coating sand with iron oxide and silver nanoparticles on the transport and viability of Escherichia coli cells under saturated conditions. Results showed that iron oxide coatings increase cell deposition which was generally reversed by silver nanoparticle coatings in the early stages of injection. These observations are consistent with short-term, particle surface charge controls on bacteria transport, where a negatively charged surface induced by silver nanoparticles reverses the positive charge due to iron oxide coatings, but columns eventually recovered irreversible cell deposition. Silver nanoparticle coatings significantly increased cell inactivation during transit through the columns. However, when viability data is normalised to volume throughput, only a small improvement in cell inactivation is observed for silver nanoparticle coated sands relative to iron oxide coating alone. This counterintuitive result underscores the importance of net surface charge in controlling cell transport and inactivation and implies that the extra cost for implementing silver nanoparticle coatings on porous beds coated with iron oxides may not be justified in designing point of use water filters in low income countries. PMID:26042624

  17. Quantifying potential sources of surface water contamination with Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    PubMed

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Penny, Christian; Ragimbeau, Catherine; Schets, Franciska M; Blaak, Hetty; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A; de Boer, Albert; Cauchie, Henry-Michel; Mossong, Joel; van Pelt, Wilfrid

    2016-09-15

    Campylobacter is the most common causative agent of human bacterial gastroenteritis and is frequently found in surface water, where it indicates recent contamination with animal faeces, sewage effluent, and agricultural run-off. The contribution of different animal reservoirs to surface water contamination with Campylobacter is largely unknown. In the Netherlands, the massive poultry culling to control the 2003 avian influenza epidemic coincided with a 44-50% reduction in human campylobacteriosis cases in the culling areas, suggesting substantial environment-mediated spread of poultry-borne Campylobacter. We inferred the origin of surface water Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli strains in Luxembourg and the Netherlands, as defined by multilocus sequence typing, by comparison to strains from poultry, pigs, ruminants, and wild birds, using the asymmetric island model for source attribution. Most Luxembourgish water strains were attributed to wild birds (61.0%), followed by poultry (18.8%), ruminants (15.9%), and pigs (4.3%); whereas the Dutch water strains were mainly attributed to poultry (51.7%), wild birds (37.3%), ruminants (9.8%), and pigs (1.2%). Attributions varied over seasons and surface water types, and geographical variation in the relative contribution of poultry correlated with the magnitude of poultry production at either the national or provincial level, suggesting that environmental dissemination of Campylobacter from poultry farms and slaughterhouses can be substantial in poultry-rich regions. PMID:27244295

  18. Interaction of sigma 70 with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase core enzyme studied by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, A L; Hughes, A D; Tufail, U; Baumann, C G; Scott, D J; Hoggett, J G

    2000-09-22

    The interaction between the core form of bacterial RNA polymerases and sigma factors is essential for specific promoter recognition, and for coordinating the expression of different sets of genes in response to varying cellular needs. The interaction between Escherichia coli core RNA polymerase and sigma 70 has been investigated by surface plasmon resonance. The His-tagged form of sigma 70 factor was immobilised on a Ni2+-NTA chip for monitoring its interaction with core polymerase. The binding constant for the interaction was found to be 1.9x10(-7) M, and the dissociation rate constant for release of sigma from core, in the absence of DNA or transcription, was 4x10(-3) s(-1), corresponding to a half-life of about 200 s. PMID:11007979

  19. Reducing Escherichia coli growth on a composite biomaterial by a surface immobilized antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Buckholtz, Gavin A; Reger, Nina A; Anderton, William D; Schimoler, Patrick J; Roudebush, Shana L; Meng, Wilson S; Miller, Mark C; Gawalt, Ellen S

    2016-08-01

    A new composite bioceramic consisting of calcium aluminum oxide (CaAlO) and hydroxyapatite (HA) was functionalized with the synthetic antimicrobial peptide Inverso-CysHHC10. CaAlO is a bioceramic that can be mold cast easily and quickly at room temperature. Improved functionality was previously achieved through surface reactions. Here, composites containing 0-5% HA (by mass) were prepared and the elastic modulus and modulus of rupture were mechanically similar to non-load bearing bone. The addition of hydroxyapatite resulted in increased osteoblast attachment (>180%) and proliferation (>140%) on all composites compared to 100% CaAlO. Antimicrobial peptide (AMP) immobilization was achieved using an interfacial alkene-thiol click reaction. The linked AMP persisted on the composite (>99.6% after 24h) and retained its activity against Escherichia coli based on N-phenylnaphthylamine uptake and bacterial turbidity tests. Overall, this simple scaffold system improves osteoblast activity and reduces bacterial activity. PMID:27157735

  20. Mechanisms of ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L. D.; Sangwijit, K.; Prakrajang, K.; Phanchaisri, B.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Thopan, P.; Singkarat, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-05-01

    As a useful ion beam biotechnology, ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells has been successfully operated using argon ions. In the process ion bombardment of the bacterial cells modifies the cell envelope materials to favor the exogenous DNA molecules to pass through the envelope to enter the cell. The occurrence of the DNA transfer induction was found ion energy and fluence dependent in a complex manner. At ion energy of a few keV and a few tens of keV to moderate fluences the DNA transfer could be induced by ion bombardment of the bacterial cells, while at the same ion energy but to high fluences DNA transfer could not be induced. On the other hand, when the ion energy was medium, about 10-20 keV, the DNA transfer could not be induced by ion bombardment of the cells. The complexity of the experimental results indicated a complex mechanism which should be related to the complex structure of the bacterial E. coli cell envelope. A phase diagram was proposed to interpret different mechanisms involved as functions of the ion energy and fluence.

  1. The probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 induces gammadelta T cell apoptosis via caspase- and FasL-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Guzy, Claudia; Paclik, Daniela; Schirbel, Anja; Sonnenborn, Ulrich; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Sturm, Andreas

    2008-07-01

    Human gammadelta T cells play a vital role in the innate and adaptive immune response to microbial antigens by acting as antigen-presenting cells while at the same time being capable of directly activating CD4(+) T cells. Pathogenic microbes or loss of tolerance toward the host's own microflora trigger many diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases. We previously demonstrated that Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 directly interacts with the adaptive immune system by regulating central T cell functions. Here we aimed to investigate whether E. coli Nissle regulates gammadelta T cell function, thereby linking the innate and adaptive immune system. In our study, we demonstrate that, in contrast to the other probiotic strains tested, E. coli Nissle increased activation, cell cycling and expansion of gammadelta, but not alphabeta T cells. In gammadelta T cells, E. coli Nissle reduced tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion but increased IL-6 and CXCL8 release. However, after activation, only E. coli Nissle induced gammadelta T cell apoptosis, mediated via Toll-like receptor-2 by caspase- and FasLigand-dependent pathways. gammadelta T cells play an important role in the recognition of microbial antigens and the perpetuation of inflammatory processes. The demonstration that E. coli Nissle, but not the other bacteria tested, profoundly regulate gammadelta T cell function contributes to explaining the biological function of this probiotic strain in inflammatory diseases and provides us with a better understanding of the role of gammadelta T cells. PMID:18448456

  2. Molecular cloning and expression of Corynebacterium glutamicum genes for amino acid synthesis in Escherichia coli cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beskrovnaya, O.Yu.; Fonshtein, M.Yu.; Kolibaba, L.G.; Yankovskii, N.K.; Debabov, V.G.

    1989-01-01

    Molecular cloning of Corynebacterium glutamicum genes for threonine and lysine synthesis has been done in Escherichia coli cells. The clonal library of EcoRI fragments of chromosomal DNA of C. glutamicum was constructed on the plasmid vector /lambda/pSL5. The genes for threonine and lysine synthesis were identified by complementation of E. coli mutations in thrB and lysA genes, respectively. Recombinant plasmids, isolated from independent ThrB/sup +/ clone have a common 4.1-kb long EcoRI DNA fragment. Hybrid plasmids isolated from LysA/sup +/ transductants of E. coli have common 2.2 and 3.3 kb long EcoRI fragments of C. glutamicum DNA. The hybrid plasmids consistently transduced the markers thrB/sup +/ and lysA/sup +/. The Southern hybridization analysis showed that the cloned DNA fragments hybridized with the fragments of identical length in C. glutamicum chromosomes.

  3. Following cell-fate in E. coli after infection by phage lambda.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lanying; Golding, Ido

    2011-01-01

    The system comprising bacteriophage (phage) lambda and the bacterium E. coli has long served as a paradigm for cell-fate determination. Following the simultaneous infection of the cell by a number of phages, one of two pathways is chosen: lytic (virulent) or lysogenic (dormant). We recently developed a method for fluorescently labeling individual phages, and were able to examine the post-infection decision in real-time under the microscope, at the level of individual phages and cells. Here, we describe the full procedure for performing the infection experiments described in our earlier work. This includes the creation of fluorescent phages, infection of the cells, imaging under the microscope and data analysis. The fluorescent phage is a "hybrid", co-expressing wild- type and YFP-fusion versions of the capsid gpD protein. A crude phage lysate is first obtained by inducing a lysogen of the gpD-EYFP (Enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein) phage, harboring a plasmid expressing wild type gpD. A series of purification steps are then performed, followed by DAPI-labeling and imaging under the microscope. This is done in order to verify the uniformity, DNA packaging efficiency, fluorescence signal and structural stability of the phage stock. The initial adsorption of phages to bacteria is performed on ice, then followed by a short incubation at 35°C to trigger viral DNA injection. The phage/bacteria mixture is then moved to the surface of a thin nutrient agar slab, covered with a coverslip and imaged under an epifluorescence microscope. The post-infection process is followed for 4 hr, at 10 min interval. Multiple stage positions are tracked such that ~100 cell infections can be traced in a single experiment. At each position and time point, images are acquired in the phase-contrast and red and green fluorescent channels. The phase-contrast image is used later for automated cell recognition while the fluorescent channels are used to characterize the infection outcome

  4. Entire sequence of the colonization factor coli surface antigen 6-encoding plasmid pCss165 from an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Takeaki; Sabui, Subrata; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar; Hamabata, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    Coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) is one of the most prevalent colonization factors among enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolated in developing countries. Although it is known that CS6 is encoded by a plasmid, there are no reports on the sequence analysis of the CS6-encoding plasmid or genes exhibiting similar behavior to CS6. Here, we report the isolation of the CS6-encoding plasmid, pCss165Kan, from 4266 ΔcssB::kanamycin (Km) and its complete nucleotide sequence. This plasmid consisted of 165,311bp and 222 predicted coding sequences. Remarkably, there were many insertion sequence (IS) elements, which comprised 24.4% of the entire sequence. Virulence-associated genes such as heat-stable enterotoxin, homologues of ATP-binding cassette transporter in enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and ETEC autotransporter A were also present, although the ETEC autotransporter A gene was disrupted by the integration of IS629. We found that 2 transcriptional regulators belonging to the AraC family were not involved in CS6 expression. Interestingly, pCss165 had conjugative transfer genes, as well as 3 toxin-antitoxin systems that potentially exclude other plasmid-free host bacteria. These genes might be involved in the prevalence of CS6 among ETEC isolates. PMID:23933356

  5. Optimization of Fermentation Conditions for Recombinant Human Interferon Beta Production by Escherichia coli Using the Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Morowvat, Mohammad Hossein; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Rajabi Memari, Hamid; Vahidi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: The periplasmic overexpression of recombinant human interferon beta (rhIFN-β)-1b using a synthetic gene in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) was optimized in shake flasks using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) based on the Box-Behnken Design (BBD). Objectives: This study aimed to predict and develop the optimal fermentation conditions for periplasmic expression of rhIFN-β-1b in shake flasks whilst keeping the acetate excretion as the lowest amount and exploit the best results condition for rhIFN-β in a bench top bioreactor. Materials and Methods: The process variables studied were the concentration of glucose as carbon source, cell density prior the induction (OD 600 nm) and induction temperature. Ultimately, a three-factor three-level BBD was employed during the optimization process. The rhIFN-β production and the acetate excretion served as the evaluated responses. Results: The proposed optimum fermentation condition consisted of 7.81 g L-1 glucose, OD 600 nm prior induction 1.66 and induction temperature of 30.27°C. The model prediction of 0.267 g L-1 of rhIFN-β and 0.961 g L-1 of acetate at the optimum conditions was verified experimentally as 0.255 g L-1 and 0.981 g L-1 of acetate. This agreement between the predicted and observed values confirmed the precision of the applied method to predict the optimum conditions. Conclusions: It can be concluded that the RSM is an effective method for the optimization of recombinant protein expression using synthetic genes in E. coli. PMID:26034535

  6. Recovery and Detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Surface Water, Using Ultrafiltration and Real-Time PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Mull, Bonnie; Hill, Vincent R.

    2009-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC O157:H7) outbreaks have revealed the need for improved analytical techniques for environmental samples. Ultrafiltration (UF) is increasingly recognized as an effective procedure for concentrating and recovering microbes from large volumes of water and treated wastewater. This study describes the application of hollow-fiber UF as the primary step for concentrating EHEC O157:H7 seeded into 40-liter samples of surface water, followed by an established culture/immunomagnetic-separation (IMS) method and a suite of real-time PCR assays. Three TaqMan assays were used to detect the stx1, stx2, and rfbE gene targets. The results from this study indicate that approximately 50 EHEC O157:H7 cells can be consistently recovered from a 40-liter surface water sample and detected by culture and real-time PCR. Centrifugation was investigated and shown to be a viable alternative to membrane filtration in the secondary culture/IMS step when water quality limits the volume of water that can be processed by a filter. Using multiple PCR assay sets to detect rfbE, stx1, and stx2 genes allowed for specific detection of EHEC O157:H7 from strains that do not possess all three genes. The reported sample collection and analysis procedure should be a sensitive and effective tool for detecting EHEC O157:H7 in response to outbreaks of disease associated with contaminated water. PMID:19363065

  7. Tetracycline rapidly reaches all the constituent cells of uropathogenic Escherichia coli biofilms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, G.; Wood, P.; Dixon, L.; Keyhan, M.; Matin, A.; Demain, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a method for visualizing Escherichia coli cells that are exposed to tetracycline in a biofilm, based on a previous report that liposomes containing the E. coli TetR(B) protein fluoresce when exposed to this antibiotic. By our method, cells devoid of TetR(B) also exhibited tetracycline-dependent fluorescence. At 50 microg of tetracycline ml(-1), planktonic cells of a uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strain developed maximal fluorescence after 7.5 to 10 min of exposure. A similar behavior was exhibited by cells in a 24- or 48-h UPEC biofilm, as examined by confocal laser microscopy, regardless of whether they lined empty spaces or occupied densely packed regions. Further, a comparison of phase-contrast and fluorescent images of corresponding biofilm zones showed that all the cells fluoresced. Thus, all the biofilm cells were exposed to tetracycline and there were no pockets within the biofilm where the antibiotic failed to reach. It also appeared unlikely that niches of reduced exposure to the antibiotic existed within the biofilms.

  8. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts retain crucial surface properties and express chlamydial antigen: an imaging study of a delivery system for the ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Ladurner, Angela; Stein, Elisabeth; Belij, Sandra; Bintner, Nora; Schlacher, Simone; Schuerer, Nadine; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner; Leisch, Nikolaus; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2015-01-01

    To target chronic inflammatory ocular surface diseases, a drug delivery platform is needed that is safe, possesses immunomodulatory properties, and can be used either for drug delivery, or as a foreign antigen carrier. A new therapeutic approach that we have previously proposed uses nonliving bacterial ghosts (BGs) as a carrier-delivery system which can be engineered to carry foreign antigens and/or be loaded with therapeutic drugs. The parent strain chosen for development of our BG delivery system is the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN), whose intrinsic properties trigger the innate immune system with the flagella and fimbriae used to attach and stimulate epithelial cells. In previous studies, we have shown that EcN BGs are safe for the ocular surface route, but evidence that EcN BGs retain flagella and fimbriae after transformation, has never been visually confirmed. In this study, we used different visualization techniques to determine whether flagella and fimbriae are retained on EcN BGs engineered either for drug delivery or as a foreign antigen carrier. We have also shown by immunoelectron microscopy that EcN retains two foreign antigens after processing to become EcN BGs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGs derived from EcN and expressing a foreign antigen attachment to conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro without causing reduced cell viability. These results are an important step in constructing a delivery system based on a nonliving probiotic that is suitable for use in ocular surface diseases pairing immunomodulation and targeted delivery. PMID:26229437

  9. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts retain crucial surface properties and express chlamydial antigen: an imaging study of a delivery system for the ocular surface

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Ladurner, Angela; Stein, Elisabeth; Belij, Sandra; Bintner, Nora; Schlacher, Simone; Schuerer, Nadine; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner; Leisch, Nikolaus; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2015-01-01

    To target chronic inflammatory ocular surface diseases, a drug delivery platform is needed that is safe, possesses immunomodulatory properties, and can be used either for drug delivery, or as a foreign antigen carrier. A new therapeutic approach that we have previously proposed uses nonliving bacterial ghosts (BGs) as a carrier-delivery system which can be engineered to carry foreign antigens and/or be loaded with therapeutic drugs. The parent strain chosen for development of our BG delivery system is the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN), whose intrinsic properties trigger the innate immune system with the flagella and fimbriae used to attach and stimulate epithelial cells. In previous studies, we have shown that EcN BGs are safe for the ocular surface route, but evidence that EcN BGs retain flagella and fimbriae after transformation, has never been visually confirmed. In this study, we used different visualization techniques to determine whether flagella and fimbriae are retained on EcN BGs engineered either for drug delivery or as a foreign antigen carrier. We have also shown by immunoelectron microscopy that EcN retains two foreign antigens after processing to become EcN BGs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGs derived from EcN and expressing a foreign antigen attachment to conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro without causing reduced cell viability. These results are an important step in constructing a delivery system based on a nonliving probiotic that is suitable for use in ocular surface diseases pairing immunomodulation and targeted delivery. PMID:26229437

  10. Correlation of Surface Toll-Like Receptor 9 Expression with IL-17 Production in Neutrophils during Septic Peritonitis in Mice Induced by E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yunjia; Hao, Xu; Zhao, Peiyan; Yu, Yongli; Wang, Liying

    2016-01-01

    IL-17 is a proinflammatory cytokine produced by various immune cells. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are the first line of defense in bacterial infection and express surface Toll-like receptor 9 (sTLR9). To study the relationship of sTLR9 and IL-17 in PMNs during bacterial infection, we infected mice with E. coli intraperitoneally to establish a septic peritonitis model for studying the PMNs response in peritoneal cavity. We found that PMNs and some of “giant cells” were massively accumulated in the peritoneal cavity of mice with fatal septic peritonitis induced by E. coli. Kinetically, the CD11b+ PMNs were increased from 20–40% at 18 hours to >80% at 72 hours after infection. After E. coli infection, sTLR9 expression on CD11b+ and CD11b− PMNs and macrophages in the PLCs were increased at early stage and deceased at late stage; IL-17 expression was also increased in CD11b+ PMNs, CD11b− PMNs, macrophages, and CD3+ T cells. Using experiments of in vitro blockage, qRT-PCR and cell sorting, we confirmed that PMNs in the PLCs did increase their IL-17 expression during E. coli infection. Interestingly, sTLR9−CD11b+Ly6G+ PMNs, not sTLR9+CD11b+Ly6G+ PMNs, were found to be able to increase their IL-17 expression. Together, the data may help understand novel roles of PMNs in septic peritonitis. PMID:27057095

  11. Influence of curli expression on biofilm formation and attachment to plant surface by shiga toxigenic E. coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC) outbreaks have been linked to consumption of fresh produce. Bacteria extracellular appendages, such as curli fibers and cellulose may play critical role in STEC biofilm formation and adherence to plant surface. We determined cellulose and curli product...

  12. Biofilm Formation on Biotic and Abiotic Surfaces in the Presence of Antimicrobials by Escherichia coli Isolates from Cases of Bovine Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Vitor O.; Soares, Larissa O.; Silva Júnior, Abelardo; Mantovani, Hilário C.; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a highly adaptive microorganism, and its ability to form biofilms under certain conditions can be critical for antimicrobial resistance. The adhesion of four E. coli isolates from bovine mastitis to bovine mammary alveolar (MAC-T) cells, biofilm production on a polystyrene surface, and the expression profiles of the genes fliC, csgA, fimA, and luxS in the presence of enrofloxacin, gentamicin, co-trimoxazole, and ampicillin at half of the MIC were investigated. Increased adhesion of E. coli isolates in the presence of antimicrobials was not observed; however, increased internalization of some isolates was observed by confocal microscopy. All of the antimicrobials induced the formation of biofilms by at least one isolate, whereas enrofloxacin and co-trimoxazole decreased biofilm formation by at least one isolate. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that all four genes were differentially expressed when bacteria were exposed to subinhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials, with expression altered on the order of 1.5- to 22-fold. However, it was not possible to associate gene expression with induction or reduction of biofilm formation in the presence of the antimicrobials. Taken together, the results demonstrate that antimicrobials could induce biofilm formation by some isolates, in addition to inducing MAC-T cell invasion, a situation that might occur in vivo, potentially resulting in a bacterial reservoir in the udder, which might explain some cases of persistent mastitis in herds. PMID:25063668

  13. Thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and non-O157 shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli cells in mechanically tenderized veal.

    PubMed

    Luchansky, John B; Porto-Fett, Anna C S; Shoyer, Bradley A; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan; Amaya, Jesus R; Lemler, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Preflattened veal cutlets (ca. 71.5 g, ca. 0.32 cm thick) were surface inoculated with ca. 6.8 log CFU/g of a multistrain cocktail of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ECOH) or a cocktail made of single strains of serogroups O26, O45, O103, O104, O111, O121, and O145 of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) cells and then were mechanically tenderized by passing once through a "Sir Steak" tenderizer. For each cooking time, in each of at least three trials, three inoculated and tenderized cutlets, with and without breading, were individually cooked in 15 or 30 ml of canola oil for 0.0, 0.75, 1.0, 1.25, 1.5, 1.75, or 2.25 min per side on an electric skillet set at 191.5°C. The temperatures of the meat and of the skillet were monitored and recorded using a type J thermocouple. Regardless of the breading or volume of oil used to cook the meat, the longer the cooking times, the higher was the internal temperature of the meat, along with a greater reduction of both ECOH and STEC. The average final internal temperature of the meat at the approximate geometric center ranged from 56.8 to 93.1°C. Microbial reductions of ca. 2.0 to 6.7 log CFU/g and ca. 2.6 to 6.2 log CFU/g were achieved for ECOH and STEC, respectively. Our data also revealed no differences in thermal inactivation of ECOH relative to the volume of oil used to cook nonbreaded cutlets. However, when cooking breaded cutlets, the use of more (30 ml) compared with less (15 ml) cooking oil resulted in greater reductions in pathogen numbers. To deliver about a 5.0-log reduction of ECOH and STEC, and to achieve the recommended internal temperature of 71.1°C, it was necessary to cook mechanically tenderized veal cutlets for at least 1.5 min per side on a preheated electric skillet set at 191.5°C and containing 15 ml of cooking oil. These data also established that cooking times and temperatures effective for inactivating serotype O157:H7 strains of E. coli in tenderized veal are equally effective against the additional six

  14. CsgA Production by Escherichia coli O157:H7 Alters Attachment to Abiotic Surfaces in Some Growth Environments ▿

    PubMed Central

    Goulter-Thorsen, R. M.; Taran, E.; Gentle, I. R.; Gobius, K. S.; Dykes, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    The role of curli expression in attachment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to glass, Teflon, and stainless steel (SS) was investigated through the creation of csgA knockout mutants in two isolates of E. coli O157:H7. Attachment assays using epifluorescence microscopy and measurements of the force of adhesion of bacterial cells to the substrates using atomic force microscopy (AFM) force mapping were used to determine differences in attachment between wild-type (wt) and csgA-negative (ΔcsgA) strains following growth in four different media. The hydrophobicity of the cells was determined using contact angle measurements (CAM) and bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbons (BATH). The attachment assay results indicated that ΔcsgA strains attached to glass, Teflon, and SS surfaces in significantly different numbers than their wt counterparts in a growth medium-dependent fashion (P < 0.05). However, no clear correlation was seen between attachment numbers, surface type, or growth medium. No correlation was seen between BATH and CAM results (R2 < 0.70). Hydrophobicity differed between the wt and ΔcsgA in some cases in a growth medium- and method-dependent fashion (P < 0.05). AFM force mapping revealed no significant difference in the forces of adhesion to glass and SS surfaces between wt and ΔcsgA strains (P > 0.05) but a significantly greater force of adhesion to Teflon for one of the two wt strains than for its ΔcsgA counterpart (P < 0.05). This study shows that CsgA production by E. coli O157:H7 may alter attachment behavior in some environments; however, further investigation is required in order to determine the exact relationship between CsgA production and attachment to abiotic surfaces. PMID:21856839

  15. Biosensor for direct determination of organophosphate nerve agents using recombinant Escherichia coli with surface-expressed organophosphorus hydrolase. 2. Fiber-optic microbial biosensor.

    PubMed

    Mulchandani, A; Kaneva, I; Chen, W

    1998-12-01

    A fiber-optic microbial biosensor suitable for direct measurement of organophosphate nerve agents was developed. The unique features of this novel microbial biosensor were the recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing the enzyme organophosphorus hydrolase on the cell surface and the optical detection of the products of enzyme-catalyzed organophosphate hydrolysis. The use of cells with the metabolic enzyme expressed on the cell surface as a biological sensing element provides advantages of no resistance to mass transport of the analyte and product across the cell membrane and low cost due to elimination of enzyme purification, over the conventional microbial biosensors based on cells expressing enzyme intracellularly and enzyme-based sensors, respectively. The use of an optical transducer allows the detection of different organophosphates in a mixture, presently not feasible with acetylcholinesterase-based biosensors. E. coli cells expressing organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) on the cell surface were immobilized in low melting temperature agarose on a nylon membrane and attached to the common end of a bifurcated fiber-optic bundle. OPH-expressing E. coli cells catalyzed the hydrolysis of organophosphorus pesticides to form stoichiometric amounts of chromophoric products that absorb light at specific wavelengths. The backscattered radiation of the specific wavelength incident light was measured using a photomultiplier detector and correlated to the organophosphate concentration. The best sensitivity and response time were obtained using a sensor constructed with 1.5 mg of cells operating in pH 9, 50 mM HEPES buffer with 100 mM NaCl and 0.05 mM CoCl2 at 30 degrees C. At optimized conditions, the biosensor measured paraoxon, parathion, and coumaphos pesticides with high selectivity against triazine and carbamate pesticides in approximately 10 min. The lower detection limits were 3 microM for paraoxon and parathion and 5 microM for coumaphos. When stored in the

  16. Independence of buoyant cell density and growth rate in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Kubitchek, H.E.; Baldwin, W.W.; Schroeter, S.J.; Graetzer, R.

    1984-04-01

    The relationship between growth rate and buoyant density was determined for cells from exponential-phase cultures of Escherichia coli B/r NC32 by equilibrium centrifugation in Percoll gradients at growth rates ranging from 0.15 to 2.3 doublings per h. The mean buoyant density did not change significantly with growth rate in any of three sets of experiments in which different gradient conditions were used. In addition, when cultures were allowed to enter the stationary phase of growth, mean cell volumes and buoyant densities usually remained unchanged for extended periods. These and earlier results support the existence of a highly regulated, discrete state of buoyant density during steady-state growth of E. coli and other cells that divide by equatorial fission. 11 references, 3 figures.

  17. Quantification of filamentation by uropathogenic Escherichia coli during experimental bladder cell infection by using semi-automated image analysis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Kasper; Palarasah, Yaseelan; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Andersen, Thomas Emil

    2015-02-01

    Several rod-shaped pathogens including Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Klebsiella pneumonia are capable of adopting highly filamentous cell shapes under certain circumstances. This phenomenon occurs as a result of continued cell elongation during growth without the usual septation into single rod-shaped cells. Evidence has emerged over the past decade suggesting that this morphological transformation is controlled and reversible and provides selective advantages under certain growth conditions, such as during infection in humans. In order to identify the factors which induce filamentation of bacterial pathogens and study the advantages of bacterial morphological plasticity, methods are needed to accurately quantify changes in bacterial cell shape. In this study, we present a method for quantification of bacterial filamentation based on automatic detection and measurement of bacterial units in focus-stacked microscopy images. Used in combination with a flow-chamber based in vitro cystitis model, we study the factors involved in filament formation by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) during infection. The influence of substratum surface, intracellular proliferation and flow media on UPEC filamentation is evaluated. We show that reversible UPEC filamentation during cystitis is not dependent on intracellular infection, which previous studies have suggested. Instead, we find that filamentation can be induced by contact with surfaces, both biological and artificial. Lastly our data indicate that UPEC filamentation is induced by trace-amounts of specific components in urine, rather than being a generic stress-response to high urine salt concentrations. The study shows that the combined methodology is generally useful for investigation of bacterial morphological transitions during cell infection. PMID:25546841

  18. Cranberry Xyloglucan Structure and Inhibition of Escherichia coli Adhesion to Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Arland T; Nuñez, Alberto; Strahan, Gary D; Chau, Hoa K; White, André K; Marais, Jannie P J; Hom, Kellie; Vakkalanka, Malathi S; Di, Rong; Yam, Kit L; Khoo, Christina

    2015-06-17

    Cranberry juice has been recognized as a treatment for urinary tract infections on the basis of scientific reports of proanthocyanidin anti-adhesion activity against Escherichia coli as well as from folklore. Xyloglucan oligosaccharides were detected in cranberry juice and the residue remaining following commercial juice extraction that included pectinase maceration of the pulp. A novel xyloglucan was detected through tandem mass spectrometry analysis of an ion at m/z 1055 that was determined to be a branched, three hexose, four pentose oligosaccharide consistent with an arabino-xyloglucan structure. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis provided through-bond correlations for the α-L-Araf (1→2) α-D-Xylp (1→6) β-D-Glcp sequence, proving the S-type cranberry xyloglucan structure. Cranberry xyloglucan-rich fractions inhibited the adhesion of E. coli CFT073 and UTI89 strains to T24 human bladder epithelial cells and that of E. coli O157:H7 to HT29 human colonic epithelial cells. SSGG xyloglucan oligosaccharides represent a new cranberry bioactive component with E. coli anti-adhesion activity and high affinity for type 1 fimbriae. PMID:25973733

  19. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli TibA Glycoprotein Adheres to Human Intestine Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lindenthal, Christoph; Elsinghorst, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human ileum and colon. Two separate invasion loci (tia and tib) that direct noninvasive E. coli strains to adhere to and invade cultured human intestine epithelial cells have previously been isolated from the classical ETEC strain H10407. The tib locus directs the synthesis of TibA, a 104-kDa outer membrane glycoprotein. Synthesis of TibA is directly correlated with the adherence and invasion phenotypes of the tib locus, suggesting that this protein is an adhesin and invasin. Here we report the purification of TibA and characterization of its biological activity. TibA was purified by continuous-elution preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Purified TibA was biotin labeled and then shown to bind to HCT8 human ileocecal epithelial cells in a specific and saturable manner. Unlabeled TibA competed with biotin-labeled TibA, suggesting the presence of a specific TibA receptor in HCT8 cells. These results show that TibA acts as an adhesin. Polyclonal anti-TibA antiserum inhibited invasion of ETEC strain H10407 and of recombinant E. coli bearing tib locus clones, suggesting that TibA also acts as an invasin. The ability of TibA to direct epithelial cell adhesion suggests a role for this protein in ETEC pathogenesis. PMID:11119488

  20. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli TibA glycoprotein adheres to human intestine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lindenthal, C; Elsinghorst, E A

    2001-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human ileum and colon. Two separate invasion loci (tia and tib) that direct noninvasive E. coli strains to adhere to and invade cultured human intestine epithelial cells have previously been isolated from the classical ETEC strain H10407. The tib locus directs the synthesis of TibA, a 104-kDa outer membrane glycoprotein. Synthesis of TibA is directly correlated with the adherence and invasion phenotypes of the tib locus, suggesting that this protein is an adhesin and invasin. Here we report the purification of TibA and characterization of its biological activity. TibA was purified by continuous-elution preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Purified TibA was biotin labeled and then shown to bind to HCT8 human ileocecal epithelial cells in a specific and saturable manner. Unlabeled TibA competed with biotin-labeled TibA, suggesting the presence of a specific TibA receptor in HCT8 cells. These results show that TibA acts as an adhesin. Polyclonal anti-TibA antiserum inhibited invasion of ETEC strain H10407 and of recombinant E. coli bearing tib locus clones, suggesting that TibA also acts as an invasin. The ability of TibA to direct epithelial cell adhesion suggests a role for this protein in ETEC pathogenesis. PMID:11119488

  1. Competitive exclusion of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) from human enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells by heat-killed Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Chauvière, G; Coconnier, M H; Kerneis, S; Darfeuille-Michaud, A; Joly, B; Servin, A L

    1992-03-15

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bearing CFA/I or CFA/II adhesive factors specifically adhere onto the brush border of the polarized epithelial human intestinal Caco-2 cells in culture. Heat-killed Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LB, that adheres onto Caco-2 cells, inhibits diarrheagenic Escherichia coli adhesion in a concentration-dependent manner. Since the L. acidophilus does not express ETEC-CFA adhesive factors, it can be postulated that the heat-killed L. acidophilus LB cells inhibit diarrheagenic E. coli attachment by steric hindrance of the human enterocytic ETEC receptors. PMID:1624102

  2. CONTRIBUTION OF NUTRIENTS AND E. COLI TO SURFACE WATER CONDITION IN THE OZARKS I. USING PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES PREDICTIONS WHEN STANDARD REGRESSION ASSUMPTIONS ARE VIOLATED

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present here the application of PLS regression to predicting surface water total phosphorous, total ammonia and Escherichia coli from landscape metrics. The amount of variability in surface water constituents explained by each model reflects the composition of the contributi...

  3. Damage in Escherichia coli Cells Treated with a Combination of High Hydrostatic Pressure and Subzero Temperature▿

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Marwen; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Gervais, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between membrane permeability, changes in ultrastructure, and inactivation in Escherichia coli strain K-12TG1 cells subjected to high hydrostatic pressure treatment at room and subzero temperatures was studied. Propidium iodide staining performed before and after pressure treatment made it possible to distinguish between reversible and irreversible pressure-mediated cell membrane permeabilization. Changes in cell ultrastructure were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which showed noticeable condensation of nucleoids and aggregation of cytosolic proteins in cells fixed after decompression. A novel technique used to mix fixation reagents with the cell suspension in situ under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and subzero-temperature conditions made it possible to show the partial reversibility of pressure-induced nucleoid condensation. However, based on visual examination of TEM micrographs, protein aggregation did not seem to be reversible. Reversible cell membrane permeabilization was noticeable, particularly for HHP treatments at subzero temperature. A correlation between membrane permeabilization and cell inactivation was established, suggesting different mechanisms at room and subzero temperatures. We propose that the inactivation of E. coli cells under combined HHP and subzero temperature occurs mainly during their transiently permeabilized state, whereas HHP inactivation at room temperature is related to a balance of transient and permanent permeabilization. The correlation between TEM results and cell inactivation was not absolute. Further work is required to elucidate the effects of pressure-induced damage on nucleoids and proteins during cell inactivation. PMID:17766454

  4. Damage in Escherichia coli cells treated with a combination of high hydrostatic pressure and subzero temperature.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Marwen; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Gervais, Patrick

    2007-10-01

    The relationship between membrane permeability, changes in ultrastructure, and inactivation in Escherichia coli strain K-12TG1 cells subjected to high hydrostatic pressure treatment at room and subzero temperatures was studied. Propidium iodide staining performed before and after pressure treatment made it possible to distinguish between reversible and irreversible pressure-mediated cell membrane permeabilization. Changes in cell ultrastructure were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which showed noticeable condensation of nucleoids and aggregation of cytosolic proteins in cells fixed after decompression. A novel technique used to mix fixation reagents with the cell suspension in situ under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and subzero-temperature conditions made it possible to show the partial reversibility of pressure-induced nucleoid condensation. However, based on visual examination of TEM micrographs, protein aggregation did not seem to be reversible. Reversible cell membrane permeabilization was noticeable, particularly for HHP treatments at subzero temperature. A correlation between membrane permeabilization and cell inactivation was established, suggesting different mechanisms at room and subzero temperatures. We propose that the inactivation of E. coli cells under combined HHP and subzero temperature occurs mainly during their transiently permeabilized state, whereas HHP inactivation at room temperature is related to a balance of transient and permanent permeabilization. The correlation between TEM results and cell inactivation was not absolute. Further work is required to elucidate the effects of pressure-induced damage on nucleoids and proteins during cell inactivation. PMID:17766454

  5. Model development and verification for mass transport to Escherichia coli cells in a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondzo, Miki; Al-Homoud, Amer

    2007-08-01

    Theoretical studies imply that fluid motion does not significantly increase the molecular diffusive mass flux toward and away from microscopic organisms. This study presents experimental and theoretical evidence that small-scale turbulence modulates enhanced mass transport to Escherichia coli cells in a turbulent flow. Using the technique of inner region and outer region expansions, a model for dissolved oxygen and glucose uptake by E. coli was developed. The mass transport to the E. coli was modeled by the Sherwood (Sh)-Péclet (Pe) number relationship with redefined characteristic length and velocity scales. The model Sh = (1 + Pe1/2 + Pe) agreed with the laboratory measurements well. The Péclet number that quantifies the role and function of small-scale turbulence on E. coli metabolism is defined by Pe = (?) where Ezz is the root mean square of fluid extension in the direction of local vorticity, ηK is the Kolmogorov length scale, Lc is the length scale of E. coli, and D is the molecular diffusion coefficient. An alternative formulation for the redefined Pe is given by Pe = (?) where ? = 0.5(ɛν)1/4 is the Kolmogorov velocity averaged over the Kolmogorov length scale, ɛ is dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy, and ν is the kinematic viscosity of fluid. The dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy was estimated directly from measured velocity gradients and was within the reported range in engineered and natural aquatic ecosytems. The specific growth of E. coli was up to 5 times larger in a turbulent flow in comparison to the still water controls. Dissolved oxygen and glucose uptake were enhanced with increased ɛ in the turbulent flow.

  6. Quantitative phase imaging of cell division in yeast cells and E.coli using digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2015-12-01

    Digital holographic microscope (DHM) is an emerging quantitative phase imaging technique with unique imaging scales and resolutions leading to multitude of applications. DHM is promising as a novel investigational and applied tool for cell imaging, studying the morphology and real time dynamics of cells and a number of related applications. The use of numerical propagation and computational digital optics offer unique flexibility to tune the depth of focus, and compensate for image aberrations. In this work, we report imaging the dynamics of cell division in E.coli and yeast cells using a DHM platform. We demonstrate 3-D and depth imaging as well as reconstruction of phase profiles of E.coli and yeast cells using the system. We record a digital hologram of E.coli and yeast cells and reconstruct the image using Fresnel propagation algorithm. We also use aberration compensation algorithms for correcting the aberrations that are introduced by the microscope objective in the object path using linear least square fitting techniques. This work demonstrates the strong potential of a DHM platform in 3-D live cell imaging, fast clinical quantifications and pathological applications.

  7. Modulation of dendritic cell endocytosis and antigen processing pathways by Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin and mutant derivatives.

    PubMed

    Petrovska, Liljana; Lopes, Luciene; Simmons, Cameron P; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Dougan, Gordon; Chain, Benjamin M

    2003-03-28

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) is known to be a potent adjuvant of both the mucosal and systemic immune systems but the mechanism of action leading to adjuvant activity remains incompletely understood. This study investigates the action of LT and LT mutants with impaired enzymatic activity, on the function of dendritic cells. Wild-type LT and LTR72, which retains some ADP ribosyltransferase activity, induced a selective increase in cell surface expression of B7.1, and a selective decrease of CD40 expression on mouse bone marrow derived dendritic cells. LTK63 and LT-B had no obvious effect on the expression of these antigens on similar dendritic cells. LT-treated dendritic cells also showed a profoundly impaired ability to present protein antigen (ovalbumin) to cognate T cells, although this effect was not observed with non-toxic LT mutants. LT and LTR72-treated cells showed a slower rate of receptor-mediated endocytosis as measured by flow cytometric analysis of uptake of fluorescently labelled dextran. Furthermore, confocal microscopy showed changes in the intracellular distribution of endocytosed molecules, and of the class II containing acidic antigen processing compartments. This response of dendritic cells to toxin is likely to play an important role in determining the adjuvant activity of these molecules. PMID:12615441

  8. N-acylated peptides derived from human lactoferricin perturb organization of cardiolipin and phosphatidylethanolamine in cell membranes and induce defects in Escherichia coli cell division.

