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Sample records for coli endotoxin lipopolysaccharide

  1. Lipopolysaccharide Endotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Raetz, Christian R. H.; Whitfield, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Summary Since lipopolysaccharide endotoxins of Gram-negative bacteria were last reviewed in this series in 1990, much has been learned about the assembly and signaling functions of these remarkable glycoconjugates. Lipopolysaccharides typically consist of a hydrophobic domain known as lipid A (or endotoxin), a non-repeating “core” oligosaccharide, and a distal polysaccharide (or O-antigen). The flood of recent genomic data has made it possible to study lipopolysaccharide assembly in diverse Gram-negative bacteria, many of which are human or plant pathogens, and to create mutants or hybrid constructs with novel properties. Unexpectedly, key genes for lipid A biosynthesis have also been found in higher plants, indicating that eucaryotic lipid A-like molecules may exist. The carbohydrate diversity of lipopolysaccharides is better appreciated now than ten years ago, but much remains to be learned about function. Sequence comparisons suggest that extensive lateral transfer of genes for the assembly of O-antigens has occurred among bacteria. The most significant finding in the field of endotoxin biology since 1990 has been the identification of the plasma membrane protein TLR4 as the lipid A signaling receptor of animal cells. The latter belongs to a family of innate immunity receptors, all of which possess a large extracellular domain of leucine-rich repeats, a single trans-membrane segment and a smaller cytoplasmic signaling region that engages the adaptor protein MyD88. The expanding knowledge of TLR4 specificity and its downstream signaling pathways should provide new opportunities for blocking the inflammatory side effects of sepsis. Future progress will require insights into lipopolysaccharide-protein recognition at the atomic level, greater understanding of intra- and inter-cellular lipopolysaccharide trafficking, and incisive biological approaches that combine the tools of bacterial and animal genetics. PMID:12045108

  2. Endotoxin neutralization with rabbit antisera to Escherichia coli J5 and other gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, H S; Novitsky, T J; Bucklin, A; Kania, S A; Siber, G R

    1987-01-01

    To study the mechanisms of protection against endotoxin challenge offered by antisera to smooth and rough gram-negative organisms, we have developed an assay to quantitate endotoxin neutralization based on inhibition of the Limulus amoebocyte lysate test. Dilutions of different bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) were incubated with hyperimmune rabbit sera against Escherichia coli O113, E. coli O18, and rough mutants E. coli J5 and Salmonella minnesota Re595 and were then combined with limulus lysate. The gelation reaction induced by LPS in the lysate was monitored spectrophotometrically, and the concentration of LPS resulting in a 50% lysate response was determined and correlated with antibody titers measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antisera to smooth organisms neutralized homologous LPS markedly and heterologous LPSs only minimally relative to neutralization by preimmune serum. Neutralization of homologous LPS occurred immediately without preincubation of serum and LPS. Antisera to rough mutants neutralized more heterologous LPS than did antisera to smooth organisms. However, this heterologous neutralization required preincubation of serum and LPS and did not appear to be correlated with antibody concentrations. We conclude that antisera to LPS rapidly neutralize the biological activity of the homologous LPS, as detected by limulus lysate, and that neutralization is at least in part antibody mediated. Antisera to rough-mutant organisms slowly neutralized the activity of heterologous LPSs, but this effect appeared not to be correlated with concentrations of antibody to the LPS of the rough mutant, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:3298063

  3. Administration of Escherichia coli endotoxin to rat increases liver mass and hepatocyte volume in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, D; Brosnan, J T

    1996-01-01

    We have established, in vivo, an increase in liver mass and hepatocyte volume after a single intraperitoneal administration, to fasted rats, of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (0127:B8) at 3 mg/kg. The phenomenon was time- and dose-dependent and could be prevented by treatment with polyclonal antiserum against tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) before the endotoxin injection. Endotoxin caused an increase of 26% in the hepatic mass compared with fasted controls at 24 h. An increase of 27% in the hepatic water content underlay the altered hepatic mass which could not be accounted for by a change in the volume of hepatic blood and/or interstitial fluid (measured in vivo), suggesting an expansion in the hepatocellular volume. This is supported by an increase of 25% in the K+ content of the endotoxic livers. Morphometric study confirmed a 15% increase in hepatocyte volume after endotoxin administration. The data are discussed in the light of possible metabolic effects of increased hepatocyte volume. PMID:8573081

  4. Prenatal endotoxin exposure alters behavioural pain responses to lipopolysaccharide in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Hodyl, Nicolette A; Walker, F Rohan; Krivanek, Klara M; Clifton, Vicki L; Hodgson, Deborah M

    2010-05-11

    Evidence suggests that exposure to bacterial endotoxin in early life can alter the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in later life. This phenomenon may have significant consequences for pain and pain related behaviours as pro-inflammatory cytokines heighten pain sensitivity. This association has yet to be examined. As such, the aim of the present study was to characterize pain behaviours in adult rat offspring following prenatal endotoxin (PE) exposure. Pregnant F344 rats received endotoxin (200microg/kg, s.c.) or saline on gestational days 16, 18 and 20. Pain thresholds were assessed in the adult PE offspring (n=23) and control offspring (n=24) prior to and 4h following administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100microg/kg, s.c.). Three assays of pain were employed - the hot plate, tail immersion and von Frey tests. Results demonstrated sex-specific effects of prenatal endotoxin on the offspring, with PE males displaying unaltered pain thresholds on the von Frey test post-LPS administration (p<0.01), while male control offspring (n=24) displayed the expected hyperalgesia. Male PE offspring also displayed increased pain thresholds on the tail immersion test (p<0.01), while no change in pain sensitivity was observed in control males following LPS exposure. No difference in response was observed between the female PE and control offspring on the von Frey test, however PE female offspring displayed increased thresholds on the tail immersion test compared to baseline - an effect not observed in the control female offspring. Pain sensitivity on the hot plate test was unaffected by prenatal exposure to endotoxin. These data suggest that prenatal exposure to products associated with bacterial infection have the capacity to alter pain responses, which are evident in the adult offspring. PMID:20184906

  5. Delayed protection against ischaemia-induced ventricular arrhythmias and infarct size limitation by the prior administration of Escherichia coli endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Song, W.; Furman, B. L.; Parratt, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    1. Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide derived from Escherichia coli) was injected intraperitoneally in conscious rats in doses ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 mg kg-1. At various times afterwards the animals were anaesthetized and subjected to a 30 min period of left coronary artery occlusion. 2. Under these conditions the severity of ventricular arrhythmias was markedly suppressed, in comparison with saline-injected controls, but this was particularly marked with the higher doses (1.5 and 2.5 mg kg-1); the number of ventricular premature beats was reduced from 1687 +/- 227 over the 0.5 h coronary artery occlusion period to 190 +/- 46 in those rats administered 2.5 mg kg-1 endotoxin 8 h previously (P < 0.05). The duration of ventricular tachycardia was also significantly reduced (138 +/- 26 s to 8.9 +/- 4.2 s; P < 0.01) and there was a reduction in the incidence of ventricular fibrillation (from 56% to 10%). 3. The time course of this protection was studied following the administration of a single dose of 2.5 mg kg-1 of endotoxin by anaesthetizing rats 4, 8 or 24 h later. Protection was apparent at each time but was particularly marked at 8 h. 4. No rat given the highest dose of endotoxin (32 in all) died as a result of ventricular fibrillation, or from any other cause, during an occlusion, in contrast to a 26% mortality in the controls (P < 0.01). 5. Infarct size, measured following a 30 min period of coronary artery occlusion followed by a 3 h reperfusion period, was reduced both 8 and 24 h after the administration of 2.5 mg kg-1 endotoxin (reductions of 24.3 and 23.1% respectively; P < 0.05). Endotoxin had no significant effect on the area at risk. 6. The beneficial effects of endotoxin on infarct size and on ventricular arrhythmias were markedly attenuated by the prior administration of dexamethasone, 3 mg kg-1 given 1 h prior to endotoxin administration. Dexamethasone itself reduced infarct size (P < 0.05) but had no direct effect on arrhythmia severity following

  6. Synthesis, characterization and immunological properties of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 lipopolysaccharide- diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Rokhsartalab-Azar, Shadi; Shapouri, Reza; Rahnema, Mehdi; Najafzadeh, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Escherichia coli O157:H7, an emerging pathogen, causes severe enteritis and the extraintestinal complication of hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The goal of this study was to evaluate the conjugate of E. coli O157: H7 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with diphtheria toxoid (DT) as a candidate vaccine in mice model. Material and Methods: LPS from E. coli O157:H7 was extracted by hot phenol method and then detoxified. Purified LPS was coupled to DT with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as a spacer and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a linker. The coupling molar ratio of LPS to DT was 3:1. Clinical evaluation of E. coli O157:H7 LPS-DT conjugate was also performed. Results: The conjugate was devoid of endotoxin activity and indicated 0.125 U/ml of D-LPS. Mice immunization with D-LPS DT conjugate elicited fourfold higher IgG antibody in comparison to D-LPS. Also, in vivo protection of mice with conjugate provided high protection against the LD50 of E. coli O157:H7, which indicated a good correlation with the IgG titer. Conclusion: Our results showed that the suggested vaccine composed of E. coli O157:H7 LPS and DT had a significant potential to protect against E. coli infections. PMID:26668702

  7. Biophysical characterization of the interaction of Limulus polyphemus endotoxin neutralizing protein with lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Andrä, Jörg; Garidel, Patrick; Majerle, Andreja; Jerala, Roman; Ridge, Richard; Paus, Erik; Novitsky, Tom; Koch, Michel H J; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2004-05-01

    Endotoxin-neutralizing protein (ENP) of the horseshoe crab is one of the most potent neutralizers of endotoxins [bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)]. Here, we report on the interaction of LPS with recombinant ENP using a variety of physical and biological techniques. In biological assays (Limulus amebocyte lysate and tumour necrosis factor-alpha induction in human mononuclear cells), ENP causes a strong reduction of the immunostimulatory ability of LPS in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitantly, the accessible negative surface charges of LPS and lipid A (zeta potential) are neutralized and even converted into positive values. The gel to liquid crystalline phase transitions of LPS and lipid A shift to higher temperatures indicative of a rigidification of the acyl chains, however, the only slight enhancement of the transition enthalpy indicates that the hydrophobic moiety is not strongly disturbed. The aggregate structure of lipid A is converted from a cubic into a multilamellar phase upon ENP binding, whereas the secondary structure of ENP does not change due to the interaction with LPS. ENP contains a hydrophobic binding site to which the dye 1-anilino-8-sulfonic acid binds at a K(d) of 19 micro m, which is displaced by LPS. Because lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) is not able to bind to LPS when ENP and LPS are preincubated, tight binding of ENP to LPS can be deduced with a K(d) in the low nonomolar range. Importantly, ENP is able to incorporate by itself into target phospholipid liposomes, and is also able to mediate the intercalation of LPS into the liposomes thus acting as a transport protein in a manner similar to LBP. Thus, LPS-ENP complexes might enter target membranes of immunocompetent cells, but are not able to activate due to the ability of ENP to change LPS aggregates from an active into an inactive form. PMID:15128313

  8. Wet heat inactivation of lipopolysaccharide from E. coli serotype 055:B5.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shinji; Takai, Masaki; Maki, Takehiko

    2002-01-01

    Wet heat inactivation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli Serotype 055:B5 was investigated. The LPS solutions were heated at study temperatures ranging from 78 degrees C to 175 degrees C, and were assayed using the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) test. Plots of the log of the amount of endotoxin remaining versus heating time showed biphasic decreases. The initial slopes are associated with a faster rate of decrease to about a 0.5-log unit reduction, and were followed by a slower, linear rate of decline in the secondary slopes. The curves were applied to the biexponential model expressed by the equation (Et = E1e-klt + E2e-k2t). The LPS inactivation rates (k1 and k2) each conformed to their own Arrhenius equation. Therefore, the processes required to achieve the desired level of LPS inactivation can be obtained by mathematical means. PMID:12181806

  9. Capture of lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) by the blood clot: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Margaret T; Rickles, Frederick R; Armstrong, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates and arthropods, blood clotting involves the establishment of a plug of aggregated thrombocytes (the cellular clot) and an extracellular fibrillar clot formed by the polymerization of the structural protein of the clot, which is fibrin in mammals, plasma lipoprotein in crustaceans, and coagulin in the horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. Both elements of the clot function to staunch bleeding. Additionally, the extracellular clot functions as an agent of the innate immune system by providing a passive anti-microbial barrier and microbial entrapment device, which functions directly at the site of wounds to the integument. Here we show that, in addition to these passive functions in immunity, the plasma lipoprotein clot of lobster, the coagulin clot of Limulus, and both the platelet thrombus and the fibrin clot of mammals (human, mouse) operate to capture lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). The lipid A core of LPS is the principal agent of gram-negative septicemia, which is responsible for more than 100,000 human deaths annually in the United States and is similarly toxic to arthropods. Quantification using the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) test shows that clots capture significant quantities of LPS and fluorescent-labeled LPS can be seen by microscopy to decorate the clot fibrils. Thrombi generated in the living mouse accumulate LPS in vivo. It is suggested that capture of LPS released from gram-negative bacteria entrapped by the blood clot operates to protect against the disease that might be caused by its systemic dispersal. PMID:24282521

  10. Capture of Lipopolysaccharide (Endotoxin) by the Blood Clot: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Margaret T.; Rickles, Frederick R.; Armstrong, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates and arthropods, blood clotting involves the establishment of a plug of aggregated thrombocytes (the cellular clot) and an extracellular fibrillar clot formed by the polymerization of the structural protein of the clot, which is fibrin in mammals, plasma lipoprotein in crustaceans, and coagulin in the horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. Both elements of the clot function to staunch bleeding. Additionally, the extracellular clot functions as an agent of the innate immune system by providing a passive anti-microbial barrier and microbial entrapment device, which functions directly at the site of wounds to the integument. Here we show that, in addition to these passive functions in immunity, the plasma lipoprotein clot of lobster, the coagulin clot of Limulus, and both the platelet thrombus and the fibrin clot of mammals (human, mouse) operate to capture lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). The lipid A core of LPS is the principal agent of gram-negative septicemia, which is responsible for more than 100,000 human deaths annually in the United States and is similarly toxic to arthropods. Quantification using the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) test shows that clots capture significant quantities of LPS and fluorescent-labeled LPS can be seen by microscopy to decorate the clot fibrils. Thrombi generated in the living mouse accumulate LPS in vivo. It is suggested that capture of LPS released from gram-negative bacteria entrapped by the blood clot operates to protect against the disease that might be caused by its systemic dispersal. PMID:24282521

  11. Immune modulation of the pulmonary hypertensive response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) in broilers.

    PubMed

    Wideman, R F; Chapman, M E; Wang, W; Erf, G F

    2004-04-01

    The lungs of broilers are constantly challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) that can activate leukocytes and trigger thromboxane A2 (TxA2)- and serotonin (5HT)-mediated pulmonary vasoconstriction leading to pulmonary hypertension. Among broilers from a single genetic line, some individuals respond to LPS with large increases in pulmonary arterial pressure, whereas others fail to exhibit any response to the same supramaximal dose of LPS. This extreme variability in the pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS appears to reflect variability in the types or proportions of chemical mediators released by leukocytes. Our research has confirmed that TxA2 and 5HT are potent pulmonary vasoconstrictors in broilers and that broilers hatched and reared together consistently exhibit pulmonary hypertension after i.v. injections of TxA2 or 5HT. Previous in vitro studies conducted using macrophages from different lines of chickens demonstrated innate variability in the LPS-stimulated induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) followed by the onset of an LPS-refractory state. The NOS enzyme converts arginine to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO). It is known that NO produced by endothelial NOS serves as a key modulator of flow-dependent pulmonary vasodilation, and it is likely that NO generated by iNOS also contributes to the pulmonary vasodilator response. Accordingly, it is our hypothesis that the pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS in broilers is minimal when more vasodilators (NO, prostacyclin) than vasoconstrictors (TxA2, 5HT) are generated during an LPS challenge. Indeed, inhibiting NO production through pharmacological blockade of NOS with the inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester modestly increased the baseline pulmonary arterial pressure and dramatically increased the pulmonary hypertensive response to LPS in all broilers evaluated. Innate differences in the effect of LPS on the pulmonary vasculature may contribute to differences in susceptibility of

  12. Hemolymph coagulation and phenoloxidase activity in Uca tangeri induced by Escherichia coli endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Salawu, Musa O; Oloyede, Hussein O B; Oladiji, Temidayo A; Yakubu, Musa T; Amuzat, Aliyu O

    2016-05-01

    Uca tangeri is a marine fiddler crab found commonly in the West African coast and is often exposed to Gram-negative pathogens upon injury. The aim of this study was to document the patterns of endotoxin-induced protein coagulation and phenoloxidase (PO) activity in hemolymph fractions of Uca tangeri. Hemolymph from live crabs was obtained by carapace puncture, pooled. and then separated into plasma, hemocyte Lysate (HL), hemocyte lysate supernatant (HLS) and hemocyte lysate debris (HLD). The effect of Escherichia coli (O1111:B4) endotoxin and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) on protein coagulation in the presence/absence of endotoxin and the endotoxin dose-dependence of coagulation and PO activity were each studied in the plasma, HL, HLS and HLD. The results showed Ca(2+) was required to induce coagulation, and was endotoxin concentration-dependent in the plasma. PO activity was highest in the HLS but PO specific activity was highest in HLD. PO activity remained relatively constant with increased LPS concentration in the range studied 0-10 EU/ml. From the data we conclude that endotoxin-induced protein coagulation occurs in the plasma alone and might be mediated by trans-glutaminases, while PO activity is localized inside hemocytes and cell membranes in Uca tangeri. PMID:26524621

  13. Increased antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli in bovine serum after the induction of endotoxin tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hill, A W; Shears, A L; Hibbitt, K G

    1976-07-01

    Small amounts of endotoxin injected intramuscularly into cows induced endotoxin pyrogenic tolerance and an increase in the rate at which the serum killed a strain of Escherichia coli. Most of the difference between normal serum and serum from the endotoxin-tolerant animal was shown to be due to a bentonite-adsorbable factor other than lysozyme or beta-lysin. The antibacterial activity was not completely removed from either type of serum after bentonite adsorption. Electron microscope studies and measurement of the rate of release of radioactively labeled cytoplasmic contents showed that the bentonite-adsorbable factor was important in the final breakdown of the cell membrane and release of cellular contents. The antibacterial system was totally dependent on complement, and the importance of antibodies could not be entirely ruled out because adsorption at O C with homologous cells eliminated the killing activity. PMID:780275

  14. Peptide-assembled graphene oxide as a fluorescent turn-on sensor for lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) detection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seng Koon; Chen, Peng; Lee, Fook Loy; Moochhala, Shabbir; Liedberg, Bo

    2015-09-15

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a toxic inflammatory stimulator released from the outer cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, known to be directly related to, for example, septic shock, that causes millions of casualties annually. This number could potentially be lowered significantly if specific, sensitive, and more simply applicable LPS biosensors existed. In this work, we present a facile, sensitive and selective LPS sensor, developed by assembling tetramethylrhodamine-labeled LPS-binding peptides on graphene oxide (GO). The fluorescence of the dye-labeled peptide is quenched upon interaction with GO. Specific binding to LPS triggers the release of the peptide-LPS complex from GO, resulting in fluorescence recovery. This fluorescent turn-on sensor offers an estimated limit of detection of 130 pM, which is the lowest ever reported among all synthetic LPS sensors to date. Importantly, this sensor is applicable for detection of LPS in commonly used clinical injectable fluids, and it enables selective detection of LPS from different bacterial strains as well as LPS on the membrane of living E. coli. PMID:26303386

  15. Gentamicin pharmacokinetics in horses given small doses of Escherichia coli endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R C; Moore, J N; Eakle, N

    1983-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics of gentamicin (3 mg/kg of body weight) were evaluated in 6 healthy horses and in 6 horses after they were given Escherichia coli endotoxin (0.113 microgram/kg). In the horses given endotoxin, there were a maximum temperature increase of 1.97 +/- 0.44 degrees (C) and a fever index (between the 2 groups) of 8.754 units. Other mild signs of endotoxemia also occurred. Statistically significant changes were not observed in the rate constants for distribution (alpha) or elimination (beta) or in body clearance (ClB) of gentamicin in the 2 groups of horses. In the horses given endotoxin, significant (P less than 0.05) increases were found in the serum concentration data (A, B, and CoS), and significant decreases were found in the apparent volume of distribution [Vd(area)] and in the volume of the central compartment (Vc). The alterations in gentamicin kinetics in the horses given endotoxin are believed to result from the decrease in Vc. This indicates that the extracellular fluid volume available for gentamicin distribution may be reduced by endotoxin. PMID:6354019

  16. Blockade of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase protects mice against lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Jung, In Duk; Lee, Min-Goo; Chang, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Jun Sik; Jeong, Young-Il; Lee, Chang-Min; Park, Won Sun; Han, Jin; Seo, Su-Kil; Lee, Sang Yong; Park, Yeong-Min

    2009-03-01

    Suppression of an excessive systemic inflammatory response is a promising and potent strategy for treating endotoxic sepsis. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), which is the rate-limiting enzyme for tryptophan catabolism, may play a critical role in various inflammatory disorders. In this study, we report a critical role for IDO in the dysregulated immune response associated with endotoxin shock. We found that IDO knockout (IDO(-/-)) mice and 1-methyl-D-tryptophan-treated, endotoxin-shocked mice had decreased levels of the cytokines, TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-12, and enhanced levels of IL-10. Blockade of IDO is thought to promote host survival in LPS-induced endotoxin shock, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate IDO expression during endotoxin shock. In vitro and in vivo, IDO expression was increased by exogenous IL-12, but decreased by exogenous IL-10 in dendritic cells and splenic dendritic cells. Interestingly, whereas LPS-induced IL-12 levels in serum were higher than those of IL-10, the balance between serum IL-12 and IL-10 following challenge became reversed in IDO(-/-)- or 1-methyl-D-tryptophan-treated mice. Our findings demonstrate that the detrimental immune response to endotoxin shock may occur via IDO modulation. Restoring the IL-12 and IL-10 balance by blocking IDO represents a potential strategy for sepsis treatment. PMID:19234212

  17. High concentrations of extracellular potassium enhance bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide-induced neurotoxicity in glia-neuron mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Chang, R C; Hudson, P M; Wilson, B C; Liu, B; Abel, H; Hong, J S

    2000-01-01

    A sudden increase in extracellular potassium ions (K(+)) often occurs in cerebral ischemia and after brain trauma. This increase of extracellular K(+) constitutes the basis for spreading depression across the cerebral cortex, resulting in the expansion of neuronal death after ischemic and traumatic brain injuries. Besides spreading depression, it has become clear that cerebral inflammation also is a key factor contributing to secondary brain injury in acute neurological disorders. Experiments to validate the relationship between elevated levels of extracellular K(+) and inflammation have not been studied. This study aims to elucidate the roles of high concentrations of extracellular K(+) in bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide-induced production of inflammatory factors. Increased concentration of KCl in the medium (20mM) significantly enhanced neurotoxicity by lipopolysaccharide in glia-neuron mixed cultures. To delineate the underlying mechanisms of increased neurotoxicity, the effects of high extracellular K(+) were examined by using mixed glial cultures. KCl at 20mM significantly enhanced nitrite, an index for nitric oxide, production by about twofold, and was pronounced from 24 to 48h, depending on the concentration of KCl. Besides nitric oxide production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha was also enhanced. The augmentative effects of high KCl on the production of inflammatory factors were probably due to the further activation of microglia, since high KCl also enhanced the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in microglia-enriched cultures. The increased production of nitrite by high K(+) was eliminated through use of a K(+)-blocker. Taken together, the results show that increases of extracellular K(+) concentrations in spreading depression augment lipopolysaccharide-elicited neurotoxicity, because production of inflammatory factors such as nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha are potentiated. Since spreading depression and cerebral inflammation

  18. Induction of reversible shock by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide in rats. Changes in serum and cell membrane parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, M. A.; García, R.; Pagani, R.; Portolés, M. T.; Díaz-Laviada, I.; Abarca, S.; Ainaga, M. J.; Risco, C.; Municio, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Reversible endotoxic shock was induced in adult rats by i.v. injection of Escherichia coli O111:B4 lipopolysaccharide (1.6 mg/100 g). The shock progression was evaluated by measuring serum glucose levels as well as activities of aspartate aminotransferase (GOT) and alkaline phosphatase in serum. A rapid increase of serum glucose levels occurs, after LPS injection, followed by hypoglycaemia (minimum values at 6 h) with progressive reversion to control values. Serum GOT activity increased (twofold) 6 h after endotoxin administration and returned to control values at 72 h. No appreciable changes occurred in serum alkaline phosphatase activity. Endotoxaemia produced a decrease in the cytochrome P-450 levels in all target organs considered: lung, adrenal glands and liver. The progressive decrease in the serum albumin concentration as well as changes of the physical properties of the plasma membranes observed in vivo, can not be explained only by direct interaction of endotoxin with the target organs, underlining the importance of serum mediators in the induction of the shock response. PMID:3064800

  19. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides form procollagen-endotoxin complexes that trigger cartilage inflammation and degeneration: implications for the development of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We have previously reported that bacterial toxins, especially endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS), might be important causative agents in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in an in vitro model that simulates the potential effects of residing in damp buildings. Since numerous inflammatory processes are linked with the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), we investigated in detail the effects of LPS on the NF-κB pathway and the postulated formation of procollagen-endotoxin complexes. Methods An in vitro model of human chondrocytes was used to investigate LPS-mediated inflammatory signaling. Results Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that LPS physically interact with collagen type II in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and anti-collagen type II significantly reduced this interaction. BMS-345541 (a specific inhibitor of IκB kinase (IKK)) or wortmannin (a specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K)) inhibited the LPS-induced degradation of the ECM and apoptosis in chondrocytes. This effect was completely inhibited by combining BMS-345541 and wortmannin. Furthermore, BMS-345541 and/or wortmannin suppressed the LPS-induced upregulation of catabolic enzymes that mediate ECM degradation (matrix metalloproteinases-9, -13), cyclooxygenase-2 and apoptosis (activated caspase-3). These proteins are regulated by NF-κB, suggesting that the NF-κB and PI-3K pathways are involved in LPS-induced cartilage degradation. The induction of NF-κB correlated with activation of IκBα kinase, IκBα phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, p65 phosphorylation and p65 nuclear translocation. Further upstream, LPS induced the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and bound with TLR4, indicating that LPS acts through TLR4. Conclusion These results suggest that molecular associations between LPS/TLR4/collagen type II in chondrocytes upregulate the NF-κB and PI-3K signaling pathways and activate proinflammatory activity. PMID:24020912

  20. Renal blood flow distribution during E. coli endotoxin shock in dog.

    PubMed

    Kirkebø, A; Tyssebotn, I

    1980-04-01

    The effect of endotoxin on renal blood flow distribution was studied in anesthetized dogs. Renal blood flow was measured as hydrogen clearance by platinum electrodes placed in outer and in inner halves of cortex and by electromagnetic flowmeter. Intravenous injection of E. coli endotoxin, 3-5 mg/kg b. wt., promptly reduced arterial blood pressure (AP) and renal blood flow. After a transient increase for 45 min AP and renal blood flow declined to about 50% of the control 2 1/2-3 h after injection. The reduction in outer cortical blood flow (OCF) was not significantly different from the reduction in inner cortical blood flow (ICF). The hematocrit (Hct) increased from 40.1 +/- 3.8% to 54.6 +/- 8%, but mean renal vascular resistance did not change. Total plasma protein concentration was not significantly elevated. A marked local flow variability was observed in some periods during the phase of shock with declining AP and total renal blood flow at high Hct. Thus renal blood flow showed phasic changes, but the OCF/ICF ratio was not changed during endotoxin shock. Local blood flow instability was observed periodically at high Hct. PMID:6998257

  1. Murine Monoclonal Antibodies against Escherichia coli O4 Lipopolysaccharide and H5 Flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Betancourt, Mildred; Keen, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Two murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb), 2C5-F10 and 8D1-H10, reactive with Escherichia coli O4 and H5 antigens, respectively, were generated and characterized. Enzyme immunoassays and immunoblots demonstrated that MAb 2C5-F10 reacted specifically with lipopolysaccharide O antigen of E. coli O4 isolates, while MAb 8D1-H10 reacted with E. coli strains expressing H5 flagella. PMID:11526192

  2. Role of endotoxin in acute inflammation induced by gram-negative bacteria: specific inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-mediated responses with an amino-terminal fragment of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, F R; Kung, A H

    1995-01-01

    A recombinant 23-kDa amino-terminal fragment of human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (rBPI23), a potent lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding/neutralizing protein, was used as a probe to assess the role of endotoxin in the acute inflammatory responses elicited by gram-negative bacteria in rat subcutaneous air pouches. In initial experiments, rBPI23 prevented the Escherichia coli O111:B4 LPS-induced accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and nitrite (a stable end product of nitric oxide formation) in exudate fluids. Significant inhibition of TNF-alpha production was still evident when rBPI23 treatment was delayed for 30 min after LPS instillation. In subsequent experiments, rBPI23 also prevented the nitrite and early (2-h) TNF-alpha accumulation induced by three different strains of formaldehyde-killed gram-negative bacteria (E. coli O7:K1, E. coli O111:B4, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 12.4.4) but did not inhibit the PMN or late (6-h) TNF-alpha accumulation induced by these bacteria. As with LPS challenge, a significant inhibition of early TNF-alpha production was still evident when rBPI23 treatment was delayed for 30 to 60 min after instillation of killed bacteria. The results indicate that in this experimental model the NO and early TNF-alpha responses to gram-negative bacterial challenge are mediated predominantly by endotoxin, whereas the PMN and late TNF-alpha responses may be mediated by other bacterial components. Moreover, the results indicate that rBPI23 can inhibit the bacterially induced production of certain potentially harmful mediators (TNF-alpha and NO) without entirely blocking the host defense, i.e., PMN response, against the bacteria. PMID:7806373

  3. Comparison of bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide concentrations in the blood, ovarian follicular fluid and uterine fluid: a clinical case of bovine metritis

    PubMed Central

    MAGATA, Fumie; ISHIDA, Yoshikazu; MIYAMOTO, Akio; FURUOKA, Hidefumi; INOKUMA, Hisashi; SHIMIZU, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the concentration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the blood, ovarian follicular fluid and uterine fluid of a clinical case of bovine metritis. A 2-year-old lactating Holstein cow exhibited continuous fever >39.5°C for more than 2 weeks after normal calving. The cow produced a fetid, watery, red-brown uterine discharge from the vagina and was diagnosed with metritis. The LPS concentrations in plasma and uterine fluid were 0.94 and 6.34 endotoxin units (EU)/ml, respectively. One of seven follicles showed an extremely high level of LPS (12.40 EU/ml) compared to the other follicles (0.62–0.97 EU/ml). These results might suggest the presence of high concentration of LPS in follicles in cows with postpartum metritis. PMID:25223344

  4. Comparison of bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide concentrations in the blood, ovarian follicular fluid and uterine fluid: a clinical case of bovine metritis.

    PubMed

    Magata, Fumie; Ishida, Yoshikazu; Miyamoto, Akio; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Inokuma, Hisashi; Shimizu, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the concentration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the blood, ovarian follicular fluid and uterine fluid of a clinical case of bovine metritis. A 2-year-old lactating Holstein cow exhibited continuous fever >39.5°C for more than 2 weeks after normal calving. The cow produced a fetid, watery, red-brown uterine discharge from the vagina and was diagnosed with metritis. The LPS concentrations in plasma and uterine fluid were 0.94 and 6.34 endotoxin units (EU)/ml, respectively. One of seven follicles showed an extremely high level of LPS (12.40 EU/ml) compared to the other follicles (0.62-0.97 EU/ml). These results might suggest the presence of high concentration of LPS in follicles in cows with postpartum metritis. PMID:25223344

  5. Myocardial dysfunction in endotoxin- and E. coli-induced shock: pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Archer, L T

    1985-01-01

    Experimental studies have documented that myocardial dysfunction is precipitated between 3 and 6 hr after endotoxin or E. coli. This finding has now been confirmed in human septic shock. A "Hinshaw-modified" isolated working left ventricle preparation has been used to document and assess the degree of failure. It was found that the failure is often severe and reversible only temporarily by adrenergic agents but reversible by digoxin or insulin. The cause of the failure has not been identified, but evidence is presented against a myocardial depressant factor (MDF) being the causative factor. Hearts subjected to a 2-4 hr period of hypotension on the threshold of failure show no signs of failure when subjected to blood circulating from an animal in splanchnic arterial occlusion shock. Hearts from pancreatectomized animals subjected to endotoxin shock with their source of MDF removed demonstrate the typical failure in 4-6 hr. Other factors are suggested that contribute to myocardial dysfunction: hypotension or nonuniform perfusion of subendocardial regions of the heart, depressed responsiveness to inotropic and chronotropic stimuli, intracardiac ionic and fluid disturbances, and increases in heart chamber and muscle stiffness. Since steroid/antibiotic therapy increases the probability (p less than 0.05) that an animal will survive lethal sepsis, investigating the effect of this therapy on myocardial function may aid in determining whether or not this degree of heart failure contributes in the animal to irreversible shock and death. PMID:3888434

  6. Potent CD14-mediated signalling of human leukocytes by Escherichia coli can be mediated by interaction of whole bacteria and host cells without extensive prior release of endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, S S; Chen, K; Chen, S; Doerfler, M E; Elsbach, P; Weiss, J

    1996-01-01

    How invading microorganisms are detected by the host has not been well defined. We have compared the abilities of Escherichia coli and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) purified from these bacteria to prime isolated neutrophils for phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated arachidonate release, to trigger respiratory burst in 1% blood, and to increase steady-state levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA in whole blood. In all three assays, bacteria were > or = 10-fold more potent than equivalent amounts of LPS and could trigger maximal cellular responses at ratios as low as one bacterium per 20 to 200 leukocytes. Both E. coli and LPS-triggered responses were enhanced by LPS-binding protein and inhibited by an anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody and the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI). However, whereas O polysaccharide did not affect the potency of isolated LPS, intact E. coli carrying long-chain LPS (O111:B4) was less potent than rough E. coli (J5). Furthermore, material collected by filtration or centrifugation of bacteria incubated under conditions used to trigger arachidonate release or chemiluminescence was 5- or 30-fold less active, respectively, than whole bacterial suspensions. Extracellular BPI (not bound to bacteria) inhibited bacterial signalling, but BPI bound to bacteria was much more potent. Taken together, these findings indicate that E. coli cells can strongly signal their presence to human leukocytes not only by shedding LPS into surrounding fluids but also by exposing endotoxin at or near their surface during direct interaction with host cells. PMID:8751904

  7. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF BOVINE MACROPHAGES IN RESPONSE TO ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to identify changes in bovine macrophage gene expression in response to treatment with Escherichia coli 0157:H7 lipopolysaccharide (LPS), utilizing a human gene microarray. Bovine cDNA from control and LPS-treated primary macrophages hybridized to greater than 5,644 (79.8%)...

  8. Fimbriae and lipopolysaccharides are necessary for co-aggregation between Lactobacilli and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kouhei; Furukawa, Soichi; Usui, Yumi; Ishiba, Madoka; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Cells of Lactobacilli co-aggregated with Escherichia coli K-12 cells to form co-aggregates under mixed-culture conditions at 37 °C for 24 h. Co-aggregation was inhibited by sodium dodecyl sulfate but not by protease. E. coli deletion mutants of fimbriae formation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) formation did not co-aggregate with Lactobacilli. These results showed that fimbriae and LPS are necessary for co-aggregation between Lactobacilli and E. coli. PMID:25209514

  9. Oral administration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae boulardii reduces mortality associated with immune and cortisol responses to Escherichia coli endotoxin in pigs.

    PubMed

    Collier, C T; Carroll, J A; Ballou, M A; Starkey, J D; Sparks, J C

    2011-01-01

    The effects of active dry yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae boulardii (Scb), on the immune/cortisol response and subsequent mortality to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration were evaluated in newly weaned piglets (26.1 ± 3.4 d of age). Barrows were assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups: with (Scb; n = 15) and without (control; n = 15) the in-feed inclusion of Scb (200 g/t) for 16 d. On d 16, all piglets were dosed via indwelling jugular catheters with LPS (25 μg/kg of BW) at 0 h. Serial blood samples were collected at 30-min intervals from -1 to 6 h and then at 24 h. Differential blood cell populations were enumerated hourly from 0 to 6 h and at 24 h. Serum cortisol, IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) concentrations were determined via porcine-specific ELISA at all time points. In Scb-treated piglets, cumulative ADG increased (P < 0.05) by 39.9% and LPS-induced piglet mortality was reduced 20% compared with control piglets. White blood cells, lymphocytes, and neutrophils were increased (P < 0.05) in Scb-treated animals before LPS dosing compared with control piglets before being equally suppressed (P < 0.05) from baseline in both treatments after LPS dosing with a return to baseline by 24 h. Suppression of circulating cortisol concentrations (P < 0.05) was observed in Scb-treated piglets from -1 h to 1 h relative to LPS dosing compared with control animals before both peaked equally and subsequently returned to baseline. Peak production (P < 0.05) of IL-1β and IL-6 was less in Scb-treated piglets after LPS administration compared with controls before both equally returned to baseline. Peak TNF-α production in Scb-treated animals was accelerated 0.5 h and was greater (P < 0.05) than peak production in control piglets, after which both equally returned to baseline. The peak production of IFN-γ was greater and had increased (P < 0.05) amplitude persistence for 3 h in Scb-treated animals compared with

  10. In vivo effects of the antiglucocorticoid RU 486 on glucocorticoid and cytokine responses to Escherichia coli endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Hawes, A S; Rock, C S; Keogh, C V; Lowry, S F; Calvano, S E

    1992-01-01

    The endogenous adrenocortical response to sepsis is critical for host survival. The in vivo interactions among the endogenous glucocorticoid response, the induction of cytokines, and host survival during endotoxemia were explored in this study by use of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU 486. Male Lewis rats underwent sterile insertion of a right jugular venous catheter. After a 72-h recovery period, animals received a 50% lethal dose of Escherichia coli endotoxin (2.5 mg/kg) via the catheter after pretreatment for 30 min prior to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment with (i) vehicle alone intravenously (i.v.) (-corticosterone [-Cort]/-RU 486/+LPS) (n = 10), (ii) the antiglucocorticoid RU 486 (10 mg/kg) i.v. (-Cort/+RU 486/+LPS) (n = 11), or (iii) RU 486 (10 mg/kg) i.v. in animals that had undergone subcutaneous implantation of a corticosterone pellet at the time of catheter insertion (+Cort/+RU 486/+LPS) (n = 10). Except in animals receiving corticosterone pretreatment, baseline plasma corticosterone levels were low in all groups. Plasma corticosterone levels increased significantly (P less than 0.001) above the baseline following LPS administration. Animals in the -Cort/+RU 486/+LPS-treated group exhibited significantly increased mortality (P less than 0.001), with only 9% of the animals surviving at 72 h, as well as significantly increased plasma interleukin-6 levels, compared with animals receiving the vehicle alone (-Cort/-RU 486/+LPS), which showed 50% mortality. Pretreatment with corticosterone and RU 486 (+Cort/+RU 486/+LPS) significantly (P less than 0.001) reversed the mortality observed with RU 486 pretreatment alone (-Cort/+RU 486/+LPS), with 70% of the animals surviving at 72 h, and significantly attenuated the peak plasma tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6 responses to LPS, compared with those in the animals treated with vehicle alone. These data demonstrate that the blockade of glucocorticoid binding by RU 486 increases LPS

  11. Human mesenchymal stem cell microvesicles for treatment of Escherichia coli endotoxin-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying-Gang; Feng, Xiao-Mei; Abbott, Jason; Fang, Xiao-Hui; Hao, Qi; Monsel, Antoine; Qu, Jie-Ming; Matthay, Michael A; Lee, Jae W

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or its conditioned medium restored lung protein permeability and reduced alveolar inflammation following Escherichia coli endotoxin-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in an ex vivo perfused human lung in part through the secretion of soluble factors such as keratinocyte growth factor (KGF). Recently, MSC were found to release microvesicles (MVs) that were biologically active because of the presence of mRNA or miRNA with reparative properties. MVs are circular fragments of membrane released from the endosomal compartment as exosomes or shed from the surface membranes. These studies were designed to determine if MVs released by human bone marrow derived MSCs would be effective in restoring lung protein permeability and reducing inflammation in E. coli endotoxin-induced ALI in C57BL/6 mice. The intratracheal instillation of MVs improved several indices of ALI at 48 hours. Compared to endotoxin-injured mice, MVs reduced extravascular lung water by 43% and reduced total protein levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid by 35%, demonstrating a reduction in pulmonary edema and lung protein permeability. MVs also reduced the influx of neutrophils and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 levels in the BAL fluid by 73% and 49%, respectively, demonstrating a reduction in inflammation. KGF siRNA-pretreatment of MSC partially eliminated the therapeutic effects of MVs released by MSCs, suggesting that KGF protein expression was important for the underlying mechanism. In summary, human MSC-derived MVs were therapeutically effective following E. coli endotoxin-induced ALI in mice in part through the expression of KGF mRNA in the injured alveolus. PMID:23939814

  12. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for the lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli O157.

