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Sample records for coli f41 fimbrial

  1. Fimbrial Profiles Predict Virulence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains: Contribution of Ygi and Yad Fimbriae▿

    PubMed Central

    Spurbeck, Rachel R.; Stapleton, Ann E.; Johnson, James R.; Walk, Seth T.; Hooton, Thomas M.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli, a cause of ∼90% of urinary tract infections (UTI), utilizes fimbrial adhesins to colonize the uroepithelium. Pyelonephritis isolate E. coli CFT073 carries 12 fimbrial operons, 5 of which have never been studied. Using multiplex PCR, the prevalence of these 12 and 3 additional fimbrial types was determined for a collection of 303 E. coli isolates (57 human commensal, 32 animal commensal, 54 asymptomatic bacteriuria, 45 complicated UTI, 38 uncomplicated cystitis, and 77 pyelonephritis). The number of fimbrial types per E. coli isolate was distributed bimodally: those with low (3.2 ± 1.1) and those with high (8.3 ± 1.3) numbers of fimbrial types (means ± standard errors of the means). The fimbrial genes ygiL, yadN, yfcV, and c2395 were significantly more prevalent among urine isolates than human commensal isolates. The effect of deletion of Ygi and Yad fimbrial operons on growth, motility, biofilm formation, adherence to immortalized human epithelial cells, and pathogenesis in the mouse model of UTI was examined. Yad fimbriae were necessary for wild-type levels of adherence to a bladder epithelial cell line and for biofilm formation. Deletion of these fimbrial genes increased motility. Ygi fimbriae were necessary for wild-type levels of adherence to a human embryonic kidney cell line, biofilm formation, and in vivo fitness in the urine and kidneys. Complementation of each fimbrial mutant restored wild-type levels of motility, biofilm formation, adherence and, for ygi, in vivo fitness. A double deletion strain, Δygi Δyad, was attenuated in the urine, bladder, and kidneys in the mouse model, demonstrating that these fimbriae contribute to uropathogenesis. PMID:21911462

  2. Passive protection of suckling infant mice against F41-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains by intravenous inoculation of the dams with monoclonal antibodies against F41.

    PubMed Central

    Duchet-Suchaux, M; Menanteau, P; van Zijderveld, F G

    1992-01-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against five different epitope clusters of adhesion factor F41 (two MAbs per cluster) were tested for protection of infant mice against an oral challenge with F41-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) B2C and B41M. Infant mice suckling dams intravenously inoculated with MAbs were orally challenged, and the survival rates were measured for 12 days after inoculation and challenge. Irrespective of their epitope specificity, all F41 MAbs given in a single dose of 4 mg per dam had a protective effect against both ETEC strains. In contrast, one K99 MAb of the same isotype and given in the same dose as the F41 MAbs did not protect infant mice at all. A reduction in the dose of F41 MAbs to 0.032 mg per dam resulted in a decrease in protection. Two different MAbs against the same epitope cluster were not necessarily equally protective. Combining MAbs two by two, whether the MAbs recognized the same epitope cluster or not, resulted in protective activity essentially similar to that obtained with each MAb separately, without any improvement. Therefore, one MAb against any epitope may be sufficient for protection. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titers of MAbs in the serum of dams were similar, irrespective of the epitope specificity of the MAbs, and gradually decreased from day 1 to day 12 after inoculation. We found a good correlation between colostrum and milk ELISA titers of MAbs and serum ELISA titers of MAbs. Colostrum and milk MAb titers were 10-fold lower than corresponding serum MAb titers and stayed high until day 5 after inoculation. The most protective MAb had the highest ELISA titers in colostrum and milk for the first 5 days after inoculation. ETEC strain B2C colonized the intestines of infant mice suckling MAb-inoculated mothers until day 12 after challenge. Intestinal levels of the challenge strain were high on day 2 but never reached the very high numbers (10(9) to 10(10)) described previously in a

  3. F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) adhesion mediated by the major fimbrial subunit FaeG.

    PubMed

    Xia, Pengpeng; Song, Yujie; Zou, Yajie; Yang, Ying; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2015-09-01

    The FaeG subunit is the major constituent of F4(+) fimbriae, associated with glycoprotein and/or glycolipid receptor recognition and majorly contributes to the pathogen attachment to the host cells. To investigate the key factor involved in the fimbrial binding of F4(+) Escherichia coli, both the recombinant E. coli SE5000 strains carrying the fae operon gene clusters that express the different types of fimbriae in vitro, named as rF4ab, rF4ac, and rF4ad, respectively, corresponding to the fimbrial types F4ab, F4ac, and F4ad, and the three isogenic in-frame faeG gene deletion mutants were constructed. The adhesion assays and adhesion inhibition assays showed that ΔfaeG mutants had a significant reduction in the binding to porcine brush border as well as the intestinal epithelial cell lines, while the complemented strain ΔfaeG/pfaeG restored the adhesion function. The recombinant bacterial strains rF4ab, rF4ac, and rF4ad have the same binding property as wild-type F4(+) E. coli strains do and improvement in terms of binding to porcine brush border and the intestinal epithelial cells, and the adherence was blocked by the monoclonal antibody anti-F4 fimbriae. These data demonstrate that the fimbrial binding of F4(+) E. coli is directly mediated by the major FaeG subunit. PMID:25847483

  4. Adaptive evolution of class 5 fimbrial genes in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and its functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Tchesnokova, Veronika; McVeigh, Annette; Kisiela, Dagmara I; Dori, Kathleen; Navarro, Armando; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Savarino, Stephen J

    2012-02-24

    Class 5 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) comprise eight serologically discrete colonization factors that mediate small intestinal adhesion. Their differentiation has been attributed to the pressure imposed by host adaptive immunity. We sequenced the major pilin and minor adhesin subunit genes of a geographically diverse population of ETEC elaborating CFA/I (n = 31), CS17 (n = 20), and CS2 (n = 18) and elucidated the functional effect of microevolutionary processes. Between the fimbrial types, the pairwise nucleotide diversity for the pilin or adhesin genes ranged from 35-43%. Within each fimbrial type, there were 17 non-synonymous and 1 synonymous point mutations among all pilin or adhesin gene copies, implying that each fimbrial type was acquired by ETEC strains very recently, consistent with a recent origin of this E. coli pathotype. The 17 non-synonymous allelic differences occurred in the CFA/I pilin gene cfaB (two changes) and adhesin gene cfaE (three changes), and CS17 adhesin gene csbD (12 changes). All but one amino acid change in the adhesins clustered around the predicted ligand-binding pocket. Functionally, these changes conferred an increase in cell adhesion in a flow chamber assay. In contrast, the two mutations in the non-adhesive CfaB subunit localized to the intersubunit interface and significantly reduced fimbrial adhesion in this assay. In conclusion, naturally occurring mutations in the ETEC adhesive and non-adhesive subunits altered function, were acquired under positive selection, and are predicted to impact bacteria-host interactions. PMID:22215679

  5. Adaptive Evolution of Class 5 Fimbrial Genes in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Its Functional Consequences*

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Tchesnokova, Veronika; McVeigh, Annette; Kisiela, Dagmara I.; Dori, Kathleen; Navarro, Armando; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Savarino, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Class 5 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) comprise eight serologically discrete colonization factors that mediate small intestinal adhesion. Their differentiation has been attributed to the pressure imposed by host adaptive immunity. We sequenced the major pilin and minor adhesin subunit genes of a geographically diverse population of ETEC elaborating CFA/I (n = 31), CS17 (n = 20), and CS2 (n = 18) and elucidated the functional effect of microevolutionary processes. Between the fimbrial types, the pairwise nucleotide diversity for the pilin or adhesin genes ranged from 35–43%. Within each fimbrial type, there were 17 non-synonymous and 1 synonymous point mutations among all pilin or adhesin gene copies, implying that each fimbrial type was acquired by ETEC strains very recently, consistent with a recent origin of this E. coli pathotype. The 17 non-synonymous allelic differences occurred in the CFA/I pilin gene cfaB (two changes) and adhesin gene cfaE (three changes), and CS17 adhesin gene csbD (12 changes). All but one amino acid change in the adhesins clustered around the predicted ligand-binding pocket. Functionally, these changes conferred an increase in cell adhesion in a flow chamber assay. In contrast, the two mutations in the non-adhesive CfaB subunit localized to the intersubunit interface and significantly reduced fimbrial adhesion in this assay. In conclusion, naturally occurring mutations in the ETEC adhesive and non-adhesive subunits altered function, were acquired under positive selection, and are predicted to impact bacteria-host interactions. PMID:22215679

  6. A High-resolution Typing Assay for Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Based on Fimbrial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yi; Palusiak, Agata; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Li, Xiao; Wei, Huiting; Kong, Qingke; Rozalski, Antoni; Yao, Zhi; Wang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections in humans, causing cystitis, pyelonephritis, and renal failure. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the leading cause of UTIs. Accurate and rapid discrimination of UPEC lineages is useful for epidemiological surveillance. Fimbriae are necessary for the adherence of UPEC strains to host uroepithelia, and seem to be abundant and diverse in UPEC strains. By analyzing all the possible fimbrial operons in UPEC strains, we found that closely related strains had similar types of chaperone-usher fimbriae, and the diversity of fimbrial genes was higher than that of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) genes. A typing assay based on the polymorphism of four gene sequences (three fimbrial genes and one housekeeping gene) and the diversity of fimbriae present was developed. By comparison with the MLST, whole-genome sequence (WGS) and fumC/fimH typing methods, this was shown to be accurate and have high resolution, and it was also relatively inexpensive and easy to perform. The assay can supply more discriminatory information for UPEC lineages, and have the potential to be applied in epidemiological surveillance of UPEC isolates. PMID:27199951

  7. A High-resolution Typing Assay for Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Based on Fimbrial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yi; Palusiak, Agata; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Li, Xiao; Wei, Huiting; Kong, Qingke; Rozalski, Antoni; Yao, Zhi; Wang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections in humans, causing cystitis, pyelonephritis, and renal failure. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the leading cause of UTIs. Accurate and rapid discrimination of UPEC lineages is useful for epidemiological surveillance. Fimbriae are necessary for the adherence of UPEC strains to host uroepithelia, and seem to be abundant and diverse in UPEC strains. By analyzing all the possible fimbrial operons in UPEC strains, we found that closely related strains had similar types of chaperone-usher fimbriae, and the diversity of fimbrial genes was higher than that of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) genes. A typing assay based on the polymorphism of four gene sequences (three fimbrial genes and one housekeeping gene) and the diversity of fimbriae present was developed. By comparison with the MLST, whole-genome sequence (WGS) and fumC/fimH typing methods, this was shown to be accurate and have high resolution, and it was also relatively inexpensive and easy to perform. The assay can supply more discriminatory information for UPEC lineages, and have the potential to be applied in epidemiological surveillance of UPEC isolates. PMID:27199951

  8. H-NS controls pap and daa fimbrial transcription in Escherichia coli in response to multiple environmental cues.

    PubMed

    White-Ziegler, C A; Villapakkam, A; Ronaszeki, K; Young, S

    2000-11-01

    A comparative study was completed to determine the influence of various environmental stimuli on the transcription of three different fimbrial operons in Escherichia coli and to determine the role of the histone-like protein H-NS in this environmental regulation. The fimbrial operons studied included the pap operon, which encodes pyelonephritis-associated pili (P pili), the daa operon, which encodes F1845 fimbriae, and the fan operon, which encodes K99 fimbriae. Using lacZYA transcriptional fusions within each of the fimbrial operons, we tested temperature, osmolarity, carbon source, rich medium, oxygen levels, pH, amino acids, solid medium, and iron concentration for their effects on fimbrial gene expression. Low temperature, high osmolarity, glucose as a carbon source, and rich medium repressed transcription of all three operons. High iron did not alter transcription of any of the operons tested, whereas the remaining stimuli had effects on individual operons. For the pap and daa operons, introduction of the hns651 mutation relieved the repression, either fully or partially, due to low temperature, glucose as a carbon source, rich medium, and high osmolarity. Taken together, these data indicate that there are common environmental cues that regulate fimbrial transcription in E. coli and that H-NS is an important environmental regulator for fimbrial transcription in response to several stimuli. PMID:11053383

  9. Structural Sampling of Glycan Interaction Profiles Reveals Mucosal Receptors for Fimbrial Adhesins of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lonardi, Emanuela; Moonens, Kristof; Buts, Lieven; de Boer, Arjen R; Olsson, Johan D M; Weiss, Manfred S; Fabre, Emeline; Guérardel, Yann; Deelder, André M; Oscarson, Stefan; Wuhrer, Manfred; Bouckaert, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Fimbriae are long, proteinaceous adhesion organelles expressed on the bacterial envelope, evolutionarily adapted by Escherichia coli strains for the colonization of epithelial linings. Using glycan arrays of the Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG), the lectin domains were screened of the fimbrial adhesins F17G and FedF from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and of the FimH adhesin from uropathogenic E. coli. This has led to the discovery of a more specific receptor for F17G, GlcNAcb1,3Gal. No significant differences emerged from the glycan binding profiles of the F17G lectin domains from five different E. coli strains. However, strain-dependent amino acid variations, predominantly towards the positively charged arginine, were indicated by sulfate binding in FedF and F17G crystal structures. For FedF, no significant binders could be observed on the CFG glycan array. Hence, a shotgun array was generated from microvilli scrapings of the distal jejunum of a 3-week old piglet about to be weaned. On this array, the blood group A type 1 hexasaccharide emerged as a receptor for the FedF lectin domain and remarkably also for F18-fimbriated E. coli. F17G was found to selectively recognize glycan species with a terminal GlcNAc, typifying intestinal mucins. In conclusion, F17G and FedF recognize long glycan sequences that could only be identified using the shotgun approach. Interestingly, ETEC strains display a large capacity to adapt their fimbrial adhesins to ecological niches via charge-driven interactions, congruent with binding to thick mucosal surfaces displaying an acidic gradient along the intestinal tract. PMID:24833052

  10. Structural Sampling of Glycan Interaction Profiles Reveals Mucosal Receptors for Fimbrial Adhesins of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lonardi, Emanuela; Moonens, Kristof; Buts, Lieven; de Boer, Arjen R.; Olsson, Johan D. M.; Weiss, Manfred S.; Fabre, Emeline; Guérardel, Yann; Deelder, André M.; Oscarson, Stefan; Wuhrer, Manfred; Bouckaert, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Fimbriae are long, proteinaceous adhesion organelles expressed on the bacterial envelope, evolutionarily adapted by Escherichia coli strains for the colonization of epithelial linings. Using glycan arrays of the Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG), the lectin domains were screened of the fimbrial adhesins F17G and FedF from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and of the FimH adhesin from uropathogenic E. coli. This has led to the discovery of a more specific receptor for F17G, GlcNAcβ1,3Gal. No significant differences emerged from the glycan binding profiles of the F17G lectin domains from five different E. coli strains. However, strain-dependent amino acid variations, predominantly towards the positively charged arginine, were indicated by sulfate binding in FedF and F17G crystal structures. For FedF, no significant binders could be observed on the CFG glycan array. Hence, a shotgun array was generated from microvilli scrapings of the distal jejunum of a 3-week old piglet about to be weaned. On this array, the blood group A type 1 hexasaccharide emerged as a receptor for the FedF lectin domain and remarkably also for F18-fimbriated E. coli. F17G was found to selectively recognize glycan species with a terminal GlcNAc, typifying intestinal mucins. In conclusion, F17G and FedF recognize long glycan sequences that could only be identified using the shotgun approach. Interestingly, ETEC strains display a large capacity to adapt their fimbrial adhesins to ecological niches via charge-driven interactions, congruent with binding to thick mucosal surfaces displaying an acidic gradient along the intestinal tract. PMID:24833052

  11. The Escherichia coli G-fimbrial lectin protein participates both in fimbrial biogenesis and in recognition of the receptor N-acetyl-D-glucosamine.

    PubMed Central

    Saarela, S; Taira, S; Nurmiaho-Lassila, E L; Makkonen, A; Rhen, M

    1995-01-01

    The gafD gene encoding the N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-specific fimbrial lectin (adhesin) protein GafD of uropathogenic Escherichia coli was cloned and subjected to genetic analysis. The corresponding gene product was isolated as a MalE fusion protein. The lectin gene was identified with the aid of deletion mutagenesis; mutations in gafD impaired either receptor binding or both receptor binding and fimbria production, depending on the mutation created. All mutants converted to wild-type expressors when complemented in trans with the cloned intact gafD gene. The predicted 354-amino-acid sequence of GafD, deduced from the nucleotide sequence, is closely related to those of the fimbria-associated F17-G and F17b-G proteins coded for by enterotoxigenic and invasive E. coli strains. Isolated GafD was shown to recognize N-acetyl-D-glucosamine by virtue of specific binding to an immobilized receptor, thus proving directly that GafD is a sugar-binding protein. Our results indicate that GafD as such is sufficient for receptor recognition and that the protein also participates in fimbrial biogenesis. PMID:7883703

  12. Molecular analysis of type 3 fimbrial genes from Escherichia coli, Klebsiella and Citrobacter species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is the most common nosocomial infection in the United States and is caused by a range of uropathogens. Biofilm formation by uropathogens that cause CAUTI is often mediated by cell surface structures such as fimbriae. In this study, we characterised the genes encoding type 3 fimbriae from CAUTI strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Citrobacter koseri and Citrobacter freundii. Results Phylogenetic analysis of the type 3 fimbrial genes (mrkABCD) from 39 strains revealed they clustered into five distinct clades (A-E) ranging from one to twenty-three members. The majority of sequences grouped in clade A, which was represented by the mrk gene cluster from the genome sequenced K. pneumoniae MGH78578. The E. coli and K. pneumoniae mrkABCD gene sequences clustered together in two distinct clades, supporting previous evidence for the occurrence of inter-genera lateral gene transfer. All of the strains examined caused type 3 fimbriae mediated agglutination of tannic acid treated human erythrocytes despite sequence variation in the mrkD-encoding adhesin gene. Type 3 fimbriae deletion mutants were constructed in 13 representative strains and were used to demonstrate a direct role for type 3 fimbriae in biofilm formation. Conclusions The expression of functional type 3 fimbriae is common to many Gram-negative pathogens that cause CAUTI and is strongly associated with biofilm growth. Our data provides additional evidence for the spread of type 3 fimbrial genes by lateral gene transfer. Further work is now required to substantiate the clade structure reported here by examining more strains as well as other bacterial genera that make type 3 fimbriae and cause CAUTI. PMID:20576143

  13. Mucosal immune responses following oral immunisation of pigs with fimbrial antigens of enterotoxigenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Cox, Eric; Snoeck, Veerle; Verdonck, Frank; Goddeeris, Bruno

    2003-01-01

    The intestinal mucosal immune system can discriminate actively between harmful pathogens and harmless food antigens resulting in different immune responses namely IgA production and oral tolerance, respectively. Whereas particulate antigen (microorganisms) can induce an IgA response, soluble antigen often leads to tolerance. Recently, it has been demonstrated that F4 fimbrial antigens of enterotoxigenic E. coli (F4 ETEC) can be used to immunise piglets. Oral administration of soluble F4 to F4R+ piglets (pigs with a receptor for these fimbriae (F4R+) on their small intestinal villous enterocytes) results in an intestinal mucosal immune response that completely protects the piglets against a challenge infection. In F4R- pigs, such an intestinal mucosal immune response does not occur. However, a priming of the systemic immune system can be seen similar to the priming in pigs fed with the same dose of a food antigen, suggesting that F4 in F4R- pigs behaves as a food antigen. These results indicate that a receptor-mediated mechanism is involved in the induction of a protective intestinal mucosal immune response using soluble antigen. However, oral administration of soluble F18 fimbriae of verotoxigenic E. coli to F18R+ piglets could not induce a similar protective immune response. So the type of the receptor and/or the nature of the antigen seem to be important to obtain an intestinal IgA response. PMID:24757806

  14. Effect of Temperature on Fimbrial Gene Expression and Adherence of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hinthong, Woranich; Indrawattana, Nitaya; Pitaksajjakul, Pannamthip; Pipattanaboon, Chonlatip; Kongngoen, Thida; Tharnpoophasiam, Prapin; Worakhunpiset, Suwalee

    2015-08-01

    The influence of temperature on bacterial virulence has been studied worldwide from the viewpoint of climate change and global warming. The bacterium enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is the causative agent of watery diarrhea and shows an increasing incidence worldwide. Its pathogenicity is associated with the virulence factors aggregative adherence fimbria type I and II (AAFI and AAFII), encoded by aggA and aafA in EAEC strains 17-2 and 042, respectively. This study focused on the effect of temperature increases from 29 °C to 40 °C on fimbrial gene expression using real-time PCR, and on its virulence using an aggregative adherence assay and biofilm formation assay. Incubation at 32 °C caused an up-regulation in both EAEC strains 17-2 and strain 042 virulence gene expression. EAEC strain 042 cultured at temperature above 32 °C showed down-regulation of aafA expression except at 38 °C. Interestingly, EAEC cultured at a high temperature showed a reduced adherence to cells and an uneven biofilm formation. These results provide evidence that increases in temperature potentially affect the virulence of pathogenic EAEC, although the response varies in each strain. PMID:26213951

  15. The GafD protein of the G (F17) fimbrial complex confers adhesiveness of Escherichia coli to laminin.

    PubMed Central

    Saarela, S; Westerlund-Wikström, B; Rhen, M; Korhonen, T K

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli IHE11088(pRR-5) expressing the G (F17) fimbria adhered to immobilized laminin as well as to reconstituted basement membranes. No adhesion was seen with the plasmidless strain IHE11088 or with the deletion derivative IHE11088(pHUB110), which expresses the G-fimbrial filament with a defective GafD lectin and lacks N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-specific binding. Adhesion of IHE11088(pRR-5) to laminin and to reconstituted basement membranes was specifically inhibited by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and adhesion was abolished after N-glycosidase F treatment of laminin. The results show that the GafD lectin binds to laminin carbohydrate and suggest a novel function for the F17 fimbria in binding to mammalian basement membranes. PMID:8698525

  16. Maternal Vaccination with a Fimbrial Tip Adhesin and Passive Protection of Neonatal Mice against Lethal Human Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Luiz, Wilson B.; Rodrigues, Juliana F.; Crabb, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a leading cause of childhood and travelers' diarrhea, for which an effective vaccine is needed. Prevalent intestinal colonization factors (CFs) such as CFA/I fimbriae and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) are important virulence factors and protective antigens. We tested the hypothesis that donor strand-complemented CfaE (dscCfaE), a stabilized form of the CFA/I fimbrial tip adhesin, is a protective antigen, using a lethal neonatal mouse ETEC challenge model and passive dam vaccination. For CFA/I-ETEC strain H10407, which has been extensively studied in volunteers, an inoculum of 2 × 107 bacteria resulted in 50% lethal doses (LD50) in neonatal DBA/2 mice. Vaccination of female DBA/2 mice with CFA/I fimbriae or dscCfaE, each given with a genetically attenuated LT adjuvant (LTK63) by intranasal or orogastric delivery, induced high antigen-specific serum IgG and fecal IgA titers and detectable milk IgA responses. Neonates born to and suckled by dams antenatally vaccinated with each of these four regimens showed 78 to 93% survival after a 20× LD50 challenge with H10407, compared to 100% mortality in pups from dams vaccinated with sham vaccine or LTK63 only. Crossover experiments showed that high pup survival rates after ETEC challenge were associated with suckling but not birthing from vaccinated dams, suggesting that vaccine-specific milk antibodies are protective. In corroboration, preincubation of the ETEC inoculum with antiadhesin and antifimbrial bovine colostral antibodies conferred a dose-dependent increase in pup survival after challenge. These findings indicate that the dscCfaE fimbrial tip adhesin serves as a protective passive vaccine antigen in this small animal model and merits further evaluation. PMID:26371126

  17. Maternal vaccination with a fimbrial tip adhesin and passive protection of neonatal mice against lethal human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli challenge.

    PubMed

    Luiz, Wilson B; Rodrigues, Juliana F; Crabb, Joseph H; Savarino, Stephen J; Ferreira, Luis C S

    2015-12-01

    Globally, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a leading cause of childhood and travelers' diarrhea, for which an effective vaccine is needed. Prevalent intestinal colonization factors (CFs) such as CFA/I fimbriae and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) are important virulence factors and protective antigens. We tested the hypothesis that donor strand-complemented CfaE (dscCfaE), a stabilized form of the CFA/I fimbrial tip adhesin, is a protective antigen, using a lethal neonatal mouse ETEC challenge model and passive dam vaccination. For CFA/I-ETEC strain H10407, which has been extensively studied in volunteers, an inoculum of 2 × 10(7) bacteria resulted in 50% lethal doses (LD50) in neonatal DBA/2 mice. Vaccination of female DBA/2 mice with CFA/I fimbriae or dscCfaE, each given with a genetically attenuated LT adjuvant (LTK63) by intranasal or orogastric delivery, induced high antigen-specific serum IgG and fecal IgA titers and detectable milk IgA responses. Neonates born to and suckled by dams antenatally vaccinated with each of these four regimens showed 78 to 93% survival after a 20× LD50 challenge with H10407, compared to 100% mortality in pups from dams vaccinated with sham vaccine or LTK63 only. Crossover experiments showed that high pup survival rates after ETEC challenge were associated with suckling but not birthing from vaccinated dams, suggesting that vaccine-specific milk antibodies are protective. In corroboration, preincubation of the ETEC inoculum with antiadhesin and antifimbrial bovine colostral antibodies conferred a dose-dependent increase in pup survival after challenge. These findings indicate that the dscCfaE fimbrial tip adhesin serves as a protective passive vaccine antigen in this small animal model and merits further evaluation. PMID:26371126

  18. Oral immunisation of pigs with fimbrial antigens of enterotoxigenic E. coli: an interesting model to study mucosal immune mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cox, Eric; Van der Stede, Yves; Verdonck, Frank; Snoeck, Veerle; Van den Broeck, Wim; Goddeeris, Bruno

    2002-09-10

    The intestinal mucosal immune system can discriminate actively between harmful pathogenic agents and harmless food antigens resulting in different immune responses namely IgA production and oral tolerance, respectively. Recently, a pig model has been developed for studying intestinal mucosal immune responses in which F4 fimbrial antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (F4 ETEC) are used as oral antigens. A unique feature of this model is that soluble F4 antigens can be administered to pigs which have a receptor for this fimbriae (F4R(+)) on their small intestinal villous enterocytes and pigs which do not have this receptor (F4R(-)). Oral administration of F4 to the F4R(+) pigs results in an intestinal mucosal immune response that completely protects the pigs against a challenge infection. In F4R(-) pigs such an intestinal mucosal immune response does not occur. However, a priming of the systemic immune system can be seen similar to the priming in pigs fed with the same dose of a food antigen, suggesting that F4 in F4R(-) pigs behaves as a food antigen. The fact that different mucosal immune responses can be induced with soluble F4, makes it an interesting model to study mucosal immune mechanisms in the pig. PMID:12072248

  19. Protective efficacy by various doses of Salmonella ghost vaccine candidate carrying enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbrial antigen against neonatal piglet colibacillosis.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Lee, John Hwa

    2016-07-01

    Humoral immune responses and protective efficacy by various doses of Salmonella ghost cells carrying enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) fimbrial antigens for protection against piglet colibacillosis were studied. All groups were orally primed and boosted at 11 and 14 wk of pregnancy, respectively. Group A sows were inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and groups B, C, and D sows were immunized with 2 × 10(9), 2 × 10(10), and 2 × 10(11) ghost cells, respectively. Serum immunoglobulin (Ig) G, and colostrum IgG and IgA levels of groups C and D sows were significantly higher than those of group A sows. In addition, serum IgG and IgA levels in group C and D piglets were significantly increased compared to those of group A piglets. After challenge with wild-type ETEC, diarrhea and mortality were not observed in group C and D piglets, while diarrhea was observed in 88.9% and 58.8% of groups A and B piglets, respectively, and 16.7% mortality was observed in group A piglets. These findings indicate that oral immunization of sows with 2 × 10(10) or 10(11) ghost cells can effectively protect their offspring from colibacillosis. PMID:27408340

  20. Escherichia coli K88ac fimbriae expressing heat-labile and heat-stable (STa) toxin epitopes elicit antibodies that neutralize cholera toxin and STa toxin and inhibit adherence of K88ac fimbrial E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengxian; Zhang, Weiping

    2010-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Bacterial adhesins and heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins are the virulence determinants in ETEC diarrhea. It is believed that vaccines inducing anti-adhesin immunity to inhibit bacterial adherence and anti-toxin immunity to eliminate toxin activity would provide broad-spectrum protection against ETEC. In this study, an ETEC fimbrial adhesin was used as a platform to express LT and STa for adhesin-toxin fusion antigens to induce anti-toxin and anti-adhesin immunity. An epitope from the B subunit of LT toxin (LTP1, (8)LCSEYRNTQIYTIN(21)) and an STa toxoid epitope ((5)CCELCCNPQCAGCY(18)) were embedded in the FaeG major subunit of E. coli K88ac fimbriae. Constructed K88ac-toxin chimeric fimbriae were harvested and used for rabbit immunization. Immunized rabbits developed anti-K88ac, anti-LT, and anti-STa antibodies. Moreover, induced antibodies not only inhibited adherence of K88ac fimbrial E. coli to porcine small intestinal enterocytes but also neutralized cholera toxin and STa toxin. Data from this study demonstrated that K88ac fimbriae expressing LT and STa epitope antigens elicited neutralizing anti-toxin antibodies and anti-adhesin antibodies and suggested that E. coli fimbriae could serve as a platform for the development of broad-spectrum vaccines against ETEC. PMID:20980482

  1. Age-dependent competition of porcine enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) with different fimbria genes - short communication.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Lee, Kyeong Min; Lee, John Hwa

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the association of pathogenic Escherichia coli fimbrial adhesins with the development of diarrhoea in piglets of different age groups and to test their relative competitiveness, piglets were orally inoculated with a mixture of E. coli strains harbouring F4, F5, F6, F18 and F41 fimbrial genes. A total of 537 E. coli strains with haemolytic activity were isolated from 36 diarrhoeic piglets. The F4 fimbrial gene was observed in 98.5%, 97.6% and 80.6% strains carrying fimbrial genes isolated from diarrhoeic piglets that were infected at 1, 3 and 5 weeks of age, respectively. These data demonstrate that F4 fimbriae are highly associated with diarrhoea in piglets of all age groups. Interestingly, the F18 fimbrial gene was observed in 2.4% and 25.4% strains carrying fimbrial genes isolated from the 3- and 5-week-old groups, respectively, which confirms that F18 fimbriae are associated with diarrhoea in piglets from late stages of suckling to post-weaning, and are more related to diarrhoea in weaned than in unweaned piglets. PMID:22079701

  2. Cloning and Expression of Genes Encoding F107-C and K88-1NT Fimbrial Proteins of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli from Piglets.

    PubMed

    Loc, Nguyen Hoang; Ngoc, Le My Tieu; Lan, Tran Thuy; Viet, Le Quoc; Thao, Le Duc; Quang, Hoang Tan; Lan, Dinh Thi Bich; Long, Phung Thang

    2013-12-01

    We cloned two genes coding F107-C and K88-1NT fimbrial subunits from strains E. coli C and 1NT isolated from Thua Thien Hue province, Vietnam. The mature peptide of faeG gene from strain E. coli 1NT (called faeG-1NT) is 100 % similarity with faeG gene, while the CDS of fedA gene from strain C (called fedA-C) has a similarity of 97 % with the fedA gene. Expression of the faeG-1NT and fedA-C genes in E. coli BL21 Star™ (DE3) produced proteins of ~31 and 22 kDa, respectively. The effect of IPTG concentration on the K88-1NT and F107-C fimbriae production was investigated. The results showed that 0.5 mM IPTG is suitable for higher expression of K88-1NT subunit, while 0.75 mM IPTG strongly stimulated expression of F107-C subunit. The optimal induction time for expression was also examined. Generally, highest expression of K88-1NT subunit occurred after 6 h of induction, while that of F107-C subunit is after 14 h. PMID:24426156

  3. The fimbrial adhesin F17-G of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli has an immunoglobulin-like lectin domain that binds N-acetylglucosamine.

    PubMed

    Buts, Lieven; Bouckaert, Julie; De Genst, Erwin; Loris, Remy; Oscarson, Stefan; Lahmann, Martina; Messens, Joris; Brosens, Elke; Wyns, Lode; De Greve, Henri

    2003-08-01

    The F17-G adhesin at the tip of flexible F17 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli mediates binding to N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine-presenting receptors on the microvilli of the intestinal epithelium of ruminants. We report the 1.7 A resolution crystal structure of the lectin domain of F17-G, both free and in complex with N-acetylglucosamine. The monosaccharide is bound on the side of the ellipsoid-shaped protein in a conserved site around which all natural variations of F17-G are clustered. A model is proposed for the interaction between F17-fimbriated E. coli and microvilli with enhanced affinity compared with the binding constant we determined for F17-G binding to N-acetylglucosamine (0.85 mM-1). Unexpectedly, the F17-G structure reveals that the lectin domains of the F17-G, PapGII and FimH fimbrial adhesins all share the immunoglobulin-like fold of the structural components (pilins) of their fimbriae, despite lack of any sequence identity. Fold comparisons with pilin and chaperone structures of the chaperone/usher pathway highlight the central role of the C-terminal beta-strand G of the immunoglobulin-like fold and provides new insights into pilus assembly, function and adhesion. PMID:12864853

  4. Use of a wild-type gene fusion to determine the influence of environmental conditions on expression of the S fimbrial adhesin in an Escherichia coli pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Schmoll, T; Ott, M; Oudega, B; Hacker, J

    1990-01-01

    S fimbrial adhesins (Sfa) enable pathogenic Escherichia coli strains to bind to sialic acid-containing eucaryotic receptor molecules. In order to determine the influence of culture conditions on the expression of the sfa determinant in a wild-type strain, we fused the gene lacZ, coding for the enzyme beta-galactosidase, to the sfaA gene, responsible for the major protein subunit of S fimbriae. By using a plasmid which carries an R6K origin, the sfaA-lac hybrid construct was site-specifically integrated into the chromosome of the uropathogenic E. coli strain 536WT. The expression of lacZ, which was under the control of the sfa wild-type promoters, was now equivalent to the sfa expression of strain 536WT. With the help of this particular wild-type construct, it was demonstrated that the sfa determinant is better expressed on solid media than in liquid broth. The growth rate had a strong influence on Sfa expression under aerobic but not under anaerobic conditions. Production of Sfa was further regulated by catabolite repression, osmolarity, and temperature. Images PMID:1975582

  5. Characterization of F107 fimbriae of Escherichia coli 107/86, which causes edema disease in pigs, and nucleotide sequence of the F107 major fimbrial subunit gene, fedA.

    PubMed Central

    Imberechts, H; De Greve, H; Schlicker, C; Bouchet, H; Pohl, P; Charlier, G; Bertschinger, H; Wild, P; Vandekerckhove, J; Van Damme, J

    1992-01-01

    F107 fimbriae were isolated and purified from edema disease strain 107/86 of Escherichia coli. Plasmid pIH120 was constructed, which contains the gene cluster that codes for adhesive F107 fimbriae. The major fimbrial subunit gene, fedA, was sequenced. An open reading frame that codes for a protein with 170 amino acids, including a 21-amino-acid signal peptide, was found. The protein without the signal sequence has a calculated molecular mass of 15,099 Da. Construction of a nonsense mutation in the open reading frame of fedA abolished both fimbrial expression and the capacity to adhere to isolated porcine intestinal villi. In a screening of 28 reference edema disease strains and isolates from clinically ill piglets, fedA was detected in 24 cases (85.7%). In 20 (83.3%) of these 24 strains, fedA was found in association with Shiga-like toxin II variant genes, coding for the toxin that is characteristic for edema disease strains of E. coli. The fimbrial subunit gene was not detected in enterotoxigenic E. coli strains. Because of the capacity of E. coli HB101(pIH120) transformants to adhere to isolated porcine intestinal villi, the high prevalence of fedA in edema disease strains, and the high correlation with the Shiga-like toxin II variant toxin-encoding genes, we suggest that F107 fimbriae are an important virulence factor in edema disease strains of E. coli. Images PMID:1348723

  6. Differentiation of Crohn’s Disease-Associated Isolates from Other Pathogenic Escherichia coli by Fimbrial Adhesion under Shear Force

    PubMed Central

    Szunerits, Sabine; Zagorodko, Oleksandr; Cogez, Virginie; Dumych, Tetiana; Chalopin, Thibaut; Alvarez Dorta, Dimitri; Sivignon, Adeline; Barnich, Nicolas; Harduin-Lepers, Anne; Larroulet, Iban; Yanguas Serrano, Aritz; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Pesquera, Amaia; Zurutuza, Amaia; Gouin, Sébastien G.; Boukherroub, Rabah; Bouckaert, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Shear force exerted on uropathogenic Escherichia coli adhering to surfaces makes type-1 fimbriae stretch out like springs to catch on to mannosidic receptors. This mechanism is initiated by a disruption of the quaternary interactions between the lectin and the pilin of the two-domain FimH adhesin and transduces allosterically to the mannose-binding pocket of FimH to increase its affinity. Mannose-specific adhesion of 14 E. coli pathovars was measured under flow, using surface plasmon resonance detection on functionalized graphene-coated gold interfaces. Increasing the shear had important differential consequences on bacterial adhesion. Adherent-invasive E. coli, isolated from the feces and biopsies of Crohn’s disease patients, consistently changed their adhesion behavior less under shear and displayed lower SPR signals, compared to E. coli opportunistically infecting the urinary tract, intestines or loci of knee and hip prostheses. We exemplified this further with the extreme behaviors of the reference strains UTI89 and LF82. Whereas their FimA major pilins have identical sequences, FimH of LF82 E. coli is marked by the Thr158Pro mutation. Positioned in the inter-domain region known to carry hot spots of mutations in E. coli pathotypes, residue 158 is indicated to play a structural role in the allosteric regulation of type-1 fimbriae-mediated bacterial adhesion. PMID:27043645

  7. Escherichia coli K88ac Fimbriae Expressing Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable (STa) Toxin Epitopes Elicit Antibodies That Neutralize Cholera Toxin and STa Toxin and Inhibit Adherence of K88ac Fimbrial E. coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengxian; Zhang, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Bacterial adhesins and heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins are the virulence determinants in ETEC diarrhea. It is believed that vaccines inducing anti-adhesin immunity to inhibit bacterial adherence and anti-toxin immunity to eliminate toxin activity would provide broad-spectrum protection against ETEC. In this study, an ETEC fimbrial adhesin was used as a platform to express LT and STa for adhesin-toxin fusion antigens to induce anti-toxin and anti-adhesin immunity. An epitope from the B subunit of LT toxin (LTP1, 8LCSEYRNTQIYTIN21) and an STa toxoid epitope (5CCELCCNPQCAGCY18) were embedded in the FaeG major subunit of E. coli K88ac fimbriae. Constructed K88ac-toxin chimeric fimbriae were harvested and used for rabbit immunization. Immunized rabbits developed anti-K88ac, anti-LT, and anti-STa antibodies. Moreover, induced antibodies not only inhibited adherence of K88ac fimbrial E. coli to porcine small intestinal enterocytes but also neutralized cholera toxin and STa toxin. Data from this study demonstrated that K88ac fimbriae expressing LT and STa epitope antigens elicited neutralizing anti-toxin antibodies and anti-adhesin antibodies and suggested that E. coli fimbriae could serve as a platform for the development of broad-spectrum vaccines against ETEC. PMID:20980482

  8. The gaf Fimbrial Gene Cluster of Escherichia coli Expresses a Full-Size and a Truncated Soluble Adhesin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tanskanen, Jarna; Saarela, Sirkku; Tankka, Sanna; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Rhen, Mikael; Korhonen, Timo K.; Westerlund-Wikström, Benita

    2001-01-01

    The GafD lectin of the G (F17) fimbriae of diarrhea-associated Escherichia coli was overexpressed and purified from the periplasm of E. coli by affinity chromatography on GlcNAc-agarose. The predicted mature GafD peptide comprises 321 amino acids, but the predominant form of GafD recovered from the periplasm was 19,092 Da in size and corresponded to the 178 N-terminal amino acid residues, as judged by mass spectrometry and amino acid sequencing, and was named ΔGafD. Expression of gafD from the cloned gaf gene cluster in DegP-, Lon-, and OmpT-deficient recombinant strains did not significantly decrease the formation of ΔGafD. The peptide was also detected in the periplasm of the wild-type E. coli strain from which the gaf gene cluster originally was cloned. We expressed gafD fragments encoding C-terminally truncated peptides. Peptides GafD1-252, GafD1-224, GafD1-189, and the GafD1-178, isolated from the periplasm by affinity chromatography, had apparent sizes closely similar to that of ΔGafD. Only trace amounts of truncated forms with expected molecular sizes were detected in spheroplasts. In contrast, the shorter GafD1-157 peptide was detected in spheroplasts but not in the periplasm, indicating that it was poorly translocated or was degraded by periplasmic proteases. Pulse-chase assays using gafD indicated that ΔGafD was processed from GafD and is not a primary translation product. The ΔGafD peptide was soluble by biochemical criteria and exhibited specific binding to GlcNAc-agarose. Inhibition assays with mono- and oligosaccharides gave a similar inhibition pattern in the hemagglutination by the G-fimbria-expressing recombinant E. coli strain and in the binding of [14C]ΔGafD to GlcNAc-agarose. ΔGafD bound specifically to laminin, a previously described tissue target for the G fimbria. Our results show that a soluble, protease-resistant subdomain of GafD exhibits receptor-binding specificity similar to that for intact G fimbriae and that it is formed when

  9. The use of quantitative PCR for identification and quantification of Brachyspira pilosicoli, Lawsonia intracellularis and Escherichia coli fimbrial types F4 and F18 in pig feces.