    PubMed

    Zweytick, Dagmar; Japelj, Bostjan; Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Zorko, Mateja; Dowhan, William; Blondelle, Sylvie E; Riedl, Sabrina; Jerala, Roman; Lohner, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Two types of recently described antibacterial peptides derived from human lactoferricin, either nonacylated or N-acylated, were studied for their different interaction with membranes of Escherichia coli in vivo and in model systems. Electron microscopy revealed striking effects on the bacterial membrane as both peptide types induced formation of large membrane blebs. Electron and fluorescence microscopy, however demonstrated that only the N-acylated peptides partially induced the generation of oversized cells, which might reflect defects in cell-division. Further a different distribution of cardiolipin domains on the E. coli membrane was shown only in the presence of the N-acylated peptides. The lipid was distributed over the whole bacterial cell surface, whereas cardiolipin in untreated and nonacylated peptide-treated cells was mainly located at the septum and poles. Studies with bacterial membrane mimics, such as cardiolipin or phosphatidylethanolamine revealed that both types of peptides interacted with the negatively charged lipid cardiolipin. The nonacylated peptides however induced segregation of cardiolipin into peptide-enriched and peptide-poor lipid domains, while the N-acylated peptides promoted formation of many small heterogeneous domains. Only N-acylated peptides caused additional severe effects on the main phase transition of liposomes composed of pure phosphatidylethanolamine, while both peptide types inhibited the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition. Lipid mixtures of phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin revealed anionic clustering by all peptide types. However additional strong perturbation of the neutral lipids was only seen with the N-acylated peptides. Nuclear magnetic resonance demonstrated different conformational arrangement of the N-acylated peptide in anionic and zwitterionic micelles revealing possible mechanistic differences in their action on different membrane lipids. We hypothesized that both peptides kill bacteria by

  9. Stress response of Escherichia coli induced by surface streamer discharge in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doležalová, Eva; Prukner, Václav; Lukeš, Petr; Šimek, Milan

    2016-02-01

    Inactivation of Escherichia coli by means of surface streamer discharge has been investigated to obtain new insights into the key mechanisms involved, with a particular emphasis placed on the microbial response to plasma-induced stress. The surface streamer discharge was produced in coplanar dielectric barrier discharge electrode geometry, and was driven by an amplitude-modulated ac high voltage in humid synthetic air at atmospheric pressure. The response to plasma-induced stress was evaluated by using conventional cultivation, sublethal injury and resazurin assay and the LIVE/DEAD® BacLight™ Bacterial Viability kit. Compared to conventional cultivation, the LIVE/DEAD® test labels bacteria with damaged membranes, while resazurin assay tracks their metabolic activity. Our results clearly demonstrate that the treated bacteria partly lost their ability to grow properly, i.e. they became injured and culturable, or even viable but nonculturable (VBNC). The ability to develop colonies could have been lost due to damage of the bacterial membrane. Damage of the membranes was mainly caused by the lipid peroxidation, evidencing the key role of oxygen reactive species, in particular ozone. We conclude that the conventional cultivation method overestimates the decontamination efficiency of various plasma sources, and must therefore be complemented by alternative techniques capable of resolving viable but nonculturable bacteria.

  10. "Escherichia coli-milk" biofilm removal from stainless steel surfaces: synergism between ultrasonic waves and enzymes.

    PubMed

    Oulahal-Lagsir, Nadia; Martial-Gros, Adele; Bonneau, Marc; Blum, Loic J

    2003-06-01

    Three different methods to standardize biofilm removal for in situ sanitary control of closed surfaces in the food industry have been developed and compared, i.e. sonication, enzymatic treatment and a combined treatment which involved the application of ultrasound to enzyme preparations. The biofilm studied was an Escherichia coli model biofilm, made with milk on stainless steel sheets. Plate counting and epifluorescence microscopy were used to assess the efficiency of each treatment. The results are expressed in percentages, 100% denoting total removal, obtained with a flat ultrasonic transducer (T1) developed and presented in a previous study. The application of ultrasound by a patented curved transducer, T2 (10 s, 40 kHz), specifically devised for closed surfaces, was not sufficient to completely remove the biofilm (30 +/- 7%). This biofilm was dislodged by two proteolytic enzyme preparations tested by immersion, viz. a 15-min application of protease (84 +/- 1%) and a 30-min trypsin application (95 +/- 8%). Using a combined treatment, the results showed a synergism between ultrasonic waves and proteolytic or glycolytic enzyme preparations, with removal of a significant amount of biofilm, i.e. 61-96% depending on the conditions tested, i.e. two to three times greater compared to sonication alone (30%). This application was in agreement with an industrial control, i.e. a good reproducible recovery of the biofilm in 10 s compared with 30 or 15 min with the enzyme alone. PMID:14619284

  11. Comparative Single-Cell Analysis of Different E. coli Expression Systems during Microfluidic Cultivation.

    PubMed

    Binder, Dennis; Probst, Christopher; Grünberger, Alexander; Hilgers, Fabienne; Loeschcke, Anita; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Drepper, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant protein production is mostly realized with large-scale cultivations and monitored at the level of the entire population. Detailed knowledge of cell-to-cell variations with respect to cellular growth and product formation is limited, even though phenotypic heterogeneity may distinctly hamper overall production yields, especially for toxic or difficult-to-express proteins. Unraveling phenotypic heterogeneity is thus a key aspect in understanding and optimizing recombinant protein production in biotechnology and synthetic biology. Here, microfluidic single-cell analysis serves as the method of choice to investigate and unmask population heterogeneities in a dynamic and spatiotemporal fashion. In this study, we report on comparative microfluidic single-cell analyses of commonly used E. coli expression systems to uncover system-inherent specifications in the synthetic M9CA growth medium. To this end, the PT7lac/LacI, the PBAD/AraC and the Pm/XylS system were systematically analyzed in order to gain detailed insights into variations of growth behavior and expression phenotypes and thus to uncover individual strengths and deficiencies at the single-cell level. Specifically, we evaluated the impact of different system-specific inducers, inducer concentrations as well as genetic modifications that affect inducer-uptake and regulation of target gene expression on responsiveness and phenotypic heterogeneity. Interestingly, the most frequently applied expression system based on E. coli strain BL21(DE3) clearly fell behind with respect to expression homogeneity and robustness of growth. Moreover, both the choice of inducer and the presence of inducer uptake systems proved crucial for phenotypic heterogeneity. Conclusively, microfluidic evaluation of different inducible E. coli expression systems and setups identified the modified lacY-deficient PT7lac/LacI as well as the Pm/XylS system with conventional m-toluic acid induction as key players for precise and robust

  12. Comparative Single-Cell Analysis of Different E. coli Expression Systems during Microfluidic Cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Hilgers, Fabienne; Loeschcke, Anita; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Drepper, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant protein production is mostly realized with large-scale cultivations and monitored at the level of the entire population. Detailed knowledge of cell-to-cell variations with respect to cellular growth and product formation is limited, even though phenotypic heterogeneity may distinctly hamper overall production yields, especially for toxic or difficult-to-express proteins. Unraveling phenotypic heterogeneity is thus a key aspect in understanding and optimizing recombinant protein production in biotechnology and synthetic biology. Here, microfluidic single-cell analysis serves as the method of choice to investigate and unmask population heterogeneities in a dynamic and spatiotemporal fashion. In this study, we report on comparative microfluidic single-cell analyses of commonly used E. coli expression systems to uncover system-inherent specifications in the synthetic M9CA growth medium. To this end, the PT7lac/LacI, the PBAD/AraC and the Pm/XylS system were systematically analyzed in order to gain detailed insights into variations of growth behavior and expression phenotypes and thus to uncover individual strengths and deficiencies at the single-cell level. Specifically, we evaluated the impact of different system-specific inducers, inducer concentrations as well as genetic modifications that affect inducer-uptake and regulation of target gene expression on responsiveness and phenotypic heterogeneity. Interestingly, the most frequently applied expression system based on E. coli strain BL21(DE3) clearly fell behind with respect to expression homogeneity and robustness of growth. Moreover, both the choice of inducer and the presence of inducer uptake systems proved crucial for phenotypic heterogeneity. Conclusively, microfluidic evaluation of different inducible E. coli expression systems and setups identified the modified lacY-deficient PT7lac/LacI as well as the Pm/XylS system with conventional m-toluic acid induction as key players for precise and robust

  13. Substances released from probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 potentiate NF-κB activity in Escherichia coli-stimulated urinary bladder cells.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Mattias; Scherbak, Nikolai; Khalaf, Hazem; Olsson, Per-Erik; Jass, Jana

    2012-11-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 is a probiotic bacterium used to maintain urogenital health. The putative mechanism for its probiotic effect is by modulating the host immunity. Urinary tract infections (UTI) are often caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli that frequently evade or suppress immune responses in the bladder and can target pathways, including nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). We evaluated the role of L. rhamnosus GR-1 on NF-κB activation in E. coli-stimulated bladder cells. Viable L. rhamnosus GR-1 was found to potentiate NF-κB activity in E. coli-stimulated T24 bladder cells, whereas heat-killed lactobacilli demonstrated a marginal increase in NF-κB activity. Surface components released by trypsin- or LiCl treatment, or the resultant heat-killed shaved lactobacilli, had no effect on NF-κB activity. Isolation of released products from L. rhamnosus GR-1 demonstrated that the induction of NF-κB activity was owing to released product(s) with a relatively large native size. Several putative immunomodulatory proteins were identified, namely GroEL, elongation factor Tu and NLP/P60. GroEL and elongation factor Tu have previously been shown to elicit immune responses from human cells. Isolating and using immune-augmenting substances produced by lactobacilli is a novel strategy for the prevention or treatment of UTI caused by immune-evading E. coli. PMID:22620976

  14. Strategies for recovering of planktonic and sessile cells of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from freshwater environment.

    PubMed

    Marucci, Patricia L; Cubitto, María A

    2016-07-01

    The experiments were performed with Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL 933 in freshwater microcosms at 12 °C. At 35, 45, and 70 days, samples were taken and filtered through 0.45 μm membrane filters. The following alternatives were tested to evaluate the recovery percentage of injured cells: (1) selective media CHROMagar(™)O157 and chromID(™)O157:H7 agar, at 37 °C for 24 h; (2) tryptic soy agar supplemented with yeast extract (TSAE), incubated at 25 °C for 2 or 4 h, then transferred to CHROMagar(™)O157 or chromID(™)O157:H7 agar at 37 °C (TSAE2h-CHROM, TSAE4h-CHROM and TSAE2h-ID, TSAE4h-ID); (3) thin agar layer (TAL) method, TSAE was overlaid on CHROMagar(™)O157 or chromID(™)O157:H7 agar (TALCHROM and TALID, respectively) and incubated at 37 °C for 24 h; and (4) TALCHROM at 25 °C for 4 h, then continued up to complete 24 h at 37 °C (TALCHROM4h). Furthermore, the recovery of E. coli O157:H7 cells adhering to glass coverslips were evaluated to mimic biofilm conditions. The recovery percentages obtained from each alternative were calculated relative to TSAE counts. After 70 days, TSAE4h-CHROM and TALCHROM4h showed the highest recovery percentage (>90 %) from water microcosms. Despite the improved recovery of cell adhering to glass surfaces, the percentages obtained with TSAE4h-CHROM were low. Further studies for the recovery of biofilm-forming E. coli O157:H7 are required. Pre-incubation on TSAE at 25 °C for 4 h, combined with CHROMagar(™)O157, or by thin agar layer method (TALCHROM) enhanced significantly the recovery of viable cells of E. coli O157:H7 after prolonged stay in water microcosms. PMID:27344557

  15. Direct Injection of Functional Single-Domain Antibodies from E. coli into Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Muyldermans, Serge; Frankel, Gad; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular proteins have a great potential as targets for therapeutic antibodies (Abs) but the plasma membrane prevents access to these antigens. Ab fragments and IgGs are selected and engineered in E. coli and this microorganism may be also an ideal vector for their intracellular delivery. In this work we demonstrate that single-domain Ab (sdAbs) can be engineered to be injected into human cells by E. coli bacteria carrying molecular syringes assembled by a type III protein secretion system (T3SS). The injected sdAbs accumulate in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells at levels ca. 105–106 molecules per cell and their functionality is shown by the isolation of sdAb-antigen complexes. Injection of sdAbs does not require bacterial invasion or the transfer of genetic material. These results are proof-of-principle for the capacity of E. coli bacteria to directly deliver intracellular sdAbs (intrabodies) into human cells for analytical and therapeutic purposes. PMID:21170340

  16. Computational and experimental approaches to chart the Escherichia coli cell-envelope-associated proteome and interactome.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Mejía, Juan Javier; Babu, Mohan; Emili, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial cell-envelope consists of a complex arrangement of lipids, proteins and carbohydrates that serves as the interface between a microorganism and its environment or, with pathogens, a human host. Escherichia coli has long been investigated as a leading model system to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying microbial cell-envelope biology. This includes extensive descriptions of the molecular identities, biochemical activities and evolutionary trajectories of integral transmembrane proteins, many of which play critical roles in infectious disease and antibiotic resistance. Strikingly, however, only half of the c. 1200 putative cell-envelope-related proteins of E. coli currently have experimentally attributed functions, indicating an opportunity for discovery. In this review, we summarize the state of the art of computational and proteomic approaches for determining the components of the E. coli cell-envelope proteome, as well as exploring the physical and functional interactions that underlie its biogenesis and functionality. We also provide a comprehensive comparative benchmarking analysis on the performance of different bioinformatic and proteomic methods commonly used to determine the subcellular localization of bacterial proteins. PMID:19054114

  17. Computational and experimental approaches to chart the Escherichia coli cell-envelope-associated proteome and interactome

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Mejía, Juan Javier; Babu, Mohan; Emili, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial cell-envelope consists of a complex arrangement of lipids, proteins and carbohydrates that serves as the interface between a microorganism and its environment or, with pathogens, a human host. Escherichia coli has long been investigated as a leading model system to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying microbial cell-envelope biology. This includes extensive descriptions of the molecular identities, biochemical activities and evolutionary trajectories of integral transmembrane proteins, many of which play critical roles in infectious disease and antibiotic resistance. Strikingly, however, only half of the c. 1200 putative cell-envelope-related proteins of E. coli currently have experimentally attributed functions, indicating an opportunity for discovery. In this review, we summarize the state of the art of computational and proteomic approaches for determining the components of the E. coli cell-envelope proteome, as well as exploring the physical and functional interactions that underlie its biogenesis and functionality. We also provide a comprehensive comparative benchmarking analysis on the performance of different bioinformatic and proteomic methods commonly used to determine the subcellular localization of bacterial proteins. PMID:19054114

  18. Engineering Escherichia coli into a Protein Delivery System for Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens encode type 3 secretion systems, sophisticated nanomachines that deliver proteins directly into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. These systems present attractive opportunities for therapeutic protein delivery applications; however, their utility has been limited by their inherent pathogenicity. Here, we report the reengineering of a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli with a tunable type 3 secretion system that can efficiently deliver heterologous proteins into mammalian cells, thereby circumventing the need for virulence attenuation. We first introduced a 31 kB region of Shigella flexneri DNA that encodes all of the information needed to form the secretion nanomachine onto a plasmid that can be directly propagated within E. coli or integrated into the E. coli chromosome. To provide flexible control over type 3 secretion and protein delivery, we generated plasmids expressing master regulators of the type 3 system from either constitutive or inducible promoters. We then constructed a Gateway-compatible plasmid library of type 3 secretion sequences to enable rapid screening and identification of sequences that do not perturb function when fused to heterologous protein substrates and optimized their delivery into mammalian cells. Combining these elements, we found that coordinated expression of the type 3 secretion system and modified target protein substrates produces a nonpathogenic strain that expresses, secretes, and delivers heterologous proteins into mammalian cells. This reengineered system thus provides a highly flexible protein delivery platform with potential for future therapeutic applications. PMID:25853840

  19. Flow cell hydrodynamics and their effects on E. coli biofilm formation under different nutrient conditions and turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    Teodósio, J S; Simões, M; Melo, L F; Mergulhão, F J

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a major factor in the growth and spread of both desirable and undesirable bacteria as well as in fouling and corrosion. In order to simulate biofilm formation in industrial settings a flow cell system coupled to a recirculating tank was used to study the effect of a high (550 mg glucose l⁻¹) and a low (150 mg glucose l⁻¹) nutrient concentration on the relative growth of planktonic and attached biofilm cells of Escherichia coli JM109(DE3). Biofilms were obtained under turbulent flow (a Reynolds number of 6000) and the hydrodynamic conditions of the flow cell were simulated by using computational fluid dynamics. Under these conditions, the flow cell was subjected to wall shear stresses of 0.6 Pa and an average flow velocity of 0.4 m s⁻¹ was reached. The system was validated by studying flow development on the flow cell and the applicability of chemostat model assumptions. Full development of the flow was assessed by analysis of velocity profiles and by monitoring the maximum and average wall shear stresses. The validity of the chemostat model assumptions was performed through residence time analysis and identification of biofilm forming areas. These latter results were obtained through wall shear stress analysis of the system and also by assessment of the free energy of interaction between E. coli and the surfaces. The results show that when the system was fed with a high nutrient concentration, planktonic cell growth was favored. Additionally, the results confirm that biofilms adapt their architecture in order to cope with the hydrodynamic conditions and nutrient availability. These results suggest that until a certain thickness was reached nutrient availability dictated biofilm architecture but when that critical thickness was exceeded mechanical resistance to shear stress (ie biofilm cohesion) became more important. PMID:21082456

  20. Survival and SOS response induction in ultraviolet B irradiated Escherichia coli cells with defective repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Prada Medina, Cesar Augusto; Aristizabal Tessmer, Elke Tatjana; Quintero Ruiz, Nathalia; Serment-Guerrero, Jorge; Fuentes, Jorge Luis

    2016-06-01

    Purpose In this paper, the contribution of different genes involved in DNA repair for both survival and SOS induction in Escherichia coli mutants exposed to ultraviolet B radiation (UVB, [wavelength range 280-315 nm]) was evaluated. Materials and methods E. coli strains defective in uvrA, oxyR, recO, recN, recJ, exoX, recB, recD or xonA genes were used to determine cell survival. All strains also had the genetic sulA::lacZ fusion, which allowed for the quantification of SOS induction through the SOS Chromotest. Results Five gene products were particularly important for survival, as follows: UvrA > RecB > RecO > RecJ > XonA. Strains defective in uvrA and recJ genes showed elevated SOS induction compared with the wild type, which remained stable for up to 240 min after UVB-irradiation. In addition, E. coli strains carrying the recO or recN mutation showed no SOS induction. Conclusions The nucleotide excision and DNA recombination pathways were equally used to repair UVB-induced DNA damage in E. coli cells. The sulA gene was not turned off in strains defective in UvrA and RecJ. RecO protein was essential for processing DNA damage prior to SOS induction. In this study, the roles of DNA repair proteins and their contributions to the mechanisms that induce SOS genes in E. coli are proposed. PMID:26967458

  1. Metabolic Control of Intracellular Proteolysis in Growing and Resting Cells of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pine, Martin J.

    1966-01-01

    Pine, Martin J. (Roswell Park Memorial Institute, Buffalo, N.Y.). Metabolic control of intracellular proteolysis in growing and resting cells of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 92:847–850. 1966.—Protein breakdown was examined in Escherichia coli under varying conditions of growth and during nutritional deprivation. Optimal breakdown rates, estimated over short time periods of protein synthesis and decay, are invariant and unrepressible by any condition of growth or starvation. A more important aspect of metabolic control is manifest in the selection imposed by the physiological state of the cell for breakdown of limited populations of proteins. During the progress of growth, one-half to three-quarters of the protein susceptible in the resting state is progressively spared, and breakdown is continued in populations that are more selected and more frequently regenerated. PMID:5333026

  2. Spatial coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Männik, Jaan; Bailey, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    To successfully propagate, cells need to coordinate chromosomal replication and segregation with cell division to prevent formation of DNA-less cells and cells with damaged DNA. Here, we review molecular systems in Escherichia coli that are known to be involved in positioning the divisome and chromosome relative to each other. Interestingly, this well-studied micro-organism has several partially redundant mechanisms to achieve this task; none of which are essential. Some of these systems determine the localization of the divisome relative to chromosomes such as SlmA-dependent nucleoid occlusion, some localize the chromosome relative to the divisome such as DNA translocation by FtsK, and some are likely to act on both systems such as the Min system and newly described Ter linkage. Moreover, there is evidence that E. coli harbors other divisome-chromosome coordination systems in addition to those known. The review also discusses the minimal requirements of coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins needed for cell viability. Arguments are presented that cells can propagate without any dedicated coordination between their chromosomes and cell division machinery at the expense of lowered fitness. PMID:25926826

  3. Spatial coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Männik, Jaan; Bailey, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully propagate, cells need to coordinate chromosomal replication and segregation with cell division to prevent formation of DNA-less cells and cells with damaged DNA. Here, we review molecular systems in Escherichia coli that are known to be involved in positioning the divisome and chromosome relative to each other. Interestingly, this well-studied micro-organism has several partially redundant mechanisms to achieve this task; none of which are essential. Some of these systems determine the localization of the divisome relative to chromosomes such as SlmA-dependent nucleoid occlusion, some localize the chromosome relative to the divisome such as DNA translocation by FtsK, and some are likely to act on both systems such as the Min system and newly described Ter linkage. Moreover, there is evidence that E. coli harbors other divisome-chromosome coordination systems in addition to those known. The review also discusses the minimal requirements of coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins needed for cell viability. Arguments are presented that cells can propagate without any dedicated coordination between their chromosomes and cell division machinery at the expense of lowered fitness. PMID:25926826

  4. Development of a fluorometric microplate antiadhesion assay using uropathogenic Escherichia coli and human uroepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kimble, Lindsey L; Mathison, Bridget D; Kaspar, Kerrie L; Khoo, Christina; Chew, Boon P

    2014-05-23

    A fluorometric microplate assay has been developed to determine Escherichia (E.) coli adhesion to uroepithelial cells (UEC). P-fimbriated E. coli were labeled with BacLight Green and preincubated 30 min with human urine or standard. Fluorescent-E. coli were added to UEC in mircoplates at a 400:1 ratio, incubated 1 h, and washed, and the fluorescence intensity was measured. Specific labeling and adherence were confirmed by flow cytometry. A myricetin (1) standard curve (0-30 μg/mL) was developed; the lower limit of detection was 0.1 μg/mL, and half-maximal inhibitory concentration was 0.88 μg/mL (intra- and interassay coefficients of variance were <10% and <15%, respectively). Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry) extracts, quercetin (2), and procyanidins B1 (3), B2 (4), and C1 (5) showed similar inhibition. Antiadhesion activity of urine samples from subjects (n = 12) consuming placebo or V. macrocarpon beverage determined using this assay was positively correlated (R(2) = 0.78; p < 0.01) with a radiolabeled-E. coli assay. PMID:24749980

  5. Separation and detection of amino acid metabolites of Escherichia coli in microbial fuel cell with CE.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Lihong; Lin, Ping; Xu, Kaixuan

    2016-07-01

    In this work, CE-LIF was employed to investigate the amino acid metabolites produced by Escherichia coli (E. coli) in microbial fuel cell (MFC). Two peptides, l-carnosine and l-alanyl-glycine, together with six amino acids, cystine, alanine, lysine, methionine, tyrosine, arginine were separated and detected in advance by a CE-LIF system coupled with a homemade spontaneous injection device. The injection device was devised to alleviate the effect of electrical discrimination for analytes during sample injection. All analytes could be completely separated within 8 min with detection limits of 20-300 nmol/L. Then this method was applied to analyze the substrate solution containing amino acid metabolites produced by E. coli. l-carnosine, l-alanyl-glycine, and cystine were used as the carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur source for the E. coli culture in the MFC to investigate the amino acid metabolites during metabolism. Two MFCs were used to compare the activity of metabolism of the bacteria. In the sample collected at the running time 200 h of MFC, the amino acid methionine was discovered as the metabolite with the concentrations 23.3 μg/L. PMID:27121957

  6. Release of cell wall peptides into culture medium by exponentially growing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Goodell, E W; Schwarz, U

    1985-01-01

    Escherichia coli W7 cells were found to release three different muropeptides into the culture medium: tetrapeptide (L-Ala-D-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic acid-D-Ala), tripeptide (L-Ala-D-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic acid), and a previously undescribed dipeptide (meso-diaminopimelic acid-D-Ala). From the rate of release of these three peptides, it was calculated that 6 to 8% of the murein in the sacculus was lost per generation. PMID:2858468

  7. Biosensor for direct determination of organophosphate nerve agents using recombinant Escherichia coli with surface-expressed organophosphorus hydrolase. 1. Potentiometric microbial electrode.

    PubMed

    Mulchandani, A; Mulchandani, P; Kaneva, I; Chen, W

    1998-10-01

    A potentiometric microbial biosensor for the direct measurement of organophosphate (OP) nerve agents was developed by modifying a pH electrode with an immobilized layer of Escherichia coli cells expressing organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) on the cell surface. OPH catalyzes the hydrolysis of organophosporus pesticides to release protons, the concentration of which is proportional to the amount of hydrolyzed substrate. The sensor signal and response time were optimized with respect to the buffer pH, ionic concentration of buffer, temperature, and weight of cells immobilized using paraoxon as substrate. The best sensitivity and response time were obtained using a sensor constructed with 2.5 mg of cells and operating in pH 8.5, 1 mM HEPES buffer. Using these conditions, the biosensor was used to measure as low as 2 microM of paraoxon, methyl parathion, and diazinon. The biosensor had very good storage and multiple use stability. The use of cells with the metabolic enzyme expressed on cell surface as a biological transducer provides advantages of no resistances to mass transport of the analyte and product across the cell membrane and low cost due to elimination of enzyme purification, over the conventional microbial biosensors based on cells expressing enzyme intracellularly and enzyme-based sensors, respectively. PMID:9784751

  8. Efficient Surface Display of Diisopropylfluorophosphatase (DFPase) in E. coli for Biodegradation of Toxic Organophosphorus Compounds (DFP and Cp).

    PubMed

    Latifi, Ali Mohammad; Karami, Ali; Khodi, Samaneh

    2015-10-01

    Compounds including organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and chemical nerve agents are toxic compounds synthesized recently which disrupt the mechanisms of neural transmission. Therefore, a critical requirement is the development of a bio-refining technology to facilitate the biodegradation of organophosphorus pollutants. The diisopropylfluorophosphatase (DFPase, EC 3.1.8.2) from the ganglion and brain of Loligo vulgaris acts on P-F bonds present in some OPs. Intracellular production of OPs-degrading enzymes or the use of native bacteria and fungi leads to a low degradation rate of OPs due to a mass transfer issue which reduces the overall catalytic efficiency. To overcome this challenge, we expressed DFPase on the surface of E. coli for the first time by employing the N-terminal domain of the ice nucleation protein (InaV-N) as an anchoring motif. Tracking the recombinant protein confirmed that DFPase is successfully located on the outer membrane. Further studies on its activity to degrade diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) showed its significant ability for the biodegradation of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) with a specific activity of 500 U/mg of wet cell weight. Recombinant cells could also degrade chlorpyrifos (Cp) with an activity equivalent to a maximum value of 381.44 U/ml with a specific activity of 476.75 U/mg of cell, analyzed using HPLC technique. The optimum activity of purified DFPase was found at 30 °C. A more increased activity was also obtained in the presence of glucose-mineral-salt (GMS) supplemented with tryptone and 100 mg/L Co(2+) ion. These results highlight the high potential of the InaV-N anchoring domain to produce an engineered bacterium that can be used in the bioremediation of pesticide-contaminated environments. PMID:26239441

  9. Morphological and ultrastructural changes in the cell structure of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 following treatment with Quercus infectoria nut galls.

    PubMed

    Suwalak, Sakol; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang P

    2009-10-01

    Some information is available on the oak (Quercus infectoria) nut gall as an effective medicinal plant against Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7. However, its antibacterial mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. In this study, some antibacterial actions against STEC O157:H7 were investigated by observing cell viability as well as morphological and ultrastructural changes. An ethanolic extract of Q. infectoria demonstrated inhibitory and bactericidal effects on all of the strains tested with minimal inhibition concentrations (MICs) at 0.78-1.56 mg ml(-1) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) at 1.56-3.12 mg ml(-1). Cell numbers treated with 4MIC of the extract decreased at least two log-fold within 4 h and were completely killed within 12 h. Scanning electron microscopy illustrated a complete loss of surface appendages and pronounced morphological changes at MIC and 2MIC. The whole cell collapsed at 4MIC. Ultrastructural changes from corresponding transmission electron micrographs further verified that damages in the treated cells increased with the increase in the extract concentrations. At MIC (0.78 mg ml(-1)), there was some evidence that the cytoplasmic membranes of the treated E. coli were bulging and/or ruptured, and the cells appeared to be discharging intracellular materials. At 2MIC, the outer membrane of the treated E. coli which was attached to the cell wall became separated from the wall. Disruption in the outer wall and cytoplasmic membranes, especially at the polar regions of the cells occurred and some vacuolization appeared. At 4MIC, the damage to E. coli cells was extensive, and there was loss of their cellular integrity. PMID:19451663

  10. E. coli Nissle 1917 Affects Salmonella Adhesion to Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schierack, Peter; Kleta, Sylvia; Tedin, Karsten; Babila, Julius Tachu; Oswald, Sibylle; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A.; Hiemann, Rico; Paetzold, Susanne; Wieler, Lothar H.

    2011-01-01

    Background The probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) has been shown to interfere in a human in vitro model with the invasion of several bacterial pathogens into epithelial cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EcN on Salmonella Typhimurium invasion of porcine intestinal epithelial cells, focusing on EcN effects on the various stages of Salmonella infection including intracellular and extracellular Salmonella growth rates, virulence gene regulation, and adhesion. We show that EcN affects the initial Salmonella invasion steps by modulating Salmonella virulence gene regulation and Salmonella SiiE-mediated adhesion, but not extra- and intracellular Salmonella growth. However, the inhibitory activity of EcN against Salmonella invasion always correlated with EcN adhesion capacities. EcN mutants defective in the expression of F1C fimbriae and flagellae were less adherent and less inhibitory toward Salmonella invasion. Another E. coli strain expressing F1C fimbriae was also adherent to IPEC-J2 cells, and was similarly inhibitory against Salmonella invasion like EcN. Conclusions We propose that EcN affects Salmonella adhesion through secretory components. This mechanism appears to be common to many E. coli strains, with strong adherence being a prerequisite for an effective reduction of SiiE-mediated Salmonella adhesion. PMID:21379575

  11. Acetate metabolism by Escherichia coli in high-cell-density fermentation.

    PubMed Central

    Kleman, G L; Strohl, W R

    1994-01-01

    Little is known about the cellular physiology of Escherichia coli at high cell densities (e.g., greater than 50 g [dry cell weight] per liter), particularly in relation to the cellular response to different growth conditions. E. coli W3100 cultures were grown under identical physical and nutritional conditions, by using a computer-controlled fermentation system which maintains the glucose concentration at 0.5 g/liter, to high cell densities at pH values of 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, and 7.5. The data suggest a relationship between the pH of the environment and the amount of acetate excreted by the organism during growth. At pH values of 6.0 and 6.5, the acetate reached a concentration of 6 g/liter, whereas at pH 7.5, the acetate reached a concentration of 12 g/liter. Furthermore, at pH values of 6.0 to 7.0, the E. coli culture undergoes a dramatic metabolic switch in which oxygen and glucose consumption and CO2 evolution all temporarily decreased by 50 to 80%, with a concomitant initiation of acetate utilization. After a 30-min pause in which approximately 50% of the available acetate is consumed, the culture recovers and resumes consuming glucose and oxygen and producing acetate and CO2 at preswitch levels. During the switch period, the specific activity of isocitrate lyase typically increases approximately fourfold. PMID:7993084

  12. Quantifying transfer rates of Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 between fresh-cut produce and common kitchen surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Dane A; Friedrich, Loretta M; Harris, Linda J; Danyluk, Michelle D; Schaffner, Donald W

    2013-09-01

    Cross-contamination between foods and surfaces in food processing environments and home kitchens may play a significant role in foodborne disease transmission. This study quantifies the cross-contamination rates between a variety of fresh-cut produce and common kitchen surfaces (ceramic, stainless steel, glass, and plastic) using scenarios that differ by cross-contamination direction, surface type, produce type, and drying time/moisture level. A five-strain cocktail of rifampin-resistant Salmonella was used in transfer scenarios involving celery, carrot, and watermelon, and a five-strain cocktail of rifampin-resistant Escherichia coli O157:H7 was used in transfer scenarios involving lettuce. Produce or surface coupons were placed in buffer-filled filter bags and homogenized or massaged, respectively, to recover cells. The resulting solutions were serially diluted in 0.1% peptone and surface plated onto tryptic soy agar with 80 μg/ml rifampin and bismuth sulfite agar with 80 μg/ml rifampin for Salmonella or sorbitol MacConkey agar with 80 μg/ml rifampin for E. coli O157:H7. When the food contact surface was freshly inoculated, a high amount (>90%) of the inoculum was almost always transferred to the cut produce item. If the inoculated food contact surfaces were allowed to dry for 1 h, median transfer was generally >90% for carrots and watermelon but ranged from <1 to ∼70% for celery and lettuce. Freshly inoculated celery or lettuce transferred more bacteria (<2 to ∼25% of the inoculum) compared with freshly inoculated carrots or watermelon (approximately <1 to 8%). After 1 h of drying, the rate of transfer from inoculated celery, carrot, and lettuce was <0.01 to ∼5% and <1 to ∼5% for watermelon. Surface moisture and direction of transfer have the greatest influence on microbial transfer rates. PMID:23992497

  13. Probe microscopy: Scanning below the cell surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Ozgur

    2008-08-01

    Conventional atomic force microscopy probes only the surface of specimens. A related technique called scanning near-field ultrasonic holography can now image nanoparticles buried below the surfaces of cells, which could prove useful in nanotoxicology.

  14. Rate and topography of peptidoglycan synthesis during cell division in Escherichia coli: Concept of a leading edge

    SciTech Connect

    Wientjes, F.B.; Nanninga, N. )

    1989-06-01

    The rate at which the peptidoglycan of Escherichia coli is synthesized during the division cycle was studied with two methods. One method involved synchronization of E. coli MC4100 lysA cultures by centrifugal elutriation and subsequent pulse-labeling of the synchronously growing cultures with (meso-{sup 3}H)diaminopimelic acid (({sup 3}H)Dap). The second method was autoradiography of cells pulse-labeled with ({sup 3}H)Dap. It was found that the peptidoglycan is synthesized at a more or less exponentially increasing rate during the division cycle with a slight acceleration in this rate as the cells start to constrict. Apparently, polar cap formation requires synthesis of extra surface components, presumably to accommodate for a change in the surface-to-volume ratio. Furthermore, it was found that the pool size of Dap was constant during the division cycle. Close analysis of the topography of ({sup 3}H)Dap incorporation at the constriction site revealed that constriction proceeded by synthesis of peptidoglycan at the leading edge of the invaginating cell envelope. During constriction, no reallocation of incorporation occurred, i.e., the incorporation at the leading edge remained high throughout the process of constriction. Impairment of penicillin-binding protein 3 by mutation or by the specific {beta}-lactam antibiotic furazlocillin did not affect ({sup 3}H)Dap incorporation during initiation of constriction. However, the incorporation at the constriction site was inhibited in later stages of the constriction process. It is concluded that during division at least two peptidoglycan-synthesizing systems are operating sequentially.

  15. A portable, shock-proof, surface-heated droplet PCR system for Escherichia coli detection.

    PubMed

    Angus, Scott V; Cho, Soohee; Harshman, Dustin K; Song, Jae-Young; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2015-12-15

    A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device was developed that uses wire-guided droplet manipulation (WDM) to guide a droplet over three different heating chambers. After PCR amplification, end-point detection is achieved using a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope. The device was tested for identification of the 16S rRNA gene V3 hypervariable region from Escherichia coli genomic DNA. The lower limit of detection was 10(3) genome copies per sample. The device is portable with smartphone-based end-point detection and provides the assay results quickly (15 min for a 30-cycle amplification) and accurately. The system is also shock and vibration resistant, due to the multiple points of contact between the droplet and the thermocouple and the Teflon film on the heater surfaces. The thermocouple also provides real-time droplet temperature feedback to ensure it reaches the set temperature before moving to the next chamber/step in PCR. The device is equipped to use either silicone oil or coconut oil. Coconut oil provides additional portability and ease of transportation by eliminating spilling because its high melting temperature means it is solid at room temperature. PMID:26164008

  16. Cell Division During Inhibition of Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Helmstetter, Charles E.; Pierucci, Olga

    1968-01-01

    When cultures of Escherichia coli B/r growing at various rates were exposed to ultraviolet light, mitomycin C, or nalidixic acid, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis stopped but cell division continued for at least 20 min. The chromosome configurations in the cells which divided were estimated by determining the rate of DNA synthesis during the division cycle. The cultures were pulse-labeled with 14C-thymidine, and the amount of label incorporated into cells of different ages was found by measuring the radioactivity in cells born subsequent to the labeling period. The cells which divided in the absence of DNA synthesis were those which had completed a round of chromosome replication prior to the treatments. It was concluded that completion of a round of replication is a necessary and sufficient condition of DNA synthesis for cell division. PMID:4870278

  17. Division genes in Escherichia coli are expressed coordinately to cell septum requirements by gearbox promoters.

    PubMed

    Aldea, M; Garrido, T; Pla, J; Vicente, M

    1990-11-01

    The cell division ftsQAZ cluster and the ftsZ-dependent bolA morphogene of Escherichia coli are found to be driven by gearboxes, a distinct class of promoters characterized by showing an activity that is inversely dependent on growth rate. These promoters contain specific sequences upstream from the mRNA start point, and their -10 region is essential for the inverse growth rate dependence. Gearbox promoters are essential for driving ftsQAZ and bolA gene expression so that the encoded products are synthesized at constant amounts per cell independently of cell size. This mode of regulation would be expected for the expression of proteins that either play a regulatory role in cell division or form a stoichiometric component of the septum, a structure that, independently of cell size and growth rate, is produced once per cell cycle. PMID:1698623

  18. Study of mechanical properties of DNA in E. coli cells by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, Rudra; Liebeskind, Molly; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    Mechanical quantities like the elasticity of cells are conventionally measured by directly probing them mechanically. Measurements of these quantities for subcellular structures in living cells are almost impossible this way. We use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure such mechanical quantities in chromosomal DNA in E. coli cells. We present methods to address complexities of live-cell FCS such as photobleaching, and calculate the viscoelastic moduli from the FCS data. We compare the measured viscoelastic moduli of live cells with those that are ATP-depleted to stop all molecular motor action and find substantial differences. Active processes are stopped in ATP-depleted cells and hence the bacterial DNA appears to become stiffer and the surrounding intracellular medium more viscous. We also compare our results with the FCS data obtained from the lambda DNA solution in various concentrations to mimic the cellular environment.

  19. Chemotaxis for enhanced immobilization of Escherichia coli and Legionella pneumophila on biofunctionalized surfaces of GaAs.