    PubMed Central

    Westerman, R B; He, Y; Keen, J E; Littledike, E T; Kwang, J

    1997-01-01

    Identification of the O157 antigen is an essential part of the detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7, which is recognized as a major etiologic agent of hemorrhagic colitis. However, polyclonal antibodies produced against E. coli O157:H7 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may react with several other bacteria including Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, Yersinia enterocolitica O9, Escherichia hermannii, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. We produced eight monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the LPS of E. coli O157. Western blots (immunoblots) of both the phenol phase (smooth) and the aqueous phase (rough) of hot phenol-water-purified LPS indicated that three of the MAbs were specific for the O antigen and five were reactive with the LPS core. The eight MAbs could be further differentiated by their reactivities to Salmonella O30 LPS (group N), which is reported to be identical to the E. coli O157 antigen. All eight MAbs reacted strongly to all of the 64 strains of E. coli O157 tested, which included 47 isolates of O157:H7 and 17 other O157 strains. None of the eight MAbs cross-reacted with any of the 38 other E. coli serotypes tested, which consisted of 29 different O-antigen serotypes, or with 38 strains (22 genera) of non-E. coli gram-negative enteric bacteria. PMID:9041412

  13. Engineering N-linked protein glycosylation with diverse O antigen lipopolysaccharide structures in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Mario F; Wacker, Michael; Hernandez, Marcela; Hitchen, Paul G; Marolda, Cristina L; Kowarik, Michael; Morris, Howard R; Dell, Anne; Valvano, Miguel A; Aebi, Markus

    2005-02-22

    Campylobacter jejuni has a general N-linked protein glycosylation system that can be functionally transferred to Escherichia coli. In this study, we engineered E. coli cells in a way that two different pathways, protein N-glycosylation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis, converge at the step in which PglB, the key enzyme of the C. jejuni N-glycosylation system, transfers O polysaccharide from a lipid carrier (undecaprenyl pyrophosphate) to an acceptor protein. PglB was the only protein of the bacterial N-glycosylation machinery both necessary and sufficient for the transfer. The relaxed specificity of the PglB oligosaccharyltransferase toward the glycan structure was exploited to create novel N-glycan structures containing two distinct E. coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa O antigens. PglB-mediated transfer of polysaccharides might be valuable for in vivo production of O polysaccharides-protein conjugates for use as antibacterial vaccines. PMID:15703289

  14. [Changes in the afferent activity of the vagus nerve and the rectal temperature in rats following Escherichia coli endotoxin administration].

    PubMed

    Lapsha, V I; Lukashenko, T M; Utkina, L N; Gurin, V N

    2001-10-01

    In anaesthetised rats, i.p. administration of the Echerichia coli lipopolysaccharide in doses 5 mcg/kg (LPS) increased afferent activity of the cervical vagus, whereas 100 and 1000 mcg/kg doses inhibited the afferent discharges. Pyrogen-free saline (PFS) did not alter the activity. Rectal temperature (RT) was decreased by the PFS and by large doses of the LPS. Sodium salicylate administration prevented the effects. PMID:11767451

  15. Colistin inhibits E. coli O157:H7 Shiga-like toxin release, binds endotoxins and protects Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Percivalle, Elena; Monzillo, Vincenzina; Pauletto, Alessandro; Marone, Piero; Imberti, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The role of antibiotics in the treatment of Shiga-like toxin (Stx)-producing E. coli infection is still controversial. This study investigated the effects of colistin on Vero cell cytotoxicity caused by the enterohemorrhagic EC O157:H7, and the effects of colistin on Stx and endotoxin release by EC O157:H7. Vero cells were incubated with supernatant collected from EC O157:H7 cultured for 18 h without (control) or with various concentrations of colistin. In the absence of colistin, Vero cell viability after 48 h was 29.1±6.5%. Under the same conditions, the overnight presence of colistin reduced cytotoxicity to Vero cells (viability: 97±3.5 to 56.5±14.4% for colistin concentrations ≥MIC). Sub-MIC concentrations of colistin also provided partial protection (viability: 38.8±12.5 to 36.6±14% for 0.125 and 0.06 mcg/ml colistin, respectively). Endotoxins contributed to the cytotoxic effects on Vero cells since lower but still significant protection was observed when colistin was added directly to the supernatant collected from cultures of untreated EC O157:H7. Colistin reduced Stx release in a concentration-dependent manner, also at sub-MIC concentrations. Coincubation of the supernatant from EC O157:H7 cultures with colistin markedly reduced the endotoxin concentration at all doses investigated. In conclusion, colistin protects Vero cells from EC O157:H7 at supra- and sub-MIC concentrations by inhibiting Stx release and binding endotoxins. Colistin might be a valuable treatment for clinically severe forms of EC O157:H7 infection. PMID:27196550

  16. Paeonol suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cytokines in macrophage cells and protects mice from lethal endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Na; Liu, Dianfeng; Soromou, Lanan Wassy; Sun, Jingjing; Zhong, Weiting; Guo, Weixiao; Huo, Meixia; Li, Hongyu; Guan, Shuang; Chen, Zhenwen; Feng, Haihua

    2014-06-01

    Paeonol (2'-hydroxy-4'-methoxyacetophenone) is the main phenolic compound of the radix of Paeonia suffruticosa which has been used as traditional Chinese medicine. In this study, we primarily investigated the anti-inflammatory effects and the underlying mechanisms of paeonol in RAW macrophage cells; and based on these effects, we assessed the protective effects of paeonol on lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia in mice. The in vitro study showed that paeonol regulated the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 via inactivation of IκBα, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK. In mouse model of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines are significantly regulated, and thus the survival rates of lipolysaccharide-challenged mice are improved by paeonol (150, 200, or 250 mg/kg). Therefore, paeonol has a beneficial activity against lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 cell and mouse models. PMID:23413967

  17. Morphological damage induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide in cultured hepatocytes: localization and binding properties.

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, R.; Portolés, M. T.; Díaz-Laviada, I.; Municio, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria are considered to be the responsible agents for the induction of endotoxic shock, affecting the liver as a target organ. In this study, the cell morphology and some biochemical properties of 24 h-culture-hepatocyte monolayers treated with Escherichia coli 0111:B4 lipopolysaccharide, were observed. Cell morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence methods. LPS interaction induced an increase in rounded cells with diminished adhesion capacity. As biochemical parameters, albumin synthesis and 2-deoxyglucose uptake were measured. LPS decreased the hexose uptake in a dose-dependent manner. Binding of (14C)LPS to cultured hepatocytes showed that LPS binds to non-specific constituents of the membrane bilayer. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 7 PMID:3052562

  18. Influence of Core Oligosaccharide of Lipopolysaccharide to Outer Membrane Behavior of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhou; Wang, Jianli; Ren, Ge; Li, Ye; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides, major molecules in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, play important roles on membrane integrity of the cell. However, how the core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide affect the membrane behavior is not well understood. In this study, the relationship between the core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide and the membrane behavior was investigated using a series of Escherichia coli mutants defective in genes to affect the biosynthesis of core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide. Cell surface hydrophobicity, outer membrane permeability, biofilm formation and auto-aggregation of these mutant cells were compared. Compared to the wild type W3110, cell surface hydrophobicities of mutant ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG, ΔwaaO, ΔwaaP, ΔwaaY and ΔwaaB were enhanced, outer membrane permeabilities of ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG and ΔwaaP were significantly increased, abilities of biofilm formation by ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG, ΔwaaO, ΔwaaR, ΔwaaP, ΔwaaQ and ΔwaaY decreased, and auto-aggregation abilities of ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG, ΔwaaO, ΔwaaR, ΔwaaU, ΔwaaP and ΔwaaY were strongly enhanced. These results give new insight into the influence of core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide on bacterial cell membrane behavior. PMID:26023839

  19. Immunologic activity of lipopolysaccharides released from macrophages after the uptake of intact E coli in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, R.L. Jr.; Hoffman, J.; Tesh, V.L.; Morrison, D.C.

    1986-04-15

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) have been isolated from culture supernatants and from cell lysates after the in vitro phagocytosis of E. coli by murine macrophages. By using E. coli radiolabeled specifically in the LPS component with (/sup 3/H)galactose, the authors studies have shown that the macrophage-processed LPS is enhanced with respect to its immunostimulatory activity in comparison with control phenol-water-extracted LPS. As assessed by its ability to induce interluekin 1 production in naive macrophages or proliferation in cultures of murine splenocytes, the macrophage-processed LPS is between 10- and 100-fold greater in specific activity. Evidence is presented for both structural and chemical alterations in the LPS macromolecule.

  20. Enhanced host immune recognition of E.coli causing mastitis in CD-14 transgenic mice.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherchia coli causes mastitis, an economically significant disease in dairy animals. E. coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) when bound by host membrane proteins such as CD-14, causes release of pro-inflammatory cytokines recruiting neutrophils as a early innate immune response. Excessive pr...

  1. Preliminary Characterization of the Transcriptional Response of the Porcine Intestinal Cell Line IPEC-J2 to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli, and E. coli Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Geens, Marisa M.; Niewold, Theo A.

    2010-01-01

    IPEC-J2, a promising in vitro model system, is not well characterized especially on the transcriptional level, in contrast to human counterparts. The aim of this study was to characterize the gene expression in IPEC-J2 cells when coincubated with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), nonpathogenic E. coli, and E. coli endotoxin. Apical infection of polarized IPEC-J2 monolayers caused a time-dependent decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). Microarray analysis showed up-regulation of interleukins when IPEC-J2 were cocultured with E. coli strains this has so far never been measured in this cell line. Highest IL8 expression was found with the ETEC strain possessing the F4 fimbrium, suggesting IPEC-J2 cells to be F4 receptor positive, confirmed in a brush border membrane adhesion assay. It is concluded that the innate immune responses to pathogens and LPS makes the IPEC-J2 cell line a suitable model for research on intestinal host pathogen interaction. PMID:21318186

  2. Cytokine production by mononuclear cells following stimulation with a peptide-containing, endotoxin-free Escherichia coli extract.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, A; Loppnow, H

    1995-05-01

    The beneficial effects of the E. coli extract Colibiogen inj. N (Cb) observed in therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases, allergies, or gastrointestinal tumors are possibly mediated by the induction of cytokines in human leukocytes or vascular cells. Thus, the induction of the cytokines interleukin 1 (IL1), IL6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in human mononuclear cells (MNC) and vascular cells was investigated in vitro. Various administration forms of the extract (including Cb-inj. N, Cb-oral, and Cb-infantibus N) induced the release of IL1 and IL6 from MNC. The compounds stimulated TNF production less potently, possibly due to a lower sensitivity of the TNF assay system, as compared to the IL1 and IL6 detection system. The MNC produced the cytokines with a kinetics similar to that observed with other stimuli. Monospecific antibodies abolished the respective cytokine activity in the biological assays. Addition of submaximal amounts of endotoxin potently enhanced the IL1- and IL6-inducing activity of the bacterial extract, indicating synergism of the extract and endotoxin. These results provide evidence that cytokines produced by MNC following administration of the tested bacterial extract may contribute to the regulation of the immune response during therapy of gastrointestinal tumors. At present the in vivo production of cytokines following treatment with the bacterial extract tested is under investigation in a phase III study. PMID:7612070

  3. The effect of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide and Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha on ovarian function

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Erin J.; Sibley, Kelly; Miller, Aleisha N.; Lane, Elizabeth A.; Fishwick, John; Nash, Deborah M.; Herath, Shan; England, Gary CW; Dobson, Hilary; Sheldon, I. Martin

    2009-01-01

    Problem Pelvic inflammatory disease and metritis are important causes of infertility in humans and domestic animals. Uterine infection with Escherichia coli in cattle is associated with reduced ovarian follicle growth and decreased estradiol secretion. We hypothesized that this effect could be mediated by the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Method of study In vitro, bovine ovarian theca and granulosa cells were treated with LPS or TNFα and steroid secretion measured. In vivo, the effect of LPS or TNFα intrauterine infusion was determined by ovarian ultrasonography and measurement of hormones in cattle. Results LPS reduced granulosa cell estradiol secretion, whilst TNFα decreased theca and granulosa cell androstenedione and estradiol production, respectively. In vivo, fewer animals ovulated following intrauterine infusion with LPS or TNFα. Conclusion LPS and TNFα suppress ovarian cell function, supporting the concept that pelvic inflammatory disease and metritis are detrimental for bovine ovarian health. PMID:19238751

  4. Transforming Growth Factor Beta-Induced Is Essential for Endotoxin Tolerance Induced by a Low Dose of Lipopolysaccharide in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Sun, Hanxiao; Li, Xiuying; Ding, Qing; Wei, Pijin; Zhou, Jingguang

    2015-06-01

    Our prior study found that transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI) is an important negative regulator in TLR-induced inflammation. However, whether TGFBI may affect inflammation during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxin tolerance (ET) is still unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether TGFBI was involved in the mechanisms of ET in human through dampening nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) mediated pathway. ET models of isolated healthy volunteers peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were established by pretreating with a low dose of LPS to observe the changes of TGFBI expression during ET induction, compared with ten healthy controls. Moreover, a vector-based short hairpin RNA expression system was used to specifically inhibit TGFBI expression to further explore its role in ET induction. The expression was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. The responses to LPS were determined by the activation of NF-κB, the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and Nitric Oxide (NO), which were analysed by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). The results showed that TGFBI expression in the ET group obviously increased; ET also led to a hyporesponse of PBMCs to LPS with less activation of NF-κB, less production of TNF-α and NO, as well as more expression of TGFBI than those of non-ET group. Moreover, the inhibitory effect was partly refracted in plasmid TGFBI short hairpin RNA (pTGFBI-shRNA) transfected PBMCs. Meanwhile, the absence of TGFBI caused abnormal enhancement of inflammatory cytokine production and it was involved in ET induction through dampening NF-κB mediated pathway. Therefore, TGFBI may be a new target for the clinical treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:26546902

  5. Antiinflammatory effects of endotoxin. Inhibition of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocyte responses to complement (C5)-derived peptides in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, J. T.; Hartiala, K. T.; Webster, R. O.; Howes, E. L.; Goldstein, I. M.

    1983-01-01

    Although capable of provoking a variety of inflammatory effects, endotoxin (bacterial lipopolysaccharide) paradoxically has been reported to be antiinflammatory. The authors have found that single intravenous injections of Escherichia coli endotoxin, 24 hours before challenge, inhibit almost completely the vascular permeability changes and exudation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes induced in rabbit skin by reversed passive Arthus reactions. Whereas intravenous injections of endotoxin also caused modest inhibition of the vascular permeability changes induced in rabbit skin by the synthetic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), exudation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was unaffected. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes from rabbits given single injected doses of endotoxin exhibited markedly diminished chemotactic and degranulation responses to complement (C5)-derived peptides in vitro. Responses of these cells to FMLP, however, were normal. These data suggest that selective suppression of polymorphonuclear leukocyte responses to C5-derived peptides accounts, in part, for the antiinflammatory effects of endotoxin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6228151

  6. Bladder instillation of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide alters the muscle contractions in rat urinary bladder via a protein kinase C-related pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, T.I.; Chen, W.J.; Liu, S.H. . E-mail: shliu@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2005-10-15

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli is a common cause of urinary tract infection. We determined the effects of intravesical instillation of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) on muscle contractions, protein kinase C (PKC) translocation, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in rat urinary bladder. The contractions of the isolated rat detrusor muscle evoked by electrical field stimulations were measured short-term (1 h) or long-term (24 h) after intravesical instillation of LPS. One hour after LPS intravesical instillation, bladder PKC-{alpha} translocation from cytosolic fraction to membrane fraction and endothelial (e)NOS protein was elevated, and detrusor muscle contractions were significantly increased. PKC inhibitors chelerythrine and Ro32-0432 inhibited this LPS-enhanced contractile response. Application of PKC activator {beta}-phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate enhanced the muscle contractions. Three hours after intravesical instillation of LPS, iNOS mRNA was detected in the bladder. Immunoblotting study also demonstrated that the induction of iNOS proteins is detected in bladder in which LPS was instilled. 24 h after intravesical instillation of LPS, PKC-{alpha} translocation was impaired in the bladder; LPS did not affect PKC-{delta} translocation. Muscle contractions were also decreased 24 h after LPS intravesical instillation. Aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor, blocked the decrease in PKC-{alpha} translocation and detrusor contractions induced by LPS. These results indicate that there are different mechanisms involved in the alteration of urinary bladder contractions after short-term and long-term treatment of LPS; an iNOS-regulated PKC signaling may participate in causing the inhibition of muscle contractions in urinary bladder induced by long-term LPS treatment.

  7. Effects of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides on mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, F A; Richardson, G J; Michalek, S M

    1997-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte plays an important role in the regulation of microbe-induced inflammation, in part through its ability to secrete mediators, particularly cytokines, in response to microorganisms and their products. To evaluate the effects of the microbial flora associated with chronic adult periodontitis on cytokine induction, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis was used to stimulate naive and phorbol ester-primed U937 monocytic cells, as well as elutriated human peripheral blood monocytes. We assessed the effect of this LPS, in comparison to that of LPS from Escherichia coli, on cell proliferation, cytokine induction, and surface expression of the LPS receptor CD14. P. gingivalis LPS stimulated proliferation of U937 cells at concentrations of greater than 1 ng/ml, while E. coli LPS inhibited proliferation. Phorbol myristic acid (PMA)-treated U937 cells and elutriated monocytes responded to E. coli LPS activation by producing tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA and protein; however, P. gingivalis LPS induced greater numbers of TNF-alpha mRNA-positive cells and higher (P < 0.05) levels of protein than did E. coli LPS. Both cell types expressed interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) mRNA and protein in response to either LPS treatment. Compared with E. coli LPS, P. gingivalis LPS induced significantly (P < 0.05) higher numbers of IL-1 mRNA-positive U937 cells and elutriated monocytes, as well as production of significantly more (P < 0.05) IL-1 protein by the monocytes. The PMA-treated U937 cells and the monocytes produced high levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist mRNA and protein which were only marginally affected by the LPS preparations. While E. coli LPS induced expression of CD 14 on the surface of PMA-primed U937 cells and monocytes, P. gingivalis LPS exhibited a significantly (P < 0.05) greater ability to enhance receptor levels. Our results indicate that P. gingivalis LPS can activate the mononuclear phagocyte

  8. Nitric oxide production and energy state in the heart after endotoxin administration.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, R; Aramaki, T; Hirakawa, K; Asano, G

    1998-07-01

    To evaluate nitric oxide (NO) production and the energy state of the heart after endotoxin administration, Wistar rats were injected i.p. with 10 mg/kg Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin). Morphologic changes, plasma nitrite concentration, expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and cardiac energy state, as reflected by several metabolites, were observed chronologically 0 (control), 4, 6 and 8 h after endotoxin administration. Electrocardiography (ECG) demonstrated arrhythmia after endotoxin administration. Biochemically, NO production increased in blood and iNOS increased in the heart. The amount of myocardial beta-ATP measured by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) increased transiently and then decreased. This transient increase might be a hyperdynamic response to endotoxin administration. At 4 and 6 h after endotoxin administration, pH measured by 31P-MRS was slightly decreased, but this decline was not statistically significant. On the other hand, the amount of lactate in heart samples increased in the 1H magnetic resonance spectra (1H-MRS). Ultrastructurally, in cardiovascular tissue, intracytoplasmic organelles were observed to be injured in blood vessels and cardiomyocytes associated with mast cell infiltration. These results suggest significant metabolic and morphologic abnormalities in the heart after endotoxin administration. PMID:9707010

  9. Crystallization of R-form lipopolysaccharides from Salmonella minnesota and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, N; Ohta, M; Kido, N; Ito, H; Naito, S; Hasegawa, T; Watabe, T; Sasaki, K

    1990-01-01

    Salmonella minnesota Re and Ra lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) and Escherichia coli K-12 LPS formed three-dimensional crystals, either hexagonal plates (preferential growth along the a axis) or solid columns (preferential growth along the c axis), when they were precipitated by the addition of 2 volumes of 95% ethanol containing 375 mM MgCl2 and incubated in 70% ethanol containing 250 mM MgCl2 at 4 degrees C for 10 days. Analyses of crystals suggested that they consist of hexagonal lattices with the a axis (a side of the lozenge as a unit cell on the basal plane) of 0.462 nm for all these three kinds of LPSs and the c axes (perpendicular to the basal plane) of 5.85, 8.47, and 8.75 nm for S. minnesota Re and Ra LPSs and E. coli K-12 LPS, respectively, and that hydrocarbon chains of the lipid A portion play the leading part in crystallization, whereas the hydrophilic part of the lipid A (the disaccharide backbone) and R core exhibit a disordered structure or are in a random orientation. The phenomenon of doubling of the a axis to 0.924 nm was observed with crystals of S. minnesota Re LPS when they were incubated in 70% ethanol for an additional 180 days, but not with crystals of S. minnesota Ra LPS or E. coli K-12 LPS. S. minnesota S-form LPS possessing the O-antigen-specific polysaccharide and S. minnesota free lipid A obtained by acid hydrolysis of Re LPS did not crystallize under the same experimental conditions. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3A-3B FIG. 3C FIG. 4 PMID:2407725

  10. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with K1-encapsulated Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide are opsonic and protect mice against lethal challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, B M; Cross, A S; Futrovsky, S L; Sidberry, H F; Sadoff, J C

    1986-01-01

    Seven murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against O-side-chain determinants of the K1-encapsulated Bortolussi strain of Escherichia coli (O18:K1:H7) were evaluated for their in vitro and in vivo activities. All the MAbs reacted well in Western blots against E. coli O18 lipopolysaccharide antigens. Two MAbs of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) class promoted in vitro opsonophagocytosis and protected mice lethally challenged with bacteria. Two IgM MAbs showed partial protection, although they had no in vitro opsonic activity, and the remaining three IgM MAbs showed no apparent functional activities. Monoclonal IgG antibodies against bacterial lipopolysaccharide can be opsonic and protective in spite of the presence of the K1 capsule on the bacterium. Images PMID:3516883

  11. Early effects of Escherichia coli endotoxin infusion on vasopressin-stimulated breakdown and metabolism of inositol lipids in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez de Turco, E.B.; Spitzer, J.A.

    1988-08-30

    The turnover of vasopressin-stimulated 32P-phosphoinositides and 32P-phosphatidic acid and accumulation of (2-3H)-inositol phosphates were examined in hepatocytes from rats infused i.v. with saline and E. coli endotoxin for 3 hrs. Within 60s of VP stimulation the decrease in phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate labeling as well as the increased uptake of 32P into phosphatidic acid were similar in both groups. However, at a later time (300s) the 32P-phosphatidylinositol turnover was greatly decreased concomitantly with a higher labeling of phosphatidic acid. The accumulation of (2-3H)-inositol phosphates in ET-cells was significantly decreased both at 30s and 600s after VP addition. The distribution of (2-3H)-inositol labeling accumulated in the different inositol phosphate fractions over the first 30s of VP stimulation showed a tendency to lower accumulation of inositol trisphosphate, and a significantly lower accumulation of inositol bisphosphate simultaneously with a higher labeling of the inositol tetrakisphosphate fraction. These observations reflect an early effect of ET-infusion on VP-stimulated inositol lipid turnover and on the subsequent metabolism of the released inositol phosphates.

  12. Extraction, Purification and Characterization of Lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi

    PubMed Central

    Rezania, Simin; Amirmozaffari, Noor; Tabarraei, Bahman; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Zarei, Omid; Alizadeh, Reza; Masjedian, Faramarz; Zarnani, Amir Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an important structural component of the outer cell membrane complex of gram negative microorganisms. Its causative role in gram negative bacteria-induced diseases and broad applications in different kinds of cell stimulation experiments provided a conceptual basis for studies directed at the isolation, purification, and detailed chemical characterization of LPS. The main problem with LPS purification protocols is the contamination of the end product with nucleic acids and proteins in variable proportions which could potentially interfere with downstream applications. In this study, a simple procedure for purification of LPS from Escherichia coli (E.coli) and Salmonella typhi (S.typhi) with high purity and very low contaminating nucleic acids and proteins based on the hot phenol-water extraction protocol has been introduced. The purity of extracted LPS was evaluated by silver and coomassie blue staining of SDS-PAGE gels and HPLC analysis. Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) coagulation activity and rabbit pyrogen assay were exploited to monitor the functionality of purified LPS. The results showed that DNase and RNase treatment of the sample is essential after the sonication step to eliminate nucleic acid contamination in the LPS fraction. Silver staining demonstrated ladder pattern which is characteristic of LPS. No contaminating protein was found as assessed by coomassie blue staining. HPLC fractionation revealed high degree of purity comparable with commercial LPS. Parenteral administration of purified LPS resulted in substantial increase of rabbits’ body temperature (mean: 1.45°C). LAL coagulation assay confirmed the functional activity of the purified LPS. In conclusion, the protocol presented here could be employed for isolation of LPS with high purity and functional activity. PMID:23407691

  13. A mutant Escherichia coli that attaches peptidoglycan to lipopolysaccharide and displays cell wall on its surface

    PubMed Central

    Grabowicz, Marcin; Andres, Dorothee; Lebar, Matthew D; Malojčić, Goran; Kahne, Daniel; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) forms the surface-exposed leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, an organelle that shields the underlying peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall. Both LPS and PG are essential cell envelope components that are synthesized independently and assembled by dedicated transenvelope multiprotein complexes. We have identified a point-mutation in the gene for O-antigen ligase (WaaL) in Escherichia coli that causes LPS to be modified with PG subunits, intersecting these two pathways. Synthesis of the PG-modified LPS (LPS*) requires ready access to the small PG precursor pool but does not weaken cell wall integrity, challenging models of precursor sequestration at PG assembly machinery. LPS* is efficiently transported to the cell surface without impairing OM function. Because LPS* contains the canonical vancomycin binding site, these surface-exposed molecules confer increased vancomycin-resistance by functioning as molecular decoys that titrate the antibiotic away from its intracellular target. This unexpected LPS glycosylation fuses two potent pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05334.001 PMID:25551294

  14. Pharmacokinetics of florfenicol after intravenous administration in Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxaemic sheep.

    PubMed

    Pérez, R; Palma, C; Drápela, C; Sepulveda, M; Espinoza, A; Peñailillo, A K

    2015-04-01

    Experiments in different animal species have shown that febrile conditions, induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), may alter the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs. The objective was to study the effects of a LPS-induced acute-phase response (APR) model on plasma pharmacokinetics of florfenicol (FFC) after its intravenous administration in sheep. Six adult clinically healthy Suffolk Down sheep, 8 months old and 35.5 ± 2.2 kg in body weight (bw), were distributed through a crossover factorial 2 × 2 design, with 4 weeks of washout. Pairs of sheep similar in body weight were assigned to experimental groups: Group 1 (LPS) was treated with three intravenous doses of 1 μg/kg bw of E. coli LPS before FFC treatment. Group 2 (control) was treated with an equivalent volume of saline solution (SS) at similar intervals as LPS. At 24 h after the first injection of LPS or SS, an intravenous bolus of 20 mg/kg bw of FFC was administered. Blood samples (5 mL) were collected before drug administration and at different times between 0.05 and 48.0 h after treatment. FFC plasma concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography. A noncompartmental pharmacokinetic model was used for data analysis, and data were compared using a Mann-Whitney U-test. The mean values of AUC0-∞ in the endotoxaemic sheep (105.9 ± 14.3 μg·h/mL) were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than values observed in healthy sheep (78.4 ± 5.2 μg·h/mL). The total mean plasma clearance (CLT ) decreased from 257.7 ± 16.9 mL·h/kg in the control group to 198.2 ± 24.1 mL·h/kg in LPS-treated sheep. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in the terminal half-life was observed in the endotoxaemic sheep (16.9 ± 3.8 h) compared to the values observed in healthy sheep (10.4 ± 3.2 h). In conclusion, the APR induced by the intravenous administration of E. coli LPS in sheep produces higher plasma concentrations of FFC due to a decrease in the total body clearance of the

  15. Residual Endotoxin Contaminations in Recombinant Proteins Are Sufficient to Activate Human CD1c+ Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Harald; Schmittner, Maria; Duschl, Albert; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Many commercially available recombinant proteins are produced in Escherichia coli, and most suppliers guarantee contamination levels of less than 1 endotoxin unit (EU). When we analysed commercially available proteins for their endotoxin content, we found contamination levels in the same range as generally stated in the data sheets, but also some that were higher. To analyse whether these low levels of contamination have an effect on immune cells, we stimulated the monocytic cell line THP-1, primary human monocytes, in vitro differentiated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and primary human CD1c+ dendritic cells (DCs) with very low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; ranging from 0.002–2 ng/ml). We show that CD1c+ DCs especially can be activated by minimal amounts of LPS, equivalent to the levels of endotoxin contamination we detected in some commercially available proteins. Notably, the enhanced endotoxin sensitivity of CD1c+ DCs was closely correlated with high CD14 expression levels observed in CD1c+ DCs that had been maintained in cell culture medium for 24 hours. When working with cells that are particularly sensitive to LPS, even low endotoxin contamination may generate erroneous data. We therefore recommend that recombinant proteins be thoroughly screened for endotoxin contamination using the limulus amebocyte lysate test, fluorescence-based assays, or a luciferase based NF-κB reporter assay involving highly LPS-sensitive cells overexpressing TLR4, MD-2 and CD14. PMID:25478795

  16. Mammalian nitrate biosynthesis: mouse macrophages produce nitrite and nitrate in response to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Stuehr, D.J.; Marletta, M.A.

    1985-11-01

    Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitrate biosynthesis was studied in LPS-sensitive C3H/He and LPS-resistant C3H/HeJ mice. Intraperitoneal injection of 15 ..mu..g of LPS led to a temporary 5- to 6-fold increase in blood nitrate concentration in the C3H/He strain. Levels of nitrate excreted in the urine were also increased. In contrast, no increase was observed in the C3H/HeJ strain with LPS injections up to 175 ..mu..g. Furthermore, thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages from C3H/He, but not from C3H/HeJ mice, produced nitrite (60%) and nitrate (40%) when cultured with LPS (10 ..mu..g/ml). T-lymphocyte addition/depletion experiments showed the presence of T cells enhanced this response. However, LPS did not cause nitrite or nitrate production in cultures of spleen lymphocytes from either strain. LPS-induced nitrate synthesis was also observed with nude mice and CBA/N mice, indicating that neither functional T lymphocytes nor LPS-responsive B lymphocytes were required for the response in vivo. This was consistent with the in vitro results showing macrophages alone were competent. Mycobacterium bovis infection of C3H/He and C3H/HeJ mice resulted in a large increase in nitrate production over the course of the infection for both strains, suggesting T-lymphocyte-mediated activation of macrophages as a potent stimulus for nitrate biosynthesis. The synthesis of nitrite is significant in that it can directly participate in the endogenous formation of nitrosamines and may also be involved in some aspect of the chemistry of cytotoxicity.

  17. Mammalian nitrate biosynthesis: mouse macrophages produce nitrite and nitrate in response to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Stuehr, D J; Marletta, M A

    1985-01-01

    Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitrate biosynthesis was studied in LPS-sensitive C3H/He and LPS-resistant C3H/HeJ mice. Intraperitoneal injection of 15 micrograms of LPS led to a temporary 5- to 6-fold increase in blood nitrate concentration in the C3H/He strain. Levels of nitrate excreted in the urine were also increased. In contrast, no increase was observed in the C3H/HeJ strain with LPS injections up to 175 micrograms. Furthermore, thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages from C3H/He, but not from C3H/HeJ mice, produced nitrite (60%) and nitrate (40%) when cultured with LPS (10 micrograms/ml). T-lymphocyte addition/depletion experiments showed the presence of T cells enhanced this response. However, LPS did not cause nitrite or nitrate production in cultures of spleen lymphocytes from either strain. LPS-induced nitrate synthesis was also observed with nude mice and CBA/N mice, indicating that neither functional T lymphocytes nor LPS-responsive B lymphocytes were required for the response in vivo. This was consistent with the in vitro results showing macrophages alone were competent. Mycobacterium bovis infection of C3H/He and C3H/HeJ mice resulted in a large increase in nitrate production over the course of the infection for both strains, suggesting T-lymphocyte-mediated activation of macrophages as a potent stimulus for nitrate biosynthesis. The synthesis of nitrite is significant in that it can directly participate in the endogenous formation of nitrosamines and may also be involved in some aspect of the chemistry of cytotoxicity. PMID:3906650

  18. Metabolic and Hematological Consequences of Dietary Deoxynivalenol Interacting with Systemic Escherichia coli Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Bannert, Erik; Tesch, Tanja; Kluess, Jeannette; Frahm, Jana; Kersten, Susanne; Kahlert, Stefan; Renner, Lydia; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Dänicke, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that chronic oral deoxynivalenol (DON) exposure modulated Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammation, whereby the liver was suspected to play an important role. Thus, a total of 41 barrows was fed one of two maize-based diets, either a DON-diet (4.59 mg DON/kg feed, n = 19) or a control diet (CON, n = 22). Pigs were equipped with indwelling catheters for pre- or post-hepatic (portal vs. jugular catheter) infusion of either control (0.9% NaCl) or LPS (7.5 µg/kg BW) for 1h and frequent blood sampling. This design yielded six groups: CON_CONjugular-CONportal, CON_CONjugular-LPSportal, CON_LPSjugular-CONportal, DON_CONjugular-CONportal, DON_CONjugular-LPSportal and DON_LPSjugular-CONportal. Blood samples were analyzed for blood gases, electrolytes, glucose, pH, lactate and red hemogram. The red hemogram and electrolytes were not affected by DON and LPS. DON-feeding solely decreased portal glucose uptake (p < 0.05). LPS-decreased partial oxygen pressure (pO2) overall (p < 0.05), but reduced pCO2 only in arterial blood, and DON had no effect on either. Irrespective of catheter localization, LPS decreased pH and base-excess (p < 0.01), but increased lactate and anion-gap (p < 0.01), indicating an emerging lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis was more pronounced in the group DON_LPSjugular-CONportal than in CON-fed counterparts (p < 0.05). DON-feeding aggravated the porcine acid-base balance in response to a subsequent immunostimulus dependent on its exposure site (pre- or post-hepatic). PMID:26580654

  19. Extraction of cyanobacterial endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, John; Linke, Thomas A; Kapralos, Con; Nicholson, Brenton C; Steffensen, Dennis A

    2004-02-01

    To simplify our efforts in acquiring toxicological information on endotoxins produced by cyanobacteria, a method development study was undertaken to identify relatively hazard-free and efficient procedures for their extraction. One article sourced and two novel methods were evaluated for their ability to extract lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) or endotoxins from cyanobacteria. The Limulus polyphemus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) assay was employed to compare the performance of a novel method utilizing a 1-butanol-water (HBW) solvent system to that of Westphal's (1965) phenol-water system (HPW) for the extraction of endotoxin from various cyanobacteria. The traditional HPW method extracted from 3- to 12-fold more endotoxin from six different cyanobacterial blooms and culture materials than did the novel HBW method. In direct contrast, the novel HBW method extracted ninefold more endotoxin from a non-microcystin producing Microcystis aeruginosa culture as compared to the HPW method. A solvent system utilizing N,N'-dimethylformamide-water (HDW) was compared to both the HPW and HBW methods for the extraction of endotoxin from natural samples of Anabaena circinalis, Microcystis flos-aquae, and a 1:1 mixture of Microcystis aeruginosa/Microcystisflos-aquae. The LAL activities of these extracts showed that the novel HDW method extracted two- and threefold more endotoxin from the Anabaena sample that did the HBW and HPW methods, respectively. The HDW method also extracted approximately 1.5-fold more endotoxin from the Microcystis flos-aquae sample as compared to both the HBW and HPW methods. On the other hand, the HBW method extracted 2- and 14-fold more endotoxin from the Microcystis flos-aquae/Microcystis aeruginosa mixture than did the HPW and HDW methods, respectively. Results of this study demonstrate that significant disparities exist between the physicochemical properties of the cell wall constituents not only of different cyanobacterial species but also of different strains of

  20. Synthesis of the Tetrasaccharide Motif and Its Structural Analog Corresponding to the Lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli O75

    PubMed Central

    Sau, Abhijit; Misra, Anup Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Background Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli are mostly responsible for a diverse spectrum of invasive human and animal infections leading to the urinary tract infections. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides are responsible for their pathogenicity and their interactions with host immune responses. In spite of several breakthroughs in the development of therapeutics to combat urinary tract infections and related diseases, the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains is a serious concern. Lipopolysaccharides are attractive targets for the development of long-term therapeutic agents to eradicate the infections. Since the natural sources cannot provide the required amount of oligosaccharides, development of chemical synthetic strategies for their synthesis is relevant to gain access to a reservoir of oligosaccharides and their close analogs. Methodology Two tetrasaccharide derivatives were synthesized from a single disaccharide intermediate. β-d-mannoside moiety was prepared from β-d-glucoside moiety following oxidation–reduction methodology. A [2+2] stereoselective block glycosylation strategy has been adopted for the preparation of tetrasaccharide derivative. α-d-Glucosamine moiety was prepared from α-d-mannosidic moiety following triflate formation at C-2 and SN2 substitution. A one-pot iterative glycosylation exploiting the orthogonal property of thioglycoside was carried out during the synthesis of tetrasaccharide analog. Results Synthesis of the tetrasaccharide motif (1) and its structural analog (2) corresponding to the lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli O75 was successfully achieved in excellent yield. Most of the reactions are clean and high yielding. Both compounds 1 and 2 were synthesized as their 4-methoxyphenyl glycoside, which can act as a temporary anomeric protecting group for further use of these tetrasaccharides in the preparation of glycoconjugates. PMID:22662142

  1. Intratracheal Recombinant Surfactant Protein D Prevents Endotoxin Shock in the Newborn Preterm Lamb

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Machiko; Carter, Karen; Bishop, Kimberly; Yadav, Annuradha; Masterjohn, Elizabeth; Brondyk, William; Scheule, Ronald K.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: The susceptibility of neonates to pulmonary and systemic infection has been associated with the immaturity of both lung structure and the immune system. Surfactant protein (SP) D is a member of the collectin family of innate immune molecules that plays an important role in innate host defense of the lung. Objectives: We tested whether treatment with recombinant human SP-D influenced the response of the lung and systemic circulation to intratracheally administered Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides. Methods: After intratracheal lipopolysaccharide instillation, preterm newborn lambs were treated with surfactant and ventilated for 5 h. Measurement: Survival rate, physiologic lung function, lung and systemic inflammation, and endotoxin level in plasma were evaluated. Main Results: In control lambs, intratracheal lipopolysaccharides caused septic shock and death associated with increased endotoxin in plasma. In contrast, all lambs treated with recombinant human SP-D were physiologically stable and survived. Leakage of lipopolysaccharides from the lungs to the systemic circulation was prevented by intratracheal recombinant human SP-D. Recombinant human SP-D prevented systemic inflammation and decreased the expression of IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-6 in the spleen and liver. Likewise, recombinant human SP-D decreased IL-1β and IL-6 in the lung and IL-8 in the plasma. Recombinant human SP-D did not alter pulmonary mechanics following endotoxin exposure. Recombinant human SP-D was readily detected in the lung 5 h after intratracheal instillation. Conclusions: Intratracheal recombinant human SP-D prevented shock caused by endotoxin released from the lung during ventilation in the premature newborn. PMID:16556693

  2. Recent advances in biosensor based endotoxin detection.

    PubMed

    Das, A P; Kumar, P S; Swain, S

    2014-01-15

    Endotoxins also referred to as pyrogens are chemically lipopolysaccharides habitually found in food, environment and clinical products of bacterial origin and are unavoidable ubiquitous microbiological contaminants. Pernicious issues of its contamination result in high mortality and severe morbidities. Standard traditional techniques are slow and cumbersome, highlighting the pressing need for evoking agile endotoxin detection system. The early and prompt detection of endotoxin assumes prime importance in health care, pharmacological and biomedical sectors. The unparalleled recognition abilities of LAL biosensors perched with remarkable sensitivity, high stability and reproducibility have bestowed it with persistent reliability and their possible fabrication for commercial applicability. This review paper entails an overview of various trends in current techniques available and other possible alternatives in biosensor based endotoxin detection together with its classification, epidemiological aspects, thrust areas demanding endotoxin control, commercially available detection sensors and a revolutionary unprecedented approach narrating the influence of omics for endotoxin detection. PMID:23934306

  3. Distribution of lipopolysaccharide core types among avian pathogenic Escherichia coli in relation to the major phylogenetic groups.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, D R A; Wijewardana, T G; Gunawardena, G A; Poxton, I R

    2008-12-10

    Five distinct lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core types, namely R1-R4 and K12 have been identified in Escherichia coli. The aims of this study were to determine, primarily by means of PCR, the distribution of those oligosaccharide core types among avian pathogenic E. coli and their relationship to phylogenetic groups. To identify putative avian pathogenic E. coli, serum resistance and the presence of three virulence genes encoding temperature sensitive haemagglutinin (tsh), increased serum survival (iss) and colicin V (cvaC) were determined. Of the 143 clinical isolates examined 62% possessed the R1 core, 22% were R3, 13% were R4 and 3% were R2. Fifty commensal isolates consisted of 58% with R1 core, 38% with R3 core, 4% with R4 core, and none with R2. None of the isolates were of K12 core type. The distribution of core oligosaccharide types in clinical and commensal isolates were not statistically significant (P=0.51). Three genes, tsh, iss and cvaC were found in E. coli of all four core types. The genes tsh (P<0.001) and iss (P=0.03412) were significantly associated with the R4 core oligosaccharide type. The isolates containing R4 core type LPS were mainly confined to phylogenetic group D. The widespread R1 core type showed less ability to possess virulence genes and 83% were in the phylogenetic group A. Results of this study indicated that E. coli with R1, R2, R3 and R4 were important in causing infections in chickens and further, the E. coli with R4 core type were less common among commensals, possessed more virulence genes and were related to phylogenetic groups pathogenic for poultry. PMID:18597955

  4. Study of Bone Marrow and Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treatment of Escherichia coli Endotoxin-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qi; Zhu, Ying-gang; Monsel, Antoine; Gennai, Stephane; Lee, Travis; Xu, Fengyun

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be derived from multiple tissue sources. However, the optimal source of MSCs for cell-based therapy for acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. In the present experiments, we studied bone marrow (BM)-derived and embryonic stem cell-derived human MSC (ES-MSCs) as a therapeutic agent in Escherichia coli endotoxin-induced ALI in mice. We hypothesized that ES-MSCs would be more potent than BM-MSCs owing to its more primitive source of origin. ALI was induced by the intratracheal instillation of endotoxin at 4 mg/kg into 10–12-week-old C57BL/6 mice with or without BM-MSCs, ES-MSCs, or normal human lung fibroblasts as a cellular control. Compared with the endotoxin-injured mice at 48 hours, the administration of ES-MSCs provided results similar to those of BM-MSCs, significantly reducing the influx of white blood cells and neutrophils and decreasing the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the injured alveolus. BM-MSCs also reduced extravascular lung water, a measure of pulmonary edema, by 60% and the total protein levels, a measure of lung permeability, by 66%. However, surprisingly, ES-MSCs did not have these protective effects, which was partially explained by the increased secretion of matrix metallopeptidase 9 by ES-MSCs, an enzyme known to increase lung protein permeability. In conclusion, both BM-MSCs and ES-MSCs markedly decreased endotoxin-induced inflammation. However, ES-MSCs did not show any beneficial effect on reducing pulmonary edema and lung protein permeability compared with BM-MSCs, suggesting that not all MSCs behave in a similar fashion. Our results highlight the need perhaps for a disease-specific potency assay for MSCs. Significance To determine the optimal source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cell-based therapy for acute lung injury, bone marrow (BM)- and embryonic stem cell-derived human MSC (ES-MSCs) were compared as therapeutic agents

  5. The efficient removal of endotoxins from insulin using quaternized polyethyleneimine-coated porous zirconia.

    PubMed

    McNeff, C; Zhao, Q; Almlöf, E; Flickinger, M; Carr, P W

    1999-10-15

    The synthesis and use of a zirconia-based, alkali-stable strong anion-exchange stationary phase are described for the removal of pyrogenic lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from insulin. The strong anion-exchange material is produced by deposition of polyethyleneimine (PEI) onto porous zirconia particles, followed by cross-linking with a novel reagent, 1,2-bis-(2-iodoethoxy) ethane, and quaternization with iodomethane. Physical characterization of the chromatographic support shows that it has an ion-exchange capacity of 0.6 mmol/g, and 82% of the amine sites on the surface are in quaternized form. Isocratic elution of small benzoic acid derivatives shows good column efficiency. The two primary virtues of this material are its chemical stability under alkali conditions (up to pH 13) and its lower hydrophobicity compared to previously described alkali-stable PEI-coated zirconia supports cross-linked with 1,10-diiododecane. Using this new zirconia-based phase, a purification protocol is developed for the efficient removal of Escherichia coli 0111:B4 LPS from bovine insulin samples. An endotoxin clearance rate of up to 1.3 x 10(8) was attained. Endotoxin levels were reduced to less than 5 endotoxin units/ml even at initial contamination levels as high as 5.0 x 10(6) endotoxin units/ml. Furthermore, endotoxin adsorbed to the porous zirconia column may be easily removed (depyrogenated) using alkali for repeated purification cycles. PMID:10527514

  6. EFFECTS OF FISH OIL SUPPLEMENTATION ON PERFORMANCE AS WELL AS IMMUNOLOGICAL, ADRENAL, AND SOMATOTROPHIC RESPONSES OF WEANED PIGS AFTER ESCHERICHIA COLI LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE CHALLENGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seventy-two crossbred pigs (7.58 +/- 0.3 kg BW) weaned at 28 days of age were used to investigate the effects of fish oil supplementation on pig performance and immunological, adrenal, and somatotropic responses following Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in a 2 x 2 factorial desig...