    PubMed

    Ståhl, M; Kokotovic, B; Hjulsager, C K; Breum, S Ø; Angen, Ø

    2011-08-01

    Four quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were evaluated for quantitative detection of Brachyspira pilosicoli, Lawsonia intracellularis, and E. coli fimbrial types F4 and F18 in pig feces. Standard curves were based on feces spiked with the respective reference strains. The detection limits from the spiking experiments were 10(2) bacteria/g feces for Bpilo-qPCR and Laws-qPCR, 10(3)CFU/g feces for F4-qPCR and F18-qPCR. The PCR efficiency for all four qPCR assays was between 0.91 and 1.01 with R(2) above 0.993. Standard curves, slopes and elevation, varied between assays and between measurements from pure DNA from reference strains and feces spiked with the respective strains. The linear ranges found for spiked fecal samples differed both from the linear ranges from pure culture of the reference strains and between the qPCR tests. The linear ranges were five log units for F4-qPCR, and Laws-qPCR, six log units for F18-qPCR and three log units for Bpilo-qPCR in spiked feces. When measured on pure DNA from the reference strains used in spiking experiments, the respective log ranges were: seven units for Bpilo-qPCR, Laws-qPCR and F18-qPCR and six log units for F4-qPCR. This shows the importance of using specific standard curves, where each pathogen is analysed in the same matrix as sample DNA. The qPCRs were compared to traditional bacteriological diagnostic methods and found to be more sensitive than cultivation for E. coli and B. pilosicoli. The qPCR assay for Lawsonia was also more sensitive than the earlier used method due to improvements in DNA extraction. In addition, as samples were not analysed for all four pathogen agents by traditional diagnostic methods, many samples were found positive for agents that were not expected on the basis of age and case history. The use of quantitative PCR tests for diagnosis of enteric diseases provides new possibilities for veterinary diagnostics. The parallel simultaneous analysis for several bacteria in multi-qPCR and the

  10. Purification, morphology, and genetics of a new fimbrial putative colonization factor of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O159:H4.

    PubMed Central

    Tacket, C O; Maneval, D R; Levine, M M

    1987-01-01

    The ability to colonize the small intestine is essential for the pathogenesis of diarrhea caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). Colonization is mediated by fimbriae (pili), of which there are several antigenically distinct types, including colonization factor antigen I, colonization factor antigen II (CS1, CS2, and CS3), and PCF8775 (CS4, CS5, and CS6). These fimbriae are associated with certain ETEC O serogroups. Serogroup O159 has had no known colonization factor. We found a distinct plasmid-encoded fimbria composed of 19-kilodalton protein subunits associated with ETEC serotype O159:H4. Rabbit antibody against this purified fimbria reacted with a single 19-kilodalton protein band as seen by Western immunoblot of sheared-cell preparations. The rabbit antibody, treated with colloidal-gold-labeled goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulin G, bound specifically to fimbriae when cells were examined with an electron microscope. Of 10 available ETEC O159:H4 strains from Europe, Bangladesh, and Kenya, 6 expressed this type of fimbria; its true prevalence among ETEC strains is unknown. This putative colonization factor of O159:H4 joins other ETEC fimbriae as potentially useful immunogens against human diarrhea. Images PMID:2883122

  11. Development of a novel live vaccine delivering enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbrial antigens to prevent post-weaning diarrhea in piglets.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Lee, John Hwa

    2012-05-15

    The efficacy of a novel, live delivery vaccine was examined for protection against post-weaning diarrhea in pigs. An expression/secretion plasmid harboring genes encoding enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88ab, K88ac, FedA and FedF fimbriae was constructed and harbored in an attenuated Salmonella, which was used as the vaccine candidate. Groups A (n=3) and B (n=3) sows were orally immunized with the candidate vaccine and PBS as a control, respectively, at 8 and 11 weeks of pregnancy. All group piglets were challenged with two challenge strains at 5-week-old. All immunized sows had significantly increased IgG and IgA levels in both serum and colostrum to individual adhesins compared to the control (p ≤ 0.05). Immune response in Group A piglets were significantly increased (p ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, no clinical signs were observed in Group A piglets after the challenge and no challenge strains were detected in rectal swabs, while diarrhea was observed in 47.8% control piglets and challenge strains were isolated from all the diarrheic piglets. These results show that immune response of sucking piglets can maintain at higher levels through the milk of the immunized sows and vaccination of sows with the candidate may protect colibacillosis in weaned piglets. PMID:22417986

  12. Characterization of porcine intestinal receptors for the K88ac fimbrial adhesin of Escherichia coli as mucin-type sialoglycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, A K; Baker, D R; Bosworth, B T; Casey, T A; Benfield, D A; Francis, D H

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified two K88ac adhesion receptors (210 and 240 kDa) which are present in membrane preparations from adhesive but not nonadhesive porcine intestinal brush border cells; these adhesin receptors are postulated to be important determinants of the susceptibility of pigs to K88ac+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections (A.K. Erickson, J.A. Willgohs, S.Y. McFarland, D.A. Benfield, and D.F. Francis, Infect. Immun. 60:983-988, 1992). We now describe a procedure for the purification of these two receptors. Receptors were solubilized from adhesive intestinal brush border vesicles using deoxycholate and were purified by gel filtration chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B and then by hydroxyapatite chromatography. Amino acid compositional analyses indicated that the two receptors have similar amino acid compositions. The most distinguishing characteristic of both receptors is a high percentage of threonine and proline residues. Neuraminidase treatment caused the K88ac adhesin receptors to migrate with a slower mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels, indicating that these receptors are sialoglycoproteins. Results from lectin-binding studies indicated that the receptors contain O-linked oligosaccharides composed of galactosyl (beta-1,3)N-acetylgalactosamine, alpha-linked fucose, galactosyl(beta-1,4)N-acetylglucosamine, sialic acid, galactose, and N-acetylgalactosamine. Collectively, these characteristics indicate that the K88ac adhesin receptors are mucin-type sialoglycoproteins. Images PMID:7960120

  13. Tight conformational coupling between the domains of the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbrial adhesin CfaE regulates binding state transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Esser, Lothar; Interlandi, Gianluca; Kisiela, Dagmara I; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Thomas, Wendy E; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Xia, Di; Savarino, Stephen J

    2013-04-01

    CfaE, the tip adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I fimbriae, initiates binding of this enteropathogen to the small intestine. It comprises stacked β-sandwich adhesin (AD) and pilin (PD) domains, with the putative receptor-binding pocket at one pole and an equatorial interdomain interface. CfaE binding to erythrocytes is enhanced by application of moderate shear stress. A G168D replacement along the AD facing the CfaE interdomain region was previously shown to decrease the dependence on shear by increasing binding at lower shear forces. To elucidate the structural basis for this functional change, we studied the properties of CfaE G168D (with a self-complemented donor strand) and solved its crystal structure at 2.6 Å resolution. Compared with native CfaE, CfaE G168D showed a downward shift in peak erythrocyte binding under shear stress and greater binding under static conditions. The thermal melting transition of CfaE G168D occurred 10 °C below that of CfaE. Compared with CfaE, the atomic structure of CfaE G168D revealed a 36% reduction in the buried surface area at the interdomain interface. Despite the location of this single modification in the AD, CfaE G168D exhibited structural derangements only in the adjoining PD compared with CfaE. In molecular dynamics simulations, the G168D mutation was associated with weakened interdomain interactions under tensile force. Taken together, these findings indicate that the AD and PD of CfaE are conformationally tightly coupled and support the hypothesis that opening of the interface plays a critical modulatory role in the allosteric activation of CfaE. PMID:23393133

  14. Tight Conformational Coupling between the Domains of the Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Fimbrial Adhesin CfaE Regulates Binding State Transition*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Esser, Lothar; Interlandi, Gianluca; Kisiela, Dagmara I.; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Thomas, Wendy E.; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Xia, Di; Savarino, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    CfaE, the tip adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I fimbriae, initiates binding of this enteropathogen to the small intestine. It comprises stacked β-sandwich adhesin (AD) and pilin (PD) domains, with the putative receptor-binding pocket at one pole and an equatorial interdomain interface. CfaE binding to erythrocytes is enhanced by application of moderate shear stress. A G168D replacement along the AD facing the CfaE interdomain region was previously shown to decrease the dependence on shear by increasing binding at lower shear forces. To elucidate the structural basis for this functional change, we studied the properties of CfaE G168D (with a self-complemented donor strand) and solved its crystal structure at 2.6 Å resolution. Compared with native CfaE, CfaE G168D showed a downward shift in peak erythrocyte binding under shear stress and greater binding under static conditions. The thermal melting transition of CfaE G168D occurred 10 °C below that of CfaE. Compared with CfaE, the atomic structure of CfaE G168D revealed a 36% reduction in the buried surface area at the interdomain interface. Despite the location of this single modification in the AD, CfaE G168D exhibited structural derangements only in the adjoining PD compared with CfaE. In molecular dynamics simulations, the G168D mutation was associated with weakened interdomain interactions under tensile force. Taken together, these findings indicate that the AD and PD of CfaE are conformationally tightly coupled and support the hypothesis that opening of the interface plays a critical modulatory role in the allosteric activation of CfaE. PMID:23393133

  15. Frequency of virulence genes in Escherichia coli strains isolated from piglets with diarrhea in the North Parana State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Vidotto, Marilda C.; de Lima, Natália C.S.; Fritzen, Juliana T.T.; de Freitas, Júlio C.; Venâncio, merson J.; Ono, Mario A.

    2009-01-01

    Identification of Escherichia coli causing porcine postweaning diarrhea requires knowledge regarding the prevalent pathotypes within a given region. A total of 100 Escherichia coli isolates from piglets with diarrhea in Londrina city, Parana State, South Brazil, were screened for the presence of genes for F4, F5, F6, F18, F41 fimbrial antigens by specific probes and for enterotoxins (STa, STb, LT and STx2e) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results showed that 60% of the isolates were positive for one or more of the fimbrial antigens and 92% were positive at least for one of the virulence factors examined. Virulence factor genes detected were F4 (44%), F18 (38%), F5 (30%), F41 (32%), F6 (25%), LTp-I (71%), STa (40%), STb (47%) and STx2e (3%). Twenty four patterns of virulence factor according to the different virulence genes form were found and the most frequent virulence gene pattern was F4, F18, F41, STa, STb and LT. Most of the isolates that carried genes for adhesins also harboured genes for toxins. PMID:24031344

  16. [Fimbriae of animal-originated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli--a review].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Zhu, Jun; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2012-06-01

    Animal-originated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major pathogens resulting in newborn and young animal diarrhea. Adhesins and enterotoxins, both are essential for the pathogenicity of ETEC, are two major virulent factors of ETEC. Adhesion of animal-originated ETEC fimbrial adhesins (mainly including K88, K99, 987P, F18, F17 and F41) to intestinal epithelial cells is the initial and most important step involved in the ETEC infection. From the 1960s, studies on ETEC fimbrial genes, structure, biosynthesis, regulation of expression, interaction between fimbriae and host receptors have helped to better understand the biology and role of these organelles in pathogenesis. These studies also provide insight into new diagnostic tools and development of vaccines and inhibitors of ETEC colonization. PMID:22934347

  17. Construction of Bifidobacterium infantis as a live oral vaccine that expresses antigens of the major fimbrial subunit (CfaB) and the B subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin (LTB) from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongping; Luo, Yaolin; Huang, Xueping; Song, Fangzhou; Liu, Geli

    2012-02-01

    We sought to develop Bifidobacterium infantis (BI) as a vehicle for the expression of heterologous antigens. Two proteins of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) were expressed in BI: CfaB, a major fimbrial subunit protein, and LTB, the B subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin. The expression of CfaB and LTB in BI was verified by electrophoretic analysis. Sprague-Dawley rats were then subjected to intragastric immunization with BI-CfaB and BI-LTB systems both separately and together. ELISA was used to characterize the serum and mucosal immune responses against ETEC antigens. The immunized rats were intraperitoneally challenged with wild-type ETEC H10407 to study the immune response in vivo. The serum titres of IgG and faecal IgA antibodies in the BI-CfaB plus BI-LTB mixed vaccination group were significantly greater than those in the other two groups, which were immunized with a single vaccine (P<0.05). However, no significant difference was seen between the two groups that received a single immunization. These results suggest that expressing CfaB and LTB in BI provides a probiotic system with immunogenic properties. Furthermore, the expression of LTB in BI preserved its mucosal adjuvant effect. So this study confirms that BI can be used as a novel oral vaccine expression system for a heterologous antigen and BI-LTB can provide mucosal adjuvant properties. PMID:22053005

  18. Virulence profiles of enterotoxigenic, shiga toxin and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in South African pigs.

    PubMed

    Mohlatlole, Ramadimetja Prescilla; Madoroba, Evelyn; Muchadeyi, Farai Catherine; Chimonyo, Michael; Kanengoni, Arnold Tapera; Dzomba, Edgar Farai

    2013-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and shiga toxin E. coli (STEC) are important causes of colibacillosis in piglets. Recently, enteroaggregative E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin 1 (EAST-1) has been implicated in pig diarrhoea. This study investigated the prevalence of enterotoxin [heat-labile toxins (LT), heat-stable toxin a (STa), heat-stable toxin b (STb)], shiga toxins (Stx1, Stx2, Stx2e), enteroaggregative heat-stable E. coli (EAST-1), associated fimbriae (F4, F5, F6, F41, F18ab, F18ac) and non-fimbrial adhesins [adhesin involved in diffuse adherence 1 (AIDA-1), attaching and effacing factor, porcine attaching- and effacing-associated factor] in South African pigs. A total of 263 E. coli strains were isolated from Landrace (n = 24), Large White (n = 126), Duroc (n = 28) and indigenous (n = 85) breeds of piglets aged between 9 and 136 days. PCR was used in the analysis. Virulent genes were detected in 40.3% of the isolates, of which 18.6, 0.4 and 17.5% were classified as ETEC, STEC and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), respectively. Individual genes were found in the following proportions: STb (19.01%), LT (0.4%), STa (3.4%), St2xe (1.1%) and EAST-1 (20.2%) toxins. None of the tested fimbriae were detected in ETEC and STEC isolates. About one third of the ETEC and STEC isolates was tested negative for both fimbrial and non-fimbrial adhesins. Twenty-five pathotypes from ETEC-, EAEC- and STEC-positive strains were identified. Pathotypes EAST-1 (30.2%), STb (13.2%) and STb/AIDA-1 (10.4%) were most prevalent. The study provided insight on possible causes of colibacillosis in South African pigs. PMID:23417826

  19. Generation of Salmonella ghost cells expressing fimbrial antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and evaluation of their antigenicity in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan Song; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong Kug; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium ghost cells expressing K88ab, K88ac, K99, and FasA fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in their envelopes were constructed. The genes encoding the fimbriae were individually cloned into an expression plasmid, pMMP81, carrying the asd gene, which was subsequently electroporated into the Δasd S. Typhimurium mutant. Plasmid pJHLP99, carrying the phiX174 lysis gene E, was also subsequently electroporated into the Salmonella mutant. The presence of the individual fimbriae on the ghost cells was examined by Western blot analysis. Forty BALB/c mice were equally divided into 2 groups of 20 mice each. Group A mice were intramuscularly vaccinated with a mixture of the 4 ghost cells expressing the individual fimbriae. The group B mice were inoculated with sterile phosphate-buffered saline as a control. The antigen-specific serum IgG concentrations were significantly higher in group A than in group B from week 2 until week 6 after inoculation. In addition, the antigen-specific IgA concentrations in fecal samples were significantly higher in group A than in group B at week 2 after inoculation. A large difference between the groups in the number of antigen-specific IgA-secreting cells in the small intestine was observed by immunohistochemical study. Also, the splenic lymphocyte proliferative responses were significantly greater in group A than in the control mice. These results suggest that vaccination with our Salmonella ghost cells can induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses and that the increased number of antigen-specific IgA-secreting cells in the small intestine may be correlated with the elevated fecal IgA immune response. PMID:26733731

  20. A vaccine candidate for post-weaning diarrhea in swine constructed with a live attenuated Salmonella delivering Escherichia coli K88ab, K88ac, FedA, and FedF fimbrial antigens and its immune responses in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jin; Stein, Barry D.; Lee, John Hwa

    2012-01-01

    In order to construct a novel vaccine candidate for preventing post-weaning diarrhea in swine, the individual genes for Escherichia coli K88ab, K88ac, FedA, and FedF fimbriae were inserted into a secretion plasmid pBP244 containing asd, lepB, secA, and secB. These were transformed into Salmonella Typhimurium Δlon ΔcpxR Δasd. Secretion of the individual recombinant fimbrial antigens was confirmed by immunoblot analysis. Groups 1 and 2 mice received a single oral dose of the vaccine mixture and S. Typhimurium carrying pBP244 only as a control, respectively. In groups 3 and 4, mice were primed and boosted with the vaccine mixture and S. Typhimurium carrying pBP244 only as a control, respectively. In general, all immunized mice had significantly increased serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G (P < 0.05) and intestinal secretory IgA against the individual fimbrial antigens compared with those mice in the control group. In the IgG2a and IgG1 titer assay, only IgG2a titer was increased in group 1, while both IgG2a and IgG1 titers were increased in group 3. Furthermore, the vaccine strains were not detected in the excreted feces of any immunized mice. Thus, the vaccine candidate can be highly immunogenic and be safe to the environment. PMID:23277697

  1. Multiple insertions of fimbrial operons correlate with the evolution of Salmonella serovars responsible for human disease.

    PubMed

    Folkesson, A; Advani, A; Sukupolvi, S; Pfeifer, J D; Normark, S; Löfdahl, S

    1999-08-01

    On centisome 7, Salmonella spp. contain a large region not present in the corresponding region of Escherichia coli. This region is flanked by sequences with significant homology to the E. coli tRNA gene aspV and the hypothetical E. coli open reading frame yafV. The locus consists of a mosaic of differentially acquired inserts forming a dynamic cs7 region of horizontally transferred inserts. Salmonella enterica subspecies I, responsible for most Salmonella infections in warm-blooded animals, carries a fimbrial gene cluster (saf) in this region as well as a regulatory gene (sinR). These genes are flanked by inverted repeats and are inserted in another laterally transferred region present in most members of Salmonella spp. encoding a putative invasin (pagN ). S. enterica subspecies I serovar Typhi, the Salmonella serovar that causes the most severe form of human salmonellosis, contains an additional insert of at least 8 kb in the sinR-pagN intergenic region harbouring a novel fimbrial operon (tcf ) similar to the coo operon encoding the CS1 fimbrial adhesin expressed by human-specific enterotoxigenic E. coli. It is suggested that the multiple insertions of fimbrial genes that have occurred in the cs7 region have contributed to phylogenetic diversity and host adaptation of Salmonella spp. PMID:10417651

  2. Molecular screening of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from dairy neonatal calves in Cordoba province, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Picco, Natalia Y; Alustiza, Fabrisio E; Bellingeri, Romina V; Grosso, María C; Motta, Carlos E; Larriestra, Alejandro J; Vissio, Claudina; Tiranti, Karina I; Terzolo, Horacio R; Moreira, Ana R; Vivas, Adriana B

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a current molecular characterization of bovine pathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from random samplings in Argentinean dairy farms. Rectal swabs were obtained from 395 (63.7%) healthy and 225 (36.3%) diarrheic calves, belonging to 45 dairy farms in Cordoba Province, Argentina. E. coli isolates were examined for virulence genes (f5, f41, f17, sta, stb, lt, eae, vt) using PCR and the prevalence of E. coli virulence profiles was spatially described in terms of spatial distribution. A total of 30.1% isolates were found to be positive for at least one of the virulence genes. Depending on the different gene combinations present, 11 virulence profiles were found. Most of the isolates analyzed had a single gene, and no combination of fimbrial and enterotoxin gene was predominant. There was no association between the frequency and distribution of E. coli virulence genes and calf health status. Most of the virulence profiles were compatible with ETEC strains and showed a homogeneous distribution over the sampled area. A clustering pattern for E. coli virulence profiles could not be recognized. This work provides updated information on the molecular characterization of pathogenic E. coli strains from dairy herds in Cordoba, Argentina. These findings would be important to formulate prevention programs and effective therapies for diarrhea in calves caused by E. coli. PMID:26026231

  3. Divergent Evolution of the repFII Replicon of IncF Plasmids Carrying Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor cnf2, Cytolethal Distending Toxin cdtIII, and f17Ae Fimbrial Variant Genes in Type 2 Necrotoxigenic Escherichia coli Isolates from Calves.

    PubMed

    Bihannic, Morgan; Haenni, Marisa; Oswald, Eric; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Among the pathovars of Escherichia coli in cattle, necrotoxigenic E. coli (NTEC) is defined by the production of cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs). In particular, type 2 NTEC (NTEC2) strains are frequent in diarrheic and septicemic calves and usually coproduce CNF type 2 (CNF2), cytolethal distending toxin type III (CDTIII), and fimbrial adhesins of the F17 family, whose genetic determinants have frequently been reported on the same Vir-like plasmid. In this study, we investigated the genetic environment of the cnf2, f17Ae, and cdtIII genes in a collection of fecal E. coli isolates recovered from 484 French and 58 Iranian calves. In particular, we highlighted the spread of cnf2, f17Ae, and cdtIII on similar 150-kb IncF plasmids harboring the newly assigned repFII replicon allele F74 in NTEC2 isolates. Interestingly, this 150-kb IncF plasmid differed from the 140-kb IncF plasmid harboring the newly assigned repFII replicon allele F75 and carrying cnf2 alone. These results suggest two divergent lineages of cnf2-carrying IncF plasmids depending on the presence of the f17Ae and cdtIII genes. This partition was observed in E. coli strains of unrelated backgrounds, suggesting two different evolutionary paths of cnf2-carrying IncF plasmids rather than divergent evolutions of NTEC2 clones. The driving forces for such divergent evolutions are not known, and further studies are required to clarify the selection of plasmid subtypes spreading virulence determinants in E. coli, in particular, plasmids of the IncF family. PMID:26546422

  4. Divergent Evolution of the repFII Replicon of IncF Plasmids Carrying Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor cnf2, Cytolethal Distending Toxin cdtIII, and f17Ae Fimbrial Variant Genes in Type 2 Necrotoxigenic Escherichia coli Isolates from Calves

    PubMed Central

    Bihannic, Morgan; Haenni, Marisa; Oswald, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Among the pathovars of Escherichia coli in cattle, necrotoxigenic E. coli (NTEC) is defined by the production of cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs). In particular, type 2 NTEC (NTEC2) strains are frequent in diarrheic and septicemic calves and usually coproduce CNF type 2 (CNF2), cytolethal distending toxin type III (CDTIII), and fimbrial adhesins of the F17 family, whose genetic determinants have frequently been reported on the same Vir-like plasmid. In this study, we investigated the genetic environment of the cnf2, f17Ae, and cdtIII genes in a collection of fecal E. coli isolates recovered from 484 French and 58 Iranian calves. In particular, we highlighted the spread of cnf2, f17Ae, and cdtIII on similar 150-kb IncF plasmids harboring the newly assigned repFII replicon allele F74 in NTEC2 isolates. Interestingly, this 150-kb IncF plasmid differed from the 140-kb IncF plasmid harboring the newly assigned repFII replicon allele F75 and carrying cnf2 alone. These results suggest two divergent lineages of cnf2-carrying IncF plasmids depending on the presence of the f17Ae and cdtIII genes. This partition was observed in E. coli strains of unrelated backgrounds, suggesting two different evolutionary paths of cnf2-carrying IncF plasmids rather than divergent evolutions of NTEC2 clones. The driving forces for such divergent evolutions are not known, and further studies are required to clarify the selection of plasmid subtypes spreading virulence determinants in E. coli, in particular, plasmids of the IncF family. PMID:26546422

  5. Identification of fimbrial subunits in the genome of Trueperella pyogenes and association between serum antibodies against fimbrial proteins and uterine conditions in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bisinotto, R S; Filho, J C Oliveira; Narbus, C; Machado, V S; Murray, E; Bicalho, R C

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the role of fimbrial subunits during bacterial adherence and the host's immunological response against anchorage proteins is critical for the development of strategies to prevent pathogens from thriving. The objectives of the present study were to locate fimbria-related proteins in the genome of Trueperella pyogenes (CP007519), define their importance for bacterial adherence, and evaluate the association between serum antibodies against fimbrial subunits and uterine health in dairy cows. Using a BLASTp search through the GenBank database, 4 putative clusters for fimbrial assembly were identified in the genome of T. pyogenes, namely FimA, FimC, FimE, and the novel major fimbriae FimJ. The fimbrial proteins FimA, FimC, FimE, and surface-anchored protein (SAP) were cloned into the pET 26b (+) vector, expressed in Escherichia coli BL21, and purified using affinity chromatography. Serum antibodies against FimA, FimC, FimE, and SAP were determined by ELISA on d 260±3 of gestation and at 2±1 and 35±3 d in milk (DIM) to assess the relationship between antigenicity against fimbrial proteins and parameters of uterine health. Antibodies against FimC and FimE were greater both pre- and postpartum in cows from which T. pyogenes was recovered by uterine flushing at 35±3 DIM, whereas T. pyogenes infection was not associated with differences in serum concentrations of FimA and SAP antibodies. Likewise, concentrations of FimC antibodies were consistently greater in cows diagnosed with clinical endometritis at 35±3 DIM compared with healthy counterparts. These results suggest that fimbrial proteins evaluated in the present study, particularly FimC and FimE, are important for maintenance of T. pyogenes in the uterus postpartum and development of uterine diseases in dairy cattle. Additional research is warranted to elucidate the mechanisms by which each fimbrial subunit contributes to the establishment of uterine diseases, evaluate its effect on fertility responses

  6. Detection of virulence factors of Escherichia coli focused on prevalence of EAST1 toxin in stool of diarrheic and non-diarrheic piglets and presence of adhesion involving virulence factors in astA positive strains.

    PubMed

    Zajacova, Zuzana Sramkova; Konstantinova, Lucie; Alexa, Pavel

    2012-01-27

    Between 2005 and 2009, a total of 800 Escherichia coli strains isolated from piglets with diarrhea were tested for the presence of enteroaggregative heat-stable enterotoxin EAST1, heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable enterotoxins (STa) and shigatoxin (Stx2e) by PCR with the purpose of investigating the present distribution of virulence factors on swine farms in the Czech Republic. The isolates were analyzed for their O-serogroup, fimbrial (K88, K99, 987P, F41, F18) and nonfimbrial adhesins (adhesin involved in diffuse adherence AIDA and porcine attaching and effacing-associated factor PAA). The detection rates of ETEC and STEC isolates were 36.5% and 7.75%, respectively, which implies that ETEC play the major role in E. coli infections in Czech herds. Generally, the most common serotype was O149:K88 which possessed genetic determinants for LT and EAST1. None of the tested E. coli isolates was positive for genes K99, 987P and F41. It was shown that out of 800 E. coli strains isolated from pigs, 277 were EAST1 positive and 74% from the latter were identified as ETEC. Of the fimbrial adhesins, K88 and F18 were commonly detected. Over 80% of K88/EAST1 positive strains possessed the gene for paa. We detected no EAE isolate positive for fimbrial adhesins or PAA and AIDA. The AIDA was more often associated with F18 than with K88. The gene astA was also identified among E. coli isolates of non-diarrheic piglets. We tested rectal swab samples collected from apparently healthy piglets on three farms. On all farms, E. coli astA positive strains (26.66%, 90.00% and 46.66% astA positive animals) were isolated. Our results showed a significantly higher prevalence of astA positive E. coli isolates among apparently healthy piglets in comparison with diarrheic piglets. The question remains as to what is the role of the astA gene in the pathogenesis of porcine colibacillosis and as a virulence factor. PMID:21864997

  7. Identification and sequence analysis of lpfABCDE, a putative fimbrial operon of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Bäumler, A J; Heffron, F

    1995-01-01

    A chromosomal region present in Salmonella typhimurium but absent from related species was identified by hybridization. A DNA probe originating from 78 min on the S. typhimurium chromosome hybridized with DNA from Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella heidelberg, and Salmonella dublin but not with DNA from Salmonella typhi, Salmonella arizonae, Escherichia coli, and Shigella serotypes. Cloning and sequence analysis revealed that the corresponding region of the S. typhimurium chromosome encodes a fimbrial operon. Long fimbriae inserted at the poles of the bacterium were observed by electron microscopy when this fimbrial operon was introduced into a nonpiliated E. coli strain. The genes encoding these fimbriae were therefore termed lpfABCDE, for long polar fimbriae. Genetically, the lpf operon was found to be most closely related to the fim operon of S. typhimurium, both in gene order and in conservation of the deduced amino acid sequences. PMID:7721701

  8. Replicon typing of virulence plasmids of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates from cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Mainil, J G; Bex, F; Dreze, P; Kaeckenbeeck, A; Couturier, M

    1992-01-01

    Plasmid DNA hybridization with probes for virulence factors used for basic replicons of plasmids was used to identify the virulence plasmids of a collection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates from cattle. The virulence probes were derived from the genes coding for the heat-stable enterotoxin STaP and for the F5 (K99) and F41 fimbrial adhesins. The replicon probes were derived from 16 different basic replicons of plasmids (probes repFIA, repFIB, repFIC, repFIIA, repI1, repHI1, repHI2, repL/M, repN, repP, repQ, repT, repU, repW, repX, and repY). The virulence genes coding for the STaP enterotoxin and for the F5 adhesin were located on a single plasmid band in each isolate. The sizes of most of these virulence plasmids were from 65 to 95 MDa. The F41 probe failed to hybridize with any plasmid band. The virulence plasmids had multireplicon types typical of plasmids of the IncF groups. The most common basic replicon association was the triple RepFIA-RepFIB-RepFIC family association. Images PMID:1639505

  9. The Fimbrial Protein is a Virulence Factor and Potential Vaccine Antigen of Avibacterium paragallinarum.

    PubMed

    Liu, C-C; Ou, S-C; Tan, D-H; Hsieh, M-K; Shien, J-H; Chang, P-C

    2016-09-01

    Fimbriae are recognized as virulence factors and potential vaccine antigens of several pathogenic bacteria, but the function of the fimbriae from Avibacterium paragallinarum is not well known. In this study, a gene encoding the fimbrial protein FlfA was identified in A. paragallinarum . Sequencing analysis of the putative promoter region of flfA suggests that flfA expression in A. paragallinarum might be controlled by phase variation. The flfA gene from A. paragallinarum was expressed as a recombinant protein (r-FlfA) in Escherichia coli . Immunization with r-FlfA conferred chickens protection against challenge infection with A. paragallinarum . Virulence assays showed that the flfA-deficient mutants of A. paragallinarum were less virulent than their parental wild-type strains. These results indicated that the fimbrial protein FlfA is a virulence factor and potential vaccine antigen from A. paragallinarum . PMID:27610725

  10. Simultaneous oral immunization of mice with live attenuated Escherichia coli expressing LT192-STa 13 and LT 192-STb fusion immunogen, respectively, for polyvalent vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxin; Li, Jinping; Bao, Jun; Li, Xingyue; Guan, Weikun; Yuan, Chaowen; Tang, Jie; Zhao, Zhiteng; Shi, Dongfang

    2015-05-01

    Previous epidemiological study showed that most of the porcine enterotoxin Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple enterotoxins but lack any of the fimbriae or non-fimbrial adhesion genes. Therefore, effective ETEC vaccines need to aim directly at all the enterotoxin antigens. The objective of this study was to evaluate the simultaneous immune effect of two live attenuated E. coli strains expressing LTR192G-STaA13Q and LTR192G-STb fusion immunogen, respectively. The results showed that both local mucosal and systemic immune responses against LT, STa, STb, and F41 were induced in BALB/c mice immunized orally with the recombinant E. coli strains ER-A and ER-B simultaneously. In addition, results of cellular immune responses showed that stimulation index (SI) values of immunized mice were significantly higher than control mice (P < 0.05) and a marked shift toward type-2 helper T lymphocyte (Th 2) immunity. Moreover, the induced antibodies demonstrated neutralizing effects on LT, STa, and STb producing E. coli infection. These data indicated that the use of recombinant E. coli ER-A and ER-B could be a valuable strategy for future polyvalent vaccine development of ETEC. PMID:25549617

  11. A new enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccine candidate constructed using a Salmonella ghost delivery system: comparative evaluation with a commercial vaccine for neonatal piglet colibacillosis.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-04-15

    In this study, a comparative evaluation between a Salmonella ghost vaccine expressing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) fimbrial antigens and a commercial ETEC vaccine was conducted in neonatal piglets. Genes encoding the ETEC K88ab, K88ac, K99, FasA, and F41 fimbrial proteins were individually cloned into an expression/ghost plasmid (pJHLP184) carrying the pBR origin, asd, the ompA signal sequence to direct antigens to the cell membrane, cI857/λPR promoter, araC ParaBAD, and the phiX174 lysis gene E. Individual clones were subsequently used to electroporate a Δasd S. Typhimurium strain, and positive clones were used to generate Salmonella ghosts. Pregnant sows (n=12) were equally divided into four groups. Pregnant sows were primed and boosted at 11 and 14 weeks of pregnancy, respectively. Group A, B, and C sows were intramuscularly inoculated with PBS as a control, a commercial vaccine, and with 2×10(10) ghost cells, respectively, while group D sows were orally immunized with 2×10(10) ghost cells. All the vaccinated sows and their offspring exhibited increased ETEC fimbrial antigen antibody levels relative to those in the unimmunized group A. Especially, serum IgG and colostrum IgA levels in the group D sows and serum IgG and IgA levels in their piglets were significantly higher than those in control group sows and offspring, respectively. The levels of interleukin-4 against all the fimbrial proteins in peripheral blood lymphocytes of group D sows also increased significantly, whereas no difference between the control group and any of the immunized groups was detected for interferon-γ. In addition, the piglets of group D did not experience diarrhea following challenge with virulent ETEC strains. Diarrhea was observed in 88.9%, 30.4%, and 23.5% of the piglets in groups A, B and C, respectively. Mortality was observed in 16.7% and 5.9% of the piglets in groups A and C, respectively. These findings indicate that immunization of sows with the ghost vaccine

  12. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of pre- and postpolymerization states in the F4 fimbrial subunit FaeG.