    PubMed

    Hassen, Walid M; Sanyal, Hashimita; Hammood, Manar; Moumanis, Khalid; Frost, Eric H; Dubowski, Jan J

    2016-06-01

    The authors have investigated the effect of chemotaxis on immobilization of bacteria on the surface of biofunctionalized GaAs (001) samples. Escherichia coli K12 bacteria were employed to provide a proof-of-concept of chemotaxis-enhanced bacterial immobilization, and then, these results were confirmed using Legionella pneumophila. The recognition layer was based on a self-assembled monolayer of thiol functionalized with specific antibodies directed toward E. coli or L. pneumophila, together with the enzyme beta-galactosidase (β-gal). The authors hypothesized that this enzyme together with its substrate lactose would produce a gradient of glucose which would attract bacteria toward the biochip surface. The chemotaxis effect was monitored by comparing the number of bacteria bound to the biochip surface with and without attractant. The authors have observed that β-gal plus lactose enhanced the immobilization of bacteria on our biochips with a higher effect at low bacterial concentrations. At 100 and 10 bacteria/ml, respectively, for E. coli and L. pneumophila, the authors observed up to 11 and 8 times more bacteria bound to biochip surfaces assisted with the chemotaxis effect in comparison to biochips without chemotaxis. At 10(4) bacteria/ml, the immobilization enhancement rate did not exceed two times. PMID:27098616

  20. Monitoring Dynamic Protein Expression in Single Living E. Coli. Bacterial Cells by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, J W; Winhold, H; Corzett, M H; Ulloa, J M; Cosman, M; Balhorn, R; Huser, T

    2007-01-09

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) is a novel, nondestructive, and label-free method that can be used to quantitatively measure changes in cellular activity in single living cells. Here, we demonstrate its use to monitor changes in a population of E. coli cells that occur during overexpression of a protein, the extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(1-120)) Raman spectra were acquired of individual E. coli cells suspended in solution and trapped by a single tightly focused laser beam. Overexpression of MOG(1-120) in transformed E. coli Rosetta-Gami (DE3)pLysS cells was induced by addition of isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). Changes in the peak intensities of the Raman spectra from a population of cells were monitored and analyzed over a total duration of three hours. Data was also collected for concentrated purified MOG(1-120) protein in solution, and the spectra compared with that obtained for the MOG(1-120) expressing cells. Raman spectra of individual, living E. coli cells exhibit signatures due to DNA and protein molecular vibrations. Characteristic Raman markers associated with protein vibrations, such as 1257 cm{sup -1}, 1340 cm{sup -1}, 1453 cm{sup -1} and 1660 cm{sup -1}, are shown to increase as a function of time following the addition of IPTG. Comparison of these spectra and the spectra of purified MOG protein indicates that the changes are predominantly due to the induction of MOG protein expression. Protein expression was found to occur mostly within the second hour, with a 470% increase relative to the protein expressed in the first hour. A 230% relative increase between the second and third hour indicates that protein expression begins to level off within the third hour. It is demonstrated that LTRS has sufficient sensitivity for real-time, nondestructive, and quantitative monitoring of biological processes, such as protein expression, in single living cells. Such capabilities, which are not currently available in

  1. Fate of Escherichia coli O157 Cells Inoculated into Lightly Pickled Chinese Cabbage during Processing, Storage and Incubation in Artificial Gastric Juice.

    PubMed

    Inatsu, Yasuhiro; Ohata, Yukiko; Ananchaipattana, Chiraporn; Latiful Bari, Md; Hosotani, Yukie; Kawasaki, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Fate of Escherichia coli O157 cells was evaluated when inoculated into each step after production of lightly pickled Chinese cabbage. The efficacy of surface sterilization by 100 mg/L of chlorine water for 10 min on raw leaves (6.0 log CFU/g) was 2.2 log CFU/g reduction. No meaningful change of the population of E. coli O157 (3.5 log CFU/g to 1.5 log MPN/g) contaminated into 19 kinds of products was observed. These results indicated the difficulty of estimating the viable count of the cells between contaminated on farms and further processing and storage steps. The population of E. coli O157 (3 log CFU/g to 1 log MPN/g) inoculated into the Chinese cabbage products was reduced less than 0.6 log CFU/g after 2 h-incubation at 37℃ in artificial gastric juice. Prevention from initial contamination of E. coli O157 on the ingredients of Chinese cabbage products is important to reduce the risk of food poisoning because the reduction of the bacterial counts after processing and consumption are limited. PMID:27009510

  2. Origins of Escherichia coli Growth Rate and Cell Shape Changes at High External Osmolality

    PubMed Central

    Pilizota, Teuta; Shaevitz, Joshua W.

    2014-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, a sudden increase in external concentration causes a pressure drop across the cell envelope, followed by an active recovery. After recovery, and if the external osmolality remains high, cells have been shown to grow more slowly, smaller, and at reduced turgor pressure. Despite the fact that the active recovery is a key stress response, the nature of these changes and how they relate to each other is not understood. Here, we use fluorescence imaging of single cells during hyperosmotic shocks, combined with custom made microfluidic devices, to show that cells fully recover their volume to the initial, preshock value and continue to grow at a slower rate immediately after the recovery. We show that the cell envelope material properties do not change after hyperosmotic shock, and that cell shape recovers along with cell volume. Taken together, these observations indicate that the turgor pressure recovers to its initial value so that reduced turgor is not responsible for the reduced growth rate observed immediately after recovery. To determine the point at which the reduction in cell size and turgor pressure occurs after shock, we measured the volume of E. coli cells at different stages of growth in bulk cultures. We show that cell volume reaches the same maximal level irrespective of the osmolality of the media. Based on these measurements, we propose that turgor pressure is used as a feedback variable for osmoregulatory pumps instead of being directly responsible for the reduction in growth rates. Reestablishment of turgor to its initial value might ensure correct attachment of the inner membrane and cell wall needed for cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:25418177

  3. Translocation of surface-inoculated Escherichia coli into whole muscle nonintact beef striploins following blade tenderization.

    PubMed

    Johns, Daniel F; Bratcher, Christy L; Kerth, Chris R; McCaskey, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Translocation of Escherichia coli among beef loins processed with a mechanical tenderizer was evaluated. Two beef striploins were inoculated on the lean side with 6.4 to 7.2 ml of a nalidixic acid-resistant E. coli at 8.2 to 10.1 log CFU/ml. Total E. coli inoculated onto striploins ranged from 1.12 × 10(9) to 9.10 × 10(10) CFU. Striploins were passed once (lean side up, anterior end first) through a mechanical blade tenderizer. After the inoculated striploins had been tenderized, uninoculated beef striploins (n = 5) were passed once (lean side up, anterior end first) through the same mechanical tenderizer. This procedure was repeated twice for a total of 12 striploins. Six core samples were taken from each striploin starting with the anterior end. Each core was cut into six sections; sections 1 through 4 represented the top 4 cm of the core sample, and sections 5 and 6 represented the remaining part of the core split in half. After tenderization, E. coli levels were highest (P < 0.05) in loin 1. Loin 2 had higher levels (P < 0.05) than did loins 4, 5, and 6. No differences in E. coli levels (P > 0.05) were found among loins 3, 4, 5, and 6, for which levels were below the limit of detection. Levels of E. coli from section 1 were higher than those for all other sections. Section 2 had higher levels (P < 0.05) than did sections 3, 4, 5, and 6. E. coli recovery from section 6 was higher (P < 0.05) than that from sections 3, 4, and 5. No differences in E. coli recovery (P > 0.05) were found among sections 3, 4, and 5. Data indicate that even after inoculation of E. coli a high initial levels, contamination from one loin to another is quickly reduced to < 10 CFU/g. PMID:21819662

  4. Mechanisms of pressure-mediated cell death and injury in Escherichia coli: from fundamentals to food applications

    PubMed Central

    Gänzle, Michael; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure is commercially applied to extend the shelf life of foods, and to improve food safety. Current applications operate at ambient temperature and 600 MPa or less. However, bacteria that may resist this pressure level include the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and strains of Escherichia coli, including shiga-toxin producing E. coli. The resistance of E. coli to pressure is variable between strains and highly dependent on the food matrix. The targeted design of processes for the safe elimination of E. coli thus necessitates deeper insights into mechanisms of interaction and matrix-strain interactions. Cellular targets of high pressure treatment in E. coli include the barrier properties of the outer membrane, the integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane as well as the activity of membrane-bound enzymes, and the integrity of ribosomes. The pressure-induced denaturation of membrane bound enzymes results in generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent cell death caused by oxidative stress. Remarkably, pressure resistance at the single cell level relates to the disposition of misfolded proteins in inclusion bodies. While the pressure resistance E. coli can be manipulated by over-expression or deletion of (stress) proteins, the mechanisms of pressure resistance in wild type strains is multi-factorial and not fully understood. This review aims to provide an overview on mechanisms of pressure-mediated cell death in E. coli, and the use of this information for optimization of high pressure processing of foods. PMID:26157424

  5. Effect of Antimicrobial Agents on MinD Protein Oscillations in E. coli Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Corey; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2012-02-01

    The pole-to-pole oscillation of MinD proteins in E. coli cells determines the location of the division septum, and is integral to healthy cell division. It has been shown previously that the MinD oscillation period is approximately 40 s for healthy cells [1] but is strongly dependant on environmental factors such as temperature, which may place stress on the cell [2,3]. We use a strain of E. coli in which the MinD proteins are tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP), allowing fluorescence visualization of the MinD oscillation. We use high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a custom, temperature controlled flow cell to observe the effect of exposure to antimicrobial agents on the MinD oscillation period and, more generally, to analyze the time variation of the spatial distribution of the MinD proteins within the cells. These measurements provide insight into the mechanism of antimicrobial action. [1] Raskin, D.M.; de Boer, P. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 96: 4971-4976. [2] Touhami, A.; Jericho, M; Rutenberg, A. (2006) J. Bacteriol. 188: 7661-7667. [3] Downing, B.; Rutenberg, A.; Touhami, A.; Jericho, M. (2009) PLoS ONE 4: e7285.

  6. Biocatalytic Formation of Gold Nanoparticles Decorated with Functional Proteins inside Recombinant Escherichia coli Cells.

    PubMed

    Hosomomi, Yukiho; Niide, Teppei; Wakabayashi, Rie; Goto, Masahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2016-01-01

    A novel strategy for the preparation of protein-decorated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) was developed inside Escherichia coli cells, where an artificial oxidoreductase, composed of antibody-binding protein (pG), Bacillus stearothermophilus glycerol dehydrogenase (BsGLD) and a peptide tag with gold-binding affinity (H6C), was overexpressed in the cytoplasm. In situ formation of Au NPs was promoted by a natural electron-donating cofactor, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), which was regenerated to the reduced form of NADH by the catalytic activity of the fusion protein (pG-BsGLD-H6C) overexpressed in the cytoplasm of E. coli, with the concomitant addition of exogenous glycerol to the reaction system. The fusion protein was self-immobilized on Au NPs inside the E. coli cells, which was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and western blotting analyses of the resultant Au NPs. Finally, the IgG binding ability of the pG moiety displayed on Au NPs was evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:26960608

  7. Surface Functionalization for Protein and Cell Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpo, Pascal; Ruiz, Ana; Ceriotti, Laura; Rossi, François

    The interaction of biological systems with synthetic material surfaces is an important issue for many biological applications such as implanted devices, tissue engineering, cell-based sensors and assays, and more generally biologic studies performed ex vivo. To ensure reliable outcomes, the main challenge resides in the ability to design and develop surfaces or artificial micro-environment that mimic 'natural environment' in interacting with biomolecules and cells without altering their function and phenotype. At this effect, microfabrication, surface chemistry and material science play a pivotal role in the design of advanced in-vitro systems for cell culture applications. In this chapter, we discuss and describe different techniques enabling the control of cell-surface interactions, including the description of some techniques for immobilization of ligands for controlling cell-surface interactions and some methodologies for the creation of well confined cell rich areas.

  8. Production of the Escherichia coli Common Pilus by Uropathogenic E. coli Is Associated with Adherence to HeLa and HTB-4 Cells and Invasion of Mouse Bladder Urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Casas, Erika Margarita; Durán, Laura; Zhang, Yushan; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Puente, José L.; Daaka, Yehia; Girón, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains cause urinary tract infections and employ type 1 and P pili in colonization of the bladder and kidney, respectively. Most intestinal and extra-intestinal E. coli strains produce a pilus called E. coli common pilus (ECP) involved in cell adherence and biofilm formation. However, the contribution of ECP to the interaction of UPEC with uroepithelial cells remains to be elucidated. Here, we report that prototypic UPEC strains CFT073 and F11 mutated in the major pilin structural gene ecpA are significantly deficient in adherence to cultured HeLa (cervix) and HTB-4 (bladder) epithelial cells in vitro as compared to their parental strains. Complementation of the ecpA mutant restored adherence to wild-type levels. UPEC strains produce ECP upon growth in Luria-Bertani broth or DMEM tissue culture medium preferentially at 26°C, during incubation with cultured epithelial cells in vitro at 37°C, and upon colonization of mouse bladder urothelium ex vivo. ECP was demonstrated on and inside exfoliated bladder epithelial cells present in the urine of urinary tract infection patients. The ability of the CFT073 ecpA mutant to invade the mouse tissue was significantly reduced. The presence of ECP correlated with the architecture of the biofilms produced by UPEC strains on inert surfaces. These data suggest that ECP can potentially be produced in the bladder environment and contribute to the adhesive and invasive capabilities of UPEC during its interaction with the host bladder. We propose that along with other known adhesins, ECP plays a synergistic role in the multi-step infection of the urinary tract. PMID:25036370

  9. Human mesenchymal stem cell microvesicles for treatment of Escherichia coli endotoxin-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying-Gang; Feng, Xiao-Mei; Abbott, Jason; Fang, Xiao-Hui; Hao, Qi; Monsel, Antoine; Qu, Jie-Ming; Matthay, Michael A; Lee, Jae W

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or its conditioned medium restored lung protein permeability and reduced alveolar inflammation following Escherichia coli endotoxin-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in an ex vivo perfused human lung in part through the secretion of soluble factors such as keratinocyte growth factor (KGF). Recently, MSC were found to release microvesicles (MVs) that were biologically active because of the presence of mRNA or miRNA with reparative properties. MVs are circular fragments of membrane released from the endosomal compartment as exosomes or shed from the surface membranes. These studies were designed to determine if MVs released by human bone marrow derived MSCs would be effective in restoring lung protein permeability and reducing inflammation in E. coli endotoxin-induced ALI in C57BL/6 mice. The intratracheal instillation of MVs improved several indices of ALI at 48 hours. Compared to endotoxin-injured mice, MVs reduced extravascular lung water by 43% and reduced total protein levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid by 35%, demonstrating a reduction in pulmonary edema and lung protein permeability. MVs also reduced the influx of neutrophils and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 levels in the BAL fluid by 73% and 49%, respectively, demonstrating a reduction in inflammation. KGF siRNA-pretreatment of MSC partially eliminated the therapeutic effects of MVs released by MSCs, suggesting that KGF protein expression was important for the underlying mechanism. In summary, human MSC-derived MVs were therapeutically effective following E. coli endotoxin-induced ALI in mice in part through the expression of KGF mRNA in the injured alveolus. PMID:23939814

  10. Improved membrane filtration media for enumeration of total coliforms and Escherichia coli from sewage and surface waters.

    PubMed Central

    Freier, T A; Hartman, P A

    1987-01-01

    Two media were developed that allowed both a total coliform count and an Escherichia coli count to be determined on the same medium after 24 h of incubation at 35 degrees C. The new media were tested along with two standard media on 10 surface water and 7 sewage samples. The experimental media yielded equivalent or higher counts relative to the standard media and recovered more specifically the desired indicator groups as determined by colony identification. PMID:3300547

  11. Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 bares the characteristics of both enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) and enteroaggregative (EAEC) E. coli. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga...

  12. Diffusing colloidal probes of cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Gregg A; Fairbrother, D Howard; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-05-25

    Measurements and analyses are reported to quantify dynamic and equilibrium interactions between colloidal particles and live cell surfaces using dark field video microscopy. Two-dimensional trajectories of micron-sized polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated silica colloids relative to adherent epithelial breast cancer cell perimeters are determined allowing measurement of position dependent diffusivities and interaction potentials. PEG was chosen as the material system of interest to assess non-specific interactions with cell surfaces and establishes a basis for investigation of specific interactions in future studies. Analysis of measured potential energies on cell surfaces reveals the spatial dependence in cell topography. With the measured cell topography and models for particle-cell surface hydrodynamic interactions, excellent agreement is obtained between theoretical and measured colloidal transport on cell surfaces. Quantitative analyses of association lifetimes showed that PEG coatings act to stabilize colloids above the cell surface through net repulsive, steric interactions. Our results demonstrate a self-consistent analysis of diffusing colloidal probe interactions due to conservative and non-conservative forces to characterize biophysical cell surface properties. PMID:27117575

  13. Escherichia coli Binding to and Invasion of Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from Humans and Rats of Different Ages

    PubMed Central

    Stins, Monique F.; Nemani, Prasadarao V.; Wass, Carol; Kim, Kwang Sik

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli meningitis commonly occurs in the neonatal period, but the basis of this age dependency is unclear. We have previously identified two types of E. coli-brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMEC) interactions contributing to E. coli traversal of the blood-brain barrier (i.e., binding and invasion). The present study examined whether the age dependency of E. coli meningitis stemmed from differences in the capacities of neonatal and adult BMECs to interact with E. coli. BMECs were isolated from rats of different ages (10 days, 20 days and 3 months) as well as from humans of different ages (fetuses, 4- to 7-year-old children, and a 35-year-old adult, and 60- to 85-year-old geriatrics). The bindings of E. coli to young and old rat BMECs were similar. Also, the abilities of E. coli to invade BMECs were similar for BMECs derived from young and old rats and from human fetuses, children, adults, and geriatrics. These findings suggest that the predominance of E. coli meningitis in neonates is not likely due to greater binding and invasion capacities of newborn compared to adult BMECs. PMID:10496943

  14. Methionine deficiency reduces autophagy and accelerates death in intestinal epithelial cells infected with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulong; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Li, Fengna; Ren, Wenkai; Kong, Xiangfeng; Qiu, Wei; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2015-10-01

    Infections by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) result in large economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Dietary supplementation with amino acids has been considered as a potential mechanism to improve host defenses against infection. The goal of this study was to determine whether methionine deprivation alters ETEC interactions with porcine intestinal epithelial cells. IPEC-1 cells were cultured in media with or without L-methionine. Methionine deprivation resulted in enhanced ETEC adhesion and increased both the cytotoxicity and apoptotic responses of IPEC-1 cells infected with ETEC. Methionine deprivation inhibited IPEC-1 cell autophagic responses, suggesting that the increased cytotoxicity of ETEC to methionine-deprived IPEC-1 cells might be due to defects in autophagy. PMID:24965529

  15. Partial purification and characterization of an escherichia coli toxic factor that induces morphological cell alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, A; Falbo, V; Roda, L G; Ruggeri, F M; Zona, C

    1983-01-01

    A factor produced by several strains of Escherichia coli isolated from enteritis-affected children has been shown to produce both a necrotizing effect on rabbit skin and striking morphological alterations on CHO, Vero, and HeLa cells. The same strains were found to have hemolytic activity on sheep erythrocytes. The toxic, cell-altering factor was demonstrated to be different from both heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxins and from Vero toxin. The main effect induced by the isolated factor on cultured cells was the formation of large multinucleated cells. The partial purification achieved suggests that the same factor (most likely a protein with a molecular weight of 70,000 to 80,000) is responsible for toxic and cell-altering activities, whereas a different molecular species is responsible for hemolytic activity. Images PMID:6341235

  16. Vibrio fischeri and Escherichia coli adhesion tendencies towards photolithographically modified nanosmooth poly (tert-butyl methacrylate) polymer surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Elena P; Mitik-Dineva, Natasa; Mocanasu, Radu C; Murphy, Sarah; Wang, James; van Riessen, Grant; Crawford, Russell J

    2008-01-01

    This study reports the adhesion behavior of two bacterial species, Vibrio fischeri and Escherichia coli, to the photoresistant poly(tert-butyl methacrylate) (P(tBMA)) polymer surface. The data has demonstrated that ultraviolet irradiation of P(tBMA) was able to provide control over bacterial adhesion tendencies. Following photolithography, several of the surface characteristics of P(tBMA) were found to be altered. Atomic force microscopy analysis indicated that photolithographically modified P(tBMA) (henceforth termed ‘modified polymer’) appeared as a ‘nanosmooth’ surface with an average surface roughness of 1.6 nm. Although confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis clearly demonstrated that V. fischeri and E. coli presented largely different patterns of attachment in order to adhere to the same surfaces, both species exhibited a greater adhesion propensity towards the ‘nanosmooth’ surface. The adhesion of both species to the modified polymer surface appeared to be facilitated by an elevated production of extracellular polymeric substances when in contact with the substrate. PMID:24198459

  17. Antibacterial efficacy of inhalable antibiotic-encapsulated biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles against E. coli biofilm cells.

    PubMed

    Cheow, Wean Sin; Chang, Matthew Wook; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2010-08-01

    Biofilm is a sessile community of bacterial cells enclosed by a self-secreted extracellular polymeric matrix that exhibit a high recalcitrance towards antibiotics. Inhaled antibiotic nanoparticles with a sustained release capability have emerged as one of the most promising anti-biofilm formulations in the fight against respiratory biofilm infections attributed to their ability to penetrate the biofilm sputum. The present work examines the antibacterial efficacies and physical characteristics of different antibiotic-loaded polymeric nanoparticle formulations. PLGA and PCL nanoparticles prepared by an emulsification-solvent-evaporation method are used as the antibiotic carrier nanoparticles. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics (i.e., ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin) are selected as the antibiotic models due to their proven effectiveness against dormant bacterial cells and their ability to penetrate the biofilm matrix. The antibacterial efficacy against E. coli biofilm cells is examined in a time-kill study in which the effects of biofilm age, antibiotic exposure history, and drug removal are taken into account. Ciprofloxacin-loaded PLGA nanoparticles are identified as the most ideal formulation due to their high drug encapsulation efficiency, high antibacterial efficacy at a low dose against biofilm cells and biofilm-derived planktonic cells of E. coli. Moreover, the nanoparticulate suspension can be transformed into micro-scale dry-powder aerosols having aerodynamic characteristics ideal for inhaled delivery. PMID:21323113

  18. Insect cells are superior to Escherichia coli in producing malaria proteins inducing IgG targeting PfEMP1 on infected erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The PFD1235w Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) antigen is associated with severe malaria in children and can be expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes (IE) adhering to ICAM1. However, the exact three-dimensional structure of this PfEMP1 and its surface-exposed epitopes are unknown. An insect cell and Escherichia coli based system was used to express single and double domains encoded by the pfd1235w var gene. The resulting recombinant proteins have been evaluated for yield and purity and their ability to induce rat antibodies, which react with the native PFD1235w PfEMP1 antigen expressed on 3D7PFD1235w-IE. Their recognition by human anti-malaria antibodies from previously infected Tanzanian donors was also analysed. Methods The recombinant proteins were run on SDS-PAGE and Western blots for quantification and size estimation. Insect cell and E. coli-produced recombinant proteins were coupled to a bead-based Luminex assay to measure the plasma antibody reactivity of 180 samples collected from Tanzanian individuals. The recombinant proteins used for immunization of rats and antisera were also tested by flow cytometry for their ability to surface label 3D7PFD1235w-IE. Results All seven pAcGP67A constructs were successfully expressed as recombinant protein in baculovirus-infected insect cells and subsequently produced to a purity of 60-97% and a yield of 2-15 mg/L. By comparison, only three of seven pET101/D-TOPO constructs expressed in the E. coli system could be produced at all with purity and yield ranging from 3-95% and 6-11 mg/L. All seven insect cell, but only two of the E. coli produced proteins induced antibodies reactive with native PFD1235w expressed on 3D7PFD1235w-IE. The recombinant proteins were recognized in an age- and transmission intensity-dependent manner by antibodies from 180 Tanzanian individuals in a bead-based Luminex assay. Conclusions The baculovirus based insect cell system was distinctly

  19. Actin pedestal formation by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli enhances bacterial host cell attachment and concomitant type III translocation.

    PubMed

    Battle, Scott E; Brady, Michael J; Vanaja, Sivapriya Kailasan; Leong, John M; Hecht, Gail A

    2014-09-01

    Attachment of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) to intestinal epithelial cells is critical for colonization and is associated with localized actin assembly beneath bound bacteria. The formation of these actin "pedestals" is dependent on the translocation of effectors into mammalian cells via a type III secretion system (T3SS). Tir, an effector required for pedestal formation, localizes in the host cell plasma membrane and promotes attachment of bacteria to mammalian cells by binding to the EHEC outer surface protein Intimin. Actin pedestal formation has been shown to foster intestinal colonization by EHEC in some animal models, but the mechanisms responsible for this remain undefined. Investigation of the role of Tir-mediated actin assembly promoting host cell binding is complicated by other, potentially redundant EHEC-encoded binding pathways, so we utilized cell binding assays that specifically detect binding mediated by Tir-Intimin interaction. We also assessed the role of Tir-mediated actin assembly in two-step assays that temporally segregated initial translocation of Tir from subsequent Tir-Intimin interaction, thereby permitting the distinction of effects on translocation from effects on cell attachment. In these experimental systems, we compromised Tir-mediated actin assembly by chemically inhibiting actin assembly or by infecting mammalian cells with EHEC mutants that translocate Tir but are specifically defective in Tir-mediated pedestal formation. We found that an inability of Tir to promote actin assembly resulted in a significant and striking decrease in bacterial binding mediated by Tir and Intimin. Bacterial mutants defective for pedestal formation translocated type III effectors to mammalian cells with reduced efficiency, but the decrease in translocation could be entirely accounted for by the decrease in host cell attachment. PMID:24958711

  20. A Single-Amino-Acid Substitution in Obg Activates a New Programmed Cell Death Pathway in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dewachter, Liselot; Verstraeten, Natalie; Monteyne, Daniel; Kint, Cyrielle Ines; Versées, Wim; Pérez-Morga, David; Fauvart, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Programmed cell death (PCD) is an important hallmark of multicellular organisms. Cells self-destruct through a regulated series of events for the benefit of the organism as a whole. The existence of PCD in bacteria has long been controversial due to the widely held belief that only multicellular organisms would profit from this kind of altruistic behavior at the cellular level. However, over the past decade, compelling experimental evidence has established the existence of such pathways in bacteria. Here, we report that expression of a mutant isoform of the essential GTPase ObgE causes rapid loss of viability in Escherichia coli. The physiological changes that occur upon expression of this mutant protein—including loss of membrane potential, chromosome condensation and fragmentation, exposure of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface, and membrane blebbing—point to a PCD mechanism. Importantly, key regulators and executioners of known bacterial PCD pathways were shown not to influence this cell death program. Collectively, our results suggest that the cell death pathway described in this work constitutes a new mode of bacterial PCD. PMID:26695632

  1. Detecting cell lysis using viscosity monitoring in E. coli fermentation to prevent product loss.

    PubMed

    Newton, Joseph M; Schofield, Desmond; Vlahopoulou, Joanna; Zhou, Yuhong

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring the physical or chemical properties of cell broths to infer cell status is often challenging due to the complex nature of the broth. Key factors indicative of cell status include cell density, cell viability, product leakage, and DNA release to the fermentation broth. The rapid and accurate prediction of cell status for hosts with intracellular protein products can minimise product loss due to leakage at the onset of cell lysis in fermentation. This article reports the rheological examination of an industrially relevant E. coli fermentation producing antibody fragments (Fab'). Viscosity monitoring showed an increase in viscosity during the exponential phase in relation to the cell density increase, a relatively flat profile in the stationary phase, followed by a rapid increase which correlated well with product loss, DNA release and loss of cell viability. This phenomenon was observed over several fermentations that a 25% increase in broth viscosity (using induction-point viscosity as a reference) indicated 10% product loss. Our results suggest that viscosity can accurately detect cell lysis and product leakage in postinduction cell cultures, and can identify cell lysis earlier than several other common fermentation monitoring techniques. This work demonstrates the utility of rapidly monitoring the physical properties of fermentation broths, and that viscosity monitoring has the potential to be a tool for process development to determine the optimal harvest time and minimise product loss. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology Progress published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers, 32:1069-1076, 2016. PMID:27111912

  2. Detecting cell lysis using viscosity monitoring in E. coli fermentation to prevent product loss

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Joseph M.; Schofield, Desmond; Vlahopoulou, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the physical or chemical properties of cell broths to infer cell status is often challenging due to the complex nature of the broth. Key factors indicative of cell status include cell density, cell viability, product leakage, and DNA release to the fermentation broth. The rapid and accurate prediction of cell status for hosts with intracellular protein products can minimise product loss due to leakage at the onset of cell lysis in fermentation. This article reports the rheological examination of an industrially relevant E. coli fermentation producing antibody fragments (Fab'). Viscosity monitoring showed an increase in viscosity during the exponential phase in relation to the cell density increase, a relatively flat profile in the stationary phase, followed by a rapid increase which correlated well with product loss, DNA release and loss of cell viability. This phenomenon was observed over several fermentations that a 25% increase in broth viscosity (using induction‐point viscosity as a reference) indicated 10% product loss. Our results suggest that viscosity can accurately detect cell lysis and product leakage in postinduction cell cultures, and can identify cell lysis earlier than several other common fermentation monitoring techniques. This work demonstrates the utility of rapidly monitoring the physical properties of fermentation broths, and that viscosity monitoring has the potential to be a tool for process development to determine the optimal harvest time and minimise product loss. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology Progress published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers, 32:1069–1076, 2016 PMID:27111912

  3. Bacterial growth, detachment and cell size control on polyethylene terephthalate surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liyun; Fan, Daming; Chen, Wei; Terentjev, Eugene M.

    2015-01-01

    In medicine and food industry, bacterial colonisation on surfaces is a common cause of infections and severe illnesses. However, the detailed quantitative information about the dynamics and the mechanisms involved in bacterial proliferation on solid substrates is still lacking. In this study we investigated the adhesion and detachment, the individual growth and colonisation, and the cell size control of Escherichia coli (E. coli) MG1655 on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surfaces. The results show that the bacterial growth curve on PET exhibits the distinct lag and log phases, but the generation time is more than twice longer than in bulk medium. Single cells in the lag phase are more likely to detach than clustered ones in the log phase; clustered bacteria in micro-colonies have stronger adhesive bonds with surfaces and their neighbours with the progressing colonisation. We show that the cell size is under the density-dependent pathway control: when the adherent cells are at low density, the culture medium is responsible for coordinating cell division and cell size; when the clustered cells are at high population density, we demonstrate that the effect of quorum sensing causes the cell size decrease as the cell density on surfaces increases. PMID:26464114

  4. Escherichia coli uropathogenesis in vitro: invasion, cellular escape, and secondary infection analyzed in a human bladder cell infection model.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Thomas E; Khandige, Surabhi; Madelung, Michelle; Brewer, Jonathan; Kolmos, Hans J; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2012-05-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are capable of invading bladder epithelial cells (BECs) on the bladder luminal surface. Based primarily on studies in mouse models, invasion is proposed to trigger an intracellular uropathogenic cascade involving intracellular bacterial proliferation followed by escape of elongated, filamentous bacteria from colonized BECs. UPEC filaments on the mouse bladder epithelium are able to revert to rod-shaped bacteria, which are believed to invade neighboring cells to initiate new rounds of intracellular colonization. So far, however, these late-stage infection events have not been replicated in vitro. We have established an in vitro model of human bladder cell infection by the use of a flow chamber (FC)-based culture system, which allows investigation of steps subsequent to initial invasion. Short-term bacterial colonization on the FC-BEC layer led to intracellular colonization. Exposing invaded BECs to a flow of urine, i.e., establishing conditions similar to those faced by UPEC reemerging on the bladder luminal surface, led to outgrowth of filamentous bacteria similar to what has been reported to occur in mice. These filaments were capable of reverting to rods that could invade other BECs. Hence, under growth conditions established to resemble those present in vivo, the elements of the proposed uropathogenic cascade were inducible in a human BEC model system. Here, we describe the model and show how these characteristics are reproduced in vitro. PMID:22354025

  5. Depletion of pre-16S rRNA in starved Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Cangelosi, G A; Brabant, W H

    1997-07-01

    Specific hybridization assays for intermediates in rRNA synthesis (pre-rRNA) may become useful for monitoring the growth activity of individual microbial species in complex natural systems. This possibility depends upon the assumption that rRNA processing in microbial cells continues after growth and pre-rRNA synthesis cease, resulting in drainage of the pre-rRNA pool. This is not the case in many eukaryotic cells, but less is known about the situation in bacteria. Therefore, we used DNA probes to measure steady-state cellular pre-16S rRNA pools during growth state transitions in Escherichia coli. Pre-16S rRNA became undetectable when cells entered the stationary phase on rich medium and was replenished upon restoration of favorable growth conditions. These fluctuations were of much greater magnitude than concurrent fluctuations in the mature 16S rRNA pool. The extent of pre-16S rRNA depletion depended upon the circumstances limiting growth. It was significantly more pronounced in carbon-energy-starved cells than in nitrogen-starved cells or in cells treated with energy uncouplers. In the presence of the transcriptional inhibitor rifampin, rates of pre-16S rRNA depletion in carbon-energy-starved cells and nitrogen-starved cells were similar, suggesting that the difference between these conditions resides primarily at the level of pre-rRNA synthesis. Chloramphenicol, which inhibits the final steps in rRNA maturation, halted pre-16S rRNA depletion under all conditions. The data show that E. coli cells continue to process pre-rRNA after growth and rrn operon transcription cease, leading to drainage of the pre-rRNA pool. This supports the feasibility of using pre-rRNA-targeted probes to monitor bacterial growth in natural systems, with the caveat that patterns of pre-rRNA depletion vary with the conditions limiting growth. PMID:9226253

  6. MtgA Deletion-Triggered Cell Enlargement of Escherichia coli for Enhanced Intracellular Polyester Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Kadoya, Ryosuke; Matsumoto, Ken’ichiro; Ooi, Toshihiko; Taguchi, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial polyester polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) have been produced in engineered Escherichia coli, which turned into an efficient and versatile platform by applying metabolic and enzyme engineering approaches. The present study aimed at drawing out the latent potential of this organism using genome-wide mutagenesis. To meet this goal, a transposon-based mutagenesis was carried out on E. coli, which was transformed to produce poly(lactate-co-3-hydroxybutyrate) from glucose. A high-throughput screening of polymer-accumulating cells on Nile red-containing plates isolated one mutant that produced 1.8-fold higher quantity of polymer without severe disadvantages in the cell growth and monomer composition of the polymer. The transposon was inserted into the locus within the gene encoding MtgA that takes part, as a non-lethal component, in the formation of the peptidoglycan backbone. Accordingly, the mtgA-deleted strain E. coli JW3175, which was a derivate of superior PHA-producing strain BW25113, was examined for polymer production, and exhibited an enhanced accumulation of the polymer (7.0 g/l) compared to the control (5.2 g/l). Interestingly, an enlargement in cell width associated with polymer accumulation was observed in this strain, resulting in a 1.6-fold greater polymer accumulation per cell compared to the control. This result suggests that the increase in volumetric capacity for accumulating intracellular material contributed to the enhanced polymer production. The mtgA deletion should be combined with conventional engineering approaches, and thus, is a promising strategy for improved production of intracellularly accumulated biopolymers. PMID:26039058

  7. MreB Orientation Correlates with Cell Diameter in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ouzounov, Nikolay; Nguyen, Jeffrey P; Bratton, Benjamin P; Jacobowitz, David; Gitai, Zemer; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria have remarkably robust cell shape control mechanisms. For example, cell diameter only varies by a few percent across a given population. The bacterial actin homolog, MreB, is necessary for establishment and maintenance of rod shape although the detailed properties of MreB that are important for shape control remained unknown. In this study, we perturb MreB in two ways: by treating cells with the polymerization-inhibiting drug A22 and by creating point mutants in mreB. These perturbations modify the steady-state diameter of cells over a wide range, from 790 ± 30 nm to 1700 ± 20 nm. To determine which properties of MreB are important for diameter control, we correlated structural characteristics of fluorescently tagged MreB polymers with cell diameter by simultaneously analyzing three-dimensional images of MreB and cell shape. Our results indicate that the helical pitch angle of MreB inversely correlates with the cell diameter of Escherichia coli. Other correlations between MreB and cell diameter are not found to be significant. These results demonstrate that the physical properties of MreB filaments are important for shape control and support a model in which MreB organizes the cell wall growth machinery to produce a chiral cell wall structure and dictate cell diameter. PMID:27602731

  8. Systematic approach to Escherichia coli cell population control using a genetic lysis circuit

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell population control allows for the maintenance of a specific cell population density. In this study, we use lysis gene BBa_K117000 from the Registry of Standard Biological Parts, formed by MIT, to lyse Escherichia coli (E. coli). The lysis gene is regulated by a synthetic genetic lysis circuit, using an inducer-regulated promoter-RBS component. To make the design more easily, it is necessary to provide a systematic approach for a genetic lysis circuit to achieve control of cell population density. Results Firstly, the lytic ability of the constructed genetic lysis circuit is described by the relationship between the promoter-RBS components and inducer concentration in a steady state model. Then, three types of promoter-RBS libraries are established. Finally, according to design specifications, a systematic design approach is proposed to provide synthetic biologists with a prescribed I/O response by selecting proper promoter-RBS component set in combination with suitable inducer concentrations, within a feasible range. Conclusion This study provides an important systematic design method for the development of next-generation synthetic gene circuits, from component library construction to genetic circuit assembly. In future, when libraries are more complete, more precise cell density control can be achieved. PMID:25559865

  9. Co-Detection of Virulent Escherichia coli Genes in Surface Water Sources

    PubMed Central

    Ndlovu, Thando; Le Roux, Marcellous; Khan, Wesaal; Khan, Sehaam

    2015-01-01

    McNemar’s test and the Pearson Chi-square were used to assess the co-detection and observed frequency, respectively, for potentially virulent E. coli genes in river water. Conventional multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) assays confirmed the presence of the aggR gene (69%), ipaH gene (23%) and the stx gene (15%) carried by Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), Enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and Enterohermorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), respectively, in river water samples collected from the Berg River (Paarl, South Africa). Only the aggR gene was present in 23% of samples collected from the Plankenburg River system (Stellenbosch, South Africa). In a comparative study, real-time multiplex PCR assays confirmed the presence of aggR (EAEC) in 69%, stx (EHEC) in 15%, ipaH (EIEC) in 31% and eae (EPEC) in 8% of the river water samples collected from the Berg River. In the Plankenburg River, aggR (EAEC) was detected in 46% of the samples, while eae (EPEC) was present in 15% of the water samples analyzed using real-time multiplex PCR in the Plankenburg River. Pearson Chi-square showed that there was no statistical difference (p > 0.05) between the conventional and real-time multiplex PCRs for the detection of virulent E. coli genes in water samples. However, the McNemar’s test showed some variation in the co-detection of virulent E. coli genes, for example, there was no statistical difference in the misclassification of the discordant results for stx versus ipaH, which implies that the ipaH gene was frequently detected with the stx gene. This study thus highlights the presence of virulent E. coli genes in river water and while early detection is crucial, quantitative microbial risk analysis has to be performed to identify and estimate the risk to human health. PMID:25659126

  10. Highly reproductive Escherichia coli cells with no specific assignment to the UAG codon

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Takahito; Hoshi, Hiroko; Ohtake, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Mihoko; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayashi, Akiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Sakamoto, Kensaku

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a widely used host organism for recombinant technology, and the bacterial incorporation of non-natural amino acids promises the efficient synthesis of proteins with novel structures and properties. In the present study, we developed E. coli strains in which the UAG codon was reserved for non-natural amino acids, without compromising the reproductive strength of the host cells. Ninety-five of the 273 UAG stop codons were replaced synonymously in the genome of E. coli BL21(DE3), by exploiting the oligonucleotide-mediated base-mismatch-repair mechanism. This genomic modification allowed the safe elimination of the UAG-recognizing cellular component (RF-1), thus leaving the remaining 178 UAG codons with no specific molecule recognizing them. The resulting strain B-95.ΔA grew as vigorously as BL21(DE3) in rich medium at 25–42°C, and its derivative B-95.ΔAΔfabR was better adapted to low temperatures and minimal media than B-95.ΔA. UAG was reassigned to synthetic amino acids by expressing the specific pairs of UAG-reading tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. Due to the preserved growth vigor, the B-95.ΔA strains showed superior productivities for hirudin molecules sulfonated on a particular tyrosine residue, and the Fab fragments of Herceptin containing multiple azido groups. PMID:25982672

  11. Effect of visible light on progressive dormancy of Escherichia coli cells during the survival process in natural fresh water.