  7. Relation Between Excreted Lipopolysaccharide Complexes and Surface Structures of a Lysine-Limited Culture of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Knox, K. W.; Vesk, Maret; Work, Elizabeth

    1966-01-01

    Knox, K. W. (Twyford Laboratories, London, England), Maret Vesk, and Elizabeth Work. Relation between excreted lipopolysaccharide complexes and surface structures of a lysine-limited culture of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 92:1206–1217. 1966.—The lysine-requiring mutant Escherichia coli 12408, when grown in 15 liters of defined medium containing a suboptimal amount of lysine, showed a biphasic type of growth. During a long stationary phase of 15 hr, there was a steady accumulation of diaminopimelic acid (DAP) and an antigenic complex of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoprotein; the accumulation continued unchanged until the end of the second growth phase. The rapid rate of DAP excretion suggested that it was the result of a derepressed state of a biosynthetic pathway. LPS excretion was such that the amount in the culture fluid was doubled during a period corresponding to the normal generation time for the organism; this suggested that the LPS-lipoprotein complex was a product of unbalanced growth. Surface defects were suggested by the action of lysozyme, which, in low concentrations (10 μg/ml), lysed the lysine-limited cells even in the absence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, but had no effect at 10 μg/ml on cells grown with adequate lysine. Electron microscopy of cells excreting the LPS complex showed them to be surrounded by a mass of stacked leaflets and globules, some of which were bounded by triple membranes. Sections showed no lysis but changes in cell surfaces; outer layers of the walls had numerous blebs whose outer membranes were sometimes continuous with the outer triple membrane of the wall. LPS-lipoprotein probably originates from these blebs. Images PMID:4959044

  8. Endotoxin hitchhiking on polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Donnell, Mason L; Lyon, Andrew J; Mormile, Melanie R; Barua, Sutapa

    2016-07-15

    The control of microbial infections is critical for the preparation of biological media including water to prevent lethal septic shock. Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. More than half a million patients suffer from sepsis every year. Both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria are responsible for septic infection by the most common organisms i.e., Escherichia coli and Pseuodomonas aeruginosa. The bacterial cell membrane releases negatively charged endotoxins upon death and enzymatic destruction, which stimulate antigenic response in humans to gram-negative infections. Several methods including distillation, ethylene oxide treatment, filtration and irradiation have been employed to remove endotoxins from contaminated samples, however, the reduction efficiency remains low, and presents a challenge. Polymer nanoparticles can be used to overcome the current inability to effectively sequester endotoxins from water. This process is termed endotoxin hitchhiking. The binding of endotoxin on polymer nanoparticles via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions offers efficient removal from water. However, the effect of polymer nanoparticles and its surface areas has not been investigated for removal of endotoxins. Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) polymer was tested for its ability to effectively bind and remove endotoxins from water. By employing a simple one-step phase separation technique, we were able to synthesize PCL nanoparticles of 398.3 ± 95.13 nm size and a polydispersity index of 0.2. PCL nanoparticles showed ∼78.8% endotoxin removal efficiency, the equivalent of 3.9 × 10(5) endotoxin units (EU) per ml. This is 8.34-fold more effective than that reported for commercially available membranes. Transmission electron microscopic images confirmed binding of multiple endotoxins to the nanoparticle surface. The concept of using nanoparticles may be applicable not only to eliminate gram-negative bacteria, but also for any gram

  9. Endotoxin hitchhiking on polymer nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnell, Mason L.; Lyon, Andrew J.; Mormile, Melanie R.; Barua, Sutapa

    2016-07-01

    The control of microbial infections is critical for the preparation of biological media including water to prevent lethal septic shock. Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. More than half a million patients suffer from sepsis every year. Both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria are responsible for septic infection by the most common organisms i.e., Escherichia coli and Pseuodomonas aeruginosa. The bacterial cell membrane releases negatively charged endotoxins upon death and enzymatic destruction, which stimulate antigenic response in humans to gram-negative infections. Several methods including distillation, ethylene oxide treatment, filtration and irradiation have been employed to remove endotoxins from contaminated samples, however, the reduction efficiency remains low, and presents a challenge. Polymer nanoparticles can be used to overcome the current inability to effectively sequester endotoxins from water. This process is termed endotoxin hitchhiking. The binding of endotoxin on polymer nanoparticles via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions offers efficient removal from water. However, the effect of polymer nanoparticles and its surface areas has not been investigated for removal of endotoxins. Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) polymer was tested for its ability to effectively bind and remove endotoxins from water. By employing a simple one-step phase separation technique, we were able to synthesize PCL nanoparticles of 398.3 ± 95.13 nm size and a polydispersity index of 0.2. PCL nanoparticles showed ∼78.8% endotoxin removal efficiency, the equivalent of 3.9 × 105 endotoxin units (EU) per ml. This is 8.34-fold more effective than that reported for commercially available membranes. Transmission electron microscopic images confirmed binding of multiple endotoxins to the nanoparticle surface. The concept of using nanoparticles may be applicable not only to eliminate gram-negative bacteria, but also for any gram

  10. ENDOTOXINS, ALGAE AND 'LIMULUS' AMOEBOCYTE LYSATE TEST IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to determine the distribution of algae and bacteria, and investigate sources of endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides) in drinking water. The field survey was performed on five drinking water systems located in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania ...

  11. The structural characterization of the O-polysaccharide antigen in the lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli serotype O118 and its relationship to the O-antigens of Salmonella enterica O47 and Escherichia coli serotype O151

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide produced by Escherichia coli O118:H16 (standard reference strain; NRCC 6613) contained an O-polysaccharide (O-PS) composed of D-galactose, 2-acetimidoylamino-2,6-dideoxy-L-galactose (L-FucNAm), 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose, ribitol, and phosphate (1:1...

  12. Isolation and Purification of Endotoxin by Hydrolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lehrer, Samuel; Nowotny, Alois

    1972-01-01

    Various commercial hydrolases were used in an attempt to degrade the endotoxic lipopolysaccharide macromolecule. Some inert components, such as peptides and nucleic acids, could be removed from endotoxin preparations. As a result, endotoxic activity, measured by pyrogenicity, Shwartzman reaction, and mouse lethality, was increased. The remarkable resistance of endotoxin to hydrolases led to the use of such enzymes for the liberation and purification of endotoxin from whole bacterial cells. PMID:4344633

  13. Endotoxin induced uncoupling of the somatotrophic axis in nursery pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin known to stimulate the innate immune response and stress axis in pigs. However, little is known about the effects of LPS on pig somatotrophic responses. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of an endotoxin challenge on weaned pig serum con...

  14. Thermographic variation of the udder of dairy ewes in early lactation and following an Escherichia coli endotoxin intramammary challenge in late lactation.

    PubMed

    Castro-Costa, A; Caja, G; Salama, A A K; Rovai, M; Flores, C; Aguiló, J

    2014-03-01

    A total of 83 lactating dairy ewes (Manchega, n=48; Lacaune, n=35) were used in 2 consecutive experiments for assessing the ability of infrared thermography (IRT) to detect intramammary infections (IMI) by measuring udder skin temperatures (UST). In experiment 1, ewes were milked twice daily and IRT pictures of the udder were taken before and after milking at 46 and 56d in milk (DIM). Milk yield was 1.46 ± 0.04 L/d, on average. Detection of IMI was done using standard bacterial culture by udder half at 15, 34, and 64 DIM. Twenty-two ewes were classified as having IMI in at least one udder half, the others being healthy (142 healthy and 24 IMI halves, respectively). Four IMI halves had clinical mastitis. No UST differences were detected by IMI and udder side, being 32.94 ± 0.04°C on average. Nevertheless, differences in UST were detected for breed (Lacaune - Manchega=0.35 ± 0.08°C), milking process moment (after - before=0.13 ± 0.11°C), and milking schedule (p.m. - a.m.=0.79 ± 0.07°C). The UST increased linearly with ambient temperature (r=0.88). In experiment 2, the UST response to an Escherichia coli O55:B5 endotoxin challenge (5 μg/udder half) was studied in 9 healthy Lacaune ewes milked once daily in late lactation (0.58 ± 0.03 L/d; 155 ± 26 DIM). Ewes were allocated into 3 balanced groups of 3 ewes to which treatments were applied by udder half after milking. Treatments were (1) control (C00, both udder halves untreated), (2) half udder treated (T10 and C01, one udder half infused with endotoxin and the other untreated, respectively), and (3) treated udder halves (T11, both udder halves infused with endotoxin). Body (vaginal) temperature and UST, milk yield, and milk composition changes were monitored by udder half at different time intervals (2 to 72 h). First local and systemic signs of IMI were observed at 4 and 6h postchallenge, respectively. For all treatments, UST increased after the challenge, peaking at 6h in T 0055 (which differed from that

  15. Effect of endotoxin administration in pregnant camels

    PubMed Central

    AL-Dughaym, A.M.; Homeida, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Intravenous administration of Escherichia coli endotoxin at a dose of 0.05 μg/kg bodyweight to pregnant camels resulted in abortion. The injection of endotoxin caused significant increases in the plasma concentration of 13,14-dihydro-15-prostaglandin F2α, the metabolite of prostaglandin F2α (PG F2α) and cortisol and a significant decrease in the concentration of progesterone. It is suggested that endotoxin caused abortion in camels was a consequence of endotoxin induced PG F2α secretion resulting in luteal regression and decreased progesterone concentration. PMID:23961064

  16. Antagonism of airway tolerance by endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide through promoting OX40L and suppressing antigen-specific Foxp3+ T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wei; So, Takanori; Croft, Michael

    2008-12-15

    Respiratory exposure to allergens can lead to airway tolerance. Factors that antagonize tolerance mechanisms in the lung might result in susceptibility to diseases such as asthma. We show that inhalation of endotoxin/LPS with Ag prevented airway tolerance and abolished protection from T cell-driven asthmatic lung inflammation. Under conditions leading to tolerance, adaptive Ag-specific CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells (Treg) were generated following exposure to intranasal Ag and outnumbered IL-4- and IFN-gamma-producing CD4 T cells by 100:1 or greater. Inhaled LPS altered the ratio of Treg to IL-4(+) or IFN-gamma(+) T cells by concomitantly suppressing Treg generation and promoting effector T cell generation. LPS induced OX40L expression on dendritic cells and B cells that resulted in a synergistic activity between TLR4 and OX40 signals, leading to production of IL-4, IFN-gamma, and IL-6, which blocked Treg development. Furthermore, inhibiting OX40/OX40L interactions prevented LPS from suppressing tolerance, and resulted in the generation of greater numbers of adaptive Treg. Thus, cooperation between TLR4 and OX40 controls susceptibility to developing airway disease via modulating the balance between adaptive Treg and IL-4(+) or IFN-gamma(+) T cells. Targeting OX40L then has the potential to improve the efficacy of Ag immunotherapy to promote tolerance. PMID:19050285

  17. Bacterial invasion augments epithelial cytokine responses to Escherichia coli through a lipopolysaccharide-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schilling, J D; Mulvey, M A; Vincent, C D; Lorenz, R G; Hultgren, S J

    2001-01-15

    One mechanism of initiating innate host defenses against uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the production of cytokines by bladder epithelial cells; however, the means by which these cells recognize bacterial pathogens is poorly understood. Type 1 pili, expressed by the majority of UPEC, have been shown to have a critical role in inducing the expression of IL-6 in bladder epithelial cells after exposure to E. coli. In this study, we demonstrate that type 1 pili are not sufficient to activate IL-6 production by bladder epithelial cells. Instead, it was shown that bacterial invasion mediated by type 1 pili augments bladder epithelial responses to E. coli via an LPS-dependent mechanism, leading to the production of IL-6. RNA transcripts for the LPSR Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was detected in cultured bladder epithelial cells. The in vivo role of TLR4 was assessed using C3H/HeJ mice, which express a dominant negative form of TLR4. After infection with UPEC, C3H/HeJ mice have large foci of intracellular bacteria that persist within the bladder epithelium in the absence of any notable inflammatory response. These results indicate that LPS is required for bacterial invasion to enhance host responses to E. coli within the bladder. PMID:11145696

  18. Mediated effect of endotoxin and lead upon hepatic metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Kuttner, R.E.; Ebata, T.; Schumer, W.

    1984-10-01

    A test was made of the possibility that gram-negative bacterial cell wall lipopolysaccharides acted directly on key glucoregulatory enzymes in rat liver cytosol to cause the characteristic hypoglycemia of severe endotoxemia. Fasted male rats were sensitized to endotoxin by the simultaneous intravenous injection of lead acetate. The minimum systemic dosage of endotoxin necessary to perturb the normal pattern of hepatic glycolytic intermediates was determined by serial testing with diminishing dosages of endotoxin. The hepatocyte concentration of endotoxin was then calculated from this minimum dosage by use of literature data on the fraction of endotoxin delivered to liver cells after a systemic intravenous injection of radiochromium labeled lipopolysaccharides. Accepting a molecular weight of 118,000 daltons for the smallest endotoxin monomer capable of evoking a physiologic response, the molar amount of endotoxin present in 1 gram of hepatocytes was readily calculated. The concentration of glucoregulatory enzymes in parenchymal cells was then estimated from other literature sources. It was found that the amount of endotoxin in the hepatocytes was insufficient to combine directly with even 1 per cent of the quantity of a single key glucoregulatory enzyme in liver parenchyma. Since a one to one stoichiometric reaction between endotoxin and enzyme could not occur in the liver cytosol, a direct interaction mechanism between agonist and biocatalyst can be ruled out. It is concluded that bacterial endotoxin must act on hepatic glucoregulation by an indirect mechanism presumably based upon the release and operation of mediators.

  19. Intravenous Endotoxin Challenge in Healthy Humans: An Experimental Platform to Investigate and Modulate Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, James N.; Segre, Elisabetta; De Maeyer, Roel P.H.; Maini, Alexander A.N.; Gilroy, Derek W.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways represents a central mechanism in multiple disease states both acute and chronic. Triggered via either pathogen or tissue damage-associated molecular motifs, common biochemical pathways lead to conserved yet variable physiological and immunological alterations. Dissection and delineation of the determinants and mechanisms underlying phenotypic variance in response is expected to yield novel therapeutic advances. Intravenous (IV) administration of endotoxin (gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide), a specific Toll-like receptor 4 agonist, represents an in vivo model of systemic inflammation in man. National Institutes for Health Clinical Center Reference Endotoxin (CCRE, Escherichia coli O:113:H10:K negative) is employed to reliably and reproducibly generate vascular, hematological, endocrine, immunological and organ-specific functional effects that parallel, to varying degrees, those seen in the early stages of pathological states. Alteration of dose (0.06 - 4 ng/kg) and time-scale of exposure (bolus vs. infusion) allows replication of either acute or chronic inflammation and a range of severity to be elicited, with higher doses (2 - 4 ng/kg) frequently being used to create a 'sepsis-like' state. Established and novel medicinal compounds may additionally be administered prior to or post endotoxin exposure to appreciate their effect on the inflammatory cascade. Despite limitations in scope and generalizability, human IV endotoxin challenge offers a unique platform to gain mechanistic insights into inducible physiological responses and inflammatory pathways. Rationally employed it may aid translation of this knowledge into therapeutic innovations. PMID:27213711

  20. Intravenous Endotoxin Challenge in Healthy Humans: An Experimental Platform to Investigate and Modulate Systemic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, James N; Segre, Elisabetta; De Maeyer, Roel P H; Maini, Alexander A N; Gilroy, Derek W

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways represents a central mechanism in multiple disease states both acute and chronic. Triggered via either pathogen or tissue damage-associated molecular motifs, common biochemical pathways lead to conserved yet variable physiological and immunological alterations. Dissection and delineation of the determinants and mechanisms underlying phenotypic variance in response is expected to yield novel therapeutic advances. Intravenous (IV) administration of endotoxin (gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide), a specific Toll-like receptor 4 agonist, represents an in vivo model of systemic inflammation in man. National Institutes for Health Clinical Center Reference Endotoxin (CCRE, Escherichia coli O:113:H10:K negative) is employed to reliably and reproducibly generate vascular, hematological, endocrine, immunological and organ-specific functional effects that parallel, to varying degrees, those seen in the early stages of pathological states. Alteration of dose (0.06 - 4 ng/kg) and time-scale of exposure (bolus vs. infusion) allows replication of either acute or chronic inflammation and a range of severity to be elicited, with higher doses (2 - 4 ng/kg) frequently being used to create a 'sepsis-like' state. Established and novel medicinal compounds may additionally be administered prior to or post endotoxin exposure to appreciate their effect on the inflammatory cascade. Despite limitations in scope and generalizability, human IV endotoxin challenge offers a unique platform to gain mechanistic insights into inducible physiological responses and inflammatory pathways. Rationally employed it may aid translation of this knowledge into therapeutic innovations. PMID:27213711

  1. Lipopolysaccharide interaction is decisive for the activity of the antimicrobial peptide NK-2 against Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Malte U; Brauser, Annemarie; Olak, Claudia; Brezesinski, Gerald; Goldmann, Torsten; Gutsmann, Thomas; Andrä, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    Phosphatidylglycerol is a widely used mimetic to study the effects of AMPs (antimicrobial peptides) on the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. However, the antibacterial activities of novel NK-2-derived AMPs could not be sufficiently explained by using this simple model system. Since the LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-containing outer membrane is the first barrier of Gram-negative bacteria, in the present study we investigated interactions of NK-2 and a shortened variant with viable Escherichia coli WBB01 and Proteus mirabilis R45, and with model membranes composed of LPS isolated from these two strains. Differences in net charge and charge distribution of the two LPS have been proposed to be responsible for the differential sensitivity of the respective bacteria to other AMPs. As imaged by TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and AFM (atomic force microscopy), NK-2-mediated killing of these bacteria was corroborated by structural alterations of the outer and inner membranes, the release of E. coli cytoplasma, and the formation of unique fibrous structures inside P. mirabilis, suggesting distinct and novel intracellular targets. NK-2 bound to and intercalated into LPS bilayers, and eventually induced the formation of transient heterogeneous lesions in planar lipid bilayers. However, the discriminative activity of NK-2 against the two bacterial strains was independent of membrane intercalation and lesion formation, which both were indistinguishable for the two LPS. Instead, differences in activity originated from the LPS-binding step, which could be demonstrated by NK-2 attachment to intact bacteria, and to solid-supported LPS bilayers on a surface acoustic wave biosensor. PMID:20187872

  2. Purification and characterization of lipopolysaccharides from six strains of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stromberg, Loreen R; Stromberg, Zachary R; Banisadr, Afsheen; Graves, Steven W; Moxley, Rodney A; Mukundan, Harshini

    2015-09-01

    Certain Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are virulent human pathogens that are most often acquired through contaminated food. The United States Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service has declared several serogroups of STEC as adulterants in non-intact raw beef products. Hence, sensitive and specific tests for the detection of these STEC are a necessity for implementation in food safety programs. E. coli serogroups are identified by their respective O-antigen moiety on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) macromolecule. We propose that the development of O-antigen-specific immunological assays can facilitate simple and rapid discriminatory detection of STEC in beef. However, the resources (antigens and antibodies) required for such development are not readily available. To overcome this, we extracted and characterized LPS and O-antigen from six STEC strains. Using hot phenol extraction, we isolated the LPS component from each strain and purified it using a series of steps to eliminate proteins, nucleic acids, and lipid A antigens. Antigens and crude LPS extracts were characterized using gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and modified Western blotting with commercially available antibodies, thus assessing the serogroup specificity and sensitivity of available ligands as well. The results indicate that, while many commercially available antibodies bind LPS, their activities and specificities are highly variable, and often not as specific as those required for serogroup discrimination. This variability could be minimized by the production of antibodies specific for the O-antigen. Additionally, the antigens generated from this study provide a source of characterized LPS and O-antigen standards for six serogroups of STEC. PMID:26093258

  3. Inhibition of endotoxin-induced interleukin-6 production by synthetic lipid A partial structures in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M H; Flad, H D; Feist, W; Brade, H; Kusumoto, S; Rietschel, E T; Ulmer, A J

    1991-01-01

    The effect of two synthetic lipid A partial structures, compound 406 (or LA-14-PP, identical in structure to the lipid A precursor, known as Ia or IVa) and compound 401 (lipid X), on the in vitro modulation of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide)-induced interleukin-6 production by human blood mononuclear cells was investigated. Lipopolysaccharide of Salmonella abortus equi and synthetic Escherichia coli-type lipid A (compound 506, or LA-15-PP) had potent interleukin-6-inducing capacities. The maximum release of interleukin-6 was found after stimulation with 1 to 10 ng of lipopolysaccharide or 10 to 100 ng of synthetic E. coli-type lipid A per ml. Both synthetic lipid A partial structures (compounds 406 and 401) failed to induce interleukin-6 release. However, they inhibited lipopolysaccharide- or lipid A-induced interleukin-6 production in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition was found not only in mononuclear cells but also in purified monocytes and was not due to a shift in the kinetics of cytokine production. Suppression was manifested in the early stage of interleukin-6 production. Inhibition was also found in the presence of recombinant gamma interferon, indicating that compound 406 and recombinant gamma interferon act in different, independent pathways. Our data, therefore, indicate that the inhibition of interleukin-6 production by lipid A partial structures may help elucidate the mechanism of interaction of the lipid A component of lipopolysaccharide with immune cells in the inflammatory reaction during gram-negative infection. PMID:1937825

  4. Endotoxin removal by radio frequency gas plasma (glow discharge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Angela

    2011-12-01

    Contaminants remaining on implantable medical devices, even following sterilization, include dangerous fever-causing residues of the outer lipopolysaccharide-rich membranes of Gram-negative bacteria such as the common gut microorganism E. coli. The conventional method for endotoxin removal is by Food & Drug Administration (FDA)-recommended dry-heat depyrogenation at 250°C for at least 45 minutes, an excessively time-consuming high-temperature technique not suitable for low-melting or heat-distortable biomaterials. This investigation evaluated the mechanism by which E. coli endotoxin contamination can be eliminated from surfaces during ambient temperature single 3-minute to cumulative 15-minute exposures to radio-frequency glow discharge (RFGD)-generated residual room air plasmas activated at 0.1-0.2 torr in a 35MHz electrodeless chamber. The main analytical technique for retained pyrogenic bio-activity was the Kinetic Chromogenic Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) Assay, sufficiently sensitive to document compliance with FDA-required Endotoxin Unit (EU) titers less than 20 EU per medical device by optical detection of enzymatic color development corresponding to < 0.5 EU/ml in sterile water extracts of each device. The main analytical technique for identification of chemical compositions, amounts, and changes during sequential reference Endotoxin additions and subsequent RFGD-treatment removals from infrared (IR)-transparent germanium (Ge) prisms was Multiple Attenuated Internal Reflection (MAIR) infrared spectroscopy sensitive to even monolayer amounts of retained bio-contaminant. KimaxRTM 60 mm x 15 mm and 50mm x 15mm laboratory glass dishes and germanium internal reflection prisms were inoculated with E. coli bacterial endotoxin water suspensions at increments of 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, and 5 EU, and characterized by MAIR-IR spectroscopy of the dried residues on the Ge prisms and LAL Assay of sterile water extracts from both glass and Ge specimens. The Ge prism MAIR

  5. Effect of Polysaccharides from Acanthopanax senticosus on Intestinal Mucosal Barrier of Escherichia coli Lipopolysaccharide Challenged Mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Xu, Yunhe; Yang, Di; Yu, Ning; Bai, Zishan; Bian, Lianquan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of polysaccharide from Acanthopanax senticosus (ASPS) in preventing lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal injury, 18 mice (at 5 wk of age) were assigned to three groups with 6 replicates of one mouse each. Mice were administrated by oral gavage with or without ASPS (300 mg/kg body weight) for 14 days and were injected with saline or LPS at 15 days. Intestinal samples were collected at 4 h post-challenge. The results showed that ASPS ameliorated LPS-induced deterioration of digestive ability of LPS-challenged mice, indicated by an increase in intestinal lactase activity (45%, p<0.05), and the intestinal morphology, as proved by improved villus height (20.84%, p<0.05) and villus height:crypt depth ratio (42%, p<0.05), and lower crypt depth in jejunum (15.55%, p<0.05), as well as enhanced intestinal tight junction proteins expression involving occludin-1 (71.43%, p<0.05). ASPS also prevented intestinal inflammation response, supported by decrease in intestinal inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor α (22.28%, p<0.05) and heat shock protein (HSP70) (77.42%, p<0.05). In addition, intestinal mucus layers were also improved by ASPS, as indicated by the increase in number of goblet cells (24.89%, p<0.05) and intestinal trefoil peptide (17.75%, p<0.05). Finally, ASPS facilitated mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor (100%, p<0.05) and its receptor (200%, p<0.05) gene. These results indicate that ASPS can prevent intestinal mucosal barrier injury under inflammatory conditions, which may be associated with up-regulating gene mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor and its receptor. PMID:26732337

  6. Effect of Polysaccharides from Acanthopanax senticosus on Intestinal Mucosal Barrier of Escherichia coli Lipopolysaccharide Challenged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jie; Xu, Yunhe; Yang, Di; Yu, Ning; Bai, Zishan; Bian, Lianquan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of polysaccharide from Acanthopanax senticosus (ASPS) in preventing lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal injury, 18 mice (at 5 wk of age) were assigned to three groups with 6 replicates of one mouse each. Mice were administrated by oral gavage with or without ASPS (300 mg/kg body weight) for 14 days and were injected with saline or LPS at 15 days. Intestinal samples were collected at 4 h post-challenge. The results showed that ASPS ameliorated LPS-induced deterioration of digestive ability of LPS-challenged mice, indicated by an increase in intestinal lactase activity (45%, p<0.05), and the intestinal morphology, as proved by improved villus height (20.84%, p<0.05) and villus height:crypt depth ratio (42%, p<0.05), and lower crypt depth in jejunum (15.55%, p<0.05), as well as enhanced intestinal tight junction proteins expression involving occludin-1 (71.43%, p<0.05). ASPS also prevented intestinal inflammation response, supported by decrease in intestinal inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor α (22.28%, p<0.05) and heat shock protein (HSP70) (77.42%, p<0.05). In addition, intestinal mucus layers were also improved by ASPS, as indicated by the increase in number of goblet cells (24.89%, p<0.05) and intestinal trefoil peptide (17.75%, p<0.05). Finally, ASPS facilitated mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor (100%, p<0.05) and its receptor (200%, p<0.05) gene. These results indicate that ASPS can prevent intestinal mucosal barrier injury under inflammatory conditions, which may be associated with up-regulating gene mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor and its receptor. PMID:26732337

  7. A comparison of the endotoxin biosynthesis and protein oxidation pathways in the biogenesis of the outer membrane of Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Piek, Susannah; Kahler, Charlene M.

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope consists of an inner membrane (IM) that surrounds the cytoplasm and an asymmetrical outer-membrane (OM) that forms a protective barrier to the external environment. The OM consists of lipopolysaccahride (LPS), phospholipids, outer membrane proteins (OMPs), and lipoproteins. Oxidative protein folding mediated by periplasmic oxidoreductases is required for the biogenesis of the protein components, mainly constituents of virulence determinants such as pili, flagella, and toxins, of the Gram-negative OM. Recently, periplasmic oxidoreductases have been implicated in LPS biogenesis of Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis. Differences in OM biogenesis, in particular the transport pathways for endotoxin to the OM, the composition and role of the protein oxidation, and isomerization pathways and the regulatory networks that control them have been found in these two Gram-negative species suggesting that although form and function of the OM is conserved, the pathways required for the biosynthesis of the OM and the regulatory circuits that control them have evolved to suit the lifestyle of each organism. PMID:23267440

  8. Salt-inducible kinase 3 deficiency exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxin shock accompanied by increased levels of pro-inflammatory molecules in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanosaka, Masato; Fujimoto, Minoru; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Nagatake, Takahiro; Itoh, Yumi; Kagawa, Mai; Kumagai, Ayako; Fuchino, Hiroyuki; Kunisawa, Jun; Naka, Tetsuji; Takemori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in the innate immune system during infection and systemic inflammation. When bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binds to Toll-like receptor 4 on macrophages, several signalling cascades co-operatively up-regulate gene expression of inflammatory molecules. The present study aimed to examine whether salt-inducible kinase [SIK, a member of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family] could contribute to the regulation of immune signal not only in cultured macrophages, but also in vivo. LPS up-regulated SIK3 expression in murine RAW264.7 macrophages and exogenously over-expressed SIK3 negatively regulated the expression of inflammatory molecules [interleukin-6 (IL-6), nitric oxide (NO) and IL-12p40] in RAW264.7 macrophages. Conversely, these inflammatory molecule levels were up-regulated in SIK3-deficient thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages (TEPM), despite no impairment of the classical signalling cascades. Forced expression of SIK3 in SIK3-deficient TEPM suppressed the levels of the above-mentioned inflammatory molecules. LPS injection (10 mg/kg) led to the death of all SIK3-knockout (KO) mice within 48 hr after treatment, whereas only one mouse died in the SIK1-KO (n = 8), SIK2-KO (n = 9) and wild-type (n = 8 or 9) groups. In addition, SIK3-KO bone marrow transplantation increased LPS sensitivity of the recipient wild-type mice, which was accompanied by an increased level of circulating IL-6. These results suggest that SIK3 is a unique negative regulator that suppresses inflammatory molecule gene expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages. PMID:25619259

  9. Interaction of antimicrobial peptide temporin L with lipopolysaccharide in vitro and in experimental rat models of septic shock caused by gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Mocchegiani, Federico; Orlando, Fiorenza; Silvestri, Carmela; Bozzi, Argante; Di Giulio, Antonio; Luzi, Carla; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Barra, Donatella; Saba, Vittorio; Scalise, Giorgio; Rinaldi, Andrea C

    2006-07-01

    Sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients, despite intense efforts to improve survival. The primary lead for septic shock results from activation of host effector cells by endotoxin, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) associated with cell membranes of gram-negative bacteria. For these reasons, the quest for compounds with antiendotoxin properties is actively pursued. We investigated the efficacy of the amphibian skin antimicrobial peptide temporin L in binding Escherichia coli LPS in vitro and counteracting its effects in vivo. Temporin L strongly bound to purified E. coli LPS and lipid A in vitro, as proven by fluorescent displacement assay, and readily penetrated into E. coli LPS monolayers. Furthermore, the killing activity of temporin L against E. coli was progressively inhibited by increasing concentrations of LPS added to the medium, further confirming the peptide's affinity for endotoxin. Antimicrobial assays showed that temporin L interacted synergistically with the clinically used beta-lactam antibiotics piperacillin and imipenem. Therefore, we characterized the activity of temporin L when combined with imipenem and piperacillin in the prevention of lethality in two rat models of septic shock, measuring bacterial growth in blood and intra-abdominal fluid, endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations in plasma, and lethality. With respect to controls and single-drug treatments, the simultaneous administration of temporin L and beta-lactams produced the highest antimicrobial activities and the strongest reduction in plasma endotoxin and TNF-alpha levels, resulting in the highest survival rates. PMID:16801429

  10. Advances and needs for endotoxin-free production strains.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Seiichi; Ooi, Toshihiko; Mizuno, Kouhei; Matsusaki, Hiromi

    2015-11-01

    The choice of an appropriate microbial host cell and suitable production conditions is crucial for the downstream processing of pharmaceutical- and food-grade products. Although Escherichia coli serves as a highly valuable leading platform for the production of value-added products, like most Gram-negative bacteria, this bacterium contains a potent immunostimulatory lipopolysaccharide (LPS), referred to as an endotoxin. In contrast, Gram-positive bacteria, notably Bacillus, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Corynebacterium, and yeasts have been extensively used as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) endotoxin-free platforms for the production of a variety of products. This review summarizes the currently available knowledge on the utilization of these representative Gram-positive bacteria for the production of eco- and bio-friendly products, particularly natural polyesters, polyhydroxyalkanoates, bacteriocins, and membrane proteins. The successful case studies presented here serve to inspire the use of these microorganisms as a main-player or by-player depending on their individual properties for the industrial production of these desirable targets. PMID:26362682

  11. Impact of endotoxin challenge in obese pigs.

    PubMed

    Duburcq, Thibault; Hubert, Thomas; Saint-Léger, Pierre; Mangalaboyi, Jacques; Favory, Raphael; Gmyr, Valery; Quintane, Laurence; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Tournoys, Antoine; Pattou, François; Jourdain, Mercé

    2014-06-01

    Studies exploring the influence of obesity on septic shock remain limited and controversial. Pigs were chosen as a clinically relevant species, resembling to humans in various functions. We hypothesize obesity may impair porcine acute endotoxic shock. Four groups of five "Yucatan" minipigs were studied: lean and obese control groups, lean lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group receiving Escherichia coli endotoxin (LPS) and obese LPS group receiving the same endotoxin dose. We measured hemodynamic and oxygenation parameters, skin microvascular blood flow at rest and during reactive hyperemia, von Willebrand factor, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6. All measurements were performed at baseline and at 30, 60, 90, 150, and 300 min. Results were given as median with 25th to 75th interquartile range. Control groups remained stable during the study period. In LPS groups, administration of endotoxin resulted in a typical hypokinetic shock. In obese LPS group at 300 min, we observed a significant impairment of cardiac index (1.2 [1.06-1.45] vs. 1.7 [1.57-1.97] L/min per m, P = 0.008) compared with the lean LPS group; moreover, pulmonary hypertension (mean arterial pressure: 42 [39-47] vs. 32 [28-34] mmHg, P = 0.008), hypoxemia (partial pressure of oxygen: 216 [178-262] vs. 325 [285-414] mmHg, P = 0.02), and lactate levels (5.8 [4.2-6.8] vs. 3.9 [2.2-5.5] mmol/L, P = 0.04) were significantly higher compared with the lean LPS group. Throughout the study, rest flow and peak flow during reactive hyperemia were more decreased in the obese LPS group. Compared with the lean LPS group, tumor necrosis factor α levels at 60 min (269 [178-428] vs. 126 [105-166] ng/mL, P = 0.03) and interleukin 6 levels at 300 min (101 [61-142] vs. 52 [36-64] ng/mL, P = 0.03) were significantly higher in the obese LPS group. In our model of endotoxic shock, obese pigs developed a more severe hemodynamic failure with pronounced microcirculatory dysfunction and proinflammatory response. PMID:24569508

  12. Lipid X ameliorates pulmonary hypertension and protects sheep from death due to endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Golenbock, D T; Will, J A; Raetz, C R; Proctor, R A

    1987-01-01

    Lipid X (2,3-diacylglucosamine-1-phosphate) is a novel monosaccharide precursor of lipid A that has some of the physiologic activities of endotoxin but little toxicity. To determine whether lipid X would interfere with the toxic effects of endotoxin, we pretreated sheep with either 100 or 200 micrograms of lipid X per kg of body weight and then challenged them with a potentially fatal dose of Escherichia coli endotoxin (20 micrograms/kg). Twenty-one sheep underwent pulmonary artery catheterization and were monitored for changes in pulmonary artery pressure, temperature, pH, partial O2 pressure, partial CO2 pressure, blood pressure, and cell counts over 7 h. Overall mortality for control animals was 37% versus 5.3% for pretreated animals. None of the 13 animals pretreated with 100 micrograms of lipid X per kg died. These differences in survival were significant (P less than 0.05). Animals pretreated with 100 micrograms of lipid X per kg had significantly lower pulmonary artery pressure during both phases 1 and 2 of endotoxin-induced pulmonary artery hypertension. A higher dose of lipid X, 200 micrograms/kg, produced pulmonary hypertension. Perhaps because lipid X is a subunit of lipid A, lipid X shows a partial pyrogenic effect while also decreasing the pyrogenic activity of complete lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Lipid X did not prevent endotoxin-induced neutropenia or moderate hypotension in response to LPS. Lipid X is a potential prototype compound for a new type of chemotherapy directed at blocking the harmful effects of LPS during bacterial septicemia. PMID:3308707

  13. The acute phase response induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide modifies the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of florfenicol in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Pérez, R; Palma, C; Burgos, R; Jeldres, J A; Espinoza, A; Peñailillo, A K

