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Sample records for coli mcra protein

  1. Cloning, Purification and Initial Characterization of E. coli McrA, a Putative 5-methylcytosine-specific Nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan,E.; Dunn, J.

    2008-01-01

    Expression strains of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) overproducing the E. coli m5C McrA restriction protein were produced by cloning the mcrA coding sequence behind a T7 promoter. The recombinant mcrA minus BL21(DE3) host produces active McrA as evidenced by its acquired ability to selectively restrict the growth of T7 phage containing DNA methylated in vitro by HpaII methylase. The mcrA coding region contains several non-optimal E. coli triplets. Addition of the pACYC-RIL tRNA encoding plasmid to the BL21(DE3) host increased the yield of recombinant McrA (rMcrA) upon induction about 5- to 10-fold. McrA protein expressed at 37 C is insoluble but a significant fraction is recovered as soluble protein after autoinduction at 20 C. rMcrA protein, which is predicted to contain a Cys4-Zn2+ finger and a catalytically important histidine triad in its putative nuclease domain, binds to several metal chelate resins without addition of a poly-histidine affinity tag. This feature was used to develop an efficient protocol for the rapid purification of nearly homogeneous rMcrA. The native protein is a dimer with a high a-helical content as measured by circular dichroism analysis. Under all conditions tested purified rMcrA does not have measurable nuclease activity on HpaII methylated (Cm5CGG) DNA, although the purified protein does specifically bind HpaII methylated DNA. These results have implications for understanding the in vivo activity of McrA in 'restricting' m5C-containing DNA and suggest that rMcrA may have utility as a reagent for affinity purification of DNA fragments containing m5C residues.

  2. Cloning, purification and initial characterization of E. coli McrA, a putative 5-methylcytosine-specific nuclease.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Elizabeth A; Dunn, John J

    2008-11-01

    Expression strains of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) overproducing the E. coli m(5)C McrA restriction protein were produced by cloning the mcrA coding sequence behind a T7 promoter. The recombinant mcrA minus BL21(DE3) host produces active McrA as evidenced by its acquired ability to selectively restrict the growth of T7 phage containing DNA methylated in vitro by HpaII methylase. The mcrA coding region contains several non-optimal E. coli triplets. Addition of the pACYC-RIL tRNA encoding plasmid to the BL21(DE3) host increased the yield of recombinant McrA (rMcrA) upon induction about 5- to 10-fold. McrA protein expressed at 37 degrees C is insoluble but a significant fraction is recovered as soluble protein after autoinduction at 20 degrees C. rMcrA protein, which is predicted to contain a Cys(4)-Zn(2+) finger and a catalytically important histidine triad in its putative nuclease domain, binds to several metal chelate resins without addition of a poly-histidine affinity tag. This feature was used to develop an efficient protocol for the rapid purification of nearly homogeneous rMcrA. The native protein is a dimer with a high alpha-helical content as measured by circular dichroism analysis. Under all conditions tested purified rMcrA does not have measurable nuclease activity on HpaII methylated (Cm(5)CGG) DNA, although the purified protein does specifically bind HpaII methylated DNA. These results have implications for understanding the in vivo activity of McrA in "restricting" m(5)C-containing DNA and suggest that rMcrA may have utility as a reagent for affinity purification of DNA fragments containing m(5)C residues. PMID:18662788

  3. Mitomycin resistance in mammalian cells expressing the bacterial mitomycin C resistance protein MCRA.

    PubMed

    Belcourt, M F; Penketh, P G; Hodnick, W F; Johnson, D A; Sherman, D H; Rockwell, S; Sartorelli, A C

    1999-08-31

    The mitomycin C-resistance gene, mcrA, of Streptomyces lavendulae produces MCRA, a protein that protects this microorganism from its own antibiotic, the antitumor drug mitomycin C. Expression of the bacterial mcrA gene in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells causes profound resistance to mitomycin C and to its structurally related analog porfiromycin under aerobic conditions but produces little change in drug sensitivity under hypoxia. The mitomycins are prodrugs that are enzymatically reduced and activated intracellularly, producing cytotoxic semiquinone anion radical and hydroquinone reduction intermediates. In vitro, MCRA protects DNA from cross-linking by the hydroquinone reduction intermediate of these mitomycins by oxidizing the hydroquinone back to the parent molecule; thus, MCRA acts as a hydroquinone oxidase. These findings suggest potential therapeutic applications for MCRA in the treatment of cancer with the mitomycins and imply that intrinsic or selected mitomycin C resistance in mammalian cells may not be due solely to decreased bioactivation, as has been hypothesized previously, but instead could involve an MCRA-like mechanism. PMID:10468636

  4. Mitomycin resistance in mammalian cells expressing the bacterial mitomycin C resistance protein MCRA

    PubMed Central

    Belcourt, Michael F.; Penketh, Philip G.; Hodnick, William F.; Johnson, David A.; Sherman, David H.; Rockwell, Sara; Sartorelli, Alan C.

    1999-01-01

    The mitomycin C-resistance gene, mcrA, of Streptomyces lavendulae produces MCRA, a protein that protects this microorganism from its own antibiotic, the antitumor drug mitomycin C. Expression of the bacterial mcrA gene in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells causes profound resistance to mitomycin C and to its structurally related analog porfiromycin under aerobic conditions but produces little change in drug sensitivity under hypoxia. The mitomycins are prodrugs that are enzymatically reduced and activated intracellularly, producing cytotoxic semiquinone anion radical and hydroquinone reduction intermediates. In vitro, MCRA protects DNA from cross-linking by the hydroquinone reduction intermediate of these mitomycins by oxidizing the hydroquinone back to the parent molecule; thus, MCRA acts as a hydroquinone oxidase. These findings suggest potential therapeutic applications for MCRA in the treatment of cancer with the mitomycins and imply that intrinsic or selected mitomycin C resistance in mammalian cells may not be due solely to decreased bioactivation, as has been hypothesized previously, but instead could involve an MCRA-like mechanism. PMID:10468636

  5. 32 CFR 757.13 - Responsibility for MCRA actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Navy Medical Treatment Facility (MTF). (1) Naval MTFs are responsible for ensuring potential MCRA/10 U... all potential MCRA/10 U.S.C. 1095 cases by forwarding a copy of the daily injury log entries...

  6. 32 CFR 757.13 - Responsibility for MCRA actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Navy Medical Treatment Facility (MTF). (1) Naval MTFs are responsible for ensuring potential MCRA/10 U... all potential MCRA/10 U.S.C. 1095 cases by forwarding a copy of the daily injury log entries...

  7. 32 CFR 757.13 - Responsibility for MCRA actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Navy Medical Treatment Facility (MTF). (1) Naval MTFs are responsible for ensuring potential MCRA/10 U... all potential MCRA/10 U.S.C. 1095 cases by forwarding a copy of the daily injury log entries...

  8. 32 CFR 757.13 - Responsibility for MCRA actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Navy Medical Treatment Facility (MTF). (1) Naval MTFs are responsible for ensuring potential MCRA/10 U... all potential MCRA/10 U.S.C. 1095 cases by forwarding a copy of the daily injury log entries...

  9. 32 CFR 757.13 - Responsibility for MCRA actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Navy Medical Treatment Facility (MTF). (1) Naval MTFs are responsible for ensuring potential MCRA/10 U... all potential MCRA/10 U.S.C. 1095 cases by forwarding a copy of the daily injury log entries...

  10. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  11. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  12. Real-time quantification of mcrA, pmoA for methanogen, methanotroph estimations during composting.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ranjana; Ryan, Kelly; Hao, Xiying; Larney, Francis J; McAllister, Tim A; Topp, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Composting is the controlled biological decomposition of organic matter by microorganisms during predominantly aerobic conditions. It is being increasingly adopted due to its benefits in nutrient recycling, soil reclamation, and urban land use. However, it poses an environmental concern related to its contribution to greenhouse gas production. During composting, activities of methanogenic and methanotrophic communities influence the net methane (CH4) release into the atmosphere. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), this study was aimed at assessing the changes in the methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) copy numbers for estimation of methanogenic and methanotrophic communities, respectively. Open-windrow composting of beef cattle (Bos Taurus L.) manure with temperatures reaching > 55 degrees C was effective indegrading commensal Escherichia coli within the first week. Quantification of community DNA revealed significant differences in mcrA and pmoA copy numbers between top and middle sections. Consistent mcrA copy numbers (7.07 to 8.69 log copy number g(-1)) were detected throughout the 15-wk composting period. However, pmoA copy number varied significantly over time, with higher values during Week 0 and 1 (6.31 and 5.41 log copy number g(-1), respectively) and the lowest at Week 11 (1.6 log copy number g(-1)). Net surface CH4 emissions over the 15-wk period were correlated with higher mcrA copy number. Higher net ratio of mrA: pmoA copy numbers was observed when surface CH4 flux was high. Our results indicate that mcrA and pmoA copy numbers vary during composting and that methanogen and methanotroph populations need to be examined in conjunction with net CH4 emissions from open-windrow composting of cattle feedlot manure. PMID:21488508

  13. Preparation of Soluble Proteins from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    Purification of human IL-1β is used in this unit as an example of the preparation of a soluble protein from E. coli. Bacteria containing IL-1β are lysed, and IL-1 β in the resulting supernatant is purified by anion-exchange chromatography, salt precipitation, and cation-exchange chromatography, and then concentrated. Finally, the IL-1 β protein is applied to a gel-filtration column to separate it from remaining higher- and lower-molecular-weight contaminants, the purified protein is stored frozen or is lyophilized. The purification protocol described is typical for a protein that is expressed in fairly high abundance (i.e., >5% total protein) and accumulates in a soluble state. In addition, the purification procedure serves as an example of how to use classical protein purifications methods, which may also be used in conjunction with the affinity-based methods now more commonly used. PMID:25367009

  14. Preparation of Soluble Proteins from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Purification of human IL-1β is used in this unit as an example of the preparation of soluble proteins from E. coli. Bacteria containing IL-1β are lysed, and IL-1 β in the resulting supernatant is purified by anion-exchange chromatography, salt precipitation and cation-exchange chromatography, and then concentrated. Finally, the IL-1 β protein is applied to a gel-filtration column to separate it from remaining higher- and lower-molecular-weight contaminants, the purified protein is stored frozen or is lyophilized. The purification protocol described is typical for a protein that is expressed in fairly high abundance (i.e., >5% total protein) and accumulates in a soluble state. Also, the purification procedure serves as an example of how use classical protein purifications methods which may also be used in conjunction with the affinity-based methods now more commonly used. PMID:25367009

  15. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, Germán L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the organisms of choice for the production of recombinant proteins. Its use as a cell factory is well-established and it has become the most popular expression platform. For this reason, there are many molecular tools and protocols at hand for the high-level production of heterologous proteins, such as a vast catalog of expression plasmids, a great number of engineered strains and many cultivation strategies. We review the different approaches for the synthesis of recombinant proteins in E. coli and discuss recent progress in this ever-growing field. PMID:24860555

  16. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Riley, M

    1998-01-01

    GenProtEC is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins, representing groups of paralogous genes, with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. GenProtEC can be accessed at the URL http://www.mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html PMID:9399799

  17. Transformation of Escherichia coli and protein expression using lipoplex mimicry.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2016-11-01

    We investigated a "one-step" method for transformation of and protein expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a complex of n-stearylamine, a cationic lipid, and plasmid DNA, which mimics lipoplex-based approaches. When E. coli cells were treated with the cationic lipid-plasmid complex, the transformation efficiencies were in the range of approximately 2-3 × 10(6) colony-forming units. Further increase in the efficiency was obtained by co-treatment with calcium chloride (or rubidium chloride) and the complexes. Moreover, after DNA transfer, E. coli cells successfully expressed plasmid-encoded proteins such as cytochrome P450s and glutathione-S-transferase without overnight incubation of the cells to form colonies, an indispensable step in other bacterial transformation methods. In this study, we provide a simple method for E. coli transformation, which does not require the preparation of competent cells. The present method also shortens the overall procedures for transformation and gene expression in E. coli by omitting the colony-forming step. PMID:27416742

  18. Protein secretion controlled by a synthetic gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blanchin-Roland, S; Masson, J M

    1989-03-01

    The inability of Escherichia coli to secrete proteins in growth medium is one of the major drawbacks in its use in genetic engineering. A synthetic gene, homologous to the one coding for the kil peptide of pColE1, was made and cloned under the control of the lac promoter, in order to obtain the inducible secretion of homologous or heterologous proteins by E. coli. The efficiency of this synthetic gene to promote secretion was assayed by analysing the production and secretion of two proteins, the R-TEM1 beta-lactamase, and the alpha-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis. This latter protein was expressed in E. coli from its gene either on the same plasmid as the kil gene or on a different plasmid. The primary effect of the induction of the kil gene is the overproduction of the secreted proteins. When expressed at a high level, the kil gene promotes the overproduction of all periplasmic proteins and the total secretion in the culture medium of both the beta-lactamase or the alpha-amylase. This secretion is semi-selective for most periplasmic proteins are not secreted. The kil peptide induces the secretion of homologous or heterologous proteins in two steps, first acting on the cytoplasmic membrane, then permeabilizing the outer membrane. This system, which is now being assayed at the fermentor scale, is the first example of using a synthetic gene to engineer a new property into a bacterial strain. PMID:2652141

  19. Collagen-like proteins in pathogenic E. coli strains.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Neelanjana; McKillop, Thomas J; Jowitt, Thomas A; Howard, Marjorie; Davies, Heather; Holmes, David F; Roberts, Ian S; Bella, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequences of enterohaemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 strains show multiple open-reading frames with collagen-like sequences that are absent from the common laboratory strain K-12. These putative collagens are included in prophages embedded in O157:H7 genomes. These prophages carry numerous genes related to strain virulence and have been shown to be inducible and capable of disseminating virulence factors by horizontal gene transfer. We have cloned two collagen-like proteins from E. coli O157:H7 into a laboratory strain and analysed the structure and conformation of the recombinant proteins and several of their constituting domains by a variety of spectroscopic, biophysical, and electron microscopy techniques. We show that these molecules exhibit many of the characteristics of vertebrate collagens, including trimer formation and the presence of a collagen triple helical domain. They also contain a C-terminal trimerization domain, and a trimeric α-helical coiled-coil domain with an unusual amino acid sequence almost completely lacking leucine, valine or isoleucine residues. Intriguingly, these molecules show high thermal stability, with the collagen domain being more stable than those of vertebrate fibrillar collagens, which are much longer and post-translationally modified. Under the electron microscope, collagen-like proteins from E. coli O157:H7 show a dumbbell shape, with two globular domains joined by a hinged stalk. This morphology is consistent with their likely role as trimeric phage side-tail proteins that participate in the attachment of phage particles to E. coli target cells, either directly or through assembly with other phage tail proteins. Thus, collagen-like proteins in enterohaemorrhagic E. coli genomes may have a direct role in the dissemination of virulence-related genes through infection of harmless strains by induced bacteriophages. PMID:22701585

  20. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli (GenProtEc).

    PubMed

    Riley, M; Space, D B

    1996-01-01

    GenProtEc is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. The database is available as a PKZip file by ftp from mbl.edu/pub/ecoli.exe. The program runs under MS-DOS on IMB-compatible machines. GenProtEc can also be accessed through the World Wide Web at URL http://mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html. PMID:8594596

  1. Lateral diffusion of proteins in the periplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Brass, J M; Higgins, C F; Foley, M; Rugman, P A; Birmingham, J; Garland, P B

    1986-01-01

    We have introduced biologically active, fluorescently labeled maltose-binding protein into the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli and measured its lateral diffusion coefficient by the fluorescence photobleaching recovery method. Diffusion of this protein in the periplasm was found to be surprisingly low (lateral diffusion coefficient, 0.9 X 10(-10) cm2 s-1), about 1,000-fold lower than would be expected for diffusion in aqueous medium and almost 100-fold lower than for an equivalent-size protein in the cytoplasm. Galactose-binding protein, myoglobin, and cytochrome c were also introduced into the periplasm and had diffusion coefficients identical to that determined for the maltose-binding protein. For all proteins nearly 100% recovery of fluorescence was obtained after photobleaching, indicating that the periplasm is a single contiguous compartment surrounding the cell. These data have considerable implications for periplasmic structure and for the role of periplasmic proteins in transport and chemotaxis. Images PMID:3005237

  2. Comprehensive analysis of phosphorylated proteins of Escherichia coli ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Soung, George Y; Miller, Jennifer L; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C

    2009-07-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in 24 Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining, and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr; or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, and L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given phosphorylation sites in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  3. A homolog of an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, C. M.; White, F. F.; Heaton, L. A.; Guikema, J. A.; Leach, J. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae gene with sequence similarity to an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene (phoS) produces a periplasmic protein of apparent M(r) 35,000 when expressed in E. coli. Amino terminal sequencing revealed that a signal peptide is removed during transport to the periplasm in E. coli.

  4. An engineered eukaryotic protein glycosylation pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Valderrama-Rincon, Juan D; Fisher, Adam C; Merritt, Judith H; Fan, Yao-Yun; Reading, Craig A; Chhiba, Krishan; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Aebi, Markus; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2012-05-01

    We performed bottom-up engineering of a synthetic pathway in Escherichia coli for the production of eukaryotic trimannosyl chitobiose glycans and the transfer of these glycans to specific asparagine residues in target proteins. The glycan biosynthesis was enabled by four eukaryotic glycosyltransferases, including the yeast uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine transferases Alg13 and Alg14 and the mannosyltransferases Alg1 and Alg2. By including the bacterial oligosaccharyltransferase PglB from Campylobacter jejuni, we successfully transferred glycans to eukaryotic proteins. PMID:22446837

  5. Escherchia coli ribose binding protein based bioreporters revisited

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Artur; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon; Roy, Shantanu; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2014-01-01

    Bioreporter bacteria, i.e., strains engineered to respond to chemical exposure by production of reporter proteins, have attracted wide interest because of their potential to offer cheap and simple alternative analytics for specified compounds or conditions. Bioreporter construction has mostly exploited the natural variation of sensory proteins, but it has been proposed that computational design of new substrate binding properties could lead to completely novel detection specificities at very low affinities. Here we reconstruct a bioreporter system based on the native Escherichia coli ribose binding protein RbsB and one of its computationally designed variants, reported to be capable of binding 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Our results show in vivo reporter induction at 50 nM ribose, and a 125 nM affinity constant for in vitro ribose binding to RbsB. In contrast, the purified published TNT-binding variant did not bind TNT nor did TNT cause induction of the E. coli reporter system. PMID:25005019

  6. Interactions between Phage-Shock Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Hendrik; Teertstra, Wieke; Demmers, Jeroen; Boesten, Rolf; Tommassen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Expression of the pspABCDE operon of Escherichia coli is induced upon infection by filamentous phage and by many other stress conditions, including defects in protein export. Expression of the operon requires the alternative sigma factor σ54 and the transcriptional activator PspF. In addition, PspA plays a negative regulatory role, and the integral-membrane proteins PspB and PspC play a positive one. In this study, we investigated whether the suggested protein-protein interactions implicated in this complex regulatory network can indeed be demonstrated. Antisera were raised against PspB, PspC, and PspD, which revealed, in Western blotting experiments, that PspC forms stable sodium dodecyl sulfate-resistant dimers and that the hypothetical pspD gene is indeed expressed in vivo. Fractionation experiments showed that PspD localizes as a peripherally bound inner membrane protein. Cross-linking studies with intact cells revealed specific interactions of PspA with PspB and PspC, but not with PspD. Furthermore, affinity-chromatography suggested that PspB could bind PspA only in the presence of PspC. These data indicate that regulation of the psp operon is mediated via protein-protein interactions. PMID:12562786

  7. The MCRA model for probabilistic single-compound and cumulative risk assessment of pesticides.

    PubMed

    van der Voet, Hilko; de Boer, Waldo J; Kruisselbrink, Johannes W; Goedhart, Paul W; van der Heijden, Gerie W A M; Kennedy, Marc C; Boon, Polly E; van Klaveren, Jacob D

    2015-05-01

    Pesticide risk assessment is hampered by worst-case assumptions leading to overly pessimistic assessments. On the other hand, cumulative health effects of similar pesticides are often not taken into account. This paper describes models and a web-based software system developed in the European research project ACROPOLIS. The models are appropriate for both acute and chronic exposure assessments of single compounds and of multiple compounds in cumulative assessment groups. The software system MCRA (Monte Carlo Risk Assessment) is available for stakeholders in pesticide risk assessment at mcra.rivm.nl. We describe the MCRA implementation of the methods as advised in the 2012 EFSA Guidance on probabilistic modelling, as well as more refined methods developed in the ACROPOLIS project. The emphasis is on cumulative assessments. Two approaches, sample-based and compound-based, are contrasted. It is shown that additional data on agricultural use of pesticides may give more realistic risk assessments. Examples are given of model and software validation of acute and chronic assessments, using both simulated data and comparisons against the previous release of MCRA and against the standard software DEEM-FCID used by the Environmental Protection Agency in the USA. It is shown that the EFSA Guidance pessimistic model may not always give an appropriate modelling of exposure. PMID:25455888

  8. Small-scale expression of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zerbs, Sarah; Giuliani, Sarah; Collart, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Proteins participate in virtually every cellular activity, and a knowledge of protein function is essential for an understanding of biological systems. However, protein diversity necessitates the application of an array of in vivo and in vitro approaches for characterization of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. Methods that enable production of proteins for in vitro studies are critical for determination of the molecular, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of these molecules. Ideally, proteins could be purified from the original source; however, the native host is often unsuitable for a number of reasons. Consequently, systems for heterologous protein production are commonly used to produce large amounts of protein. Heterologous expression hosts are chosen using a number of criteria, including genetic tractability, advantageous production or processing characteristics (secretion or posttranslational modifications), or economy of time and growth requirements. The subcloning process also provides an opportunity to introduce purification tags, epitope tags, fusions, truncations, and mutations into the coding sequence that may be useful in downstream purification or characterization applications. Bacterial systems for heterologous protein expression have advantages in ease of use, cost, short generation times, and scalability. These expression systems have been widely used by high-throughput protein production projects and often represent an initial experiment for any expression target. Escherichia coli has been studied for many years as a model bacterial organism and is one of the most popular hosts for heterologous protein expression (Terpe, 2006). Its protein production capabilities have been intensively studied, and the ease of genetic manipulation in this organism has led to the development of strains engineered exclusively for use in protein expression. These resources are widely available from commercial sources and public repositories

  9. Genome engineering for improved recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mahalik, Shubhashree; Sharma, Ashish K; Mukherjee, Krishna J

    2014-01-01

    A metabolic engineering perspective which views recombinant protein expression as a multistep pathway allows us to move beyond vector design and identify the downstream rate limiting steps in expression. In E.coli these are typically at the translational level and the supply of precursors in the form of energy, amino acids and nucleotides. Further recombinant protein production triggers a global cellular stress response which feedback inhibits both growth and product formation. Countering this requires a system level analysis followed by a rational host cell engineering to sustain expression for longer time periods. Another strategy to increase protein yields could be to divert the metabolic flux away from biomass formation and towards recombinant protein production. This would require a growth stoppage mechanism which does not affect the metabolic activity of the cell or the transcriptional or translational efficiencies. Finally cells have to be designed for efficient export to prevent buildup of proteins inside the cytoplasm and also simplify downstream processing. The rational and the high throughput strategies that can be used for the construction of such improved host cell platforms for recombinant protein expression is the focus of this review. PMID:25523647

  10. Escherichia coli Protein Expression System for Acetylcholine Binding Proteins (AChBPs)

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Nikita; Paul, Blessy; Ragnarsson, Lotten; Lewis, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand gated ion channels, identified as therapeutic targets for a range of human diseases. Drug design for nAChR related disorders is increasingly using structure-based approaches. Many of these structural insights for therapeutic lead development have been obtained from co-crystal structures of nAChR agonists and antagonists with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP). AChBP is a water soluble, structural and functional homolog of the extracellular, ligand-binding domain of nAChRs. Currently, AChBPs are recombinantly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems for structural and biophysical studies. Here, we report the establishment of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system that significantly reduces the cost and time of production compared to the existing expression systems. E. coli can efficiently express unglycosylated AChBP for crystallography and makes the expression of isotopically labelled forms feasible for NMR. We used a pHUE vector containing an N-terminal His-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein to facilitate AChBP expression in the soluble fractions, and thus avoid the need to recover protein from inclusion bodies. The purified protein yield obtained from the E. coli expression system is comparable to that obtained from existing AChBP expression systems. E. coli expressed AChBP bound nAChR agonists and antagonists with affinities matching those previously reported. Thus, the E. coli expression system significantly simplifies the expression and purification of functional AChBP for structural and biophysical studies. PMID:27304486

  11. Amplification of single-strand DNA binding protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Chase, J W; Whittier, R F; Auerbach, J; Sancar, A; Rupp, W D

    1980-01-01

    An E. coli strain containing a recombinant plasmid carrying the E. coli ssbA+ gene has been shown to produce 12 to 15 fold increased amounts of single-strand DNA binding-protein relative to wild-type strains. In addition, a gamma transducing phage carrying the E. coli uvrA+ gene has been shown to also carry the ssbA+ gene and to be capable of producing increased amounts of binding protein. PMID:6449689

  12. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation. PMID

  13. Protein folding in the cell envelope of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    De Geyter, Jozefien; Tsirigotaki, Alexandra; Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Zorzini, Valentina; Economou, Anastassios; Karamanou, Spyridoula

    2016-01-01

    While the entire proteome is synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes, almost half associates with, localizes in or crosses the bacterial cell envelope. In Escherichia coli a variety of mechanisms are important for taking these polypeptides into or across the plasma membrane, maintaining them in soluble form, trafficking them to their correct cell envelope locations and then folding them into the right structures. The fidelity of these processes must be maintained under various environmental conditions including during stress; if this fails, proteases are called in to degrade mislocalized or aggregated proteins. Various soluble, diffusible chaperones (acting as holdases, foldases or pilotins) and folding catalysts are also utilized to restore proteostasis. These responses can be general, dealing with multiple polypeptides, with functional overlaps and operating within redundant networks. Other chaperones are specialized factors, dealing only with a few exported proteins. Several complex machineries have evolved to deal with binding to, integration in and crossing of the outer membrane. This complex protein network is responsible for fundamental cellular processes such as cell wall biogenesis; cell division; the export, uptake and degradation of molecules; and resistance against exogenous toxic factors. The underlying processes, contributing to our fundamental understanding of proteostasis, are a treasure trove for the development of novel antibiotics, biopharmaceuticals and vaccines. PMID:27573113

  14. Medium-throughput production of recombinant human proteins: protein production in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Burgess-Brown, Nicola A; Mahajan, Pravin; Strain-Damerell, Claire; Gileadi, Opher; Gräslund, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    In Chapter 4 we described the SGC process for generating multiple constructs of truncated versions of each protein using LIC. In this chapter we provide a step-by-step procedure of our E. coli system for test expressing intracellular (soluble) proteins in a 96-well format that enables us to identify which proteins or truncated versions are expressed in a soluble and stable form suitable for structural studies. In addition, we detail the process for scaling up cultures for large-scale protein purification. This level of production is required to obtain sufficient quantities (i.e., milligram amounts) of protein for further characterization and/or crystallization experiments. Our standard process is purification by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) using nickel resin followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), with additional procedures arising from the complexity of the protein itself. PMID:24203325

  15. Membrane attachment activates dnaA protein, the initiation protein of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, B.Y.; Kornberg, A.

    1988-10-01

    ADP and ATP are tightly bound to dnaA protein and are crucial to its function in DNA replication; the exchange of these nucleotides is effected specifically by the acidic phospholipids (cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol) present in Escherichia coli membranes. We now find that phospholipids derived from membranes lacking an unsaturated fatty acid (e.g., oleic acid) are unable to promote the exchange. This observation correlates strikingly with the long-known effect of 3-decynoyl-N-acetylcysteamine, a ''suicide analog'' that prevents initiation of a cycle of replication in E. coli by inhibiting the synthesis of oleic acid, an inhibition that can be overcome by providing the cells with oleic acid. Profound influences on the specific binding of dnaA protein to phospholipids by temperature, the content of unsaturated fatty acids, and the inclusion of cholesterol can be explained by the need for the phospholipids to be in fluid-phase vesicles. These findings suggest that membrane attachment of dnaA protein is vital for its function in the initiation of chromosome replication in E. coli.

  16. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF.

    PubMed

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Galbraith, David W; McEvoy, Megan M; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-05-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli has been improved considerably through the use of fusion proteins, because they increase protein solubility and facilitate purification via affinity chromatography. In this article, we propose the use of CusF as a new fusion partner for expression and purification of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Using a cell-free protein expression system, based on the E. coli S30 extract, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was expressed with a series of different N-terminal tags, immobilized on self-assembled protein microarrays, and its fluorescence quantified. GFP tagged with CusF showed the highest fluorescence intensity, and this was greater than the intensities from corresponding GFP constructs that contained MBP or GST tags. Analysis of protein production in vivo showed that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein with low levels of inclusion bodies. Furthermore, fusion proteins can be exported to the cellular periplasm, if CusF contains the signal sequence. Taking advantage of its ability to bind copper ions, recombinant proteins can be purified with readily available IMAC resins charged with this metal ion, producing pure proteins after purification and tag removal. We therefore recommend the use of CusF as a viable alternative to MBP or GST as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli. PMID:26805756

  17. Effects of ribosome-inactivating proteins on Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens translation systems.

    PubMed Central

    Girbés, T; Barbieri, L; Ferreras, M; Arias, F J; Rojo, M A; Iglesias, R; Alegre, C; Escarmis, C; Stirpe, F

    1993-01-01

    The effects of 30 type 1 and of 2 (ricin and volkensin) type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) on Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens cell-free translation systems were compared with the effects on a rabbit reticulocyte translation system. The depurinating activity of RIPs on E. coli ribosomes was also evaluated. Only six type 1 RIPs inhibited endogenous mRNA-directed translational activity of E. coli lysates, with submicromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations. Four RIPs had similar activities on poly(U)-directed phenylalanine polymerization by E. coli ribosomes, and three RIPs inhibited poly(U)-directed polyphenylalanine synthesis by A. tumefaciens ribosomes, with submicromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations. Images PMID:8407849

  18. Non-standard amino acid incorporation into proteins using Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seok Hoon; Kwon, Yong-Chan; Jewett, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Incorporating non-standard amino acids (NSAAs) into proteins enables new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions. In recent years, improvements in cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems have opened the way to accurate and efficient incorporation of NSAAs into proteins. The driving force behind this development has been three-fold. First, a technical renaissance has enabled high-yielding (>1 g/L) and long-lasting (>10 h in batch operation) CFPS in systems derived from Escherichia coli. Second, the efficiency of orthogonal translation systems has improved. Third, the open nature of the CFPS platform has brought about an unprecedented level of control and freedom of design. Here, we review recent developments in CFPS platforms designed to precisely incorporate NSAAs. In the coming years, we anticipate that CFPS systems will impact efforts to elucidate structure/function relationships of proteins and to make biomaterials and sequence-defined biopolymers for medical and industrial applications.

  19. Functions that protect Escherichia coli from DNA-protein crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Krasich, Rachel; Wu, Sunny Yang; Kuo, H Kenny; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2015-04-01

    Pathways for tolerating and repairing DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) are poorly defined. We used transposon mutagenesis and candidate gene approaches to identify DPC-hypersensitive Escherichia coli mutants. DPCs were induced by azacytidine (aza-C) treatment in cells overexpressing cytosine methyltransferase; hypersensitivity was verified to depend on methyltransferase expression. We isolated hypersensitive mutants that were uncovered in previous studies (recA, recBC, recG, and uvrD), hypersensitive mutants that apparently activate phage Mu Gam expression, and novel hypersensitive mutants in genes involved in DNA metabolism, cell division, and tRNA modification (dinG, ftsK, xerD, dnaJ, hflC, miaA, mnmE, mnmG, and ssrA). Inactivation of SbcCD, which can cleave DNA at protein-DNA complexes, did not cause hypersensitivity. We previously showed that tmRNA pathway defects cause aza-C hypersensitivity, implying that DPCs block coupled transcription/translation complexes. Here, we show that mutants in tRNA modification functions miaA, mnmE and mnmG cause defects in aza-C-induced tmRNA tagging, explaining their hypersensitivity. In order for tmRNA to access a stalled ribosome, the mRNA must be cleaved or released from RNA polymerase. Mutational inactivation of functions involved in mRNA processing and RNA polymerase elongation/release (RNase II, RNaseD, RNase PH, RNase LS, Rep, HepA, GreA, GreB) did not cause aza-C hypersensitivity; the mechanism of tmRNA access remains unclear. PMID:25731940

  20. Functions that protect Escherichia coli from DNA-protein crosslinks

    PubMed Central

    Krasich, Rachel; Wu, Sunny Yang; Kuo, H. Kenny; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2015-01-01

    Pathways for tolerating and repairing DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) are poorly defined. We used transposon mutagenesis and candidate gene approaches to identify DPC-hypersensitive Escherichia coli mutants. DPCs were induced by azacytidine (aza-C) treatment in cells overexpressing cytosine methyltransferase; hypersensitivity was verified to depend on methyltransferase expression. We isolated hypersensitive mutants that were uncovered in previous studies (recA, recBC, recG, and uvrD), hypersensitive mutants that apparently activate phage Mu Gam expression, and novel hypersensitive mutants in genes involved in DNA metabolism, cell division, and tRNA modification (dinG, ftsK, xerD, dnaJ, hflC, miaA, mnmE, mnmG, and ssrA). Inactivation of SbcCD, which can cleave DNA at protein-DNA complexes, did not cause hypersensitivity. We previously showed that tmRNA pathway defects cause aza-C hypersensitivity, implying that DPCs block coupled transcription/translation complexes. Here, we show that mutants in tRNA modification functions miaA, mnmE and mnmG cause defects in aza-C-induced tmRNA tagging, explaining their hypersensitivity. In order for tmRNA to access a stalled ribosome, the mRNA must be cleaved or released from RNA polymerase. Mutational inactivation of functions involved in mRNA processing and RNA polymerase elongation/release (RNase II, RNaseD, RNase PH, RNase LS, Rep, HepA, GreA, GreB) did not cause aza-C hypersensitivity; the mechanism of tmRNA access remains unclear. PMID:25731940

  1. Endogenous occurrence of protein S-guanylation in Escherichia coli: Target identification and genetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Jung, Minkyung; Zhang, Tianli; Ono, Katsuhiko; Ida, Tomoaki; Kunieda, Kohei; Ihara, Hideshi; Akaike, Takaaki; Sawa, Tomohiro

    2016-09-01

    8-Nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) is a nitrated cGMP derivative formed in response to nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). It can cause a post-translational modification (PTM) of protein thiols through cGMP adduction (protein S-guanylation). Accumulating evidence has suggested that, in mammals, S-guanylation of redox-sensor proteins may implicate in regulation of adaptive responses against ROS-associated oxidative stress. Occurrence as well as protein targets of S-guanylation in bacteria remained unknown, however. Here we demonstrated, for the first time, the endogenous occurrence of protein S-guanylation in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Western blotting using anti-S-guanylation antibody clearly showed that multiple proteins were S-guanylated in E. coli. Interestingly, some of those proteins were more intensely S-guanylated when bacteria were cultured under static culture condition than shaking culture condition. It has been known that E. coli is deficient of guanylate cyclase, an enzyme indispensable for 8-nitro-cGMP formation in mammals. We found that adenylate cyclase from E. coli potentially catalyzed 8-nitro-cGMP formation from its precursor 8-nitroguanosine 5'-triphosphate. More importantly, E. coli lacking adenylate cyclase showed significantly reduced formation of S-guanylated proteins. Our S-guanylation proteomics successfully identified S-guanylation protein targets in E. coli, including chaperons, ribosomal proteins, and enzymes which associate with protein synthesis, redox regulation and metabolism. Understanding of functional impacts for protein S-guanylation in bacterial signal transduction is necessary basis for development of potential chemotherapy and new diagnostic strategy for control of pathogenic bacterial infections. PMID:27473654

  2. Green fluorescent protein functions as a reporter for protein localization in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Feilmeier, B J; Iseminger, G; Schroeder, D; Webber, H; Phillips, G J

    2000-07-01

    The use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter for protein localization in Escherichia coli was explored by creating gene fusions between malE (encoding maltose-binding protein [MBP]) and a variant of gfp optimized for fluorescence in bacteria (GFPuv). These constructs encode hybrid proteins composed of GFP fused to the carboxy-terminal end of MBP. Fluorescence was not detected when the hybrid protein was synthesized with the MBP signal sequence. In contrast, when the MBP signal sequence was deleted, fluorescence was observed. Cell fractionation studies showed that the fluorescent MBP-GFP hybrid protein was localized in the cytoplasm, whereas the nonfluorescent version was localized to the periplasmic space. Smaller MBP-GFP hybrid proteins, however, exhibited abnormal fractionation. Expression of the gene fusions in different sec mutants, as well as signal sequence processing assays, confirmed that the periplasmically localized hybrid proteins were exported by the sec-dependent pathway. The distinction between fluorescent and nonfluorescent colonies was exploited as a scorable phenotype to isolate malE signal sequence mutations. While expression of hybrid proteins comprised of full-length MBP did not result in overproduction lethality characteristic of some exported beta-galactosidase hybrid proteins, synthesis of shorter, exported hybrid proteins was toxic to the cells. Purification of MBP-GFP hybrid protein from the different cellular compartments indicated that GFP is improperly folded when localized outside of the cytoplasm. These results suggest that GFP could serve as a useful reporter for genetic analysis of bacterial protein export and of protein folding. PMID:10869087

  3. Fusion tags for protein solubility, purification and immunogenicity in Escherichia coli: the novel Fh8 system

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sofia; Almeida, André; Castro, António; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are now widely produced in diverse microbial cell factories. The Escherichia coli is still the dominant host for recombinant protein production but, as a bacterial cell, it also has its issues: the aggregation of foreign proteins into insoluble inclusion bodies is perhaps the main limiting factor of the E. coli expression system. Conversely, E. coli benefits of cost, ease of use and scale make it essential to design new approaches directed for improved recombinant protein production in this host cell. With the aid of genetic and protein engineering novel tailored-made strategies can be designed to suit user or process requirements. Gene fusion technology has been widely used for the improvement of soluble protein production and/or purification in E. coli, and for increasing peptide’s immunogenicity as well. New fusion partners are constantly emerging and complementing the traditional solutions, as for instance, the Fh8 fusion tag that has been recently studied and ranked among the best solubility enhancer partners. In this review, we provide an overview of current strategies to improve recombinant protein production in E. coli, including the key factors for successful protein production, highlighting soluble protein production, and a comprehensive summary of the latest available and traditionally used gene fusion technologies. A special emphasis is given to the recently discovered Fh8 fusion system that can be used for soluble protein production, purification, and immunogenicity in E. coli. The number of existing fusion tags will probably increase in the next few years, and efforts should be taken to better understand how fusion tags act in E. coli. This knowledge will undoubtedly drive the development of new tailored-made tools for protein production in this bacterial system. PMID:24600443

  4. Recombinant protein production data after expression in the bacterium Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Cano Del Villar, Kevin D; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-06-01

    Fusion proteins have become essential for the expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. The metal-binding protein CusF has shown several features that make it an attractive fusion protein and affinity tag: "Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF" (Cantu-Bustos et al., 2016 [1]). Here we present accompanying data from protein expression experiments; we tested different protein tags, temperatures, expression times, cellular compartments, and concentrations of inducer in order to obtain soluble protein and low formation of inclusion bodies. Additionally, we present data from the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged with CusF, using Ag(I) metal affinity chromatography. PMID:27014739

  5. Recombinant protein production data after expression in the bacterium Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cantu-Bustos, J. Enrique; Cano del Villar, Kevin D.; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-01-01

    Fusion proteins have become essential for the expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. The metal-binding protein CusF has shown several features that make it an attractive fusion protein and affinity tag: "Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF" (Cantu-Bustos et al., 2016 [1]). Here we present accompanying data from protein expression experiments; we tested different protein tags, temperatures, expression times, cellular compartments, and concentrations of inducer in order to obtain soluble protein and low formation of inclusion bodies. Additionally, we present data from the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged with CusF, using Ag(I) metal affinity chromatography. PMID:27014739

  6. Optimizing Escherichia coli as a protein expression platform to produce Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunogenic proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A number of valuable candidates as tuberculosis vaccine have been reported, some of which have already entered clinical trials. The new vaccines, especially subunit vaccines, need multiple administrations in order to maintain adequate life-long immune memory: this demands for high production levels and degree of purity. Results In this study, TB10.4, Ag85B and a TB10.4-Ag85B chimeric protein (here-after referred as full) - immunodominant antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis - were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The rational design of expression constructs and optimization of fermentation and purification conditions allowed a marked increase in solubility and yield of the recombinant antigens. Indeed, scaling up of the process guaranteed mass production of all these three antigens (2.5-25 mg of pure protein/L cultivation broth). Quality of produced soluble proteins was evaluated both by mass spectrometry to assess the purity of final preparations, and by circular dichroism spectroscopy to ascertain the protein conformation. Immunological tests of the different protein products demonstrated that when TB10.4 was fused to Ag85B, the chimeric protein was more immunoreactive than either of the immunogenic protein alone. Conclusions We reached the goal of purifying large quantities of soluble antigens effective in generating immunological response against M. tuberculosis by a robust, controlled, scalable and economically feasible production process. PMID:24252280

  7. Elimination of truncated recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli by removing cryptic translation initiation site.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Matthew J; Barrios, Adam F; Tan, Song

    2016-05-01

    Undesirable truncated recombinant protein products pose a special expression and purification challenge because such products often share similar chromatographic properties as the desired full length protein. We describe here our observation of both full length and a truncated form of a yeast protein (Gcn5) expressed in Escherichia coli, and the reduction or elimination of the truncated form by mutating a cryptic Shine-Dalgarno or START codon within the Gcn5 coding region. Unsuccessful attempts to engineer in a cryptic translation initiation site into other recombinant proteins suggest that cryptic Shine-Dalgarno or START codon sequences are necessary but not sufficient for cryptic translation in E. coli. PMID:26739786

  8. Localization of Protein Aggregation in Escherichia coli Is Governed by Diffusion and Nucleoid Macromolecular Crowding Effect

    PubMed Central

    Coquel, Anne-Sophie; Jacob, Jean-Pascal; Primet, Mael; Demarez, Alice; Dimiccoli, Mariella; Julou, Thomas; Moisan, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Aggregates of misfolded proteins are a hallmark of many age-related diseases. Recently, they have been linked to aging of Escherichia coli (E. coli) where protein aggregates accumulate at the old pole region of the aging bacterium. Because of the potential of E. coli as a model organism, elucidating aging and protein aggregation in this bacterium may pave the way to significant advances in our global understanding of aging. A first obstacle along this path is to decipher the mechanisms by which protein aggregates are targeted to specific intercellular locations. Here, using an integrated approach based on individual-based modeling, time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and automated image analysis, we show that the movement of aging-related protein aggregates in E. coli is purely diffusive (Brownian). Using single-particle tracking of protein aggregates in live E. coli cells, we estimated the average size and diffusion constant of the aggregates. Our results provide evidence that the aggregates passively diffuse within the cell, with diffusion constants that depend on their size in agreement with the Stokes-Einstein law. However, the aggregate displacements along the cell long axis are confined to a region that roughly corresponds to the nucleoid-free space in the cell pole, thus confirming the importance of increased macromolecular crowding in the nucleoids. We thus used 3D individual-based modeling to show that these three ingredients (diffusion, aggregation and diffusion hindrance in the nucleoids) are sufficient and necessary to reproduce the available experimental data on aggregate localization in the cells. Taken together, our results strongly support the hypothesis that the localization of aging-related protein aggregates in the poles of E. coli results from the coupling of passive diffusion-aggregation with spatially non-homogeneous macromolecular crowding. They further support the importance of “soft” intracellular structuring (based on macromolecular

  9. Strain engineering to prevent norleucine incorporation during recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Veeravalli, Karthik; Laird, Michael W; Fedesco, Mark; Zhang, Yu; Yu, X Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Incorporation of norleucine in place of methionine residues during recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli is well known. Continuous feeding of methionine is commonly used in E. coli recombinant protein production processes to prevent norleucine incorporation. Although this strategy is effective in preventing norleucine incorporation, there are several disadvantages associated with continuous feeding. Continuous feeding increases the operational complexity and the overall cost of the fermentation process. In addition, the continuous feed leads to undesirable dilution of the fermentation medium possibly resulting in lower cell densities and recombinant protein yields. In this work, the genomes of three E. coli hosts were engineered by introducing chromosomal mutations that result in methionine overproduction in the cell. The recombinant protein purified from the fermentations using the methionine overproducing hosts had no norleucine incorporation. Furthermore, these studies demonstrated that the fermentations using one of the methionine overproducing hosts exhibited comparable fermentation performance as the control host in three different recombinant protein production processes. PMID:25315437

  10. Engineering N-linked protein glycosylation with diverse O antigen lipopolysaccharide structures in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Mario F; Wacker, Michael; Hernandez, Marcela; Hitchen, Paul G; Marolda, Cristina L; Kowarik, Michael; Morris, Howard R; Dell, Anne; Valvano, Miguel A; Aebi, Markus

    2005-02-22

    Campylobacter jejuni has a general N-linked protein glycosylation system that can be functionally transferred to Escherichia coli. In this study, we engineered E. coli cells in a way that two different pathways, protein N-glycosylation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis, converge at the step in which PglB, the key enzyme of the C. jejuni N-glycosylation system, transfers O polysaccharide from a lipid carrier (undecaprenyl pyrophosphate) to an acceptor protein. PglB was the only protein of the bacterial N-glycosylation machinery both necessary and sufficient for the transfer. The relaxed specificity of the PglB oligosaccharyltransferase toward the glycan structure was exploited to create novel N-glycan structures containing two distinct E. coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa O antigens. PglB-mediated transfer of polysaccharides might be valuable for in vivo production of O polysaccharides-protein conjugates for use as antibacterial vaccines. PMID:15703289

  11. Microbial trophic interactions and mcrA gene expression in monitoring of anaerobic digesters

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alejandra; Montañez-Hernández, Lilia E.; Palacio-Molina, Sandra L.; Oropeza-Navarro, Ricardo; Luévanos-Escareño, Miriam P.; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a biological process where different trophic groups of microorganisms break down biodegradable organic materials in the absence of oxygen. A wide range of AD technologies is being used to convert livestock manure, municipal and industrial wastewaters, and solid organic wastes into biogas. AD gains importance not only because of its relevance in waste treatment but also because of the recovery of carbon in the form of methane, which is a renewable energy and is used to generate electricity and heat. Despite the advances on the engineering and design of new bioreactors for AD, the microbiology component always poses challenges. Microbiology of AD processes is complicated as the efficiency of the process depends on the interactions of various trophic groups involved. Due to the complex interdependence of microbial activities for the functionality of the anaerobic bioreactors, the genetic expression of mcrA, which encodes a key enzyme in methane formation, is proposed as a parameter to monitor the process performance in real time. This review evaluates the current knowledge on microbial groups, their interactions, and their relationship to the performance of anaerobic biodigesters with a focus on using mcrA gene expression as a tool to monitor the process. PMID:25429286

  12. Microbial trophic interactions and mcrA gene expression in monitoring of anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Alejandra; Montañez-Hernández, Lilia E; Palacio-Molina, Sandra L; Oropeza-Navarro, Ricardo; Luévanos-Escareño, Miriam P; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a biological process where different trophic groups of microorganisms break down biodegradable organic materials in the absence of oxygen. A wide range of AD technologies is being used to convert livestock manure, municipal and industrial wastewaters, and solid organic wastes into biogas. AD gains importance not only because of its relevance in waste treatment but also because of the recovery of carbon in the form of methane, which is a renewable energy and is used to generate electricity and heat. Despite the advances on the engineering and design of new bioreactors for AD, the microbiology component always poses challenges. Microbiology of AD processes is complicated as the efficiency of the process depends on the interactions of various trophic groups involved. Due to the complex interdependence of microbial activities for the functionality of the anaerobic bioreactors, the genetic expression of mcrA, which encodes a key enzyme in methane formation, is proposed as a parameter to monitor the process performance in real time. This review evaluates the current knowledge on microbial groups, their interactions, and their relationship to the performance of anaerobic biodigesters with a focus on using mcrA gene expression as a tool to monitor the process. PMID:25429286

  13. Transphosphorylation of E. coli proteins during production of recombinant protein kinases provides a robust system to characterize kinase specificity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein kinase specificity is of fundamental importance to pathway regulation and signal transduction. Here, we report a convenient system to monitor the activity and specificity of recombinant protein kinases expressed in E.coli. We apply this to the study of the cytoplasmic domain of the plant rec...

  14. Interaction of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli protein, translocated intimin receptor (Tir), with focal adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Zurawski, D V; Chowrashi, P; Ayoob, J C; Huang, L; Mittal, B; Sanger, J M; Sanger, J W

    2000-12-01

    When enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) attach and infect host cells, they induce a cytoskeletal rearrangement and the formation of cytoplasmic columns of actin filaments called pedestals. The attached EPEC and pedestals move over the surface of the host cell in an actin-dependent reaction [Sanger et al., 1996: Cell Motil Cytoskeleton 34:279-287]. The discovery that EPEC inserts the protein, translocated intimin receptor (Tir), into the membrane of host cells, where it binds the EPEC outer membrane protein, intimin [Kenny et al., 1997: Cell 91:511-520], suggests Tir serves two functions: tethering the bacteria to the host cell and providing a direct connection to the host's cytoskeleton. The sequence of Tir predicts a protein of 56.8 kD with three domains separated by two predicted trans-membrane spanning regions. A GST-fusion protein of the N-terminal 233 amino acids of Tir (Tir1) binds to alpha-actinin, talin, and vinculin from cell extracts. GST-Tir1 also coprecipitates purified forms of alpha-actinin, talin, and vinculin while GST alone does not bind these three focal adhesion proteins. Biotinylated probes of these three proteins also bound Tir1 cleaved from GST. Similar associations of alpha-actinin, talin, and vinculin were also detected with the C-terminus of Tir, i.e., Tir3, the last 217 amino acids. Antibody staining of EPEC-infected cultured cells reveals the presence of focal adhesion proteins beneath the attached bacteria. Our experiments support a model in which the cytoplasmic domains of Tir recruit a number of focal adhesion proteins that can bind actin filaments to form pedestals. Since pedestals also contain villin, tropomyosin and myosin II [Sanger et al., 1996: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 34:279-287], the pedestals appear to be a novel structure sharing properties of both focal adhesions and microvilli. PMID:11093251

  15. Production of recombinant protein in Escherichia coli cultured in extract from waste product alga, Ulva lactuca.

    PubMed

    Rechtin, Tammy M; Hurst, Matthew; Potts, Tom; Hestekin, Jamie; Beitle, Robert; McLaughlin, John; May, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the potential for waste product alga, Ulva lactuca, to serve as a media component for recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli. To facilitate this investigation, U. lactuca harvested from Jamaica Bay was dried, and nutrients acid extracted for use as a growth media. The E. coli cell line BL21(DE3) was used to assess the effects on growth and production of recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP). This study showed that media composed of acid extracts without further nutrient addition maintained E. coli growth and recombinant protein production. Extracts made from dried algae lots less than six-months-old were able to produce two-fold more GFP protein than traditional Lysogeny Broth media. PMID:24799463

  16. The DNA protection during starvation protein (Dps) influences attachment of Escherichia coli to abiotic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goulter-Thorsen, Rebecca M; Gentle, Ian R; Gobius, Kari S; Dykes, Gary A

    2011-08-01

    The attachment of bacterial species such as Escherichia coli to abiotic materials is of concern to the food industry. This study investigated the role of DNA protection during starvation protein (Dps) in cell surface hydrophobicity and attachment of E. coli to glass, stainless steel, and Teflon surfaces. The Dps was not found to influence hydrophobicity, but did have a putative role in attachment in a strain- and substrate-dependent manner. PMID:21438764

  17. Engineering Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Derivative Strains To Minimize E. coli Protein Contamination after Purification by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Robichon, Carine; Luo, Jianying; Causey, Thomas B.; Benner, Jack S.; Samuelson, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant His-tagged proteins expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) are commonly coeluted with native E. coli proteins, especially if the recombinant protein is expressed at a low level. The E. coli contaminants display high affinity to divalent nickel or cobalt ions, mainly due to the presence of clustered histidine residues or biologically relevant metal binding sites. To improve the final purity of expressed His-tagged protein, we engineered E. coli BL21(DE3) expression strains in which the most recurring contaminants are either expressed with an alternative tag or mutated to decrease their affinity to divalent cations. The current study presents the design, engineering, and characterization of two E. coli BL21(DE3) derivatives, NiCo21(DE3) and NiCo22(DE3), which express the endogenous proteins SlyD, Can, ArnA, and (optionally) AceE fused at their C terminus to a chitin binding domain (CBD) and the protein GlmS, with six surface histidines replaced by alanines. We show that each E. coli CBD-tagged protein remains active and can be efficiently eliminated from an IMAC elution fraction using a chitin column flowthrough step, while the modification of GlmS results in loss of affinity for nickel-containing resin. The “NiCo” strains uniquely complement existing methods for improving the purity of recombinant His-tagged protein. PMID:21602383

  18. A novel nucleoid protein of Escherichia coli induced under anaerobiotic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Jun; Yoshimura, Shige H; Takeyasu, Kunio; Ishihama, Akira

    2010-06-01

    A systematic search was performed for DNA-binding sequences of YgiP, an uncharacterized transcription factor of Escherichia coli, by using the Genomic SELEX. A total of 688 YgiP-binding loci were identified after genome-wide profiling of SELEX fragments with a high-density microarray (SELEX-chip). Gel shift and DNase-I footprinting assays indicated that YgiP binds to multiple sites along DNA probes with a consensus GTTNATT sequence. Atomic force microscope observation indicated that at low concentrations, YgiP associates at various sites on DNA probes, but at high concentrations, YgiP covers the entire DNA surface supposedly through protein-protein contact. The intracellular concentration of YgiP is very low in growing E. coli cells under aerobic conditions, but increases more than 100-fold to the level as high as the major nucleoid proteins under anaerobic conditions. An E. coli mutant lacking ygiP showed retarded growth under anaerobic conditions. High abundance and large number of binding sites together indicate that YgiP is a nucleoid-associated protein with both architectural and regulatory roles as the nucleoid proteins Fis and IHF. We then propose that YgiP is a novel nucleoid protein of E. coli under anaerobiosis and propose to rename it Dan (DNA-binding protein under anaerobic conditions). PMID:20156994

  19. Most RNAs regulating ribosomal protein biosynthesis in Escherichia coli are narrowly distributed to Gammaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yang; Deiorio-Haggar, Kaila; Anthony, Jon; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, 12 distinct RNA structures within the transcripts encoding ribosomal proteins interact with specific ribosomal proteins to allow autogenous regulation of expression from large multi-gene operons, thus coordinating ribosomal protein biosynthesis across multiple operons. However, these RNA structures are typically not represented in the RNA Families Database or annotated in genomic sequences databases, and their phylogenetic distribution is largely unknown. To investigate the extent to which these RNA structures are conserved across eubacterial phyla, we created multiple sequence alignments representing 10 of these messenger RNA (mRNA) structures in E. coli. We find that while three RNA structures are widely distributed across many phyla of bacteria, seven of the RNAs are narrowly distributed to a few orders of Gammaproteobacteria. To experimentally validate our computational predictions, we biochemically confirmed dual L1-binding sites identified in many Firmicute species. This work reveals that RNA-based regulation of ribosomal protein biosynthesis is used in nearly all eubacterial phyla, but the specific RNA structures that regulate ribosomal protein biosynthesis in E. coli are narrowly distributed. These results highlight the limits of our knowledge regarding ribosomal protein biosynthesis regulation outside of E. coli, and the potential for alternative RNA structures responsible for regulating ribosomal proteins in other eubacteria. PMID:23396277

  20. Expression of the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Manning, D S; Stewart, S J

    1993-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Chlamydia trachomatis was expressed in Escherichia coli. To assess whether it assembled into a conformationally correct structure at the cell surface, we characterized the recombinant MOMP (rMOMP) by Western immunoblot analysis, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize contiguous and conformational MOMP epitopes. Western blot analysis showed that most of the rMOMP comigrated with authentic monomer MOMP, indicating that its signal peptide was recognized and cleaved by E. coli. The rMOMP could not be detected on the cell surface of viable or formalin-killed E. coli organisms by indirect immunofluorescence staining with a MAb specific for a MOMP contiguous epitope. In contrast, the same MAb readily stained rMOMP-expressing E. coli cells that had been permeabilized by methanol fixation. A MAb that recognizes a conformational MOMP epitope and reacted strongly with formalin- or methanol-fixed elementary bodies failed to stain formalin- or methanol-fixed E. coli expressing rMOMP. Moreover, this MAb did not immunoprecipitate rMOMP from expressing E. coli cells even though it precipitated the authentic protein from lysates of C. trachomatis elementary bodies. Therefore we concluded that rMOMP was not localized to the E. coli cell surface and was not recognizable by a conformation-dependent antibody. These results indicate that rMOMP expressed by E. coli is unlikely to serve as an accurate model of MOMP structure and function. They also question the utility of rMOMP as a source of immunogen for eliciting neutralizing antibodies against conformational antigenic sites of the protein. Images PMID:8406797

  1. Enhanced expression of rabies virus surface G-protein in Escherichia coli using SUMO fusion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ankit; Yadav, Dinesh; Rai, Krishan Mohan; Srivastava, Meenal; Verma, Praveen C; Singh, Pradhyumna K; Tuli, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Fusion systems are known to increase the expression of difficult to express recombinant proteins in soluble form to facilitate their purification. Rabies glycoprotein was also tough to express at sufficient level in soluble form in both E. coli and plant. The present work was aimed to over-express and purify this membrane protein from soluble extract of E. coli. Fusion of Small Ubiqutin like Modifier (SUMO) with rabies glycoprotein increased ~1.5 fold higher expression and ~3.0 fold solubility in comparison to non-fused in E. coli. The SUMO fusion also simplified the purification process. Previously engineered rabies glycoprotein gene in tobacco plants provides complete protection to mice, but the expression was very low for purification. Our finding demonstrated that the SUMO-fusion was useful for enhancing expression and solubility of the membrane protein and again proves to be a good alternative technology for applications in biomedical and pharmaceutical research. PMID:22134654

  2. Strategies for the expression of SUMO-modified target proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Hisato; Uwada, Junsuke; Azusa, Kawasaki

    2009-01-01

    We previously described the establishment of a binary vector system that allows co-expression of SUMO conjugation enzymes and a target protein of interest, leading to efficient SUMO modification and the production of a large amount of recombinant SUMO-modified proteins in Escherichia coli. The advantages of this E. coli expression/modification approach include scalability of experiments, low cost, fast growth, and a lack of proteases that cleave the isopeptide linkage between SUMO and the target protein. Thus, this E. coli method provides a useful alternative to authentic SUMO modification assays, such as in vitro SUMO conjugation and in vivo SUMO modification using baculovirus or mammalian cell culture, that are usually complicated, time-consuming and expensive. PMID:19107420

  3. NMR Structure of the hypothetical protein encoded by the YjbJ gene from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Liao, Jack; Wu, Bin; Yee, Adelinda; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Edwards, Aled M.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2002-06-01

    Here we describe the solution structure of YjbJ (gil418541) as part of a structural proteomics project on the feasibility of the high-throughput generation of samples from Escherichia coli for structural studies. YjbJ is a hypothetical protein from Escherichia coli protein of unknown function. It is conserved, showing significant sequence identity to four predicted prokaryotic proteins, also of unknown function (Figure 1A). These include gil16762921 from Salmonella enterica (S. typhi), gil17938413 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, gil16265654 from Sinorizhobium meliloti, and gil15599932 from Pseudomona aeruginosa. The structure of YjbJ reveals a new variation of a common motif (four-helix bundle) that could not be predicted from the protein sequence. Although the biochemical function is unknown, the existence of patterns of conserved residues on the protein surface suggest that the fold and function of all these proteins could be similar.

  4. Escherichia coli as host for membrane protein structure determination: a global analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hattab, Georges; Warschawski, Dror E.; Moncoq, Karine; Miroux, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The structural biology of membrane proteins (MP) is hampered by the difficulty in producing and purifying them. A comprehensive analysis of protein databases revealed that 213 unique membrane protein structures have been obtained after production of the target protein in E. coli. The primary expression system used was the one based on the T7 RNA polymerase, followed by the arabinose and T5 promoter based expression systems. The C41λ(DE3) and C43λ(DE3) bacterial mutant hosts have contributed to 28% of non E. coli membrane protein structures. A large scale analysis of expression protocols demonstrated a preference for a combination of bacterial host-vector together with a bimodal distribution of induction temperature and of inducer concentration. Altogether our analysis provides a set of rules for the optimal use of bacterial expression systems in membrane protein production. PMID:26160693

  5. The production of recombinant dengue virus E protein using Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Sugrue, R J; Cui, T; Xu, Q; Fu, J; Chan, Y C

    1997-12-01

    The dengue virus envelope protein was expressed as a GST fusion protein using E. coli and P. pastoris as expression hosts. In E. coli the recombinant E protein is expressed initially as a soluble 81 kDa GST fusion protein. Treatment of the fusion protein with thrombin released a 55 kDa protein, which is the expected size for correctly processed, non-glycosylated recombinant E protein. The antiserum from animals immunised with this recombinant E protein was found to specifically recognise the dengue virus E protein in virus-infected cells, thus demonstrating the immunogenic nature of the recombinant E protein. This expression system allowed production of up to 2 mg of purified recombinant E protein from a 1 1 bacterial culture. In contrast, expression of this GST fusion protein in P. pastoris is associated with extensive proteolytic degradation of the recombinant E protein. However, this proteolytic degradation was not observed in the truncated E protein sequences which were expressed. One of these recombinant fusion proteins, GST E401 was secreted into the culture medium at levels of up to 100 microg/l of growth medium. PMID:9504761

  6. The dependence of Escherichia coli asparaginase II formation on cyclic AMP and cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Russell, L; Yamazaki, H

    1978-05-01

    The amount of asparaginase II in an Escherichia coli wild-type strain (cya+, crp+) markedly increased upon a shift from aerobic to anaerobic growth. However, no such increase occurred in a mutant (cya) lacking cyclic AMP synthesis unless supplemented with exogenous cyclic AMP. Since a mutant (crp) deficient in cyclic AMP receptor protein also did not support the anaerobic formation of this enzyme, it is concluded that the formation of E. coli asparaginase II depends on both cyclic AMP and cyclic AMP receptor protein. PMID:207402

  7. Protein kinase C mediates enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7-induced attaching and effacing lesions.

    PubMed

    Shen-Tu, Grace; Kim, Hyunhee; Liu, Mingyao; Johnson-Henry, Kathene C; Sherman, Philip M

    2014-04-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 causes outbreaks of diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome. E. coli O157:H7 intimately attaches to epithelial cells, effaces microvilli, and recruits F-actin into pedestals to form attaching and effacing lesions. Lipid rafts serve as signal transduction platforms that mediate microbe-host interactions. The aims of this study were to determine if protein kinase C (PKC) is recruited to lipid rafts in response to E. coli O157:H7 infection and what role it plays in attaching and effacing lesion formation. HEp-2 and intestine 407 tissue culture epithelial cells were challenged with E. coli O157:H7, and cell protein extracts were then separated by buoyant density ultracentrifugation to isolate lipid rafts. Immunoblotting for PKC was performed, and localization in lipid rafts was confirmed with an anti-caveolin-1 antibody. Isoform-specific PKC small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to determine the role of PKC in E. coli O157:H7-induced attaching and effacing lesions. In contrast to uninfected cells, PKC was recruited to lipid rafts in response to E. coli O157:H7. Metabolically active bacteria and cells with intact lipid rafts were necessary for the recruitment of PKC. PKC recruitment was independent of the intimin gene, type III secretion system, and the production of Shiga toxins. Inhibition studies, using myristoylated PKCζ pseudosubstrate, revealed that atypical PKC isoforms were activated in response to the pathogen. Pretreating cells with isoform-specific PKC siRNA showed that PKCζ plays a role in E. coli O157:H7-induced attaching and effacing lesions. We concluded that lipid rafts mediate atypical PKC signal transduction responses to E. coli O157:H7. These findings contribute further to the understanding of the complex array of microbe-eukaryotic cell interactions that occur in response to infection. PMID:24491575

  8. High-throughput recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ease of genetic manipulation, low cost, rapid growth and number of previous studies have made Escherichia coli one of the most widely used microorganism species for producing recombinant proteins. In this post-genomic era, challenges remain to rapidly express and purify large numbers of proteins for academic and commercial purposes in a high-throughput manner. In this review, we describe several state-of-the-art approaches that are suitable for the cloning, expression and purification, conducted in parallel, of numerous molecules, and we discuss recent progress related to soluble protein expression, mRNA folding, fusion tags, post-translational modification and production of membrane proteins. Moreover, we address the ongoing efforts to overcome various challenges faced in protein expression in E. coli, which could lead to an improvement of the current system from trial and error to a predictable and rational design. PMID:27581654

  9. A self-inducible heterologous protein expression system in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Briand, L.; Marcion, G.; Kriznik, A.; Heydel, J. M.; Artur, Y.; Garrido, C.; Seigneuric, R.; Neiers, F.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important experimental, medical and industrial cell factory for recombinant protein production. The inducible lac promoter is one of the most commonly used promoters for heterologous protein expression in E. coli. Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) is currently the most efficient molecular inducer for regulating this promoter’s transcriptional activity. However, limitations have been observed in large-scale and microplate production, including toxicity, cost and culture monitoring. Here, we report the novel SILEX (Self-InducibLe Expression) system, which is a convenient, cost-effective alternative that does not require cell density monitoring or IPTG induction. We demonstrate the broad utility of the presented self-inducible method for a panel of diverse proteins produced in large amounts. The SILEX system is compatible with all classical culture media and growth temperatures and allows protein expression modulation. Importantly, the SILEX system is proven to be efficient for protein expression screening on a microplate scale. PMID:27611846

  10. High-throughput recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jia, Baolei; Jeon, Che Ok

    2016-08-01

    The ease of genetic manipulation, low cost, rapid growth and number of previous studies have made Escherichia coli one of the most widely used microorganism species for producing recombinant proteins. In this post-genomic era, challenges remain to rapidly express and purify large numbers of proteins for academic and commercial purposes in a high-throughput manner. In this review, we describe several state-of-the-art approaches that are suitable for the cloning, expression and purification, conducted in parallel, of numerous molecules, and we discuss recent progress related to soluble protein expression, mRNA folding, fusion tags, post-translational modification and production of membrane proteins. Moreover, we address the ongoing efforts to overcome various challenges faced in protein expression in E. coli, which could lead to an improvement of the current system from trial and error to a predictable and rational design. PMID:27581654

  11. A self-inducible heterologous protein expression system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Briand, L; Marcion, G; Kriznik, A; Heydel, J M; Artur, Y; Garrido, C; Seigneuric, R; Neiers, F

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important experimental, medical and industrial cell factory for recombinant protein production. The inducible lac promoter is one of the most commonly used promoters for heterologous protein expression in E. coli. Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) is currently the most efficient molecular inducer for regulating this promoter's transcriptional activity. However, limitations have been observed in large-scale and microplate production, including toxicity, cost and culture monitoring. Here, we report the novel SILEX (Self-InducibLe Expression) system, which is a convenient, cost-effective alternative that does not require cell density monitoring or IPTG induction. We demonstrate the broad utility of the presented self-inducible method for a panel of diverse proteins produced in large amounts. The SILEX system is compatible with all classical culture media and growth temperatures and allows protein expression modulation. Importantly, the SILEX system is proven to be efficient for protein expression screening on a microplate scale. PMID:27611846

  12. Global Profiling of Protein Lysine Malonylation in Escherichia coli Reveals Its Role in Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lili; Nie, Litong; Chen, Ming; Liu, Ping; Zhu, Jun; Zhai, Linhui; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhao, Yingming; Tan, Minjia

    2016-06-01

    Protein lysine malonylation is a recently identified post-translational modification (PTM), which is evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to mammals. Although analysis of lysine malonylome in mammalians suggested that this modification was related to energy metabolism, the substrates and biological roles of malonylation in prokaryotes are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed qualitative and quantitative analyses to globally identify lysine malonylation substrates in Escherichia coli. We identified 1745 malonylation sites in 594 proteins in E. coli, representing the first and largest malonylome data set in prokaryotes up to date. Bioinformatic analyses showed that lysine malonylation was significantly enriched in protein translation, energy metabolism pathways and fatty acid biosynthesis, implying the potential roles of protein malonylation in bacterial physiology. Quantitative proteomics by fatty acid synthase inhibition in both auxotrophic and prototrophic E. coli strains revealed that lysine malonylation is closely associated with E. coli fatty acid metabolism. Protein structural analysis and mutagenesis experiment suggested malonylation could impact enzymatic activity of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in citric acid (TCA) cycle. Further comparative analysis among lysine malonylome, succinylome and acetylome data showed that these three modifications could participate in some similar enriched metabolism pathways, but they could also possibly play distinct roles such as in fatty acid synthesis. These data expanded our knowledge of lysine malonylation in prokaryotes, providing a resource for functional study of lysine malonylation in bacteria. PMID:27183143

  13. Engineering Escherichia coli into a Protein Delivery System for Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens encode type 3 secretion systems, sophisticated nanomachines that deliver proteins directly into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. These systems present attractive opportunities for therapeutic protein delivery applications; however, their utility has been limited by their inherent pathogenicity. Here, we report the reengineering of a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli with a tunable type 3 secretion system that can efficiently deliver heterologous proteins into mammalian cells, thereby circumventing the need for virulence attenuation. We first introduced a 31 kB region of Shigella flexneri DNA that encodes all of the information needed to form the secretion nanomachine onto a plasmid that can be directly propagated within E. coli or integrated into the E. coli chromosome. To provide flexible control over type 3 secretion and protein delivery, we generated plasmids expressing master regulators of the type 3 system from either constitutive or inducible promoters. We then constructed a Gateway-compatible plasmid library of type 3 secretion sequences to enable rapid screening and identification of sequences that do not perturb function when fused to heterologous protein substrates and optimized their delivery into mammalian cells. Combining these elements, we found that coordinated expression of the type 3 secretion system and modified target protein substrates produces a nonpathogenic strain that expresses, secretes, and delivers heterologous proteins into mammalian cells. This reengineered system thus provides a highly flexible protein delivery platform with potential for future therapeutic applications. PMID:25853840

  14. Secretion and proteolysis of heterologous proteins fused to the Escherichia coli maltose binding protein in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiguo; Leung, Wilson; Yon, Amy; Nguyen, John; Perez, Vincent C; Vu, Jane; Giang, William; Luong, Linda T; Phan, Tracy; Salazar, Kate A; Gomez, Seth R; Au, Colin; Xiang, Fan; Thomas, David W; Franz, Andreas H; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P

    2010-07-01

    The Escherichia coli maltose binding protein (MBP) has been utilized as a translational fusion partner to improve the expression of foreign proteins made in E. coli. When located N-terminal to its cargo protein, MBP increases the solubility of intracellular proteins and improves the export of secreted proteins in bacterial systems. We initially explored whether MBP would have the same effect in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, a popular eukaryotic host for heterologous protein expression. When MBP was fused as an N-terminal partner to several C-terminal cargo proteins expressed in this yeast, proteolysis occurred between the two peptides, and MBP reached the extracellular region unattached to its cargo. However, in two of three instances, the cargo protein reached the extracellular region as well, and its initial attachment to MBP enhanced its secretion from the cell. Extensive mutagenesis of the spacer region between MBP and its C-terminal cargo protein could not inhibit the cleavage although it did cause changes in the protease target sites in the fusion proteins, as determined by mass spectrometry. Taken together, these results suggested that an uncharacterized P. pastoris protease attacked at different locations in the region C-terminal of the MBP domain, including the spacer and cargo regions, but the MBP domain could still act to enhance the secretion of certain cargo proteins. PMID:20230898

  15. An optimized protocol for overproduction of recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bahreini, Elham; Aghaiypour, Khosrow; Abbasalipourkabir, Roghayeh; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Saidijam, Massoud; Safavieh, Sedigheh Sadat

    2014-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli) offers a means for rapid, high-yield, and economical production of recombinant proteins. Here, a protocol for optimization of parameters involved in bacterial expression conditions is described. L-Asparaginase (ASNase II) was chosen as a model protein for our experiments. ASNase II gene (ansB) was cloned into the pAED4 plasmid and transformed into E. coli BL21pLysS (DE3)-competent cells. It was assumed that high cell density and high copy number of recombinant plasmid in the bacteria host could result in very high production of the recombinant protein. Circumstances for the overproduction of recombinant ASNase II including cell growth conditions, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) level, ampicillin (Amp) concentration before and during IPTG induction, and cell density were optimized. Regarding the final optimization, overexpression of ASNase II was assessed on a large scale in LB medium. Periplasmic ASNase II was extracted using an alkaline lysis method. The extracted protein was purified by one-step DEAE-Sepharose fast-flow chromatography. ASNase II activity was considered an index for the protein expression. Applying the optimized practical protocol, protein production was significantly enhanced in comparison to the traditional IPTG induction method in the absence of a fermentor and can be applied for overexpression of other recombinant proteins. PMID:24219068

  16. Challenges associated with heterologous expression of Flavobacterium psychrophilum proteins in Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-parameter statistical model was used to predict the solubility of 96 putative virulence associated genes of Flavobacterium psychrophilum (CSF259-93) upon over expression in E. coli. This analysis indicated that 88.5% of the F. psychrophilum proteins would be expressed as insoluble aggregates c...