    PubMed

    Barcina, I; González, J M; Iriberri, J; Egea, L

    1989-01-01

    Some effects of visible light on the survival of Escherichia coli in waters of the Butrón river were studied by comparing illuminated and nonilluminated systems. The following count methods were used: CFU on a selective medium (eosin-methylene blue agar), CFU on a medium of recuperation (Trypticase soy agar with yeast extract and glucose), number of metabolically active cells by reduction of 2-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride (INT) to INT-formazan, and total number of E. coli cells as determined by the acridine orange direct-count method. In the illuminated systems, decreases in CFU of E. coli and in the number of metabolically active cells were observed. However, no decline of the total number of E. coli cells was observed. By count methods, different stages of progressive dormancy of E. coli cells were determined to exist in illuminated systems. Culturable and recoverable cells were defined as viable cells, and metabolically active cells and morphologically intact cells were defined as somnicells. Indirect activity measurements were also done by using [14C]glucose. In illuminated systems, a decrease of glucose uptake by E. coli cells was observed throughout the experiments. The assimilated fraction of [14C]glucose decreased faster than the respired fraction in illuminated systems. The percentage of respired [14C]glucose (14CO2 production) with respect to the total glucose uptake increased throughout the experiments, and the percentage of assimilated glucose decreased. Therefore, the visible light was also responsible for an additional inhibition of biosynthetic processes. PMID:2650620

  12. Essential oils--their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and effect on intestinal cell viability.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Dusan; Dusan, Fabian; Sabol, Marián; Marián, Sabol; Domaracká, Katarína; Katarína, Domaracká; Bujnáková, Dobroslava; Dobroslava, Bujnáková

    2006-12-01

    Essential oils are known to possess antimicrobial activity against a wide spectrum of bacteria. The main objective of this study was to evaluate possible harmful effects of four commonly used essential oils and their major components on intestinal cells. Antimicrobial activity of selected plant extracts against enteroinvasive Escherichia coli was dose dependent. However, doses of essential oils with the ability to completely inhibit bacterial growth (0.05%) showed also relatively high cytotoxicity to intestinal-like cells cultured in vitro. Lower doses of essential oils (0.01%) had only partial antimicrobial activity and their damaging effect on Caco-2 cells was only modest. Cell death assessment based on morphological and viability staining followed by fluorescence microscopy showed that essential oils of cinnamon and clove and their major component eugenol had almost no cytotoxic effect at lower doses. Although essential oil of oregano and its component carvacrol slightly increased the incidence of apoptotic cell death, they showed extensive antimicrobial activity even at lower concentrations. Relatively high cytotoxicity was demonstrated by thyme oil, which increased both apoptotic and necrotic cell death incidence. In contrast, its component thymol showed no cytotoxic effect as well as greatly-reduced ability to inhibit visible growth of the chosen pathogen in the doses used. On the other hand, the addition of all essential oils and their components at lower doses, with the exception of thyme oil, to bacterial suspension significantly reduced the cytotoxic effect of E. coli on Caco-2 cells after 1h culture. In conclusion, it is possible to find appropriate doses of essential oils showing both antimicrobial activity and very low detrimental effect on intestinal cells. PMID:16919909

  13. Transcription of ftsZ oscillates during the cell cycle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, T; Sánchez, M; Palacios, P; Aldea, M; Vicente, M

    1993-01-01

    The FtsZ protein is a key element controlling cell division in Escherichia coli. A powerful transcription titration assay was used to quantify the ftsZ mRNA present in synchronously dividing cells. The ftsZ mRNA levels oscillate during the cell cycle reaching a maximum at about the time DNA replication initiates. This cell cycle dependency is specifically due to the two proximal ftsZ promoters. A strain was constructed in which expression of ftsZ could be modulated by an exogenous inducer. In this strain cell size and cell division frequency were sensitive to the cellular FtsZ contents, demonstrating the rate-limiting role of this protein in cell division. Transcriptional activity of the ftsZ promoters was found to be independent of DnaA, indicating that DNA replication and cell division may be independently controlled at the time when new rounds of DNA replication are initiated. This suggests a parallelism between the prokaryotic cell cycle signals and the START point of eukaryotic cell cycles. Images PMID:8404863

  14. Escherichia coli Surface Display of Single-Chain Antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin-Xu; Mellon, Michael; Bowder, Dane; Quinn, Meghan; Shea, Danielle; Wood, Charles; Xiang, Shi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission and infection occur mainly via the mucosal surfaces. The commensal bacteria residing in these surfaces can potentially be employed as a vehicle for delivering inhibitors to prevent HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have employed a bacteria-based strategy to display a broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01, which could potentially be used to prevent HIV-1 infection. The VRC01 antibody mimics CD4-binding to gp120 and has broadly neutralization activities against HIV-1. We have designed a construct that can express the fusion peptide of the scFv-VRC01 antibody together with the autotransporter β-barrel domain of IgAP gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which enabled surface display of the antibody molecule. Our results indicate that the scFv-VRC01 antibody molecule was displayed on the surface of the bacteria as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. The engineered bacteria can capture HIV-1 particles via surface-binding and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell culture. PMID:25482819

  15. Potent CD14-mediated signalling of human leukocytes by Escherichia coli can be mediated by interaction of whole bacteria and host cells without extensive prior release of endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, S S; Chen, K; Chen, S; Doerfler, M E; Elsbach, P; Weiss, J

    1996-01-01

    How invading microorganisms are detected by the host has not been well defined. We have compared the abilities of Escherichia coli and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) purified from these bacteria to prime isolated neutrophils for phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated arachidonate release, to trigger respiratory burst in 1% blood, and to increase steady-state levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA in whole blood. In all three assays, bacteria were > or = 10-fold more potent than equivalent amounts of LPS and could trigger maximal cellular responses at ratios as low as one bacterium per 20 to 200 leukocytes. Both E. coli and LPS-triggered responses were enhanced by LPS-binding protein and inhibited by an anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody and the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI). However, whereas O polysaccharide did not affect the potency of isolated LPS, intact E. coli carrying long-chain LPS (O111:B4) was less potent than rough E. coli (J5). Furthermore, material collected by filtration or centrifugation of bacteria incubated under conditions used to trigger arachidonate release or chemiluminescence was 5- or 30-fold less active, respectively, than whole bacterial suspensions. Extracellular BPI (not bound to bacteria) inhibited bacterial signalling, but BPI bound to bacteria was much more potent. Taken together, these findings indicate that E. coli cells can strongly signal their presence to human leukocytes not only by shedding LPS into surrounding fluids but also by exposing endotoxin at or near their surface during direct interaction with host cells. PMID:8751904

  16. X-ray micrography and imaging of Escherichia coli cell shape using laser plasma pulsed point x-ray sources.

    PubMed Central

    Rajyaguru, J M; Kado, M; Richardson, M C; Muszynski, M J

    1997-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray microscopy is a relatively new technique and is performed mostly at a few large synchrotron x-ray sources that use exposure times of seconds. We utilized a bench-top source of single-shot laser (ns) plasma to generate x-rays similar to synchrotron facilities. A 5 microlitres suspension of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 in 0.9% phosphate buffered saline was placed on polymethylmethyacrylate coated photoresist, covered with a thin (100 nm) SiN window and positioned in a vacuum chamber close to the x-ray source. The emission spectrum was tuned for optimal absorption by carbon-rich material. Atomic force microscope scans provided a surface and topographical image of differential x-ray absorption corresponding to specimen properties. By using this technique we observed a distinct layer around whole cells, possibly representing the Gram-negative envelope, darker stained areas inside the cell corresponding to chromosomal DNA as seen by thin section electron microscopy, and dent(s) midway through one cell, and 1/3- and 2/3-lengths in another cell, possibly representing one or more division septa. This quick and high resolution with depth-of-field microscopy technique is unmatched to image live hydrated ultrastructure, and has much potential for application in the study of fragile biological specimens. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:9083658

  17. Lactobacilli, bifidobacteria and E. coli nissle induce pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Helwig, Ulf; Lammers, Karen M; Rizzello, Fernando; Brigidi, Patricia; Rohleder, Verena; Caramelli, Elisabetta; Gionchetti, Paolo; Schrezenmeir, Juergen; Foelsch, Ulrich R; Schreiber, Stefan; Campieri, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) with the cell debris and cell extraction of different probiotic strains is similar or species specific. METHODS: Three strains of bifidobacteria, 4 strains of lactobacilli, and E. coli nissle were sonicated and centrifuged in order to divide them into cell extract and cell debris. PBMNC were separated by density gradient and incubated for 36 h with either the cell debris or the cell extract of single strains of probiotic bacteria in doses from 102 to 108 CFU/mL. Cell supernatants were taken and interleukin (IL)-10, IL-1β, and tumor necosis factor (TNF)-α were determined by ELISA. RESULTS: Depending on the species super-family, the strains had different stimulation patterns. Except for both L. casei strains, the cell extract of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli had less stimulating capacity than cell debris, whereas the cell extract of E. coli nissle had similar stimulating properties to that of the cell debris of the strain and significantly more stimulating capacity than that of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. The cell debris of bifidobacteria stimulated more cytokine release than the cell debris of lactobacilli. The cell debris of lactobacilli did not have a stimulating capacity when lower concentrations were used. Neither cell extraction nor cell debris had an inhibitory effect on the production of the tested cytokines by stimulated PBMNC. CONCLUSION: The incubation of probiotic strains, which have been used in clinical trials for inflammatory diseases, with immunocompetent cells leads to different species specific reactions. High IL-10 response to cell debris of bifidobacteria and E. coli nissle can be found. This corresponds to positive effects of bifidobacteria and E. coli nissle in clinical trials for inflammatory bowel disease compared to negative outcomes obtained with lactobacilli. PMID:17009396

  18. The Redundancy of Peptidoglycan Carboxypeptidases Ensures Robust Cell Shape Maintenance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Katharina; Kannan, Suresh; Rao, Vincenzo A.; Biboy, Jacob; Vollmer, Daniela; Erickson, Stephen W.; Lewis, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Peptidoglycan (PG) is an essential structural component of the bacterial cell wall and maintains the integrity and shape of the cell by forming a continuous layer around the cytoplasmic membrane. The thin PG layer of Escherichia coli resides in the periplasm, a unique compartment whose composition and pH can vary depending on the local environment of the cell. Hence, the growth of the PG layer must be sufficiently robust to allow cell growth and division under different conditions. We have analyzed the PG composition of 28 mutants lacking multiple PG enzymes (penicillin-binding proteins [PBPs]) after growth in acidic or near-neutral-pH media. Statistical analysis of the muropeptide profiles identified dd-carboxypeptidases (DD-CPases) that were more active in cells grown at acidic pH. In particular, the absence of the DD-CPase PBP6b caused a significant increase in the pentapeptide content of PG as well as morphological defects when the cells were grown at acidic pH. Other DD-CPases (PBP4, PBP4b, PBP5, PBP6a, PBP7, and AmpH) and the PG synthase PBP1B made a smaller or null contribution to the pentapeptide-trimming activity at acidic pH. We solved the crystal structure of PBP6b and also demonstrated that the enzyme is more stable and has a lower Km at acidic pH, explaining why PBP6b is more active at low pH. Hence, PBP6b is a specialized DD-CPase that contributes to cell shape maintenance at low pH, and E. coli appears to utilize redundant DD-CPases for normal growth under different conditions. PMID:27329754

  19. The C-terminal portion of the tail fiber protein of bacteriophage lambda is responsible for binding to LamB, its receptor at the surface of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Hofnung, M; Charbit, A

    2000-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda adsorbs to its Escherichia coli K-12 host by interacting with LamB, its cell-surface receptor. We fused C-terminal portions of J, the tail fiber protein of lambda, to maltose-binding protein. Solid-phase binding assays demonstrated that a purified fusion protein comprising only the last 249 residues of J could bind to LamB trimers and inhibited recognition by anti-LamB antibodies. Electron microscopy further demonstrated that the fusion protein could also bind to LamB at the surface of intact cells. This interaction prevented lambda adsorption but affected only partially maltose uptake. PMID:10629200

  20. Enhanced expression of rabies virus surface G-protein in Escherichia coli using SUMO fusion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ankit; Yadav, Dinesh; Rai, Krishan Mohan; Srivastava, Meenal; Verma, Praveen C; Singh, Pradhyumna K; Tuli, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Fusion systems are known to increase the expression of difficult to express recombinant proteins in soluble form to facilitate their purification. Rabies glycoprotein was also tough to express at sufficient level in soluble form in both E. coli and plant. The present work was aimed to over-express and purify this membrane protein from soluble extract of E. coli. Fusion of Small Ubiqutin like Modifier (SUMO) with rabies glycoprotein increased ~1.5 fold higher expression and ~3.0 fold solubility in comparison to non-fused in E. coli. The SUMO fusion also simplified the purification process. Previously engineered rabies glycoprotein gene in tobacco plants provides complete protection to mice, but the expression was very low for purification. Our finding demonstrated that the SUMO-fusion was useful for enhancing expression and solubility of the membrane protein and again proves to be a good alternative technology for applications in biomedical and pharmaceutical research. PMID:22134654

  1. Timing of initiation of chromosome replication in individual Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed Central

    Skarstad, K; Boye, E; Steen, H B

    1986-01-01

    The synchrony of initiation of chromosome replication at multiple origins within individual Escherichia coli cells was studied by a novel method. Initiation of replication was inhibited with rifampicin or chloramphenicol and after completion of ongoing rounds of replication the numbers of fully replicated chromosomes in individual cells were measured by flow cytometry. In rapidly growing cultures, with parallel replication of several chromosomes, cells will end up with 2n (n = 1, 2, 3) chromosomes if initiation occurs simultaneously at all origins. A culture with asynchronous initiation may in addition contain cells with irregular numbers (not equal to 2n) of chromosomes. The frequency of cells with irregular numbers of chromosomes is a measure of the degree of asynchrony of initiation. After inhibition of initiation and run-out of replication in rapidly growing B/r A and K-12 cultures, a small fraction of the cells (2-7%) contained 3, 5, 6 or 7 chromosomes. From these measurements it was calculated that initiation at four origins in a single cell occurred within a small fraction, 0.1, of the doubling time (tau). A dnaA(Ts) mutant strain grown at permissive temperature exhibited a very large fraction of cells with irregular numbers of chromosomes after drug treatment demonstrating virtually random timing of initiation. A similar pattern of chromosome number per cell was found after treatment of a recA strain. PMID:3527695

  2. Morphological analysis of nuclear separation and cell division during the life cycle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Woldringh, C L

    1976-01-01

    Quantitative electron microscope observations were performed on Escherichia coli B/r after balanced growth with doubling times (tau) of 32 and 60 min. The experimental approach allowed the timing of morphological events during the cell cycle by classifying serially sectioned cells according to length. Visible separation of the nucleoplasm was found to coincide with the time of termination of chromosome replication as predicted by the Cooper-Helmstetter model. The duration of the process of constrictive cell division (10 min) appeared to be independent of the growth rate for tau equals 60 min or less but to increase with increase doubling time in more slowly growing cells. Physiological division, i.e., compartmentalization prior to physical separation of the cells, was only observed to occur in the last minute of the cell cycle. The morphological results indicate that cell elongation continues during the division process in cells with tau equals 32 min, but fails to continue in cells with tau equals 60 min. Images PMID:1107308

  3. [Effect of Stress on Emergence of Antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli Cells].

    PubMed

    Loiko, N G; Kozlova, A N; Nikolaev, Yu A; Gaponov, A M; Tutel'yan, A V; El'-Registan, G I

    2015-01-01

    Effect of sublethal doses of physical and chemical stressors (heat shock for 2 h at 45 degrees C and addition of C12-alkylhydroxybenzene, a microbial alarmone) on development of resistance to the subsequent lethal antibiotic attack and the role of the time interval between these treatments were studied on a submerged batch culture of Escherichia coli 12. The interval sufficient for the development of stress response provides for development of temporary adaptive resistance to the antibiotic attack, resulting in increased number of surviving persister cells. The interval below the time required for the stress response potentiates cell death and results in a decreased number of persisters. Heterogeneity of the fractions (10(-4) to 10(-2)% of the intial CFU number) surviving lethal doses of an antibiotic (a mpicillin or ciprofloxacin) was found. Apart from a low number of antibiotic-resistant cells (up to 0.005% of surviving cells), the fractions contained antibiotic-tolerant forms, such as temporarily resistant metabolically adapted cells, long-term persisters, and the cells of slowly growing SCV variants with small colonies (d ≤ 1 mm). Persisters are hypothesized to act as precursors for cystlike dormant cells (CLC), in which the cell differentiation stage is completed and the processes of cell ametabolism (transition to the anabiotic state) are still incomplete. PMID:27169240

  4. MioC and GidA proteins promote cell division in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Lies, Mark; Visser, Bryan J.; Joshi, Mohan C.; Magnan, David; Bates, David

    2015-01-01

    The well-conserved genes surrounding the E. coli replication origin, mioC and gidA, do not normally affect chromosome replication and have little known function. We report that mioC and gidA mutants exhibit a moderate cell division inhibition phenotype. Cell elongation is exacerbated by a fis deletion, likely owing to delayed replication and subsequent cell cycle stress. Measurements of replication initiation frequency and origin segregation indicate that mioC and gidA do not inhibit cell division through any effect on oriC function. Division inhibition is also independent of the two known replication/cell division checkpoints, SOS and nucleoid occlusion. Complementation analysis indicates that mioC and gidA affect cell division in trans, indicating their effect is at the protein level. Transcriptome analysis by RNA sequencing showed that expression of a cell division septum component, YmgF, is significantly altered in mioC and gidA mutants. Our data reveal new roles for the gene products of gidA and mioC in the division apparatus, and we propose that their expression, cyclically regulated by chromatin remodeling at oriC, is part of a cell cycle regulatory program coordinating replication initiation and cell division. PMID:26074904

  5. Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Nagata, S; Suzuki, J; Segawa, K; Fujii, T

    2016-06-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) is a phospholipid that is abundant in eukaryotic plasma membranes. An ATP-dependent enzyme called flippase normally keeps PtdSer inside the cell, but PtdSer is exposed by the action of scramblase on the cell's surface in biological processes such as apoptosis and platelet activation. Once exposed to the cell surface, PtdSer acts as an 'eat me' signal on dead cells, and creates a scaffold for blood-clotting factors on activated platelets. The molecular identities of the flippase and scramblase that work at plasma membranes have long eluded researchers. Indeed, their identity as well as the mechanism of the PtdSer exposure to the cell surface has only recently been revealed. Here, we describe how PtdSer is exposed in apoptotic cells and in activated platelets, and discuss PtdSer exposure in other biological processes. PMID:26891692

  6. Detecting Bacterial Surface Organelles on Single Cells Using Optical Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Zakrisson, Johan; Singh, Bhupender; Svenmarker, Pontus; Wiklund, Krister; Zhang, Hanqing; Hakobyan, Shoghik; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Andersson, Magnus

    2016-05-10

    Bacterial cells display a diverse array of surface organelles that are important for a range of processes such as intercellular communication, motility and adhesion leading to biofilm formation, infections, and bacterial spread. More specifically, attachment to host cells by Gram-negative bacteria are mediated by adhesion pili, which are nanometers wide and micrometers long fibrous organelles. Since these pili are significantly thinner than the wavelength of visible light, they cannot be detected using standard light microscopy techniques. At present, there is no fast and simple method available to investigate if a single cell expresses pili while keeping the cell alive for further studies. In this study, we present a method to determine the presence of pili on a single bacterium. The protocol involves imaging the bacterium to measure its size, followed by predicting the fluid drag based on its size using an analytical model, and thereafter oscillating the sample while a single bacterium is trapped by an optical tweezer to measure its effective fluid drag. Comparison between the predicted and the measured fluid drag thereby indicate the presence of pili. Herein, we verify the method using polymer coated silica microspheres and Escherichia coli bacteria expressing adhesion pili. Our protocol can in real time and within seconds assist single cell studies by distinguishing between piliated and nonpiliated bacteria. PMID:27088225

  7. Solar cell having improved back surface reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, A. T.

    1982-10-01

    The operating temperature is reduced and the output of a solar cell is increased by using a solar cell which carries electrodes in a grid finger pattern on its back surface. These electrodes are sintered at the proper temperature to provide good ohmic contact. After sintering, a reflective material is deposited on the back surface by vacuum evaporation. Thus, the application of the back surface reflector is separate from the back contact formation. Back surface reflectors formed in conjunction with separate grid finger configuration back contacts are more effective than those formed by full back metallization of the reflector material.

  8. Role of major surface structures of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in initial attachment to biotic and abiotic surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection by human pathogens through fresh, minimally processed produce and solid plant-derived foods is a major concern of U.S. and global food industry and public health services. The enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a frequent and potent food borne pathogen that causes severe disease...

  9. Low-level red laser therapy alters effects of ultraviolet C radiation on Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Canuto, K S; Sergio, L P S; Guimarães, O R; Geller, M; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-10-01

    Low-level lasers are used at low power densities and doses according to clinical protocols supplied with laser devices or based on professional practice. Although use of these lasers is increasing in many countries, the molecular mechanisms involved in effects of low-level lasers, mainly on DNA, are controversial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-level red lasers on survival, filamentation, and morphology of Escherichia colicells that were exposed to ultraviolet C (UVC) radiation. Exponential and stationary wild-type and uvrA-deficientE. coli cells were exposed to a low-level red laser and in sequence to UVC radiation. Bacterial survival was evaluated to determine the laser protection factor (ratio between the number of viable cells after exposure to the red laser and UVC and the number of viable cells after exposure to UVC). Bacterial filaments were counted to obtain the percentage of filamentation. Area-perimeter ratios were calculated for evaluation of cellular morphology. Experiments were carried out in duplicate and the results are reported as the means of three independent assays. Pre-exposure to a red laser protected wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells against the lethal effect of UVC radiation, and increased the percentage of filamentation and the area-perimeter ratio, depending on UVC fluence and physiological conditions in the cells. Therapeutic, low-level red laser radiation can induce DNA lesions at a sub-lethal level. Consequences to cells and tissues should be considered when clinical protocols based on this laser are carried out. PMID:26445338

  10. Low-level red laser therapy alters effects of ultraviolet C radiation on Escherichia coli cells

    PubMed Central

    Canuto, K.S.; Sergio, L.P.S.; Guimarães, O.R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Low-level lasers are used at low power densities and doses according to clinical protocols supplied with laser devices or based on professional practice. Although use of these lasers is increasing in many countries, the molecular mechanisms involved in effects of low-level lasers, mainly on DNA, are controversial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-level red lasers on survival, filamentation, and morphology of Escherichia colicells that were exposed to ultraviolet C (UVC) radiation. Exponential and stationary wild-type and uvrA-deficientE. coli cells were exposed to a low-level red laser and in sequence to UVC radiation. Bacterial survival was evaluated to determine the laser protection factor (ratio between the number of viable cells after exposure to the red laser and UVC and the number of viable cells after exposure to UVC). Bacterial filaments were counted to obtain the percentage of filamentation. Area-perimeter ratios were calculated for evaluation of cellular morphology. Experiments were carried out in duplicate and the results are reported as the means of three independent assays. Pre-exposure to a red laser protected wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells against the lethal effect of UVC radiation, and increased the percentage of filamentation and the area-perimeter ratio, depending on UVC fluence and physiological conditions in the cells. Therapeutic, low-level red laser radiation can induce DNA lesions at a sub-lethal level. Consequences to cells and tissues should be considered when clinical protocols based on this laser are carried out. PMID:26445338

  11. High vacuum cells for classical surface techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Imee Su; Baldelli, Steven

    2010-04-15

    Novel glass cells were designed and built to be able to perform surface potential and surface tension measurements in a contained environment. The cells can withstand pressures of approximately 1x10{sup -6} Torr, providing a reasonable level of control in terms of the amounts of volatile contaminants during experimentation. The measurements can take several hours; thus the cells help maintain the integrity of the sample in the course of the experiment. To test for the feasibility of the cell design, calibration measurements were performed. For the surface potential cell, the modified TREK 6000B-7C probe exhibited performance comparable to its unmodified counterpart. The correlation measurements between applied potential on the test surface and the measured potential showed R-values very close to 1 as well as standard deviation values of less than 1. Results also demonstrate improved measurement values for experiments performed in vacuum. The surface tension cell, on the other hand, which was used to perform the pendant drop method, was tested on common liquids and showed percentage errors of 0.5% when compared to literature values. The fabricated cells redefine measurements using classical surface techniques, providing unique and novel methods of sample preparation, premeasurement preparation, and sample analysis at highly beneficial expenditure cost.

  12. Gut myoelectrical activity induces heat shock response in Escherichia coli and Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Laubitz, Daniel; Jankowska, Alicja; Sikora, Anna; Woliński, Jarosław; Zabielski, Romuald; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta

    2006-09-01

    The heat shock response is associated with the intracellular expression of a number of highly conserved heat shock proteins (Hsps). According to their molecular size, Hsps have been divided into several groups, which are strongly conserved and show high homology between the species, e.g., Hsp70, MW 70 kDa (Lindquist & Craig, 1998; Morimoto, 1998; Jolly & Morimoto, 2000; Zylicz et al. 2001). In all organisms the Hsp expression under stress conditions is regulated at transcriptional level, e.g., in humans by the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1 (Morimoto, 1998; Wu, 1995), while in Escherichia coli by replacement of the sigma factor sigma(70) in RNA polymerase by the sigma factor sigma(32) (Gross, 1987). The Hsps allow cell survival under stress conditions by renaturating of denaturated proteins, protecting of stress-labile proteins, preventing protein aggregation (chaperone functions), and by degradation of damaged proteins (protease activities) (Lindquist & Craig, 1988; Morimoto, 1998; Jolly & Morimoto, 2000). They have also many housekeeping functions under non-stressful conditions during the cell cycle, growth, development, and differentiation (Morimoto, 1998). Among a number of plausible inducing factors already studied, extremely low artificial electromagnetic fields have been shown to induce stress response in various cells, such as expression of sigma(32) mRNA (Cairo et al. 1998) and induction of DnaJ and DnaK proteins in Eschericha coli (Chow & Tung, 2000); expression of hsp-16 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans (Miyakawa et al., 2001); induction of heat shock transcription factor Hsf1 and Hsp70, Hsp90 and Hsp27 in human cells (Lin et al. 1997; Lin et al. 1998; Goodman & Blank, 1998; Pipkin et al. 1999). Nevertheless, the role of endogenous electromagnetic fields, i.e., generated by electrically active cells within a body remains controversial. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) protect cells against various environmental and endogenous stressors. Cytoprotection

  13. Curli modulates adherence of Escherichia coli O157 to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our recent studies have shown that Intimin and the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement-encoded proteins do not play a role in Escherichia coli O157 (O157) adherence to the bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial cells (RSE) cells. Hence, to define factors that play a contributory role, we investi...

  14. Human Milk Oligosaccharides Protect Bladder Epithelial Cells Against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Invasion and Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ann E.; Autran, Chloe A.; Espanola, Sophia D.; Bode, Lars; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The invasive pathogen uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Recurrent infection that can progress to life-threatening renal failure has remained as a serious global health concern in infants. UPEC adheres to and invades bladder epithelial cells to establish infection. Studies have detected the presence of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) in urine of breast-fed, but not formula-fed, neonates. We investigated the mechanisms HMOs deploy to elicit protection in human bladder epithelial cells infected with UPEC CFT073, a prototypic urosepsis-associated strain. We found a significant reduction in UPEC internalization into HMO-pretreated epithelial cells without observing any significant effect in UPEC binding to these cells. This event coincides with a rapid decrease in host cell cytotoxicity, recognized by LIVE/DEAD staining and cell detachment, but independent of caspase-mediated or mitochondrial-mediated programmed cell death pathways. Further investigation revealed HMOs, and particularly the sialic acid-containing fraction, reduced UPEC-mediated MAPK and NF-κB activation. Collectively, our results indicate that HMOs can protect bladder epithelial cells from deleterious cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of UPEC infection, and may be one contributing mechanism underlying the epidemiological evidence of reduced UTI incidence in breast-fed infants. PMID:23990566

  15. Enteropathogenic E. coli-induced barrier function alteration is not a consequence of host cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, V. K.; Weflen, Andrew; Koutsouris, Athanasia; Roxas, Jennifer L.; Hecht, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a diarrheagenic pathogen that perturbs intestinal epithelial function. Many of the alterations in the host cells are mediated by effector molecules that are secreted directly into epithelial cells by the EPEC type III secretion system. The secreted effector molecule EspF plays a key role in redistributing tight junction proteins and altering epithelial barrier function. EspF has also been shown to localize to mitochondria and trigger membrane depolarization and eventual host cell death. The relationship, if any, between EspF-induced host cell death and epithelial barrier disruption is presently not known. Site-directed mutation of leucine 16 (L16E) of EspF impairs both mitochondrial localization and consequent host cell death. Although the mutation lies within a region critical for type III secretion, EspF(L16E) is secreted efficiently from EPEC. Despite its inability to promote cell death, EspF(L16E) was not impaired for tight junction alteration or barrier disruption. Consistent with this, the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPH, despite reducing EPEC-induced host cell death, had no effect on infection-mediated barrier function alteration. Thus EPEC alters the epithelial barrier independent of its ability to induce host cell death. PMID:18356531

  16. Recent advances in adherence and invasion of pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kalita, Anjana; Hu, Jia; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Colonization of the host epithelia by pathogenic Escherichia coli is influenced by the ability of the bacteria to interact with host surfaces. Because the initial step of an E. coli infection is to adhere, invade, and persist within host cells, some strategies used by intestinal and extra-intestinal E. coli to infect host cell are presented. Recent findings This review highlights recent progress understanding how extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli strains express specific adhesins/invasins that allow colonization of the urinary tract or the meninges, while intestinal E. coli strains are able to colonize different regions of the intestinal tract using other specialized adhesins/invasins. Finally, evaluation of, different diets and environmental conditions regulating the colonization of these pathogens is discussed. Summary Discovery of new interactions between pathogenic E. coli and the host epithelial cells unravels the need of more mechanistic studies that can provide new clues in how to combat these infections. PMID:25023740

  17. Cells of Escherichia coli are protected against severe chemical stress by co-habiting cell aggregates formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Jagmann, Nina; Henke, Sebastian Franz; Philipp, Bodo

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial cells within biofilms and cell aggregates show increased resistance against chemical stress compared with suspended cells. It is not known whether bacteria that co-habit biofilms formed by other bacteria also acquire such resistance. This scenario was investigated in a proof-of-principle experiment with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 as cell aggregate-forming bacterium and Escherichia coli strain MG1655 as potential co-habiting bacterium equipped with an inducible bioluminescence system. Cell aggregation of strain PAO1 can be induced by the toxic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). In single cultures of strain MG1655, bioluminescence was inhibited by the protonophor carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) but the cells were still viable. By applying CCCP and SDS together, cells of strain MG1655 lost their bioluminescence and viability indicating the importance of energy-dependent resistance mechanisms against SDS. In co-suspensions with strain PAO1, bioluminescence of strain MG1655 was sustained in the presence of SDS and CCCP. Image analysis showed that bioluminescent cells were located in cell aggregates formed by strain PAO1. Thus, cells of strain MG1655 that co-habited cell aggregates formed by strain PAO1 were protected against a severe chemical stress that was lethal to them in single cultures. Co-habiting could lead to increased survival of pathogens in clinical settings and could be employed in biotechnological applications involving toxic milieus. PMID:26066844

  18. Attachment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to intact and cut lettuce surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination in produce may occur at any point throughout the food continuum via incidental contact with the organism. To develop effective strategies to minimize the risk of foodborne disease caused by this organism, it is essential to examine initial stages ...

  19. Proteomic analysis and identification of cell surface-associated proteins of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Jayaramaiah, Usharani; Singh, Neetu; Thankappan, Sabarinath; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Chaudhuri, Pallab; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Nagaleekar, Viswas Konasagara

    2016-06-01

    Blackleg is a highly fatal disease of cattle and sheep, caused by Clostridium chauvoei, a Gram positive, anaerobic, spore forming bacteria. Cell surface-associated proteins play a major role in inducing the protective immunity. However, the identity of a majority of cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei is not known. In the present investigation, we have used SDS-PAGE, 2D-gel electrophoresis and Western blotting followed by mass spectrometry to identify cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei. Among the identified proteins, which have shown to offer protective antigencity in other bacteria, Enolase, Chaperonin, Ribosomal protein L10, Glycosyl Hydrolase and Flavoprotein were characterized by sequencing and their overexpression in Escherichia coli. In conclusion, cell surface-associated proteins were identified using proteomic approach and the genes for the immunoreactive proteins were expressed, which may prove to be potential diagnostic or vaccine candidates. PMID:26971466

  20. Periplasmic Acid Stress Increases Cell Division Asymmetry (Polar Aging) of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Michelle W.; Yie, Anna M.; Eder, Elizabeth K.; Dennis, Richard G.; Basting, Preston J.; Martinez, Keith A.; Jones, Brian D.; Slonczewski, Joan L.

    2015-01-01

    Under certain kinds of cytoplasmic stress, Escherichia coli selectively reproduce by distributing the newer cytoplasmic components to new-pole cells while sequestering older, damaged components in cells inheriting the old pole. This phenomenon is termed polar aging or cell division asymmetry. It is unknown whether cell division asymmetry can arise from a periplasmic stress, such as the stress of extracellular acid, which is mediated by the periplasm. We tested the effect of periplasmic acid stress on growth and division of adherent single cells. We tracked individual cell lineages over five or more generations, using fluorescence microscopy with ratiometric pHluorin to measure cytoplasmic pH. Adherent colonies were perfused continually with LBK medium buffered at pH 6.00 or at pH 7.50; the external pH determines periplasmic pH. In each experiment, cell lineages were mapped to correlate division time, pole age and cell generation number. In colonies perfused at pH 6.0, the cells inheriting the oldest pole divided significantly more slowly than the cells inheriting the newest pole. In colonies perfused at pH 7.50 (near or above cytoplasmic pH), no significant cell division asymmetry was observed. Under both conditions (periplasmic pH 6.0 or pH 7.5) the cells maintained cytoplasmic pH values at 7.2–7.3. No evidence of cytoplasmic protein aggregation was seen. Thus, periplasmic acid stress leads to cell division asymmetry with minimal cytoplasmic stress. PMID:26713733

  1. Polysaccharide-based silver nanoparticles synthesized by Klebsiella oxytoca DSM 29614 cause DNA fragmentation in E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Franco; Daniele, Salvatore; Gallo, Michele; Paganelli, Stefano; Battistel, Dario; Piccolo, Oreste; Faleri, Claudia; Puglia, Anna Maria; Gallo, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), embedded into a specific exopolysaccharide (EPS), were produced by Klebsiella oxytoca DSM 29614 by adding AgNO3 to the cultures during exponential growth phase. In particular, under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, two types of silver nanoparticles, named AgNPs-EPS(aer) and the AgNPs-EPS(anaer), were produced respectively. The effects on bacterial cells was demonstrated by using Escherichia coli K12 and Kocuria rhizophila ATCC 9341 (ex Micrococcus luteus) as Gram-negative and Gram-positive tester strains, respectively. The best antimicrobial activity was observed for AgNPs-EPS(aer), in terms of minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum bactericidal concentrations. Observations by transmission electron microscopy showed that the cell morphology of both tester strains changed during the exposition to AgNPs-EPS(aer). In particular, an electron-dense wrapped filament was observed in E. coli cytoplasm after 3 h of AgNPs-EPS(aer) exposition, apparently due to silver accumulation in DNA, and both E. coli and K. rhizophila cells were lysed after 18 h of exposure to AgNPs-EPS(aer). The DNA breakage in E. coli cells was confirmed by the comparison of 3-D fluorescence spectra fingerprints of DNA. Finally the accumulation of silver on DNA of E. coli was confirmed directly by a significant Ag(+) release from DNA, using the scanning electrochemical microscopy and the voltammetric determinations. PMID:26886276

  2. Real-time observation of Escherichia coli cells under irradiation with a 2-MeV H{sup +} microbeam

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Mikio; Meissl, Walter; Ikeda, Tokihiro; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Umezawa, Kenji

    2012-05-07

    A high-energy H{sup +} microbeam generated by tapered glass capillary optics was applied to a single Escherichia coli cell, in order to evaluate the effects of irradiation on the activity of the flagellar motor and cell growth in real time. The flagellar motor of the tethered cells was stopped by irradiation with an average ion fluence of 2.0 x 10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2}. When a lower dose was applied to the cells attached to the substrate, an elongated cell, which seemed ready to divide, divided into two daughter cells; however, the daughter cells did not elongate, neither did further cell division occur.

  3. Low-Reflectance Surfaces For Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fatemi, Navid; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved method for increasing solar cell efficiency has potential application for space-based and terrestrial solar power systems and optoelectronic devices. Etched low-angle grooves help recover reflected light. Light reflected from v-grooved surface trapped in cover glass and adhesive by total internal reflection. Reflected light redirected onto surface, and greater fraction of incident light absorbed, producing more electrical energy in InP solar photovoltaic cell.

  4. Switching first contact: photocontrol of E. coli adhesion to human cells.

    PubMed

    Möckl, L; Müller, A; Bräuchle, C; Lindhorst, T K

    2016-01-21

    We have shown previously that carbohydrate-specific bacterial adhesion to a non-physiological surface can be photocontrolled by reversible E/Z isomerisation using azobenzene-functionalised sugars. Here, this approach is applied to the surface of human cells. We show not only that bacterial adhesion to the azobenzene glycoside-modified cell surface is higher in the E than in the Z state, but add data about the specific modulation of the effect. PMID:26612767

  5. Inactivation of E. Coli cell viability and DNA Photo-breakage by Pulsed Nitrogen Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheba, Ben Amar; Alzaag, Ali; Tilfah, Nafie A.

    2005-03-17

    The mutagenic and lethal effect of nitrogen laser radiation: 337.1 nm wave length, 1.5 millijoul pulse energy, 10 nanosecond pulse with and pulse repetition rate range from 1 to 50 Pulse/ second was evaluated on E. Coli cells. Results indicated that irradiation of E. coli JMP39 with pulse repetition of 8 , 16 , 32 pulse/sec, for 1, 5 , 10, 25 min respectively led to a significant decrease in cell count proportional to irradiation dose with significant increase in lacmutation frequency accompanied with some mutations in pattern of antibiotic resistance. The effect of nitrogen laser on the genomic content of the strain JMP39 was also studied by irradiating the total DNA with 30 pulse/second for 1 ,5, 15 , 30 min then subjected to both agarose gel electrophoresis and scanning spectrophotometry. The first technique revealed to DNA photo breakage and significant decrease in DNA absorbency was noticed by scanning spectrophotometry. This could be attributed to photo-decomposition resulted from multi-photo-excitation of UV-Laser pulses.