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute phase response (APR) on the pharmaco-kinetics and biotransformation of florfenicol (FFC) in rabbits. Six rabbits (3.0 ± 0.08 kg body weight (bw)) were distributed through a crossover design with 4 weeks of washout period. Pairs of rabbits similar in bw and sex were assigned to experimental groups: Group 1 (LPS) was treated with three intravenous doses of 1 μg/kg bw of E. coli LPS at intervals of 6 h, and Group 2 (control) was treated with an equivalent volume of saline solution (SS) at the same intervals and frequency of Group 1. At 24 h after the first injection of LPS or SS, an intravenous bolus of 20 mg/kg bw of FFC was administered. Blood samples were collected from the auricular vein before drug administration and at different times between 0.05 and 24.0 h after treatment. FFC and florfenicol-amine (FFC-a) were extracted from the plasma, and their concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. A noncompartmental pharmacokinetic model was used for data analysis, and data were compared using the paired Student t-test. The mean values of AUC0-∞ in the endotoxaemic rabbits (26.3 ± 2.7 μg·h/mL) were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than values observed in healthy rabbits (17.2 ± 0.97 μg·h/mL). The total mean plasma clearance (CLT ) decreased from 1228 ± 107.5 mL·h/kg in the control group to 806.4 ± 91.4 mL·h/kg in the LPS-treated rabbits. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in the half-life of elimination was observed in the endotoxaemic rabbits (5.59 ± 1.14 h) compared to the values observed in healthy animals (3.44 ± 0.57 h). In conclusion, the administration of repeated doses of 1 μg/kg E. coli LPS induced an APR in rabbits, producing significant modifications in plasma concentrations of FFC leading to increases in the AUC, terminal half-life and mean residence time (MRT), but a

  14. Differential Regulation of Membrane CD14 Expression and Endotoxin-Tolerance in Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-Min; Frevert, Charles W.; Kajikawa, Osamu; Wurfel, Mark M.; Ballman, Kimberly; Mongovin, Stephen; Wong, Venus A.; Selk, Amy; Martin, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY CD14 is important in the clearance of bacterial pathogens from lungs. However, the mechanisms that regulate the expression of membrane CD14 (mCD14) on alveolar macrophages (AM) have not been studied in detail. This study examines the regulation of mCD14 on AM exposed to Escherichia coli in vivo and in vitro and explores the consequences of changes in mCD14 expression. The expression of mCD14 was decreased on AM exposed to E. coli in vivo and AM incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or E. coli in vitro. Polymyxin B abolished LPS effects but only partially blocked the effects of E. coli. Blockade of extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathways attenuated LPS and E. coli-induced decrease in mCD14 expression. Inhibition of proteases abrogated the LPS-induced decrease in mCD14 expression on AM and the release of sCD14 into the supernatants, but did not affect the response to E. coli. The production of TNF-α in response to a second challenge with Staphylococcus aureus or zymosan was decreased in AM following incubation with E. coli but not LPS. These studies show that distinct mechanisms regulate the expression of mCD14 and the induction of endotoxin-tolerance in AM and suggest that AM function is impaired at sites of bacterial infection. PMID:15059784

  15. A Single Nucleotide Exchange in the wzy Gene Is Responsible for the Semirough O6 Lipopolysaccharide Phenotype and Serum Sensitivity of Escherichia coli Strain Nissle 1917

    PubMed Central

    Grozdanov, Lubomir; Zähringer, Ulrich; Blum-Oehler, Gabriele; Brade, Lore; Henne, Anke; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Schombel, Ursula; Schulze, Jürgen; Sonnenborn, Ulrich; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Hacker, Jörg; Rietschel, Ernst T.; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Structural analysis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from semirough, serum-sensitive Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (DSM 6601, serotype O6:K5:H1) revealed that this strain's LPS contains a bisphosphorylated hexaacyl lipid A and a tetradecasaccharide consisting of one E. coli O6 antigen repeating unit attached to the R1-type core. Configuration of the GlcNAc glycosidic linkage between O-antigen oligosaccharide and core (β) differs from that interlinking the repeating units in the E. coli O6 antigen polysaccharide (α). The wa∗ and wb∗ gene clusters of strain Nissle 1917, required for LPS core and O6 repeating unit biosyntheses, were subcloned and sequenced. The DNA sequence of the wa∗ determinant (11.8 kb) shows 97% identity to other R1 core type-specific wa∗ gene clusters. The DNA sequence of the wb∗ gene cluster (11 kb) exhibits no homology to known DNA sequences except manC and manB. Comparison of the genetic structures of the wb∗O6 (wb∗ from serotype O6) determinants of strain Nissle 1917 and of smooth and serum-resistant uropathogenic E. coli O6 strain 536 demonstrated that the putative open reading frame encoding the O-antigen polymerase Wzy of strain Nissle 1917 was truncated due to a point mutation. Complementation with a functional wzy copy of E. coli strain 536 confirmed that the semirough phenotype of strain Nissle 1917 is due to the nonfunctional wzy gene. Expression of a functional wzy gene in E. coli strain Nissle 1917 increased its ability to withstand antibacterial defense mechanisms of blood serum. These results underline the importance of LPS for serum resistance or sensitivity of E. coli. PMID:12374825

  16. CD36 regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced signaling pathways and mediates the internalization of Escherichia coli in cooperation with TLR4 in goat mammary gland epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Duoyao; Luo, Jun; Chen, Dekun; Xu, Huifen; Shi, Huaiping; Jing, Xiaoqi; Zang, Wenjuan

    2016-01-01

    The scavenger receptor CD36 is involved in pathogen recognition, phagocytosis, and pathogen-induced signaling. This study investigated the relationship between CD36 and TLR4 in modifying lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced signaling pathways and mediating Escherichia coli (E. coli) endocytosis in primary goat mammary epithelial cells (pGMECs). The manipulation of CD36 expression significantly influenced TLR4 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) mRNA expression in pGMECs stimulated with LPS for 12 h. NF-κB and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was regulated by the manipulation of CD36 expression in LPS-induced pGMECs. However, CD36-mediated AP-1 activation occurred primarily through c-Jun N-terminal kinase (c-JNK). Adaptor proteins and proinflammatory cytokines were also involved in these signaling pathways and acted by regulating CD36 expression in LPS-stimulated cells. Moreover, CD36 cooperated with TLR4 in TLR4-mediated phagocytosis following E. coli simulation, but this complex was not induced by LPS treatment. Our study is the first to illuminate CD36 as a scavenger receptor in ruminants. Additionally, this study indicates that CD36 plays a vital role in the LPS-induced activation of downstream signaling cascades and mediates E. coli phagocytosis via TLR4 in pGMECs, which offers a novel treatment strategy for mastitis. PMID:26976286

  17. Pathogenic Escherichia coli and lipopolysaccharide enhance the expression of IL-8, CXCL5, and CXCL10 in canine endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Iulia; Hagman, Ragnvi; Guo, Yongzhi; Humblot, Patrice; Wang, Liya; Wernersson, Sara

    2015-07-01

    Chemokines play a central role in cellular communication in response to bacterial infection. However, the knowledge of the chemokine responses to bacterial infections in dogs remains limited. Uterine bacterial infection (pyometra) is one of the most common bacterial diseases in dogs and causes sepsis in most of the cases. We have shown previously that dogs with pyometra have higher messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of chemokines in uterus. To assess whether the stromal part of the endometrium expresses chemokines in response to bacterial infection, we cultured endometrial stromal cells isolated from healthy dogs and exposed them to either live pathogenic Escherichia coli, isolated from the uterus of a dog with pyometra, or lipopolysaccharide. Changes in the mRNA expression of ELR(+) CXC chemokines, IL-8, CXCL5, CXCL7, and ELR(-) CXC chemokine, CXCL10, were measured after 24 hours using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Levels of IL-8, CXCL5, and CXCL10 were upregulated in endometrial stromal cells exposed to E coli and lipopolysaccharide, whereas the level of CXCL7 was decreased or unaffected. In addition, levels of IL-8 and CXCL5, but not CXCL7 or CXCL10, were significantly higher in dogs with pyometra than those in healthy dogs. Our findings show that pathogenic uterine-derived E coli induces a CXC chemokine response both in cultured endometrial stromal cells within 24 hours and in pyometra-affected uteri from dogs. Stromal cells could therefore play an important role in early neutrophil and T cell recruitment to the site of inflammation during gram-negative bacterial infection of the uterus. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of chemokines in host response to bacterial infection in dogs and the possibility of using chemokines as diagnostic parameters for bacterial infection in this species. PMID:25765298

  18. Isolation of Endotoxin Eliminating Lactic Acid Bacteria and a Property of Endotoxin Eliminating Protein.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Ayaka; Asami, Kyoko; Suda, Yoshihito; Shimoyamada, Makoto; Kanauchi, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Recently, many scholars have reported lactic acid bacteria (LAB) functions, such as anticancer activity and anti-inflammatory activity for intestines. To decrease inflammatory substances such as endotoxins, LAB consumed safely with meals were isolated from food and food ingredients. First, LAB were isolated as 168 strains of bacillus LAB (49 strain) and coccus LAB (119 strains) from food ingredients and fermented foods such as rice, rice bran, malt, grains, miso soy paste, and some pickles. Their LAB (168 strains) were cultivated in medium containing endotoxin from Escherichia coli O18 LPS at 15 and 30 °C for 64 h to identify endotoxin-eliminating LAB. Consequently, the AK-23 strain was screened as an endotoxin-eliminating LAB strain. The strain decreased endotoxin in YP medium without sugar at 30 °C for 64 h until 9% of endotoxin. The strain was identified as Pediococcus pentosaceus according to morphological characteristics such as its cell shape, physiological characteristics related to its fermentation type, assimilation of sugars, pH tolerance, optimum growth temperature, and molecular biological characteristics as its homology to 16S rRNA. To investigate the location of the endotoxin-eliminating substance, 4 fractions were separated from AK-23 cells as extracellular, cell wall digestion, cytoplasm, and cell membrane fractions. The endotoxin-decreasing substance, located on a cell wall, was identified as a 217 kDa protein. PMID:27096744

  19. Bactericidal Monoclonal Antibodies Specific to the Lipopolysaccharide O Antigen from Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Clone ST131-O25b:H4 Elicit Protection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Szijártó, Valéria; Guachalla, Luis M.; Visram, Zehra C.; Hartl, Katharina; Varga, Cecília; Mirkina, Irina; Zmajkovic, Jakub; Badarau, Adriana; Zauner, Gerhild; Pleban, Clara; Magyarics, Zoltán; Nagy, Eszter

    2015-01-01

    The Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131)-O25b:H4 clone has spread worldwide and become responsible for a significant proportion of multidrug-resistant extraintestinal infections. We generated humanized monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that target the lipopolysaccharide O25b antigen conserved within this lineage. These MAbs bound to the surface of live bacterial cells irrespective of the capsular type expressed. In a serum bactericidal assay in vitro, MAbs induced >95% bacterial killing in the presence of human serum as the complement source. Protective efficacy at low antibody doses was observed in a murine model of bacteremia. The mode of action in vivo was investigated by using aglycosylated derivatives of the protective MAbs. The significant binding to live E. coli cells and the in vitro and in vivo efficacy were corroborated in assays using bacteria grown in human serum to mimic relevant clinical conditions. Given the dry pipeline of novel antibiotics against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens, passive immunization with bactericidal antibodies offers a therapeutic alternative to control infections caused by E. coli ST131-O25b:H4. PMID:25779571

  20. Effect of endotoxins on contractility of smooth muscle preparations from the bovine abomasal antrum.

    PubMed

    Kaze, C; Mevissen, M; Hirsbrunner, G; Steiner, A

    2004-01-01

    The effects of endotoxin (ET) on spontaneous contractility and of carbachol- and alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine-(alpha-M-5-HT; 5-HT2 receptor agonist) induced contractions of smooth muscle preparations from the bovine abomasal antrum were investigated in vitro. Preparations from the abomasal antrum of freshly slaughtered healthy dairy cows were cut parallel to the longitudinal and circular fibres, suspended in isolated organ baths, and contractility was recorded and analyzed, using digitalized data. The traits maximum amplitude, time till maximum amplitude, frequency, basal tone, and area under curve were calculated. The contractile effect of Carbachol (CH) was concentration dependent. Repeated administration of CH (3.75 x 10(-6) M), each time interrupted by flushing of the organ baths, did not reveal any significant effect on contractility traits of CH-induced contractions. Endotoxin (10 micrograms/ml; lipopolysaccharide from E. coli, O26:B6) significantly reduced some of the spontaneously occurring contractility traits and of carbachol-(3.75 x 10(-6) M) and alpha-M-5-HT-induced (2.14 x 10(-5) M) contractions. The effects of higher and lower concentrations of ET occurred less consistently. The inhibitory effect of endotoxin was more pronounced after 6 hours as compared to 2 hours of incubation. The results of the present study (i) support the hypothesis of a possible role of endotoxin in reducing motility of the abomasum during the development of spontaneous abomasal displacement in dairy cows, and (ii) may serve as the basis for the development of an in vitro model of abomasal displacement with endotoxemia for future studies on the effect of motility modulating drugs. PMID:14983752

  1. 2F3 Monoclonal Antibody Recognizes the O26 O-Antigen Moiety of the Lipopolysaccharide of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Strain 4276

    PubMed Central

    Szalo, I. M.; Taminiau, B.; Goffaux, F.; Pirson, V.; McCappin, J.; Ball, H. J.; Mainil, J. G.

    2004-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) organisms are groups of pathogenic strains whose infections are characterized by a typical lesion of enterocyte attachment and effacement. They are involved in enteric diseases both in humans and in animals, and EHEC strains can be responsible for hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. Previously, it was shown that the 2F3 monoclonal antibody (MAb) is specific for the O26 EHEC and EPEC strains (P. Kerr, H. Ball, B. China, J. Mainil, D. Finlay, D. Pollock, I. Wilson, and D. Mackie, Clin. Diagn. Lab. Immunol. 6:610-614, 1999). As these groups of bacteria play an important role in pathology, the aim of this paper was to characterize the antigen recognized by the 2F3 MAb and its genetic determinant. A genomic locus containing the entire O-antigen gene cluster and half of the colanic acid gene cluster from an O26 EHEC strain was shown to be sufficient for the production of the antigen recognized by the 2F3 MAb in an E. coli DH5α strain. By transposon mutagenesis performed on the recombinant plasmid, all 2F3 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-negative mutants had their transposons inserted into the O-antigen gene cluster. The O-antigen gene cluster was also cloned from an O26 EHEC strain into the E. coli DH5α strain, which then produced a positive result with the 2F3 MAb. Further analysis of the type of lipopolysaccharides (smooth or rough) produced by the clones and mutants and of the O antigen of the 2F3-positive clones confirmed that the epitope recognized by the 2F3 MAb is located on the O antigen in the O26 EHEC and EPEC strains and that its genetic determinant is located inside the O-antigen gene cluster. PMID:15138178

  2. FtsH-Mediated Coordination of Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis in Escherichia coli Correlates with the Growth Rate and the Alarmone (p)ppGpp

    PubMed Central

    Schäkermann, Michael; Langklotz, Sina

    2013-01-01

    The outer membrane is the first line of defense for Gram-negative bacteria and serves as a major barrier for antibiotics and other harmful substances. The biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), the essential component of the outer membrane, must be tightly controlled as both too much and too little LPS are toxic. In Escherichia coli, the cellular level of the key enzyme LpxC, which catalyzes the first committed step in LPS biosynthesis, is adjusted by proteolysis carried out by the essential and membrane-bound protease FtsH. Here, we demonstrate that LpxC is degraded in a growth rate-dependent manner with half-lives between 4 min and >2 h. According to the cellular demand for LPS biosynthesis, LpxC is degraded during slow growth but stabilized when cells grow rapidly. Disturbing the balance between LPS and phospholipid biosynthesis in favor of phospholipid production in an E. coli strain encoding a hyperactive FabZ protein abolishes growth rate dependency of LpxC proteolysis. Lack of the alternative sigma factor RpoS or inorganic polyphosphates, which are known to mediate growth rate-dependent gene regulation in E. coli, did not affect proteolysis of LpxC. In contrast, absence of RelA and SpoT, which synthesize the alarmone (p)ppGpp, deregulated LpxC degradation resulting in rapid proteolysis in fast-growing cells and stabilization during slow growth. Our data provide new insights into the essential control of LPS biosynthesis in E. coli. PMID:23417489

  3. Transfer of immunoglobulins through the mammary endothelium and epithelium and in the local lymph node of cows during the initial response after intramammary challenge with E. coli endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Östensson, Karin; Lun, Shichun

    2008-01-01

    Background The first hours after antigen stimulation, interactions occur influencing the outcome of the immunological reaction. Immunoglobulins originate in blood and/or are locally synthesized. The transfer of Ig isotypes (Igs) in the udder has been studied previously but without the possibility to distinguish between the endothelium and the epithelium. The purpose of this study was to map the Ig transfer through each barrier, separately, and Ig transfer in the local lymph nodes of the bovine udder during the initial innate immune response. Methods The content of IgG1, IgG2, IgM, IgA and albumin (BSA) was examined in peripheral/afferent mammary lymph and lymph leaving the supramammary lymph nodes, and in blood and milk before (0 h) and during 4 hours after intramammary challenge with Esherichia coli endotoxin in 5 cows. Results Igs increased most rapidly in afferent lymph resulting in higher concentrations than in efferent lymph at postinfusion hour (PIH) 2, contrary to before challenge. Ig concentrations in milk were lower than in lymph; except for IgA at 0 h; and they increased more slowly. Afferent lymph:serum and efferent lymph:serum concentration ratios (CR) of Igs were similar to those of BSA but slightly lower. Milk:afferent lymph (M:A) CRs of each Ig, except for IgG2, showed strikingly different pattern than those of BSA. The M:A CR of IgG1, IgM and IgA were higher than that of BSA before challenge and the CR of IgA and IgG1 remained higher also thereafter. At PIH 2 there was a drop in Ig CRs, except for IgG2, in contrast to the BSA CR which gradually increased. The M:A CR of IgM and Ig A decreased from 0 h to PIH 4, in spite of increasing permeability. Conclusion The transfer of Igs through the endothelium appeared to be merely a result of diffusion although their large molecular size may hamper the diffusion. The transfer through the epithelium and the Ig concentrations in milk seemed more influenced by selective mechanisms and local sources

  4. Influence of Sanitizers on the Lipopolysaccharide Toxicity of Escherichia coli Strains Cultivated in the Presence of Zygosaccharomyces bailii

    PubMed Central

    Mogotsi, Lerato; De Smidt, Olga; Venter, Pierre; Groenewald, Willem

    2014-01-01

    The influence of sublethal concentrations of two sanitizers, liquid iodophor and liquid hypochlorite (LH), on the growth rates and toxicity of food-borne pathogenic Escherichia coli strains grown in the presence of spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii was assessed. When grown in combination with Z. bailii both E. coli O113 and E. coli O26 exhibited slower growth rates, except when E. coli O113 was grown in combination with Z. bailii at 0.2% LH. The growth rate of Z. bailii was not impacted by the addition of the sanitizers or by communal growth with E. coli strains. LAL and IL-6 results indicated a decrease in toxicity of pure E. coli cultures with comparable profiles for control and sanitizer exposed samples, although the LAL assay proved to be more sensitive. Interestingly, pure cultures of Z. bailii showed increased toxicity measured by LAL and decreased toxicity measured by IL-6. LAL analysis showed a decrease in toxicity of both E. coli strains grown in combination with Z. bailii, while IL-6 analysis of the mixed cultures showed an increase in toxicity. The use of LAL for toxicity determination in a mixed culture overlooks the contribution made by spoilage yeast, thus demonstrating the importance of using the appropriate method for toxicity testing in mixed microbe environments. PMID:24977173

  5. Acinetobacter and E. coli lipopolysaccharide preparations comparative mitogenicity and induction in vitro of immunoglobulin synthesis in adult and neonatal pig lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Symons, D B; Clarkson, C A

    1979-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was prepared by phenol/water extraction of bacterial membranes prepared from Acinetobacter and Escherichia coli. The mitogenicity of laboratory-prepared LPS was significantly greater than that of commercial E. coli LPS for pig, sheep, calf and rat lymphocytes, assayed as [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Mouse lymphocytes responded well to commercial LPS and no greater response was obtained with other LPS preparations. A small proportion (14%) of the Acinetobacter LPS preparations was soluble in aqueous medium, the remainder comprising membraneous fragments of variable form and size. It is suggested that the insoluble presentation of LPS to cells may contribute to the improved mitogenicity compared with wholly soluble LPS. Acinetobacter LPS preparations were used to induce synthesis and secretion in vitro of immunoglobulin by adult blood lymphocytes and pre-suckled, neonatal spleen cells of the pig. IgM was the dominant class of immunoglobulin secreted. This work thus demonstrated that virgin, unprimed B cells could be induced into immunoglobulin secretion by mitogen stimulation. PMID:391702

  6. Thiazolidinedione (pioglitazone) blocks P. gingivalis- and F. nucleatum, but not E. coli, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M; Nishimura, F; Naruishi, H; Soga, Y; Kokeguchi, S; Takashiba, S

    2005-03-01

    An elevated level of C-reactive protein (CRP) predicts the future development of coronary heart disease. Periodontitis appears to up-regulate CRP. CRP is produced by hepatocytes in response to interleukin-6 (IL-6). A major source of IL-6 in obese subjects is adipocytes. We hypothesized that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from periodontal pathogens stimulated adipocytes to produce IL-6, and that the production was suppressed by the drugs targeted against insulin resistance, thiazolidinedione (pioglitazone), since this agent potentially showed an anti-inflammatory effect. Mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes were stimulated with E. coli, P. gingivalis, and F. nucleatum LPS. The IL-6 concentration in culture supernatants was measured. All LPS stimulated adipocytes to produce IL-6. Although pioglitazone changed adipocyte appearance from large to small, and completely suppressed P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum LPS-induced IL-6 production, E. coli LPS-induced IL-6 production was not efficiently blocked. Thus, pioglitazone completely blocked periodontal-bacteria-derived LPS-induced IL-6 production in adipocytes, a major inducer of CRP. PMID:15723863

  7. Structural analysis of the lipid A isolated from Hafnia alvei 32 and PCM 1192 lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Lukasiewicz, Jolanta; Jachymek, Wojciech; Niedziela, Tomasz; Kenne, Lennart; Lugowski, Czeslaw

    2010-03-01

    Hafnia alvei, a Gram-negative bacterium, is an opportunistic pathogen associated with mixed hospital infections, bacteremia, septicemia, and respiratory diseases. The majority of clinical symptoms of diseases caused by this bacterium have a lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin)-related origin. The lipid A structure affects the biological activity of endotoxins predominantly. Thus, the structure of H. alvei lipid A was analyzed for the first time. The major form, asymmetrically hexa-acylated lipid A built of beta-D-GlcpN4P-(1-->6)-alpha-D-GlcpN1P substituted with (R)-14:0(3-OH) at N-2 and O-3, 14:0(3-(R)-O-12:0) at N-2', and 14:0(3-(R)-O-14:0) at O-3', was identified by ESI-MS(n) and MALDI-time-of-flight (TOF) MS. Comparative analysis performed by MS suggested that LPSs of H. alvei 32, PCM 1192, PCM 1206, and PCM 1207 share the identified structure of lipid A. LPSs of H. alvei are yet another example of enterobacterial endotoxins having the Escherichia coli-type structure of lipid A. The presence of hepta-acylated forms of H. alvei lipid A resulted from the addition of palmitate (16:0) substituting 14:0(3-OH) at N-2 of the alpha-GlcpN residue. All the studied strains of H. alvei have an ability to modify their lipid A structure by palmitoylation. PMID:19706748

  8. The effect of probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 lipopolysaccharide on the 5-aminosalicylic acid transepithelial transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Stětinová, Věra; Smetanová, Libuše; Kholová, Dagmar; Květina, Jaroslav; Svoboda, Zbyněk; Zídek, Zdeněk; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena

    2013-09-01

    The object of this study was to investigate the effect of probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) (i) EcN lipopolysaccharide (EcN LPS) and (ii) bacteria-free supernatant of EcN suspension (EcN supernatant) on in vitro transepithelial transport of mesalazine (5-aminosalicylic acid, 5-ASA), the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory drug in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Effect of co-administered EcN LPS (100 µg/ml) or EcN supernatant (50 µg/ml) on the 5-ASA transport (300 µmol/l) was studied using the Caco-2 monolayer (a human colon carcinoma cell line) as a model of human intestinal absorption. Permeability characteristics for absorptive and secretory transport of parent drug and its intracellularly-formed metabolite were determined. The quantification of 5-ASA and its main metabolite N-acetyl-5-amino-salicylic acid (N-Ac-5-ASA) was performed by high performance liquid chromatography. Obtained results suggest that neither EcN LPS nor EcN supernatant had effect on the total 5-ASA transport (secretory flux greater than absorptive flux) and on the transport of intracellularly formed N-Ac-5-ASA (preferentially transported in the secretory direction). The percent cumulative transport of the total 5-ASA alone or in combination with EcN LPS or EcN supernatant did not exceed 1%. PMID:23846256

  9. Influence of lipopolysaccharides and lipids A from some marine bacteria on spontaneous and Escherichia coli LPS-induced TNF-alpha release from peripheral human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Vorobeva, E V; Krasikova, I N; Solov'eva, T F

    2006-07-01

    Some endotoxic properties of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and lipids A (LA) from the marine bacteria Marinomonas communis ATCC 27118(T), Marinomonas mediterranea ATCC 700492(T), and Chryseobacterium indoltheticum CIP 103168(T) were studied. The preparations tested were shown to have high 50% lethal doses (4 microg per mouse for LPS from M. mediterranea and more than 12 microg per mouse for two other LPS and LA from C. indoltheticum) and were moderate (371 +/- 37 pg/ml at 10 microg/ml of C. indoltheticum LPS), weak (148 +/- 5 pg/ml at 1 microg/ml of M. mediterranea LPS), and zero (LA and LPS from M. communis and LA from C. indoltheticum) inducers of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) release from peripheral human blood cells. The capacity of the LA and LPS samples from marine bacteria to inhibit TNF-alpha release induced by LPS from Escherichia coli O55 : B5 (10 ng/ml) was also studied. PMID:16903830

  10. Adherent endotoxin on dental implant surfaces: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Cascardo, Giovanna; Bellanda, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Osteoimmunology is the crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems, suggesting a role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulation of osteoclast activity. Endotoxin or bacterial challenges to inflammatory cells are directly relevant to dental implant pathologies involving bone resorption, such as osseointegration failure and peri-implantitis. While the endotoxin amount on implant devices is regulated by standards, it is unknown whether commercially available dental implants elicit different levels of adherent-endotoxin stimulated cytokines. The objective of this work is to develop a model system and evaluate endotoxin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes relevant to osteoclast activation on commercially available dental implants. Murine J774-A1 macrophages were cultured on Ti disks with different level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination to define the time-course of the inflammatory response to endotoxin, as evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The developed protocol was then used to measure adherent endotoxin on commercially available packaged and sterile dental implants in the "as-implanted" condition. Results show that tested dental implants induce variable expression of endotoxin-stimulated genes, sometimes above the level expected to promote bone resorption in vivo. Results are unaffected by the specific surface treatment; rather, they likely reflect care in cleaning and packaging protocols. In conclusion, expression of genes that enhance osteoclast activity through endotoxin stimulation of inflammatory cells is widely different on commercially available dental implants. A reappraisal of the clinical impact of adherent endotoxins on dental (and bone) implant devices is required in light of increasing knowledge on crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems. PMID:25699642

  11. Methods of Endotoxin Detection.

    PubMed

    Su, Wenqiong; Ding, Xianting

    2015-08-01

    Endotoxin, present in the outer membrane of all gram-negative bacteria, can pose serious risks to human health, from irreversible shock to death. Therefore, it is essential to develop sensitive, accurate, and rapid methods for its detection. The rabbit pyrogen test is the first standard technique for endotoxin detection and, nowadays, has been replaced by the Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate test, which is the most popular detection technique for endotoxin. With in-depth understanding of endotoxin, biosensors based on endotoxin-sensing components are promising alternatives to pursue in developing low-cost, easy-operation, and fast-response endotoxin detection techniques. This article summarizes the recent advances of endotoxin detection methods with a particular emphasis on optical and electrochemical biosensors based on various sensing elements ranging from nature biomolecules to artificial materials. As the research and technological revolution continues, the highly integrated and miniaturized commercial devices for sensitively and reliably detecting endotoxin will provide a wide range of applications in people's daily life. PMID:25720597

  12. A model for the proteolytic regulation of LpxC in the lipopolysaccharide pathway of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Emiola, Akintunde; Falcarin, Paolo; Tocher, Joanne; George, John

    2013-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an essential structural component found in Gram-negative bacteria. The molecule is comprised of a highly conserved lipid A and a variable outer core consisting of various sugars. LPS plays important roles in membrane stability in the bacterial cell and is also a potent activator of the human immune system. Despite its obvious importance, little is understood regarding the regulation of the individual enzymes involved or the pathway as a whole. LpxA and LpxC catalyze the first two steps in the LPS pathway. The reaction catalyzed by LpxA possesses a highly unfavourable equilibrium constant with no evidence of coupling to an energetically favourable reaction. In our model the presence of the second enzyme LpxC was sufficient to abate this unfavourable reaction and confirming previous studies suggesting that this reaction is the first committed step in LPS synthesis. It is believed that the protease FtsH regulates LpxC activity via cleavage. It is also suspected that the activity of FtsH is regulated by a metabolite produced by the LPS pathway; however, it is not known which one. In order to investigate these mechanisms, we obtained kinetic parameters from literature and developed estimates for other simulation parameters. Our simulations suggest that under modest increases in LpxC activity, FtsH is able to regulate the rate of product formation. However, under extreme increases in LpxC activities such as over-expression or asymmetrical cell division then FtsH activation may not be sufficient to regulate this first stage of synthesis. PMID:23831517

  13. Extracorporeal adsorption of endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Staubach, K H; Rosenfeldt, J A; Veit, O; Bruch, H P

    1997-02-01

    In a porcine endotoxin shock model using a continuous intravenous endotoxin infusion of 250 ng/kg body weight per hour, the cardiorespiratory and hematologic parameters were studied while applying a new on-line polymyxin B immobilized adsorption system. This preliminary report shows that the new adsorbent can remove endotoxin selectively from the circulation and confers a good amount of protection from endotoxin-induced cardiopulmonary decompensation as well as hematologic alterations. Survival time could be extended from 216 min to 313 min. Whereas cardiac output and mean arterial pressure declined critically after 3 h in the controls, the treated group remained stable for another 3 h. These data show that endotoxin adsorption by polymyxin B coupled covalently to acrylic spheres as an adjunctive on-line measure in the septic syndrome seems feasible. PMID:10225785

  14. Neutralization of endotoxin in vitro and in vivo by Bac7(1-35), a proline-rich antibacterial peptide.

    PubMed

    Ghiselli, Roberto; Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar; Circo, Raffaella; Mocchegiani, Federico; Skerlavaj, Barbara; D'Amato, Giuseppina; Scalise, Giorgio; Zanetti, Margherita; Saba, Vittorio

    2003-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), or endotoxins, are structural components of gram-negative bacteria implicated in the pathogenesis of septic shock. In this study the antiendotoxin activity of Bac7(1-35), a synthetic peptide based on the sequence of a proline-rich antibacterial peptide from bovine neutrophils, was investigated in vitro and in an experimental rat model of gram-negative septic shock. The ability of Bac7(1-35) to bind LPS from Escherichia coli O111:B4 was determined using a sensitive Limulus chromogenic assay. In the in vivo study, adult male Wistar rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of 1 x 10(9) colony-forming units of E. coli ATCC 25922. All animals were randomized to receive intraperitoneally 1 mg/kg Bac7(1-35), or isotonic sodium chloride solution (control group C1), 60 mg/kg of piperacillin and 1 mg/kg polymyxin B, 1 mg/kg of polymyxin B plus 60 mg/kg of piperacillin, and 1 mg/kg of Bac7(1-35) plus 60 mg/kg of piperacillin. Each group included 15 animals. Bac7(1-35) was found to completely inhibit the LPS procoagulant activity at approximately 10 microM peptide concentration, as determined by in vitro LAL chromogenic assay. Treatment with Bac7(1-35) resulted in significant decrease in plasma endotoxin levels and lethality rates compared with saline injected control animals. No statistically significant differences were noted between Bac7(1-35) and polymyxin B in reducing all variables measured. These results provide evidence for the ability of Bac7(1-35) to effectively bind LPS and protect animals from lethal effects of this molecule, and point to its potential use for the treatment of endotoxin-induced septic shock. PMID:12785015

  15. In vivo protection against endotoxin by plasma high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, D M; Parker, T S; Donnelly, T M; Walsh, A; Rubin, A L

    1993-01-01

    Overwhelming bacterial infection is accompanied by fever, hypotension, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and multiple organ failure leading to death in 30-80% of cases. These classical symptoms of septic shock are caused by potent cytokines that are produced in response to endotoxin released from Gram-negative bacteria. Treatments with antibodies and receptor antagonists to block endotoxin or cytokine mediators have given mixed results in clinical trials. High density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural component of plasma that is known to neutralize endotoxin in vitro. We report here that raising the plasma HDL concentration protects mice against endotoxin in vivo. Transgenic mice with 2-fold-elevated plasma HDL levels had more endotoxin bound to HDL, lower plasma cytokine levels, and improved survival rates compared with low-HDL mice. Intravenous infusion of HDL also protected mice, but only when given as reconstituted HDL prepared from phospholipid and either HDL apoprotein or an 18-amino acid peptide synthesized to mimic the structure of apolipoprotein A-I of HDL. Intact plasma HDL was mildly toxic, and HDL apoprotein was ineffective. The effectiveness of the reconstituted peptide renders very unlikely any significant contribution to protection by trace proteins in apo-HDL. These data suggest a simple leaflet insertion model for binding and neutralization of lipopolysaccharide by phospholipid on the surface of HDL. Plasma HDL may normally act to protect against endotoxin; this protection may be augmented by administration of reconstituted HDL or reconstituted peptides. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8265667

  16. Biochemical principle of Limulus test for detecting bacterial endotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Sadaaki

    2007-01-01

    A hemocyte lysate from horseshoe crab (Limulus) produced a gel, when exposed to Gram-negative bacterial endotoxins, lipopolysaccharides (LPS). This gelation reaction of the lysate, so-called Limulus test, has been widely employed as a simple and very sensitive assay method for endotoxins. Recent biochemical studies on the principle of Limulus test indicate that the hemocytes contain several serine protease zymogens, which constitute a coagulation cascade triggered by endotoxins, and that there is a (1,3)-β-D-glucan-mediated coagulation pathway which also results in the formation of gel. Up to now, six protein components, designated coagulogen, proclotting enzyme, factor B, factor C, and factor G, all of which are closely associated with the endotoxin-mediated coagulation pathway, have been purified and biochemically characterized. The molecular structures of these proteins have also been elucidated. Moreover, the reconstitution experiments using the isolated clotting factors, factor C, factor B, proclotting enzyme and coagulogen in the presence of endotoxin, leads to the formation of coagulin gel. Here, I will focus on the biochemical principle of Limulus test for detecting bacterial endotoxins, and its activation and regulation mechanism on the LPS-mediated coagulation cascade. PMID:24019589

  17. Relative potencies of four reference endotoxin standards as measured by the Limulus amoebocyte lysate and USP rabbit pyrogen tests.

    PubMed Central

    Weary, M E; Donohue, G; Pearson, F C; Story, K

    1980-01-01

    Four commonly used reference endotoxin standards, Escherichia coli O113:H10:K0, E. coli O55:B5, Salmonella abortusequi, and Shigella dysenteriae were compared by the USP rabbit pyrogen and the Limulus amoebocyte lysate tests. By the rabbit pyrogen test, S. abortus equi was identified as the most potent endotoxin, followed closely by E. coli O113:H10:K0 and E. coli O55:B5. PMID:7006505

  18. Differential induction of the toll-like receptor 4-MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling pathways by endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Zughaier, Susu M; Zimmer, Shanta M; Datta, Anup; Carlson, Russell W; Stephens, David S

    2005-05-01

    The biological response to endotoxin mediated through the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-MD-2 receptor complex is directly related to lipid A structure or configuration. Endotoxin structure may also influence activation of the MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling pathways of TLR4. To address this possibility, human macrophage-like cell lines (THP-1, U937, and MM6) or murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with picomolar concentrations of highly purified endotoxins. Harvested supernatants from previously stimulated cells were also used to stimulate RAW 264.7 or 23ScCr (TLR4-deficient) macrophages (i.e., indirect induction). Neisseria meningitidis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) was a potent direct inducer of the MyD88-dependent pathway molecules tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha (MIP-3alpha), and the MyD88-independent molecules beta interferon (IFN-beta), nitric oxide, and IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10). Escherichia coli 55:B5 and Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) at the same pmole/ml lipid A concentrations induced comparable levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and MIP-3alpha, but significantly less IFN-beta, nitric oxide, and IP-10. In contrast, LPS from Salmonella enterica serovars Minnesota and Typhimurium induced amounts of IFN-beta, nitric oxide, and IP-10 similar to meningococcal LOS but much less TNF-alpha and MIP-3alpha in time course and dose-response experiments. No MyD88-dependent or -independent response to endotoxin was seen in TLR4-deficient cell lines (C3H/HeJ and 23ScCr) and response was restored in TLR4-MD-2-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Blocking the MyD88-dependent pathway by DNMyD88 resulted in significant reduction of TNF-alpha release but did not influence nitric oxide release. IFN-beta polyclonal antibody and IFN-alpha/beta receptor 1 antibody significantly reduced nitric oxide release. N

  19. Binding of /sup 125/I-labeled endotoxin to bovine, canine, and equine platelets and endotoxin-induced agglutination of canine platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, K.M.; Boehme, M.; Inbar, O.

    1982-10-01

    Endotoxin from Escherichia coli O127:B8, Salmonella abortus-equi and S minnesota induced clumping of some canine platelets (PLT) at a final endotoxin concentration of 1 microgram/ml. Endotoxin-induced clumping of canine PLT was independent of PLT energy-requiring processes, because clumping was observed with canine PLT incubated with 2-deoxy-D-glucose and antimycin A. The PLT responded to adenosine diphosphate before, but not after, incubation with the metabolic inhibitors. Endotoxin induced a slight and inconsistant clumping of bovine and equine PLT at high (mg/ml) endotoxin concentration. High-affinity binding sites could not be demonstrated on canine, bovine, and equine PLT, using /sup 125/I-labeled E coli O127:B8 endotoxin. Nonspecific binding was observed and appeared to be due primarily to an extraneous coat on the PLT surface that was removed by gel filtration. The endotoxin that was bound to PLT did not appear to modify PLT function. An attempt to identify plasma proteins that bound physiologically relevant amounts of endotoxin was not successful. The significance of the endotoxin-induced clumping or lack of it on the pathophysiology of endotoxemia is discussed.

  20. Structural analysis of the lipid A isolated from Hafnia alvei 32 and PCM 1192 lipopolysaccharides[S

    PubMed Central

    Lukasiewicz, Jolanta; Jachymek, Wojciech; Niedziela, Tomasz; Kenne, Lennart; Lugowski, Czeslaw

    2010-01-01

    Hafnia alvei, a Gram-negative bacterium, is an opportunistic pathogen associated with mixed hospital infections, bacteremia, septicemia, and respiratory diseases. The majority of clinical symptoms of diseases caused by this bacterium have a lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin)-related origin. The lipid A structure affects the biological activity of endotoxins predominantly. Thus, the structure of H. alvei lipid A was analyzed for the first time. The major form, asymmetrically hexa-acylated lipid A built of β-d-GlcpN4P-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpN1P substituted with (R)-14:0(3-OH) at N-2 and O-3, 14:0(3-(R)-O-12:0) at N-2′, and 14:0(3-(R)-O-14:0) at O-3′, was identified by ESI-MSn and MALDI-time-of-flight (TOF) MS. Comparative analysis performed by MS suggested that LPSs of H. alvei 32, PCM 1192, PCM 1206, and PCM 1207 share the identified structure of lipid A. LPSs of H. alvei are yet another example of enterobacterial endotoxins having the Escherichia coli-type structure of lipid A. The presence of hepta-acylated forms of H. alvei lipid A resulted from the addition of palmitate (16:0) substituting 14:0(3-OH) at N-2 of the α-GlcpN residue. All the studied strains of H. alvei have an ability to modify their lipid A structure by palmitoylation. PMID:19706748

  1. Statistical optimization of medium composition and culture condition for the production of recombinant anti-lipopolysaccharide factor of Eriocheir sinensis in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Baojie; Jiang, Keyong; Wang, Lei

    2011-11-01

    Anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) are important antimicrobial peptides that are isolated from some aquatic species. In a previous study, we isolated ALF genes from Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis. In this study, we optimized the production of a recombinant ALF by expressing E. sinensis ALF genes in Escherichia coli maintained in shake-flasks. In particular, we focused on optimization of both the medium composition and the culture condition. Various medium components were analyzed by the Plackett-Burman design, and two significant screened factors, (NH4)2SO4 and KH2PO4, were further optimized via the central composite design (CCD). Based on the CCD analysis, we investigated the induction start-up time, the isopropylthio-D-galactoside (IPTG) concentration, the post-induction time, and the temperature by response surface methodology. We found that the highest level of ALF fusion protein was achieved in the medium containing 1.89 g/L (NH4)2SO4 and 3.18 g/L KH2PO4, with a cell optical density of 0.8 at 600 nm before induction, an IPTG concentration of 0.5 mmol/L, a post-induction temperature of 32.7°C, and a post-induction time of 4 h. Applying the whole optimization strategy using all optimal factors improved the target protein content from 6.1% (without optimization) to 13.2%. We further applied the optimized medium and conditions in high cell density cultivation, and determined that the soluble target protein constituted 10.5% of the total protein. Our identification of the economic medium composition, optimal culture conditions, and details of the fermentation process should facilitate the potential application of ALF for further research.