  17. Production and characterization of ZFP36L1 antiserum against recombinant protein from Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tristetraprolin (TTP/ZFP36) family proteins are anti-inflammatory. They bind and destabilize some AU-rich element-containing mRNAs such as tumor necrosis factor mRNA. In this study, recombinant ZFP36L1/TIS11B (a TTP homologue) was over-expressed in E. coli, purified, and used for polyclonal antibody...

  18. Problem-Solving Test: RNA and Protein Synthesis in Bacteriophage-Infected "E. coli" Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    The classic experiment presented in this problem-solving test was designed to identify the template molecules of translation by analyzing the synthesis of phage proteins in "Escherichia coli" cells infected with bacteriophage T4. The work described in this test led to one of the most seminal discoveries of early molecular biology: it dealt a…

  19. Codon optimization for high level expression of human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Retnoningrum, Debbie S; Pramesti, H T; Santika, P Y; Valerius, O; Asjarie, S; Suciati, T

    2012-08-01

    Codons in the open reading frame (ORF) encoding for human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (hBMP-2) were optimized to reach high level expression in Escherichia coli. The optimization was done by the computer programs DNA works and DNA Star according to Thermodynamically Balanced Inside Out (TBIO) approach. The ORF consisting of 342 base pairs (bp) was assembled using two-steps Polymerase Chain Reaction, cloned into a pGEM-T vector with a mutation rate of 6.38 bp per kb and transformed into E. coli JM109. After a DNA sequence confirmation, mutation-free ORF was subcloned into pET32b and transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3). The rhBMP-2 was produced as a thioredoxin-his-tag fusion protein at relatively high level, approximately 60% of total intracellular proteins as inclusion bodies (IB), with a yield of 1.39 g per liter culture. Solubilization of IB gave soluble monomer rhBMP-2 with a recovery of 13.6% and refolding of soluble rhBMP-2 produced dimeric forms with a yield of 8.7%. The size and identity of the purified rhBMP-2 was confirmed by nano-LC-MS/MS2 analysis. Our work demonstrates for the first time that by using TBIO approach, a codon-optimized ORF encoding for rhBMP-2 protein can be expressed at high level in E. coli expression system. PMID:22691543

  20. No effect of femtosecond laser pulses on DNA, protein, M13, or E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Holwitt, Eric A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Estlack, Larry E.; Sheldon, Katharine E.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2011-03-01

    We were unable to reproduce published inactivation results, or show any interaction, between 90 femtosecond (fs) pulses of 850 nm or 425 nm laser radiation and buffer/water, DNA, protein, M13 bacteriophage or E. coli. Using agarose electrophoresis and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we examined purified plasmid DNA (pUC19), bovine serum albumin, and DNA and coat proteins extracted from M13 following exposures to irradiances of up to 120 MW/cm2. We measured M13 viability using an assay for plaque-forming ability in soft agar after exposure to the same irradiances used for the protein and DNA experiments. Exposures of up 1 GW/cm2 at 850 nm had no effect on the viability of E. coli as measured by a colony forming assay in soft agar. Peroxynitrite, known to be toxic, to cause single strand breaks in DNA, and fragment proteins in vitro gave positive results in all assays.

  1. Characterization of the "Escherichia Coli" Acyl Carrier Protein Phosphodiesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a small essential protein that functions as a carrier of the acyl intermediates of fatty acid synthesis. ACP requires the posttranslational attachment of a 4'phosphopantetheine functional group, derived from CoA, in order to perform its metabolic function. A Mn[superscript 2+] dependent enzymatic activity that removes…

  2. Production of bioactive chicken (Gallus gallus) follistatin-type proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Beum; Park, Sung Kwon; Kim, Yong Soo

    2015-12-01

    Follistatin (FST) is a cysteine-rich autocrine glycoprotein and plays an important role in mammalian prenatal and postnatal development. FST binds to and inhibit myostatin (MSTN), a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth, and FST abundance enhances muscle growth in animals via inhibition of MSTN activity. The objective of this study was to produce biologically active, four chicken FST-type proteins in an Escherichia coli expression system. Gibson assembly cloning method was used to insert the DNA fragments of four FST-type proteins, designated as FST288, NDFSD1/2, NDFSD1, and NDFSD1/1, into pMALc5x vector downstream of the maltose-binding protein (MBP) gene, and the plasmids containing the inserts were eventually transformed into Shuffle E. coli strain for protein expression. We observed a soluble expression of the four MBP-fused FST-type proteins, and the proteins could be easily purified by the combination of amylose and heparin resin affinity chromatography. MBP-fused FST-type proteins demonstrated their affinity to anti-FST antibody. In an in vitro reporter gene assay to examine their potencies and selectivities to different ligands (MSTN, GDF11, and activin A), the four FST-type proteins (MBP-FST288, MBP-NDFSD1/2, MBP-NDFSD1, and MBP-NDFSD1/1) showed different potency and selectivity against the three ligands from each other. Ligand selectivity of each FST-type proteins was similar to its counterpart FST-type protein of eukaryotic origin. In conclusion, we could produce four FST-type proteins having different ligand selectivity in E. coli, and the results imply that economic production of a large amount of FST-type proteins with different ligand selectivity is possible to examine their potential use in meat-producing animals. PMID:26302688

  3. Regulation of ribonuclease E activity by the L4 ribosomal protein of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dharam; Chang, Ssu-Jean; Lin, Pei-Hsun; Averina, Olga V.; Kaberdin, Vladimir R.; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Whereas ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) are known primarily as components of the translational machinery, certain of these r-proteins have been found to also have extraribosomal functions. Here we report the novel ability of an r-protein, L4, to regulate RNA degradation in Escherichia coli. We show by affinity purification, immunoprecipitation analysis, and E. coli two-hybrid screening that L4 interacts with a site outside of the catalytic domain of RNase E to regulate the endoribonucleolytic functions of the enzyme, thus inhibiting RNase E-specific cleavage in vitro, stabilizing mRNAs targeted by RNase E in vivo, and controlling plasmid DNA replication by stabilizing an antisense regulatory RNA normally attacked by RNase E. Broader effects of the L4-RNase E interaction on E. coli transcripts were shown by DNA microarray analysis, which revealed changes in the abundance of 65 mRNAs encoding the stress response proteins HslO, Lon, CstA, YjiY, and YaeL, as well as proteins involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and transport, transcription/translation, and DNA/RNA synthesis. Analysis of mRNA stability showed that the half lives of stress-responsive transcripts were increased by ectopic expression of L4, which normally increases along with other r-proteins in E. coli under stress conditions, and also by inactivation of RNase E. Our finding that L4 can inhibit RNase E-dependent decay may account at least in part for the elevated production of stress-induced proteins during bacterial adaptation to adverse environments. PMID:19144914

  4. Towards a classification of E. coli ribosomal proteins: A hypothetical `small ribosome' as a primitive protein-synthesizing apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Koji

    1984-12-01

    Homologies were searched among the published primary sequences of 51 E. coli ribosomal proteins, partly by ‘eye’ and partly by computer-assisted methods. By employing Moore and Goodman's alignment statistics for evaluating homology levels, 33 out of these 51 ribosomal proteins has been classified into 9 homology groups, some of which being yet tentative and remaining to be further analyzed. Taking it into consideration that most ribosomal protein genes are clustered at str- stc region, rif region and several other regions, these results strongly suggest that most or all of the contemporary ribosomal proteins must have evolved by repeated gene duplications of very few (or only one) primitive ancestral ribosomal protein gene(s). Thus it is most reasonable to propose that a ‘ small ribosome’ consisting of very few (or only one) ribosomal protein(s) must have existed as a primitive protein-synthesizing apparatus.

  5. Protective immunity of E. coli-synthesized NS1 protein of Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Wen; Liu, Kuang-Ting; Huang, Hong-Da; Chen, Wei-June

    2008-02-01

    Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) NS1 proteins generated using DNA vaccines and recombinant viruses have been demonstrated to induce protection in mice against a challenge of JEV at a lethal dose. The West Nile virus NS1 region expressed in E. coli is recognized by these protective monoclonal antibodies and, in this study, we compare immunogenicity and protective immunity of the E. coli-synthesized NS1 protein with another protective immunogen, the envelope domain III (ED3). Pre-challenge, detectable titers of JEV-specific neutralizing antibody were detected in the immunized mice with E. coli-synthesized ED3 protein (PRNT50 = 1:28) and the attenuated JEV strain T1P1 (PRNT50 = 1:53), but neutralizing antibodies were undetectable in the immunized mice with E. coli-synthesized NS1 protein (PRNT50 < 1:10). However, the survival rate of the NS1-immunized mice against the JEV challenge was 87.5% (7/8), showing significantly higher levels of protection than the ED3-immunized mice, 62.5% (5/8) (P = 0.041). In addition, E. coli-synthesized NS1 protein induced a significant increase of anti-NS1 IgG1 antibodies, resulting in an ELISA titer of 100,1000 in the immunized sera before lethal JEV challenge. Surviving mice challenged with the virulent JEV strain Beijing-1 showed a ten-fold or greater rise in IgG1 and IgG2b titers of anti-NS1 antibodies, implying that the Th2 cell activation might be predominantly responsible for antibody responses and mice protection. PMID:17876533

  6. Beyond the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli: localizing recombinant proteins where you want them.

    PubMed

    Boock, Jason T; Waraho-Zhmayev, Dujduan; Mizrachi, Dario; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli represents a cornerstone of the biotechnology enterprise. While cytoplasmic expression in this host has received the most attention, achieving substantial yields of correctly folded proteins in this compartment can sometimes be met with difficulties. These issues can often be overcome by targeting protein expression to extracytoplasmic compartments (e.g., membrane, periplasm) or to the culture medium. This chapter discusses various strategies for exporting proteins out of the cytoplasm as well as tools for monitoring and optimizing these different export mechanisms. PMID:25447860

  7. Optimized expression of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domains in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Kirsten; Ahuja, Sanjay; Chene, Arnaud; Bejarano, Maria Teresa; Chen, Qijun

    2004-01-01

    Background The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is an important and frequently used tool within malaria research, however, this method remains problematic. High A/T versus C/G content and frequent lysine and arginine repeats in the Plasmodium falciparum genome are thought to be the main reason for early termination in the mRNA translation process. Therefore, the majority of P. falciparum derived recombinant proteins is expressed only as truncated forms or appears as insoluble inclusion bodies within the bacterial cells. Methods Several domains of PfEMP1 genes obtained from different P. falciparum strains were expressed in E. coli as GST-fusion proteins. Expression was carried out under various culture conditions with a main focus on the time point of induction in relation to the bacterial growth stage. Results and conclusions When expressed in E. coli recombinant proteins derived from P. falciparum sequences are often truncated and tend to aggregate what in turn leads to the formation of insoluble inclusion bodies. The analysis of various factors influencing the expression revealed that the time point of induction plays a key role in successful expression of A/T rich sequences into their native conformation. Contrary to recommended procedures, initiation of expression at post-log instead of mid-log growth phase generated significantly increased amounts of soluble protein of a high quality. Furthermore, these proteins were shown to be functionally active. Other factors such as temperature, pH, bacterial proteases or the codon optimization for E. coli had little or no effect on the quality of the recombinant protein, nevertheless, optimizing these factors might be beneficial for each individual construct. In conclusion, changing the timepoint of induction and conducting expression at the post-log stage where the bacteria have entered a decelerated growth phase, greatly facilitates and improves the expression of sequences containing rare codons

  8. Passive immunization by recombinant ferric enterobactin protein (FepA) from Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Larrie-Bagha, Seyed Mehdi; Rasooli, Iraj; Mousavi-Gargari, Seyed Latif; Rasooli, Zohreh; Nazarian, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 has been recognized as a major food borne pathogen responsible for frequent hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. Cattle are important reservoirs of E. coli O157:H7, in which the organism colonizes the intestinal tract and is shed in the feces. Objective Vaccination of cattle has significant potential as a pre-harvest intervention strategy for E. coli O157:H7. The aim of this study was to evaluate active and passive immunization against E. coli O157:H7 using a recombinant protein. Materials and Methods The recombinant FepA protein induced by IPTG was purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Antibody titre was determined by ELISA in FepA immunized rabbits sera. Sera collected from vaccinated animals were used for bacterial challenge in passive immunization studies. Results The results demonstrate that passive immunization with serum raised against FepA protects rabbits from subsequent infection. Conclusion Significant recognition by the antibody of ferric enterobactin binding protein may lead to its application in the restriction of Enterobacteriaceae propagation. PMID:23825727

  9. Factors influencing inclusion body formation in the production of a fused protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, L; Enfors, S O

    1991-01-01

    Different parameters that influenced the formation of inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli during production of a fused protein consisting of protein A from Staphylococcus aureus and beta-galactosidase from E. coli were examined. The intracellular expression of the fused protein was controlled by the pR promoter and its temperature-sensitive repressor. The induction temperature, the pH of the cultivation medium, and changes in the amino acid sequence in the linker region between protein A and beta-galactosidase had a profound effect on the formation of inclusion bodies. At 42 degrees C, inclusion bodies were formed only during the first hours after induction, and thereafter all the recombinant protein that was further produced appeared in a soluble and active state. Production at 39 and 44 degrees C resulted in inclusion body formation throughout the production period with 15 to 20% of the produced recombinant protein appearing as inclusion bodies. Cultivating cells without control of pH caused inclusion body formation throughout the induction period, and inclusion body formation increased with decreasing pH, and at least part of the insoluble protein was formed from the pool of soluble fusion protein within the cell. Changes in the amino acid sequence in the linker region between the two parts of the fusion protein abolished inclusion body formation. PMID:1908208

  10. Isolation and characterization of an endogenous inhibitor of protein synthesis in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, V L

    1979-01-01

    A low-molecular-weight factor was isolated from cell extracts of Escherichia coli K-12. The concentration of the factor in cells was dependent upon nutritional conditions, the concentration being higher in faster growing cells. Treatment of cells with colicin K caused an increase in concentration of the factor. The factor inhibited protein synthesis in E. coli. This inhibition was reversible, apparently because of metabolism of the factor. The inhibition of synthesis of beta-galactosidase lasted longer than the inhibition of protein synthesis; cyclic AMP eliminated this difference. The factor inhibited the synthesis of beta-galactosidase from preformed lac mRNA, indicating an inhibition of translation. Kinetic studies of the onset of inhibition of beta-galactosidase synthesis by the factor suggested that the factor may inhibit protein synthesis at the initiation of translation. PMID:104965

  11. Ni2+-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Velkov, Tony; Jones, Alun; Lim, Maria L R

    2008-01-01

    A two-step chromatographic sequence is described for the purification of native lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli cells. The first step involves Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of the soluble cytoplasmic extract. This method provides superior speed, resolution and yield than the established phosphocellulose cation-exchange chromatographic procedure. Anion-exchange chromatography is used for further purification to >95% purity. The identity and purity of the lactose repressor protein were demonstrated using sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide electrophoresis, crystallization, tryptic finger-printing mass spectrometry, and inducer binding assays. The purified lac repressor exhibited inducer sensitivity for operator DNA binding and undergoes a conformational change upon inducer binding. By all these extensive biochemical criteria, the purified protein behaves exactly as that described for the Escherichia coli lactose operon repressor. PMID:18800304

  12. Simulation and prediction of protein production in fed-batch E. coli cultures: An engineering approach.

    PubMed

    Calleja, Daniel; Kavanagh, John; de Mas, Carles; López-Santín, Josep

    2016-04-01

    An overall model describing the dynamic behavior of fed-batch E. coli processes for protein production has been built, calibrated and validated. Using a macroscopic approach, the model consists of three interconnected blocks allowing simulation of biomass, inducer and protein concentration profiles with time. The model incorporates calculation of the extra and intracellular inducer concentration, as well as repressor-inducer dynamics leading to a successful prediction of the product concentration. The parameters of the model were estimated using experimental data of a rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase-producer strain, grown under a wide range of experimental conditions. After validation, the model has successfully predicted the behavior of different strains producing two different proteins: fructose-6-phosphate aldolase and ω-transaminase. In summary, the presented approach represents a powerful tool for E. coli production process simulation and control. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 772-782. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26416399

  13. Endogenous protein S-Nitrosylation in E. coli: regulation by OxyR.

    PubMed

    Seth, Divya; Hausladen, Alfred; Wang, Ya-Juan; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2012-04-27

    Endogenous S-nitrosylation of proteins, a principal mechanism of cellular signaling in eukaryotes, has not been observed in microbes. We report that protein S-nitrosylation is an obligate concomitant of anaerobic respiration on nitrate in Escherichia coli. Endogenous S-nitrosylation during anaerobic respiration is controlled by the transcription factor OxyR, previously thought to operate only under aerobic conditions. Deletion of OxyR resulted in large increases in protein S-nitrosylation, and S-nitrosylation of OxyR induced transcription from a regulon that is distinct from the regulon induced by OxyR oxidation. Furthermore, products unique to the anaerobic regulon protected against S-nitrosothiols, and anaerobic growth of E. coli lacking OxyR was impaired on nitrate. Thus, OxyR serves as a master regulator of S-nitrosylation, and alternative posttranslational modifications of OxyR control distinct transcriptional responses. PMID:22539721

  14. Individual and collective contributions of chaperoning and degradation to protein homeostasis in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Cho, Younhee; Zhang, Xin; Pobre, Kristine Faye R; Liu, Yu; Powers, David L; Kelly, Jeffery W; Gierasch, Lila M; Powers, Evan T

    2015-04-14

    The folding fate of a protein in vivo is determined by the interplay between a protein's folding energy landscape and the actions of the proteostasis network, including molecular chaperones and degradation enzymes. The mechanisms of individual components of the E. coli proteostasis network have been studied extensively, but much less is known about how they function as a system. We used an integrated experimental and computational approach to quantitatively analyze the folding outcomes (native folding versus aggregation versus degradation) of three test proteins biosynthesized in E. coli under a variety of conditions. Overexpression of the entire proteostasis network benefited all three test proteins, but the effect of upregulating individual chaperones or the major degradation enzyme, Lon, varied for proteins with different biophysical properties. In sum, the impact of the E. coli proteostasis network is a consequence of concerted action by the Hsp70 system (DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE), the Hsp60 system (GroEL/GroES), and Lon. PMID:25843722

  15. Antibacterial activity and inhibition of protein synthesis in Escherichia coli by antisense DNA analogs.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M A; Summerton, J; Foster, E; Cunningham, K; Stirchak, E; Weller, D; Schaup, H W

    1991-01-01

    Protein synthesis, which takes place within ribosomes, is essential for the survival of any living organism. Ribosomes are composed of both proteins and RNA. Specific interaction between the 3' end CCUCC sequence of prokaryotic 16S rRNA and a partially complementary sequence preceding the initiating codon of mRNA is believed to be a prerequisite for initiation of protein synthesis. Here we report the use of short (three to six nucleotides) synthetic DNA analogs complementary to this sequence to block protein synthesis in vitro and in vivo in Escherichia coli. In the DNA analogs the normal phosphodiester bond in the antisense DNA was replaced by methylcarbamate internucleoside linkages to enhance transport across plasma membranes. Of the analogs tested, those with the sequence AGG and GGA inhibit protein synthesis and colony formation by E. coli strains lacking an outer cell wall. Polyethylene glycol 1000 (PEG 1000) was attached to the 5' end of some of the test methylcarbamate DNAs to enhance solubility. Analogs of AGG and GGAG with PEG 1000 attached inhibited colony formation in normal E. coli. These analogs may be useful food additives to control bacterial spoilage and biomedically as antibiotics. PMID:1821653

  16. Binding of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli to 32- to 33-kilodalton human intestinal brush border proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Manjarrez-Hernandez, A; Gavilanes-Parra, S; Chavez-Berrocal, M E; Molina-Lopez, J; Cravioto, A

    1997-01-01

    We have detected human intestinal brush border proteins to which Escherichia coli strains adhere by means of a blotting-nitrocellulose method in which the binding of radiolabeled bacteria to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated intestinal cell membranes was evaluated. The brush border fraction contained several polypeptides that bound only adherent E. coli strains. The most prominent and consistent of these proteins had apparent molecular masses of 32 to 33 kDa. Additional polypeptides ranging from 50 to 70, from 105 to 130, and from 180 to 200 kDa were also recognized by adherent E. coli strains, although with less intensity (in accordance with the number of bound bacteria to these polypeptides). Independently of the pattern of adherence (localized [LA], diffuse [DA], or aggregative [AggA]) all HEp-2-adhering strains recognized, with different intensities, the 32- to 33-kDa brush border proteins, whereas nonadhesive strains did not. The relative avidity of an LA strain to bind to the 32- to 33-kDa proteins was approximately seven- and sixfold higher than the binding of strains with aggregative and diffuse adherence, respectively. Thus, it is reasonable to think that LA, DA, and AggA strains have a common adhesin that mediates binding to the 32- to 33-kDa bands. Inhibition experiments using HEp-2 cells demonstrated that isolated 32- to 33-kDa proteins or specific antiserum blocked preferentially bacterial adherence of the LA pattern. Delipidization and protein digestion of the human brush borders confirmed that E. coli bound to structures of a proteinaceous nature. Deglycosylation studies and sodium meta-periodate oxidation of the intestinal cell membranes decreased bacterial binding activity significantly, indicating that E. coli bound to carbohydrate moieties in the glycoproteins. These results suggest that binding of E. coli strains, mainly of the LA phenotype, to the 32- to 33-kDa proteins could play a role in colonization through

  17. Quantification and Classification of E. coli Proteome Utilization and Unused Protein Costs across Environments.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Edward J; Utrilla, Jose; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2016-06-01

    The costs and benefits of protein expression are balanced through evolution. Expression of un-utilized protein (that have no benefits in the current environment) incurs a quantifiable fitness costs on cellular growth rates; however, the magnitude and variability of un-utilized protein expression in natural settings is unknown, largely due to the challenge in determining environment-specific proteome utilization. We address this challenge using absolute and global proteomics data combined with a recently developed genome-scale model of Escherichia coli that computes the environment-specific cost and utility of the proteome on a per gene basis. We show that nearly half of the proteome mass is unused in certain environments and accounting for the cost of this unused protein expression explains >95% of the variance in growth rates of Escherichia coli across 16 distinct environments. Furthermore, reduction in unused protein expression is shown to be a common mechanism to increase cellular growth rates in adaptive evolution experiments. Classification of the unused protein reveals that the unused protein encodes several nutrient- and stress- preparedness functions, which may convey fitness benefits in varying environments. Thus, unused protein expression is the source of large and pervasive fitness costs that may provide the benefit of hedging against environmental change. PMID:27351952

  18. Quantification and Classification of E. coli Proteome Utilization and Unused Protein Costs across Environments

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Edward J.; Utrilla, Jose; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2016-01-01

    The costs and benefits of protein expression are balanced through evolution. Expression of un-utilized protein (that have no benefits in the current environment) incurs a quantifiable fitness costs on cellular growth rates; however, the magnitude and variability of un-utilized protein expression in natural settings is unknown, largely due to the challenge in determining environment-specific proteome utilization. We address this challenge using absolute and global proteomics data combined with a recently developed genome-scale model of Escherichia coli that computes the environment-specific cost and utility of the proteome on a per gene basis. We show that nearly half of the proteome mass is unused in certain environments and accounting for the cost of this unused protein expression explains >95% of the variance in growth rates of Escherichia coli across 16 distinct environments. Furthermore, reduction in unused protein expression is shown to be a common mechanism to increase cellular growth rates in adaptive evolution experiments. Classification of the unused protein reveals that the unused protein encodes several nutrient- and stress- preparedness functions, which may convey fitness benefits in varying environments. Thus, unused protein expression is the source of large and pervasive fitness costs that may provide the benefit of hedging against environmental change. PMID:27351952

  19. Tender coconut water an economical growth medium for the production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is most widely used prokaryotic expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. Several strategies have been employed for expressing recombinant proteins in E.coli. This includes the development of novel host systems, expression vectors and cost effective media. In this study, we exploit tender coconut water (TCW) as a natural and cheaper growth medium for E.coli and Pichia pastoris. Result E.coli and P.pastoris were cultivated in TCW and the growth rate was monitored by measuring optical density at 600 nm (OD600nm), where 1.55 for E.coli and 8.7 for P.pastoris was obtained after 12 and 60 hours, respectively. However, variation in growth rate was observed among TCW when collected from different localities (0.15-2.5 at OD600nm), which is attributed to the varying chemical profile among samples. In this regard, we attempted the supplementation of TCW with different carbon and nitrogen sources to attain consistency in growth rate. Here, supplementation of TCW with 25 mM ammonium sulphate (TCW-S) was noted efficient for the normalization of inconsistency, which further increased the biomass of E.coli by 2 to 10 folds, and 1.5 to 2 fold in P.pastoris. These results indicate that nitrogen source is the major limiting factor for growth. This was supported by total nitrogen and carbon estimation where, nitrogen varies from 20 to 60 mg/100 ml while carbohydrates showed no considerable variation (2.32 to 3.96 g/100 ml). In this study, we also employed TCW as an expression media for recombinant proteins by demonstrating successful expression of maltose binding protein (MBP), MBP-TEV protease fusion and a photo switchable fluorescent protein (mEos2) using TCW and the expression level was found to be equivalent to Luria Broth (LB). Conclusion This study highlights the possible application of TCW-S as a media for cultivation of a variety of microorganisms and recombinant protein expression. PMID:24004578

  20. Construction of an effective protein expression system using the tpl promoter in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Takashi; Katayama, Takane; Hirao, Ai; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Kumagai, Hidehiko

    2005-09-01

    An effective protein expression system was constructed in Escherichia coli using the promoter of the tyrosine phenol-lyase (tpl) gene of Erwinia herbicola. This system involves a mutant form of the TyrR protein with an enhanced ability to activate tpl and the TutB protein with an ability to transport L-tyrosine (an inducer of Tpl). The highest expression level obtained for this system was more than twice that obtained for the tac system, although it was lower than the level obtained for the T7 system, as revealed with the lac-reporter assay and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PMID:16215823

  1. Increasing recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli K12 through metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Waegeman, Hendrik; De Lausnay, Stijn; Beauprez, Joeri; Maertens, Jo; De Mey, Marjan; Soetaert, Wim

    2013-01-25

    Escherichia coli strains are widely used as host for the production of recombinant proteins. Compared to E. coli K12, E. coli BL21 (DE3) has several biotechnological advantages, such as a lower acetate yield and a higher biomass yield, which have a beneficial effect on protein production. In a previous study (BMC Microbiol. 2011, 11:70) we have altered the metabolic fluxes of a K12 strain (i.e. E. coli MG1655) by deleting the regulators ArcA and IclR in such a way that the biomass yield is remarkably increased, while the acetate production is decreased to a similar value as for BL21 (DE3). In this study we show that the increased biomass yield beneficially influences recombinant protein production as a higher GFP yield was observed for the double knockout strain compared to its wild type. However, at higher cell densities (>2 g L(-1) CDW), the GFP concentration decreases again, due to the activity of proteases which obstructs the application of the strain in high cell density cultivations. By further deleting the genes lon and ompT, which encode for proteases, this degradation could be reduced. Consequently, higher GFP yields were observed in the quadruple knockout strain as opposed to the double knockout strain and the MG1655 wild type and its yield approximates the GFP yield of E. coli BL21 (DE3), that is, 27±5 mg g(CDW)(-1) vs. 30±5 mg g(CDW)(-1), respectively. PMID:22115732

  2. No effect of femtosecond laser pulses on M13, E. coli, DNA, or protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Holwitt, Eric A.; Estlack, Larry E.; Noojin, Gary D.; Saunders, Katharine E.; Yakovlev, Valdislav V.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Data showing what appears to be nonthermal inactivation of M13 bacteriophage (M13), Tobacco mosaic virus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Jurkatt T-cells following exposure to 80-fs pulses of laser radiation have been published. Interest in the mechanism led to attempts to reproduce the results for M13 and E. coli. Bacteriophage plaque-forming and bacteria colony-forming assays showed no inactivation of the microorganisms; therefore, model systems were used to see what, if any, damage might be occurring to biologically important molecules. Purified plasmid DNA (pUC19) and bovine serum albumin were exposed to and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), respectively, and no effect was found. DNA and coat proteins extracted from laser-exposed M13 and analyzed by AGE or PAGE found no effect. Raman scattering by M13 in phosphate buffered saline was measured to determine if there was any physical interaction between M13 and femtosecond laser pulses, and none was found. Positive controls for the endpoints measured produced the expected results with the relevant assays. Using the published methods, we were unable to reproduce the inactivation results or to show any interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and buffer/water, DNA, protein, M13 bacteriophage, or E. coli.

  3. Actin Cytoskeleton Manipulation by Effector Proteins Secreted by Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Pathotypes

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Serapio-Palacios, Antonio; Ugalde-Silva, Paul; Tapia-Pastrana, Gabriela; Chavez-Dueñas, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure necessary for cell and tissue organization, including the maintenance of epithelial barriers. Disruption of the epithelial barrier coincides with alterations of the actin cytoskeleton in several disease states. These disruptions primarily affect the paracellular space, which is normally regulated by tight junctions. Thereby, the actin cytoskeleton is a common and recurring target of bacterial virulence factors. In order to manipulate the actin cytoskeleton, bacteria secrete and inject toxins and effectors to hijack the host cell machinery, which interferes with host-cell pathways and with a number of actin binding proteins. An interesting model to study actin manipulation by bacterial effectors is Escherichia coli since due to its genome plasticity it has acquired diverse genetic mobile elements, which allow having different E. coli varieties in one bacterial species. These E. coli pathotypes, including intracellular and extracellular bacteria, interact with epithelial cells, and their interactions depend on a specific combination of virulence factors. In this paper we focus on E. coli effectors that mimic host cell proteins to manipulate the actin cytoskeleton. The study of bacterial effector-cytoskeleton interaction will contribute not only to the comprehension of the molecular causes of infectious diseases but also to increase our knowledge of cell biology. PMID:23509714

  4. Individual and Collective Contributions of Chaperoning and Degradation to Protein Homeostasis in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Younhee; Zhang, Xin; Pobre, Kristine Faye R.; Liu, Yu; Powers, David L.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Gierasch, Lila M.; Powers, Evan T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The folding fate of a protein in vivo is determined by the interplay between a protein’s folding energy landscape and the actions of the proteostasis network, including molecular chaperones and degradation enzymes. The mechanisms of individual components of the E. coli proteostasis network have been studied extensively, but much less is known about how they function as a system. We used an integrated experimental and computational approach to quantitatively analyze the folding outcomes (native folding vs. aggregation vs. degradation) of three test proteins biosynthesized in E. coli under a variety of conditions. Overexpression of the entire proteostasis network benefited all three test proteins, but the effect of upregulating individual chaperones or the major degradation enzyme, Lon, varied for proteins with different biophysical properties. In sum, the impact of the E. coli proteostasis network is a consequence of concerted action by the Hsp70 system (DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE), the Hsp60 system (GroEL/GroES), and Lon. PMID:25843722

  5. Biocatalytic Formation of Gold Nanoparticles Decorated with Functional Proteins inside Recombinant Escherichia coli Cells.

    PubMed

    Hosomomi, Yukiho; Niide, Teppei; Wakabayashi, Rie; Goto, Masahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2016-01-01

    A novel strategy for the preparation of protein-decorated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) was developed inside Escherichia coli cells, where an artificial oxidoreductase, composed of antibody-binding protein (pG), Bacillus stearothermophilus glycerol dehydrogenase (BsGLD) and a peptide tag with gold-binding affinity (H6C), was overexpressed in the cytoplasm. In situ formation of Au NPs was promoted by a natural electron-donating cofactor, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), which was regenerated to the reduced form of NADH by the catalytic activity of the fusion protein (pG-BsGLD-H6C) overexpressed in the cytoplasm of E. coli, with the concomitant addition of exogenous glycerol to the reaction system. The fusion protein was self-immobilized on Au NPs inside the E. coli cells, which was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and western blotting analyses of the resultant Au NPs. Finally, the IgG binding ability of the pG moiety displayed on Au NPs was evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:26960608

  6. Ribosomal protein methylation in Escherichia coli: the gene prmA, encoding the ribosomal protein L11 methyltransferase, is dispensable.

    PubMed

    Vanet, A; Plumbridge, J A; Guérin, M F; Alix, J H

    1994-12-01

    The prmA gene, located at 72 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome, is the genetic determinant of ribosomal protein L11-methyltransferase activity. Mutations at this locus, prmA1 and prmA3, result in a severely undermethylated form of L11. No effect, other than the lack of methyl groups on L11, has been ascribed to these mutations. DNA sequence analysis of the mutant alleles prmA1 and prmA3 detected point mutations near the C-terminus of the protein and plasmids overproducing the wild-type and the two mutant proteins have been constructed. The wild-type PrmA protein could be crosslinked to its radiolabelled substrate, S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), by u.v. irradiation indicating that it is the gene for the methyltransferase rather than a regulatory protein. One of the mutant proteins, PrmA3, was also weakly crosslinked to SAM. Both mutant enzymes when expressed from the overproducing plasmids were capable of catalysing the incorporation of 3H-labelled methyl groups from SAM to L11 in vitro. This confirmed the observation that the mutant proteins possess significant residual activity which could account for their lack of growth phenotype. However, a strain carrying an in vitro-constructed null mutation of the prmA gene, transferred to the E. coli chromosome by homologous recombination, was perfectly viable. PMID:7715456

  7. Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli Strains Induce Attaching and Effacing Phenotypes and Secrete Homologs of Esp Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beinke, Christina; Laarmann, Sven; Wachter, Clemens; Karch, Helge; Greune, Lilo; Schmidt, M. Alexander

    1998-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that Escherichia coli strains which exhibit the diffuse-adherence phenotype (DAEC strains) represent a potential cause of diarrhea in infants. We investigated the interaction of DAEC strains isolated from diarrhea patients in Brazil and in Germany with epithelial cells in tissue culture. The investigated strains were identified as DAEC strains by (i) their attachment pattern, (ii) presence of genes associated with the Dr family of adhesins, and (iii) lack of genetic markers for other diarrhea-associated E. coli categories. Several clinical DAEC isolates were shown to secrete similar patterns of proteins into tissue culture medium. Protein secretion was found to be regulated by environmental parameters, namely, medium, temperature, pH, and iron concentration. DAEC strains secreting these proteins induced accumulation of actin and tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins at sites of bacterial attachment, leading to the formation of pedestals and/or extended surface structures. These changes were phenotypically similar to the attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions observed with enteropathogenic and some enterohemorrhagic E. coli strains carrying the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island. Proteins homologous to the EspA, EspB, and EspD proteins, necessary for signal transduction events inducing A/E lesions, were identified by sequence analysis and cross-reaction of specific antibodies. However, initially nonadhering strains secreting these proteins induced signal transduction events only after prolonged infection. These results indicate that secretion of the Esp proteins alone is not sufficient for efficient signal transduction. This study further shows that some DAEC strains are likely to contain a homolog(s) of the LEE locus which may contribute to the pathogenic potential of DAEC. PMID:9453606

  8. Solute Transport Proteins and the Outer Membrane Protein NmpC Contribute to Heat Resistance of Escherichia coli AW1.7▿

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Lifang; Pleitner, Aaron; Gänzle, Michael G.; McMullen, Lynn M.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate determinants of heat resistance in Escherichia coli by comparing the composition of membrane lipids, as well as gene expression, in heat-resistant E. coli AW1.7 and heat-sensitive E. coli GGG10 with or without heat shock. The survival of E. coli AW1.7 at late exponential phase was 100-fold higher than that of E. coli GGG10 after incubation at 60°C for 15 min. The cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli AW1.7 contained a higher proportion of saturated and cyclopropane fatty acids than that of E. coli GGG10. Microarray hybridization of cDNA libraries obtained from exponentially growing or heat-shocked cultures was performed to compare gene expression in these two strains. Expression of selected genes from different functional groups was quantified by quantitative PCR. DnaK and 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits were overexpressed in E. coli GGG10 relative to E. coli AW1.7 upon heat shock at 50°C, indicating improved ribosome stability. The outer membrane porin NmpC and several transport proteins were overexpressed in exponentially growing E. coli AW1.7. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of membrane properties confirmed that NmpC is present in the outer membrane of E. coli AW1.7 but not in that of E. coli GGG10. Expression of NmpC in E. coli GGG10 increased survival at 60°C 50- to 1,000-fold. In conclusion, the outer membrane porin NmpC contributes to heat resistance in E. coli AW1.7, but the heat resistance of this strain is dependent on additional factors, which likely include the composition of membrane lipids, as well as solute transport proteins. PMID:21398480

  9. Two-dimensional polyacylamide gel electrophoresis of envelope proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W C; Silhavy, T J; Boos, W

    1975-03-01

    A method of separating envelope proteins by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is described. Escherichia coli envelopes (inner and outer membranes) were prepared by French pressing and washed by repeated centrifugation. Membrane proteins were solubilized with guanidine thiocyanate and were dialyzed against urea prior to two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis. The slab gel apparatus and conditions were similar to the technique developed by Metz and Bogorad (1974) for the separation of ribosomal proteins. This separation occurs in 8 M urea for the first dimension and in 0.2% sodium dodecyl sulfate for the second dimension. The technique separates about 70 different membrane proteins in a highly reproducible fashion according to both intrinsic charge and molecular weight. Some examples of alterations in the membrane protein pattern are demonstrated. These alterations are caused by a mutation affecting a sugar transport system and by growth in the presence of D-fucose, inducer of the transport system. A further example of membrane protein changes introduced by growth at the nonpermissive temperature of a temperature-sensitive cell division mutant is shown. Finally, it is demonstrated that the major outer membrane component of Escherichia coli K-12 contains more than four proteins of similar molecular weight. PMID:803821

  10. The ybeY protein from Escherichia coli is a metalloprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Chenyang; Fedorov, Elena V.; Shi, Wuxian; Ramagopal, U. A.; Thirumuruhan, R.; Manjasetty, Babu A.; Almo, Steve C.; Fiser, Andras; Chance, Mark R.; Fedorov, Alexander A.

    2005-11-01

    The ybeY protein from E. coli is reported at a 2.7 Å resolution with a metal ion. The three-dimensional crystallographic structure of the ybeY protein from Escherichia coli (SwissProt entry P77385) is reported at 2.7 Å resolution. YbeY is a hypothetical protein that belongs to the UPF0054 family. The structure reveals that the protein binds a metal ion in a tetrahedral geometry. Three coordination sites are provided by histidine residues, while the fourth might be a water molecule that is not seen in the diffraction map because of its relatively low resolution. X-ray fluorescence analysis of the purified protein suggests that the metal is a nickel ion. The structure of ybeY and its sequence similarity to a number of predicted metal-dependent hydrolases provides a functional assignment for this protein family. The figures and tables of this paper were prepared using semi-automated tools, termed the Autopublish server, developed by the New York Structural GenomiX Research Consortium, with the goal of facilitating the rapid publication of crystallographic structures that emanate from worldwide Structural Genomics efforts, including the NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiative.

  11. Functional expression of miraculin, a taste-modifying protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Tomomi; Satoh, Makiko; Nakata, Rieko; Aoyama, Takashi; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2009-04-01

    Miraculin isolated from red berries of Richadella dulcifica, a native shrub of West Africa, has the unusual property of modifying a sour taste into a sweet one. This homodimer protein consists of two glycosylated polypeptides that are cross-linked by a disulfide bond. Recently, functional expression of miraculin was reported in host cells with the ability to glycosylate proteins, such as lettuce, tomato and the microbe Aspergillus oryzae, but not Escherichia coli. Thus, a question remains as to whether glycosylation of miraculin is essential for its taste-modifying properties. Here we show that recombinant miraculin expressed in E. coli has taste-modifying properties as a homodimer, not as a monomer, indicating that glycosylation is not essential for the taste-modifying property. PMID:19122203

  12. Bacteriocin release protein-mediated secretory expression of recombinant chalcone synthase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Iffah Izzati; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2011-09-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites synthesized by plants shown to exhibit health benefits such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor effects. Thus, due to the importance of this compound, several enzymes involved in the flavonoid pathway have been cloned and characterized in Escherichia coli. However, the formation of inclusion bodies has become a major disadvantage of this approach. As an alternative, chalcone synthase from Physcomitrella patens was secreted into the medium using a bacteriocin release protein expression vector. Secretion of P. patens chalcone synthase into the culture media was achieved by co-expression with a psW1 plasmid encoding bacteriocin release protein in E. coli Tuner (DE3) plysS. The optimized conditions, which include the incubation of cells for 20 h with 40 ng/ml mitomycin C at OD(600) induction time of 0.5 was found to be the best condition for chalcone synthase secretion. PMID:21633820

  13. Electron crystallography of PhoE porin, an outer membrane, channel- forming protein from E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Walian, P.J.

    1989-11-01

    One approach to studying the structure of membrane proteins is the use of electron crystallography. Dr. Bing Jap has crystallized PhoE pore-forming protein (porin) from the outer membrane of escherichia coli (E. coli) into monolayer crystals. The findings of this research and those of Jap (1988, 1989) have determined these crystals to be highly ordered, yielding structural information to a resolution of better than 2.8 angstroms. The task of this thesis has been to collect and process the electron diffraction patterns necessary to generate a complete three-dimensional set of high resolution structure factor amplitudes of PhoE porin. Fourier processing of these amplitudes when combined with the corresponding phase data is expected to yield the three-dimensional structure of PhoE porin at better than 3.5 angstroms resolution. 92 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs. (CBS)

  14. Monitoring Dynamic Protein Expression in Single Living E. Coli. Bacterial Cells by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, J W; Winhold, H; Corzett, M H; Ulloa, J M; Cosman, M; Balhorn, R; Huser, T

    2007-01-09

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) is a novel, nondestructive, and label-free method that can be used to quantitatively measure changes in cellular activity in single living cells. Here, we demonstrate its use to monitor changes in a population of E. coli cells that occur during overexpression of a protein, the extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(1-120)) Raman spectra were acquired of individual E. coli cells suspended in solution and trapped by a single tightly focused laser beam. Overexpression of MOG(1-120) in transformed E. coli Rosetta-Gami (DE3)pLysS cells was induced by addition of isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). Changes in the peak intensities of the Raman spectra from a population of cells were monitored and analyzed over a total duration of three hours. Data was also collected for concentrated purified MOG(1-120) protein in solution, and the spectra compared with that obtained for the MOG(1-120) expressing cells. Raman spectra of individual, living E. coli cells exhibit signatures due to DNA and protein molecular vibrations. Characteristic Raman markers associated with protein vibrations, such as 1257 cm{sup -1}, 1340 cm{sup -1}, 1453 cm{sup -1} and 1660 cm{sup -1}, are shown to increase as a function of time following the addition of IPTG. Comparison of these spectra and the spectra of purified MOG protein indicates that the changes are predominantly due to the induction of MOG protein expression. Protein expression was found to occur mostly within the second hour, with a 470% increase relative to the protein expressed in the first hour. A 230% relative increase between the second and third hour indicates that protein expression begins to level off within the third hour. It is demonstrated that LTRS has sufficient sensitivity for real-time, nondestructive, and quantitative monitoring of biological processes, such as protein expression, in single living cells. Such capabilities, which are not currently available in

  15. The Crystalline Structure of Escherichia Coli Derived, - and Holo-Rat Cellular Retinol Binding Protein II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Nathan Shoup

    1993-01-01

    Crystal of apo- and holo-rat cellular retinol binding protein II from the recombinant protein isolated from E. coli were grown. X-ray data to about 2A resolution for both crystal forms were collected. The phases for both data sets were determined by the molecular replacement technique using cellular retinol binding protein. The structures were then refined. The electron density from bound retinol was observed in the holo-form. Other than the presence or absence of bound retinol, little difference was noted in the structures of the apo- and holo-protein. The retinol was bound in a interior cavity with the hydroxyl group in the center of the protein, and the ionone ring near the surface. The hydroxyl group of the retinol made a hydrogen bond to glutamine 108, and the amine group of lysine 40 came into Van der Waals contact with the isoprene chain. The structure of cellular retinol binding protein II was then compared with the structures of five other intracellular lipid binding proteins: adipocyte lipid binding protein, cellular retinol binding protein, intestinal fatty acid binding protein, p2 protein from myelin sheaths, and a midgut fatty acid binding protein.

  16. Folding and Purification of Insoluble (Inclusion Body) Proteins from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Paul T; Palmer, Ira; Liang, Shu-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Heterologous expression of recombinant proteins in E. coli often results in the formation of insoluble and inactive protein aggregates, commonly referred to as inclusion bodies. To obtain the native (i.e., correctly folded) and hence active form of the protein from such aggregates, four steps are usually followed: (1) the cells are lysed, (2) the cell wall and outer membrane components are removed, (3) the aggregates are solubilized (or extracted) with strong protein denaturants, and (4) the solubilized, denatured proteins are folded with concomitant oxidation of reduced cysteine residues into the correct disulfide bonds to obtain the native protein. This unit features three different approaches to the final step of protein folding and purification. In the first, guanidine·HCl is used as the denaturant, after which the solubilized protein is folded (before purification) in an "oxido-shuffling" buffer system to increase the rate of protein oxidation. In the second, acetic acid is used to solubilize the protein, which is then partially purified by gel filtration before folding; the protein is then folded and oxidized by simple dialysis against water. Thirdly, folding and purification of a fusion protein using metal-chelate affinity chromatography are described. PMID:25367010

  17. Size dependence of protein diffusion in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nenninger, Anja; Mastroianni, Giulia; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2010-09-01

    Diffusion in the bacterial cytoplasm is regarded as the primary method of intracellular protein movement and must play a major role in controlling the rates of cell processes. A number of recent studies have used green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagging and fluorescence microscopy to probe the movement and distribution of proteins in the bacterial cytoplasm. However, the dynamic behavior of indigenous proteins must be controlled by a complex mixture of specific interactions, combined with the basic physical constraints imposed by the viscosity and macromolecular crowding of the cytoplasm. These factors are difficult to unravel in studies with indigenous proteins. To what extent the addition of a GFP tag might affect the movement of a protein through the cytoplasm has also remained unknown. To resolve these problems, we have carried out a systematic study of the size dependence of protein diffusion coefficients in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm, using engineered GFP multimers (from 2 to 6 covalently linked GFP molecules). Diffusion coefficients were measured using confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). At least up to 110 kDa (four linked GFP molecules), the diffusion coefficient varies with size roughly as would be predicted from the Einstein-Stokes equation for a classical (Newtonian) fluid. Thus, protein diffusion coefficients are predictable over this range. GFP tagging of proteins has little impact on the diffusion coefficient over this size range and therefore need not significantly perturb protein movement. Two indigenous E. coli proteins were used to show that their specific interactions within the cell are the main controllers of the diffusion rate. PMID:20581203

  18. Uptake of non-pathogenic E. coli by Arabidopsis induces downregulation of heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Susanne; Lonhienne, Thierry GA

    2010-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that non-pathogenic and non-symbiotic microbes E. coli and yeast are taken up by roots and used as a source of nutrients by the plant. Although this process appears to be beneficial for the plant, the nutritional gain of microbe incorporation has to exceed the energy expense of microbe uptake and digestion, and the question remains whether the presence of microbes triggers pathogen- and other stress-induced responses. Here, we present evidence that digesting microbes is accompanied by strong downregulation of genes linked to stress response in Arabidopsis. Genome-wide transcription analysis shows that uptake of E. coli by Arabidopsis roots is accompanied by a pronounced downregulation of heat shock proteins. Plants upregulate heat shock proteins in response to environmental stresses including temperature, salt, light and disease agents including microbial pathogens. The pronounced downregulation of heat shock proteins in the presence of E. coli indicates that uptake and subsequent digestion of microbes does not induce stress. Additionally it suggests that resources devoted to stress resistance in control plants may be re-allocated to the process of microbe uptake and digestion. This observation adds evidences to the notion that uptake of microbes is an active, purposeful and intentional behavior of the plant. PMID:21139429

  19. Codon influence on protein expression in E. coli correlates with mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Boël, Grégory; Letso, Reka; Neely, Helen; Price, W Nicholson; Wong, Kam-Ho; Su, Min; Luff, Jon D; Valecha, Mayank; Everett, John K; Acton, Thomas B; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano T; Aalberts, Daniel P; Hunt, John F

    2016-01-21

    Degeneracy in the genetic code, which enables a single protein to be encoded by a multitude of synonymous gene sequences, has an important role in regulating protein expression, but substantial uncertainty exists concerning the details of this phenomenon. Here we analyse the sequence features influencing protein expression levels in 6,348 experiments using bacteriophage T7 polymerase to synthesize messenger RNA in Escherichia coli. Logistic regression yields a new codon-influence metric that correlates only weakly with genomic codon-usage frequency, but strongly with global physiological protein concentrations and also mRNA concentrations and lifetimes in vivo. Overall, the codon content influences protein expression more strongly than mRNA-folding parameters, although the latter dominate in the initial ~16 codons. Genes redesigned based on our analyses are transcribed with unaltered efficiency but translated with higher efficiency in vitro. The less efficiently translated native sequences show greatly reduced mRNA levels in vivo. Our results suggest that codon content modulates a kinetic competition between protein elongation and mRNA degradation that is a central feature of the physiology and also possibly the regulation of translation in E. coli. PMID:26760206

  20. Crystal structure of CspA, the major cold shock protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schindelin, H; Jiang, W; Inouye, M; Heinemann, U

    1994-05-24

    The major cold shock protein of Escherichia coli, CspA, produced upon a rapid downshift in growth temperature, is involved in the transcriptional regulation of at least two genes. The protein shares high homology with the nucleic acid-binding domain of the Y-box factors, a family of eukaryotic proteins involved in transcriptional and translational regulation. The crystal structure of CspA has been determined at 2-A resolution and refined to R = 0.187. CspA is composed of five antiparallel beta-strands forming a closed five-stranded beta-barrel. The three-dimensional structure of CspA is similar to that of the major cold shock protein of Bacillus subtilis, CspB, which has recently been determined at 2.45-A resolution. However, in contrast to CspB, no dimer is formed in the crystal. The surface of CspA is characteristic for a protein interacting with single-stranded nucleic acids. Due to the high homology of the bacterial cold shock proteins with the Y-box factors, E. coli CspA and B. subtilis CspB define a structural framework for the common cold shock domain. PMID:8197194

  1. Co-expression of RNA–protein complexes in Escherichia coli and applications to RNA biology

    PubMed Central

    Ponchon, Luc; Catala, Marjorie; Seijo, Bili; El Khouri, Marguerite; Dardel, Frédéric; Nonin-Lecomte, Sylvie; Tisné, Carine

    2013-01-01

    RNA has emerged as a major player in many cellular processes. Understanding these processes at the molecular level requires homogeneous RNA samples for structural, biochemical and pharmacological studies. We previously devised a generic approach that allows efficient in vivo expression of recombinant RNA in Escherichia coli. In this work, we have extended this method to RNA/protein co-expression. We have engineered several plasmids that allow overexpression of RNA–protein complexes in E. coli. We have investigated the potential of these tools in many applications, including the production of nuclease-sensitive RNAs encapsulated in viral protein pseudo-particles, the co-production of non-coding RNAs with chaperone proteins, the incorporation of a post-transcriptional RNA modification by co-production with the appropriate modifying enzyme and finally the production and purification of an RNA–His-tagged protein complex by nickel affinity chromatography. We show that this last application easily provides pure material for crystallographic studies. The new tools we report will pave the way to large-scale structural and molecular investigations of RNA function and interactions with proteins. PMID:23804766

  2. DYNAMIC STRUCTURAL REARRANGEMENTS BETWEEN DNA BINDING MODES of E. coli SSB PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Rahul; Kozlov, Alexander G.; Lohman, Timothy M.; Ha, Taekjip

    2007-01-01

    Summary Escherichia coli (E. coli) single stranded (ss)DNA binding (SSB) protein binds ssDNA in multiple binding modes and regulates many DNA processes via protein-protein interactions. Here, we present direct evidence for fluctuations between the two major modes of SSB binding, (SSB)35 and (SSB)65 formed on (dT)70, with rates of interconversion on time scales that vary as much as 200-fold for a mere 4-fold change in NaCl concentration. Such remarkable electrostatic effects allow only one of the two modes to be significantly populated outside a narrow range of salt concentration, providing a context for precise control of SSB function in cellular processes via SSB expression levels and interactions with other proteins. Deletion of the acidic C-terminus of SSB, the site of binding of several proteins involved in DNA metabolism, does not affect the strong salt dependence, but shifts the equilibrium towards the highly cooperative (SSB)35 mode, suggesting that interactions of proteins with the C-terminus may regulate the binding mode transition and vice versa. Single molecule analysis further revealed a novel low abundance binding configuration and provides a direct demonstration that the SSB-ssDNA complex is a finely tuned assembly in dynamic equilibrium among several well-defined structural and functional states. PMID:17490681

  3. Chemokines derived from soluble fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli are biologically active

    SciTech Connect

    Magistrelli, Giovanni; Gueneau, Franck; Muslmani, Machadiya; Ravn, Ulla; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas . E-mail: nfischer@novimmune.com

    2005-08-26

    Chemokines are a class of low molecular weight proteins that are involved in leukocytes trafficking. Due to their involvement in recruiting immune cells to sites of inflammation, chemokines, and chemokine receptors have become an attractive class of therapeutic targets. However, when expressed in Escherichia coli chemokines are poorly soluble and accumulate in inclusion bodies. Several purification methods have been described but involve time-consuming refolding, buffer exchange, and purification steps that complicate expression of these proteins. Here, we describe a simple and reliable method to express chemokines as fusions to the protein NusA. The fusion proteins were largely found in the soluble fraction and could be readily purified in a single step. Proteolytic cleavage was used to obtain soluble recombinant chemokines that were found to be very active in a novel in vitro chemotaxis assays. This method could be applied to several {alpha} and {beta} human chemokines, suggesting that it is generally applicable to this class of proteins.

  4. Cloning, expression, and purification of the general stress protein YhbO from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Jad; Kern, Renee; Malki, Abderrahim; Eckey, Viola; Richarme, Gilbert

    2006-06-01

    We cloned, expressed, and purified the Escherichia coli yhbO gene product, which is an amino acid sequence homolog to the Bacillus subtilis general stress protein 18 (the yfkM gene product), the Pyrococcus furiosus intracellular protease PfpI, and the human Parkinson disease protein DJ-1. The gene coding for YhbO was generated by amplifying the yhbO gene from E. coli by polymerase chain reaction. It was inserted into the expression plasmid pET-21a, under the transcriptional control of the bacteriophage T7 promoter and lac operator. A BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain transformed with the YhbO-expression vector, pET-21a-yhbO, accumulates large amounts of a soluble protein with a molecular mass of 20 kDa in SDS-PAGE that matches the expected YhbO molecular weight. YhbO was purified to homogeneity by ion exchange chromatography and hydroxyapatite chromatography, and its identity was confirmed by N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry analysis. The native protein exists in monomeric, trimeric, and hexameric forms. We also report a strong sequence homology between YhbO and the general stress protein YfkM (64% identities), which suggests that YhbO is a stress protein, and a strong structural homology between YhbO and the Pyrococcus horikoshii intracellular protease PhpI. We could not, however, detect any proteolytic or peptidolytic activity of YhbO, using classical biochemical substrates. PMID:16380269

  5. pH-Dependent Catabolic Protein Expression during Anaerobic Growth of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Yohannes, Elizabeth; Barnhart, D. Michael; Slonczewski, Joan L.

    2004-01-01

    During aerobic growth of Escherichia coli, expression of catabolic enzymes and envelope and periplasmic proteins is regulated by pH. Additional modes of pH regulation were revealed under anaerobiosis. E. coli K-12 strain W3110 was cultured anaerobically in broth medium buffered at pH 5.5 or 8.5 for protein identification on proteomic two-dimensional gels. A total of 32 proteins from anaerobic cultures show pH-dependent expression, and only four of these proteins (DsbA, TnaA, GatY, and HdeA) showed pH regulation in aerated cultures. The levels of 19 proteins were elevated at the high pH; these proteins included metabolic enzymes (DhaKLM, GapA, TnaA, HisC, and HisD), periplasmic proteins (ProX, OppA, DegQ, MalB, and MglB), and stress proteins (DsbA, Tig, and UspA). High-pH induction of the glycolytic enzymes DhaKLM and GapA suggested that there was increased fermentation to acids, which helped neutralize alkalinity. Reporter lac fusion constructs showed base induction of sdaA encoding serine deaminase under anaerobiosis; in addition, the glutamate decarboxylase genes gadA and gadB were induced at the high pH anaerobically but not with aeration. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that there is a connection between the gad system and GabT metabolism of 4-aminobutanoate. On the other hand, 13 other proteins were induced by acid; these proteins included metabolic enzymes (GatY and AckA), periplasmic proteins (TolC, HdeA, and OmpA), and redox enzymes (GuaB, HmpA, and Lpd). The acid induction of NikA (nickel transporter) is of interest because E. coli requires nickel for anaerobic fermentation. The position of the NikA spot coincided with the position of a small unidentified spot whose induction in aerobic cultures was reported previously; thus, NikA appeared to be induced slightly by acid during aeration but showed stronger induction under anaerobic conditions. Overall, anaerobic growth revealed several more pH-regulated proteins; in particular, anaerobiosis

  6. Lysyl-derived aldehydes in outer membrane proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, D L; Schnaitman, C A

    1978-01-01

    The major outer membrane proteins from Escherichia coli K-12 are modified to contain alpha-aminoadipic acid delta-semialdehyde (allysine). The allysine was found to be derived from lysine and it was identified by derivatizing it to chloronorleucine by reduction, alpha-aminoadipic acid by oxidation, and to alpha,epsilon-diaminopimelic acid by reacting it with CN- and NH3. The alpha-aminoadipic acid was identified by mass spectrometry. Two major outer membrane proteins were found to possess allysine, a modified lysine characteristically found to connective tissue. PMID:358196

  7. Detection and identification of stable oligomeric protein complexes in Escherichi coli inner membranes: a proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Spelbrink, Robin E J; Kolkman, Annemieke; Slijper, Monique; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2005-08-01

    In this study we present a new technology to detect stable oligomeric protein complexes in membranes. The technology is based on the ability of small membrane-active alcohols to dissociate the highly stable homotetrameric potassium channel KcsA. It is shown via a proteomics approach, using diagonal electrophoresis and nano-flow liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, that a large number of both integral and peripheral Escherichia coli inner membrane proteins are part of stable oligomeric complexes that can be dissociated by small alcohols. This study gives insight into the composition and stability of these complexes. PMID:15919657

  8. Exopolysaccharide assay in Escherichia coli microcolonies using a cleavable fusion protein of GFP-labeled carbohydrate-binding module.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Yoshihiro; Suparman, Asep; Nguyen, Minh Hong; Sakka, Makiko; Sakka, Kazuo; Taya, Masahito

    2015-07-01

    A fused protein composed of a carbohydrate-binding module and green fluorescence protein (GFP) was developed to measure the exopolysaccharides (EPShs) present in Escherichia coli microcolonies. The cleavage of the GFP part of this protein using a site-specific protease allowed for the non-invasive and quantitative evaluation of the EPShs. PMID:25978970

  9. Insights from the molecular characterization of mercury stress proteins identified by proteomics in E.coli nissle 1917.

    PubMed

    Seshapani, Panthangi; Rayalu, Daddam Jayasimha; Kumar, Vadde Kiran; Sekhar, Kathera Chandra; Kumari, Jasti Pramoda

    2013-01-01

    Differently expressed proteins in probiotic Escherichia coli nissle 1917 under mercury stress identified by using a proteomic approach. We applied to separate proteins by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF-MS using PMF, by mascot database search using the NCBI database. we identified six proteins after exposure to mercury stress with respect to different functional classes. It is useful to understand the molecular insights into mercury stress in probiotic E. coli. Next we describe a structure generated by homology modelling and functional domain identification; it is interesting to study the impact of stress on protein structures. MS characterization and computational methods together provide the opportunity to examine the impact of stress arising from mercury. The role of these proteins in metal tolerance and structure relation is discussed. To the best of our knowledge, proteomics of E. coli nissle 1917 overview of mercury stress has been reported for the first time. PMID:23847405

  10. Production of initial-stage eukaryotic N-glycan and its protein glycosylation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srichaisupakit, Akkaraphol; Ohashi, Takao; Misaki, Ryo; Fujiyama, Kazuhito

    2015-04-01

    N-Glycosylation is a ubiquitous protein post-translational modification mechanism in eukaryotes. In this work, a synthetic pathway containing glycosyltransferases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was introduced to Escherichia coli to synthesize lipid-linked mannosyl-chitobiose (Man-GlcNAc2) and trimannosyl-chitobiose (Man3-GlcNAc2). Transfer of Man3-GlcNAc2 onto a model periplasmic protein occurred in the engineered E. coli cell using oligosaccharyltransferase PglB from Campylobacter jejuni. Mass spectrometric analysis of the fluorescently labeled N-glycan indicated a glycan signal composed of 2 HexNAc and 3 Hex residues. The reversed-phase HPLC analysis suggested that the Hex residues were α1,3-, α1,6- and β1,4-linked mannoses. These results indicated that the constructed system synthesizes a Man3-GlcNAc2, identical to that observed in an early eukaryotic dolichol pathway. Finally, glycopeptide mass spectrometry confirmed the transfer of the assembled glycan moiety onto an engineered glycosylation motif of recombinant maltose binding protein. Surprisingly, the Man3-GlcNAc2 structure but not Man-GlcNAc2 was transferred onto maltose binding protein. This work showed that PglB protein might be able to accommodate the transfer of the further engineered glycan with greater complexity. PMID:25449758

  11. Identification and preliminary characterization of Treponema pallidum protein antigens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stamm, L V; Kerner, T C; Bankaitis, V A; Bassford, P J

    1983-08-01

    We have previously described the construction in Escherichia coli K-12 of a hybrid plasmid colony bank of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) genomic DNA. By screening a portion of this bank with an in situ immunoassay, we identified six E. coli clones that express T. pallidum antigens. In this study, the recombinant plasmids from each of these clones have been analyzed in E. coli maxicells and have been found to encode a number of proteins that are not of vector pBR322 origin and are, therefore, of treponemal origin. In each case, several of these proteins can be specifically precipitated from solubilized maxicell extracts by high-titer experimental rabbit syphilitic serum. Certain of these proteins are also precipitated by high-titer latent human syphilitic sera (HSS). The T. pallidum DNA inserts in these plasmids range in size from 6.2 to 14 kilobase pairs, and from the restriction patterns of the inserts and the protein profiles generated by each plasmid in maxicells, it is apparent that we have recovered a total of four unique clones from our colony bank. Recombinant plasmids pLVS3 and pLVS5 were of particular interest. Plasmid pLVS3 encodes three major protein antigens with molecular weights of 39,000, 35,000, and 25,000. These three proteins, which were not recognized by pooled normal human sera, were efficiently precipitated by most secondary HSS, latent HSS, and late HSS tested. These proteins were also precipitated, although somewhat inefficiently, by most primary HSS tested. Plasmid pLVS5 encodes a major protein antigen with a molecular weight of 32,000 and several minor protein antigens that, although efficiently precipitated by experimental rabbit syphilitic serum, were generally not recognized by the various HSS tested. Evidence is presented indicating that the protein antigens encoded by plasmids pLVS3 and pLVS5 are specific for pathogenic treponemal species. We have also demonstrated that immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against these protein

  12. Induction of the lac carrier and an associated membrane protein in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Lagarias, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Induction of the lac operon in wild type Escherichia coli strains results in synthesis of a 16 kilodalton inner membrane protein in addition to the known products of the lacZ, lacY and lacA genes. Cells carrying the lacY gene on a plasmid over produce this 16 kilodalton polypeptide as well as the Lac carrier, the membrane protein product of the lacY gene. However, (/sup 35/S)methionine labeling of minicells carrying the lacY plasmid shows that the 16 kDa protein is not synthesized from the plasmid DNA. The 16 kDa protein was purified and partially characterized. It is an acidic membrane protein of apparent molecular weight 15,800 whose amino terminal sequence (NH/sub 2/-Met-Arg-Asn-Phe-Asp-Leu-) does not correspond to any nucleotide sequence known in lac operon DNA. Using antibody prepared to the purified 16 kDa protein, a quantitative analysis of conditions under which this protein is made was accomplished, and reveals that the amount of 16 kDa protein which appears in the membrane is proportional to lac operon expression. Hybridization of a synthetic oligonucleotide probe complementary to the 5' end of 16 kDa protein mRNA shows that its synthesis is regulated at the level of transcription. A description of attempts to clone this gene is given. Possible functional roles for the 16 kDa protein are discussed.