  6. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli expresses a novel flagellin that causes IL-8 release from intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Ted S.; Nataro, James P.; Poteet-Smith, Celeste E.; Smith, Jeffrey A.; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging cause of acute and persistent diarrhea worldwide. EAEC infections are associated with intestinal inflammation and growth impairment in infected children, even in the absence of diarrhea. We previously reported that prototype EAEC strains rapidly induce IL-8 production by Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells, and that this effect is mediated by a soluble, heat-stable factor released by these bacteria in culture. We herein report the cloning, sequencing, and expression of this biologically active IL-8–releasing factor from EAEC, and its identification as a flagellin that is unique among known expressed proteins. Flagella purified from EAEC 042 and several other EAEC isolates potently release IL-8 from Caco-2 cells; an engineered aflagellar mutant of 042 does not release IL-8. Finally, cloned EAEC flagellin expressed in nonpathogenic E. coli as a polyhistidine-tagged fusion protein maintains its proinflammatory activity. These findings demonstrate a major new means by which EAEC may cause intestinal inflammation, persistent diarrhea, and growth impairment that characterize human infection with these organisms. Furthermore, they open new approaches for diagnosis and vaccine development. This novel pathogenic mechanism of EAEC extends an emerging paradigm of bacterial flagella as inflammatory stimuli. PMID:10862792

  7. Biocatalytic Production of Trehalose from Maltose by Using Whole Cells of Permeabilized Recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaojuan; Xu, Ying; Sun, Ye; Mei, Wending; Ouyang, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose is a non-reducing disaccharide, which can protect proteins, lipid membranes, and cells from desiccation, refrigeration, dehydration, and other harsh environments. Trehalose can be produced by different pathways and trehalose synthase pathway is a convenient, practical, and low-cost pathway for the industrial production of trehalose. In this study, 3 candidate treS genes were screened from genomic databases of Pseudomonas and expressed in Escherichia coli. One of them from P. stutzeri A1501 exhibited the best transformation ability from maltose into trehalose and the least byproduct. Thus, whole cells of this recombinant E. coli were used as biocatalyst for trehalose production. In order to improve the conversion rate of maltose to trehalose, optimization of the permeabilization and biotransformation were carried out. Under optimal conditions, 92.2 g/l trehalose was produced with a high productivity of 23.1 g/(l h). No increase of glucose was detected during the whole course. The biocatalytic process developed in this study might serve as a candidate for the large scale production of trehalose. PMID:26462117

  8. A model for chromosome organization during the cell cycle in live E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuru; Xie, Ping; Wang, Pengye; Li, Ming; Li, Hui; Li, Wei; Dou, Shuoxing

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomal DNA is a highly compact nucleoid. The organization of this nucleoid is poorly understood due to limitations in the methods used to monitor the complexities of DNA organization in live bacteria. Here, we report that circular plasmid DNA is auto-packaged into a uniform dual-toroidal-spool conformation in response to mechanical stress stemming from sharp bending and un-winding by atomic force microscopic analysis. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon was deduced with basic physical principles to explain the auto-packaging behaviour of circular DNA. Based on our observations and previous studies, we propose a dynamic model of how chromosomal DNA in E. coli may be organized during a cell division cycle. Next, we test the model by monitoring the development of HNS clusters in live E. coli during a cell cycle. The results were in close agreement with the model. Furthermore, the model accommodates a majority of the thus-far-discovered remarkable features of nucleoids in vivo. PMID:26597953

  9. Biocatalytic Production of Trehalose from Maltose by Using Whole Cells of Permeabilized Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Mei, Wending; Ouyang, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose is a non-reducing disaccharide, which can protect proteins, lipid membranes, and cells from desiccation, refrigeration, dehydration, and other harsh environments. Trehalose can be produced by different pathways and trehalose synthase pathway is a convenient, practical, and low-cost pathway for the industrial production of trehalose. In this study, 3 candidate treS genes were screened from genomic databases of Pseudomonas and expressed in Escherichia coli. One of them from P. stutzeri A1501 exhibited the best transformation ability from maltose into trehalose and the least byproduct. Thus, whole cells of this recombinant E. coli were used as biocatalyst for trehalose production. In order to improve the conversion rate of maltose to trehalose, optimization of the permeabilization and biotransformation were carried out. Under optimal conditions, 92.2 g/l trehalose was produced with a high productivity of 23.1 g/(l h). No increase of glucose was detected during the whole course. The biocatalytic process developed in this study might serve as a candidate for the large scale production of trehalose. PMID:26462117

  10. A magnetite suspension-based washing method for immunoassays using Escherichia coli cells with autodisplayed Z-domains.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hoon; Bong, Ji-Hong; Yoo, Gu; Chang, Seo-Yoon; Chang, Young Wook; Kang, Min-Jung; Jose, Joachim; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2016-10-01

    Escherichia coli cells with autodisplayed Z-domains have been used for immunoassays of specific target analytes. In this study, a magnetite suspension was used for the washing step in immunoassays of E. coli cells with autodisplayed Z-domains. This approach enhanced the washing conditions for these immunoassays by determining (1) the optimal concentration of the magnetite suspension, (2) the capacity of the magnetite suspension-based washing method to recover E. coli cells, and (3) the level at which the activity of autodisplayed Z-domains is maintained. In immunoassays of C-reactive protein (CRP), the immunoassay incorporating the magnetite suspension-based washing method showed a sensitivity and limit of detection considerably higher than those of the conventional centrifugation-based washing method. The results indicated that immunoassays incorporating the magnetite suspension-based washing method are effective for medical diagnoses based on CRP assay. PMID:27542738

  11. Constitutive stable DNA replication in Escherichia coli cells lacking type 1A topoisomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Martel, Makisha; Balleydier, Aurélien; Sauriol, Alexandre; Drolet, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Type 1A topoisomerases (topos) are ubiquitous enzymes involved in supercoiling regulation and in the maintenance of genome stability. Escherichia coli possesses two type 1A enzymes, topo I (topA) and topo III (topB). Cells lacking both enzymes form very long filaments and have severe chromosome segregation and growth defects. We previously found that RNase HI overproduction or a dnaT::aph mutation could significantly correct these phenotypes. This leads us to hypothesize that they were related to unregulated replication originating from R-loops, i.e. constitutive stable DNA replication (cSDR). cSDR, first observed in rnhA (RNase HI) mutants, is characterized by its persistence for several hours following protein synthesis inhibition and by its requirement for primosome components, including DnaT. Here, to visualize and measure cSDR, the incorporation of the nucleotide analog ethynyl deoxyuridine (EdU) during replication in E. coli cells pre-treated with protein synthesis inhibitors, was revealed by "click" labeling with Alexa Fluor(®) 488 in fixed cells, and flow cytometry analysis. cSDR was detected in rnhA mutants, but not in wild-type strains, and the number of cells undergoing cSDR was significantly reduced by the introduction of the dnaT::aph mutation. cSDR was also found in topA, double topA topB but not in topB null cells. This result is consistent with the established function of topo I in the inhibition of R-loop formation. Moreover, our finding that topB rnhA mutants are perfectly viable demonstrates that topo III is not uniquely required during cSDR. Thus, either topo I or III can provide the type 1A topo activity that is specifically required during cSDR to allow chromosome segregation. PMID:26444226

  12. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  13. Surface Charge Visualization at Viable Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Perry, David; Paulose Nadappuram, Binoy; Momotenko, Dmitry; Voyias, Philip D; Page, Ashley; Tripathi, Gyanendra; Frenguelli, Bruno G; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-03-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is demonstrated to be a powerful technique for quantitative nanoscale surface charge mapping of living cells. Utilizing a bias modulated (BM) scheme, in which the potential between a quasi-reference counter electrode (QRCE) in an electrolyte-filled nanopipette and a QRCE in bulk solution is modulated, it is shown that both the cell topography and the surface charge present at cellular interfaces can be measured simultaneously at high spatial resolution with dynamic potential measurements. Surface charge is elucidated by probing the properties of the diffuse double layer (DDL) at the cellular interface, and the technique is sensitive at both low-ionic strength and under typical physiological (high-ionic strength) conditions. The combination of experiments that incorporate pixel-level self-referencing (calibration) with a robust theoretical model allows for the analysis of local surface charge variations across cellular interfaces, as demonstrated on two important living systems. First, charge mapping at Zea mays root hairs shows that there is a high negative surface charge at the tip of the cell. Second, it is shown that there are distinct surface charge distributions across the surface of human adipocyte cells, whose role is the storage and regulation of lipids in mammalian systems. These are new features, not previously recognized, and their implications for the functioning of these cells are highlighted. PMID:26871001

  14. Measurement of SOS expression in individual Escherichia coli K-12 cells using fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    McCool, Jesse D; Long, Edward; Petrosino, Joseph F; Sandler, Hilary A; Rosenberg, Susan M; Sandler, Steven J

    2004-09-01

    Many recombination, DNA repair and DNA replication mutants have high basal levels of SOS expression as determined by a sulAp-lacZ reporter gene system on a population of cells. Two opposing models to explain how the SOS expression is distributed in these cells are: (i) the 'Uniform Expression Model (UEM)' where expression is evenly distributed in all cells or (ii) the 'Two Population Model (TPM)' where some cells are highly induced while others are not at all. To distinguish between these two models, a method to quantify SOS expression in individual bacterial cells was developed by fusing an SOS promoter (sulAp) to the green fluorescent protein (gfp) reporter gene and inserting it at attlambda on the Escherichia coli chromosome. It is shown that the fluorescence in sulAp-gfp cells is regulated by RecA and LexA. This system was then used to distinguish between the two models for several mutants. The patterns displayed by priA, dnaT, recG, uvrD, dam, ftsK, rnhA, polA and xerC mutants were explained best by the TPM while only lexA (def), lexA3 (ind-) and recA defective mutants were explained best by the UEM. These results are discussed in a context of how the processes of DNA replication and recombination may affect cells in a population differentially. PMID:15387814

  15. Distribution of Escherichia coli 0157 and Salmonella on hide surfaces, the oral cavity, and in feces of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Stephens, T P; Loneragan, G H; Thompson, T W; Sridhara, A; Branham, L A; Pitchiah, S; Brashears, M M

    2007-06-01

    To determine the distribution of pathogens on cattle hides at the feedlot, samples were collected from six hide surface locations (back, flank, hock, neck, perineum, and ventrum), the oral cavity, the rectal-anal junction, and the feces of feedlot cattle and subjected to Escherichia coli 0157 detection via culture methods and to Salmonella detection via PCR. E. coli 0157 was isolated from one or more of the sampling locations from 31 (42.5%) of the 73 animals sampled. Location-specific prevalence of E. coli 0157 was 5% for back samples, 5% for flank samples, 12% for hock samples, 7% for neck samples, 12% for perineum samples, 8% for ventrum samples, 1% for oral cavity samples, 4% for rectal-anal junction swabs, and 23% for fecal grab samples. Salmonella was isolated from one or more of these sample locations from 100% (50 of 50 samples) of all animals sampled. Location-specific prevalence of Salmonella was 76% for back samples, 74% for flank samples, 94% for hock samples, 76% for neck samples, 88% for perineum samples, 86% for ventrum samples, 94% for oral cavity samples, 64% for rectal-anal junction swabs, and 50% for fecal grab samples. The sampling locations that maximized the likelihood of finding E. coli 0157 and Salmonella (84 and 96%, respectively) if the animal was positive at one sampling location or more were the hock, perineum, and fecal grab. These data suggest that the use of multiple sample locations is useful when isolating these pathogens from feedlot cattle. Focusing on one sampling location may underestimate the prevalence. PMID:17612062

  16. Surface Structures Involved in Plant Stomata and Leaf Colonization by Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia Coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, Zeus; Sánchez, Ethel; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Puente, Jose Luis; Girón, Jorge A.

    2011-01-01

    Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 uses a myriad of surface adhesive appendages including pili, flagella, and the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) to adhere to and inflict damage to the human gut mucosa. Consumption of contaminated ground beef, milk, juices, water, or leafy greens has been associated with outbreaks of diarrheal disease in humans due to STEC. The aim of this study was to investigate which of the known STEC O157:H7 adherence factors mediate colonization of baby spinach leaves and where the bacteria reside within tainted leaves. We found that STEC O157:H7 colonizes baby spinach leaves through the coordinated production of curli, the E. coli common pilus, hemorrhagic coli type 4 pilus, flagella, and T3SS. Electron microscopy analysis of tainted leaves revealed STEC bacteria in the internal cavity of the stomata, in intercellular spaces, and within vascular tissue (xylem and phloem), where the bacteria were protected from the bactericidal effect of gentamicin, sodium hypochlorite or ozonated water treatments. We confirmed that the T3S escN mutant showed a reduced number of bacteria within the stomata suggesting that T3S is required for the successful colonization of leaves. In agreement, non-pathogenic E. coli K-12 strain DH5α transformed with a plasmid carrying the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island, harboring the T3SS and effector genes, internalized into stomata more efficiently than without the LEE. This study highlights a role for pili, flagella, and T3SS in the interaction of STEC with spinach leaves. Colonization of plant stomata and internal tissues may constitute a strategy by which STEC survives in a nutrient-rich microenvironment protected from external foes and may be a potential source for human infection. PMID:21887151

  17. Effect of Micro- and Nanoscale Topography on the Adhesion of Bacterial Cells to Solid Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Lillian C.; Fang, Jean; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana A.; Worobo, Randy W.

    2013-01-01

    Attachment and biofilm formation by bacterial pathogens on surfaces in natural, industrial, and hospital settings lead to infections and illnesses and even death. Minimizing bacterial attachment to surfaces using controlled topography could reduce the spreading of pathogens and, thus, the incidence of illnesses and subsequent human and financial losses. In this context, the attachment of key microorganisms, including Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Pseudomonas fluorescens, to silica and alumina surfaces with micron and nanoscale topography was investigated. The results suggest that orientation of the attached cells occurs preferentially such as to maximize their contact area with the surface. Moreover, the bacterial cells exhibited different morphologies, including different number and size of cellular appendages, depending on the topographical details of the surface to which they attached. This suggests that bacteria may utilize different mechanisms of attachment in response to surface topography. These results are important for the design of novel microbe-repellant materials. PMID:23416997

  18. Data in support of Gallium (Ga(3+)) antibacterial activities to counteract E. coli and S. epidermidis biofilm formation onto pro-osteointegrative titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cochis, A; Azzimonti, B; Sorrentino, R; Della Valle, C; De Giglio, E; Bloise, N; Visai, L; Bruni, G; Cometa, S; Pezzoli, D; Candiani, G; Rimondini, L; Chiesa, R

    2016-03-01

    This paper contains original data supporting the antibacterial activities of Gallium (Ga(3+))-doped pro-osteointegrative titanium alloys, obtained via Anodic Spark Deposition (ASD), as described in "The effect of silver or gallium doped titanium against the multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii" (Cochis et al. 2016) [1]. In this article we included an indirect cytocompatibility evaluation towards Saos2 human osteoblasts and extended the microbial evaluation of the Ga(3+) enriched titanium surfaces against the biofilm former Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains. Cell viability was assayed by the Alamar Blue test, while bacterial viability was evaluated by the metabolic colorimetric 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Finally biofilm morphology was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Data regarding Ga(3+) activity were compared to Silver. PMID:26909385

  19. Data in support of Gallium (Ga3+) antibacterial activities to counteract E. coli and S. epidermidis biofilm formation onto pro-osteointegrative titanium surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cochis, A.; Azzimonti, B.; Sorrentino, R.; Della Valle, C.; De Giglio, E.; Bloise, N.; Visai, L.; Bruni, G.; Cometa, S.; Pezzoli, D.; Candiani, G.; Rimondini, L.; Chiesa, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper contains original data supporting the antibacterial activities of Gallium (Ga3+)-doped pro-osteointegrative titanium alloys, obtained via Anodic Spark Deposition (ASD), as described in “The effect of silver or gallium doped titanium against the multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii” (Cochis et al. 2016) [1]. In this article we included an indirect cytocompatibility evaluation towards Saos2 human osteoblasts and extended the microbial evaluation of the Ga3+ enriched titanium surfaces against the biofilm former Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains. Cell viability was assayed by the Alamar Blue test, while bacterial viability was evaluated by the metabolic colorimetric 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Finally biofilm morphology was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Data regarding Ga3+ activity were compared to Silver. PMID:26909385

  20. Structure and functions of fungal cell surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 24 references on the biochemistry, molecular structure, and function of cell surfaces of fungi, especially dermatophytes: the chemistry and structure of the cell wall, the effect of polyene antibiotics on the morphology and function of cytoplasmic membranes, and the chemical structure and function of pigments produced by various fungi are discussed.

  1. The Surface Sensor NlpE of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Contributes to Regulation of the Type III Secretion System and Flagella by the Cpx Response to Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Ichimura, Kimitoshi; Noda, Masatoshi

    2016-02-01

    Although the adhesion of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is central to the EHEC-host interaction during infection, it remains unclear how such adhesion regulates virulence factors. Adhesion to abiotic surfaces by E. coli has been reported to be an outer membrane lipoprotein NlpE-dependent activation cue of the Cpx pathway. Therefore, we investigated the role of NlpE in EHEC on the adhesion-mediated expression of virulence genes. NlpE in EHEC contributed to upregulation of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genes encoded type III secretion system and to downregulated expression of the flagellin gene by activation of the Cpx pathway during adherence to hydrophobic glass beads and undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Moreover, LysR homologue A (LrhA) in EHEC was involved in regulating the expression of the LEE genes and flagellin gene in response to adhesion. Gel mobility shift analysis revealed that response regulator CpxR bound to the lrhA promoter region and thereby regulated expressions of the LEE genes and flagellin gene via the transcriptional regulator LrhA in EHEC. Therefore, these results suggest that the sensing of adhesion signals via NlpE is important for regulation of the expression of the type III secretion system and flagella in EHEC during infection. PMID:26644384

  2. The Surface Sensor NlpE of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Contributes to Regulation of the Type III Secretion System and Flagella by the Cpx Response to Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Kimitoshi; Noda, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Although the adhesion of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is central to the EHEC-host interaction during infection, it remains unclear how such adhesion regulates virulence factors. Adhesion to abiotic surfaces by E. coli has been reported to be an outer membrane lipoprotein NlpE-dependent activation cue of the Cpx pathway. Therefore, we investigated the role of NlpE in EHEC on the adhesion-mediated expression of virulence genes. NlpE in EHEC contributed to upregulation of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genes encoded type III secretion system and to downregulated expression of the flagellin gene by activation of the Cpx pathway during adherence to hydrophobic glass beads and undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Moreover, LysR homologue A (LrhA) in EHEC was involved in regulating the expression of the LEE genes and flagellin gene in response to adhesion. Gel mobility shift analysis revealed that response regulator CpxR bound to the lrhA promoter region and thereby regulated expressions of the LEE genes and flagellin gene via the transcriptional regulator LrhA in EHEC. Therefore, these results suggest that the sensing of adhesion signals via NlpE is important for regulation of the expression of the type III secretion system and flagella in EHEC during infection. PMID:26644384

  3. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CS21 pilus contributes to adhesion to intestinal cells and to pathogenesis under in vivo conditions.

    PubMed

    Guevara, C P; Luiz, W B; Sierra, A; Cruz, C; Qadri, F; Kaushik, R S; Ferreira, L C S; Gómez-Duarte, O G

    2013-08-01

    Colonization surface antigens (CSs) represent key virulence-associated factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains. They are required for gut colonization, the first step of the diarrhoeal disease process induced by these bacteria. One of the most prevalent CSs is CS21, or longus, a type IV pili associated with bacterial self-aggregation, protection against environmental stresses, biofilm formation and adherence to epithelial cell lines. The objectives of this study were to assess the role of CS21 in adherence to primary intestinal epithelial cells and to determine if CS21 contributes to the pathogenesis of ETEC infection in vivo. We evaluated adherence of a CS21-expressing wild-type ETEC strain and an isogenic CS21-mutant strain to pig-derived intestinal cell lines. To determine the role of CS21 in pathogenesis we used the above ETEC strains in a neonatal mice challenge infection model to assess mortality. Quantitative adherence assays confirmed that ETEC adheres to primary intestinal epithelial cells lines in a CS21-dependent manner. In addition, the CS21-mediated ETEC adherence to cells was specific as purified LngA protein, the CS21 major subunit, competed for binding with the CS21-expressing ETEC while specific anti-LngA antibodies blocked adhesion to intestinal cells. Neonatal DBA/2 mice died after intra-stomach administration of CS21-expressing strains while lack of CS21 expression drastically reduced the virulence of the wild-type ETEC strain in this animal model. Collectively these results further support the role of CS21 during ETEC infection and add new evidence on its in vivo relevance in pathogenesis. PMID:23760820

  4. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CS21 pilus contributes to adhesion to intestinal cells and to pathogenesis under in vivo conditions

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, C. P.; Luiz, W. B.; Sierra, A.; Cruz, C.; Qadri, F.; Kaushik, R. S.; Ferreira, L. C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Colonization surface antigens (CSs) represent key virulence-associated factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains. They are required for gut colonization, the first step of the diarrhoeal disease process induced by these bacteria. One of the most prevalent CSs is CS21, or longus, a type IV pili associated with bacterial self-aggregation, protection against environmental stresses, biofilm formation and adherence to epithelial cell lines. The objectives of this study were to assess the role of CS21 in adherence to primary intestinal epithelial cells and to determine if CS21 contributes to the pathogenesis of ETEC infection in vivo. We evaluated adherence of a CS21-expressing wild-type ETEC strain and an isogenic CS21-mutant strain to pig-derived intestinal cell lines. To determine the role of CS21 in pathogenesis we used the above ETEC strains in a neonatal mice challenge infection model to assess mortality. Quantitative adherence assays confirmed that ETEC adheres to primary intestinal epithelial cells lines in a CS21-dependent manner. In addition, the CS21-mediated ETEC adherence to cells was specific as purified LngA protein, the CS21 major subunit, competed for binding with the CS21-expressing ETEC while specific anti-LngA antibodies blocked adhesion to intestinal cells. Neonatal DBA/2 mice died after intra-stomach administration of CS21-expressing strains while lack of CS21 expression drastically reduced the virulence of the wild-type ETEC strain in this animal model. Collectively these results further support the role of CS21 during ETEC infection and add new evidence on its in vivo relevance in pathogenesis. PMID:23760820

  5. Genetic Interaction Maps in Escherichia coli Reveal Functional Crosstalk among Cell Envelope Biogenesis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Vlasblom, James; Gagarinova, Alla; Phanse, Sadhna; Graham, Chris; Yousif, Fouad; Ding, Huiming; Xiong, Xuejian; Nazarians-Armavil, Anaies; Alamgir, Md; Ali, Mehrab; Pogoutse, Oxana; Pe'er, Asaf; Arnold, Roland; Michaut, Magali; Parkinson, John; Golshani, Ashkan; Whitfield, Chris; Wodak, Shoshana J.; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Emili, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium) and prototrophic (minimal medium) culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among >235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens) and an important target. PMID:22125496

  6. Construction of an efficient Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalyst for D-mannitol production.

    PubMed

    Reshamwala, Shamlan M S; Pagar, Sandip K; Velhal, Vishal S; Maranholakar, Vijay M; Talangkar, Vishal G; Lali, Arvind M

    2014-12-01

    Mannitol is a six carbon sugar alcohol that finds applications in the pharmaceutical and food industries. A novel Escherichia coli strain capable of converting D-glucose to D-mannitol has been constructed, wherein native mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (MtlD) and codon-optimized Eimeria tenella mannitol-1-phosphatase (M1Pase) have been overexpressed. Codon-optimized Pseudomonas stutzeri phosphite dehydrogenase (PtxD) was overexpressed for cofactor (NADH) regeneration with the concomitant oxidation of phosphite to phosphate. Whole-cell biotransformation using resting cells in a medium containing D-glucose and equimolar sodium phosphite resulted in d-mannitol yield of 87 mol%. Thus, production of an industrially relevant biochemical without using complex media components and elaborate process control mechanisms has been demonstrated. PMID:24908186

  7. The mechanism of sensitivity to phleomycin in growing Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Sleigh, M J; Grigg, G W

    1976-04-01

    Stationary-phase Escherichia coli B cells transferred to new growth medium are initially resistant to net DNA breakage by low concentrations of phleomycin, and become sensitive as DNA replication commences. From studies with inhibitors of various stages of the DNA replication cycle it is evident that it is not DNA synthesis itself that is required for induction of DNA breakage by phleomycin, but events associated with the initiation of DNA replication. Termination of replication in the absence of further initiaiton results in resistance to phleomycin. The cellular change responsible for changes in sensitivity to phleomycin could be the attachment of the bacterial chromosome to the cell membrane at initiation and detachment on termination of replication, suggesting an alteration in the balance between cellular DNA breakage and repair processes for membrane-associated compared with non-membrane-associated DNA. PMID:59594

  8. Metabolic Regulation of a Bacterial Cell System with Emphasis on Escherichia coli Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    It is quite important to understand the overall metabolic regulation mechanism of bacterial cells such as Escherichia coli from both science (such as biochemistry) and engineering (such as metabolic engineering) points of view. Here, an attempt was made to clarify the overall metabolic regulation mechanism by focusing on the roles of global regulators which detect the culture or growth condition and manipulate a set of metabolic pathways by modulating the related gene expressions. For this, it was considered how the cell responds to a variety of culture environments such as carbon (catabolite regulation), nitrogen, and phosphate limitations, as well as the effects of oxygen level, pH (acid shock), temperature (heat shock), and nutrient starvation. PMID:25937963

  9. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  10. Escherichia coli isolated from a Crohn's disease patient adheres, invades, and induces inflammatory responses in polarized intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia; Allen, Christopher A; Taormina, Joanna; Swidsinski, Alexander; Tutt, Christopher B; Jezek, G Eric; Islas-Islas, Martha; Torres, Alfredo G

    2008-07-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the intestinal tract are a major health concern both in the United States and around the world. Evidence now suggests that a new category of Escherichia coli, designated Adherent Invasive E. coli (AIEC) is highly prevalent in Crohn's Disease (CD) patients. AIEC strains have been shown to colonize and adhere to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). However, the role AIEC strains play in the induction of an inflammatory response is not known. Therefore, we examined several E. coli strains (designated LF82, O83:H1, 6604 and 6655) that were isolated from CD patients for their ability to induce inflammation in two IEC, Caco-2BBe and T-84 cells. Results showed that each strain had varying abilities to adhere to and invade IEC as well as induced cytokine secretion from polarized IEC. However, E. coli O83:H1 displayed the best characteristics of AIEC strains as compared to the prototype AIEC strain LF82, inducing cytokine secretion from IEC and promoting immune cell migration through IEC. Upon further analysis, E. coli O83:H1 did not harbor virulence genes present in known pathogenic intestinal organisms. Further characterization of E. coli O83:H1 virulence determinants showed that a non-flagellated O83:H1 strain significantly decreased the organism's ability to adhere to and invade both IEC and elicit IEC cytokine secretion compared to the wild type and complemented strains. These findings demonstrate that E. coli O83:H1 possesses the characteristics of the AIEC LF82 strain that may contribute to the low-grade, chronic inflammation observed in Crohn's disease. PMID:17900983

  11. Escherichia Coli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  12. Sat, the Secreted Autotransporter Toxin of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli, Is a Vacuolating Cytotoxin for Bladder and Kidney Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guyer, Debra M.; Radulovic, Suzana; Jones, Faye-Ellen; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2002-01-01

    The secreted autotransporter toxin (Sat) of uropathogenic Escherichia coli exhibits cytopathic activity upon incubation with HEp-2 cells. We further investigated the effects of Sat on cell lines more relevant to the urinary tract, namely, those derived from bladder and kidney epithelium. Sat elicited elongation of cells and apparent loosening of cellular junctions upon incubation with Vero kidney cells. Additionally, incubation with Sat triggered significant vacuolation within the cytoplasm of both human bladder (CRL-1749) and kidney (CRL-1573) cell lines. This activity has been associated with only a few other known toxins. Following transurethral infection of CBA mice with a sat mutant, no reduction of CFU in urine, bladder, or kidney tissue was seen compared to that in mice infected with wild-type E. coli CFT073. However, significant histological changes were observed within the kidneys of mice infected with wild-type E. coli CFT073, including dissolution of the glomerular membrane and vacuolation of proximal tubule cells. Such damage was not observed in kidney sections of mice infected with a Sat-deficient mutant. These results indicate that Sat, a vacuolating cytotoxin expressed by uropathogenic E. coli CFT073, elicits defined damage to kidney epithelium during upper urinary tract infection and thus contributes to pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. PMID:12117966

  13. Simulation of E. coli Gene Regulation including Overlapping Cell Cycles, Growth, Division, Time Delays and Noise

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ruoyu; Ye, Lin; Tao, Chenyang; Wang, Kankan

    2013-01-01

    Due to the complexity of biological systems, simulation of biological networks is necessary but sometimes complicated. The classic stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) by Gillespie and its modified versions are widely used to simulate the stochastic dynamics of biochemical reaction systems. However, it has remained a challenge to implement accurate and efficient simulation algorithms for general reaction schemes in growing cells. Here, we present a modeling and simulation tool, called ‘GeneCircuits’, which is specifically developed to simulate gene-regulation in exponentially growing bacterial cells (such as E. coli) with overlapping cell cycles. Our tool integrates three specific features of these cells that are not generally included in SSA tools: 1) the time delay between the regulation and synthesis of proteins that is due to transcription and translation processes; 2) cell cycle-dependent periodic changes of gene dosage; and 3) variations in the propensities of chemical reactions that have time-dependent reaction rates as a consequence of volume expansion and cell division. We give three biologically relevant examples to illustrate the use of our simulation tool in quantitative studies of systems biology and synthetic biology. PMID:23638057

  14. Hydroxyurea induces hydroxyl radical-mediated cell death in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Bryan W.; Kohanski, Michael A.; Simmons, Lyle A.; Winkler, Jonathan A.; Collins, James J.; Walker, Graham C.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Hydroxyurea (HU) specifically inhibits class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), depleting dNTP pools and leading to replication fork arrest. While HU inhibition of RNR has been recognized for decades, the mechanism by which it leads to cell death remains unknown. To investigate the mechanism of HU-induced cell death we used a systems-level approach to determine the genomic and physiological responses of E. coli to HU treatment. Our results suggest a model by which HU treatment rapidly induces a set of protective responses to manage genomic instability in the majority of the cell population. Continued HU stress activates iron uptake as well as the toxins MazF and RelE whose activity causes the synthesis of incompletely translated proteins and stimulation of the envelope stress response system. These effects alter the properties of one of the cell’s two terminal cytochrome oxidases in the electron transport chain, causing an increase in the production of superoxide. The increased superoxide production from the respiratory chain together with the increased iron uptake fuels the formation of hydroxyl radicals that contribute to HU-induced cell death. This work significantly expands our understanding of HU-mediated cell death and more broadly suggests a pathway whereby replication fork arrest leads to cell death. PMID:20005847

  15. Effect of cell immobilization on the growth dynamics of Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli at suboptimal temperatures.

    PubMed

    Smet, Cindy; Van Derlinden, Eva; Mertens, Laurence; Noriega, Estefanía; Van Impe, Jan F

    2015-09-01

    Predictive microbiology has recently acknowledged the impact of the solid(like) food structure on microbial behavior. The presence of this solid(like) structure causes microorganisms to grow as colonies and no longer planktonically as in liquid. In this paper, the growth dynamics of Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli were studied as a function of temperature, considering different growth morphologies, i.e., (i) planktonic cells, (ii) immersed colonies and (iii) surface colonies. For all three growth morphologies, both microorganisms were grown in petri dishes. While E. coli was grown under optimal pH and water activity (aw), for S. Typhimurium pH and aw were adapted to 5.5 and 0.990. In order to mimic a solid(like) environment, 5% (w/v) gelatin was added. All petri dishes were incubated under static conditions at temperatures in the range [8.0°C-22.0°C]. Cell density was determined via viable plate counting. This work demonstrates that the growth morphology (planktonic vs. colony) has a negligible effect on the growth dynamics as a function of temperature. The observation of almost equal growth rates for planktonic cultures and colonies is in contrast to literature where, mostly, a difference is observed, i.e., μplanktonic cells≥μimmersed colonies≥μsurface colonies. This difference might be due to shaking of the liquid culture in these studies, which results in a nutrient and oxygen rich environment, in contrast to the diffusion-limited gel system. Experiments also indicate that lag phases for solid(like) systems are similar to those for the planktonic cultures, as can be found in literature for similar growth conditions. Considering the maximum cell density, no clear trend was deducted for either of the microorganisms. This study indicates that the growth parameters in the suboptimal temperature range do not depend on the growth morphology. For the considered experimental conditions, models previously developed for liquid environments can be used

  16. Cell Adhesion on Surface-Functionalized Magnesium.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Victoria; Schilling, Achim; Mainka, Astrid; Hennig, Diana; Gerum, Richard; Kelch, Marie-Luise; Keim, Simon; Fabry, Ben; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2016-05-18

    The biocompatibility of commercially pure magnesium-based (cp Mg) biodegradable implants is compromised of strong hydrogen evolution and surface alkalization due to high initial corrosion rates of cp Mg in the physiological environment. To mitigate this problem, the addition of corrosion-retarding alloying elements or coating of implant surfaces has been suggested. In the following work, we explored the effect of organic coatings on long-term cell growth. cp Mg was coated with aminopropyltriehtoxysilane + vitamin C (AV), carbonyldiimidazole (CDI), or stearic acid (SA). All three coatings have been previously suggested to reduce initial corrosion and to enhance protein adsorption and hence cell adhesion on magnesium surfaces. Endothelial cells (DH1+/+) and osteosarcoma cells (MG63) were cultured on coated samples for up to 20 days. To quantify Mg corrosion, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was measured after 1, 3, and 5 days of cell culture. We also investigated the speed of initial cell spreading after seeding using fluorescently labeled fibroblasts (NIH/3T3). Hydrogen evolution after contact with cell culture medium was markedly decreased on AV- and SA-coated Mg compared to uncoated Mg. These coatings also showed improved cell adhesion and spreading after 24 h of culture comparable to tissue-treated plastic surfaces. On AV-coated cp Mg, a confluent layer of endothelial cells formed after 5 days and remained intact for up to 20 days. Together, these data demonstrate that surface coating with AV is a viable strategy for improving long-term biocompatibility of cp Mg-based implants. EIS measurements confirmed that the presence of a confluent cell layer increased the corrosion resistance. PMID:27089250

  17. Escherichia coli Common Pilus (ECP) Targets Arabinosyl Residues in Plant Cell Walls to Mediate Adhesion to Fresh Produce Plants*

    PubMed Central

    Rossez, Yannick; Holmes, Ashleigh; Lodberg-Pedersen, Henriette; Birse, Louise; Marshall, Jacqueline; Willats, William G. T.; Toth, Ian K.; Holden, Nicola J.

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli are often associated with fresh produce. However, the molecular basis to adherence is unknown beyond ionic lipid-flagellum interactions in plant cell membranes. We demonstrate that arabinans present in different constituents of plant cell walls are targeted for adherence by E. coli common pilus (ECP; or meningitis-associated and temperature-regulated (Mat) fimbriae) for E. coli serotypes O157:H7 and O18:K1:H7. l-Arabinose is a common constituent of plant cell wall that is rarely found in other organisms, whereas ECP is widespread in E. coli and other environmental enteric species. ECP bound to oligosaccharides of at least arabinotriose or longer in a glycan array, plant cell wall pectic polysaccharides, and plant glycoproteins. Recognition overlapped with the antibody LM13, which binds arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitopes, and showed a preferential affinity for (1→5)-α-linked l-arabinosyl residues and longer chains of arabinan as demonstrated with the use of arabinan-degrading enzymes. Functional adherence in planta was mediated by the adhesin EcpD in combination with the structural subunit, EcpA, and expression was demonstrated with an ecpR–GFP fusion and ECP antibodies. Spinach was found to be enriched for ECP/LM13 targets compared with lettuce. Specific recognition of arabinosyl residues may help explain the persistence of E. coli in the wider environment and association of verotoxigenic E. coli with some fresh produce plants by exploitation of a glycan found only in plant, not animal, cells. PMID:25320086

  18. IQGAP1 mediates the disruption of adherens junctions to promote Escherichia coli K1 invasion of brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Subramanian; Fernandez, G. Esteban; Sacks, David B.; Prasadarao, Nemani V.

    2012-01-01

    The transcellular entry of E. coli K1 through human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) is responsible for tight junction disruption, leading to brain edema in neonatal meningitis. Previous studies demonstrated that outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of E. coli K1 interacts with its receptor, Ecgp96 to induce PKC-α phosphorylation, adherens junction (AJ) disassembly (by dislodging β-catenin from VE-cadherin), and remodeling of actin in HBMEC. We report here that IQGAP1 mediates β-catenin dissociation from AJs to promote actin polymerization required for E. coli K1 invasion of HBMEC. Overexpression of C-terminal truncated IQGAP1 (IQΔC) that cannot bind β-catenin prevents both AJ disruption and E. coli K1 entry. Of note, phospho-PKC-α interacts with the C-terminal portion of Ecgp96 as well as with VE-cadherin after IQGAP1 mediated AJ disassembly. HBMEC overexpressing either C-terminal truncated Ecgp96 (Ecgp96Δ200) or IQΔC upon infection with E. coli showed no interaction of phospho-PKC-α with Ecgp96. These data indicate that the binding of OmpA to Ecgp96 induces PKC-α phosphorylation and association of phospho-PKC-α with Ecgp96, and then signals IQGAP1 to detach β-catenin from AJs. Subsequently, IQGAP1/β-catenin bound actin translocates to the site of E. coli K1 attachment to promote invasion. PMID:22519731

  19. Reproducible acquisition of Escherichia coli porin surface topographs by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Schabert, F A; Engel, A

    1994-01-01

    Crystalline membranes reconstituted from Escherichia coli OmpF porin and phospholipids were adsorbed to freshly cleaved mica and imaged in solution by the atomic force microscope. The extracellular as well as the periplasmic side of the porin trimers could be identified and the conditions to record topographs at 1-nm lateral and 0.1-nm vertical resolution were established. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:7696479

  20. Effectiveness of acidified sodium chlorite and other sanitizers to control Escherichia coli O157:H7 on tomato surfaces.

    PubMed

    Inatsu, Yasuhiro; Kitagawa, Tomoko; Bari, Md Latiful; Nei, Daisuke; Juneja, Vijay; Kawamoto, Shinichi

    2010-06-01

    The use of a suitable sanitizer can reduce the risk of produce-related foodborne illnesses. We evaluated the effectiveness of several sanitizers to reduce inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7 on the surface of cherry tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiform). Depending on the method of inoculation (dipping/spotting), each of 80 g (eight tomatoes) of inoculated cherry tomatoes was washed in 400 mL of sanitizer solutions or 400 mL distilled water for 5 minutes. The effectiveness of sanitizers on spot-inoculated E. coli O157:H7 on tomato surfaces was found higher than on dip-inoculated tomatoes. Washing with water or chlorine water (0.1 g/L as free chlorine) could reduce 1.3 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 in dip-inoculated (6.8 log CFU/g) tomatoes. Washing with lactic acid (LA) solution (1.0 g/L), phytic acid solution (1.0 g/L), calcinated seashells (oyster/sakhalin surf clam), and 1.0 g/L chitosan in 0.5 g/L LA (Chito) did not exhibit a significant higher effectiveness than that of water wash alone (1.0 log CFU/g). Acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) solution prepared from 0.5 g/L of sodium chlorite and 1.0 g/L LA or phytic acid reduced 3.5 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 in dip-inoculated tomato surfaces. ASC (0.5 g/L of sodium chlorite and 1.0 g/L of LA) wash followed by a second wash with LA exhibited an additional sanitary effectiveness compared to a single wash with ASC. However, washing with ASC followed by a second wash with Chito exhibited an additional 1.0 log CFU/g reduction compared to a secondary wash with water. No significant difference of color, taste, and texture was observed among the washed cherry tomatoes. PMID:20113205

  1. Dendritic Cell Responses to Surface Properties of Clinical Titanium Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Peng Meng; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play pivotal roles in responding to foreign entities during an innate immune response and initiating effective adaptive immunity as well as maintaining immune tolerance. The sensitivity of DCs to foreign stimuli also makes them useful cells to assess the inflammatory response to biomaterials. Elucidating the material property-DC phenotype relationships using a well-defined biomaterial system is expected to provide criteria for immuno-modulatory biomaterial design. Clinical titanium (Ti) substrates, including pretreatment (PT), sand-blasted and acid-etched (SLA), and modified SLA (modSLA), with different roughness and surface energy were used to treat DCs and resulted in differential DC responses. PT and SLA induced a mature DC (mDC) phenotype, while modSLA promoted a non-inflammatory environment by supporting an immature DC (iDC) phenotype based on surface marker expression, cytokine production profiles and cell morphology. Principal component analysis (PCA) confirmed these experimental results, and it also indicated that the non-stimulating property of modSLA covaried with certain surface properties, such as high surface hydrophilicity, % oxygen and % Ti of the substrates. In addition to the previous research that demonstrated the superior osteogenic property of modSLA compared to PT and SLA, the result reported herein indicates that modSLA may further benefit implant osteo-integration by reducing local inflammation and its associated osteoclastogenesis. PMID:20977948

  2. The Escherichia coli LexA repressor-operator system works in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G M; Mileham, K A; Cooke, S E; Woolston, S J; George, H K; Charles, A D; Brammar, W J

    1988-01-01

    We have demonstrated the use of the Escherichia coli LexA repressor-operator system to down-regulate gene expression in mouse cells. The LexA gene was placed downstream of the RSVLTR promoter with polyadenylation and splice signals from SV40. This expression unit was introduced into mouse Ltk- cells by calcium phosphate transfection and stable transfectants selected which express LexA protein. We have used the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (CAT) as our reporter gene. Transcription of this gene was driven by the HSV tk promoter, into which we have introduced one or two synthetic LexA operator sequences in various positions throughout the promoter. Necessary 3' signals were from the HSV tk gene. Repression by LexA was assessed by comparing the transient expression of tkCAT target constructs, containing LexA operator sequences in the promoter, in cells expressing LexA protein with that in control cells not expressing the repressor. We have observed up to 10-fold repression of CAT expression in LexA+ cells from promoters containing LexA operator sequences. Images PMID:3208758

  3. [Biological properties of L-asparaginase preparations from E. coli in cell cultures].