    PubMed

    Van Molle, Inge; Moonens, Kristof; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Buts, Lieven; De Kerpel, Maia; Wyns, Lode; Bouckaert, Julie; De Greve, Henri

    2009-12-18

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli expressing F4 fimbriae are the major cause of porcine colibacillosis and are responsible for significant death and morbidity in neonatal and postweaned piglets. Via the chaperone-usher pathway, F4 fimbriae are assembled into thin, flexible polymers mainly composed of the single-domain adhesin FaeG. The F4 fimbrial system has been labeled eccentric because the F4 pilins show some features distinct from the features of pilins of other chaperone-usher-assembled structures. In particular, FaeG is much larger than other pilins (27 versus approximately 17 kDa), grafting an additional carbohydrate binding domain on the common immunoglobulin-like core. Structural data of FaeG during different stages of the F4 fimbrial biogenesis process, combined with differential scanning calorimetry measurements, confirm the general principles of the donor strand complementation/exchange mechanisms taking place during pilus biogenesis via the chaperone-usher pathway. PMID:19799915

  13. Assessment of Adhesins as an Indicator of Pathovar-Associated Virulence Factors in Bovine Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Valat, Charlotte; Forest, Karine; Auvray, Frédéric; Métayer, Véronique; Méheut, Thomas; Polizzi, Charlène; Gay, Emilie; Haenni, Marisa; Oswald, Eric; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-12-01

    The CS31A, F17, and F5 adhesins are usually targeted by serology-based methods to detect pathogenic Escherichia coli associated with calf enteritis. However, the virulence traits of the selected isolates are still poorly described. Here, from a set of 349 diarrheagenic E. coli isolates from cattle, we demonstrated a 70.8% concordance rate (Cohen's kappa, 0.599) between serology- and PCR-based approaches for the detection of adhesins under field conditions. A 79% to 82.4% correspondence between the two methods was found for fimbrial adhesins, whereas major discrepancies (33%) were observed for CS31A-type antigens. Various F17A variants were found, such as F17Ac (20K) (50%), F17Aa (FY) (18.9%), F17Ab (8.1%), and F17Ad (111K) (5.4%), including a high proportion (17.6%) of new F17A internal combinations (F17Aab, F17Aac, and F17Abc) or untypeable variants. In addition, the highest proportion of pathovar-associated virulence factor (VF) genes was observed among E. coli isolates that produced F5/F41 adhesins. A specific link between the heat-stable toxins related to the enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) pathovar and adhesins was identified. STa was significantly linked to F5/F41 and EAST1 to CS31A adhesins (P < 0.001), respectively, whereas NTEC was associated with F17 adhesin (P = 0.001). Clustering between phylogroups according to the adhesin types was also observed. Also, few Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) or enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) pathovars were identified. Finally, no statistically significant difference was observed in the occurrence of extended-spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) production according to the adhesins expressed by the isolates (P = 0.09). Altogether, this study gives new insights into the relationship between adhesins, VF, and antimicrobial resistance in calf enteritis and supports the need for further standardization of methodologies for such approaches. PMID:25217019

  14. Frequency of virulence factors in Escherichia coli isolated from suckling pigs with diarrhoea in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxin; Yuan, Chaowen; Meng, Xiangqiu; Du, Yuance; Gao, Ruize; Tang, Jie; Shi, Dongfang

    2014-02-01

    Escherichia coli-associated diarrhoea is an important disease adversely affecting the pig industry. This study was conducted to investigate the frequency of virulence factors expressed by E. coli strains isolated from suckling pigs with diarrhoea in China. A total of 381 E. coli strains, obtained from 290 faecal samples from pigs on 38 farms, were tested for fimbriae (K88, K99, 987P, F41, F18, F17), non-fimbrial adhesins (AIDA-I, paa, CS31A, eae, saa), enterotoxin (LT-I, LT-II, STa, STb, EAST1), Shiga toxin (Stx1, Stx2, Stx2e), pathogenicity islands (HPI, LEE), α-haemolysin (hlyA), afa8 gene cluster (afaD, afaE) and sepA genes by PCR. Out of the 381 isolates, 206 carried at least one virulence gene. Of the 206 virulence positive isolates, the virulence factor genes detected were EAST1 (n=120), irp2 (n=59), paa (n=50), STb (n=41), AIDA-I (n=34), LT-I (n=23), ler (n=11), hlyA (n=9), K88 (n=8), eae (n=8), STa (n=7), sepA (n=6), F18 (n=5), afaD (n=3), afaE (n=3), K99 (n=2) and Stx2e (n=1), with most isolates carrying multiple virulence genes. These results demonstrate that relatively few isolates from the study population express K88, K99, LT-I or STa, but that EAST1 (58%), irp2 (29%), AIDA-I (16.5%), paa (24%) and STb (20%) are frequent virulence factors expressed by E. coli strains isolated from suckling pigs with diarrhoea in China. PMID:24378293

  15. Comparative evaluation of a vaccine candidate expressing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) adhesins for colibacillosis with a commercial vaccine using a pig model.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Lee, John Hwa

    2012-06-01

    In this study, a comparative evaluation of a novel live vaccine candidate expressing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) fimbriae and a commercial ETEC vaccine was carried out in suckling to weaned piglets. The E. coli K88ab, K88ac, K99, FasA and F41 fimbrial genes were individually inserted into an expression/secretion plasmid, pBP244. These plasmids were subsequently transfected into attenuated Salmonella, which were used as the vaccine candidate. Eighteen pregnant sows and 107 of their piglets were used in this comparative study. All the vaccinated groups of sows and piglets exhibited significantly increased antibody levels relative to specific antigens when compared with those in the unimmunized control. The experimental piglets with the vaccine candidate did not experience diarrhea following challenge with the virulent ETEC strains. However, diarrhea was observed in 36.8% of the piglets in the group immunized with the commercial vaccine and in 50% of the control group after challenge with the ETEC strains. These findings indicate that immunization of sows with the candidate vaccine can effectively protect their young pigs against colibacillosis. PMID:22507658

  16. A cryptic fimbrial gene in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed Central

    Moriya, T; Kawabata, S; Mizunoe, Y; Amako, K

    1989-01-01

    The gene coding for the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinating fimbriae in Serratia marcescens US5 was cloned into Escherichia coli K4 with a cosmid vector system. One of the transformants, US5-1, expressed two morphologically distinct fimbriae, one that was 5-nm wide and one that was 3-nm wide. The latter fimbria was morphologically and serologically indistinguishable from that of strain US5. Genetic analysis of transformant US5-1 showed that the gene responsible for the 5-nm-wide fimbriae was located more than 10 kilobases away from the gene responsible for the 3-nm-wide fimbriae. The molecular sizes of the subunits of these two fimbriae, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were 19 kilodaltons for the 3-nm-wide fimbriae and 20 kilodaltons for the 5-nm-wide fimbriae. Serologically, the 5-nm-wide fimbriae did not cross-react with monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies raised against the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinating fimbriae of strain US5. Strain EL101, which expressed only the 5-nm-wide fimbriae, did not agglutinate chicken or human erythrocytes. These experimental results suggest that the gene for the 5-nm-wide fimbriae is cryptic in strain US5 and is expressed in E. coli K4 only after it is moved by transformation. Images PMID:2574174

  17. Recombinant hemoglobin betaG83C-F41Y.

    PubMed

    Vasseur-Godbillon, Corinne; Sahu, Sarata C; Domingues, Elisa; Fablet, Christophe; Giovannelli, Janel L; Tam, Tsuey Chyi; Ho, Nancy T; Ho, Chien; Marden, Michael C; Baudin-Creuza, Véronique

    2006-01-01

    We have engineered a stable octameric hemoglobin (Hb) of molecular mass 129 kDa, a dimer of recombinant hemoglobin (rHb betaG83C-F41Y) tetramers joined by disulfide bonds at the beta83 position. One of the major problems with oxygen carriers based on acellular hemoglobin solutions is vasoactivity, a limitation which may be overcome by increasing the molecular size of the carrier. The oxygen equilibrium curves showed that the octameric rHb betaG83C-F41Y exhibited an increased oxygen affinity and a decreased cooperativity. The CO rebinding kinetics, auto-oxidation kinetics, and size exclusion chromatography did not show the usual dependence on protein concentration, indicating that this octamer was stable and did not dissociate easily into tetramers or dimers at low concentration. These results were corroborated by the experiments with haptoglobin showing no interaction between octameric rHb betaG83C-F41Y and haptoglobin, a plasma glycoprotein that binds the Hb dimers and permits their elimination from blood circulation. The lack of dimers could be explained if there are two disulfide bridges per octamer, which would be in agreement with the lack of reactivity of the additional cysteine residues. The kinetics of reduction of the disulfide bridge by reduced glutathione showed a rate of 1000 M(-1) x h(-1) (observed time coefficient of 1 h at 1 mM glutathione) at 25 degrees C. Under air, the cysteines are oxidized and the disulfide bridge forms spontaneously; the kinetics of the tetramer to octamer reaction displayed a bimolecular reaction of time coefficient of 2 h at 11 microM Hb and 25 degrees C. In addition, the octameric rHb betaG83C-F41Y was resistant to potential reducing agents present in fresh plasma. PMID:16367763

  18. Subcutaneous or oral immunization of mice with Lactococcus lactis expressing F4 fimbrial adhesin FaeG.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shujie; Li, Yongming; Xu, Ziwei; Wang, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most common causes of diarrhea in neonatal and postweaning piglets. Fimbrial adhesion of ETEC has been considered an important colonization factor with antigenicity. To safely and effectively deliver the F4 (K88) fimbrial adhesin FaeG to the immune system, we have previously constructed the secretory expression vector pNZ8112-faeG, and FaeG was produced in cytoplasmic form in Lactococcus lactis. In this work, BALB/c mice were immunized with recombinant L. lactis to further determine the immunogenicity of recombinant FaeG (rFaeG) via the subcutaneous or oral route. Subcutaneous immunization in mice with recombinant L. lactis induced a significant increase in the F4-specific serum IgG titer and the number of antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) in the spleen. Oral immunization of mice with recombinant L. lactis induced mucosal and systemic F4-specific immune responses and increased the number of ASCs in the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. High-dose (2.8 × 10(11) CFU) recombinant strains and adjuvant cholera toxin B subunit enhanced specific mucosal immune responses. The results suggest the feasibility of delivering rFaeG expressed in L. lactis to the immune system in order to induce an F4-specific immune response. PMID:23386358

  19. Induction of specific immune responses in piglets by intramuscular immunization with fimbrial adhesin FaeG expressed in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shujie; Li, Yongming; Xu, Ziwei

    2013-08-01

    Fimbrial adhesin plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC)-induced piglet diarrhoea. Lactococcus lactis is an attractive food-grade host for the production of heterologous antigens. We previously demonstrated that fimbrial adhesin FaeG was expressed in L. lactis and that oral immunization in mice with recombinant L. lactis expressing FaeG induced F4-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. In the present study, we explored the immune responses of piglets induced by intramuscular vaccination with recombinant L. lactis expressing rFaeG. Intramuscular vaccination resulted in significantly elevated serum IgG level and modest increases in serum IgA and IgM levels. In addition, IgG, IgA, and IgM antibody secreting cells were induced in the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, and jejunum. The growth performance of piglets was not influenced by intramuscular vaccination. The results suggest that L. lactis expressing FaeG is a promising candidate vaccine against ETEC. PMID:23540979

  20. Nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the major subunit of CS3 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, M; Smyth, C J; Scott, J R

    1988-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a 612-base-pair DNA fragment containing the gene for the major fimbrial subunit of CS3 of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is presented. A possible promoter region, a ribosome-binding site, and two potential signal peptidase cleavage sites are indicated. Unlike the best-studied fimbrial proteins, the predicted CS3 sequence has no Cys residues. PMID:2903130

  1. Antibody-mediated disruption of the mechanics of CS20 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhupender; Mortezaei, Narges; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J.; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Preventive vaccines against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are being developed, many of which target common fimbrial colonization factors as the major constituent, based on empirical evidence that these function as protective antigens. Particularly, passive oral administration of ETEC anti-fimbrial antibodies prevent ETEC diarrhea. Little is, however, known regarding the specific mechanisms by which intestinal antibodies against ETEC fimbriae function to prevent disease. Using coli surface antigen 20 (CS20) fimbriae as a model ETEC colonization factor, we show using force spectroscopy that anti-fimbrial antibodies diminish fimbrial elasticity by inhibiting their natural capacity to unwind and rewind. In the presence of anti-CS20 antibodies the force required to unwind a single fimbria was increased several-fold and the extension length was shortened several-fold. Similar measurements in the presence of anti-CS20 Fab fragments did not show any effect, indicating that bivalent antibody binding is required to reduce fimbrial elasticity. Based on these findings, we propose a model for an in-vivo mechanism whereby antibody-mediated disruption of the biomechanical properties of CS20 fimbriae impedes sustained adhesion of ETEC to the intestinal mucosal surface. Further elucidation of the role played by intestinal antibodies in mechanical disruption of fimbrial function may provide insights relevant to ETEC vaccine development. PMID:26411657

  2. Antibody-mediated disruption of the mechanics of CS20 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupender; Mortezaei, Narges; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Preventive vaccines against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are being developed, many of which target common fimbrial colonization factors as the major constituent, based on empirical evidence that these function as protective antigens. Particularly, passive oral administration of ETEC anti-fimbrial antibodies prevent ETEC diarrhea. Little is, however, known regarding the specific mechanisms by which intestinal antibodies against ETEC fimbriae function to prevent disease. Using coli surface antigen 20 (CS20) fimbriae as a model ETEC colonization factor, we show using force spectroscopy that anti-fimbrial antibodies diminish fimbrial elasticity by inhibiting their natural capacity to unwind and rewind. In the presence of anti-CS20 antibodies the force required to unwind a single fimbria was increased several-fold and the extension length was shortened several-fold. Similar measurements in the presence of anti-CS20 Fab fragments did not show any effect, indicating that bivalent antibody binding is required to reduce fimbrial elasticity. Based on these findings, we propose a model for an in-vivo mechanism whereby antibody-mediated disruption of the biomechanical properties of CS20 fimbriae impedes sustained adhesion of ETEC to the intestinal mucosal surface. Further elucidation of the role played by intestinal antibodies in mechanical disruption of fimbrial function may provide insights relevant to ETEC vaccine development. PMID:26411657

  3. Immunogenicity of recombinant F4 (K88) fimbrial adhesin FaeG expressed in tobacco chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Shen, Huifeng; Qian, Bingjun; Chen, Weiwei; Liu, Zhenhua; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Dabing; Liang, Wanqi

    2010-08-01

    To test the possibility of producing the novel vaccine in plants against diarrhea normally found in neonatal and newly weaned piglets, the faeG gene, encoding a major F4ac fimbrial subunit protein, was introduced into the tobacco chloroplast genome. After two rounds of selection under spectinomycin, we obtained the transgenic plants nearly homoplasmic. RNA gel blot analysis indicated that faeG and the antibiotic selective gene aminoglycoside 3' adenylyltransferase (aadA) were highly transcribed as a dicistron, while the translational level of recombinant FaeG in transplastomic tobacco was about 0.15% of total soluble protein. The immunogenicity of recombinant FaeG produced in tobacco chloroplasts was confirmed by the observation that FaeG-specific antibodies were elicited in mice immunized with total soluble protein of transgenic plants, as well as the result that mouse sera stimulated by chloroplast-derived recombinant FaeG could neutralize F4ac enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in vivo. This study provides a new alternative for producing the ETEC vaccine using the chloroplast expression system. PMID:20705597

  4. Bordetella bronchiseptica fimbrial protein-enhanced immunogenicity of a Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin fragment.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, S; Kania, S A; Nair, R V; McPherson, J T; Moore, R N; Bemis, D A

    2001-09-14

    Leukotoxin produced by Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica is an important virulence factor in shipping fever pneumonia in feedlot cattle and is a critical protective antigen. In this study, the immune response to a chimeric protein generated by combining a gene fragment encoding neutralizing epitopes of M. haemolytica leukotoxin and a fimbrial protein gene (fim N) from Bordetella bronchiseptica was evaluated. The recombinant gene was cloned in a bacterial expression vector under the control of the tac promoter and expressed as a fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase (GST) in Escherichia coli. Immunization of mice with the recombinant protein, GST-LTXFIM elicited a significantly stronger anti-leukotoxin antibody response than comparable immunizations with GST-LTX fusion proteins lacking FIM N. The GST-LTXFIM was also more stable than GST-LTX during storage at -80 degrees C, thus alleviating a stability problem inherent to leukotoxin. This chimeric protein may be a candidate for inclusion in new generation vaccines against shipping fever pneumonia. PMID:11535337

  5. Genes Related to Long Polar Fimbriae of Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains as Reliable Markers To Identify Virulent Isolates▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Alfredo G.; Blanco, Miguel; Valenzuela, Patricio; Slater, Terry M.; Patel, Shilpa D.; Dahbi, Ghizlane; López, Cecilia; Barriga, Ximena Fernández; Blanco, Jesús E.; Gomes, Tânia A. T.; Vidal, Roberto; Blanco, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Lpf (stands for long polar fimbriae) is one of the few adhesive factors of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 associated with colonization of the intestine. E. coli O157:H7 strains possess two lpf loci encoding highly regulated fimbrial structures. Database analysis of the genes encoding the major fimbrial subunits demonstrated that they are present in commensal as well as pathogenic (both intestinal and extraintestinal) E. coli strains and in Salmonella strains and that the lpfA1 and lpfA2 genes are highly prevalent among LEE (locus of enterocyte effacement)-positive E. coli strains associated with severe and/or epidemic disease. Further DNA sequence analysis of the lpfA1 and lpfA2 genes from different attaching-and-effacing E. coli strains has led us to the identification of several polymorphisms and the classification of the major fimbrial subunits into distinct variants. Using collections of pathogenic E. coli isolates from Europe and Latin America, we demonstrated that the different lpfA types are associated with the presence of specific intimin (eae) adhesin variants and, most importantly, that they are found in specific E. coli pathotypes. Our results showed that the use of these fimbrial genes as markers, in combination with the different intimin types, resulted in a specific test for the identification of E. coli O157:H7, distinguishing it from other pathogenic E. coli strains. PMID:19494071

  6. Proteus mirabilis mannose-resistant, Proteus-like fimbriae: MrpG is located at the fimbrial tip and is required for fimbrial assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Zhao, H; Geymonat, L; Bahrani, F; Johnson, D E; Mobley, H L

    1997-01-01

    The mannose-resistant, Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbria, responsible for mannose-resistant hemagglutination, is a virulence factor for uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Based on known fimbrial gene organization, we postulated that MrpG, a putative minor subunit of the MR/P fimbria, functions as an adhesin responsible for hemagglutination, while MrpA serves as the major structural subunit for the filamentous structure. To test this hypothesis, an mrpG mutant was constructed by allelic-exchange mutagenesis and verified by PCR and Southern blotting. The mrpG mutant was found to be negative for hemagglutination, while wild-type strain H14320 and the complemented mutant were positive. Western blots with antiserum raised against an overexpressed MrpG'-His6 fusion protein showed that MrpG was present in the fimbrial preparations of both the wild-type strain and the complemented mutant but absent in that of the mrpG mutant. The mrpG mutant was significantly less virulent in a CBA mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. Western blots with antiserum to whole MR/P fimbriae showed that MrpA protein was also missing from the fimbrial preparation of the mrpG mutant. Using immunogold electron microscopy, we found that the normal MR/P-fimbrial structure was absent in the mrpG mutant, suggesting that MrpG is essential for initiation of normal fimbrial formation. In the wild-type strain, MrpG protein was localized to the tips of the fimbriae or at the surface of the cell when antiserum raised against overexpressed MrpG was used. Given the tip localization, MrpG may be required for initiation of assembly of MR/P fimbriae but does not appear to be the fimbrial adhesin. PMID:9119470

  7. Avian P1 antigens inhibit agglutination mediated by P fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J R; Swanson, J L; Neill, M A

    1992-01-01

    Whole egg white from pigeon, dove, and cockatiel eggs, as well as the ovomucoid fraction of pigeon egg white, exhibited strong P1 antigenic activities and inhibited agglutination of human P1 erythrocytes and of digalactoside-coated latex beads by P-fimbriated Escherichia coli strains. In contrast, chicken egg white exhibited only weak P1 antigenic activity and had little impact on P-fimbrial agglutination. These preparations did not affect hemagglutination by E. coli strains expressing mannose-resistant adhesins other than P fimbriae, i.e., Dr, F1845, and S adhesins. Human anti-P1 serum diminished the P-fimbrial inhibitory activities of pigeon egg white and pigeon ovomucoid. Pigeon ovomucoid was equipotent on a molar basis with globoside, and the pigeon, dove, and cockatiel egg white preparations were equipotent with each other in P-fimbrial inhibition. Incubation of p erythrocytes in whole egg whites or in pigeon ovomucoid did not render them agglutinable by P-fimbriated bacteria, whereas incubation in globoside did. These data demonstrate that whole egg whites (and their ovomucoid fraction) from members of the families Columbidae (pigeons and doves) and Psittacidae (parrots) specifically and potently inhibit P-fimbrial agglutination, probably by providing P1 antigen as a receptor for the P-fimbrial adhesin. Avian egg white preparations may facilitate adhesin characterization of wild-type uropathogenic strains and may useful in preventing upper urinary tract infections due to P-fimbriated E. coli. PMID:1346125

  8. Bordetella pertussis isolates in Finland: Serotype and fimbrial expression

    PubMed Central

    Heikkinen, Eriikka; Xing, Dorothy K; Ölander, Rose-Marie; Hytönen, Jukka; Viljanen, Matti K; Mertsola, Jussi; He, Qiushui

    2008-01-01

    Background Bordetella pertussis causes whooping cough or pertussis in humans. It produces several virulence factors, of which the fimbriae are considered adhesins and elicit immune responses in the host. B. pertussis has three distinct serotypes Fim2, Fim3 or Fim2,3. Generally, B. pertussis Fim2 strains predominate in unvaccinated populations, whereas Fim3 strains are often isolated in vaccinated populations. In Finland, pertussis vaccination was introduced in 1952. The whole-cell vaccine contained two strains, 18530 (Fim3) since 1962 and strain 1772 (Fim2,3) added in 1976. After that the vaccine has remained the same until 2005 when the whole-cell vaccine was replaced by the acellular vaccine containing pertussis toxin and filamentous hemagglutinin. Our aims were to study serotypes of Finnish B. pertussis isolates from 1974 to 2006 in a population with > 90% vaccination coverage and fimbrial expression of the isolates during infection. Serotyping was done by agglutination and serotype-specific antibody responses were determined by blocking ELISA. Results Altogether, 1,109 isolates were serotyped. Before 1976, serotype distributions of Fim2, Fim3 and Fim2,3 were 67%, 19% and 10%, respectively. From 1976 to 1998, 94% of the isolates were Fim2 serotype. Since 1999, the frequency of Fim3 strains started to increase and reached 83% during a nationwide epidemic in 2003. A significant increase in level of serum IgG antibodies against purified fimbriae was observed between paired sera of 37 patients. The patients infected by Fim3 strains had antibodies which blocked the binding of monoclonal antibodies to Fim3 but not to Fim2. Moreover, about one third of the Fim2 strain infected patients developed antibodies capable of blocking of binding of both anti-Fim2 and Fim3 monoclonal antibodies. Conclusion Despite extensive vaccinations in Finland, B. pertussis Fim2 strains were the most common serotype. Emergence of Fim3 strains started in 1999 and coincided with nationwide

  9. Structures of C-mannosylated anti-adhesives bound to the type 1 fimbrial FimH adhesin.

    PubMed

    de Ruyck, Jerome; Lensink, Marc F; Bouckaert, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Selective inhibitors of the type 1 fimbrial adhesin FimH are recognized as attractive alternatives for antibiotic therapies and prophylaxes against Escherichia coli infections such as urinary-tract infections. To construct these inhibitors, the α-d-mannopyranoside of high-mannose N-glycans, recognized with exclusive specificity on glycoprotein receptors by FimH, forms the basal structure. A hydrophobic aglycon is then linked to the mannose by the O1 oxygen inherently present in the α-anomeric configuration. Substitution of this O atom by a carbon introduces a C-glycosidic bond, which may enhance the therapeutic potential of such compounds owing to the inability of enzymes to degrade C-glycosidic bonds. Here, the first crystal structures of the E. coli FimH adhesin in complex with C-glycosidically linked mannopyranosides are presented. These findings explain the role of the spacer in positioning biphenyl ligands for interactions by means of aromatic stacking in the tyrosine gate of FimH and how the normally hydrated C-glycosidic link is tolerated. As these new compounds can bind FimH, it can be assumed that they have the potential to serve as potent new antagonists of FimH, paving the way for the design of a new family of anti-adhesive compounds against urinary-tract infections. PMID:27158502

  10. Structures of C-mannosylated anti-adhesives bound to the type 1 fimbrial FimH adhesin

    PubMed Central

    de Ruyck, Jerome; Lensink, Marc F.; Bouckaert, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of the type 1 fimbrial adhesin FimH are recognized as attractive alternatives for antibiotic therapies and prophylaxes against Escherichia coli infections such as urinary-tract infections. To construct these inhibitors, the α-d-mannopyranoside of high-mannose N-glycans, recognized with exclusive specificity on glycoprotein receptors by FimH, forms the basal structure. A hydrophobic aglycon is then linked to the mannose by the O1 oxygen inherently present in the α-anomeric configuration. Substitution of this O atom by a carbon introduces a C-glycosidic bond, which may enhance the therapeutic potential of such compounds owing to the inability of enzymes to degrade C-glycosidic bonds. Here, the first crystal structures of the E. coli FimH adhesin in complex with C-glycosidically linked mannopyranosides are presented. These findings explain the role of the spacer in positioning biphenyl ligands for interactions by means of aromatic stacking in the tyrosine gate of FimH and how the normally hydrated C-glycosidic link is tolerated. As these new compounds can bind FimH, it can be assumed that they have the potential to serve as potent new antagonists of FimH, paving the way for the design of a new family of anti-adhesive compounds against urinary-tract infections. PMID:27158502

  11. RosE represses Std fimbrial expression in Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Chessa, Daniela; Winter, Maria G; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Tükel, Çagla; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2008-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) genome contains a large repertoire of putative fimbrial operons that remain poorly characterized because they are not expressed in vitro. In this study, insertions that induced expression of the putative stdABCD fimbrial operon were identified from a random bank of transposon mutants by screening with immuno-magnetic particles for ligand expression (SIMPLE). Transposon insertions upstream of csgC and lrhA or within dam, setB and STM4463 (renamed rosE) resulted in expression of StdA and its assembly into fimbrial filaments on the cell surface. RosE is a novel negative regulator of Std fimbrial expression as indicated by its repression of a std::lacZ reporter construct and by binding of the purified protein to a DNA region upstream of the stdA start codon. Expression of Std fimbriae in the rosE mutant resulted in increased attachment of S. typhimurium to human colonic epithelial cell lines (T-84 and CaCo-2). A rosE mutant exhibited a reduced ability to compete with virulent S. typhimurium for colonization of murine organs, while no defect was observed when both competing strains carried a stdAB deletion. These data suggest that a tight control of Std fimbrial expression mediated by RosE is required during host pathogen interaction. PMID:18331470

  12. The F4 fimbrial chaperone FaeE is stable as a monomer that does not require self-capping of its pilin-interactive surfaces.

    PubMed

    Van Molle, Inge; Moonens, Kristof; Buts, Lieven; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Panjikar, Santosh; Wyns, Lode; De Greve, Henri; Bouckaert, Julie

    2009-05-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use the chaperone-usher pathway to express adhesive surface structures, such as fimbriae, in order to mediate attachment to host cells. Periplasmic chaperones are required to shuttle fimbrial subunits or pilins through the periplasmic space in an assembly-competent form. The chaperones cap the hydrophobic surface of the pilins through a donor-strand complementation mechanism. FaeE is the periplasmic chaperone required for the assembly of the F4 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. The FaeE crystal structure shows a dimer formed by interaction between the pilin-binding interfaces of the two monomers. Dimerization and tetramerization have been observed previously in crystal structures of fimbrial chaperones and have been suggested to serve as a self-capping mechanism that protects the pilin-interactive surfaces in solution in the absence of the pilins. However, thermodynamic and biochemical data show that FaeE occurs as a stable monomer in solution. Other lines of evidence indicate that self-capping of the pilin-interactive interfaces is not a mechanism that is conservedly applied by all periplasmic chaperones, but is rather a case-specific solution to cap aggregation-prone surfaces. PMID:19390146

  13. Production and regulation of functional amyloid curli fimbriae by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional amyloid, in the form of adhesive fimbrial proteins termed curli, was first described in Salmonella and Escherichia coli. Curli fibers adhere to various host cells and structural proteins, interact with components of the host immune system, and participate in biofilm formation. Shiga toxin...

  14. A food-grade fimbrial adhesin FaeG expression system in Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Lu, W W; Wang, T; Wang, Y; Xin, M; Kong, J

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is the major cause of diarrhea in neonatal piglets. The fimbriae as colonizing factor in the pathogenesis of ETEC constitute a primary target for vaccination against ETEC. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are attractive tools to deliver antigens at the mucosal level. With the safety of genetically modified LAB in mind, a food-grade secretion vector (pALRc or pALRb) was constructed with DNA entirely from LAB, including the replicon, promoter, signal peptide, and selection marker alanine racemase gene (alr). To evaluate the feasibility of the system, the nuclease gene (nuc) from Staphylococcus aureus was used as a reporter to be expressed in both Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei. Subsequently, the extracellular secretion of the fimbrial adhesin FaeG of ETEC was confirmed by Western blot analysis. These results showed that this food-grade expression system has potential as the delivery vehicle for the safe use of genetically modified LAB for the development of vaccines against ETEC infection. PMID:26825016

  15. Structural insight in histo-blood group binding by the F18 fimbrial adhesin FedF.

    PubMed

    Moonens, Kristof; Bouckaert, Julie; Coddens, Annelies; Tran, Thao; Panjikar, Santosh; De Kerpel, Maia; Cox, Eric; Remaut, Han; De Greve, Henri

    2012-10-01

    F18-positive enterotoxigenic and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli are responsible for post-weaning diarrhoea and oedema disease in pigs and lead to severe production losses in the farming industry. F18 fimbriae attach to the small intestine of young piglets by latching onto glycosphingolipids with A/H blood group determinants on type 1 core. We demonstrate the N-terminal domain of the F18 fimbrial subunit FedF to be responsible for ABH-mediated attachment and present its X-ray structure in ligand-free form and bound to A and B type 1 hexaoses. The FedF lectin domain comprises a 10-stranded immunoglobulin-like β-sandwich. Three linear motives, Q(47) -N(50), H(88) -S(90) and R(117) -T(119), form a shallow glycan binding pocket near the tip of the domain that is selective for type 1 core glycans in extended conformation. In addition to the glycan binding pocket, a polybasic loop on the membrane proximal surface of FedF lectin domain is shown to be required for binding to piglet enterocytes. Although dispensable for ABH glycan recognition, the polybasic surface adds binding affinity in the context of the host cell membrane, a mechanism that is proposed to direct ABH-glycan binding to cell-bound glycosphingolipids and could allow bacteria to avoid clearance by secreted glycoproteins. PMID:22812428

  16. Synthesis and assembly of Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbrial protein in potato tissues.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun-Ah; Park, Yong Keun; Lee, Kang Oh; Langridge, William H R; Lee, Jin-Yong

    2009-10-01

    Periodontal disease caused by the gram-negative oral anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis is thought to be initiated by the binding of P. gingivalis fimbrial protein to saliva-coated oral surfaces. To assess whether biologically active fimbrial antigen can be synthesized in edible plants, a cDNA fragment encoding the C-terminal binding portion of P. gingivalis fimbrial protein, fimA (amino acids 266-337), was cloned behind the mannopine synthase promoter in plant expression vector pPCV701. The plasmid was transferred into potato (Solanum tuberosum) leaf cells by Agrobacterium tumefaciens in vivo transformation methods. The fimA cDNA fragment was detected in transformed potato leaf genomic DNA by PCR amplification methods. Further, a novel immunoreactive protein band of ~6.5 kDa was detected in boiled transformed potato tuber extracts by acrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis methods using primary antibodies to fimbrillin, a monomeric P. gingivalis fimbrial subunit. Antibodies generated against native P. gingivalis fimbriae detected a dimeric form of bacterial-synthesized recombinant FimA(266-337) protein. Further, a protein band of ~160 kDa was recognized by anti-FimA antibodies in undenatured transformed tuber extracts, suggesting that oligomeric assembly of plant-synthesized FimA may occur in transformed plant cells. Based on immunoblot analysis, the maximum amount of FimA protein synthesized in transformed potato tuber tissues was approximately 0.03% of total soluble tuber protein. Biosynthesis of immunologically detectable FimA protein and assembly of fimbrial antigen subunits into oligomers in transformed potato tuber tissues demonstrate the feasibility of producing native FimA protein in edible plant cells for construction of plant-based oral subunit vaccines against periodontal disease caused by P. gingivalis. PMID:19507071

  17. The Lpp lipoprotein suppresses motility in a biofilm-forming strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain ATCC 43895, a guanine to thymine transversion in a gene involved in fimbrial (curlifiber) synthesis created strain 43895OR. Strain 43895OR produces an abundant extracellular matrix rich in curli fibers and generates dense biofilms on solid surfaces. We investigated...

  18. Antibodies and the Aberdeen typhoid outbreak of 1964. II. Coombs', complement fixation and fimbrial agglutination tests.

    PubMed

    Brodie, J

    1977-10-01

    In a previous paper (Brodie, 1977) the value of the Widal test in the diagnosis of typhoid fever was shown to be limited. Evaluation of possible alternative tests showed that: (1) the sensitivity of the anti-human globulin (Coombs') test appeared greater than that of the agglutination test but the length of time (48 h) before results were available rendered it of little value in rapid diagnosis: (2) the complement fixation test offered no particular help towards diagnosis; (3) immunized and non-immunized typhoid fever patients developed fimbrial antibodies, as also did immunized healthy individuals. In this latter group, however, those immunized with alcoholized TAB vaccine had higher antibody titres to fimbrial antigen than those immunized with heat-killed phenolized vaccine. PMID:269194

  19. Evolution of the Chaperone/Usher Assembly Pathway: Fimbrial Classification Goes Greek†

    PubMed Central

    Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Many Proteobacteria use the chaperone/usher pathway to assemble proteinaceous filaments on the bacterial surface. These filaments can curl into fimbrial or nonfimbrial surface structures (e.g., a capsule or spore coat). This article reviews the phylogeny of operons belonging to the chaperone/usher assembly class to explore the utility of establishing a scheme for subdividing them into clades of phylogenetically related gene clusters. Based on usher amino acid sequence comparisons, our analysis shows that the chaperone/usher assembly class is subdivided into six major phylogenetic clades, which we have termed α-, β-, γ-, κ-, π-, and σ-fimbriae. Members of each clade share related operon structures and encode fimbrial subunits with similar protein domains. The proposed classification system offers a simple and convenient method for assigning newly discovered chaperone/usher systems to one of the six major phylogenetic groups. PMID:18063717

  20. A conserved fold for fimbrial components revealed by the crystal structure of a putative fimbrial assembly protein (BT1062) from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron at 2.2 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Cai, Xiaohui; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Yeh, Andrew; Zhou, Jiadong; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    BT1062 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is a homolog of Mfa2 (PGN0288 or PG0179), which is a component of the minor fimbriae in Porphyromonas gingivalis. The crystal structure of BT1062 revealed a conserved fold that is widely adopted by fimbrial components. PMID:20944223

  1. Proteus mirabilis MR/P fimbrial operon: genetic organization, nucleotide sequence, and conditions for expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bahrani, F K; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, an agent of urinary tract infection, expresses at least four fimbrial types. Among these are the MR/P (mannose-resistant/Proteus-like) fimbriae. MrpA, the structural subunit, is optimally expressed at 37 degrees C in Luria broth cultured statically for 48 h by each of seven strains examined. Genes encoding this fimbria were isolated, and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined. The mrp gene cluster encoded by 7,293 bp predicts eight polypeptides: MrpI (22,133 Da), MrpA (17,909 Da), MrpB (19,632 Da), MrpC (96,823 Da), MrpD (27,886 Da), MrpE (19,470 Da), MrpF (17,363 Da), and MrpG (13,169 Da). mrpI is upstream of the gene encoding the major structural subunit gene mrpA and is transcribed in the direction opposite to that of the rest of the operon. All predicted polypeptides share > or = 25% amino acid identity with at least one other enteric fimbrial gene product encoded by the pap, fim, smf, fan, or mrk gene clusters. Images PMID:7910820

  2. Schistosoma-associated Salmonella resist antibiotics via specific fimbrial attachments to the flatworm

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Schistosomes are parasitic helminths that infect humans through dermo-invasion while in contaminated water. Salmonella are also a common water-borne human pathogen that infects the gastrointestinal tract via the oral route. Both pathogens eventually enter the systemic circulation as part of their respective disease processes. Concurrent Schistosoma-Salmonella infections are common and are complicated by the bacteria adhering to adult schistosomes present in the mesenteric vasculature. This interaction provides a refuge in which the bacterium can putatively evade antibiotic therapy and anthelmintic monotherapy can lead to a massive release of occult Salmonella. Results Using a novel antibiotic protection assay, our results reveal that Schistosoma-associated Salmonella are refractory to eight different antibiotics commonly used to treat salmonellosis. The efficacy of these antibiotics was decreased by a factor of 4 to 16 due to this association. Salmonella binding to schistosomes occurs via a specific fimbrial protein (FimH) present on the surface on the bacterium. This same fimbrial protein confers the ability of Salmonella to bind to mammalian cells. Conclusions Salmonella can evade certain antibiotics by binding to Schistosoma. As a result, effective bactericidal concentrations of antibiotics are unfortunately above the achievable therapeutic levels of the drugs in co-infected individuals. Salmonella-Schistosoma binding is analogous to the adherence of Salmonella to cells lining the mammalian intestine. Perturbing this binding is the key to eliminating Salmonella that complicate schistosomiasis. PMID:21711539

  3. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: Orchestrated host engagement.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, James M; Munson, George M; Rasko, David A

    2013-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are a pervasive cause of serious diarrheal illness in developing countries. Presently, there is no vaccine to prevent these infections, and many features of the basic pathogenesis of these organisms remain poorly understood. Until very recently most pathogenesis studies had focused almost exclusively on a small subset of known "classical" virulence genes, namely fimbrial colonization factors and the heat-labile (LT) and heat stable (ST) enterotoxins. However, recent investigations of pathogen-host interactions reveal a surprisingly complex and intricately orchestrated engagement involving the interplay of classical and "novel" virulence genes, as well as participation of genes highly conserved in the E. coli species. These studies may inform further rational approaches to vaccine development for these important pathogens. PMID:23892244

  4. Capsular Polysaccharide-Fimbrial Protein Conjugate Vaccine Protects against Porphyromonas gingivalis Infection in SCID Mice Reconstituted with Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jeom-Il; Schifferle, Robert E.; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Kim, Byung-Woo

    1998-01-01

    The effect of immunization with either a Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbrial protein, a capsular polysaccharide, or a capsular polysaccharide-fimbrial protein conjugate vaccine were compared in hu-PBL-SCID mice. A significantly higher human immunoglobulin G antibody response and the highest degree of in vivo protection against bacterial challenge was observed in the group immunized with the conjugate vaccine. It was concluded that capsular polysaccharide-fimbrial protein conjugate from P. gingivalis could potentially be developed as a vaccine against periodontal infection by P. gingivalis. PMID:9423888

  5. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Adhesins.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Brian D; Torres, Alfredo G

    2014-06-01

    Adhesins are a group of proteins in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) that are involved in the attachment or colonization of this pathogen to abiotic (plastic or steel) and biological surfaces, such as those found in bovine and human intestines. This review provides the most up-to-date information on these essential adhesion factors, summarizing important historical discoveries and analyzing the current and future state of this research. In doing so, the proteins intimin and Tir are discussed in depth, especially regarding their role in the development of attaching and effacing lesions and in EHEC virulence. Further, a series of fimbrial proteins (Lpf1, Lpf2, curli, ECP, F9, ELF, Sfp, HCP, and type 1 fimbria) are also described, emphasizing their various contributions to adherence and colonization of different surfaces and their potential use as genetic markers in detection and classification of different EHEC serotypes. This review also discusses the role of several autotransporter proteins (EhaA-D, EspP, Saa and Sab, and Cah), as well as other proteins associated with adherence, such as flagella, EibG, Iha, and OmpA. While these proteins have all been studied to varying degrees, all of the adhesins summarized in this article have been linked to different stages of the EHEC life cycle, making them good targets for the development of more effective diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:26103974

  6. Adhesion properties of a putative polymorphic fimbrial subunit protein from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenta; Nishiyama, Keita; Miyajima, Hiroki; Osawa, Ro; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we found that the open reading frame bl0675 in the genome of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum isolated from human feces encoded a novel putative fimbrial protein, was highly polymorphic, and had five variants (A, B, C, D, and E types). The aim of this study was to evaluate the affinity of these variants to porcine colonic mucins (PCMs). Protein-binding properties were examined using the recombinant BL0675 protein containing a C-terminal 6 × His tag (His-BL0675). Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that the His-BL0675 A type had strong affinity to PCMs (KD = 9.82 × 10(-8) M), whereas the B, C, D, and E types exhibited little or no binding. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, His-BL0675 A type binding was reduced by addition of mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting that the binding occurs via carbohydrate chains of PCMs. The localization of BL0675 to the B. longum subsp. longum cell surface was confirmed by western blot analysis using A type polyclonal antibodies. Bacterial adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum to PCMs was also blocked by A type-specific antibodies; however, its adhesion properties were strain specific. Our results suggest that the BL0675 variants significantly contribute to the adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum strains. The expression and the adhesive properties of this protein are affected by genetic polymorphisms and are specific for B. longum subsp. longum strains. However, further studies are required on the properties of binding of these putative fimbrial proteins to the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26858927

  7. The major fimbrial subunit of Bordetella pertussis binds to sulfated sugars.

    PubMed Central

    Geuijen, C A; Willems, R J; Mooi, F R

    1996-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis fimbriae are composed of major and minor subunits, and recently it was shown that the minor fimbrial subunit binds to Vla-5, a receptor located on monocytes (W. Hazenbos, C. Geuijen, B. van den Berg, F. Mooi, and R. van Furth, J. Infect. Dis. 171:924-929, 1995). Here we present evidence that the major subunits bind to sulfated sugars, which are ubiquitous in the respiratory tract. Binding was observed to chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate, and dextran sulfate but not to dextran. Removal of the minor subunit from fimbriae did not significantly affect binding to sulfated sugars, indicating that the major subunit alone is sufficient for this binding. Fimbriae were also able to bind HEp-2 cells, which are known to display glycoconjugates on their surface. This binding was not dependent on the presence of the minor subunit. However, binding was dependent on the sulfation state of the glycoconjugates, since inhibition of the sulfation resulted in a significant reduction of fimbria binding. The specificity of fimbria binding was further characterized by using heparan sulfate-derived disaccharides in inhibition assays. Two disaccharides were highly effective inhibitors, and it was observed that both the degree of sulfation and the arrangement of the sulfate groups on the disaccharides were important for binding to fimbriae. B. pertussis bacteria also bound to sulfated sugars and HEp-2 cells, and analysis of B. pertussis mutants indicated that both filamentous hemagglutinin and fimbriae were required for this binding. A host protein present in the extracellular matrix, fibronectin, has binding activities similar to those of B. pertussis fimbriae, binding to both Vla-5 and sulfated sugars. Two regions in the major fimbrial subunit were identified which showed similarity with fibronectin peptides which bind to sulfated sugars. Thus, B. pertussis fimbriae exemplify molecular mimicry and may co-opt host processes by mimicking natural ligand

  8. Adhesion properties of a putative polymorphic fimbrial subunit protein from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Kenta; NISHIYAMA, Keita; MIYAJIMA, Hiroki; OSAWA, Ro; YAMAMOTO, Yuji; MUKAI, Takao

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we found that the open reading frame bl0675 in the genome of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum isolated from human feces encoded a novel putative fimbrial protein, was highly polymorphic, and had five variants (A, B, C, D, and E types). The aim of this study was to evaluate the affinity of these variants to porcine colonic mucins (PCMs). Protein-binding properties were examined using the recombinant BL0675 protein containing a C-terminal 6 × His tag (His-BL0675). Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that the His-BL0675 A type had strong affinity to PCMs (KD = 9.82 × 10−8 M), whereas the B, C, D, and E types exhibited little or no binding. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, His-BL0675 A type binding was reduced by addition of mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting that the binding occurs via carbohydrate chains of PCMs. The localization of BL0675 to the B. longum subsp. longum cell surface was confirmed by western blot analysis using A type polyclonal antibodies. Bacterial adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum to PCMs was also blocked by A type-specific antibodies; however, its adhesion properties were strain specific. Our results suggest that the BL0675 variants significantly contribute to the adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum strains. The expression and the adhesive properties of this protein are affected by genetic polymorphisms and are specific for B. longum subsp. longum strains. However, further studies are required on the properties of binding of these putative fimbrial proteins to the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26858927

  9. Purification and characterisation of a fimbrial haemagglutinin from Bordetella pertussis for use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Askelöf, P; Granström, M; Gillenius, P; Lindberg, A A

    1982-02-01

    The fimbrial haemagglutinin (F-HA) of Bordetella pertussis grown on solid medium was extracted with 1M sodium acetate for 72 h at 20 degree C, and partially purified by Sephacryl S-300 gel chromatography. A pooled fraction with fimbrial haemmagglutinating activity was shown to contain fimbriae haemagglutinating activity was shown to contain fimbriae of the expected morphology by electron microscopy. Chemical and biological assays showed that the F-HA fraction contained some heat-labile agglutinogen and lipopolysaccharide but no measureable lymphocytosis-promoting factor or heat-labile toxin. The F-HA fraction used as antigen in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) permitted the detection of antibodies in convalescent serum from a patient with whooping cough. The impurities, heat-labile agglutinogens and lipopolysaccharide, did not contribute to the ELISA activity. The method for preparation of the F-HA antigen is simple, reproducible and gives a high yield. PMID:6292428

  10. Role of the Bordetella pertussis minor fimbrial subunit, FimD, in colonization of the mouse respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Geuijen, C A; Willems, R J; Bongaerts, M; Top, J; Gielen, H; Mooi, F R

    1997-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis fimbriae are composed of a major subunit, Fim2 or Fim3, and the minor subunit FimD. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we provide evidence that FimD is located at the fimbrial tip. The role of FimD in colonization of the mouse respiratory tract was studied by using two fimbrial mutants: a mutant completely devoid of fimbriae (designated FimD-) and a mutant devoid of the major fimbrial subunits but still producing the minor subunit (designated FimD+). The ability of the two fimbrial mutants to colonize the nasopharynx, trachea, and lungs was compared with those of the wild type parental strain and a filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) mutant. Of the three mutants studied, the FimD- mutant showed the greatest defect, colonizing less well in the nasopharynx, trachea, and lungs. The most pronounced defect in colonizing ability of the three mutants was observed in the trachea. However, the colonizing defect of the FHA and FimD+ mutants in the trachea was observed only during the first 3 days of infection. After 10 days, the colonization level was nearly restored to wild-type levels. The FHA and FimD+ mutants showed a slight colonization defect in the nasopharynx but no defect in the lungs. A maltose binding protein-FimD fusion protein and a peptide derived from FimD were able to bind to heparin, a member of a class of sulfated sugars which are ubiquitous in the respiratory tract. Recently it was shown (W. L. W. Hazenbos, C. A. W. Geuijen, B. M. van den Berg, F. R. Mooi, and R. van Furth, J. Infect. Dis. 171:924-929, 1995) that FimD also binds to the integrin VLA-5, and our results suggest that the binding of B. pertussis to these two molecules plays an important role in colonization of the respiratory tract of the mouse. PMID:9317030

  11. Escherichia coli (E. coli)

    MedlinePlus

    ... so you might hear about E. coli being found in drinking water, which are not themselves harmful, but indicate the ... at CDC Foodborne disease Travelers' Health: Safe Food & Water Healthy Swimming E. coli Infection & Farm ... Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple ...