  13. Functional activities of the Tsh protein from avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Renata K; Gaziri, Luis Carlos; Vidotto, Marilda C

    2010-12-01

    The temperature-sensitive hemagglutinin (Tsh) expressed by strains of avian pathogenic Escherichia (E.) coli (APEC) has both agglutinin and protease activities. Tsh is synthesized as a 140 kDa precursor protein, whose processing results in a 106 kDa passenger domain (Tsh(s)) and a 33 kDa β-domain (Tsh(β)). In this study, both recombinant Tsh (rTsh) and supernatants from APEC, which contain Tsh(s) (106 kDa), caused proteolysis of chicken tracheal mucin. Both rTsh (140 kDa) and pellets from wild-type APEC, which contain Tsh(β) (33 kDa), agglutinated chicken erythrocytes. On Western blots, the anti-rTsh antibody recognized the rTsh and 106 kDa proteins in recombinant E. coli BL21/pET 101-Tsh and in the supernatants from APEC grown at either 37°C or 42°C. Anti-rTsh also recognized a 33 kDa protein in the pellets from APEC13 cultures grown in either Luria-Bertani agar, colonization factor antigen agar, or mucin agar at either 26°C, 37°C, or 42°C, and in the extracts of outer membrane proteins of APEC. The 106 kDa protein was more evident when the bacteria were grown at 37°C in mucin agar, and it was not detected when the bacteria were grown at 26°C in any of the culture media used in this study. Chicken anti-Tsh serum inhibited hemagglutinating and mucinolytic activities of strain APEC13 and recombinant E. coli BL21/pET101-Tsh. This work suggests that the mucinolytic activity of Tsh might be important for the colonization of the avian tracheal mucous environment by APEC. PMID:21113100

  14. Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 1a directs cell surface display of tick BM95 immunogenic peptides on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Canales, Mario; Almazán, Consuelo; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; de la Fuente, José

    2008-07-31

    The surface display of heterologous proteins on live Escherichia coli using anchoring motifs from outer membranes proteins has impacted on many areas of biochemistry, molecular biology and biotechnology. The Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 1a (MSP1a) contains N-terminal surface-exposed repeated peptides (28-289 amino acids) that are involved in pathogen interaction with host cell receptors and is surface-displayed when the recombinant protein is expressed in E. coli. Therefore, it was predicted that MSP1a would surface display on E. coli peptides inserted in the N-terminal repeats region of the protein. The Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus BM86 and BM95 glycoproteins are homologous proteins that protect cattle against tick infestations. In this study, we demonstrated that a recombinant protein comprising tick BM95 immunogenic peptides fused to the A. marginale MSP1a N-terminal region is displayed on the E. coli surface and is recognized by anti-BM86 and anti-MSP1a antibodies. This system provides a novel approach to the surface display of heterologous antigenic proteins on live E. coli and suggests the possibility to use the recombinant bacteria for immunization studies against cattle tick infestations. PMID:18582976

  15. An alternative method of enhancing the expression level of heterologous protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Tian, Hong; Bao, Lichen; Dai, Xin; Gao, Xiangdong; Yao, Wenbing

    2014-12-12

    Though numerous strategy options are available for achieving high expression levels of genes in Escherichia coli, not every gene can be efficiently expressed in this organism. By investigating the relationship between the mRNA secondary structure of translational initiation region (TIR) and gene expression in E.coli, we establish a simple method to design sequences of appropriate TIR (from -35 to +36) that meet a specific expression level as we need. Using this method, overexpression of native human humor necrosis factor α and extracellular domain of Her2/neu protein (aa 23-146) in E. coli were achieved. Differences in expression appeared was mainly related to the efficiency of translation initiation and the stability of mRNA secondary structure, because the intracellular mRNA levels analyzed by real-time RT-PCR were quite similar. Our approach can overcome the steric hindrance of translation startup, and therefore promote translation smoothly to acquire high expression of exogenous protein. PMID:25449272

  16. Potential role of Escherichia coli DNA mismatch repair proteins in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahanavaj

    2015-12-01

    The epithelium of gastrointestinal tract organizes many innate defense systems against microbial intruders such as integrity of epithelial, rapid eviction of infected cells, quick turnover of epithelial cell, intrinsic immune responses and autophagy. However, Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) are equipped with well developed infectious tricks that evade the host defense systems and utilize the gastrointestinal epithelium as a multiplicative foothold. During multiplication on and within the epithelium, EPEC secrete various toxins that can weaken, usurp, and use many host cellular systems. However, the possible mechanisms of pathogenesis are still poorly elusive. Recent study reveals the existence of EPEC in colorectal cancer patients and their potential role in depletion of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins of host cell in colonic cell lines. The EPEC colonised intracellularly in colon mucosa of colorectal carcinoma whereas extracellular strain was detected in mucosa of normal colon cells. Interestingly, alteration in MutS, MutL complexes and MUTYH of mammalian cells may be involved in development of CRC. These data propose that MMR of E. coli may be potential therapeutic targets and early detection biomarkers for CRC. This article reviews the potential role of E. coli MutS, MutL and MutY protein in CRC aetiology. PMID:26014615

  17. The Switch Regulating Transcription of the Escherichia coli Biotin Operon Does Not Require Extensive Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Solbiati, José; Cronan, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription of the Escherichia coli biotin (bio) operon is regulated by BirA, a protein that is not only the repressor that regulates bio operon expression by DNA binding but also the enzyme that covalently attaches biotin to its cognate acceptor proteins. Binding of BirA to the bio operator requires dimerization of the protein that is triggered by BirA-catalyzed synthesis of biotinoyl-adenylate (bio-AMP), the obligatory intermediate of the attachment reaction. The current model postulates that the unmodified acceptor protein binds the monomeric BirA:bio-AMP complex and thereby blocks assembly (dimerization) of the form of BirA that binds DNA. We report that expression of fusion proteins that carry synthetic biotin accepting peptide sequences was as effective as the natural acceptor protein in derepression of bio operon transcription. These peptide sequences have sequences that are remarkably dissimilar to that of the natural acceptor protein and thus our data argue that the regulatory switch does not require the extensive protein-protein interactions postulated in the current model. PMID:20142036

  18. A new role for Escherichia coli DsbC protein in protection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Denoncin, Katleen; Vertommen, Didier; Arts, Isabelle S; Goemans, Camille V; Rahuel-Clermont, Sophie; Messens, Joris; Collet, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    We report a new function for Escherichia coli DsbC, a protein best known for disulfide bond isomerization in the periplasm. We found that DsbC regulates the redox state of the single cysteine of the L-arabinose-binding protein AraF. This cysteine, which can be oxidized to a sulfenic acid, mediates the formation of a disulfide-linked homodimer under oxidative stress conditions, preventing L-arabinose binding. DsbC, unlike the homologous protein DsbG, reduces the intermolecular disulfide, restoring AraF binding properties. Thus, our results reveal a new link between oxidative protein folding and the defense mechanisms against oxidative stress. PMID:24634211

  19. Nutrient-dependent methylation of a membrane-associated protein of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.C.; Alvarez, J.D.; Bernlohr, R.W. )

    1990-09-01

    Starvation of a mid-log-phase culture of Escherichia coli B/r for nitrogen, phosphate, or carbon resulted in methylation of a membrane-associated protein of about 43,000 daltons (P-43) in the presence of chloramphenicol and (methyl-3H)methionine. The in vivo methylation reaction occurred with a doubling time of 2 to 5 min and was followed by a slower demethylation process. Addition of the missing nutrient to a starving culture immediately prevented further methylation of P-43. P-43 methylation is not related to the methylated chemotaxis proteins because P-43 is methylated in response to a different spectrum of nutrients and because P-43 is methylated on lysine residues. The characteristics of P-43 are similar to those of a methylated protein previously described in Bacillus subtilis and B. licheniformis and are consistent with the proposal that methylation of this protein functions in nutrient sensing.

  20. The RNA-Protein Complexes of E. coli Hfq: Form and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoo; Feig, Andrew L.

    E. coli Hfq is an RNA binding protein that has received significant attention due to its role in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Hfq facilitates the base-pairing between mRNAs and ncRNAs leading to translational activation, translational repression and/or degradation of mRNAs — the bacterial analog of the RNA interference pathway. Hfq is the bacterial homolog of the Sm and Lsm proteins and has a similar doughnut-shaped structure. This review summarizes what is known about the diverse physiological roles of Hfq and how its structure facilitates a diverse array of RNA—protein and protein—protein interactions. These interactions are put into context to explain the models of how Hfq is thought to help facilitate post-transcriptional gene regulation by non-coding RNAs in bacteria.

  1. Altered Escherichia coli membrane protein assembly machinery allows proper membrane assembly of eukaryotic protein vitamin K epoxide reductase

    PubMed Central

    Hatahet, Feras; Blazyk, Jessica L.; Martineau, Eugenie; Mandela, Eric; Zhao, Yongxin; Campbell, Robert E.; Beckwith, Jonathan; Boyd, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Functional overexpression of polytopic membrane proteins, particularly when in a foreign host, is often a challenging task. Factors that negatively affect such processes are poorly understood. Using the mammalian membrane protein vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKORc1) as a reporter, we describe a genetic selection approach allowing the isolation of Escherichia coli mutants capable of functionally expressing this blood-coagulation enzyme. The isolated mutants map to components of membrane protein assembly and quality control proteins YidC and HslV. We show that changes in the VKORc1 sequence and in the YidC hydrophilic groove along with the inactivation of HslV promote VKORc1 activity and dramatically increase its expression level. We hypothesize that such changes correct for mismatches in the membrane topogenic signals between E. coli and eukaryotic cells guiding proper membrane integration. Furthermore, the obtained mutants allow the study of VKORc1 reaction mechanisms, inhibition by warfarin, and the high-throughput screening for potential anticoagulants. PMID:26598701

  2. Crystal structure of the membrane fusion protein CusB from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chih-Chia; Yang, Feng; Long, Feng; Reyon, Deepak; Routh, Mathew D.; Kuo, Dennis W.; Mokhtari, Adam K.; Van Ornam, Jonathan D.; Rabe, Katherine L.; Hoy, Julie A.; Lee, Young Jin; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Yu, Edward W.

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, frequently utilize tripartite efflux complexes belonging to the resistance-nodulation-division family to expel diverse toxic compounds from the cell. These systems contain a periplasmic membrane fusion protein that is critical for substrate transport. We here present the x-ray structures of the CusB membrane fusion protein from the copper/silver efflux system of E. coli. This is the first structure of any membrane fusion proteins associated with heavy-metal efflux transporters. CusB bridges the inner membrane efflux pump CusA and outer membrane channel CusC to mediate resistance to Cu+ and Ag+ ions. Two distinct structures of the elongated molecules of CusB were found in the asymmetric unit of a single crystal, which suggests the flexible nature of this protein. Each protomer of CusB can be divided into four different domains, whereby the first three domains are mostly β-strands and the last domain adopts an entirely helical architecture. Unlike other known structures of membrane fusion proteins, the α-helical domain of CusB is folded into a three-helix bundle. This three-helix bundle presumably interacts with the periplasmic domain of CusC. The N and C-termini of CusB form the first β-strand domain, which is found to interact with the periplasmic domain of the CusA efflux pump. Atomic details of how this efflux protein binds Cu+ and Ag+ were revealed by the crystals of the CusB-Cu(I) and CusB-Ag(I) complexes. The structures indicate that CusB consists of multiple binding sites for these metal ions. These findings reveal novel structural features of a membrane fusion protein in the resistance-nodulation-division efflux system, and provide evidence that this protein specifically interacts with transported substrates. PMID:19695261

  3. Two regions of mature periplasmic maltose-binding protein of Escherichia coli involved in secretion.

    PubMed

    Duplay, P; Hofnung, M

    1988-10-01

    Six mutations in malE, the structural gene for the periplasmic maltose-binding protein (MBP) from Escherichia coli, prevent growth on maltose as a carbon source, as well as release of the mutant proteins by the cold osmotic-shock procedure. These mutations correspond to insertion of an oligonucleotide linker, concomitant with a deletion. One of the mutations (malE127) affects the N-terminal extension (the signal peptide), whereas the five others lie within the mature protein. As expected, the export of protein MalE127 is blocked at an early stage. This protein is neither processed to maturity nor sensitive to proteinase K in spheroplasts. In contrast, in the five other mutants, the signal peptide is cleaved and the protein is accessible to proteinase K added to spheroplasts. This indicates that the five mutant proteins are, at least in part, exported through the inner membrane. We propose that the corresponding mutations define two regions of the mature protein (between residues 18 and 42 and between residues 280 and 306), which are important for release of the protein from the inner membrane into the periplasm. We discuss the results in terms of possible conformational changes at this late step of export to the periplasm. PMID:3049532

  4. Effect of Antimicrobial Agents on MinD Protein Oscillations in E. coli Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Corey; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2012-02-01

    The pole-to-pole oscillation of MinD proteins in E. coli cells determines the location of the division septum, and is integral to healthy cell division. It has been shown previously that the MinD oscillation period is approximately 40 s for healthy cells [1] but is strongly dependant on environmental factors such as temperature, which may place stress on the cell [2,3]. We use a strain of E. coli in which the MinD proteins are tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP), allowing fluorescence visualization of the MinD oscillation. We use high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a custom, temperature controlled flow cell to observe the effect of exposure to antimicrobial agents on the MinD oscillation period and, more generally, to analyze the time variation of the spatial distribution of the MinD proteins within the cells. These measurements provide insight into the mechanism of antimicrobial action. [1] Raskin, D.M.; de Boer, P. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 96: 4971-4976. [2] Touhami, A.; Jericho, M; Rutenberg, A. (2006) J. Bacteriol. 188: 7661-7667. [3] Downing, B.; Rutenberg, A.; Touhami, A.; Jericho, M. (2009) PLoS ONE 4: e7285.

  5. A proposed feeding strategy for the overproduction of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Babaeipour, Valiollah; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Khalilzadeh, Rasoul; Maghsoudi, Nader; Tabandeh, Fatemeh

    2008-02-01

    Different feeding strategies for the production of human interferon-gamma using an isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactoside-inducible expression system in recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) (plasmid pET3a-ifngamma) were studied. Four fed-batch modes were designed to compare the effect of mu (specific growth rate) on recombinant-protein production, substrate consumption, by-product formation and plasmid stability during pre- and post-chemical induction in high-cell-density cultures of E. coli. It was found that Y(p/s), the product/substrate yield of interferon-gamma was significantly affected by mu throughout the process, but product/biomass yield (Y(p/x)) was influenced by mu at the pre-induction stage. By applying an efficient feeding strategy, in which the mu was maintained at the maximum attainable level, recombinant protein was accumulated up to a level of 60% of the total cell protein and its productivity was increased significantly. In this case, the overall productivities of biomass and recombinant protein were 6.36 g l(-1) h(-1) and 2.1 g l(-1) h(-1) respectively, in comparison with 1.91 g l(-1) h(-1) and 0.16 g l(-1) h(-1) during exponential feeding, in which the specific growth rate was kept constant throughout the entire process. PMID:17630954

  6. Multiple DNA Binding Proteins Contribute to Timing of Chromosome Replication in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Riber, Leise; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is initiated from a single origin, oriC. Initiation involves a number of DNA binding proteins, but only DnaA is essential and specific for the initiation process. DnaA is an AAA+ protein that binds both ATP and ADP with similar high affinities. DnaA associated with either ATP or ADP binds to a set of strong DnaA binding sites in oriC, whereas only DnaA(ATP) is capable of binding additional and weaker sites to promote initiation. Additional DNA binding proteins act to ensure that initiation occurs timely by affecting either the cellular mass at which DNA replication is initiated, or the time window in which all origins present in a single cell are initiated, i.e. initiation synchrony, or both. Overall, these DNA binding proteins modulate the initiation frequency from oriC by: (i) binding directly to oriC to affect DnaA binding, (ii) altering the DNA topology in or around oriC, (iii) altering the nucleotide bound status of DnaA by interacting with non-coding chromosomal sequences, distant from oriC, that are important for DnaA activity. Thus, although DnaA is the key protein for initiation of replication, other DNA-binding proteins act not only on oriC for modulation of its activity but also at additional regulatory sites to control the nucleotide bound status of DnaA. Here we review the contribution of key DNA binding proteins to the tight regulation of chromosome replication in E. coli cells. PMID:27446932

  7. Soluble cysteine-rich tick saliva proteins Salp15 and Iric-1 from E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Philipp; Vorreiter, Jolanta; Habicht, Jüri; Bentrop, Detlef; Wallich, Reinhard; Nassal, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ticks transmit numerous pathogens, including borreliae, which cause Lyme disease. Tick saliva contains a complex mix of anti-host defense factors, including the immunosuppressive cysteine-rich secretory glycoprotein Salp15 from Ixodes scapularis ticks and orthologs like Iric-1 from Ixodesricinus. All tick-borne microbes benefit from the immunosuppression at the tick bite site; in addition, borreliae exploit the binding of Salp15 to their outer surface protein C (OspC) for enhanced transmission. Hence, Salp15 proteins are attractive targets for anti-tick vaccines that also target borreliae. However, recombinant Salp proteins are not accessible in sufficient quantity for either vaccine manufacturing or for structural characterization. As an alternative to low-yield eukaryotic systems, we investigated cytoplasmic expression in Escherichia coli, even though this would not result in glycosylation. His-tagged Salp15 was efficiently expressed but insoluble. Among the various solubility-enhancing protein tags tested, DsbA was superior, yielding milligram amounts of soluble, monomeric Salp15 and Iric-1 fusions. Easily accessible mutants enabled epitope mapping of two monoclonal antibodies that, importantly, cross-react with glycosylated Salp15, and revealed interaction sites with OspC. Free Salp15 and Iric-1 from protease-cleavable fusions, despite limited solubility, allowed the recording of 1H–15N 2D NMR spectra, suggesting partial folding of the wild-type proteins but not of Cys-free variants. Fusion to the NMR-compatible GB1 domain sufficiently enhanced solubility to reveal first secondary structure elements in 13C/15N double-labeled Iric-1. Together, E. coli expression of appropriately fused Salp15 proteins may be highly valuable for the molecular characterization of the function and eventually the 3D structure of these medically relevant tick proteins. PMID:25628987

  8. Multiple DNA Binding Proteins Contribute to Timing of Chromosome Replication in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Riber, Leise; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is initiated from a single origin, oriC. Initiation involves a number of DNA binding proteins, but only DnaA is essential and specific for the initiation process. DnaA is an AAA+ protein that binds both ATP and ADP with similar high affinities. DnaA associated with either ATP or ADP binds to a set of strong DnaA binding sites in oriC, whereas only DnaAATP is capable of binding additional and weaker sites to promote initiation. Additional DNA binding proteins act to ensure that initiation occurs timely by affecting either the cellular mass at which DNA replication is initiated, or the time window in which all origins present in a single cell are initiated, i.e. initiation synchrony, or both. Overall, these DNA binding proteins modulate the initiation frequency from oriC by: (i) binding directly to oriC to affect DnaA binding, (ii) altering the DNA topology in or around oriC, (iii) altering the nucleotide bound status of DnaA by interacting with non-coding chromosomal sequences, distant from oriC, that are important for DnaA activity. Thus, although DnaA is the key protein for initiation of replication, other DNA-binding proteins act not only on oriC for modulation of its activity but also at additional regulatory sites to control the nucleotide bound status of DnaA. Here we review the contribution of key DNA binding proteins to the tight regulation of chromosome replication in E. coli cells. PMID:27446932

  9. Soluble cysteine-rich tick saliva proteins Salp15 and Iric-1 from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Philipp; Vorreiter, Jolanta; Habicht, Jüri; Bentrop, Detlef; Wallich, Reinhard; Nassal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ticks transmit numerous pathogens, including borreliae, which cause Lyme disease. Tick saliva contains a complex mix of anti-host defense factors, including the immunosuppressive cysteine-rich secretory glycoprotein Salp15 from Ixodes scapularis ticks and orthologs like Iric-1 from Ixodes ricinus. All tick-borne microbes benefit from the immunosuppression at the tick bite site; in addition, borreliae exploit the binding of Salp15 to their outer surface protein C (OspC) for enhanced transmission. Hence, Salp15 proteins are attractive targets for anti-tick vaccines that also target borreliae. However, recombinant Salp proteins are not accessible in sufficient quantity for either vaccine manufacturing or for structural characterization. As an alternative to low-yield eukaryotic systems, we investigated cytoplasmic expression in Escherichia coli, even though this would not result in glycosylation. His-tagged Salp15 was efficiently expressed but insoluble. Among the various solubility-enhancing protein tags tested, DsbA was superior, yielding milligram amounts of soluble, monomeric Salp15 and Iric-1 fusions. Easily accessible mutants enabled epitope mapping of two monoclonal antibodies that, importantly, cross-react with glycosylated Salp15, and revealed interaction sites with OspC. Free Salp15 and Iric-1 from protease-cleavable fusions, despite limited solubility, allowed the recording of (1)H-(15)N 2D NMR spectra, suggesting partial folding of the wild-type proteins but not of Cys-free variants. Fusion to the NMR-compatible GB1 domain sufficiently enhanced solubility to reveal first secondary structure elements in (13)C/(15)N double-labeled Iric-1. Together, E. coli expression of appropriately fused Salp15 proteins may be highly valuable for the molecular characterization of the function and eventually the 3D structure of these medically relevant tick proteins. PMID:25628987

  10. Substrate oscillations boost recombinant protein release from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jazini, Mohammadhadi; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Intracellular production of recombinant proteins in prokaryotes necessitates subsequent disruption of cells for protein recovery. Since the cell disruption and subsequent purification steps largely contribute to the total production cost, scalable tools for protein release into the extracellular space is of utmost importance. Although there are several ways for enhancing protein release, changing culture conditions is rather a simple and scalable approach compared to, for example, molecular cell design. This contribution aimed at quantitatively studying process technological means to boost protein release of a periplasmatic recombinant protein (alkaline phosphatase) from E. coli. Quantitative analysis of protein in independent bioreactor runs could demonstrate that a defined oscillatory feeding profile was found to improve protein release, about 60 %, compared to the conventional constant feeding rate. The process technology included an oscillatory post-induction feed profile with the frequency of 4 min. The feed rate was oscillated triangularly between a maximum (1.3-fold of the maximum feed rate achieved at the end of the fed-batch phase) and a minimum (45 % of the maximum). The significant improvement indicates the potential to maximize the production rate, while this oscillatory feed profile can be easily scaled to industrial processes. Moreover, quantitative analysis of the primary metabolism revealed that the carbon dioxide yield can be used to identify the preferred feeding profile. This approach is therefore in line with the initiative of process analytical technology for science-based process understanding in process development and process control strategies. PMID:24114459

  11. Green fluorescent protein as a scaffold for high efficiency production of functional bacteriotoxic proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Cho, Hye-sun; Ahn, Byeongyong; Choi, Minkyung; Thong, Le Minh; Choi, Hojun; Cha, Se-Yeoun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Park, Choi-Kyu; Seo, Kunho; Park, Chankyu

    2016-01-01

    The availability of simple, robust, and cost-effective methods for the large-scale production of bacteriotoxic peptides such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is essential for basic and pharmaceutical research. However, the production of bacteriotoxic proteins has been difficult due to a high degree of toxicity in bacteria and proteolytic degradation. In this study, we inserted AMPs into the Green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a loop region and expressed them as insoluble proteins in high yield, circumventing the inherent toxicity of AMP production in Escherichia coli. The AMPs inserted were released by cyanogen bromide and purified by chromatography. We showed that highly potent AMPs such as Protegrin-1, PMAP-36, Buforin-2, and Bactridin-1 are produced in high yields and produced AMPs showed similar activities compared to chemically synthesized AMPs. We increased the yield more than two-fold by inserting three copies of Protegrin-1 in the GFP scaffold. The immunogold electron micrographs showed that the expressed Protegrin-1 in the GFP scaffold forms large and small size aggregates in the core region of the inclusion body and become entirely nonfunctional, therefore not influencing the proliferation of E. coli. Our novel method will be applicable for diverse bacteriotoxic peptides which can be exploited in biomedical and pharmaceutical researches. PMID:26864123

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis of proteins expression changes in the mammary tissue of cows infected with Escherichia coli mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-wei; Huang, Dong-wei; Cheng, Guang-long; Zhao, Hui-ling

    2015-01-01

    Cows infected with Escherichia (E.) coli usually experience severe clinical symptoms, including damage to mammary tissues, reduced milk yield, and altered milk composition. In order to investigate the host response to E. coli infection and discover novel markers for mastitis treatment, mammary tissue samples were collected from healthy cows and bovines with naturally occurring severe E. coli mastitis. Changes of mammary tissue proteins were examined using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and label-free proteomic approaches. A total of 95 differentially expressed proteins were identified. Of these, 56 proteins were categorized according to molecular function, cellular component, and biological processes. The most frequent biological processes influenced by the proteins were response to stress, transport, and establishment of localization. Furthermore, a network analysis of the proteins with altered expression in mammary tissues demonstrated that these factors are predominantly involved with binding and structural molecule activities. Vimentin and α-enolase were central "functional hubs" in the network. Based on results from the present study, disease-induced alterations of protein expression in mammary glands and potential markers for the effective treatment of E. coli mastitis were identified. These data have also helped elucidate defense mechanisms that protect the mammary glands and promote the pathogenesis of E. coli mastitis. PMID:25549220

  13. Co-expression of ferrochelatase allows for complete heme incorporation into recombinant proteins produced in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Kabir, Mariam; Airola, Michael V.; Patel, Bhumit A.; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Dennis L.; Crane, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Over-expression of heme binding proteins in E. coli often results in sub-optimal heme incorporation and the amount of heme-bound protein produced usually varies with the protein of interest. Complete heme incorporation is important for biochemical characterization, spectroscopy, structural studies, and for the production of homogeneous commercial proteins with high activity. We have determined that recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli often contain less than a full complement of heme because they rather are partially incorporated with free-base porphyrin. Porphyrin-incorporated proteins have similar spectral characteristics as the desired heme-loaded targets, and thus are difficult to detect, even in purified samples. We present a straightforward and inexpensive solution to this problem that involves the co-expression of native ferrochelatase with the protein of interest. The method is shown to be effective for proteins that contain either Cys- or His- ligated hemes. PMID:20303407

  14. Helicases that underpin replication of protein-bound DNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Peter

    2011-04-01

    A pre-requisite for successful cell division in any organism is synthesis of an accurate copy of the genetic information needed for survival. This copying process is a mammoth task, given the amount of DNA that must be duplicated, but potential blocks to replication fork movement also pose a challenge for genome duplication. Damage to the template inhibits the replication machinery but proteins bound to the template such as RNA polymerases also present barriers to replication. This review discusses recent results from Escherichia coli that shed light on the roles of helicases in overcoming protein-DNA barriers to replication and that may illustrate fundamental aspects of how duplication of protein-bound DNA is underpinned in all organisms. PMID:21428948

  15. Protease La from Escherichia coli Hydrolyzes ATP and Proteins in a Linked Fashion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, Lloyd; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    1982-08-01

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli results from an ATP requirement for the function of protease La, the product of the lon gene. This novel serine protease contains an ATPase activity that is essential for proteolysis. ATP and protein hydrolysis show the same Km for ATP (30-40 μ M) and are affected similarly by various inhibitors, activators, and ATP analogs. Vanadate inhibited ATP cleavage and caused a proportionate reduction in casein hydrolysis, and inhibitors of serine proteases reduced ATP cleavage. Thus, ATP and protein hydrolysis appear to be linked stoichiometrically. Furthermore, ATP hydrolysis is stimulated two- to threefold by polypeptides that are substrates for the protease (casein, glucagon) but not by nonhydrolyzed polypeptides (insulin, RNase). Unlike hemoglobin or native albumin, globin and denatured albumin stimulated ATP hydrolysis and were substrates for proteolysis. It is suggested that the stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by potential substrates triggers activation of the proteolytic function.

  16. Autonomous induction of recombinant proteins by minimally rewiring native quorum sensing regulon of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Chen-Yu; Hooshangi, Sara; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Valdes, James J; Bentley, William E

    2010-05-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) enables an individual bacterium's metabolic state to be communicated to and ultimately control the phenotype of an emerging population. Harnessing the hierarchical nature of this signal transduction process may enable the exploitation of individual cell characteristics to direct or "program" entire populations of cells. We re-engineered the native QS regulon so that individual cell signals (autoinducers) are used to guide high level expression of recombinant proteins in E. coli populations. Specifically, the autoinducer-2 (AI-2) QS signal initiates and guides the overexpression of green fluorescent protein (GFP), chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) and beta-galactosidase (LacZ). The new process requires no supervision or input (e.g., sampling for optical density measurement, inducer addition, or medium exchange) and represents a low-cost, high-yield platform for recombinant protein production. Moreover, rewiring a native signal transduction circuit exemplifies an emerging class of metabolic engineering approaches that target regulatory functions. PMID:20060924

  17. Differential secretion pathways of proteins fused to the Escherichia coli maltose binding protein (MBP) in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Moua, Pachai S; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Oshiro, Kristin T; Tam, Vivian; Li, Zhiguo Harry; Chang, Jennifer; Leung, Wilson; Yon, Amy; Thor, Der; Venkatram, Sri; Franz, Andreas H; Risser, Douglas D; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P

    2016-08-01

    The Escherichia coli maltose binding protein (MBP) is an N-terminal fusion partner that was shown to enhance the secretion of some heterologous proteins from the yeast Pichia pastoris, a popular host for recombinant protein expression. The amount of increase in secretion was dependent on the identity of the cargo protein, and the fusions were proteolyzed prior to secretion, limiting its use as a purification tag. In order to overcome these obstacles, we used the MBP as C-terminal partner for several cargo peptides. While the Cargo-MBP proteins were no longer proteolyzed in between these two moieties when the MBP was in this relative position, the secretion efficiency of several fusions was lower than when MBP was located at the opposite end of the cargo protein (MBP-Cargo). Furthermore, fluorescence analysis suggested that the MBP-EGFP and EGFP-MBP proteins followed different routes within the cell. The effect of several Pichia pastoris beta-galactosidase supersecretion (bgs) strains, mutants showing enhanced secretion of select reporters, was also investigated on both MBP-EGFP and EGFP-MBP. While the secretion efficiency, proteolysis and localization of the MBP-EGFP was influenced by the modified function of Bgs13, EGFP-MBP behavior was not affected in the bgs strain. Taken together, these results indicate that the location of the MBP in a fusion affects the pathway and trans-acting factors regulating secretion in P. pastoris. PMID:27079175

  18. Tat Peptide-Mediated Soluble Expression of the Membrane Protein LSECtin-CRD in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guofu; Wang, Changzhen; Wu, Yonghong; Cong, Jianbo; Cheng, Li; Wang, Mingqun; Zhao, Pengkai; Tang, Li; Zhang, Chenggang; Wu, Ke

    2013-01-01

    The human liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin (hLSECtin), a type II integral membrane protein, containing a Ca2+-dependent carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), has a well-established biological activity, yet its three-dimensional structure is unknown due to low expression yields and aggregation into inclusion bodies. Previous study has demonstrated that the HIV-1 virus-encoded Tat peptide (‘YGRKKRRQRRR’) can increase the yields and the solubility of heterologous proteins. However, whether the Tat peptide could promote the high-yield and soluble expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli is not known. Therefore, the prokaryotic expression vector pET28b-Tat-hLSECtin-CRD (using pET28b and pET28b-hLSECtin-CRD as controls) was constructed, and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells and induced with isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactoside (IPTG) followed with identifying by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Subsequently, the bacterial subcellular structure, in which overexpressed the heterologous proteins Tat-hLSECtin-CRD and Tat-free hLSECtin-CRD, was analyzed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) respectively, and the mannose-binding activity of Tat-hLSECtin-CRD was also determined. Expectedly, the solubility of Tat-LSECtin-CRD significantly increased compared to Tat-free LSECtin-CRD (**p < 0.01) with prolonged time, and the Tat-LSECtin-CRD had a significant mannose-binding activity. The subcellular structure analysis indicated that the bacterial cells overexpressed Tat-hLSECtin-CRD exhibited denser region compared with controls, while dot denser region aggregated in the two ends of bacterial cells overexpressed Tat-free hLSECtin-CRD. This study provided a novel method for improving the soluble expression of membrane proteins in prokaryotic systems by fusion with the Tat peptide, which may be potentially expanded to the expression of other membrane proteins. PMID:24358298

  19. Cell surface display of carbonic anhydrase on Escherichia coli using ice nucleation protein for CO₂ sequestration.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Hai; Liu, Ning; Yu, Ming-Rui; Yang, Shang-Tian; Chen, Huan-Lin

    2011-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) has recently gained renewed interests for its potential as a mass-transfer facilitator for CO(2) sequestration. However, the low stability and high price severely limit its applications. In this work, the expression of α-CA from Helicobacter pylori on the outer membrane of Escherichia coli using a surface-anchoring system derived from ice nucleation protein (INP) from Pseudomonas syringae was developed. To find the best surface anchoring motif, full-length INP (114 kDa), truncated INP (INP-NC, 33 kDa), and INP's N-domain with first two subunits (INP-N, 22 kDa) were evaluated. Two vectors, pKK223-3 and pET22b(+), with different promoters (T7 and Tac) were used to construct the fusion genes, and for each vector, three recombinant strains, each expressing a different length of the fusion protein, were obtained. SDS-PAGE, Western blot, immunofluorescence microscopy, FACS, and whole-cell ELISA confirmed the expression of fusion proteins on the surface of E. coli. The smallest fusion protein with INP-N as the anchoring motif had the highest expression level and CA activity, suggesting that INP-N is the best carrying protein due to its smaller size. Also, the T7 promoter in pET22b(+) induced with 0.2 mM IPTG gave high protein expression levels, whereas the Tac promoter in pKK223-3 gave low expression levels. The surface displayed CA was at least twofold more stable than that of the free form, and did not show any adverse effect on cell growth and outer membrane integrity. Cells with surface displayed CA were successfully used to facilitate CO(2) sequestration in contained liquid membrane (CLM). PMID:21732326

  20. Fixation and stabilization of Escherichia coli cells displaying genetically engineered cell surface proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, A.; Abramov, S.; Georgiou, G.

    1996-12-05

    A large biotechnological potential is inherent in the display of proteins. Applications such as immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts or cellular adsorbents require cell fixation to prevent disintegration, stabilization of the anchored protein from leakage, denaturation or proteolysis, and total loss of cell viability, preventing medium and potential product contamination with cells. In this article the authors describe the adaptation of a simple two-stage chemical crosslinking procedure based on bi-layer encagement for stabilizing Escherichia coli cells expressing an Lpp-OmpA-{beta}-lactamase fusion that displays {beta}-lactamase on the cell surface. Bilayer crosslinking and coating the bacteria with a polymeric matrix is accomplished by treating the cells first with either glutaraldehyde or polyglutaraldehyde, followed by secondary crosslinking with polyacrylamide hydrazide. These treatments resulted in a 5- to 25-fold reduction of the thermal inactivation rate constant at 55 C of surface anchored {beta}-lactamase and completely prevented the deterioration of the cells for at least a week of storage at 4 C. The stabilization procedure developed paves the way to scalable biotechnological applications of E. coli displaying surface anchored proteins as whole-cell biocatalysts and adsorbents.

  1. Tunable recombinant protein expression in E. coli: enabler for continuous processing?

    PubMed

    Marschall, Lukas; Sagmeister, Patrick; Herwig, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Tuning of transcription is a powerful process technological tool for efficient recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli. Many challenges such as product toxicity, formation of inclusion bodies, cell death, and metabolic burden are associated with non-suitable (too high or too low) levels of recombinant protein expression. Tunable expression systems allow adjusting the recombinant protein expression using process technological means. This enables to exploit the cell's metabolic capacities to a maximum. Within this article, we review genetic and process technological aspects of tunable expression systems in E. coli, providing a roadmap for the industrial exploitation of the reviewed technologies. We attempt to differentiate the term "expression tuning" from its inflationary use by providing a concise definition and highlight interesting fields of application for this versatile new technology. Dependent on the type of inducer (metabolizable or non-metabolizable), different process strategies are required in order to achieve tuning. To fully profit from the benefits of tunable systems, an independent control of growth rate and expression rate is indispensable. Being able to tackle problems such as long-term culture stability and constant product quality expression tuning is a promising enabler for continuous processing in biopharmaceutical production. PMID:27170324

  2. 2-step purification of the Ku DNA repair protein expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The Ku protein is involved in DNA double-strand break repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is crucial to the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammals. To study the role of Ku in NHEJ we developed a bicistronic E. coli expression system for the Ku70 and Ku80 subunits. Association of the Ku70 and Ku80 subunits buries a substantial amount of surface area (~9000Å2 [1]), which suggests that herterodimerization may be important for protein stability. N-terminally his6-tagged Ku80 was soluble in the presence, but not in the absence, of bicistronically expressed untagged Ku70. In a 2-step purification, metal chelating affinity chromatography was followed by step-gradient elution from heparin-agarose. Co-purification of equimolar amounts of his6-tagged Ku80 and untagged Ku70 was observed, which indicated heterodimerization. Recombinant Ku bound dsDNA, activated the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent kinase (DNA-PKcs) and functioned in NHEJ reactions in vitro. Our results demonstrate that while the heterodimeric interface of Ku is extensive it is nonetheless possible to produce biologically active Ku protein in E. coli. PMID:17110127

  3. Differential expression of two isolates of beak and feather disease virus capsid protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Edward I; Swarbrick, Crystall M D; Roman, Noelia; Forwood, Jade K; Raidal, Shane R

    2013-04-01

    Expression of recombinant beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) capsid-associated protein (Cap) has relied on inefficient techniques that typically produce low yields or use specialized expression systems, which greatly increase the cost and expertise required for mass production. An Escherichia coli system was used to express recombinant BFDV Cap derived from two isolates of BFDV, from a Long-billed Corella (Cacatua tenuirostris) and an Orange-bellied parrot (OBP; Neophema chrysogaster). Purification by affinity and size exclusion chromatography was optimized through an iterative process involving screening and modification of buffer constituents and pH. A buffer containing glycerol, β-mercaptoethanol, Triton X-100, and a high concentration of NaCl at pH 8 was used to increase solubility of the protein. The final concentration of the corella-isolated BFDV protein was fifteen- to twenty-fold greater than that produced in previous publications using E. coli expression systems. Immunoassays were used to confirm the specific antigenicity of recombinant Cap, verifying its validity for use in continued experimentation as a potential vaccine, a reagent in diagnostic assays, and as a concentrated sample for biological discoveries. PMID:23403150

  4. Effect of Ethionine on the Ribonucleic Acid, Deoxyribonucleic Acid, and Protein Content of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert C.; Salmon, W. D.

    1965-01-01

    Smith, Robert C. (Auburn University, Auburn, Ala.), and W. D. Salmon. Effect of ethionine on the ribonucleic acid, deoxyribonucleic acid, and protein content of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 89:687–692. 1965.—The addition of ethionine to cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 W6, a methionine-requiring auxotroph, led to inhibition of the rate of increase in optical density when the ratio of ethionine to methionine was 200:1. When the ratio was 600:1, the increase in optical density became linear. When ethionine was substituted for methionine in the medium, the optical density of the culture increased, and there was a parallel increase in protein content. There was no cell division in these cultures. The rate of synthesis of ribonucleic acid (RNA) in a culture containing ethionine was similar to that of a culture deprived of methionine, but the synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid in a culture with ethionine was about twice that of a culture deprived of methionine. No detectable radioactivity from ethionine-ethyl-1-C14 was incorporated into RNA. Ethionine-ethyl-1-C14 was readily incorporated into the protein fraction. PMID:14273646

  5. Structure of the Escherichia coli Phosphonate Binding Protein PhnD and Rationally Optimized Phosphonate Biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Alicea, Ismael; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Miklos, Aleksandr E.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2012-09-17

    The phnD gene of Escherichia coli encodes the periplasmic binding protein of the phosphonate (Pn) uptake and utilization pathway. We have crystallized and determined structures of E. coli PhnD (EcPhnD) in the absence of ligand and in complex with the environmentally abundant 2-aminoethylphosphonate (2AEP). Similar to other bacterial periplasmic binding proteins, 2AEP binds near the center of mass of EcPhnD in a cleft formed between two lobes. Comparison of the open, unliganded structure with the closed 2AEP-bound structure shows that the two lobes pivot around a hinge by {approx}70{sup o} between the two states. Extensive hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions stabilize 2AEP, which binds to EcPhnD with low nanomolar affinity. These structures provide insight into Pn uptake by bacteria and facilitated the rational design of high signal-to-noise Pn biosensors based on both coupled small-molecule dyes and autocatalytic fluorescent proteins.

  6. Independent mobility of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nenninger, Anja; Mastroianni, Giulia; Robson, Alexander; Lenn, Tchern; Xue, Quan; Leake, Mark C; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2014-06-01

    Fluidity is essential for many biological membrane functions. The basis for understanding membrane structure remains the classic Singer-Nicolson model, in which proteins are embedded within a fluid lipid bilayer and able to diffuse laterally within a sea of lipid. Here we report lipid and protein diffusion in the plasma membrane of live cells of the bacterium Escherichia coli, using Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to measure lateral diffusion coefficients. Lipid and protein mobility within the membrane were probed by visualizing an artificial fluorescent lipid and a simple model membrane protein consisting of a single membrane-spanning alpha-helix with a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) tag on the cytoplasmic side. The effective viscosity of the lipid bilayer is strongly temperature-dependent, as indicated by changes in the lipid diffusion coefficient. Surprisingly, the mobility of the model protein was unaffected by changes in the effective viscosity of the bulk lipid, and TIRF microscopy indicates that it clusters in segregated, mobile domains. We suggest that this segregation profoundly influences the physical behaviour of the protein in the membrane, with strong implications for bacterial membrane function and bacterial physiology. PMID:24735432

  7. Engineering formation of multiple recombinant Eut protein nanocompartments in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Held, Mark; Kolb, Alexander; Perdue, Sarah; Hsu, Szu-Yi; Bloch, Sarah E.; Quin, Maureen B.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of designed metabolic pathways within protein based nanocompartments has the potential to increase reaction efficiency in multi-step biosynthetic reactions. We previously demonstrated proof-of-concept of this aim by targeting a functional enzyme to single cellular protein nanocompartments, which were formed upon recombinant expression of the Salmonella enterica LT2 ethanolamine utilization bacterial microcompartment shell proteins EutS or EutSMNLK in Escherichia coli. To optimize this system, increasing overall encapsulated enzyme reaction efficiency, factor(s) required for the production of more than one nanocompartment per cell must be identified. In this work we report that the cupin domain protein EutQ is required for assembly of more than one nanocompartment per cell. Overexpression of EutQ results in multiple nanocompartment assembly in our recombinant system. EutQ specifically interacts with the shell protein EutM in vitro via electrostatic interactions with the putative cytosolic face of EutM. These findings lead to the theory that EutQ could facilitate multiple nanocompartment biogenesis by serving as an assembly hub for shell proteins. This work offers insights into the biogenesis of Eut bacterial microcompartments, and also provides an improved platform for the production of protein based nanocompartments for targeted encapsulation of enzyme pathways. PMID:27063436

  8. Engineering formation of multiple recombinant Eut protein nanocompartments in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Held, Mark; Kolb, Alexander; Perdue, Sarah; Hsu, Szu-Yi; Bloch, Sarah E; Quin, Maureen B; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of designed metabolic pathways within protein based nanocompartments has the potential to increase reaction efficiency in multi-step biosynthetic reactions. We previously demonstrated proof-of-concept of this aim by targeting a functional enzyme to single cellular protein nanocompartments, which were formed upon recombinant expression of the Salmonella enterica LT2 ethanolamine utilization bacterial microcompartment shell proteins EutS or EutSMNLK in Escherichia coli. To optimize this system, increasing overall encapsulated enzyme reaction efficiency, factor(s) required for the production of more than one nanocompartment per cell must be identified. In this work we report that the cupin domain protein EutQ is required for assembly of more than one nanocompartment per cell. Overexpression of EutQ results in multiple nanocompartment assembly in our recombinant system. EutQ specifically interacts with the shell protein EutM in vitro via electrostatic interactions with the putative cytosolic face of EutM. These findings lead to the theory that EutQ could facilitate multiple nanocompartment biogenesis by serving as an assembly hub for shell proteins. This work offers insights into the biogenesis of Eut bacterial microcompartments, and also provides an improved platform for the production of protein based nanocompartments for targeted encapsulation of enzyme pathways. PMID:27063436

  9. Pyrosequencing of mcrA and Archaeal 16S rRNA Genes Reveals Diversity and Substrate Preferences of Methanogen Communities in Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, David; Lu, Xiao-Ying; Shen, Zhiyong; Chen, Jiapeng

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea play a key role in biogas-producing anaerobic digestion and yet remain poorly taxonomically characterized. This is in part due to the limitations of low-throughput Sanger sequencing of a single (16S rRNA) gene, which in the past may have undersampled methanogen diversity. In this study, archaeal communities from three sludge digesters in Hong Kong and one wastewater digester in China were examined using high-throughput pyrosequencing of the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and 16S rRNA genes. Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanosarcinales were detected in each digester, indicating that both hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis was occurring. Two sludge digesters had similar community structures, likely due to their similar design and feedstock. Taxonomic classification of the mcrA genes suggested that these digesters were dominated by acetoclastic methanogens, particularly Methanosarcinales, while the other digesters were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The proposed euryarchaeotal order Methanomassiliicoccales and the uncultured WSA2 group were detected with the 16S rRNA gene, and potential mcrA genes for these groups were identified. 16S rRNA gene sequencing also recovered several crenarchaeotal groups potentially involved in the initial anaerobic digestion processes. Overall, the two genes produced different taxonomic profiles for the digesters, while greater methanogen richness was detected using the mcrA gene, supporting the use of this functional gene as a complement to the 16S rRNA gene to better assess methanogen diversity. A significant positive correlation was detected between methane production and the abundance of mcrA transcripts in digesters treating sludge and wastewater samples, supporting the mcrA gene as a biomarker for methane yield. PMID:25381241

  10. The product of gene secC is involved in the synthesis of exported proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Ferro-Novick, S; Honma, M; Beckwith, J

    1984-08-01

    To obtain additional mutants in the secretory apparatus of E. coli we have isolated suppressors of a mutant (secAts) that is temperature-sensitive for secretion. One of these, secC, can suppress the secretion defect of secA and has a phenotype of its own. At 23 degrees C, the secC mutant is cold-sensitive for growth and blocks the synthesis of transported proteins. The synthesis of at least one secreted protein, maltose-binding protein (MBP), can be restored by mutations that alter the hydrophobic region of the signal sequence of MBP. The phenotype of the secC mutant suggests that the SecC protein may be a component of the secretory apparatus of E. coli; it also supports the notion that in procaryotes secretion and gene expression are coupled. The secC gene maps at 68.5 minutes on the E. coli chromosome. PMID:6088066

  11. In vitro expression of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein genes: autogenous inhibition of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, J L; Arfsten, A E; Nomura, M

    1980-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L1 (0.5 micro M) was found to inhibit the synthesis of both proteins of the L11 operon, L11 and L1, but not the synthesis of other proteins directed by lambda rifd 18 DNA. Similarly, S4 (1 micro M) selectively inhibited the synthesis of three proteins of the alpha operon, S13, S11, and S4, directed by lambda spcI DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment obtained from this DNA. S8 (3.6 micro M) also showed preferential inhibitory effects on the synthesis of some proteins encoded in the spc operon, L24 and L5 (and probably S14 and S8), directed by lambda spcl DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment carrying the genes for these proteins. The inhibitory effect of L1 was observed only with L1 and not with other proteins examined, including S4 and S8. Similarly, the effect of S4 was not observed with L1 or S8, and that of S8 was not seen with L1 or S4. Inhibition was shown to take place at the level of translation rather than transcription. Thus, at least some ribosomal proteins (L1 S4, and S8) have the ability to cause selective translational inhibition of the synthesis of certain ribosomal proteins whose genes are in the same operon as their own. These results support the hypothesis that certain free ribosomal proteins not assembled into ribosomes act as "autogenous" feedback inhibitors to regulate the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:6445562

  12. Gut Commensal E. coli Proteins Activate Host Satiety Pathways following Nutrient-Induced Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Breton, Jonathan; Tennoune, Naouel; Lucas, Nicolas; Francois, Marie; Legrand, Romain; Jacquemot, Justine; Goichon, Alexis; Guérin, Charlène; Peltier, Johann; Pestel-Caron, Martine; Chan, Philippe; Vaudry, David; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Liénard, Fabienne; Pénicaud, Luc; Fioramonti, Xavier; Ebenezer, Ivor S; Hökfelt, Tomas; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2016-02-01

    The composition of gut microbiota has been associated with host metabolic phenotypes, but it is not known if gut bacteria may influence host appetite. Here we show that regular nutrient provision stabilizes exponential growth of E. coli, with the stationary phase occurring 20 min after nutrient supply accompanied by bacterial proteome changes, suggesting involvement of bacterial proteins in host satiety. Indeed, intestinal infusions of E. coli stationary phase proteins increased plasma PYY and their intraperitoneal injections suppressed acutely food intake and activated c-Fos in hypothalamic POMC neurons, while their repeated administrations reduced meal size. ClpB, a bacterial protein mimetic of α-MSH, was upregulated in the E. coli stationary phase, was detected in plasma proportional to ClpB DNA in feces, and stimulated firing rate of hypothalamic POMC neurons. Thus, these data show that bacterial proteins produced after nutrient-induced E. coli growth may signal meal termination. Furthermore, continuous exposure to E. coli proteins may influence long-term meal pattern. PMID:26621107

  13. Identification of enzymes and regulatory proteins in Escherichia coli that are oxidized under nitrogen, carbon, or phosphate starvation

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Yasuko; Berlett, Barbara S.; Stadtman, Earl R.; Aponte, Angel; Morgan, Meghan; Shen, Rong-Fong

    2007-01-01

    Using proteomic technologies, we identified 62 proteins that are oxidized to carbonyl derivatives during growth of Escherichia coli under nitrogen starvation (NS), carbon starvation (CS), and phosphate starvation (PS) conditions. The carbonylated proteins were converted to 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivatives and these were identified using Western blotting and mass spectrometry by searching E. coli proteins in the Swiss-Prot and/or NCBI databases. Fourteen of the oxidized proteins were formed under both NS and CS conditions, and only three proteins were specifically oxidized under PS conditions. Interestingly, the carbonyl content of proteins in crude extracts of cells harvested after 48 h of stationary growth under NS and CS was significantly lower than that observed at mid-log and end-log phases of growth. In contrast, the carbonyl content of proteins in extracts of cells grown under PS conditions was fairly constant during comparable periods of growth. PMID:18003895

  14. Export of the periplasmic maltose-binding protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bassford, P J

    1990-06-01

    The export of the maltose-binding protein (MBP), the malE gene product, to the periplasm of Escherichia coli cells has been extensively investigated. The isolation of strains synthesizing MalE-LacZ hybrid proteins led to a novel genetic selection for mutants that accumulate export-defective precursor MBP (preMBP) in the cytoplasm. The export defects were subsequently shown to result from alterations in the MBP signal peptide. Analysis of these and a variety of mutants obtained in other ways has provided considerable insight into the requirements for an optimally functional MBP signal peptide. This structure has been shown to have multiple roles in the export process, including promoting entry of preMBP into the export pathway and initiating MBP translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane. The latter has been shown to be a late event relative to synthesis and can occur entirely posttranslationally, even many minutes after the completion of synthesis. Translocation requires that the MBP polypeptide exist in an export-competent conformation that most likely represents an unfolded state that is not inhibitory to membrane transit. The signal peptide contributes to the export competence of preMBP by slowing the rate at which the attached mature moiety folds. In addition, preMBP folding is thought to be further retarded by the binding of a cytoplasmic protein, SecB, to the mature moiety of nascent preMBP. In cells lacking this antifolding factor, MBP export represents a race between delivery of newly synthesized, export-competent preMBP to the translocation machinery in the cytoplasmic membrane and folding of preMBP into an export-incompetent conformation. SecB is one of three E. coli proteins classified as "molecular chaperones" by their ability to stabilize precursor proteins for membrane translocation. PMID:2202725

  15. TiO2 photocatalysis damages lipids and proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Carré, Gaëlle; Hamon, Erwann; Ennahar, Saïd; Estner, Maxime; Lett, Marie-Claire; Horvatovich, Peter; Gies, Jean-Pierre; Keller, Valérie; Keller, Nicolas; Andre, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms of UV-A (315 to 400 nm) photocatalysis with titanium dioxide (TiO2) applied to the degradation of Escherichia coli and their effects on two key cellular components: lipids and proteins. The impact of TiO2 photocatalysis on E. coli survival was monitored by counting on agar plate and by assessing lipid peroxidation and performing proteomic analysis. We observed through malondialdehyde quantification that lipid peroxidation occurred during the photocatalytic process, and the addition of superoxide dismutase, which acts as a scavenger of the superoxide anion radical (O2·(-)), inhibited this effect by half, showing us that O2·(-) radicals participate in the photocatalytic antimicrobial effect. Qualitative analysis using two-dimensional electrophoresis allowed selection of proteins for which spot modifications were observed during the applied treatments. Two-dimensional electrophoresis highlighted that among the selected protein spots, 7 and 19 spots had already disappeared in the dark in the presence of 0.1 g/liter and 0.4 g/liter TiO2, respectively, which is accounted for by the cytotoxic effect of TiO2. Exposure to 30 min of UV-A radiation in the presence of 0.1 g/liter and 0.4 g/liter TiO2 increased the numbers of missing spots to 14 and 22, respectively. The proteins affected by photocatalytic oxidation were strongly heterogeneous in terms of location and functional category. We identified several porins, proteins implicated in stress response, in transport, and in bacterial metabolism. This study reveals the simultaneous effects of O2·(-) on lipid peroxidation and on the proteome during photocatalytic treatment and therefore contributes to a better understanding of molecular mechanisms in antibacterial photocatalytic treatment. PMID:24532071

  16. High Level Expression and Purification of Recombinant Proteins from Escherichia coli with AK-TAG

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dan; Wen, Caixia; Zhao, Rongchuan; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Xinxin; Cui, Jingjing; Liang, Joshua G.; Liang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (AK) from Escherichia coli was used as both solubility and affinity tag for recombinant protein production. When fused to the N-terminus of a target protein, an AK fusion protein could be expressed in soluble form and purified to near homogeneity in a single step from Blue-Sepherose via affinity elution with micromolar concentration of P1, P5- di (adenosine—5’) pentaphosphate (Ap5A), a transition-state substrate analog of AK. Unlike any other affinity tags, the level of a recombinant protein expression in soluble form and its yield of recovery during each purification step could be readily assessed by AK enzyme activity in near real time. Coupled to a His-Tag installed at the N-terminus and a thrombin cleavage site at the C terminus of AK, the streamlined method, here we dubbed AK-TAG, could also allow convenient expression and retrieval of a cleaved recombinant protein in high yield and purity via dual affinity purification steps. Thus AK-TAG is a new addition to the arsenal of existing affinity tags for recombinant protein expression and purification, and is particularly useful where soluble expression and high degree of purification are at stake. PMID:27214237

  17. Preparation and characterization of a novel chimeric protein VEGI-CTT in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jiping; Wei, Ruili; Cheng, Jinwei

    2008-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell growth inhibitor (VEGI) is a recently identified antiangiogenic cytokine that belongs to the TNF superfamily, and could effectively inhibit endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Synthetic peptide CTT (CTTHWGFTLC) has been found to suppress invasion and migration of both tumor and endothelial cells by potent and selective inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9. To prepare chimeric protein VEGI-CTT for more potent antitumor therapy, the recombinant expression vector pET-VEGI-CTT was constructed. This fusion protein was expressed in inclusion bodies in E. coli BL21 (DE3), and was refolded and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography using His-tag. Purified VEGI-CTT protein was characterized by proliferation assays of the endothelial cells and casein degradation assay in vitro. The results demonstrated that chimeric protein VEGI-CTT had a potent activity of antiangiogenesis through inhibiting the proliferation of endothelial cells, and could effectively reduce the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. The preliminarily in vivo study demonstrated that chimeric protein VEGI-CTT had more potent antitumor activity than VEGI and/or CTT peptide against CA46 human lymphoma xenografts in nude mice. Thus, these facts that are derived from the present study suggest that the chimeric protein VEGI-CTT may be used for tumor therapy in the future. PMID:18769489

  18. Strategies for successful recombinant expression of disulfide bond-dependent proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    de Marco, Ario

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are simple and cost effective hosts for producing recombinant proteins. However, their physiological features may limit their use for obtaining in native form proteins of some specific structural classes, such as for instance polypeptides that undergo extensive post-translational modifications. To some extent, also the production of proteins that depending on disulfide bridges for their stability has been considered difficult in E. coli. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms keep their cytoplasm reduced and, consequently, disulfide bond formation is impaired in this subcellular compartment. Disulfide bridges can stabilize protein structure and are often present in high abundance in secreted proteins. In eukaryotic cells such bonds are formed in the oxidizing environment of endoplasmic reticulum during the export process. Bacteria do not possess a similar specialized subcellular compartment, but they have both export systems and enzymatic activities aimed at the formation and at the quality control of disulfide bonds in the oxidizing periplasm. This article reviews the available strategies for exploiting the physiological mechanisms of bactera to produce properly folded disulfide-bonded proteins. PMID:19442264

  19. Reconstitution of Protein Translation of Mycobacterium Reveals Functional Conservation and Divergence with the Gram-Negative Bacterium Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Aashish; Asahara, Haruichi; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Haiying; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Chong, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Protein translation is essential for all bacteria pathogens. It has also been a major focus of structural and functional studies and an important target of antibiotics. Here we report our attempts to biochemically reconstitute mycobacterial protein translation in vitro from purified components. This mycobacterial translation system consists of individually purified recombinant translation factors from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), purified tRNAs and ribosomes from Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), and an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) mixture from the cell-extract of M. smegmatis. We demonstrate that such mycobacterial translation system was efficient in in vitro protein synthesis, and enabled functional comparisons of translational components between the gram-positive Mycobacterium and the gram-negative E. coli. Although mycobacterial translation factors and ribosomes were highly compatible with their E. coli counterparts, M. smegmatis tRNAs were not properly charged by the E. coli AARSs to allow efficient translation of a reporter. In contrast, both E. coli and M. smegmatis tRNAs exhibited similar activity with the semi-purified M. smegmatis AARSs mixture for in vitro translation. We further demonstrated the use of both mycobacterial and E. coli translation systems as comparative in vitro assays for small-molecule antibiotics that target protein translation. While mycobacterial and E. coli translation were both inhibited at the same IC50 by the antibiotic spectinomycin, mycobacterial translation was preferentially inhibited by the antibiotic tetracycline, suggesting that there may be structural differences at the antibiotic binding sites between the ribosomes of Mycobacterium and E. coli. Our results illustrate an alternative approach for antibiotic discovery and functional studies of protein translation in mycobacteria and possibly other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27564552

  20. Reconstitution of Protein Translation of Mycobacterium Reveals Functional Conservation and Divergence with the Gram-Negative Bacterium Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Aashish; Asahara, Haruichi; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Haiying; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Chong, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Protein translation is essential for all bacteria pathogens. It has also been a major focus of structural and functional studies and an important target of antibiotics. Here we report our attempts to biochemically reconstitute mycobacterial protein translation in vitro from purified components. This mycobacterial translation system consists of individually purified recombinant translation factors from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), purified tRNAs and ribosomes from Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), and an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) mixture from the cell-extract of M. smegmatis. We demonstrate that such mycobacterial translation system was efficient in in vitro protein synthesis, and enabled functional comparisons of translational components between the gram-positive Mycobacterium and the gram-negative E. coli. Although mycobacterial translation factors and ribosomes were highly compatible with their E. coli counterparts, M. smegmatis tRNAs were not properly charged by the E. coli AARSs to allow efficient translation of a reporter. In contrast, both E. coli and M. smegmatis tRNAs exhibited similar activity with the semi-purified M. smegmatis AARSs mixture for in vitro translation. We further demonstrated the use of both mycobacterial and E. coli translation systems as comparative in vitro assays for small-molecule antibiotics that target protein translation. While mycobacterial and E. coli translation were both inhibited at the same IC50 by the antibiotic spectinomycin, mycobacterial translation was preferentially inhibited by the antibiotic tetracycline, suggesting that there may be structural differences at the antibiotic binding sites between the ribosomes of Mycobacterium and E. coli. Our results illustrate an alternative approach for antibiotic discovery and functional studies of protein translation in mycobacteria and possibly other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27564552

  1. Novel quinolone resistance mutations of the Escherichia coli DNA gyrase A protein: enzymatic analysis of the mutant proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, P; Maxwell, A

    1991-01-01

    Using the techniques of gap misrepair mutagenesis and site-directed mutagenesis, we have generated two novel quinolone resistance mutations of the Escherichia coli DNA gyrase A protein. DNA sequencing showed these mutations to be Ser-83----Ala and Gln-106----Arg. The mutant proteins were overproduced and purified, and their enzymatic properties were analyzed and compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. With ciprofloxacin and other quinolones, the inhibition of DNA supercoiling, relaxation, and decatenation and the induction of DNA cleavage were investigated for both wild-type and mutant enzymes. In each assay, the mutant enzymes were found to require approximately 10 times more drug to inhibit the reaction or induce cleavage than was the wild-type enzyme. However, the Ca2(+)-directed DNA cleavage reaction was indistinguishable for wild-type and mutant gyrases. We discuss models for the gyrase-mediated bactericidal effects of quinolone drugs. Images PMID:1850970

  2. Construction and application of the vectors to identify genes encoding exported proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dong; Shen, Qinfang; Zhu, Junli; Liu, Jiangmei; Yuan, Jiajie; Tan, Shuang; Yu, Xuping

    2013-10-01

    In order to clone genes having signal sequences of Escherichia coli, four vectors with or without Lac or Ara promoter were constructed using a leaderless β-lactamase as reporter. Fragments of tetracycline resistance gene (Tet) with or without promoter were used to confirm the vectors' ability to clone and report signal sequences. The minimum inhibitory concentration of ampicillin of the transformants was measured to detect the expression and secretion efficiency of the vectors. The results showed that the β-lactamase could be co-expressed and secreted with Tet protein. The Lac or Ara promoter in the vectors could be regulated by different inducers, and the Ara promoter showed higher regulative efficiency than the Lac. The best induction dose of L-arabinose for the Ara promoter is 1.25 %. All the four vectors were stably maintained in host after being inoculated for 20 passages in antibiotics-free media. Genomic library of an avian pathogenic strain, E. coli O2, was constructed using the pMB-Ara-T vector we developed. 318 clones were obtained from the genomic library of E. coli strain O2, and the inserts in these clones represented 276 genes based on sequence analysis. Among the 276 cloned fragments, only 128 had complete promoter sequence. For the 128 fragments with promoter, only 27 could be expressed under LB culture condition without inducer, the other 101 were only expressed under induction. The results showed our constructed vectors could efficiently capture all kinds of exported protein genes in vitro, including the ones without promoter or with inactive promoter. PMID:24052231

  3. Biochemical properties and catalytic domain structure of the CcmH protein from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xue-Ming; Hong, Jing; Li, Hai-Yin; Lin, Dong-Hai; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2012-12-01

    In the Gram-negative bacterium of Escherichia coli, eight genes organized as a ccm operon (ccmABCDEFGH) are involved in the maturation of c-type cytochromes. The proteins encoded by the last three genes ccmFGH are believed to form a lyase complex functioning in the reduction of apocytochrome c and haem attachment. Among them, CcmH is a membrane-associated protein; its N-terminus is a catalytic domain with the active CXXC motif and the C-terminus is predicted as a TPR-like domain with unknown function. By using SCAM (scanning cysteine accessibility mutagenesis) and Gaussia luciferase fusion assays, we provide experimental evidence for the entire topological structure of E. coli CcmH. The mature CcmH is a periplasm-resident oxidoreductase anchored to the inner membrane by two transmembrane segments. Both N- and C-terminal domains are located and function in the periplasmic compartment. Moreover, the N-terminal domain forms a monomer in solution, while the C-terminal domain is a compact fold with helical structures. The NMR solution structure of the catalytic domain in reduced form exhibits mainly a three-helix bundle, providing further information for the redox mechanism. The redox potential suggests that CcmH exhibits a strong reductase that may function in the last step of reduction of apocytochrome c for haem attachment. PMID:22789558

  4. Binding of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli to RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Pinkney, M; Hoggett, J G

    1988-01-01

    Fluorescence polarization studies were used to study the interaction of a fluorescein-labelled conjugate of the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (F-CRP) and RNA polymerase. Under conditions of physiological ionic strength, F-CRP binds to RNA polymerase holoenzyme in a cyclic AMP-dependent manner; the dissociation constant was about 3 microM in the presence of cyclic AMP and about 100 microM in its absence. Binding to core RNA polymerase under the same conditions was weak (Kdiss. approx. 80-100 microM) and independent of cyclic AMP. Competition experiments established that native CRP and F-CRP compete for the same binding site on RNA polymerase holoenzyme and that the native protein binds about 3 times more strongly than does F-CRP. Analytical ultracentrifuge studies showed that CRP binds predominantly to the monomeric rather than the dimeric form of RNA polymerase. PMID:2839152

  5. Binding of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli to RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Pinkney, M; Hoggett, J G

    1988-03-15

    Fluorescence polarization studies were used to study the interaction of a fluorescein-labelled conjugate of the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (F-CRP) and RNA polymerase. Under conditions of physiological ionic strength, F-CRP binds to RNA polymerase holoenzyme in a cyclic AMP-dependent manner; the dissociation constant was about 3 microM in the presence of cyclic AMP and about 100 microM in its absence. Binding to core RNA polymerase under the same conditions was weak (Kdiss. approx. 80-100 microM) and independent of cyclic AMP. Competition experiments established that native CRP and F-CRP compete for the same binding site on RNA polymerase holoenzyme and that the native protein binds about 3 times more strongly than does F-CRP. Analytical ultracentrifuge studies showed that CRP binds predominantly to the monomeric rather than the dimeric form of RNA polymerase. PMID:2839152

  6. The Escherichia Coli Hfq Protein: An Unattended DNA-Transactions Regulator.

    PubMed

    Cech, Grzegorz M; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka; Kubiak, Krzysztof; Malabirade, Antoine; Grange, Wilfried; Arluison, Veronique; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The Hfq protein was discovered in Escherichia coli as a host factor for bacteriophage Qβ RNA replication. Subsequent studies indicated that Hfq is a pleiotropic regulator of bacterial gene expression. The regulatory role of Hfq is ascribed mainly to its function as an RNA-chaperone, facilitating interactions between bacterial non-coding RNA and its mRNA target. Thus, it modulates mRNA translation and stability. Nevertheless, Hfq is able to interact with DNA as well. Its role in the regulation of DNA-related processes has been demonstrated. In this mini-review, it is discussed how Hfq interacts with DNA and what is the role of this protein in regulation of DNA transactions. Particularly, Hfq has been demonstrated to be involved in the control of ColE1 plasmid DNA replication, transposition, and possibly also transcription. Possible mechanisms of these Hfq-mediated regulations are described and discussed. PMID:27517037

  7. Substrate-Protein Interactions of Type II NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Salewski, Johannes; Batista, Ana P; Sena, Filipa V; Millo, Diego; Zebger, Ingo; Pereira, Manuela M; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2016-05-17

    Type II NADH:quinone oxidoreductases (NDH-2s) are membrane proteins involved in respiratory chains and responsible for the maintenance of NADH/NAD(+) balance in cells. NDH-2s are the only enzymes with NADH dehydrogenase activity present in the respiratory chain of many pathogens, and thus, they were proposed as suitable targets for antimicrobial therapies. In addition, NDH-2s were also considered key players for the treatment of complex I-related neurodegenerative disorders. In this work, we explored substrate-protein interaction in NDH-2 from Escherichia coli (EcNDH-2) combining surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopic studies with electrochemical experiments, fluorescence spectroscopy assays, and quantum chemical calculations. Because of the specific stabilization of substrate complexes of EcNDH-2 immobilized on electrodes, it was possible to demonstrate the presence of two distinct substrate binding sites for NADH and the quinone and to identify a bound semiprotonated quinol as a catalytic intermediate. PMID:27109164

  8. Expression, purification, and characterization of human osteoclastic protein-tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domain in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huan; Sui, Yuan; Cui, Yue; Lin, Peng; Li, Wannan; Xing, Shu; Wang, Deli; Hu, Min; Fu, Xueqi

    2015-03-01

    Osteoclastic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-oc) is a structurally unique transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) that contains only a relatively small intracellular PTP catalytic domain, does not have an extracellular domain, and lacks a signal peptide proximal to the NH2 terminus. The present study reports the expression, purification, and characterization of the intracellular catalytic domain of PTP-oc (ΔPTP-oc). ΔPTP-oc was expressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion with a six-histidine tag and was purified via nickel affinity chromatography. When with para-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) as a substrate, ΔPTP-oc exhibited classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Its responses to temperature and ionic strength were similar to those of other PTPs. The optimal pH value of ΔPTP-oc is approximately 7.0, unlike other PTPs, whose optimal pH values are approximately 5.0. PMID:25462809

  9. The Escherichia Coli Hfq Protein: An Unattended DNA-Transactions Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Cech, Grzegorz M.; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka; Kubiak, Krzysztof; Malabirade, Antoine; Grange, Wilfried; Arluison, Veronique; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The Hfq protein was discovered in Escherichia coli as a host factor for bacteriophage Qβ RNA replication. Subsequent studies indicated that Hfq is a pleiotropic regulator of bacterial gene expression. The regulatory role of Hfq is ascribed mainly to its function as an RNA-chaperone, facilitating interactions between bacterial non-coding RNA and its mRNA target. Thus, it modulates mRNA translation and stability. Nevertheless, Hfq is able to interact with DNA as well. Its role in the regulation of DNA-related processes has been demonstrated. In this mini-review, it is discussed how Hfq interacts with DNA and what is the role of this protein in regulation of DNA transactions. Particularly, Hfq has been demonstrated to be involved in the control of ColE1 plasmid DNA replication, transposition, and possibly also transcription. Possible mechanisms of these Hfq-mediated regulations are described and discussed. PMID:27517037

  10. Crystal Structure of the Membrane Fusion Protein CusB from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Chih-Chia; Yang, Feng; Long, Feng; Reyon, Deepak; Routh, Mathew D.; Kuo, Dennis W.; Mokhtari, Adam K.; Van Ornam, Jonathan D.; Rabe, Katherine L.; Hoy, Julie A.; Lee, Young Jin; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Yu, Edward W.