  2. Vitamin E and omega-3 fatty acids independently attenuate plasma concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E3 in Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide-challenged growing-finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Upadhaya, S D; Kim, J C; Mullan, B P; Pluske, J R; Kim, I H

    2015-06-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that vitamin E (Vit E) and omega-3 fatty acids will additively attenuate the production of proinflammatory cytokines and PGE2 in immune system–stimulated growing–finishing pigs. A total of 80 mixed sex pigs weighing 50.7 ± 0.76 kg (mean ± SE) were blocked and stratified based on sex and BW to a 2 × 2 factorial design with the respective factors being 1) without and with 300 IU Vit E and 2) without and with 25% replacement of tallow to linseed oil as a source of n-3 fatty acids. Each treatment consisted of 4 replicate pens with 5 pigs (3 barrows and 2 gilts) per pen. All pigs were challenged with an intramuscular injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS; O111:B4) twice weekly over the 6-wk experiment. After LPS challenge, pigs fed a diet supplemented with n-3 fatty acids had fewer (P < 0.05) white blood cells and tended to show both a reduced (P < 0.10) proportion of lymphocytes and IgG concentration compared with pigs fed a diet without any supplements. Supplementation of n-3 fatty acids reduced (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05) serum concentrations of cortisol and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), respectively. The serum concentration of PGE2 was decreased (P < 0.05) with supplementation of both Vit E and n-3 fatty acids; however, the extent of the reduction was greater (P < 0.001) in pigs fed an n-3 fatty acid–supplemented diet. However, there were no additive effects of the combined supplementation of Vit E and n-3 fatty acids on serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and PGE2. The results suggest that n-3 fatty acids independently attenuate production of TNF-α and PGE2 in immune system–stimulated growing–finishing pigs. PMID:26115279

  3. Polaprezinc Protects Mice against Endotoxin Shock.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Shuzo; Moriyama, Chihiro; Yamashita, Atsushi; Nishida, Tadashi; Kusumoto, Chiaki; Mochida, Shinsuke; Minami, Yukari; Nakada, Junya; Shomori, Kohei; Inagaki, Yoshimi; Ohta, Yoshiji; Matsura, Tatsuya

    2010-05-01

    Polaprezinc (PZ), a chelate compound consisting of zinc and l-carnosine (Car), is an anti-ulcer drug developed in Japan. In the present study, we investigated whether PZ suppresses mortality, pulmonary inflammation, and plasma nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels in endotoxin shock mice after peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and how PZ protects against LPS-induced endotoxin shock. PZ pretreatment inhibited the decrease in the survival rate of mice after LPS injection. PZ inhibited the increases in plasma NO as well as TNF-alpha after LPS. Compatibly, PZ suppressed LPS-induced inducible NO synthase mRNA transcription in the mouse lungs. PZ also improved LPS-induced lung injury. However, PZ did not enhance the induction of heat shock protein (HSP) 70 in the mouse lungs after LPS. Pretreatment of RAW264 cells with PZ suppressed the production of NO and TNF-alpha after LPS addition. This inhibition likely resulted from the inhibitory effect of PZ on LPS-mediated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. Zinc sulfate, but not Car, suppressed NO production after LPS. These results indicate that PZ, in particular its zinc subcomponent, inhibits LPS-induced endotoxin shock via the inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and subsequent induction of proinflammatory products such as NO and TNF-alpha, but not HSP induction. PMID:20490319

  4. Antiproteases modulate bronchial epithelial cell responses to endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, S.; Rennard, S. I.; Claassen, L.; Robbins, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Escherichia coli endotoxin (0.1 to 1000 micrograms/ml) stimulated the release of neutrophil chemotactic activity (P < 0.001) and induced bronchial epithelial cell (BEC) cytotoxicity assessed by lactate dehydrogenase release (P < 0.001). Endotoxin (100 micrograms/ml) inhibited BEC accumulation (P < 0.001). In the present study, we investigated the role of proteolytic activity of BECs per se in response to endotoxin. Several structurally and functionally different antiproteases, alpha 1 protease inhibitor, soybean trypsin inhibitor, two chloromethyl ketone derivatives (N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone and methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val chloromethyl ketone), and L-658,758, a neutrophil elastase inhibitor, attenuated the release of neutrophil chemotactic activity and lactate dehydrogenase (P < 0.01). alpha 1-Protease inhibitor and N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone attenuated the inhibition of BEC accumulation by endotoxin (P < 0.001). The proteolytic enzyme activity measured by synthetic substrates revealed that endotoxin significantly augmented the serine proteolytic activity in the cell layers. Culture supernatant fluids and cell lysates of BECs in the presence of endotoxin solubilized 14C-labeled casein. These data suggest that responses of BECs to endotoxin may involve activation of cellular proteolytic activity. PMID:7747815

  5. Kinetics of Hydrothermal Inactivation of Endotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lixiong; Wilbur, Chris L.; Mintz, Kathryn L.

    2011-01-01

    A kinetic model was established for the inactivation of endotoxins in water at temperatures ranging from 210°C to 270°C and a pressure of 6.2 × 106 Pa. Data were generated using a bench scale continuous-flow reactor system to process feed water spiked with endotoxin standard (Escherichia coli O113:H10). Product water samples were collected and quantified by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. At 250°C, 5-log endotoxin inactivation was achieved in about 1 s of exposure, followed by a lower inactivation rate. This non-log-linear pattern is similar to reported trends in microbial survival curves. Predictions and parameters of several non-log-linear models are presented. In the fast-reaction zone (3- to 5-log reduction), the Arrhenius rate constant fits well at temperatures ranging from 120°C to 250°C on the basis of data from this work and the literature. Both biphasic and modified Weibull models are comparable to account for both the high and low rates of inactivation in terms of prediction accuracy and the number of parameters used. A unified representation of thermal resistance curves for a 3-log reduction and a 3 D value associated with endotoxin inactivation and microbial survival, respectively, is presented. PMID:21193667

  6. Vagus nerve stimulation attenuates the systemic inflammatory response to endotoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikova, Lyudmila V.; Ivanova, Svetlana; Zhang, Minghuang; Yang, Huan; Botchkina, Galina I.; Watkins, Linda R.; Wang, Haichao; Abumrad, Naji; Eaton, John W.; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2000-05-01

    Vertebrates achieve internal homeostasis during infection or injury by balancing the activities of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide), produced by all gram-negative bacteria, activates macrophages to release cytokines that are potentially lethal. The central nervous system regulates systemic inflammatory responses to endotoxin through humoral mechanisms. Activation of afferent vagus nerve fibres by endotoxin or cytokines stimulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal anti-inflammatory responses. However, comparatively little is known about the role of efferent vagus nerve signalling in modulating inflammation. Here, we describe a previously unrecognized, parasympathetic anti-inflammatory pathway by which the brain modulates systemic inflammatory responses to endotoxin. Acetylcholine, the principle vagal neurotransmitter, significantly attenuated the release of cytokines (tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-18), but not the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human macrophage cultures. Direct electrical stimulation of the peripheral vagus nerve in vivo during lethal endotoxaemia in rats inhibited TNF synthesis in liver, attenuated peak serum TNF amounts, and prevented the development of shock.

  7. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides in plant and mammalian innate immunity.

    PubMed

    De Castro, Cristina; Holst, Otto; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Molinaro, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    This mini-review gives a structural view on the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), the endotoxin from Gram negative bacteria, paying attention on the features that are relevant for their activity as elicitors of the innate immune system of humans, animals and plants. PMID:22533617

  8. Carbapenem-induced endotoxin release in gram-negative bacterial sepsis rat models.

    PubMed

    Horii, T; Kobayashi, M; Nadai, M; Ichiyama, S; Ohta, M

    1998-08-01

    The carbapenem-induced endotoxin release was evaluated using experimental models of gram-negative bacterial sepsis in Wistar rats. Infections with Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis resulted in an increase of the plasma endotoxin concentration after treatment with ceftazidime and carbapenems including imipenem, panipenem, meropenem and biapenem. Except for P. aeruginosa, the plasma endotoxin concentrations after carbapenem treatment were significantly lower than those after ceftazidime treatment. It is noteworthy that treatment of P. aeruginosa sepsis with meropenem or biapenem induced significantly more endotoxin release than other carbapenems and the endotoxin concentrations induced by these carbapenems reached those of ceftazidime treatment. The plasma endotoxin concentrations appeared to correlate with the reduction of platelet counts and the elevation of both glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and glutamic pyruvic transaminase values. PMID:9753002

  9. Removing Endotoxin from Metallic Biomaterials with Compressed Carbon Dioxide-Based Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Tarafa, Pedro J.; Williams, Eve; Panvelker, Samir; Zhang, Jian; Matthews, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxins have strong affinity for metallic biomaterials because of surface energy effects. Conventional depyrogenation methods may not eradicate endotoxins and may compromise biological properties and functionality of metallic instruments and implants. We evaluated the solubilization and removal of E. coli endotoxin from smooth and porous titanium (Ti) surfaces and stainless steel lumens using compressed CO2-based mixtures having water and/or surfactant Ls-54. The CO2/water/Ls-54 ternary mixture in the liquid CO2 region (25 °C and 27.6 MPa) with strong mixing removed endotoxin below detection levels. This suggests that the ternary mixture penetrates and dissolves endotoxins from all the tested substrates. The successful removal of endotoxins from metallic biomaterials with compressed CO2 is a promising cleaning technology for biomaterials and reusable medical devices. PMID:21499532

  10. α-Chaconine isolated from a Solanum tuberosum L. cv Jayoung suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory mediators via AP-1 inactivation in RAW 264.7 macrophages and protects mice from endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung-Goo; Lee, Suel-Gie; Lee, Hwi-Ho; Lee, Hae Jun; Shin, Ji-Sun; Kim, Nan-Jung; An, Hyo-Jin; Nam, Jung-Hwan; Jang, Dae Sik; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2015-06-25

    In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of α-chaconine in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages and in LPS-induced septic mice. α-Chaconine inhibited the expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) at the transcriptional level, and attenuated the transcriptional activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1) by reducing the translocation and phosphorylation of c-Jun. α-Chaconine also suppressed the phosphorylation of TGF-β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), which lies upstream of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 7 (MKK7)/Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. JNK knockdown using siRNA prevented the α-chaconine-mediated inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators. In a sepsis model, pretreatment with α-chaconine reduced the LPS-induced lethality and the mRNA and production levels of pro-inflammatory mediators by inhibiting c-Jun activation. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of α-chaconine are associated with the suppression of AP-1, and support its possible therapeutic role for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:25913072

  11. Metabolic and clinical response to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide in layer pullets of different genetic backgrounds supplied with graded dietary L-arginine.

    PubMed

    Lieboldt, M A; Frahm, J; Halle, I; Görs, S; Schrader, L; Weigend, S; Preisinger, R; Metges, C C; Breves, G; Dänicke, S

    2016-03-01

    L-arginine (Arg) is an essential amino acid in birds that plays a decisive role in avian protein synthesis and immune response. Effects of graded dietary Arg supply on metabolic and clinical response to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were studied over 48 hours after a single intramuscular LPS injection in 18-week-old genetically diverse purebred pullets. LPS induced a genotype-specific fever response within 4 hours post injectionem. Whereas brown genotypes showed an initial hypothermia followed by longer-lasting moderate hyperthermia, white genotypes exhibited a biphasic hyperthermia without initial hypothermia. Furthermore, within 2 hours after LPS injection, sickness behavior characterized by lethargy, anorexia, intensified respiration, and ruffled feathers appeared, persisted for 3 to 5 hours and recovered 12 hours post injectionem. The varying grades of Arg did not alter the examined traits named above, whereas insufficient Arg reduced body growth and increased relative weights of liver and pancreas significantly. At 48 hours post injectionem, increased relative weights of liver and spleen were also found in LPS treated pullets, whereas LPS decreased those of pancreas, bursa, thymus, and cecal tonsils. Moreover, LPS lowered the sum of plasma amino acids and decreased plasma concentrations of Arg, citrulline, glutamate, methionine, ornithine, phenylalanine, proline, tryptophan, and tyrosine, and increased those of aspartate, glutamine, lysine, 1- and 3-methyl-histidine. Elevating concentrations of dietary Arg led to increasing plasma concentrations of Arg, citrulline, ornithine, and 3-methyl-histidine subsequently. As quantitative expression of LPS-induced anorexia, proteolysis, and the following changes in plasma amino acids, pullets showed a significant decrease of feed and nitrogen intake and catabolic metabolism characterized by negative nitrogen balance and body weight loss in the first 24 hours post injectionem. Pullets recovered from the

  12. Stress-Derived Corticotropin Releasing Factor Breaches Epithelial Endotoxin Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Yang, Gui; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Loss of the endotoxin tolerance of intestinal epithelium contributes to a number of intestinal diseases. The etiology is not clear. Psychological stress is proposed to compromise the intestinal barrier function. The present study aims to elucidate the role of the stress-derived corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) in breaching the established intestinal epithelial endotoxin tolerance. Methods Epithelial cells of HT-29, T84 and MDCK were exposed to lipopolysaccharide to induce the endotoxin tolerance; the cells were then stimulated with CRF. The epithelial barrier function was determined using as indicators of the endotoxin tolerant status. A water-avoid stress mouse model was employed to test the role of CRF in breaching the established endotoxin tolerance in the intestine. Results The established endotoxin tolerance in the epithelial cell monolayers was broken down by a sequent exposure to CRF and LPS manifesting a marked drop of the transepithelial resistance (TER) and an increase in the permeability to a macromolecular tracer, horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The exposure to CRF also increased the expression of Cldn2 in the epithelial cells, which could be mimicked by over expression of TLR4 in epithelial cells. Over expression of Cldn2 resulted in low TER in epithelial monolayers and high permeability to HRP. After treating mice with the 10-day chronic stress, the intestinal epithelial barrier function was markedly compromised, which could be prevented by blocking either CRF, or TLR4, or Cldn2. Conclusions Psychological stress-derived CRF can breach the established endotoxin tolerance in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:23840363

  13. EFFECT OF ENDOTOXIN ON CELLS AND ON THEIR RESPONSE TO INFECTION BY POLIOVIRUSES1

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William H.; Wisner, Carolyn

    1962-01-01

    Murphy, W. H. (The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) and C. Wisner. Effect of endotoxin on cells and on their response to infection by polioviruses. J. Bacteriol. 83:649–662. 1962.—The effect of lipopolysaccharide on HeLa-S3, HeLa-Gey, Chang-liver, Maben, and L strain mouse fibroblasts was studied. The liminal dose of endotoxin for the human epithelial cell strains was approximately 250 μg/ml, and their order of sensitivity to endotoxin was: Chang-liver, HeLa-Gey, HeLa-S3, and Maben, the latter being the most resistant. Endotoxin at concentrations exceeding 100 μg/ml was cytotoxic to the L strain of mouse fibroblasts and caused them to markedly agglutinate. Cytotoxic response of cells to endotoxin was not characterized by cell lysis, but by distinctive nuclear changes. In an attempt to demonstrate the metabolic induction of the latent infection of cell cultures by a noncytopathic variant of poliovirus, endotoxin was added at maximal subliminal concentration to cell cultures totally, partially, or fully susceptible to virus. Endotoxin caused a slight but consistent accelerative cytopathic response of cells to infection by cytopathic poliovirus, but failed to induce cytopathic response to infection by submoderate (noncytopathic) poliovirus. Although endotoxin slightly suppressed yields of poliovirus from cells, it did not affect the plating efficiency of virus on cell monolayers. Images PMID:14477444

  14. Bench-to-bedside review: Endotoxin tolerance as a model of leukocyte reprogramming in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Adib-Conquy, Minou

    2006-01-01

    Endotoxin tolerance is defined as a reduced responsiveness to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge following a first encounter with endotoxin. Endotoxin tolerance protects against a lethal challenge of LPS and prevents infection and ischemia-reperfusion damage. Endotoxin tolerance is paralleled by a dramatic reduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production and some other cytokines in response to LPS. Endotoxin tolerance involves the participation of macrophages and mediators, such as glucocorticoids, prostaglandins, IL-10, and transforming growth factor-β. Endotoxin tolerance is accompanied by the up-regulation of inhibitory molecules that down-regulate the Toll-like receptor (TLR)4-dependent signaling pathway. Cross-tolerance between LPS and other TLR specific ligands, as well as IL-1 and TNF, has been regularly reported. A similar loss of LPS reactivity has been repeatedly reported in circulating leukocytes of septic patients and in patients with non-infectious systemic inflammation response syndrome (SIRS). Studies on cellular signaling within leukocytes from septic and SIRS patients reveal numerous alterations reminiscent of those observed in endotoxin tolerant cells. However, altered responsiveness to LPS of leukocytes from sepsis and SIRS patients is not synonymous with a global down-regulation of cellular reactivity. The term 'cellular reprogramming', which has been proposed to qualify the process of endotoxin tolerance, defines well the immune status of circulating leukocytes in septic and SIRS patients. PMID:17044947

  15. Cynandione A attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced production of inflammatory mediators via MAPK inhibition and NF-κB inactivation in RAW264.7 macrophages and protects mice against endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sang Min; Park, Ji Hae; Park, Keun Hyung; Jung, Mira; Jung, Hana; Mohamed, Mohamed Antar Aziz; Baek, Nam-In; Chung, In Sik; Kim, Jiyoung

    2015-07-01

    Cynanchum wilfordii has been traditionally used in eastern Asia for the treatment of various diseases such as gastrointestinal diseases and arteriosclerosis. Cynandione A (CA), an acetophenone, is one of major constituents from roots of C. wilfordii. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory activities of CA were investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW264.7 macrophages and LPS-administered C57BL/6 N mice. CA significantly decreased LPS-induced production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 in a dose-dependent manner, while CA up to 200 μM did not exhibit cytotoxic activity. Our data also showed that CA significantly attenuated expression of iNOS and COX-2 in LPS-stimulated macrophages. CA inhibited phosphorylation of IκB-α and MAP kinases such as ERK and p38. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CA inhibited translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus, transcription of the NF-κB minimal promoter and NF-κB DNA binding activity. Administration of CA significantly decreased the plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in LPS-injected mice and improved survival of septic mice with lethal endotoxemia. These results demonstrate that CA has effective inhibitory effects on production of inflammatory mediators via suppressing activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, suggesting that CA may be used as a potential anti-inflammatory agent for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25361770

  16. Influence of various dust sampling and extraction methods on the measurement of airborne endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Douwes, J; Versloot, P; Hollander, A; Heederik, D; Doekes, G

    1995-05-01

    The influence of various filter types and extraction conditions on the quantitation of airborne endotoxin with the Limulus amebocyte lysate test was studied by using airborne dusts sampled in a potato processing plant. Samples were collected with an apparatus designed to provide parallel samples. Data from the parallel-sampling experiment were statistically evaluated by using analysis of variance. In addition, the influence of storage conditions on the detectable endotoxin concentration was investigated by using commercially available lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and endotoxin-containing house dust extracts. The endotoxin extraction efficiency of 0.05% Tween 20 in pyrogen-free water was seven times higher than that of pyrogen-free water only. Two-times-greater amounts of endotoxin were extracted from glass fiber, Teflon, and polycarbonate filters than from cellulose ester filters. The temperature and shaking intensity during extraction were not related to the extraction efficiency. Repeated freeze (-20 degrees C)-and-thaw cycles with commercial LPS reconstituted in pyrogen-free water had a dramatic effect on the detectable endotoxin level. A 25% loss in endotoxin activity per freeze-thaw cycle was observed. Storage of LPS samples for a period of 1 year at 7 degrees C had no effect on the endotoxin level. House dust extracts showed a decrease of about 20% in the endotoxin level after they had been frozen and thawed for a second time. The use of different container materials (borosilicate glass, "soft" glass, and polypropylene) did not result in different endotoxin levels. This study indicates that the assessment of endotoxin exposure may differ considerably between groups when different sampling, extraction, and storage procedures are employed. PMID:7646014

  17. Influence of various dust sampling and extraction methods on the measurement of airborne endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Douwes, J; Versloot, P; Hollander, A; Heederik, D; Doekes, G

    1995-01-01

    The influence of various filter types and extraction conditions on the quantitation of airborne endotoxin with the Limulus amebocyte lysate test was studied by using airborne dusts sampled in a potato processing plant. Samples were collected with an apparatus designed to provide parallel samples. Data from the parallel-sampling experiment were statistically evaluated by using analysis of variance. In addition, the influence of storage conditions on the detectable endotoxin concentration was investigated by using commercially available lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and endotoxin-containing house dust extracts. The endotoxin extraction efficiency of 0.05% Tween 20 in pyrogen-free water was seven times higher than that of pyrogen-free water only. Two-times-greater amounts of endotoxin were extracted from glass fiber, Teflon, and polycarbonate filters than from cellulose ester filters. The temperature and shaking intensity during extraction were not related to the extraction efficiency. Repeated freeze (-20 degrees C)-and-thaw cycles with commercial LPS reconstituted in pyrogen-free water had a dramatic effect on the detectable endotoxin level. A 25% loss in endotoxin activity per freeze-thaw cycle was observed. Storage of LPS samples for a period of 1 year at 7 degrees C had no effect on the endotoxin level. House dust extracts showed a decrease of about 20% in the endotoxin level after they had been frozen and thawed for a second time. The use of different container materials (borosilicate glass, "soft" glass, and polypropylene) did not result in different endotoxin levels. This study indicates that the assessment of endotoxin exposure may differ considerably between groups when different sampling, extraction, and storage procedures are employed. PMID:7646014

  18. Development of an anti-endotoxin vaccine for sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cross, Alan S

    2010-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) is an important initiator of sepsis, a clinical syndrome that is a leading cause of death in intensive care units. Vaccines directed against core LPS structures that are widely conserved among Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) have been developed for the treatment and/or prevention of sepsis. Killed whole bacterial vaccines (E. coli O111:B4, J5 [Rc chemotype] mutant and S. minnesota, Re chemotype) protected mice against experimental sepsis. Human J5 immune antisera reduced the mortality from GNB sepsis in a large controlled clinical trial; however, subsequent clinical studies with antiendotoxin antibodies did not demonstrate protective efficacy in sepsis. Multiple clinical studies have since demonstrated a correlation between the level of circulating antibodies to LPS core and morbidity and mortality in different clinical settings. We therefore developed a subunit vaccine by combining detoxified J5 LPS (J5 dLPS) with the outer membrane protein (OMP) from group B N. meningitidis. This vaccine was highly efficacious in experimental models of sepsis and progressed to phase 1 clinical trial. While well-tolerated, this vaccine induced only 3-4-fold increases in anti-J5 dLPS antibody. Addition of the TLR9 agonist, oligodeoxynucleotide with a CpG motif, as adjuvant to the vaccine increased antibody levels in mice and the vaccine/CpG combination will progress to phase 1 human study. Additional vaccines in which the core glycolipid was either conjugated to carrier protein or incorporated into liposomes have been developed, but have not progressed to clinical trial. Should an antiendotoxin vaccine become available, a new immunization strategy directed towards distinct populations at risk will be required. PMID:20593272

  19. Endotoxin and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, Jessica I.; Checkoway, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Objective Exposure to endotoxin, a component of gram-negative bacterial cell walls, is widespread in many industrial settings and in the ambient environment. Heavy-exposure environments include livestock farms, cotton textile facilities, and saw mills. Concentrations are highly variable in non-occupational indoor and outdoor environments. Endotoxin is a potent inflammagen with recognized health effects, including fever, shaking chills, septic shock, toxic pneumonitis, and respiratory symptoms. Somewhat paradoxically, given the putative role of inflammation in carcinogenesis, various lines of evidence suggest that endotoxin may prevent cancer initiation or limit tumor growth. The hypothesis that components of bacteria may retard cancer progression dates back to William B. Coley’s therapeutic experiments (“bacterial vaccine”) in the 1890s. Data sources In this article, we review epidemiologic, clinical trial, and experimental studies pertinent to the hypothesis that endotoxin prevents cancer. Since the 1970s, epidemiologic studies of cotton textile and other endotoxin-exposed occupational groups have consistently demonstrated reduced lung cancer risks. Experimental animal toxicology research and some limited therapeutic trials in cancer patients offer additional support for an anticarcinogenic potential. The underlying biological mechanisms of anticarcinogenesis are not entirely understood but are thought to involve the recruitment and activation of immune cells and proinflammatory mediators (e.g., tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-1 and -6). Conclusions In view of the current state of knowledge, it would be premature to recommend endotoxin as a cancer-chemopreventive agent. Nonetheless, further epidemiologic and experimental investigations that can clarify further dose–effect and exposure–timing relations could have substantial public health and basic biomedical benefits. PMID:19750096

  20. Generation of slow-reacting substance (leukotrienes) by endotoxin and lipid A from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bremm, K D; König, W; Spur, B; Crea, A; Galanos, C

    1984-01-01

    Leukotrienes were released from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes on incubation with endotoxins and lipid A. The analysis was performed by their smooth muscle contracting properties, reversed phase high-pressure liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay for leukotrienes C4 and D4. The active component of the lipopolysaccharides seems to be the lipid A portion. PMID:6490085

  1. Biosensor of endotoxin and sepsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yang; Wang, Xiang; Wu, Xi; Gao, Wei; He, Qing-hua; Cai, Shaoxi

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the relation between biosensor of endotoxin and endotoxin of plasma in sepsis. Method: biosensor of endotoxin was designed with technology of quartz crystal microbalance bioaffinity sensor ligand of endotoxin were immobilized by protein A conjugate. When a sample soliton of plasma containing endotoxin 0.01, 0.03, 0.06, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0Eu, treated with perchloric acid and injected into slot of quartz crystal surface respectively, the ligand was released from the surface of quartz crystal to form a more stable complex with endotoxin in solution. The endotoxin concentration corresponded to the weight change on the crystal surface, and caused change of frequency that occurred when desorbed. The result was biosensor of endotoxin might detect endotoxin of plasma in sepsis, measurements range between 0.05Eu and 0.5Eu in the stop flow mode, measurement range between 0.1Eu and 1Eu in the flow mode. The sensor of endotoxin could detect the endotoxin of plasm rapidly, and use for detection sepsis in clinically.

  2. Ultrasensitive detection of endotoxins using computationally designed nanoMIPs.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Zeynep; Abdin, Mohammed J; Tothill, Alexander M; Karim, Kal; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2016-09-01

    Novel molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (nanoMIPs) were designed for endotoxin from Escherichia coli 0111:B4, using computational modeling. The screening process based on binding energy between endotoxin and each monomer was performed with 21 commonly used monomers, resulting in the selection of itaconic acid, methacrylic acid and acrylamide as functional monomers due to their strong binding interaction with the endotoxin template. The nanoMIPs were successfully synthesized with functional groups on the outer surface to aid in the immobilization onto sensor surface. The solid phase photopolymerization approach used for the synthesis of nanoMIPs ranging from 200 to 235 nm in diameter. The limit of detection and KD were significantly improved when endotoxin samples were prepared using a novel triethylamine method. This improved the efficiency of gold nanoparticle functionalization by targeting the subunits of the endotoxin. Compared to the vancomycin MIP control, the endotoxin MIPs displayed outstanding affinity and selectivity towards the endotoxin with KD values in the range of 4.4-5.3 × 10(-10) M, with limits of detection of 0.44 ± 0.02 ng mL(-1) as determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor when itaconic acid was used as the functional monomer. The MIP surface can be regenerated >30 times without significant loss of binding activity making this approach highly cost effective for expensive analyte templates. The combination of molecular modeling and solid phase synthesis enabled the successful synthesis of nanoMIPs capable of recognition and ultrasensitive detection of endotoxins using the highly sensitive SPR biosensor with triethylamine method. PMID:27543033

  3. Removal of endotoxin from water by microfiltration through a microporous polyethylene hollow-fiber membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Y.; Fujii, R.; Igami, I.; Kawai, A.; Kamiki, T.; Niwa, M.

    1986-04-01

    The microporous polyethylene hollow-fiber membrane has a unique microfibrile structure throughout its depth and has been found to possess the functions of filtration and adsorption of endotoxin in water. The membrane has a maximum pore diameter of approximately 0.04 micron, a diameter which is within the range of microfiltration. Approximately 10 and 20% of the endotoxin in tap water and subterranean water, respectively, was smaller than 0.025 micron. Endotoxin in these water sources was efficiently removed by the microporous polyethylene hollow-fiber membrane. Escherichia coli O113 culture broth contained 26.4% of endotoxin smaller than 0.025 micron which was also removed. Endotoxin was leaked into the filtrate only when endotoxin samples were successively passed through the membrane. These results indicate that endotoxin smaller than the pore size of the membrane was adsorbed and then leaked into the filtrate because of a reduction in binding sites. Dissociation of /sup 3/H-labeled endotoxin from the membrane was performed, resulting in the removal of endotoxin associated with the membrane by alcoholic alkali at 78% efficiency.

  4. Capillary electrophoresis chips for screening of endotoxin chemotypes from whole-cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Kilár, Anikó; Péterfi, Zoltán; Csorba, Eszter; Kilár, Ferenc; Kocsis, Béla

    2008-10-01

    A fast microchip electrophoresis method was developed to analyze and differentiate bacterial endotoxins directly from whole-cell lysates after removal of the proteinaceous components with proteinase K digestion and a precipitation of the endotoxin components. The partially purified endotoxin components were visualized by the interaction with dodecyl sulphate and then a fluorescent dye. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) profiles can be directly evaluated from digested bacterial cells, and the electrophoresis patterns very closely resembled to those of pure LPSs, and the R and S chemotypes can be used to assign the strains. The method has been found to be useful in the screening of a large number of bacterial mutants and the structural characterization of endotoxins extracted only from 1 ml cultures. PMID:18692189

  5. Altered surfactant protein A gene expression and protein metabolism associated with repeat exposure to inhaled endotoxin.

    PubMed

    George, Caroline L S; White, Misty L; O'Neill, Marsha E; Thorne, Peter S; Schwartz, David A; Snyder, Jeanne M

    2003-12-01

    Chronically inhaled endotoxin, which is ubiquitous in many occupational and domestic environments, can adversely affect the respiratory system resulting in an inflammatory response and decreased lung function. Surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) is part of the lung innate immune system and may attenuate the inflammatory response in various types of lung injury. Using a murine model to mimic occupational exposures to endotoxin, we hypothesized that SP-A gene expression and protein would be elevated in response to repeat exposure to inhaled grain dust and to purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our results demonstrate that repeat exposure to inhaled endotoxin, either in the form of grain dust or purified LPS, results in increased whole lung SP-A gene expression and type II alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia, whereas SP-A protein levels in lung lavage fluid are decreased. Furthermore, these alterations in SP-A gene activity and protein metabolism are dependent on an intact endotoxin signaling system. PMID:12922979

  6. Endotoxin detection--from limulus amebocyte lysate to recombinant factor C.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jeak Ling; Ho, Bow

    2010-01-01

    Gram negative bacterial endotoxin is a biological pyrogen that causes fever when introduced intravenously. The endotoxin, also known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. During Gram-negative sepsis, endotoxin stimulates host macrophages to release inflammatory cytokines. However, excessive inflammation causes multiple organ failure and death. Endotoxins, which are ubiquitous pathogenic molecules, are a bane to the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare community. Thus early and sensitive detection of endotoxin is crucial to prevent endotoxaemia. The limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) has been widely used for ~30 years for the detection of endotoxin in the quality assurance of injectable drugs and medical devices. The LAL constitutes a cascade of serine proteases which are triggered by trace levels of endotoxin, culminating in a gel clot at the end of the reaction. The Factor C, which normally exists as a zymogen, is the primer of this coagulation cascade. In vivo, Factor C is the perfect biosensor, which alerts the horseshoe crab of the presence of a Gram-negative invader. The hemostatic end-point entraps the invader, killing it and limiting further infection. However, as an in vitro endotoxin detection tool, variations in the sensitivity and specificity of LAL to endotoxin, and the dwindling supply of horseshoe crabs are posing increasing challenges to the biotechnology industry. This has necessitated the innovation of an alternative test for endotoxin. Thus, Factor C became the obvious, albeit tricky target for the recombinant technology effort. This chapter documents the backwater of mining the natural blood lysate of the endangered species to the monumental effort of genetic engineering, to produce recombinant Factor C (rFC). The rFC is a 132 kDa molecule, which was produced as a proenzyme inducible by the presence of trace levels of endotoxin. The rFC forms the basis of the "PyroGene" kit, which is a novel micro

  7. Endotoxin Structures in the Psychrophiles Psychromonas marina and Psychrobacter cryohalolentis Contain Distinctive Acyl Features

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Charles R.; Alpuche, Giancarlo M.; Landis, Corinne A.; Sandman, Benjamin C.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid A is the essential component of endotoxin (Gram-negative lipopolysaccharide), a potent immunostimulatory compound. As the outer surface of the outer membrane, the details of lipid A structure are crucial not only to bacterial pathogenesis but also to membrane integrity. This work characterizes the structure of lipid A in two psychrophiles, Psychromonas marina and Psychrobacter cryohalolentis, and also two mesophiles to which they are related using MALDI-TOF MS and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC-MS. P. marina lipid A is strikingly similar to that of Escherichia coli in organization and total acyl size, but incorporates an unusual doubly unsaturated tetradecadienoyl acyl residue. P. cryohalolentis also shows structural organization similar to a closely related mesophile, Acinetobacter baumannii, however it has generally shorter acyl constituents and shows many acyl variants differing by single methylene (-CH2-) units, a characteristic it shares with the one previously reported psychrotolerant lipid A structure. This work is the first detailed structural characterization of lipid A from an obligate psychrophile and the second from a psychrotolerant species. It reveals distinctive structural features of psychrophilic lipid A in comparison to that of related mesophiles which suggest constitutive adaptations to maintain outer membrane fluidity in cold environments. PMID:25010385

  8. The NLRP3 inflammasome is active but not essential in endotoxin-induced uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Woods, April; Clowers, Jenna S.; Planck, Stephen R.; Rosenbaum, James T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The inflammasome complex involving caspase-1 and nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing protein (NLRP)3, also known as NALP3 or cryopyrin is important for host responses to microbial pathogens and several autoinflammatory diseases. We investigated the extent to which NLRP3 and caspase-1 control ocular interleukin (IL)-1β production and severity of uveitis (intraocular inflammatory disease) in an established, acute inflammatory uveitis model, endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU). Methods Expression of NLRP3, its adaptor molecule ASC, also known as PYCARD (PYD and CARD domain containing), and caspase-1 were examined by immunoblotting. IL-1β production was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Using knockout mice, roles for caspase-1 and NLRP3 were examined in uveitis induced by intraocular injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Results NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 proteins are constitutively expressed in eye tissue. During EIU, IL-1β protein production increases; this requires the presence of both caspase-1 and NLRP3. However, severity of EIU is not altered by deficiency in either caspase-1 or NLRP3, as assessed by both intravital microscopy and histology. Conclusions These data identify the importance of the NLRP3 inflammasome for IL-1β production in the eye, yet indicate that its participation in EIU is nonessential. PMID:22119862

  9. Insulin Suppresses Endotoxin-Induced Oxidative, Nitrosative, and Inflammatory Stress in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dandona, Paresh; Ghanim, Husam; Bandyopadhyay, Arindam; Korzeniewski, Kelly; Ling Sia, Chang; Dhindsa, Sandeep; Chaudhuri, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether insulin reduces the magnitude of oxidative, nitrosative, and inflammatory stress and tissue damage responses induced by endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Nine normal subjects were injected intravenously with 2 ng/kg LPS prepared from Escherichia coli. Ten others were infused with insulin (2 units/h) for 6 h in addition to the LPS injection along with 100 ml/h of 5% dextrose to maintain normoglycemia. RESULTS LPS injection induced a rapid increase in plasma concentrations of nitric oxide metabolites, nitrite and nitrate (NOM), and thiobarbituric acid–reacting substances (TBARS), an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs), and marked increases in plasma free fatty acids, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage migration inhibition factor (MIF), C-reactive protein, resistin, visfatin, lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), high mobility group-B1 (HMG-B1), and myoglobin concentrations. The coinfusion of insulin led to a total elimination of the increase in NOM, free fatty acids, and TBARS and a significant reduction in ROS generation by PMNLs and plasma MIF, visfatin, and myoglobin concentrations. Insulin did not affect TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-6, LBP, resistin, and HMG-B1 increases induced by the LPS. CONCLUSIONS Insulin reduces significantly several key mediators of oxidative, nitrosative, and inflammatory stress and tissue damage induced by LPS. These effects of insulin require further investigation for its potential use as anti-inflammatory therapy for endotoxemia. PMID:20699433

  10. Antimicrobial Action and Cell Agglutination by the Eosinophil Cationic Protein Are Modulated by the Cell Wall Lipopolysaccharide Structure

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, David; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Andreu, David; Nogués, M. Victòria

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs) are essential effectors of innate immunity, acting as a first line of defense against bacterial infections. Many AMPs exhibit high affinity for cell wall structures such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a potent endotoxin able to induce sepsis. Hence, understanding how AMPs can interact with and neutralize LPS endotoxin is of special relevance for human health. Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is an eosinophil secreted protein with high activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. ECP has a remarkable affinity for LPS and a distinctive agglutinating activity. By using a battery of LPS-truncated E. coli mutant strains, we demonstrate that the polysaccharide moiety of LPS is essential for ECP-mediated bacterial agglutination, thereby modulating its antimicrobial action. The mechanism of action of ECP at the bacterial surface is drastically affected by the LPS structure and in particular by its polysaccharide moiety. We have also analyzed an N-terminal fragment that retains the whole protein activity and displays similar cell agglutination behavior. Conversely, a fragment with further minimization of the antimicrobial domain, though retaining the antimicrobial capacity, significantly loses its agglutinating activity, exhibiting a different mechanism of action which is not dependent on the LPS composition. The results highlight the correlation between the protein's antimicrobial activity and its ability to interact with the LPS outer layer and promote bacterial agglutination. PMID:22330910

  11. The Effect of Lipopolysaccharide on Ischemic-Reperfusion Injury of Heart: A Double Hit Model of Myocardial Ischemia and Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Nader D.; Asgeri, Mehrdad; Davari-Farid, Sina; Pourafkari, Leili; Ahmadpour, Faraz; Porhomayon, Jahan; Javadzadeghan, Hassan; Negargar, Sohrab; Knight, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Myocardial ischemia may coincide and interact with sepsis and inflammation. Our objective was to examine the effects of bacterial endotoxin on myocardial functions and cell injury during acute ischemia. Methods: Rabbits were pretreated with incremental doses of E. Coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or normal saline. Myocardial ischemia was induced by 50-minute occlusion of left anterior descending artery. S-TNFaR was additionally used to block the effects LPS. Results: Ventricular contractility as it was measured by dp/dt during systole decreased from 2445± 1298 to 1422 ± 944 mm Hg/s, P = .019. Isovolumetric relaxation time as an index of diastolic function was prolonged from 50±18 ms to 102± 64 ms following ischemia. Pretreatment with low concentrations of LPS (<1 μg) had no effect on dp/dt, while at higher concentrations it suppressed both contractility and prolonged IVRT. Cell injury as measured by cardiac troponin I level increased to 15.1± 3.2 ng/dL following ischemia and continued to rise with higher doses of LPS. While blocking TNFa did not improve the myocardial contractility after ischemia, it eliminated additional deleterious effects of LPS. Conclusion: Lower doses of LPS had no deleterious effect on myocardial function, whereas higher doses of this endotoxin cause cardiac dysfunction and increased extent of injury. PMID:26430494

  12. Proteogenomics of selective susceptibility to endotoxin using circulating acute phase biomarkers and bioassay development in sheep: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have injected endotoxin into animals to investigate and understand various pathologies and novel therapies for several decades. Recent observations have shown that there is selective susceptibility to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin in sheep, despite having similar breed characteristics. The reason behind this difference is unknown, and has prompted studies aiming to explain the variation by proteogenomic characterisation of circulating acute phase biomarkers. It is hypothesised that genetic trait, biochemical, immunological and inflammation marker patterns contribute in defining and predicting mammalian response to LPS. This review discusses the effects of endotoxin and host responses, genetic basis of innate defences, activation of the acute phase response (APR) following experimental LPS challenge, and the current approaches employed in detecting novel biomarkers including acute phase proteins (APP) and micro-ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) in serum or plasma. miRNAs are novel targets for elucidating molecular mechanisms of disease because of their differential expression during pathological, and in healthy states. Changes in miRNA profiles during a disease challenge may be reflected in plasma. Studies show that gel-based two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with either matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) or liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are currently the most used methods for proteome characterisation. Further evidence suggests that proteomic investigations are preferentially shifting from 2-DE to non-gel based LC-MS/MS coupled with data extraction by sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH) approaches that are able to identify a wider range of proteins. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and most recently proteomic methods have been used to

  13. [Regulation of thyroid and pituitary functions by lipopolysaccharide].