    PubMed

    Kondrat'eva, N A; Dobrynin, Ia V; Merkulov, M F

    1978-01-01

    Non-specific cytotoxicity and specific antitumor activity of 5 preparations of L-asparaginase from E. coli were studied. Two cell line, i.e. the asparagine-dependent (Berkitt lymphoma cells) and asparagin-independent (human ovary cancer cells) were used as the test-system. Incorporation of 3H-thimidine into DNA was the criterion of the preparation effect on the cells. Preparation I with the specific activity of 60-90 IU per 1 mg of protein obtained at the first stages of purification had high non-specific cytotoxicity. Preparation II obtained after further purification of preparation I, as well as preparation II without any stabilizer with the specific activity of 200 IU/mg were not inferior to the "Bayer" preparation by their biological properties. Addition of L-asparaginase to the preparation as a stabilizer of excessive glycine (preparation IV) increased its non-specific cytotoxicity and interfered with the study of its properties in the cell systems. Mannitol (preparation V) had no effect on the biological activity of L-asparaginase preparation. PMID:341799

  4. Effect of the Min System on Timing of Cell Division in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shuxin; Keilberg, Daniela; Hot, Edina; Thanbichler, Martin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Lenz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the Min protein system plays an important role in positioning the division site. We show that this system also has an effect on timing of cell division. We do this in a quantitative way by measuring the cell division waiting time (defined as time difference between appearance of a division site and the division event) and the Z-ring existence time. Both quantities are found to be different in WT and cells without functional Min system. We develop a series of theoretical models whose predictions are compared with the experimental findings. Continuous improvement leads to a final model that is able to explain all relevant experimental observations. In particular, it shows that the chromosome segregation defect caused by the absence of Min proteins has an important influence on timing of cell division. Our results indicate that the Min system affects the septum formation rate. In the absence of the Min proteins this rate is reduced, leading to the observed strongly randomized cell division events and the longer division waiting times. PMID:25090009

  5. Metabolism of HeLa cells revealed through autofluorescence lifetime upon infection with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buryakina, Tatyana Yu.; Su, Pin-Tzu; Syu, Wan-Jr; Allen Chang, C.; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2012-10-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a sensitive technique in monitoring functional and conformational states of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide reduced (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD),main compounds participating in oxidative phosphorylation in cells. In this study, we have applied FLIM to characterize the metabolic changes in HeLa cells upon bacterial infection and made comparison with the results from the cells treated with staurosporine (STS), a well-known apoptosis inducer. The evolving of NADH's average autofluorescence lifetime during the 3 h after infection with enterohemorragic Escherichia coli (EHEC) or STS treatment has been observed. The ratio of the short and the long lifetime components' relative contributions of NADH increases with time, a fact indicating cellular metabolic activity, such as a decrease of oxidative phosphorylation over the course of infection, while opposite dynamics is observed in FAD. Being associated with mitochondria, FAD lifetimes and redox ratio could indicate heterogeneous mitochondrial function, microenvironment with bacterial infection, and further pathway to cell death. The redox ratios for both EHEC-infected and STS-treated HeLa cells have been observed and these observations also indicate possible apoptosis induced by bacterial infection.

  6. Progenitor cells for ocular surface regenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Nieto-Nicolau, Nuria; Martínez-Conesa, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    The integrity and normal function of the corneal epithelium are essential for maintaining the cornea's transparency and vision. The existence of a cell population with progenitor characteristics in the limbus maintains a dynamic of constant epithelial repair and renewal. Currently, cell-based therapies for bio-replacement, such as cultured limbal epithelial transplantation and cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplantation, present very encouraging clinical results for treating limbal stem cell deficiencies. Another emerging therapeutic strategy consists of obtaining and implementing human progenitor cells of different origins using tissue engineering methods. The development of cell-based therapies using stem cells, such as human adult mesenchymal stromal cells, represents a significant breakthrough in the treatment of certain eye diseases and also offers a more rational, less invasive and more physiological approach to ocular surface regeneration. PMID:23257987

  7. Engineering NAD+ availability for Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalysis: a case study for dihydroxyacetone production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whole-cell redox biocatalysis has been intensively explored for the production of valuable compounds because excellent selectivity is routinely achieved. Although the cellular cofactor level, redox state and the corresponding enzymatic activity are expected to have major effects on the performance of the biocatalysts, our ability remains limited to predict the outcome upon variation of those factors as well as the relationship among them. Results In order to investigate the effects of cofactor availability on whole-cell redox biocatalysis, we devised recombinant Escherichia coli strains for the production of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) catalyzed by the NAD+-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase (GldA). In this model system, a water-forming NAD+ oxidase (NOX) and a NAD+ transporter (NTT4) were also co-expressed for cofactor regeneration and extracellular NAD+ uptake, respectively. We found that cellular cofactor level, NAD+/NADH ratio and NOX activity were not only strain-dependent, but also growth condition-dependent, leading to significant differences in specific DHA titer among different whole-cell biocatalysts. The host E. coli DH5α had the highest DHA specific titer of 0.81 g/gDCW with the highest NAD+/NADH ratio of 6.7 and NOX activity of 3900 U. The biocatalyst had a higher activity when induced with IPTG at 37°C for 8 h compared with those at 30°C for 8 h and 18 h. When cells were transformed with the ntt4 gene, feeding NAD+ during the cell culture stage increased cellular NAD(H) level by 1.44 fold and DHA specific titer by 1.58 fold to 2.13 g/gDCW. Supplementing NAD+ during the biotransformation stage was also beneficial to cellular NAD(H) level and DHA production, and the highest DHA productivity reached 0.76 g/gDCW/h. Cellular NAD(H) level, NAD+/NADH ratio, and NOX and GldA activity dropped over time during the biotransformation process. Conclusions High NAD+/NADH ratio driving by NOX was very important for DHA production. Once cofactor was

  8. Biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John Tanner

    Islet transplantation has emerged as a promising cell-based therapy for the treatment of diabetes, but its clinical efficacy remains limited by deleterious host responses that underlie islet destruction. In this dissertation, we describe the assembly of ultrathin conformal coatings that confer molecular-level control over the composition and biophysicochemical properties of the islet surface with implications for improving islet engraftment. Significantly, this work provides novel biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering with broad biomedical and biotechnological applications in cell-based therapeutics and beyond. Encapsulation of cells and tissue offers a rational approach for attenuating deleterious host responses towards transplanted cells, but a need exists to develop cell encapsulation strategies that minimize transplant volume. Towards this end, we endeavored to generate nanothin films of diverse architecture with tunable properties on the extracellular surface of individual pancreatic islets through a process of layer-by-layer (LbL) self assembly. We first describe the formation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-rich conformal coatings on islets via LbL self assembly of poly(L-lysine)-g-PEG(biotin) and streptavidin. Multilayer thin films conformed to the geometrically and chemically heterogeneous islet surface, and could be assembled without loss of islet viability or function. Significantly, coated islets performed comparably to untreated controls in a murine model of allogenic intraportal islet transplantation, and, to our knowledge, this is the first study to report in vivo survival and function of nanoencapsulated cells or cell aggregates. Based on these findings, we next postulated that structurally similar PLL-g-PEG copolymers comprised of shorter PEG grafts might be used to initiate and propagate the assembly of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films on pancreatic islets, while simultaneously preserving islet viability. Through control of PLL

  9. Comparison of the Transport of Tetracycline-Resistant and Tetracycline-Susceptible Escherichia coli Isolated from Lake Michigan.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Jacob J; Bardy, Sonia L; Feriancikova, Lucia; Xu, Shangping

    2011-11-01

    It was recently reported that tetracycline could enhance the mobility of manure-derived Escherichia coli within saturated porous media (Walczak et al. (Water Research 45:1681-1690, 2011)). It was also shown, however, that E. coli from various sources could display marked variation in their mobility (Bolster et al. (Journal of Environmental Quality 35:1018-1025, 2009)). The focus of this research was to examine if the observed difference in the mobility of manure-derived tetracycline-resistant (tet(R)) and tetracycline-susceptible (tet(S)) E. coli strains was source-dependent. Specifically, E. coli were isolated from Lake Michigan, and the influence of tetracycline resistance on Lake Michigan-derived E. coli was investigated through column transport experiments. Additionally, a variety of cell morphology and surface properties were determined and related to the observed bacterial transport behavior. Our experimental results showed that, consistent with previous observations, the deposition rate coefficients of the tet(R)E. coli strain was ~20-100% higher than those of the tet(S)E. coli strain. The zeta potential of the tet(R)E. coli cells was ~25 mV more negative than the tet(S)E. coli cells. Because the surfaces of the E. coli cells and the quartz sands were negatively charged, the repulsive electrostatic double-layer interaction between the tet(R)E. coli cells and the quartz sands was stronger, and the mobility of the tet(R)E. coli cells in the sand packs was thus higher. The tet(R)E. coli cells were also more hydrophilic than the tet(S)E. coli cells. Results from migration to hydrocarbon phase (MATH) tests showed that about ~35% more tet(S)E. coli cells partitioned to the hydrocarbon phase. As it was previously shown that cell hydrophobicity could enhance the attachment of bacterial cells to quartz sand, the difference in cell hydrophobicity could also have contributed to the observed higher mobility of the tet(R)E. coli cells. The size of the tet(R) and tet

  10. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-07-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  11. Isolation of an Aptamer that Binds Specifically to E. coli.

    PubMed

    Marton, Soledad; Cleto, Fernanda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio; Cardoso, Josiane

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species found ubiquitously in the intestinal flora of animals, although pathogenic variants cause major public health problems. Aptamers are short oligonucleotides that bind to targets with high affinity and specificity, and have great potential for use in diagnostics and therapy. We used cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) to isolate four single stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers that bind strongly to E. coli cells (ATCC generic strain 25922), with Kd values in the nanomolar range. Fluorescently labeled aptamers label the surface of E. coli cells, as viewed by fluorescent microscopy. Specificity tests with twelve different bacterial species showed that one of the aptamers-called P12-31-is highly specific for E. coli. Importantly, this aptamer binds to Meningitis/sepsis associated E. coli (MNEC) clinical isolates, and is the first aptamer described with potential for use in the diagnosis of MNEC-borne pathologies. PMID:27104834

  12. Optimization of high cell density fermentation process for recombinant nitrilase production in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Sohoni, Sujata Vijay; Nelapati, Dhanaraj; Sathe, Sneha; Javadekar-Subhedar, Vaishali; Gaikaiwari, Raghavendra P; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2015-01-01

    Nitrilases constitute an important class of biocatalysts for chiral synthesis. This work was undertaken with the aim to optimize nitrilase production in a host that is well-studied for protein production. Process parameters were optimized for high cell density fermentation, in batch and fed-batch modes, of Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) expressing Pseudomonas fluorescens nitrilase with a T7 promoter based expression system. Effects of different substrates, temperature and isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction on nitrilase production were studied. Super optimal broth containing glycerol but without an inducer gave best results in batch mode with 32 °C as the optimal temperature. Use of IPTG led to insoluble protein and lower enzyme activity. Optimized fed-batch strategy resulted in significant improvement in specific activity as well as volumetric productivity of the enzyme. On a volumetric basis, the activity improved 40-fold compared to the unoptimized batch process. PMID:25739996

  13. Control of microbial activity by flow injection analysis during high cell density cultivation of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ding, T; Bilitewski, U; Schmid, R D; Korz, D J; Sanders, E A

    1993-01-01

    The application of an automated flow injection analysis (FIA) system for on-line determination of microbial activity, during high cell density cultivations of Escherichia coli is reported. Based on a bioelectrochemical principle, the FIA method used a redox mediator (potassium hexacyanoferrate(III)) to facilitate electron transfer from the microorganisms to an electrochemical detector. Assays were carried out using a new sampling device which provided aseptic operation by use of a valve and chemical sterilisation. No sample dilution or pretreatment was necessary for biomass concentrations up to approx. 40 g l-1. The sample volume was 0.5 ml and the overall analysis time was 5 min. FIA signals were found to correlate well with the oxygen uptake rate (OUR). Changes in metabolic activity due to low substrate levels or high inhibitor concentrations in the cultivation medium became obvious from the FIA signals. PMID:7763463

  14. Non-standard amino acid incorporation into proteins using Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seok Hoon; Kwon, Yong-Chan; Jewett, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Incorporating non-standard amino acids (NSAAs) into proteins enables new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions. In recent years, improvements in cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems have opened the way to accurate and efficient incorporation of NSAAs into proteins. The driving force behind this development has been three-fold. First, a technical renaissance has enabled high-yielding (>1 g/L) and long-lasting (>10 h in batch operation) CFPS in systems derived from Escherichia coli. Second, the efficiency of orthogonal translation systems has improved. Third, the open nature of the CFPS platform has brought about an unprecedented level of control and freedom of design. Here, we review recent developments in CFPS platforms designed to precisely incorporate NSAAs. In the coming years, we anticipate that CFPS systems will impact efforts to elucidate structure/function relationships of proteins and to make biomaterials and sequence-defined biopolymers for medical and industrial applications.

  15. Genetically encoding photoswitchable click amino acids in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, Christian; Lacey, Vanessa K; Louie, Gordon V; Wei, Jing; Noel, Joseph P; Wang, Lei

    2014-04-01

    The ability to reversibly control protein structure and function with light would offer high spatiotemporal resolution for investigating biological processes. To confer photoresponsiveness on general proteins, we genetically incorporated a set of photoswitchable click amino acids (PSCaas), which contain both a reversible photoswitch and an additional click functional group for further modifications. Orthogonal tRNA-synthetases were evolved to genetically encode PSCaas bearing azobenzene with an alkene, keto, or benzyl chloride group in E. coli and in mammalian cells. After incorporation into calmodulin, the benzyl chloride PSCaa spontaneously generated a covalent protein bridge by reacting with a nearby cysteine residue through proximity-enabled bioreactivity. The resultant azobenzene bridge isomerized in response to light, thereby changing the conformation of calmodulin. These genetically encodable PSCaas will prove valuable for engineering photoswitchable bridges into proteins for reversible optogenetic regulation. PMID:24615769

  16. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Ruano-Gallego, David; Álvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-09-18

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these "molecular syringes" for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells. PMID:26017572

  17. Epithelial and Mesenchymal Cells in the Bovine Colonic Mucosa Differ in Their Responsiveness to Escherichia coli Shiga Toxin 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cells in the depth of the crypts in the bovine colon express CD77 molecules that potentially act as receptors for Shiga toxins (Stx). The implication of this finding for the intestinal colonization 25 of cattle with human pathogenic Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) remains undefined. We used f...

  18. Enhancing isomaltulose production by recombinant Escherichia coli producing sucrose isomerase: culture medium optimization containing agricultural wastes and cell immobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Xu, Hong; Yu, Jianguang; Wang, Yanyuan; Feng, Xiaohai; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2013-10-01

    Isomaltulose is a structural isomer of sucrose commercially used in food industries. In this work, recombinant Escherichia coli producing sucrose isomerase (SIase) was used to convert sucrose into isomaltulose. To develop an economical industrial medium, untreated cane molasses (10.63 g l⁻¹), yeast extract (25.93 g l⁻¹), and corn steep liquor (10.45 g l⁻¹) were used as main culture compositions for SIase production. The relatively high SIase activity (14.50 ± 0.11 U mg DCW⁻¹) was obtained by the recombinant cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on SIase production by engineered E. coli using untreated cane molasses. The recombinant E. coli cells expressing the SIase gene were immobilized in calcium alginate gel in order to improve the efficiency of recycling. The immobilization was most effective with 2 % (w/v) sodium alginate and 3 % (w/v) calcium chloride. The optimal initial biomass for immobilization was 20 % (w/v, wet wt.), with a hardening time of 8 h for cell immobilization. The immobilized E. coli cells exhibited good stability for 30 batches with the productivity of 0.45 g isomaltulose g pellet⁻¹ h⁻¹. A continuous isomaltulose formation process using a column reactor remained stable for 40 days with 83 ± 2 % isomaltulose yield, which would be beneficial for economical production of isomaltulose. PMID:23300051

  19. Cell-surface nucleolin is sequestered into EPEC microcolonies and may play a role during infection.

    PubMed

    Dean, Paul; Kenny, Brendan

    2011-06-01

    Nucleolin is a prominent nucleolar protein that is mobilized into the cytoplasm during infection by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). Nucleolin also exists at low levels at the cell surface of eukaryotic cells and here we show that upon infection of an intestinal cell model, EPEC recruits and subsequently sequesters cell-surface EGFP-nucleolin into extracellularly located bacterial microcolonies. The recruitment of nucleolin was evident around bacteria within the centre of the microcolonies that were not directly associated with actin-based pedestals. Incubation of host intestinal cells with different ligands that specifically bind nucleolin impaired the ability of EPEC to disrupt epithelial barrier function but did not inhibit bacterial attachment or other effector-driven processes such as pedestal formation or microvilli effacement. Taken together, this work suggests that EPEC exploits two spatially distinct pools of nucleolin during the infection process. PMID:21436219

  20. Characterization of the cell surface properties of drinking water pathogens by microbial adhesion to hydrocarbon and electrophoretic mobility measurements.

    PubMed

    Popovici, Jonathan; White, Colin P; Hoelle, Jill; Kinkle, Brian K; Lytle, Darren A

    2014-06-01

    The surface characteristics of microbial cells directly influence their mobility and behavior within aqueous environments. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microbial cells impact a number of interactions and processes including aggregation, adhesion to surfaces, and stability of the cells within the aqueous environments. These cell characteristics are unique to the bacterial species and are a reflection of the large diversity of surface structures, proteins, and appendages of microorganisms. CSH and EPM of bacterial cells contribute substantially to the effectiveness of drinking water treatment to remove them, and therefore an investigation of these properties will be useful in predicting their removal through drinking water treatment processes and transport through drinking water distribution systems. EPM and CSH measurements of six microbiological pathogen or surrogate species suspended in phosphate-buffered water are reported in this work. Two strains of Vibrio cholerae were hydrophobic, while three strains of Escherichia coli were hydrophilic. Bacillus cereus was categorized as moderately hydrophobic. The strains of E. coli had the highest (most negative) EPM. Based on the measurements, E. coli species is predicted to be most difficult to remove from water while V. cholerae will be the easiest to remove. PMID:24815929

  1. Effect of growth rate and cell shape on the peptidoglycan composition in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Driehuis, F; Wouters, J T

    1987-01-01

    The muropeptide composition of peptidoglycan from Escherichia coli W7 cultivated at different growth rates in chemostat cultures was compared by using high-pressure liquid chromatography. At a low growth rate (D = 0.1 h-1), about 40% more covalently bound lipoprotein and at least twofold more diaminopimelyl-diaminopimelic acid cross-bridges were found than at a high growth rate (D = 0.8 h-1). The total degree of cross-linkage was only slightly increased, and the fraction of trimeric muropeptides and the average length of the glycan chains were not changed significantly. Analysis of the peptidoglycan from a morphological variant strain of W7 revealed that the altered peptidoglycan composition in slowly growing W7 cells was not correlated with the observation that these cells, due to their decreased cell length, were relatively enriched in polar material. In fact, our results suggested that peptidoglycan forming cell poles is chemically identical to that forming lateral wall. Images PMID:3539928

  2. Hydrogen peroxide signals E. coli phagocytosis by human polymorphonuclear cells; up-stream and down-stream pathway.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Michalis; Karamolegkou, Georgia; Rosmaraki, Eleftheria; Tsakas, Sotiris

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (Η2Ο2) is produced during a variety of cellular procedures. In this paper, the regulatory role of Η2Ο2, in Escherichia coli phagocytosis by the human polymorphonuclears, was investigated. White blood cells were incubated with dihydrorhodamine (DHR) in order to study H2O2 synthesis and E. coli-FITC to study phagocytosis. Flow cytometry revealed increased synthesis of H2O2 in polymorphonuclears which incorporated E. coli-FITC. The blocking of H2O2 synthesis by specific inhibitors, N-ethylmaleimide (ΝΕΜ) for NADPH oxidase and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) for superoxide dismutase (SOD), decreased E. coli phagocytosis, as well. Immunoblot analysis of white blood cell protein extracts revealed that the blocking of NADPH oxidase and SOD decreased ERK-1/2 phosphorylation, while it had no effect on JNK and p38. Confocal microscopy showed that phosphorylation of MAPKs and phagocytosis solely occur in the polymorphonuclear and not in mononuclear cells. The use of specific MAPKs inhibitors showed that all of them are necessary for phagocytosis, but only phospho-p38 affects H2O2 synthesis. The blocking of JNK phosphorylation, in the presence of E. coli, evoked a further decrease of cytoplasmic p47 thus increasing its translocation onto the plasma membrane for the assembly of NADPH oxidase. It appears that newly synthesised H2O2 invigorates the phosphorylation and action of ERK-1/2 in E. coli phagocytosis, while phospho-JNK and phospho-p38 appear to regulate H2O2 production. PMID:26204503

  3. Substrate-Dependent Assembly of the Tat Translocase as Observed in Live Escherichia coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Patrick; Fröbel, Julia; Graumann, Peter L.; Müller, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway guides fully folded proteins across membranes of bacteria, archaea and plant chloroplasts. In Escherichia coli, Tat-specific transport is executed in a still largely unknown manner by three functionally diverse membrane proteins, termed TatA, TatB, and TatC. In order to follow the intracellular distribution of the TatABC proteins in live E. coli cells, we have individually expressed fluorophore-tagged versions of each Tat protein in addition to a set of chromosomally encoded TatABC proteins. In this way, a Tat translocase could form from the native TatABC proteins and be visualized via the association of a fluorescent Tat variant. A functionally active TatA-green fluorescent protein fusion was found to re-locate from a uniform distribution in the membrane into a few clusters preferentially located at the cell poles. Clustering was absolutely dependent on the co-expression of functional Tat substrates, the proton-motive force, and the cognate TatBC subunits. Likewise, polar cluster formation of a functional TatB-mCherry fusion required TatA and TatC and that of a functional TatC-mCherry fusion a functional Tat substrate. Furthermore we directly demonstrate the co-localization of TatA and TatB in the same fluorescent clusters. Our collective results are consistent with distinct Tat translocation sites dynamically forming in vivo in response to newly synthesized Tat substrates. PMID:23936332

  4. Specific Adhesion to Cellulose and Hydrolysis of Organophosphate Nerve Agents by a Genetically Engineered Escherichia coli Strain with a Surface-Expressed Cellulose-Binding Domain and Organophosphorus Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Aijun A.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2002-01-01

    A genetically engineered Escherichia coli cell expressing both organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and a cellulose-binding domain (CBD) on the cell surface was constructed, enabling the simultaneous hydrolysis of organophosphate nerve agents and immobilization via specific adsorption to cellulose. OPH was displayed on the cell surface by use of the truncated ice nucleation protein (INPNC) fusion system, while the CBD was surface anchored by the Lpp-OmpA fusion system. Production of both INPNC-OPH and Lpp-OmpA-CBD fusion proteins was verified by immunoblotting, and the surface localization of OPH and the CBD was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Whole-cell immobilization with the surface-anchored CBD was very specific, forming essentially a monolayer of cells on different supports, as shown by electron micrographs. Optimal levels of OPH activity and binding affinity to cellulose supports were achieved by investigating expression under different induction levels. Immobilized cells degraded paraoxon rapidly at an initial rate of 0.65 mM/min/g of cells (dry weight) and retained almost 100% efficiency over a period of 45 days. Owing to its superior degradation capacity and affinity to cellulose, this immobilized-cell system should be an attractive alternative for large-scale detoxification of organophosphate nerve agents. PMID:11916685

  5. Sulfated Escherichia coli K5 Polysaccharide Derivatives Inhibit Dengue Virus Infection of Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Interacting with the Viral Envelope Protein E Domain III

    PubMed Central

    Vervaeke, Peter; Alen, Marijke; Noppen, Sam; Schols, Dominique; Oreste, Pasqua; Liekens, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an emerging mosquito-borne pathogen that causes cytokine-mediated alterations in the barrier function of the microvascular endothelium, leading to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). We observed that DENV (serotype 2) productively infects primary (HMVEC-d) and immortalized (HMEC-1) human dermal microvascular endothelial cells, despite the absence of well-described DENV receptors, such as dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) or the mannose receptor on the cell surface. However, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) were highly expressed on these cells and pre-treatment of HMEC-1 cells with heparinase II or with glycosaminoglycans reduced DENV infectivity up to 90%, suggesting that DENV uses HSPGs as attachment receptor on microvascular endothelial cells. Sulfated Escherichia coli K5 derivatives, which are structurally similar to heparin/heparan sulfate but lack anticoagulant activity, were able to block DENV infection of HMEC-1 and HMVEC-d cells in the nanomolar range. The highly sulfated K5-OS(H) and K5-N,OS(H) inhibited virus attachment and subsequent entry into microvascular endothelial cells by interacting with the viral envelope (E) protein, as shown by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis using the receptor-binding domain III of the E protein. PMID:24015314

  6. Surface texturing and patterning in solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1993-11-01

    Surface texture can perform a number of functions in modern solar cell design. The most obvious function is in control of reflection from surfaces on which sunlight is incident. However, texture can also be used to influence the fate of light that is refracted into the cell. Light steering by surface texture can ensure this refracted light is absorbed in regions of the cell which are most responsive. When used with rear reflectors, surface texture can help trap weakly absorbed light into the cell, increasing the effective path length or optical thickness of the cell by factors of 30--60. Two general types of texture are considered. One involves macroscopic features of controlled shape designed to control the direction of interacting light. The other is based on the use of irregular features of size comparable to wavelength of the light. These can be very effective in scattering light into a wide range of directions. Non-optical uses of texture are also briefly described. 62 refs., 22 figs.

  7. PHYSICOCHEMICAL INTERACTION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI CELL ENVELOPES AND BACILLUS SUBTILIS CELL WALLS WITH TWO CLAYS AND ABILITY OF THE COMPOSITE TO IMMOBILIZE HEAVY METALS FROM SOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated Escherichia coli K-l2 cell envelopes or Bacillus subtilis 168 cell walls were reacted with smectite or kaolinite clay in distilled deionized water (pH 6.0); unbound envelopes or walls were separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and the extent of adsorption...

  8. Plasmid-encoded toxin of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli is internalized by epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Navarro-García, F; Canizalez-Roman, A; Luna, J; Sears, C; Nataro, J P

    2001-02-01

    We have previously described a 104-kDa protein termed Pet (for plasmid-encoded toxin) secreted by some strains of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC). Through an unknown mechanism, this toxin (i) raises transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc) and decreases the electrical resistance of rat jejunum mounted in the Ussing chamber, (ii) causes cytoskeletal alterations in HEp-2 cells and HT29/C1 cells, and (iii) is required for histopathologic effects of EAEC on human intestinal mucosa. Pet is a member of the autotransporter class of secreted proteins and together with Tsh, EspP, EspC, ShMu, and SepA proteins comprises the SPATE subfamily. Here, we show that Pet is internalized by HEp-2 cells and that internalization appears to be required for the induction of cytopathic effects. Evidence supporting Pet internalization includes the facts that (i) the effects of Pet on epithelial cells were inhibited by brefeldin A, which interferes with various steps of intracellular vesicular transport; (ii) immunoblots using anti-Pet antibodies detected Pet in the cytoplasmic fraction of intoxicated HEp-2 cells; (iii) Pet was detected inside HEp-2 cells by confocal microscopy; and (iv) a mutant in the passenger domain cleavage site, which prevents Pet release from the bacterial outer membrane, did not produce cytopathic effects on epithelial cells, whereas the release of mutant Pet from the outer membrane with trypsin yielded active toxin. We have also shown that the Pet serine protease motif is required to produce cytopathic effects but not for Pet secretion. Our results suggest an intracellular mode of action for the Pet protease and are consistent with we our recent report suggesting an intracellular mode of action for Pet. PMID:11160002

  9. Production of cell surface and secreted glycoproteins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Seiradake, Elena; Zhao, Yuguang; Lu, Weixian; Aricescu, A Radu; Jones, E Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian protein expression systems are becoming increasingly popular for the production of eukaryotic secreted and cell surface proteins. Here we describe methods to produce recombinant proteins in adherent or suspension human embryonic kidney cell cultures, using transient transfection or stable cell lines. The protocols are easy to scale up and cost-efficient, making them suitable for protein crystallization projects and other applications that require high protein yields. PMID:25502196

  10. Uropathogenic E. coli adhesin-induced host cell receptor conformational changes: implications in transmembrane signaling transduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaibin; Min, Guangwei; Glockshuber, Rudi; Sun, Tung-Tien; Kong, Xiang-Peng

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the second most common infectious disease, and is caused predominantly by type 1-fimbriated uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). UPEC initiates infection by attaching to uroplakin Ia, its urothelial surface receptor, via the FimH adhesins capping the distal end of its fimbriae. Uroplakin Ia, together with uroplakins Ib, II and IIIa, forms a 16 nm receptor complex that is assembled into hexagonally packed two-dimensional crystals (urothelial plaques) covering >90% of the urothelial apical surface. Recent studies indicate that FimH is the invasin of UPEC as its attachment to the urothelial surface can induce cellular signaling events including calcium elevation and the phosphorylation of the uroplakin IIIa cytoplasmic tail, leading to cytoskeletal rearrangements and bacterial invasion. However, it remains unknown how the binding of FimH to the uroplakin receptor triggers a signal that can be transmitted through the highly impermeable urothelial apical membrane. We show here by cryo-electron microscopy that FimH-binding to the extracellular domain of UPIa induces global conformational changes in the entire uroplakin receptor complex, including a coordinated movement of the tightly bundled transmembrane helices. This movement of the transmembrane helix bundles can cause a corresponding lateral translocation of the uroplakin cytoplasmic tails, which can be sufficient to trigger downstream signaling events. Our results suggest a novel pathogen-induced transmembrane signal transduction mechanism that plays a key role in the initial stages of UPEC invasion and receptor-mediated bacterial invasion in general. PMID:19577575

  11. CRISPR1 analysis of naturalized surface water and fecal Escherichia coli suggests common origin.

    PubMed

    Tymensen, Lisa D

    2016-06-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) are part of an acquired bacterial immune system that functions as a barrier to exogenous genetic elements. Since naturalized Escherichia coli are likely to encounter different genetic elements in aquatic environments compared to enteric strains, we hypothesized that such differences would be reflected within the hypervariable CRISPR alleles of these two populations. Comparison of CRISPR1 alleles from naturalized and fecal phylogroup B1 E. coli strains revealed that the alleles could be categorized into four major distinct groups (designated G6-G9), and all four allele groups were found among naturalized strains and fecal strains. The distribution of CRIPSR G6 and G8 alleles was similar among strains of both ecotypes, while naturalized strains tended to have CRISPR G7 alleles rather than G9 alleles. Since CRISPR G7 alleles were not specific to naturalized strains, they, however, would not be useful as a marker for identifying naturalized strains. Notably, CRISPR alleles from naturalized and fecal strains also had similar spacer repertoires. This indicates a shared history of encounter with mobile genetic elements and suggests that the two populations were derived from common ancestors. PMID:27004771

  12. Effects of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and the role of the surface protein dispersin

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Allison, David Post

    2011-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) are bacterial pathogens that cause watery diarrhoea, which is often persistent and can be inflammatory. The antibiotic ciprofloxacin is used to treat EAEC infections, but a full understanding of the antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin is needed for more efficient treatment of bacterial infections. In this study, it was found that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of ciprofloxacin had an inhibitory effect on EAEC adhesion to glass and mammalian HEp-2 cells. It was also observed that bacterial surface properties play an important role in bacterial sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. In an EAEC mutant strain where the hydrophobic positively charged surface protein dispersin was absent, sensitivity to ciprofloxacin was reduced compared with the wild-type strain. Identified here are several antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin at sub-MIC concentrations indicating that bacterial surface hydrophobicity affects the response to ciprofloxacin. Investigating the effects of sub-MIC doses of antibiotics on targeted bacteria could help to further our understanding of bacterial pathogenicity and elucidate future antibiotic treatment modalities.

  13. The effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin concentrations on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and the role of the surface protein dispersin

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, Ninell P; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Trevino-Dopatka, Sonia; Maggart, Michael J; Boisen, Nadia; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Nataro, James; Allison, David P

    2011-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) are bacterial pathogens that cause watery diarrhea, which is often persistent and can be inflammatory. The antibiotic ciprofloxacin is used to treat EAEC infections, but a full understanding of the antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin is needed for more efficient treatment of bacterial infections. In this study, it was found that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of ciprofloxacin had an inhibitory effect on EAEC adhesion to glass and mammalian HEp-2 cells. It was also observed that bacterial surface properties play an important role in bacterial sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. In an EAEC mutant strain where the hydrophobic positively charged surface protein dispersin was absent, sensitivity to ciprofloxacin was reduced compared with the wild-type strain. Identified here are several antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin at sub-MIC concentrations indicating that bacterial surface hydrophobicity affects the response to ciprofloxacin. Investigating the effects of sub-MIC doses of antibiotics on targeted bacteria could help to further our understanding of bacterial pathogenicity and elucidate future antibiotic treatment modalities.

  14. Slow unloading leads to DNA-bound β2-sliding clamp accumulation in live Escherichia coli cells

    PubMed Central

    Moolman, M. Charl; Krishnan, Sriram Tiruvadi; Kerssemakers, Jacob W. J.; van den Berg, Aafke; Tulinski, Pawel; Depken, Martin; Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo; Sherratt, David J.; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous sliding clamp facilitates processivity of the replicative polymerase and acts as a platform to recruit proteins involved in replication, recombination and repair. While the dynamics of the E. coli β2-sliding clamp have been characterized in vitro, its in vivo stoichiometry and dynamics remain unclear. To probe both β2-clamp dynamics and stoichiometry in live E. coli cells, we use custom-built microfluidics in combination with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and photoactivated fluorescence microscopy. We quantify the recruitment, binding and turnover of β2-sliding clamps on DNA during replication. These quantitative in vivo results demonstrate that numerous β2-clamps in E. coli remain on the DNA behind the replication fork for a protracted period of time, allowing them to form a docking platform for other enzymes involved in DNA metabolism. PMID:25520215

  15. Slow unloading leads to DNA-bound β2-sliding clamp accumulation in live Escherichia coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moolman, M. Charl; Krishnan, Sriram Tiruvadi; Kerssemakers, Jacob W. J.; van den Berg, Aafke; Tulinski, Pawel; Depken, Martin; Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo; Sherratt, David J.; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-12-01

    The ubiquitous sliding clamp facilitates processivity of the replicative polymerase and acts as a platform to recruit proteins involved in replication, recombination and repair. While the dynamics of the E. coli β2-sliding clamp have been characterized in vitro, its in vivo stoichiometry and dynamics remain unclear. To probe both β2-clamp dynamics and stoichiometry in live E. coli cells, we use custom-built microfluidics in combination with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and photoactivated fluorescence microscopy. We quantify the recruitment, binding and turnover of β2-sliding clamps on DNA during replication. These quantitative in vivo results demonstrate that numerous β2-clamps in E. coli remain on the DNA behind the replication fork for a protracted period of time, allowing them to form a docking platform for other enzymes involved in DNA metabolism.

  16. Decolorization of acid and basic dyes: understanding the metabolic degradation and cell-induced adsorption/precipitation by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cerboneschi, Matteo; Corsi, Massimo; Bianchini, Roberto; Bonanni, Marco; Tegli, Stefania

    2015-10-01

    Escherichia coli strain DH5α was successfully employed in the decolorization of commercial anthraquinone and azo dyes, belonging to the general classes of acid or basic dyes. The bacteria showed an aptitude to survive at different pH values on any dye solution tested, and a rapid decolorization was obtained under aerobic conditions for the whole collection of dyes. A deep investigation about the mode of action of E. coli was carried out to demonstrate that dye decolorization mainly occurred via three different pathways, specifically bacterial induced precipitation, cell wall adsorption, and metabolism, whose weight was correlated with the chemical nature of the dye. In the case of basic azo dyes, an unexpected fast decolorization was observed after just 2-h postinoculation under aerobic conditions, suggesting that metabolism was the main mechanism involved in basic azo dye degradation, as unequivocally demonstrated by mass spectrometric analysis. The reductive cleavage of the azo group by E. coli on basic azo dyes was also further demonstrated by the inhibition of decolorization occurring when glucose was added to the dye solution. Moreover, no residual toxicity was found in the E. coli-treated basic azo dye solutions by performing Daphnia magna acute toxicity assays. The results of the present study demonstrated that E. coli can be simply exploited for its natural metabolic pathways, without applying any recombinant technology. The high versatility and adaptability of this bacterium could encourage its involvement in industrial bioremediation of textile and leather dyeing wastewaters. PMID:26062529

  17. Characterization of the variable region in the class 1 integron of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from surface water.