    2010-03-29

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, frequently utilize tripartite efflux complexes belonging to the resistance-nodulation-division family to expel diverse toxic compounds from the cell. These systems contain a periplasmic membrane fusion protein (MFP) that is critical for substrate transport. We here present the x-ray structures of the CusB MFP from the copper/silver efflux system of E. coli. This is the first structure of any MFPs associated with heavy-metal efflux transporters. CusB bridges the inner-membrane efflux pump CusA and outer-membrane channel CusC to mediate resistance to Cu{sup +} and Ag{sup +} ions. Two distinct structures of the elongated molecules of CusB were found in the asymmetric unit of a single crystal, which suggests the flexible nature of this protein. Each protomer of CusB can be divided into four different domains, whereby the first three domains are mostly {beta}-strands and the last domain adopts an entirely helical architecture. Unlike other known structures of MFPs, the {alpha}-helical domain of CusB is folded into a three-helix bundle. This three-helix bundle presumably interacts with the periplasmic domain of CusC. The N- and C-termini of CusB form the first {beta}-strand domain, which is found to interact with the periplasmic domain of the CusA efflux pump. Atomic details of how this efflux protein binds Cu{sup +} and Ag{sup +} were revealed by the crystals of the CusB-Cu(I) and CusB-Ag(I) complexes. The structures indicate that CusB consists of multiple binding sites for these metal ions. These findings reveal novel structural features of an MFP in the resistance-nodulation-division efflux system and provide direct evidence that this protein specifically interacts with transported substrates.

  11. Protein Interactions and Regulation of EscA in Enterohemorrhagic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Nan; Sun, Wei-Sheng W.; Lu, Hui-Yin; Ng, Swee-Chuan; Liao, Ying-Shu; Syu, Wan-Jr

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) can lead to diarrhea with abdominal cramps and sometimes are complicated by severe hemolytic uremic syndrome. EHEC secretes effector proteins into host cells through a type III secretion system that is composed of proteins encoded by a chromosomal island, locus for the enterocyte effacement (LEE). EspA is the major component of the filamentous structure connecting the bacteria and the host's cells. Synthesis and secretion of EspA must be carefully controlled since the protein is prone to polymerize. CesAB, CesA2, and EscL have been identified as being able to interact with EspA. Furthermore, the intracellular level of EspA declines when cesAB, cesA2, and escL are individually deleted. Here, we report a LEE gene named l0033, which also affects the intracellular level of EspA. We renamed l0033 as escA since its counterpart in enteropathogenic E. coli has been recently described. Similar to CesAB, EscL, and CesA2, EscA interacts with EspA and enhances the protein stability of EspA. However, EscA is also able to interact with inner membrane-associated EscL, CesA2, and EscN, but not with cytoplasmic CesAB. In terms of gene organizations, escA locates in LEE3. Expression of EscA is faithfully regulated via Mpc, the first gene product of LEE3. Since Mpc is tightly regulated to low level, we suggest that EscA is highly synchronized and critical to the process of escorting EspA to its final destination. PMID:24454847

  12. Temperature- and medium-dependent secretion of proteins by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ebel, F; Deibel, C; Kresse, A U; Guzmán, C A; Chakraborty, T

    1996-01-01

    Infections due to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are responsible for severe diarrheal disease in humans and livestock, and these bacteria have recently emerged as a leading cause of renal failure in children. In this study, we have examined medium- and temperature-dependent production of secreted proteins from a STEC O26 serotype strain. Growth of bacteria in Luria broth led to the detection of secreted polypeptides of 104, 55, 54, and 37 kDa (p104, p55, p54, and p37, respectively). When grown in serum-free tissue culture medium, only p104, p37 and two additional polypeptides of 25 and 22 kDa (p25 and p22) were present in supernatant fluids. Production of these polypeptides was growth temperature dependent and induced in cultures grown at 37 degrees C. N-terminal amino acid sequencing revealed that p104 was homologous to the secreted p110 of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), and both proteins belong to a family of secreted proteins in pathogenic bacteria of which the immunoglobulin A protease of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the prototype. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of p55 and p54 were unique to the STEC strain, while p37 and p25 were found to be highly homologous to the similarly sized EspA and EspB proteins, previously detected in culture supernatants of EPEC. Molecular cloning and sequencing of STEC espB alleles from two different serotypes showed that the encoded polypeptides were about 80% homologous. A monoclonal antibody raised against STEC EspB also cross-reacted with its EPEC analog and allowed us to demonstrate medium- and temperature-dependent production of this important virulence factor in STEC and EPEC strains of differing serotypes. PMID:8890194

  13. Two distinct regions in the model protein Peb1 are critical for its heterologous transport out of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is frequently the first-choice host organism in expression of heterologous recombinant proteins in basic research as well as in production of commercial, therapeutic polypeptides. Especially the secretion of proteins into the culture medium of E. coli is advantageous compared to intracellular production due to the ease in recovery of the recombinant protein. Since E. coli naturally is a poor secretor of proteins, a few strategies for optimization of extracellular secretion have been described. We have previously reported efficient secretion of the diagnostically interesting model protein Peb1 of Campylobacter jejuni into the growth medium of Escherichia coli strain MKS12 (ΔfliCfliD). To generate a more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind this interesting heterologous secretion system with biotechnological implications, we here analyzed further the transport of Peb1 in the E. coli host. Results When mature Peb1 was expressed without its SecA-YEG -dependent signal sequence and without the putative signal peptidase II recognition sequence in E. coli MKS111ΔHBB lacking the flagellar secretion complex, the protein was found in the periplasm and growth medium which indicated a flagellum-independent translocation. We assessed the Peb1 secretion proficiency by an exhaustive search for transport-affecting regions using a transposition-based scanning mutagenesis strategy. Strikingly, insertion mutagenesis of only two segments, called TAR1 (residues 42 and 43) and TAR2 (residues 173 to 180), prevented Peb1 secretion individually. We confirmed the importance of TAR regions by subsequent site-specific mutagenesis and verified that the secretion deficiency of Peb1 mutants was not due to insolubility or aggregation of the proteins in the cytoplasm. We found by cell fractionation that the mutant proteins were present in the periplasm as well as in the cytoplasm of MKS12. Hence, mutagenesis of TAR regions did not affect export of

  14. Identification of Proteins Possibly Involved in Glucosinolate Metabolism in L. agilis R16 and E. coli VL8.

    PubMed

    Luang-In, Vijitra; Narbad, Arjan; Cebeci, Fatma; Bennett, Mark; Rossiter, John T

    2015-04-01

    This study was aimed to identify sinigrin-induced bacterial proteins potentially involved in the metabolism of glucosinolate in two glucosinolate-metabolising bacteria Lactobacillus agilis R16 and Escherichia coli VL8. Sinigrin (2 mM) was used to induce the proteins in both bacteria under anaerobic incubation for 8 h at 30 °C for L. agilis R16 and 37 °C for E. coli VL8 and the controls without sinigrin were performed. Allyl isothiocyanate and allyl nitrile as two degradation products of sinigrin were detected in sinigrin-induced cultures of L. agilis R16 (27% total products) and E. coli VL8 (38% total products) from a complete sinigrin degradation in 8 h for both bacteria. 2D gel electrophoresis was conducted to identify induced proteins with at least twofold increased abundance. Sinigrin-induced L. agilis R16 and the control produced 1561 and 1543 protein spots, respectively. For E. coli VL8, 1363 spots were detected in sinigrin-induced and 1354 spots in the control. A combination of distinct proteins and upregulated proteins of 32 and 35 spots in L. agilis R16 and E. coli VL8, respectively were detected upon sinigrin induction. Of these, 12 and 16 spots from each bacterium respectively were identified by LC-MS/MS. In both bacteria most of the identified proteins are involved in carbohydrate metabolism, oxidoreduction system and sugar transport while the minority belong to purine metabolism, hydrolysis, and proteolysis. This indicated that sinigrin induction led to the expressions of proteins with similar functions in both bacteria and these proteins may play a role in bacterial glucosinolate metabolism. PMID:25805049

  15. Proteome analysis for the global proteins in the jejunum tissues of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli -infected piglets.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Chen, Shuai; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Li, Tiejun; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a common cause of diarrhea in humans and livestock. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) combined with multidimensional liquid chromatography (LC) and MS analysis was used for screening the differentially expressed proteins in piglet jejunum after ETEC infection. Totally 1,897 proteins were identified with quantitative information in piglet jejunum. We identified 92 differentially expressed proteins in ETEC-induced diarrhea, of which 30 were up regulated and 62 down regulated. Most of the differentially expressed proteins were involved in intestinal function of binding, metabolic process, catalytic activity and immune responses. The inhibition of intestinal immune responses in the jejunum in ETEC-induced diarrhea was also validated by immunobloting and RT-PCR. Our study is the first attempt to analyze the protein profile of ETEC-infected piglets by quantitative proteomics, and our findings could provide valuable information with respect to better understanding the host response to ETEC infection. PMID:27157636

  16. Proteome analysis for the global proteins in the jejunum tissues of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli -infected piglets

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Chen, Shuai; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Li, Tiejun; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a common cause of diarrhea in humans and livestock. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) combined with multidimensional liquid chromatography (LC) and MS analysis was used for screening the differentially expressed proteins in piglet jejunum after ETEC infection. Totally 1,897 proteins were identified with quantitative information in piglet jejunum. We identified 92 differentially expressed proteins in ETEC-induced diarrhea, of which 30 were up regulated and 62 down regulated. Most of the differentially expressed proteins were involved in intestinal function of binding, metabolic process, catalytic activity and immune responses. The inhibition of intestinal immune responses in the jejunum in ETEC-induced diarrhea was also validated by immunobloting and RT-PCR. Our study is the first attempt to analyze the protein profile of ETEC-infected piglets by quantitative proteomics, and our findings could provide valuable information with respect to better understanding the host response to ETEC infection. PMID:27157636

  17. Periscope: quantitative prediction of soluble protein expression in the periplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chang, Catherine Ching Han; Li, Chen; Webb, Geoffrey I; Tey, BengTi; Song, Jiangning; Ramanan, Ramakrishnan Nagasundara

    2016-01-01

    Periplasmic expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli not only offers a much-simplified downstream purification process, but also enhances the probability of obtaining correctly folded and biologically active proteins. Different combinations of signal peptides and target proteins lead to different soluble protein expression levels, ranging from negligible to several grams per litre. Accurate algorithms for rational selection of promising candidates can serve as a powerful tool to complement with current trial-and-error approaches. Accordingly, proteomics studies can be conducted with greater efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Here, we developed a predictor with a two-stage architecture, to predict the real-valued expression level of target protein in the periplasm. The output of the first-stage support vector machine (SVM) classifier determines which second-stage support vector regression (SVR) classifier to be used. When tested on an independent test dataset, the predictor achieved an overall prediction accuracy of 78% and a Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.77. We further illustrate the relative importance of various features with respect to different models. The results indicate that the occurrence of dipeptide glutamine and aspartic acid is the most important feature for the classification model. Finally, we provide access to the implemented predictor through the Periscope webserver, freely accessible at http://lightning.med.monash.edu/periscope/. PMID:26931649

  18. Periscope: quantitative prediction of soluble protein expression in the periplasm of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Catherine Ching Han; Li, Chen; Webb, Geoffrey I.; Tey, BengTi; Song, Jiangning; Ramanan, Ramakrishnan Nagasundara

    2016-01-01

    Periplasmic expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli not only offers a much-simplified downstream purification process, but also enhances the probability of obtaining correctly folded and biologically active proteins. Different combinations of signal peptides and target proteins lead to different soluble protein expression levels, ranging from negligible to several grams per litre. Accurate algorithms for rational selection of promising candidates can serve as a powerful tool to complement with current trial-and-error approaches. Accordingly, proteomics studies can be conducted with greater efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Here, we developed a predictor with a two-stage architecture, to predict the real-valued expression level of target protein in the periplasm. The output of the first-stage support vector machine (SVM) classifier determines which second-stage support vector regression (SVR) classifier to be used. When tested on an independent test dataset, the predictor achieved an overall prediction accuracy of 78% and a Pearson’s correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.77. We further illustrate the relative importance of various features with respect to different models. The results indicate that the occurrence of dipeptide glutamine and aspartic acid is the most important feature for the classification model. Finally, we provide access to the implemented predictor through the Periscope webserver, freely accessible at http://lightning.med.monash.edu/periscope/. PMID:26931649

  19. A microscale method of protein extraction from bacteria: Interaction of Escherichia coli with cationic microparticles.

    PubMed

    Trefilov, Alexandru; Imendoerffer, Moritz; Sekot, Gerhard; Strobl, Florian; Jungbauer, Alois; Hahn, Rainer

    2015-08-10

    We developed a simple, highly selective, efficient method for extracting recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli. Our recombinant protein yield was equivalent to those obtained with high pressure homogenization, and did not require exposure to harsh thermal, chemical, or other potentially denaturing factors. We first ground conventional resin, designed for the exchange of small anions, into microparticles about 1μm in size. Then, these cationic microparticles were brought convectively into close contact with bacteria, and cell membranes were rapidly perforated, but solid cell structures were not disrupted. The released soluble components were adsorbed onto the cell wall associated microparticles or diffused directly into the supernatant. Consequently, the selective adsorption and desorption of acidic molecules is built into our extraction method, and replaces the equally effective subsequent capture on anion exchange media. Simultaneously to cell perforation flocculation was induced by the microparticles facilitating separation of cells yet after desorption of proteins with NaCl. Relative to high pressure homogenization, endogenous component release was reduced by up to three orders of magnitude, including DNA, endotoxins, and host cell proteins, particularly outer membrane protein, which indicates the presence of cell debris. PMID:25959169

  20. Levels of major proteins of Escherichia coli during growth at different temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Herendeen, S L; VanBogelen, R A; Neidhardt, F C

    1979-01-01

    The adaptation of Escherichia coli B/r to temperature was studied by measuring the levels of 133 proteins (comprising 70% of the cell's protein mass) during balanced growth in rich medium at seven temperatures from 13.5 to 46 degrees C. The growth rate of this strain in either rich or minimal medium varies as a simple function of temperature with an Arrhenius constant of approximately 13,500 cal (ca. 56,500 J) per mol from 23 to 37 degrees C, the so-called normal range; above and below this range the growth rate decreases sharply. Analysis of the detailed results indicates that (i) metabolic coordination within the normal (Arrhenius) range is largely achieved by modulation of enzyme activity rather than amount; (ii) the restricted growth that occurs outside this range is accompanied by marked changes in the levels of most of these proteins; (iii) a few proteins are thermometer-like in varying simply with temperature over the whole temperature range irrespective of the influence of temperature on cell growth; and (iv) the temperature response of half of the proteins can be predicted from current information on their metabolic role or from their variation in level in different media at 37 degrees C. PMID:156716

  1. Self-cycling operation increases productivity of recombinant protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Storms, Zachary J; Brown, Tobin; Sauvageau, Dominic; Cooper, David G

    2012-09-01

    Self-cycling fermentation (SCF), a cyclical, semi-continuous process that induces cell synchrony, was incorporated into a recombinant protein production scheme. Escherichia coli CY15050, a lac(-) mutant lysogenized with temperature-sensitive phage λ modified to over-express β-galactosidase, was used as a model system. The production scheme was divided into two de-coupled stages. The host cells were cultured under SCF operation in the first stage before being brought to a second stage where protein production was induced. In the first stage, the host strain demonstrated a stable cycling pattern immediately following the first cycle. This reproducible pattern was maintained over the course of the experiments and a significant degree of cell synchrony was obtained. By growing cells using SCF, productivity increased 50% and production time decreased by 40% compared to a batch culture under similar conditions. In addition, synchronized cultures induced from the end of a SCF cycle displayed shorter lysis times and a more complete culture-wide lysis than unsynchronized cultures. Finally, protein synthesis was influenced by the time at which the lytic phase was induced in the cell life cycle. For example, induction of a synchronized culture immediately prior to cell division resulted in the maximum protein productivity, suggesting protein production can be optimized with respect to the cell life cycle using SCF. PMID:22407770

  2. Prediction of recombinant protein overexpression in Escherichia coli using a machine learning based model (RPOLP).

    PubMed

    Habibi, Narjeskhatoon; Norouzi, Alireza; Mohd Hashim, Siti Z; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Samian, Razip

    2015-11-01

    Recombinant protein overexpression, an important biotechnological process, is ruled by complex biological rules which are mostly unknown, is in need of an intelligent algorithm so as to avoid resource-intensive lab-based trial and error experiments in order to determine the expression level of the recombinant protein. The purpose of this study is to propose a predictive model to estimate the level of recombinant protein overexpression for the first time in the literature using a machine learning approach based on the sequence, expression vector, and expression host. The expression host was confined to Escherichia coli which is the most popular bacterial host to overexpress recombinant proteins. To provide a handle to the problem, the overexpression level was categorized as low, medium and high. A set of features which were likely to affect the overexpression level was generated based on the known facts (e.g. gene length) and knowledge gathered from related literature. Then, a representative sub-set of features generated in the previous objective was determined using feature selection techniques. Finally a predictive model was developed using random forest classifier which was able to adequately classify the multi-class imbalanced small dataset constructed. The result showed that the predictive model provided a promising accuracy of 80% on average, in estimating the overexpression level of a recombinant protein. PMID:26476414

  3. Location and unusual membrane topology of the immunity protein of the Escherichia coli phage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, M J; Stierhof, Y D; Henning, U

    1993-01-01

    The immunity protein (Imm) encoded by the Escherichia coli phage T4 effects exclusion of phage superinfecting cells already infected with T4. The 83-residue polypeptide possesses two long lipophilic areas (from residues 3 to 32 and 37 to 65) interrupted by a hydrophilic stretch including two positively charged residues. The charge distribution of the protein very strongly suggested that it is a plasma membrane protein with the C terminus facing the periplasm. While it could be shown that the expected location was correct, fusions of Imm to alkaline phosphatase or beta-galactosidase showed that the C terminus was at the cytosolic side of the membrane. Also, concerning function, there was almost no structural specificity to this part of the protein. Even removal of the two positively charged residues did not completely abolish function. Evidence suggesting that Imm is associated with the membrane at specific sites is presented. It is proposed that Imm is localized to the membrane with the help of a receptor and that, therefore, it does not follow the established rules for the topology of other membrane proteins. The results also suggest that Imm acts indirectly, possibly by altering the conformation of a component of a phage DNA injection site. Images PMID:8331731

  4. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Ruano-Gallego, David; Álvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-09-18

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these "molecular syringes" for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells. PMID:26017572

  5. Overexpression of transport proteins improves the production of 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Xu, Jing; Jiang, Tongtong; Ge, Yongsheng; Liu, Pan; Zhang, Manman; Su, Zhiguo; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial transporters mediate the exchanges between intracellular and extracellular environments. Modification of transport route could be applied to speed up the metabolic reactions and promote the production of aimed compounds. Herein, lysine 2-monooxygenase (DavB) and δ-aminovaleramidase (DavA) were co-expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) to produce nylon-5 monomer 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine. Then, PP2911 (4-aminobutyrate transporter in Pseudomonas putida) and LysP (the lysine specific permease in E. coli) were overexpressed to promote 5-aminovalerate production using whole cells of recombinant E. coli. The constructed E. coli strain overexpressing transport proteins exhibited good 5-aminovalerate production performance and might serve as a promising biocatalyst for 5-aminovalerate production from l-lysine. This strategy not only shows an efficient process for the production of nylon monomers but also might be used in production of other chemicals. PMID:27510748

  6. Overexpression of transport proteins improves the production of 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhong; Xu, Jing; Jiang, Tongtong; Ge, Yongsheng; Liu, Pan; Zhang, Manman; Su, Zhiguo; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial transporters mediate the exchanges between intracellular and extracellular environments. Modification of transport route could be applied to speed up the metabolic reactions and promote the production of aimed compounds. Herein, lysine 2-monooxygenase (DavB) and δ-aminovaleramidase (DavA) were co-expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) to produce nylon-5 monomer 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine. Then, PP2911 (4-aminobutyrate transporter in Pseudomonas putida) and LysP (the lysine specific permease in E. coli) were overexpressed to promote 5-aminovalerate production using whole cells of recombinant E. coli. The constructed E. coli strain overexpressing transport proteins exhibited good 5-aminovalerate production performance and might serve as a promising biocatalyst for 5-aminovalerate production from l-lysine. This strategy not only shows an efficient process for the production of nylon monomers but also might be used in production of other chemicals. PMID:27510748

  7. The first global screening of protein substrates bearing protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine in E. coli and human mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangkyu; Chen, Yue; Luo, Hao; Wu, Andrew A.; Wilde, Michael; Schumacker, Paul T.; Zhao, Yingming

    2010-01-01

    Protein hydroxylation at proline and lysine residues is known to have important effects on cellular functions, such as the response to hypoxia. However, for protein hydroxylation at tyrosine residues (called protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (PB-DOPA) has not been carefully examined. Here we report the first proteomics screening of the PB-DOPA protein substrates and their sites in E. coli and human mitochondria by nano-LC/MS/MS and protein sequence alignment using the PTMap algorithm. Our study identified 67 novel PB-DOPA sites in 43 E. coli proteins, and 9 novel PB-DOPA sites in 7 proteins from HeLa mitochondria. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that the structured region is more favored than the unstructured regions of proteins for the PB-DOPA modification. The PB-DOPA substrates in E. coli were dominantly enriched in proteins associated with carbohydrate metabolism. Our study showed that PB-DOPA may be involved in regulation of the specific activity of certain evolutionarily conserved proteins such as superoxide dismutase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, suggesting the conserved nature of the modification among distant biological species. The substrate proteins identified in this study offer a rich source for hunting their regulatory enzymes, and for further characterization of the possible contributions of this modification to cellular physiology and human diseases. PMID:20818827

  8. The Escherichia coli Membrane Protein Insertase YidC Assists in the Biogenesis of Penicillin Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Borges, Anabela; de Keyzer, Jeanine; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Membrane proteins need to be properly inserted and folded in the membrane in order to perform a range of activities that are essential for the survival of bacteria. The Sec translocon and the YidC insertase are responsible for the insertion of the majority of proteins into the cytoplasmic membrane. YidC can act in combination with the Sec translocon in the insertion and folding of membrane proteins. However, YidC also functions as an insertase independently of the Sec translocon for so-called YidC-only substrates. In addition, YidC can act as a foldase and promote the proper assembly of membrane protein complexes. Here, we investigate the effect of Escherichia coli YidC depletion on the assembly of penicillin binding proteins (PBPs), which are involved in cell wall synthesis. YidC depletion does not affect the total amount of the specific cell division PBP3 (FtsI) in the membrane, but the amount of active PBP3, as assessed by substrate binding, is reduced 2-fold. A similar reduction in the amount of active PBP2 was observed, while the levels of active PBP1A/1B and PBP5 were essentially similar. PBP1B and PBP3 disappeared from higher-Mw bands upon YidC depletion, indicating that YidC might play a role in PBP complex formation. Taken together, our results suggest that the foldase activity of YidC can extend to the periplasmic domains of membrane proteins. IMPORTANCE This study addresses the role of the membrane protein insertase YidC in the biogenesis of penicillin binding proteins (PBPs). PBPs are proteins containing one transmembrane segment and a large periplasmic or extracellular domain, which are involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. We observe that in the absence of YidC, two critical PBPs are not correctly folded even though the total amount of protein in the membrane is not affected. Our findings extend the function of YidC as a foldase for membrane protein (complexes) to periplasmic domains of membrane proteins. PMID:25666136

  9. Methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) gene abundance correlates with activity measurements of methanogenic H2/CO2-enriched anaerobic biomass

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Rachel; Schauer-Gimenez, Anne; Bhattad, Ujwal; Kearney, Colleen; Struble, Craig A; Zitomer, Daniel; Maki, James S

    2014-01-01

    Biologically produced methane (CH4) from anaerobic digesters is a renewable alternative to fossil fuels, but digester failure can be a serious problem. Monitoring the microbial community within the digester could provide valuable information about process stability because this technology is dependent upon the metabolic processes of microorganisms. A healthy methanogenic community is critical for digester function and CH4 production. Methanogens can be surveyed and monitored using genes and transcripts of mcrA, which encodes the α subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase – the enzyme that catalyses the final step in methanogenesis. Using clone libraries and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we compared the diversity and abundance of mcrA genes and transcripts in four different methanogenic hydrogen/CO2 enrichment cultures to function, as measured by specific methanogenic activity (SMA) assays using H2/CO2. The mcrA gene copy number significantly correlated with CH4 production rates using H2/CO2, while correlations between mcrA transcript number and SMA were not significant. The DNA and cDNA clone libraries from all enrichments were distinctive but community diversity also did not correlate with SMA. Although hydrogenotrophic methanogens dominated these enrichments, the results indicate that this methodology should be applicable to monitoring other methanogenic communities in anaerobic digesters. Ultimately, this could lead to the engineering of digester microbial communities to produce more CH4 for use as renewable fuel. PMID:24320083

  10. Flagellar Cap Protein FliD Mediates Adherence of Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to Enterocyte Microvilli.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Suely C F; Luiz, Wilson B; Vieira, Mônica A M; Ferreira, Rita C C; Garcia, Bruna G; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Sampaio, Jorge L M; Ferreira, Luís C S; Gomes, Tânia A T

    2016-04-01

    The expression of flagella correlates with different aspects of bacterial pathogenicity, ranging from adherence to host cells to activation of inflammatory responses by the innate immune system. In the present study, we investigated the role of flagella in the adherence of an atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strain (serotype O51:H40) to human enterocytes. Accordingly, isogenic mutants deficient in flagellin (FliC), the flagellar structural subunit; the flagellar cap protein (FliD); or the MotAB proteins, involved in the control of flagellar motion, were generated and tested for binding to differentiated Caco-2 cells. Binding of the aEPEC strain to enterocytes was significantly impaired in strains with the fliCa nd fliD genes deleted, both of which could not form flagella on the bacterial surface. A nonmotile but flagellated MotAB mutant also showed impaired adhesion to Caco-2 cells. In accordance with these observations, adhesion of a EPEC strain 1711-4 to Caco-2 cells was drastically reduced after the treatment of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD. In addition, incubation of a EPEC bacteria with specific anti-FliD serum impaired binding to Caco-2 cells. Finally, incubation of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD, followed by immunolabeling, showed that the protein was specifically bound to the microvillus tips of differentiated Caco-2 cells. The a EPEC FliD or anti-FliD serum also reduced the adherence of prototype typical enteropathogenic, enterohemorrhagic, and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains to Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, our findings further strengthened the role of flagella in the adherence of a EPEC to human enterocytes and disclosed the relevant structural and functional involvement of FliD in the adhesion process. PMID:26831466

  11. Solitary BioY Proteins Mediate Biotin Transport into Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Kirsch, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters form a large group of vitamin uptake systems in prokaryotes. They are composed of highly diverse, substrate-specific, transmembrane proteins (S units), a ubiquitous transmembrane protein (T unit), and homo- or hetero-oligomeric ABC ATPases. Biotin transporters represent a special case of ECF-type systems. The majority of the biotin-specific S units (BioY) is known or predicted to interact with T units and ABC ATPases. About one-third of BioY proteins, however, are encoded in organisms lacking any recognizable T unit. This finding raises the question of whether these BioYs function as transporters in a solitary state, a feature ascribed to certain BioYs in the past. To address this question in living cells, an Escherichia coli K-12 derivative deficient in biotin synthesis and devoid of its endogenous high-affinity biotin transporter was constructed as a reference strain. This organism is particularly suited for this purpose because components of ECF transporters do not naturally occur in E. coli K-12. The double mutant was viable in media containing either high levels of biotin or a precursor of the downstream biosynthetic path. Importantly, it was nonviable on trace levels of biotin. Eight solitary bioY genes of proteobacterial origin were individually expressed in the reference strain. Each of the BioYs conferred biotin uptake activity on the recombinants, which was inferred from uptake assays with [3H]biotin and growth of the cells on trace levels of biotin. The results underscore that solitary BioY transports biotin across the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:23836870

  12. Calcium chloride made E. coli competent for uptake of extraneous DNA through overproduction of OmpC protein.

    PubMed

    Aich, Pulakesh; Patra, Monobesh; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Roy, Sourav Singha; Basu, Tarakdas

    2012-06-01

    In the standard method of transformation of Escherichia coli with extraneous DNA, cells are made competent for DNA uptake by incubating in ice-cold 100 mM CaCl(2). Analysis of the whole protein profile of CaCl(2)-treated E. coli cells by the techniques of one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, MALDI-MS and immunoprecipitation revealed overproduction of outer membrane proteins OmpC, OmpA and heat-shock protein GroEL. In parity, transformation efficiency of E. coli ompC mutant by plasmid pUC19 DNA was found to be about 40 % lower than that of the wild type strain. Moreover, in E. coli cells containing groEL-bearing plasmid, induction of GroEL caused simultaneous overproduction of OmpC. On the other hand, less OmpC was synthesized in E. coli groEL mutant compared to its wild type counterpart, by CaCl(2)-shock. From these results it can be suggested that in the process of CaCl(2)-mediated generation of competence, the heat-shock chaperone GroEL has specific role in DNA entry into the cell, possibly through the overproduced OmpC and OmpA porins. PMID:22562126

  13. Systematic Nomenclature for GGDEF and EAL Domain-Containing Cyclic Di-GMP Turnover Proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Regine; Galperin, Michael Y; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Gomelsky, Mark; Green, Jeffrey; Hughes, Kelly T; Jenal, Urs; Landini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, Escherichia coli has served as one of a few model bacterial species for studying cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling. The widely used E. coli K-12 laboratory strains possess 29 genes encoding proteins with GGDEF and/or EAL domains, which include 12 diguanylate cyclases (DGC), 13 c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDE), and 4 "degenerate" enzymatically inactive proteins. In addition, six new GGDEF and EAL (GGDEF/EAL) domain-encoding genes, which encode two DGCs and four PDEs, have recently been found in genomic analyses of commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains. As a group of researchers who have been studying the molecular mechanisms and the genomic basis of c-di-GMP signaling in E. coli, we now propose a general and systematic dgc and pde nomenclature for the enzymatically active GGDEF/EAL domain-encoding genes of this model species. This nomenclature is intuitive and easy to memorize, and it can also be applied to additional genes and proteins that might be discovered in various strains of E. coli in future studies. PMID:26148715

  14. Functional Heterogeneity of the UpaH Autotransporter Protein from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Allsopp, Luke P.; Beloin, Christophe; Moriel, Danilo Gomes; Totsika, Makrina; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is responsible for the majority of urinary tract infections (UTI). To cause a UTI, UPEC must adhere to the epithelial cells of the urinary tract and overcome the shear flow forces of urine. This function is mediated primarily by fimbrial adhesins, which mediate specific attachment to host cell receptors. Another group of adhesins that contributes to UPEC-mediated UTI is autotransporter (AT) proteins. AT proteins possess a range of virulence properties, such as adherence, aggregation, invasion, and biofilm formation. One recently characterized AT protein of UPEC is UpaH, a large adhesin-involved-in-diffuse-adherence (AIDA-I)-type AT protein that contributes to biofilm formation and bladder colonization. In this study we characterized a series of naturally occurring variants of UpaH. We demonstrate that extensive sequence variation exists within the passenger-encoding domain of UpaH variants from different UPEC strains. This sequence variation is associated with functional heterogeneity with respect to the ability of UpaH to mediate biofilm formation. In contrast, all of the UpaH variants examined retained a conserved ability to mediate binding to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Bioinformatic analysis of the UpaH passenger domain identified a conserved region (UpaHCR) and a hydrophobic region (UpaHHR). Deletion of these domains reduced biofilm formation but not the binding to ECM proteins. Despite variation in the upaH sequence, the transcription of upaH was repressed by a conserved mechanism involving the global regulator H-NS, and mutation of the hns gene relieved this repression. Overall, our findings shed new light on the regulation and functions of the UpaH AT protein. PMID:22904291

  15. Novel Host Proteins and Signaling Pathways in Enteropathogenic E. coli Pathogenesis Identified by Global Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Scott, Nichollas E; Trimble, William S; Foster, Leonard J; Finlay, B Brett

    2015-07-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to directly translocate effector proteins into host cells where they play a pivotal role in subverting host cell signaling needed for disease. However, our knowledge of how EPEC affects host protein phosphorylation is limited to a few individual protein studies. We employed a quantitative proteomics approach to globally map alterations in the host phosphoproteome during EPEC infection. By characterizing host phosphorylation events at various time points throughout infection, we examined how EPEC dynamically impacts the host phosphoproteome over time. This experimental setup also enabled identification of T3SS-dependent and -independent changes in host phosphorylation. Specifically, T3SS-regulated events affected various cellular processes that are known EPEC targets, including cytoskeletal organization, immune signaling, and intracellular trafficking. However, the involvement of phosphorylation in these events has thus far been poorly studied. We confirmed the MAPK family as an established key host player, showed its central role in signal transduction during EPEC infection, and extended the repertoire of known signaling hubs with previously unrecognized proteins, including TPD52, CIN85, EPHA2, and HSP27. We identified altered phosphorylation of known EPEC targets, such as cofilin, where the involvement of phosphorylation has so far been undefined, thus providing novel mechanistic insights into the roles of these proteins in EPEC infection. An overlap of regulated proteins, especially those that are cytoskeleton-associated, was observed when compared with the phosphoproteome of Shigella-infected cells. We determined the biological relevance of the phosphorylation of a novel protein in EPEC pathogenesis, septin-9 (SEPT9). Both siRNA knockdown and a phosphorylation-impaired SEPT9 mutant decreased bacterial adherence and EPEC-mediated cell death. In contrast, a phosphorylation

  16. Possible involvement of lipoic acid in binding protein-dependent transport systems in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Richarme, G

    1985-04-01

    We describe the properties of the binding protein dependent-transport of ribose, galactose, and maltose and of the lactose permease, and the phosphoenolpyruvate-glucose phosphotransferase transport systems in a strain of Escherichia coli which is deficient in the synthesis of lipoic acid, a cofactor involved in alpha-keto acid dehydrogenation. Such a strain can grow in the absence of lipoic acid in minimal medium supplemented with acetate and succinate. Although the lactose permease and the phosphoenolypyruvate-glucose phosphotransferase are not affected by lipoic acid deprivation, the binding protein-dependent transports are reduced by 70% in conditions of lipoic acid deprivation when compared with their activity in conditions of lipoic acid supply. The remaining transport is not affected by arsenate but is inhibited by the uncoupler carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone; however the lipoic acid-dependent transport is completely inhibited by arsenate and only weakly inhibited by carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone. The known inhibitor of alpha-keto acid dehydrogenases, 5-methoxyindole-2-carboxylic acid, completely inhibits all binding protein-dependent transports whether in conditions of lipoic supply or deprivation; the results suggest a possible relation between binding protein-dependent transport and alpha-keto acid dehydrogenases and shed light on the inhibition of these transports by arsenicals and uncouplers. PMID:3920206

  17. l-Arabinose Binding Protein from Escherichia coli B/r

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, R. W.; Englesberg, E.

    1969-01-01

    A protein which is capable of binding l-arabinose-1-14C has been isolated from l-arabinose-induced cultures of Escherichia coli B/r. Analysis for this l-arabinose-binding protein (ABP) in a number of l-arabinose-negative mutants suggests that the ABP is not coded for by any of the known genetic units of the l-arabinose complex yet is under the control of the regulator gene araC. The ABP has been purified and found to bind l-arabinose, d-fucose, d-xylose, and l-ribulose with decreasing affinities. The Km for l-arabinose is 5.7 × 10−6m. The molecular weight, as determined by equilibrium centrifugation, was found to be 32,000. The protein was observed to have many features that liken it to other recently isolated binding proteins that have been implicated in the active transport of small molecules. Images PMID:4899002

  18. A PLGA-encapsulated chimeric protein protects against adherence and toxicity of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Shahram; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Rasooli, Iraj; Hasannia, Sadegh; Pirooznia, Nazanin

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common cause of diarrhea among children. Colonization factors and enterotoxins are the major ETEC candidate vaccines. Since protection against ETEC mostly occurs by induction of IgA antibodies, much effort is focused on the development of oral vaccines. In this study oral immunogenicity of a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) encapsulated chimeric protein containing CfaB, CstH, CotA and LTB (Heat-labile B subunit) was investigated. The protein was encapsulated in PLGA by double emulsion method and nanoparticles were characterized physicochemically. Immunogenicity was assessed by evaluating IgG1, IgG2 and IgA titers after BALB/c mice vaccination. Non aggregated nanoparticles had a spherical shape with an average particle size of 252.7±23 nm and 91.96±4.4% of encapsulation efficiency. Western blotting showed maintenance of the molecular weight and antigenicity of the released protein. Oral immunization of mice induced serum IgG and fecal IgA antibody responses. Immunization induced protection against ETEC binding to Caco-2 cells. The effect of LT toxin on fluid accumulation in ileal loops was neutralized by inhibition of enterotoxin binding to GM1-ganglosides. Delivery of the chimeric protein in PLGA elicited both systemic and mucosal immune responses. The findings could be exploited to development of oral multi-component ETEC prophylactic measures. PMID:23906742

  19. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R; Middleton, Dorothy M; Loewen, Matthew E; Kidney, Beverly A; Simko, Elemir

    2015-04-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization. PMID:25852227

  20. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane

    PubMed Central

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y.; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R.; Middleton, Dorothy M.; Loewen, Matthew E.; Kidney, Beverly A.; Simko, Elemir

    2015-01-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization. PMID:25852227

  1. Escherichia coli Response to Uranyl Exposure at Low pH and Associated Protein Regulations

    PubMed Central

    Khemiri, Arbia; Carrière, Marie; Bremond, Nicolas; Ben Mlouka, Mohamed Amine; Coquet, Laurent; Llorens, Isabelle; Chapon, Virginie; Jouenne, Thierry; Cosette, Pascal; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of uranyl toxicity in bacteria is necessary to optimize strains for bioremediation purposes or for using bacteria as biodetectors for bioavailable uranyl. In this study, after different steps of optimization, Escherichia colicells were exposed to uranyl at low pH to minimize uranyl precipitation and to increase its bioavailability. Bacteria were adapted to mid acidic pH before exposure to 50 or 80 µM uranyl acetate for two hours at pH≈3. To evaluate the impact of uranium, growth in these conditions were compared and the same rates of cells survival were observed in control and uranyl exposed cultures. Additionally, this impact was analyzedby two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis proteomics to discover protein actors specifically present or accumulated in contact with uranium.Exposure to uranium resulted in differential accumulation of proteins associated with oxidative stress and in the accumulation of the NADH/quinone oxidoreductase WrbA. This FMN dependent protein performs obligate two-electron reduction of quinones, and may be involved in cells response to oxidative stress. Interestingly, this WrbA protein presents similarities with the chromate reductase from E. coli, which was shown to reduce uranyl in vitro. PMID:24587082

  2. Integrated bioprocess for the production and purification of recombinant proteins by affinity chromatography in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Beshay, Usama; Miksch, Gerhard; Friehs, Karl; Flaschel, Erwin

    2009-02-01

    In order to improve the effectiveness of the production of recombinant proteins in E. coli, integrated fermentation processes were developed. Therefore, expression vectors were constructed containing a strongly expressed gene for a beta-glucanase fused with a metal-chelating affinity tag and a leader peptide for directing the fusion protein into the periplasmic space. Its export into the medium was achieved by means of co-expression of a bacteriocin-release protein, the Kil protein from pColE1. Bioreactors were modified so that special devices containing metal chelate pentadentate chelator PDC resins were located within the bioreactor. Using the bioreactor with an internal device the Zn2+-PDC had a 4.3-fold higher binding capacity than metal-free PDC (12.3 and 2.6 kU ml(-1) PDC, respectively. Using the bioreactor with charged PDC in an external circuit revealed even higher beta-glucanase concentration (65.6 kU ml(-1)), i.e. 1.5-fold compared to the internal adsorbent system. PMID:18481103

  3. Nutrient-dependent methylation of a membrane-associated protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Young, C C; Alvarez, J D; Bernlohr, R W

    1990-01-01

    Starvation of a mid-log-phase culture of Escherichia coli B/r for nitrogen, phosphate, or carbon resulted in methylation of a membrane-associated protein of about 43,000 daltons (P-43) in the presence of chloramphenicol and [methyl-3H]methionine. The in vivo methylation reaction occurred with a doubling time of 2 to 5 min and was followed by a slower demethylation process. Addition of the missing nutrient to a starving culture immediately prevented further methylation of P-43. P-43 methylation is not related to the methylated chemotaxis proteins because P-43 is methylated in response to a different spectrum of nutrients and because P-43 is methylated on lysine residues. The characteristics of P-43 are similar to those of a methylated protein previously described in Bacillus subtilis and B. licheniformis (R. W. Bernlohr, A. L. Saha, C. C. Young, B. R. Toth, and K. J. Golden, J. Bacteriol. 170:4113-4118, 1988; K. J. Golden and R. W. Bernlohr, Mol. Gen. Genet. 220:1-7, 1989) and are consistent with the proposal that methylation of this protein functions in nutrient sensing. Images PMID:2203742

  4. The hexameric ring structure of the Escherichia coli RuvB branch migration protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ju; Yu, Xiong; Egelman, Edward H

    2002-06-01

    The RuvB protein is part of the homologous recombination machinery in prokaryotic cells. Many studies have shown that RuvB is organized into hexameric rings functioning as DNA pumps at Holliday junctions, using ATP hydrolysis to drive branch migration. Structures now exist for two RuvB proteins, as well as for several structurally homologous proteins, including the replication factor-C small subunit (RFCS). Two models for the possible hexameric organization of RuvB subunits have been proposed, based upon the hexameric structures of NSF and HslU, two AAA-ATPases involved in vesicle fusion and proteolysis, respectively. We have used electron microscopy to generate an improved three-dimensional reconstruction of the double hexamers formed by Escherichia coli RuvB on double-stranded DNA. We find that an atomic model of the hexameric RFCS provides a significantly better fit to the RuvB hexamer than do the models for RuvB generated from NSF and HslU. This suggests that there may be a highly conserved structure for many proteins involved in different aspects of DNA replication, recombination, transcription and repair. PMID:12054856

  5. Characterization of the knob domain of the adenovirus type 5 fiber protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, L J; Xia, D; Wilke, M E; Deisenhofer, J; Gerard, R D

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus fiber protein is used for attachment of the virus to a specific receptor on the cell surface. Structurally, the protein consists of a long, thin shaft that protrudes from the vertex of the virus capsid and terminates in a globular domain termed the knob. To verify that the knob is the domain which interacts with the cellular receptor, we have cloned and expressed the knob from adenovirus type 5 together with a single repeat of the shaft in Escherichia coli. The protein was purified by conventional chromatography and functionally characterized for its interaction with the adenovirus receptor. The recombinant knob domain bound about 4,700 sites per HeLa cell with an affinity of 3 x 10(9) M-1 and blocked adenovirus infection of human cells. Antibodies raised against the knob also blocked virus infection. By gel filtration and X-ray diffraction analysis of protein crystals, the knob was shown to consist of a homotrimer of 21-kDa subunits. The results confirm that the trimeric knob is the ligand for attachment to the adenovirus receptor. Images PMID:8035520

  6. Structure and Function of the Escherichia coli Tol-Pal Stator Protein TolR*

    PubMed Central

    Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Cutts, Erin; Kaminska, Renata; Papadakos, Grigorios; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Staunton, David; Robinson, Carol V.; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-01-01

    TolR is a 15-kDa inner membrane protein subunit of the Tol-Pal complex in Gram-negative bacteria, and its function is poorly understood. Tol-Pal is recruited to cell division sites where it is involved in maintaining the integrity of the outer membrane. TolR is related to MotB, the peptidoglycan (PG)-binding stator protein from the flagellum, suggesting it might serve a similar role in Tol-Pal. The only structure thus far reported for TolR is of the periplasmic domain from Haemophilus influenzae in which N- and C-terminal residues had been deleted (TolR(62–133), Escherichia coli numbering). H. influenzae TolR(62–133) is a symmetrical dimer with a large deep cleft at the dimer interface. Here, we present the 1.7-Å crystal structure of the intact periplasmic domain of E. coli TolR (TolR(36–142)). E. coli TolR(36–142) is also dimeric, but the architecture of the dimer is radically different from that of TolR(62–133) due to the intertwining of its N and C termini. TolR monomers are rotated ∼180° relative to each other as a result of this strand swapping, obliterating the putative PG-binding groove seen in TolR(62–133). We found that removal of the strand-swapped regions (TolR(60–133)) exposes cryptic PG binding activity that is absent in the full-length domain. We conclude that to function as a stator in the Tol-Pal complex dimeric TolR must undergo large scale structural remodeling reminiscent of that proposed for MotB, where the N- and C-terminal sequences unfold in order for the protein to both reach and bind the PG layer ∼90 Å away from the inner membrane. PMID:26354441

  7. Involvement of a periplasmic protein kinase in DNA strand break repair and homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Kamble, Vidya A; Mangoli, Suhas H; Apte, Shree K; Misra, Hari S

    2007-07-01

    The involvement of signal transduction in the repair of radiation-induced damage to DNA has been known in eukaryotes but remains understudied in bacteria. This article for the first time demonstrates a role for the periplasmic lipoprotein (YfgL) with protein kinase activity transducing a signal for DNA strand break repair in Escherichia coli. Purified YfgL protein showed physical as well as functional interaction with pyrroloquinoline-quinone in solution and the protein kinase activity of YfgL was strongly stimulated in the presence of pyrroloquinoline-quinone. Transgenic E. coli cells producing Deinococcus radiodurans pyrroloquinoline-quinone synthase showed nearly four log cycle improvement in UVC dark survival and 10-fold increases in gamma radiation resistance as compared with untransformed cells. Pyrroloquinoline-quinone enhanced the UV resistance of E. coli through the YfgL protein and required the active recombination repair proteins. The yfgL mutant showed higher sensitivity to UVC, mitomycin C and gamma radiation as compared with wild-type cells and showed a strong impairment in homologous DNA recombination. The mutant expressing an active YfgL in trans recovered the lost phenotypes to nearly wild-type levels. The results strongly suggest that the periplasmic phosphoquinolipoprotein kinase YfgL plays an important role in radiation-induced DNA strand break repair and homologous recombination in E. coli. PMID:17630970

  8. Construction of prokaryotic expression plasmid of mtrC protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and its expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxiang; Tu, Yating; Lin, Nengxing; Huang, Changzheng

    2005-01-01

    In order to provide a rational research basis for detection of resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to antimicrobial hydrophobic agents and study on the resistant mechanism of multiple transferable resistance (mtr) efflux system, plasmid pET-28a(+) encoding mtrC gene was constructed and the related target protein was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) DE3. The fragments of mtrC gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from the standard strains were amplified and cloned into prokaryotic expression plasmid pET-28a(+) with restriction endonuclease to construct recombinant pET-mtrC which was verified by restriction endonuclease and DNA sequencing. The recombinant was transformed into E. coli DE3 to express the protein mtrC induced by IPTG. The results showed mtrC DNA fragment was proved correct through restriction endonuclease and DNA sequencing. Its sequence was 99.5% homologus to that published on GeneBank (U14993). A 48.5 kD fusion protein which was induced by IPTG was detected by SDS-PAGE. It was concluded that the construction of prokaryotic expression plasmid of mtrC protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae was correct and the fusion protein was successively expressed in E. coli. PMID:16463681

  9. Tweedle cuticular protein BmCPT1 is involved in innate immunity by participating in recognition of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiubo; Wang, Ting; Xiang, Zhonghuai; He, Ningjia

    2015-03-01

    Bombyx mori, a lepidopteran insect, is one of the earliest models for pattern recognition of Gram-negative bacteria, which may induce the IMD pathway for production of antibacterial peptides. So far, several recognition proteins have been reported in B. mori. However, the connection between pattern recognition of Gram negative bacteria and activation of BmRelish1, a transcription factor controlled by the IMD pathway remains largely unknown. In the present study, we identify BmCPT1, a cuticle protein bearing a Tweedle domain. Its gene expression is co-regulated by NF-kappaB and juvenile hormone signals. BmCPT1 is induced by Escherichia coli in fat bodies and hemocytes, but is constitutively expressed in the epidermis. In vitro binding assays indicate that BmCPT1 protein recognizes and binds to E. coli peptidoglycan. Post-transcriptionally modified BmCPT1 in the hemolymph binds to E. coli cells through interactions with peptidoglycan recognition protein-5 (BmPGRP5) and lipopolysaccharide binding protein (BmLBP). Transgenic overexpression of BmCPT1 causes the upregulated expression of BmRelish1 and clear induction of two gloverin genes. Therefore, BmCPT1 may work along with BmPGRP-S5 and BmLBP to recognize E. coli in the hemolymph and indirectly activate BmRelish1 to induce antimicrobial peptide synthesis. PMID:25449127

  10. Activity of protein MalE (maltose-binding protein) fused to cytoplasmic and periplasmic regions of an Escherichia coli inner membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Dassa, E; Lambert, P

    1997-06-01

    We analysed the properties of mature MBP (maltose-binding protein or MalE protein) fused to an integral cytoplasmic membrane protein of Escherichia coli. Fusion of MalE to the first MalG periplasmic loop enabled a strain defective in the malE gene to utilize maltose. In contrast, fusion of MalE to a cytoplasmic loop did not complement the malE delta 444 deletion. We obtained results highly correlated with those obtained by using alkaline phosphatase as a reporter for the topology of MalG. We discuss the possibility of genetically determining the topology of cytoplasmic membrane proteins by a method based on engineered fusions to MBP. PMID:9765817

  11. Crystal structure analysis of c4763, a uropathogenic Escherichia coli-specific protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hun; Choi, Jongkeun; Kim, Doyoun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2015-08-01

    Urinary-tract infections (UTIs), which are some of the most common infectious diseases in humans, can cause sepsis and death without proper treatment. Therefore, it is necessary to understand their pathogenicity for proper diagnosis and therapeutics. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli, the major causative agents of UTIs, contain several genes that are absent in nonpathogenic strains and are therefore considered to be relevant to UTI pathogenicity. c4763 is one of the uropathogenic E. coli-specific proteins, but its function is unknown. To investigate the function of c4763 and its possible role in UTI pathogenicity, its crystal structure was determined at a resolution of 1.45 Å by a multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction method. c4763 is a homodimer with 129 residues in one subunit that contains a GGCT-like domain with five α-helices and seven β-strands. c4763 shows structural similarity to the C-terminal domain of allophanate hydrolase from Kluyveromyces lactis, which is involved in the degradation of urea. These results suggest that c4763 might be involved in the utilization of urea, which is necessary for bacterial survival in the urinary tract. Further biochemical and physiological investigation will elucidate its functional relevance in UTIs. PMID:26249697

  12. Spatial coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Männik, Jaan; Bailey, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    To successfully propagate, cells need to coordinate chromosomal replication and segregation with cell division to prevent formation of DNA-less cells and cells with damaged DNA. Here, we review molecular systems in Escherichia coli that are known to be involved in positioning the divisome and chromosome relative to each other. Interestingly, this well-studied micro-organism has several partially redundant mechanisms to achieve this task; none of which are essential. Some of these systems determine the localization of the divisome relative to chromosomes such as SlmA-dependent nucleoid occlusion, some localize the chromosome relative to the divisome such as DNA translocation by FtsK, and some are likely to act on both systems such as the Min system and newly described Ter linkage. Moreover, there is evidence that E. coli harbors other divisome-chromosome coordination systems in addition to those known. The review also discusses the minimal requirements of coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins needed for cell viability. Arguments are presented that cells can propagate without any dedicated coordination between their chromosomes and cell division machinery at the expense of lowered fitness. PMID:25926826

  13. Spatial coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Männik, Jaan; Bailey, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully propagate, cells need to coordinate chromosomal replication and segregation with cell division to prevent formation of DNA-less cells and cells with damaged DNA. Here, we review molecular systems in Escherichia coli that are known to be involved in positioning the divisome and chromosome relative to each other. Interestingly, this well-studied micro-organism has several partially redundant mechanisms to achieve this task; none of which are essential. Some of these systems determine the localization of the divisome relative to chromosomes such as SlmA-dependent nucleoid occlusion, some localize the chromosome relative to the divisome such as DNA translocation by FtsK, and some are likely to act on both systems such as the Min system and newly described Ter linkage. Moreover, there is evidence that E. coli harbors other divisome-chromosome coordination systems in addition to those known. The review also discusses the minimal requirements of coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins needed for cell viability. Arguments are presented that cells can propagate without any dedicated coordination between their chromosomes and cell division machinery at the expense of lowered fitness. PMID:25926826

  14. Correlation between penicillin-binding protein 2 mutations and carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamachika, Shinichiro; Sugihara, Chika; Kamai, Yasuki; Yamashita, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    It is well known that carbapenem-resistant mutations in penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are not observed in most Gram-negative bacteria under either clinical or experimental conditions. To understand the mechanisms involved in carbapenem resistance, this study constructed a mutS- and tolC-deficient Escherichia coli strain, which was expected to have elevated mutation frequencies and to lack drug efflux. Using this mutant, carbapenem-resistant strains with target mutations were successfully and efficiently isolated. The mutations T547I/A, M574I and G601D were identified in the PBP2 gene. Meropenem (MEPM)-resistant strains with the PBP2 T547I mutation showed fourfold increased resistance to 1-β-methyl-substituted carbapenems, such as doripenem, MEPM and biapenem, but not to non-substituted carbapenems such as imipenem and panipenem and other β-lactams. In addition, resistance resulting from the G601D mutation was limited to MEPM, whilst the M574I mutation conferred resistance to MEPM, imipenem and panipenem. This is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, that E. coli also has a carbapenem-resistance mechanism as a result of PBP2 mutations, and it provides insight into the resistance profiles of PBP2 mutations to carbapenems with and without the 1-β-methyl group. PMID:23222859

  15. Direct linking of metabolism and gene expression in the proline utilization A protein from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuzhen; Zhu, Weidong; Bellur, Padmanetra S.; Rewinkel, Dustin; Becker, Donald F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The control of gene expression by enzymes provides a direct pathway for cells to respond to fluctuations in metabolites and nutrients. One example is the proline utilization A (PutA) protein from Escherichia coli. PutA is a membrane-associated enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of L-proline to glutamate using a flavin containing proline dehydrogenase domain and a NAD+ dependent Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase domain. In some Gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli, PutA is also endowed with a ribbon-helix-helix DNA-binding domain and acts as a transcriptional repressor of the proline utilization genes. PutA switches between transcriptional repressor and enzymatic functions in response to proline availability. Molecular insights into the redox based mechanism of PutA functional switching from recent studies are reviewed. In addition, new results from cell-based transcription assays are presented which correlate PutA membrane localization with put gene expression levels. General membrane localization of PutA, however, is not sufficient to activate the put genes. PMID:18324349

  16. Crystal Structure of Escherichia Coli Rnk, a New RNA Polymerase-Interacting Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lamour, V.; Kuznedelov, K; Rutherford, S; Ramagopal, U; Gourse, R; Severinov, K; Darst, S

    2008-01-01

    Sequence-based searches identified a new family of genes in proteobacteria, named rnk, which shares high sequence similarity with the C-terminal domains of the Gre factors (GreA and GreB) and the Thermus/Deinococcus anti-Gre factor Gfh1. We solved the X-ray crystal structure of Escherichia coli regulator of nucleoside kinase (Rnk) at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution using the anomalous signal from the native protein. The Rnk structure strikingly resembles those of E. coli GreA and GreB and Thermus Gfh1, all of which are RNA polymerase (RNAP) secondary channel effectors and have a C-terminal domain belonging to the FKBP fold. Rnk, however, has a much shorter N-terminal coiled coil. Rnk does not stimulate transcript cleavage in vitro, nor does it reduce the lifetime of the complex formed by RNAP on promoters. We show that Rnk competes with the Gre factors and DksA (another RNAP secondary channel effector) for binding to RNAP in vitro, and although we found that the concentration of Rnk in vivo was much lower than that of DksA, it was similar to that of GreB, consistent with a potential regulatory role for Rnk as an anti-Gre factor.

  17. Potential Regulatory Interactions of Escherichia coli RraA Protein with DEAD-box Helicases*

    PubMed Central

    Pietras, Zbigniew; Hardwick, Steven W.; Swiezewski, Szymon; Luisi, Ben F.

    2013-01-01

    Members of the DEAD-box family of RNA helicases contribute to virtually every aspect of RNA metabolism, in organisms from all domains of life. Many of these helicases are constituents of multicomponent assemblies, and their interactions with partner proteins within the complexes underpin their activities and biological function. In Escherichia coli the DEAD-box helicase RhlB is a component of the multienzyme RNA degradosome assembly, and its interaction with the core ribonuclease RNase E boosts the ATP-dependent activity of the helicase. Earlier studies have identified the regulator of ribonuclease activity A (RraA) as a potential interaction partner of both RNase E and RhlB. We present structural and biochemical evidence showing how RraA can bind to, and modulate the activity of RhlB and another E. coli DEAD-box enzyme, SrmB. Crystallographic structures are presented of RraA in complex with a portion of the natively unstructured C-terminal tail of RhlB at 2.8-Å resolution, and in complex with the C-terminal RecA-like domain of SrmB at 2.9 Å. The models suggest two distinct mechanisms by which RraA might modulate the activity of these and potentially other helicases. PMID:24045937

  18. Display of membrane proteins on the heterologous caveolae carved by caveolin-1 in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jonghyeok; Jung, Young-Hun; Cho, Da-Hyeong; Park, Myungseo; Lee, Kyung Eun; Yang, Yoosoo; Jeong, Cherlhyun; Sung, Bong Hyun; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jin-Byung; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    Caveolae are membrane-budding structures that exist in many vertebrate cells. One of the important functions of caveolae is to form membrane curvature and endocytic vesicles. Recently, it was shown that caveolae-like structures were formed in Escherichia coli through the expression of caveolin-1. This interesting structure seems to be versatile for a variety of biotechnological applications. Targeting of heterologous proteins in the caveolae-like structure should be the first question to be addressed for this purpose. Here we show that membrane proteins co-expressed with caveolin-1 are embedded into the heterologous caveolae (h-caveolae), the cavaolae-like structures formed inside the cell. Two transmembrane SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins, Syntaxin 1a and vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2), were displayed on the h-caveolae surface. The size of the h-caveolae harboring the transmembrane proteins was ∼100 nm in diameter. The proteins were functional and faced outward on the h-caveolae. Multi-spanning transmembrane proteins FtsH and FeoB could be included in the h-caveolae, too. Furthermore, the recombinant E. coli cells were shown to endocytose substrate supplemented in the medium. These results provide a basis for exploiting the h-caveolae formed inside E. coli cells for future biotechnological applications. PMID:26320715

  19. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Proteins in Escherichia coli for Potential Use in a Human Malaria Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, James F.; Hockmeyer, Wayne T.; Gross, Mitchell; Ripley Ballou, W.; Wirtz, Robert A.; Trosper, James H.; Beaudoin, Richard L.; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Miller, Louis H.; Diggs, Carter L.; Rosenberg, Martin

    1985-05-01

    The circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum may be the most promising target for the development of a malaria vaccine. In this study, proteins composed of 16, 32, or 48 tandem copies of a tetrapeptide repeating sequence found in the CS protein were efficiently expressed in the bacterium Escherichia coli. When injected into mice, these recombinant products resulted in the production of high titers of antibodies that reacted with the authentic CS protein on live sporozoites and blocked sporozoite invasion of human hepatoma cells in vitro. These CS protein derivatives are therefore candidates for a human malaria vaccine.

  20. Rapid Identification of Protein Biomarkers of E. coli O157:H7 by MALDI-TOF-TOF Mass Spectrometry and Top-Down Proteomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified six protein biomarkers from two strains of E. coli O157:H7 and one non-pathogenic E. coli strain by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (TOF/TOF-MS/MS) and top-down proteomics. Mature, intact proteins were ext...

  1. Structure and Function of the E. coli Protein YmgB: a Protein Critical for Biofilm Formation and Acid-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jintae; Page, Rebecca; García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Palermino, Jeanne-Marie; Zhang, Xue-Song; Doshi, Ojus; Wood, Thomas K.; Peti, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gene cluster ymgABC was identified in transcriptome studies to play a role in biofilm development and stability. In this study we show that YmgB represses biofilm formation in rich medium containing glucose, decreases cellular motility, and protects the cell from acid indicating that YmgB plays a major role in acid-resistance in E. coli. Our data also shows that these phenotypes are potentially mediated through interactions with the important cell signal indole. In addition, gel shift assays suggest that YmgB may be a non-specific DNA-binding protein. Using nickel-enrichment DNA microarrays, we show that YmgB binds, either directly or indirectly via a second protein, genes important for biofilm formation. To advance our understanding of the function of YmgB, we used X-ray crystallography to solve the structure of the protein to 1.8 Å resolution. YmgB is a biological dimer that is structurally homologous to the E. coli gene regulatory protein Hha, despite its low sequence identity of only 5%. This supports our DNA microarray data that YmgB is a gene regulatory protein. Therefore, this protein, which clearly has a critical role in acid-resistance in E. coli, has been renamed as AriR for regulator of acid-resistance influenced by indole. PMID:17765265

  2. Separation of sublethal and lethal effects of the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, B A; Weiss, J; Elsbach, P

    1990-01-01

    Binding of the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI) of granulocytes to Escherichia coli promptly produces several discrete outer envelope alterations and growth arrest without major impairment of bacterial structure or biosynthetic capabilities, raising the question whether these early effects of BPI are sufficient to cause bacterial death. In this study, the bactericidal action of BPI was examined more closely. We have found that bovine or human serum albumin blocks bacterial killing without preventing BPI binding or an increase in outer membrane permeability. Moreover, addition of serum albumin after BPI results in growth resumption without displacement of bound BPI and without (early) repair of the envelope alterations. These effects are opposite to those produced by Mg2+ (80 mM), which displaces greater than 85% of bound BPI and rapidly initiates outer envelope repair without restoration of bacterial growth. The extent of rescue by serum albumin depends on the time and pH of preincubation of BPI with E. coli: e.g., for E. coli J5 treated with human BPI, t1/2 = 79 min at pH 7.4 and 10 min at pH 6.0. The serum albumin effects on BPI action are the same in wild-type E. coli and in a mutant strain lacking an activatable phospholipase, indicating that serum albumin does not act by sequestering membrane-damaging products of bacterial phospholipid hydrolysis. The progression from reversible to irreversible growth arrest, revealed by the subsequent addition of serum albumin at different times, is paralleled by a decrease in amino acid uptake and an increase in the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane to o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactoside. These findings demonstrate at least two stages in the action of BPI: (a) an early, reversible, sublethal stage in which BPI has effects on the outer envelope and causes growth arrest, and (b) time- and pH-dependent progression to a lethal stage, apparently involving cytoplasmic membrane damage, possibly caused by

  3. Identification and relative quantification of proteins in Escherichia coli proteome by "up-front" collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Arike, Liisa; Nahku, Ranno; Borrisova, Maria; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivu

    2010-01-01

    A method for identifying and quantifying proteins with relatively low-cost orthogonal acceleration time-of- flight mass spectrometry (oa-ToF-MS) was tested. Escherichia coli (E. coli) K12 MG1655 cell lysate was separated by 1D gel-electrophoresis; fractions were digested and separated fast and reproducibly by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). Peptides were identified using oa-ToF-MS to measure exact masses of parent ions and the fragment ions generated by up-front collision-induced dissociation. Fragmentation of all compounds was achieved by rapidly cycling between high- and low values of energy applied to ions. More than 100 proteins from E. coli K12 proteome were identified and relatively quantified. Results were found to correlate with transcriptome data determined by DNA microarrays. PMID:20212332

  4. Mutational activation of CheA, the protein kinase in the chemotaxis system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Tawa, P.; Stewart, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    In Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, appropriate changes of cell swimming patterns are mediated by CheA, an autophosphorylating histidine protein kinase whose activity is regulated by receptor/transducer proteins. The molecular mechanism underlying this regulation remains unelucidated but may involve CheA shifting between high-activity and low-activity conformations. We devised an in vivo screen to search for potential hyperkinase variants of CheA and used this screen to identify two cheA point mutations that cause the CheA protein to have elevated autokinase activity. Each point mutation resulted in alteration of proline 337. In vitro, CheA337PL and CheA337PS autophosphorylated significantly more rapidly than did wild-type CheA. This rate enhancement reflected the higher affinities of the mutant proteins for ATP and an increased rate constant for acquisition by CheA of the gamma-phosphoryl group of ATP within a kinetically defined CheA.ATP complex. In addition, the mutant proteins reacted with ADP more rapidly than did wild-type CheA. We considered the possibility that the mutations served to lock CheA into an activated signaling conformation; however, we found that both mutant proteins were regulated in a normal fashion by the transducer Tsr in the presence of CheW. We exploited the activated properties of one of these mutants to investigate whether the CheA subunits within a CheA dimer make equivalent contributions to the mechanism of trans phosphorylation. Our results indicate that CheA trans phosphorylation may involve active-site residues that are located both in cis and in trans to the autophosphorylation site and that the two protomers of a CheA dimer make nonequivalent contributions in determining the affinity of the ATP-binding site(s) of CheA. Images PMID:8021207

  5. The Crystal Structure of the Escherichia coli Autoinducer-2 Processing Protein LsrF

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Z.; Xavier, K; Miller, S

    2009-01-01

    Many bacteria produce and respond to the quorum sensing signal autoinducer-2 (AI-2). Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium are among the species with the lsr operon, an operon containing AI-2 transport and processing genes that are up regulated in response to AI-2. One of the Lsr proteins, LsrF, has been implicated in processing the phosphorylated form of AI-2. Here, we present the structure of LsrF, unliganded and in complex with two phospho-AI-2 analogues, ribose-5-phosphate and ribulose-5-phosphate. The crystal structure shows that LsrF is a decamer of (??)8-barrels that exhibit a previously unseen N-terminal domain swap and have high structural homology with aldolases that process phosphorylated sugars. Ligand binding sites and key catalytic residues are structurally conserved, strongly implicating LsrF as a class I aldolase.