    PubMed

    Iaglova, N V; Berezov, T T

    2010-01-01

    Activation of toll-like receptors-4 by bacterial lipopolysaccharide downregulates pituitary and thyroid function. Besides decrease of thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion lipopolysaccharide affects secretion in follicular thyroid cells directly. The endotoxin partially activates and inhibits different phases of follicular thyrocytes' secretion. Lipopolysaccharide enhances thyroglobulin synthesis and exocytosis into follicular lumen and suppresses its resorbtion. It results in sharp drop of blood thyroxine concentration without decrease of deiodinases-mediated thiroxine to triiodothyronine conversion. Stimulation of the lipopolysaccharide-pretreated thyroid gland with thyroid-stimulating hormone increases resorbtion of thyroglobulin and thyroid hormone production. Combined stimulation of the thyroid gland increases protein bound thyroxine and triiodothyronine serum concentration unlike only TSH stimulation resulting in increase of free thyroid hormone levels. It also proves that binding capacity of thyroid hormone serum transport proteins during nonthyroidal illness syndrome remains normal. PMID:21341506

  14. Single session of Nd:YAG laser intracanal irradiation neutralizes endotoxin in dental root dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archilla, José R. F.; Moreira, Maria S. N. A.; Miyagi, Sueli P. H.; Bombana, Antônio C.; Gutknecht, Norbert; Marques, Márcia M.

    2012-11-01

    Endotoxins released in the dental root by Gram-negative microorganisms can be neutralized by calcium hydroxide, when this medication is applied inside the root canal for at least seven days. However, several clinical situations demand faster root canal decontamination. Thus, for faster endotoxin neutralization, endodontists are seeking additional treatments. The in vitro study tested whether or not intracanal Nd:YAG laser irradiation would be able to neutralize endotoxin within the human dental root canal in a single session. Twenty-four human teeth with one root were mounted between two chambers. After conventional endodontic treatment, root canals were contaminated with Escherichia coli endotoxin. Then they were irradiated or not (controls) in contact mode with an Nd:YAG laser (1.5 W, 15 Hz, 100 mJ and pulse fluency of 124 J/cm2). The endotoxin activity was measured using the limulus lysate technique and data were statistically compared (p≤0.05). The concentration of active endotoxin measured in the negative control group was significantly lower than that of the positive control group (p=0.04). The concentrations of endotoxin in both irradiated groups were significantly lower than that of the positive control group (p=0.027) and similar to that of negative control group (p=0.20). A single session of intracanal Nd:YAG laser irradiation is able to neutralize endotoxin in the dental root tissues.

  15. Anti-inflammatory and anti-endotoxin properties of peptides derived from the carboxy-terminal region of a defensin from the tick Ornithodoros savignyi.

    PubMed

    Malan, Melissa; Serem, June C; Bester, Megan J; Neitz, Albert W H; Gaspar, Anabella R M

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small cationic peptides that possess a large spectrum of bioactivities, including antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Several antimicrobial peptides are known to inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in vitro and to protect animals from sepsis. In this study, the cellular anti-inflammatory and anti-endotoxin activities of Os and Os-C, peptides derived from the carboxy-terminal of a tick defensin, were investigated. Both Os and Os-C were found to bind LPS in vitro, albeit to a lesser extent than polymyxin B and melittin, known endotoxin-binding peptides. Binding to LPS was found to reduce the bactericidal activity of Os and Os-C against Escherichia coli confirming the affinity of both peptides for LPS. At a concentration of 25 µM, the nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of Os was higher than glutathione, a known NO scavenger. In contrast, Os-C showed no scavenging activity. Os and Os-C inhibited LPS/IFN-γ induced NO and TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, with no cellular toxicity even at a concentration of 100 µM. Although inhibition of NO and TNF-α secretion was more pronounced for melittin and polymyxin B, significant cytotoxicity was observed at concentrations of 1.56 µM and 25 µM for melittin and polymyxin B, respectively. In addition, Os, Os-C and glutathione protected RAW 264.7 cells from oxidative damage at concentrations as low as 25 µM. This study identified that besides previously reported antibacterial activity of Os and Os-C, both peptides have in addition anti-inflammatory and anti-endotoxin properties. PMID:26662999

  16. Unique genome-wide transcriptome profiles of chicken macrophages exposed to Salmonella-derived endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Macrophages play essential roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Bacteria require endotoxin, a complex lipopolysaccharide, for outer membrane permeability and the host interprets endotoxin as a signal to initiate an innate immune response. The focus of this study is kinetic and global transcriptional analysis of the chicken macrophage response to in vitro stimulation with endotoxin from Salmonella typhimurium-798. Results The 38535-probeset Affymetrix GeneChip Chicken Genome array was used to profile transcriptional response to endotoxin 1, 2, 4, and 8 hours post stimulation (hps). Using a maximum FDR (False Discovery Rate) of 0.05 to declare genes as differentially expressed (DE), we found 13, 33, 1761 and 61 DE genes between endotoxin-stimulated versus non-stimulated cells at 1, 2, 4 and 8 hps, respectively. QPCR demonstrated that endotoxin exposure significantly affected the mRNA expression of IL1B, IL6, IL8, and TLR15, but not IL10 and IFNG in HD 11 cells. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that 10% of the total DE genes were involved in inflammatory response. Three, 9.7, 96.8, and 11.8% of the total DE inflammatory response genes were significantly differentially expressed with endotoxin stimulation at 1, 2, 4 and 8 hps, respectively. The NFKBIA, IL1B, IL8 and CCL4 genes were consistently induced at all times after endotoxin treatment. NLRC5 (CARD domain containing, NOD-like receptor family, RCJMB04_18i2), an intracellular receptor, was induced in HD11 cells treated with endotoxin. Conclusions As above using an in vitro model of chicken response to endotoxin, our data revealed the kinetics of gene networks involved in host response to endotoxin and extend the known complexity of networks in chicken immune response to Gram-negative bacteria such as Salmonella. The induction of NFKBIA, IL1B, IL8, CCL4 genes is a consistent signature of host response to endotoxin over time. We make the first report of induction of a NOD-like receptor

  17. Chylomicrons enhance endotoxin excretion in bile.

    PubMed Central

    Read, T E; Harris, H W; Grunfeld, C; Feingold, K R; Calhoun, M C; Kane, J P; Rapp, J H

    1993-01-01

    Chylomicrons prevent endotoxin toxicity and increase endotoxin uptake by hepatocytes. As a consequence, less endotoxin is available to activate macrophages, thereby reducing tumor necrosis factor secretion. To determine whether the chylomicron-mediated increase in hepatocellular uptake of endotoxin results in increased endotoxin excretion into bile, we examined bile after endotoxin administration. A sublethal dose (7 micrograms/kg) of 125I-endotoxin was incubated with either rat mesenteric lymph containing nascent chylomicrons (500 mg of chylomicron triglyceride per kg of body weight) or an equal volume of normal saline (controls) for 3 h and then infused into male Sprague-Dawley rats. Bile samples were collected via a common bile duct catheter for 24 h. Infusion of endotoxin incubated with chylomicrons increased biliary excretion of endotoxin by 67% at 3 h (P < or = 0.006) and by 20% at 24 h (P < or = 0.01) compared with infusion of endotoxin incubated in saline. Endotoxin activity, as measured by the Limulus assay, was not detected in the bile of test animals. However, endotoxin activity was detected after hot phenol-water extraction of bile, demonstrating that endotoxin is inactive in the presence of bile but retains bioactivity after hepatic processing. Since the majority of an intravenous endotoxin load has been shown to be cleared by the liver, acceleration of hepatocyte clearance and biliary excretion of endotoxin may represent a component of the mechanism by which chylomicrons protect against endotoxin-induced lethality. PMID:8335381

  18. Endotoxin suppresses surfactant synthesis in cultured rat lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F.

    1989-02-01

    Pulmonary complications secondary to postburn sepsis are a major cause of death in burned patients. Using an in vitro organotypic culture system, we examined the effect of E. coli endotoxin (LPS) on lung cell surfactant synthesis. Our results showed that E. coli endotoxin (1.0, 2.5, 10 micrograms LPS/ml) was capable of suppressing the incorporation of /sup 3/H-choline into de novo synthesized surfactant, lamellar bodies (LB), and common myelin figures (CMF) at 50%, 68%, and 64%, respectively. In a similar study, we were able to show that LPS also inhibited /sup 3/H-palmitate incorporation by cultured lung cells. LPS-induced suppression of surfactant synthesis was reversed by hydrocortisone. Our results suggest that LPS may play a significant role in reducing surfactant synthesis by rat lung cells, and thus contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis-related respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in burn injury.

  19. Temperament influences endotoxin-induced changes in rectal temperature, sickness behavior, and plasma epinephrine concentrations in bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the influence of temperament on endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) induced changes in body temperature and the secretion of cortisol and epinephrine. Purebred Brahman bulls were selected based on temperament score (average of exit velocity, EV, and pen score, PS...

  20. Sexually dimorphic secretion of cortisol but not catecholamines in response to an endotoxin challenge in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) challenge on secretion of the adrenal stress-related hormones cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine in bull and heifer calves. Brahman calves (n = 12; 269 ± 11.7 kg) were randomly selected from the fall 2007 c...

  1. Influence of an in vivo endotoxin challenge on ex vivo phagocytic and oxidative burst capacities of bovine neutrophils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutrophils promote health by reducing the early growth of invading pathogens. The objective of this study was to elucidate the temporal effects of an exogenous endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) challenge on neutrophil function. Brahman heifers (186.1±11.8 kg; n=6) were challenged with an intraven...

  2. Ultrasound body composition traits response to an endotoxin challenge in Brahman heifers supplemented with Omnigen-AF

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the effect of feeding OmniGen-AF (OG; Prince Agri Products) on the body composition traits response of newly-weaned heifers to an endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) challenge. Brahman heifers (n=24; 183 ± 5 kg) from the Texas AgriLife Research Center in Overton, TX, were separat...

  3. Detection and quantitative evaluation of endotoxin contamination in nanoparticle formulations by LAL-based assays.

    PubMed

    Neun, Barry W; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a membrane component of all Gram-negative bacteria. The administration of products contaminated with bacterial endotoxin can cause fever, shock, and even death. Accordingly, the FDA sets limits on the number of endotoxin units (EU) that may be present in a drug or device product. Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) is the extract from amoebocytes of the horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus, which reacts with bacterial endotoxin. Detection of the products of this reaction is an effective means of quantifying the EU present in a drug formulation. However, nanoparticles frequently interfere with the reactivity of endotoxin, the LAL reaction, or the detection of the reaction products. This interference can be manifested as either an enhancement or an inhibition, causing a respective overestimation or underestimation of the EU in the sample. Here, we present two methods for the detection and quantification of endotoxin in nanoparticle preparations: one is based on an end-point chromogenic LAL assay, and the second approach is based on measuring the turbidity of the LAL extract. PMID:21116960

  4. Removal of endotoxin from deionized water using micromachined silicon nanopore membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ross A.; Goldman, Ken; Fissell, William H.; Fleischman, Aaron J.; Zorman, Christian A.; Roy, Shuvo

    2011-05-01

    Endotoxins are lipopolysaccharide components of the cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria that trigger the body's innate immune system and can cause shock and death. Water for medical therapy, including parenteral and dialysate solutions, must be free of endotoxin. This purity is challenging to achieve as many Gram-negative bacteria are endemic in the environment, and can thrive in harsh, nutrient-poor conditions. Current methods for removing endotoxin include distillation and reverse osmosis, both of which are resource intensive processes. Membranes that present an absolute barrier to macromolecular passage may be capable of delivering pure water for biomedical applications. In this work, endotoxin has been filtered from aqueous solutions using silicon nanopore membranes (SNMs) with monodisperse pore size distributions. SNMs with critical pore sizes between 26 and 49 nm were challenged with solutions of deionized water spiked with endotoxin and with Pseudomonas cepacia. The filtrate produced by the SNM from Pseudomonas-contaminated water had <1.0 endotoxin unit (EU) ml-1, which meets standards for dialysate purity. This approach suggests a technique for single-step cleanup of heavily contaminated water that may be suitable for field or clinical use.

  5. Oxidative degradation of endotoxin by advanced oxidation process (O3/H2O2 & UV/H2O2).

    PubMed

    Oh, Byung-Taek; Seo, Young-Suk; Sudhakar, Dega; Choe, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Park, Youn-Jong; Cho, Min

    2014-08-30

    The presence of endotoxin in water environments may pose a serious public health hazard. We investigated the effectiveness of advanced oxidative processes (AOP: O3/H2O2 and UV/H2O2) in the oxidative degradation of endotoxin. In addition, we measured the release of endotoxin from Escherichia coli following typical disinfection methods, such as chlorine, ozone alone and UV, and compared it with the use of AOPs. Finally, we tested the AOP-treated samples in their ability to induce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in mouse peritoneal macrophages. The production of hydroxyl radical in AOPs showed superior ability to degrade endotoxin in buffered solution, as well as water samples from Korean water treatment facilities, with the ozone/H2O2 being more efficient compared to UV/H2O2. In addition, the AOPs proved effective not only in eliminating E. coli in the samples, but also in endotoxin degradation, while the standard disinfection methods lead to the release of endotoxin following the bacteria destruction. Furthermore, in the experiments with macrophages, the AOPs-deactivated endotoxin lead to the smallest induction of TNF-α, which shows the loss of inflammation activity, compared to ozone treatment alone. In conclusion, these results suggest that AOPs offer an effective and mild method for endotoxin degradation in the water systems. PMID:25038578

  6. Induction of immune and adjuvant immunoglobulin G responses in mice by Brucella lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, E; Kurtz, R S; Berman, D T

    1984-01-01

    The immunogenic and adjuvant properties of Brucella abortus and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) were studied in endotoxin-responsive, athymic, and euthymic BALB/c mice and in responsive C3H/HeAu mice and congenic nonresponsive C3H/HeJ mice. Consistent with previous reports, E. coli LPS did not stimulate significant primary or secondary antibody responses in C3H/HeJ mice and induced the production of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and low levels of IgG in C3H/HeAu mice. In contrast, B. abortus smooth and rough LPS stimulated primary and secondary antibody responses and induced the production of IgM and high levels of IgG in both responsive and nonresponsive strains of C3H/He mice and in nude mice. When used as adjuvant, B. abortus LPS augmented the IgG plaque-forming-cell response of C3H/HeAu and BALB/c euthymic mice to the T-dependent antigen sheep erythrocytes. E. coli LPS augmented only the IgM plaque-forming-cell response in the same mouse strains. Neither B. abortus nor E. coli LPS was adjuvant for C3H/HeJ or nude mice. The dichotomy between the antibody and adjuvant responses of both C3H/HeJ mice and athymic mice to B. abortus LPS may be a function of the true thymus independence and dependence of these responses. In addition, the refractiveness of C3H/HeJ and nude mice to B. abortus LPS as adjuvant, but not as mitogen or polyclonal B cell activator, clearly dissociates these phenomena. PMID:6434430

  7. Induction of hepatocyte lipopolysaccharide binding protein in models of sepsis and the acute-phase response.

    PubMed

    Geller, D A; Kispert, P H; Su, G L; Wang, S C; Di Silvio, M; Tweardy, D J; Billiar, T R; Simmons, R L

    1993-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) is a serum glycoprotein that complexes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to facilitate macrophage response to endotoxin. To determine the conditions that stimulate LBP production in vivo, we measured the induction of LBP in models of inflammation produced by LPS, Corynebacterium parvum, and turpentine injection. Plasma aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase concentrations and hepatocyte fibrinogen synthesis were elevated in all models. Northern blot analysis revealed 17-, 14-, and 20-fold upregulation of hepatocyte LBP mRNA following treatment with LPS, C parvum, and turpentine, respectively. Peritoneal macrophage interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor production following endotoxin stimulation was augmented by cultured hepatocyte supernatants, suggesting increased LBP synthesis in these groups. The results show that LBP mRNA is induced during hepatic inflammation and suggest that LBP is an acute-phase protein important in regulating the in vivo response to endotoxin. PMID:8418776

  8. Biophysical mechanisms of endotoxin neutralization by cationic amphiphilic peptides.

    PubMed

    Kaconis, Yani; Kowalski, Ina; Howe, Jörg; Brauser, Annemarie; Richter, Walter; Razquin-Olazarán, Iosu; Iñigo-Pestaña, Melania; Garidel, Patrick; Rössle, Manfred; Martinez de Tejada, Guillermo; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2011-06-01

    Bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides (LPS)) are strong elicitors of the human immune system by interacting with serum and membrane proteins such as lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) and CD14 with high specificity. At LPS concentrations as low as 0.3 ng/ml, such interactions may lead to severe pathophysiological effects, including sepsis and septic shock. One approach to inhibit an uncontrolled inflammatory reaction is the use of appropriate polycationic and amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides, here called synthetic anti-LPS peptides (SALPs). We designed various SALP structures and investigated their ability to inhibit LPS-induced cytokine secretion in vitro, their protective effect in a mouse model of sepsis, and their cytotoxicity in physiological human cells. Using a variety of biophysical techniques, we investigated selected SALPs with considerable differences in their biological responses to characterize and understand the mechanism of LPS inactivation by SALPs. Our investigations show that neutralization of LPS by peptides is associated with a fluidization of the LPS acyl chains, a strong exothermic Coulomb interaction between the two compounds, and a drastic change of the LPS aggregate type from cubic into multilamellar, with an increase in the aggregate sizes, inhibiting the binding of LBP and other mammalian proteins to the endotoxin. At the same time, peptide binding to phospholipids of human origin (e.g., phosphatidylcholine) does not cause essential structural changes, such as changes in membrane fluidity and bilayer structure. The absence of cytotoxicity is explained by the high specificity of the interaction of the peptides with LPS. PMID:21641310

  9. In silico designed nanoMIP based optical sensor for endotoxins monitoring.

    PubMed

    Abdin, M J; Altintas, Z; Tothill, I E

    2015-05-15

    Molecular modelling was used to select specific monomers suitable for the design of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with high affinity towards endotoxins. MIPs were synthesised using solid-phase photopolymerisation with endotoxins from Escherichia coli 0111:B4 as the template. This technique also allowed the endotoxin template to be reused successfully. Particle size of ~190-220 nm was achieved with low polydispersity index, which confirms the quality of the produced MIPs. For the development of the optical sensor, SPR-2 biosensor system was used by functionalising the gold sensor chip with the MIP nanoparticles using EDC/NHS coupling procedure. The affinity based-endotoxin assay can detect endotoxins in the concentration range of 15.6-500 ng mL(-1). MIP surfaces were regenerated showing stability of the method for subsequent analysis and dissociation constants were calculated as 3.24-5.24×10(-8) M. The developed SPR sensor with the novel endotoxins nanoMIP showed the potential of the technology for endotoxins capture, detection and risk management and also the importance of computational modelling to design the artificial affinity ligands. PMID:25155060

  10. Grape seed procyanidin extract reduces the endotoxic effects induced by lipopolysaccharide in rats.

    PubMed

    Pallarès, Victor; Fernández-Iglesias, Anabel; Cedó, Lídia; Castell-Auví, Anna; Pinent, Montserrat; Ardévol, Anna; Salvadó, Maria Josepa; Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Blay, Mayte

    2013-07-01

    Acute inflammation is a response to injury, infection, tissue damage, or shock. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin implicated in triggering sepsis and septic shock, and LPS promotes the inflammatory response, resulting in the secretion of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as the interleukins (IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor-α by the immune cells. Furthermore, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species levels increase rapidly, which is partially due to the activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase in several tissues in response to inflammatory stimuli. Previous studies have shown that procyanidins, polyphenols present in foods such as apples, grapes, cocoa, and berries, have several beneficial properties against inflammation and oxidative stress using several in vitro and in vivo models. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of two physiological doses and two pharmaceutical doses of grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) were analyzed using a rat model of septic shock by the intraperitoneal injection of LPS derived from Escherichia coli. The high nutritional (75mg/kg/day) and the high pharmacological doses (200mg/kg/day) of GSPE showed anti-inflammatory effects by decreasing the proinflammatory marker NOx in the plasma, red blood cells, spleen, and liver. Moreover, the high pharmacological dose also downregulated the genes Il-6 and iNos; and the high nutritional dose decreased the glutathione ratio (GSSG/total glutathione), further illustrating the antioxidant capability of GSPE. In conclusion, several doses of GSPE can alleviate acute inflammation triggered by LPS in rats at the systemic and local levels when administered for as few as 15 days before the injection of endotoxin. PMID:23439188

  11. Biophysical characterization of the interaction of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) with endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Klaus; Jürgens, Gudrun; Andrä, Jörg; Lindner, Buko; Koch, Michel H J; Blume, Alfred; Garidel, Patrick

    2002-12-01

    The interaction of bacterial endotoxins [lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the 'endotoxic principle' lipid A], with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) from serum was investigated with a variety of physical techniques and biological assays. HDL exhibited an increase in the gel to liquid crystalline phase transition temperature Tc and a rigidification of the acyl chains of the endotoxins as measured by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The functional groups of the endotoxins interacting with HDL are the phosphates and the diglucosamine backbone. The finding of phosphates as target groups is in accordance to measurements of the electrophoretic mobility showing that the zeta potential decreases from -50 to -60 mV to -20 mV at binding saturation. The importance of the sugar backbone as further target structure is in accordance with the remaining negative potential and competition experiments with polymyxin B (PMB) and phase transition data of the system PMB/dephosphorylated LPS. Furthermore, endotoxin binding to HDL influences the secondary structure of the latter manifesting in a change from a mixed alpha-helical/beta-sheet structure to a predominantly alpha-helical structure. The aggregate structure of the lipid A moiety of the endotoxins as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering shows a change of a unilamellar/inverted cubic into a multilamellar structure in the presence of HDL. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer data indicate an intercalation of pure HDL, and of [LPS]-[HDL] complexes into phospholipid liposomes. Furthermore, HDL may enhance the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein-induced intercalation of LPS into phospholipid liposomes. Parallel to these observations, the LPS-induced cytokine production of human mononuclear cells and the reactivity in the Limulus test are strongly reduced by the addition of HDL. These data allow to develop a model of the [endotoxin]/[HDL] interaction. PMID:12444987

  12. The Stimulation by Endotoxin of the Nonspecific Resistance of Mice to Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hill, A. W.; Hibbitt, K. G.; Shears, A.

    1974-01-01

    The nonspecific resistance of mice to challenge was enhanced following the administration of an E. coli O55 B5 endotoxin. Although the route of administration of the endotoxin and the challenge organism were varied, the nonspecific resistance of the animal was enhanced in all the experiments. The efficiency of this resistance was highest when the inducing substance and the challenge dose of bacteria were administered intraperitoneally. Poly I: C and double stranded RNA were also studied but were much less effective than endotoxin in stimulating a resistance to infection. Stimulation of the fixed macrophages could not explain fully the enhanced resistance, since the clearance rates of colloidal carbon and radioactively labelled bacteria from the blood were not significantly enhanced after the administration of endotoxin. Furthermore, splenectomized animals, and animals injected with agents which interfere with the RES activity, trypan blue and corticosteroids, still developed a degree of nonspecific resistance to infection. PMID:4599349

  13. Effects of endotoxin induced lung injury and exercise in goats/sheep. Final report, 1 February 1992-2 June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mundie, T.G.

    1993-06-02

    This study was designed the effects of exercise performed on animals already injured with E. coli endotoxin. This would tell us whether exercise makes the lung injury worse. It would also tell us how much exercise performance is impaired. These studies were designed to give further insights into the underlying causes of acute lung injury. Premature termination of the study prevented completion of the research project. It appeared from the limited experimentation conducted that maximal exercise was impaired by endotoxin-induced lung injury. Conclusions regarding exacerbation of endotoxin-induced lung injury cannot be made.... Acute lung injury, Maximal exercise, Endotoxin.

  14. Physical properties of defined lipopolysaccharide salts

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, R.T.; Haug, A.; McGroarty, E.J.

    1983-01-01

    The electron spin resonance probes 5-doxylstearate and 4-(dodecyldimethylammonia)-1-oxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine bromide were used to characterize the fluidity of the acyl chain and head-group regions, respectively, of defined salts of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli K12. The removal of the weakly bound divalent cations from native LPS by electrodialysis and their replacement by sodium had little effect on the midpoint of the lipid-phase transition or on head-group mobility. In contrast, lipopolysaccharide acyl chain mobility increased following electrodialysis. The replacement of most of the remaining cations with sodium resulted in a further dramatic increase in mobility in both the polar and nonpolar regions of lipopolysaccharide. Head-group mobility of the sodium salt of LPS was shown to be reduced with the addition of divalent cations. Furthermore, evidence is presented which suggests that low magnesium concentrations may induce phase separations in the sodium salt. The magnesium salt of lipopolysaccharide closely resembled the native form in both head-group and acyl chain mobility although the cation charge to phosphorus ratio in the magnesium salt was greater than that detected in the native isolate. Analyses of other lipopolysaccharide salts support our hypothesis that many of the observed differences in the physical and pathological properties of lipopolysaccharide salts may simply be explained by the degree of charge neutralization.

  15. Physical properties of defined lipopolysaccharide salts.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, R T; Haug, A; McGroarty, E J

    1983-04-12

    The electron spin resonance probes 5-doxylstearate and 4-(dodecyldimethylammonio)-1-oxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine bromide were used to characterize the fluidity of the acyl chain and head-group regions, respectively, of defined salts of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli K12. The removal of the weakly bound divalent cations from native LPS by electrodialysis and their replacement by sodium had little effect on the midpoint of the lipid-phase transition or on head-group mobility. In contrast, lipopolysaccharide acyl chain mobility increased following electrodialysis. The replacement of most of the remaining cations with sodium resulted in a further dramatic increase in mobility in both the polar and nonpolar regions of lipopolysaccharide. Head-group mobility of the sodium salt of LPS was shown to be reduced with the addition of divalent cations. Furthermore, evidence is presented which suggests that low magnesium concentrations may induce phase separations in the sodium salt. The magnesium salt of lipopolysaccharide closely resembled the native form in both head-group and acyl chain mobility although the cation charge to phosphorus ratio in the magnesium salt was greater than that detected in the native isolate. Analyses of other lipopolysaccharide salts support our hypothesis that many of the observed differences in the physical and pathological properties of lipopolysaccharide salts may simply be explained by the degree of charge neutralization. PMID:6303400

  16. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES CHRONIC AIRWAY DISEASE IN ENDOTOXIN-SENSITIVE BUT NOT ENDOTOXIN-RESISTANT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES CHRONIC AIRWAY DISEASE IN ENDOTOXIN-SENSITIVE BUT NOT ENDOTOXIN-RESISTANT MICE. D. M. Brass, J. D. Savov, *S. H. Gavett, ?C. George, D. A. Schwartz. Duke Univ Medical Center Durham, NC, *U.S. E.P.A. Research Triangle Park, NC, ?Univ of Iowa,...

  17. Harnessing aptamers for electrochemical detection of endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Eun; Su, Wenqiong; Cho, MiSuk; Lee, Youngkwan; Choe, Woo-Seok

    2012-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), also known as endotoxin, triggers a fatal septic shock; therefore, fast and accurate detection of LPS from a complex milieu is of primary importance. Several LPS affinity binders have been reported so far but few of them have proved their efficacy in developing electrochemical sensors capable of selectively detecting LPS from crude biological liquors. In this study, we identified 10 different single-stranded DNA aptamers showing specific affinity to LPS with dissociation constants (K(d)) in the nanomolar range using a NECEEM-based non-SELEX method. Based on the sequence and secondary structure analysis of the LPS binding aptamers, an aptamer exhibiting the highest affinity to LPS (i.e., B2) was selected to construct an impedance biosensor on a gold surface. The developed electrochemical aptasensor showed excellent sensitivity and specificity in the linear detection range from 0.01 to 1 ng/mL of LPS with significantly reduced detection time compared with the traditional Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. PMID:22370280

  18. P-body formation limits proinflammatory cytokine synthesis in endotoxin tolerant monocytes and murine septic macrophages

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Clara; Brudecki, Laura; Yao, Zhi Q.; McCall, Charles E.; Gazzar, Mohamed El

    2015-01-01

    An anti-inflammatory phenotype with pronounced immunosuppression develops during sepsis, during which time neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages limit their toll-like receptor 4 responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS/endotoxin). We previously reported that during this endotoxin tolerant state, distinct signaling pathways differentially repress transcription and translation of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNFα and IL-6. Sustained endotoxin tolerance contributes to sepsis mortality. While transcription repression requires chromatin modifications, a translational repressor complex of Ago2 and RBM4, which bind the 3’ UTR of TNFα and IL-6 mRNA, limits protein synthesis. Here, we show that Dcp1 supports the assembly of Ago2 and RBM4 repressor complex into cytoplasmic p-bodies in endotoxin-tolerant THP-1 human monocytes following stimulation with LPS, resulting in translational repression and limiting protein synthesis. Importantly, this translocation process is reversed by Dcp1 knockdown, which restores TNFα and IL-6 protein levels. We also find this translational repression mechanism in primary macrophages of septic mice. Because p-body formation is a critical step in mRNA translation repression, we conclude that Dcp1 is a major component of the translational repression machinery of endotoxin tolerance and may contribute to sepsis outcome. PMID:25998849

  19. Obesity Increases Sensitivity to Endotoxin Liver Injury: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Steatohepatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shi Qi; Zhi Lin, Hui; Lane, M. Daniel; Clemens, Mark; Diehl, Anna Mae

    1997-03-01

    Genetically obese fatty/fatty rats and obese/obese mice exhibit increased sensitivity to endotoxin hepatotoxicity, quickly developing steatohepatitis after exposure to low doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Among obese animals, females are more sensitive to endotoxin liver injury than males. LPS induction of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα ), the proven affecter of endotoxin liver injury, is no greater in the livers, white adipose tissues, or sera of obese animals than in those of lean controls. Indeed, the lowest serum concentrations of TNF occur in female obese rodents, which exhibit the most endotoxin-induced liver injury. Several cytokines that modulate the biological activity of TNF are regulated abnormally in the livers of obese animals. After exposure to LPS, mRNA of interferon γ , which sensitizes hepatocytes to TNF toxicity, is overexpressed, and mRNA levels of interleukin 10, a TNF inhibitor, are decreased. The phagocytic activity of liver macrophages and the hepatic expression of a gene encoding a macrophage-specific receptor are also decreased in obesity. This new animal model of obesity-associated liver disease demonstrates that hepatic macrophage dysfunction occurs in obesity and suggests that this might promote steatohepatitis by sensitizing hepatocytes to endotoxin.

  20. An Endotoxin Tolerance Signature Predicts Sepsis and Organ Dysfunction at Initial Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Olga M.; Hancock, David G.; Lyle, Ngan H.; Linder, Adam; Russell, James A.; Xia, Jianguo; Fjell, Christopher D.; Boyd, John H.; Hancock, Robert E.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sepsis involves aberrant immune responses to infection, but the exact nature of this immune dysfunction remains poorly defined. Bacterial endotoxins like lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are potent inducers of inflammation, which has been associated with the pathophysiology of sepsis, but repeated exposure can also induce a suppressive effect known as endotoxin tolerance or cellular reprogramming. It has been proposed that endotoxin tolerance might be associated with the immunosuppressive state that was primarily observed during late-stage sepsis. However, this relationship remains poorly characterised. Here we clarify the underlying mechanisms and timing of immune dysfunction in sepsis. Methods We defined a gene expression signature characteristic of endotoxin tolerance. Gene-set test approaches were used to correlate this signature with early sepsis, both newly and retrospectively analysing microarrays from 593 patients in 11 cohorts. Then we recruited a unique cohort of possible sepsis patients at first clinical presentation in an independent blinded controlled observational study to determine whether this signature was associated with the development of confirmed sepsis and organ dysfunction. Findings All sepsis patients presented an expression profile strongly associated with the endotoxin tolerance signature (p < 0.01; AUC 96.1%). Importantly, this signature further differentiated between suspected sepsis patients who did, or did not, go on to develop confirmed sepsis, and predicted the development of organ dysfunction. Interpretation Our data support an updated model of sepsis pathogenesis in which endotoxin tolerance-mediated immune dysfunction (cellular reprogramming) is present throughout the clinical course of disease and related to disease severity. Thus endotoxin tolerance might offer new insights guiding the development of new therapies and diagnostics for early sepsis. PMID:25685830

  1. Endotoxin induces fibrosis in vascular endothelial cells through a mechanism dependent on transient receptor protein melastatin 7 activity.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, Cesar; Montorfano, Ignacio; Hermosilla, Tamara; Armisén, Ricardo; Velásquez, Luis A; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of systemic inflammatory diseases, including endotoxemia-derived sepsis syndrome, is characterized by endothelial dysfunction. It has been demonstrated that the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces the conversion of endothelial cells (ECs) into activated fibroblasts through endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition mechanism. Fibrogenesis is highly dependent on intracellular Ca2+ concentration increases through the participation of calcium channels. However, the specific molecular identity of the calcium channel that mediates the Ca2+ influx during endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis is still unknown. Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a calcium channel that is expressed in many cell types, including ECs. TRPM7 is involved in a number of crucial processes such as the conversion of fibroblasts into activated fibroblasts, or myofibroblasts, being responsible for the development of several characteristics of them. However, the role of the TRPM7 ion channel in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis is unknown. Thus, our aim was to study whether the TRPM7 calcium channel participates in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. Using primary cultures of ECs, we demonstrated that TRPM7 is a crucial protein involved in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. Suppression of TRPM7 expression protected ECs from the fibrogenic process stimulated by endotoxin. Downregulation of TRPM7 prevented the endotoxin-induced endothelial markers decrease and fibrotic genes increase in ECs. In addition, TRPM7 downregulation abolished the endotoxin-induced increase in ECM proteins in ECs. Furthermore, we showed that intracellular Ca2+ levels were greatly increased upon LPS challenge in a mechanism dependent on TRPM7 expression. These results demonstrate that TRPM7 is a key protein involved in the mechanism underlying endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. PMID:24710004

  2. Endotoxin Induces Fibrosis in Vascular Endothelial Cells through a Mechanism Dependent on Transient Receptor Protein Melastatin 7 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Echeverría, Cesar; Montorfano, Ignacio; Hermosilla, Tamara; Armisén, Ricardo; Velásquez, Luis A.; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of systemic inflammatory diseases, including endotoxemia-derived sepsis syndrome, is characterized by endothelial dysfunction. It has been demonstrated that the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces the conversion of endothelial cells (ECs) into activated fibroblasts through endothelial­to­mesenchymal transition mechanism. Fibrogenesis is highly dependent on intracellular Ca2+ concentration increases through the participation of calcium channels. However, the specific molecular identity of the calcium channel that mediates the Ca2+ influx during endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis is still unknown. Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a calcium channel that is expressed in many cell types, including ECs. TRPM7 is involved in a number of crucial processes such as the conversion of fibroblasts into activated fibroblasts, or myofibroblasts, being responsible for the development of several characteristics of them. However, the role of the TRPM7 ion channel in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis is unknown. Thus, our aim was to study whether the TRPM7 calcium channel participates in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. Using primary cultures of ECs, we demonstrated that TRPM7 is a crucial protein involved in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. Suppression of TRPM7 expression protected ECs from the fibrogenic process stimulated by endotoxin. Downregulation of TRPM7 prevented the endotoxin-induced endothelial markers decrease and fibrotic genes increase in ECs. In addition, TRPM7 downregulation abolished the endotoxin-induced increase in ECM proteins in ECs. Furthermore, we showed that intracellular Ca2+ levels were greatly increased upon LPS challenge in a mechanism dependent on TRPM7 expression. These results demonstrate that TRPM7 is a key protein involved in the mechanism underlying endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. PMID:24710004

  3. The influence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide on the thermoregulation of the box turtle Terrapene carolina.

    PubMed

    do Amaral, José Pedro Sousa; Marvin, Glenn A; Hutchison, Victor H

    2002-01-01

    Ectotherms can adjust their thermoregulatory set points in response to bacterial infection; the result may be similar to endothermic fever. We examined the influence of dose on the set point of body temperature (T(b)) in Terrapene carolina. After acclimating postprandial turtles to 20 degrees C, we injected them with two doses of bacterial endotoxin (LPS; lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli), 0.0025 or 0.025 mg LPS/g nonshell body mass, or with reptilian saline (control group). We placed the animals singly in linear thigmothermal gradients and recorded their T(b)'s for 48 h. The turtles showed dose-influenced thermal selection. Turtles injected with the high dose had T(b)'s significantly higher than control turtles, whereas low-dose turtles had T(b)'s significantly lower than control turtles. Also, there was a low daily effect on the T(b) of the turtles injected with the high dose. High-dose turtles had significantly higher T(b)'s than the control turtles during the first day but not during the second. Our results support the prediction of Romanovsky and Székely that an infectious agent may elicit opposite thermoregulatory responses depending on quality and quantity of the agent and the host health status. PMID:12177830

  4. Methods for chromatographic removal of endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Adam J; Bardliving, Cameron L; Batt, Carl A

    2012-01-01

    Endotoxin removal is critical when producing therapeutic proteins in bacterial systems. This hydrophobic compound can be removed through chromatography or filtration, but presents unique challenges dependent upon protein composition as well as production scale. Here we present a robust method for endotoxin removal at the pilot production scale using fast protein liquid chromatography and buffers specifically engineered for endotoxin removal. PMID:22735959

  5. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES PERSISTENT AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The endotoxin component of organic dusts causes acute reversible airflow obstruction and airway inflammation. To test the hypothesis that endotoxin alone causes airway remodeling, we have compared the response of two inbred mouse strains to subchronic endotoxin ...

  6. Endotoxin Studies And Biosolids Stabilization Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation has three parts; a review of bench-scale endotoxin research, a review of observations from a field scale endotoxin release study, and discussion of biosolids stabilization and characterization by PLFA/FAME microbial community analysis. Endotoxins are part of th...

  7. Acute alterations in growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor axis in humans injected with endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Lang, C H; Pollard, V; Fan, J; Traber, L D; Traber, D L; Frost, R A; Gelato, M C; Prough, D S

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to characterize the acute changes in the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system in humans after administration of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS). Escherichia coli LPS (4 ng/kg) was injected intravenously into healthy adults, and serial blood samples were collected for the next 5 h; subjects injected with saline served as time-matched controls. LPS administration resulted in a gradual decrease in the total extractable IGF-I concentration, which was reduced by approximately 20% over the final 2 h of the experiment; levels of free IGF-I were not significantly altered. LPS also produced a marked but transient elevation in growth hormone (GH) concentration. IGF-binding protein (BP)-1 levels were elevated more than fivefold 2 h after LPS injection, and thereafter levels gradually returned toward baseline. IGFBP-2 concentration also increased after LPS injection, but the maximal increase (approximately 50% above basal) was observed during the final 2 h of the protocol. In contrast, IGFBP-3 levels did not vary over the period examined in response to LPS, and there was no apparent increase in number of BP-3 proteolytic fragments. Cortisol levels were increased early and remained two- to threefold above baseline throughout the protocol. No significant alterations in serum concentration of glucose or insulin were noted. LPS also produced an early elevation in tumor necrosis factor and a later increase in interleukin-6. These data indicate that the acute changes in the GH-IGF axis in humans in response to LPS are comparable with those observed in humans in other traumatic conditions and in animal models of endotoxemia and infection. PMID:9249574

  8. Effect of endotoxin on lipid peroxidation in vivo in selenium and vitamin E deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, J.T.; Pope, A.L.; Hoekstra, W.G.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have used respiratory ethane production by selenium (Se) and vitamin E (E) deficient rats, an index of lipid peroxidation, to identify oxidant stressors which might precipitate sudden tissue degeneration in deficient animals. Other studies have suggested that endotoxin (gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide-LPS) might be such an oxidant stressor, especially in the lungs. Male weanling rats were fed a Se and E deficient diet for about 80 days. Rats were injected ip with Salmonella typhimurium LPS (.25, .5, or 1.0 mg/kg) or saline, and respiratory ethane was collected for 16 hr. In a representative experiment, mean rate of ethane production (nm/100g/hr) was increased (p < .01) by LPS: saline, .48 +/- .04 (SEM); .25 mg LPS/kg, 1.30 +/- .17; .5, 1.47 +/- .18 and 1.0, 1.68 +/- .18. E. coli and S. minnesota LPS gave similar results. Rats fed a supplemented diet (.2 ppm Se and 200 IU E/kg diet) produced less (p < .01) ethane: saline, .068 +/- .009 and .5 mg LPS/kg, .114 +/- .01. Over all experiments LPS produced a small yet significant increase in ethane in rats receiving Se or E supplementation but produced a marked increase in unsupplemented rats. In further studies with LPS treated rats, Se supplementation alone was 73%, and E supplementation alone 99% as effective as Se + E. These results showed that LPS stimulates lipid peroxidation in Se and E deficient rats and that infections may initiate oxidative cell damage in deficient animals. E was more protective than Se against LPS-induced peroxidation.