    PubMed

    Canal, Natália; Meneghetti, Karine Lena; de Almeida, Clara Ponzi; da Rosa Bastos, Marina; Otton, Letícia Muner; Corção, Gertrudes

    2016-01-01

    Fecal bacteria are considered to be a potential reservoir of antimicrobial resistance genes in the aquatic environment and could horizontally transfer these genes to autochthonous bacteria when carried on transferable and/or mobile genetic elements. Such circulation of resistance genes constitutes a latent public health hazard. The aim of this study was to characterize the variable region of the class 1 integron and relate its genetic content to resistance patterns observed in antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from the surface waters of Patos Lagoon, Southern Brazil. Genetic diversity of the isolates and presence of the qacEΔ1 gene, which confers resistance to quaternary ammonium compounds, were also investigated. A total of 27 isolates were analyzed. The variable region harbored dfrA17, dfrA1 and dfrA12 genes, which confer resistance to trimethoprim, and aadA1, aadA5 and aadA22 genes that encode resistance to streptomycin/spectinomycin. Most of the isolates were considered resistant to quaternary ammonium compounds and all of them carried the qacEΔ1 gene at the 3' conserved segment of the integron. ERIC-PCR analyses of E. coli isolates that presented the integrons showed great genetic diversity, indicating diverse sources of contamination in this environment. These results suggest that fecal bacteria with class 1 integrons in aquatic environments are potentially important reservoirs of antibiotic-resistance genes and may transfer these elements to other bacteria that are capable of infecting humans. PMID:26991286

  18. Structure and Cell Wall Cleavage by Modular Lytic Transglycosylase MltC of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The lytic transglycosylases are essential bacterial enzymes that catalyze the nonhydrolytic cleavage of the glycan strands of the bacterial cell wall. We describe here the structural and catalytic properties of MltC, one of the seven lytic transglycosylases found in the genome of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. The 2.3 Å resolution X-ray structure of a soluble construct of MltC shows a unique, compared to known lytic transglycosylase structures, two-domain structure characterized by an expansive active site of 53 Å length extending through an interface between the domains. The structures of three complexes of MltC with cell wall analogues suggest the positioning of the peptidoglycan in the active site both as a substrate and as a product. One complex is suggested to correspond to an intermediate in the course of sequential and exolytic cleavage of the peptidoglycan. Moreover, MltC partitioned its reactive oxocarbenium-like intermediate between trapping by the C6-hydroxyl of the muramyl moiety (lytic transglycosylase activity, the major path) and by water (muramidase activity). Genomic analysis identifies the presence of an MltC homologue in no less than 791 bacterial genomes. While the role of MltC in cell wall assembly and maturation remains uncertain, we propose a functional role for this enzyme as befits the uniqueness of its two-domain structure. PMID:24988330

  19. Cell division in Escherichia coli BS-12 is hypersensitive to deoxyribonucleic acid damage by ultraviolet light.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, B A; Mottershead, R P; Green, M H

    1977-01-01

    Escherichia coli BS-12 uvrA lon is hypersensitive to ultraviolet light. On minimal agar plates at densities in excess of about 10(7) bacteria per plate, as few as one or two photoreversible pyrimidine dimers in the entire genome are sufficient to cause inhibition of cell division. Most of the resulting filaments are unable to divide or form a viable colony. Inhibition of cell division appears to be a rapid consequence of replication of deoxyribonucleic acid containing a pyrimidine dimer. Photoreversibility of the inhibition of cell division persists indefinitely, indicating that the continued presence of the pyrimidine dimers (or the continued generation of daughter strand gaps) is necessary to maintain the division-inhibited state. In view of the kinetics for the production of filamentation by ultraviolet light and the extremely low average inducing fluence (0.03 J/m2), it is concluded that the initiating signal is not the same as that causing other inducible phenomena such as prophage induction or Weigle reactivation. PMID:400790

  20. Structure and cell wall cleavage by modular lytic transglycosylase MltC of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Artola-Recolons, Cecilia; Lee, Mijoon; Bernardo-García, Noelia; Blázquez, Blas; Hesek, Dusan; Bartual, Sergio G; Mahasenan, Kiran V; Lastochkin, Elena; Pi, Hualiang; Boggess, Bill; Meindl, Kathrin; Usón, Isabel; Fisher, Jed F; Mobashery, Shahriar; Hermoso, Juan A

    2014-09-19

    The lytic transglycosylases are essential bacterial enzymes that catalyze the nonhydrolytic cleavage of the glycan strands of the bacterial cell wall. We describe here the structural and catalytic properties of MltC, one of the seven lytic transglycosylases found in the genome of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. The 2.3 Å resolution X-ray structure of a soluble construct of MltC shows a unique, compared to known lytic transglycosylase structures, two-domain structure characterized by an expansive active site of 53 Å length extending through an interface between the domains. The structures of three complexes of MltC with cell wall analogues suggest the positioning of the peptidoglycan in the active site both as a substrate and as a product. One complex is suggested to correspond to an intermediate in the course of sequential and exolytic cleavage of the peptidoglycan. Moreover, MltC partitioned its reactive oxocarbenium-like intermediate between trapping by the C6-hydroxyl of the muramyl moiety (lytic transglycosylase activity, the major path) and by water (muramidase activity). Genomic analysis identifies the presence of an MltC homologue in no less than 791 bacterial genomes. While the role of MltC in cell wall assembly and maturation remains uncertain, we propose a functional role for this enzyme as befits the uniqueness of its two-domain structure. PMID:24988330

  1. Glycopeptide Capture for Cell Surface Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M. C. Gilbert; Sun, Bingyun

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface proteins, including extracellular matrix proteins, participate in all major cellular processes and functions, such as growth, differentiation, and proliferation. A comprehensive characterization of these proteins provides rich information for biomarker discovery, cell-type identification, and drug-target selection, as well as helping to advance our understanding of cellular biology and physiology. Surface proteins, however, pose significant analytical challenges, because of their inherently low abundance, high hydrophobicity, and heavy post-translational modifications. Taking advantage of the prevalent glycosylation on surface proteins, we introduce here a high-throughput glycopeptide-capture approach that integrates the advantages of several existing N-glycoproteomics means. Our method can enrich the glycopeptides derived from surface proteins and remove their glycans for facile proteomics using LC-MS. The resolved N-glycoproteome comprises the information of protein identity and quantity as well as their sites of glycosylation. This method has been applied to a series of studies in areas including cancer, stem cells, and drug toxicity. The limitation of the method lies in the low abundance of surface membrane proteins, such that a relatively large quantity of samples is required for this analysis compared to studies centered on cytosolic proteins. PMID:24836557

  2. Localization of Cell Division Protein FtsQ by Immunofluorescence Microscopy in Dividing and Nondividing Cells of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Buddelmeijer, Nienke; Aarsman, Mirjam E. G.; Kolk, Arend H. J.; Vicente, Miguel; Nanninga, Nanne

    1998-01-01

    The localization of cell division protein FtsQ in Escherichia coli wild-type cells was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy with specific monoclonal antibodies. FtsQ could be localized to the division site in constricting cells. FtsQ could also localize to the division site in ftsQ1(Ts) cells grown at the permissive temperature. A hybrid protein in which the cytoplasmic domain and the transmembrane domain were derived from the γ form of penicillin-binding protein 1B and the periplasmic domain was derived from FtsQ was also able to localize to the division site. This result indicates that the periplasmic domain of FtsQ determines the localization of FtsQ, as has also been concluded by others for the periplasmic domain of FtsN. Noncentral FtsQ foci were found in the area of the cell where the nucleoid resides and were therefore assumed to represent sites where the FtsQ protein is synthesized and simultaneously inserted into the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:9829918

  3. Water disinfection using silver nanoparticle impregnated activated carbon: Escherichia coli cell-killing in batch and continuous packed column operation over a long duration.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Pritam; Bandyopadhyaya, Rajdip

    2016-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) were selectively impregnated on the external surface of plasma treated activated carbon (AC) granules (referred to as Ag-AC hybrid, having 0.8 wt% of Ag), for achieving continuous disinfection of water in a single flow-column set-up. First, Ag-NPs (28 nm mean size) were synthesized by UV reduction. Subsequently, Escherichia coli cell-killing experiments were performed in both shake flask (i. e. batch-mode) and flow-column (i. e. continuous-mode) operations, using E. coli K12 (MTCC 1302) as a model organism. Batch results using 8 mg Ag-AC hybrid/ml of cell suspension showed that, 10(4) CFU/ml of cells were killed within 25 min contact time, with cell concentration decaying exponentially in time. Maintaining almost the same contact time as in the batch experiments, three columns packed with Ag-AC (all having a height of 25 cm but increasing diameters of 1, 5 and 8 cm, respectively) were used for monitoring cell-killing performance over a long duration. For all columns, inlet water having 10(4) CFU/ml E. coli could be completely disinfected to produce treated, outlet water having zero cell count. Specifically for the 8 cm diameter column, a maximum throughput of treating 1.62 L of contaminated water per hour could be maintained for at least up to 16 days. Moreover, the Ag concentration in the outlet water was only up to 29.8 μg/L at steady state, which is well within the recommended limit of 100 μg/L for drinking water. Hence, water disinfection for potable quality water (zero E. coli count and <100 μg/L Ag) can be achieved in a continuous manner over a long duration, with our packed Ag-AC column. PMID:27179597

  4. Phytochemicals in lowbush wild blueberry inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 by damaging its cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Lacombe, Alison; Tadepalli, Shravani; Hwang, Chen-An; Wu, Vivian C H

    2013-11-01

    The antimicrobial activity and model of action of polyphenolic compounds extracted from lowbush wild blueberries (LWB) were studied against Escherichia coli O157:H7. Polyphenols in LWB were extracted using 80% vol/vol methanol and designated as total blueberry phenolics (TBP). The fraction was further separated by a C-18 Sep-Pak cartridge into monomeric phenolics acids (MPA) and anthocyanins plus proanthocyanidins (A&P). The A&P fraction was further separated into anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins using a LH-20 Sephadex column. Each fraction was diluted in 0.85% wt/vol NaCl, inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 to achieve 8 log colony-forming units (CFU)/mL, and incubated at 25 °C for 1 h. The survival populations of E. coli O157:H7 in the phenolic fractions were determined by a viable cell counts method. The permeability of the cell membrane of E. coli O157:H7 was determined using LIVE/DEAD viability assay, and the damage was visualized by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Significant (p<0.05) reductions of 5 log CFU/mL of E. coli O157:H7 were observed for MPA at 0.4 g/L gallic acid equivalents (GAE), A&P at 0.9 g/L GAE, and anthocyanins at 0.65 g/L GAE. Reductions of 6-7 CFU/mL were observed for MPA at 0.8 g/L GAE, A&P at 1.8 g/L GAE, and anthocyanins at 1.3 g/L GAE compared to the control. The cell membrane of E. coli O157:H7 exhibited a significantly increased permeability when treated with proanthocyanidins (0.15 g/L GAE), A&P (0.45 g/L GAE), anthocyanins (0.65 g/L GAE), and TBP (0.14 g/L GAE). TEM confirmed the inactivation and increased membrane permeability of E. coli O157:H7. This study demonstrated the antimicrobial effect of polyphenols from LWB against E. coli O157:H7 and the probable mode of action. PMID:23944751

  5. Plasmolysis and cell shape depend on solute outer-membrane permeability during hyperosmotic shock in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Pilizota, Teuta; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2013-06-18

    The concentration of chemicals inside the bacterial cytoplasm generates an osmotic pressure, termed turgor, which inflates the cell and is necessary for cell growth and survival. In Escherichia coli, a sudden increase in external concentration causes a pressure drop across the cell envelope that drives changes in cell shape, such as plasmolysis, where the inner and outer membranes separate. Here, we use fluorescence imaging of single cells during hyperosmotic shock with a time resolution on the order of seconds to examine the response of cells to a range of different conditions. We show that shock using an outer-membrane impermeable solute results in total cell volume reduction with no plasmolysis, whereas a shock caused by outer-membrane permeable ions causes plasmolysis immediately upon shock. Slowly permeable solutes, such as sucrose, which cross the membrane in minutes, cause plasmolysis to occur gradually as the chemical potential equilibrates. In addition, we quantify the detailed morphological changes to cell shape during osmotic shock. Nonplasmolyzed cells shrink in length with an additional lateral size reduction as the magnitude of the shock increases. Quickly plasmolyzing cells shrink largely at the poles, whereas gradually plasmolyzing cells invaginate along the cell cylinder. Our results give a comprehensive picture of the initial response of E. coli to hyperosmotic shock and offer explanations for seemingly opposing results that have been reported previously. PMID:23790382

  6. Modeling of the effect of washing solution flow conditions on Escherichia coli O157:H7 population reduction on fruit surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Liang, Wei; Feng, Hao; Luo, Yaguang

    2007-11-01

    Washing produce with sanitizing solutions is an important step in reducing microbial populations during postharvest handling. Little information exists regarding the effects of washing solution flow conditions on the efficacy of pathogen reduction during washing. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of washing conditions such as flow velocity, agitation rate, and contact time on the reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 populations from the surfaces of cantaloupe rind and cut apples. Top surfaces of cylindrical samples were spot inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 and treated with peroxyacetic acid (POAA; 80 mg/liter) solution under different flow velocities and agitation rates and with different washing modes. Test results indicate that the reduction rate of E. coli O157:H7 increased with the increase in flow velocity and agitation rate under the testing conditions. In a 3-min treatment in the flow-through chamber, the E. coli O157:H7 count reduction on cantaloupe rind and cup apples reached 2.5 and 2.3 log CFU/cm2, respectively, when the flow velocity increased from 0.0 to 0.8 m/min. Agitation conducted at the bottom of the treatment chamber reduced the E. coli O157:H7 population on cut apples by 1.2 log CFU/cm2 in 3 min, whereas in the treatment with the agitation over the top of the chamber, the survival count of E. coli O157:H7 was reduced by only 0.8 log CFU/cm2. The experimental data were used to fit four microbial reduction kinetic models. It was found that E. coli O157:H7 reduction from the fruit surfaces was best described by the Weibull model. These findings may be useful in designing produce wash systems for achieving enhanced pathogen reduction and improved produce quality and safety. PMID:18044431

  7. Effects of the Probiotic Enterococcus faecium and Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains in a Pig and Human Epithelial Intestinal Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Lodemann, Ulrike; Strahlendorf, Julia; Schierack, Peter; Klingspor, Shanti; Aschenbach, Jörg R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study has been to elucidate the effect of the probiotic Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 on epithelial integrity in intestinal epithelial cells and whether pre- and coincubation with this strain can reproducibly prevent damage induced by enterotoxigenic (ETEC) and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). Porcine (IPEC-J2) and human (Caco-2) intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with bacterial strains and epithelial integrity was assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and mannitol flux rates. E. faecium alone increased TEER of Caco-2 cells without affecting mannitol fluxes whereas the E. coli strains decreased TEER and concomitantly increased mannitol flux rates in both cell lines. Preincubation with E. faecium had no effect on the TEER decrease induced by E. coli in preliminary experiments. However, in a second set of experiments using a slightly different protocol, E. faecium ameliorated the TEER decrease induced by ETEC at 4 h in IPEC-J2 and at 2, 4, and 6 h in Caco-2 cells. We conclude that E. faecium positively affected epithelial integrity in monoinfected Caco-2 cells and could ameliorate the damage on TEER induced by an ETEC strain. Reproducibility of the results is, however, limited when experiments are performed with living bacteria over longer periods. PMID:25883829

  8. Effect of gold nanoparticles on thermal gradient generation and thermotaxis of E. coli cells in microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, Nithya; Panda, Tapobrata; Das, Sarit K

    2016-08-01

    Bacteria responds to changing chemical and thermal environment by moving towards or away from a particular location. In this report, we looked into thermal gradient generation and response of E. coli DH5α cells to thermal gradient in the presence and in the absence of spherical gold nanoparticles (size: 15 to 22 nm) in a static microfluidic environment using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) made microfluidic device. A PDMS-agarose based microfluidic device for generating thermal gradient has been developed and the thermal gradient generation in the device has been validated with the numerical simulation. Our studies revealed that the presence of gold nanoparticles, AuNPs (0.649 μg/mL) has no effect on the thermal gradient generation. The E. coli DH5α cells have been treated with AuNPs of two different concentrations (0.649 μg/mL and 0.008 μg/mL). The thermotaxis behavior of cells in the presence of AuNPs has been studied and compared to the thermotaxis of E.coli DH5α cells in the absence of AuNPs. In case of thermotaxis, in the absence of the AuNPs, the E. coli DH5α cells showed better thermotaxis towards lower temperature range, whereas in the presence of AuNPs (0.649 μg/mL and 0.008 μg/mL) thermotaxis of the E. coli DH5α cells has been inhibited. The results show that the spherical AuNPs intervenes in the themotaxis of E. coli DH5α cells and inhibits the cell migration. The reason for the failure in thermotaxis response mechanism may be due to decreased F-type ATP synthase activity and collapse of membrane potential by AuNPs, which, in turn, leads to decreased ATP levels. This has been hypothesized since both thermotaxis and chemotaxis follows the same response mechanism for migration in which ATP plays critical role. PMID:27246690

  9. Enhanced bioaccumulation of heavy metal ions by bacterial cells due to surface display of short metal binding peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kotrba, P.; Ruml, T.; Doleckova, L.; Lorenzo, V. de

    1999-03-01

    Metal binding peptides of sequences Gly-His-His-Pro-His-Gly (named HP) and Gly-Cys-Gly-Cys-Pro-Cys-Gly-Cys-Gly (named CP) were genetically engineered into LamB protein and expressed in Escherichia coli. The Cd{sup 2+}-to-HP and Cd{sup 2+}-to-CP stoichiometries of peptides were 1:1 and 3:1, respectively. Hybrid LamB proteins were found to be properly folded in the outer membrane of E. coli. Isolated cell envelopes of E. coli bearing newly added metal binding peptides showed an up to 1.8-fold increase in Cd{sup 2+} binding capacity. The bioaccumulation of Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} by E. coli was evaluated. Surface display of CP multiplied the ability of E. coli to bind Cd{sup 2+} from growth medium fourfold. Display of HP peptide did not contribute to an increase in the accumulation of Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. However, Cu{sup 2+} ceased contribution of HP for Cd{sup 2+} accumulation, probably due to the strong binding of Cu{sup 2+} to HP. Thus, considering the cooperation of cell structures with inserted peptides, the relative affinities of metal binding peptide and, for example, the cell wall to metal ion should be taken into account in the rational design of peptide sequences possessing specificity for a particular metal.

  10. Enhanced Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metal Ions by Bacterial Cells Due to Surface Display of Short Metal Binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kotrba, Pavel; Dolečková, Lucie; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Ruml, Tomas

    1999-01-01

    Metal binding peptides of sequences Gly-His-His-Pro-His-Gly (named HP) and Gly-Cys-Gly-Cys-Pro-Cys-Gly-Cys-Gly (named CP) were genetically engineered into LamB protein and expressed in Escherichia coli. The Cd2+-to-HP and Cd2+-to-CP stoichiometries of peptides were 1:1 and 3:1, respectively. Hybrid LamB proteins were found to be properly folded in the outer membrane of E. coli. Isolated cell envelopes of E. coli bearing newly added metal binding peptides showed an up to 1.8-fold increase in Cd2+ binding capacity. The bioaccumulation of Cd2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ by E. coli was evaluated. Surface display of CP multiplied the ability of E. coli to bind Cd2+ from growth medium fourfold. Display of HP peptide did not contribute to an increase in the accumulation of Cu2+ and Zn2+. However, Cu2+ ceased contribution of HP for Cd2+ accumulation, probably due to the strong binding of Cu2+ to HP. Thus, considering the cooperation of cell structures with inserted peptides, the relative affinities of metal binding peptide and, for example, the cell wall to metal ion should be taken into account in the rational design of peptide sequences possessing specificity for a particular metal. PMID:10049868

  11. Solar cell having improved front surface metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Lillington, D.R.; Mardesich, N.; Dill, H.G.; Garlick, G.F.J.

    1987-09-15

    This patent describes a solar cell comprising: a first layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of an N+ conductivity; a second layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of an N conductivity overlying the first layer; a third layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of a P conductivity overlying the N conductivity layer and forming a P-N junction therebetween. A layer of aluminium gallium arsenide semiconductor material of a p conductivity overlying the front major surface of the P conductivity third layer and having an exposed surface essentially parallel to the front major surface and at least one edge; a plurality of metallic contact lines made of a first metal alloy composition and being spaced apart by a first predetermined distance traversing the exposed surface and extending through the aluminium gallium arsenide layer to the front major surface and making electrical contact to the third layer; a plurality of longitudinally disposed metallic grid lines made of a second metal alloy composition and being spaced apart by a second predetermined distance located on the exposed surface of the aluminium gallium arsenide layer and which cross the metallic contact lines and make electrical contact to the metallic lines; a flat metallic strip disposed on the aluminium gallium arsenide layer exposed surface near the edge, the strip electrically coupling the metallic grid lines to one another; and a back contact located on the back major surface.

  12. Persistence of Salmonella and E. coli on the surface of restaurant menus.

    PubMed

    Sirsat, Sujata A; Choi, Jin-Kyung K; Almanza, Barbara A; Neal, Jack A

    2013-03-01

    To the authors' knowledge, the role of restaurant menus as a vehicle for pathogens has not been explored. Menus, however, can pose as a vector for bacterial contamination and transfer. Sampling menus from two restaurants in the Houston, Texas, area showed the presence of up to 100 CFU/cm2 aerobic bacteria. Follow-up studies designed to investigate the ability of Salmonella and E. coli to persist on paper and laminated menus at various time points (0, 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours) demonstrated that bacteria persist more efficiently on laminated menus as compared to paper menus. Transfer studies performed to quantitatively determine the ability of bacteria to transfer from menus to fingertips and from fingertips to clean menus showed that bacteria can be transferred for up to 24 hours. The study described here showed that restaurant menus may serve as vehicles for pathogens and hence present a public health issue within the retail food environment. PMID:23505769

  13. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Cell Death: The Major Defences Relative Roles and Consequences in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Lionel; Dukan, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a mathematical model for predicting reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration and macromolecules oxidation in vivo. We constructed such a model using Escherichia coli as a model organism and a set of ordinary differential equations. In order to evaluate the major defences relative roles against hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2), we investigated the relative contributions of the various reactions to the dynamic system and searched for approximate analytical solutions for the explicit expression of changes in H2 O2 internal or external concentrations. Although the key actors in cell defence are enzymes and membrane, a detailed analysis shows that their involvement depends on the H2 O2 concentration level. Actually, the impact of the membrane upon the H2 O2 stress felt by the cell is greater when micromolar H2 O2 is present (9-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell) than when millimolar H2 O2 is present (about 2-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell). The ratio between maximal external H2 O2 and internal H2 O2 concentration also changes, reducing from 8 to 2 while external H2 O2 concentration increases from micromolar to millimolar. This non-linear behaviour mainly occurs because of the switch in the predominant scavenger from Ahp (Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase) to Cat (catalase). The phenomenon changes the internal H2 O2 maximal concentration, which surprisingly does not depend on cell density. The external H2 O2 half-life and the cumulative internal H2 O2 exposure do depend upon cell density. Based on these analyses and in order to introduce a concept of dose response relationship for H2 O2-induced cell death, we developed the concepts of "maximal internal H2 O2 concentration" and "cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration" (e.g. the total amount of H2 O2). We predict that cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration is responsible for the H2 O2-mediated death of bacterial cells. PMID:27494019

  14. Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Cell Death: The Major Defences Relative Roles and Consequences in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Lionel; Dukan, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a mathematical model for predicting reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration and macromolecules oxidation in vivo. We constructed such a model using Escherichia coli as a model organism and a set of ordinary differential equations. In order to evaluate the major defences relative roles against hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2), we investigated the relative contributions of the various reactions to the dynamic system and searched for approximate analytical solutions for the explicit expression of changes in H2 O2 internal or external concentrations. Although the key actors in cell defence are enzymes and membrane, a detailed analysis shows that their involvement depends on the H2 O2 concentration level. Actually, the impact of the membrane upon the H2 O2 stress felt by the cell is greater when micromolar H2 O2 is present (9-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell) than when millimolar H2 O2 is present (about 2-fold less H2 O2 in the cell than out of the cell). The ratio between maximal external H2 O2 and internal H2 O2 concentration also changes, reducing from 8 to 2 while external H2 O2 concentration increases from micromolar to millimolar. This non-linear behaviour mainly occurs because of the switch in the predominant scavenger from Ahp (Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase) to Cat (catalase). The phenomenon changes the internal H2 O2 maximal concentration, which surprisingly does not depend on cell density. The external H2 O2 half-life and the cumulative internal H2 O2 exposure do depend upon cell density. Based on these analyses and in order to introduce a concept of dose response relationship for H2 O2-induced cell death, we developed the concepts of “maximal internal H2 O2 concentration” and “cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration” (e.g. the total amount of H2 O2). We predict that cumulative internal H2 O2 concentration is responsible for the H2 O2-mediated death of bacterial cells. PMID:27494019

  15. Topoisomerase IIα Binding Domains of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Influence Cell Cycle Progression and Aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Coffey, Robert J.; Osheroff, Neil; Neufeld, Kristi L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Truncating mutations in the tumor suppressor gene APC (Adenomatous Polyposis Coli) are thought to initiate the majority of colorectal cancers. The 15- and 20-amino acid repeat regions of APC bind β-catenin and have been widely studied for their role in the negative regulation of canonical Wnt signaling. However, functions of APC in other important cellular processes, such as cell cycle control or aneuploidy, are only beginning to be studied. Our previous investigation implicated the 15-amino acid repeat region of APC (M2-APC) in the regulation of the G2/M cell cycle transition through interaction with topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα). Methodology/Principal Findings We now demonstrate that the 20-amino acid repeat region of APC (M3-APC) also interacts with topo IIα in colonic epithelial cells. Expression of M3-APC in cells with full-length endogenous APC causes cell accumulation in G2. However, cells with a mutated topo IIα isoform and lacking topo IIβ did not arrest, suggesting that the cellular consequence of M2- or M3-APC expression depends on functional topoisomerase II. Both purified recombinant M2- and M3-APC significantly enhanced the activity of topo IIα. Of note, although M3-APC can bind β-catenin, the G2 arrest did not correlate with β-catenin expression or activity, similar to what was seen with M2-APC. More importantly, expression of either M2- or M3-APC also led to increased aneuploidy in cells with full-length endogenous APC but not in cells with truncated endogenous APC that includes the M2-APC region. Conclusions/Significance Together, our data establish that the 20-amino acid repeat region of APC interacts with topo IIα to enhance its activity in vitro, and leads to G2 cell cycle accumulation and aneuploidy when expressed in cells containing full-length APC. These findings provide an additional explanation for the aneuploidy associated with many colon cancers that possess truncated APC. PMID:20368985

  16. Bacterial cell surface properties: role of loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenqiang; Yang, Shanshan; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS) on the comprehensive surface properties of four bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus suis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida). The removal of LB-EPS from bacterial surfaces by high-speed centrifugation (12,000×g) was confirmed by SEM images. Viability tests showed that the percentages of viable cells ranged from 95.9% to 98.0%, and no significant difference was found after treatment (P>0.05). FTIR spectra revealed the presence of phosphodiester, carboxylic, phosphate, and amino functional groups on bacteria surfaces, and the removal of LB-EPS did not alter the types of cell surface functional groups. Potentiometric titration results suggested the total site concentrations on the intact bacteria were higher than those on LB-EPS free bacteria. Most of the acidity constants (pKa) were almost identical, except the increased pKa values of phosphodiester groups on LB-EPS free S. suis and E. coli surfaces. The electrophoretic mobilities and hydrodynamic diameters of the intact and LB-EPS free bacteria were statistically unchanged (P>0.05), indicating LB-EPS had no influence on the net surface charges and size distribution of bacteria. However, LB-ESP could enhance cell aggregation processes. The four LB-EPS free bacteria all exhibited fewer hydrophobicity values (26.1-65.0%) as compared to the intact cells (47.4-69.3%), suggesting the removal of uncharged nonpolar compounds (e.g., carbohydrates) in LB-EPS. These findings improve our understanding of the changes in cell surface characterizations induced by LB-EPS, and have important implications for assessing the role of LB-EPS in bacterial adhesion and transport behaviors. PMID:25805151

  17. Application to Photocatalytic H2 Production of a Whole-Cell Reaction by Recombinant Escherichia coli Cells Expressing [FeFe]-Hydrogenase and Maturases Genes.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yuki; Hagiwara, Hidehisa; Ida, Shintaro; Ishihara, Tatsumi

    2016-07-01

    A photocatalytic H2 production system using an inorganic-bio hybrid photocatalyst could contribute to the efficient utilization of solar energy, but would require the development of a new approach for preparing a H2 -forming biocatalyst. In the present study, we constructed a recombinant strain of Escherichia coli expressing the genes encoding the [FeFe]-hydrogenase and relevant maturases from Clostridium acetobutylicum NBRC 13948 for use as a biocatalyst. We investigated the direct application of a whole-cell of the recombinant E. coli. The combination of TiO2 , methylviologen, and the recombinant E. coli formed H2 under light irradiation, demonstrating that whole cells of the recombinant E. coli could be employed for photocatalytic H2 production without any time-consuming and costly manipulations (for example, enzyme purification). This is the first report of the direct application of a whole-cell reaction of recombinant E. coli to photocatalytic H2 production. PMID:27194524

  18. Individuality and universality in the growth-division laws of single E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Kennard, Andrew S; Osella, Matteo; Javer, Avelino; Grilli, Jacopo; Nghe, Philippe; Tans, Sander J; Cicuta, Pietro; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The mean size of exponentially dividing Escherichia coli cells in different nutrient conditions is known to depend on the mean growth rate only. However, the joint fluctuations relating cell size, doubling time, and individual growth rate are only starting to be characterized. Recent studies in bacteria reported a universal trend where the spread in both size and doubling times is a linear function of the population means of these variables. Here we combine experiments and theory and use scaling concepts to elucidate the constraints posed by the second observation on the division control mechanism and on the joint fluctuations of sizes and doubling times. We found that scaling relations based on the means collapse both size and doubling-time distributions across different conditions and explain how the shape of their joint fluctuations deviates from the means. Our data on these joint fluctuations highlight the importance of cell individuality: Single cells do not follow the dependence observed for the means between size and either growth rate or inverse doubling time. Our calculations show that these results emerge from a broad class of division control mechanisms requiring a certain scaling form of the "division hazard rate function," which defines the probability rate of dividing as a function of measurable parameters. This "model free" approach gives a rationale for the universal body-size distributions observed in microbial ecosystems across many microbial species, presumably dividing with multiple mechanisms. Additionally, our experiments show a crossover between fast and slow growth in the relation between individual-cell growth rate and division time, which can be understood in terms of different regimes of genome replication control. PMID:26871102

  19. Internalization of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 by Bovine Rectal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Haiqing; Wang, Jing; Lim, Ji Youn; Davitt, Christine; Minnich, Scott A.; Hovde, Carolyn J.

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) causes human diarrheal disease and healthy cattle are its primary reservoir. O157 colonize the bovine epithelial mucosa at the recto-anal junction (RAJ). Previous studies show that O157 at this site are not eliminated by aggressive interventions including applications of O157-specific lytic bacteriophages and other bactericidal agents. We hypothesize that some O157 at the RAJ mucosa are protected from these killing agents by host cell internalization. To test this hypothesis, rectal biopsies from O157 culture positive and negative cattle were analyzed by fluorescent microscopy and subjected to gentamicin protection assays. GFP-labeled bacteria were found located deep within the tissue crypts and a small number of O157 were recovered from rectal biopsies after gentamicin treatment. Primary bovine rectal epithelial (PBRE) cell cultures were incubated with O157 and subjected to gentamicin protection assays. Strains ATCC 43895, 43894, Sakai, and WSU180 entered the PBRE cells with different levels of efficiency ranging from 0.18 to 19.38% of the inocula. Intracellular bacteria were confirmed to be within membrane-bounded vacuoles by electron microscopy. Cytochalasin D curtailed internalization of O157 indicating internalization was dependent on eukaryotic microfilament assembly. Strain ATCC 43895 exhibited the highest efficiency of internalization and survived for at least 24 h within PBRE cells. Deletion mutation of intimin or its receptor in ATCC 43895 did not reduce bacterial internalization. This strain produced more biofilm than the others tested. Retrospective analysis of cattle challenged with two O157 strains, showed ATCC 43895, the most efficient at host cell internalization, was most persistent. PMID:21687423

  20. Individuality and universality in the growth-division laws of single E. coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennard, Andrew S.; Osella, Matteo; Javer, Avelino; Grilli, Jacopo; Nghe, Philippe; Tans, Sander J.; Cicuta, Pietro; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The mean size of exponentially dividing Escherichia coli cells in different nutrient conditions is known to depend on the mean growth rate only. However, the joint fluctuations relating cell size, doubling time, and individual growth rate are only starting to be characterized. Recent studies in bacteria reported a universal trend where the spread in both size and doubling times is a linear function of the population means of these variables. Here we combine experiments and theory and use scaling concepts to elucidate the constraints posed by the second observation on the division control mechanism and on the joint fluctuations of sizes and doubling times. We found that scaling relations based on the means collapse both size and doubling-time distributions across different conditions and explain how the shape of their joint fluctuations deviates from the means. Our data on these joint fluctuations highlight the importance of cell individuality: Single cells do not follow the dependence observed for the means between size and either growth rate or inverse doubling time. Our calculations show that these results emerge from a broad class of division control mechanisms requiring a certain scaling form of the "division hazard rate function," which defines the probability rate of dividing as a function of measurable parameters. This "model free" approach gives a rationale for the universal body-size distributions observed in microbial ecosystems across many microbial species, presumably dividing with multiple mechanisms. Additionally, our experiments show a crossover between fast and slow growth in the relation between individual-cell growth rate and division time, which can be understood in terms of different regimes of genome replication control.

  1. Mechanism of cell integration on biomaterial implant surfaces in the presence of bacterial contamination.

    PubMed

    Yue, Chongxia; van der Mei, Henny C; Kuijer, Roel; Busscher, Henk J; Rochford, Edward T J

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial contamination during biomaterial implantation is often unavoidable, yielding a combat between cells and bacteria. Here we aim to determine the modulatory function of bacterial components on stem-cell, fibroblast, and osteoblast adhesion to a titanium alloy, including the role of toll-like-receptors (TLRs). Presence of heat-sacrificed Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced dose and cell-type dependent responses. Stem-cells were most sensitive to bacterial presence, demonstrating decreased adhesion number yet increased adhesion effort with a relatively large focal adhesion contact area. Blocking TLRs had no effect on stem-cell adhesion in presence of S. aureus, but blocking both TLR2 and TLR4 induced an increased adhesion effort in presence of E. coli. Neither lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, nor bacterial DNA provoked the same cell response as did whole bacteria. Herewith we suggest a new mechanism as to how biomaterials are integrated by cells despite the unavoidable presence of bacterial contamination. Stimulation of host cell integration of implant surfaces may open a new window to design new biomaterials with enhanced healing, thereby reducing the risk of biomaterial-associated infection of both "hardware-based" implants as well as of tissue-engineered constructs, known to suffer from similarly high infection risks as currently prevailing in "hardware-based" implants. PMID:25966819

  2. Differential Mechanism of Escherichia coli Inactivation by (+)-Limonene as a Function of Cell Physiological State and Drug's Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Chueca, Beatriz; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    (+)-limonene is a lipophilic antimicrobial compound, extracted from citrus fruits' essential oils, that is used as a flavouring agent and organic solvent by the food industry. A recent study has proposed a common and controversial mechanism of cell death for bactericidal antibiotics, in which hydroxyl radicals ultimately inactivated cells. Our objective was to determine whether the mechanism of Escherichia coli MG1655 inactivation by (+)-limonene follows that of bactericidal antibiotics. A treatment with 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene inactivated 4 log10 cycles of exponentially growing E. coli cells in 3 hours. On one hand, an increase of cell survival in the ΔacnB mutant (deficient in a TCA cycle enzyme), or in the presence of 2,2′-dipyridyl (inhibitor of Fenton reaction by iron chelation), thiourea, or cysteamine (hydroxyl radical scavengers) was observed. Moreover, the ΔrecA mutant (deficient in an enzyme involved in SOS response to DNA damage) was more sensitive to (+)-limonene. Thus, this indirect evidence indicates that the mechanism of exponentially growing E. coli cells inactivation by 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene is due to the TCA cycle and Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical formation that caused oxidative DNA damage, as observed for bactericidal drugs. However, several differences have been observed between the proposed mechanism for bactericidal drugs and for (+)-limonene. In this regard, our results demonstrated that E. coli inactivation was influenced by its physiological state and the drug's concentration: experiments with stationary-phase cells or 4,000 μL/L (+)-limonene uncovered a different mechanism of cell death, likely unrelated to hydroxyl radicals. Our research has also shown that drug's concentration is an important factor influencing the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by antibiotics, such as kanamycin. These results might help in improving and spreading the use of (+)-limonene as an antimicrobial compound, and in clarifying the controversy

  3. Differential mechanism of Escherichia coli Inactivation by (+)-limonene as a function of cell physiological state and drug's concentration.

    PubMed

    Chueca, Beatriz; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    (+)-limonene is a lipophilic antimicrobial compound, extracted from citrus fruits' essential oils, that is used as a flavouring agent and organic solvent by the food industry. A recent study has proposed a common and controversial mechanism of cell death for bactericidal antibiotics, in which hydroxyl radicals ultimately inactivated cells. Our objective was to determine whether the mechanism of Escherichia coli MG1655 inactivation by (+)-limonene follows that of bactericidal antibiotics. A treatment with 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene inactivated 4 log10 cycles of exponentially growing E. coli cells in 3 hours. On one hand, an increase of cell survival in the ΔacnB mutant (deficient in a TCA cycle enzyme), or in the presence of 2,2'-dipyridyl (inhibitor of Fenton reaction by iron chelation), thiourea, or cysteamine (hydroxyl radical scavengers) was observed. Moreover, the ΔrecA mutant (deficient in an enzyme involved in SOS response to DNA damage) was more sensitive to (+)-limonene. Thus, this indirect evidence indicates that the mechanism of exponentially growing E. coli cells inactivation by 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene is due to the TCA cycle and Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical formation that caused oxidative DNA damage, as observed for bactericidal drugs. However, several differences have been observed between the proposed mechanism for bactericidal drugs and for (+)-limonene. In this regard, our results demonstrated that E. coli inactivation was influenced by its physiological state and the drug's concentration: experiments with stationary-phase cells or 4,000 μL/L (+)-limonene uncovered a different mechanism of cell death, likely unrelated to hydroxyl radicals. Our research has also shown that drug's concentration is an important factor influencing the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by antibiotics, such as kanamycin. These results might help in improving and spreading the use of (+)-limonene as an antimicrobial compound, and in clarifying the controversy about

  4. Escherichia coli (E. coli)

    MedlinePlus

    ... so you might hear about E. coli being found in drinking water, which are not themselves harmful, but indicate the ... at CDC Foodborne disease Travelers' Health: Safe Food & Water Healthy Swimming E. coli Infection & Farm ... Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple ...

  5. IbeA and OmpA of Escherichia coli K1 exploit Rac1 activation for invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maruvada, Ravi; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2012-06-01

    Meningitis-causing Escherichia coli K1 internalization of the blood-brain barrier is required for penetration into the brain, but the host-microbial interactions involved in E. coli entry of the blood-brain barrier remain incompletely understood. We show here that a meningitis-causing E. coli K1 strain RS218 activates Rac1 (GTP-Rac1) of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) in a time-dependent manner. Both activation and bacterial invasion were significantly inhibited in the presence of a Rac1 inhibitor. We further showed that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav2, not β-Pix, was involved in E. coli K1-mediated Rac1 activation. Since activated STAT3 is known to bind GTP-Rac1, the relationship between STAT3 and Rac1 was examined in E. coli K1 invasion of HBMEC. Downregulation of STAT3 resulted in significantly decreased E. coli invasion compared to control HBMEC, as well as a corresponding decrease in GTP-Rac1, suggesting that Rac1 activation in response to E. coli is under the control of STAT3. More importantly, two E. coli determinants contributing to HBMEC invasion, IbeA and OmpA, were shown to affect both Rac1 activation and their association with STAT3. These findings demonstrate for the first time that specific E. coli determinants regulate a novel mechanism of STAT3 cross talk with Rac1 in E. coli K1 invasion of HBMEC. PMID:22451524

  6. Behavior of pulsed electric field injured Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells in apple juice amended with pyruvate and catalase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulse Electric Field (PEF) treatment has been used to inactivate bacteria in liquid foods. However, information on the behavior of PEF injured Escherichia coli bacteria in media during storage at 5 and 23C are limited. In this study, we investigated the fate of E. coli O157:H7 cells at 6.8 log CFU/m...

  7. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, C.R. |

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  8. Ultrasonic flexural-plate-wave sensor for detecting the concentration of settling E. coli W3110 cells.