  12. Novel antigens for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, James; Sheikh, Alaullah; Qadri, Firdausi

    2014-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common bacterial pathogens causing diarrhea in developing countries where they lead to hundreds of thousands of deaths, mostly in children. These organisms are a leading cause of diarrheal illness in travelers to endemic countries. ETEC pathogenesis, and consequently vaccine approaches, have largely focused on plasmid-encoded enterotoxins or fimbrial colonization factors. To date these approaches have not yielded a broadly protective vaccine. However, recent studies suggest that ETEC pathogenesis is more complex than previously appreciated and involves additional plasmid and chromosomally encoded virulence molecules that can be targeted in vaccines. Here, we review recent novel antigen discovery efforts, potential contribution of these proteins to the molecular pathogenesis of ETEC and protective immunity, and the potential implications for development of next generation vaccines for important pathogens. These proteins may help to improve the effectiveness of future vaccines by making them simpler and possibly broadly protective because of their conserved nature. PMID:24702311

  13. E. Coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... E. coli is short for the medical term Escherichia coli . The strange thing about these bacteria — and lots ... cause a very serious infection. Someone who has E. coli infection may have these symptoms: bad stomach cramps and ...

  14. Mouse-protecting and histamine-sensitizing activities of pertussigen and fimbrial hemagglutinin from Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, J J; Arai, H; Cole, R L

    1981-01-01

    We compared the protective activities of fimbrial hemagglutinin (FHA) and pertussigen and their respective antibodies in mice infected intracerebrally with Bordetella pertussis. We found that mice were protected by a 1.7-microgram/mouse dose of pertussigen which was free of detectable FHA and was detoxified by treatment with glutaraldehyde. A pertussigen preparation made from cells grown in shake cultures that did not contain demonstrable FHA protected mice at a dose of 1.4 microgram/mouse. FHA at a dose of 10 microgram/mouse protected mice from intracerebral infection, but it also sensitized mice to histamine at a dose of 2 micrograms/mouse, which indicated that it was contaminated with pertussigen. When FHA was obtained free of demonstrable pertussigen, it failed to sensitize mice to histamine at a dose of 30 micrograms/mouse and to protect mice from infection at a dose of 12 micrograms/mouse (largest doses tested). Passive protection tests with antisera known to contain antibodies to pertussigen protected mice from intracerebral infection, whereas sera lacking anti-pertussigen antibodies but containing high concentrations of anti-FHA antibodies did not protect mice. The most important antigen for the immunization of mice against intracerebral infection with B. pertussis appears to be pertussigen. Images PMID:6260681

  15. Receptor for the F4 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC).

    PubMed

    Xia, Pengpeng; Zou, Yajie; Wang, Yiting; Song, Yujie; Liu, Wei; Francis, David H; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2015-06-01

    Infection with F4(+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) responsible for diarrhea in neonatal and post-weaned piglets leads to great economic losses in the swine industry. These pathogenic bacteria express either of three fimbrial variants F4ab, F4ac, and F4ad, which have long been known for their importance in host infection and initiating protective immune responses. The initial step in infection for the bacterium is to adhere to host enterocytes through fimbriae-mediated recognition of receptors on the host cell surface. A number of receptors for ETEC F4 have now been described and characterized, but their functions are still poorly understood. The current review summarizes the latest research addressing the characteristics of F4 fimbriae receptors and the interactions of F4 fimbriae and their receptors on host cells. These include observations that as follows: (1) FaeG mediates the binding activities of F4 and is an essential component of the F4 fimbriae, (2) the F4 fimbrial receptor gene is located in a region of chromosome 13, (3) the biochemical properties of F4 fimbrial receptors that form the binding site of the bacterium are now recognized, and (4) specific receptors confer susceptibility/resistance to ETEC F4 infection in pigs. Characterizing the host-pathogen interaction will be crucial to understand the pathogenicity of the bacteria, provide insights into receptor activation of the innate immune system, and develop therapeutic strategies to prevent this illness. PMID:25967654

  16. Evolution of Salmonella enterica Virulence via Point Mutations in the Fimbrial Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Kisiela, Dagmara I.; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Libby, Stephen J.; Karlinsey, Joyce E.; Fang, Ferric C.; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Kramer, Jeremy J.; Beskhlebnaya, Viktoriya; Samadpour, Mansour; Grzymajlo, Krzysztof; Ugorski, Maciej; Lankau, Emily W.; Mackie, Roderick I.; Clegg, Steven; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2012-01-01

    Whereas the majority of pathogenic Salmonella serovars are capable of infecting many different animal species, typically producing a self-limited gastroenteritis, serovars with narrow host-specificity exhibit increased virulence and their infections frequently result in fatal systemic diseases. In our study, a genetic and functional analysis of the mannose-specific type 1 fimbrial adhesin FimH from a variety of serovars of Salmonella enterica revealed that specific mutant variants of FimH are common in host-adapted (systemically invasive) serovars. We have found that while the low-binding shear-dependent phenotype of the adhesin is preserved in broad host-range (usually systemically non-invasive) Salmonella, the majority of host-adapted serovars express FimH variants with one of two alternative phenotypes: a significantly increased binding to mannose (as in S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi C, S. Dublin and some isolates of S. Choleraesuis), or complete loss of the mannose-binding activity (as in S. Paratyphi B, S. Choleraesuis and S. Gallinarum). The functional diversification of FimH in host-adapted Salmonella results from recently acquired structural mutations. Many of the mutations are of a convergent nature indicative of strong positive selection. The high-binding phenotype of FimH that leads to increased bacterial adhesiveness to and invasiveness of epithelial cells and macrophages usually precedes acquisition of the non-binding phenotype. Collectively these observations suggest that activation or inactivation of mannose-specific adhesive properties in different systemically invasive serovars of Salmonella reflects their dynamic trajectories of adaptation to a life style in specific hosts. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that point mutations are the target of positive selection and, in addition to horizontal gene transfer and genome degradation events, can contribute to the differential pathoadaptive evolution of Salmonella. PMID:22685400

  17. Design and Evaluation of a Multiplex PCR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Genes for Nine Different Virulence Factors Associated with Escherichia coli that Cause Diarrhea and Edema Disease in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multiplex PCR assay was developed for detection and characterization of pathogenic E. coli that cause diarrhea and Edema Disease in swine. This PCR assay was designed as a single reaction for detecting five different adhesins (K88, K99, 987P, F41 and F18), three enterotoxins (LT, STaP, STb), and ...

  18. Phylogenetic group-associated differences in regulation of the common colonization factor Mat fimbria in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lehti, Timo A; Bauchart, Philippe; Kukkonen, Maini; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Korhonen, Timo K; Westerlund-Wikström, Benita

    2013-03-01

    Heterogeneity of cell population is a key component behind the evolutionary success of Escherichia coli. The heterogeneity supports species adaptation and mainly results from lateral gene transfer. Adaptation may also involve genomic alterations that affect regulation of conserved genes. Here we analysed regulation of the mat (or ecp) genes that encode a conserved fimbrial adhesin of E. coli. We found that the differential and temperature-sensitive expression control of the mat operon is dependent on mat promoter polymorphism and closely linked to phylogenetic grouping of E. coli. In the mat promoter lineage favouring fimbriae expression, the mat operon-encoded regulator MatA forms a positive feedback loop that overcomes the repression by H-NS and stabilizes the fimbrillin mRNA under low growth temperature, acidic pH or elevated levels of acetate. The study exemplifies phylogenetic group-associated expression of a highly common surface organelle in E. coli. PMID:23347101

  19. K88 Fimbrial Adhesin Targeting of Microspheres Containing Gentamicin Made with Albumin Glycated with Lactose.

    PubMed

    Sarabia-Sainz, Andre-I; Sarabia-Sainz, Hector Manuel; Montfort, Gabriela Ramos-Clamont; Mata-Haro, Veronica; Guzman-Partida, Ana María; Guzman, Roberto; Garcia-Soto, Mariano; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz

    2015-01-01

    The formulation and characterization of gentamicin-loaded microspheres as a delivery system targeting enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 (E. coli K88) was investigated. Glycated albumin with lactose (BSA-glucose-β (4-1) galactose) was used as the microsphere matrix (MS-Lac) and gentamicin included as the transported antibiotic. The proposed target strategy was that exposed galactoses of MS-Lac could be specifically recognized by E. coli K88 adhesins, and the delivery of gentamicin would inhibit bacterial growth. Lactosylated microspheres (MS-Lac1, MS-Lac2 and MS-Lac3) were obtained using a water-in-oil emulsion, containing gentamicin, followed by crosslinking with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde. Electron microscopy displayed spherical particles with a mean size of 10-17 µm. In vitro release of gentamicin from MS-Lac was best fitted to a first order model, and the antibacterial activity of encapsulated and free gentamicin was comparable. MS-Lac treatments were recognized by plant galactose-specific lectins from Ricinus communis and Sophora japonica and by E. coli K88 adhesins. Results indicate MS-Lac1, produced with 4.2 mg/mL of crosslinker, as the best treatment and that lactosylated microsphere are promising platforms to obtain an active, targeted system against E. coli K88 infections. PMID:26389896

  20. K88 Fimbrial Adhesin Targeting of Microspheres Containing Gentamicin Made with Albumin Glycated with Lactose

    PubMed Central

    Sarabia-Sainz, Andre-i; Sarabia-Sainz, Hector Manuel; Ramos-Clamont Montfort, Gabriela; Mata-Haro, Veronica; Guzman-Partida, Ana María; Guzman, Roberto; Garcia-Soto, Mariano; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz

    2015-01-01

    The formulation and characterization of gentamicin-loaded microspheres as a delivery system targeting enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 (E. coli K88) was investigated. Glycated albumin with lactose (BSA-glucose-β (4-1) galactose) was used as the microsphere matrix (MS-Lac) and gentamicin included as the transported antibiotic. The proposed target strategy was that exposed galactoses of MS-Lac could be specifically recognized by E. coli K88 adhesins, and the delivery of gentamicin would inhibit bacterial growth. Lactosylated microspheres (MS-Lac1, MS-Lac2 and MS-Lac3) were obtained using a water-in-oil emulsion, containing gentamicin, followed by crosslinking with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde. Electron microscopy displayed spherical particles with a mean size of 10–17 µm. In vitro release of gentamicin from MS-Lac was best fitted to a first order model, and the antibacterial activity of encapsulated and free gentamicin was comparable. MS-Lac treatments were recognized by plant galactose-specific lectins from Ricinus communis and Sophora japonica and by E. coli K88 adhesins. Results indicate MS-Lac1, produced with 4.2 mg/mL of crosslinker, as the best treatment and that lactosylated microsphere are promising platforms to obtain an active, targeted system against E. coli K88 infections. PMID:26389896

  1. Shear-enhanced binding of intestinal colonization factor antigen I of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tchesnokova, Veronika; McVeigh, Annette L.; Kidd, Brian; Yakovenko, Olga; Thomas, Wendy E.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Savarino, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In the intestine, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli works against peristaltic forces, adhering to the epithelium via the CFA/I fimbrial adhesin CfaE. The CfaE adhesin is similar in localization and tertiary (but not primary) structure to FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which shows shear-dependent binding to epithelial receptors by an allosteric catch-bond mechanism. Thus, we speculated that CfaE is also capable of shear-enhanced binding. Indeed, bovine erythrocytes coursing over immobilized CFA/I fimbriae in flow-chambers exhibited low accumulation levels and fast rolling at low shear, but an 80-fold increase in accumulation and 3-fold decrease in rolling velocity at elevated shear. This effect was reversible and abolished by pre-incubation of fimbriae with anti-CfaE antibody. Erythrocytes bound to whole CfaE in the same shear-enhanced manner, but to CfaE adhesin domain in a shear-inhibitable fashion. Residue replacements designed to disrupt CfaE interdomain interaction decreased the shear-dependency of adhesion and increased binding under static conditions to human intestinal epithelial cells. These findings indicate that close interaction between adhesive and anchoring pilin domains of CfaE keeps the former in a low-affinity state that toggles into a high-affinity state upon separation of two domains, all consistent with an allosteric catch-bond mechanism of CfaE binding. PMID:20345656

  2. Identification of Type 3 Fimbriae in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Reveals a Role in Biofilm Formation▿

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y.; Ulett, Glen C.; Mabbett, Amanda N.; Beatson, Scott A.; Webb, Richard I.; Monaghan, Wayne; Nimmo, Graeme R.; Looke, David F.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Schembri, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is the most common nosocomial infection in the United States. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the most common cause of CAUTI, can form biofilms on indwelling catheters. Here, we identify and characterize novel factors that affect biofilm formation by UPEC strains that cause CAUTI. Sixty-five CAUTI UPEC isolates were characterized for phenotypic markers of urovirulence, including agglutination and biofilm formation. One isolate, E. coli MS2027, was uniquely proficient at biofilm growth despite the absence of adhesins known to promote this phenotype. Mini-Tn5 mutagenesis of E. coli MS2027 identified several mutants with altered biofilm growth. Mutants containing insertions in genes involved in O antigen synthesis (rmlC and manB) and capsule synthesis (kpsM) possessed enhanced biofilm phenotypes. Three independent mutants deficient in biofilm growth contained an insertion in a gene locus homologous to the type 3 chaperone-usher class fimbrial genes of Klebsiella pneumoniae. These type 3 fimbrial genes (mrkABCDF), which were located on a conjugative plasmid, were cloned from E. coli MS2027 and could complement the biofilm-deficient transconjugants when reintroduced on a plasmid. Primers targeting the mrkB chaperone-encoding gene revealed its presence in CAUTI strains of Citrobacter koseri, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Klebsiella oxytoca. All of these mrkB-positive strains caused type 3 fimbria-specific agglutination of tannic acid-treated red blood cells. This is the first description of type 3 fimbriae in E. coli, C. koseri, and C. freundii. Our data suggest that type 3 fimbriae may contribute to biofilm formation by different gram-negative nosocomial pathogens. PMID:18055599

  3. Chloroplasts assemble the major subunit FaeG of Escherichia coli F4 (K88) fimbriae to strand-swapped dimers.

    PubMed

    Van Molle, Inge; Joensuu, Jussi J; Buts, Lieven; Panjikar, Santosh; Kotiaho, Mirkka; Bouckaert, Julie; Wyns, Lode; Niklander-Teeri, Viola; De Greve, Henri

    2007-05-01

    F4 fimbriae encoded by the fae operon are the major colonization factors associated with porcine neonatal and postweaning diarrhoea caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). Via the chaperone/usher pathway, the F4 fimbriae are assembled as long polymers of the major subunit FaeG, which also possesses the adhesive properties of the fimbriae. Intrinsically, the incomplete fold of fimbrial subunits renders them unstable and susceptible to aggregation and/or proteolytic degradation in the absence of a specific periplasmic chaperone. In order to test the possibility of producing FaeG in plants, FaeG expression was studied in transgenic tobacco plants. FaeG was directed to different subcellular compartments by specific targeting signals. Targeting of FaeG to the chloroplast results in much higher yields than FaeG targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum or the apoplast. Two chloroplast-targeted FaeG variants were purified from tobacco plants and crystallized. The crystal structures show that chloroplasts circumvent the absence of the fimbrial assembly machinery by assembling FaeG into strand-swapped dimers. Furthermore, the structures reveal how FaeG combines the structural requirements of a major fimbrial subunit with its adhesive role by grafting an additional domain on its Ig-like core. PMID:17368480

  4. A Multiepitope Fusion Antigen Elicits Neutralizing Antibodies against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Homologous Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hashish, Emad A.; Zhang, Chengxian; Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E.; Chase, Christopher C.; Isaacson, Richard E.; Zhou, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most important bovine diseases. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are the major causes of diarrhea in calves and cattle. ETEC expressing K99 (F5) fimbriae and heat-stable type Ia (STa) toxin are the leading bacteria causing calf diarrhea, and BVDV causes diarrhea and other clinical illnesses in cattle of all ages. It is reported that maternal immunization with K99 fimbrial antigens provides passive protection to calves against K99 fimbrial ETEC and that BVDV major structural protein E2 elicits antibodies neutralizing against BVDV viral infection. Vaccines inducing anti-K99 and anti-STa immunity would protect calves more effectively against ETEC diarrhea, and those also inducing anti-E2 neutralizing antibodies would protect calves and cattle against diarrhea caused by both ETEC and BVDV. In this study, we used the ETEC K99 major subunit FanC as a backbone, genetically embedded the STa toxoid STaP12F and the most-antigenic B-cell epitope and T-cell epitope predicted from the BVDV E2 glycoprotein into FanC for the multivalent antigen FanC-STa-E2, and examined immunogenicity of this multivalent antigen to assess vaccine potential against bovine diarrhea. Mice intraperitoneally (i.p.) immunized with this multivalent antigen developed anti-K99, anti-STa, and anti-BVDV antibodies. Moreover, elicited antibodies showed neutralization activities, as they inhibited adherence of K99 fimbrial E. coli, neutralized STa toxin, and prevented homologous BVDV viral infection in vitro. Results from this study suggest that this multiepitope fusion antigen can potentially be developed as a vaccine for broad protection against bovine diarrhea and that the multiepitope fusion strategy may be generally applied for multivalent vaccine development against heterogeneous pathogens. PMID:23697572

  5. A multiepitope fusion antigen elicits neutralizing antibodies against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and homologous bovine viral diarrhea virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hashish, Emad A; Zhang, Chengxian; Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E; Chase, Christopher C; Isaacson, Richard E; Zhou, Guoqiang; Zhang, Weiping

    2013-07-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most important bovine diseases. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are the major causes of diarrhea in calves and cattle. ETEC expressing K99 (F5) fimbriae and heat-stable type Ia (STa) toxin are the leading bacteria causing calf diarrhea, and BVDV causes diarrhea and other clinical illnesses in cattle of all ages. It is reported that maternal immunization with K99 fimbrial antigens provides passive protection to calves against K99 fimbrial ETEC and that BVDV major structural protein E2 elicits antibodies neutralizing against BVDV viral infection. Vaccines inducing anti-K99 and anti-STa immunity would protect calves more effectively against ETEC diarrhea, and those also inducing anti-E2 neutralizing antibodies would protect calves and cattle against diarrhea caused by both ETEC and BVDV. In this study, we used the ETEC K99 major subunit FanC as a backbone, genetically embedded the STa toxoid STaP12F and the most-antigenic B-cell epitope and T-cell epitope predicted from the BVDV E2 glycoprotein into FanC for the multivalent antigen FanC-STa-E2, and examined immunogenicity of this multivalent antigen to assess vaccine potential against bovine diarrhea. Mice intraperitoneally (i.p.) immunized with this multivalent antigen developed anti-K99, anti-STa, and anti-BVDV antibodies. Moreover, elicited antibodies showed neutralization activities, as they inhibited adherence of K99 fimbrial E. coli, neutralized STa toxin, and prevented homologous BVDV viral infection in vitro. Results from this study suggest that this multiepitope fusion antigen can potentially be developed as a vaccine for broad protection against bovine diarrhea and that the multiepitope fusion strategy may be generally applied for multivalent vaccine development against heterogeneous pathogens. PMID:23697572

  6. Abrupt Emergence of a Single Dominant Multidrug-Resistant Strain of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James R.; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Johnston, Brian; Clabots, Connie; Roberts, Pacita L.; Billig, Mariya; Riddell, Kim; Rogers, Peggy; Qin, Xuan; Butler-Wu, Susan; Price, Lance B.; Aziz, Maliha; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène; DebRoy, Chitrita; Robicsek, Ari; Hansen, Glen; Urban, Carl; Platell, Joanne; Trott, Darren J.; Zhanel, George; Weissman, Scott J.; Cookson, Brad T.; Fang, Ferric C.; Limaye, Ajit P.; Scholes, Delia; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Hooper, David C.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli are increasingly prevalent. Their clonal origins—potentially critical for control efforts—remain undefined. Methods. Antimicrobial resistance profiles and fine clonal structure were determined for 236 diverse-source historical (1967–2009) E. coli isolates representing sequence type ST131 and 853 recent (2010–2011) consecutive E. coli isolates from 5 clinical laboratories in Seattle, Washington, and Minneapolis, Minnesota. Clonal structure was resolved based on fimH sequence (fimbrial adhesin gene: H subclone assignments), multilocus sequence typing, gyrA and parC sequence (fluoroquinolone resistance-determining loci), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Results. Of the recent fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates, 52% represented a single ST131 subclonal lineage, H30, which expanded abruptly after 2000. This subclone had a unique and conserved gyrA/parC allele combination, supporting its tight clonality. Unlike other ST131 subclones, H30 was significantly associated with fluoroquinolone resistance and was the most prevalent subclone among current E. coli clinical isolates, overall (10.4%) and within every resistance category (11%–52%). Conclusions. Most current fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli clinical isolates, and the largest share of multidrug-resistant isolates, represent a highly clonal subgroup that likely originated from a single rapidly expanded and disseminated ST131 strain. Focused attention to this strain will be required to control the fluoroquinolone and multidrug-resistant E. coli epidemic. PMID:23288927

  7. Epithelial cell invasion by bovine septicemic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Korth, M J; Lara, J C; Moseley, S L

    1994-01-01

    Little is known regarding the pathogenesis of Escherichia coli-induced septicemic colibacillosis of calves. To understand the mechanism by which these strains penetrate the intestinal epithelium and gain access to the bloodstream, we examined the potential of bovine septicemic E. coli to invade cultured epithelial cells. By using a gentamicin survival assay, we demonstrated bacterial invasion of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Transcytosis of polarized MDCK cell monolayers was also observed, but only when bacteria were added to the basolateral surface. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of intracellular organisms which appeared to be within membrane-bound vacuoles. The bovine septicemic isolate used in this study expressed the fimbrial adhesion CS31A. To examine the role of CS31A-mediated adherence in invasion and transcytosis of MDCK cell monolayers, a CS31A-deficient mutant was constructed by suicide vector-mediated insertional mutagenesis. Although nonadherent, the mutant showed a level of invasion similar to that of the wild-type parent. E. coli DH5 alpha carrying the cloned CS31A determinant was noninvasive. These findings suggest that expression of CS31A is neither required nor sufficient to mediate invasion. Images PMID:7903284

  8. Putative glycoprotein and glycolipid polymorphonuclear leukocyte receptors for the Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 fimbrial lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, A L; Ruhl, S; Joralmon, R A; Brennan, M J; Sutphin, M J; Cisar, J O

    1995-01-01

    Recognition of receptors on sialidase-treated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) by the Gal/GalNAc lectin associated with the type 2 fimbriae of certain strains of actinomyces results in activation of the PMNs, phagocytosis, and destruction of the bacteria. In the present study, plant lectins were utilized as probes to identify putative PMN receptors for the actinomyces lectin. The Gal-reactive lectin from Ricinus communis (RCAI), the Gal/GalNAc-reactive lectins from R. communis (RCAII) and Bauhinia purpurea (BPA), as well as the Gal beta 1-3GalNAc-specific lectins from Arachis hypogaea (PNA) and Agaricus bisporus (ABA) inhibited killing of Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 by sialidase-treated PMNs. These five lectins detected a 130-kDa surface-labeled glycoprotein on nitrocellulose transfers of PMN extracts separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This glycoprotein was revealed only after treatment of the transfers with sialidase, a condition analogous to the sialidase dependence of the lectin-mediated biological responses of the PMNs to the actinomyces. The mannose-reactive lectin concanavalin A did not inhibit killing of the actinomyces and failed to detect the 130-kDa glycoprotein but did block PMN-dependent killing of Escherichia coli B, a bacterium that possesses mannose-sensitive fimbriae. Therefore, the PMN glycoprotein receptor for A. naeslundii is clearly distinct from those recognized by E. coli. Two major putative glycolipid receptors were also identified by actinomyces and RCAI overlays on sialidase-treated thin-layer chromatograms of PMN gangliosides. Thus, both a 130-kDa glycoprotein and certain gangliosides are implicated in the attachment of the actinomyces to PMNs. PMID:7790078

  9. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in the spleens of hens by bacterins that vary in fimbrial protein SefD.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ingunza, Roxana; Guard, Jean; Morales, Cesar A; Icard, Alan H

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this research was to determine whether variation in the presence of fimbrial protein SefD would impact efficacy of bacterins as measured by recovery of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) from the spleens of hens. Two bacterins were prepared that varied in SefD content. Also, two adjuvants were tested, namely, water-in-oil and aluminum hydroxide gel (alum). Control groups for both adjuvant preparations included infected nonvaccinated hens and uninfected nonvaccinated hens. At 21 days postinfection, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 69.7%, 53.1%, and 86.0% from the spleens of all hens vaccinated with bacterins lacking SefD, bacterins that included SefD, and infected nonvaccinated control hens, respectively. No Salmonella was recovered from uninfected nonvaccinates. Results from individual trials showed that both bacterins reduced positive spleens, but that the one with SefD was more efficacious. Alum adjuvant had fewer side effects on hens and egg production as compared to water-in-oil. However, adjuvant did not change the relative recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis from spleens. These results suggest that SefD is a promising target antigen for improving the efficacy of immunotherapy in hens, and is intended to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis in the food supply. PMID:26218804

  10. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in the Spleens of Hens by Bacterins That Vary in Fimbrial Protein SefD

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Ingunza, Roxana; Morales, Cesar A.; Icard, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this research was to determine whether variation in the presence of fimbrial protein SefD would impact efficacy of bacterins as measured by recovery of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) from the spleens of hens. Two bacterins were prepared that varied in SefD content. Also, two adjuvants were tested, namely, water-in-oil and aluminum hydroxide gel (alum). Control groups for both adjuvant preparations included infected nonvaccinated hens and uninfected nonvaccinated hens. At 21 days postinfection, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 69.7%, 53.1%, and 86.0% from the spleens of all hens vaccinated with bacterins lacking SefD, bacterins that included SefD, and infected nonvaccinated control hens, respectively. No Salmonella was recovered from uninfected nonvaccinates. Results from individual trials showed that both bacterins reduced positive spleens, but that the one with SefD was more efficacious. Alum adjuvant had fewer side effects on hens and egg production as compared to water-in-oil. However, adjuvant did not change the relative recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis from spleens. These results suggest that SefD is a promising target antigen for improving the efficacy of immunotherapy in hens, and is intended to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis in the food supply. PMID:26218804

  11. [Genotypic characterization of toxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from pigs with postweaning diarrhea (PWD) and edema disease (ED)].

    PubMed

    Moredo, Fabiana A; Cappuccio, Javier A; Insarralde, Lucas; Perfumo, Carlos J; Quiroga, María A; Leotta, Gerardo A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize 47 Escherichia coli strains isolated from 32 pigs diagnosed with postweaning diarrhea and three pigs with edema disease by PCR. Forty two (95.5 %) of the strains isolated from diarrheic pigs were characterized as enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and 2 (4.5 %) as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Fourteen (33.3 %) ETEC strains were positive for est/estII/fedA genes. The most complex genotype was eltA/estI/faeG/aidA. Strains isolated from pigs with ED were classified as porcine STEC and were stx2e/aidA carriers. Eleven (25 %) strains carried the gene encoding adhesin protein AIDA-I. However, genes coding for F5, F6, F41, intimin and Paa were not detected. The development of vaccines generating antibodies against prevalent E. coli adhesins in Argentina could be useful for the prevention of PWD and ED. PMID:22997765

  12. Permissive linker insertion sites in the outer membrane protein of 987P fimbriae of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Schifferli, D M; Alrutz, M A

    1994-01-01

    The FasD protein is essential for the biogenesis of 987P fimbriae of Escherichia coli. In this study, subcellular fractionation was used to demonstrate that FasD is an outer membrane protein. In addition, the accessibility of FasD to proteases established the presence of surface-exposed FasD domains on both sides of the outer membrane. The fasD gene was sequenced, and the deduced amino acid sequence was shown to share homologous domains with a family of outer membrane proteins from various fimbrial systems. Similar to porins, fimbrial outer membrane proteins are relatively polar, lack typical hydrophobic membrane-spanning domains, and posses secondary structures predicted to be rich in turns and amphipathic beta-sheets. On the basis of the experimental data and structural predictions, FasD is postulated to consist essentially of surface-exposed turns and loops and membrane-spanning interacting amphipathic beta-strands. In an attempt to test this prediction, the fasD gene was submitted to random in-frame linker insertion mutagenesis. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that it was possible to produce fasD mutants, whose products remain functional for fimbrial export and assembly. Subsequently, 11 fasD alleles, containing linker inserts encoding beta-turn-inducing residues, were shown to express functional proteins. The insertion sites were designated permissive sites. The inserts used are expected to be least detrimental to the function of FasD when they are inserted into surface-exposed domains not directly involved in fimbrial export. In contrast, FasD is not expected to accommodate such residues in its amphipathic beta-strands without being destabilized in the membrane and losing function. All permissive sites were sequenced and shown to be located in or one residue away from predicted turns. In contrast, 5 of 10 sequenced nonpermissive sites were mapped to predicted amphipathic beta-strands. These results are consistent with the structural predictions for Fas

  13. Inversion-independent phase variation of type 1 fimbriae in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    McClain, M S; Blomfield, I C; Eberhardt, K J; Eisenstein, B I

    1993-01-01

    The roles of fimB and fimE in the phase-variable expression of type 1 fimbriae in Escherichia coli were examined. A method was developed to study the effects of fimB and fimE on both recombination of the fim invertible element and fimbrial expression. The method used an allelic exchange procedure consisting of two steps. The first step, construction of intermediate strains, deleted fimB and fimE. This step locked the invertible element in either the on or the off orientation. The second step of the exchange procedure introduced either wild-type or mutant alleles of fimB and/or fimE into the chromosome of the intermediate strains. Analysis of the resulting strains supported the current, plasmid-based model of recombination. Unexpectedly, strains in which the invertible element was locked in the on orientation (either by mutation of both fimB and fimE or, in a control strain, by mutation of the left inverted repeat sequence of the invertible element) continued to exhibit phase-variable expression of type 1 fimbriae. A strain in which fimA was transcribed from the tac promoter continued to exhibit phase-variable fimbrial expression, suggesting that inversion-independent phase variation cannot be explained by variable transcription initiation of fimA. Images PMID:8101185

  14. E. Coli and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... care provider. What is E. coli? E. coli (Escherichia coli) is a bacterium that lives in your colon ( ... 10):1411-1413. Jones B, et al. 2004. Escherichia coli: a growing problem in early onset neonatal sepsis. ...

  15. E. Coli Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is E. coli? E. coli is short for Escherichia coli -- bacteria (germs) that cause severe cramps and diarrhea. E. ... and especially in people who have another illness. E. coli infection is more common during the summer months and ...

  16. Effect of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid herbicide Escherichia coli growth, chemical, composition, and cellular envelope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Hooten, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is a herbicide widely used in the world and mainly excreted by the renal route in exposed humans and animals. Herbicides can affect other nontarget organisms, such as Escherichia coli. We observed that a single exposure to 1 mM 2,4-D diminished growth and total protein content in all E. coli strains tested in vitro. In addition, successive exposures to 0.01 mM 2,4-D had a toxic effect decreasing growth up to early stationary phase. Uropathogenic E. coli adhere to epithelial cells mediated by fimbriae, adhesins, and hydrophobic properties. 2,4-D exposure of uropathogenic E. coli demonstrated altered hydrophobicity and fimbriation. Hydrophobicity index values obtained by partition in p-xylene/water were 300-420% higher in exposed cells than in control ones. Furthermore, values of hemagglutination titer, protein contents in fimbrial crude extract, and electron microscopy demonstrated a significant diminution of fimbriation in treated cells. Other envelope alterations could be detected, such as lipoperoxidation, evidenced by decreased polyunsaturated fatty acids and increased lipid degradation products (malonaldehyde), and motility diminution. These alterations decreased cell adherence to erythrocytes, indicating a diminished pathogenic capacity of the 2,4-D-exposed E. coli. ?? 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Analysis of the Type IV Fimbrial-Subunit Gene fimA of Xanthomonas hyacinthi: Application in PCR-Mediated Detection of Yellow Disease in Hyacinths

    PubMed Central

    van Doorn, J.; Hollinger, T. C.; Oudega, B.

    2001-01-01

    A sensitive and specific detection method was developed for Xanthomonas hyacinthi; this method was based on amplification of a subsequence of the type IV fimbrial-subunit gene fimA from strain S148. The fimA gene was amplified by PCR with degenerate DNA primers designed by using the N-terminal and C-terminal amino acid sequences of trypsin fragments of FimA. The nucleotide sequence of fimA was determined and compared with the nucleotide sequences coding for the fimbrial subunits in other type IV fimbria-producing bacteria, such as Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Moraxella bovis. In a PCR internal primers JAAN and JARA, designed by using the nucleotide sequences of the variable central and C-terminal region of fimA, amplified a 226-bp DNA fragment in all X. hyacinthi isolates. This PCR was shown to be pathovar specific, as assessed by testing 71 Xanthomonas pathovars and bacterial isolates belonging to other genera, such as Erwinia and Pseudomonas. Southern hybridization experiments performed with the labelled 226-bp DNA amplicon as a probe suggested that there is only one structural type IV fimbrial-gene cluster in X. hyacinthi. Only two Xanthomonas translucens pathovars cross-reacted weakly in PCR. Primers amplifying a subsequence of the fimA gene of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria (T. Ojanen-Reuhs, N. Kalkkinen, B. Westerlund-Wikström, J. van Doorn, K. Haahtela, E.-L. Nurmiaho-Lassila, K. Wengelink, U. Bonas, and T. K. Korhonen, J. Bacteriol. 179: 1280–1290, 1997) were shown to be pathovar specific, indicating that the fimbrial-subunit sequences are more generally applicable in xanthomonads for detection purposes. Under laboratory conditions, approximately 1,000 CFU of X. hyacinthi per ml could be detected. In inoculated leaves of hyacinths the threshold was 5,000 CFU/ml. The results indicated that infected hyacinths with early symptoms could be successfully screened for X. hyacinthi with PCR. PMID:11157222

  18. The pvc operon regulates the expression of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup) genes.

    PubMed

    Qaisar, Uzma; Luo, Liming; Haley, Cecily L; Brady, Sean F; Carty, Nancy L; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial structures encoded by the cup gene clusters (cupB and cupC) contribute to its attachment to abiotic surfaces and biofilm formation. The P. aeruginosa pvcABCD gene cluster encodes enzymes that synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin, paerucumarin. Paerucumarin has already been characterized chemically, but this is the first report elucidating its role in bacterial biology. We examined the relationship between the pvc operon and the cup gene clusters in the P. aeruginosa strain MPAO1. Mutations within the pvc genes compromised biofilm development and significantly reduced the expression of cupB1-6 and cupC1-3, as well as different genes of the cupB/cupC two-component regulatory systems, roc1/roc2. Adjacent to pvc is the transcriptional regulator ptxR. A ptxR mutation in MPAO1 significantly reduced the expression of the pvc genes, the cupB/cupC genes, and the roc1/roc2 genes. Overexpression of the intact chromosomally-encoded pvc operon by a ptxR plasmid significantly enhanced cupB2, cupC2, rocS1, and rocS2 expression and biofilm development. Exogenously added paerucumarin significantly increased the expression of cupB2, cupC2, rocS1 and rocS2 in the pvcA mutant. Our results suggest that pvc influences P. aeruginosa biofilm development through the cup gene clusters in a pathway that involves paerucumarin, PtxR, and different cup regulators. PMID:23646138

  19. The pvc Operon Regulates the Expression of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fimbrial Chaperone/Usher Pathway (Cup) Genes

    PubMed Central

    Qaisar, Uzma; Luo, Liming; Haley, Cecily L.; Brady, Sean F.; Carty, Nancy L.; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A.; Hamood, Abdul N.

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa fimbrial structures encoded by the cup gene clusters (cupB and cupC) contribute to its attachment to abiotic surfaces and biofilm formation. The P. aeruginosa pvcABCD gene cluster encodes enzymes that synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin, paerucumarin. Paerucumarin has already been characterized chemically, but this is the first report elucidating its role in bacterial biology. We examined the relationship between the pvc operon and the cup gene clusters in the P. aeruginosa strain MPAO1. Mutations within the pvc genes compromised biofilm development and significantly reduced the expression of cupB1-6 and cupC1-3, as well as different genes of the cupB/cupC two-component regulatory systems, roc1/roc2. Adjacent to pvc is the transcriptional regulator ptxR. A ptxR mutation in MPAO1 significantly reduced the expression of the pvc genes, the cupB/cupC genes, and the roc1/roc2 genes. Overexpression of the intact chromosomally-encoded pvc operon by a ptxR plasmid significantly enhanced cupB2, cupC2, rocS1, and rocS2 expression and biofilm development. Exogenously added paerucumarin significantly increased the expression of cupB2, cupC2, rocS1 and rocS2 in the pvcA mutant. Our results suggest that pvc influences P. aeruginosa biofilm development through the cup gene clusters in a pathway that involves paerucumarin, PtxR, and different cup regulators. PMID:23646138

  20. E. coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure that ground beef has reached a safe internal temperature of 160° F. Wash hands before preparing food, after diapering infants, and after contact with cows, sheep, or goats, their food or treats, or their living environment . General Information E. coli Infections (NIH MedlinePlus) Trusted ...