  9. Comparison of Different Irrigants in the Removal of Endotoxins and Cultivable Microorganisms from Infected Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Cardoso, Flávia Goulart da Rosa; Chung, Adriana; Xavier, Ana Cláudia Carvalho; Figueiredo, Mariana Diehl; Martinho, Frederico Canato; Palo, Renato Miotto

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of different irrigants used to remove endotoxins and cultivable microorganisms during endodontic therapy. Forty root canals were contaminated and divided into groups according to the irrigant: 2% NaOCl + surfactant, 2% CHX, 2.5% NaOCl, and pyrogen-free saline solution (control). Samples were collected after root canal contamination (S1), after instrumentation (S2), and 7 days after instrumentation (S3). Microorganisms and endotoxins were recovered from 100% of the contaminated root canals (S1). At S2, 2% NaOCl + surfactant, 2% CHX, and 2.5% NaOCl were able to completely eliminate cultivable microorganisms. At S3, both 2% CHX and 2.5% NaOCl were effective in preventing C. albicans and E. coli regrowth, but E. faecalis was still detected. No microorganism species was recovered from root canals instrumented with 2% NaOCl + surfactant. At S2, a higher percentage value of endotoxin reduction was found for 2% NaOCl + surfactant (99.3%) compared to 2% CHX (98.9%) and 2.5% NaOCl (97.18%) (p < 0.05). Moreover, at S3, 2% NaOCl + surfactant (100%) was the most effective irrigant against endotoxins. All irrigants tested were effective in reducing microorganisms and endotoxins from root canals. Moreover, 2% NaOCl + surfactant was the most effective irrigant against endotoxins and regrowth of microorganisms. PMID:26346574

  10. Performance, serum biochemical responses, and gene expression of intestinal folate transporters of young and older laying hens in response to dietary folic acid supplementation and challenge with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Jing, M; Munyaka, P M; Tactacan, G B; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; O, K; House, J D

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary folic acid (FA) supplementation on performance, serum biochemical indices, and mRNA abundance of intestinal folate transporters in young and older laying hens after acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Two experiments were conducted separately involving 48 Shaver White young laying hens (24 wk of age) in experiment 1 and 48 Shaver White older laying hens (58 wk of age) in experiment 2. Birds were fed 2 diets in a complete randomized design. The diets were wheat-soybean meal based, with or without supplemental 4 mg of FA/kg of diet. Birds were fed for 8 wk, during which time feed consumption and egg production were monitored. At the end of each feeding experiment, 6 hens from each dietary treatment were injected intravenously with 8 mg/kg of BW of either Escherichia coli LPS or sterile saline. Four hours after injection, blood and intestinal samples were collected for further analysis. Compared with the control, dietary FA supplementation increased egg weight and egg mass and decreased serum glucose levels in the young laying hens, and reduced serum uric acid in the older laying hens (P < 0.05). Relative to saline injection, plasma homocysteine, serum calcium, and phosphorus levels were found to be lower in both young and older laying hens after LPS challenge (P < 0.05). Other serum biochemical variables and the mRNA expression of 2 folate transport genes in the small and large intestine were differentially affected by LPS challenge, and some of those responses varied with the age of the birds. Additionally, interactions between diet and LPS challenge were specifically found in the older laying hens. In summary, in addition to improving production performance, there were effects of dietary FA supplementation and its interaction with LPS challenge on biochemical constituents, and age played a role in the development of responses to diet and bacterial LPS infections. PMID:24570431

  11. The Lack of the Essential LptC Protein in the Trans-Envelope Lipopolysaccharide Transport Machine Is Circumvented by Suppressor Mutations in LptF, an Inner Membrane Component of the Escherichia coli Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Benedet, Mattia; Falchi, Federica A.; Puccio, Simone; Di Benedetto, Cristiano; Peano, Clelia; Polissi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) transport (Lpt) system is responsible for transferring LPS from the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane (IM) to the outer leaflet of the outer membrane (OM), where it plays a crucial role in OM selective permeability. In E. coli seven essential proteins are assembled in an Lpt trans-envelope complex, which is conserved in γ-Proteobacteria. LptBFG constitute the IM ABC transporter, LptDE form the OM translocon for final LPS delivery, whereas LptC, an IM-anchored protein with a periplasmic domain, interacts with the IM ABC transporter, the periplasmic protein LptA, and LPS. Although essential, LptC can tolerate several mutations and its role in LPS transport is unclear. To get insights into the functional role of LptC in the Lpt machine we searched for viable mutants lacking LptC by applying a strong double selection for lptC deletion mutants. Genome sequencing of viable ΔlptC mutants revealed single amino acid substitutions at a unique position in the predicted large periplasmic domain of the IM component LptF (LptFSupC). In complementation tests, lptFSupC mutants suppress lethality of both ΔlptC and lptC conditional expression mutants. Our data show that mutations in a specific residue of the predicted LptF periplasmic domain can compensate the lack of the essential protein LptC, implicate such LptF domain in the formation of the periplasmic bridge between the IM and OM complexes, and suggest that LptC may have evolved to improve the performance of an ancestral six-component Lpt machine. PMID:27529623

  12. Effects of Puerariae Radix Extract on Endotoxin Receptors and TNF-α Expression Induced by Gut-Derived Endotoxin in Chronic Alcoholic Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jing-Hua; Cui, Tuan; Sun, Zhao-Lin; Huang, Fu; Chen, Liang; Xu, Lin; Feng, Qin; Hu, Yi-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Kudzu (Pueraria lobata) is one of the earliest medicinal plants used to treat alcohol abuse in traditional Chinese medicine for more than a millennium. However, little is known about its effects on chronic alcoholic liver injury. Therefore, the present study observed the effects of puerariae radix extract (RPE) on chronic alcoholic liver injury as well as Kupffer cells (KCs) activation to release tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) induced by gut-derived endotoxin in rats and macrophage cell line. RPE was observed to alleviate the pathological changes and lipids deposition in liver tissues as well as the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and hepatic gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activity. Meanwhile, RPE inhibited KCs activation and subsequent hepatic TNF-α expression and downregulated the protein expression of endotoxin receptors, lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), CD14, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, and TLR4 in chronic alcohol intake rats. Furthermore, an in vitro study showed that RPE inhibited the expression of TNF-α and endotoxin receptors, CD14 and TLR4, induced by LPS in RAW264.7 cells. In summary, this study demonstrated that RPE mitigated liver damage and lipid deposition induced by chronic alcohol intake in rats, as well as TNF-α release, protein expression of endotoxin receptors in vivo or in vitro. PMID:23133491

  13. Physicochemical characterization of the endotoxins from Coxiella burnetii strain Priscilla in relation to their bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    Toman, Rudolf; Garidel, Patrick; Andrä, Jörg; Slaba, Katarina; Hussein, Ahmed; Koch, Michel HJ; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    Background Coxiella burnetii is the etiological agent of Q fever found worldwide. The microorganism has like other Gram-negative bacteria a lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) in its outer membrane, which is important for the pathogenicity of the bacteria. In order to understand the biological activity of LPS, a detailed physico-chemical analysis of LPS is of utmost importace. Results The lipid A moiety of LPS is tetraacylated and has longer (C-16) acyl chains than most other lipid A from enterobacterial strains. The two ester-linked 3-OH fatty acids found in the latter are lacking. The acyl chains of the C. burnetii endotoxins exhibit a broad melting range between 5 and 25°C for LPS and 10 and 40°C for lipid A. The lipid A moiety has a cubic inverted aggregate structure, and the inclination angle of the D-glucosamine disaccharide backbone plane of the lipid A part with respect to the membrane normal is around 40°. Furthermore, the endotoxins readily intercalate into phospholipid liposomes mediated by the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP). The endotoxin-induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) production in human mononuclear cells is one order of magnitude lower than that found for endotoxins from enterobacterial strains, whereas the same activity as in the latter compounds is found in the clotting reaction of the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Conclusions Despite a considerably different chemical primary structure of the C. burnetii lipid A in comparison with enterobacterial lipid A, the data can be well understood by applying the previously presented conformational concept of endotoxicity, a conical shape of the lipid A moiety of LPS and a sufficiently high inclination of the sugar backbone plane with respect to the membrane plane. Importantly, the role of the acyl chain fluidity in modulating endotoxicity now becomes more evident. PMID:14715092

  14. Staphylococcus aureus and Lipopolysaccharide Modulate Gene Expressions of Drug Transporters in Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells Correlation to Inflammatory Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Tallkvist, Jonas; Artursson, Karin; Oskarsson, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation in the mammary gland (mastitis) is the most common disease in dairy herds worldwide, often caused by the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli). Little is known about the effects of mastitis on drug transporters and the impact on transporter-mediated excretion of drugs into milk. We used murine mammary epithelial HC11 cells, after lactogenic differentiation into a secreting phenotype, and studied gene expressions of ABC- and SLC- transporters after treatment of cells with S. aureus and lipopolysaccharide, an endotoxin secreted by E. coli. The studied transporters were Bcrp, Mdr1, Mrp1, Oatp1a5, Octn1 and Oct1. In addition, Csn2, the gene encoding β-casein, was analyzed. As biomarkers of the inflammatory response, gene expressions of the cytokines Il6 and Tnfα and the chemokine Cxcl2 were determined. Our results show that S. aureus and LPS treatment of cells, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, induced an up-regulation of Mdr1 and of the inflammatory biomarkers, except that Tnfα was not affected by lipopolysaccharide. By simple regression analysis we could demonstrate statistically significant positive correlations between each of the transporters with each of the inflammatory biomarkers in cells treated with S. aureus. The coefficients of determination (R2) were 0.7-0.9 for all but one correlation. After treatment of cells with lipopolysaccharide, statistically significant correlations were only found between Mdr1 and the two parameters Cxcl2 and Il6. The expression of Csn2 was up-regulated in cells treated with S. aureus, indicating that the secretory function of the cells was not impaired. The strong correlation in gene expressions between transporters and inflammatory biomarkers may suggest a co-regulation and that the transporters have a role in the transport of cytokines and chemokines. Our results demonstrate that transporters in mammary cells can be affected by infection, which may have an impact on transport

  15. A non-chromatographic method for the removal of endotoxins from bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Branston, Steven D; Wright, Jason; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2015-08-01

    The Ff filamentous bacteriophages show potential as a new class of therapeutics, displaying utility in materials science as well as pharmaceutical applications. These phages are produced by the infection of E. coli, a Gram-negative bacterium which unavoidably sheds endotoxins into the extracellular space during growth. Since endotoxin molecules are highly immunoreactive, separation from the phage product is of critical importance, particularly those developed for human therapeutic use. The properties of M13, one of the Ff group, present a purification challenge chiefly because the standard scalable method for endotoxin removal from proteins-anion exchange chromatography-is not applicable due to pI similarity between the particles. This article examines the potential of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-NaCl precipitation as a scalable method for the separation of endotoxins from phage M13. Precipitation of M13 by 2% (w/v) PEG 6 000, 500 mM NaCl reduced endotoxin contamination of the phage product by 88%, but additional precipitation rounds did not maintain this proportional decrease. Dynamic light scattering was subsequently used to determine the effectiveness of a detergent to disassociate endotoxin molecules from M13. As a result, PEG-NaCl precipitation was supplemented with up to 2% (v/v) Triton X-100 to improve separation. A 5.7 log10 reduction in endotoxin concentration was achieved over three rounds of precipitation whilst retaining over 97% of the phage. This method compares favorably with the well-known ATPS (Triton X-114) technique for endotoxin removal from protein solutions. PMID:25728530

  16. Impact of bacterial endotoxin on the structure of DMPC membranes.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Michael; Brauckmann, Stephan; Moegle-Hofacker, Franzeska; Effenberger-Neidnicht, Katharina; Hartmann, Matthias; de Groot, Herbert; Mayer, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides are believed to have a toxic effect on human cell membranes. In this study, the influence of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli on the structure, the dynamics and the mechanical strength of phospholipid membranes are monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Model membranes are formed from 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and are either prepared as multilamellar bulk samples or multilamellar vesicles. Field gradient NMR data directly prove the rapid integration of LPS into DMPC membranes. Solid state NMR experiments primarily detect decreasing molecular order parameters with increasing LPS content. This is accompanied by a mechanical softening of the membrane bilayers as is shown by AFM indentation measurements. Altogether, the data prove that lipopolysaccharide molecules quickly insert into phospholipid bilayers, increase membrane fluctuation amplitudes and significantly weaken their mechanical stiffness. PMID:26071197

  17. Metabolic and mitochondrial morphological changes that mimic Reye syndrome after endotoxin administration to rats.

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, M C; Egler, J M; Yudkoff, M; Chatten, J; Douglas, S D; Polin, R A

    1985-01-01

    The administration of sublethal doses of Escherichia coli O111:B4 endotoxin to starved rats results in significant increases in plasma ammonia, free fatty acids, and serum lactate compared with starved controls. These metabolic alterations are associated with Reye syndrome-like histological findings of hepatic microvesicular fatty accumulation and hepatic ultrastructural evidence of mitochondrial pleomorphism with matrix disruption. This sublethal endotoxin model may help elucidate the relationship between the hepatic mitochondrial injury, characteristic metabolic impairment, and encephalopathy seen in patients with Reye syndrome. Images PMID:3965406

  18. Endotoxin levels in sera of elderly individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Goto, T; Edén, S; Nordenstam, G; Sundh, V; Svanborg-Edén, C; Mattsby-Baltzer, I

    1994-01-01

    The endotoxin levels in serum of 377 72-year-old individuals were quantitated. The study population was a representative sample of this age group and was participating in a general study of health and disease among the elderly in Göteborg, Sweden. The endotoxin levels in serum were quantified by the chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate assay and were correlated with the health status and laboratory findings for each individual. The mean endotoxin levels (+/- 1 standard deviation) in men and women, when excluding four outliers, were 6.6 +/- 3.8 and 6.9 +/- 3.8 pg/ml, respectively. All included, 21.5% of individuals had endotoxin levels equal to or above the sensitivity limit of 10 pg/ml. Strong positive correlations were found between endotoxin levels and plasma triglycerides (P > 0.995) and between endotoxin levels and serum protein (P > 0.9875). The endotoxin activity also correlated with mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (P < 0.005, negative correlation), body mass index (P > 0.9875), and decreased appetite (P > 0.9875). A high alcohol consumption was associated with increased endotoxin levels (P = 0.995). There are no previous studies which examine endotoxin levels in serum samples from individuals representative of the population. This study showed that elderly individuals had the same mean level of endotoxin as has been found in other age groups. The increased endotoxin levels seen in heavy drinkers may be explained by a decreased ability of the liver to remove endotoxin. The correlations found between endotoxin and triglycerides, protein, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, decreased appetite, and body mass index are discussed. PMID:8556521

  19. Peptides with dual mode of action: Killing bacteria and preventing endotoxin-induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Klaus; Heinbockel, Lena; Correa, Wilmar; Lohner, Karl

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infections, with the most severe form being sepsis, can often not be treated adequately leading to high morbidity and lethality of infected patients in critical care units. In particular, the increase in resistant bacterial strains and the lack of new antibiotics are main reasons for the worsening of the current situation, As a new approach, the use of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) seems to be promising, combining the ability of broad-spectrum bactericidal activity and low potential of induction of resistance. Peptides based on natural defense proteins or polypeptides such as lactoferrin, Limulus anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (LALF), cathelicidins, and granulysins are candidates due to their high affinity to bacteria and to their pathogenicity factors, in first line lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) of Gram-negative origin. In this review, we discuss literature with the focus on the use of AMPs from natural sources and their variants as antibacterial as well as anti-endotoxin (anti-inflammatory) drugs. Considerable progress has been made by the design of new AMPs for acting efficiently against the LPS-induced inflammation reaction in vitro as well as in vivo (mouse) models of sepsis. Furthermore, the data indicate that efficient antibacterial compounds are not necessarily equally efficient as anti-endotoxin drugs and vice versa. The most important reason for this may be the different molecular geometry of LPS in bacteria and in free form. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26801369

  20. Immobilization of ɛ-polylysine onto the probe surface for molecular adsorption type endotoxin detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooe, Katsutoshi; Tsuji, Akihito; Nishishita, Naoki; Hirano, Yoshiaki

    2007-04-01

    Patients with renal failure become not able to expel the waste product, and they accumulate the toxic products for themselves. They therefore must use the hemodialysis to weed out the metabolic decomposition product. Hemodialysis for chronic renal failure is the most popular treatment method with artificial organs. However, hemodialysis patients must continue the treatment throughout their life, the results of long term extracorporeal dialysis, those patients develop the various complications and diseases, for example, dialysis amyloidosis etc. Dialysis amyloidosis is one of the refractory complications, and the prevention of this complication is important. Recently, endotoxin is thought to be the most likely cause of the complication. Endotoxin is one of the major cell wall components of gram-negative bacteria, and it forms the complex with proteins and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It has various biological activities, e.g. attack of fever, when it gets mixed into human blood. In addition, it is known that large amount of endotoxin exists in living environment, and medicine is often contaminated with endotoxin. When contaminated dialyzing fluids are used to hemodialysis, above-mentioned dialysis amyloidosis is developed. Therefore, it is important that the detection and removal of endotoxin from dialyzing fluids. Until now, the measurement methods using Limulus Amebosyte Lysate (LAL) reagent were carried out as the tests for the presence of endotoxin. However, these methods include several different varieties of measurement techniques. The following are examples of them, gelatinization method, turbidimetric assay method, colorimetric assay method and fluoroscopic method. However, these techniques needed 30-60 minutes for the measurement. From these facts, they are not able to use as a "real-time endotoxin detector". The detection of endotoxin has needed to carry out immediately, for that reason, a new "real-time" detection method is desired. We focused attention to

  1. Biophysical Mechanisms of Endotoxin Neutralization by Cationic Amphiphilic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kaconis, Yani; Kowalski, Ina; Howe, Jörg; Brauser, Annemarie; Richter, Walter; Razquin-Olazarán, Iosu; Iñigo-Pestaña, Melania; Garidel, Patrick; Rössle, Manfred; Martinez de Tejada, Guillermo; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides (LPS)) are strong elicitors of the human immune system by interacting with serum and membrane proteins such as lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) and CD14 with high specificity. At LPS concentrations as low as 0.3 ng/ml, such interactions may lead to severe pathophysiological effects, including sepsis and septic shock. One approach to inhibit an uncontrolled inflammatory reaction is the use of appropriate polycationic and amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides, here called synthetic anti-LPS peptides (SALPs). We designed various SALP structures and investigated their ability to inhibit LPS-induced cytokine secretion in vitro, their protective effect in a mouse model of sepsis, and their cytotoxicity in physiological human cells. Using a variety of biophysical techniques, we investigated selected SALPs with considerable differences in their biological responses to characterize and understand the mechanism of LPS inactivation by SALPs. Our investigations show that neutralization of LPS by peptides is associated with a fluidization of the LPS acyl chains, a strong exothermic Coulomb interaction between the two compounds, and a drastic change of the LPS aggregate type from cubic into multilamellar, with an increase in the aggregate sizes, inhibiting the binding of LBP and other mammalian proteins to the endotoxin. At the same time, peptide binding to phospholipids of human origin (e.g., phosphatidylcholine) does not cause essential structural changes, such as changes in membrane fluidity and bilayer structure. The absence of cytotoxicity is explained by the high specificity of the interaction of the peptides with LPS. PMID:21641310

  2. Rapid removal of bacterial endotoxin and natural organic matter in water by dielectric barrier discharge plasma: Efficiency and toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Fang, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjun; Tian, Fang; Bai, Miao

    2016-11-15

    Low-temperature plasma was used to control bacteria, endotoxins and natural organic matter (NOM) in water by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device. Results indicate that DBD plasma has an obvious inactivation effect on various bacteria in water. The degree of inactivation from difficult to easy is as follows: Bacillus subtilis>Escherichia coli>Staphylococcus aureus. Activated ultrapure water treated using DBD plasma exhibited a sustained sterilization effect, but this sterilization effect decreased gradually after 1h. The total-endotoxin (free-endotoxin and bound-endotoxin) released by Escherichia coli during inactivation, as well as artificially simulated endotoxin in a control solution, was significantly controlled by DBD plasma. Both the metabolites that appeared after inactivation of microorganisms by plasma treatment, and the NOM in filtration effluent of a water treatment plant were well removed by DBD plasma if the treatment duration was sufficiently long. However, the acute toxicity increased significantly, and persisted for at least 2h, indicating that some long-life active substances were generated during the DBD process. Therefore, the removal of bacteria, endotoxins or NOM does not mean a safe water is produced. It is also important to eliminate the toxicity and byproducts produced during water treatment for the continuous promotion and industrial application of DBD plasma. PMID:27388420

  3. Escherichia coli Morphological Changes and Lipid A Removal Induced by Reduced Pressure Nitrogen Afterglow Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zerrouki, Hayat; Rizzati, Virginie; Bernis, Corinne; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne; Sarrette, Jean Philippe; Cousty, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Lipid A is a major hydrophobic component of lipopolysaccharides (endotoxin) present in the membrane of most Gram-negative bacteria, and the major responsible for the bioactivity and toxicity of the endotoxin. Previous studies have demonstrated that the late afterglow region of flowing post-discharges at reduced pressure (1-20 Torr) can be used for the sterilization of surfaces and of the reusable medical instrumentation. In the present paper, we show that the antibacterial activity of a pure nitrogen afterglow can essentially be attributed to the large concentrations of nitrogen atoms present in the treatment area and not to the UV radiation of the afterglow. In parallel, the time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial Escherichia coli (E. coli) population is correlated with morphologic changes observed on the bacteria by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for increasing afterglow exposure times. The effect of the afterglow exposure is also studied on pure lipid A and on lipid A extracted from exposed E. coli bacteria. We report that more than 60% of lipid A (pure or bacteria-extracted) are lost with the used operating conditions (nitrogen flow QN2 = 1 standard liter per minute (slpm), pressure p = 5 Torr, microwave injected power PMW = 200 W, exposure time: 40 minutes). The afterglow exposure also results in a reduction of the lipid A proinflammatory activity, assessed by the net decrease of the redox-sensitive NFκB transcription factor nuclear translocation in murine aortic endothelial cells stimulated with control vs afterglow-treated (pure and extracted) lipid A. Altogether these results point out the ability of reduced pressure nitrogen afterglows to neutralize the cytotoxic components in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25837580

  4. Escherichia coli morphological changes and lipid A removal induced by reduced pressure nitrogen afterglow exposure.

    PubMed

    Zerrouki, Hayat; Rizzati, Virginie; Bernis, Corinne; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne; Sarrette, Jean Philippe; Cousty, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Lipid A is a major hydrophobic component of lipopolysaccharides (endotoxin) present in the membrane of most Gram-negative bacteria, and the major responsible for the bioactivity and toxicity of the endotoxin. Previous studies have demonstrated that the late afterglow region of flowing post-discharges at reduced pressure (1-20 Torr) can be used for the sterilization of surfaces and of the reusable medical instrumentation. In the present paper, we show that the antibacterial activity of a pure nitrogen afterglow can essentially be attributed to the large concentrations of nitrogen atoms present in the treatment area and not to the UV radiation of the afterglow. In parallel, the time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial Escherichia coli (E. coli) population is correlated with morphologic changes observed on the bacteria by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for increasing afterglow exposure times. The effect of the afterglow exposure is also studied on pure lipid A and on lipid A extracted from exposed E. coli bacteria. We report that more than 60% of lipid A (pure or bacteria-extracted) are lost with the used operating conditions (nitrogen flow QN2 = 1 standard liter per minute (slpm), pressure p = 5 Torr, microwave injected power PMW = 200 W, exposure time: 40 minutes). The afterglow exposure also results in a reduction of the lipid A proinflammatory activity, assessed by the net decrease of the redox-sensitive NFκB transcription factor nuclear translocation in murine aortic endothelial cells stimulated with control vs afterglow-treated (pure and extracted) lipid A. Altogether these results point out the ability of reduced pressure nitrogen afterglows to neutralize the cytotoxic components in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25837580

  5. Feline endotoxin shock: effects of methylprednisolone on kininogen-depletion, on the pulmonary circulation and on survival.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kaisi, N; Parratt, J R; Siddiqui, H H; Zeitlin, I J

    1977-01-01

    1 Escherichia coli endotoxin, administered intravenously in a dose of 2 mg/kg to pentobarbitone anaesthetized, artificially ventilated cats resulted in pulmonary hypertension, systemic hypotension and an immediate (1-2 min) 30-40% reduction in plasma kininogen, an effect which probably indicates a release of plasma kinins. 2 Methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg), when administered 30 min before endotoxin, did not influence the endotoxin-induced pulmonary hypertension or systemic hypotension but completely prevented the depletion of plasma kininogen. 3 In spontaneously breathing cats, methylprednisolone, administered 30 min after endotoxin, caused a rapid repletion of kininogen and prolonged survival (47% at 6 h compared to 10% in the endotoxinalone animals). Methylprednisolone did not appear to influence lactate production or the hyperventilation observed during the delayed endotoxin shock phase. 4 It is concluded t,at methylprednisolone does not prevent the release, by endotoxin, of a pulmonary vasoconstrictor prostaglandin, or its effects, but that perhaps by preventing kinin release it may reduce endotoxin-induced capillary leakage. PMID:329935

  6. Escin attenuates acute lung injury induced by endotoxin in mice.

    PubMed

    Xin, Wenyu; Zhang, Leiming; Fan, Huaying; Jiang, Na; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2011-01-18

    Endotoxin causes multiple organ dysfunctions, including acute lung injury (ALI). The current therapeutic strategies for endotoxemia are designed to neutralize one or more of the inflammatory mediators. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that escin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-edematous effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of escin on ALI induced by endotoxin in mice. ALI was induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intravenously. The mice were given dexamethasone or escin before injection of LPS. The mortality rate was recorded. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and nitric oxide (NO) were measured. Pulmonary superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were also determined. The expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) level was detected by Western blotting. Pretreatment with escin could decrease the mortality rate, attenuate lung injury resulted from LPS, down-regulate the level of the inflammation mediators, including NO, TNF-α, and IL-1β, enhance the endogenous antioxidant capacity, and up-regulating the GR expression in lung. The results suggest that escin may have potent protective effect on the LPS-induced ALI by inhibiting of the inflammatory response, and its mechanism involves in up-regulating the GR and enhancing the endogenous antioxidant capacity. PMID:21040784

  7. Postnatal acquisition of endotoxin tolerance in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lotz, Michael; Gütle, Dominique; Walther, Sabrina; Ménard, Sandrine; Bogdan, Christian; Hornef, Mathias W

    2006-04-17

    The role of innate immune recognition by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) in vivo is ill-defined. Here, we used highly enriched primary IECs to analyze Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and mechanisms that prevent inappropriate stimulation by the colonizing microflora. Although the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor complex TLR4/MD-2 was present in fetal, neonatal, and adult IECs, LPS-induced nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and chemokine (macrophage inflammatory protein 2 [MIP-2]) secretion was only detected in fetal IECs. Fetal intestinal macrophages, in contrast, were constitutively nonresponsive to LPS. Acquisition of LPS resistance was paralleled by a spontaneous activation of IECs shortly after birth as illustrated by phosphorylation of IkappaB-alpha and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB p65 in situ as well as transcriptional activation of MIP-2. Importantly, the spontaneous IEC activation occurred in vaginally born mice but not in neonates delivered by Caesarean section or in TLR4-deficient mice, which together with local endotoxin measurements identified LPS as stimulatory agent. The postnatal loss of LPS responsiveness of IECs was associated with a posttranscriptional down-regulation of the interleukin 1 receptor-associated kinase 1, which was essential for epithelial TLR4 signaling in vitro. Thus, unlike intestinal macrophages, IECs acquire TLR tolerance immediately after birth by exposure to exogenous endotoxin to facilitate microbial colonization and the development of a stable intestinal host-microbe homeostasis. PMID:16606665

  8. Circadian responses to endotoxin treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Marpegán, Luciano; Bekinschtein, Tristán A; Costas, Monica A; Golombek, Diego A

    2005-03-01

    We tested the ability of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to phase-shift the activity circadian rhythm in C57Bl/6J mice. Intraperitoneal administration of 25 microg/kg LPS induced photic-like phase delays (-43+/-10 min) during the early subjective night. These delays were non-additive to those induced by light at CT 15, and were reduced by the previous administration of sulfasalazine, a NF-kappaB activation inhibitor. At CT 15, LPS induced c-Fos expression in the dorsal area of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Our results suggest that the activation of the immune system should be considered an entraining signal for the murine circadian clock. PMID:15710463

  9. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Toxic Shock Syndrome in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Stach, Christopher S; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of susceptibility to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin) is a defining characteristic of Staphylococcus aureus superantigens. At the time of this publication, there are 24 identified staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs), some of which have yet to be fully characterized. Testing the capacity of superantigens to potentiate LPS sensitivity is essential to characterize the role of these proteins in disease development. Here we describe how to perform studies of the enhancement of LPS-induced toxic shock syndrome in rabbits. This protocol also provides information on a second important activity of superantigens: the production of fever. PMID:26676037

  10. Preparation, characterization, and immunological properties in mice of Escherichia coli O157 O-specific polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Konadu, E; Robbins, J B; Shiloach, J; Bryla, D A; Szu, S C

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157 causes severe enteritis and the extraintestinal complication of hemolytic-uremic syndrome, with their highest incidence occurring in children. We postulated that serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to the O-specific polysaccharide of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may confer protective immunity to enteric pathogens by inducing bactericidal reactions against the ingested organisms in the jejunum (J. B. Robbins, C. Chu, and R. Schneerson, Clin. Infect. Dis. 15:346-361, 1992; S. C. Szu, R. Gupta, and J. B. Robbins, p. 381-394, in I. K. Wachsmuth, P. A. Blake, and O. Olsvik, ed., Vibrio cholerae, 1994). Because polysaccharide-protein conjugates induce serum IgG antibodies in infants, we bound the O-specific polysaccharide of E. coli O157 to proteins. E. coli O157 LPS, treated with acetic acid or hydrazine, was derivatized with adipic acid dihydrazide and bound to proteins by carbodiimide-mediated condensation. Conjugates of these adipic hydrazide derivative were prepared with bovine serum albumin, formalin-treated exotoxin C of Clostridium welchii (Pig Bel toxoid), or Pseudomonas aeruginosa recombinant exoprotein A. The conjugates had low levels of endotoxin and elicited serum antibodies with bactericidal activity to the O157 LPS. The largest increase in LPS antibodies was of the IgG class. Clinical evaluation of E. coli O157-toxoid conjugates is planned. Images PMID:7927787

  11. Electronic tongue for simultaneous detection of endotoxins and other contaminants of microbiological origin.

    PubMed

    Heras, Jorge Yánez; Pallarola, Diego; Battaglini, Fernando

    2010-07-15

    Endotoxins, also referred to as pyrogens, are lipopolysaccharides (LPS) present in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and represent one of the most dangerous microbiological contaminants in water for hemodialysis and intravenous infusion. A method is presented for the simultaneous detection of endotoxins and other bacterial lysis contaminating species in purified water for parenteral formulations. The technique used is electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, with data interpretation using principal component analysis (PCA), cluster analysis (CA), and multivariate discriminant analysis (MDA). Two types of electrode surfaces were modified with LPS recognition agents: (i) a 37 amino acids fragment of a 18 kDa cationic antimicrobial protein (CAP18F) that has LPS binding activity; (ii) the highly selective endotoxin neutralizing protein (ENP). Statistical multivariate analysis of the impedance spectral data allowed the detection of endotoxin at, and below, the threshold pharmaceutical regulatory level. Discrimination of LPS from samples containing proteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids or their mixtures was achieved. These results open a new route to a practical instrumental method capable of detecting and discriminating LPS from other potential pro-inflammatory species of microbiological origin, such as nucleic acids. PMID:20434900

  12. Dephosphorylation of endotoxin by alkaline phosphatase in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Poelstra, K.; Bakker, W. W.; Klok, P. A.; Kamps, J. A.; Hardonk, M. J.; Meijer, D. K.

    1997-01-01

    Natural substrates for alkaline phosphatase (AP) are at present not identified despite extensive investigations. Difficulties in imagining a possible physiological function involve its extremely high pH optimum for the usual exogenous substrates and its localization as an ecto-enzyme. As endotoxin is a substance that contains phosphate groups and is usually present in the extracellular space, we studied whether AP is able to dephosphorylate this bacterial product at physiological pH levels. We tested this in intestinal cryostat sections using histochemical methods with endotoxin from Escherichia coli and Salmonella minnesota R595 as substrate. Results show that dephosphorylation of both preparations occurs at pH 7.5 by AP activity. As phosphate residues in the lipid A moiety determine the toxicity of the molecule, we examined the effect of the AP inhibitor levamisole in vivo using a septicemia model in the rat. The results show that inhibition of endogenous AP by levamisole significantly reduces survival of rats intraperitoneally injected with E. coli bacteria, whereas this drug does not influence survival of rats receiving a sublethal dose of the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus. In view of the endotoxin-dephosphorylating properties of AP demonstrated in vitro, we propose a crucial role for this enzyme in host defense. The effects of levamisole during gram-negative bacterial infections and the localization of AP as an ecto-enzyme in most organs as well as the induction of enzyme activity during inflammatory reactions and cholestasis is in accordance with such a protective role. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:9327750

  13. Endotoxin enhances EEG alpha and beta power in human sleep.

    PubMed

    Trachsel, L; Schreiber, W; Holsboer, F; Pollmächer, T

    1994-03-01

    Endotoxin, a lipopolysaccharide (0.4 or 0.8 ng/kg body weight), was injected at 1900 hours in 17 healthy men in a single-blind, placebo-controlled experiment. The administration was followed by a 4-hour period of quiet wakefulness in bed (light intensity < 200 lux). Unlimited sleep was allowed after 2300 hours (lights off) until the next morning. The electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyogram, electrooculogram, electrocardiogram and rectal temperature were recorded throughout the experimental session. Standard sleep stages were assessed, and the EEG was submitted to a state-specific, serial spectral analysis. Endotoxin administration induced a rise of body temperature and heart rate, which started approximately 2 hours after the injection and persisted through most of the sleep period. Sleep latency remained unchanged, whereas rapid eye movement (REM) sleep latency increased from 60.3 to 89.0 minutes (paired t test; p = 0.06) compared to control values. Stage 2 sleep was elevated from 45.5 to 49.0% of time in bed (p < 0.05), and total nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep from 64.2 to 69.1% (p < 0.05). No significant change could be observed in slow-wave sleep (SWS, stages 3 and 4). During the first 4 hours of the sleep period, NREM sleep EEG spectral power was distinctly and markedly increased between 8 and 12 Hz (alpha) and 15 and 20 Hz (beta) (p < 0.05), whereas at the same time EEG power between 1 and 8 Hz (delta, theta) was not significantly changed. We conclude that in humans the primary host response induced by endotoxin initially suppresses REM sleep and increases stage 2 NREM sleep, but does not affect SWS. No clear modification of sleep EEG delta activity could be observed after endotoxin injection, despite marked endocrinological and physiological changes such as the elevation of body temperature. Numerous factors related to the human primary host response may be responsible for the EEG intensification of the alpha and beta range. PMID:8036367

  14. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein enhances the responsiveness of alveolar macrophages to bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Implications for cytokine production in normal and injured lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T R; Mathison, J C; Tobias, P S; Letúrcq, D J; Moriarty, A M; Maunder, R J; Ulevitch, R J

    1992-01-01

    A plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) has been shown to regulate the response of rabbit peritoneal macrophages and human blood monocytes to endotoxin (LPS). We investigated whether LBP is present in lung fluids and the effects of LBP on the response of lung macrophages to LPS. Immunoreactive LBP was detectable in the lavage fluids of patients with the adult respiratory distress syndrome by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting, and also by specific immunoassay. In rabbits, the LBP appeared to originate outside of the lungs, inasmuch as mRNA transcripts for LBP were identified in total cellular RNA from liver, but not from lung homogenates or alveolar macrophages. Purified LBP enhanced the response of human and rabbit alveolar macrophages to both smooth form LPS (Escherichia coli O111B:4) and rough form LPS (Salmonella minnesota Re595). In the presence of LBP and LPS, the onset of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) production occurred earlier and at an LPS threshold dose that was as much as 1,000-fold lower for both types of LPS. In rabbit alveolar macrophages treated with LBP and LPS, TNF alpha mRNA appeared earlier, reached higher levels, and had a prolonged half-life as compared with LPS treatment alone. Neither LPS nor LPS and LBP affected pHi or [Cai++] in alveolar macrophages. Specific monoclonal antibodies to CD14, a receptor that binds LPS/LBP complexes, inhibited TNF alpha production by human alveolar macrophages stimulated with LPS alone or with LPS/LBP complexes, indicating the importance of CD14 in mediating the effects of LPS on alveolar macrophages. Thus, immunoreactive LBP accumulates in lung lavage fluids in patients with lung injury and enhances LPS-stimulated TNF alpha gene expression in alveolar macrophages by a pathway that depends on the CD14 receptor. LBP may play an important role in augmenting TNF alpha expression by alveolar macrophages within the lungs. Images PMID:1281827

  15. Involvement of preprotachykinin A gene-encoded peptides and the neurokinin 1 receptor in endotoxin-induced murine airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Elekes, Krisztián; Sándor, Katalin; Szitter, István; Kereskai, László; Pintér, Erika; Kemény, Agnes; Szolcsányi, János; McLaughlin, Lynn; Vasiliou, Sylvia; Kipar, Anja; Zimmer, Andreas; Hunt, Stephen P; Stewart, James P; Quinn, John P

    2010-10-01

    Tachykinins encoded by the preprotachykinin A (TAC1) gene such as substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) are involved in neurogenic inflammatory processes via predominantly neurokinins 1 and 2 (NK1 and NK2) receptor activation, respectively. Endokinins and hemokinins encoded by the TAC4 gene also have remarkable selectivity and potency for the NK1 receptors and might participate in inflammatory cell functions. The aim of the present study was to investigate endotoxin-induced airway inflammation and consequent bronchial hyper-reactivity in TAC1(-/-), NK1(-/-) and also in double knockout (TAC1(-/-)/NK1(-/-)) mice. Sub-acute interstitial lung inflammation was evoked by intranasal Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the knockout mice and their wildtype C57BL/6 counterparts 24 h before measurement. Respiratory parameters were measured with unrestrained whole body plethysmography. Bronchoconstriction was induced by inhalation of the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol and Penh (enhanced pause) correlating with airway resistance was calculated. Lung interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations were measured with ELISA. Histological evaluation was performed and a composite morphological score was determined. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the lung was measured with spectrophotometry to quantify the number of infiltrating neutrophils/macrophages. Airway hyper-reactivity was significantly reduced in the TAC1(-/-) as well as the TAC1(-/-)/NK1(-/-) groups. However, LPS-induced histological inflammatory changes (perivascular/peribronchial oedema, neutrophil infiltration and goblet cell hyperplasia), MPO activity and TNF-alpha concentration were markedly diminished only in TAC1(-/-) mice. Interestingly, the concentrations of both cytokines, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, were significantly greater in the NK1(-/-) group. These data clearly demonstrated on the basis of histology, MPO and cytokine measurements that TAC1 gene

  16. Movement of Endotoxin Through Soil Columns

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sagar M.; Gerba, Charles P.; Lance, J. Clarence

    1980-01-01

    Land treatment of wastewater is an attractive alternative to conventional sewage treatment systems and is gaining widespread acceptance. Although land application systems prevent surface water pollution and augment the available water supplies, the potential dangers to human health should be evaluated. Since sewage may contain high amounts of bacterial endotoxin, the removal of endotoxin from sewage by percolation through soil was investigated. It was found that 90 to 99% of the endotoxin was removed after travel of sewage through 100 to 250 cm of loamy sand soil. When distilled water was allowed to infiltrate into the soil to simulate rainfall, the endotoxin was mobilized and moved in a concentrated band through the soil column. On testing samples from actual land treatment sites, as much as 480 ng of endotoxin per milliliter was found in some groundwater samples. The presence of endotoxin in potable water is known to be a potential problem under some circumstances, but the importance of endotoxin in water supplies has not been fully assessed. Therefore, the design, operation, and management of land application systems should take into account the fate of endotoxin in groundwater beneath the sites. PMID:7387154

  17. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  18. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  19. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  20. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  1. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  2. Lipopolysaccharide recognition, CD14, and lipopolysaccharide receptors.