  6. MreB-Dependent Organization of the E. coli Cytoplasmic Membrane Controls Membrane Protein Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Felix; Varadarajan, Aravindan; Lill, Holger; Peterman, Erwin J G; Bollen, Yves J M

    2016-03-01

    The functional organization of prokaryotic cell membranes, which is essential for many cellular processes, has been challenging to analyze due to the small size and nonflat geometry of bacterial cells. Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and three-dimensional quantitative analyses in live Escherichia coli to demonstrate that its cytoplasmic membrane contains microdomains with distinct physical properties. We show that the stability of these microdomains depends on the integrity of the MreB cytoskeletal network underneath the membrane. We explore how the interplay between cytoskeleton and membrane affects trans-membrane protein (TMP) diffusion and reveal that the mobility of the TMPs tested is subdiffusive, most likely caused by confinement of TMP mobility by the submembranous MreB network. Our findings demonstrate that the dynamic architecture of prokaryotic cell membranes is controlled by the MreB cytoskeleton and regulates the mobility of TMPs. PMID:26958890

  7. A long period grating-based platform for the detection of E. coli proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queirós, R. B.; Gouveia, C.; Fernandes, J. R. A.; Marques, P. V. S.; Noronha, J. P.; Sales, M. G. F.; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2013-11-01

    A Long Period Grating (LPG)-based platform for the detection of E. coli outer membranes proteins (EcOMPs) is presented. The sensing probe is achieved by the functionalization of a LPG inscribed in a single mode fiber (SMF28) with a DNA-aptamer resulting in a label-free configuration capable of specific recognize EcOMPs in waters. Measurement takes place by tracking the variations induced in the resonance wavelength by the refractive index changes at the fiber surface (≈100 nm/RIU). The sensing head was characterized and tested against EcOMPs and applied to spiked environmental water samples. The sensor displayed logarithmic responses in the range of 0.1 nM to 10 nM EcOMPs and is regenerated (under low pH conditions) and the deviation of the subsequent detection was less than 0.1 %.

  8. Expression of Escherichia coli virulence usher protein attenuates wild-type Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Suo, Zhiyong; Thornburg, Theresa; Holderness, Kathryn; Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Walters, Nancy; Kellerman, Laura; Loetterle, Linda; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W

    2012-01-01

    Generation of a live attenuated vaccine for bacterial pathogens often requires prior knowledge of the pathogen's virulence factors. We hypothesized an alternative approach of heterologous gene expression would make a wild-type (wt) pathogen more susceptible to host cell killing, thus, resulting in immunization. As proof of concept, the heterologous expression of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) was tested to attenuate Salmonella. The overexpression of CFA/I resulted in significant attenuation of wt Salmonella. In-depth studies revealed the attenuation depended on the co-expression of chaperone (CfaA) and usher (CfaC) proteins. Remarkably, the CfaAC-attenuated Salmonella conferred protection against wt Salmonella challenge. Mechanistic study indicated CfaAC made Salmonella outer membranes permeable, causing Salmonella to be vulnerable to host destruction. Thus, enhancing bacterial permeability via CfaAC represents an alternative method to attenuate pathogens despite the presence of unknown virulence factors. PMID:22286706

  9. Multiple sites of methylation in the methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Chelsky, D.; Dahlquist, F.W.

    1981-01-01

    The methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCP) of E coli show at least five bands when subjected to SDS-gel electrophoresis. The intensity of the individual bands varies depending on the environment of the cells before solubilization. The faster migrating bands are enhanced following attractant stimulation, whereas the slower migrating bands are enhanced following attractant dilution or repellent increase. The time scale of these intensity changes is similar to that for adaptation of the behavioral response in these cells suggesting that methylation of the MCP is involved in producing these bands. Peptide mapping experiments show three methylated peptides in both MCP I and MCP II. These results suggest multiple sites of methylation, which are responsible, at least in part, for the observed multiple bands of the MCPs.

  10. Aspirin augments the expression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli protein by suppression of IKKβ

    SciTech Connect

    Ashida, Noboru; Kishihata, Masako; Tien, Dat Nguyen; Kamei, Kaeko; Kimura, Takeshi; Yokode, Masayuki

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Clinical studies revealed aspirin inhibits cancer, but the mechanism is not known. • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a well-known tumor-suppressing gene. • We found aspirin up-regulates the protein of APC. • Aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, an essential kinase in NFκB activation. • The deletion of IKKβ significantly increases the expression of APC protein. - Abstract: Aspirin has been widely used as analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory medicine for long. In addition to these traditional effects, clinical studies suggest that aspirin can protect against cancer, but its mechanism has not been explored. To unveil it, we identified the proteins up- or down-regulated after incubation with aspirin by using proteomics analysis with Nano-flow LC/MALDI-TOF system. Interestingly, the analysis identified the protein of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) as one of the most up-regulated protein. APC regulates cell proliferation or angiogenesis, and is widely known as a tumor-suppressing gene which can cause colorectal cancer when it is mutated. Western blots confirmed this result, and real-time PCR indicated it is transcriptionally regulated. We further tried to elucidate the molecular mechanism with focusing on IKKβ. IKKβ is the essential kinase in activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), major transcriptional factors that regulate genes responsible for inflammation or immune response. Previous reports indicated that aspirin specifically inhibits IKKβ activity, and constitutively active form of IKKβ accelerates APC loss. We found that aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, and the deletion of IKKβ by siRNA increases the expression of APC in HEK294 cells. Finally, we observed similar effects of aspirin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results reveal that aspirin up-regulates the expression of APC via the suppression of IKKβ. This can be a mechanism how aspirin prevents cancer at

  11. High yield production of pigeon circovirus capsid protein in the E. coli by evaluating the key parameters needed for protein expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pigeon circovirus (PiCV) is considered to be a viral agent central to the development of young pigeon disease syndrome (YPDS). The Cap protein, a structural protein encoded by the cap (or C1) gene of PiCV, has been shown to be responsible for not only capsid assembly, but also has been used as antigen for detecting antibody when the host is infected with PiCV. The antigenic characteristics of the Cap protein potentially may allow the development of a detection kit that could be applied to control PiCV infection. However, poor expression and poor protein solubility have hampered the production of recombinant Cap protein in the bacteria. This study was undertaken to develop the optimal expression of recombinant full-length Cap protein of PiCV using an E. coli expression system. Results The PiCV cap gene was cloned and fused with different fusion partners including a His-tag, a GST-tag (glutathioine-S-transferase tag) and a Trx-His-tag (thioredoxin-His tag). The resulting constructs were then expressed after transformation into a number of different E. coli strains; these then had their protein expression evaluated. The expression of the recombinant Cap protein in E. coli was significantly increased when Cap protein was fused with either a GST-tag or a Trx-His tag rather than a His-tag. After various rare amino acid codons presented in the Cap protein were optimized to give the sequence rCapopt, the expression level of the GST-rCapopt in E. coli BL21(DE3) was further increased to a significant degree. The highest protein expression level of GST-rCapopt obtained was 394.27 ± 26.1 mg/L per liter using the E. coli strain BL21(DE3)-pLysS. Moreover, approximately 74.5% of the expressed GST-rCapopt was in soluble form, which is higher than the soluble Trx-His-rCapopt expressed using the BL21(DE3)-pLysS strain. After purification using a GST affinity column combined with ion-exchange chromatography, the purified recombinant GST-rCapopt protein was found to

  12. Mechanosensitive channels of Escherichia coli: the MscL gene, protein, and activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukharev, S. I.; Blount, P.; Martinac, B.; Kung, C.

    1997-01-01

    Although mechanosensory responses are ubiquitous and diverse, the molecular bases of mechanosensation in most cases remain mysterious MscL, a mechanosensitive channel of large conductance of Escherichia coli and its bacterial homologues are the first and currently only channel molecules shown to directly sense mechanical stretch of the membrane. In response to the tension conveyed via the lipid bilayer, MscL increases its open probability by several orders of magnitude. In the present review we describe the identification, cloning, and first sets of biophysical and structural data on this simplest mechanosensory molecule. We discovered a 2.5-ns mechanosensitive conductance in giant E. coli spheroplasts. Using chromatographies to enrich the target and patch clamp to assay the channel activity in liposome-reconstituted fractions, we identified the MscL protein and cloned the mscL gene. MscL comprises 136 amino acid residues (15 kDa), with two highly hydrophobic regions, and resides in the inner membrane of the bacterium. PhoA-fusion experiments indicate that the protein spans the membrane twice with both termini in the cytoplasm. Spectroscopic techniques show that it is highly helical. Expression of MscL tandems and covalent cross-linking suggest that the active channel complex is a homo-hexamer. We have identified several residues, which when deleted or substituted, affect channel kinetics or mechanosensitivity. Although unique when discovered, highly conserved MscL homologues in both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria have been found, suggesting their ubiquitous importance among bacteria.

  13. High Throughput Quantitative Expression Screening and Purification Applied to Recombinant Disulfide-rich Venom Proteins Produced in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Saez, Natalie J.; Nozach, Hervé; Blemont, Marilyne; Vincentelli, Renaud

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most widely used expression system for the production of recombinant proteins for structural and functional studies. However, purifying proteins is sometimes challenging since many proteins are expressed in an insoluble form. When working with difficult or multiple targets it is therefore recommended to use high throughput (HTP) protein expression screening on a small scale (1-4 ml cultures) to quickly identify conditions for soluble expression. To cope with the various structural genomics programs of the lab, a quantitative (within a range of 0.1-100 mg/L culture of recombinant protein) and HTP protein expression screening protocol was implemented and validated on thousands of proteins. The protocols were automated with the use of a liquid handling robot but can also be performed manually without specialized equipment. Disulfide-rich venom proteins are gaining increasing recognition for their potential as therapeutic drug leads. They can be highly potent and selective, but their complex disulfide bond networks make them challenging to produce. As a member of the FP7 European Venomics project (www.venomics.eu), our challenge is to develop successful production strategies with the aim of producing thousands of novel venom proteins for functional characterization. Aided by the redox properties of disulfide bond isomerase DsbC, we adapted our HTP production pipeline for the expression of oxidized, functional venom peptides in the E. coli cytoplasm. The protocols are also applicable to the production of diverse disulfide-rich proteins. Here we demonstrate our pipeline applied to the production of animal venom proteins. With the protocols described herein it is likely that soluble disulfide-rich proteins will be obtained in as little as a week. Even from a small scale, there is the potential to use the purified proteins for validating the oxidation state by mass spectrometry, for characterization in pilot studies, or for sensitive

  14. Heat-Shock Response Transcriptional Program Enables High-Yield and High-Quality Recombinant Protein Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthesis of soluble, properly folded recombinant proteins in large quantities from Escherichia coli is desirable for academic research and industrial protein production. The basal E. coli protein homeostasis (proteostasis) network capacity is often insufficient to efficiently fold overexpressed proteins. Herein we demonstrate that a transcriptionally reprogrammed E. coli proteostasis network is generally superior for producing soluble, folded, and functional recombinant proteins. Reprogramming is accomplished by overexpressing a negative feedback deficient heat-shock response transcription factor before and during overexpression of the protein-of-interest. The advantage of transcriptional reprogramming versus simply overexpressing select proteostasis network components (e.g., chaperones and co-chaperones, which has been explored previously) is that a large number of proteostasis network components are upregulated at their evolved stoichiometry, thus maintaining the system capabilities of the proteostasis network that are currently incompletely understood. Transcriptional proteostasis network reprogramming mediated by stress-responsive signaling in the absence of stress should also be useful for protein production in other cells. PMID:25051296

  15. The Role of Protein-Ligand Contacts in Allosteric Regulation of the Escherichia coli Catabolite Activator Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Philip D.; Rodgers, Thomas L.; Glover, Laura C.; Korhonen, Heidi J.; Richards, Shane A.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark R.; Hodgson, David R. W.; McLeish, Tom C. B.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distant site. Both experimental and theoretical evidence demonstrate that allostery can be communicated through altered slow relaxation protein dynamics without conformational change. The catabolite activator protein (CAP) of Escherichia coli is an exemplar for the analysis of such entropically driven allostery. Negative allostery in CAP occurs between identical cAMP binding sites. Changes to the cAMP-binding pocket can therefore impact the allosteric properties of CAP. Here we demonstrate, through a combination of coarse-grained modeling, isothermal calorimetry, and structural analysis, that decreasing the affinity of CAP for cAMP enhances negative cooperativity through an entropic penalty for ligand binding. The use of variant cAMP ligands indicates the data are not explained by structural heterogeneity between protein mutants. We observe computationally that altered interaction strength between CAP and cAMP variously modifies the change in allosteric cooperativity due to second site CAP mutations. As the degree of correlated motion between the cAMP-contacting site and a second site on CAP increases, there is a tendency for computed double mutations at these sites to drive CAP toward noncooperativity. Naturally occurring pairs of covarying residues in CAP do not display this tendency, suggesting a selection pressure to fine tune allostery on changes to the CAP ligand-binding pocket without a drive to a noncooperative state. In general, we hypothesize an evolutionary selection pressure to retain slow relaxation dynamics-induced allostery in proteins in which evolution of the ligand-binding site is occurring. PMID:26187469

  16. Composite sequence proteomic analysis of protein biomarkers of Campylobacter coli, C. lari and C. concisus for bacterial identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins biomarkers observed in the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectra (MALDI-TOF-MS) of cell lysates of three strains of Campylobacter coli, two strains of C. lari and one strain of C. concisus have been identified by "bottom-up" proteomic techniques. The signif...

  17. "In Vitro" Synthesis and Activity of Reporter Proteins in an "Escherichia coli" S30 Extract System: An Undergraduate Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Pamela J.

    2005-01-01

    This undergraduate laboratory experiment integrates multiple techniques ("in vitro" synthesis, enzyme assays, Western blotting) to determine the production and detection sensitivity of two common reporter proteins (beta-galactosidase and luciferase) within an "Escherichia coli" S30 transcription/translation extract. Comparison of the data suggests…

  18. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integration Protein Expressed in Escherichia Coli Possesses Selective DNA Cleaving Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Paula A.; Fyfe, James A.

    1990-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integration protein, a potential target for selective antiviral therapy, was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, free of detectable contaminating endonucleases, selectively cleaved double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that mimic the U3 and the U5 termini of linear HIV DNA. Two nucleotides were removed from the 3' ends of both the U5 plus strand and the U3 minus strand; in both cases, cleavage was adjacent to a conserved CA dinucleotide. The reaction was metal-ion dependent, with a preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+. Reaction selectivity was further demonstrated by the lack of cleavage of an HIV U5 substrate on the complementary (minus) strand, an analogous substrate that mimics the U3 terminus of an avian retrovirus, and an HIV U5 substrate in which the conserved CA dinucleotide was replaced with a TA dinucleotide. Such an integration protein-mediated cleavage reaction is expected to occur as part of the integration event in the retroviral life cycle, in which a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome is inserted into the host cell DNA.

  19. Evidence for two interconverting protein isomers in the methotrexate complex of dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Falzone, C.J.; Benkovic, S.J. ); Wright, P.E. )

    1991-02-26

    Two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR methods and a knowledge of the X-ray crystal structure have been used to make resonance assignments for the amino acid side chains of dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli complexed with methotrexate. The H7 proton on the pteridine ring of methotrexate was found to have NOEs to the methyl protons of Leu-28 which were assigned by using the L28F mutant. These NOEs indicated that the orientation of the methotrexate pteridine ring is similar in both solution and crystal structures. During the initial assignment process, it became evident that many of the resonances in this complex, unlike those of the folate complex, are severally broadened or doubled. The observation of two distinct sets of resonances in a ratio of approximately 2:1 was attributed to the presence of two protein isomers. Many of the side chains with clearly doubled resonances were located in the {beta}-sheet and the active site. Preliminary studies on the apoprotein also revealed doubled resonances in the absence of the inhibitor, indicating the existence of the protein isomers prior to methotrexate binding. In contrast to the methotrexate complex, the binary complex with folate and the ternary MTX-NADPH-DHFR complex presented a single enzyme form. These results are proposed to reflect the ability of folate and NADPH to bind predominantly to one protein isomer.

  20. Cloning, expression, and antigenic characterization of recombinant protein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rocha, T S; Tramuta, C; Catania, S; Matucci, A; Giuffrida, M G; Baro, C; Profiti, M; Bertolotti, L; Rosati, S

    2015-04-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a member of the most important avian mycoplasmas, causing chronic respiratory disease in chickens and leading to important economic losses in the poultry industry. Recombinant technology represents a strategic approach used to achieve highly reliable and specific diagnostic tests in veterinary diseases control: in particular this aspect is crucial for confirming mycoplasma infection and for maintaining mycoplasma-free breeder flocks. In this study, we identified a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (i.e., E2) protein by 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), characterized it in immunoblotting assays, and analyzed its recombinant (r-E2) in a rec-ELISA test. For full-length protein expression in Escherichia coli (EC) a point mutation was introduced. A rabbit antiserum produced against r-E2 was tested in a Western Blot using different samples of Mycoplasma species. The results showed the applicability of site-directed mutagenesis, with a good yield of the r-E2 after purification. Also, anti-E2 serum reacted with all the tested MG strains showing no cross reaction with other mycoplasmas. The developed E2 ELISA test was capable of detecting MG antibodies in the sera examined. Those results demonstrate the antigenic stability of the E2 protein which could represent a recombinant antigen with potential diagnostic applications. PMID:25667423

  1. Structure and Mechanisms of a Protein-Based Organelle in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Shiho; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2010-08-18

    Many bacterial cells contain proteinaceous microcompartments that act as simple organelles by sequestering specific metabolic processes involving volatile or toxic metabolites. Here we report the three-dimensional (3D) crystal structures, with resolutions between 1.65 and 2.5 angstroms, of the four homologous proteins (EutS, EutL, EutK, and EutM) that are thought to be the major shell constituents of a functionally complex ethanolamine utilization (Eut) microcompartment. The Eut microcompartment is used to sequester the metabolism of ethanolamine in bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. The four Eut shell proteins share an overall similar 3D fold, but they have distinguishing structural features that help explain the specific roles they play in the microcompartment. For example, EutL undergoes a conformational change that is probably involved in gating molecular transport through shell protein pores, whereas structural evidence suggests that EutK might bind a nucleic acid component. Together these structures give mechanistic insight into bacterial microcompartments.

  2. Optimization of expression and purification of HSPA6 protein from Camelus dromedarius in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ajamaluddin; Alsenaidy, Abdulrahman M; Elrobh, Mohamed; Khan, Wajahatullah; Alanazi, Mohammed S; Bazzi, Mohammad D

    2016-05-01

    The HSPA6, one of the members of large family of HSP70, is significantly up-regulated and has been targeted as a biomarker of cellular stress in several studies. Herein, conditions were optimized to increase the yield of recombinant camel HSPA6 protein in its native state, primarily focusing on the optimization of upstream processing parameters that lead to an increase in the specific as well as volumetric yield of the protein. The results showed that the production of cHSPA6 was increased proportionally with increased incubation temperature up to 37 °C. Induction with 10 μM IPTG was sufficient to induce the expression of cHSPA6 which was 100 times less than normally used IPTG concentration. Furthermore, the results indicate that induction during early to late exponential phase produced relatively high levels of cHSPA6 in soluble form. In addition, 5 h of post-induction incubation was found to be optimal to produce folded cHSPA6 with higher specific and volumetric yield. Subsequently, highly pure and homogenous cHSPA6 preparation was obtained using metal affinity and size exclusion chromatography. Taken together, the results showed successful production of electrophoretically pure recombinant HSPA6 protein from Camelus dromedarius in Escherichia coli in milligram quantities from shake flask liquid culture. PMID:27081368

  3. Solvent accessibility and purifying selection within proteins of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, C D; Townsend, J P; Hartl, D L

    2000-02-01

    The neutral theory of molecular evolution predicts that variation within species is inversely related to the strength of purifying selection, but the strength of purifying selection itself must be related to physical constraints imposed by protein folding and function. In this paper, we analyzed five enzymes for which polymorphic sequence variation within Escherichia coli and/or Salmonella enterica was available, along with a protein structure. Single and multivariate logistic regression models are presented that evaluate amino acid size, physicochemical properties, solvent accessibility, and secondary structure as predictors of polymorphism. A model that contains a positive coefficient of association between polymorphism and solvent accessibility and separate intercepts for each secondary-structure element is sufficient to explain the observed variation in polymorphism between sites. The model predicts an increase in the probability of amino acid polymorphism with increasing solvent accessibility for each protein regardless of physicochemical properties, secondary-structure element, or size of the amino acid. This result, when compared with the distribution of synonymous polymorphism, which shows no association with solvent accessibility, suggests a strong decrease in purifying selection with increasing solvent accessibility. PMID:10677853

  4. The Escherichia coli Fis protein prevents initiation of DNA replication from oriC in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Wold, S; Crooke, E; Skarstad, K

    1996-01-01

    Fis protein participates in the normal control of chromosomal replication in Escherichia coli. However, the mechanism by which it executes its effect is largely unknown. We demonstrate an inhibitory influence of purified Fis protein on replication from oriC in vitro. Fis inhibits DNA synthesis equally well in replication systems either dependent upon or independent of RNA polymerase, even when the latter is stimulated by the presence of HU or IHF. The extent of inhibition by Fis is modulated by the concentrations of DnaA protein and RNA polymerase; the more limiting the amounts of these, the more severe the inhibition by Fis. Thus, the level of inhibition seems to depend on the ease with which the open complex can be formed. Fis-mediated inhibition of DNA replication does not depend on a functional primary Fis binding site between DnaA boxes R2 and R3 in oriC, as mutations that cause reduced binding of Fis to this site do not affect the degree of inhibition. The data presented suggest that Fis prevents formation of an initiation-proficient structure at oriC by forming an alternative, initiation-preventive complex. This indicates a negative role for Fis in the regulation of replication initiation. PMID:8836178

  5. Localization of polyamine enhancement of protein synthesis to subcellular components of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim.

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, C L; Bunce, S C; Hurwitz, C

    1983-01-01

    At 5 mM Mg2+, spermidine stimulation of polyphenylalanine synthesis by cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli was found to be about 30 times greater than that by extracts of Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim, a unique organism which lacks detectable levels of spermidine. By means of reconstitution experiments, the target of spermidine stimulation was localized to the protein fraction of the highspeed supernatant component (S-100) of E. coli and was absent from, or deficient in, the S-100 fraction of Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim. The spermidine stimulation did not appear to be due to the presence in the E. coli S-100 fraction of ribosomal protein S1, elongation factors, or E. coli aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. The failure to observe spermidine stimulation by the Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim S-100 fraction was also not due to a spermidine-enhanced polyuridylic acid degradation. The synthesis of polyphenylalanine by Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim extracts was stimulated by putrescine and by S-(+)-2-hydroxyputrescine to a greater degree than was synthesis by E. coli extracts. The enhancement by putrescine and by S-(+)-2-hydroxyputrescine with Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim extracts was found to be due to effects on its ribosomes. PMID:6336736

  6. The cost of expression of Escherichia coli lac operon proteins is in the process, not in the products.

    PubMed

    Stoebel, Daniel M; Dean, Antony M; Dykhuizen, Daniel E

    2008-03-01

    Transcriptional regulatory networks allow bacteria to express proteins only when they are needed. Adaptive hypotheses explaining the evolution of regulatory networks assume that unneeded expression is costly and therefore decreases fitness, but the proximate cause of this cost is not clear. We show that the cost in fitness to Escherichia coli strains constitutively expressing the lactose operon when lactose is absent is associated with the process of making the lac gene products, i.e., associated with the acts of transcription and/or translation. These results reject the hypotheses that regulation exists to prevent the waste of amino acids in useless protein or the detrimental activity of unnecessary proteins. While the cost of the process of protein expression occurs in all of the environments that we tested, the expression of the lactose permease could be costly or beneficial, depending on the environment. Our results identify the basis of a single selective pressure likely acting across the entire E. coli transcriptome. PMID:18245823

  7. Simple defined autoinduction medium for high-level recombinant protein production using T7-based Escherichia coli expression systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaopeng; Kessler, Wolfgang; van den Heuvel, Joop; Rinas, Ursula

    2011-08-01

    Protein production under the control of lac operon regulatory elements using autoinduction is based on diauxic growth of Escherichia coli on lactose after consumption of more preferred carbon substrates. A novel simple and cost-effective defined autoinduction medium using a mixture of glucose, glycerol, and lactose as carbon substrate and NH(4)(+) as sole nitrogen source without any supplementation of amino acids and vitamins was developed for T7-based E. coli expression systems. This medium was successfully employed in 96-well microtiter plates, test tubes, shake flasks, and 15-L bioreactor cultivations for production of different types of proteins achieving an average yield of 500 mg L(-1) product. Cell-specific protein concentrations and solubility were similar as during conventional isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside induction using Luria-Bertani broth. However, the final yield of target proteins was about four times higher, as a higher final biomass was achieved using this novel defined autoinduction broth. PMID:21698378

  8. Structure and Function of the Escherichia coli Protein YmgB: A Protein Critical for Biofilm Formation and Acid-resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,J.; Page, R.; Garcia-Contreras, R.; Palermino, J.; Zhang, X.; Doshi, O.; Wood, T.; Peti, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gene cluster ymgABC was identified in transcriptome studies to have a role in biofilm development and stability. In this study, we showed that YmgB represses biofilm formation in rich medium containing glucose, decreases cellular motility, and protects the cell from acid indicating that YmgB has a major role in acid-resistance in E. coli. Our data show that these phenotypes are potentially mediated through interactions with the important cell signal indole. In addition, gel mobility-shift assays suggest that YmgB may be a non-specific DNA-binding protein. Using nickel-enrichment DNA microarrays, we showed that YmgB binds, either directly or indirectly, via a probable ligand, genes important for biofilm formation. To advance our understanding of the function of YmgB, we used X-ray crystallography to solve the structure of the protein to 1.8 A resolution. YmgB is a biological dimer that is structurally homologous to the E. coli gene regulatory protein Hha, despite having only 5% sequence identity. This supports our DNA microarray data showing that YmgB is a gene regulatory protein. Therefore, this protein, which clearly has a critical role in acid-resistance in E. coli, has been renamed as AriR for regulator of acid resistance influenced by indole.

  9. The 2B domain of the Escherichia coli Rep protein is not required for DNA helicase activity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Brendza, Katherine M; Gauss, George H; Korolev, Sergey; Waksman, Gabriel; Lohman, Timothy M

    2002-12-10

    The Escherichia coli Rep protein is a 3' to 5' SF1 DNA helicase required for replication of bacteriophage phiX174 in E. coli, and is structurally homologous to the E. coli UvrD helicase and the Bacillus stearothermophilus PcrA helicase. Previous crystallographic studies of Rep protein bound to single-stranded DNA revealed that it can undergo a large conformational change consisting of an approximately 130 degrees rotation of its 2B subdomain about a hinge region connected to the 2A subdomain. Based on crystallographic studies of PcrA, its 2B subdomain has been proposed to form part of its duplex DNA binding site and to play a role in duplex destabilization. To test the role of the 2B subdomain in Rep-catalyzed duplex DNA unwinding, we have deleted its 2B subdomain, replacing it with three glycines, to form the RepDelta2B protein. This RepDelta2B protein can support phiX174 replication in a rep(-) E. coli strain, although the growth rate of E. coli containing the repDelta2B gene is approximately 1.5-fold slower than with the wild-type rep gene. Pre-steady-state, single-turnover DNA unwinding kinetics experiments show that purified RepDelta2B protein has DNA helicase activity in vitro and unwinds an 18-bp DNA duplex with rates at least as fast as wild-type Rep, and with higher extents of unwinding and higher affinity for the DNA substrate. These studies show that the 2B domain of Rep is not required for DNA helicase activity in vivo or in vitro, and that it does not facilitate DNA unwinding in vitro. PMID:12441398

  10. Deuterium incorporation into Escherichia coli proteins. A neutron-scattering study of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Lederer, H; May, R P; Kjems, J K; Schaefer, W; Crespi, H L; Heumann, H

    1986-05-01

    Neutron small-angle scattering studies of single protein subunits in a protein-DNA complex require the adjustment of the neutron scattering-length densities of protein and DNA, which is attainable by specific deuteration of the protein. The neutron scattering densities of unlabelled DNA and DNA-dependent RNA polymerase of Escherichia coli match when RNA polymerase is isolated from cells grown in a medium containing 46% D2O and unlabelled glucose as carbon source. Their contrasts vanish simultaneously in a dialysis buffer containing 65% D2O. An expression was evaluated which allows the calculation of the degree of deuteration and match point of any E. coli protein from the D2O content of the growth medium, taking the 2H incorporation into RNA polymerase amino acids to be representative for all amino acids in E. coli proteins. The small-angle scattering results, on which the calculation of the degree of deuteration is based, were confirmed by mass spectrometric measurements. PMID:3516697

  11. Escherichia coli EDA is a novel fusion expression partner to improve solubility of aggregation-prone heterologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yoon-Sik; Song, Jong-Am; Han, Kyung-Yeon; Lee, Jeewon

    2015-01-20

    Since the use of solubility enhancer proteins is one of the effective methods to produce active recombinant proteins within Escherichia coli, the development of a novel fusion expression partner that can be applied to various aggregation-prone proteins is of crucial importance. In our previous work, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) was employed to systematically analyze the E. coli BL21 (DE3) proteome profile in response to heat treatment, and KDPG aldolase (EDA) was identified as a heat-responsive and aggregation-resistant protein. When used as fusion expression partner, EDA significantly increased the solubility of seven aggregation-prone heterologous proteins in the E. coli cytoplasm. The efficacy of EDA as a fusion expression partner was evaluated through the analysis of bioactivity or secondary structure of several target proteins: EDA-fusion expression resulted in the synthesis of bioactive human ferritin light chain and bacterial arginine deiminase and the formation of correct secondary structure of human granulocyte colony stimulation factor. PMID:25486632

  12. The 32-kilodalton envelope protein of vaccinia virus synthesized in Escherichia coli binds with specificity to cell surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, C F; Gong, S C; Esteban, M

    1991-01-01

    The nature of interaction between vaccinia virus and the surface of host cells as the first step in virus infection is undefined. A 32-kDa virus envelope protein has been identified as a cell surface binding protein (J.-S. Maa, J. F. Rodriguez, and M. Esteban, J. Biol. Chem. 265:1569-1577, 1990). To carry out studies on the structure-function relationship of this protein, the 32-kDa protein was obtained from Escherichia coli cells harboring the expression plasmid pT7Ek32. The recombinant polypeptide was found to have structural properties similar to those of the native virus envelope protein. Binding studies of 125I-labeled 32-kDa protein to cultured cells of various origins revealed that the E. coli-produced 32-kDa protein exhibited selectivity, specificity, and saturability. Scatchard analysis indicated about 4.5 x 10(4) sites per cell with a high affinity (Kd = 1.8 x 10(-9) M), suggesting interaction of the 32-kDa protein with a specific receptor. The availability of large quantities of the 32-kDa virus protein in bacteria will permit further structural and functional studies of this virus envelope protein and facilitate identification of the specific cell surface receptor. Images PMID:1985213

  13. Evaluation of three industrial Escherichia coli strains in fed-batch cultivations during high-level SOD protein production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the biopharmaceutical industry, Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains are among the most frequently used bacterial hosts for producing recombinant proteins because they allow a simple process set-up and they are Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for human applications. Widespread use of E. coli in biotechnology has led to the development of many different strains, and selecting an ideal host to produce a specific protein of interest is an important step in developing a production process. E. coli B and K–12 strains are frequently employed in large-scale production processes, and therefore are of particular interest. We previously evaluated the individual cultivation characteristics of E. coli BL21 and the K–12 hosts RV308 and HMS174. To our knowledge, there has not yet been a detailed comparison of the individual performances of these production strains in terms of recombinant protein production and system stability. The present study directly compared the T7-based expression hosts E. coli BL21(DE3), RV308(DE3), and HMS174(DE3), focusing on evaluating the specific attributes of these strains in relation to high-level protein production of the model protein recombinant human superoxide dismutase (SOD). The experimental setup was an exponential carbon-limited fed-batch cultivation with minimal media and single-pulse induction. Results The host strain BL21(DE3) produced the highest amounts of specific protein, followed by HMS174(DE3) and RV308(DE3). The expression system HMS174(DE3) exhibited system stability by retaining the expression vector over the entire process time; however, it entirely stopped growing shortly after induction. In contrast, BL21(DE3) and RV308(DE3) encountered plasmid loss but maintained growth. RV308(DE3) exhibited the lowest ppGpp concentration, which is correlated with the metabolic stress level and lowest degradation of soluble protein fraction compared to both other strains. Conclusions Overall, this study provides

  14. A novel mass spectrometric strategy "BEMAP" reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Duggin, Iain G; Larsen, Martin R; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues mapping to 140 proteins in ETEC, including several known virulence factors, and 34 in E. coli K-12. The two strains had 32 glycoproteins in common. Remarkably, the majority of the ETEC glycoproteins were conserved in both strains but nevertheless were only glycosylated in the pathogen. Therefore, bacterial O-linked glycosylation is much more extensive than previously thought, and is especially important to the pathogen. PMID:27562176

  15. A novel mass spectrometric strategy “BEMAP” reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Duggin, Iain G.; Larsen, Martin R.; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues mapping to 140 proteins in ETEC, including several known virulence factors, and 34 in E. coli K-12. The two strains had 32 glycoproteins in common. Remarkably, the majority of the ETEC glycoproteins were conserved in both strains but nevertheless were only glycosylated in the pathogen. Therefore, bacterial O-linked glycosylation is much more extensive than previously thought, and is especially important to the pathogen. PMID:27562176

  16. Preparation, characterization, and immunological properties in mice of Escherichia coli O157 O-specific polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Konadu, E; Robbins, J B; Shiloach, J; Bryla, D A; Szu, S C

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157 causes severe enteritis and the extraintestinal complication of hemolytic-uremic syndrome, with their highest incidence occurring in children. We postulated that serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to the O-specific polysaccharide of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may confer protective immunity to enteric pathogens by inducing bactericidal reactions against the ingested organisms in the jejunum (J. B. Robbins, C. Chu, and R. Schneerson, Clin. Infect. Dis. 15:346-361, 1992; S. C. Szu, R. Gupta, and J. B. Robbins, p. 381-394, in I. K. Wachsmuth, P. A. Blake, and O. Olsvik, ed., Vibrio cholerae, 1994). Because polysaccharide-protein conjugates induce serum IgG antibodies in infants, we bound the O-specific polysaccharide of E. coli O157 to proteins. E. coli O157 LPS, treated with acetic acid or hydrazine, was derivatized with adipic acid dihydrazide and bound to proteins by carbodiimide-mediated condensation. Conjugates of these adipic hydrazide derivative were prepared with bovine serum albumin, formalin-treated exotoxin C of Clostridium welchii (Pig Bel toxoid), or Pseudomonas aeruginosa recombinant exoprotein A. The conjugates had low levels of endotoxin and elicited serum antibodies with bactericidal activity to the O157 LPS. The largest increase in LPS antibodies was of the IgG class. Clinical evaluation of E. coli O157-toxoid conjugates is planned. Images PMID:7927787

  17. Heat shock induction by a misassembled cytoplasmic membrane protein complex in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mourez, M; Skouloubris, S; Betton, J M; Dassa, E

    1997-11-01

    We analysed the effects of the overproduction of parts or all of a multisubunit ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, the MalFGK2 complex, involved in the uptake of maltose and maltodextrins in Escherichia coli. We found that production of the MalF protein alone was inducing the phtrA promoter, which is under the control of a recently discovered sigma factor, sigma24, involved in the response to extracytoplasmic stresses. The production level, stability and localization of MalF were not altered when produced without its partners, suggesting that the protein was correctly inserted in the membrane. Our results indicate that a large periplasmic loop located between the third and fourth transmembrane segment of MalF, the L3 loop, is responsible for phtrA induction: (i) deleted MalF proteins with no L3 loop or with a L3 loop lacking 120 amino acids do not induce the phtrA promoter; (ii) the export to the periplasm of the L3 loop alone or fused to MalE induces the phtrA promoter. Moreover, the proteolytic sensitivity of MalF is different when it is produced alone and when MalF and MalG are produced together, suggesting a change in the conformation and/or accessibility of MalF. These results suggest that some inner membrane proteins can be sensed outside the cytoplasm by a quality control apparatus or by the export machinery. Moreover, the observation of the phtrA induction by MalF could be a useful new tool for studying the insertion and assembly of the MalFGK2 complex. PMID:9427411

  18. Mapping of the RNA recognition site of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S7.

    PubMed Central

    Robert, F; Gagnon, M; Sans, D; Michnick, S; Brakier-Gingras, L

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial ribosomal protein S7 initiates the folding of the 3' major domain of 16S ribosomal RNA by binding to its lower half. The X-ray structure of protein S7 from thermophilic bacteria was recently solved and found to be a modular structure, consisting of an alpha-helical domain with a beta-ribbon extension. To gain further insights into its interaction with rRNA, we cloned the S7 gene from Escherichia coli K12 into a pET expression vector and introduced 4 deletions and 12 amino acid substitutions in the protein sequence. The binding of each mutant to the lower half of the 3' major domain of 16S rRNA was assessed by filtration on nitrocellulose membranes. Deletion of the N-terminal 17 residues or deletion of the B hairpins (residues 72-89) severely decreased S7 affinity for the rRNA. Truncation of the C-terminal portion (residues 138-178), which includes part of the terminal alpha-helix, significantly affected S7 binding, whereas a shorter truncation (residues 148-178) only marginally influenced its binding. Severe effects were also observed with several strategic point mutations located throughout the protein, including Q8A and F17G in the N-terminal region, and K35Q, G54S, K113Q, and M115G in loops connecting the alpha-helices. Our results are consistent with the occurrence of several sites of contact between S7 and the 16S rRNA, in line with its role in the folding of the 3' major domain. PMID:11105763

  19. Porin channels in Escherichia coli: studies with liposomes reconstituted from purified proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, H; Rosenberg, E Y

    1983-01-01

    Rates of diffusion of uncharged and charged solute molecules through porin channels were determined by using liposomes reconstituted from egg phosphatidylcholine and purified Escherichia coli porins OmpF (protein 1a), OmpC (protein 1b), and PhoE (protein E). All three porin proteins appeared to produce channels of similar size, although the OmpF channel appeared to be 7 to 9% larger than the OmpC and PhoE channels in an equivalent radius. Hydrophobicity of the solute retarded the penetration through all three channels in a similar manner. The presence of one negative charge on the solute resulted in about a threefold reduction in penetration rates through OmpF and OmpC channels, whereas it produced two- to tenfold acceleration of diffusion through the PhoE channel. The addition of the second negatively charged group to the solutes decreased the diffusion rates through OmpF and OmpC channels further, whereas diffusion through the PhoE channel was not affected much. These results suggest that PhoE specializes in the uptake of negatively charged solutes. At the present level of resolution, no sign of true solute specificity was found in OmpF and OmpC channels; peptides, for example, diffused through both of these channels at rates expected from their molecular size, hydrophobicity, and charge. However, the OmpF porin channel allowed influx of more solute molecules per unit time than did the equivalent weight of the OmpC porin when the flux was driven by a concentration gradient of the same size. This apparent difference in "efficiency" became more pronounced with larger solutes, and it is likely to be the consequence of the difference in the sizes of OmpF and OmpC channels. PMID:6294049

  20. Innate immunity of surfactant proteins A and D in urinary tract infection with uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fengqi; Ding, Guohua; Zhang, Zhiyong; Gatto, Louis A.; Hawgood, Samuel; Poulain, Francis R.; Cooney, Robert N.; Wang, Guirong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of surfactant proteins A and D (SP-A, SP-D) in urinary tract infection (UTI), SP-A and SP-D double knockout (SP-A/D KO) and wild type (WT) C57BL/6 female mice were infected with uropathogenic Escherichia coli by intravesical inoculation. Compared with WT mice SP-A/D KO mice showed increased susceptibility to UTI as evidenced by higher bacterial CFU, more infiltrating neutrophils and severe pathological changes. Keratinocyte-derived chemokine increased in the kidney of WT mice but not in SP-A/D KO mice 24 h post-infection. Compared to control, level of IL-17 was elevated in the kidney of infected WT and SP-A/D KO mice and the level of IL-17 was higher in the infected SP-A/D KO mice than infected WT mice 24 and 48 h post-infection. Basal level of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in SP-A/D KO mice was higher compared to WT mice. Phosphorylated-p38 level was elevated in the kidney of WT mice post-infection but not in SP-A/D KO mice. Furthermore, in vitro growth of uropathogenic E. coli was inhibited by SP-A and SP-D. We conclude that SP-A and SP-D function as mediators of innate immunity by inhibiting bacterial growth and modulating renal inflammation in part by regulating p38 MAPK-related pathway in murine UTI. PMID:26511057

  1. Innate immunity of surfactant proteins A and D in urinary tract infection with uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fengqi; Ding, Guohua; Zhang, Zhiyong; Gatto, Louis A; Hawgood, Samuel; Poulain, Francis R; Cooney, Robert N; Wang, Guirong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of surfactant proteins A and D (SP-A and SP-D, respectively) in urinary tract infection (UTI), SP-A and SP-D double knockout (SP-A/D KO) and wild type (WT) C57BL/6 female mice were infected with uropathogenic Escherichia coli by intravesical inoculation. Compared with WT mice SP-A/D KO mice showed increased susceptibility to UTI, as evidenced by higher bacterial CFU, more infiltrating neutrophils and severe pathological changes. Keratinocyte-derived chemokine increased in the kidney of WT mice but not in SP-A/D KO mice 24 h post-infection. Compared with control, the level of IL-17 was elevated in the kidney of infected WT and SP-A/D KO mice and the level of IL-17 was higher in the infected SP-A/D KO mice than in infected WT mice 24 and 48 h post-infection. The basal level of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in SP-A/D KO mice was higher than in WT mice. The phosphorylated p38 level was elevated in the kidney of WT mice post infection but not in SP-A/D KO mice. Furthermore, in vitro growth of uropathogenic E. coli was inhibited by SP-A and SP-D. We conclude that SP-A and SP-D function as mediators of innate immunity by inhibiting bacterial growth and modulating renal inflammation in part by regulating p38 MAPK-related pathway in murine UTI. PMID:26511057

  2. Mechanism of chromosome compaction and looping by the E. coli nucleoid protein Fis

    PubMed Central

    Skoko, Dunja; Yoo, Daniel; Bai, Hua; Schnurr, Bernhard; Yan, Jie; McLeod, Sarah M.; Marko, John F.; Johnson, Reid C.

    2006-01-01

    Fis, the most abundant DNA-binding protein in E. coli during rapid growth, has been suspected to play an important role in defining nucleoid structure. Using bulk-phase and single-DNA molecule experiments we analyze the structural consequences of nonspecific binding by Fis to DNA. Fis binds DNA in a largely sequence-neutral fashion at nanomolar concentrations, resulting in mild compaction against applied force due to DNA bending. With increasing concentration, Fis first coats DNA to form an ordered array with one Fis dimer bound per 21 bp and then abruptly shifts to forming a higher-order Fis-DNA filament, referred to as a ‘low mobility complex’ (LMC). The LMC initially contains two Fis dimers per 21 bp, but additional Fis dimers assemble into the LMC as the concentration is further increased. These complexes, formed at or above 1 μM Fis, are able to collapse large DNA molecules via stabilization of DNA loops. The opening and closing of loops on single DNA molecules can be followed in real time as abrupt jumps in DNA extension. Formation of loop-stabilizing complexes is sensitive to high ionic strength, even under conditions where DNA bending-compaction is unaltered. Analyses of mutants indicate that Fis-mediated DNA looping does not involve tertiary or quaternary changes in the Fis dimer structure but that a number of surface-exposed residues located both within and outside the helix-turn-helix DNA binding region are critical. These results suggest that Fis may play a role in vivo as a ‘domain barrier element’ by organizing DNA loops within the E. coli chromosome. PMID:17045294

  3. Genes on a Wire: The Nucleoid-Associated Protein HU Insulates Transcription Units in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael; Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Petya; Rapiteanu, Radu; Lisicovas, Viktoras; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which chromosomal gene position in prokaryotes affects local gene expression remains an open question. Several studies have shown that chromosomal re-positioning of bacterial transcription units does not alter their expression pattern, except for a general decrease in gene expression levels from chromosomal origin to terminus proximal positions, which is believed to result from gene dosage effects. Surprisingly, the question as to whether this chromosomal context independence is a cis encoded property of a bacterial transcription unit, or if position independence is a property conferred by factors acting in trans, has not been addressed so far. For this purpose, we established a genetic test system assessing the chromosomal positioning effects by means of identical promoter-fluorescent reporter gene fusions inserted equidistantly from OriC into both chromosomal replichores of Escherichia coli K-12. Our investigations of the reporter activities in mutant cells lacking the conserved nucleoid associated protein HU uncovered various drastic chromosomal positional effects on gene transcription. In addition we present evidence that these positional effects are caused by transcriptional activity nearby the insertion site of our reporter modules. We therefore suggest that the nucleoid-associated protein HU is functionally insulating transcription units, most likely by constraining transcription induced DNA supercoiling. PMID:27545593

  4. Engineering and overexpression of periplasmic forms of the penicillin-binding protein 3 of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Fraipont, C; Adam, M; Nguyen-Distèche, M; Keck, W; Van Beeumen, J; Ayala, J A; Granier, B; Hara, H; Ghuysen, J M

    1994-01-01

    Replacement of the 36 and 56 N-terminal amino acid residues of the 588-amino-acid-residue membrane-bound penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) of Escherichia coli by the OmpA signal peptide allows export of F37-V577 PBP3 and G57-V577 PBP3 respectively into the periplasm. The modified ftsI genes were placed under the control of the fused lpp promoter and lac promoter/operator; expression of the truncated PBP3s was optimized by varying the copy number of the recombinant plasmids and the amount of LacI repressor, and export was facilitated by increasing the SecB content of the producing strain. The periplasmic PBP3s (yield 8 mg/l of culture) were purified to 70% protein homogeneity. They require the presence of 0.25 M NaCl to remain soluble. Like the membrane-bound PBP3, they undergo processing by elimination of the C-terminal decapeptide I578-S588, they bind penicillin in a 1:1 molar ratio and they catalyse hydrolysis and aminolysis of acyclic thioesters that are analogues of penicillin. The membrane-anchor-free PBP3s have ragged N-termini. The G57-V577 PBP3, however, is less prone to proteolytic degradation than the F37-V577 PBP3. Images Figure 3 PMID:8129719

  5. Flavin-Induced Oligomerization in Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The process known as “adaptive response” allows Escherichia coli to respond to small doses of DNA-methylating agents by upregulating the expression of four proteins. While the role of three of these proteins in mitigating DNA damage is well understood, the function of AidB is less clear. Although AidB is a flavoprotein, no catalytic role has been established for the bound cofactor. Here we investigate the possibility that flavin plays a structural role in the assembly of the AidB tetramer. We report the generation and biophysical characterization of deflavinated AidB and of an AidB mutant that has greatly reduced affinity for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Using fluorescence quenching and analytical ultracentrifugation, we find that apo AidB has a high affinity for FAD, as indicated by an apparent dissociation constant of 402.1 ± 35.1 nM, and that binding of substoichiometric amounts of FAD triggers a transition in the AidB oligomeric state. In particular, deflavinated AidB is dimeric, whereas the addition of FAD yields a tetramer. We further investigate the dimerization and tetramerization interfaces of AidB by determining a 2.8 Å resolution crystal structure in space group P32 that contains three intact tetramers in the asymmetric unit. Taken together, our findings provide strong evidence that FAD plays a structural role in the formation of tetrameric AidB. PMID:22004173

  6. An endogenous protein inhibitor, YjhX (TopAI), for topoisomerase I from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Inouye, Masayori

    2015-01-01

    Almost all free-living bacteria contain toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems on their genomes and the targets of toxins are highly diverse. Here, we found a novel, previously unidentified TA system in Escherichia coli named yjhX-yjhQ. Induction of YjhX (85 amino acid residues) causes cell-growth arrest resulting in cell death, while YjhQ (181 residues) co-induction resumes cell growth. The primary cellular target of YjhX was found to be topoisomerase I (TopA), inhibiting both DNA replication and RNA synthesis. Notably, YjhX has no homology to any other toxins of the TA systems. YjhX was expressed well with an N-terminal protein S (PrS) tag in soluble forms. PrS-YjhX specifically interacts with the N-terminal region of TopA (TopA67) but not full-TopA in the absence of plasmid DNA, while PrS-YjhX binds to full-TopA in the presence of DNA. Notably, YjhX does not directly interact with DNA and RNA. YjhX inhibits only topoisomerase I but not topoisomerase III and IV in vitro. Hence, yjhX is renamed as the gene for the TopA inhibitor (the topAI gene). TopAI is the first endogenous protein inhibitor specific for topoisomerase I. PMID:26553797

  7. Genes on a Wire: The Nucleoid-Associated Protein HU Insulates Transcription Units in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael; Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Petya; Rapiteanu, Radu; Lisicovas, Viktoras; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which chromosomal gene position in prokaryotes affects local gene expression remains an open question. Several studies have shown that chromosomal re-positioning of bacterial transcription units does not alter their expression pattern, except for a general decrease in gene expression levels from chromosomal origin to terminus proximal positions, which is believed to result from gene dosage effects. Surprisingly, the question as to whether this chromosomal context independence is a cis encoded property of a bacterial transcription unit, or if position independence is a property conferred by factors acting in trans, has not been addressed so far. For this purpose, we established a genetic test system assessing the chromosomal positioning effects by means of identical promoter-fluorescent reporter gene fusions inserted equidistantly from OriC into both chromosomal replichores of Escherichia coli K-12. Our investigations of the reporter activities in mutant cells lacking the conserved nucleoid associated protein HU uncovered various drastic chromosomal positional effects on gene transcription. In addition we present evidence that these positional effects are caused by transcriptional activity nearby the insertion site of our reporter modules. We therefore suggest that the nucleoid-associated protein HU is functionally insulating transcription units, most likely by constraining transcription induced DNA supercoiling. PMID:27545593

  8. An endogenous protein inhibitor, YjhX (TopAI), for topoisomerase I from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Inouye, Masayori

    2015-12-01

    Almost all free-living bacteria contain toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems on their genomes and the targets of toxins are highly diverse. Here, we found a novel, previously unidentified TA system in Escherichia coli named yjhX-yjhQ. Induction of YjhX (85 amino acid residues) causes cell-growth arrest resulting in cell death, while YjhQ (181 residues) co-induction resumes cell growth. The primary cellular target of YjhX was found to be topoisomerase I (TopA), inhibiting both DNA replication and RNA synthesis. Notably, YjhX has no homology to any other toxins of the TA systems. YjhX was expressed well with an N-terminal protein S (PrS) tag in soluble forms. PrS-YjhX specifically interacts with the N-terminal region of TopA (TopA67) but not full-TopA in the absence of plasmid DNA, while PrS-YjhX binds to full-TopA in the presence of DNA. Notably, YjhX does not directly interact with DNA and RNA. YjhX inhibits only topoisomerase I but not topoisomerase III and IV in vitro. Hence, yjhX is renamed as the gene for the TopA inhibitor (the topAI gene). TopAI is the first endogenous protein inhibitor specific for topoisomerase I. PMID:26553797

  9. A physical model for the translocation and helicase activities of Escherichia coli transcription termination protein Rho.

    PubMed Central

    Geiselmann, J; Wang, Y; Seifried, S E; von Hippel, P H

    1993-01-01

    Transcription termination protein Rho of Escherichia coli interacts with newly synthesized RNA chains and brings about their release from elongation complexes paused at specific Rho-dependent termination sites. Rho is thought to accomplish this by binding to a specific Rho "loading site" on the nascent RNA and then translocating preferentially along the transcript in a 5'-->3' direction. On reaching the elongation complex, Rho releases the nascent RNA by a 5'-->3' RNA.DNA helicase activity. These translocation and helicase activities are driven by the RNA-dependent ATPase activity of Rho. In this paper we propose a mechanism for these processes that is based on the structure and properties of the Rho protein. Rho is a hexamer of identical subunits that are arranged as a trimer of asymmetric dimers with D3 symmetry. The binding of ATP and RNA to Rho also reflects this pattern; the Rho hexamer carries three strong and three weak binding sites for each of these entities. The asymmetric dimers of Rho correspond to functional dimers that can undergo conformational transitions driven by ATP hydrolysis. We propose that the quaternary structure of Rho coordinates the ATP-driven RNA binding and release processes to produce a biased random walk of the Rho hexamer along the RNA, followed by RNA.DNA helicase activity and transcript release. The proposed model may have implications for other hexameric DNA.DNA, RNA.DNA, and RNA.RNA helicases that function in replication and transcription. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7689228

  10. Image analysis reveals that Escherichia coli RecA protein consists of two domains.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, X; Egelman, E H

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli RecA protein catalyzes homologous genetic recombination by forming helical polymers around DNA molecules. These polymers have an ATPase activity, which is essential for the movement of strands between two DNA molecules. One obstacle to structural studies of the RecA filament has been that the ATPase results in a dynamical polymer containing a mixture of states with respect to the bound ATP and its hydrolytic products. We have formed filaments which are trapped in the ADP-Pi state by substituting AIF4- for the Pi, and have used these stable filaments to generate a three-dimensional reconstruction from electron micrographs. The resolution of the reconstruction is sufficient to resolve the 38-k RecA subunit into two nearly equal domains. This reconstruction provides the most detailed view yet of the RecA protein, and serves as a framework within which existing biochemical data on RecA can be understood. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 12 PMID:2137715

  11. Membrane topology and multimeric structure of a mechanosensitive channel protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Blount, P; Sukharev, S I; Moe, P C; Schroeder, M J; Guy, H R; Kung, C

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the membrane topology and multimeric structure of a mechanosensitive channel, MscL, which we previously isolated and cloned from Escherichia coli. We have localized this 15-kDa protein to the inner membrane and, by PhoA fusion, have shown that it contains two transmembrane domains with both the amino and carboxyl termini on the cytoplasmic side. Mutation of the glutamate at position 56 to histidine led to changes in channel kinetics which were dependent upon the pH on the periplasmic, but not cytoplasmic side of the membrane, providing additional evidence for the periplasmic positioning of this part of the molecule. Tandems of two MscL subunits expressed as a single polypeptide formed functional channels, suggesting an even number of transmembrane domains per subunit (amino and carboxyl termini on the same side of the membrane), and an even number of subunits per functional complex. Finally, cross-linking studies suggest that the functional MscL complex is a homohexamer. In summary, these data are all consistent with a protein domain assignment and topological model which we propose and discuss. Images PMID:8890153

  12. One-step Negative Chromatographic Purification of Helicobacter pylori Neutrophil-activating Protein Overexpressed in Escherichia coli in Batch Mode.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ting-Yu; Hong, Zhi-Wei; Tsai, Chung-Che; Yang, Yu-Chi; Fu, Hua-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). It plays a critical role in H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation by activating several innate leukocytes including neutrophils, monocytes, and mast cells. The immunogenic and immunomodulatory properties of HP-NAP make it a potential diagnostic and vaccine candidate for H. pylori and a new drug candidate for cancer therapy. In order to obtain substantial quantities of purified HP-NAP used for its clinical applications, an efficient method to purify this protein with high yield and purity needs to be established. In this protocol, we have described a method for one-step negative chromatographic purification of recombinant HP-NAP overexpressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) by using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) ion-exchange resins (e.g., Sephadex) in batch mode. Recombinant HP-NAP constitutes nearly 70% of the total protein in E. coli and is almost fully recovered in the soluble fraction upon cell lysis at pH 9.0. Under the optimal condition at pH 8.0, the majority of HP-NAP is recovered in the unbound fraction while the endogenous proteins from E. coli are efficiently removed by the resin. This purification method using negative mode batch chromatography with DEAE ion-exchange resins yields functional HP-NAP from E. coli in its native form with high yield and purity. The purified HP-NAP could be further utilized for the prevention, treatment, and prognosis of H. pylori-associated diseases as well as cancer therapy. PMID:27404433

  13. A dual-functional E. coli vector for expressing recombinant protein with high solubility and antigen presentation ability.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chin-Kai; Su, Yu-Show; Fan, Chiu-Tin; Lee, Wen-Chuan; Chen, Ming-Yu

    2009-05-01

    A dual-functional Escherichia coli expression vector capable of producing soluble recombinant proteins with high immunogenicity in animals is introduced. This vector expresses polypeptides fused to a PTD-J-domain peptide. The J-domain peptide is derived from murine Hsp40 by using optimized codons for E. coli. The association of the J-domain to the nucleotide binding domain of the DnaK chaperone increases the probability that the fused polypeptide will be folded by the DnaK and hence increases the solubility of the recombinant protein. The PTD-J-domain can also enhance the immunogenicity of the fused chicken IGF-I polypeptide as well as an oligo-peptide derived from haptoglobin in rodents, possibly via the association with either the extracellular or intracellular Hsp70 proteins. PMID:19162194

  14. Extraction of recombinant protein from Escherichia coli by using a novel cell autolysis activity of VanX.

    PubMed

    Kamioka, Tetsuya; Sohya, Shihori; Wu, Nan; Maki, Tei; Matsuda, Tomoki; Ikegami, Takahisa; Nakamura, Haruki; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2013-08-15

    Escherichia coli is a versatile, low-cost, and popular host for expressing recombinant proteins. However, extracting recombinant proteins from E. coli requires cell wall breakage, which is both time- and effort-consuming. Here we report a novel cell breakage method based on our recent finding that VanX, which is a d-Ala-d-Ala dipeptidase encoded in a vancomycin-resistant VanA gene cluster, exhibits a strong cell lysis activity when expressed in isolation in E. coli. In our strategy, we coexpress VanX with the target protein, causing cell autolysis and release of the cellular content into the culture medium. We demonstrated this strategy for two model proteins, a green fluorescent protein variant (GFPuv) and Gaussia luciferase, and optimized the autolysis conditions and coexpression vectors. The fluorescence activity of GFPuv collected from the medium was identical to that of GFPuv purified by conventional methods. Cell breakage by VanX-mediated autolysis is very simple to implement and will efficiently complement traditional methods. PMID:23624113

  15. Effects of Outer Membrane Protein TolC on the Transport of Escherichia coli within Saturated Quartz Sands

    PubMed Central

    Feriancikova, Lucia; Bardy, Sonia L.; Wang, Lixia; Li, Jin; Xu, Shangping

    2013-01-01

    The outer membrane protein (OMP) TolC is the cell surface component of several drug efflux pumps that are responsible for bacterial resistance against a variety of antibiotics. In this research, we investigated the effects of OMP TolC on E. coli transport within saturated sands through column experiments using a wide type E. coli K12 strain (with OMP TolC), as well as the corresponding transposon mutant (tolC∷kan) and the markerless deletion mutant (ΔtolC). Our results showed OMP TolC could significantly enhance the transport of E. coli when the ionic strength was 20 mM NaCl or higher. The deposition rate coefficients for the wild type E. coli strain (with OMP TolC) was usually >50% lower than those of the tolC-negative mutants. The measurements of contact angles using three probe liquids suggested that TolC altered the surface tension components of E. coli cells and lead to lower Hamaker constants for the cell-water-sand system. The interaction energy calculations using the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory suggested that the deposition of the E. coli cell primarily occurred at the secondary energy minimum. The depth of the secondary energy minimum increased with ionic strength, and was greater for the TolC-deletion strains under high ionic strength conditions. Overall, the transport behavior of three E. coli strain within saturated sands could be explained by the XDLVO calculations. Results from this research suggested that antibiotic resistant bacteria expressing OMP TolC could spread more widely within sandy aquifers. PMID:23627691

  16. The spc ribosomal protein operon of Escherichia coli: sequence and cotranscription of the ribosomal protein genes and a protein export gene.

    PubMed

    Cerretti, D P; Dean, D; Davis, G R; Bedwell, D M; Nomura, M

    1983-05-11

    The genes encoding the 52 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) of Escherichia coli are organized into approximately 19 operons scattered throughout the chromosome. One of these, the spc operon, contains the genes for ten ribosomal proteins: L14, L24, L5, S14, S8, L6, L18, S5, L30 and L15 (rp1N, rp1X, rp1E, rpsN, rpsH, rp1F, rp1R, rpsE, rpmD, and rp1O). We now report the entire 5.9 kb nucleotide sequence of the spc operon. DNA sequence analysis has confirmed the genetic organization and refined the amino acid sequence of the ten r-proteins in this operon. It has also revealed the presence of two open reading frames past the last known gene (L15) of the spc operon. One of these corresponds to a gene (pr1A or secY) which recently has been shown by others to be involved in protein export. In addition, S1 mapping experiments indicate that a significant proportion of transcription initiated from the spc operon continues not only into the two putative genes, but also without termination into the downstream alpha r-protein operon. PMID:6222285

  17. Self-assembly of virus-like particles of porcine circovirus type 2 capsid protein expressed from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is a serious problem to the swine industry and can lead to significant negative impacts on profitability of pork production. Syndrome associated with PCV2 is known as porcine circovirus closely associated with post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). The capsid (Cap) protein of PCV2 is a major candidate antigen for development of recombinant vaccine and serological diagnostic method. The recombinant Cap protein has the ability to self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) in vitro, it is particularly opportunity to develop the PV2 VLPs vaccine in Escherichia coli,(E.coli ), because where the cost of the vaccine must be weighed against the value of the vaccinated pig, when it was to extend use the VLPs vaccine of PCV2. Results In this report, a highly soluble Cap-tag protein expressed in E.coli was constructed with a p-SMK expression vector with a fusion tag of small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO). The recombinant Cap was purified using Ni2+ affinity resins, whereas the tag was used to remove the SUMO protease. Simultaneously, the whole native Cap protein was able to self-assemble into VLPs in vitro when viewed under an electron microscope. The Cap-like particles had a size and shape that resembled the authentic Cap. The result could also be applied in the large-scale production of VLPs of PCV2 and could be used as a diagnostic antigen or a potential VLP vaccine against PCV2 infection in pigs. Conclusion we have, for the first time, utilized the SUMO fusion motif to successfully express the entire authentic Cap protein of PCV2 in E. coli. After the cleavage of the fusion motif, the nCap protein has the ability to self-assemble into VLPs, which can be used as as a potential vaccine to protect pigs from PCV2-infection. PMID:20646322

  18. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these “molecular syringes” for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells. PMID:26017572

  19. Protein expression and isotopic enrichment based on induction of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Refaeli, Bosmat; Goldbourt, Amir

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Entner-Doudoroff pathway is induced during protein expression in E. coli. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1-{sup 13}C-gluconate and {sup 15}NH{sub 4}Cl provide a carbonyl-amide protein backbone labeling scheme. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enrichment pattern is determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. -- Abstract: The Entner-Doudoroff pathway is known to exist in many organisms including bacteria, archea and eukarya. Although the common route for carbon catabolism in Escherichia coli is the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, it was shown that gluconate catabolism in E. coli occurs via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. We demonstrate here that by supplying BL21(DE3) competent E.coli cells with gluconate in a minimal growth medium, protein expression can be induced. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of over-expressed ubiquitin show that by using [1-{sup 13}C]-gluconate as the only carbon source, and {sup 15}N-enriched ammonium chloride, sparse isotopic enrichment in the form of a spin-pair carbonyl-amide backbone enrichment is obtained. The specific amino acid labeling pattern is analyzed and is shown to be compatible with Entner-Doudoroff metabolism. Isotopic enrichment serves as a key factor in the biophysical characterization of proteins by various methods including nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy and more. Therefore, the method presented here can be applied to study proteins by obtaining sparse enrichment schemes that are not based on the regular glycolytic pathway, or to study the Entner-Doudoroff metabolism during protein expression.

  20. Kinetics of Biosynthesis of Iron-Regulated Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Klebba, Phillip E.; McIntosh, Mark A.; Neilands, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    Using biological iron chelators to control specifically iron availability to Escherichia coli K-12 in conjunction with radioactive pulse-labels, we examined the biosynthesis of six iron-regulated membrane proteins. Iron deprivation induced the synthesis of five proteins, which had molecular weights of 83,000 (83K), 81K (Fep), 78K (TonA), 74K (Cir), and 25K. The kinetics of induction were the same in entA and entA+ strains, but were affected by the initial iron availability in the media. Iron-poor cells induced rapidly (half-time, 10 min), whereas iron-rich cells began induction after a lag and showed a slower induction half-time (30 min). Within this general pattern of induction after iron deprivation, several different kinetic patterns were apparent. The 83K, 81K, and 74K proteins were coordinately controlled under all of the conditions examined. The 78K and 25K proteins were regulated differently. The synthesis of a previously unrecognized 90K inner membrane protein was inhibited by iron deprivation and stimulated by iron repletion. Both ferrichrome and ferric enterobactin completely repressed 81K and 74K synthesis when the siderophores were supplied at concentrations of 5 μM in vivo (half-time, 2.5 min). At concentrations less than 5 μM, however, both siderophores repressed synthesis only temporarily; the duration of repression was proportional to the amount of ferric siderophore added. The half-lives of the 81K and 74K mRNAs, as measured by rifampin treatment, were 1.2 and 1.6 min, respectively. The results of this study suggest that enteric bacteria are capable of instantaneously detecting and reacting to fluctuations in the extracellular iron concentration and that they store iron during periods of iron repletion for utilization during periods of iron stress. Neither iron storage nor iron regulation of envelope protein synthesis is dependent on the ability of the bacteria to form heme. Images PMID:6174499

  1. The Escherichia coli small heat-shock proteins IbpA and IbpB prevent the aggregation of endogenous proteins denatured in vivo during extreme heat shock.