  1. Escherichia Coli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  2. Avirulent K88 (F4)+ Escherichia coli strains constructed to express modified enterotoxins protect young piglets from challenge with a virulent enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain that expresses the same adhesion and enterotoxins.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Mateo, Kristina; Zhao, Mojun; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Weiping; Francis, David H

    2012-10-12

    Virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is associated with fimbrial adhesins and enterotoxins such as heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. Previous studies using a cell culture model suggest that exclusion of ETEC from attachment to epithelial cells requires expression of both an adhesin such as K88 (F4) fimbriae, and LT. To test the ability of non-pathogenic E. coli constructs to exclude virulent ETEC sufficiently to prevent clinical disease, we utilized a piglet ETEC challenge model. Thirty-nine 5-day-old piglets were inoculated with a placebo (control), or with either of the three K88(+)E. coli strains isogenic with regard to modified LT expression: 8017 (pBR322 plasmid vector control), non-toxigenic mutant 8221 (LT(R192G)) in pBR322, or 8488, with the LT gene fused to the STb gene in pBR322 (LT(R192G)-STb). Piglets were challenged with virulent ETEC Strain 3030-2 (K88(+)/LT/STb) 24h post-inoculation. K88ac receptor-positive piglets in the control group developed diarrhea and became dehydrated 12-24h post-challenge. Piglets inoculated with 8221 or 8488 did not exhibit clinical signs of ETEC disease; most piglets inoculated with 8017 showed diarrhea. Control pigs exhibited significant weight loss, increased blood total protein, and higher numbers of colony-forming units of 3030-2 E. coli in washed ileum and jejunum than treated pigs. This study shows for the first time that pre-inoculation with an avirulent strain expressing adhesive fimbriae and a non-toxic form of LT provides significant short term protection from challenge with a virulent ETEC strain that expresses the same fimbrial adhesion and enterotoxin. PMID:22541162

  3. Molecular response of Escherichia coli adhering onto nanoscale topography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion onto abiotic surfaces is an important issue in biology and medicine since understanding the bases of such interaction represents a crucial aspect in the design of safe implant devices with intrinsic antibacterial characteristics. In this framework, we investigated the effects of nanostructured metal substrates on Escherichia coli adhesion and adaptation in order to understand the bio-molecular dynamics ruling the interactions at the interface. In particular, we show how highly controlled nanostructured gold substrates impact the bacterial behavior in terms of morphological changes and lead to modifications in the expression profile of several genes, which are crucially involved in the stress response and fimbrial synthesis. These results mainly demonstrate that E. coli cells are able to sense even slight changes in surface nanotopography and to actively respond by activating stress-related pathways. At the same time, our findings highlight the possibility of designing nanoengineered substrates able to trigger specific bio-molecular effects, thus opening the perspective of smartly tuning bacterial behavior by biomaterial design. PMID:23078758

  4. Structure of CFA/I fimbriae from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Fu; Poole, Steven; Nishio, Kazuya; Jang, Ken; Rasulova, Fatima; McVeigh, Annette; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di; Bullitt, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Adhesion pili (fimbriae) play a critical role in initiating the events that lead to intestinal colonization and diarrheal disease by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), an E. coli pathotype that inflicts an enormous global disease burden. We elucidate atomic structures of an ETEC major pilin subunit, CfaB, from colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae. These data are used to construct models for 2 morphological forms of CFA/I fimbriae that are both observed in vivo: the helical filament into which it is typically assembled, and an extended, unwound conformation. Modeling and corroborative mutational data indicate that proline isomerization is involved in the conversion between these helical and extended forms. Our findings affirm the strong structural similarities seen between class 5 fimbriae (from bacteria primarily causing gastrointestinal disease) and class 1 pili (from bacteria that cause urinary, respiratory, and other infections) in the absence of significant primary sequence similarity. They also suggest that morphological and biochemical differences between fimbrial types, regardless of class, provide structural specialization that facilitates survival of each bacterial pathotype in its preferred host microenvironment. Last, we present structural evidence for bacterial use of antigenic variation to evade host immune responses, in that residues occupying the predicted surface-exposed face of CfaB and related class 5 pilins show much higher genetic sequence variability than the remainder of the pilin protein. PMID:19515814

  5. Structure of CFA/I fimbriae from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong-Fu; Poole, Steven; Nishio, Kazuya; Jang, Ken; Rasulova, Fatima; McVeigh, Annette; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di; Bullitt, Esther

    2009-10-21

    Adhesion pili (fimbriae) play a critical role in initiating the events that lead to intestinal colonization and diarrheal disease by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), an E. coli pathotype that inflicts an enormous global disease burden. We elucidate atomic structures of an ETEC major pilin subunit, CfaB, from colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae. These data are used to construct models for 2 morphological forms of CFA/I fimbriae that are both observed in vivo: the helical filament into which it is typically assembled, and an extended, unwound conformation. Modeling and corroborative mutational data indicate that proline isomerization is involved in the conversion between these helical and extended forms. Our findings affirm the strong structural similarities seen between class 5 fimbriae (from bacteria primarily causing gastrointestinal disease) and class 1 pili (from bacteria that cause urinary, respiratory, and other infections) in the absence of significant primary sequence similarity. They also suggest that morphological and biochemical differences between fimbrial types, regardless of class, provide structural specialization that facilitates survival of each bacterial pathotype in its preferred host microenvironment. Last, we present structural evidence for bacterial use of antigenic variation to evade host immune responses, in that residues occupying the predicted surface-exposed face of CfaB and related class 5 pilins show much higher genetic sequence variability than the remainder of the pilin protein.

  6. Regulation of type 1 fimbriae synthesis and biofilm formation by the transcriptional regulator LrhA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blumer, Caroline; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Lehnen, Daniela; Heintz, Margit; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Nagy, Gábor; Michaelis, Kai; Emödy, Levente; Polen, Tino; Rachel, Reinhard; Wendisch, Volker F; Unden, Gottfried

    2005-10-01

    Type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli facilitate attachment to the host mucosa and promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The transcriptional regulator LrhA, which is known as a repressor of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes, regulates biofilm formation and expression of type 1 fimbriae. Whole-genome expression profiling revealed that inactivation of lrhA results in an increased expression of structural components of type 1 fimbriae. In vitro, LrhA bound to the promoter regions of the two fim recombinases (FimB and FimE) that catalyse the inversion of the fimA promoter, and to the invertible element itself. Translational lacZ fusions with these genes and quantification of fimE transcript levels by real-time PCR showed that LrhA influences type 1 fimbrial phase variation, primarily via activation of FimE, which is required for the ON-to-OFF transition of the fim switch. Enhanced type 1 fimbrial expression as a result of lrhA disruption was confirmed by mannose-sensitive agglutination of yeast cells. Biofilm formation was stimulated by lrhA inactivation and completely suppressed upon LrhA overproduction. The effects of LrhA on biofilm formation were exerted via the changed levels of surface molecules, most probably both flagella and type 1 fimbriae. Together, the data show a role for LrhA as a repressor of type 1 fimbrial expression, and thus as a regulator of the initial stages of biofilm development and, presumably, bacterial adherence to epithelial host cells also. PMID:16207912

  7. Contribution of the highly conserved EaeH surface protein to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Alaullah; Luo, Qingwei; Roy, Koushik; Shabaan, Salwa; Kumar, Pardeep; Qadri, Firdausi; Fleckenstein, James M

    2014-09-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are among the most common causes of diarrheal illness worldwide. These pathogens disproportionately afflict children in developing countries, where they cause substantial morbidity and are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths each year. Although these organisms are important targets for enteric vaccines, most development efforts to date have centered on a subset of plasmid-encoded fimbrial adhesins known as colonization factors and heat-labile toxin (LT). Emerging data suggest that ETEC undergoes considerable changes in its surface architecture, sequentially deploying a number of putative adhesins during its interactions with the host. We demonstrate here that one putative highly conserved, chromosomally encoded adhesin, EaeH, engages the surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells and contributes to bacterial adhesion, LT delivery, and colonization of the small intestine. PMID:24935979

  8. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the epidemiology of pathogenic Escherichia coli of calves and the role of calves as reservoirs for human pathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kolenda, Rafał; Burdukiewicz, Michał; Schierack, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli bacteria are the most common causes of diarrhea and septicemia in calves. Moreover, calves form a major reservoir for transmission of pathogenic E. coli to humans. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of publications on E. coli as calf pathogens and the role of calves as reservoir have not been done so far. We reviewed studies between 1951 and 2013 reporting the presence of virulence associated factors (VAFs) in calf E. coli and extracted the following information: year(s) and country of sampling, animal number, health status, isolate number, VAF prevalence, serotypes, diagnostic methods, and biological assays. The prevalence of VAFs or E. coli pathotypes was compared between healthy and diarrheic animals and was analyzed for time courses. Together, 106 papers with 25,982 E. coli isolates from 27 countries tested for VAFs were included. F5, F17, and F41 fimbriae and heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) - VAFs of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) were significantly associated with calf diarrhea. On the contrary, ETEC VAF F4 fimbriae and heat-labile enterotoxin as well as enteropathogenic (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing (STEC), and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) were not associated with diarrhea. The prevalence increased overtime for ST-positive isolates, but decreased for F5- and STEC-positive isolates. Our study provides useful information about the history of scientific investigations performed in this domain so far, and helps to define etiological agents of calf disease, and to evaluate calves as reservoir hosts for human pathogenic E. coli. PMID:25815276

  9. Development and Efficacy Assessment of an Enteric Coated Porous Tablet Loaded With F4 Fimbriae for Oral Vaccination of Piglets against F4+ Escherichia coli Infections.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Atul; Gowda, D V; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V; Siddaramaiah

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is one of the major causes contributing to the development of diarrhoea and mortality in new born, suckling and newly weaned piglets. To date, no preventive/treatment strategy showed promising results, which could be due to the lack of potent vaccines, and/or due to the development of resistance of ETEC to antibiotics. Therefore, in the present investigation, a novel porous sodium alginate (SA) tablet formulation loaded with F4 fimbriae antigen was developed and tested for efficacy against ETEC infections in piglet models. Precompression parameters of the powder mixes and post compression parameters of tablets have been evaluated and results were found to be satisfactory. Loading of F4 fimbrial antigens into the tablets was achieved by inducing pores in the tablets via the sublimation of camphor followed by incubation with purified F4 fimbriae. The loaded tablets have been coated with Eudragit L100 to protect the F4 fimbriae from (a) highly acidic gastric environment; (b) proteolytic cleavage by pepsin; and (c) to promote subsequent release in the intestine. Evaluation of developed F4 fimbrial tablets in a Pig model demonstrated induction of mucosal immunity, and a significant reduction of F4+ E. coli in faeces. Therefore, F4 fimbriae loaded porous tablets could be a novel oral vaccination candidate to induce mucosal and systemic immunity against ETEC infections. PMID:26212139

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaE, the adhesive subunit of the CFA/I fimbriae from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong-Fu; Poole, Steven; Rasulova, Fatima; Esser, Lothar; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di

    2006-02-01

    The adhesin CfaE of the CFA/I fimbriae from human enterotoxigenic E. coli has been crystallized. CfaE crystals diffracted X-rays to better than 2.4 Å and phasing was solved by the SIRAS method. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) represents a formidable food and waterborne diarrheal disease threat of global importance. The first step in ETEC pathogenesis is bacterial attachment to small-intestine epithelial cells via adhesive fimbriae, many of which are genetically related to the prototype colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I). The minor fimbrial subunit CfaE is required for initiation of CFA/I fimbrial assembly and mediates bacterial attachment to host cell-surface receptors. A donor-strand complemented variant of CfaE (dscCfaE) was expressed with a hexahistidine tag, purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected to 2.4 Å resolution for both native and derivatized crystals and showed the symmetry of space group P6{sub 2}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 142.9, c = 231.9 Å. Initial phases were derived from the SIRAS approach and electron density showed two molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Sequence assignments were aided by anomalous signals from the selenium of an SeMet-derivatized crystal and from S atoms of a native crystal.

  11. Genome sequences and phylogenetic analysis of K88- and F18-positive porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Sara M; Danzeisen, Jessica L; Isaacson, Richard E; Seemann, Torsten; Achtman, Mark; Johnson, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    Porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) continues to result in major morbidity and mortality in the swine industry via postweaning diarrhea. The key virulence factors of ETEC strains, their serotypes, and their fimbrial components have been well studied. However, most studies to date have focused on plasmid-encoded traits related to colonization and toxin production, and the chromosomal backgrounds of these strains have been largely understudied. Here, we generated the genomic sequences of K88-positive and F18-positive porcine ETEC strains and examined the phylogenetic distribution of clinical porcine ETEC strains and their plasmid-associated genetic content. The genomes of porcine ETEC strains UMNK88 and UMNF18 were both found to contain remarkable plasmid complements containing known virulence factors, potential novel virulence factors, and antimicrobial resistance-associated elements. The chromosomes of these strains also possessed several unique genomic islands containing hypothetical genes with similarity to classical virulence factors, although phage-associated genomic islands dominated the accessory genomes of these strains. Phylogenetic analysis of 78 clinical isolates associated with neonatal and porcine diarrhea revealed that a limited subset of porcine ETEC lineages exist that generally contain common toxin and fimbrial profiles, with many of the isolates belonging to the ST10, ST23, and ST169 multilocus sequencing types. These lineages were generally distinct from existing human ETEC database isolates. Overall, most porcine ETEC strains appear to have emerged from a limited subset of E. coli lineages that either have an increased propensity to carry plasmid-encoded virulence factors or have the appropriate ETEC core genome required for virulence. PMID:22081385

  12. E. coli enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Traveler's diarrhea - E. coli ; Food poisoning - E. coli ; E. coli diarrhea; Hamburger disease ... infected. The most common symptom is sudden, severe diarrhea that is often bloody. Other symptoms may include: ...

  13. Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System 2 ATPase EivC Is Involved in the Motility and Virulence of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xuan; Yang, Denghui; Wang, Dong; Han, Xiangan; Shi, Yonghong; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are crucial for bacterial infections because they deliver effector proteins into host cells. The Escherichia coli type III secretion system 2 (ETT2) is present in the majority of E. coli strains, and although it is degenerate, ETT2 regulates bacterial virulence. An ATPase is essential for T3SS secretion, but the function of the ETT2 ATPase has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that EivC is homologous to the β subunit of F0F1 ATPases and it possesses ATPase activity. To investigate the effects of ETT2 ATPase EivC on the phenotype and virulence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), eivC mutant and complemented strains were constructed and characterized. Inactivation of eivC led to impaired flagella production and augmented fimbriae on the bacterial surface, and, consequently, reduced bacterial motility. In addition, the eivC mutant strain exhibited attenuated virulence in ducks, diminished serum resistance, reduced survival in macrophage cells and in ducks, upregulated fimbrial gene expression, and downregulated flagellar and virulence gene expression. The expression of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 were increased in HD-11 macrophages infected with the eivC mutant strain, compared with the wild-type strain. These virulence-related phenotypes were restored by genetic complementation. These findings demonstrate that ETT2 ATPase EivC is involved in the motility and pathogenicity of APEC.

  14. Detection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I in stool specimens by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D G; Evans, D J; Clegg, S

    1980-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to detect and quantitate the fimbrial colonization factor antigen (CFA/I) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in stool specimens obtained from adult cases of diarrhea in which CFA/I-positive E. coli was the known causative agent. The inhibition method, or blocking technique, was used. In this method, a standardized dilution of human anti-CFA/I serum was preincubated with dilutions of stool extract before transfer to CFA/I-coated microtiter plate wells, and then ELISA was performed with alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human immunoglobulin. CFA/I purified from E. coli strain H-10407 (O78:H11) was used. Acute-phase diarrheal stool specimens were found to contain approximately 3.0 mg of antigen (mean value) per g stool, whereas control (CFA/I-negative) specimens contained insignificant amounts (less than 0.03 mg/g) of antigen. Also, CFA/I was detected in culture fluids of CFA/I positive enterotoxigenic E. coli belonging to a variety of serotypes and was undetectable in similar preparations from P-strains (spontaneous CFA/I-negative derivatives) of the same test cultures. Equivalent results were obtained in ELISA tests by using bacterial cells taken from isolated colonies grown on CFA agar. These results indicate that the ELISA technique will be useful for the diagnosis of diarrhea caused by CFA/I-positive enterotoxigenic E. coli. PMID:7031075

  15. The role of Type 1, P and S fimbriae in binding of Escherichia coli to the canine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Krekeler, N; Marenda, M S; Browning, G F; Holden, K M; Charles, J A; Wright, P J

    2013-06-28

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most commonly isolated infectious agent causing pyometra in bitches. Many E. coli strains isolated from the uteri of infected dogs carry several adhesin genes (fimH, papGIII and sfa). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of each adhesin gene product, acting alone or expressed in combination, in the bacterial binding to canine endometrium. E. coli strain P3, which was isolated from a uterus of a bitch naturally affected with pyometra, was shown by PCR to carry all three known fimbrial adhesin genes fimH, papGIII and sfa. Knockout (KO) mutants of this wildtype (P3-wt) strain were generated using insertional inactivation. Adhesion assays on anoestrous uteri of three post-pubertal bitches were undertaken. Overall, the number of bacteria adhering to canine endometrial biopsies was comparable between strains and no significant difference in the number of bound bacteria was found between the P3-wt strain and the single or double KO-strains. However, the triple knockout strain displayed less binding to the canine endometrium compared with the P3-wt strain. This study shows that a pathogenic E. coli strain (P3) isolated from the uterus of a bitch with pyometra was able to fully compensate for the loss of two of its three known adhesin genes. It was necessary to inactivate all three known adhesin genes in order to see a significant decrease in binding to canine endometrium. PMID:23523172

  16. Identification of Two Laminin-Binding Fimbriae, the Type 1 Fimbria of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and the G Fimbria of Escherichia coli, as Plasminogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kukkonen, Maini; Saarela, Sirkku; Lähteenmäki, Kaarina; Hynönen, Ulla; Westerlund-Wikström, Benita; Rhen, Mikael; Korhonen, Timo K.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains carrying recombinant plasmids encoding either the type 1 fimbria of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium or the G fimbria of E. coli exhibited binding of human 125I-Glu-plasminogen and enhanced the tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. Purified type 1 or G fimbriae similarly bound plasminogen and enhanced its activation. The binding of plasminogen did not involve the characteristic carbohydrate-binding property of the fimbriae but was inhibited at low concentrations by the lysine analog ɛ-aminocaproic acid. Because these fimbrial types bind to laminin of basement membranes (M. Kukkonen et al., Mol. Microbiol. 7:229–237, 1993; S. Saarela et al., Infect. Immun. 64:2857–2860, 1996), the results demonstrate a structural unity in the creation and targeting of bacterium-bound proteolytic plasmin activity to basement membranes. PMID:9746604

  17. Up-regulation of serotonergic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H) WB4101 following fimbrial transection and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine-induced lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, A.L.; Norman, A.B.; Battaglia, G.; Loy, R.; Creese, I.

    1985-11-18

    Lesions of the serotonergic afferents to the hippocampus, by fimbrial transection or by 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine treatment, produce an increase in the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 to its nanomolar affinity binding site, with no effect on its picomolar affinity binding site or on (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding. The nanomolar site is serotonergic as the serotonergic agonists, serotonin and 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetraline (8-OH-DPAT) have nanomolar affinity for (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding when studied in the presence of a prazosin mask (30nM) of the alpha-1 component of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding. The serotonin receptor antagonists metergoline, lysergic acid diethylamide and lisuride also have high nanomolar affinities while ketanserin, yohimbine, prazosin and noradrenergic agonists have affinities in the micromolar range. Fimbrial transection or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine injections produced 32% and 44% increases in the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding in the presence of a prazosin mask. Serotonin competition for (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding was identical in control and experimental tissues from each lesion experiment. Although specific binding of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 was increased, there was no change in the affinities or the percentages of the two binding components for serotonin competition with (/sup 3/H)WB4101. These data suggest that removal of the serotonergic input to the hippocampus produces an increase in the Bmax of serotonin receptor binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)WB4101. 33 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Genomic Subtractive Hybridization and Selective Capture of Transcribed Sequences Identify a Novel Salmonella typhimurium Fimbrial Operon and Putative Transcriptional Regulator That Are Absent from the Salmonella typhi Genome

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Brian J.; Graham, James E.; Curtiss, Roy

    1999-01-01

    Salmonella typhi, the etiologic agent of typhoid fever, is adapted to the human host and unable to infect nonprimate species. The genetic basis for host specificity in S. typhi is unknown. The avirulence of S. typhi in animal hosts may result from a lack of genes present in the broad-host-range pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Genomic subtractive hybridization was successfully employed to isolate S. typhimurium genomic sequences which are absent from the S. typhi genome. These genomic subtracted sequences mapped to 17 regions distributed throughout the S. typhimurium chromosome. A positive cDNA selection method was then used to identify subtracted sequences which were transcribed by S. typhimurium following macrophage phagocytosis. A novel putative transcriptional regulator of the LysR family was identified as transcribed by intramacrophage S. typhimurium. This putative transcriptional regulator was absent from the genomes of the human-adapted serovars S. typhi and Salmonella paratyphi A. Mutations within this gene did not alter the level of S. typhimurium survival within macrophages or virulence within mice. A subtracted genomic fragment derived from the ferrichrome operon also hybridized to the intramacrophage cDNA. Nucleotide sequence analysis of S. typhimurium and S. typhi chromosomal sequences flanking the ferrichrome operon identified a novel S. typhimurium fimbrial operon with a high level of similarity to sequences encoding Proteus mirabilis mannose-resistant fimbriae. The novel fimbrial operon was absent from the S. typhi genome. The absence of specific genes may have allowed S. typhi to evolve as a highly invasive, systemic human pathogen. PMID:10496884

  19. Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in wild European starlings at a Kansas cattle feedlot.

    PubMed

    Gaukler, Shannon M; Linz, George M; Sherwood, Julie S; Dyer, Neil W; Bleier, William J; Wannemuehler, Yvonne M; Nolan, Lisa K; Logue, Catherine M

    2009-12-01

    The prevalence of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolated from the feces of wild European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) humanely trapped at a feedlot in central Kansas was assessed. All E. coli and Salmonella isolates recovered were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility using National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System panels and the E. coli isolates were classified as to their content of genes associated with pathogenic E. coli of birds and cattle, including cvaC, iroN2, ompTp, hlyF2, eitC, iss, iutA, ireA, papC, stxI, stxII, sta, K99, F41, and eae. Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis were not detected and Salmonella was isolated from only three samples, two of which displayed antimicrobial resistance. Approximately half of the E. coli isolates were resistant to antimicrobial agents with 96% showing resistance to tetracycline. Only one isolate was positive for a single gene associated with bovine pathogenic E. coli. An interesting finding of this study was that 5% of the E. coli isolates tested met the criteria established for identification as avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC). Thus these findings suggest that starlings are not a significant source of Salmonella spp., Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, E. coli O157, or other shiga toxin-producing E. coli in this feedlot. However, they may have the potential to spread APEC, an important pathogen of poultry and a potential pathogen to human beings. PMID:20095155

  20. Porcine intestinal glycosphingolipids recognized by F6-fimbriated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Madar Johansson, Miralda; Coddens, Annelies; Benktander, John; Cox, Eric; Teneberg, Susann

    2014-11-01

    One important virulence factor of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is their ability to adhere via fimbrial adhesins to specific receptors located on the intestinal mucosa. Here, the potential glycosphingolipid receptors of enterotoxigenic F6-fimbriated E. coli were examined by binding of purified F6 fimbriae, and F6-expressing bacteria, to glycosphingolipids on thin-layer chromatograms. When intestinal mucosal non-acid glycosphingolipids from single pigs were assayed for F6 binding capacity, a selective interaction with two glycosphingolipids was observed. The binding-active glycosphingolipids were isolated and characterized as lactotriaosylceramide (GlcNAcβ3Galβ4Glcβ1Cer) and lactotetraosylceramide (Galβ3GlcNAcβ3Galβ4Glcβ1Cer). Further binding assays using a panel of reference glycosphingolipids showed a specific interaction between the F6 fimbriae and a number of neolacto core chain (Galβ4GlcNAc) glycosphingolipids. In addition, an occasional binding of the F6 fimbriae to sulfatide, galactosylceramide, lactosylceramide with phytosphingosine and/or hydroxy fatty acids, isoglobotriaosylceramide, gangliotriaosylceramide, and gangliotetraosylceramide was obtained. From the results we conclude that lactotriaosylceramide and lactotetraosylceramide are major porcine intestinal receptors for F6-fimbriated E. coli. PMID:25241919

  1. RegR virulence regulon of rabbit-specific enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strain E22.

    PubMed

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Hocking, Dianna M; Praszkier, Judyta; Wakefield, Matthew J; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Yang, Ji; Tauschek, Marija

    2013-04-01

    AraC-like regulators play a key role in the expression of virulence factors in enteric pathogens, such as enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteroaggregative E. coli, and Citrobacter rodentium. Bioinformatic analysis of the genome of rabbit-specific EPEC (REPEC) strain E22 (O103:H2) revealed the presence of a gene encoding an AraC-like regulatory protein, RegR, which shares 71% identity to the global virulence regulator, RegA, of C. rodentium. Microarray analysis demonstrated that RegR exerts 25- to 400-fold activation on transcription of several genes encoding putative virulence-associated factors, including a fimbrial operon (SEF14), a serine protease, and an autotransporter adhesin. These observations were confirmed by proteomic analysis of secreted and heat-extracted surface-associated proteins. The mechanism of RegR-mediated activation was investigated by using its most highly upregulated gene target, sefA. Transcriptional analyses and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that RegR activates the expression of sefA by binding to a region upstream of the sefA promoter, thereby relieving gene silencing by the global regulatory protein H-NS. Moreover, RegR was found to contribute significantly to virulence in a rabbit infection experiment. Taken together, our findings indicate that RegR controls the expression of a series of accessory adhesins that significantly enhance the virulence of REPEC strain E22. PMID:23340312

  2. Pseudocatabolite repression of type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Eisenstein, B I; Dodd, D C

    1982-09-01

    Previous work on the control of fimbriation in bacteria has demonstrated the importance of environmental factors such as static versus shaking broth and the absence versus the presence of glucose on the degree of fimbriation. When the Pil+ K-12 strain of Escherichia coli CSH50 was grown in static broth, the bacteria grown with glucose were less fimbriate (as determined by electron microscopy) than those grown without glucose. In contrast, a derivative, the pil-lac operon fusion strain VL361, gave off similar proportions of Lac+ and Lac- colonies when grown with or without glucose. Introduction of delta cya into either CSH50 or VL361 did not affect synthesis of either fimbriae or beta-galactosidase, respectively. When total synthesis of fimbriae by strain CSH50 was assayed, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent inhibition test, glucose-grown bacteria made less antigen when they were grown in static broth but not when they were grown in shaking broth. When results are taken together, we interpret them as showing that glucose does not suppress fimbrial synthesis by classic catabolite repression but rather merely prevents the outgrowth or fimbriate bacteria in static broth. PMID:6125501

  3. Isolation of Escherichia coli from piglets in South Korea with diarrhea and characteristics of the virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeong Ju; Kim, Ji Hee; Hur, Jin; Lee, John Hwa

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli was isolated from the feces of 122 piglets with diarrhea on 55 farms in Korea. The virulence genes of each isolate were characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of the 562 isolates, 191 carried 1 or more of the virulence genes tested for in this study. Of the 191 isolates, 114 (60%) carried 1 or more of the genes for enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) fimbriae F4, F5, F6, F18, and F41 and ETEC toxins LT, STa, and STb, 57 (30%) carried 1 or more of the genes for the Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) toxins Stx1, Stx2, and Stx2e, and 21% and 37% carried the gene for enteropathogenic E. coli intimin and for enteroaggregative E. coli toxin, respectively. Collectively, our results indicate that other pathotypes of E. coli as well as ETEC can be strongly associated with diarrhea in piglets. In addition, detection of the genes for Stx1 and Stx2 indicates that pigs are reservoirs of human pathogenic STEC. PMID:20357961

  4. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nataro, James P.; Kaper, James B.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the predominant nonpathogenic facultative flora of the human intestine. Some E. coli strains, however, have developed the ability to cause disease of the gastrointestinal, urinary, or central nervous system in even the most robust human hosts. Diarrheagenic strains of E. coli can be divided into at least six different categories with corresponding distinct pathogenic schemes. Taken together, these organisms probably represent the most common cause of pediatric diarrhea worldwide. Several distinct clinical syndromes accompany infection with diarrheagenic E. coli categories, including traveler’s diarrhea (enterotoxigenic E. coli), hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (enterohemorrhagic E. coli), persistent diarrhea (enteroaggregative E. coli), and watery diarrhea of infants (enteropathogenic E. coli). This review discusses the current level of understanding of the pathogenesis of the diarrheagenic E. coli strains and describes how their pathogenic schemes underlie the clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and epidemiologic investigation of these important pathogens. PMID:9457432

  5. Evolutionary and Functional Relationships of Colonization Factor Antigen I and Other Class 5 Adhesive Fimbriae of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Anantha, Ravi P.; McVeigh, Annette L.; Lee, Lanfong H.; Agnew, Mary K.; Cassels, Frederick J.; Scott, Daniel A.; Whittam, Thomas S.; Savarino, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) is the archetype of eight genetically related fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) designated class 5 fimbriae. Assembled by the alternate chaperone pathway, these organelles comprise a rigid stalk of polymerized major subunits and an apparently tip-localized minor adhesive subunit. We examined the evolutionary relationships of class 5-specific structural proteins and correlated these with functional properties. We sequenced the gene clusters encoding coli surface antigen 4 (CS4), CS14, CS17, CS19, and putative colonization factor antigen O71 (PCFO71) and analyzed the deduced proteins and the published homologs of CFA/I, CS1, and CS2. Multiple alignment and phylogenetic analysis of the proteins encoded by each operon define three subclasses, 5a (CFA/I, CS4, and CS14), 5b (CS1, CS17, CS19, and PCFO71), and 5c (CS2). These share distant evolutionary relatedness to fimbrial systems of three other genera. Subclass divisions generally correlate with distinguishing in vitro adherence phenotypes of strains bearing the ETEC fimbriae. Phylogenetic comparisons of the individual structural proteins demonstrated greater intrasubclass conservation among the minor subunits than the major subunits. To correlate this with functional attributes, we made antibodies against CFA/I and CS17 whole fimbriae and maltose-binding protein fusions with the amino-terminal half of the corresponding minor subunits. Anti-minor subunit Fab preparations showed hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) of ETEC expressing homologous and intrasubclass heterologous colonization factors while anti-fimbrial Fab fractions showed HAI activity limited to colonization factor-homologous ETEC. These results were corroborated with similar results from the Caco-2 cell adherence assay. Our findings suggest that the minor subunits of class 5 fimbriae may be superior to whole fimbriae in inducing antiadhesive immunity. PMID:15557644

  6. Characterization of an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain from Africa Expressing a Putative Colonization Factor

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Sami B.; Cassels, Frederick J.; Shaheen, Hind I.; Pannell, Lewis K.; El-Ghorab, Nemat; Kamal, Karim; Mansour, Moustafa; Savarino, Stephen J.; Peruski, Leonard F.

    1999-01-01

    An enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain of serotype O114:H− that expressed both heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxins and tested negative for colonization factors (CF) was isolated from a child with diarrhea in Egypt. This strain, WS0115A, induced hemagglutination of bovine erythrocytes and adhered to the enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2, suggesting that it may elaborate novel fimbriae. Surface-expressed antigen purified by differential ammonium sulfate precipitation and column chromatography yielded a single protein band with Mr 14,800 when resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (16% polyacrylamide). A monoclonal antibody against this putative fimbrial antigen was generated and reacted with strain WS0115A and also with CS1-, CS17-, and CS19-positive strains in a dot blot assay. Reactivity was temperature dependent, with cells displaying reactivity when grown at 37°C but not when grown at 22°C. Immunoblot analysis of a fimbrial preparation from strain WS0115A showed that the monoclonal antibody reacted with a single protein band. Electron microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy revealed fimbria-like structures on the surface of strain WS0115A. These structures were rigid and measured 6.8 to 7.4 nm in diameter. Electrospray mass-spectrometric analysis showed that the mass of the purified fimbria was 14,965 Da. The N-terminal sequence of the fimbria established that it was a member of the CFA/I family, with sequence identity to the amino terminus of CS19, a new CF recently identified in India. Cumulatively, our results suggest that this fimbria is CS19. Screening of a collection of ETEC strains isolated from children with diarrhea in Egypt found that 4.2% of strains originally reported as CF negative were positive for this CF, suggesting that it is biologically relevant in the pathogenesis of ETEC. PMID:10417169

  7. Immunogenicity of a prototype enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli adhesin vaccine in mice and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Sincock, Stephanie A; Hall, Eric R; Woods, Colleen M; O'Dowd, Aisling; Poole, Steven T; McVeigh, Annette L; Nunez, Gladys; Espinoza, Nereyda; Miller, Milagros; Savarino, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common cause of bacterial diarrhea in young children in developing countries and in travelers. Efforts to develop an ETEC vaccine have intensified in the past decade, and intestinal colonization factors (CFs) are somatic components of most investigational vaccines. CFA/I and related Class 5 fimbrial CFs feature a major stalk-forming subunit and a minor, antigenically conserved tip adhesin. We hypothesized that the tip adhesin is critical for stimulating antibodies that specifically inhibit ETEC attachment to the small intestine. To address this, we compared the capacity of donor strand complemented CfaE (dscCfaE), a stabilized form of the CFA/I fimbrial tip adhesin, and CFA/I fimbriae to elicit anti-adhesive antibodies in mice, using hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) as proxy for neutralization of intestinal adhesion. When given with genetically attenuated heat-labile enterotoxin LTR192G as adjuvant by intranasal (IN) or orogastric (OG) vaccination, dscCfaE exceeded CFA/I fimbriae in eliciting serum HAI titers and anti-CfaE antibody titers. Based on these findings, we vaccinated Aotus nancymaae nonhuman primates (NHP) with dscCfaE alone or admixed with one of two adjuvants, LTR192G and cholera toxin B-subunit, by IN and OG administration. Only IN vaccination with dscCfaE with either adjuvant elicited substantial serum HAI titers and IgA and IgG anti-adhesin responses, with the latter detectable a year after vaccination. In conclusion, we have shown that dscCfaE elicits robust HAI and anti-adhesin antibody responses in both mice and NHPs when given with adjuvant by IN vaccination, encouraging further evaluation of an ETEC adhesin-based vaccine approach. PMID:26597148

  8. Coli surface antigens 1 and 3 of colonization factor antigen II-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: morphology, purification, and immune responses in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, M M; Ristaino, P; Marley, G; Smyth, C; Knutton, S; Boedeker, E; Black, R; Young, C; Clements, M L; Cheney, C

    1984-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) of serotype O6:H16, biotype A, bearing colonization factor antigen II (CFA/II) possesses two distinct coli surface antigens, CS1 and CS3, whereas CFA/II-positive ETEC of serotype O8:H9 manifests only CS3. CS1 has been shown to be fimbrial in nature, but heretofore the morphology of CS3 has not been described. Accordingly, by immune electron microscopy we investigated the morphological characteristics of CS3 on bacterial cells and after purification. CS3 was found to consist of thin (2-nm), flexible, wiry, "fibrillar" fimbriae, visible both on bacteria (O6:H16, biotype A, and O8:H9 strains) and in the pure state. In contrast, CS1 exists as wider (6-nm), rigid fimbriae on the surface of O6:H16, biotype A, strains. By the use of antisera to CS1 and CS3 in immune electron microscopy, immunodiffusion in gel, and immunoblotting techniques, CS1 and CS3 were found to be immunologically as well as morphologically distinct. Six of nine volunteers who developed diarrhea after challenge with an O139:H28 ETEC strain bearing CS1 and CS3 had significant serological rises to purified CS1 and CS3 antigens, suggesting that both antigens are elaborated in vivo, play a role in pathogenesis, and stimulate an immune response. Images PMID:6370866

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaE, the adhesive subunit of the CFA/I fimbriae from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Fu; Poole, Steven; Rasulova, Fatima; Esser, Lothar; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di

    2006-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) represents a formidable food and waterborne diarrheal disease threat of global importance. The first step in ETEC pathogenesis is bacterial attachment to small-intestine epithelial cells via adhesive fimbriae, many of which are genetically related to the prototype colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I). The minor fimbrial subunit CfaE is required for initiation of CFA/I fimbrial assembly and mediates bacterial attachment to host cell-surface receptors. A donor-strand complemented variant of CfaE (dscCfaE) was expressed with a hexahistidine tag, purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected to 2.4 Å resolution for both native and derivatized crystals and showed the symmetry of space group P6222, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 142.9, c = 231.9 Å. Initial phases were derived from the SIRAS approach and electron density showed two molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Sequence assignments were aided by anomalous signals from the selenium of an SeMet-derivatized crystal and from S atoms of a native crystal. PMID:16511280

  10. Transcriptional Analysis of the sfa Determinant Revealing Multiple mRNA Processing Events in the Biogenesis of S Fimbriae in Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Balsalobre, Carlos; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Jass, Jana; Hacker, Jörg; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2003-01-01

    Among the virulence factors present in pathogenic extraintestinal Escherichia coli strains, expression of fimbrial adhesins is necessary for attachment to the host tissues and subsequent colonization. Occurrence of the sfa determinant coding for the S fimbriae is widespread among the uropathogens and meningitis isolates. The sfa operon consists of nine genes. In the biogenesis of S fimbriae, the proteins encoded by the sfa genes are presumably required in a specific stoichiometry. In the present work we studied how differential expression of the sfa operon genes occurs. Our findings indicate that a number of endoribonucleolytic cleavages occur in the mRNA from the sfa operon, and we detected the presence of different distinct transcriptional products, including sfaBA, sfaA, sfaADE, and sfaGSH. The sfaGSH transcript represents the three distal genes of the sfa operon, which code for the minor subunits of the S fimbriae. Analysis of the proteins in S fimbriae suggested that expression of the sfaGSH transcript provides equimolar amounts of the minor subunits. Furthermore, we showed that in the generation of the major sfaA transcript, the processing included RNase E endoribonuceolytic cleavage of the precursor sfaBA transcript. We suggest that posttranscriptional mRNA processing events result in differential gene expression important to achieve the stoichiometry necessary for fimbrial adhesin biogenesis. PMID:12511509

  11. Identification of New Resistance Mechanisms in Escherichia coli against Apidaecin 1b Using Quantitative Gel- and LC-MS-Based Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Rico; Krizsan, Andor; Volke, Daniela; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Bacteria have acquired resistance mechanisms to overcome antibiotic treatments, triggering major concerns about the return of epidemic infections. Antimicrobial peptides identified in insects, animals, and plants represent a huge pool of promising lead structures that can be further developed for medical applications. Short proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) have gained much attention due to their clinically interesting activity spectrum, serum protease stability, efficacy in murine infection models, and low adverse effects. Here we induced resistances by incubating Escherichia coli with increasing concentrations of apidaecin 1b, a PrAMP isolated from honeybees, and quantitatively evaluated the proteomes between wild-type and resistant strains. Surprisingly, 2D differential gel electrophoresis did not reveal differences, indicating that the expression levels of dominant proteins were very similar. Reversed-phase chromatography coupled online to a mass spectrometer identified 2131 proteins in the soluble fraction (cytosolic fraction) and 1296 proteins in the nonsolubilized pellet (membrane fraction). Overall 29 proteins showed a statistically significant upregulation in the resistant E. coli strain, whereas 18 proteins were downregulated. Interestingly, periplasmic chaperone FimC, fimbrial protein FimA, and mannose-binding domain protein FimH, which are part of the fimbrial complex, were not detected in the resistant strain that was also unable to form biofilms. Furthermore, the expression of a few other proteins known as virulence factors was downregulated. Additionally, the expression level of isochorismatase hydrolase (YcaC) decreased in the membrane fraction of the resistant strain to 35%, and the corresponding knockout mutant of E. coli BW25113 was eight times less susceptible to apidaecin 1b and the related designer peptide Api88. PMID:27405093

  12. Pathogenicity of an Escherichia coli O115:K"V165" mutant negative for F165(1) fimbriae in septicemia of gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Ngeleka, M; Jacques, M; Martineau-Doizé, B; Daigle, F; Harel, J; Fairbrother, J M

    1993-03-01

    To evaluate the role of the F165(1) fimbrial system in the pathogenesis of septicemia, 2-day-old germfree pigs were inoculated intragastrically with Escherichia coli O115:K"V165":F165 wild-type strain 5131, its F165(1)-negative TnphoA mutant M48, or E. coli O115:K(-):F165(-) wild-type strain 862B. Pigs were sacrificed at different times (3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 96 h) postinfection (p.i.). Pigs inoculated with strain 5131 developed clinical signs (anorexia, lameness, reluctance to move, or lack of motor coordination) and were moribund within 48 h p.i., and, at necropsy, infecting bacteria were isolated in various extraintestinal organs. Strain 5131 was isolated as early as 6 h p.i. from the blood of inoculated pigs. Pigs inoculated with mutant M48 developed only mild clinical signs at 96 h p.i. Mutant M48 colonized extraintestinal organs of pigs but to a lesser extent than the parent strain did. In contrast to the parent strain, this mutant was not isolated in the blood of inoculated pigs. Pigs inoculated with strain 862B remained normal during the experiment. All of the strains colonized the mucus layer of the intestine, but no histological changes of intestinal mucosa were observed by either light or electron microscopy. The parent strain, but not the mutant M48, expressed F165(1) in vivo. In a competitive study in which the parent strain and its afimbrial mutant were inoculated simultaneously, clinical signs of septicemia developed 24 h after inoculation, and only the parent strain 5131 was isolated from the blood of inoculated pigs. Our results suggest that the F165(1) fimbrial system of E. coli O115:K"V165" strains may play an important role in the ability of the bacteria to survive in the blood and spread systemically through the porcine host. PMID:8094383

  13. E. Coli Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults with weak immune systems. You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. Symptoms of ... pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 ...