    PubMed

    Ingalls, R R; Heine, H; Lien, E; Yoshimura, A; Golenbock, D

    1999-06-01

    The ability of a host to sense invasion by a pathogenic organism, and to respond appropriately to control infection, is paramount to survival. To that end, an array of receptors and binding proteins has evolved as part of the innate immune system to detect Gram-negative bacteria. This article reviews the role of CD14, other LPS binding proteins, and the Toll family of receptors in the innate recognition of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. PMID:10340170

  3. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide induced acute inflammation in lung by chlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinshan; Xue, Jinling; Xu, Bi; Xie, Jiani; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-02-13

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, also called endotoxin) is a pro-inflammatory constituent of gram negative bacteria and cyanobacteria, which causes a potential health risk in the process of routine urban application of reclaimed water, such as car wash, irrigation, scenic water refilling, etc. Previous studies indicated that the common disinfection treatment, chlorination, has little effect on endotoxin activity removal measured by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. However, in this study, significant decrease of acute inflammatory effects was observed in mouse lung, while LAL assay still presented a moderate increase of endotoxin activity. To explore the possible mechanisms, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results showed the chlorination happened in alkyl chain of LPS molecules, which could affect the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein. Also the size of LPS aggregates was found to drop significantly after treatment, which could be another results of chlorination caused polarity change. In conclusion, our observation demonstrated that chlorination is effective to reduce the LPS induced inflammation in lung, and it is recommended to use health effect-based methods to assess risk removal of water treatment technologies. PMID:26530889

  4. Influence of droplet size, pH and ionic strength on endotoxin-triggered ordering transitions in liquid crystalline droplets

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel S.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2012-01-01

    We report an investigation of ordering transitions that are induced in water-dispersed, micrometer-sized droplets of a thermotropic liquid crystal (LC) by the bacterial lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. We reveal that the ordering transitions induced by endotoxin – from a bipolar state of the droplets to a radial state – are strongly dependent on the size of the LC droplets. Specifically, as the diameters of the LC droplets increase from 2 μm to above 10 μm (in phosphate buffered saline with an ionic strength of 90 mM and a pH of 7.2), we measured the percentage of droplets exhibiting a radial configuration in the presence of 100 pg/mL endotoxin to decrease from 98 ± 1 % to 3 ± 2 %. In addition, we measured a decrease in either the ionic strength or pH of the aqueous phase to reduce the percentage of droplets exhibiting a radial configuration in the presence of endotoxin. These results, when interpreted within the context of a simple thermodynamic model that incorporates the contributions of elasticity and surface anchoring to the free energies of the LC droplets, lead us to conclude that (i) the elastic constant K24 plays a central role in determining the size-dependent response of the LC droplets to endotoxin, and (ii) endotoxin-triggered ordering transitions occur only under solution conditions (pH, ionic strength) where the combined contributions of elasticity and surface anchoring to the free energies of the bipolar and radial configurations of the LC droplets are similar in magnitude. Our analysis also suggests that the presence of endotoxin perturbs the free energies of the LC droplets by ~10−17 J/droplet, which is comparable to the standard free energy of self-association of ~103 endotoxin molecules. These results, when combined with prior reports of localization of endotoxin at the center of LC droplets, are consistent with the hypothesis that self-assembly of endotoxin within micrometer-sized LC droplets provides the driving force for the ordering

  5. Responses in whole-body amino acid kinetics to an acute, sub-clinical endotoxin challenge in lambs.

    PubMed

    Hoskin, S O; Bremner, D M; Holtrop, G; Lobley, G E

    2016-02-28

    Some effects of parasitism, endotoxaemia or sepsis can be mitigated by provision of extra protein. Supplemented protein may encompass a metabolic requirement for specific amino acids (AA). The current study investigates a method to identify and quantify the amounts of AA required during inflammation induced by an endotoxin challenge. One of each pair of six twin sheep was infused in the jugular vein for 20 h with either saline (control) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 2 ng/kg body weight per min) from Escherichia coli. Between 12 and 20 h a mixture of stable isotope-labelled AA was infused to measure irreversible loss rates. From 16 to 20 h all sheep were supplemented with a mixture of unlabelled AA infused intravenously. Blood samples were taken before the start of infusions, and then continuously over intervals between 14 and 20 h. At 20 h the sheep were euthanised, and liver and kidney samples were taken for measurement of serine-threonine dehydratase (SDH) activity. LPS infusion decreased plasma concentrations of most AA (P<0·05; P<0·10 for leucine and tryptophan), except for phenylalanine (which increased P=0·022) and tyrosine. On the basis of the incremental response to the supplemental AA, arginine, aspartate, cysteine, glutamate, lysine (tendency only), glycine, methionine, proline, serine and threonine were important in the metabolic response to the endotoxaemia. The AA infusion between 16 and 20 h restored the plasma concentrations in the LPS-treated sheep for the majority of AA, except for glutamine, isoleucine, methionine, serine and valine. LPS treatment increased (P<0·02) SDH activity in both liver and kidney. The approach allows quantification of key AA required during challenge situations. PMID:26652711

  6. Inhibition of IRAK-4 activity for rescuing endotoxin LPS-induced septic mortality in mice by lonicerae flos extract

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sun Hong; Roh, Eunmiri; Kim, Hyun Soo; Baek, Seung-Il; Choi, Nam Song; Kim, Narae; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •Lonicerae flos extract (HS-23) is a clinical candidate, Phase I for sepsis treatment. •Here, HS-23 or its major constituents rescued LPS-induced septic mortality in mice. •As a mechanism, they directly inhibited IRAK-4-catalyzed kinase activity. •Thus, they suppressed LPS-induced expression of NF-κB/AP-1-target inflammatory genes. -- Abstract: Lonicerae flos extract (HS-23) is a clinical candidate currently undergoing Phase I trial in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected healthy human volunteers, but its molecular basis remains to be defined. Here, we investigated protective effects of HS-23 or its major constituents on Escherichia coli LPS-induced septic mortality in mice. Intravenous treatment with HS-23 rescued LPS-intoxicated C57BL/6J mice under septic conditions, and decreased the levels of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) in the blood. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) and its isomers were assigned as major constituents of HS-23 in the protection against endotoxemia. As a molecular mechanism, HS-23 or CGA isomers inhibited endotoxin LPS-induced autophosphorylation of the IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4) in mouse peritoneal macrophages as well as the kinase activity of IRAK-4 in cell-free reactions. HS-23 consequently suppressed downstream pathways critical for LPS-induced activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB or activating protein 1 (AP-1) in the peritoneal macrophages. HS-23 also inhibited various toll-like receptor agonists-induced nitric oxide (NO) production, and down-regulated LPS-induced expression of NF-κB/AP-1-target inflammatory genes in the cells. Taken together, HS-23 or CGA isomers exhibited anti-inflammatory therapy against LPS-induced septic mortality in mice, at least in part, mediated through the inhibition of IRAK-4.

  7. Nitric oxide-mediated hyporeactivity to noradrenaline precedes the induction of nitric oxide synthase in endotoxin shock.

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C.; Mitchell, J. A.; Thiemermann, C.; Vane, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    1. The role of an enhanced formation of nitric oxide (NO) and the relative importance of the constitutive and inducible NO synthase (NOS) for the development of immediate (within 60 min) and delayed (at 180 min) vascular hyporeactivity to noradrenaline was investigated in a model of circulatory shock induced by endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) in the rat. 2. Male Wistar rats were anaesthetized and instrumented for the measurement of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate. In addition, the calcium-dependent and calcium-independent NOS activity was measured ex vivo by the conversion of [3H]-arginine to [3H]-citrulline in homogenates from several organs obtained from vehicle- and LPS-treated rats. 3. E. coli LPS (10 mg kg-1, i.v. bolus) caused a rapid (within 5 min) and sustained fall in MAP. At 30 and 60 min after LPS, pressor responses to noradrenaline (0.3, 1 or 3 micrograms kg-1, i.v.) were significantly reduced. The pressor responses were restored by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 1 mg kg-1, i.v. at 60 min), a potent inhibitor of NO synthesis. In contrast, L-NAME did not potentiate the noradrenaline-induced pressor responses in control animals. 4. Dexamethasone (3 mg kg-1, i.v., 60 min prior to LPS), a potent inhibitor of the induction of NOS, did not alter initial MAP or pressor responses to noradrenaline in control rats, but significantly attenuated the LPS-induced fall in MAP at 15 to 60 min after LPS. Dexamethasone did not influence the development of the LPS-induced immediate (within 60 min) hyporeactivity to noradrenaline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7682137

  8. Endotoxin-induced myocardial dysfunction: effects of macrophage migration inhibitory factor neutralization.

    PubMed

    Chagnon, Frederic; Metz, Christine N; Bucala, Richard; Lesur, Olivier

    2005-05-27

    The pathophysiology of sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction still remains controversial. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has recently been identified as a cardiac-derived myocardial depressant factor in septic shock. Putative mechanisms by which MIF affects cardiac function are unknown. In an investigation of possible mechanisms of action, a rat model of endotoxin toxicity was designed using intraperitoneal (I/P) injection of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with or without coinfusion of neutralizing anti-MIF or isotypic-matched antibodies. Echocardiographic evaluation revealed that MIF neutralization reversed endotoxin-induced myocardial dysfunction at 24 hours after injection. RNase protection assay (RPA) and Western blot established that MIF neutralization prevented LPS-induced mRNA expression and production of heart-derived inflammatory paracrine and autocrine cytokines such as IL-1s and IL-6. Moreover, MIF immunoneutralization increased heart Bcl-2/Bax protein ratio and suppressed endotoxin-induced release of mitochondrial cytochrome-c, as demonstrated by Western blotting. Inhibition of mitochondrial loss of cytochrome-c decreased in heart caspase-3 activity at 6 and 24 hours after injection. MIF neutralization also restored the LPS-induced deficient nuclear translocation of phospho-Akt and consequently the expression of the heart survival nuclear factor GATA-4. The restoration of the translocation/expression of survival factors by MIF inhibition resulted in lowered endotoxin-induced DNA fragmentation at 24 hours, a hallmark of downstream cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Our data indicate that early inactivation of MIF significantly reverses the imbalance of proapoptotic to prosurvival pathways and reduces acute inflammation of the heart thereby improving myocardial dysfunction induced by endotoxin. PMID:15879312

  9. Structural stability of Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin homolog-scanning mutants determined by susceptibility to proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Almond, B D; Dean, D H

    1993-01-01

    Forty homolog-scanning (double-reciprocal-crossover) mutant proteins of two Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin genes (cryIAa and cryIAc) were examined for potential structural alterations by a series of proteolytic assays. Three groups of mutants could be identified. Group 1, consisting of 13 mutants, showed no delta-endotoxin present during overexpression conditions in Escherichia coli (48 h at 37 degrees C, with a ptac promoter). These mutants produced full-sized delta-endotoxin detectable by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with Coomassie blue staining or Western immunoanalysis after 24 h of growth but not after 48 h, suggesting sensitivity to intracellular proteases. Group 2 consisted of 13 mutants that produced stable delta-endotoxins that were completely digested by 2% bovine trypsin. In contrast, native delta-endotoxin produces a 65,000-Da trypsin-resistant peptide, which is the active toxin. Group 3 mutants expressed delta-endotoxin and trypsin-stable toxins, similar to the wild type. In this study, 12 group 3 mutant toxins were compared with wild type toxins by thermolysin digestion at a range of temperatures. The two wild-type toxins exhibited significant differences in thermolysin digestion midpoints. Among the group 3 mutants, most possessed significantly different protein stabilities relative to their parental toxins. Two of the group 3 mutants were observed to have exchanged the thermolysin sensitivity properties of the parental toxins. Images PMID:8368834

  10. Identification of a new anti-LPS agent, geniposide, from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, and its ability of direct binding and neutralization of lipopolysaccharide in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xinchuan; Yang, Dong; Liu, Xin; Wang, Ning; Li, Bin; Cao, Hongwei; Lu, Yongling; Wei, Guo; Zhou, Hong; Zheng, Jiang

    2010-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS/endotoxin) is a key pathogen recognition molecule for sepsis. Currently, one of the therapeutic approaches for severe sepsis is focusing on the neutralization of LPS, and clinical trials have shown a lot of traditional Chinese herbs possess anti-sepsis function. Herein, to elucidate the bioactive components of traditional Chinese herbs that can neutralize LPS, the lipid A-binding abilities of sixty herbs were tested using affinity biosensor technology. The aqueous extract of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, traditionally used to treat inflammation in Asian countries for centuries, was further investigated. Subsequently, a monomer, identified as geniposide, was isolated. In vitro, geniposide was found to directly bind LPS and neutralize LPS. It dose-dependently inhibited cytokines release from RAW264.7 cells induced by LPS without affecting the cell viability, and inhibited TNF-α mRNA expression up-regulated by LPS. However, geniposide did not decrease TNF-α release induced by CpG DNA, Poly I:C or IL-1β. Significantly, geniposide dose-dependently down-regulated TLR4 mRNA expression up-regulated by LPS, and suppressed the phosphorylations of p38 MAKP induced by LPS but not by IL-1β. In vivo, geniposide (40mg/kg) could significantly protect mice challenge with lethal heat-killed E. coli, and dose-dependently decreased the level of serum endotoxin which was tightly associated with the cytokine levels in endotoxemia mice. In summary, we successfully isolated geniposide from G. jasminoides Ellis. Geniposide directly bound LPS and neutralized LPS in vitro, and significantly protected sepsis model mice. Therefore, geniposide could be as a useful lead compound for anti-sepsis drug development. PMID:20655404

  11. Distribution and survival of Escherichia coli translocating from the intestine after thermal injury.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J W; Gianotti, L; Pyles, T; Carey, M A; Babcock, G F

    1991-01-01

    The present investigation was performed to study the kinetics of tissue distribution and deposition of Escherichia coli and endotoxin translocating from the intestine after thermal injury. Escherichia coli was grown in the presence of 14C glucose and both labeled bacteria and endotoxin prepared from the labeled bacteria were used as translocation probes. Escherichia coli (10(8) to 10(10) bacteria) and E. coli endotoxin (100 micrograms per animal) were gavaged into the stomach immediately before a 30% burn injury was inflicted in mice. Animals were killed 1, 4 and 24 hours after burn injury. Translocation occurred extensively within 1 hour after burn injury. Expressed as amount of radioactivity per gram of tissue, translocation was greatest in the mesenteric lymph node (MLN) followed by spleen, lung, and liver. Translocation of endotoxin was similar to translocation of intact bacteria, with the exception that less radioactivity could be found in the peritoneal cavity and more in the liver. Both intact E. coli and endotoxin translocated directly through the intact bowel wall. Killing of bacteria was greatest in the MLN and spleen, approximating 95% to more than 99% of translocating bacteria. Killing efficiency was lowest in the lungs. It is concluded that estimation of translocation by viable bacterial counts in tissues grossly underestimates the extent of translocation of bacteria and ignores the extent of translocation of endotoxin. Translocation of endotoxin may have biologic significance that is independent of and in addition to translocation of intact bacteria. PMID:2039286

  12. Lipopolysaccharide augments aflatoxin B(1)-induced liver injury through neutrophil-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Barton, C C; Ganey, P E; Roth, R A

    2000-11-01

    Exposure to small, noninjurious doses of the inflammagen, bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) augments the toxicity of certain hepatotoxicants including aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)). Mediators of inflammation, in particular neutrophils (PMNs), are responsible for tissue injury in a variety of animal models. This study was conducted to examine the role of PMNs in the pathogenesis of hepatic injury after AFB(1)/LPS cotreatment. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats (250-350 g) were treated with either 1 mg AFB(1)/kg, ip or its vehicle (0.5% DMSO/saline), and 4 h later with either E. coli LPS (7. 4 x 10(6) EU/kg, iv) or its saline vehicle. Over a course of 6 to 96 h after AFB(1) administration, rats were killed and livers were stained immunohistochemically for PMNs. LPS resulted in an increase in PMN accumulation in the liver that preceded the onset of liver injury. To assess if PMNs contributed to the pathogenesis, an anti-PMN antibody was administered to reduce PMN numbers in blood and liver, and injury was evaluated. Hepatic parenchymal cell injury was evaluated as increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities in serum and from histologic examination of liver sections. Biliary tract alterations were evaluated as increased concentration of serum bile acids and activities of gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and 5'-nucleotidase (5'-ND) in serum. Neutrophil depletion protected against hepatic parenchymal cell injury caused by AFB(1)/LPS cotreatment but not against markers of biliary tract injury. This suggests that LPS augments AFB(1) hepatotoxicity through two mechanisms: one of which is PMN-dependent, and another that is not. PMID:11053557

  13. Beneficial effect of hyperbaric oxygen pretreatment on lipopolysaccharide-induced shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Pedoto, Alessia; Nandi, Jyotirmoy; Yang, Zhong-Jin; Wang, Jingping; Bosco, Gerardo; Oler, Albert; Hakim, Tawfic S; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2003-07-01

    1. We investigated the effect of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO2) pretreatment on the production of exhaled nitric oxide (ENO) and the expression of lung inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced shock in an experimental rat model. 2. Rats were randomized into four groups, anaesthetized, mechanically ventilated with room air and infused with normal saline (2 mL/h) through the jugular vein for 5 h. Group 1 (NS) received only normal saline. Group 2 (HBO2-NS) was pretreated with HBO2 at 2.8 absolute atmospheres for 2 h and then received normal saline. Group 3 (LPS) received LPS, 20 mg/kg, i.v., bolus. Group 4 (HBO2-LPS) was pretreated with HBO2 for 2 h, followed by LPS. 3. Arterial blood gases, blood pressure, blood pH and ENO production were measured every 30 min. Plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) concentrations were assessed at the beginning (baseline) and at the end of the study. Lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, iNOS expression and histological scores were measured for the evaluation of lung injury. 4. Administration of LPS was associated with decreased blood pressure and pH, increased ENO production, plasma NOx concentrations, lung iNOS expression and MPO activity. 5. Pretreatment with HBO2 significantly alleviated the LPS-induced hypotension, acidosis and decreased ENO production, plasma NOx concentrations, lung MPO activity and expression of iNOS. Hyperbaric O2 had no effect on control rats. 6. Our data show that HBO2 pretreatment has beneficial haemodynamic effects in rats with endotoxin shock. The beneficial effects of HBO2 may be partially mediated by decreased ENO production via reduced LPS-induced lung iNOS expression. PMID:12823263

  14. Human exposure to endotoxins and fecal indicators originating from water features.

    PubMed

    de Man, H; Heederik, D D J; Leenen, E J T M; de Roda Husman, A M; Spithoven, J J G; van Knapen, F

    2014-03-15

    Exposure to contaminated aerosols and water originating from water features may pose public health risks. Endotoxins in air and water and fecal bacteria in water of water features were measured as markers for exposure to microbial cell debris and enteric pathogens, respectively. Information was collected about wind direction, wind force, distance to the water feature, the height of the water feature and the tangibility of water spray. The mean concentration of endotoxins in air nearby and in water of 31 water features was 10 endotoxin units (EU)/m(3) (Geometric Mean (GM), range 0-85.5 EU/m(3) air) and 773 EU/mL (GM, range 9-18,170 EU/mL water), respectively. Such mean concentrations may be associated with respiratory health effects. The water quality of 26 of 88 water features was poor when compared to requirements for recreational water in the Bathing Water Directive 2006/7/EC. Concentrations greater than 1000 colony forming units (cfu) Escherichia coli per 100 mL and greater than 400 cfu intestinal enterococci per 100 mL increase the probability of acquiring gastrointestinal health complaints. Regression analyses showed that the endotoxin concentration in air was significantly influenced by the concentration of endotoxin in water, the distance to the water feature and the tangibility of water spray. Exposure to air and water near water features was shown to lead to exposure to endotoxins and fecal bacteria. The potential health risks resulting from such exposure to water features may be estimated by a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA), however, such QMRA would require quantitative data on pathogen concentrations, exposure volumes and dose-response relationships. The present study provides estimates for aerosolisation ratios that can be used as input for QMRA to quantify exposure and to determine infection risks from exposure to water features. PMID:24231029

  15. Cardiovascular sequelae of endotoxin shock in diabetic dogs.

    PubMed

    Law, W R; Moriarty, M T; McLane, M P

    1991-10-01

    Diabetic patients exhibit a higher incidence of post-surgical sepsis, as well as a higher rate of mortality from sepsis, than their non-diabetic counterparts. This may be a result of cardiovascular deterioration associated with diabetes mellitus. This study was designed to characterize the cardiovascular sequelae associated with endotoxin shock in a canine model of diabetes. Diabetes was induced with alloxan (50 mg/kg) and streptozotocin (30 mg/kg) in dogs weighing 19-25 kg. Thirty days later, anaesthetized dogs were instrumented to obtain blood pressures, blood samples, left ventricular chamber diameter, circumflex arterial blood flow, and aortic blood flow. Metabolic parameters were calculated according to the Fick principle, and myocardial inotropic state assessed with the end-systolic pressure-diameter relationship. After stable baseline measurements, Escherichia coli endotoxin (1 mg/kg) was infused over 1 h, and measurements were obtained every 30 min. After endotoxin administration diabetic dogs became more hypotensive than the non-diabetic dogs. Cardiac performance parameters were also depressed to a greater degree. These changes could be attributed to depressions in vascular resistance and myocardial inotropic state in diabetic dogs. Cardiac dysfunction occurred in association with a relative decrease in the supply to demand ratio for oxygen in the diabetic dogs, suggesting functional ischemia. Data indicating a decrease in pre-load and vascular resistance in the diabetic group suggest a greater degree of vascular collapse, vascular pooling, or extravasation of fluid than occurred in the non-diabetic group. These data support the hypothesis that the cardiovascular system of diabetic subjects cannot tolerate a septic insult as well as their non-diabetic counterparts. PMID:1959700

  16. Addressing endotoxin issues in bioengineered heparin.

    PubMed

    Suwan, Jiraporn; Torelli, Amanda; Onishi, Akihiro; Dordick, Jonathan S; Linhardt, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Heparin is a widely used clinical anticoagulant that is prepared from pig intestine. A contamination of heparin in 2008 has led to a reexamination of animal-derived pharmaceuticals. A bioengineered heparin prepared by bacterial fermentation and chemical and enzymatic processing is currently under development. This study examines the challenges of reducing or removing endotoxins associated with this process that are necessary to proceed with preclinical in vivo evaluation of bioengineered heparin. The current process is assessed for endotoxin levels, and strategies are examined for endotoxin removal from polysaccharides and enzymes involved in this process. PMID:23586950

  17. Gastrointestinal antibody responses in axenic mice to topically administered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, J L; Molinari, J A

    1977-01-01

    Immunoglobulin levels were determined in gastrointestinal secretions of both conventional and axenic mice, as was the stability of the immunoglobulin classes in these secretions. Axenic animals were then administered nonviable Escherichia coli O111:B4 by topical application into the oral cavity. Immunoglobulin (Ig) A, IgG1, AND IgG2 were detected in the gastrointestinal secretions, with an apparent gradation in stability (IgA greater than IgG1 greater than IgG2) under the conditions investigated. Specific antibodies (IgA and IgG) to both the somatic and the flagellar antigens of E. coli were demonstrated. The time course of the responses to the polysaccharide and protein antigens suggested that a secondary response to lipolysaccharide was being observed in the secretions. Examination of the autoclaved diet fed to the germfree animals indicated the presence of antigenically intact polysaccharide materials (i.e., lipopolysaccharides), whereas antigenic bacterial proteins were uniformly undetectable. Therefore, endotoxin in the diet was apparently causing a primary type of sensitization in the mice, whereas the active oral immunization regimen induced a secondary antibacterial response in the secretions. PMID:330399

  18. Effects of Propofol and Midazolam on the Inflammation of Lungs after Intravenous Endotoxin Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Mine Gursac; Saracoglu, Ayten; Saracoglu, Tolga; Kursad, Husnu; Dostbil, Aysenur; Aksoy, Mehmet; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Ince, Ilker

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Pulmonary complications are important sepsis (such as ARDS, diffuse pneumonia). Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by the extensive migration of neutrophils into alveoli of the lungs. Propofol and midazolam are the most widely used agents for sedation in intensive care units. Aimed to investigate the effects of anaesthesia with propofol and midazolam on measured hemodynamic variables and neutrophil migration induced by Escherichia Coli endotoxin (ECE) in pulmonary viscera. Materials and Methods: Forty Sprague Dawley male rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Thiopental Sodium 30 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally to anesthetize the rats. They were ventilated via tracheotomy. Femoral artery was cannulated for the measurement of continuous blood pressure and gases. Group C was the control. After the administration of 1 mL/kg 0.9% NaCL, infusion began at 1 mL/kg/h rate. In Group E 15 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide derived from ECE was administered iv. In Group PE, after a bolus dose of 10 mg/kg propofol and 15 mg/kg ECE, 10 mg/kg/h infusion was applied. In Group ME, after 0.1 mg/kg midazolam bolus dose and 15 mg/kg ECE administration, 0.1 mg/kg/h infusion was administered iv. Rats were sacrified by iv potassium chloride. The lungs were then removed, fixed in 10% buffered formalin for 3 days and embedded in paraffin. They were graded on a scale of 0–3 according to the aggregation of neutrophils. Results: There was intense neutrophil migration in Group E (grade 2, 3). However, although mild neutrophil migration was obtained in 70% of the rat lungs in Group ME (grade 1, 2), it was recorded in only 30% of Group PE (grade 1). Conclusion: The sepsis model induced by ECE and compared with midazolam, propofol anaesthesia is associated with less neutrophil infiltration. In the light of the literature, propofol attenuate the free-radical-mediated lipid peroxidation and systemic inflammation in patients. PMID:26180495

  19. Antimicrobial peptides and endotoxin inhibit cytokine and nitric oxide release but amplify respiratory burst response in human and murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zughaier, Susu M.; Shafer, William M.; Stephens, David S.

    2005-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), in addition to their antibacterial properties, are also chemotactic and signalling molecules that connect the innate and adaptive immune responses. The role of AMP [α defensins, LL-37, a cathepsin G-derived peptide (CG117-136), protegrins (PG-1), polymyxin B (PMX) and LLP1] in modulating the respiratory burst response in human and murine macrophages in the presence of bacterial endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or lipooligosaccharide (LOS)] was investigated. AMP were found to neutralize endotoxin induction of nitric oxide and TNFα release in macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, macrophages primed overnight with AMP and LOS or LPS significantly enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) release compared with cells primed with endotoxin or AMP alone, while no responses were seen in unprimed cells. This enhanced ROS release by macrophages was seen in all cell lines including those obtained from C3H/HeJ (TLR4−/−) mice. Similar effects were also seen when AMP and endotoxin were added directly with zymosan to trigger phagocytosis and the respiratory burst in unprimed RAW 264.7 and C3H/HeJ macrophages. Amplification of ROS release was also demonstrated in a cell-free system of xanthine and xanthine oxidase. Although AMP inhibited cytokine and nitric oxide induction by endotoxin in a TLR4-dependent manner, AMP and endotoxin amplified ROS release in a TLR4-independent manner possibly by exerting a prolonged catalytic effect on the ROS generating enzymes such as the NADPH-oxidase complex. PMID:16098213

  20. Biophysical analysis of the interaction of granulysin-derived peptides with enterobacterial endotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Howe, Jörg; Andrä, Jörg; Rössle, Manfred; Richter, Walter; Silva, Ana Paula Galvão da; Krensky, Alan M.; Clayberger, Carol; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    To combat infections by Gram-negative bacteria, it is not only necessary to kill the bacteria but also to neutralize pathogenicity factors such as endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). The development of antimicrobial peptides based on mammalian endotoxin-binding proteins is a promising tool in the fight against bacterial infections, and septic shock syndrome. Here, synthetic peptides derived from granulysin (Gra-pep) were investigated in microbiological and biophysical assays to understand their interaction with LPS. We analyzed the influence of the binding of Gra-pep on (1) the acyl chain melting of the hydrophobic moiety of LPS, lipid A, by Fourier-transform spectroscopy, (2) the aggregate structure of LPS by small-angle X-ray scattering and cryo-transmission electron microscopy, and 3) the enthalpy change by isothermal titration calorimetry. In addition, the influence of Gra-pep on the incorporation of LPS and LPS-LBP (lipopolysaccharide-binding protein) complexes into negatively charged liposomes was monitored. Our findings demonstrate a characteristic change in the aggregate structure of LPS into multilamellar stacks in the presence of Gra-pep, but little or no change of acyl chain fluidity. Neutralization of LPS by Gra-pep is not due to a scavenging effect in solution, but rather proceeds after incorporation into target membranes, suggesting a requisite membrane-bound step. PMID:17555705

  1. Possible pro-carcinogenic association of endotoxin on lung cancer among Shanghai women textile workers

    PubMed Central

    Checkoway, H; Lundin, J I; Costello, S; Ray, R; Li, W; Eisen, E A; Astrakianakis, G; Seixas, N; Applebaum, K; Gao, D L; Thomas, D B

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) is a widespread contaminant in many environmental settings. Since the 1970s, there has been generally consistent evidence indicating reduced risks for lung cancer associated with occupational endotoxin exposure. Methods: We updated a case–cohort study nested within a cohort of 267 400 female textile workers in Shanghai, China. We compared exposure histories of 1456 incident lung cancers cases diagnosed during 1989–2006 with those of a reference subcohort of 3022 workers who were free of lung cancer at the end of follow-up. We applied Cox proportional hazards modelling to estimate exposure–response trends, adjusted for age and smoking, for cumulative exposures lagged by 0, 10, and 20 years, and separately for time windows of ⩽15 and >15 years since first exposure. Results: We observed no associations between cumulative exposure and lung cancer, irrespective of lag interval. In contrast, analyses by exposure time windows revealed modestly elevated, but not statistically significant relative risks (∼1.27) at the highest three exposure quintiles for exposures that occurred >15 years since first exposure. Conclusions: The findings do not support a protective effect of endotoxin, but are suggestive of possible lung cancer promotion with increasing time since first exposure. PMID:24921918

  2. Super-low Dose Endotoxin Pre-conditioning Exacerbates Sepsis Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Keqiang; Geng, Shuo; Yuan, Ruoxi; Diao, Na; Upchurch, Zachary; Li, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis mortality varies dramatically in individuals of variable immune conditions, with poorly defined mechanisms. This phenomenon complements the hypothesis that innate immunity may adopt rudimentary memory, as demonstrated in vitro with endotoxin priming and tolerance in cultured monocytes. However, previous in vivo studies only examined the protective effect of endotoxin tolerance in the context of sepsis. In sharp contrast, we report herein that pre-conditioning with super-low or low dose endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause strikingly opposite survival outcomes. Mice pre-conditioned with super-low dose LPS experienced severe tissue damage, inflammation, increased bacterial load in circulation, and elevated mortality when they were subjected to cecal-ligation and puncture (CLP). This is in contrast to the well-reported protective phenomenon with CLP mice pre-conditioned with low dose LPS. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that super-low and low dose LPS differentially modulate the formation of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) in neutrophils. Instead of increased ERK activation and NET formation in neutrophils pre-conditioned with low dose LPS, we observed significantly reduced ERK activation and compromised NET generation in neutrophils pre-conditioned with super-low dose LPS. Collectively, our findings reveal a mechanism potentially responsible for the dynamic programming of innate immunity in vivo as it relates to sepsis risks. PMID:26029736

  3. Bacterial endotoxin sensitizes the immature brain to hypoxic--ischaemic injury.

    PubMed

    Eklind, S; Mallard, C; Leverin, A L; Gilland, E; Blomgren, K; Mattsby-Baltzer, I; Hagberg, H

    2001-03-01

    Epidemiological studies show a markedly increased risk of cerebral palsy following the combined exposure of infection and birth asphyxia. However, the underlying mechanisms of this increased vulnerability remain unclear. We have examined the effects of a low dose of bacterial endotoxin on hypoxic--ischaemic injury in the immature brain of rats. Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide 0.3 mg/kg) was administered to 7-day-old rats 4 h prior to unilateral hypoxia--ischaemia and the neurological outcome was determined 3 days later. Rectal temperature and cerebral blood flow was measured during the study and the expression of CD14 and toll-like receptor-4 mRNA in the brain was examined. We found that a low dose of endotoxin dramatically sensitizes the immature brain to injury and induces cerebral infarction in response to short periods of hypoxia--ischaemia that by themselves caused no or little injury. This effect could not be explained by a reduction in cerebral blood flow or hyperthermia. In association with the sensitization of injury we found an altered expression of CD14 mRNA and toll-like receptor-4 mRNA in the brain. These results suggest that the innate immune system may be involved in the vulnerability of the immature brain following the combination of infection and hypoxia--ischaemia. PMID:11285007

  4. Upregulation of Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Channels Contributes to Endotoxin-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gui-Lan; Jiang, Hongni; Zou, Fangdong

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic shock is a pathologic condition caused by endotoxin-producing bacteria, and often associated with severe pulmonary hypertension. Inflammation is a major systemic response to endotoxin; however, it is unknown whether endotoxin has a direct impact on pulmonary arteries that contributes to pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Material/Methods Rat pulmonary arteries and primary pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were cultured in vitro and treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and blockers of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. Neointimal growth and arterial stenosis were observed on cryosections of cultured pulmonary arteries. Proliferation of PASMCs was examined by a WST-1 (water-soluble tetrazolium salt) assay. Expression of TRPC genes in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs were detected and quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Results LPS significantly induced neointimal growth and stenosis of pulmonary arteries and promoted proliferation of PASMCs. TRPC channel blockers 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and SKF-96365 inhibited LPS-induced remodeling of pulmonary arteries and PASMC proliferation. Expression of TRPC1/3/4/6 was detected in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs. LPS treatment dramatically increased the expression of TRPC3 and TRPC4 at both messenger RNA and protein levels. Conclusions LPS stimulates stenosis of pulmonary arteries through enhancement of TRPC-mediated Ca2+ entry into PASMCs, which is caused by upregulation of TRPC3 and TRPC4 channels. PMID:27471122

  5. Effect of naloxone on regional cerebral blood flow during endotoxin shock in conscious rats

    SciTech Connect

    Law, W.R.; Ferguson, J.L. )

    1987-09-01

    Maintenance of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is vital during cardiovascular shock. Since opioids have been implicated in the pathophysiology of endotoxin shock and have been shown to alter cerebral perfusion patterns, the authors determined whether opioids were responsible for any of the changes in regional CBF observed during endotoxin shock and whether the use of naloxone might impair or aid in the maintenance of CBF. When blood flow (BF) is studied with radioactively-labeled microspheres in rats, the left ventricle of the heart is often cannulated via the right carotid artery. Questions have arisen concerning the potential adverse effects of this method on CBF in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the ligated artery. They measured right and left regional CBF by use of this route of cannulation. Twenty-four hours after cannulations were performed, flow measurements were made using radiolabeled microspheres in conscious unrestrained male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-400 g) before and 10, 30, and 60 min after challenging with 10 mg/kg Escherichia coli endotoxin (etx) or saline. Naloxone (2 mg/kg) or saline was given as a treatment 25 min post-etx. They found no significant differences between right and left cortical, midbrain, or cerebellar BF at any time in any treatment group. Therefore naloxone treatment of endotoxin shock may be beneficial in preventing decreases in regional CBF.

  6. Thiamin deficiency impairs endotoxin-induced increases in hepatic glucose output.

    PubMed

    Molina, P E; Yousef, K A; Smith, R M; Tepper, P G; Lang, C H; Abumrad, N N

    1994-05-01

    We addressed the role of thiamin, a cofactor for several enzymes involved in glucose metabolism, in the glucose metabolic response to endotoxin. Characterized by hyperglycemia, increased hepatic glucose production exceeding elevated rates of whole-body glucose utilization, this response is mediated by hormones and cytokines and is dependent on the immune and nutritional status of the host. We hypothesized that a thiamin-deficient state would impair the metabolic response to endotoxin. Rats were fed a thiamin-deficient or control diet for 6 wk before in vivo assessment of glucose kinetics. In control rats, Escherichia coli endotoxin increased the rate of glucose appearance (+76%), disappearance (+70%), and metabolic clearance (+50%). Thiamin deficiency resulted in increased plasma glucose (18%) and lactate (3- to 4-fold) as well as in a 30% decrease in insulin and an increase in glucagon (2.6-fold) and corticosterone (3.6-fold). Thiamin deficiency inhibited the endotoxin-induced hyperglycemia and the rise in hepatic glucose production, glucose utilization, and metabolic clearance rate. PMID:8172089

  7. Effect of Zingiber officinale and propolis on microorganisms and endotoxins in root canals

    PubMed Central

    MAEKAWA, Lilian Eiko; VALERA, Marcia Carneiro; de OLIVEIRA, Luciane Dias; CARVALHO, Cláudio Antonio Talge; CAMARGO, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro; JORGE, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of glycolic propolis (PRO) and ginger (GIN) extracts, calcium hydroxide (CH), chlorhexidine (CLX) gel and their combinations as ICMs (ICMs) against Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and endotoxins in root canals. Material and Methods: After 28 days of contamination with microorganisms, the canals were instrumented and then divided according to the ICM: CH+saline; CLX, CH+CLX, PRO, PRO+CH; GIN; GIN+CH; saline. The antimicrobial activity and quantification of endotoxins by the chromogenic test of Limulus amebocyte lysate were evaluated after contamination and instrumentation at 14 days of ICM application and 7 days after ICM removal. Results and Conclusion: After analysis of results and application of the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn statistical tests at 5% significance level, it was concluded that all ICMs were able to eliminate the microorganisms in the root canals and reduce their amount of endotoxins; however, CH was more effective in neutralizing endotoxins and less effective against C. albicans and E. faecalis, requiring the use of medication combinations to obtain higher success. PMID:23559108

  8. Progranulin protects against endotoxin-induced acute kidney injury by downregulating renal cell death and inflammatory responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoying; Gou, Linfeng; Zhou, Meng; Yang, Fusheng; Zhao, Yihan; Feng, Tingting; Shi, Peikun; Ghavamian, Armin; Zhao, Weiming; Yu, Yuan; Lu, Yi; Yi, Fan; Liu, Guangyi; Tang, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Progranulin (PGRN), a pluripotent secreted growth factor, is involved in various physiologic and disease processes. However, the role of PGRN in endotoxin-induced septic acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unknown. The objective of this study is to investigate the protective effects of PGRN on an endotoxin-induced AKI mouse model by using PGRN-deficient mice and recombinant PGRN (rPGRN) pretreatment. PGRN levels were increased in kidneys of wild-type (WT) mice at 6 and 24h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Renal function detection, hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemical staining, ELISA and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine triphosphate nick-end labeling were used to reveal tissue injury, inflammatory cell infiltration, production of inflammatory mediators and cell death in mouse kidneys after LPS injection. PGRN deficiency resulted in severe kidney injury and increased apoptotic death, inflammatory cell infiltration, production of pro-inflammatory mediators and the expression and nucleus-to-cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1 in the kidney. In addition, rPGRN administration before LPS treatment ameliorated the endotoxin-induced AKI in WT mice. PGRN may be a novel biologic agent with therapeutic potential for endotoxin-induced septic AKI possibly by inhibiting LPS-induced renal cell death and inflammatory responses in mice. PMID:27367257

  9. Fractionation and analysis of lipopolysaccharide-derived oligosaccharides by zwitterionic-type hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Man-Kupisinska, Aleksandra; Bobko, Ewelina; Gozdziewicz, Tomasz K; Maciejewska, Anna; Jachymek, Wojciech; Lugowski, Czeslaw; Lukasiewicz, Jolanta

    2016-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) is a main surface antigen and virulence factor of Gram-negative bacteria. Regardless of the source of LPS, this molecule, isolated from the smooth forms of bacteria, is characterised by a general structural layout encompassing three regions: (i) an O-specific polysaccharide (O-PS) - a polymer of repeating oligosaccharide units, (ii) core oligosaccharide (OS), and (iii) the lipid A anchoring LPS in the outer membrane of the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria. Structural analysis usually requires degradation of LPS and further efficient separation of various poly- and oligosaccharide glycoforms. The hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was shown as an efficient technique for separation of labelled or native neutral and acidic glycans, glycopeptides, sialylated glycans, glycosylated and nonglycosylated peptides. Herein we adopted ZIC(®) (zwitterionic stationary phase covalently attached to porous silica)-HILIC technology in combination with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry to separate different LPS-derived oligosaccharides. As a result three effective procedures have been developed: (i) to separate different core oligosaccharides of Escherichia coli R1 LOS, (ii) to separate RU-[Hep]-Kdo oligosaccharides from core OS glycoforms of Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 LPS, and (iii) to separate Hep and Kdo-containing mono, di-, tri- and tetrasaccharides of H. alvei PCM 1200 LPS. Moreover, some of developed analytical procedures were scaled to semi-preparative protocols and used to obtain highly-purified fractions of the interest in larger quantities required for future evaluation, analysis, and biological applications. PMID:27085741

  10. Arachidonic acid metabolism in endotoxin tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wise, W C; Cook, J A; Halushka, P V

    1983-01-01

    The arachidonic acid metabolites thromboxane A2, a potent platelet aggregator, and prostacyclin, a potent vasodilator, are released early in endotoxin shock and may contribute to its pathologic sequelae. Plasma levels of thromboxane (Tx) A2 and prostacyclin were measured via radioimmunoassay of their stable metabolites immunoreactive (i) TxB2 and i6-keto-PGF1 alpha in tolerant and nontolerant rats after endotoxin. Long-Evans rats were made tolerant to endotoxin by four daily IV injections of S enteritidis (endotoxin) (0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 mg/kg). In normal rats (N = 15) given LPS (IV, 15 mg/kg), only 11% survived at 24 h; in contrast, tolerant rats (N = 13) all survived even at a dose of 50 mg/kg. At 1 h, after endotoxin (15 mg/kg) IV, plasma i6-keto-PGF1 alpha in nontolerant rats was 1,005 +/- 149 pg/ml (N = 14) and continued to rise to 4,209 +/- 757 pg/ml (N = 5) (P less than 0.001) after 4 h. In tolerant rats, given endotoxin (15 mg/kg), plasma i6-keto-PGF1 alpha at 1 h was 800 +/- 203 pg/ml (N = 5) and was not significantly different (734 +/- 254 pg/ml) at 4 h. Plasma iTxB2 at both 1 and 4 h was significantly (P less than 0.01) lower in tolerant than nontolerant rats. Both iTxB2 and i6-keto-PGF1 alpha were significantly (P less than 0.01) lower in tolerant rats given 50 mg/kg IV endotoxin than nontolerant rats. Endotoxin-induced elevation in fibrin degradation products was significantly decreased (P less than 0.05) during endotoxin tolerance although there was no difference in the severity of thrombocytopenia. These composite observations demonstrate that endotoxin tolerance in the rat is associated with altered arachidonic acid metabolism. PMID:6410699