    PubMed

    Kuczyńska-Wiśnik, Dorota; Kedzierska, Sabina; Matuszewska, Ewelina; Lund, Peter; Taylor, Alina; Lipińska, Barbara; Laskowska, Ewa

    2002-06-01

    The roles of the Escherichia coli IbpA and IbpB chaperones in protection of heat-denatured proteins against irreversible aggregation in vivo were investigated. Overproduction of IbpA and IbpB resulted in stabilization of the denatured and reversibly aggregated proteins (the S fraction), which could be isolated from E. coli cells by sucrose gradient centrifugation. This finding is in agreement with the present model of the small heat-shock proteins' function, based mainly on in vitro studies. Deletion of the ibpAB operon resulted in almost twofold increase in protein aggregation and in inactivation of an enzyme (fructose-1,6-biphosphate aldolase) in cells incubated at 50 degrees C for 4 h, decreased efficiency of the removal of protein aggregates formed during prolonged incubation at 50 degrees C and affected cell viability at this temperature. IbpA/B proteins were not needed for removal of protein aggregates or for the enzyme protection/renaturation in cells heat shocked at 50 degrees C for 15 min. These results show that the IbpA/B proteins are required upon an extreme, long-term heat shock. Overproduction of IbpA but not IbpB caused an increase of the level of beta-lactamase precursor, which was localized in the S fraction, together with the IbpA protein, which suggests that the unfolded precursor binds to IbpA but not to IbpB. Although in the wild-type cells both E. coli small heat-shock proteins are known to localize in the S fraction, only 2% of total IbpB co-localized with the aggregated proteins in the absence of IbpA, while in the absence of IbpB, the majority of IbpA was present in the aggregates fraction. PMID:12055295

  2. Role of the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair proteins in DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Moolenaar, G F; Moorman, C; Goosen, N

    2000-10-01

    DNA polymerase I (PolI) functions both in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and in the processing of Okazaki fragments that are generated on the lagging strand during DNA replication. Escherichia coli cells completely lacking the PolI enzyme are viable as long as they are grown on minimal medium. Here we show that viability is fully dependent on the presence of functional UvrA, UvrB, and UvrD (helicase II) proteins but does not require UvrC. In contrast, delta polA cells grow even better when the uvrC gene has been deleted. Apparently UvrA, UvrB, and UvrD are needed in a replication backup system that replaces the PolI function, and UvrC interferes with this alternative replication pathway. With specific mutants of UvrC we could show that the inhibitory effect of this protein is related to its catalytic activity that on damaged DNA is responsible for the 3' incision reaction. Specific mutants of UvrA and UvrB were also studied for their capacity to support the PolI-independent replication. Deletion of the UvrC-binding domain of UvrB resulted in a phenotype similar to that caused by deletion of the uvrC gene, showing that the inhibitory incision activity of UvrC is mediated via binding to UvrB. A mutation in the N-terminal zinc finger domain of UvrA does not affect NER in vivo or in vitro. The same mutation, however, does give inviability in combination with the delta polA mutation. Apparently the N-terminal zinc-binding domain of UvrA has specifically evolved for a function outside DNA repair. A model for the function of the UvrA, UvrB, and UvrD proteins in the alternative replication pathway is discussed. PMID:11004168

  3. Mechanism of maltose transport in Escherichia coli: transmembrane signaling by periplasmic binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Davidson, A L; Shuman, H A; Nikaido, H

    1992-03-15

    Maltose transport across the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli is dependent on the presence of a periplasmic maltose-binding protein (MBP), the product of the malE gene. The products of the malF, malG, and malK genes form a membrane-associated complex that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ATP to provide energy for the transport event. Previously, mutants were isolated that had gained the ability to grow on maltose in the absence of MBP. After reconstitution of the transport complex into proteoliposomes, measurement of the ATPase activity of wild-type and mutant complexes in the presence and absence of MBP revealed that the wild-type complex hydrolyzed ATP rapidly only when MBP and maltose were both present. In contrast, the mutant complexes have gained the ability to hydrolyze ATP in the absence of maltose and MBP. The basal rate of hydrolysis by the different mutant complexes was directly proportional to the growth rate of that strain on maltose, a result indicating that the constitutive ATP hydrolysis and presumably the resultant cyclic conformational changes of the complex produce maltose transport in the absence of MBP. These results also suggest that ATP hydrolysis is not directly coupled to ligand transport even in wild-type cells and that one important function of MBP is to transmit a transmembrane signal, through the membrane-spanning MalF and MalG proteins, to the MalK protein on the other side of the membrane, so that ATP hydrolysis can occur. PMID:1549599

  4. Dual-emitting biosensors for glucose and glutamine from genertically engineered E. coli binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolosa, Leah; Ge, Xudong; Kostov, Yordan; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Rao, Govind

    2003-07-01

    Glucose is the major source of carbon, and glutamine is the major source of nitrogen in cell culture media. Thus, glucose and glutamine monitoring are important in maintaining optimal conditions in industrial bioprocesses. Here we report reagentless glucose and glutamine sensors using the E. coli glucose binding protein (GBP) and the glutamine binding protein (GlnBP). Both of these proteins are derived from the permease system of the gram-negative bacteria. The Q26C variant of GBP was labeled at the 26-position with anilino-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS), while the S179C variant of GlnBP was labeled at the 179-position with acrylodan. The ANS and acrylodan emissions are quenched in the presence of glucose and glutamine, respectively. The acrylodan-labeled GlnBP was labeled at the N-terminal with ruthenium bis-(2,2"-bipyridyl)-1,10-phenanthroline-9-isothiocyanate. The ruthenium acts as a non-responsive long-lived reference. The apparent binding constant, Kd", of 8.0 μM glucose was obtained from the decrease in intensity of ANS in GBP. The reliability of the method in monitoring glucose during yeast fermentation was determined by comparison with the YSI Biochemistry Analyzer. The apparent binding constant, Kd", of 0.72 μM glutamine was calculated from the ratio of emission intensities of acrylodan and ruthenium (I515/I610) in GlnBP. The presence of the long-lived ruthenium allowed for modulation sensing at lower frequencies (1-10 MHz) approaching an accuracy of +/- 0.02 μM. The conversion of the GBP into a similar ratiometric sensor was described.

  5. Functional reconstitution and characterization of AqpZ, the E. coli water channel protein.

    PubMed

    Borgnia, M J; Kozono, D; Calamita, G; Maloney, P C; Agre, P

    1999-09-01

    Understanding the selectivity of aquaporin water channels will require structural and functional studies of wild-type and modified proteins; however, expression systems have not previously yielded aquaporins in the necessary milligram quantities. Here we report expression of a histidine-tagged form of Escherichia coli aquaporin-Z (AqpZ) in its homologous expression system. 10-His-AqpZ is solubilized and purified to near homogeneity in a single step with a final yield of approximately 2.5 mg/l of culture. The histidine tag is removed by trypsin, yielding the native protein with the addition of three N-terminal residues, as confirmed by microsequencing. Sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis showed that the native, solubilized AqpZ protein is a trypsin-resistant tetramer. Unlike other known aquaporins, AqpZ tetramers are not readily dissociated by 1% SDS at neutral pH. Hydrophilic reducing agents have a limited effect on the stability of the tetramer in 1% SDS, whereas incubations for more than 24 hours, pH values below 5.6, or exposure to the hydrophobic reducing agent ethanedithiol cause dissociation into monomers. Cys20, but not Cys9, is necessary for the stability of the AqpZ tetramer in SDS. Upon reconstitution into proteoliposomes, AqpZ displays very high osmotic water permeability (pf > or = 10 x 10(-14) cm3 s-1 subunit-1) and low Arrhenius activation energy (Ea = 3.7 kcal/mol), similar to mammalian aquaporin-1 (AQP1). No permeation by glycerol, urea or sorbitol was detected. Expression of native and modified AqpZ in milligram quantities has permitted biophysical characterization of this remarkably stable aquaporin tetramer, which is being utilized for high-resolution structural studies. PMID:10518952

  6. The cost and capacity of signaling in the Escherichia coli protein reaction network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsen, Jacob Bock; Krishna, Sandeep; Sneppen, Kim

    2008-01-01

    In systems biology new ways are required to analyze the large amount of existing data on regulation of cellular processes. Recent work can be roughly classified into either dynamical models of well-described subsystems, or coarse-grained descriptions of the topology of the molecular networks at the scale of the whole organism. In order to bridge these two disparate approaches one needs to develop simplified descriptions of dynamics and topological measures which address the propagation of signals in molecular networks. Transmission of a signal across a reaction node depends on the presence of other reactants. It will typically be more demanding to transmit a signal across a reaction node with more input links. Sending signals along a path with several subsequent reaction nodes also increases the constraints on the presence of other proteins in the overall network. Therefore counting in and out links along reactions of a potential pathway can give insight into the signaling properties of a particular molecular network. Here, we consider the directed network of protein regulation in E. coli, characterizing its modularity in terms of its potential to transmit signals. We demonstrate that the simplest measure based on identifying subnetworks of strong components, within which each node could send a signal to every other node, does indeed partition the network into functional modules. We suggest that the total number of reactants needed to send a signal between two nodes in the network can be considered as the cost associated with transmitting this signal. Similarly we define spread as the number of reaction products that could be influenced by transmission of a successful signal. Our considerations open for a new class of network measures that implicitly utilize the constrained repertoire of chemical modifications of any biological molecule. The counting of cost and spread connects the topology of networks to the specificity of signaling across the network. Thereby, we

  7. Inner Membrane Protein YhcB Interacts with RodZ Involved in Cell Shape Maintenance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gaochi; Hamamoto, Kentaro; Kitakawa, Madoka

    2012-01-01

    Depletion of YhcB, an inner membrane protein of Escherichia coli, inhibited the growth of rodZ deletion mutant showing that the loss of both YhcB and RodZ is synthetically lethal. Furthermore, YhcB was demonstrated to interact with RodZ as well as several other proteins involved in cell shape maintenance and an inner membrane protein YciS of unknown function, using bacterial two-hybrid system. These observations seem to indicate that YhcB is involved in the biogenesis of cell envelope and the maintenance of cell shape together with RodZ.

  8. A signal sequence is not required for protein export in prlA mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Derman, A I; Puziss, J W; Bassford, P J; Beckwith, J

    1993-01-01

    The prlA/secY gene, which codes for an integral membrane protein component of the Escherichia coli protein export machinery, is the locus of the strongest suppressors of signal sequence mutations. We demonstrate that two exported proteins of E.coli, maltose-binding protein and alkaline phosphatase, each lacking its entire signal sequence, are exported to the periplasm in several prlA mutants. The export efficiency can be substantial; in a strain carrying the prlA4 allele, 30% of signal-sequenceless alkaline phosphatase is exported to the periplasm. Other components of the E.coli export machinery, including SecA, are required for this export. SecB is required for the export of signal-sequenceless alkaline phosphatase even though the normal export of alkaline phosphatase does not require this chaperonin. Our findings indicate that signal sequences confer speed and efficiency upon the export process, but that they are not always essential for export. Entry into the export pathway may involve components that so overlap in function that the absence of a signal sequence can be compensated for, or there may exist one or more means of entry that do not require signal sequences at all. Images PMID:8458344

  9. Structural dynamics of E. coli single-stranded DNA binding protein reveal DNA wrapping and unwrapping pathways

    PubMed Central

    Suksombat, Sukrit; Khafizov, Rustem; Kozlov, Alexander G; Lohman, Timothy M; Chemla, Yann R

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli single-stranded (ss)DNA binding (SSB) protein mediates genome maintenance processes by regulating access to ssDNA. This homotetrameric protein wraps ssDNA in multiple distinct binding modes that may be used selectively in different DNA processes, and whose detailed wrapping topologies remain speculative. Here, we used single-molecule force and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate E. coli SSB binding to ssDNA. Stretching a single ssDNA-SSB complex reveals discrete states that correlate with known binding modes, the likely ssDNA conformations and diffusion dynamics in each, and the kinetic pathways by which the protein wraps ssDNA and is dissociated. The data allow us to construct an energy landscape for the ssDNA-SSB complex, revealing that unwrapping energy costs increase the more ssDNA is unraveled. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism by which proteins gain access to ssDNA bound by SSB, as demonstrated by experiments in which SSB is displaced by the E. coli recombinase RecA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08193.001 PMID:26305498

  10. Development of a Cold-Adapted Pseudoalteromonas Expression System for the Pseudoalteromonas Proteins Intractable for the Escherichia coli System.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zi-Chao; Tang, Bai-Lu; Zhao, Dian-Li; Pang, Xiuhua; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Although the Escherichia coli expression system is the most commonly used expression system, some proteins are still difficult to be expressed by this system, such as proteins with high thermolability and enzymes that cannot mature by autoprocessing. Therefore, it is necessary to develop alternative expression systems. In this study, a cold-adapted Pseudoalteromonas expression system was developed. A shuttle vector was constructed, and a conjugational transfer system between E. coli and psychrophilic strain Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM20429 was established. Based on the shuttle vector, three reporter vectors were constructed to compare the strength of the cloned promoters at low temperature. The promoter of xylanase gene from Pseudoalteromonas sp. BSi20429 was chosen due to its high activity at 10-15°C. An expression vector pEV containing the chosen promoter, multiple cloning sites and a His tag was constructed for protein expression and purification. With pEV as expression vector and SM20429 as the host, a cold-adapted protease, pseudoalterin, which cannot be maturely expressed in E. coli, was successfully expressed as an active extracellular enzyme when induced by 2% oat spelt xylan at 15°C for 48 h. Recombinant pseudoalterin purified from the culture by Ni affinity chromatography had identical N-terminal sequence, similar molecular mass and substrate specificity as the native pseudoalterin. In addition, another two cold-adapted enzymes were also successfully expressed by this system. Our results indicate that this cold-adapted Pseudoalteromonas expression system will provide an alternative choice for protein expression, especially for the Pseudoalteromonas proteins intractable for the E. coli system. PMID:26333173

  11. Comparing the predicted and observed properties of proteins encoded in the genome of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Link, A J; Robison, K; Church, G M

    1997-08-01

    Mining the emerging abundance of microbial genome sequences for hypotheses is an exciting prospect of "functional genomics". At the forefront of this effort, we compared the predictions of the complete Escherichia coli genomic sequence with the observed gene products by assessing 381 proteins for their mature N-termini, in vivo abundances, isoelectric points, molecular masses, and cellular locations. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and Edman sequencing were combined to sequence Coomassie-stained 2-DE spots representing the abundant proteins of wild-type E. coli K-12 strains. Greater than 90% of the abundant proteins in the E. coli proteome lie in a small isoelectric point and molecular mass window of 4-7 and 10-100 kDa, respectively. We identified several highly abundant proteins, YjbJ, YjbP, YggX, HdeA, and AhpC, which would not have been predicted from the genomic sequence alone. Of the 223 uniquely identified loci, 60% of the encoded proteins are proteolytically processed. As previously reported, the initiator methionine was efficiently cleaved when the penultimate amino acid was serine or alanine. In contrast, when the penultimate amino acid was threonine, glycine, or proline, cleavage was variable, and valine did not signal cleavage. Although signal peptide cleavage sites tended to follow predicted rules, the length of the putative signal sequence was occassionally greater than the consensus. For proteins predicted to be in the cytoplasm or inner membrane, the N-terminal amino acids were highly constrained compared to proteins localized to the periplasm or outer membrane. Although cytoplasmic proteins follow the N-end rule for protein stability, proteins in the periplasm or outer membrane do not follow this rule; several have N-terminal amino acids predicted to destabilize the proteins. Surprisingly, 18% of the identified 2-DE spots represent isoforms in which protein products of the same gene have different observed pI and M(r), suggesting they are

  12. Creation of a Cellooligosaccharide-Assimilating Escherichia coli Strain by Displaying Active Beta-Glucosidase on the Cell Surface via a Novel Anchor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kawabata, Hitomi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated direct assimilation of cellooligosaccharide using Escherichia coli displaying beta-glucosidase (BGL). BGL from Thermobifida fusca YX (Tfu0937) was displayed on the E. coli cell surface using a novel anchor protein named Blc. This strain was grown successfully on 0.2% cellobiose, and the optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was 1.05 after 20 h. PMID:21742905

  13. Large protein analysis of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MALDI TOF mass spectrometry using amoxicillin functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nazim; Guo, Zhongxian; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria or their protein and peptide entity enrichment using biomolecules-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles, and analysis by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is a promising technique to analyze microorganisms. High and low molecular weight proteins like penicillin-binding proteins are responsible for final step synthesis of peptidoglycan biosynthesis; those are the target of lactam antibiotics. In this paper, we synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (mag-NPs) and further modified them with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, and then the β-lactam antibiotic amoxicillin was covalently linked to their surface. β-Lactam group attributes as penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) in bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were used as model bacteria for enrichment based on the β-lactam affinity of magnetic nanoparticles, and then the bacteria were easily separated by an external magnet. Several high molecular weight penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) were detected by MALDI MS containing 10(4) and 10(3) colony-forming unit (cfu) per milileter (mL) of S. aureus and E. coli, respectively. In the case of E. coli, higher molecular weight PBPs were observed at 20 to 55 kDa in MALDI mass spectra. However, S. aureus bacteria resulted with femAB operon-based proteins, with molecular weight of 49570.4 Da, by MALDI MS after using amoxicillin functionalized-mag-NPs. The current approach provides an effective bacteria detection and preconcentration method that has high potential in the near future for fast and sensitive diagnosis of pathogenic bacteria infection. Graphical Abstract Schematic for large proteins analysis by MALDI TOF MS (a) mag-NPs and bacterial interaction (b) Penicillin binding proteins trapping by Amox-mag-NPs. PMID:27565791

  14. Cell age dependent concentration of Escherichia coli divisome proteins analyzed with ImageJ and ObjectJ.

    PubMed

    Vischer, Norbert O E; Verheul, Jolanda; Postma, Marten; van den Berg van Saparoea, Bart; Galli, Elisa; Natale, Paolo; Gerdes, Kenn; Luirink, Joen; Vollmer, Waldemar; Vicente, Miguel; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2015-01-01

    The rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli multiplies by elongation followed by binary fission. Longitudinal growth of the cell envelope and synthesis of the new poles are organized by two protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively. We have analyzed the spatio-temporal localization patterns of many of these morphogenetic proteins by immunolabeling the wild type strain MC4100 grown to steady state in minimal glucose medium at 28°C. This allowed the direct comparison of morphogenetic protein localization patterns as a function of cell age as imaged by phase contrast and fluorescence wide field microscopy. Under steady state conditions the age distribution of the cells is constant and is directly correlated to cell length. To quantify cell size and protein localization parameters in 1000s of labeled cells, we developed 'Coli-Inspector,' which is a project running under ImageJ with the plugin 'ObjectJ.' ObjectJ organizes image-analysis tasks using an integrated approach with the flexibility to produce different output formats from existing markers such as intensity data and geometrical parameters. ObjectJ supports the combination of automatic and interactive methods giving the user complete control over the method of image analysis and data collection, with visual inspection tools for quick elimination of artifacts. Coli-inspector was used to sort the cells according to division cycle cell age and to analyze the spatio-temporal localization pattern of each protein. A unique dataset has been created on the concentration and position of the proteins during the cell cycle. We show for the first time that a subset of morphogenetic proteins have a constant cellular concentration during the cell division cycle whereas another set exhibits a cell division cycle dependent concentration variation. Using the number of proteins present at midcell, the stoichiometry of the divisome is discussed. PMID:26124755

  15. Cell age dependent concentration of Escherichia coli divisome proteins analyzed with ImageJ and ObjectJ

    PubMed Central

    Vischer, Norbert O. E.; Verheul, Jolanda; Postma, Marten; van den Berg van Saparoea, Bart; Galli, Elisa; Natale, Paolo; Gerdes, Kenn; Luirink, Joen; Vollmer, Waldemar; Vicente, Miguel; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2015-01-01

    The rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli multiplies by elongation followed by binary fission. Longitudinal growth of the cell envelope and synthesis of the new poles are organized by two protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively. We have analyzed the spatio-temporal localization patterns of many of these morphogenetic proteins by immunolabeling the wild type strain MC4100 grown to steady state in minimal glucose medium at 28°C. This allowed the direct comparison of morphogenetic protein localization patterns as a function of cell age as imaged by phase contrast and fluorescence wide field microscopy. Under steady state conditions the age distribution of the cells is constant and is directly correlated to cell length. To quantify cell size and protein localization parameters in 1000s of labeled cells, we developed ‘Coli-Inspector,’ which is a project running under ImageJ with the plugin ‘ObjectJ.’ ObjectJ organizes image-analysis tasks using an integrated approach with the flexibility to produce different output formats from existing markers such as intensity data and geometrical parameters. ObjectJ supports the combination of automatic and interactive methods giving the user complete control over the method of image analysis and data collection, with visual inspection tools for quick elimination of artifacts. Coli-inspector was used to sort the cells according to division cycle cell age and to analyze the spatio-temporal localization pattern of each protein. A unique dataset has been created on the concentration and position of the proteins during the cell cycle. We show for the first time that a subset of morphogenetic proteins have a constant cellular concentration during the cell division cycle whereas another set exhibits a cell division cycle dependent concentration variation. Using the number of proteins present at midcell, the stoichiometry of the divisome is discussed. PMID:26124755

  16. Permissive linker insertion sites in the outer membrane protein of 987P fimbriae of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Schifferli, D M; Alrutz, M A

    1994-01-01

    The FasD protein is essential for the biogenesis of 987P fimbriae of Escherichia coli. In this study, subcellular fractionation was used to demonstrate that FasD is an outer membrane protein. In addition, the accessibility of FasD to proteases established the presence of surface-exposed FasD domains on both sides of the outer membrane. The fasD gene was sequenced, and the deduced amino acid sequence was shown to share homologous domains with a family of outer membrane proteins from various fimbrial systems. Similar to porins, fimbrial outer membrane proteins are relatively polar, lack typical hydrophobic membrane-spanning domains, and posses secondary structures predicted to be rich in turns and amphipathic beta-sheets. On the basis of the experimental data and structural predictions, FasD is postulated to consist essentially of surface-exposed turns and loops and membrane-spanning interacting amphipathic beta-strands. In an attempt to test this prediction, the fasD gene was submitted to random in-frame linker insertion mutagenesis. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that it was possible to produce fasD mutants, whose products remain functional for fimbrial export and assembly. Subsequently, 11 fasD alleles, containing linker inserts encoding beta-turn-inducing residues, were shown to express functional proteins. The insertion sites were designated permissive sites. The inserts used are expected to be least detrimental to the function of FasD when they are inserted into surface-exposed domains not directly involved in fimbrial export. In contrast, FasD is not expected to accommodate such residues in its amphipathic beta-strands without being destabilized in the membrane and losing function. All permissive sites were sequenced and shown to be located in or one residue away from predicted turns. In contrast, 5 of 10 sequenced nonpermissive sites were mapped to predicted amphipathic beta-strands. These results are consistent with the structural predictions for Fas

  17. Characterization of methanogenic and prokaryotic assemblages based on mcrA and 16S rRNA gene diversity in sediments of the Kazan mud volcano (Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Kormas, K A; Meziti, A; Dählmann, A; DE Lange, G J; Lykousis, V

    2008-12-01

    The diversity of the methyl-coenzyme reductase A (mcrA) and 16S rRNA genes was investigated in gas hydrate containing sediment from the Kazan mud volcano, eastern Mediterranean Sea. mcrA was detected only at 15 and 20 cm below seafloor (cmbsf) from a 40-cm long push core, while based on chemical profiles of methane, sulfate, and sulfide, possible anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) depth was inferred at 12-15 cmbsf. The phylogenetic relationships of the obtained mcrA, archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA genes, showed that all the found sequences were found in both depths and at similar relative abundances. mcrA diversity was low. All sequences were related to the Methanosarcinales, with the most dominant (77.2%) sequences falling in group mcrA-e. The 16S rRNA-based archaeal diversity also revealed low diversity and clear dominance (72.8% of all archaeal phylotypes) of the Methanosarcinales and, in particular, ANME-2c. Bacteria showed higher diversity but 83.2% of the retrieved phylotypes from both sediment layers belonged to the delta-Proteobacteria. These phylotypes fell in the SEEP-SRB1 putative AOM group. In addition, the rest of the less abundant phylotypes were related to yet-uncultivated representatives of the Actinobacteria, Spirochaetales, and candidate divisions OP11 and WS3 from gas hydrate-bearing habitats. These phylotype patterns indicate that AOM is occurring in the 15 and 20 cmbsf sediment layers. PMID:19076636

  18. Expression and purification of a Tuber borchii fruitbody-specific protein, TBF-1, from Escherichia coli: generation of polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Palma, Francesco; Agostini, Deborah; Cerigini, Emanuela; Polidori, Emanuela; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2005-01-01

    TBF-1 is a fruitbody-specific protein present in the white truffle species Tuber borchii Vittad. A similar protein has been found only in the closely related species Tuber dryophilum (TDF-1), but not in other truffles. The protein from T. borchii was overexpressed as fusion protein in E. coli and was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography. Recombinant protein was used for generating polyclonal antibodies. The antiserum strongly reacted with TBF-1, weakly recognized TDF-1, and did not detect correlate band in the other white truffle species. The high level of expression of this protein in the fruitbody and the specificity of the antibody anti-TBF-1 make it possible to set up a diagnostic tool for detecting these species in natural samples and foodstuffs. PMID:15881596

  19. Recombinant dengue type 1 virus NS5 protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibits RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Tan, B H; Fu, J; Sugrue, R J; Yap, E H; Chan, Y C; Tan, Y H

    1996-02-15

    The complete nonstructural NS5 gene of dengue type 1 virus, Singapore strain S275/90 (D1-S275/90) was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (126 kDa). The GST-NS5 fusion protein was purified and the recombinant NS5 protein released from the fusion protein by thrombin cleavage. The recombinant NS5 had a predicted molecular weight of 100 kDa and reacted with antiserum against D1-S275/90 virus in Western blot analysis. The purified recombinant NS5 protein possessed RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity which was inhibited (>99%) by antibodies against the recombinant NS5 protein. The polymerase product was shown to be a negative-stranded RNA molecule, of template size, which forms a double-stranded complex with the template RNA. PMID:8607261

  20. [Intrinsic prokaryotic promoter activity of SUMO gene and its applications in the protein expression system of Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Qi, Yanhong; Zou, Zhurong; Zou, Huaying; Fan, Yunliu; Zhang, Chunyi

    2011-06-01

    Nowadays, SUMO fusion system is important for recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli, yet a few aspects remain to be improved, including the efficacy for vector construction and protein solubility. In this study, we found the SUMO gene Smt3 (Sm) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae conferred an unexpected activity of constitutive prokaryotic promoter during its PCR cloning, and the gene coding regions of SUMOs in most species had a sigma70-dependent prokaryotic promoter embedded, through the prediction via the BPROM program developed by Softberry. By combining the characters of Sm promoter activity and the Stu I site (added at the 3'-terminal of Sm), and introducing a His-tag and a hyper-acidic solubility-enhancing tag, we further constructed a set of versatile vectors for gene cloning and expression on the basis of Sm'-LacZa fusion gene. Experimentally started from these vectors, several target genes were subcloned and expressed through blue-white screening and SDS-PAGE analysis. The results manifest a few of expectable advantages such as rapid vector construction, highly soluble protein expression and feasible co-expression of correlated proteins. Conclusively, our optimized SUMO fusion technology herein could confer a large potential in E. coli protein expression system, and the simultaneously established co-expression vector systems could also be very useful in studying the protein-protein interactions in vivo. PMID:22034825

  1. Isotopically Labeled Expression in E. coli, Purification, and Refolding of the Full Ectodomain of the Influenza Virus Membrane Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Spencer, Ryan M.; Weliky, David P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes methods to produce an isotopically labeled 23 kDa viral membrane protein with purified yield of 20 mg/L of E. coli shake flask culture. This yield is sufficient for NMR structural studies and the protein production methods are simple, straightforward, and rapid and likely applicable to other recombinant membrane proteins expressed in E. coli. The target FHA2 protein is the full ectodomain construct of the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein which catalyzes fusion between the viral and the cellular endosomal membranes during infection. The high yield of FHA2 was achieved by: (1) initial growth in rich medium to A600 ~ 8 followed by a switch to minimal medium and induction of protein expression; and (2) obtaining protein both from purification of the detergent-soluble lysate and from solubilization, purification, and refolding of inclusion bodies. The high cell density was achieved after optimization of pH, oxygenation, and carbon source and concentration, and the refolding protocol was optimized using circular dichroism spectroscopy. For a single residue of membrane-associated FHA2 that was obtained from purification and refolding of inclusion bodies, native conformation was verified by the 13CO chemical shift measured using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:18640277

  2. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis 65-kilodalton antigen is a heat shock protein which corresponds to common antigen and to the Escherichia coli GroEL protein.

    PubMed Central

    Shinnick, T M; Vodkin, M H; Williams, J C

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal hybridoma antibodies directed against a 65-kilodalton (kDa) mycobacterial protein could detect similarly sized antigens in many other bacterial species. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the cross-reacting protein corresponded to a 62-kDa antigen that has been called Common Antigen. The mycobacterial 65-kDa antigen and Common Antigen are similar in that both (i) are highly immunoreactive molecules, (ii) contain species-specific and genus-specific epitopes in addition to the broadly cross-reactive epitopes, (iii) can be isolated as homomultimers of greater than 240 kDa, and (iv) have similar amino acid compositions. In Escherichia coli, the cross-reactive protein corresponded to the GroEL protein. Both the GroEL protein and the mycobacterial 65-kDa protein are expressed as heat shock proteins. Images PMID:2892795

  3. Mutations that alter the ability of the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein to activate transcription.

    PubMed

    Bell, A; Gaston, K; Williams, R; Chapman, K; Kolb, A; Buc, H; Minchin, S; Williams, J; Busby, S

    1990-12-25

    The effects of a number of mutations in the E. coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) have been determined by monitoring the in vivo expression and in vitro open complex formation at two semi-synthetic promoters that are totally CRP-dependent. At one promoter the CRP-binding site is centered around 41.5 base pairs upstream from the transcription start whilst at the other promoter it is 61.5 base pairs upstream. The CRP mutation E171K reduces expression from both promoters whilst H159L renders CRP totally inactive: neither mutation stops CRP binding at either promoter. The mutations K52N and K52Q reverse the effect of H159L and 'reeducate' CRP to activate transcription. CRP carrying both H159L and K52N activates transcription from the promoter with the CRP site at -41.5 better than wild type CRP. In sharp contrast, this doubly changed CRP is totally inactive with respect to the activation of transcription from the promoter carrying the CRP site at -61.5. Our results suggest that CRP can use different contacts and/or conformations during transcription activation at promoters with different architectures. PMID:2259621

  4. Mutations that alter the ability of the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein to activate transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, A; Gaston, K; Williams, R; Chapman, K; Kolb, A; Buc, H; Minchin, S; Williams, J; Busby, S

    1990-01-01

    The effects of a number of mutations in the E. coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) have been determined by monitoring the in vivo expression and in vitro open complex formation at two semi-synthetic promoters that are totally CRP-dependent. At one promoter the CRP-binding site is centered around 41.5 base pairs upstream from the transcription start whilst at the other promoter it is 61.5 base pairs upstream. The CRP mutation E171K reduces expression from both promoters whilst H159L renders CRP totally inactive: neither mutation stops CRP binding at either promoter. The mutations K52N and K52Q reverse the effect of H159L and 'reeducate' CRP to activate transcription. CRP carrying both H159L and K52N activates transcription from the promoter with the CRP site at -41.5 better than wild type CRP. In sharp contrast, this doubly changed CRP is totally inactive with respect to the activation of transcription from the promoter carrying the CRP site at -61.5. Our results suggest that CRP can use different contacts and/or conformations during transcription activation at promoters with different architectures. Images PMID:2259621

  5. Characterization of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Dynamics and Localization at the Centrosome

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Christina; Mok, Myth T. S.; Henderson, Beric R.

    2016-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is a multifunctional regulator of Wnt signaling and acts as a mobile scaffold at different cellular sites. APC was recently found to stimulate microtubule (MT) growth at the interphase centrosome; however, little is known about its dynamics and localization at this site. To address this, we analysed APC dynamics in fixed and live cells by fluorescence microscopy. In detergent-extracted cells, we discovered that APC was only weakly retained at the centrosome during interphase suggesting a rapid rate of exchange. This was confirmed in living cells by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which identified two pools of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-APC: a major rapidly exchanging pool (~86%) and minor retained pool (~14%). The dynamic exchange rate of APC was unaffected by C-terminal truncations implicating a targeting role for the N-terminus. Indeed, we mapped centrosome localization to N-terminal armadillo repeat (ARM) domain amino acids 334–625. Interestingly, the rate of APC movement to the centrosome was stimulated by intact MTs, and APC dynamics slowed when MTs were disrupted by nocodazole treatment or knockdown of γ-tubulin. Thus, the rate of APC recycling at the centrosome is enhanced by MT growth, suggesting a positive feedback to stimulate its role in MT growth. PMID:27144584

  6. Characterization of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Dynamics and Localization at the Centrosome.

    PubMed

    Lui, Christina; Mok, Myth T S; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is a multifunctional regulator of Wnt signaling and acts as a mobile scaffold at different cellular sites. APC was recently found to stimulate microtubule (MT) growth at the interphase centrosome; however, little is known about its dynamics and localization at this site. To address this, we analysed APC dynamics in fixed and live cells by fluorescence microscopy. In detergent-extracted cells, we discovered that APC was only weakly retained at the centrosome during interphase suggesting a rapid rate of exchange. This was confirmed in living cells by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which identified two pools of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-APC: a major rapidly exchanging pool (~86%) and minor retained pool (~14%). The dynamic exchange rate of APC was unaffected by C-terminal truncations implicating a targeting role for the N-terminus. Indeed, we mapped centrosome localization to N-terminal armadillo repeat (ARM) domain amino acids 334-625. Interestingly, the rate of APC movement to the centrosome was stimulated by intact MTs, and APC dynamics slowed when MTs were disrupted by nocodazole treatment or knockdown of γ-tubulin. Thus, the rate of APC recycling at the centrosome is enhanced by MT growth, suggesting a positive feedback to stimulate its role in MT growth. PMID:27144584

  7. Crystal Structure of Penicillin-Binding Protein 3 (PBP3) from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fraipont, Claudine; Joris, Marine; Herman, Raphaël; Rocaboy, Mathieu; Schloesser, Marie; Dumas, Jacques; Kerff, Frédéric; Nguyen-Distèche, Martine; Charlier, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3), also known as FtsI, is a central component of the divisome, catalyzing cross-linking of the cell wall peptidoglycan during cell division. PBP3 is mainly periplasmic, with a 23 residues cytoplasmic tail and a single transmembrane helix. We have solved the crystal structure of a soluble form of PBP3 (PBP357–577) at 2.5 Å revealing the two modules of high molecular weight class B PBPs, a carboxy terminal module exhibiting transpeptidase activity and an amino terminal module of unknown function. To gain additional insight, the PBP3 Val88-Ser165 subdomain (PBP388–165), for which the electron density is poorly defined in the PBP3 crystal, was produced and its structure solved by SAD phasing at 2.1 Å. The structure shows a three dimensional domain swapping with a β-strand of one molecule inserted between two strands of the paired molecule, suggesting a possible role in PBP357–577 dimerization. PMID:24875494

  8. Electrochemical Characterization of Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    PubMed Central

    Hamill, Michael J.; Jost, Marco; Wong, Cintyu; Bene, Nicholas C.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Elliott, Sean J.

    2012-01-01

    When exposed to known DNA-damaging alkylating agents, Escherichia coli cells increase production of four DNA repair enzymes: Ada, AlkA, AlkB, and AidB. The role of three enzymes (Ada, AlkA, and AlkB) in repairing DNA lesions has been well characterized, while the function of AidB is poorly understood. AidB has a distinct cofactor that is potentially related to the elusive role of AidB in adaptive response: a redox active flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). In this study, we report the thermodynamic redox properties of the AidB flavin for the first time, both for free protein and in the presence of potential substrates. We find that the midpoint reduction potential of the AidB flavin is within a biologically relevant window for redox chemistry at −181 mV, that AidB significantly stabilizes the flavin semiquinone, and that small molecule binding perturbs the observed reduction potential. Our electrochemical results combined with structural analysis allow for fresh comparisons between AidB and the homologous acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (ACAD) family of enzymes. AidB exhibits several discrepancies from ACADs that suggest a novel catalytic mechanism distinct from that of the ACAD family enzymes. PMID:23443126

  9. Protein diffusion in the periplasm of E. coli under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Sochacki, Kem A; Shkel, Irina A; Record, M Thomas; Weisshaar, James C

    2011-01-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of the cell envelope of Escherichia coli are poorly understood. We use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to measure diffusion of periplasmic green fluorescent protein and probe the fluidity of the periplasm as a function of external osmotic conditions. For cells adapted to growth in complete medium at 0.14-1.02 Osm, the mean diffusion coefficient increases from 3.4 μm² s⁻¹ to 6.6 μm² s⁻¹ and the distribution of D(peri) broadens as growth osmolality increases. This is consistent with a net gain of water by the periplasm, decreasing its biopolymer volume fraction. This supports a model in which the turgor pressure drops primarily across the thin peptidoglycan layer while the cell actively maintains osmotic balance between periplasm and cytoplasm, thus avoiding a substantial pressure differential across the cytoplasmic membrane. After sudden hyperosmotic shock (plasmolysis), the cytoplasm loses water as the periplasm gains water. Accordingly, increases threefold. The fluorescence recovery after photobleaching is complete and homogeneous in all cases, but in minimal medium, the periplasm is evidently thicker at the cell tips. For the relevant geometries, Brownian dynamics simulations in model cytoplasmic and periplasmic volumes provide analytical formulae for extraction of accurate diffusion coefficients from readily measurable quantities. PMID:21190653

  10. MioC and GidA proteins promote cell division in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Lies, Mark; Visser, Bryan J.; Joshi, Mohan C.; Magnan, David; Bates, David

    2015-01-01

    The well-conserved genes surrounding the E. coli replication origin, mioC and gidA, do not normally affect chromosome replication and have little known function. We report that mioC and gidA mutants exhibit a moderate cell division inhibition phenotype. Cell elongation is exacerbated by a fis deletion, likely owing to delayed replication and subsequent cell cycle stress. Measurements of replication initiation frequency and origin segregation indicate that mioC and gidA do not inhibit cell division through any effect on oriC function. Division inhibition is also independent of the two known replication/cell division checkpoints, SOS and nucleoid occlusion. Complementation analysis indicates that mioC and gidA affect cell division in trans, indicating their effect is at the protein level. Transcriptome analysis by RNA sequencing showed that expression of a cell division septum component, YmgF, is significantly altered in mioC and gidA mutants. Our data reveal new roles for the gene products of gidA and mioC in the division apparatus, and we propose that their expression, cyclically regulated by chromatin remodeling at oriC, is part of a cell cycle regulatory program coordinating replication initiation and cell division. PMID:26074904

  11. Mutation at position 791 in Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA affects processes involved in the initiation of protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Tapprich, W E; Goss, D J; Dahlberg, A E

    1989-01-01

    A single base was mutated from guanine to adenine at position 791 in 16S rRNA in the Escherichia coli rrnB operon on the multicopy plasmid pKK3535. The plasmid-coded rRNA was processed and assembled into 30S ribosomal subunits in E. coli and caused a retardation of cell growth. The mutation affected crucial functional roles of the 30S subunit in the initiation of protein synthesis. The affinity of the mutant 30S subunits for 50S subunits was reduced and the association equilibrium constant for initiation factor 3 was decreased by a factor of 10 compared to wild-type 30S subunits. The interrelationship among the region of residue 790 in 16S rRNA, subunit association, and initiation factor 3 binding during initiation complex formation, as revealed by this study, offers insights into the functional role of rRNA in protein synthesis. PMID:2662189

  12. Mdt(A), a New Efflux Protein Conferring Multiple Antibiotic Resistance in Lactococcus lactis and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Perreten, Vincent; Schwarz, Franziska V.; Teuber, Michael; Levy, Stuart B.

    2001-01-01

    The mdt(A) gene, previously designated mef214, from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis plasmid pK214 encodes a protein [Mdt(A) (multiple drug transporter)] with 12 putative transmembrane segments (TMS) that contain typical motifs conserved among the efflux proteins of the major facilitator superfamily. However, it also has two C-motifs (conserved in the fifth TMS of the antiporters) and a putative ATP-binding site. Expression of the cloned mdt(A) gene decreased susceptibility to macrolides, lincosamides, streptogramins, and tetracyclines in L. lactis and Escherichia coli, but not in Enterococcus faecalis or in Staphylococcus aureus. Glucose-dependent efflux of erythromycin and tetracycline was demonstrated in L. lactis and in E. coli. PMID:11257023

  13. Laboratory Scale Production of Recombinant Haa86 Tick Protein in Pichia pastoris and in Escherichia coli System.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Binod; P, Azhahianambi; Ghosh, Srikant

    2016-01-01

    The commercial recombinant Bm86-based vaccines against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in Australia (TickGARD™, TickGARD plus™) and in Cuba (Gavac™) provided significant impetus to researchers globally to work on anti-tick vaccines. The Bm86 homologue of Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum Izatnagar isolate, rHaa86, is considered a potent vaccine candidate against Hyalomma tick species, transmitting animal and human diseases. The two expression systems, prokaryotic, using bacterial expression plasmid vectors and Escherichia coli, and eukaryotic, using methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris and yeast expression plasmid vectors, are used in the laboratory level production of rHaa86. Unlike proteins expressed in prokaryotic system, eukaryotic system-expressed proteins are glycosylated and may be a requisite for proper immunogenicity. Here, the protocol for laboratory scale expression of rHaa86 antigen in E. coli and P. pastoris for development of an anti-Hyalomma tick vaccine is described. PMID:27076316

  14. Proteomic analysis reveals protein expression differences in Escherichia coli strains associated with persistent versus transient mastitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli is a leading cause of bacterial mastitis in dairy cattle. Typically this infection is transient in nature, causing an infection that lasts 2-3 days. However, in a minority of cases, E. coli has been shown to cause a persistent intramammary infection. The mechanisms that allow for...

  15. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pane, Katia; Durante, Lorenzo; Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200-250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15-18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96-98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  16. Conformations of the signal recognition particle protein Ffh from Escherichia coli as determined by FRET.

    PubMed

    Buskiewicz, Iwona; Peske, Frank; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Rodnina, Marina V; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2005-08-12

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) initiates the co-translational targeting of proteins to the plasma membrane in bacteria by binding to the N-terminal signal sequence emerging from the translating ribosome. SRP in Escherichia coli is composed of one protein, Ffh, and 4.5S RNA. In the present work, we probe the structure of Ffh alone and in the complex with 4.5S RNA by measuring distances between different positions within Ffh and between Ffh and 4.5S RNA by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). According to the FRET distances, NG and M domains in free Ffh are in close contact, as in the A/A arrangement in the crystal structure of Ffh from Thermus aquaticus, in agreement with the formation of a crosslink between cysteine residues at two critical positions in the G and M domains. Upon Ffh binding to 4.5S RNA or a 61 nucleotide fragment comprising internal loops A-C, the G and M domains move apart to assume a more open conformation, as indicated by changes of FRET distances. The movement is smaller when Ffh binds to a 49 nucleotide fragment of 4.5S RNA comprising only internal loops A and B, i.e. lacking the binding site of the NG domain. The FRET results suggest that in the SRP complex 4.5S RNA is present in a bent, rather than extended, conformation. The domain rearrangement of Ffh that takes place upon formation of the SRP is probably important for subsequent steps of membrane targeting, including interactions with the translating ribosome and the SRP receptor. PMID:16005894

  17. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200–250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15–18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96–98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  18. Bacteriostasis of a milk-sensitive strain of Escherichia coli by immunoglobulins and iron-binding proteins in association

    PubMed Central

    Spik, Geneviève; Cheron, A.; Montreuil, J.; Dolby, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The growth of a milk-sensitive strain of Escherichia coli in 1% peptone water can be inhibited for at least 3 h by IgA isolated from human milk or IgG1 from bovine colostrum acting with native iron-binding proteins from milk or serum. The immunoglobulins alone are inactive; the native iron-binding proteins alone are sometimes partially active. All this activity is inconsistent and not always enhanced by the addition of bicarbonate ions. The growth of E. coli in human milk that has been inactivated by heating at 100° is consistently inhibited by IgA or IgG1 acting with native iron-binding proteins. The immunoglobulins are inactive alone but the iron-binding proteins have considerably more activity when added alone to inactivated milk than to peptone water, suggesting that the growth medium is contributing to or stabilising the activity. The addition of bicarbonate ions is without effect. Attempted absorption of antibody with suspensions of E. coli and replacement of bacteriostatic activity by addition of purified milk proteins has not, however, suggested any participants in the bacteriostasis of milk-sensitive strains other than antibody and iron-binding protein. Bacteriostasis is abolished by saturating the transferrins with iron. The iron-free apo-derivatives are not more inhibitory than the native proteins except for human apo-lactotransferrin in peptone water which inhibits growth completely. This latter inhibition is not attributable to the low pH and 10–100 times more iron is needed to abolish this activity than is needed to abolish that of bovine apo-lactotransferrin. PMID:361548

  19. Expression, purification and characterization of two truncated peste des petits ruminants virus matrix proteins in Escherichia coli, and production of polyclonal antibodies against this protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuxiao; Wu, Xiaodong; Li, Lin; Liu, Zengshan; Wang, Zhiliang

    2013-09-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), the etiological agent of peste des petits ruminants, is classified into the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. The PPRV matrix (M) gene is composed of 1483 base pairs, encoding a 335 amino acids M protein with a molecular weight of approximately 38kD. We have demonstrated previously that the full-length M protein was expressed at an extremely low level or not even expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). In this study, the M protein was split into two truncated forms to be successfully expressed in E. coli at a high level using the pET30a (+) vector, respectively, by analysis of SDS-PAGE, western blot and MALDI-TOF-MS. The optimization of culture conditions led us to perform the recombinant protein induction with 0.2mM IPTG at 28°C for 12h, whereby both proteins nevertheless were expressed in the insoluble form. Therefore, both His-tagged proteins were purified under the denaturing condition using a commercially available kit. Balb/c mice were immunized with the complex of purified proteins and then effectively produced polyclonal antibodies, which reached to a relatively high titer by the analysis of ELISA. The specificity of the prepared polyclonal antibodies was checked by western blot and immunofluorescence, revealing them with the desirable specificity against both non-denatured and denatured M proteins. PMID:23827209

  20. Genes required for formation of the apoMoFe protein of Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Harris, G S; White, T C; Flory, J E; Orme-Johnson, W H

    1990-09-15

    A binary plasmid system was used to produce nitrogenase components in Escherichia coli and subsequently to define a minimum set of nitrogen fixation (nif) genes required for the production of the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco) reactivatable apomolybdenum-iron (apoMoFe) protein of nitrogenase. The active MoFe protein is an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer containing two FeMoco clusters and 4 Fe4S4 P centers (for review see, Orme-Johnson, W.H. (1985) Annu. Rev. Biophys. Biophys. Chem. 14, 419-459). The plasmid pVL15, carrying a tac-promoted nifA activator gene, was coharbored in E. coli with the plasmid pGH1 which contained nifHDKTYENXUSVWZMF' derived from the chromosome of the nitrogen fixing bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae. The apoMoFe protein produced in E. coli by pGH1 + VL15 was identical to the apoprotein in derepressed cells of the nifB- mutant of K. pneumoniae (UN106) in its electrophoretic properties on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels as well as in its ability to be activated by FeMoco. The constituent peptides migrated identically to those from purified MoFe protein during electrophoresis on denaturing gels. The concentrations of apoMoFe protein produced in nif-transformed strains of E. coli were greater than 50% of the levels of MoFe protein observed in derepressed wild-type K. pneumoniae. Systematic deletion of individual nif genes carried by pGH1 has established the requirements for the maximal production of the FeMoco-reactivatable apoMoFe protein to be the following gene products, NifHDKTYUSWZM+A. It appears that several of the genes (nifT, Y, U, W, and Z) are only required for maximal production of the apoMoFe protein, while others (nifH, D, K, and S) are absolutely required for synthesis of this protein in E. coli. One curious result is that the nifH gene product, the peptide of the Fe protein, but not active Fe protein itself, is required for formation of the apoMoFe protein. This suggests the possibility of a ternary complex of the NifH, D, and K

  1. In silico analysis and recombinant expression of BamA protein as a universal vaccine against Escherichia coli in mice.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qingfeng; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Xiumin; Teng, Da; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-06-01

    Colibacillosis, caused by pathogenic Escherichia coli, is a common disease in animals and human worldwide with extensive losses in breeding industry and with millions of people death annually. There is thus an urgent need for the development of universal vaccines against colibacillosis. In this study, the BamA protein was analyzed in silico for sequence homology, physicochemical properties, allergenic prediction, and epitopes prediction. The BamA protein (containing 286 amino acids) clusters in E. coli were retrieved in UniProtKB database, in which 81.7 % sequences were identical (Uniref entry A7ZHR7), and sequences with 94.82 % identity were above 93.4 %. Moreover, BamA was highly conserved among Salmonella and Shigella and has no allergenicity to mice and human. The epitopes of BamA were located principally in periplasm and extracellular domain. Surf_Ag_VNR domain (at position 448-810 aa) of BamA was expressed, purified, and then used for immunization of mice. Titers of the rBamA sera were 1:736,000 and 1:152,000 against rBamA and E. coli and over 1:27,000 against Salmonella and Shigella. Opsonophagocytosis result revealed that the rBamA sera strengthened the phagocytic activity of neutrophils against E. coli. The survival rate of mice vaccinated with rBamA and PBS was 80 and 20 %, respectively. These data indicated that BamA could serve as a promising universal vaccine candidate for the development of a protective subunit vaccine against bacterial infection. Thus, the above protocol would provide more feasible technical clues and choices for available control of pathogenic E. coli, Salmonella, and Shigella. PMID:27020285

  2. Overproduction of the MotA protein of Escherichia coli and estimation of its wild-type level.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M L; Macnab, R M

    1988-01-01

    The motA gene of Escherichia coli was placed under the control of a high-level promoter, that of the tryptophan operon of Serratia marcescens. In the presence of the inducer beta-indoleacrylic acid, MotA was synthesized at greatly elevated levels and inserted without apparent limit into the inner membrane. Growth and motility were impaired, but not drastically so, indicating that MotA by itself does not act as a proton ionophore. Antibody raised against the overproduced protein was used to estimate that a wild-type cell contained 600 +/- 250 copies of MotA. This number is more than would be needed to surround each flagellar basal body with a single circlet of MotA protein; possible interpretations of the result are discussed. The antibody was also used to establish that the MotA protein of Salmonella typhimurium has a similar molecular weight to that of E. coli and is immunologically cross-reactive with it; functional complementation of S. typhimurium motA mutants by the E. coli gene was established. Images PMID:2828314

  3. The Escherichia coli O157:H7 cattle immunoproteome includes outer membrane protein A (OmpA), a modulator of adherence to bovine rectoanal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Building on previous studies, we defined the repertoire of proteins comprising the antigenome of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM) supplemented with norepinephrine (NE; O157 protein-antigenome), a beta-adrenergic hormone that regulates E. coli O157 ...

  4. Semi-quantitative colony immunoassay for determining and optimizing protein expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cridge, Andrew G; Visweswaraiah, Jyothsna; Ramesh, Rashmi; Sattlegger, Evelyn

    2014-02-15

    This work describes a quick semi-quantitative colony immunoassay (QSCI) method for immunoblot detection of intracellularly expressed proteins in both yeast and bacterial cells. After induction of protein expression, only 4.5 h is required for cell breakage, protein detection, and data analysis. This protocol was used to screen and unambiguously identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells efficiently overexpressing glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged Yih1 in addition to cells expressing the myc-tagged large 297-kDa Gcn1 protein. In addition, the method was used to identify Escherichia coli cells efficiently expressing His6-tagged Yih1 and a GST-tagged Gcn1 fragment, respectively. The protocol allows the use of both epitope-specific and protein-specific antibodies. The same colony immunoassay can also be used to determine the minimal concentration of inducing agent sufficient for induction of optimal protein expression (e.g., galactose for yeast, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside [IPTG] for E. coli). To our knowledge, this is the first report on a rapid low-cost procedure that allows the calibration of inducing agent on solid medium. PMID:24176934

  5. E. coli metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase-E binds to the ribosome: a unique moonlighting action revealed.

    PubMed

    Shasmal, Manidip; Dey, Sandip; Shaikh, Tanvir R; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that a high degree of regulation is involved in the protein synthesis machinery entailing more interacting regulatory factors. A multitude of proteins have been identified recently which show regulatory function upon binding to the ribosome. Here, we identify tight association of a metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) with the E. coli 70S ribosome isolated from cell extract under low salt wash conditions. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the ribosome sample allows us to localize its position on the head of the small subunit, near the mRNA entrance. Our study demonstrates substantial RNA unwinding activity of AdhE which can account for the ability of ribosome to translate through downstream of at least certain mRNA helices. Thus far, in E. coli, no ribosome-associated factor has been identified that shows downstream mRNA helicase activity. Additionally, the cryo-EM map reveals interaction of another extracellular protein, outer membrane protein C (OmpC), with the ribosome at the peripheral solvent side of the 50S subunit. Our result also provides important insight into plausible functional role of OmpC upon ribosome binding. Visualization of the ribosome purified directly from the cell lysate unveils for the first time interactions of additional regulatory proteins with the ribosome. PMID:26822933

  6. E. coli metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase-E binds to the ribosome: a unique moonlighting action revealed

    PubMed Central

    Shasmal, Manidip; Dey, Sandip; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that a high degree of regulation is involved in the protein synthesis machinery entailing more interacting regulatory factors. A multitude of proteins have been identified recently which show regulatory function upon binding to the ribosome. Here, we identify tight association of a metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) with the E. coli 70S ribosome isolated from cell extract under low salt wash conditions. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the ribosome sample allows us to localize its position on the head of the small subunit, near the mRNA entrance. Our study demonstrates substantial RNA unwinding activity of AdhE which can account for the ability of ribosome to translate through downstream of at least certain mRNA helices. Thus far, in E. coli, no ribosome-associated factor has been identified that shows downstream mRNA helicase activity. Additionally, the cryo-EM map reveals interaction of another extracellular protein, outer membrane protein C (OmpC), with the ribosome at the peripheral solvent side of the 50S subunit. Our result also provides important insight into plausible functional role of OmpC upon ribosome binding. Visualization of the ribosome purified directly from the cell lysate unveils for the first time interactions of additional regulatory proteins with the ribosome. PMID:26822933

  7. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane protein OmpW from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Reinhard; Zeth, Kornelius; Söding, Johannes; Lupas, Andrei; Linke, Dirk

    2006-04-01

    The outer membrane protein OmpW from E. coli was overexpressed in inclusion bodies and refolded with the help of detergent. The protein has been crystallized and the crystals diffract to 3.5 Å resolution. OmpW is an eight-stranded 21 kDa molecular-weight β-barrel protein from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. It is a major antigen in bacterial infections and has implications in antibiotic resistance and in the oxidative degradation of organic compounds. OmpW from Escherichia coli was cloned and the protein was expressed in inclusion bodies. A method for refolding and purification was developed which yields properly folded protein according to circular-dichroism measurements. The protein has been crystallized and crystals were obtained that diffracted to a resolution limit of 3.5 Å. The crystals belong to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = 122.5, c = 105.7 Å. A homology model of OmpW is presented based on known structures of eight-stranded β-barrels, intended for use in molecular-replacement trials.

  8. A set of ligation-independent expression vectors for co-expression of proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Pranab K; Edris, Wade A; Kennedy, Jeffrey D

    2006-05-01

    A set of ligation-independent expression vectors system has been developed for co-expression of proteins in Escherichia coli. These vectors contain a strong T7 promoter, different drug resistant genes, and an origin of DNA replication from a different incompatibility group, allowing combinations of these plasmids to be stably maintained together. In addition, these plasmids also contain the lacI gene, a transcriptional terminator, and a 3' polyhistidine (6x His) affinity tag (H6) for easy purification of target proteins. All of these vectors contain an identical transportable cassette flanked by suitable restriction enzyme cleavage sites for easy cloning and shuttling among different vectors. This cassette incorporates a ligation-independent cloning (LIC) site for LIC manipulations, an optimal ribosome binding site for efficient protein translation, and a 6x His affinity tag for protein purification Therefore, any E. coli expression vector of choice can be easily converted to LIC type expression vectors by shuttling the cassette using the restriction enzyme cleavage sites at the ends. We have demonstrated the expression capabilities of these vectors by co-expressing three bacterial (dsbA, dsbG, and Trx) and also two other mammalian proteins (KChIP1 and Kv4.3). We further show that co-expressed KChIP1/Kv4.3 forms soluble protein complexes that can be purified for further studies. PMID:16325426

  9. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the E. coli-expressed domain III of Japanese encephalitis virus envelope protein in mice.

    PubMed

    Alka; Bharati, Kaushik; Malik, Y P S; Vrati, Sudhanshu

    2007-12-01

    Domain III of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) envelope protein (E-DIII) was synthesized in E. coli as a fusion protein containing maltose-binding protein (MBP-E-DIII) or six contiguous histidine residues (His-E-DIII) at its N-terminus. MBP-E-DIII was found both in the soluble as well as the insoluble fraction of the bacterial lysate, while His-E-DIII was found exclusively in the inclusion bodies. These purified proteins were examined in mice for their immunogenicity in presence of an aluminium hydroxide based-adjuvant Alhydrogel and Freund's adjuvant. While both proteins generated anti-JEV antibodies that neutralized JEV activity in vitro, His-E-DIII generated higher antibody titers than MBP-E-DIII. Mice immunized with His-E-DIII in presence of Alhydrogel generated antibody titers similar to those induced by the commercial vaccine and protected mice against lethal JEV challenge. PMID:17377815

  10. Evaluation of Novel Antibacterial N-Halamine Nanoparticles Prodrugs towards Susceptibility of Escherichia coli Induced by DksA Protein.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qigeqi; Dong, Alideertu; Morigen

    2015-01-01

    Novel N-halamine nanoparticles potentially useful for killing pathogenic bacteria, i.e., SiO2@PS/N-halamine NPs, were successfully synthesized via the immobilization of N-halamines onto the polystyrene-coated silica nanoparticles (SiO2@PS NPs). The effect of reaction conditions, i.e., chlorination temperature, bleaching concentration, chlorination time, on the oxidative chlorine content in the products was systematically investigated. The antibacterial activity of the products was tested via the modified plate counting methd using Escherichia coli (E. coli) as a model bacterium. The possible mechanism of the antibacterial action of the products was also studied using scanning electron microscopy combined with a inhibition zone study. The antimicrobial capability of the products was well controlled by tuning the oxidative chlorine content in the products. More importantly, the role of DksA protein in the susceptibility of E. coli against the products was proven using a time-kill assay. This in-depth investigation of the sensitivity of E. coli towards N-halamine NPs provides a systematic understanding of the utility of N-halamines for deactivating bacteria or even disease control. PMID:25905606

  11. Development of a Fur-dependent and tightly regulated expression system in Escherichia coli for toxic protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a continuous demanding for tightly regulated prokaryotic expression systems, which allow functional synthesis of toxic proteins in Escherichia coli for bioscience or biotechnology application. However, most of the current promoter options either are tightly repressed only with low protein production levels, or produce substantial protein but lacking of the necessary repression to avoid mutations initiated by leaky expression in the absence of inducer. The aim of this study was to develop a tightly regulated, relatively high-efficient expression vector in E. coli based on the principle of iron uptake system. Results By using GFP as reporter, PfhuA with the highest relative fluorescence units, but leaky expression, was screened from 23 iron-regulated promoter candidates. PfhuA was repressed by ferric uptake regulator (Fur)-Fe2+ complex binding to Fur box locating at the promoter sequence. Otherwise, PfhuA was activated without Fur-Fe2+ binding in the absence of iron. In order to improve the tightness of PfhuA regulation for toxic gene expression, Fur box in promoter sequence and fur expression were refined through five different approaches. Eventually, through substituting E. coli consensus Fur box for original one of PfhuA, the induction ratio of modified PfhuA (named PfhuA1) was improved from 3 to 101. Under the control of PfhuA1, strong toxic gene E was successfully expressed in high, middle, low copy-number vectors, and other two toxic proteins, Gef and MazF were functionally synthesized without E. coli death before induction. Conclusions The features of easy control, tight regulation and relatively high efficiency were combined in the newly engineered PfhuA1. Under this promoter, the toxic genes E, gef and mazF were functionally expressed in E. coli induced by iron chelator in a tightly controllable way. This study provides a tightly regulated expression system that might enable the stable cloning, and functional synthesis of toxic proteins

  12. Immunoproteomic Analysis To Identify Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Outer Membrane Proteins Expressed during Human Infection

    PubMed Central

    Montero, David; Orellana, Paz; Gutiérrez, Daniela; Araya, Daniela; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Prado, Valeria; Oñate, Ángel; del Canto, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is the etiologic agent of acute diarrhea, dysentery, and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). There is no approved vaccine for STEC infection in humans, and antibiotic use is contraindicated, as it promotes Shiga toxin production. In order to identify STEC-associated antigens and immunogenic proteins, outer membrane proteins (OMPs) were extracted from STEC O26:H11, O103, O113:H21, and O157:H7 strains, and commensal E. coli strain HS was used as a control. SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional-PAGE analysis, Western blot assays using sera from pediatric HUS patients and controls, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–tandem time of flight analyses were used to identify 12 immunogenic OMPs, some of which were not reactive with control sera. Importantly, seven of these proteins have not been previously reported to be immunogenic in STEC strains. Among these seven proteins, OmpT and Cah displayed IgG and IgA reactivity with sera from HUS patients. Genes encoding these two proteins were present in a majority of STEC strains. Knowledge of the antigens produced during infection of the host and the immune response to those antigens will be important for future vaccine development. PMID:25156722

  13. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty-three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers. PMID:26781930

  14. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty–three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers. PMID:26781930

  15. Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Inflammation Alters the Expression of Proteins by Intestinal Escherichia coli Strains in a Gnotobiotic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Sara; Alpert, Carl; Engst, Wolfram; Loh, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    To identify Escherichia coli proteins involved in adaptation to intestinal inflammation, mice were monoassociated with the colitogenic E. coli strain UNC or with the probiotic E. coli strain Nissle. Intestinal inflammation was induced by treating the mice with 3.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Differentially expressed proteins in E. coli strains collected from cecal contents were identified by 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. In both strains, acute inflammation led to the downregulation of pathways involved in carbohydrate breakdown and energy generation. Accordingly, DSS-treated mice had lower concentrations of bacterial fermentation products in their cecal contents than control mice. Differentially expressed proteins also included the Fe-S cluster repair protein NfuA, the tryptophanase TnaA, and the uncharacterized protein YggE. NfuA expression was 3-fold higher in E. coli strains from DSS-treated than from control mice. Reporter experiments confirmed the induction of nfuA in response to iron deprivation, mimicking Fe-S cluster destruction by inflammation. YggE expression, which has been reported to reduce the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species, was 4- to 8-fold higher in E. coli Nissle than in E. coli UNC. This was confirmed by in vitro reporter gene assays indicating that Nissle is better equipped to cope with oxidative stress than UNC. Nissle isolated from DSS-treated and control mice had TnaA levels 4- to 7-fold-higher than those of UNC. Levels of indole resulting from the TnaA reaction were higher in control animals associated with E. coli Nissle. Because of its anti-inflammatory effect, indole is hypothesized to be involved in the extension of the remission phase in ulcerative colitis described for E. coli Nissle. PMID:22210207

  16. Molecular and Structural Characterization of a Novel Escherichia coli Interleukin Receptor Mimic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Moriel, Danilo G.; Paxman, Jason J.; Lo, Alvin W.; Tan, Lendl; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Dando, Samantha J.; Beatson, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a disease of extremely high incidence in both community and nosocomial settings. UTIs cause significant morbidity and mortality, with approximately 150 million cases globally per year. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of UTI and is generally treated empirically. However, the rapidly increasing incidence of UTIs caused by multidrug-resistant UPEC strains has led to limited available treatment options and highlights the urgent need to develop alternative treatment and prevention strategies. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis to define the regulation, structure, function, and immunogenicity of recently identified UPEC vaccine candidate C1275 (here referred to as IrmA). We showed that the irmA gene is highly prevalent in UPEC, is cotranscribed with the biofilm-associated antigen 43 gene, and is regulated by the global oxidative stress response OxyR protein. Localization studies identified IrmA in the UPEC culture supernatant. We determined the structure of IrmA and showed that it adopts a unique domain-swapped dimer architecture. The dimeric structure of IrmA displays similarity to those of human cytokine receptors, including the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R), interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R), and interleukin-10 receptor (IL-10R) binding domains, and we showed that purified IrmA can bind to their cognate cytokines. Finally, we showed that plasma from convalescent urosepsis patients contains high IrmA antibody titers, demonstrating the strong immunogenicity of IrmA. Taken together, our results indicate that IrmA may play an important role during UPEC infection. PMID:26980835

  17. The Highly Conserved MraZ Protein Is a Transcriptional Regulator in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Eraso, Jesus M.; Markillie, Lye M.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Orr, Galya

    2014-01-01

    The mraZ and mraW genes are highly conserved in bacteria, both in sequence and in their position at the head of the division and cell wall (dcw) gene cluster. Located directly upstream of the mraZ gene, the Pmra promoter drives the transcription of mraZ and mraW, as well as many essential cell division and cell wall genes, but no regulator of Pmra has been found to date. Although MraZ has structural similarity to the AbrB transition state regulator and the MazE antitoxin and MraW is known to methylate the 16S rRNA, mraZ and mraW null mutants have no detectable phenotypes. Here we show that overproduction of Escherichia coli MraZ inhibited cell division and was lethal in rich medium at high induction levels and in minimal medium at low induction levels. Co-overproduction of MraW suppressed MraZ toxicity, and loss of MraW enhanced MraZ toxicity, suggesting that MraZ and MraW have antagonistic functions. MraZ-green fluorescent protein localized to the nucleoid, suggesting that it binds DNA. Consistent with this idea, purified MraZ directly bound a region of DNA containing three direct repeats between Pmra and the mraZ gene. Excess MraZ reduced the expression of an mraZ-lacZ reporter, suggesting that MraZ acts as a repressor of Pmra, whereas a DNA-binding mutant form of MraZ failed to repress expression. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis suggested that MraZ also regulates the expression of genes outside the dcw cluster. In support of this, purified MraZ could directly bind to a putative operator site upstream of mioC, one of the repressed genes identified by RNA-seq. PMID:24659771

  18. Analysis and expansion of the role of the Escherichia coli protein ProQ.

    PubMed

    Sheidy, Daniel T; Zielke, Ryszard A

    2013-01-01

    The decrease in proline transport by the proline porter ProP in a ΔproQ strain has been well documented; however, the reason for this phenotype remains undefined. Previous studies have speculated that ProQ facilitates translation of proP mRNA. Here, we demonstrate that ProQ is enriched in the polysome fractions of sucrose gradient separations of E. coli lysates and the 30S fractions of lysates separated under conditions causing ribosomal subunit dissociation. Thus, ProQ is a bona fide ribosome associated protein. Analysis of proQ constructs lacking predicted structural domains implicates the N-terminal domain in ribosome association. Association with the ribosome appears to be mediated by an interaction with the mRNA being translated, as limited treatment of lysates with Micrococcal Nuclease maintains ribosome integrity but disrupts ProQ localization with polysomes. ProQ also fails to robustly bind to mRNA-free 70S ribosomes in vitro. Interestingly, deletion of proP does not disrupt the localization of ProQ with translating ribosomes, and deletion of proP in combination with the proU operon has no effect on ProQ localization. We also demonstrate that ProQ is necessary for robust biofilm formation, and this phenotype is independent of ProP. Binding studies were carried out using tryptophan fluorescence and in vitro transcribed proP mRNAs. proP is transcribed from two differentially regulated promoters, and ProQ interacts with proP mRNA transcribed from both promoters, as well as a control mRNA with similar affinities. In total, these data suggest that ProQ is positioned to function as a novel translational regulator, and its cellular role extends beyond its effects on proline uptake by ProP. PMID:24205389

  19. The tib adherence locus of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is regulated by cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Espert, Shirley M; Elsinghorst, Eric A; Munson, George P

    2011-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a Gram-negative enteric pathogen that causes profuse watery diarrhea through the elaboration of heat-labile and/or heat-stable toxins. Virulence is also dependent upon the expression of adhesive pili and afimbrial adhesins that allow the pathogen to adhere to the intestinal epithelium or mucosa. Both types of enterotoxins are regulated at the level of transcription by cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP). To further our understanding of virulence gene regulation, an in silico approach was used to identify putative CRP binding sites in the genome of H10407 (O78:H11), an ETEC strain that was originally isolated from the stool of a Bangledeshi patient with cholera-like symptoms circa 1971. One of the predicted binding sites was located within an intergenic region upstream of tibDBCA. TibA is an autotransporter and afimbrial adhesin that is glycosylated by TibC. Expression of the TibA glycoprotein was abolished in an H10407 crp mutant and restored when crp was provided in trans. TibA-dependent aggregation was also abolished in a cyaA::kan strain and restored by addition of exogenous cAMP to the growth medium. DNase I footprinting confirmed that the predicted site upstream of tibDBCA is bound by CRP. Point mutations within the CRP binding site were found to abolish or significantly impair CRP-dependent activation of the tibDB promoter. Thus, these studies demonstrate that CRP positively regulates the expression of the glycosylated afimbrial adhesin TibA through occupancy of a binding site within tibDBp. PMID:21216994

  20. Anionic lipid binding to the foreign protein MGS provides a tight coupling between phospholipid synthesis and protein overexpression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ariöz, Candan; Ye, Weihua; Bakali, Amin; Ge, Changrong; Liebau, Jobst; Götzke, Hansjörg; Barth, Andreas; Wieslander, Ake; Mäler, Lena

    2013-08-20

    Certain membrane proteins involved in lipid synthesis can induce formation of new intracellular membranes in Escherichia coli, i.e., intracellular vesicles. Among those, the foreign monotopic glycosyltransferase MGS from Acholeplasma laidlawii triggers such massive lipid synthesis when overexpressed. To examine the mechanism behind the increased lipid synthesis, we investigated the lipid binding properties of MGS in vivo together with the correlation between lipid synthesis and MGS overexpression levels. A good correlation between produced lipid quantities and overexpressed MGS protein was observed when standard LB medium was supplemented with four different lipid precursors that have significant roles in the lipid biosynthesis pathway. Interestingly, this correlation was highest concerning anionic lipid production and at the same time dependent on the selective binding of anionic lipid molecules by MGS. A selective interaction with anionic lipids was also observed in vitro by (31)P NMR binding studies using bicelles prepared with E. coli lipids. The results clearly demonstrate that the discriminative withdrawal of anionic lipids, especially phosphatidylglycerol, from the membrane through MGS binding triggers an in vivo signal for cells to create a "feed-forward" stimulation of lipid synthesis in E. coli. By this mechanism, cells can produce more membrane surface in order to accommodate excessively produced MGS molecules, which results in an interdependent cycle of lipid and MGS protein synthesis. PMID:23869703

  1. Conserved protein YecM from Escherichia coli shows structural homology to metal-binding isomerases and oxygenases.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Duke, N.; Laskowski, R.; Evdokimova, E.; Skarina, T.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Savchenko, A.; Univ. of Toronto; Univ. Health Network; Birbeck Coll.