  14. High-Resolution Two-Locus Clonal Typing of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James R.; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Billig, Mariya; Dykhuizen, Daniel; Riddell, Kim; Rogers, Peggy; Qin, Xuan; Butler-Wu, Susan; Cookson, Brad T.; Fang, Ferric C.; Scholes, Delia; Chattopadhyay, Sujay

    2012-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is usually based on the sequencing of 5 to 8 housekeeping loci in the bacterial chromosome and has provided detailed descriptions of the population structure of bacterial species important to human health. However, even strains with identical MLST profiles (known as sequence types or STs) may possess distinct genotypes, which enable different eco- or pathotypic lifestyles. Here we describe a two-locus, sequence-based typing scheme for Escherichia coli that utilizes a 489-nucleotide (nt) internal fragment of fimH (encoding the type 1 fimbrial adhesin) and the 469-nt internal fumC fragment used in standard MLST. Based on sequence typing of 191 model commensal and pathogenic isolates plus 853 freshly isolated clinical E. coli strains, this 2-locus approach—which we call CH (fumC/fimH) typing—consistently yielded more haplotypes than standard 7-locus MLST, splitting large STs into multiple clonal subgroups and often distinguishing different within-ST eco- and pathotypes. Furthermore, specific CH profiles corresponded to specific STs, or ST complexes, with 95% accuracy, allowing excellent prediction of MLST-based profiles. Thus, 2-locus CH typing provides a genotyping tool for molecular epidemiology analysis that is more economical than standard 7-locus MLST but has superior clonal discrimination power and, at the same time, corresponds closely to MLST-based clonal groupings. PMID:22226951

  15. Structure and function of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbriae from differing assembly pathways.

    PubMed

    Mortezaei, Narges; Epler, Chelsea R; Shao, Paul P; Shirdel, Mariam; Singh, Bhupender; McVeigh, Annette; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J; Andersson, Magnus; Bullitt, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the major bacterial cause of diarrhea in young children in developing countries and in travelers, causing significant mortality in children. Adhesive fimbriae are a prime virulence factor for ETEC, initiating colonization of the small intestinal epithelium. Similar to other Gram-negative bacteria, ETEC express one or more diverse fimbriae, some assembled by the chaperone-usher pathway and others by the alternate chaperone pathway. Here, we elucidate structural and biophysical aspects and adaptations of each fimbrial type to its respective host niche. CS20 fimbriae are compared with colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae, which are two ETEC fimbriae assembled via different pathways, and with P-fimbriae from uropathogenic E. coli. Many fimbriae unwind from their native helical filament to an extended linear conformation under force, thereby sustaining adhesion by reducing load at the point of contact between the bacterium and the target cell. CFA/I fimbriae require the least force to unwind, followed by CS20 fimbriae and then P-fimbriae, which require the highest unwinding force. We conclude from our electron microscopy reconstructions, modeling and force spectroscopy data that the target niche plays a central role in the biophysical properties of fimbriae that are critical for bacterial pathophysiology. PMID:25355550

  16. Nanobody Mediated Inhibition of Attachment of F18 Fimbriae Expressing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Moonens, Kristof; De Kerpel, Maia; Coddens, Annelies; Cox, Eric; Pardon, Els; Remaut, Han; De Greve, Henri

    2014-01-01

    Post-weaning diarrhea and edema disease caused by F18 fimbriated E. coli are important diseases in newly weaned piglets and lead to severe production losses in farming industry. Protective treatments against these infections have thus far limited efficacy. In this study we generated nanobodies directed against the lectin domain of the F18 fimbrial adhesin FedF and showed in an in vitro adherence assay that four unique nanobodies inhibit the attachment of F18 fimbriated E. coli bacteria to piglet enterocytes. Crystallization of the FedF lectin domain with the most potent inhibitory nanobodies revealed their mechanism of action. These either competed with the binding of the blood group antigen receptor on the FedF surface or induced a conformational change in which the CDR3 region of the nanobody displaces the D″-E loop adjacent to the binding site. This D″-E loop was previously shown to be required for the interaction between F18 fimbriated bacteria and blood group antigen receptors in a membrane context. This work demonstrates the feasibility of inhibiting the attachment of fimbriated pathogens by employing nanobodies directed against the adhesin domain. PMID:25502211

  17. Lethal neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by multi-drug resistant, highly virulent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Junaid; Dufendach, Kevin R; Wellons, John C; Kuba, Maria G; Nickols, Hilary H; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G; Wynn, James L

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal meningitis is a rare but devastating condition. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria represent a substantial global health risk. This study reports on an aggressive case of lethal neonatal meningitis due to a MDR Escherichia coli (serotype O75:H5:K1). Serotyping, MDR pattern and phylogenetic typing revealed that this strain is an emergent and highly virulent neonatal meningitis E. coli isolate. The isolate was resistant to both ampicillin and gentamicin; antibiotics currently used for empiric neonatal sepsis treatment. The strain was also positive for multiple virulence genes including K1 capsule, fimbrial adhesion fimH, siderophore receptors iroN, fyuA and iutA, secreted autotransporter toxin sat, membrane associated proteases ompA and ompT, type II polysaccharide synthesis genes (kpsMTII) and pathogenicity-associated island (PAI)-associated malX gene. The presence of highly-virulent MDR organisms isolated in neonates underscores the need to implement rapid drug resistance diagnostic methods and should prompt consideration of alternate empiric therapy in neonates with Gram negative meningitis. PMID:27030919

  18. Structure and function of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbriae from differing assembly pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mortezaei, Narges; Epler, Chelsea R.; Shao, Paul P.; Shirdel, Mariam; Singh, Bhupender; McVeigh, Annette; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J.; Andersson, Magnus; Bullitt, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the major bacterial cause of diarrhea in young children in developing countries and in travelers, causing significant mortality in children. Adhesive fimbriae are a prime virulence factor for ETEC, initiating colonization of the small intestinal epithelium. Similar to other Gram-negative bacteria, ETEC express one or more diverse fimbriae, some assembled by the chaperone-usher pathway and others by the alternate chaperone pathway. Here we elucidate structural and biophysical aspects and adaptations of each fimbrial type to its respective host niche. CS20 fimbriae are compared to CFA/I fimbriae, which are two ETEC fimbriae assembled via different pathways, and to P-fimbriae from uropathogenic E. coli. Many fimbriae unwind from their native helical filament to an extended linear conformation under force, thereby sustaining adhesion by reducing load at the point of contact between the bacterium and the target cell. CFA/I fimbriae require the least force to unwind, followed by CS20 fimbriae and then P-fimbriae, which require the highest unwinding force. We conclude from our electron microscopy reconstructions, modeling, and force spectroscopy data that the target niche plays a central role in the biophysical properties of fimbriae that are critical for bacterial pathophysiology. PMID:25355550

  19. Characterisation of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) associated with colisepticaemia compared to faecal isolates from healthy birds.

    PubMed

    McPeake, S J W; Smyth, J A; Ball, H J

    2005-10-31

    A total of 114 avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) isolates were collected from cases of colisepticaemia occurring in broilers (77) and layers (37) within Ireland. In addition 45 strains isolated from faeces of healthy birds were included for comparison. All isolates were serogrouped, and examined for known virulence factors, mostly by PCR. The O78 serogroup represented 55 and 27% of broiler and layer colisepticaemic isolates respectively. All isolates were positive for curli fimbriae (crl, csg) and negative for afimbrial adhesin (afa). S-fimbrial (sfa) sequences were present in 8.8% of septicaemic isolates and 8.9% of healthy bird isolates. The majority of E. coli from cases of colisepticaemia (97.4%) and healthy bird (95.6%) isolates were positive for aerobactin (aer), and temperature sensitive haemagglutinin (tsh) was similarly detected in high numbers in 93.9 and 93.3%, respectively. In comparison to E. coli isolates from the faeces of healthy birds, a significantly higher percentage of isolates from septicaemic cases possessed Type 1 fimbriae (fimC) and increased serum survival (iss) gene sequences. Forty-seven (41.2%) isolates from septicaemic birds possessed P-fimbriae (pap) gene sequences, compared with only 15.6% from E. coli isolated from healthy birds. Haemolysin (hlyE) sequences were detected in 46.7% of isolates from healthy birds in comparison with 6.1% of septicaemic isolates. Sequences encoding colicin V (cvaC) were detected in 99.1% of septicaemic isolates and 82.2% of isolates from healthy birds. The K1 capsule was only present in two septicaemic isolates, both taken from layers. Motility was detected in 36.8% of E. coli isolated from cases of septicaemia, compared with 93.3% of isolates from healthy birds. These results demonstrate the presence of 11 virulence genes in E. coli isolated from cases of colisepticaemia within Ireland, and indicate the prevalence of iss and fimC. PMID:16150559

  20. Examination of the Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to Cinnamaldehyde Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Visvalingam, Jeyachchandran; Hernandez-Doria, Juan David

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a natural antimicrobial that has been found to be effective against many food-borne pathogens, including Escherichia coli O157:H7. Although its antimicrobial effects have been well investigated, limited information is available on its effects at the molecular level. Sublethal treatment at 200 mg/liter cinnamaldehyde inhibited growth of E. coli O157:H7 at 37°C and for ≤2 h caused cell elongation, but from 2 to 4 h growth resumed and cells reverted to normal length. To understand this transient behavior, genome-wide transcriptional analysis of E. coli O157:H7 was performed at 2 and 4 h of exposure to cinnamaldehyde in conjunction with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) analysis for cinnamaldehyde and other cinnamic compounds. Drastically different gene expression profiles were obtained at 2 and 4 h. RP-HPLC analysis showed that cinnamaldehyde was structurally stable for at least 2 h. At 2 h of exposure, cinnamaldehyde induced expression of many oxidative stress-related genes and repressed expression of DNA, protein, O-antigen, and fimbrial synthetic genes. At 4 h, many cinnamaldehyde-induced repressive effects on E. coli O157:H7 gene expression were reversed, and cells became more motile and grew at a slightly higher rate. Data indicated that by 4 h, E. coli O157:H7 was able to convert cinnamaldehyde into the less toxic cinnamic alcohol using dehydrogenase/reductase enzymes (YqhD and DkgA). This is the first study to characterize the ability of E. coli O157:H7 to convert cinnamaldehyde into cinnamic alcohol which, in turn, showed that the antimicrobial activity of cinnamaldehyde is mainly attributable to its carbonyl aldehyde group. PMID:23183978

  1. Two autonomous structural modules in the fimbrial shaft adhesin FimA mediate Actinomyces interactions with streptococci and host cells during oral biofilm development

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Arunima; Devarajan, Bharanidharan; Reardon, Melissa E.; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Krishnan, Vengadesan; Cisar, John O.; Das, Asis; Narayana, Sthanam V.L.; Ton-That, Hung

    2011-09-06

    By combining X-ray crystallography and modelling, we describe here the atomic structure of distinct adhesive moieties of FimA, the shaft fimbrillin of Actinomyces type 2 fimbriae, which uniquely mediates the receptor-dependent intercellular interactions between Actinomyces and oral streptococci as well as host cells during the development of oral biofilms. The FimA adhesin is built with three IgG-like domains, each of which harbours an intramolecular isopeptide bond, previously described in several Gram-positive pilins. Genetic and biochemical studies demonstrate that although these isopeptide bonds are dispensable for fimbrial assembly, cell-cell interactions and biofilm formation, they contribute significantly to the proteolytic stability of FimA. Remarkably, FimA harbours two autonomous adhesive modules, which structurally resemble the Staphylococcus aureus Cna B domain. Each isolated module can bind the plasma glycoprotein asialofetuin as well as the polysaccharide receptors present on the surface of oral streptococci and epithelial cells. Thus, FimA should serve as an excellent paradigm for the development of therapeutic strategies and elucidating the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between cellular receptors and Gram-positive fimbriae.

  2. Biofilm-Forming Abilities of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates Associated with Human Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vogeleer, Philippe; Tremblay, Yannick D. N.; Jubelin, Grégory; Jacques, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Forming biofilms may be a survival strategy of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli to enable it to persist in the environment and the food industry. Here, we evaluate and characterize the biofilm-forming ability of 39 isolates of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates recovered from human infection and belonging to seropathotypes A, B, or C. The presence and/or production of biofilm factors such as curli, cellulose, autotransporter, and fimbriae were investigated. The polymeric matrix of these biofilms was analyzed by confocal microscopy and by enzymatic digestion. Cell viability and matrix integrity were examined after sanitizer treatments. Isolates of the seropathotype A (O157:H7 and O157:NM), which have the highest relative incidence of human infection, had a greater ability to form biofilms than isolates of seropathotype B or C. Seropathotype A isolates were unique in their ability to produce cellulose and poly-N-acetylglucosamine. The integrity of the biofilms was dependent on proteins. Two autotransporter genes, ehaB and espP, and two fimbrial genes, z1538 and lpf2, were identified as potential genetic determinants for biofilm formation. Interestingly, the ability of several isolates from seropathotype A to form biofilms was associated with their ability to agglutinate yeast in a mannose-independent manner. We consider this an unidentified biofilm-associated factor produced by those isolates. Treatment with sanitizers reduced the viability of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli but did not completely remove the biofilm matrix. Overall, our data indicate that biofilm formation could contribute to the persistence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and specifically seropathotype A isolates in the environment. PMID:26712549

  3. A New Clone Sweeps Clean: the Enigmatic Emergence of Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is an extensively antimicrobial-resistant E. coli clonal group that has spread explosively throughout the world. Recent molecular epidemiologic and whole-genome phylogenetic studies have elucidated the fine clonal structure of ST131, which comprises multiple ST131 subclones with distinctive resistance profiles, including the (nested) H30, H30-R, and H30-Rx subclones. The most prevalent ST131 subclone, H30, arose from a single common fluoroquinolone (FQ)-susceptible ancestor containing allele 30 of fimH (type 1 fimbrial adhesin gene). An early H30 subclone member acquired FQ resistance and launched the rapid expansion of the resulting FQ-resistant subclone, H30-R. Subsequently, a member of H30-R acquired the CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and launched the rapid expansion of the CTX-M-15-containing subclone within H30-R, H30-Rx. Clonal expansion clearly is now the dominant mechanism for the rising prevalence of both FQ resistance and CTX-M-15 production in ST131 and in E. coli generally. Reasons for the successful dissemination and expansion of the key ST131 subclones remain undefined but may include increased transmissibility, greater ability to colonize and/or persist in the intestine or urinary tract, enhanced virulence, and more-extensive antimicrobial resistance compared to other E. coli. Here we discuss the epidemiology and molecular phylogeny of ST131 and its key subclones, possible mechanisms for their ecological success, implications of their widespread dissemination, and future research needs. PMID:24867985

  4. Immune responses elicited in mice with recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing F4 fimbrial adhesin FaeG by oral immunization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shujie; Li, Yongming; Xu, Ziwei; Wang, Yicheng

    2010-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major pathogenic agent causing piglet diarrhea. The major subunit and adhesin FaeG of F4(+) ETEC is an important virulence factor with strong immunogenicity. To determine whether Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) could effectively deliver FaeG to the mucosal immune system, recombinant L. lactis expressing FaeG was constructed, and immune responses in mice following oral route delivery of recombinant L. lactis were explored. The production of FaeG expressed in L. lactis was up to approximately 10% of soluble whole-cell proteins, and recombinant FaeG (rFaeG) possessed good immunoreactivity by Western blot analysis. Oral immunization with recombinant L. lactis expressing FaeG induced F4-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses in the mice. In addition, high dose recombinant L. lactis or co-administration of high dose recombinant L. lactis with CTB enhanced the immune responses. These results suggested that L. lactis expressing FaeG was a promising candidate vaccine against ETEC. PMID:20532816

  5. Ongoing Horizontal and Vertical Transmission of Virulence Genes and papA Alleles among Escherichia coli Blood Isolates from Patients with Diverse-Source Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James R.; O'Bryan, Timothy T.; Kuskowski, Michael; Maslow, Joel N.

    2001-01-01

    The phylogenetic distributions of multiple putative virulence factors (VFs) and papA (P fimbrial structural subunit) alleles among 182 Escherichia coli blood isolates from patients with diverse-source bacteremia were defined. Phylogenetic correspondence among these strains, the E. coli Reference (ECOR) collection, and other collections of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) was assessed. Although among the 182 bacteremia isolates phylogenetic group B2 predominated, exhibited the greatest concentration of individual VFs, and contained the largest number of familiar virulent clones, other phylogenetic groups exhibited greater concentrations of certain VFs than did group B2 and included several additional virulent clones. Certain of the newly detected VF genes, e.g., fyuA (yersiniabactin; 76%) and focG (F1C fimbriae; 25%), were as prevalent or more prevalent than their more familiar traditional counterparts, e.g., iut (aerobactin; 57%) and sfaS (S fimbriae; 14%), thus possibly offering additional useful targets for preventive interventions. Considerable diversity of VF profiles was observed at every level within the phylogenetic tree, including even within individual lineages. This suggested that many different pathways can lead to extraintestinal virulence in E. coli and that the evolution of ExPEC, which involves extensive horizontal transmission of VFs and continuous remodeling of pathogenicity-associated islands, is a highly active, ongoing process. PMID:11500406

  6. F9 Fimbriae of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Are Expressed at Low Temperature and Recognise Galβ1-3GlcNAc-Containing Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Wurpel, Daniël J.; Totsika, Makrina; Allsopp, Luke P.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Day, Christopher J.; Peters, Kate M.; Sarkar, Sohinee; Ulett, Glen C.; Yang, Ji; Tiralongo, Joe; Strugnell, Richard A.; Jennings, Michael P.; Schembri, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the leading causative agent of urinary tract infections (UTI) in the developed world. Among the major virulence factors of UPEC, surface expressed adhesins mediate attachment and tissue tropism. UPEC strains typically possess a range of adhesins, with type 1 fimbriae and P fimbriae of the chaperone-usher class the best characterised. We previously identified and characterised F9 as a new chaperone-usher fimbrial type that mediates biofilm formation. However, the regulation and specific role of F9 fimbriae remained to be determined in the context of wild-type clinical UPEC strains. In this study we have assessed the distribution and genetic context of the f9 operon among diverse E. coli lineages and pathotypes and demonstrated that f9 genes are significantly more conserved in a UPEC strain collection in comparison to the well-defined E. coli reference (ECOR) collection. In the prototypic UPEC strain CFT073, the global regulator protein H-NS was identified as a transcriptional repressor of f9 gene expression at 37°C through its ability to bind directly to the f9 promoter region. F9 fimbriae expression was demonstrated at 20°C, representing the first evidence of functional F9 fimbriae expression by wild-type E. coli. Finally, glycan array analysis demonstrated that F9 fimbriae recognise and bind to terminal Galβ1-3GlcNAc structures. PMID:24671091

  7. Global Molecular Epidemiology of the O15:K52:H1 Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Clonal Group: Evidence of Distribution beyond Europe

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, James R.; Stell, Adam L.; O'Bryan, Timothy T.; Kuskowski, Michael; Nowicki, Bogdan; Johnson, Candice; Maslow, Joel N.; Kaul, Anil; Kavle, Justine; Prats, Guillem

    2002-01-01

    Escherichia coli O15:K52:H1 is a significant extraintestinal pathogen in Europe (G. Prats et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 38:201-209, 2000). To search for evidence of this clonal group outside of Europe, 75 non-European E. coli isolates of serogroup O15 were compared with five members of the O15:K52:H1 clonal group from Barcelona, Spain, according to genomic background, virulence genotypes, and antimicrobial resistance profiles. Amplification phylotyping showed that 16 (21%) of the 75 non-European O15 isolates corresponded with the O15:K52:H1 clonal group. The 16 non-European O15:K52:H1 clonal group members represented diverse geographic locales. They were isolated almost exclusively from humans with extraintestinal infections and accounted for 50% of all O15 isolates from five human clinical collections studied. Most non-European clonal group members exhibited a consensus virulence factor profile that included the F16 or F7-2 papA alleles (P fimbrial structural subunit), papG allele II (P fimbrial adhesin), iha (putative adhesin siderophore), and iutA (aerobactin receptor). This resembles the virulence profiles of (i) European representatives of the O15:K52:H1 clonal group and (ii) phylogenetically related “clonal group A,” a recently recognized significant contributor to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance in the United States (A. R. Manges et al., N. Engl. J. Med. 345:1007-1013, 2001). Antimicrobial resistance profiles were variable, and resistance was inconsistently transferred by conjugation. These findings indicate that the O15:K52:H1 clonal group is broadly distributed beyond Europe, exhibits previously unrecognized phenotypic and genotypic diversity, and contributes significantly to extraintestinal infections in humans. PMID:12037043

  8. Intestinal receptors for adhesive fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 in swine--a review.

    PubMed

    Jin, L Z; Zhao, X

    2000-09-01

    Determining the structure of the intestinal receptor for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 fimbriae will make it possible to develop new strategies to prevent K88+ ETEC-induced disease in pigs. Putative K88 adhesin receptors have been identified in both intestinal brush border and mucus preparations as either glycoproteins or glycolipids. Proteins with sizes of 25, 35, 40-42, 60, and 80 kDa in the intestinal mucus and 16, 23, 35, 40-70, 74, 210, and 240 kDa in brush border membranes were reported to bind specifically to K88ab and K88ac fimbriae. The factors accounting for these variable results may include the variants of K88, ages, breeds, and phenotypes of pigs, and even the sampling sites in the small intestine. Of the reported K88 receptors, only three brush border receptors, i.e., a pair of mucin-type sialoglycoproteins (210 kDa or 240 kDa), an intestinal neutral glycosphingolipid (IGLad), and a 74-kDa transferrin glycoprotein (GP74), have fulfilled the criteria as phenotype-specific K88 fimbrial receptors. Inhibiting the attachment of ETEC to intestine by modifying the receptor attachment sites has been the key for developing novel approaches to preventing ETEC-induced diarrhea in pigs. These include: (1) receptor analogs from a variety of biological sources, (2) an enteric protected protease, (3) chicken egg-yolk containing anti-K88 fimbrial antibodies, and (4) some Lactobacillus isolates producing proteinaceous components or carbohydrates interacting with mucus components. Future studies should be directed to further characterize the carbohydrate and protein moieties of receptors recognized by the K88 adhesin variants and to identify the genes responsible for susceptibility to K88+ infections. PMID:11030565

  9. In vivo phase variation of MR/P fimbrial gene expression in Proteus mirabilis infecting the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Li, X; Johnson, D E; Blomfield, I; Mobley, H L

    1997-03-01

    Proteus mirabilis, associated with complicated urinary tract infection, expresses mannose-resistant/Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae. Expression of these surface structures, which mediate haemagglutination and have a demonstrated role in virulence, undergoes phase variation. By DNA sequence analysis, a 252 bp invertible element was found in the intergenic region between mrpl, the putative site-specific recombinase gene, and mrpA, the primary structural subunit gene. The invertible segment is flanked by identical 21 bp inverted repeats and the presumptive half-sites for recombinase binding show homology to those recognized by FimB and FimE encoded by the Escherichia coli fim (Type 1 fimbriae) gene cluster. When amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from static broth cultures expressing MR/P fimbriae, the switch region was found in both ON and OFF positions. When PCR was used to amplify agar cultures which do not express the fimbriae, the switch region was OFF only. A canonical sigma 70 promoter inside the invertible element drives the transcription of mrpA when in the ON position; in the OFF position it is directed away from mrpA but does not appear to drive expression of mrpI. The mrpI gene was able to confer inversion of the mrp switch region in trans from both ON to OFF and OFF to ON. To examine the position of the switch in vivo, urine, bladder, and kidneys from mice transurethrally infected with P. mirabilis were used to prepare template DNA for PCR amplification. In the absence of urolithiasis (urease-mediated stone formation), the switch was found 100% in the ON position, a condition never observed following in vitro culture. We conclude that MR/P phase variation is regulated at the transcriptional level by the action of MrpI on an invertible element and that there is strong selective pressure for the expression of MR/P fimbriae in vivo. PMID:9076737

  10. Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kaper, James B; Nataro, James P; Mobley, Harry L

    2004-02-01

    Few microorganisms are as versatile as Escherichia coli. An important member of the normal intestinal microflora of humans and other mammals, E. coli has also been widely exploited as a cloning host in recombinant DNA technology. But E. coli is more than just a laboratory workhorse or harmless intestinal inhabitant; it can also be a highly versatile, and frequently deadly, pathogen. Several different E. coli strains cause diverse intestinal and extraintestinal diseases by means of virulence factors that affect a wide range of cellular processes. PMID:15040260

  11. Prospective Genomic Characterization of the German Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O104:H4 Outbreak by Rapid Next Generation Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zentz, Emily B.; Leopold, Shana R.; Rico, Alain; Prior, Karola; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Ji, Yongmei; Zhang, Wenlan; McLaughlin, Stephen F.; Henkhaus, John K.; Leopold, Benjamin; Bielaszewska, Martina; Prager, Rita; Brzoska, Pius M.; Moore, Richard L.; Guenther, Simone; Rothberg, Jonathan M.; Karch, Helge

    2011-01-01

    An ongoing outbreak of exceptionally virulent Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli O104:H4 centered in Germany, has caused over 830 cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and 46 deaths since May 2011. Serotype O104:H4, which has not been detected in animals, has rarely been associated with HUS in the past. To prospectively elucidate the unique characteristics of this strain in the early stages of this outbreak, we applied whole genome sequencing on the Life Technologies Ion Torrent PGM™ sequencer and Optical Mapping to characterize one outbreak isolate (LB226692) and a historic O104:H4 HUS isolate from 2001 (01-09591). Reference guided draft assemblies of both strains were completed with the newly introduced PGM™ within 62 hours. The HUS-associated strains both carried genes typically found in two types of pathogenic E. coli, enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC). Phylogenetic analyses of 1,144 core E. coli genes indicate that the HUS-causing O104:H4 strains and the previously published sequence of the EAEC strain 55989 show a close relationship but are only distantly related to common EHEC serotypes. Though closely related, the outbreak strain differs from the 2001 strain in plasmid content and fimbrial genes. We propose a model in which EAEC 55989 and EHEC O104:H4 strains evolved from a common EHEC O104:H4 progenitor, and suggest that by stepwise gain and loss of chromosomal and plasmid-encoded virulence factors, a highly pathogenic hybrid of EAEC and EHEC emerged as the current outbreak clone. In conclusion, rapid next-generation technologies facilitated prospective whole genome characterization in the early stages of an outbreak. PMID:21799941

  12. Construction of an MR/P fimbrial mutant of Proteus mirabilis: role in virulence in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Bahrani, F K; Massad, G; Lockatell, C V; Johnson, D E; Russell, R G; Warren, J W; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a cause of acute pyelonephritis, produces at least four types of fimbriae, including MR/P (mannose-resistant/Proteus-like) fimbriae. To investigate the contribution of MR/P fimbriae to colonization of the urinary tract, we constructed an MR/P fimbrial mutant by allelic exchange. A 4.2-kb BamHI fragment carrying the mrpA gene was subcloned into a mobilizable plasmid, pSUP202. A 1.3-kb Kanr cassette was inserted into the mrpA open reading frame, and the construct was transferred to the parent P. mirabilis strain by conjugation. Following passage on nonselective medium, 1 of 500 transconjugants screened was found to have undergone allelic exchange as demonstrated by Southern blot. Colony immunoblot, Western immunoblot, and immunogold labeling with a monoclonal antibody to MR/P fimbriae revealed that MrpA was not expressed. Complementation with cloned mrpA restored MR/P expression as shown by hemagglutination, Western blot, and immunogold electron microscopy. To assess virulence, we challenged 40 CBA mice transurethrally with 10(7) CFU of wild-type or mutant strains. After 1 week, geometric means of log10 CFU per milliliter of urine or per gram of bladder or kidney for the wild-type and mutant strains were as follows: urine, 7.79 (wild type) versus 7.02 (mutant) (P = 0.035); bladder, 6.22 versus 4.78 (P = 0.019); left kidney, 5.02 versus 3.31 (P = 0.009); and right kidney, 5.28 versus 4.46 (P = 0.039). Mice challenged with the wild-type strain showed significantly more severe renal damage than did mice challenged with the MR/P-negative mutant (P = 0.007). We conclude that MR/P fimbriae contribute significantly to colonization of the urinary tract and increase the risk of development of acute pyelonephritis. Images PMID:7913698

  13. Generation of an attenuated strain oral vaccine candidate using a novel double selection platform in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxin; Yuan, Chaowen; Bao, Jun; Guan, Weikun; Zhao, Zhiteng; Li, Xingyue; Tang, Jie; Li, Dandan; Shi, Dongfang

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated bacteria delivered orally are interesting tools for mucosal immunization. The objective of this study was to construct a novel counter-selection platform based on an attenuated wild-type Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain and to utilize it for the delivery of LTR192G-STaA13Q fusion protein as an oral vaccine. First, a counter-selectable marker, namely, PRPL-Kil, was inserted into an attenuated wild-type E. coli strain through the use of the red and G-DOC homologous recombination systems to construct the counter-selection platform, and PRPL-Kil was subsequently replaced by the LT192-STa13 fusion gene to construct the oral vaccine O142 (yaiT::LT192-STa13) (ER-A). Subsequently, BALB/c mice were orogastrically inoculated with ER-A. Our results showed that ER-A could induce the production of specific IgA and IgG against fimbriae (F41) and enterotoxins (LT and STa), with neutralizing activity in BALB/c mice. In addition, assays of cellular immune responses showed that the stimulation index (SI) values of immunized mice were significantly higher than those of control mice (P<0.05), and revealed a marked shift toward Th2-mediated immunity. These findings suggest that ER-A is a suitable candidate for an oral vaccine strain to protect animals from enter toxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection. PMID:25301580

  14. Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli, a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is a part of the normal flora of the intestinal tract of humans and a variety of animals. E. coli strains are classified on the basis of antigenic differences in two surface components (serotyping), the somatic antigen (O) of the lipopoly...

  15. PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species which inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of man and warm-blooded animals. Because of the ubiquity of this bacterium in the intestinal flora, it serves as an important indicator organism of fecal contamination. E. coli, aside from serving a...

  16. IscR Regulates Synthesis of Colonization Factor Antigen I Fimbriae in Response to Iron Starvation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Sara; Arnaud-Barbe, Nadège; Poncet, David; Reverchon, Sylvie; Wawrzyniak, Julien; Nasser, William

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iron availability functions as an environmental cue for enteropathogenic bacteria, signaling arrival within the human host. As enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of human diarrhea, the effect of iron on ETEC virulence factors was evaluated here. ETEC pathogenicity is directly linked to production of fimbrial colonization factors and secretion of heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and/or heat-stable enterotoxin (ST). Efficient colonization of the small intestine further requires at least the flagellin binding adhesin EtpA. Under iron starvation, production of the CFA/I fimbriae was increased in the ETEC H10407 prototype strain. In contrast, LT secretion was inhibited. Furthermore, under iron starvation, gene expression of the cfa (CFA/I) and etp (EtpBAC) operons was induced, whereas transcription of toxin genes was either unchanged or repressed. Transcriptional reporter fusion experiments focusing on the cfa operon further showed that iron starvation stimulated cfaA promoter activity in ETEC, indicating that the impact of iron on CFA/I production was mediated by transcriptional regulation. Evaluation of cfaA promoter activity in heterologous E. coli single mutant knockout strains identified IscR as the regulator responsible for inducing cfa fimbrial gene expression in response to iron starvation, and this was confirmed in an ETEC ΔiscR strain. The global iron response regulator, Fur, was not implicated. IscR binding sites were identified in silico within the cfaA promoter and fixation confirmed by DNase I footprinting, indicating that IscR directly binds the promoter region to induce CFA/I. IMPORTANCE Pathogenic enterobacteria modulate expression of virulence genes in response to iron availability. Although the Fur transcription factor represents the global regulator of iron homeostasis in Escherichia coli, we show that several ETEC virulence factors are modulated by iron, with expression of the major fimbriae under the control of the iron

  17. Interaction of porcine neutrophils with different strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ondrackova, Petra; Alexa, Pavel; Matiasovic, Jan; Volf, Jiri; Faldyna, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most important causes of post-weaning diarrhea in piglets. Whilst serotype O149:F4 is frequently associated with hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, other serotypes have been found to be associated with mild or moderate enteritis. As neutrophils are recruited to sites of inflammation, the aim of this study was to ascertain whether or not there is any difference in the in vitro interaction between neutrophils and two different ETEC serotypes: O149:F4 and O147:F18. The association of bacteria with neutrophils was evaluated by flow cytometry. The respiratory burst was measured by the fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescein diacetate using flow cytometry and by L012-amplified chemiluminescence. The titers of antibodies against ETEC present in cultivation sera were assessed by agglutination. The viability of E. coli was ascertained by cultivation. It was found that the strains of O149 serotype were more frequently associated with neutrophils and induced a more intensive respiratory burst compared to the strains of O147 serotype. These differences might be due to the presence of different types of fimbriae on the surface of the strains tested and by the presence of anti-fimbrial antibodies in the porcine plasma. However, the intensive interaction between E. coli and the neutrophils and respiratory burst induced by the O149 strain did not lead to more efficient killing of the bacteria. It is suggested that a stronger respiratory burst may be an important factor causing severe clinical signs of post-weaning diarrhea in piglets. PMID:22704243

  18. Differences in Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Escherichia coli Virulence Factor Genes in the Baltic Sea Region

    PubMed Central

    Balode, Arta; Makarova, Mariia; Huik, Kristi; Kõljalg, Siiri; Kaftyreva, Lidia; Miciuleviciene, Jolanta; Naaber, Paul; Rööp, Tiiu; Toompere, Karolin; Suzhaeva, Ludmila; Sepp, Epp

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of different virulence factor (VF) genes in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from the Baltic Sea region. A total of 432 strains of phenotypically ESBL positive E. coli were collected from 20 institutions located in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and the region of St. Petersburg in Russia from January to May 2012 and analyzed for phylogenetic group and prevalence of 23 VF genes. The strains were collected from clinical material (urine, blood, wound, and respiratory tract). Bacterial isolates were compared according to phylogenetic group, clinical material, and geographical origin. Most of the VF genes were concentrated within phylogenetic group B2 and/or D. When comparing strains isolated from different countries, it was found that strains originating from Estonia and Latvia belonged mainly to group B2 and strains from Lithuania and Russia mainly to groups B2 and D. The P-fimbrial adhesin gene papEF was more prevalent in Russian strains, colicin gene cvaC in Lithuanian strains, and capsular gene kpsMTII in Latvian strains; serum resistant gene traT was less prevalent in Estonian strains. The regional differences of VF genes remained statistically significant after taking into account the phylogenetic distribution in the countries. PMID:25250320

  19. Differences in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli virulence factor genes in the Baltic Sea region.

    PubMed

    Lillo, Jana; Pai, Kristiine; Balode, Arta; Makarova, Mariia; Huik, Kristi; Kõljalg, Siiri; Ivanova, Marina; Kaftyreva, Lidia; Miciuleviciene, Jolanta; Naaber, Paul; Parv, Kristel; Pavelkovich, Anastasia; Rööp, Tiiu; Toompere, Karolin; Suzhaeva, Ludmila; Sepp, Epp

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of different virulence factor (VF) genes in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from the Baltic Sea region. A total of 432 strains of phenotypically ESBL positive E. coli were collected from 20 institutions located in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and the region of St. Petersburg in Russia from January to May 2012 and analyzed for phylogenetic group and prevalence of 23 VF genes. The strains were collected from clinical material (urine, blood, wound, and respiratory tract). Bacterial isolates were compared according to phylogenetic group, clinical material, and geographical origin. Most of the VF genes were concentrated within phylogenetic group B2 and/or D. When comparing strains isolated from different countries, it was found that strains originating from Estonia and Latvia belonged mainly to group B2 and strains from Lithuania and Russia mainly to groups B2 and D. The P-fimbrial adhesin gene papEF was more prevalent in Russian strains, colicin gene cvaC in Lithuanian strains, and capsular gene kpsMTII in Latvian strains; serum resistant gene traT was less prevalent in Estonian strains. The regional differences of VF genes remained statistically significant after taking into account the phylogenetic distribution in the countries. PMID:25250320

  20. Structural and functional insight into the carbohydrate receptor binding of F4 fimbriae-producing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Moonens, Kristof; Van den Broeck, Imke; De Kerpel, Maia; Deboeck, Francine; Raymaekers, Hanne; Remaut, Han; De Greve, Henri

    2015-03-27

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are important causes of intestinal disease in humans and lead to severe production losses in animal farming. A range of fimbrial adhesins in ETEC strains determines host and tissue tropism. ETEC strains expressing F4 fimbriae are associated with neonatal and post-weaning diarrhea in piglets. Three naturally occurring variants of F4 fimbriae (F4ab, F4ac, and F4ad) exist that differ in the primary sequence of their major adhesive subunit FaeG, and each features a related yet distinct receptor binding profile. Here the x-ray structure of FaeGad bound to lactose provides the first structural insight into the receptor specificity and mode of binding by the poly-adhesive F4 fimbriae. A small D'-D″-α1-α2 subdomain grafted on the immunoglobulin-like core of FaeG hosts the carbohydrate binding site. Two short amino acid stretches Phe(150)-Glu(152) and Val(166)-Glu(170) of FaeGad bind the terminal galactose in the lactosyl unit and provide affinity and specificity to the interaction. A hemagglutination-based assay with E. coli expressing mutant F4ad fimbriae confirmed the elucidated co-complex structure. Interestingly, the crucial D'-α1 loop that borders the FaeGad binding site adopts a different conformation in the two other FaeG variants and hints at a heterogeneous binding pocket among the FaeG serotypes. PMID:25631050

  1. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of Escherichia coli PapD-like protein (EcpD).