    PubMed

    Cowan, S E; Black, J; Keasling, J D; White, R M

    1999-08-15

    The flexural-plate-wave (FPW) sensor, a type of ultrasonic sensor, can detect changes in E. coli W3110 concentration in solution as the cells settle onto the sensor under the influence of gravity. A model of the sensor's response to cell settling has been developed and is in good agreement with the experimental data. The FPW technique improves on conventional methods for determining cell concentrations; this technique allows for on-line data collection, is nondestructive, and requires only small sample volumes. The FPW sensor has applications as a device to measure cell concentrations and growth rates in industrial fermentors, biofilms, and wastewater treatment facilities. PMID:10464487

  9. Cell invasion and survival of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli within cultured human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Fabiana; da Silva, Rita Ifuoe K; Vargas-Stampe, Thaís L Z; Cerqueira, Aloysio M F; Andrade, João R C

    2013-08-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause severe human infections and their virulence abilities are not fully understood. Cattle are a key reservoir, and the terminal rectum is the principal site of bacterial carriage. Most STEC possess a pathogenicity island termed the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). Nonetheless, LEE-negative STEC have been associated with disease. We found that invasion of LEE-positive and LEE-negative strains was higher for human enterocytic cell lines and for undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Intracellular bacteria could be detected as early as 5 min after infection and transmission electron microscopy showed bacteria within membrane-bound vacuoles. STEC invasion depended on actin microfilaments and protein kinases. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that bacterial entry was not associated with membrane ruffling. Absence of macropinocytosis or actin rearrangement at the entry points suggests a zipper-like entry mechanism. Disruption of the tight junction by EGTA enhanced invasion of Caco-2 monolayers, and bacterial invasion mostly proceeded through the basolateral pole of enterocytes. STEC persisted within Caco-2 cells for up to 96 h without cell death and bacterial viability increased after 48 h, suggesting intracellular multiplication. The relatively harmless intracellular localization of STEC can be an efficient strategy to prevent its elimination from the bovine intestinal tract. PMID:23704791

  10. Cytotoxic factor secreted by Escherichia coli associated with sepsis facilitates transcytosis through human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Tibo, Luiz Henrique Soares; Bertol, Jéssica Wildgrube; Bernedo-Navarro, Robert Alvin; Yano, Tomomasa

    2016-01-01

    Culture supernatant of sepsis-associated Escherichia coli (SEPEC) isolated from patients with sepsis caused loss of intercellular junctions and elongation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The cytotoxic factor was purified from culture supernatant of SEPEC 15 (serogroup O153) by liquid chromatography process. PAGE (polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) showed that the purified SEPEC cytotoxic factor had a molecular mass of ∼150kDa and consisted of at least two subunits. At the concentration of 1 CD50 (40μg/mL) did facilitate transcytosis through the HUVEC cells monolayer of SEPEC 15 as much as E. coli K12 within 30min without affecting cell viability. These results suggest that this cytotoxic factor, named as SPF (SEPEC's permeabilizing factor), may be an important SEPEC virulence factor that facilitates bacterial access to the bloodstream. PMID:26963151

  11. Oxygen-Dependent Cell-to-Cell Variability in the Output of the Escherichia coli Tor Phosphorelay

    PubMed Central

    Roggiani, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli senses and responds to trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in the environment through the TorT-TorS-TorR signal transduction system. The periplasmic protein TorT binds TMAO and stimulates the hybrid kinase TorS to phosphorylate the response regulator TorR through a phosphorelay. Phosphorylated TorR, in turn, activates transcription of the torCAD operon, which encodes the proteins required for anaerobic respiration via reduction of TMAO to trimethylamine. Interestingly, E. coli respires TMAO in both the presence and absence of oxygen, a behavior that is markedly different from the utilization of other alternative electron acceptors by this bacterium. Here we describe an unusual form of regulation by oxygen for this system. While the average level of torCAD transcription is the same for aerobic and anaerobic cultures containing TMAO, the behavior across the population of cells is strikingly different under the two growth conditions. Cellular levels of torCAD transcription in aerobic cultures are highly heterogeneous, in contrast to the relatively homogeneous distribution in anaerobic cultures. Thus, oxygen regulates the variance of the output but not the mean for the Tor system. We further show that this oxygen-dependent variability stems from the phosphorelay. IMPORTANCE Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) is utilized by numerous bacteria as an electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration. In E. coli, expression of the proteins required for TMAO respiration is tightly regulated by a signal transduction system that is activated by TMAO. Curiously, although oxygen is the energetically preferred electron acceptor, TMAO is respired even in the presence of oxygen. Here we describe an interesting and unexpected form of regulation for this system in which oxygen produces highly variable expression of the TMAO utilization proteins across a population of cells without affecting the mean expression of these proteins. To our knowledge, this is the first reported

  12. S fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli bind to primary human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells but do not induce expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, B; Placzek, M; Doehn, C; Hacker, J; Schmidt, G; Wasenauer, G; Daha, M R; van der Woude, F J; Sack, K

    1995-01-01

    We have recently reported an increase of expression of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 by renal carcinoma cells in response to S fimbriae of Escherichia coli. Now we demonstrate that E. coli expressing S and P fimbriae strongly binds to human proximal tubular epithelial cells. However, in primary and simian virus 40-transfected renal tubular epithelial cells S fimbriae do not enhance the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1. PMID:7622256

  13. Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli essential genes and minimal cell factories after one decade of genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario; Reuß, Daniel R; Zhu, Bingyao; Commichau, Fabian M

    2014-11-01

    Investigation of essential genes, besides contributing to understanding the fundamental principles of life, has numerous practical applications. Essential genes can be exploited as building blocks of a tightly controlled cell 'chassis'. Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli K-12 are both well-characterized model bacteria used as hosts for a plethora of biotechnological applications. Determination of the essential genes that constitute the B. subtilis and E. coli minimal genomes is therefore of the highest importance. Recent advances have led to the modification of the original B. subtilis and E. coli essential gene sets identified 10 years ago. Furthermore, significant progress has been made in the area of genome minimization of both model bacteria. This review provides an update, with particular emphasis on the current essential gene sets and their comparison with the original gene sets identified 10 years ago. Special attention is focused on the genome reduction analyses in B. subtilis and E. coli and the construction of minimal cell factories for industrial applications. PMID:25092907

  14. Extraction of recombinant protein from Escherichia coli by using a novel cell autolysis activity of VanX.

    PubMed

    Kamioka, Tetsuya; Sohya, Shihori; Wu, Nan; Maki, Tei; Matsuda, Tomoki; Ikegami, Takahisa; Nakamura, Haruki; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2013-08-15

    Escherichia coli is a versatile, low-cost, and popular host for expressing recombinant proteins. However, extracting recombinant proteins from E. coli requires cell wall breakage, which is both time- and effort-consuming. Here we report a novel cell breakage method based on our recent finding that VanX, which is a d-Ala-d-Ala dipeptidase encoded in a vancomycin-resistant VanA gene cluster, exhibits a strong cell lysis activity when expressed in isolation in E. coli. In our strategy, we coexpress VanX with the target protein, causing cell autolysis and release of the cellular content into the culture medium. We demonstrated this strategy for two model proteins, a green fluorescent protein variant (GFPuv) and Gaussia luciferase, and optimized the autolysis conditions and coexpression vectors. The fluorescence activity of GFPuv collected from the medium was identical to that of GFPuv purified by conventional methods. Cell breakage by VanX-mediated autolysis is very simple to implement and will efficiently complement traditional methods. PMID:23624113

  15. Immobilization of Escherichia coli Cells Containing Aspartase Activity with Polyurethane and Its Application for l-Aspartic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Fusee, Murray C.; Swann, Wayne E.; Calton, Gary J.

    1981-01-01

    Whole cells of Escherichia coli containing aspartase activity were immobilized by mixing a cell suspension with a liquid isocyanate-capped polyurethane prepolymer (Hypol). The immobilized cell preparation was used to convert ammonium fumarate to l-aspartic acid. Properties of the immobilized E. coli cells containing aspartase were investigated with a batch reactor. A 1.67-fold increase in the l-aspartic acid production rate was observed at 37°C as compared to 25°C operating temperature. The pH optimum was broad, ranging from 8.5 to 9.2. Increasing the concentration of ammonium fumarate to 1.5 M from 1.0 M negatively affected the reaction rate. l-Aspartic acid was produced at an average rate of 2.18 × 10−4 mol/min per g (wet weight) of immobilized E. coli cells with a 37°C substrate solution consisting of 1.0 M ammonium fumarate with 1 mM Mg2+ (pH 9.0). PMID:16345865

  16. Cell age dependent concentration of Escherichia coli divisome proteins analyzed with ImageJ and ObjectJ.

    PubMed

    Vischer, Norbert O E; Verheul, Jolanda; Postma, Marten; van den Berg van Saparoea, Bart; Galli, Elisa; Natale, Paolo; Gerdes, Kenn; Luirink, Joen; Vollmer, Waldemar; Vicente, Miguel; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2015-01-01

    The rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli multiplies by elongation followed by binary fission. Longitudinal growth of the cell envelope and synthesis of the new poles are organized by two protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively. We have analyzed the spatio-temporal localization patterns of many of these morphogenetic proteins by immunolabeling the wild type strain MC4100 grown to steady state in minimal glucose medium at 28°C. This allowed the direct comparison of morphogenetic protein localization patterns as a function of cell age as imaged by phase contrast and fluorescence wide field microscopy. Under steady state conditions the age distribution of the cells is constant and is directly correlated to cell length. To quantify cell size and protein localization parameters in 1000s of labeled cells, we developed 'Coli-Inspector,' which is a project running under ImageJ with the plugin 'ObjectJ.' ObjectJ organizes image-analysis tasks using an integrated approach with the flexibility to produce different output formats from existing markers such as intensity data and geometrical parameters. ObjectJ supports the combination of automatic and interactive methods giving the user complete control over the method of image analysis and data collection, with visual inspection tools for quick elimination of artifacts. Coli-inspector was used to sort the cells according to division cycle cell age and to analyze the spatio-temporal localization pattern of each protein. A unique dataset has been created on the concentration and position of the proteins during the cell cycle. We show for the first time that a subset of morphogenetic proteins have a constant cellular concentration during the cell division cycle whereas another set exhibits a cell division cycle dependent concentration variation. Using the number of proteins present at midcell, the stoichiometry of the divisome is discussed. PMID:26124755

  17. Cell age dependent concentration of Escherichia coli divisome proteins analyzed with ImageJ and ObjectJ

    PubMed Central

    Vischer, Norbert O. E.; Verheul, Jolanda; Postma, Marten; van den Berg van Saparoea, Bart; Galli, Elisa; Natale, Paolo; Gerdes, Kenn; Luirink, Joen; Vollmer, Waldemar; Vicente, Miguel; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2015-01-01

    The rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli multiplies by elongation followed by binary fission. Longitudinal growth of the cell envelope and synthesis of the new poles are organized by two protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively. We have analyzed the spatio-temporal localization patterns of many of these morphogenetic proteins by immunolabeling the wild type strain MC4100 grown to steady state in minimal glucose medium at 28°C. This allowed the direct comparison of morphogenetic protein localization patterns as a function of cell age as imaged by phase contrast and fluorescence wide field microscopy. Under steady state conditions the age distribution of the cells is constant and is directly correlated to cell length. To quantify cell size and protein localization parameters in 1000s of labeled cells, we developed ‘Coli-Inspector,’ which is a project running under ImageJ with the plugin ‘ObjectJ.’ ObjectJ organizes image-analysis tasks using an integrated approach with the flexibility to produce different output formats from existing markers such as intensity data and geometrical parameters. ObjectJ supports the combination of automatic and interactive methods giving the user complete control over the method of image analysis and data collection, with visual inspection tools for quick elimination of artifacts. Coli-inspector was used to sort the cells according to division cycle cell age and to analyze the spatio-temporal localization pattern of each protein. A unique dataset has been created on the concentration and position of the proteins during the cell cycle. We show for the first time that a subset of morphogenetic proteins have a constant cellular concentration during the cell division cycle whereas another set exhibits a cell division cycle dependent concentration variation. Using the number of proteins present at midcell, the stoichiometry of the divisome is discussed. PMID:26124755

  18. Quantitation of interactions between two DNA loops demonstrates loop domain insulation in E. coli cells

    PubMed Central

    Priest, David G.; Kumar, Sandip; Yan, Yan; Dunlap, David D.; Dodd, Ian B.; Shearwin, Keith E.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene regulation involves complex patterns of long-range DNA-looping interactions between enhancers and promoters, but how these specific interactions are achieved is poorly understood. Models that posit other DNA loops—that aid or inhibit enhancer–promoter contact—are difficult to test or quantitate rigorously in eukaryotic cells. Here, we use the well-characterized DNA-looping proteins Lac repressor and phage λ CI to measure interactions between pairs of long DNA loops in E. coli cells in the three possible topological arrangements. We find that side-by-side loops do not affect each other. Nested loops assist each other’s formation consistent with their distance-shortening effect. In contrast, alternating loops, where one looping element is placed within the other DNA loop, inhibit each other’s formation, thus providing clear support for the loop domain model for insulation. Modeling shows that combining loop assistance and loop interference can provide strong specificity in long-range interactions. PMID:25288735

  19. Escherichia coli redox mutants as microbial cell factories for the synthesis of reduced biochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Jimena A.; de Almeida, Alejandra; Godoy, Manuel S.; Mezzina, Mariela P.; Bidart, Gonzalo N.; Méndez, Beatriz S.; Pettinari, M. Julia; Nikel, Pablo I.

    2013-01-01

    Bioprocesses conducted under conditions with restricted O2 supply are increasingly exploited for the synthesis of reduced biochemicals using different biocatalysts. The model facultative aerobe Escherichia coli, the microbial cell factory par excellence, has elaborate sensing and signal transduction mechanisms that respond to the availability of electron acceptors and alternative carbon sources in the surrounding environment. In particular, the ArcBA and CreBC two-component signal transduction systems are largely responsible for the metabolic regulation of redox control in response to O2 availability and carbon source utilization, respectively. Significant advances in the understanding of the biochemical, genetic, and physiological duties of these regulatory systems have been achieved in recent years. This situation allowed to rationally-design novel engineering approaches that ensure optimal carbon and energy flows within central metabolism, as well as to manipulate redox homeostasis, in order to optimize the production of industrially-relevant metabolites. In particular, metabolic flux analysis provided new clues to understand the metabolic regulation mediated by the ArcBA and CreBC systems. Genetic manipulation of these regulators proved useful for designing microbial cells factories tailored for the synthesis of reduced biochemicals with added value, such as poly(3-hydroxybutyrate), under conditions with restricted O2 supply. This network-wide strategy is in contrast with traditional metabolic engineering approaches, that entail direct modification of the pathway(s) at stake, and opens new avenues for the targeted modulation of central catabolic pathways at the transcriptional level. PMID:24688679

  20. High cell density cultivation of recombinant Escherichia coli for prodrug of recombinant human GLPs production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Ma, Xue; Hou, Zheng; Xue, Xiaoyan; Meng, Jingru; Li, Mingkai; Jia, Min; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2012-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)(2) has been attracting increasing interest on account of its prominent benefits in type 2 diabetes. However, its clinical applications are limited by the short half-life in vivo. To overcome this limitation, a new polymer of GLP-1 was developed by prodrug strategy. In this study a recombinant protein, rhGLPs, was successfully constructed, cloned into plasmid pET30a (+) and expressed in Escherichia coli ArcticExpress(DE3)RP in the form of inclusion body. The recombinant fusion protein productivity could be enhanced by high cell density culture of the recombinant strain. As a result, about 40 g wet weight cells per liter were obtained. The protein was purified by size-exclusion chromatography on a Superdex 75 column and refolded using reverse dilution and dialysis methods. SDS-PAGE, HPLC and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry were undertaken to determine the purity and molecular weight of rhGLPs. Bioactivity assay revealed that it had glucose-lowering and insulin-releasing action in vivo. PMID:22771632

  1. Quantitation of interactions between two DNA loops demonstrates loop domain insulation in E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Priest, David G; Kumar, Sandip; Yan, Yan; Dunlap, David D; Dodd, Ian B; Shearwin, Keith E

    2014-10-21

    Eukaryotic gene regulation involves complex patterns of long-range DNA-looping interactions between enhancers and promoters, but how these specific interactions are achieved is poorly understood. Models that posit other DNA loops--that aid or inhibit enhancer-promoter contact--are difficult to test or quantitate rigorously in eukaryotic cells. Here, we use the well-characterized DNA-looping proteins Lac repressor and phage λ CI to measure interactions between pairs of long DNA loops in E. coli cells in the three possible topological arrangements. We find that side-by-side loops do not affect each other. Nested loops assist each other's formation consistent with their distance-shortening effect. In contrast, alternating loops, where one looping element is placed within the other DNA loop, inhibit each other's formation, thus providing clear support for the loop domain model for insulation. Modeling shows that combining loop assistance and loop interference can provide strong specificity in long-range interactions. PMID:25288735

  2. Chlorhexidine-induced elastic and adhesive changes of Escherichia coli cells within a biofilm.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Nicole; Murdaugh, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Chlorhexidine is a widely used, commercially available cationic antiseptic. Although its mechanism of action on planktonic bacteria has been well explored, far fewer studies have examined its interaction with an established biofilm. The physical effects of chlorhexidine on a biofilm are particularly unknown. Here, the authors report the first observations of chlorhexidine-induced elastic and adhesive changes to single cells within a biofilm. The elastic changes are consistent with the proposed mechanism of action of chlorhexidine. Atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy techniques were used to determine spring constants and adhesion energy of the individual bacteria within an Escherichia coli biofilm. Medically relevant concentrations of chlorhexidine were tested, and cells exposed to 1% (w/v) and 0.1% more than doubled in stiffness, while those exposed to 0.01% showed no change in elasticity. Adhesion to the biofilm also increased with exposure to 1% chlorhexidine, but not for the lower concentrations tested. Given the prevalence of chlorhexidine in clinical and commercial applications, these results have important ramifications on biofilm removal techniques. PMID:27604079

  3. Toxicity of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid to Escherichia coli: Membrane disruption, oxidative stress, and DNA damage induced cell inactivation and/or death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gesheng; Zhang, Shuai; Yang, Kun; Zhu, Lizhong; Lin, Daohui

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are two widely used polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and are persistent in the environment. This study for the first time systematically investigated their toxicities and the underlying mechanisms to Escherichia coli. Much higher toxicity was observed for PFOA than PFOS, with the 3 h half growth inhibition concentrations (IC50) determined to be 10.6 ± 1.0 and 374 ± 3 mg L(-1), respectively, while the bacterial accumulation of PFOS was much greater than that of PFOA. The PFC exposures disrupted cell membranes as evidenced by the dose-dependent variations of cell structures (by transmission electron microscopy observations), surface properties (electronegativity, hydrophobicity, and membrane fluidity), and membrane compositions (by gas chromatogram and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses). The increases in the contents of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde and the activity of superoxide dismutase indicated the increment of oxidative stress induced by the PFCs in the bacterial cells. The fact that the cell growth inhibition was mitigated by the addition of ROS scavenger (N-acetyl cysteine) further evidenced the important role of oxidative damage in the toxicities of PFOS and PFOA. Eighteen genes involved in cell division, membrane instability, oxidative stress, and DNA damage of the exposed cells were up or down expressed, indicating the DNA damage by the PFCs. The toxicities of PFOS and PFOA to E. coli were therefore ascribed to the membrane disruption, oxidative stress, and DNA damage induced cell inactivation and/or death. The difference in the bactericidal effect between PFOS and PFOA was supposed to be related to their different dominating toxicity mechanisms, i.e., membrane disruption and oxidative damage, respectively. The outcomes will shed new light on the assessment of ecological effects of PFCs. PMID:27155098

  4. Identification of epitopes recognised by mucosal CD4(+) T-cell populations from cattle experimentally colonised with Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Corbishley, Alexander; Connelley, Timothy K; Wolfson, Eliza B; Ballingall, Keith; Beckett, Amy E; Gally, David L; McNeilly, Tom N

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines targeting enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 shedding in cattle are only partially protective. The correlates of protection of these vaccines are unknown, but it is probable that they reduce bacterial adherence at the mucosal surface via the induction of blocking antibodies. Recent studies have indicated a role for cellular immunity in cattle during colonisation, providing an impetus to understand the bacterial epitopes recognised during this response. This study mapped the epitopes of 16 EHEC O157:H7 proteins recognised by rectal lymph node CD4(+) T-cells from calves colonised with Shiga toxin producing EHEC O157:H7 strains. 20 CD4(+) T-cell epitopes specific to E. coli from 7 of the proteins were identified. The highly conserved N-terminal region of Intimin, including the signal peptide, was consistently recognised by mucosal CD4(+) T-cell populations from multiple animals of different major histocompatibility complex class II haplotypes. These T-cell epitopes are missing from many Intimin constructs used in published vaccine trials, but are relatively conserved across a range of EHEC serotypes, offering the potential to develop cross protective vaccines. Antibodies recognising H7 flagellin have been consistently identified in colonised calves; however CD4(+) T-cell epitopes from H7 flagellin were not identified in this study, suggesting that H7 flagellin may act as a T-cell independent antigen. This is the first time that the epitopes recognised by CD4(+) T-cells following colonisation with an attaching and effacing pathogen have been characterised in any species. The findings have implications for the design of antigens used in the next generation of EHEC O157:H7 vaccines. PMID:27590451

  5. Effect of calcium hydroxide application to cattle feedlot pens on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and total E. coli in pen surface manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Cattle and beef products are sources of the pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7. Lime products have a long history of use in cattle production as disinfectants for sick pens, calving pens, and muddy areas, to control the spread of diseases. Lime may also be useful as a preharvest trea...

  6. Separation of biological cells in a microfluidic device using surface acoustic waves (SAWs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Ye; Marrone, Babetta L.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based microfluidic device has been developed to separate heterogeneous particle or cell mixtures in a continuous flow using acoustophoresis. The microfluidic device is comprised of two components, a SAW transducer and a microfluidic channel made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The SAW transducer was fabricated by patterning two pairs of interdigital electrodes on a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) piezoelectric substrate. When exciting the SAW transducer by AC signals, a standing SAW is generated along the cross-section of the channel. Solid particles immersed in the standing SAW field are accordingly pushed to the pressure node arising from the acoustic radiation force acting on the particles, referring to the acoustic particle-focusing phenomenon. Acoustic radiation force highly depends on the particle properties, resulting in different acoustic responses for different types of cells. A numerical model, coupling the piezoelectric effect in the solid substrate and acoustic pressure in the fluid, was developed to provide a better understanding of SAW-based particle manipulation. Separation of two types of fluorescent particles has been demonstrated using the developed SAW-based microfluidic device. An efficient separation of E. coli bacteria from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples has also been successfully achieved. The purity of separated E. coli bacteria and separated PBMCs were over 95% and 91%, respectively, obtained by a flow cytometric analysis. The developed microfluidic device can efficiently separate E. coli bacteria from biological samples, which has potential applications in biomedical analysis and clinical diagnosis.

  7. Effect of Spermidine Analogues on Cell Growth of Escherichia coli Polyamine Requiring Mutant MA261

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Taketo; Sakamoto, Akihiko; Terui, Yusuke; Takao, Koichi; Sugita, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira; Igarashi, Kazuei; Kashiwagi, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of spermidine analogues [norspermidine (NSPD, 33), spermidine (SPD, 34), homospermidine (HSPD, 44) and aminopropylcadaverine (APCAD, 35)] on cell growth were studied using Escherichia coli polyamine-requiring mutant MA261. Cell growth was compared at 32°C, 37°C, and 42°C. All four analogues were taken up mainly by the PotABCD spermidine-preferential uptake system. The degree of stimulation of cell growth at 32°C and 37°C was NSPD ≥ SPD ≥ HSPD > APCAD, and SPD ≥ HSPD ≥ NSPD > APCAD, respectively. However, at 42°C, it was HSPD » SPD > NSPD > APCAD. One reason for this is HSPD was taken up effectively compared with other triamines. In addition, since natural polyamines (triamines and teteraamines) interact mainly with RNA, and the structure of RNA is more flexible at higher temperatures, HSPD probably stabilized RNA more tightly at 42°C. We have thus far found that 20 kinds of protein syntheses are stimulated by polyamines at the translational level. Among them, synthesis of OppA, RpoE and StpA was more strongly stimulated by HSPD at 42°C than at 37°C. Stabilization of the initiation region of oppA and rpoE mRNA was tighter by HSPD at 42°C than 37°C determined by circular dichroism (CD). The degree of polyamine stimulation of OppA, RpoE and StpA synthesis by NSPD, SPD and APCAD was smaller than that by HSPD at 42°C. Thus, the degree of stimulation of cell growth by spermidine analogues at the different temperatures is dependent on the stimulation of protein synthesis by some components of the polyamine modulon. PMID:27434546

  8. Benzyl isothiocyanate inhibits inflammasome activation in E. coli LPS-stimulated BV2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Min; Lee, Dae-Sung; Jung, Won-Kyo; Yoo, Jong Su; Yim, Mi-Jin; Choi, Yung Hyun; Park, Saegwang; Seo, Su-Kil; Choi, Jung Sik; Lee, Young-Min; Park, Won Sun; Choi, Il-Whan

    2016-09-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein complexes that play a crucial role in innate immune responses. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is a naturally occurring compound found in cruciferous vegetables, and BITC exhibits potential as a chemopreventive agent. However, whether BITC exerts inflammasome-mediated regulatory effects on neuroinflammation is unknown. In this study, we examined the effects of BITC on inflammasome-mediated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. IL-1β production is tightly regulated at the post-translational level through the inflammasoume. We measured the levels of IL-1β produced from the LPS-exposed BV2 microglial cells using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). The BITC regulatory mechanisms in inflammasome-mediated cellular signaling pathways were examined by RT-PCR, western blot analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. BITC inhibited the secretion of IL-1β induced by LPS in the BV2 microglial cells. BITC inhibited inflammasome activation and NLR family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)-mediated caspase-1 activation, and decreased the levels of inflammasome activation pro-inflammatory mediators, including mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion in the LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation induced by LPS was inhibited by BITC, which may contribute to the attenuated secretion of IL-1β. These BITC-mediated inhibitory effects on IL-1β expression may thus regulate neuroinflammation through the inflammasome-mediated signaling pathway. PMID:27430883

  9. Specificity of human galectins on cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, E M; Bovin, N V

    2015-07-01

    Galectins are β-galactoside-binding proteins sharing homology in amino acid sequence of their carbohydrate-recognition domain. Their carbohydrate specificity outside cells has been studied previously. The main conclusion of these studies was that several levels of glycan ligand recognition exist for galectins: (i) disaccharide Galβ1-4GlcNAc (LN, N-acetyllactosamine) binds stronger than β-galactopyranose; (ii) substitution at O-2 and O-3 of galactose residue as well as core fragments ("right" from GlcNAc) provides significant increase in affinity; (iii) similarly glycosylated proteins can differ significantly in affinity to galectins. Information about the natural cellular receptors of galectins is limited. Until recently, it was impossible to study specificity of cell-bound galectins. A model based on controlled incorporation of a single protein into glycocalyx of cells and subsequent interaction of loaded cells with synthetic glycoprobes measured by flow cytometry made this possible recently. In this review, data about glycan specificity of proto-, chimera-, and tandem-repeat type galectins on the cell surface are systematized, and comparative analysis of the results with data on specificity of galectins in artificial systems was performed. The following conclusions from these studies were made: (i) cellular galectins have practically no ability to bind disaccharide LNn, but display affinity to 3'-substituted oligolactosamines and oligomers LNn; (ii) tandem-repeat type galectins recognize another disaccharide, namely Galβ1-3GlcNAc (Le(c)); (iii) on the cell surface, tandem-repeat type galectins conserve the ability to display high affinity to blood group antigens of ABH system; (iv) in general, when galectins are immersed into glycocalyx, they are more selective regarding glycan interactions. Thus, we conclude that competitive interaction of galectins with cell microenvironment (endogenous cell glycans) is the main factor providing selectivity of galectins in

  10. Cell Surface Markers in HTLV-1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kress, Andrea K.; Grassmann, Ralph; Fleckenstein, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    The phenotype of HTLV-1-transformed CD4+ T lymphocytes largely depends on defined viral effector molecules such as the viral oncoprotein Tax. In this review, we exemplify the expression pattern of characteristic lineage markers, costimulatory receptors and ligands of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, cytokine receptors, and adhesion molecules on HTLV-1-transformed cells. These molecules may provide survival signals for the transformed cells. Expression of characteristic surface markers might therefore contribute to persistence of HTLV-1-transformed lymphocytes and to the development of HTLV-1-associated disease. PMID:21994790

  11. Ratio of "A-type" to "B-type" proanthocyanidin interflavan bonds affects extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli invasion of gut epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Rodrigo P; Meudt, Jennifer J; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan; Krueger, Christian G; Reed, Jess D

    2014-05-01

    Gut colonization by extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) increases the risk of subsequent infections, including urinary tract infection and septicemia. Previous work suggests that cranberry proanthocyanidins (PAC) interact with bacterial surface factors, altering bacterial interaction with host cells. Methods were developed to determine if ratios of "A-type" to "B-type" interflavan bonds in PAC affect ExPEC agglutination and invasion of enterocytes. In cranberries, 94.5% of PAC contain one or more "A-type" bonds, whereas in apples, 88.3% of PAC contain exclusively "B-type" bonds. Results show that cranberry "A-type" PAC have greater bioactivity than apple "B-type" PAC for increasing ExPEC agglutination and decreasing ExPEC epithelial cell invasion. PMID:24215458

  12. Fate of surface inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium on kippered beef during extended storage at refrigeration and abusive temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The behavior of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Typhimurium was evaluated on kippered beef. Individual pieces of the product were separately inoculated on the top and bottom surfaces with each 3- to 5-strain pathogen cocktail at ca. 6.0 log10 CFU/piece and stored at...

  13. Mathematical modeling the cross-contamination of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on the surface of ready-to-eat meat product while slicing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial cross-contamination either at home or production site is one of the major factors of causing contamination of foods and leading to the foodborne illness. The knowledge regarding Escherichia coli O157:H7 surface transfer on ready-to-eat (RTE) deli meat and the slicer used for slicing diffe...

  14. Differential gene expression profiling of porcine epithelial cells infected with three enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most important pathogenic bacteria causing severe diarrhoea in human and pigs. In ETEC strains, the fimbrial types F4 and F18 are commonly found differently colonized within the small intestine and cause huge economic losses in the swine industry annually worldwide. To address the underlying mechanism, we performed a transcriptome study of porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) with and without infection of three representative ETEC strains. Results A total 2443, 3493 and 867 differentially expressed genes were found in IPEC-J2 cells infected with F4ab ETEC (CF4ab), with F4ac ETEC (CF4ac) and with F18ac ETEC (CF18ac) compared to the cells without infection (control), respectively. The number of differentially expressed genes between CF4ab and CF4ac, CF4ab and CF18ac, and CF4ac and CF18ac were 77, 1446 and 1629, respectively. The gene ontology and pathway analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes in CF4abvs control are significantly involved in cell-cycle progress and amino acid metabolism, while the clustered terms of the differentially expressed genes in CF4acvs control comprise immune, inflammation and wounding response and apoptosis as well as cell cycle progress and proteolysis. Differentially expressed genes between CF18acvs control are mainly involved in cell-cycle progression and immune response. Furthermore, fundamental differences were observed in expression levels of immune-related genes among the three ETEC treatments, especially for the important pro-inflammatory molecules, including IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, CCL20, CXCL2 etc. Conclusions The discovery in this study provides insights into the interaction of porcine intestinal epithelial cells with F4 ETECs and F18 ETEC, respectively. The genes induced by ETECs with F4 versus F18 fimbriae suggest why ETEC with F4 may be more virulent compared to F18 which seems to elicit milder effects. PMID:22823589

  15. Expression of Inflammatory and Cell Death Program Genes and Comet DNA Damage Assay Induced by Escherichia coli in Layer Hens

    PubMed Central

    Mehaisen, Gamal M. K.; Eshak, Mariam G.; El Sabry, M. I.; Abass, Ahmed O.

    2016-01-01

    Modern methods of industrial poultry and egg production systems involve stressful practices that stimulate Escherichia coli (E. coli) activity causing endotoxic shock. This investigation was conducted to evaluate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death program genes and DNA damage induced by E. coli in the brain and liver tissues of laying hens. A total of two hundred and ten H&N brown layer hens with 20 week age, were used in this research. First, preliminary experiments were designed (60 hens in total) to establish the optimal exposure dose of E. coli and to determine the nearest time of notable response to be used in the remainder studies of this research. At 35-wk of age, 150 hens were randomly assigned into 2 groups with 3 replicates of 25 birds each; the first group was injected in the brachial wing vein with 107 E. coli colony/hen, while the second group was injected with saline and served as a control. The body temperature and plasma corticosterone concentration were measured 3 hr after injection. Specimens of liver and brain were obtained from each group and the gene expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, interlukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Bax, and caspase-3 genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. DNA damage in the brain and liver tissues were also measured by comet assay. Hens treated with E. coli showed significant (P<0.05) increase of body temperature and plasma corticosterone (42.6°C and 14.5 ng/ml, respectively) compared to the control group (41.1°C and 5.5 ng/ml, respectively). Additional remarkable over-inflammation gene expression of p38, IL-1β and TNF-α.genes were also detected in the brain (2.2-fold, 2.0-fold and 3.3-fold, respectively) and the liver (2.1-fold, 1.9-fold and 3.0-fold, respectively) tissues of the infected chickens. It is also important to note that hens injected with E. coli showed an increase in DNA damage in the brain and liver cells (P<0.05). These

  16. Solubility-driven toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to Caco2 cells and Escherichia coli: Effect of sonication energy and test environment.

    PubMed

    Käkinen, Aleksandr; Kahru, Anne; Nurmsoo, Helen; Kubo, Anna-Liisa; Bondarenko, Olesja M

    2016-10-01

    Due to small size and high surface energy nanoparticles (NPs) tend to agglomerate and precipitate. To avoid/diminish that, sonication of NPs stock suspensions prior toxicity testing is often applied. Currently, there is no standardized particle sonication protocol available leading to inconsistent toxicity data, especially if toxicity is driven by NPs' dissolution that may be enhanced by sonication. In this study we addressed the effect of sonication on hydrodynamic size (Dh), dissolution and toxicity of copper oxide (CuO) NPs to mammalian cell line Caco-2 in vitro and bacteria Escherichia coli in the respective test environments (cell culture MEM medium, bacterial LB medium and deionised (DI) water). NPs were suspended using no sonication, water bath and probe sonication with different energy intensities. Increased sonication energy (i) decreased the Dh of CuO NPs in all three test environments; (ii) increased dissolution of NPs in MEM medium and their toxicity to Caco-2; (iii) increased dissolution of NPs in LB medium and their bioavailability to E. coli; and (iv) had no effect on dissolution and antibacterial effects of NPs in DI water. Thus, to reduce variations in dissolution and toxicity, we recommend sonication of NPs in DI water following the dilution into suitable test media. PMID:27511801

  17. Adherence Reduction of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Strains to HEp-2 Cells by Mannan Oligosaccharides and a High-Molecular-Weight Component of Cranberry Extract.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Hernandez, Alejandra; Rupnow, John; Hutkins, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    Campylobacter infections are a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis in the United States and are a major cause of diarrheal disease throughout the world. Colonization and subsequent infection and invasion of Campylobacter require that the bacteria adhere to the surface of host cells. Agents that inhibit adherence could be used prophylactically to reduce Campylobacter carriage and infection. Mannan oligosaccharides (MOS) have been used as a feed supplement in livestock animals to improve performance and to replace growth-promoting antibiotics. However, MOS and other nondigestible oligosaccharides may also prevent pathogen colonization by inhibiting adherence in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, plant extracts, including those derived from cranberries, have been shown to have antiadherence activity against pathogens. The goal of this study was to assess the ability of MOS and cranberry fractions to serve as antiadherence agents against strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Adherence experiments were performed using HEp-2 cells. Significant reductions in adherence of C. jejuni 29438, C. jejuni 700819, C. jejuni 3329, and C. coli 43485 were observed in the presence of MOS (up to 40 mg/ml) and with a high-molecular-weight fraction of cranberry extract (up to 3 mg/ml). However, none of the tested materials reduced adherence of C. coli BAA-1061. No additive effect in adherence inhibition was observed for an MOS-cranberry blend. These results suggest that both components, MOS and cranberry, could be used to reduce Campylobacter colonization and carriage in livestock animals and potentially limit human exposure to this pathogen. PMID:26219363

  18. Cell surface receptors for CCN proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lester F

    2016-06-01

    The CCN family (CYR61; CTGF; NOV; CCN1-6; WISP1-3) of matricellular proteins in mammals is comprised of six homologous members that play important roles in development, inflammation, tissue repair, and a broad range of pathological processes including fibrosis and cancer. Despite considerable effort to search for a high affinity CCN-specific receptor akin to growth factor receptors, no such receptor has been found. Rather, CCNs bind several groups of multi-ligand receptors as characteristic of other matricellular proteins. The most extensively documented among CCN-binding receptors are integrins, including αvβ3, αvβ5, α5β1, α6β1, αIIbβ3, αMβ2, and αDβ2, which mediate diverse CCN functions in various cell types. CCNs also bind cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), low density liproprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), and the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, which are endocytic receptors that may also serve as co-receptors in cooperation with other cell surface receptors. CCNs have also been reported to bind FGFR-2, Notch, RANK, and TrkA, potentially altering the affinities of these receptors for their ligands. The ability of CCNs to bind a multitude of receptors in various cell types may account for the remarkable versatility of their functions, and underscore the diverse signaling pathways that mediate their activities. PMID:27098435

  19. Inner Membrane Protein YhcB Interacts with RodZ Involved in Cell Shape Maintenance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gaochi; Hamamoto, Kentaro; Kitakawa, Madoka

    2012-01-01

    Depletion of YhcB, an inner membrane protein of Escherichia coli, inhibited the growth of rodZ deletion mutant showing that the loss of both YhcB and RodZ is synthetically lethal. Furthermore, YhcB was demonstrated to interact with RodZ as well as several other proteins involved in cell shape maintenance and an inner membrane protein YciS of unknown function, using bacterial two-hybrid system. These observations seem to indicate that YhcB is involved in the biogenesis of cell envelope and the maintenance of cell shape together with RodZ.

  20. DNA synthesis in yeast cell-free extracts dependent on recombinant DNA plasmids purified from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Jong, A Y; Scott, J F

    1985-01-01

    In our attempts to establish a cell-free DNA replication system for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have observed that recombinant DNA plasmids purified from Escherichia coli by a common procedure (lysozyme-detergent lysis and equilibrium banding in cesium chloride ethidium bromide gradients) often serve as templates for DNA synthesis by elongation enzymes. The templates could be elongated equally well by enzymes present in the yeast cell-free extracts, by the large proteolytic fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I or by T4 DNA polymerase. The template activity of the purified plasmids was dependent on the presence of heterologous DNA segments in the bacterial vectors. The template activity could be diminished by treatment with alkali. We propose that the ability of recombinant plasmids isolated from bacterial hosts to serve as elongation templates may lead to erroneous conclusions when these plasmids are used as templates for in vitro replication or transcription reactions. Images PMID:3889851

  1. Immune signalling responses in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to pathogenic Escherichia coli and lactic acid-producing probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ho, N K; Hawley, S P; Ossa, J C; Mathieu, O; Tompkins, T A; Johnson-Henry, K C; Sherman, P M

    2013-06-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and adherent-invasive Escherichia coli are two groups of enteric bacterial pathogens associated with haemorrhagic colitis and Crohn's Disease, respectively. Bacterial contact with host epithelial cells stimulates an immediate innate immune response designed to combat infection. In this study, immune responses of human epithelial cells to pathogens, either alone or in combination with probiotic bacteria were studied. Industrially prepared Lactobacillus helveticus strain R0052 was first examined by microarray analysis and then compared to broth-grown strains of R0052 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG using quantitative realt-time polymerase chain reaction. Results showed host immune activation responses increased following pathogen exposure, which were differentially ameliorated using probiotics depending on both the preparation of probiotics employed and conditions of exposure. These findings provide additional support for the concept that specific probiotic strains serve as a promising option for use in preventing the risk of enteric bacterial infections. PMID:23443951

  2. Common phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance patterns found in a case study of multiresistant E. coli from cohabitant pets, humans, and household surfaces.

    PubMed

    Martins, Liliana Raquel Leite; Pina, Susana Maria Rocha; Simões, Romeo Luís Rocha; de Matos, Augusto José Ferreira; Rodrigues, Pedro; da Costa, Paulo Martins Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study described in this article was to characterize the antimicrobial resistance profiles among E. coli strains isolated from cohabitant pets and humans, evaluating the concurrent colonization of pets, owners, and home surfaces by bacteria carrying the same antimicrobial-resistant genes. The authors also intended to assess whether household surfaces and objects could contribute to the within-household antimicrobial-resistant gene diffusion between human and animal cohabitants. A total of 124 E. coli strains were isolated displaying 24 different phenotypic patterns with a remarkable percentage of multiresistant ones. The same resistance patterns were isolated from the dog's urine, mouth, the laundry floor, the refrigerator door, and the dog's food bowl. Some other multiresistant phenotypes, as long as resistant genes, were found repeatedly in different inhabitants and surfaces of the house. Direct, close contact between all the cohabitants and the touch of contaminated household surfaces and objects could be an explanation for these observations. PMID:23397653

  3. Single-cell characterization of metabolic switching in the sugar phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Westermayer, Sonja A; Fritz, Georg; Gutiérrez, Joaquín; Megerle, Judith A; Weißl, Mira P S; Schnetz, Karin; Gerland, Ulrich; Rädler, Joachim O

    2016-05-01

    The utilization of several sugars in Escherichia coli is regulated by the Phosphotransferase System (PTS), in which diverse sugar utilization modules compete for phosphoryl flux from the general PTS proteins. Existing theoretical work predicts a winner-take-all outcome when this flux limits carbon uptake. To date, no experimental work has interrogated competing PTS uptake modules with single-cell resolution. Using time-lapse microscopy in perfused microchannels, we analyzed the competition between N-acetyl-glucosamine and sorbitol, as representative PTS sugars, by measuring both the expression of their utilization systems and the concomitant impact of sugar utilization on growth rates. We find two distinct regimes: hierarchical usage of the carbohydrates, and co-expression of the genes for both systems. Simulations of a mathematical model incorporating asymmetric sugar quality reproduce our metabolic phase diagram, indicating that under conditions of nonlimiting phosphate flux, co-expression is due to uncoupling of both sugar utilization systems. Our model reproduces hierarchical winner-take-all behaviour and stochastic co-expression, and predicts the switching between both strategies as a function of available phosphate flux. Hence, experiments and theory both suggest that PTS sugar utilization involves not only switching between the sugars utilized but also switching of utilization strategies to accommodate prevailing environmental conditions. PMID:26784570

  4. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these “molecular syringes” for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a g