    2003-01-01

    The crystal structure of protein YecM{sup 1} has been determined at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution as a part of the ongoing structural genomics initiative (http://www.mcsg.anl.gov). The YecM is a conserved, hypothetical Escherichia coli protein with sequence homologs found exclusively in bacteria, including Salmonella typhimunium, Yersinia pestis, Vibrio cholerae, Haemophilus influenza, and Pasteurella multocida. YecM (188 residues) shows also sequence similarity to proteins in COG database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/COG/palox-?COG3102). YecM (Pfam-B domain 24546) was selected as a structural genomics target it shows no sequence similarity with proteins of known three-dimensional structure and therefore, may contain a previously unobserved field.

  2. Evidence for the ability of L10 ribosomal proteins of Salmonella typhimurium and Klebsiella pneumoniae to regulate rplJL gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Paton, E B; Woodmaska, M I; Kroupskaya, I V; Zhyvoloup, A N; Matsuka, G Kh

    1990-06-01

    Genes rplJ, coding for ribosomal protein L10 of Salmonella typhimurium and Klebsiella pneumoniae, have been cloned on pUC plasmid. The resultant multicopy recombinant plasmids were detrimental for the growth of normal JM101 E. coli host cells and harmless for the mutant JF3029 host. This negative effect is the evidence for the ability of heterologous L10 proteins to regulate expression of rplJL genes in E. coli. Nucleotide sequence was determined completely for S. typhimurium rplJL' DNA portion and partially for rplJL' genes of K. pneumoniae. According to the nucleotide sequence data obtained three amino acid substitutions differ L10 proteins of S. typhimurium and E. coli and the long range, providing for the coupled translations of L10 and L7/L12 cistrons in E. coli mRNA is also valid for S. typhimurium and K. pneumoniae. PMID:2194828

  3. Peptidoglycan synthetic activities in membranes of Escherichia coli caused by overproduction of penicillin-binding protein 2 and rodA protein.

    PubMed

    Ishino, F; Park, W; Tomioka, S; Tamaki, S; Takase, I; Kunugita, K; Matsuzawa, H; Asoh, S; Ohta, T; Spratt, B G

    1986-05-25

    Penicillin-binding protein (PBP)-2 and the RodA protein are known to function in determining the rod shape of Escherichia coli cells. Peptidoglycan biosynthetic reactions that required these two proteins were demonstrated in the membrane fraction prepared from an E. coli strain that overproduced both of these two proteins and which lacked PBP-1B activity (the major peptidoglycan synthetase activity in the normal E. coli membranes). The cross-linked peptidoglycan was synthesized from UDP-N-acetylmuramylpentapeptide and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine in the presence of a high concentration of cefmetazole that inhibited all of PBPs except PBP-2. The peptidoglycan was synthesized via a lipid intermediate and showed up to 30% cross-linking. The cross-linking reaction was strongly inhibited by the amidinopenicillin, mecillinam, and by other beta-lactam antibiotics that have a high affinity for PBP-2, but not by beta-lactams that had very low affinity for PBP-2. The formation of peptidoglycan required the presence of high levels of both PBP-2 and the RodA protein in the membranes, but it is unclear which of the two proteins was primarily responsible for the extension of the glycan chains (transglycosylation). However, the sensitivity of the cross-linking reaction to specific beta-lactam antibiotics strongly suggested that it was catalyzed by PBP-2. The transglycosylase activity of the membranes was sensitive to enramycin and vancomycin and was unusual in being stimulated greatly by a high concentration of a chelating agent. PMID:3009484

  4. Export of unprocessed precursor maltose-binding protein to the periplasm of Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Fikes, J D; Bassford, P J

    1987-06-01

    The Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein (MBP) R2 signal peptide is a truncated version of the wild-type structure that still facilitates very efficient export of MBP to the periplasm. Among single amino acid substitutions in the R2 signal peptide resulting in an export-defective precursor MBP (pMBP) were two that replaced residues in the consensus Ala-X-Ala sequence (residues -3 to -1) that immediately precedes the cleavage site. It was suggested that the functional hydrophobic core and signal peptidase recognition sequence of this signal peptide substantially overlap and that these two alterations affect both pMBP translocation and processing. In this study, the export of pMBP by the mutants, designated CC15 and CC17, with these two alterations was investigated further. The pMBP of mutant CC17 has an Arg substituted for Leu at the -2 position. It was found that CC17 cells exported only a very small amount of MBP, but that which was exported appeared to be correctly processed. This result was consistent with other studies that have concluded that virtually any amino acid can occupy the -2 position. For mutant CC15, which exhibits a fully Mal+ phenotype, an Asp is substituted for the Ala at the -3 position. CC15 cells were found to export large quantities of unprocessed, soluble pMBP to the periplasm, although such export was achieved in a relatively slow, posttranslational manner. This result was also consistent with other studies that suggested that charged residues are normally excluded from the -3 position of the cleavage site. Using in vitro oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, we constructed a new signal sequence mutant in which Asp was substituted for Arg at the -3 position of an otherwise wild-type MBP signal peptide. This alteration had no apparent effect on pMBP translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane, but processing by signal peptidase was inhibited. This pMBP species with its full-length hydrophobic core remained anchored to the membrane

  5. Soluble M3 proteins of murine gammaherpesviruses 68 and 72 expressed in Escherichia coli: analysis of chemokine-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Matúšková, R; Pančík, P; Štibrániová, I; Belvončíková, P; Režuchová, I; Kúdelová, M

    2015-12-01

    M3 protein of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) was identified as a viral chemokine-binding protein 3 (vCKBP-3) capable to bind a broad spectrum of chemokines and their receptors. During both acute and latent infection MHV-68 M3 protein provides a selective advantage for the virus by inhibiting the antiviral and inflammatory response. A unique mutation Asp307Gly was identified in the M3 protein of murine gammaherpesvirus 72 (MHV-72), localized near chemokine-binding domain. Study on chemokine-binding properties of MHV-72 M3 protein purified from medium of infected cells implied reduced binding to some chemokines when compared to MHV-68 M3 protein. It was suggested that the mutation in the M3 protein might be involved in the attenuation of immune response to infection with MHV-72. Recently, Escherichia coli cells were used to prepare native recombinant M3 proteins of murine gammaherpesviruses 68 and 72 (Pančík et al., 2013). In this study, we assessed the chemokine-binding properties of three M3 proteins prepared in E. coli Rosetta-gami 2 (DE3) cells, the full length M3 protein of both MHV-68 and MHV-72 and MHV-68 M3 protein truncated in the signal sequence (the first 24 aa). They all displayed binding activity to human chemokines CCL5 (RANTES), CXCL8 (IL-8), and CCL3 (MIP-1α). The truncated MHV-68 M3 protein had more than twenty times reduced binding activity to CCL5, but only about five and three times reduced binding to CXCL8 and CCL3 when compared to its full length counterpart. Binding of the full length MHV-72 M3 protein to all chemokines was reduced when compared to MHV-68 M3 protein. Its binding to CCL5 and CCL3 was reduced over ten and seven times. However, its binding to CXCL8 was only slightly reduced (64.8 vs 91.8%). These data implied the significance of the signal sequence and also of a single mutation (at aa 307) for efficient M3 protein binding to some chemokines. PMID:26666184

  6. Use of FabV-Triclosan Plasmid Selection System for Efficient Expression and Production of Recombinant Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed A.; Chew, Yik Wei; Omar, Tasyriq Che; Azman, Nizuwan

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of recombinant plasmid vectors in host bacteria relies on the presence of selection antibiotics in the growth media to suppress plasmid -free segregants. However, presence of antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotics themselves is not acceptable in several applications of biotechnology. Previously, we have shown that FabV-Triclosan selection system can be used to select high and medium copy number plasmid vectors in E. coli. Here, we have extended our previous work and demonstrated that expression vectors containing FabV can be used efficiently to express heterologous recombinant proteins in similar or better amounts in E. coli host when compared with expression vectors containing β-lactamase. Use of small amount of non-antibiotic Triclosan as selection agent in growth medium, enhanced plasmid stability, applicability in various culture media, and compatibility with other selection systems for multiple plasmid maintenance are noteworthy features of FabV-Triclosan selection system. PMID:26642325

  7. Use of FabV-Triclosan Plasmid Selection System for Efficient Expression and Production of Recombinant Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed A; Chew, Yik Wei; Omar, Tasyriq Che; Azman, Nizuwan

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of recombinant plasmid vectors in host bacteria relies on the presence of selection antibiotics in the growth media to suppress plasmid -free segregants. However, presence of antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotics themselves is not acceptable in several applications of biotechnology. Previously, we have shown that FabV-Triclosan selection system can be used to select high and medium copy number plasmid vectors in E. coli. Here, we have extended our previous work and demonstrated that expression vectors containing FabV can be used efficiently to express heterologous recombinant proteins in similar or better amounts in E. coli host when compared with expression vectors containing β-lactamase. Use of small amount of non-antibiotic Triclosan as selection agent in growth medium, enhanced plasmid stability, applicability in various culture media, and compatibility with other selection systems for multiple plasmid maintenance are noteworthy features of FabV-Triclosan selection system. PMID:26642325

  8. Single-cell Characterization of Autotransporter-mediated Escherichia coli Surface Display of Disulfide Bond-containing Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Balakrishnan; Sendra, Victor G; Cirino, Patrick C; Varadarajan, Navin

    2012-01-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are a family of bacterial proteins containing a C-terminal β-barrel-forming domain that facilitates the translocation of N-terminal passenger domain whose functions range from adhesion to proteolysis. Genetic replacement of the native passenger domain with heterologous proteins is an attractive strategy not only for applications such as biocatalysis, live-cell vaccines, and protein engineering but also for gaining mechanistic insights toward understanding AT translocation. The ability of ATs to efficiently display functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides has remained largely controversial. By employing high-throughput single-cell flow cytometry, we have systematically investigated the ability of the Escherichia coli AT Antigen 43 (Ag43) to display two different recombinant reporter proteins, a single-chain antibody (M18 scFv) that contains two disulfides and chymotrypsin that contains four disulfides, by varying the signal peptide and deleting the different domains of the native protein. Our results indicate that only the C-terminal β-barrel and the threaded α-helix are essential for efficient surface display of functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides. These results imply that there are no inherent constraints for functional translocation and display of disulfide bond-containing proteins mediated by the AT system and should open new avenues for protein display and engineering. PMID:23019324

  9. Single-cell characterization of autotransporter-mediated Escherichia coli surface display of disulfide bond-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Balakrishnan; Sendra, Victor G; Cirino, Patrick C; Varadarajan, Navin

    2012-11-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are a family of bacterial proteins containing a C-terminal β-barrel-forming domain that facilitates the translocation of N-terminal passenger domain whose functions range from adhesion to proteolysis. Genetic replacement of the native passenger domain with heterologous proteins is an attractive strategy not only for applications such as biocatalysis, live-cell vaccines, and protein engineering but also for gaining mechanistic insights toward understanding AT translocation. The ability of ATs to efficiently display functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides has remained largely controversial. By employing high-throughput single-cell flow cytometry, we have systematically investigated the ability of the Escherichia coli AT Antigen 43 (Ag43) to display two different recombinant reporter proteins, a single-chain antibody (M18 scFv) that contains two disulfides and chymotrypsin that contains four disulfides, by varying the signal peptide and deleting the different domains of the native protein. Our results indicate that only the C-terminal β-barrel and the threaded α-helix are essential for efficient surface display of functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides. These results imply that there are no inherent constraints for functional translocation and display of disulfide bond-containing proteins mediated by the AT system and should open new avenues for protein display and engineering. PMID:23019324

  10. Altered expression level of Escherichia coli proteins in response to treatment with the antifouling agent zosteric acid sodium salt.

    PubMed

    Villa, Federica; Remelli, William; Forlani, Fabio; Vitali, Alberto; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2012-07-01

    Zosteric acid sodium salt is a powerful antifouling agent. However, the mode of its antifouling action has not yet been fully elucidated. Whole cell proteome of Escherichia coli was analysed to study the different protein patterns expressed by the surface-exposed planktonic cells without and with sublethal concentrations of the zosteric acid sodium salt. Proteomic analysis revealed that at least 27 proteins showed a significant (19 upregulated and 8 downregulated, P < 0.001) altered expression level in response to the antifoulant. The proteomic signatures of zosteric acid sodium salt-treated cells are characterized by stress-associated (e.g. AhpC, OsmC, SodB, GroES, IscU, DnaK), motility-related (FliC), quorum-sensing-associated (LuxS) and metabolism/biosynthesis-related (e.g. PptA, AroA, FabD, FabB, GapA) proteins. Consistent with the overexpression of LuxS enzyme, the antifouling agent increased autoinducer-2 (AI-2) concentration by twofold. Moreover, treated cells experienced a statistically significant but modest increase of reactive oxygen species (+ 23%), tryptophanase (1.2-fold) and indole (1.2-fold) synthesis. Overall, our data suggest that zosteric acid sodium salt acts as environmental cue leading to global stress on E. coli cells, which favours the expression of various protective proteins, the AI-2 production and the synthesis of flagella, to escape from adverse conditions. PMID:22176949

  11. The Escherichia coli regulatory protein OxyR discriminates between methylated and unmethylated states of the phage Mu mom promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Bölker, M; Kahmann, R

    1989-01-01

    Expression of the phage Mu mom gene is transcriptionally regulated by DNA methylation. Three GATC sites upstream of the mom promoter have to be methylated by the Escherichia coli deoxyadenosine methylase (Dam) to allow initiation of transcription. An E. coli dam strain was mutagenized with Tn5 in an attempt to isolate mutants which allow mom gene expression. Three independent Tn5 mutants were isolated, each mapped to a gene at 89.6 min which we designate momR. The wildtype gene was cloned and sequenced, it encodes a protein of 305 amino acids. The protein belongs to a group of related bacterial activators recently identified as the LysR family (Henikoff et al., 1988). MomR protein was overproduced and purified. Expression of momR is autoregulated; MomR binds to a 43 bp region upstream of its coding sequence. In the mom promoter MomR protects a 43 bp region containing the three GATC sites. Specific binding to these sequences was observed only with unmethylated DNA. Fortuitously, we learned that MomR is identical to OxyR, a regulatory protein responding to oxidative stress. We discuss the implications of this control for Mu development. Images PMID:2551682

  12. Membrane binding of Escherichia coli RNase E catalytic domain stabilizes protein structure and increases RNA substrate affinity

    PubMed Central

    Murashko, Oleg N.; Kaberdin, Vladimir R.; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-01-01

    RNase E plays an essential role in RNA processing and decay and tethers to the cytoplasmic membrane in Escherichia coli; however, the function of this membrane–protein interaction has remained unclear. Here, we establish a mechanistic role for the RNase E–membrane interaction. The reconstituted highly conserved N-terminal fragment of RNase E (NRne, residues 1–499) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids through electrostatic interactions. The membrane-binding specificity of NRne was confirmed using circular dichroism difference spectroscopy; the dissociation constant (Kd) for NRne binding to anionic liposomes was 298 nM. E. coli RNase G and RNase E/G homologs from phylogenetically distant Aquifex aeolicus, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, and Synechocystis sp. were found to be membrane-binding proteins. Electrostatic potentials of NRne and its homologs were found to be conserved, highly positive, and spread over a large surface area encompassing four putative membrane-binding regions identified in the “large” domain (amino acids 1–400, consisting of the RNase H, S1, 5′-sensor, and DNase I subdomains) of E. coli NRne. In vitro cleavage assay using liposome-free and liposome-bound NRne and RNA substrates BR13 and GGG-RNAI showed that NRne membrane binding altered its enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no obvious thermotropic structural changes in membrane-bound NRne between 10 and 60 °C, and membrane-bound NRne retained its normal cleavage activity after cooling. Thus, NRne membrane binding induced changes in secondary protein structure and enzymatic activation by stabilizing the protein-folding state and increasing its binding affinity for its substrate. Our results demonstrate that RNase E–membrane interaction enhances the rate of RNA processing and decay. PMID:22509045

  13. Membrane binding of Escherichia coli RNase E catalytic domain stabilizes protein structure and increases RNA substrate affinity.

    PubMed

    Murashko, Oleg N; Kaberdin, Vladimir R; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-05-01

    RNase E plays an essential role in RNA processing and decay and tethers to the cytoplasmic membrane in Escherichia coli; however, the function of this membrane-protein interaction has remained unclear. Here, we establish a mechanistic role for the RNase E-membrane interaction. The reconstituted highly conserved N-terminal fragment of RNase E (NRne, residues 1-499) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids through electrostatic interactions. The membrane-binding specificity of NRne was confirmed using circular dichroism difference spectroscopy; the dissociation constant (K(d)) for NRne binding to anionic liposomes was 298 nM. E. coli RNase G and RNase E/G homologs from phylogenetically distant Aquifex aeolicus, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, and Synechocystis sp. were found to be membrane-binding proteins. Electrostatic potentials of NRne and its homologs were found to be conserved, highly positive, and spread over a large surface area encompassing four putative membrane-binding regions identified in the "large" domain (amino acids 1-400, consisting of the RNase H, S1, 5'-sensor, and DNase I subdomains) of E. coli NRne. In vitro cleavage assay using liposome-free and liposome-bound NRne and RNA substrates BR13 and GGG-RNAI showed that NRne membrane binding altered its enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no obvious thermotropic structural changes in membrane-bound NRne between 10 and 60 °C, and membrane-bound NRne retained its normal cleavage activity after cooling. Thus, NRne membrane binding induced changes in secondary protein structure and enzymatic activation by stabilizing the protein-folding state and increasing its binding affinity for its substrate. Our results demonstrate that RNase E-membrane interaction enhances the rate of RNA processing and decay. PMID:22509045

  14. Recombinant expressions of sweet plant protein mabinlin II in Escherichia coli and food-grade Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenliang; Xia, Qiyu; Yao, Jing; Fu, Shaoping; Guo, Jianchun; Hu, Xinwen

    2015-04-01

    Sweet plant proteins, which are safe, natural, low-calorie sweeteners, may be suitable replacements for sugars in the food and beverage industries. Mabinlin II, a sweet plant protein, shows the most pronounced heat stability and acid resistance of any of the six known types of plant sweet proteins. However, mabinlin II is difficult to extract from the Capparis masaikai plant, which is itself becoming increasingly scarce. This limits the use of naturally acquired mabinlin II. In this study, recombinant mabinlin II proteins were expressed and purified in Escherichia coli and in food-grade Lactococcus lactis. Recombinant mabinlin II proteins MBL-BH (containing the B-chains of mabinlin II downstream fused with His-tag) and MBL-ABH (containing the A- and B-chains of mabinlin II downstream fused with His-tag) were expressed in E. coli in the form of inclusion bodies. They were then purified and renatured. The refolded MBL-BH was found to be 100 times sweeter than sucrose by weight, but it was not heat-stable. Refolded MBL-ABH was neither sweet nor heat-stable. Recombinant mabinlin II proteins were secreted and expressed intracellularly in food-grade L. lactis, in which the concentrated cell samples and culture medium samples were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting analysis with anti-mabinlin II polyclonal antibody. This study demonstrated that the single B chain of mabinlin II has a sweet taste. The recombinant mabinlin II proteins have been successfully expressed in food-grade L. lactis, which is a crucial step in the production of mabinlin II through microorganism expression systems. PMID:25649203

  15. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  16. Effects of Outer Membrane Proteins (OMPs) on the Transport of Escherichia coli within Saturated Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Bardy, S.; Feriancikova, L.

    2012-12-01

    A thorough understanding of the transport behavior of bacteria within the groundwater system is critical to the protection of groundwater resources from microbial contamination and the reduction of associated public health risks. In this study, we used TolC and Ag43 positive and negative E. coli mutants to evaluate the effects of OMP TolC and Ag43 on the transport behavior of E. coli under a wide range of water chemistry conditions. The surface properties (e.g., zeta potential, contact angles of three probing liquid) of TolC and Ag43 positive and negative E. coli cells were determined and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory, which considers Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) interaction, the electrostatic double layer (EDL) interaction as well as the Lewis acid-base (AB) (i.e., hydrophobic) interaction between E. coli cells and the surface of quartz sands, were used to explain the observed trend in E. coli mobility. In general, good agreements between the experimental observations and XDLVO calculations were observed. Findings from this research suggested that OMPs could significantly impact bacterial mobility in sandy aquifers.

  17. Construction of a Synthetically Engineered nirB Promoter for Expression of Recombinant Protein in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Reza; Akbari Eidgahi, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anaerobic-inducible promoters are alternatives of chemical-inducible promoters for expression of recombinant proteins especially in conditions where chemical induction is not possible or anaerobic conditions are preferable. The nirB promoter is the promoter of the first gene of nir operon in Escherichia coli, which encodes NADH-dependent nitrite reductase. This promoter is naturally induced under anaerobic conditions and upregulated by nitrite and nitrate. Objectives: The current study was carried out to construct a synthetic nirB promoter that does not respond to chemical inducers (nitrite or nitrate), but instead responds to anaerobic induction. For this purpose, a new plasmid was constructed (pFSnirB78-23LTB), which contains a synthetic nirB promoter. The activity of this plasmid was evaluated in E. coli under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and in response to chemical inducers, nitrite and nitrate. Materials and Methods: A synthetic nirB promoter was firstly cloned into a pKK223 derivative plasmid and then the heat labile toxin B subunit gene (LTB) of entrotoxigenic E. coli was cloned under the control of this promoter. The inducibility of this plasmid in E. coli was measured under anaerobic conditions in the presence or absence of nitrite or nitrate by ganglioside GM1 ELISA. Results: Our data showed that this promoter is strongly induced under anaerobic conditions while it showed much lower activity (11%) under aerobic conditions. In contrast to the native promoter, this promoter was not induced by chemical inducers, nitrite or nitrate. Conclusions: This study showed that the recombinant protein produced under the control of synthetic nirB promoter has critical characteristics such as pentamer formation, receptor recognition ability and conservation of antigenic epitopes. In addition, the data showed anaerobiosis and chemical inducers had no adverse effects on recombinant proteins. Based on the results, this synthetic promoter is suitable for

  18. Combined effects of the signal sequence and the major chaperone proteins on the export of human cytokines in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bergès, H; Joseph-Liauzun, E; Fayet, O

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the export of two human proteins in the course of their production in Escherichia coli. The coding sequences of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and of interleukin 13 were fused to those of two synthetic signal sequences to direct the human proteins to the bacterial periplasm. We found that the total amount of protein varies with the signal peptide-cytokine combination, as does the fraction of it that is soluble in a periplasmic extract. The possibility that the major chaperone proteins such as SecB and the GroEL-GroES and DnaK-DnaJ pairs are limiting factors for the export was tested by overexpressing one or the other of these chaperones concomitantly with the heterologous protein. The GroEL-GroES chaperone pair had no effect on protein production. Overproduction of SecB or DnaK plus DnaJ resulted in a marked increase of the quantity of human proteins in the periplasmic fraction, but this increase depends on the signal peptide-heterologous protein-chaperone association involved. PMID:8572712

  19. Escherichia coli K1 internalization via caveolae requires caveolin-1 and protein kinase Calpha interaction in human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, Sunil K; Quon, Michael J; Prasadarao, Nemani V

    2002-12-27

    The morbidity and mortality associated with Escherichia coli K1 meningitis during the neonatal period have remained significant over the last decade and are once again on the rise. Transcytosis of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) by E. coli within an endosome to avoid lysosomal fusion is crucial for dissemination into the central nervous system. Central to E. coli internalization of BMEC is the expression of OmpA (outer membrane protein A), which interacts with its receptor for the actin reorganization that leads to invasion. However, nothing is known about the nature of the signaling events for the formation of endosomes containing E. coli K1. We show here that E. coli K1 infection of human BMEC (HBMEC) results in activation of caveolin-1 for bacterial uptake via caveolae. The interaction of caveolin-1 with phosphorylated protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) at the E. coli attachment site is critical for the invasion of HBMEC. Optical sectioning of confocal images of infected HBMEC indicates continuing association of caveolin-1 with E. coli during transcytosis. Overexpression of a dominant-negative form of caveolin-1 containing mutations in the scaffolding domain blocked the interaction of phospho-PKCalpha with caveolin-1 and the E. coli invasion of HBMEC, but not actin cytoskeleton rearrangement or the phosphorylation of PKCalpha. The interaction of caveolin-1 with phospho-PKCalpha was completely abrogated in HBMEC overexpressing dominant-negative forms of either focal adhesion kinase or PKCalpha. Treatment of HBMEC with a cell-permeable peptide that represents the scaffolding domain, which was coupled to an antennapedia motif of a Drosophila transcription factor significantly blocked the interaction of caveolin-1 with phospho-PKCalpha and E. coli invasion. These results show that E. coli K1 internalizes HBMEC via caveolae and that the scaffolding domain of caveolin-1 plays a significant role in the formation of endosomes. PMID:12386163

  20. Co-solvents as stabilizing agents during heterologous overexpression in Escherichia coli - application to chlamydial penicillin-binding protein 6.

    PubMed

    Otten, Christian; De Benedetti, Stefania; Gaballah, Ahmed; Bühl, Henrike; Klöckner, Anna; Brauner, Jarryd; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Henrichfreise, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Heterologous overexpression of foreign proteins in Escherichia coli often leads to insoluble aggregates of misfolded inactive proteins, so-called inclusion bodies. To solve this problem use of chaperones or in vitro refolding procedures are the means of choice. These methods are time consuming and cost intensive, due to additional purification steps to get rid of the chaperons or the process of refolding itself. We describe an easy to use lab-scale method to avoid formation of inclusion bodies. The method systematically combines use of co-solvents, usually applied for in vitro stabilization of biologicals in biopharmaceutical formulation, and periplasmic expression and can be completed in one week using standard equipment in any life science laboratory. Demonstrating the unique power of our method, we overproduced and purified for the first time an active chlamydial penicillin-binding protein, demonstrated its function as penicillin sensitive DD-carboxypeptidase and took a major leap towards understanding the "chlamydial anomaly." PMID:25849314

  1. Purification and sequencing of the active site tryptic peptide from penicillin-binding protein 1b of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, R.A.; Suzuki, H.; Hirota, Y.; Strominger, J.L.

    1985-07-02

    This paper reports the sequence of the active site peptide of penicillin-binding protein 1b from Escherichia coli. Purified penicillin-binding protein 1b was labeled with (/sup 14/C)penicillin G, digested with trypsin, and partially purified by gel filtration. Upon further purification by high-pressure liquid chromatography, two radioactive peaks were observed, and the major peak, representing over 75% of the applied radioactivity, was submitted to amino acid analysis and sequencing. The sequence Ser-Ile-Gly-Ser-Leu-Ala-Lys was obtained. The active site nucleophile was identified by digesting the purified peptide with aminopeptidase M and separating the radioactive products on high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis confirmed that the serine residue in the middle of the sequence was covalently bonded to the (/sup 14/C)penicilloyl moiety. A comparison of this sequence to active site sequences of other penicillin-binding proteins and beta-lactamases is presented.

  2. Physico-chemical characterization of human von Ebner gland protein expressed in Escherichia coli: implications for its physiological role.

    PubMed

    Creuzenet, C; Mangroo, D

    1998-11-01

    The human von Ebner gland protein (VEG) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The sequence and mass of the recombinant protein were confirmed, and far and near UV circular dichroic analyses showed that the protein was properly folded. The secondary structure of recombinant VEG consisted of 75% beta-sheets and 12% alpha-helices, and it was found to be stable under acidic conditions, in the presence of alcohol, and at high temperatures. The denaturation temperature was 79 degreesC at pH 3.5, with a denaturation enthalpy (DeltaHd) of 160,600 J/mol. Fluorescence analysis and measurement of the denaturation temperature by circular dichroism did not detect any interaction between VEG and extremely bitter (denatonium benzoate, caffein) or sweet (aspartame) compounds. These results suggest that VEG may not function as a shuttle for transfer of sapid molecules to taste receptors. PMID:9790888

  3. Coupling of protein motions and hydrogen transfer during catalysis by Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Swanwick, Richard S.; Maglia, Giovanni; Tey, Lai-hock; Allemann, Rudolf K.

    2005-01-01

    The enzyme DHFR (dihydrofolate reductase) catalyses hydride transfer from NADPH to, and protonation of, dihydrofolate. The physical basis of the hydride transfer step catalysed by DHFR from Escherichia coli has been studied through the measurement of the temperature dependence of the reaction rates and the kinetic isotope effects. Single turnover experiments at pH 7.0 revealed a strong dependence of the reaction rates on temperature. The observed relatively large difference in the activation energies for hydrogen and deuterium transfer led to a temperature dependence of the primary kinetic isotope effects from 3.0±0.2 at 5 °C to 2.2±0.2 at 40 °C and an inverse ratio of the pre-exponential factors of 0.108±0.04. These results are consistent with theoretical models for hydrogen transfer that include contributions from quantum mechanical tunnelling coupled with protein motions that actively modulate the tunnelling distance. Previous work had suggested a coupling of a remote residue, Gly121, with the kinetic events at the active site. However, pre-steady-state experiments at pH 7.0 with the mutant G121V-DHFR, in which Gly121 was replaced with valine, revealed that the chemical mechanism of DHFR catalysis was robust to this replacement. The reduced catalytic efficiency of G121V-DHFR was mainly a consequence of the significantly reduced pre-exponential factors, indicating the requirement for significant molecular reorganization during G121V-DHFR catalysis. In contrast, steady-state measurements at pH 9.5, where hydride transfer is rate limiting, revealed temperature-independent kinetic isotope effects between 15 and 35 °C and a ratio of the pre-exponential factors above the semi-classical limit, suggesting a rigid active site configuration from which hydrogen tunnelling occurs. The mechanism by which hydrogen tunnelling in DHFR is coupled with the environment appears therefore to be sensitive to pH. PMID:16241906

  4. EsiB, a Novel Pathogenic Escherichia coli Secretory Immunoglobulin A-Binding Protein Impairing Neutrophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pastorello, Ilaria; Rossi Paccani, Silvia; Rosini, Roberto; Mattera, Rossella; Ferrer Navarro, Mario; Urosev, Dunja; Nesta, Barbara; Lo Surdo, Paola; Del Vecchio, Mariangela; Rippa, Valentina; Bertoldi, Isabella; Gomes Moriel, Danilo; Laarman, Alexander J.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Daura, Xavier; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Serino, Laura; Soriani, Marco

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, we have characterized the functional properties of a novel Escherichia coli antigen named EsiB (E. coli secretory immunoglobulin A-binding protein), recently reported to protect mice from sepsis. Gene distribution analysis of a panel of 267 strains representative of different E. coli pathotypes revealed that esiB is preferentially associated with extraintestinal strains, while the gene is rarely found in either intestinal or nonpathogenic strains. These findings were supported by the presence of anti-EsiB antibodies in the sera of patients affected by urinary tract infections (UTIs). By solving its crystal structure, we observed that EsiB adopts a superhelical fold composed of Sel1-like repeats (SLRs), a feature often associated with bacterial proteins possessing immunomodulatory functions. Indeed, we found that EsiB interacts with secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) through a specific motif identified by an immunocapturing approach. Functional assays showed that EsiB binding to SIgA is likely to interfere with productive FcαRI signaling, by inhibiting both SIgA-induced neutrophil chemotaxis and respiratory burst. Indeed, EsiB hampers SIgA-mediated signaling events by reducing the phosphorylation status of key signal-transducer cytosolic proteins, including mitogen-activated kinases. We propose that the interference with such immune events could contribute to the capacity of the bacterium to avoid clearance by neutrophils, as well as reducing the recruitment of immune cells to the infection site. PMID:23882011

  5. Refolding and purification of recombinant L-asparaginase from inclusion bodies of E. coli into active tetrameric protein.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Arun K; Singh, Anupam; Mukherjee, K J; Panda, Amulya K

    2014-01-01

    A tetrameric protein of therapeutic importance, Escherichia coli L-asparaginase-II was expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies (IBs). Asparaginase IBs were solubilized using low concentration of urea and refolded into active tetrameric protein using pulsatile dilution method. Refolded asparaginase was purified in two steps by ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatographic techniques. The recovery of bioactive asparaginase from IBs was around 50%. The melting temperature (Tm) of the purified asparaginase was found to be 64°C. The specific activity of refolded, purified asparaginase was found to be comparable to the commercial asparaginase (190 IU/mg). Enzymatic activity of the refolded asparaginase was high even at four molar urea solutions, where the IB aggregates are completely solubilized. From the comparison of chemical denaturation data and activity at different concentrations of guanidine hydrochloride, it was observed that dissociation of monomeric units precedes the complete loss of helical secondary structures. Protection of the existing native-like protein structure during solubilization of IB aggregates with 4 M urea improved the propensity of monomer units to form oligomeric structure. Our mild solubilization technique retaining native-like structures, improved recovery of asparaginase in bioactive tetrameric form. PMID:25309524

  6. Refolding and purification of recombinant L-asparaginase from inclusion bodies of E. coli into active tetrameric protein

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Arun K.; Singh, Anupam; Mukherjee, K. J.; Panda, Amulya K.

    2014-01-01

    A tetrameric protein of therapeutic importance, Escherichia coli L-asparaginase-II was expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies (IBs). Asparaginase IBs were solubilized using low concentration of urea and refolded into active tetrameric protein using pulsatile dilution method. Refolded asparaginase was purified in two steps by ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatographic techniques. The recovery of bioactive asparaginase from IBs was around 50%. The melting temperature (Tm) of the purified asparaginase was found to be 64°C. The specific activity of refolded, purified asparaginase was found to be comparable to the commercial asparaginase (190 IU/mg). Enzymatic activity of the refolded asparaginase was high even at four molar urea solutions, where the IB aggregates are completely solubilized. From the comparison of chemical denaturation data and activity at different concentrations of guanidine hydrochloride, it was observed that dissociation of monomeric units precedes the complete loss of helical secondary structures. Protection of the existing native-like protein structure during solubilization of IB aggregates with 4 M urea improved the propensity of monomer units to form oligomeric structure. Our mild solubilization technique retaining native-like structures, improved recovery of asparaginase in bioactive tetrameric form. PMID:25309524

  7. De Novo Designed Proteins from a Library of Artificial Sequences Function in Escherichia Coli and Enable Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Michael A.; McKinley, Kara L.; Bradley, Luke H.; Viola, Sara R.; Hecht, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    A central challenge of synthetic biology is to enable the growth of living systems using parts that are not derived from nature, but designed and synthesized in the laboratory. As an initial step toward achieving this goal, we probed the ability of a collection of >106 de novo designed proteins to provide biological functions necessary to sustain cell growth. Our collection of proteins was drawn from a combinatorial library of 102-residue sequences, designed by binary patterning of polar and nonpolar residues to fold into stable 4-helix bundles. We probed the capacity of proteins from this library to function in vivo by testing their abilities to rescue 27 different knockout strains of Escherichia coli, each deleted for a conditionally essential gene. Four different strains – ΔserB, ΔgltA, ΔilvA, and Δfes – were rescued by specific sequences from our library. Further experiments demonstrated that a strain simultaneously deleted for all four genes was rescued by co-expression of four novel sequences. Thus, cells deleted for ∼0.1% of the E. coli genome (and ∼1% of the genes required for growth under nutrient-poor conditions) can be sustained by sequences designed de novo. PMID:21245923

  8. Native-sized recombinant spider silk protein produced in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli results in a strong fiber.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Xia; Qian, Zhi-Gang; Ki, Chang Seok; Park, Young Hwan; Kaplan, David L; Lee, Sang Yup

    2010-08-10

    Spider dragline silk is a remarkably strong fiber that makes it attractive for numerous applications. Much has thus been done to make similar fibers by biomimic spinning of recombinant dragline silk proteins. However, success is limited in part due to the inability to successfully express native-sized recombinant silk proteins (250-320 kDa). Here we show that a 284.9 kDa recombinant protein of the spider Nephila clavipes is produced and spun into a fiber displaying mechanical properties comparable to those of the native silk. The native-sized protein, predominantly rich in glycine (44.9%), was favorably expressed in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli within which the glycyl-tRNA pool was elevated. We also found that the recombinant proteins of lower molecular weight versions yielded inferior fiber properties. The results provide insight into evolution of silk protein size related to mechanical performance, and also clarify why spinning lower molecular weight proteins does not recapitulate the properties of native fibers. Furthermore, the silk expression, purification, and spinning platform established here should be useful for sustainable production of natural quality dragline silk, potentially enabling broader applications. PMID:20660779

  9. Real Time Observation of Single Membrane Protein Insertion Events by the Escherichia coli Insertase YidC

    PubMed Central

    Winterfeld, Sophie; Ernst, Stefan; Börsch, Michael; Gerken, Uwe; Kuhn, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Membrane protein translocation and insertion is a central issue in biology. Here we focus on a minimal system, the membrane insertase YidC of Escherichia coli that inserts small proteins into the cytoplasmic membrane. In a reconstituted system individual insertion processes were followed by single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), with a pair of fluorophores on YidC and the substrate Pf3 coat protein. After addition of N-terminally labeled Pf3 coat protein a close contact to YidC at its cytoplasmic label was observed. This allowed to monitor the translocation of the N-terminal domain of Pf3 coat protein across the membrane in real time. Translocation occurred within milliseconds as the label on the N-terminal domain rapidly approached the fluorophore on the periplasmic domain of YidC at the trans side of the membrane. After the close contact, the two fluorophores separated, reflecting the release of the translocated Pf3 coat protein from YidC into the membrane bilayer. When the Pf3 coat protein was labeled C-terminally, no translocation of the label was observed although efficient binding to the cytoplasmic positions of YidC occurred. PMID:23527078

  10. Molecular parasitism in the Escherichia coli-Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus system: translocation of the matrix protein from the host to the parasite outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Guerrini, F; Romano, V; Valenzi, M; Di Giulio, M; Mupo, M R; Sacco, M

    1982-01-01

    During the intracellular maturation in Escherichia coli of the parasite Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus the outer membrane, major protein I of E. coli (i.e., the matrix protein) becomes associated with the outer membrane of the emerging parasite cells. The binding properties of this protein with the outer membrane of the host and of the parasite are identical. An analogous phenomenon also occurs during Bdellovibrio parasitism on Klebsiella pneumoniae and on Salmonella typhimurium. Possible roles for this scavenging action of Bdellovibrio, and similar phenomena in other parasitic systems, are discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:6765198

  11. The role of AlkB protein in repair of 1,N⁶-ethenoadenine in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Agnieszka M; Sokołowska, Beata; Nowicki, Adam; Kuśmierek, Jarosław T

    2011-05-01

    Etheno (ε) DNA adducts, including 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (εA), are formed by various bifunctional agents of exogenous and endogenous origin. The AT→TA transversion, the most frequent mutation provoked by the presence of εA in DNA, is very common in critical codons of the TP53 and RAS genes in tumours induced by exposure to carcinogenic vinyl compounds. Here, using a method that allows examination of the mutagenic potency of a metabolite of vinyl chloride, chloroacetaldehyde (CAA), but eliminates its cytotoxicity, we studied the participation of alkA, alkB and mug gene products in the repair of εA in Escherichia coli cells. The test system used comprised the pIF105 plasmid bearing the lactose operon of CC105 origin, which allowed monitoring of Lac(+) revertants that arose by AT→TA substitutions due to the modification of adenine by CAA. The plasmid was CAA-modified in vitro and replicated in E.coli of various genetic backgrounds (wt, alkA, alkB, mug, alkAalkB, alkAmug and alkBmug). To modify the levels of the AlkA and AlkB proteins, mutagenesis was studied in E.coli cells induced or not in adaptive response to alkylating agents. Considering the levels of CAA-induced Lac(+) revertants in strains harbouring the CAA-modified pIF105 plasmid and induced or not in adaptive response, we conclude that the AlkB dioxygenase plays a major role in decreasing the level of AT→TA mutations, thus in the repair of εA in E.coli cells. The observed differences of mutation frequencies in the various mutant strains assayed indicate that Mug glycosylase is also engaged in the repair of εA, whereas the role the AlkA glycosylase in this repair is negligible. PMID:21193516

  12. Molecular analysis of the M protein of Streptococcus equi and cloning and expression of the M protein gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Galán, J E; Timoney, J F

    1987-01-01

    A Streptococcus equi gene bank was constructed in the bacteriophage lambda gt11 cloning vector, and hybrid phage plaques were screened with S. equi M protein antiserum. A hybrid phage expressing the S. equi M protein (lambda gt11/SEM7) was identified and lysogenized into Escherichia coli Y1089. The cloned M protein appeared in immunoblots as three polypeptides with relative molecular weights of 58,000, 53,000, and 50,000. When reacted with S. equi M protein antiserum in an agar double-diffusion assay, the cloned M protein formed a line of identity with a protein in an acid extract of S. equi. Furthermore, lambda gt11/SEM7 protein inhibited opsonization of S. equi by antiserum to S. equi M protein. In addition, the recombinant protein expressed determinants of the antigen in the immune complexes of purpura hemorrhagica. Native M protein obtained from S. equi and recombinant M protein showed very similar molecular weight distributions on immunoblots, appearing as multiple closely spaced bands with molecular weights ranging from 52,000 to 60,000. Antisera prepared separately against each of the acid-extracted polypeptides shown to be important in serum bactericidal responses (molecular weight, 29,000) and nasopharyngeal local antibody responses (molecular weights, 41,000 and 46,000) of the horse each reacted with all three polypeptides in an acid extract. Moreover, antisera against protoplasts and against recombinant M protein of S. equi also reacted with these polypeptides. These results suggest that the entire M protein molecule of S. equi is present in these preparations and that the fragments in acid extracts carry overlapping segments. Images PMID:3316035

  13. Molecular analysis of the M protein of Streptococcus equi and cloning and expression of the M protein gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Galán, J E; Timoney, J F

    1987-12-01

    A Streptococcus equi gene bank was constructed in the bacteriophage lambda gt11 cloning vector, and hybrid phage plaques were screened with S. equi M protein antiserum. A hybrid phage expressing the S. equi M protein (lambda gt11/SEM7) was identified and lysogenized into Escherichia coli Y1089. The cloned M protein appeared in immunoblots as three polypeptides with relative molecular weights of 58,000, 53,000, and 50,000. When reacted with S. equi M protein antiserum in an agar double-diffusion assay, the cloned M protein formed a line of identity with a protein in an acid extract of S. equi. Furthermore, lambda gt11/SEM7 protein inhibited opsonization of S. equi by antiserum to S. equi M protein. In addition, the recombinant protein expressed determinants of the antigen in the immune complexes of purpura hemorrhagica. Native M protein obtained from S. equi and recombinant M protein showed very similar molecular weight distributions on immunoblots, appearing as multiple closely spaced bands with molecular weights ranging from 52,000 to 60,000. Antisera prepared separately against each of the acid-extracted polypeptides shown to be important in serum bactericidal responses (molecular weight, 29,000) and nasopharyngeal local antibody responses (molecular weights, 41,000 and 46,000) of the horse each reacted with all three polypeptides in an acid extract. Moreover, antisera against protoplasts and against recombinant M protein of S. equi also reacted with these polypeptides. These results suggest that the entire M protein molecule of S. equi is present in these preparations and that the fragments in acid extracts carry overlapping segments. PMID:3316035

  14. Optimized Expression, Purification of Herpes B Virus gD Protein in Escherichia coli, and Production of Its Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zian; Sun, Tao; Xia, Xueshan; Wei, Qiujiang; Song, Yuzhu; Han, Qinqin; Chen, Qiang; Hu, Juan; Zhang, Jinyang

    2016-01-01

    Background Herpes B virus (BV) is a zoonotic disease caused by double-stranded enveloped DNA virus with cercopithecidae as its natural host. The mortality rate of infected people could be up to 70% with fatal encephalitis and encephalomyelitis. Up to now, there are no effective treatments for BV infection. Among the various proteins encoded by monkey B virus, gD, a conserved structural protein, harbors important application value for serological diagnosis of frequent variations of the monkey B virus. Objectives This study aimed to expressed the gD protein of BV in Escherichia coli by a recombinant vector, and prepare specific monoclonal antibodies against gD of BV to pave the way for effective and quick diagnosis reagent research. Materials and Methods The gD gene of BV was optimized by OptimWiz to improve codon usage bias and synthesis, and the recombinant plasmid, pET32a/gD, was constructed and expressed in E. coli Rosetta (DE3). The expressed fusion protein, His-gD, was purified and the BALB/c mice were immunized by this protein. Spleen cells from the immunized mice and SP2/0 myeloma cells were fused together, and the monoclonal cell strains were obtained by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, followed by preparation of monoclonal antibody ascetic fluid. Results The optimized gD protein was highly expressed in E. coli and successfully purified. Five monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against BV were obtained and named as 4E3, 3F8, 3E7, 1H3 and 4B6, and with ascetic fluid titers of 2 × 106, 2 × 105, 2 × 105, 2 × 103 and 2 × 102, respectively. The 1H3 and 4E3 belonged to the IgG2b subclass, while 3E7, 3F8 and 4B6 belonged to the IgG1 subclass. Conclusions The cell lines obtained in this work secreted potent, stable and specific anti-BV mAbs, which were suitable for the development of herpes B virus diagnosis reagents. PMID:27226876

  15. Effects of starvation for potassium and other inorganic ions on protein degradation and ribonucleic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    St John, A C; Goldberg, A L

    1980-09-01

    Starvation of Escherichia coli for potassium, phosphate, or magnesium ions leads to a reversible increase in the rate of protein degradation and an inhibition of ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis. In cells deprived of potassium, the breakdown of the more stable cell proteins increased two- to threefold, whereas the hydrolysis of short-lived proteins, both normal ones and analog-containing polypeptides, did not change. The mechanisms initiating the enhancement of proteolysis during starvation for these ions were examined. Upon starvation for amino acids or amino acyl-transfer RNA (tRNA), protein breakdown increases in relA+ (but not relA) cells as a result of the rapid synthesis of guanosine-5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate (ppGpp). However, a lack of amino acyl-tRNA does not appear to be responsible for the increased protein breakdown in cells starved for inorganic ions, since protein breakdown increased in the absence of these ions in both relA+ and relA cultures, and since a large excess of amino acids did not affect this response. In bacteria in which energy production is restricted, ppGpp levels also rise, and protein breakdown increases. The ion-deprived cultures did show a 40 to 75% reduction in adenosine-5'-triphosphate levels,l similar to that seen upon glucose starvation. However, this decrease in ATP content does not appear to cause the increase in protein breakdown or lead to an accumulation of ppGpp. No consistent change in intracellular ppGpp levels was found in relA+ or relA cells starved for these ions. In addition, in relX mutants, removal of these ions led to accelerated protein degradation even though relX cells are unable to increase ppGpp levels or proteolysis when deprived of a carbon source. In the potassium-, phosphate-, and magnesium-deprived cultures, the addition of choramphenicol or tetracycline caused a reduction in protein breakdown toward basal levels. Such findings, however, do not indicate that protein synthesis is essential for the

  16. Expression of the type I regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Saraswat, L.D.; Filutowicz, M.

    1986-05-01

    The cDNA for the bovine type I regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase has been inserted into the expression vector pUC7. When E. coli JM105 was transformed with this plasmid, R-subunit was expressed in amounts that approached 2-4 mg/liter. The expressed protein was visualized in total cell extracts by photolabeling with 8-N/sub 3/-(/sup 32/P)-cAMP following transfer from SDS polyacrylamide gels to nitrocellulose. Expression of R-subunit was independent of IPTG. R-subunit accumulated in large amounts only in the stationary phase of growth. The addition of IPTG during the log phase of growth actually blocked the accumulation of R-subunit. The soluble, dimeric R-subunit was purifided to homogeneity by affinity chromatography. This R-subunit bound 2 mol cAMP/mol R monomer, reassociated with C-subunit to form cAMP-dependent holoenzyme, and migrated as a dimer on SDS polyacrylamide gels in the absence of reducing agents. The expressed protein was also susceptible to limited proteolysis yielding a monomeric cAMP-binding fragment having a molecular weight of 35,000. In all of these properties the expressed protein was indistinguishable from R/sup I/ purified from bovine tissue even though the R-subunit expressed in E. coli represents a fusion protein that contains 10 additional amino acids at the amino terminus that are provided by the lac Z gene of the vector. The NH/sub 2/-terminal sequence was confirmed by amino acid sequencing.

  17. Kinetics of inclusion body formation and its correlation with the characteristics of protein aggregates in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Arun K; Murmu, Aruna; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the research was to understand the structural determinants governing protein aggregation into inclusion bodies during expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) and asparaginase were expressed as inclusion bodies in E.coli and the kinetics of aggregate formation was analyzed in details. Asparaginase inclusion bodies were of smaller size (200 nm) and the size of the aggregates did not increase with induction time. In contrast, the seeding and growth behavior of hGH inclusion bodies were found to be sequential, kinetically stable and the aggregate size increased from 200 to 800 nm with induction time. Human growth hormone inclusion bodies showed higher resistance to denaturants and proteinase K degradation in comparison to those of asparaginase inclusion bodies. Asparaginase inclusion bodies were completely solubilized at 2-3 M urea concentration and could be refolded into active protein, whereas 7 M urea was required for complete solubilization of hGH inclusion bodies. Both hGH and asparaginase inclusion bodies showed binding with amyloid specific dyes. In spite of its low β-sheet content, binding with dyes was more prominent in case of hGH inclusion bodies than that of asparaginase. Arrangements of protein molecules present in the surface as well as in the core of inclusion bodies were similar. Hydrophobic interactions between partially folded amphiphillic and hydrophobic alpha-helices were found to be one of the main determinants of hGH inclusion body formation. Aggregation behavior of the protein molecules decides the nature and properties of inclusion bodies. PMID:22479486

  18. Role of N-terminal region of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase in folding and function of the protein.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Ashutosh; Singh, Amit K; Shukla, Prakash K; Equbal, Md Javed; Malik, Shikha T; Singh, Tej P; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2016-09-01

    Maltodextrin glucosidase (MalZ) hydrolyses short malto-oligosaccharides from the reducing end releasing glucose and maltose in Escherichia coli. MalZ is a highly aggregation prone protein and molecular chaperonins GroEL and GroES assist in the folding of this protein to a substantial level. The N-terminal region of this enzyme appears to be a unique domain as seen in sequence comparison studies with other amylases as well as through homology modelling. The sequence and homology model analysis show a probability of disorder in the N-Terminal region of MalZ. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been reported in the present communication. Based on the crystallographic structure, it has been interpreted that the N-terminal region of the enzyme (Met1-Phe131) might be unstructured or flexible. To understand the role of the N-terminal region of MalZ in its enzymatic activity, and overall stability, a truncated version (Ala111-His616) of MalZ was created. The truncated version failed to fold into an active enzyme both in E. coli cytosol and in vitro even with the assistance of chaperonins GroEL and GroES. Furthermore, the refolding effort of N-truncated MalZ in the presence of isolated N-terminal domain didn't succeed. Our studies suggest that while the structural rigidity or orientation of the N-terminal region of the MalZ protein may not be essential for its stability and function, but the said domain is likely to play an important role in the formation of the native structure of the protein when present as an integral part of the protein. PMID:27317979

  19. Chemical treatment of Escherichia coli: 3. Selective extraction of a recombinant protein from cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in intact cells.

    PubMed

    Falconer, R J; O'Neill, B K; Middelberg, A P

    1999-02-20

    In previous parts of this study we developed procedures for the high-efficiency chemical extraction of soluble and insoluble protein from intact Escherichia coli cells. Although high yields were obtained, extraction of recombinant protein directly from cytoplasmic inclusion bodies led to low product purity due to coextraction of soluble contaminants. In this work, a two-stage procedure for the selective extraction of recombinant protein at high efficiency and high purity is reported. In the first stage, inclusion-body stability is promoted by the addition of 15 mM 2-hydroxyethyldisulfide (2-HEDS), also known as oxidized beta-mercaptoethanol, to the permeabilization buffer (6 M urea + 3 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetate [EDTA]). 2-HEDS is an oxidizing agent believed to promote disulfide bond formation, rendering the inclusion body resistant to solubilization in 6 M urea. Contaminating proteins are separated from the inclusion-body fraction by centrifugation. In the second stage, disulfide bonds are readily eliminated by including reducing agent (20 mM dithiothreitol [DTT]) into the permeabilization buffer. Extraction using this selective two-stage process yielded an 81% (w/w) recovery of the recombinant protein Long-R3-IGF-I from inclusion bodies located in the cytoplasm of intact E. coli, at a purity of 46% (w/w). This was comparable to that achieved by conventional extraction (mechanical disruption followed by centrifugation and solubilization). A pilot-scale procedure was also demonstrated using a stirred reactor and diafiltration. This is the first reported study that achieves both high extraction efficiency and selectivity by the chemical treatment of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in intact bacterial cells. PMID:9921154

  20. Highly efficient immunodiagnosis of Large cardamom chirke virus using the polyclonal antiserum against Escherichia coli expressed recombinant coat protein.

    PubMed

    Vijayanandraj, S; Yogita, M; Das, Amrita; Ghosh, Amalendu; Mandal, Bikash

    2013-09-01

    Large cardamom chirke virus (LCCV), genus Macluravirus, family Potyviridae is an important constrain in large cardamom production in India. Purification of LCCV from large cardamom tissues is difficult and therefore immunodiagnostic reagents are not available. In the present study, we have successfully expressed coat protein (CP) gene of LCCV in Escherichia coli. The purification of expressed protein by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography was inefficient due to precipitation of protein during renaturation. We have optimized a simple, inexpensive and efficient method for purification of the expressed CP through gel extraction with 5 % SDS followed by renaturation in Milli-Q water, which resulted in high yield (4.7 mg/ml) and good quality of the protein. A higher titer (1:256,000) polyclonal antibody (PAb) to the recombinant CP was produced, which strongly recognized LCCV in crude leaf extract and showed minimal background reaction with the healthy leaf extract in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot immunobinding assay (DIBA). The sensitivities of the ELISA and DIBA were 5 and 0.1 ng of expressed protein, respectively. Both the ELISA and DIBA were validated with 100 % accuracy in detecting LCCV in field samples. The PAb differentiated Cardamom mosaic virus, another close relative of LCCV. Our study is first to report highly efficient immunodiagnosis with PAb to E. coli expressed recombinant CP of a virus under the genus Macluravirus. The antigen expression construct and PAb developed in the present study will be useful in production of virus free planting materials of large cardamom. PMID:24426280

  1. Kinetics of Inclusion Body Formation and Its Correlation with the Characteristics of Protein Aggregates in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Arun K.; Murmu, Aruna; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the research was to understand the structural determinants governing protein aggregation into inclusion bodies during expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) and asparaginase were expressed as inclusion bodies in E.coli and the kinetics of aggregate formation was analyzed in details. Asparaginase inclusion bodies were of smaller size (200 nm) and the size of the aggregates did not increase with induction time. In contrast, the seeding and growth behavior of hGH inclusion bodies were found to be sequential, kinetically stable and the aggregate size increased from 200 to 800 nm with induction time. Human growth hormone inclusion bodies showed higher resistance to denaturants and proteinase K degradation in comparison to those of asparaginase inclusion bodies. Asparaginase inclusion bodies were completely solubilized at 2–3 M urea concentration and could be refolded into active protein, whereas 7 M urea was required for complete solubilization of hGH inclusion bodies. Both hGH and asparaginase inclusion bodies showed binding with amyloid specific dyes. In spite of its low β-sheet content, binding with dyes was more prominent in case of hGH inclusion bodies than that of asparaginase. Arrangements of protein molecules present in the surface as well as in the core of inclusion bodies were similar. Hydrophobic interactions between partially folded amphiphillic and hydrophobic alpha-helices were found to be one of the main determinants of hGH inclusion body formation. Aggregation behavior of the protein molecules decides the nature and properties of inclusion bodies. PMID:22479486

  2. A review of machine learning methods to predict the solubility of overexpressed recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the last 20 years in biotechnology, the production of recombinant proteins has been a crucial bioprocess in both biopharmaceutical and research arena in terms of human health, scientific impact and economic volume. Although logical strategies of genetic engineering have been established, protein overexpression is still an art. In particular, heterologous expression is often hindered by low level of production and frequent fail due to opaque reasons. The problem is accentuated because there is no generic solution available to enhance heterologous overexpression. For a given protein, the extent of its solubility can indicate the quality of its function. Over 30% of synthesized proteins are not soluble. In certain experimental circumstances, including temperature, expression host, etc., protein solubility is a feature eventually defined by its sequence. Until now, numerous methods based on machine learning are proposed to predict the solubility of protein merely from its amino acid sequence. In spite of the 20 years of research on the matter, no comprehensive review is available on the published methods. Results This paper presents an extensive review of the existing models to predict protein solubility in Escherichia coli recombinant protein overexpression system. The models are investigated and compared regarding the datasets used, features, feature selection methods, machine learning techniques and accuracy of prediction. A discussion on the models is provided at the end. Conclusions This study aims to investigate extensively the machine learning based methods to predict recombinant protein solubility, so as to offer a general as well as a detailed understanding for researches in the field. Some of the models present acceptable prediction performances and convenient user interfaces. These models can be considered as valuable tools to predict recombinant protein overexpression results before performing real laboratory experiments, thus saving

  3. A strong antibody response to the periplasmic C-terminal domain of the OmpA protein of Escherichia coli is produced by immunization with purified OmpA or with whole E. coli or Salmonella typhimurium bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Puohiniemi, R; Karvonen, M; Vuopio-Varkila, J; Muotiala, A; Helander, I M; Sarvas, M

    1990-01-01

    We produced in Bacillus subtilis the complete, as well as the N-terminal two-thirds, OmpA protein of Escherichia coli (called here Bac-OmpA and Bac-OmpA-dN, respectively). These Bac-OmpA proteins were used to examine the immunological properties of different parts of OmpA, free of lipopolysaccharide and other components of the outer membrane. The full-length Bac-OmpA was indistinguishable from the authentic protein isolated from E. coli (Coli-OmpA) both as immunogen and as antigen in enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The N-terminal Bac-OmpA-dN was a poor immunogen which gave rise to significantly lower titers of anti-OmpA antibody than did the full-length OmpA preparations. When used as an antigen in EIA, the Bac-OmpA-dN detected anti-OmpA antibody in serum samples from animals immunized with the full-length OmpA much less efficiently than did either Bac-OmpA or Coli-OmpA. The periplasmic C-terminal domain therefore appears to be an immunodominant epitope of the purified OmpA protein. Also, when rabbits and mice were immunized with intact, live or dead E. coli, the antibody response detected by EIA with the full-length protein, Bac-OmpA, was much stronger than that detected with the N-terminal two-thirds, Bac-OmpA-dN. Similar results were obtained with the OmpA of Salmonella typhimurium. Because the ompA gene of enterobacteria is highly conserved, the Bac-OmpA might be useful as a group-specific EIA antigen to diagnose diseases caused by members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Images PMID:2111285

  4. Role of the ribosome-associated protein PY in the cold-shock response of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Di Pietro, Fabio; Brandi, Anna; Dzeladini, Nadire; Fabbretti, Attilio; Carzaniga, Thomas; Piersimoni, Lolita; Pon, Cynthia L; Giuliodori, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    Protein Y (PY) is an Escherichia coli cold-shock protein which has been proposed to be responsible for the repression of bulk protein synthesis during cold adaptation. Here, we present in vivo and in vitro data which clarify the role of PY and its mechanism of action. Deletion of yfiA, the gene encoding protein PY, demonstrates that this protein is dispensable for cold adaptation and is not responsible for the shutdown of bulk protein synthesis at the onset of the stress, although it is able to partially inhibit translation. In vitro assays reveal that the extent of PY inhibition changes with different mRNAs and that this inhibition is related to the capacity of PY of binding 30S subunits with a fairly strong association constant, thus stimulating the formation of 70S monomers. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that PY competes with the other ribosomal ligands for the binding to the 30S subunits. Overall these results suggest an alternative model to explain PY function during cold shock and to reconcile the inhibition caused by PY with the active translation observed for some mRNAs during cold shock. PMID:23420694

  5. The Intimin-Like Protein FdeC Is Regulated by H-NS and Temperature in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Easton, Donna M; Allsopp, Luke P; Phan, Minh-Duy; Moriel, Danilo Gomes; Goh, Guan Kai; Beatson, Scott A; Mahony, Timothy J; Cobbold, Rowland N; Schembri, Mark A

    2014-12-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a Shiga-toxigenic pathogen capable of inducing severe forms of enteritis (e.g., hemorrhagic colitis) and extraintestinal sequelae (e.g., hemolytic-uremic syndrome). The molecular basis of colonization of human and animal hosts by EHEC is not yet completely understood, and an improved understanding of EHEC mucosal adherence may lead to the development of interventions that could disrupt host colonization. FdeC, also referred to by its IHE3034 locus tag ECOK1_0290, is an intimin-like protein that was recently shown to contribute to kidney colonization in a mouse urinary tract infection model. The expression of FdeC is tightly regulated in vitro, and FdeC shows promise as a vaccine candidate against extraintestinal E. coli strains. In this study, we characterized the prevalence, regulation, and function of fdeC in EHEC. We showed that the fdeC gene is conserved in both O157 and non-O157 EHEC and encodes a protein that is expressed at the cell surface and promotes biofilm formation under continuous-flow conditions in a recombinant E. coli strain background. We also identified culture conditions under which FdeC is expressed and showed that minor alterations of these conditions, such as changes in temperature, can significantly alter the level of FdeC expression. Additionally, we demonstrated that the transcription of the fdeC gene is repressed by the global regulator H-NS. Taken together, our data suggest a role for FdeC in EHEC when it grows at temperatures above 37°C, a condition relevant to its specialized niche at the rectoanal junctions of cattle. PMID:25239893

  6. Improved 1, 2, 4-butanetriol production from an engineered Escherichia coli by co-expression of different chaperone proteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinyao; He, Shuying; Zong, Hong; Song, Jian; Chen, Wen; Zhuge, Bin

    2016-09-01

    1, 2, 4-Butanetriol (BT) is a high-value non-natural chemical and has important applications in polymers, medical production and military industry. In the constructed BT biosynthesis pathway from xylose in Escherichia coli, the xylose dehydrogenase (Xdh) and the benzoylformate decarboxylase (MdlC) are heterologous enzymes and the activity of MdlC is the key limiting factor for BT production. In this study, six chaperone protein systems were introduced into the engineered E. coli harboring the recombinant BT pathway. The chaperone GroES-GroEL was beneficial to Xdh activity but had a negative effect on MdlC activity and BT titer. The plasmid pTf16 containing the tig gene (trigger factor) was beneficial to Xdh and MdlC activities and improved the BT titer from 0.42 to 0.56 g/l from 20 g/l xylose. However, co-expression of trigger factor and GroES-GroEL simultaneously reduced the activity of MdlC and had no effect on the BT production. The plasmid pKJE7 harboring dnaK-dnaJ-grpE showed significant negative effects on these enzyme activities and cell growth, leading to completely restrained the BT production. Similarly, co-expression of DnaKJ-GrpPE and GroES-GroEL simultaneously reduced Xdh and MdlC activities and decreased the BT titer by 45.2 %. The BT production of the engineered E. coli harboring pTf16 was further improved to the highest level at 1.01 g/l under pH control (pH 7). This work showed the potential application of chaperone proteins in microorganism engineering to get high production of target compounds as an effective and valuable tool. PMID:27430516

  7. Structure and properties of the C-terminal β-helical domain of VgrG protein from Escherichia coli O157.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kazuya; Leiman, Petr G; Arisaka, Fumio; Kanamaru, Shuji

    2014-03-01

    The bacterial Type 6 secretion system (T6SS) translocates protein toxins (also called effectors) from the cytosol of a T6SS-carrying cell to a target cell by a syringe-like supramolecular complex resembling a contractile tail of bacteriophages. Valine-glycine repeat protein G (VgrG) proteins, which are the homologues of the gp27-gp5 (gene product) cell puncturing complex of bacteriophage T4, are considered to be located at the attacking tip of the bacterial T6SS apparatus. Here, we over-expressed six VgrG proteins from pathogenic Escherichia coli O157 and CFT073 strains. Purified VgrG1 of E. coli O157 and c3393 of E. coli CFT073 form trimer in solution and are rich in β-structure. We also solved the crystal structure of a trypsin-resistant C-terminal fragment of E. coli O157 VgrG1 (VgrG1C(G561)) at 1.95 Å resolution. VgrG1C(G561) forms a three-stranded antiparallel β-helix which is structurally similar to the β-helix domain of the central spike protein (gp138) of phi92 phage, indicating a possible evolutional relationship. Comparison of four different three-stranded β-helix proteins shows how their amino acid composition determines the protein fold. PMID:24307403

  8. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among recA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Hess, R.M.; McEntee, K.

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N/sub 3/ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T/sub 31/ of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N/sub 3/ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10/sup 7/ years.

  9. Protein fusions of beta-galactosidase to the ferrichrome-iron receptor of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Coulton, J W; Mason, P; Cameron, D R; Carmel, G; Jean, R; Rode, H N

    1986-01-01

    The fusion-generating phage lambda plac Mu1 was used to produce fusions of lacZ to fhuA, the gene encoding the ferrichrome-iron receptor (FhuA protein) in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli K-12. Fusions to the fhuA gene in a delta (lac) strain were selected by their resistance to bacteriophage phi 80 vir. Ten independent (fhuA'-'lacZ) fusions were all Lac+ and were resistant to the lethal agents which require the FhuA protein as receptor, i.e., phi 80 vir, T5, T1, UC-1, and colicin M; none could utilize ferrichrome as the sole iron source. Specialized transducing phages were obtained by illegitimate excision from the chromosome of each of the fusion-bearing strains, and EcoRI fragments which encoded the fusions were subcloned into the high-copy plasmid pMLB524. Physical mapping of the fusion-containing plasmids confirmed the presence of three restriction sites which were also located on the chromosomal DNA of sequences near the fhuA gene. The direction of transcription of the fhuA gene was deduced from the direction of transcription of the (fhuA'-'lacZ) gene fusion. Identification of the chimeric proteins was made by both radiolabeling cells and immunoprecipitating the LacZ-containing proteins with antibody to beta-galactosidase and by preparing whole cell extracts from Lac+ cells containing the cloned gene fusions. Two sizes of (FhuA'-'LacZ) proteins were detected, 121 kDa and 124 kDa. The DNA sequences at the unique fusion joints were determined. The sequence information allowed us to identify three distinct fusion joints which were grouped as follows, type I fusions, 5'-ACT GCT CAG CCA A-3'; type IIa fusions, 5'-GCG GTT GAA CCG A-3'; and type IIb fusions: 5'-ACC GCT GCA CCT G-3'. To orient these fhuA fusion joints, the complete nucleotide sequence of the fhuA gene was determined from a 2,902-base-pair fragment of DNA. A single open reading frame was found which translated into a 747-amino acid polypeptide. The signal sequence of 33 amino acids was followed

  10. Synthesis and Kinetic Analysis of Two Conformationally Restricted Peptide Substrates of Escherichia coli Penicillin-Binding Protein 5.