    PubMed

    Pandey, Nishant Kumar; Pal, Ravi Kant; Kashyap, Maruthi; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2012-08-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria are characterized by hair-like proteinaceous appendages on their surface known as fimbriae. In uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli, fimbriae mediate attachment by binding to receptors on the host cell, often contributing to virulence and disease. E. coli PapD-like protein (EcpD) is a periplasmic chaperone that plays an important role in the proper folding and guiding of Yad fimbrial proteins to the outer membrane usher protein in a process known as pilus biogenesis. EcpD is essential for pilus biogenesis in uropathogenic E. coli and plays an important role in virulence. In the present study, EcpD was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 1.67 Å resolution and belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 100.3, b = 127.6, c = 45.9 Å. There was a single molecule in the asymmetric unit and the corresponding Matthews coefficient was calculated to be 3.02 Å(3) Da(-1), with 59% solvent content. Initial phases were determined by molecular replacement. PMID:22869131

  2. Phenotypical analysis of the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG fimbrial spaFED operon: surface expression and functional characterization of recombinant SpaFED pili in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Rintahaka, Johanna; Yu, Xia; Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi; von Ossowski, Ingemar

    2014-01-01

    A noticeable genomic feature of many piliated Gram-positive bacterial species is the presence of more than one pilus-encoding operon. Paradigmatically, the gut-adapted Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG strain contains two different fimbrial operons in its genome. However, whereas one of these operons (called spaCBA) is encoding for the functionally mucus-/collagen-binding SpaCBA pilus, for the other operon (called spaFED) any native expression of the SpaFED-called pili is still the subject of some uncertainty. Irrespective of such considerations, we decided it would be of relevance or interest to decipher the gross structure of this pilus type, and as well assess its functional capabilities for cellular adhesion and immunostimulation. For this, and by following the approach we had used previously to explicate the immuno-properties of SpaCBA pili, we constructed nisin-inducible expression clones producing either wild-type or SpaF pilin-deleted surface-assembled L. rhamnosus GG SpaFED pili on Lactococcus lactis cells. Using these piliated lactococcal constructs, we found that the pilin-polymerized architecture of a recombinant-produced SpaFED pilus coincides with sequence-based functional predictions of the related pilins, and in fact is prototypical of those other sortase-dependent pilus-like structures thus far characterized for piliated Gram-positive bacteria. Moreover, we confirmed that among the different pilin subunits encompassing spaFED operon-encoded pili, the SpaF pilin is a main adhesion determinant, and when present in the assembled structure can mediate pilus binding to mucus, certain extracellular matrix proteins, and different gut epithelial cell lines. However, somewhat unexpectedly, when recombinant SpaFED pili are surface-attached, we found that they could not potentiate the existing lactococcal cell-induced immune responses so elicited from intestinal- and immune-related cells, but rather instead, they could dampen them. Accordingly, we have now provided

  3. Phenotypical Analysis of the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Fimbrial spaFED Operon: Surface Expression and Functional Characterization of Recombinant SpaFED Pili in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi; von Ossowski, Ingemar

    2014-01-01

    A noticeable genomic feature of many piliated Gram-positive bacterial species is the presence of more than one pilus-encoding operon. Paradigmatically, the gut-adapted Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG strain contains two different fimbrial operons in its genome. However, whereas one of these operons (called spaCBA) is encoding for the functionally mucus-/collagen-binding SpaCBA pilus, for the other operon (called spaFED) any native expression of the SpaFED-called pili is still the subject of some uncertainty. Irrespective of such considerations, we decided it would be of relevance or interest to decipher the gross structure of this pilus type, and as well assess its functional capabilities for cellular adhesion and immunostimulation. For this, and by following the approach we had used previously to explicate the immuno-properties of SpaCBA pili, we constructed nisin-inducible expression clones producing either wild-type or SpaF pilin-deleted surface-assembled L. rhamnosus GG SpaFED pili on Lactococcus lactis cells. Using these piliated lactococcal constructs, we found that the pilin-polymerized architecture of a recombinant-produced SpaFED pilus coincides with sequence-based functional predictions of the related pilins, and in fact is prototypical of those other sortase-dependent pilus-like structures thus far characterized for piliated Gram-positive bacteria. Moreover, we confirmed that among the different pilin subunits encompassing spaFED operon-encoded pili, the SpaF pilin is a main adhesion determinant, and when present in the assembled structure can mediate pilus binding to mucus, certain extracellular matrix proteins, and different gut epithelial cell lines. However, somewhat unexpectedly, when recombinant SpaFED pili are surface-attached, we found that they could not potentiate the existing lactococcal cell-induced immune responses so elicited from intestinal- and immune-related cells, but rather instead, they could dampen them. Accordingly, we have now provided

  4. E. Coli Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days. NIH: National Institute ...

  5. [Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC)].

    PubMed

    Goto, Tetsushi; Shirano, Michinori

    2012-08-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a bacterium that is commonly found in the gut of humans and warm-blooded animals. Most strains of E. coli are harmless. Some strains however, such as enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), can cause severe foodborne disease. It is transmitted to humans primarily through consumption of contaminated foods, such as raw meal. EHEC produces toxins, known as verotoxins. EHEC that induces bloody diarrhea leads to HUS in 10% of cases. The clinical manifestations of post-diarrheal HUS include acute renal failure, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. The verocytotoxin can directly damage renal and endothelial cells. Thrombocytopenia occurs as platelets are consumed by clotting. Hemolytic anemia results from intravascular fibrin deposition, increased fragility of red blood cells, and fragmentation. PMID:22894069

  6. Recurrent Escherichia coli bacteremia.

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, J N; Mulligan, M E; Arbeit, R D

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common gram-negative organism associated with bacteremia. While recurrent E. coli urinary tract infections are well-described, recurrent E. coli bacteremia appears to be uncommon, with no episodes noted in multiple series of patients with gram-negative bacteremias. We report on 5 patients with recurrent bloodstream infections identified from a series of 163 patients with E. coli bacteremia. For each patient, the isolates from each episode were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and ribotyping and for the presence of E. coli virulence factors. For each of four patients, the index and recurrent episodes of bacteremia represented the same strain as defined by PFGE, and the strains were found to carry one or more virulence factors. The remaining patient, with two episodes of bloodstream infection separated by a 4-year interval, was infected with two isolates that did not carry any virulence factors and that were clonally related by ribotype analysis but differed by PFGE. All five patients had either a local host defense defect (three patients) or impaired systemic defenses (one patient) or both (one patient). Thus, recurrent E. coli bacteremia is likely to represent a multifactorial process that occurs in patients with impaired host defenses who are infected with virulent isolates. Images PMID:7910828

  7. Characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from Nicaraguan children in hospital, primary care and community settings.

    PubMed

    Vilchez, Samuel; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Amaya, Erick; Perez, Claudia; Paniagua, Margarita; Reyes, Daniel; Espinoza, Felix; Weintraub, Andrej

    2014-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most common causes of diarrhoea among young children in developing countries. ETEC vaccines offer promise in reducing the burden of ETEC disease, but the development of these vaccines relies on the characterization of ETEC isolates from a variety of settings. To best reflect the full spectrum of ETEC disease in León, Nicaragua, the aim of this study was to characterize ETEC strains isolated from children with diarrhoea attending different settings (hospital, primary care clinics and in the community) and children from different age groups. We characterized ETEC isolates in terms of their colonization factors (CFs) and enterotoxins, and determined whether these factors varied with setting and age group. Diarrhoeal stool samples were obtained from children under the age of 60 months from: (1) the regional public hospital, (2) four public primary care clinics, and (3) a population-based cohort. In total, 58 ETEC-positive isolates were analysed by multiplex-PCR assays for the identification of CFs (CS1, CS2, CS3, CS4, CS5, CS6, CS7, CS8, CS12, CS13, CS14, CS15, CS17, CS18, CS19, CS20, CS21, CS22 and CFA/I), and enterotoxins [heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable variants STh and STp]. The frequency of CFs and enterotoxins was compared among the three settings and for different age groups, using Fisher's exact test or a χ(2) test. At least one CF was detected among one-half of samples; CS19 was detected among all strains in which a CF was identified, either alone or in combination with another CF. Among all CFs detected, 91.7 % were identified as members of the class 5 fimbrial family. CFs were detected more commonly among samples from infants captured in the health facility setting compared with the community setting. Overall, LT was detected among 67.2 % of samples, STh was detected among 20.7 % and both enterotoxins were detected among 12.1 %. The enterotoxin STh was detected more commonly among cases

  8. Functional expression of adhesive peptides as fusions to Escherichia coli flagellin.

    PubMed

    Westerlund-Wikström, B; Tanskanen, J; Virkola, R; Hacker, J; Lindberg, M; Skurnik, M; Korhonen, T K

    1997-11-01

    An expression system for studying epitopes of adhesion proteins based on fusion of gene fragments into fliC(H7) of Escherichia coli is described. We constructed the system by an in-frame insertion of DNA fragments encoding one, two or three of the fibronectin-binding D repeats present in the fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA) of Staphylococcus aureus, into the fliC(H7) gene region encoding the variable domain of the H7 flagellin. The constructs were expressed by in trans complementation in the E. coli strain JT1 which harbours knock-out mutations for the expression of FliC as well as of the mannoside-binding fimbrial adhesin. The resulting chimeric flagella, which contained 39, 77 or 115 heterologous amino acid residues, efficiently bound soluble and immobilized human plasma and cellular fibronectin, and the binding was most efficient with the flagella containing the three D repeats of FnBPA. The chimeric flagella bound to frozen sections of human kidney and to cultured human cells. Antibodies raised against the chimeric flagella bound to Protein A-deficient S. aureus cells and inhibited the binding of staphylococci to immobilized fibronectin. We also expressed peptides, ranging in size between 48 and 302 amino acids, of the collagen-binding YadA adhesin of Yersinia enterocolitica. A fragment of 302 amino acids representing the middle region of YadA was needed for collagen binding. Chimeric flagellar filaments expressing hundreds of intimately associated adhesive epitopes offer versatile tools to analyze adhesin-receptor interactions and functional epitopes of adhesion proteins. PMID:9514121

  9. Rapid and Specific Detection, Molecular Epidemiology, and Experimental Virulence of the O16 Subgroup within Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131

    PubMed Central

    Clermont, Olivier; Johnston, Brian; Clabots, Connie; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Junka, Adam F.; Maczynska, Beata; Denamur, Erick

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131), a widely disseminated multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogen, typically exhibits serotype O25b:H4. However, certain ST131 isolates exhibit serotype O16:H5 and derive from a phylogenetic clade that is distinct from the classic O25b:H4 ST131 clade. Both clades are assigned to ST131 by the Achtman multilocus sequence typing (MLST) system and a screening PCR assay that targets ST131-specific sequence polymorphisms in the mdh and gyrB genes. However, they are classified as separate STs by the Pasteur Institute MLST system, and an ST131 PCR method that targets the O25b rfb region and an ST131-specific polymorphism in pabB detects only the O25b-associated clade. Here, we describe a novel PCR-based method that allows for rapid and specific detection of the O16-associated ST131 clade. The clade members uniformly contained allele 41 of fimH (type 1 fimbrial adhesin) and a narrow range of alleles of gyrA and parC (fluoroquinolone target genes). The virulence genotypes of the clade members resembled those of classic O25b:H4 ST131 isolates; representative isolates were variably lethal in a mouse subcutaneous sepsis model. Several pulsotypes spanned multiple sources (adults, children, pets, and human fecal samples) and locales. An analysis of recent clinical E. coli collections showed that the O16 ST131 clade is globally distributed, accounts for 1 to 5% of E. coli isolates overall, and, when compared with other ST131 isolates, it is associated with resistance to ampicillin, gentamicin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and with susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Attention to this O16-associated ST131 clade, which is facilitated by our novel PCR-based assay, is warranted in future epidemiological studies of ST131 and, conceivably, in clinical applications. PMID:24501035

  10. Genetic recombination. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, F.W.

    1987-02-01

    The molecular pathways of gene recombination are explored and compared in studies of the model organisms, Escherichia coli and phase lambda. In the discussion of data from these studies it seems that recombination varies with the genetic idiosyncrasies of the organism and may also vary within a single organism.

  11. The Orphan Gene ybjN Conveys Pleiotropic Effects on Multicellular Behavior and Survival of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongping; Calla, Bernarda; Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Wu, Xia; Korban, Schuyler S.; Huber, Steven C.; Clough, Steven J.; Zhao, Youfu

    2011-01-01

    YbjN, encoding an enterobacteria-specific protein, is a multicopy suppressor of temperature sensitivity in the ts9 mutant strain of Escherichia coli. In this study, we further explored the role(s) of ybjN. First, we demonstrated that the ybjN transcript was about 10-fold lower in the ts9 strain compared to that of E. coli strain BW25113 (BW). Introduction of multiple copies of ybjN in the ts9 strain resulted in over-expression of ybjN by about 10-fold as compared to that of BW. These results suggested that temperature sensitivity of the ts9 mutant of E. coli may be related to expression levels of ybjN. Characterization of E. coli ybjN mutant revealed that ybjN mutation resulted in pleiotropic phenotypes, including increased motility, fimbriation (auto-aggregation), exopolysaccharide production, and biofilm formation. In contrast, over-expression of ybjN (in terms of multiple copies) resulted in reduced motility, fimbriation, exopolysaccharide production, biofilm formation and acid resistance. In addition, our results indicate that a ybjN-homolog gene from Erwinia amylovora, a plant enterobacterial pathogen, is functionally conserved with that of E. coli, suggesting similar evolution of the YbjN family proteins in enterobacteria. A microarray study revealed that the expression level of ybjN was inversely correlated with the expression of flagellar, fimbrial and acid resistance genes. Over-expression of ybjN significantly down-regulated genes involved in citric acid cycle, glycolysis, the glyoxylate shunt, oxidative phosphorylation, amino acid and nucleotide metabolism. Furthermore, over-expression of ybjN up-regulated toxin-antitoxin modules, the SOS response pathway, cold shock and starvation induced transporter genes. Collectively, these results suggest that YbjN may play important roles in regulating bacterial multicellular behavior, metabolism, and survival under stress conditions in E. coli. These results also suggest that ybjN over

  12. EX VIVO ADHERENCE TO MURINE ILEAL, BIOFILM FORMATION ABILITY AND PRESENCE OF ADHERENCE-ASSOCIATED OF HUMAN AND ANIMAL DIARRHEAGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    PubMed

    Sukkua, Kannika; Rattanachuay, Pattamarat; Sukhumungoon, Pharanai

    2016-01-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) are important bacteria causing gastrointestinal infection, which can lead to severe forms of illnesses. This study focused on DEC adherent capabilities using murine intestinal tissue as a model. Ex vivo adherence results showed that enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) strain PSU280 exhibited the highest level of adherence, followed by strains from ETEC category. Scanning electron micrographs displayed tight binding and putative bacterial curli fibers, including putative fimbrial structures. The presence of putative curli fibers was confirmed by the presence of csgA, a curli major structural subunit gene. Five and 3 of 15 DEC possessed lpf (encoding long polar fimbriae) and agn43 (encoding antigen43), respectively. Comparable biofilm formation efficiency but variable levels autoaggregation were observed among the DEC strains. In addition, yeast agglutination could be visualized in 11/15 strains. This study demonstrates the adherent ability of DEC strains isolated in southern Thailand as well as a number of crucial adherence-associated genes, information of importance to the understanding of DEC pathogenesis in this region of the country. PMID:27086424

  13. Detection of pap, sfa, afa, foc, and fim Adhesin-Encoding Operons in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolates Collected From Patients With Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rahdar, Masoud; Rashki, Ahmad; Miri, Hamid Reza; Rashki Ghalehnoo, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) with its virulence factors is the most prevalent cause of urinary tract infection (UTI). Objectives; This study aimed to determine the occurrence of fim, pap, sfa, and afa genes among 100 UPEC isolates collected from patients diagnosed with UTI. Materials and Methods A total of 100 UPEC isolates were obtained from urine samples of patients with UTI. The prevalence of 5 virulence genes encoding type 1 fimbriae (fimH), pili associated with pyelonephritis (pap), S and F1C fimbriae (sfa and foc) and afimbrial adhesins (afa) were determined through PCR method. We also investigated the phylogenetic background of all isolates. In addition, the distribution of adhesin-encoding operons between the phylogroups was assessed. Results: The prevalence of genes encoding for fimbrial adhesive systems was 95% for fim, 57% for pap, 16% for foc, and 81% for sfa. The operons encoding for afa afimbrial adhesins were identified in 12% of isolates. The various combinations of detected genes were designated as virulence patterns. The fim gene, which occurred in strains from all phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2, and D) was evaluated and no significant differences were found among these groups. Conversely, significant differences were observed in relation to pap, afa, foc, and sfa operons. Conclusions: These results indicate that the PCR method is a powerful genotypic assay for the detection of adhesin-encoding operons. Thus, this assay can be recommended for clinical use to detect virulent urinary E. coli strains, as well as epidemiological studies. PMID:26464770

  14. Role of type 1 and S fimbriae in the pathogenesis of Escherichia coli O18:K1 bacteremia and meningitis in the infant rat.

    PubMed Central

    Saukkonen, K M; Nowicki, B; Leinonen, M

    1988-01-01

    The role of fimbriae in the pathogenesis of Escherichia coli infection was studied in the infant rat model. Rat pups were challenged intraperitoneally at the age of 5 days with E. coli K1 (strain IH3080, O18:K1:H7) and three different subpopulations (type 1, type S, or nonfimbriated) of it. All bacterial subpopulations were able to produce peritonitis, bacteremia, and meningitis. However, the type 1 fraction was the least virulent and the type S fraction was the most virulent, as judged by the bacterial counts in body fluids and by the mortality rates of the pups. Fimbrial phase variation to mainly the type-S-fimbriated forms was observed in all body fluids. An initially type-S-fimbriated inoculum remained predominantly type S fimbriated in the peritoneal fluid and blood. In the cerebrospinal fluid, however, about 50% of the bacteria were type S fimbriated and 50% were nonfimbriated 1 h after challenge with the type-S-fimbriated subpopulation; at later times the share of type-S-fimbriated bacteria also increased in the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:2894363

  15. Characterization of the Escherichia coli AF/R1 pilus operon: novel genes necessary for transcriptional regulation and for pilus-mediated adherence.

    PubMed

    Cantey, J R; Blake, R K; Williford, J R; Moseley, S L

    1999-05-01

    We isolated the genetic determinant of AF/R1 pilus production in attaching/effacing Escherichia coli RDEC-1 and identified seven genes required for pilus expression and function. DNA sequence analysis of the structural subunit gene afrA corrected an error in the published sequence and extended homology with the F18 pilus subunit of pig edema E. coli strains. AfrB and AfrC, encoded downstream from AfrA, were required for pilus expression. AfrB was related to the usher protein PefC of Salmonella typhimurium plasmid-encoded fimbriae, and AfrC was related to PefD, a chaperone protein. AfrD and AfrE, encoded downstream from AfrC, were not necessary for the expression of AF/R1 pili but were required for ileal adherence as assayed by ileal brush border aggregation. Thus, the adhesive subunit of the AF/R1 pilus is distinct from the structural subunit, as is the case for Pap pili and type 1 pili. AfrD was related to FedE of the F18 fimbrial operon of the E. coli strain that causes edema disease in pigs. AfrE was a novel protein. AfrR and AfrS are encoded upstream from AfrA, in the opposite orientation. AfrR is related to the AraC family of transcriptional regulators, and AfrR and AfrS interact to function in a novel mode of transcriptional activation of afrA. AF/R1 pili mediate the adherence to Peyer's patch M cells, ileal mucosa, and colonic mucosa in a rabbit model of diarrhea caused by enteropathogenic E. coli. Our observations will facilitate the further study of the phenomena of M-cell adherence. PMID:10225886

  16. Characterization of the Escherichia coli AF/R1 Pilus Operon: Novel Genes Necessary for Transcriptional Regulation and for Pilus-Mediated Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Cantey, J. Robert; Blake, R. K.; Williford, J. R.; Moseley, Steve L.

    1999-01-01

    We isolated the genetic determinant of AF/R1 pilus production in attaching/effacing Escherichia coli RDEC-1 and identified seven genes required for pilus expression and function. DNA sequence analysis of the structural subunit gene afrA corrected an error in the published sequence and extended homology with the F18 pilus subunit of pig edema E. coli strains. AfrB and AfrC, encoded downstream from AfrA, were required for pilus expression. AfrB was related to the usher protein PefC of Salmonella typhimurium plasmid-encoded fimbriae, and AfrC was related to PefD, a chaperone protein. AfrD and AfrE, encoded downstream from AfrC, were not necessary for the expression of AF/R1 pili but were required for ileal adherence as assayed by ileal brush border aggregation. Thus, the adhesive subunit of the AF/R1 pilus is distinct from the structural subunit, as is the case for Pap pili and type 1 pili. AfrD was related to FedE of the F18 fimbrial operon of the E. coli strain that causes edema disease in pigs. AfrE was a novel protein. AfrR and AfrS are encoded upstream from AfrA, in the opposite orientation. AfrR is related to the AraC family of transcriptional regulators, and AfrR and AfrS interact to function in a novel mode of transcriptional activation of afrA. AF/R1 pili mediate the adherence to Peyer’s patch M cells, ileal mucosa, and colonic mucosa in a rabbit model of diarrhea caused by enteropathogenic E. coli. Our observations will facilitate the further study of the phenomena of M-cell adherence. PMID:10225886

  17. Characterization of unstable pEntYN10 from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) O169:H41.

    PubMed

    Ban, Erika; Yoshida, Yuka; Wakushima, Mitsuko; Wajima, Takeaki; Hamabata, Takashi; Ichikawa, Naoki; Abe, Hiroyuki; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko; Kage-Nakadai, Eriko; Yamamoto, Taro; Wada, Takayuki; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) serotype O169:H41 has been an extremely destructive epidemic ETEC type worldwide. The strain harbors a large unstable plasmid that is regarded as responsible for its virulence, although its etiology has remained unknown. To examine its genetic background specifically on the unstable retention and responsibility in the unique adherence to epithelial cells and enterotoxin production, the complete sequence of a plasmid, pEntYN10, purified from the serotype strain was determined. The length is 145,082 bp; its GC content is 46.15%. It contains 182 CDSs, which include 3 colonization factors (CFs), an enterotoxin, and large number of insertion sequences. The repertory of plasmid stability genes was extraordinarily scant. Uniquely, results showed that 3 CFs, CS6, CS8 (CFA/III)-like, and K88 (F4)-like were encoded redundantly in the plasmid with unique variations among previously known subtypes. These three CFs preserved their respective gene structures similarly to those of other ETEC strains reported previously with unique sequence variations respectively. It is particularly interesting that the K88-like gene cluster of pEntYN10 had 2 paralogous copies of faeG, which encodes the major component of fimbrial structure. It remains to be verified how the unique variations found in the CFs respectively affect the affinity to infected cells, host range, and virulence of the ETEC strain. PMID:26575107

  18. Virulence factors in Escherichia coli strains isolated from Swedish piglets with diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Söderlind, O; Thafvelin, B; Möllby, R

    1988-01-01

    Parenteral vaccination of sows against Escherichia coli diarrhea in their newborn piglets has become more common during the last decade in Sweden, and the vaccination has generally had positive effects. For more than 20 years we have investigated E. coli strains isolated from piglets and weaned pigs with enteric disorders, noting the presence of O groups, enterotoxins, and adhesins. There has been a continuous change in the frequency of these virulence factors. The present study was performed during 1983 and 1984 to follow this change, since such information is essential for the proper choice of vaccines. A total of 856 E. coli strains were obtained from 683 herds divided into three age groups: 1 to 6 days old, 1 to 6 weeks old, and weaned pigs. O group 149 still dominated in the last two age groups, while O group 101 was, for the first time, the most frequent O group in neonatal piglets. All but four O149 strains carried the K88 antigen, which was found in only one other strain (O group 8). K99 antigen was most often found in O groups 101 and 64, and among all the K99 strains ST mouse was the most common (44 of 57), followed by ST mouse-ST pig strains (12 of 57). The 987P antigen was demonstrated in 26 strains belonging to O groups 141 and OX46 and nontypable strains. Two strains belonging to O group 101 were positive for F41 antigen; one of them also carried the K99 antigen. Among all non-O149 strains, ST mouse was the most common type of enterotoxigenic E. coli ( n = 88), followed in decreasing order by ST mouse-ST pig strains ( n = 69) and ST pig strains ( n = 33). In 114 strains producing enterotoxins no adhesive factor was found. Thus, vaccination of the Swedish sow population for more than 5 years with vaccines containing O149 and K88 antigens has apparently changed the pattern of enterotoxigenic E. coli in neonatal diarrhea. The frequency of O149:K88 strains has been reduced, and O101:K99:ST mouse strains now dominate. However, O149 strains remain the

  19. The Role of Long Polar Fimbriae in Escherichia coli O104:H4 Adhesion and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Brittany N.; Rojas-Lopez, Maricarmen; Cieza, Roberto J.; McWilliams, Brian D.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2015-01-01

    A renewed interest in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains was sparked due to the appearance of an outbreak in 2011, causing 3,816 diarrheal cases and some deaths in Europe. The causative strain was classified as enteroaggregative E. coli of serotype O104:H4 that had acquired Shiga toxin genes. The ability of STEC O104:H4 to cause disease relies greatly on the bacteria’s capacity to colonize, persist, and produce Shiga toxin. However, not much is known about the colonization factors of this strain. Because long polar fimbriae (lpf) lpf1 and lpf2 operons encode important colonization factors in other STEC isolates and E. coli O104:H4 possesses both loci, we hypothesized that Lpf is required for adhesion and colonization. In this study, isogenic lpfA1 and lpfA2 major fimbrial subunit mutants were constructed. To determine their role in O104:H4’s virulence, we assessed their ability to adhere to non-polarized and polarized intestinal epithelial cells. The ΔlpfA1 showed decreased adherence in both cell systems, while the ΔlpfA2 only showed a decrease in adherence to polarized Caco-2 cells. We also tested the O104:H4 mutants’ ability to form biofilm and found that the ΔlpfA1 was unable to form a stable biofilm. In an in vivo murine model of intestinal colonization, the ΔlpfA1 had a reduced ability to colonize the cecum and large intestine, consistent with the in vitro data. Further, we tested the lpfA1 mutants’ ability to compete against the wild type. We found that in the in vitro and in vivo models, the presence of the wild type O104:H4 facilitates increased adherence of the ΔlpfA1 to levels exceeding that of the wild type. Overall, our data demonstrated that Lpf1 is one of the factors responsible for O104:H4 intestinal adhesion and colonization. PMID:26517878

  20. Structural and Functional Insight into the Carbohydrate Receptor Binding of F4 Fimbriae-producing Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli *

    PubMed Central

    Moonens, Kristof; Van den Broeck, Imke; De Kerpel, Maia; Deboeck, Francine; Raymaekers, Hanne; Remaut, Han; De Greve, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are important causes of intestinal disease in humans and lead to severe production losses in animal farming. A range of fimbrial adhesins in ETEC strains determines host and tissue tropism. ETEC strains expressing F4 fimbriae are associated with neonatal and post-weaning diarrhea in piglets. Three naturally occurring variants of F4 fimbriae (F4ab, F4ac, and F4ad) exist that differ in the primary sequence of their major adhesive subunit FaeG, and each features a related yet distinct receptor binding profile. Here the x-ray structure of FaeGad bound to lactose provides the first structural insight into the receptor specificity and mode of binding by the poly-adhesive F4 fimbriae. A small D′-D″-α1-α2 subdomain grafted on the immunoglobulin-like core of FaeG hosts the carbohydrate binding site. Two short amino acid stretches Phe150–Glu152 and Val166–Glu170 of FaeGad bind the terminal galactose in the lactosyl unit and provide affinity and specificity to the interaction. A hemagglutination-based assay with E. coli expressing mutant F4ad fimbriae confirmed the elucidated co-complex structure. Interestingly, the crucial D′-α1 loop that borders the FaeGad binding site adopts a different conformation in the two other FaeG variants and hints at a heterogeneous binding pocket among the FaeG serotypes. PMID:25631050

  1. Functional Heterogeneity of the UpaH Autotransporter Protein from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Allsopp, Luke P.; Beloin, Christophe; Moriel, Danilo Gomes; Totsika, Makrina; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is responsible for the majority of urinary tract infections (UTI). To cause a UTI, UPEC must adhere to the epithelial cells of the urinary tract and overcome the shear flow forces of urine. This function is mediated primarily by fimbrial adhesins, which mediate specific attachment to host cell receptors. Another group of adhesins that contributes to UPEC-mediated UTI is autotransporter (AT) proteins. AT proteins possess a range of virulence properties, such as adherence, aggregation, invasion, and biofilm formation. One recently characterized AT protein of UPEC is UpaH, a large adhesin-involved-in-diffuse-adherence (AIDA-I)-type AT protein that contributes to biofilm formation and bladder colonization. In this study we characterized a series of naturally occurring variants of UpaH. We demonstrate that extensive sequence variation exists within the passenger-encoding domain of UpaH variants from different UPEC strains. This sequence variation is associated with functional heterogeneity with respect to the ability of UpaH to mediate biofilm formation. In contrast, all of the UpaH variants examined retained a conserved ability to mediate binding to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Bioinformatic analysis of the UpaH passenger domain identified a conserved region (UpaHCR) and a hydrophobic region (UpaHHR). Deletion of these domains reduced biofilm formation but not the binding to ECM proteins. Despite variation in the upaH sequence, the transcription of upaH was repressed by a conserved mechanism involving the global regulator H-NS, and mutation of the hns gene relieved this repression. Overall, our findings shed new light on the regulation and functions of the UpaH AT protein. PMID:22904291

  2. Characterization of oligomeric assembly of colonization factor CS6 from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sabui, Subrata; Debnath, Anusuya; Ghosal, Abhisek; Wajima, Takeaki; Hamabata, Takashi; Ramamurthy, T; Ghosh, A N; Basak, Soumen; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar

    2016-01-01

    The widely distributed colonization factor (CF) CS6 of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) has gained importance over the years in terms of its structure and function. CS6 is an afimbrial assembly in contrast to the other ETEC CFs, which are mostly fimbrial. A recent study predicted a linear fibre model for recombinant chimeric CS6 and formation of oligomers in solution. In this study, we characterized the oligomeric assembly of CS6, purified from a clinical ETEC isolate and identified its existence in the WT strain. We found that purified CS6 forms a continuous array of higher order oligomers composed of two tightly associated subunits, CssA and CssB in an equal (1:1) stoichiometry. This oligomerization occurs by formation of (CssA-CssB)n complex where 'n' increases with the concentration. The diameter of CS6 oligomers also proportionally increases with concentration. More significantly, we showed CS6 oligomers to be spherical in shape instead of being linear fibres as predicted earlier and this was further confirmed by electron microscopy. We also showed CS6 assembled on the bacterial surface in the form of an oligomeric complex. This process depends on the expression of properly folded CssA and CssB together, guided by the chaperone CssC and usher CssD. In conclusion, our results provide evidence for the existence of concentration-dependent, spherical oligomers of CS6 comprising both the structural subunits in equal stoichiometry and the CS6 oligomeric complex on the ETEC surface. PMID:26383084

  3. sRNA-Mediated Regulation of P-Fimbriae Phase Variation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Khandige, Surabhi; Kronborg, Tina; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2015-08-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are capable of occupying physiologically distinct intracellular and extracellular niches within the urinary tract. This feat requires the timely regulation of gene expression and small RNAs (sRNAs) are known to mediate such rapid adjustments in response to changing environmental cues. This study aimed to uncover sRNA-mediated gene regulation in the UPEC strain UTI89, during infection of bladder epithelial cells. Hfq is an RNA chaperone known to facilitate and stabilize sRNA and target mRNA interactions with bacterial cells. The co-immunoprecipitation and high throughput RNA sequencing of Hfq bound sRNAs performed in this study, revealed distinct sRNA profiles in UPEC in the extracellular and intracellular environments. Our findings emphasize the importance of studying regulatory sRNAs in a biologically relevant niche. This strategy also led to the discovery of a novel virulence-associated trans-acting sRNA-PapR. Deletion of papR was found to enhance adhesion of UTI89 to both bladder and kidney cell lines in a manner independent of type-1 fimbriae. We demonstrate PapR mediated posttranscriptional repression of the P-fimbriae phase regulator gene papI and postulate a role for such regulation in fimbrial cross-talk at the population level in UPEC. Our results further implicate the Leucine responsive protein (LRP) as a transcriptional activator regulating PapR expression. Our study reports, for the first time, a role for sRNAs in regulation of P-fimbriae phase variation and emphasizes the importance of studying pathogenesis-specific sRNAs within a relevant biological niche. PMID:26291711

  4. Emerging Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains?

    PubMed Central

    Irino, Kinue; Girão, Dennys M.; Girão, Valéria B.C.; Guth, Beatriz E.C.; Vaz, Tânia M.I.; Moreira, Fabiana C.; Chinarelli, Silvia H.; Vieira, Mônica A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains of nonenteropathogenic serogroups carrying eae but lacking the enteropathogenic E. coli adherence factor plasmid and Shiga toxin DNA probe sequences were isolated from patients (children, adults, and AIDS patients) with and without diarrhea in Brazil. Although diverse in phenotype and genotype, some strains are potentially diarrheagenic. PMID:15504277

  5. Transcriptional analysis of the MrpJ network: modulation of diverse virulence-associated genes and direct regulation of mrp fimbrial and flhDC flagellar operons in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Bode, Nadine J; Debnath, Irina; Kuan, Lisa; Schulfer, Anjelique; Ty, Maureen; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-06-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is associated with a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Strict regulation of the antagonistic processes of adhesion and motility, mediated by fimbriae and flagella, respectively, is essential for disease progression. Previously, the transcriptional regulator MrpJ, which is encoded by the mrp fimbrial operon, has been shown to repress both swimming and swarming motility. Here we show that MrpJ affects an array of cellular processes beyond adherence and motility. Microarray analysis found that expression of mrpJ mimicking levels observed during UTIs leads to differential expression of 217 genes related to, among other functions, bacterial virulence, type VI secretion, and metabolism. We probed the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MrpJ using transcriptional reporters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Binding of MrpJ to two virulence-associated target gene promoters, the promoters of the flagellar master regulator flhDC and mrp itself, appears to be affected by the condensation state of the native chromosome, although both targets share a direct MrpJ binding site proximal to the transcriptional start. Furthermore, an mrpJ deletion mutant colonized the bladders of mice at significantly lower levels in a transurethral model of infection. Additionally, we observed that mrpJ is widely conserved in a collection of recent clinical isolates. Altogether, these findings support a role of MrpJ as a global regulator of P. mirabilis virulence. PMID:25847961

  6. Transcriptional Analysis of the MrpJ Network: Modulation of Diverse Virulence-Associated Genes and Direct Regulation of mrp Fimbrial and flhDC Flagellar Operons in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Nadine J.; Debnath, Irina; Kuan, Lisa; Schulfer, Anjelique; Ty, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is associated with a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Strict regulation of the antagonistic processes of adhesion and motility, mediated by fimbriae and flagella, respectively, is essential for disease progression. Previously, the transcriptional regulator MrpJ, which is encoded by the mrp fimbrial operon, has been shown to repress both swimming and swarming motility. Here we show that MrpJ affects an array of cellular processes beyond adherence and motility. Microarray analysis found that expression of mrpJ mimicking levels observed during UTIs leads to differential expression of 217 genes related to, among other functions, bacterial virulence, type VI secretion, and metabolism. We probed the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MrpJ using transcriptional reporters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Binding of MrpJ to two virulence-associated target gene promoters, the promoters of the flagellar master regulator flhDC and mrp itself, appears to be affected by the condensation state of the native chromosome, although both targets share a direct MrpJ binding site proximal to the transcriptional start. Furthermore, an mrpJ deletion mutant colonized the bladders of mice at significantly lower levels in a transurethral model of infection. Additionally, we observed that mrpJ is widely conserved in a collection of recent clinical isolates. Altogether, these findings support a role of MrpJ as a global regulator of P. mirabilis virulence. PMID:25847961

  7. Characterisation of cisplatin coordination sites in cellular Escherichia coli DNA-binding proteins by combined biphasic liquid chromatography and ESI tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Will, Joanna; Sheldrick, William S; Wolters, Dirk

    2008-03-01

    Combined multidimensional liquid chromatography and electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry was employed to analyse platinated tryptic peptides from Escherichia coli cells treated with the anticancer drug cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2] at pH 7.0. Prerequisites for the LC/LC/MS/MS analysis of protein targets that are fulfilled by cisplatin are (a) that the original protein binding sites have a high kinetic stability over the range 2.3 < pH < 8.5, and (b) that the metal fragment remains coordinated to a significant number of b+ and y+ peptide ions under MS/MS fragmentation conditions. Matching the MS/MS spectra of the platinated tryptic peptides to sequences of proteins in the E. coli database enabled the identification of 31 protein targets for cisplatin. Whereas six of these are high-abundance enzymes and ribosomal proteins in E. coli cells, five low-abundance DNA-binding proteins were also identified as specific targets. These include the DNA mismatch repair protein mutS, the DNA helicase II (uvrD) and topoisomerase I (top1). Two efflux proteins (acrD, mdtA), the redox regulator thioredoxin 1 (thiO) and the external filament-like type-1 fimbrial protein A chain (fimA1) were also characterised as specific cisplatin-binding proteins. Kinetically favoured carboxylate (D, E) and hydroxy (S, T, Y) O atoms were identified as the Pt coordination sites in 18 proteins and methionyl S atoms in 9 proteins. PMID:18157731

  8. Functional Analysis of Antigen 43 in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Reveals a Role in Long-Term Persistence in the Urinary Tract▿

    PubMed Central

    Ulett, Glen C.; Valle, Jaione; Beloin, Christophe; Sherlock, Orla; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Schembri, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the primary cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) in the developed world. The major factors associated with the virulence of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are fimbrial adhesins, which mediate specific attachment to host receptors and trigger innate host responses. Another group of adhesins is represented by the autotransporter subgroup of proteins. The best characterized of these proteins, antigen 43 (Ag43), is a self-recognizing adhesin that is associated with cell aggregation and biofilm formation in E. coli K-12. The sequenced genome of prototype UPEC strain CFT073 contains two variant Ag43-encoding genes located on pathogenicity islands. The biological significance of both of these genes and their role in UPEC pathogenesis have not been investigated previously. Here we performed a detailed molecular characterization analysis of Ag43a (c3655) and Ag43b (c1273) from UPEC CFT073. Expression of Ag43a and Ag43b in a K-12 background revealed that they possess different functional properties. Ag43a produced a strong aggregation phenotype and promoted significant biofilm growth. Deletion mutants and strains constitutively expressing Ag43a and Ag43b were also constructed using CFT073. When these mutants were analyzed in a mouse model of UTI, Ag43a (but not Ag43b) promoted long-term persistence in the urinary bladder. Our findings demonstrate that Ag43a contributes to UPEC disease pathogenesis and reveal that there are pathogenicity-adapted variants of Ag43 with distinct virulence-related functions. PMID:17420234

  9. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur containing heterocyclic molecules by mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which were selected for improved oxidation of furan and thiophene derivatives. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research as it appears to be of central importance in thiophene oxidation. We hope that analysis of the thd gene of E. coli will lead to improvement of our thiophene metabolizing bacterial strains.

  10. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur containing heterocyclic molecules such as those found in coal, by mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which were selected for improved oxidation of furan and thiophene derivatives. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research as it appears to be of central importance in thiophene oxidation. We hope that analysis of the thd genes of E. coli will lead to improvement of our thiophene metabolizing bacterial strains. 1 tab.

  11. Inhibition and Reversal of Microbial Attachment by an Antibody with Parasteric Activity against the FimH Adhesin of Uropathogenic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Della; Jalan, Aachal; Gupta, Shivani; Interlandi, Gianluca; Liu, Yan; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Rodriguez, Victoria B.; Sumida, John P.; Strong, Roland K.; Wu, Xue-Ru; Thomas, Wendy E.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2015-01-01

    Attachment proteins from the surface of eukaryotic cells, bacteria and viruses are critical receptors in cell adhesion or signaling and are primary targets for the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. It is proposed that the ligand-binding pocket in receptor proteins can shift between inactive and active conformations with weak and strong ligand-binding capability, respectively. Here, using monoclonal antibodies against a vaccine target protein - fimbrial adhesin FimH of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, we demonstrate that unusually strong receptor inhibition can be achieved by antibody that binds within the binding pocket and displaces the ligand in a non-competitive way. The non-competitive antibody binds to a loop that interacts with the ligand in the active conformation of the pocket but is shifted away from ligand in the inactive conformation. We refer to this as a parasteric inhibition, where the inhibitor binds adjacent to the ligand in the binding pocket. We showed that the receptor-blocking mechanism of parasteric antibody differs from that of orthosteric inhibition, where the inhibitor replaces the ligand or allosteric inhibition where the inhibitor binds at a site distant from the ligand, and is very potent in blocking bacterial adhesion, dissolving surface-adherent biofilms and protecting mice from urinary bladder infection. PMID:25974133

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analyses of several forms of the CfaB major subunit of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I fimbriae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Fu; Poole, Steven; Rasulova, Fatima; McVeigh, Annette L.; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di

    2009-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a major global cause of diarrhea, initiates the pathogenic process via fimbriae-mediated attachment to the small intestinal epithelium. A common prototypic ETEC fimbria, colo­nization factor antigen I (CFA/I), consists of a tip-localized minor adhesive subunit CfaE and the stalk-forming major subunit CfaB, both of which are necessary for fimbrial assembly. To elucidate the structure of CFA/I at atomic resolution, three recombinant proteins were generated consisting of fusions of the minor and major subunits (CfaEB) and of two (CfaBB) and three (CfaBBB) repeats of the major subunit. Crystals of CfaEB diffracted X-rays to 2.1 Å resolution and displayed the symmetry of space group P21. CfaBB exhibited a crystal diffraction limit of 2.3 Å resolution and had the symmetry of space group P21212. CfaBBB crystallized in the monoclinic space group C2 and diffracted X-­rays to 2.3 Å resolution. These structures were determined using the molecular-replacement method. PMID:19255474

  13. Epigenetic Influence of Dam Methylation on Gene Expression and Attachment in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Stacy Ann-Marie; Brown, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequently encountered infections in clinical practice globally. Predominantly a burden among female adults and infants, UTIs primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) results in high morbidity and fiscal health strains. During pathogenesis, colonization of the urinary tract via fimbrial adhesion to mucosal cells is the most critical point in infection and has been linked to DNA methylation. Furthermore, with continuous exposure to antibiotics as the standard therapeutic strategy, UPEC has evolved to become highly adaptable in circumventing the effect of antimicrobial agents and host defenses. Hence, the need for alternative treatment strategies arises. Since differential DNA methylation is observed as a critical precursor to virulence in various pathogenic bacteria, this body of work sought to assess the influence of the DNA adenine methylase (dam) gene on gene expression and cellular adhesion in UPEC and its potential as a therapeutic target. To monitor the influence of dam on attachment and FQ resistance, selected UPEC dam mutants created via one-step allelic exchange were transformed with cloned qnrA and dam complement plasmid for comparative analysis of growth rate, antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm formation, gene expression, and mammalian cell attachment. The absence of DNA methylation among dam mutants was apparent. Varying deficiencies in cell growth, antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation, alongside low-level increases in gene expression (recA and papI), and adherence to HEK-293 and HTB-9 mammalian cells were also detected as a factor of SOS induction to result in increased mutability. Phenotypic characteristics of parental strains were restored in dam complement strains. Dam’s vital role in DNA methylation and gene expression in local UPEC isolates was confirmed. Similarly to dam-deficient Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), these findings suggest unsuccessful therapeutic use

  14. Pneumatosis coli in a dog.

    PubMed

    Russell, Nicholas J; Tyrrell, Dayle; Irwin, Peter J; Beck, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    A 17-year-old, castrated male Maltese was presented with chronic polyphagia and a 2-week history of tenesmus, diarrhea, hematochezia, weight loss, and ribbon-like feces. Pneumatosis coli was diagnosed by abdominal radiography. Concurrent hyperadrenocorticism was suspected. The clinical signs of colorectal disease resolved within 2 days of initiating a lowresidue diet and oral metronidazole. Pneumatosis coli should be considered as a differential diagnosis for colorectal disease in dogs. PMID:18175797

  15. FimH family of type 1 fimbrial adhesins: functional heterogeneity due to minor sequence variations among fimH genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sokurenko, E V; Courtney, H S; Ohman, D E; Klemm, P; Hasty, D L

    1994-01-01

    We recently reported that the type 1-fimbriated Escherichia coli strains CSH-50 and HB101(pPKL4), both K-12 derivatives, have different patterns of adhesion to yeast mannan, human plasma fibronectin, and fibronectin derivatives, suggesting functional heterogeneity of type 1 fimbriae. In this report, we provide evidence that this functional heterogeneity is due to variations in the fimH genes. We also investigated functional heterogeneity among clinical isolates and whether variation in fimH genes accounts for differences in receptor specificity. Twelve isolates obtained from human urine were tested for their ability to adhere to mannan, fibronectin, periodate-treated fibronectin, and a synthetic peptide copying the 30 amino-terminal residues of fibronectin. CSH-50 and HB101(pPKL4) were tested for comparison. Selected isolates were also tested for adhesion to purified fragments spanning the entire fibronectin molecule. Three distinct functional classes, designated M, MF, and MFP, were observed. The fimH genes were amplified by PCR from chromosomal DNA obtained from representative strains and expressed in a delta fim strain (AAEC191A) transformed with a recombinant plasmid containing the entire fim gene cluster but with a translational stop-linker inserted into the fimH gene (pPKL114). Cloned fimH genes conferred on AAEC191A(pPKL114) receptor specificities mimicking those of the parent strains from which the fimH genes were obtained, demonstrating that the FimH subunits are responsible for the functional heterogeneity. Representative fimH genes were sequenced, and the deduced amino acid sequences were compared with the previously published FimH sequence. Allelic variants exhibiting >98% homology and encoding proteins differing by as little as a single amino acid substitution confer distinct adhesive phenotypes. This unexpected adhesive diversity within the FimH family broadens the scope of potential receptors for enterobacterial adhesion and may lead to a fundamental

  16. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaA, a molecular chaperone essential for the assembly of CFA/I fimbriae of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Rui; Esser, Lothar; Poole, Steven; McVeigh, Annette; Chen, Yu-xing; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of pilus bioassembly in Gram-negative bacteria stems mainly from studies of P pili and type 1 fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which are mediated by the classic chaperone–usher pathway (CUP). However, CFA/I fimbriae, a class 5 fimbria and intestinal colonization factor for enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), are proposed to assemble via the alternate chaperone pathway (ACP). Both CUP and ACP fimbrial bioassembly pathways require the function of a periplasmic chaperone, but their corresponding proteins share very low similarity in primary sequence. Here, the crystallization of the CFA/I periplasmic chaperone CfaA by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method is reported. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected from a native CfaA crystal to 2 Å resolution and to 1.8 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively, from a lead and a platinum derivative. These crystals displayed the symmetry of space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.6, b = 28.68, c = 90.60 Å, β = 119.7°. Initial phases were derived from multiple isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering experiments using the data from the platinum and lead derivatives. This resulted in an interpretable electron-density map showing one CfaA molecule in an asymmetric unit. Sequence assignments were aided by anomalous signals from the heavy-atom derivatives. Refinement of the atomic model of CfaA is ongoing, which is expected to further understanding of the essential aspects and allowable variations in tertiary structure of the greater family of chaperones involved in chaperone–usher mediated bioassembly. PMID:24637755

  17. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaA, a molecular chaperone essential for the assembly of CFA/I fimbriae of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bao, Rui; Esser, Lothar; Poole, Steven; McVeigh, Annette; Chen, Yu Xing; Savarino, Stephen J; Xia, Di

    2014-02-01

    Understanding of pilus bioassembly in Gram-negative bacteria stems mainly from studies of P pili and type 1 fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which are mediated by the classic chaperone-usher pathway (CUP). However, CFA/I fimbriae, a class 5 fimbria and intestinal colonization factor for enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), are proposed to assemble via the alternate chaperone pathway (ACP). Both CUP and ACP fimbrial bioassembly pathways require the function of a periplasmic chaperone, but their corresponding proteins share very low similarity in primary sequence. Here, the crystallization of the CFA/I periplasmic chaperone CfaA by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method is reported. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected from a native CfaA crystal to 2 Å resolution and to 1.8 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively, from a lead and a platinum derivative. These crystals displayed the symmetry of space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.6, b = 28.68, c = 90.60 Å, β = 119.7°. Initial phases were derived from multiple isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering experiments using the data from the platinum and lead derivatives. This resulted in an interpretable electron-density map showing one CfaA molecule in an asymmetric unit. Sequence assignments were aided by anomalous signals from the heavy-atom derivatives. Refinement of the atomic model of CfaA is ongoing, which is expected to further understanding of the essential aspects and allowable variations in tertiary structure of the greater family of chaperones involved in chaperone-usher mediated bioassembly. PMID:24637755

  18. Global analysis of posttranscriptional regulation by GlmY and GlmZ in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Charley C; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2015-04-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a significant human pathogen and is the cause of bloody diarrhea and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The virulence repertoire of EHEC includes the genes within the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) that are largely organized in five operons, LEE1 to LEE5, which encode a type III secretion system, several effectors, chaperones, and regulatory proteins. In addition, EHEC also encodes several non-LEE-encoded effectors and fimbrial operons. The virulence genes of this pathogen are under a large amount of posttranscriptional regulation. The small RNAs (sRNAs) GlmY and GlmZ activate the translation of glucosamine synthase (GlmS) in E. coli K-12, and in EHEC they destabilize the 3' fragments of the LEE4 and LEE5 operons and promote translation of the non-LEE-encoded effector EspFu. We investigated the global changes of EHEC gene expression governed by GlmY and GlmZ using RNA sequencing and gene arrays. This study extends the known effects of GlmY and GlmZ regulation to show that they promote expression of the curli adhesin, repress the expression of tryptophan metabolism genes, and promote the expression of acid resistance genes and the non-LEE-encoded effector NleA. In addition, seven novel EHEC-specific sRNAs were identified using RNA sequencing, and three of them--sRNA56, sRNA103, and sRNA350--were shown to regulate urease, fimbria, and the LEE, respectively. These findings expand the knowledge of posttranscriptional regulation in EHEC. PMID:25605763

  19. Identification of a cross-reactive continuous B-cell epitope in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I.

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, A; Svennerholm, A M

    1996-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) colonizes the intestine by means of several antigenically distinct colonization factors (CFs). Several of these CFs have very significant amino acid sequence similarity or identity, particularly in the N-terminal end. We have previously shown that a monoclonal antibody (MAb) raised against the subunits of colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae, which reacts with a peptide corresponding to the 25 N-terminal amino acids of such subunits, can inhibit attachment to intestinal cells of ETEC expressing heterologous as well as homologous CFs, with related amino acid sequences. In this study we have, by means of Pepscan analysis, determined the sequence of the MAb-specific linear epitope to be 15IDLLQ19. Parenteral immunization of rabbits with an N-terminal 25-mer synthetic peptide of CFA/I fimbrial subunit, either covalently coupled to bovine serum albumin or uncoupled, induced high titers of specific antibodies against this peptide as well as against CFA/I fimbriae. Increased titers against several heterologous CF fimbriae with a related N-terminal sequence were also induced, whereas no increase was seen against fimbriae with an unrelated sequence. Neither antisera against the coupled peptide nor antisera against the uncoupled peptide inhibited binding of CF-expressing bacteria to the human intestinal cell line Caco-2 in spite of high titers. The difference in the inhibitory capabilities of the antipeptide sera and the MAb might be due to slightly different epitope specificities. Thus, whereas the antipeptide sera bound to several continuous epitopes in the N-terminal end, none of them reacted specifically with the epitope 15IDLLQ19. PMID:8890199

  20. Modeling of the elongation and retraction of Escherichia coli P pili under strain by Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Björnham, Oscar; Axner, Ove; Andersson, Magnus

    2008-04-01

    P pili are fimbrial adhesion organelles expressed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli in the upper urinary tract. They constitute a stiff helix-like polymer consisting of a number of subunits joined by head-to-tail bonds. The elongation and retraction properties of individual P pili exposed to strain have been modeled by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The simulation model is based upon a three-state energy landscape that deforms under an applied force. Bond opening and closure are modeled by Bells theory while the elongation of the linearized part of the pilus is described by a worm-like chain model. The simulations are compared with measurements made by force measuring optical tweezers. It was found that the simulations can reproduce pili elongation as well as retraction, under both equilibrium and dynamic conditions, including entropic effects. It is shown that the simulations allow for an assessment of various model parameters, e.g. the unfolding force, energy barrier heights, and various distances in the energy landscape, including their stochastic spread that analytical models are unable to do. The results demonstrate that MC simulations are useful to model elongation and retraction properties of P pili, and therefore presumably also other types of pili, exposed to strain and/or stress. MC simulations are particularly suited for description of helix-like pili since these have an intricate self-regulating mechanical elongation behavior that makes analytical descriptions non-trivial when dynamic processes are studied, or if additional interactions in the rod or the behavior of the adhesion tip needs to be modeled. PMID:17926029

  1. Transcriptional analysis and regulation of the sfa determinant coding for S fimbriae of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Morschhäuser, J; Uhlin, B E; Hacker, J

    1993-04-01

    The sfa determinant codes for S fimbrial adhesins which constitute adherence factors of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains. We have recently shown that the sfa determinant is transcribed from three promoters, pA, pB, and pC. In comparison with the promoters pB and pC, promoter pA, which is located in front of the structural gene sfaA, showed very weak activity. Here we have determined the exact positions of the mRNA start points by primer extension studies. We have also shown that mRNAs of 500, 700 and 1400 bases can be detected using oligonucleotide probes specific for the genes sfaB, sfaC and sfaA. SfaB and SfaC are positive regulators influencing fimbriation and the production of the S-specific adhesin which is encoded by the gene sfaS located in the distal half of the determinant. In addition, it is demonstrated that SfaB and SfaC interfere with the regulatory effect of the histone-like protein H-NS, encoded by a locus termed drdX or osmZ. In a drdX+ strain the regulators are necessary for transcription of the sfa determinant. In contrast, sfa expression is activator-independent in a drdX- strain. In this latter genetic background, a substantial fraction of the sfa transcripts is initiated from promoter pA. On the basis of these data we discuss a model for the regulation of this adhesin-specific determinant. PMID:8097559

  2. Regulation and binding properties of S fimbriae cloned from E. coli strains causing urinary tract infection and meningitis.

    PubMed

    Morschhäuser, J; Vetter, V; Korhonen, T; Uhlin, B E; Hacker, J

    1993-04-01

    S fimbriae are able to recognize receptor molecules containing sialic acid and are produced by pathogenic E. coli strains causing urinary tract infection and menigitis. In order to characterize the corresponding genetic determinant, termed S fimbrial adhesin (sfa) gene cluster, we have cloned the S-specific genes from a urinary pathogen and from a meningitis isolate. Nine genes are involved in the production of S fimbriae, two of these, sfaB and sfaC code for regulatory proteins being necessary for the expression of S fimbriae. Two promoters, PB and PC, are located in front of these genes. Transcription of the sfa determinant is influenced by activation of the promoters via SfaB and SfaC, the action of the H-NS protein and an RNaseE-specific mRNA processing. In addition, a third promoter, PA, located in front of the major subunit gene sfaA, can be activated under special circumstances. Four genes of the sfa determinant code for the subunit-specific proteins, SfaA (16 kda), SfaG (17 kda), SfaS (14 kda) and SfaH (29 kda). It was demonstrated that the protein SfaA is the major subunit protein while SfaS is identical to the sialic-acid-specific adhesin of S fimbriae. The introduction of specific mutations into sfaS revealed that a region of six amino acids of the adhesin which includes two lysine and one arginine residues is involved in the receptor specific interaction of S fimbriae. Additionally, it has been shown that SfaS is necessary for the induction of fimbriation while SfaH plays a role in the stringency of binding of S fimbriae to erythrocytes. PMID:8102267

  3. RfaH Suppresses Small RNA MicA Inhibition of fimB Expression in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Moores, Alexandra; Chipper-Keating, Saranna; Sun, Lei; McVicker, Gareth; Wales, Lynn; Gashi, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    The phase variation (reversible on-off switching) of the type 1 fimbrial adhesin of Escherichia coli involves a DNA inversion catalyzed by FimB (switching in either direction) or FimE (on-to-off switching). Here, we demonstrate that RfaH activates expression of a FimB-LacZ protein fusion while having a modest inhibitory effect on a comparable fimB-lacZ operon construct and on a FimE-LacZ protein fusion, indicating that RfaH selectively controls fimB expression at the posttranscriptional level. Further work demonstrates that loss of RfaH enables small RNA (sRNA) MicA inhibition of fimB expression even in the absence of exogenous inducing stress. This effect is explained by induction of σE, and hence MicA, in the absence of RfaH. Additional work confirms that the procaine-dependent induction of micA requires OmpR, as reported previously (A. Coornaert et al., Mol. Microbiol. 76:467–479, 2010, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2958.2010.07115.x), but also demonstrates that RfaH inhibition of fimB transcription is enhanced by procaine independently of OmpR. While the effect of procaine on fimB transcription is shown to be independent of RcsB, it was found to require SlyA, another known regulator of fimB transcription. These results demonstrate a complex role for RfaH as a regulator of fimB expression. PMID:24163336

  4. Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Allen; Youngster, Ilan; McAdam, Alexander J

    2015-06-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is among the common causes of foodborne gastroenteritis. STEC is defined by the production of specific toxins, but within this pathotype there is a diverse group of organisms. This diversity has important consequences for understanding the pathogenesis of the organism, as well as for selecting the optimum strategy for diagnostic testing in the clinical laboratory. This review includes discussions of the mechanisms of pathogenesis, the range of manifestations of infection, and the several different methods of laboratory detection of Shiga toxin-producing E coli. PMID:26004641

  5. Experimental evolution of E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mengshi

    The evolution from unicellular to multicellular behavior is an essential step in the history of life. Our aim is to investigate the emergence of collective behavior in the model organism Escherichia coli (E. coli) and its selection advantages, such as better utilization of public goods. Our preliminary results suggest that the evolution of collective behavior may be a natural response to stressed conditions. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: mengshi0928@gmail.com.

  6. Serogroups of Escherichia coli from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ramteke, P W; Tewari, Suman

    2007-07-01

    Fifty seven isolates of thermotolerant E. coli were recovered from 188 drinking water sources, 45 (78.9%) were typable of which 15 (26.3%) were pathogenic serotypes. Pathogenic serogroup obtained were 04 (Uropathogenic E. coli, UPEC), 025 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC), 086 (Enteropathogenic E. coli, EPEC), 0103 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 0157 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 08 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC) and 0113 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC). All the pathogenic serotypes showed resistance to bacitracin and multiple heavy metal ions. Resistance to streptomycin and cotrimazole was detected in two strains whereas resistance to cephaloridine, polymixin-B and ampicillin was detected in one strain each. Transfer of resistances to drugs and metallic ions was observed in 9 out of 12 strains studied. Resistances to bacitracin were transferred in all nine strains. Among heavy metals resistance to As(3+) followed by Cr(6+) were transferred more frequently. PMID:17057960

  7. Characteristics and prevalence within serogroup O4 of a J96-like clonal group of uropathogenic Escherichia coli O4:H5 containing the class I and class III alleles of papG.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J R; Stapleton, A E; Russo, T A; Scheutz, F; Brown, J J; Maslow, J N

    1997-01-01

    The recent discovery of a geographically dispersed clonal group of Escherichia coli O4:H5 that includes prototypic uropathogenic strain J96 prompted us to determine the prevalence of J96-like strains within serogroup O4 and to further assess the characteristics of such strains. We used O:K:H;F serotyping, PCR-based genomic fingerprinting, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), and PCR detection of the three papG alleles and of the cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (cnf1) and aerobactin (aer) gene sequences to characterize the 15 O4 strains among 336 E. coli isolates from three clinical collections (187 from mixed-source bacteremia, 75 from urosepsis, and 74 from acute cystitis). J96-like strains constituted approximately half of the O4 strains, or 2% of the total population. In contrast to other O4 strains, the J96-like strains characteristically exhibited specific group III capsular antigens, the H5 flagellar and F13 fimbrial antigens, a distinctive PCR genomic fingerprint, the class III papG allele (plus, in 50% of strains, the enigmatic class I papG allele), and cnf1 but lacked aer. A subset of these strains was remarkably homogeneous with respect to all these characteristics and exhibited a distinctive PFGE fingerprint and MLEE pattern. These findings clarify the epidemiological relevance of J96 as a model extraintestinal pathogen, provide further evidence of the class I papG allele outside of strain J96, and offer insights into the evolution of E. coli serogroup O4. PMID:9169745

  8. Molecular Ecology of Waterborne E. coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli is a common inhabitant of surface and ground waters in the developed and developing worlds. The majority of the E coli present in water are not particularly pathogenic to humans; however, there are E coli present in small proportion, that possess virulence genes that allow them to c...

  9. Human Gut-Commensalic Lactobacillus ruminis ATCC 25644 Displays Sortase-Assembled Surface Piliation: Phenotypic Characterization of Its Fimbrial Operon through In Silico Predictive Analysis and Recombinant Expression in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xia; Lyytinen, Outi; Kant, Ravi; Åvall-Jääskeläinen, Silja; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Palva, Airi

    2015-01-01

    Sortase-dependent surface pili (or fimbriae) in Gram-positive bacteria are well documented as a key virulence factor for certain harmful opportunistic pathogens. However, it is only recently known that these multi-subunit protein appendages are also belonging to the “friendly” commensals and now, with this new perspective, they have come to be categorized as a niche-adaptation factor as well. In this regard, it was shown earlier that sortase-assembled piliation is a native fixture of two human intestinal commensalics (i.e., Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium bifidum), and correspondingly where the pili involved have a significant role in cellular adhesion and immunomodulation processes. We now reveal that intestinal indigenous (or autochthonous) Lactobacillus ruminis is another surface-piliated commensal lactobacillar species. Heeding to in silico expectations, the predicted loci for the LrpCBA-called pili are organized tandemly in the L. ruminis genome as a canonical fimbrial operon, which then encodes for three pilin-proteins and a single C-type sortase enzyme. Through electron microscopic means, we showed that these pilus formations are a surface assemblage of tip, basal, and backbone pilin subunits (respectively named LrpC, LrpB, and LrpA) in L. ruminis, and also when expressed recombinantly in Lactococcus lactis. As well, by using the recombinant-piliated lactococci, we could define certain ecologically relevant phenotypic traits, such as the ability to adhere to extracellular matrix proteins and gut epithelial cells, but also to effectuate an induced dampening on Toll-like receptor 2 signaling and interleukin-8 responsiveness in immune-related cells. Within the context of the intestinal microcosm, by wielding such niche-advantageous cell-surface properties the LrpCBA pilus would undoubtedly have a requisite functional role in the colonization dynamics of L. ruminis indigeneity. Our study provides only the second description of a native

  10. EXTRAINTESTINAL PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI (EXPEC)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) possess virulence traits that allow them to invade, colonize, and induce disease in bodily sites outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Human diseases caused by ExPEC include urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, surgic...

  11. Detection of bacteria and fungi and assessment of the molecular aspects and resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from confiscated passerines intended for reintroduction programs.

    PubMed

    Braconaro, Patricia; Saidenberg, André B S; Benites, Nilson R; Zuniga, Eveline; da Silva, Adriana M J; Sanches, Thais C; Zwarg, Ticiana; Brandão, Paulo E; Melville, Priscilla A

    2015-11-01

    Many native bird species are currently considered rare in Brazil because they have been indiscriminately collected by animal traffickers and commercialized, leading to dwindling numbers in their natural habitats. Confiscated animals are at times destined for reintroduction programs that must ensure these animals do not pose a risk to native populations. Healthy or sick wild passerines may carry a great diversity of microorganisms. Therefore, knowledge of the sanitary status of confiscated animals destined for reintroduction is critical to assess whether these animals act as microorganism carriers and to investigate the epidemiology of transmissible diseases, a crucial aspect for animal and human health preservation. This study examined the occurrence of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria and fungi in cloacal swabs collected from wild confiscated passerines intended for reintroduction programs. In vitro susceptibility tests of the most frequent isolates as well as studies of the molecular aspects of Escherichia coli isolates were also performed. There was microorganism growth in 62.5% of 253 samples. The microorganisms that were most frequently isolated were Staphylococcus spp. (15.0%), Micrococcus spp. (11.5%), E. coli (10.7%) and Klebsiella spp. (10.7%). Fifteen bacteria genera and seven fungi genera were isolated. Multidrug-resistance to antimicrobials was observed in Staphylococcus spp., Micrococcus spp., E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates. The high occurrence of Enterobacteria observed is possibly related to the sanitary conditions in which confiscated animals are usually kept. One E. coli sample (out of 27 isolates) was positive for the S-fimbrial adhesion encoding gene (sfa). Considering the low occurrence of genes that encode virulence factors, confiscated passerines may represent a low risk for the potential transmission of EPEC, APEC, UPEC and NMEC isolates to other animals or humans. The potential risk of intra- or inter-specific transmission of

  12. Clinical implications of enteroadherent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M P; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G

    2012-10-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including nonintimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called "enteroadherent E. coli" categories subsequently produce toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  13. Clinical Implications of Enteroadherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M.P.; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli enteropathogenic E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including non-intimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called “enteroadherent E. coli ” categories subsequently produced toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  14. Infection strategies of enteric pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Abigail; Young, Joanna C.; Constantinou, Nicholas; Frankel, Gad

    2012-01-01

    Enteric Escherichia coli (E. coli) are both natural flora of humans and important pathogens causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally enteric E. coli have been divided into 6 pathotypes, with further pathotypes often proposed. In this review we suggest expansion of the enteric E. coli into 8 pathotypes to include the emerging pathotypes of adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) and Shiga-toxin producing enteroaggregative E. coli (STEAEC). The molecular mechanisms that allow enteric E. coli to colonize and cause disease in the human host are examined and for two of the pathotypes that express a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) we discuss the complex interplay between translocated effectors and manipulation of host cell signaling pathways that occurs during infection. PMID:22555463

  15. Differential gene expression profiling of porcine epithelial cells infected with three enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most important pathogenic bacteria causing severe diarrhoea in human and pigs. In ETEC strains, the fimbrial types F4 and F18 are commonly found differently colonized within the small intestine and cause huge economic losses in the swine industry annually worldwide. To address the underlying mechanism, we performed a transcriptome study of porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) with and without infection of three representative ETEC strains. Results A total 2443, 3493 and 867 differentially expressed genes were found in IPEC-J2 cells infected with F4ab ETEC (CF4ab), with F4ac ETEC (CF4ac) and with F18ac ETEC (CF18ac) compared to the cells without infection (control), respectively. The number of differentially expressed genes between CF4ab and CF4ac, CF4ab and CF18ac, and CF4ac and CF18ac were 77, 1446 and 1629, respectively. The gene ontology and pathway analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes in CF4abvs control are significantly involved in cell-cycle progress and amino acid metabolism, while the clustered terms of the differentially expressed genes in CF4acvs control comprise immune, inflammation and wounding response and apoptosis as well as cell cycle progress and proteolysis. Differentially expressed genes between CF18acvs control are mainly involved in cell-cycle progression and immune response. Furthermore, fundamental differences were observed in expression levels of immune-related genes among the three ETEC treatments, especially for the important pro-inflammatory molecules, including IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, CCL20, CXCL2 etc. Conclusions The discovery in this study provides insights into the interaction of porcine intestinal epithelial cells with F4 ETECs and F18 ETEC, respectively. The genes induced by ETECs with F4 versus F18 fimbriae suggest why ETEC with F4 may be more virulent compared to F18 which seems to elicit milder effects. PMID:22823589

  16. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur-containing heterocyclic molecules by mutant strains of Escherichia coli K-12. We have previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which had gained the capacity to oxidize thiophene compounds and their furan analogs. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research, as this appears to be in a regulatory gene central to the thiophene/furan oxidation system. The thdF gene appears to be more directly involved in the oxidation reactions, whereas thdC and thdD are apparently required for increased protection against the toxic effects of thiophene and furan compounds. 4 tabs.

  17. Transcription of foreign DNA in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Warren, René L.; Freeman, John D.; Levesque, Roger C.; Smailus, Duane E.; Flibotte, Stephane; Holt, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Propagation of heterologous DNA in E. coli host cells is central to molecular biology. DNA constructs are often engineered for expression of recombinant protein in E. coli, but the extent of incidental transcription arising from natural regulatory sequences in cloned DNA remains underexplored. Here, we have used programmable microarrays and RT-PCR to measure, comprehensively, the transcription of H. influenzae, P. aeruginosa, and human DNA propagating in E. coli as bacterial artificial chromosomes. We find evidence that at least half of all H. influenzae genes are transcribed in E. coli. Highly transcribed genes are principally involved in energy metabolism, and their proximal promoter regions are significantly enriched with E. coli σ70 (also known as RpoD) binding sites. H. influenzae genes acquired from an ancient bacteriophage Mu insertion are also highly transcribed. Compared with H. influenzae, a smaller proportion of P. aeruginosa genes are transcribed in E. coli, and in E. coli there is punctuated transcription of human DNA. The presence of foreign DNA in E. coli disturbs the host transcriptional profile, with expression of the E. coli phage shock protein operon and the flagellar gene cluster being particularly strongly up-regulated. While cross-species transcriptional activation is expected to be enabling for horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, incidental expression of toxic genes can be problematic for DNA cloning. Ongoing characterization of cross-expression will help inform the design of biosynthetic gene clusters and synthetic microbial genomes. PMID:18701636

  18. Effects of lng Mutations on LngA Expression, Processing, and CS21 Assembly in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli E9034A.

    PubMed

    Saldaña-Ahuactzi, Zeus; Rodea, Gerardo E; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Viridiana; Espinosa-Mazariego, Karina; González-Montalvo, Martín A; Ochoa, Sara A; González-Pedrajo, Bertha; Eslava-Campos, Carlos A; López-Villegas, Edgar O; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Arellano-Galindo, José; Patiño-López, Genaro; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of morbidity in children under 5 years of age in low- and middle-income countries and a leading cause of traveler's diarrhea worldwide. The ability of ETEC to colonize the intestinal epithelium is mediated by fimbrial adhesins, such as CS21 (Longus). This adhesin is a type IVb pilus involved in adherence to intestinal cells in vitro and bacterial self-aggregation. Fourteen open reading frames have been proposed to be involved in CS21 assembly, hitherto only the lngA and lngB genes, coding for the major (LngA) and minor (LngB) structural subunit, have been characterized. In this study, we investigated the role of the LngA, LngB, LngC, LngD, LngH, and LngP proteins in the assembly of CS21 in ETEC strain E9034A. The deletion of the lngA, lngB, lngC, lngD, lngH, or lngP genes, abolished CS21 assembly in ETEC strain E9034A and the adherence to HT-29 cells was reduced 90%, compared to wild-type strain. Subcellular localization prediction of CS21 proteins was similar to other well-known type IV pili homologs. We showed that LngP is the prepilin peptidase of LngA, and that ETEC strain E9034A has another peptidase capable of processing LngA, although with less efficiency. Additionally, we present immuno-electron microscopy images to show that the LngB protein could be localized at the tip of CS21. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the LngA, LngB, LngC, LngD, LngH, and LngP proteins are essential for CS21 assembly, as well as for bacterial aggregation and adherence to HT-29 cells. PMID:27536289

  19. Fimbria-Encoding Gene yadC Has a Pleiotropic Effect on Several Biological Characteristics and Plays a Role in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Thaís Cabrera Galvão; Maluta, Renato Pariz; Leite, Janaína Luisa; da Silva, Livia Pilatti Mendes; Nakazato, Gerson

    2015-01-01

    The extraintestinal pathogen termed avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is known to cause colibacillosis in chickens. The molecular basis of APEC pathogenesis is not fully elucidated yet. In this work, we deleted a component of the Yad gene cluster (yadC) in order to understand the role of Yad in the pathogenicity of the APEC strain SCI-07. In vitro, the transcription level of yadC was upregulated at 41°C and downregulated at 22°C. The yadC expression in vivo was more pronounced in lungs than in spleen, suggesting a role in the early steps of the infection. Chicks infected with the wild-type and mutant strains presented, respectively, 80% and 50% mortality rates. The ΔyadC strain presented a slightly decreased ability to adhere to HeLa cells with or without the d-mannose analog compared with the wild type. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assays showed that fimH was downregulated (P < 0.05) and csgA and ecpA were slightly upregulated in the mutant strain, showing that yadC modulates expression of other fimbriae. Bacterial internalization studies showed that the ΔyadC strain had a lower number of intracellular bacteria recovered from Hep-2 cells and HD11 cells than the wild-type strain (P < 0.05). Motility assays in soft agar demonstrated that the ΔyadC strain was less motile than the wild type (P < 0.01). Curiously, flagellum-associated genes were not dramatically downregulated in the ΔyadC strain. Taken together, the results show that the fimbrial adhesin Yad contributes to the pathogenicity and modulates different biological characteristics of the APEC strain SCI-07. PMID:26502907

  20. Fimbria-Encoding Gene yadC Has a Pleiotropic Effect on Several Biological Characteristics and Plays a Role in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Verma, Renu; Rojas, Thaís Cabrera Galvão; Maluta, Renato Pariz; Leite, Janaína Luisa; da Silva, Livia Pilatti Mendes; Nakazato, Gerson; Dias da Silveira, Wanderley

    2016-01-01

    The extraintestinal pathogen termed avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is known to cause colibacillosis in chickens. The molecular basis of APEC pathogenesis is not fully elucidated yet. In this work, we deleted a component of the Yad gene cluster (yadC) in order to understand the role of Yad in the pathogenicity of the APEC strain SCI-07. In vitro, the transcription level of yadC was upregulated at 41°C and downregulated at 22°C. The yadC expression in vivo was more pronounced in lungs than in spleen, suggesting a role in the early steps of the infection. Chicks infected with the wild-type and mutant strains presented, respectively, 80% and 50% mortality rates. The ΔyadC strain presented a slightly decreased ability to adhere to HeLa cells with or without the d-mannose analog compared with the wild type. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assays showed that fimH was downregulated (P < 0.05) and csgA and ecpA were slightly upregulated in the mutant strain, showing that yadC modulates expression of other fimbriae. Bacterial internalization studies showed that the ΔyadC strain had a lower number of intracellular bacteria recovered from Hep-2 cells and HD11 cells than the wild-type strain (P < 0.05). Motility assays in soft agar demonstrated that the ΔyadC strain was less motile than the wild type (P < 0.01). Curiously, flagellum-associated genes were not dramatically downregulated in the ΔyadC strain. Taken together, the results show that the fimbrial adhesin Yad contributes to the pathogenicity and modulates different biological characteristics of the APEC strain SCI-07. PMID:26502907

  1. Effects of lng Mutations on LngA Expression, Processing, and CS21 Assembly in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli E9034A

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña-Ahuactzi, Zeus; Rodea, Gerardo E.; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Viridiana; Espinosa-Mazariego, Karina; González-Montalvo, Martín A.; Ochoa, Sara A.; González-Pedrajo, Bertha; Eslava-Campos, Carlos A.; López-Villegas, Edgar O.; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Arellano-Galindo, José; Patiño-López, Genaro; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of morbidity in children under 5 years of age in low- and middle-income countries and a leading cause of traveler's diarrhea worldwide. The ability of ETEC to colonize the intestinal epithelium is mediated by fimbrial adhesins, such as CS21 (Longus). This adhesin is a type IVb pilus involved in adherence to intestinal cells in vitro and bacterial self-aggregation. Fourteen open reading frames have been proposed to be involved in CS21 assembly, hitherto only the lngA and lngB genes, coding for the major (LngA) and minor (LngB) structural subunit, have been characterized. In this study, we investigated the role of the LngA, LngB, LngC, LngD, LngH, and LngP proteins in the assembly of CS21 in ETEC strain E9034A. The deletion of the lngA, lngB, lngC, lngD, lngH, or lngP genes, abolished CS21 assembly in ETEC strain E9034A and the adherence to HT-29 cells was reduced 90%, compared to wild-type strain. Subcellular localization prediction of CS21 proteins was similar to other well-known type IV pili homologs. We showed that LngP is the prepilin peptidase of LngA, and that ETEC strain E9034A has another peptidase capable of processing LngA, although with less efficiency. Additionally, we present immuno-electron microscopy images to show that the LngB protein could be localized at the tip of CS21. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the LngA, LngB, LngC, LngD, LngH, and LngP proteins are essential for CS21 assembly, as well as for bacterial aggregation and adherence to HT-29 cells. PMID:27536289

  2. Attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a vaccine strain CVD 1204 expressing colonization factor antigen I and mutant heat-labile enterotoxin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Koprowski, H; Levine, M M; Anderson, R J; Losonsky, G; Pizza, M; Barry, E M

    2000-09-01

    A multivalent live oral vaccine against both Shigella spp. and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is being developed based on the hypothesis that protection can be achieved if attenuated shigellae express ETEC fimbrial colonization factors and genetically detoxified heat-labile toxin from a human ETEC isolate (LTh). Two detoxified derivatives of LTh, LThK63 and LThR72, were engineered by substitution-serine to lysine at residue 63, or lysine to arginine at residue 72. The genes encoding these two derivatives were cloned separately on expression plasmids downstream from the CFA/I operon. Following electroporation into S. flexneri 2a vaccine strain CVD 1204, coexpression of CFA/I and LThK63 or LThR72 was demonstrated by Western blot analysis, GM(1) binding assays, and agglutination with anti-CFA/I antiserum. Hemagglutination and electron microscopy confirmed surface expression of CFA/I. Guinea pigs immunized intranasally on days 0 and 15 with CVD 1204 expressing CFA/I and LThK63 or LThR72 exhibited high titers of both serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal secretory IgA anti-CFA/I; 40% of the animals produced antibodies directed against LTh. All immunized guinea pigs also produced mucosal IgA (in tears) and serum IgG anti-S. flexneri 2a O antibodies. Furthermore, all immunized animals were protected from challenge with wild-type S. flexneri 2a. This prototype Shigella-ETEC hybrid vaccine demonstrates the feasibility of expressing multiple ETEC antigens on a single plasmid in an attenuated Shigella vaccine strain and engendering immune responses against both the heterologous antigens and vector strain. PMID:10948101

  3. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    van Heijenoort, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The review summarizes the abundant information on the 35 identified peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases of Escherichia coli classified into 12 distinct families, including mainly glycosidases, peptidases, and amidases. An attempt is also made to critically assess their functions in PG maturation, turnover, elongation, septation, and recycling as well as in cell autolysis. There is at least one hydrolytic activity for each bond linking PG components, and most hydrolase genes were identified. Few hydrolases appear to be individually essential. The crystal structures and reaction mechanisms of certain hydrolases having defined functions were investigated. However, our knowledge of the biochemical properties of most hydrolases still remains fragmentary, and that of their cellular functions remains elusive. Owing to redundancy, PG hydrolases far outnumber the enzymes of PG biosynthesis. The presence of the two sets of enzymes acting on the PG bonds raises the question of their functional correlations. It is difficult to understand why E. coli keeps such a large set of PG hydrolases. The subtle differences in substrate specificities between the isoenzymes of each family certainly reflect a variety of as-yet-unidentified physiological functions. Their study will be a far more difficult challenge than that of the steps of the PG biosynthesis pathway. PMID:22126997

  4. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  5. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  6. Diagnosisand Investigation of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nataro, J P; Martinez, J

    1998-01-01

    Although most Escherichia coli are harmless commensals of the human intestine, certain specific, highly-adapted E. coli strains are capable of causing urinary tract, systemic or enteric/diarrheagenic infection. Diarrheagenic E coli are divided into six distinct categories, or pathotypes, each with a distinct pathogenic scheme (Table 1). Combined, diarrheagenic E coli have emerged as perhaps the most important enteric pathogens of man. In the developing world, the E coli categories account for more cases of gastroenteiltis among infants than any other cause (1) In addition, E coli are also the most common cause of traveller's diarrhea, which afflicts more than one million travellers to the developing world annually (1). Enterohemorrhagic E coli (EHEC) are the cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which has become a major foodborne threat in many parts of the developed world (2). Table 1 Categories of Diarrheagenic E. coli Category Toxins Invasion Virulence plasmid Adhesin Clinical syndrome ETEC LT, ST - Many CFA/I, CFA/II, CFA/IV, others Watery diarrhea EPEC - + 60 MDa Bundle-forming pilus Watery diarrhea of infants EHEC SLT-1, SLT-2 - 60 MDa( a ) Intimin, Fimbriae( a ) Hemorrhagic colitis, HUS EAEC EAST1( a ) ? 65 MDa( a ) AAF/I, AAF/I Watery, persistent diarrhea EIEC EIET( a ) +++ 140 MDa Ipa's(?) Watery diarrhea, dysentery DAEC ? ? ? F1845( a ) Watery diarrhea ( a )Role in pathogenesis unproven. PMID:21390758

  7. Third International E. coli genome meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Proceedings of the Third E. Coli Genome Meeting are provided. Presentations were divided into sessions entitled (1) Large Scale Sequencing, Sequence Analysis; (2) Databases; (3) Sequence Analysis; (4) Sequence Divergence in E. coli Strains; (5) Repeated Sequences and Regulatory Motifs; (6) Mutations, Rearrangements and Stress Responses; and (7) Origins of New Genes. The document provides a collection of abstracts of oral and poster presentations.

  8. E. coli survival in waters: temperature dependence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important for evaluating microbial contamination and in making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature; this dependency is routinely expressed using an analog of the Q10 model. This suggestion...

  9. Escherichia coli and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bettelheim, Karl A.; Goldwater, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the association of strains of Escherichia coli with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and the possible role these bacteria play in this enigmatic condition. The review addresses evidence for E. coli in SIDS infants, potential sources of E. coli in the environment, colonization by commensal and pathogenic strains, the variety of currently accepted pathotypes, and how these pathotypes could compromise intestinal integrity and induce inflammation. Both intestinal and extraintestinal pathotypes are compared in relation to the apparent liability in which virulence traits can be gained or lost by strains of E. coli. The way in which E. coli infections fit with current views on infant sleeping position and other SIDS risk factors is highlighted. PMID:26191064

  10. Nonchemotactic Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John B.; Adler, Julius; Dahl, Margaret M.

    1967-01-01

    We have isolated 40 mutants of Escherichia coli which are nonchemotactic as judged by their failure to swarm on semisolid tryptone plates or to make bands in capillary tubes containing tryptone broth. All the mutants have normal flagella, a fact shown by their shape and reaction with antiflagella serum. All are fully motile under the microscope and all are sensitive to the phage chi. Unlike its parent, one of the mutants, studied in greater detail, failed to show chemotaxis toward oxygen, glucose, serine, threonine, or aspartic acid. The failure to exhibit chemotaxis does not result from a failure to use the chemicals. The swimming of this mutant was shown to be random. The growth rate was normal under several conditions, and the growth requirements were unchanged. Images PMID:5335897