    PubMed

    Nemmara, Venkatesh V; Nicholas, Robert A; Pratt, R F

    2016-07-26

    Escherichia coli PBP5 (penicillin-binding protein 5) is a dd-carboxypeptidase involved in bacterial cell wall maturation. Beyond the C-terminal d-alanyl-d-alanine moiety, PBP5, like the essential high-molecular mass PBPs, has little specificity for other elements of peptidoglycan structure, at least as elicited in vitro by small peptidoglycan fragments. On the basis of the crystal structure of a stem pentapeptide derivative noncovalently bound to E. coli PBP6 (Protein Data Bank entry 3ITB ), closely similar in structure to PBP5, we have modeled a pentapeptide structure at the active site of PBP5. Because the two termini of the pentapeptide are directed into solution in the PBP6 crystal structure, we then modeled a 19-membered cyclic peptide analogue by cross-linking the terminal amines by succinylation. An analogous smaller, 17-membered cyclic peptide, in which the l-lysine of the original was replaced by l-diaminobutyric acid, could also be modeled into the active site. We anticipated that, just as the reactivity of stem peptide fragments of peptidoglycan with PBPs in vivo may be entropically enhanced by immobilization in the polymer, so too would that of our cyclic peptides with respect to their acyclic analogues in vitro. This paper describes the synthesis of the peptides described above that were required to examine this hypothesis and presents an analysis of their structures and reaction kinetics with PBP5. PMID:27420403

  11. Development of a novel Gateway-based vector system for efficient, multiparallel protein expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Freuler, Felix; Stettler, Thomas; Meyerhofer, Marco; Leder, Lukas; Mayr, Lorenz M

    2008-06-01

    We describe a cloning and expression system which is based on the Escherichia coli T7 expression system and Gateway recombination technology. We have produced numerous destination vectors with selected fusion tags and an additional set of entry vectors containing the gene of interest and optional labeling tags. This powerful system enables us to transfer a cDNA to several expression vectors in parallel and combine them with various labeling tags. To remove the attached amino terminal tags along with the unwanted attB1 site, we inserted PreScission protease cleavage sites. In contrast to the commercially available destination vectors, our plasmids provide kanamycin resistance, which can be an advantage when expressing toxic proteins in E. coli. Some small-scale protein expression experiments are shown to demonstrate the usefulness of these novel Gateway vectors. In summary, this system has some benefits over the widely used and commercially available Gateway standard system, and it enables many different combinations for expression constructs from a single gene of interest. PMID:18375142

  12. Profiling of β-Lactam Selectivity for Penicillin-Binding Proteins in Escherichia coli Strain DC2

    PubMed Central

    Kocaoglu, Ozden

    2015-01-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are integral players in bacterial cell division, and their catalytic activities can be monitored with β-lactam-containing chemical probes. Compounds that target a single PBP could provide important information about the specific role(s) of each enzyme, making identification of such molecules important. We evaluated 22 commercially available β-lactams for inhibition of the PBPs in live Escherichia coli strain DC2. Whole cells were titrated with β-lactam antibiotics and subsequently incubated with a fluorescent penicillin derivative, Bocillin-FL (Boc-FL), to label uninhibited PBPs. Protein visualization was accomplished by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) separation and fluorescent scanning. The examined β-lactams exhibited diverse PBP selectivities, with amdinocillin (mecillinam) showing selectivity for PBP2, aztreonam, piperacillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone for PBP3, and amoxicillin and cephalexin for PBP4. The remaining β-lactams did not block any PBPs in the DC2 strain of E. coli or inhibited more than one PBP at all examined concentrations in this Gram-negative organism. PMID:25733506

  13. Heterologous expression of antifreeze protein gene AnAFP from Ammopiptanthus nanus enhances cold tolerance in Escherichia coli and tobacco.

    PubMed

    Deng, Long-Qun; Yu, Hao-Qiang; Liu, Yan-Ping; Jiao, Pei-Pei; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Su-Zhi; Li, Wan-Chen; Fu, Feng-Ling

    2014-04-10

    Antifreeze proteins are a class of polypeptides produced by certain animals, plants, fungi and bacteria that permit their survival under the subzero environments. Ammopiptanthus nanus is the unique evergreen broadleaf bush endemic to the Mid-Asia deserts. It survives at the west edge of the Tarim Basin from the disappearance of the ancient Mediterranean in the Tertiary Period. Its distribution region is characterized by the arid climate and extreme temperatures, where the extreme temperatures range from -30 °C to 40 °C. In the present study, the antifreeze protein gene AnAFP of A. nanus was used to transform Escherichia coli and tobacco, after bioinformatics analysis for its possible function. The transformed E. coli strain expressed the heterologous AnAFP gene under the induction of isopropyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside, and demonstrated significant enhancement of cold tolerance. The transformed tobacco lines expressed the heterologous AnAFP gene in response to cold stress, and showed a less change of relative electrical conductivity under cold stress, and a less wilting phenotype after 16 h of -3 °C cold stress and thawing for 1h than the untransformed wild-type plants. All these results imply the potential value of the AnAFP gene to be used in genetic modification of commercially important crops for improvement of cold tolerance. PMID:24502990

  14. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CS6 gene products and their roles in CS6 structural protein assembly and cellular adherence.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Takeaki; Sabui, Subrata; Fukumoto, Megumi; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar; Hamabata, Takashi

    2011-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) produces a variety of colonization factors necessary for attachment to the host cell, among which CS6 is one of the most prevalent in ETEC isolates from developing countries. The CS6 operon is composed of 4 genes, cssA, cssB, cssC, and cssD. The molecular mechanism of CS6 assembly and cell surface presentation, and the contribution of each protein to the attachment of the bacterium to intestinal cells remain unclear. In the present study, a series of css gene-deletion mutants of the CS6 operon were constructed in the ETEC genetic background, and their effect on adhesion to host cells and CS6 assembly was studied. Each subunit deletion resulted in a reduction in the adhesion to intestinal cells to the same level of laboratory E. coli strains, and this effect was restored by complementary plasmids, suggesting that the 4 proteins are necessary for CS6 expression. Bacterial cell fractionation and western blotting of the mutant strains suggested that the formation of a CssA-CssB-CssC complex is necessary for recognition by CssD and transport of CssA-CssB to the outer membrane as a colonization factor. PMID:21729748

  15. Effect of an Antimicrobial Compound on Different Processes within the Oscillation of Min Proteins in E. coli Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2013-03-01

    A key step in the life of a bacterium is its division into two daughter cells of equal size. This process is carefully controlled and regulated so that equal partitioning of the cellular machinery is obtained. In E. coli, this regulation is accomplished, in part, by the Min protein system. The Min proteins undergo an oscillation between the poles of rod-shaped E. coli bacteria. We use high magnification, time-resolved total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to characterize the temporal distributions of different processes within the oscillation: the MinD-MinE interaction time, the residence time for membrane bound MinD, and the recruitment time for MinD to be observed at the opposite pole. We also characterize the change in each of these processes in the presence of the antimicrobial compound polymyxin B (PMB). We show that the times corresponding to the removal of MinD from one pole and the recruitment of MinD at the opposite pole are correlated. We explain this correlation through the existence of a concentration threshold. The effect of PMB on the concentration threshold is used to identify which process within the oscillation is most affected.

  16. Interplay between E. coli DnaK, ClpB and GrpE during protein disaggregation.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Shannon M; Shastry, Shankar; Kravats, Andrea N; Shih, Yu-Hsuan; Miot, Marika; Hoskins, Joel R; Stan, George; Wickner, Sue

    2015-01-30

    The DnaK/Hsp70 chaperone system and ClpB/Hsp104 collaboratively disaggregate protein aggregates and reactivate inactive proteins. The teamwork is specific: Escherichia coli DnaK interacts with E. coli ClpB and yeast Hsp70, Ssa1, interacts with yeast Hsp104. This interaction is between the middle domains of hexameric ClpB/Hsp104 and the DnaK/Hsp70 nucleotide-binding domain (NBD). To identify the site on E. coli DnaK that interacts with ClpB, we substituted amino acid residues throughout the DnaK NBD. We found that several variants with substitutions in subdomains IB and IIB of the DnaK NBD were defective in ClpB interaction in vivo in a bacterial two-hybrid assay and in vitro in a fluorescence anisotropy assay. The DnaK subdomain IIB mutants were also defective in the ability to disaggregate protein aggregates with ClpB, DnaJ and GrpE, although they retained some ability to reactivate proteins with DnaJ and GrpE in the absence of ClpB. We observed that GrpE, which also interacts with subdomains IB and IIB, inhibited the interaction between ClpB and DnaK in vitro, suggesting competition between ClpB and GrpE for binding DnaK. Computational modeling of the DnaK-ClpB hexamer complex indicated that one DnaK monomer contacts two adjacent ClpB protomers simultaneously. The model and the experiments support a common and mutually exclusive GrpE and ClpB interaction region on DnaK. Additionally, homologous substitutions in subdomains IB and IIB of Ssa1 caused defects in collaboration between Ssa1 and Hsp104. Altogether, these results provide insight into the molecular mechanism of collaboration between the DnaK/Hsp70 system and ClpB/Hsp104 for protein disaggregation. PMID:25451597

  17. SDS-PAGE Analysis of the Outer Membrane Proteins of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolated from Patients in Different Wards of Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Behzad; Mottamedifar, Mohammad; Khoshkharam-Roodmajani, Hossein; Hassanzadeh, Amir; Zomorrodian, Kamyar; Rahimi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) constitute the main structure and about half of the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria. The OMPs of Escherichia coli (E. coli) play an important role in its drug resistance. Previous studies have shown that the OMPs of E. coli enhance its pathogenic effects by helping the bacterium to evade the immune defense and promote its adsorption to host cells. We sought to compare E. coli isolates collected from different hospital wards and to perform a primary investigation of the association between the serotypes and profiles of their OMPs. We also aimed to detect the diversity of the E. coli isolates from the hospitalized patients. Methods: A total of 115 isolates of E. coli were collected from patients hospitalized in Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. After biochemical and serological tests, OMPs were extracted by using glass beads and N-Lauroylsarcosine sodium. OMP typing was done by 10% SDS-PAGE and Coomassie brilliant blue staining. In terms of the number of protein bands, OMP-I was detected with 2 bands, OMP-α with 3 bands, and OMP-β with1 band. Results: Of the 115 isolates, 103 were OMP-I and 12 were OMP-α; none of the isolates belonged to OMP-β. Our statistical analyses showed a relationship between OMP patterns and other factors, including hospital wards and source of samples. Serotyping showed that the majority of the isolates were O128. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated some similarities between the OMP band patterns of the analyzed groups of E. coli. Of all the OMPs in the isolates from the hospitalized and outpatient department patients, OmpA and OmpC were the most prevalent proteins in the outer membrane of the studied uropathogenic E. coli. PMID:27582589

  18. The backbone structure of the thermophilic Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein is essentially identical to its mesophilic E. coli homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Tian, Yaji; Allert, Malin; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2008-10-27

    We report the X-ray crystal structure of a Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein (tteRBP) determined to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. We find that tteRBP is significantly more stable ({sup app}T{sub m} value {approx} 102 C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli ribose binding protein (ecRBP) ({sup app}T{sub m} value {approx} 56 C). The tteRBP has essentially the identical backbone conformation (0.41 {angstrom} RMSD of 235/271 C{sub {alpha}} positions and 0.65 {angstrom} RMSD of 270/271 C{sub {alpha}} positions) as ecRBP. Classification of the amino acid substitutions as a function of structure therefore allows the identification of amino acids which potentially contribute to the observed thermal stability of tteRBP in the absence of large structural heterogeneities.

  19. Use of phoA fusions to study the topology of the Escherichia coli inner membrane protein leader peptidase.

    PubMed Central

    San Millan, J L; Boyd, D; Dalbey, R; Wickner, W; Beckwith, J

    1989-01-01

    A topology of the Escherichia coli leader peptidase has been previously proposed on the basis of proteolytic studies. Here, a collection of alkaline phosphatase fusions to leader peptidase is described. Fusions to the periplasmic domain of this protein exhibit high alkaline phosphatase activity, while fusions to the cytoplasmic domain exhibit low activity. Elements within the cytoplasmic domain are necessary to stably anchor alkaline phosphatase in the cytoplasm. The amino-terminal hydrophobic segment of leader peptidase acts as a weak export signal for alkaline phosphatase. However, when this segment is preceded by four lysines, it acts as a highly efficient export signal. The coherence of in vitro studies with alkaline phosphatase fusion analysis of the topology of leader peptidase further indicates the utility of this genetic approach to membrane protein structure and insertion. Images PMID:2551889

  20. Deletions or duplications in the BtuB protein affect its level in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Köster, W; Gudmundsdottir, A; Lundrigan, M D; Seiffert, A; Kadner, R J

    1991-01-01

    The Escherichia coli btuB product is an outer membrane protein that mediates the TonB-coupled active transport of cobalamins and the uptake of the E colicins and bacteriophage BF23. The roles of various segments of the BtuB protein in its function or cellular localization were investigated by analysis of several genetic constructs. Hybrid proteins in which various lengths from the amino terminus of BtuB were linked to alkaline phosphatase (btuB::phoA genes) were all secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane. The BtuB-PhoA proteins that carried up to 327 amino acids of BtuB appeared to reside in the periplasmic space, whereas hybrid proteins containing at least 399 amino acids of BtuB were associated with the outer membrane. Eleven in-frame internal deletion mutations that spanned more than half of the mature sequence were prepared by combining appropriate restriction fragments from btuB variants with 6-bp linker insertions. None of the deleted proteins was able to complement any BtuB functions, and only three of them were detectable in the outer membrane, suggesting that most of the deletions affected sequences needed for stable association with the outer membrane. Duplications covering the same portions of BtuB were prepared in the same manner. All of these partial duplication variants complemented all BtuB functions, although some gave substantially reduced levels of activity. These proteins were found in the outer membrane, although some were subject to proteolytic cleavage within or near the duplicated segment. These results indicate that the insertion of BtuB into the outer membrane requires the presence of several regions of teh BtuB protein and that the presence of extra or redundant segments of the protein can be tolerated during its insertion and function. Images PMID:1885541

  1. Cloning and Expression of L1 Protein Human Papillomavirus Type 31 Isolated from Iranian Patients in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hajmohammadi, Sameh; Rassi, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), a major pathogen of human cervical cancer, contains a full-length L1 gene encoding its surface capsid protein. One group of potential vaccine candidates against this virus in Iranian patients is based on surface protein components such as HPV31 L1 protein that can make virus-like particles (VLPs). The high immunity response stimulation of this effecter VLP was observed in host, suggesting that the individual characteristics of a particular effecter may require empirical testing for vaccination. In the present study, we decided to clone and express HPV31 L1 protein to investigate its use as a subunit vaccine and furthermore to insert the gene into an Escherichia coli background so as to analyze production of this recombinant protein. We report the presentation of HPV31 in 100 cervical lesion tissue samples based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Type of lesion, age, and other characteristics were reviewed and confirmed by a pathologist. The sequence from L1 genes of HPV was selected using special primers. The gene encoding the major capsid protein L1 was used for subcloning in pTG19-T and pET-32a plasmid. The recombinant protein expression was confirmed by RT-PCR using L1 primers and detected by absorption sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblot testing. The results presented here offer new insights into the in vivo response of HPV31 in Iranian patients and European models. On the other hand, the use of recombinant L1 protein for Iranian patient protection as well as vaccination studies will permit testing of this antigen protection rate and open the way to the discovery of protein biomarkers for monitoring clinical and subclinical cervical cancers. PMID:27244269

  2. Effects of pH and Repellent Tactic Stimuli on Protein Methylation Levels in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Slonczewski, Joan L.; Macnab, Robert M.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Castle, Anna M.

    1982-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHint) and extracellular pH (pHext) of Escherichia coli were measured at 12-s time resolution by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance: a sudden neutral-to-acid shift in pHext (e.g., from 7.0 to 5.6) caused a transient failure of homeostasis, with pHint decreasing by about 0.4 unit in ca. 30 s and then returning to its original value (ca. 7.5) over a period of several minutes. Membrane proton conductance was estimated to be 20 pmol s−1 cm−2 pH unit−1. Addition of the membrane-permeant weak acid benzoate at constant pHext also caused a lowering of pHint; at high concentrations it generated an inverted transmembrane pH gradient (ΔpH). The buffering capacity of the cells was estimated by such experiments to be ca. 50 mM per pH unit. Effects of pH-related stimuli on the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) were examined: the steady-state methylation of MCP I was found to decrease when pHint was lowered by weak acid addition or when pHext was lowered. The extent of demethylation in the latter case was too great to be explained by imperfect steady-state homeostasis; a small but reproducible undershoot in methylation level correlated with the observed short-term homeostatic failure. MCP II underwent smaller and more complex changes than MCP I, in response to pH-related stimuli. The methylation level of MCP I could not, by any condition tested, be driven below a limit of ca. 15% of the control level (unstimulated cells at pHext 7.0). The weak-acid concentration needed to reach that limit was dependent on pHext, as would be expected on the basis of ΔpH-driven concentrative effects. The potency ranking of weak acids was the same with respect to lowering pHint, demethylating MCP I, and causing repellent behavioral responses. The data are consistent with a model whereby MCP I and hence tactic behavior are sensitive to both pHint and pHext. Evidence is presented that pHint may also have a direct (non-MCP-related) effect on motor function. Comparison of

  3. High levels of expression of the Iron-Sulfur Proteins Phthalate Dioxygenase and Phthalate Dioxygenase Reductase in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jaganaman, Sunil; Pinto, Alex; Tarasev, Michael; Ballou, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Phthalate dioxygenase (PDO), a hexamer with one Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] and one Fe (II) - mononuclear center per monomer, and its reductase (PDR), which contains flavin mononucleotide and a plant-type ferredoxin [2Fe-2S] center, are expressed by Burkholderia cepacia at ∼30 mg of crude PDO and ∼1 mg of crude PDR per liter of cell culture when grown with phthalate as the main carbon source. A high level expression system in Escherichia coli was developed for PDO and PDR. Optimization relative to Escherichia coli cell line, growth parameters, time of induction, media composition, and iron-sulfur additives resulted in yields of about 1 g/L for PDO and about 0.2 g/L for PDR. Protein expression was correlated to the increase in pH of the cell culture and exhibited a pronounced (variable from 5 to 20 hours) lag after the induction. The specific activity of purified PDO did not depend on the pH of the cell culture when harvested. However, when the pH of the culture reached 8.5-9, a large fraction of the PDR that was expressed lacked its ferredoxin domain, presumably because of proteolysis. Termination of growth while the pH of the cell culture was < 8 decreased the fraction of proteolyzed enzyme, whereas yields of the unclipped PDR were only marginally lower. Overall, changes in pH of the cell culture were found to be an excellent indicator of the overall level of native protein expression. Its monitoring allowed the real time tracking of the protein expression and made it possible to tailor the expression times to achieve a combination of high quality and high yield of protein. PMID:17049880

  4. Subcutaneous and intranasal immunization with type III secreted proteins can prevent colonization and shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in mice.

    PubMed

    Babiuk, Shawn; Asper, David J; Rogan, Dragan; Mutwiri, George K; Potter, Andrew A

    2008-07-01

    Type III secreted proteins from Escherichia coli O157:H7 are involved in the attachment of the organism to mammalian cells and have been shown to be effective vaccine components capable of reducing colonization of cattle by the organism. In the current study, we used a streptomycin-treated mouse model to evaluate the efficacy of subcutaneous vs intranasal administration of the vaccine. Following immunization, mice were infected with E. coli O157:H7 and feces were monitored for shedding. Immune responses against EspA and Tir were also monitored. Subcutaneous immunization of mice with type III secreted proteins induced significant EspA- and Tir-specific serum IgG antibodies but did not significantly induce any antigen-specific IgA in feces, whereas intranasal immunization elicited significant EspA- and Tir-specific serum IgG antibodies with some animals developing antigen-specific IgA in feces. Only mice that were immunized intranasally with formulations containing mucosal adjuvants, either cholera toxin or CpG-containing oligonucleotides, showed decreased E. coli O157:H7 shedding following experimental infection. Mice immunized subcutaneously with type III secreted proteins did not shed E. coli in feces. These results demonstrate the potential for the use of type III secreted proteins in mucosal vaccine formulations to prevent colonization and shedding of E. coli O157:H7. PMID:18487034

  5. Analysis of methane-producing and metabolizing archaeal and bacterial communities in sediments of the northern South China Sea and coastal Mai Po Nature Reserve revealed by PCR amplification of mcrA and pmoA genes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhichao; Chen, Jing; Cao, Huiluo; Han, Ping; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Communities of methanogens, anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and aerobic methanotrophic bacteria (MOB) were compared by profiling polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified products of mcrA and pmoA genes encoded by methyl-coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit and particulate methane monooxygenase alpha subunit, respectively, in sediments of northern South China Sea (nSCS) and Mai Po mangrove wetland. Community structures representing by mcrA gene based on 12 clone libraries from nSCS showed separate clusters indicating niche specificity, while, Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales clades 1,2, and Methanomassiliicoccus-like groups of methanogens were the most abundant groups in nSCS sediment samples. Novel clusters specific to the SCS were identified and the phylogeny of mcrA gene-harboring archaea was updated. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect mcrA gene abundance in all samples: similar abundance of mcrA gene in the surface layers of mangrove (3.4∼3.9 × 10(6) copies per gram dry weight) and of intertidal mudflat (5.5∼5.8 × 10(6) copies per gram dry weight) was observed, but higher abundance (6.9 × 10(6) to 1.02 × 10(8) copies per gram dry weight) was found in subsurface samples of both sediment types. Aerobic MOB were more abundant in surface layers (6.7∼11.1 × 10(5) copies per gram dry weight) than the subsurface layers (1.2∼5.9 × 10(5) copies per gram dry weight) based on pmoA gene. Mangrove surface layers harbored more abundant pmoA gene than intertidal mudflat, but less pmoA genes in the subsurface layers. Meanwhile, it is also noted that in surface layers of all samples, more pmoA gene copies were detected than the subsurface layers. Reedbed rhizosphere exhibited the highest gene abundance of mcrA gene (8.51 × 10(8) copies per gram dry weight) and pmoA gene (1.56 × 10(7) copies per gram dry weight). This study investigated the prokaryotic communities responsible for methane cycling in both marine and coastal wetland

  6. Analysis of methane-producing and metabolizing archaeal and bacterial communities in sediments of the northern South China Sea and coastal Mai Po Nature Reserve revealed by PCR amplification of mcrA and pmoA genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhichao; Chen, Jing; Cao, Huiluo; Han, Ping; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Communities of methanogens, anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and aerobic methanotrophic bacteria (MOB) were compared by profiling polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified products of mcrA and pmoA genes encoded by methyl-coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit and particulate methane monooxygenase alpha subunit, respectively, in sediments of northern South China Sea (nSCS) and Mai Po mangrove wetland. Community structures representing by mcrA gene based on 12 clone libraries from nSCS showed separate clusters indicating niche specificity, while, Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales clades 1,2, and Methanomassiliicoccus-like groups of methanogens were the most abundant groups in nSCS sediment samples. Novel clusters specific to the SCS were identified and the phylogeny of mcrA gene-harboring archaea was updated. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect mcrA gene abundance in all samples: similar abundance of mcrA gene in the surface layers of mangrove (3.4∼3.9 × 106 copies per gram dry weight) and of intertidal mudflat (5.5∼5.8 × 106 copies per gram dry weight) was observed, but higher abundance (6.9 × 106 to 1.02 × 108 copies per gram dry weight) was found in subsurface samples of both sediment types. Aerobic MOB were more abundant in surface layers (6.7∼11.1 × 105 copies per gram dry weight) than the subsurface layers (1.2∼5.9 × 105 copies per gram dry weight) based on pmoA gene. Mangrove surface layers harbored more abundant pmoA gene than intertidal mudflat, but less pmoA genes in the subsurface layers. Meanwhile, it is also noted that in surface layers of all samples, more pmoA gene copies were detected than the subsurface layers. Reedbed rhizosphere exhibited the highest gene abundance of mcrA gene (8.51 × 108 copies per gram dry weight) and pmoA gene (1.56 × 107 copies per gram dry weight). This study investigated the prokaryotic communities responsible for methane cycling in both marine and coastal wetland ecosystems, showing

  7. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli K-12 (GenProtEC).

    PubMed

    Riley, M

    1997-01-01

    GenProtEC is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities amongE.coliproteins with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. GenProtEC can also be accessed through the World Wide Web at URL http://mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html . PMID:9016503

  8. High yield expression in a recombinant E. coli of a codon optimized chicken anemia virus capsid protein VP1 useful for vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chicken anemia virus (CAV), the causative agent chicken anemia, is the only member of the genus Gyrovirus of the Circoviridae family. CAV is an immune suppressive virus and causes anemia, lymph organ atrophy and immunodeficiency. The production and biochemical characterization of VP1 protein and its use in a subunit vaccine or as part of a diagnostic kit would be useful to CAV infection prevention. Results Significantly increased expression of the recombinant full-length VP1 capsid protein from chicken anemia virus was demonstrated using an E. coli expression system. The VP1 gene was cloned into various different expression vectors and then these were expressed in a number of different E. coli strains. The expression of CAV VP1 in E. coli was significantly increased when VP1 was fused with GST protein rather than a His-tag. By optimizing the various rare amino acid codons within the N-terminus of the VP1 protein, the expression level of the VP1 protein in E. coli BL21(DE3)-pLysS was further increased significantly. The highest protein expression level obtained was 17.5 g/L per liter of bacterial culture after induction with 0.1 mM IPTG for 2 h. After purification by GST affinity chromatography, the purified full-length VP1 protein produced in this way was demonstrated to have good antigenicity and was able to be recognized by CAV-positive chicken serum in an ELISA assay. Conclusions Purified recombinant VP1 protein with the gene's codons optimized in the N-terminal region has potential as chimeric protein that, when expressed in E. coli, may be useful in the future for the development of subunit vaccines and diagnostic tests. PMID:21781331

  9. Roles of Hcp family proteins in the pathogenesis of the porcine extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli type VI secretion system.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ying; Wang, Xiangru; Shou, Jin; Zong, Bingbing; Zhang, Yanyan; Tan, Jia; Chen, Jing; Hu, Linlin; Zhu, Yongwei; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein) is considered a vital component of the functional T6SS (Type VI Secretion System), which is a newly discovered secretion system. Our laboratory has previously sequenced the whole genome of porcine extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strain PCN033, and identified an integrated T6SS encoding three different hcp family genes. In this study, we first identified a functional T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and demonstrated that the Hcp family proteins were involved in bacterial competition and the interactions with other cells. Interestingly, the three Hcp proteins had different functions. Hcp2 functioned predominantly in bacterial competition; all three proteins were involved in the colonization of mice; and Hcp1 and Hcp3 were predominantly contributed to bacterial-eukaryotic cell interactions. We showed an active T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and the Hcp family proteins had different functions in their interaction with other bacteria or host cells. PMID:27229766

  10. Chemical treatment of Escherichia coli. II. Direct extraction of recombinant protein from cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in intact cells.

    PubMed

    Falconer, R J; O'Neill, B K; Middelberg, A P

    1998-02-20

    A method is presented for the direct extraction of the recombinant protein Long-R3-IGF-I from inclusion bodies located in the cytoplasm of intact Escherichia coli cells. Chemical treatment with 6M urea, 3 mM EDTA, and 20 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) at pH 9.0 proved an effective combination for extracting recombinant protein from intact cells. Comparable levels of Long-R3-IGF-I were recovered by direct extraction as achieved by in vitro dissolution following mechanical disruption. However, the purity of directly extracted recombinant protein was lower due to contamination by bacterial cell components. The kinetics of direct extraction are described using a first-order equation with the time constant of 3 min. Urea appears important for permeabilization of the cell and dissolution of the inclusion body. Conversely, EDTA is involved in permeabilization of the cell wall and DTT enhances protein release. pH proved to be important with lower levels of protein release achieved at low pH values (<9). Cell concentration also had a minor effect on Long-R3-IGF-I release and caused an observable increase in viscosity. Advantages of the direct extraction method include its speed, simplicity, and efficiency at releasing product. PMID:10099214

  11. Coexpression of interleukin-6 and -2 from giant panda in Escherichia coli and the biological activity of the fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Y; Nian, Y-Y; Ji, H-W; Zhang, H; Zhu, L; Xu, Z-W

    2013-01-01

    To construct a fusion cytokine protein with more and stronger bioactivities to enhance the immunity of the cytokine alone, we expressed interleukin (IL)-6/(IL)-2 from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in Escherichia coli as a 59.4-kDa fusion protein. Subsequently, the inclusion bodies were solubilized with 8 M urea and applied onto a Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid column. The final production of IL-6/IL-2 reached 6 mg/L in soluble form, and the purified final product was >96% pure. In Western blot assays, the recombinant IL-6/IL-2 was recognized by polyclonal antibodies against IL-6 and IL-2 of giant panda. The results demonstrated that the protein mixture contained correctly folded IL-2 and IL-6 proteins. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay demonstrated that IL-6/IL-2 can promote lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation. These data suggest that the fusion protein could be used to develop a novel immunoadjuvant to enhance the immunity of animals against infectious diseases. PMID:23913382

  12. Roles of Hcp family proteins in the pathogenesis of the porcine extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli type VI secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Wang, Xiangru; Shou, Jin; Zong, Bingbing; Zhang, Yanyan; Tan, Jia; Chen, Jing; Hu, Linlin; Zhu, Yongwei; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein) is considered a vital component of the functional T6SS (Type VI Secretion System), which is a newly discovered secretion system. Our laboratory has previously sequenced the whole genome of porcine extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strain PCN033, and identified an integrated T6SS encoding three different hcp family genes. In this study, we first identified a functional T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and demonstrated that the Hcp family proteins were involved in bacterial competition and the interactions with other cells. Interestingly, the three Hcp proteins had different functions. Hcp2 functioned predominantly in bacterial competition; all three proteins were involved in the colonization of mice; and Hcp1 and Hcp3 were predominantly contributed to bacterial-eukaryotic cell interactions. We showed an active T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and the Hcp family proteins had different functions in their interaction with other bacteria or host cells. PMID:27229766

  13. Absence of somatic alterations of the EB1 gene adenomatous polyposis coli-associated protein in human sporadic colorectal cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Jaïs, P.; Sabourin, J. C.; Bombled, J.; Rougier, P.; Lasser, P.; Duvillard, P.; Bénard, J.; Bressac-de Paillerets, B.

    1998-01-01

    The human EB1 gene product was recently found, by a yeast two-hybrid screening, to be associated with the carboxy terminus of the APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) protein, the product of a tumour-suppressor gene thought to act as a gatekeeper in colorectal carcinogenesis. Because virtually all of the APC mutations result in the synthesis of carboxy-terminal truncated proteins, mutant APC proteins are expected to lose their ability to interact with EB1 gene product. Thus, the interaction between APC and EB1 proteins may be important for the tumour-suppressor activity of APC protein, and raises the hypothesis that EB1 is also involved in sporadic colorectal tumorigenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, somatic mutations in the entire coding sequence of EB1 cDNA were searched by reverse transcriptase single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis in 21 sporadic colorectal cancers and seven adenomas. None of these tumours contained somatic mutation, whereas a silent cDNA variant was identified in 14% of alleles. Furthermore, to investigate whether EB1 locus was included within a region subjected to losses of heterozygosity, four polymorphism markers surrounding EB1 locus were surveyed. Only one out of 28 colorectal tumours contained a loss of heterozygosity at the D20S107 marker. In conclusion, the present findings strongly suggest that EB1 gene is not involved in somatic colorectal carcinogenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9823979

  14. Alterations in protein expression caused by the hha mutation in Escherichia coli: influence of growth medium osmolarity.

    PubMed

    Balsalobre, C; Johansson, J; Uhlin, B E; Juárez, A; Muñoa, F J

    1999-05-01

    The Hha protein belongs to a new family of regulators involved in the environmental regulation of virulence factors. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the hha mutation on the overall protein pattern of Escherichia coli cells by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The growth medium osmolarity clearly influenced the effect of the hha mutation. The number of proteins whose expression was altered in hha cells, compared with wild-type cells, was three times larger at a high osmolarity than at a low osmolarity. Among the proteins whose expression was modified by the hha allele, both OmpA and protein IIAGlc of the phosphotransferase system could be identified. As this latter enzyme participates in the regulation of the synthesis of cyclic AMP and hence influences the catabolite repression system, we tested whether the expression of the lacZ gene was also modified in hha mutants. This was the case, suggesting that at least some of the pleiotropic effects of the hha mutation could be caused by its effect on the catabolite repression system. PMID:10322001

  15. A Multi-layered Protein Network Stabilizes the Escherichia coli FtsZ-ring and Modulates Constriction Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Jackson; Coltharp, Carla; Shtengel, Gleb; Yang, Xinxing; Hess, Harald; Xiao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The prokaryotic tubulin homolog, FtsZ, forms a ring-like structure (FtsZ-ring) at midcell. The FtsZ-ring establishes the division plane and enables the assembly of the macromolecular division machinery (divisome). Although many molecular components of the divisome have been identified and their interactions extensively characterized, the spatial organization of these proteins within the divisome is unclear. Consequently, the physical mechanisms that drive divisome assembly, maintenance, and constriction remain elusive. Here we applied single-molecule based superresolution imaging, combined with genetic and biophysical investigations, to reveal the spatial organization of cellular structures formed by four important divisome proteins in E. coli: FtsZ, ZapA, ZapB and MatP. We show that these interacting proteins are arranged into a multi-layered protein network extending from the cell membrane to the chromosome, each with unique structural and dynamic properties. Further, we find that this protein network stabilizes the FtsZ-ring, and unexpectedly, slows down cell constriction, suggesting a new, unrecognized role for this network in bacterial cell division. Our results provide new insight into the structure and function of the divisome, and highlight the importance of coordinated cell constriction and chromosome segregation. PMID:25848771

  16. Comparative genomics and experimental evolution of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains reveal the landscape of toxicity escape from membrane protein overproduction

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Jihyun F.

    2015-01-01

    Achieving sufficient yields of proteins in their functional form represents the first bottleneck in contemporary bioscience and biotechnology. To accomplish successful overexpression of membrane proteins in a workhorse organism such as E. coli, defined and rational optimization strategies based on an understanding of the genetic background of the toxicity-escape mechanism are desirable. To this end, we sequenced the genomes of E. coli C41(DE3) and its derivative C43(DE3), which were developed for membrane protein production. Comparative analysis of their genomes with those of their ancestral strain E. coli BL21(DE3) revealed various genetic changes in both strains. A series of E. coli variants that are able to tolerate transformation with or overexpression of membrane proteins were generated by in vitro evolution. Targeted sequencing of the evolved strains revealed the mutational hotspots among the acquired genetic changes. By these combinatorial approaches, we found non-synonymous changes in the lac repressor gene of the lac operon as well as nucleotide substitutions in the lacUV5 promoter of the DE3 region, by which the toxic effect to the host caused by overexpression of membrane proteins could be relieved. A mutation in lacI was demonstrated to be crucial for conferring tolerance to membrane protein overexpression. PMID:26531007

  17. Comparative genomics and experimental evolution of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains reveal the landscape of toxicity escape from membrane protein overproduction.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Jihyun F

    2015-01-01

    Achieving sufficient yields of proteins in their functional form represents the first bottleneck in contemporary bioscience and biotechnology. To accomplish successful overexpression of membrane proteins in a workhorse organism such as E. coli, defined and rational optimization strategies based on an understanding of the genetic background of the toxicity-escape mechanism are desirable. To this end, we sequenced the genomes of E. coli C41(DE3) and its derivative C43(DE3), which were developed for membrane protein production. Comparative analysis of their genomes with those of their ancestral strain E. coli BL21(DE3) revealed various genetic changes in both strains. A series of E. coli variants that are able to tolerate transformation with or overexpression of membrane proteins were generated by in vitro evolution. Targeted sequencing of the evolved strains revealed the mutational hotspots among the acquired genetic changes. By these combinatorial approaches, we found non-synonymous changes in the lac repressor gene of the lac operon as well as nucleotide substitutions in the lacUV5 promoter of the DE3 region, by which the toxic effect to the host caused by overexpression of membrane proteins could be relieved. A mutation in lacI was demonstrated to be crucial for conferring tolerance to membrane protein overexpression. PMID:26531007

  18. Mutations in the Escherichia coli Ribosomal Protein L22 Selectively Suppress the Expression of a Secreted Bacterial Virulence Factor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the ribosomal protein L22 that impair peptide-mediated translation arrest in Escherichia coli have been shown to reduce the expression of several genes, including secA, which encodes an ATPase that drives protein export via the Sec pathway. Here, we used a comparative proteomic approach to obtain insight into the global effects of the L22(Δ82-84) mutation on gene expression and protein synthesis. While the mutation did not affect or modestly affected the level of most soluble proteins, it dramatically reduced the level of antigen 43 (Ag43), a secreted virulence factor that promotes autoaggregation. The reduced protein concentration correlated with a sharp decrease in the abundance and stability of Ag43 mRNA. We found that the overexpression of secA or the inactivation of genes that encode presecretory and membrane proteins restored Ag43 production in the L22 mutant strain. Furthermore, impairment of the Sec pathway in a wild-type strain reduced Ag43 production but did not significantly affect the synthesis of other presecretory proteins. Taken together, these results indicate that Ag43 gene expression is exquisitely sensitive to the status of the Sec machinery and strongly suggest that the L22 mutation decreases the Ag43 concentration indirectly by reducing secA expression. Our results imply the existence of a novel regulatory mechanism in which the efficiency of protein export is coupled to gene expression and help to explain the modulation of SecA synthesis that has been observed in response to secretion stress. PMID:23625843

  19. Identification and Quantitation of Newly Synthesized Proteins in Escherichia coli by Enrichment of Azidohomoalanine-labeled Peptides with Diagonal Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Gertjan; Sprenger, Richard R.; Back, JaapWillem; Dekker, Henk L.; Nessen, Merel A.; van Maarseveen, Jan H.; de Koning, Leo J.; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.; de Jong, Luitzen; de Koster, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented to identify and quantify several hundreds of newly synthesized proteins in Escherichia coli upon pulse labeling cells with the methionine analogue azidohomoalanine (azhal). For the first 30 min after inoculation, a methionine-auxotrophic strain grows equally well on azhal as on methionine. Upon a pulse of 15 min and digestion of total protein, azhal-labeled peptides are isolated by a retention time shift between two reversed phase chromatographic runs. The retention time shift is induced by a reaction selective for the azido group in labeled peptides using tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Selectively modified peptides are identified by reversed phase liquid chromatography and on-line tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 527 proteins representative of all major Gene Ontology categories. Comparing the relative amounts of 344 proteins synthesized in 15 min upon a switch of growth temperature from 37 to 44 °C showed that nearly 20% increased or decreased more than 2-fold. Among the most up-regulated proteins many were chaperones and proteases in accordance with the cells response to unfolded proteins due to heat stress. Comparison of our data with results from previous microarray experiments revealed the importance of regulation of gene expression at the level of transcription of the most elevated proteins under heat shock conditions and enabled identification of several candidate genes whose expression may predominantly be regulated at the level of translation. This work demonstrates for the first time the use of a bioorthogonal amino acid for proteome-wide detection of changes in the amounts of proteins synthesized during a brief period upon variations in cellular growth conditions. Comparison of such data with relative mRNA levels enables assessment of the separate contributions of transcription and translation to the regulation of gene expression. PMID:19321432

  20. Crystal structure and dimerization equilibria of PcoC, a methionine-rich copper resistance protein from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Wernimont, A.K.; Huffman, D.L.; Finney, L.A.; Demeler, B.; O'Halloran, T.V.; Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    PcoC is a soluble periplasmic protein encoded by the plasmid-born pco copper resistance operon of Escherichia coli. Like PcoA, a multicopper oxidase encoded in the same locus and its chromosomal homolog CueO, PcoC contains unusual methionine rich sequences. Although essential for copper resistance, the functions of PcoC, PcoA, and their conserved methionine-rich sequences are not known. Similar methionine motifs observed in eukaryotic copper transporters have been proposed to bind copper, but there are no precedents for such metal binding sites in structurally characterized proteins. The high-resolution structures of apo PcoC, determined for both the native and selenomethionine-containing proteins, reveal a seven-stranded barrel with the methionines unexpectedly housed on a solvent-exposed loop. Several potential metal-binding sites can be discerned by comparing the structures to spectroscopic data reported for copper-loaded PcoC. In the native structure, the methionine loop interacts with the same loop on a second molecule in the asymmetric unit. In the selenomethionine structure, the methionine loops are more exposed, forming hydrophobic patches on the protein surface. These two arrangements suggest that the methionine motifs might function in protein-protein interactions between PcoC molecules or with other methionine-rich proteins such as PcoA. Analytical ultracentrifugation data indicate that a weak monomer-dimer equilibrium exists in solution for the apo protein. Dimerization is significantly enhanced upon binding Cu(I) with a measured {Delta}({Delta}G{sup o}) {le} -8.0 kJ/mole, suggesting that copper might bind at the dimer interface.

  1. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis Reveals the Min System of Escherichia coli Modulates Reversible Protein Association with the Inner Membrane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiao-Lin; Chiang, I-Chen; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Lee, Der-Yen; Chang, Geen-Dong; Wang, Kwan-Yu; Lin, Shu-Yu; Shih, Yu-Ling

    2016-05-01

    The Min system of Escherichia coli mediates placement of the division septum at the midcell. It oscillates from pole to pole to establish a concentration gradient of the division inhibition that is high at the poles but low at the midcell; the cell middle thereby becomes the most favorable site for division. Although Min oscillation is well studied from molecular and biophysical perspectives, it is still an enigma as to whether such a continuous, energy-consuming, and organized movement of the Min proteins would affect cellular processes other than the division site selection. To tackle this question, we compared the inner membrane proteome of the wild-type and Δmin strains using a quantitative approach. Forty proteins that showed differential abundance on the inner membrane of the mutant cells were identified and defined as proteins of interest (POIs). More than half of the POIs were peripheral membrane proteins, suggesting that the Min system affects mainly reversible protein association with the inner membrane. In addition, 6 out of 10 selected POIs directly interacted with at least one of the Min proteins, confirming the correlation between POIs and the Min system.Further analysis revealed a functional relationship between metabolism and the Min system. Metabolic enzymes accounted for 45% of the POIs, and there was a change of metabolites in the related reactions. We hypothesize that the Min system could alter the membrane location of proteins to modulate their enzymatic activity. Thus, the metabolic modulation in the Δmin mutant is likely an adaptive phenotype in cells of abnormal size and chromosome number due to an imbalanced abundance of proteins on the inner membrane. Taken together, the current work reports novel interactions of the Min system and reveals a global physiological impact of the Min system in addition to the division site placement. PMID:26889046

  2. Use of a Chimeric Hsp70 to Enhance the Quality of Recombinant Plasmodium falciparum S-Adenosylmethionine Decarboxylase Protein Produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Makhoba, Xolani Henry; Burger, Adélle; Coertzen, Dina; Zininga, Tawanda; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Shonhai, Addmore

    2016-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (PfAdoMetDC) from Plasmodium falciparum is a prospective antimalarial drug target. The production of recombinant PfAdoMetDC for biochemical validation as a drug target is important. The production of PfAdoMetDC in Escherichia coli has been reported to result in unsatisfactory yields and poor quality product. The co-expression of recombinant proteins with molecular chaperones has been proposed as one way to improve the production of the former in E. coli. E. coli heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL-GroES and DnaJ have previously been used to enhance production of some recombinant proteins. However, the outcomes were inconsistent. An Hsp70 chimeric protein, KPf, which is made up of the ATPase domain of E. coli DnaK and the substrate binding domain of P. falciparum Hsp70 (PfHsp70) has been previously shown to exhibit chaperone function when it was expressed in E. coli cells whose resident Hsp70 (DnaK) function was impaired. We proposed that because of its domain constitution, KPf would most likely be recognised by E. coli Hsp70 co-chaperones. Furthermore, because it possesses a substrate binding domain of plasmodial origin, KPf would be primed to recognise recombinant PfAdoMetDC expressed in E. coli. First, using site-directed mutagenesis, followed by complementation assays, we established that KPf with a mutation in the hydrophobic residue located in its substrate binding cavity was functionally compromised. We further co-expressed PfAdoMetDC with KPf, PfHsp70 and DnaK in E. coli cells either in the absence or presence of over-expressed GroEL-GroES chaperonin. The folded and functional status of the produced PfAdoMetDC was assessed using limited proteolysis and enzyme assays. PfAdoMetDC co-expressed with KPf and PfHsp70 exhibited improved activity compared to protein co-expressed with over-expressed DnaK. Our findings suggest that chimeric KPf may be an ideal Hsp70 co-expression partner for the production of recombinant plasmodial

  3. Use of a Chimeric Hsp70 to Enhance the Quality of Recombinant Plasmodium falciparum S-Adenosylmethionine Decarboxylase Protein Produced in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Makhoba, Xolani Henry; Burger, Adélle; Coertzen, Dina; Zininga, Tawanda; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Shonhai, Addmore

    2016-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (PfAdoMetDC) from Plasmodium falciparum is a prospective antimalarial drug target. The production of recombinant PfAdoMetDC for biochemical validation as a drug target is important. The production of PfAdoMetDC in Escherichia coli has been reported to result in unsatisfactory yields and poor quality product. The co-expression of recombinant proteins with molecular chaperones has been proposed as one way to improve the production of the former in E. coli. E. coli heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL-GroES and DnaJ have previously been used to enhance production of some recombinant proteins. However, the outcomes were inconsistent. An Hsp70 chimeric protein, KPf, which is made up of the ATPase domain of E. coli DnaK and the substrate binding domain of P. falciparum Hsp70 (PfHsp70) has been previously shown to exhibit chaperone function when it was expressed in E. coli cells whose resident Hsp70 (DnaK) function was impaired. We proposed that because of its domain constitution, KPf would most likely be recognised by E. coli Hsp70 co-chaperones. Furthermore, because it possesses a substrate binding domain of plasmodial origin, KPf would be primed to recognise recombinant PfAdoMetDC expressed in E. coli. First, using site-directed mutagenesis, followed by complementation assays, we established that KPf with a mutation in the hydrophobic residue located in its substrate binding cavity was functionally compromised. We further co-expressed PfAdoMetDC with KPf, PfHsp70 and DnaK in E. coli cells either in the absence or presence of over-expressed GroEL-GroES chaperonin. The folded and functional status of the produced PfAdoMetDC was assessed using limited proteolysis and enzyme assays. PfAdoMetDC co-expressed with KPf and PfHsp70 exhibited improved activity compared to protein co-expressed with over-expressed DnaK. Our findings suggest that chimeric KPf may be an ideal Hsp70 co-expression partner for the production of recombinant plasmodial

  4. Btcd, a mouse protein that binds to curved DNA, can substitute in Escherichia coli for H-NS, a bacterial nucleoid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Timchenko, T; Bailone, A; Devoret, R

    1996-01-01

    In an Escherichia coli mutant devoid of H-NS, a bacterial nucleoid protein, mouse protein Btcd was able to substitute for H-NS in two tested functions. It restored cell motility and repression of the expression of the bgl operon. Btcd1, a mutant Btcd protein deleted of its zinc finger and thus having reduced DNA binding, failed to substitute for H-NS. Mouse protein Btcd was shown to repress the bgl operon at the level of transcription initiation and to bind preferentially to a curved DNA fragment encompassing the bgl promoter. These effects of Btcd on bacterial gene transcription can be accounted for by the binding of Btcd or H-NS to a curved DNA sequence near a promoter. A few mammalian proteins have been shown to substitute for their Escherichia prototypes involved in DNA and RNA transactions. The efficiency of Btcd protein in substituting for H-NS in Escherichia suggests its possible involvement in regulating gene expression in mouse cells. Images PMID:8670903

  5. Extending the cross-linking/mass spectrometry strategy: Facile incorporation of photo-activatable amino acids into the model protein calmodulin in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Christine; Ihling, Christian H; Sinz, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Photo-induced cross-linking is a highly promising technique to investigate protein conformations and protein-protein interactions in their natural cellular environment. One strategy relies on the non-directed incorporation of diazirine-containing photo-activatable amino acids into proteins and a subsequent cross-link formation induced by UV-A irradiation. The advantage of this photo-cross-linking strategy is that it is not restricted to lysine residues and that hydrophobic regions in proteins can also be targeted, which is advantageous for investigating membrane proteins. Here, we present a simplified protocol that relies on the use of mineral salts medium without any special requirements for the incorporation of photo-methionines into proteins in Escherichia coli cells. The possibility to perform these experiments in E. coli is especially valuable as it is the major system for recombinant protein production. The method is exemplified for the Ca(2+) regulating protein calmodulin containing nine methionines, which were found to be replaced by their photo-activatable analogues. Our protocol allows the facile and stochastic incorporation of photo-methionines as the basis for conducting photo-cross-linking experiments in E. coli in an efficient manner. PMID:25726908

  6. SepD/SepL-Dependent Secretion Signals of the Type III Secretion System Translocator Proteins in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wanyin; Yu, Hong B.; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The type III protein secretion system (T3SS) encoded by the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) is essential for the pathogenesis of attaching/effacing bacterial pathogens, including enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), and Citrobacter rodentium. These pathogens use the T3SS to sequentially secrete three categories of proteins: the T3SS needle and inner rod protein components; the EspA, EspB, and EspD translocators; and many LEE- and non-LEE-encoded effectors. SepD and SepL are essential for translocator secretion, and mutations in either lead to hypersecretion of effectors. However, how SepD and SepL control translocator secretion and secretion hierarchy between translocators and effectors is poorly understood. In this report, we show that the secreted T3SS components, the translocators, and both LEE- and non-LEE-encoded effectors all carry N-terminal type III secretion and translocation signals. These signals all behave like those of the effectors and are sufficient for mediating type III secretion and translocation by wild-type EPEC and hypersecretion by the sepD and sepL mutants. Our results extended previous observations and suggest that the secretion hierarchy of the different substrates is determined by a signal other than the N-terminal secretion signal. We identified a domain located immediately downstream of the N-terminal secretion signal in the translocator EspB that is required for SepD/SepL-dependent secretion. We further demonstrated that this EspB domain confers SepD/SepL- and CesAB-dependent secretion on the secretion signal of effector EspZ. Our results thus suggest that SepD and SepL control and regulate secretion hierarchy between translocators and effectors by recognizing translocator-specific export signals. IMPORTANCE Many bacterial pathogens use a syringe-like protein secretion apparatus, termed the type III protein secretion system (T3SS), to secrete and inject numerous proteins directly into

  7. N-Terminal-Based Targeted, Inducible Protein Degradation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Karthik; Gentile, Andrew M.; Bostick, John W.; Tyo, Keith E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamically altering protein concentration is a central activity in synthetic biology. While many tools are available to modulate protein concentration by altering protein synthesis rate, methods for decreasing protein concentration by inactivation or degradation rate are just being realized. Altering protein synthesis rates can quickly increase the concentration of a protein but not decrease, as residual protein will remain for a while. Inducible, targeted protein degradation is an attractive option and some tools have been introduced for higher organisms and bacteria. Current bacterial tools rely on C-terminal fusions, so we have developed an N-terminal fusion (Ntag) strategy to increase the possible proteins that can be targeted. We demonstrate Ntag dependent degradation of mCherry and beta-galactosidase and reconfigure the Ntag system to perform dynamic, exogenously inducible degradation of a targeted protein and complement protein depletion by traditional synthesis repression. Model driven analysis that focused on rates, rather than concentrations, was critical to understanding and engineering the system. We expect this tool and our model to enable inducible protein degradation use particularly in metabolic engineering, biological study of essential proteins, and protein circuits. PMID:26900850

  8. High yield purification of nanobodies from the periplasm of E. coli as fusions with the maltose binding protein.

    PubMed

    Salema, Valencio; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2013-09-01

    Nanobodies (Nbs) are single domain antibodies based on the variable domains of heavy chain only antibodies (HCAbs) found in camelids, also referred to as VHHs. Their small size (ca. 12-15kDa), superior biophysical and antigen binding properties have made Nbs very attractive molecules for multiple biotechnological applications, including human therapy. The most widely used system for the purification of Nbs is their expression in the periplasm of Escherichia coli with a C-terminal hexa-histidine (His6) tag followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). However, significant variability in the expression levels of different Nbs are routinely observed and a single affinity chromatography step is often not sufficient to obtain Nbs of high purity. Here, we report an alternative method for expression and purification of Nbs from the periplasm of E. coli based on their fusion to maltose binding protein (MBP) in the N-terminus and His6 tag in the C-terminus (MBP-NbHis6). Soluble MBP-NbHis6 fusions were consistently expressed at high levels (⩾12mg/L of induced culture in shake flasks) in the periplasm of E. coli HM140, a strain deficient in several periplasmic proteases. Highly pure MBP-NbHis6 fusions and free NbHis6 (after site specific proteolysis of the fusions), were recovered by amylose and metal affinity chromatography steps. The monomeric nature of the purified NbHis6 was determined by gel filtration chromatography. Lastly, we demonstrated by ELISA that both monomeric NbHis6 and MBP-NbHis6 fusions retained antigen binding activity and specificity, thus facilitating their direct use in antigen recognition assays. PMID:23856605

  9. Expression of scFv-Mel-Gal4 triple fusion protein as a targeted DNA-carrier in Escherichia Coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiyu; Luo, Jian; Xu, Lining; Zeng, Jianping; Cao, Limin; Dong, Jiahong; Cai, Shouwang

    2013-12-01

    Liver-directed gene therapy has become a promising treatment for many liver diseases. In this study, we constructed a multi-functional targeting molecule, which maintains targeting, endosome-escaping, and DNA-binding abilities for gene delivery. Two single oligonucleotide chains of Melittin (M) were synthesized. The full-length cDNA encoding anti-hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor scFv C1 (C1) was purified from C1/pIT2. The GAL4 (G) gene was amplified from pSW50-Gal4 by polymerase chain reaction. M, C1 and G were inserted into plasmid pGC4C26H to product the recombinant plasmid pGC-C1MG. The fused gene C1MG was subsequently subcloned into plasmid pET32c to product the recombinant plasmid C1MG/pET32c and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The scFv-Mel-Gal4 triple fusion protein (C1MG) was purified with a Ni(2+) chelating HiTrap HP column. The fusion protein C1MG of roughly 64 kD was expressed in inclusion bodies; 4.5 mg/ml C1MG was prepared with Ni(2+) column purification. Western blot and immunohistochemistry showed the antigen-binding ability of C1MG to the cell surface of the liver-derived cell line and liver tissue slices. Hemolysis testing showed that C1MG maintained membrane-disrupting activity. DNA-binding capacity was substantiated by luciferase assay, suggesting that C1MG could deliver the DNA into cells efficiently on the basis of C1MG. Successful expression of C1MG was achieved in E. coli, and C1MG recombinant protein confers targeting, endosome-escaping and DNA-binding capacity, which makes it probable to further study its liver-specific DNA delivery efficacy in vivo. PMID:23508530

  10. Development of anaerobically inducible nar promoter expression vectors for the expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nag-Jong; Choi, Jong Hyun; Kim, Yeon Chul; Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Sang Yup; Chang, Ho Nam; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2011-01-10

    Dissolved oxygen (DO)-controlled nar promoter expression vectors were constructed, and their expression efficiency was compared with that of the T7 promoter pET22 expression vector by expressing human growth hormone (hGH), enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and β-tyrosinase in Escherichia coli cells. The nar promoter expression vector pRBS, which was engineered with a 5'-untranslated region and ribosomal binding site for the T7 promoter, expressed hGH at a rate of up to 32% of the total cellular proteins (TCP) in E. coli W3110narL⁻. The expression level of hGH was further enhanced, up to ~42% of the TCP, by adding the N-terminal peptide tag of β-galactosidase to hGH, which was comparable to the expression of ~43% of the TCP in pET-lac:hGH/BL21(DE3). A further engineered expression vector, pRBS(fnr), which coexpressed fumarate/nitrate reductase (fnr), expressed more EGFP than pET22 in BL21(DE3). In addition, recombinant β-tyrosinase was successfully expressed at a rate of up to ~45% of the TCP in pRBS(fnr) in W3110narL⁻. From these results, the DO-controlled nar promoter system developed in this study can be considered a reliable and cost-effective expression system for protein production, especially in large-scale fermentation, as an alternative to the pET/BL(DE3) system. PMID:21111764

  11. On the mode of integration of the thylakoid membrane protein cytochrome b(6) into cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Króliczewski, Jaroslaw; Gubernator, Beata; Rögner, Matthias; Szczepaniak, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    In the stroma compartment, several pathways are used for integration/translocation of chloroplast proteins into or across the thylakoid membrane. In this study we investigated the mode of incorporation of the chloroplast-encoded cytochrome b(6) into the bacterial membrane. Cytochrome b(6) naturally comprises of four transmembrane helices (A,B,C,D) and contains two b-type hemes. In the present study, mature cytochrome b(6) or constructed deletion mutants of cytochrome were expressed in E. coli cells. The membrane insertion of cytochrome b(6) in this bacterial model system requires an artificially added presequence that directs the protein to use an E. coli membrane-insertion pathway. This could be accomplished by fusion to maltose-binding protein (MBP) or to the bacterial Sec-dependent signal peptide (SSpelB). The integration of mature cytochrome b(6) into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane by the Sec pathway has been reported previously by our group (Kroliczewski et al., 2005, Biochemistry, 44: 7570). The results presented here show that cytochrome b(6) devoid of the first helix A can be inserted into the membrane, as can the entire ABCD. On the other hand, the construct devoid of helices A and B is translocated through the membrane into the periplasm without any effective insertion. This suggests the importance of the membrane-anchoring sequences that are likely to be present in only the A and B part, and it is consistent with the results of computational prediction which did not identify any membrane-anchoring sequences for the C or D helices. We also show that the incorporation of hemes into the truncated form of cytochrome b(6) is possible, as long as the B and D helices bearing axial ligands to heme are present. PMID:21725502

  12. Asymmetric Constriction of Dividing Escherichia coli Cells Induced by Expression of a Fusion between Two Min Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rowlett, Veronica Wells

    2014-01-01

    The Min system, consisting of MinC, MinD, and MinE, plays an important role in localizing the Escherichia coli cell division machinery to midcell by preventing FtsZ ring (Z ring) formation at cell poles. MinC has two domains, MinCn and MinCc, which both bind to FtsZ and act synergistically to inhibit FtsZ polymerization. Binary fission of E. coli usually proceeds symmetrically, with daughter cells at roughly 180° to each other. In contrast, we discovered that overproduction of an artificial MinCc-MinD fusion protein in the absence of other Min proteins induced frequent and dramatic jackknife-like bending of cells at division septa, with cell constriction predominantly on the outside of the bend. Mutations in the fusion known to disrupt MinCc-FtsZ, MinCc-MinD, or MinD-membrane interactions largely suppressed bending division. Imaging of FtsZ-green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed no obvious asymmetric localization of FtsZ during MinCc-MinD overproduction, suggesting that a downstream activity of the Z ring was inhibited asymmetrically. Consistent with this, MinCc-MinD fusions localized predominantly to segments of the Z ring at the inside of developing cell bends, while FtsA (but not ZipA) tended to localize to the outside. As FtsA is required for ring constriction, we propose that this asymmetric localization pattern blocks constriction of the inside of the septal ring while permitting continued constriction of the outside portion. PMID:24682325

  13. The l-Isoaspartyl Protein Repair Methyltransferase Enhances Survival of Aging Escherichia coli Subjected to Secondary Environmental Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Visick, Jonathan E.; Cai, Hui; Clarke, Steven

    1998-01-01

    Like its homologs throughout the biological world, the l-isoaspartyl protein repair methyltransferase of Escherichia coli, encoded by the pcm gene, can convert abnormal l-isoaspartyl residues in proteins (which form spontaneously from asparaginyl or aspartyl residues) to normal aspartyl residues. Mutations in pcm were reported to greatly reduce survival in stationary phase and when cells were subjected to heat or osmotic stresses (C. Li and S. Clarke, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:9885–9889, 1992). However, we subsequently demonstrated that those strains had a secondary mutation in rpoS, which encodes a stationary-phase-specific sigma factor (J. E. Visick and S. Clarke, J. Bacteriol. 179:4158–4163, 1997). We now show that the rpoS mutation, resulting in a 90% decrease in HPII catalase activity, can account for the previously observed phenotypes. We further demonstrate that a new pcm mutant lacks these phenotypes. Interestingly, the newly constructed pcm mutant, when maintained in stationary phase for extended periods, is susceptible to environmental stresses, including exposure to methanol, oxygen radical generation by paraquat, high salt concentrations, and repeated heating to 42°C. The pcm mutation also results in a competitive disadvantage in stationary-phase cells. All of these phenotypes can be complemented by a functional pcm gene integrated elsewhere in the chromosome. These data suggest that protein denaturation and isoaspartyl formation may act synergistically to the detriment of aging E. coli and that the repair methyltransferase can play a role in limiting the accumulation of the potentially disruptive isoaspartyl residues in vivo. PMID:9573145

  14. Dynamic Interaction of the Escherichia coli Cell Division ZipA and FtsZ Proteins Evidenced in Nanodiscs*

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M.; Reija, Belén; García, Concepción; Natale, Paolo; Alfonso, Carlos; Minton, Allen P.; Zorrilla, Silvia; Rivas, Germán; Vicente, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    The full-length ZipA protein from Escherichia coli, one of the essential components of the division proto-ring that provides membrane tethering to the septation FtsZ protein, has been incorporated in single copy into nanodiscs formed by a membrane scaffold protein encircling an E. coli phospholipid mixture. This is an acellular system that reproduces the assembly of part of the cell division components. ZipA contained in nanodiscs (Nd-ZipA) retains the ability to interact with FtsZ oligomers and with FtsZ polymers. Interactions with FtsZ occur at similar strengths as those involved in the binding of the soluble form of ZipA, lacking the transmembrane region, suggesting that the transmembrane region of ZipA has little influence on the formation of the ZipA·FtsZ complex. Peptides containing partial sequences of the C terminus of FtsZ compete with FtsZ polymers for binding to Nd-ZipA. The affinity of Nd-ZipA for the FtsZ polymer formed with GTP or GMPCPP (a slowly hydrolyzable analog of GTP) is moderate (micromolar range) and of similar magnitude as for FtsZ-GDP oligomers. Polymerization does not stabilize the binding of FtsZ to ZipA. This supports the role of ZipA as a passive anchoring device for the proto-ring with little implication, if any, in the regulation of its assembly. Furthermore, it indicates that the tethering of FtsZ to the membrane shows sufficient plasticity to allow for its release from noncentral regions of the cytoplasmic membrane and its subsequent relocation to midcell when demanded by the assembly of a division ring. PMID:22787144

  15. Combining a PagP fusion protein system with nickel ion-catalyzed cleavage to produce intrinsically disordered proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Somaya; Pan, Jonathan S; Liu, Philip B; Hwang, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    Many proteins contain intrinsically disordered regions that are highly solvent-exposed and susceptible to post-translational modifications. Studying these protein segments is critical to understanding their physiologic regulation, but proteolytic degradation can make them difficult to express and purify. We have designed a new protein expression vector that fuses the target protein to the N-terminus of the integral membrane protein, PagP. The two proteins are connected by a short linker containing the sequence SRHW, previously shown to be optimal for nickel ion-catalyzed cleavage. The methodology is demonstrated for an intrinsically disordered segment of cardiac troponin I. cTnI[135-209]-SRHW-PagP-His6 fusion protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, accumulating in insoluble inclusion bodies. The protein was solubilized, purified using nickel affinity chromatography, and then cleaved with 0.5mM NiSO4 at pH 9.0 and 45 °C, all in 6M guanidine-HCl. Nickel ion-catalyzed peptide bond hydrolysis is an effective chemical cleavage technique under denaturing conditions that preclude the use of proteases. Moreover, nickel-catalyzed cleavage is more specific than the most commonly used agent, cyanogen bromide, which cleaves C-terminal to methionine residues. We were able to produce 15 mg of purified cTnI[135-209] from 1L of M9 minimal media using this protocol. The methodology is more generally applicable to the production of intrinsically disordered protein segments. PMID:26297994

  16. Probing of exopolysaccharides with green fluorescence protein-labeled carbohydrate-binding module in Escherichia coli biofilms and flocs induced by bcsB overexpression.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Hong; Ojima, Yoshihiro; Sakka, Makiko; Sakka, Kazuo; Taya, Masahito

    2014-10-01

    Polysaccharides are major structural constituents to develop the three-dimensional architecture of Escherichia coli biofilms. In this study, confocal laser scanning microscopy was applied in combination with a fluorescent probe to analyze the location and arrangement of exopolysaccharide (EPSh) in microcolonies of E. coli K-12 derived strains, formed as biofilms on solid surfaces and flocs in the liquid phase. For this purpose, a novel fluorescent probe was constructed by conjugating a carbohydrate-binding module 3, from Paenibacillus curdlanolyticus, with the green fluorescence protein (GFP-CBM3). The GFP-CBM3 fused protein exhibited strong affinity to microcrystalline cellulose. Moreover, GFP-CBM3 specifically bound to cell-dense microcolonies in the E. coli biofilms, and to their flocs induced by bcsB overexpression. Therefore, the fused protein presents as a novel marker for EPSh produced by E. coli cells. Overexpression of bcsB was associated with abundant EPSh production and enhanced E. coli biofilm formation, which was similarly detectable by GFP-CBM3 probing. PMID:24746734

  17. Lipid-engineered Escherichia coli Membranes Reveal Critical Lipid Headgroup Size for Protein Function*

    PubMed Central

    Wikström, Malin; Kelly, Amélie A.; Georgiev, Alexander; Eriksson, Hanna M.; Klement, Maria Rosén; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Dowhan, William; Wieslander, Åke

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli membranes have a substantial bilayer curvature stress due to a large fraction of the nonbilayer-prone lipid phosphatidylethanolamine, and a mutant (AD93) lacking this lipid is severely crippled in several membrane-associated processes. Introduction of four lipid glycosyltransferases from Acholeplasma laidlawii and Arabidopsis thaliana, synthesizing large amounts of two nonbilayer-prone, and two bilayer-forming gluco- and galacto-lipids, (i) restored the curvature stress with the two nonbilayer lipids, and (ii) diluted the high negative lipid surface charge in all AD93 bilayers. Surprisingly, the bilayer-forming diglucosyl-diacylglycerol was almost as good in improving AD93 membrane processes as the two nonbilayer-prone glucosyl-diacylglycerol and galactosyl-diacylglycerol lipids, strongly suggesting that lipid surface charge dilution by these neutral lipids is very important for E. coli. Increased acyl chain length and unsaturation, plus cardiolipin (nonbilayer-prone) content, were probably also beneficial in the modified strains. However, despite a correct transmembrane topology for the transporter LacY in the diglucosyl-diacylglycerol clone, active transport failed in the absence of a nonbilayer-prone glycolipid. The corresponding digalactosyl-diacylglycerol bilayer lipid did not restore AD93 membrane processes, despite analogous acyl chain and cardiolipin contents. Chain ordering, probed by bis-pyrene lipids, was substantially lower in the digalactosyl-diacylglycerol strain lipids due to its extended headgroup. Hence, a low surface charge density of anionic lipids is important in E. coli membranes, but is inefficient if the headgroup of the diluting lipid is too large. This strongly indicates that a certain magnitude of the curvature stress is crucial for the bilayer in vivo. PMID:18981182

  18. Massive presence of the Escherichia coli 'major cold-shock protein' CspA under non-stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Brandi, A; Spurio, R; Gualerzi, C O; Pon, C L

    1999-03-15

    The most characteristic event of cold-shock activation in Escherichia coli is believed to be the de novo synthesis of CspA. We demonstrate, however, that the cellular concentration of this protein is > or = 50 microM during early exponential growth at 37 degrees C; therefore, its designation as a major cold-shock protein is a misnomer. The cspA mRNA level decreases rapidly with increasing cell density, becoming virtually undetectable by mid-to-late exponential growth phase while the CspA level declines, although always remaining clearly detectable. A burst of cspA expression followed by a renewed decline ensues upon dilution of stationary phase cultures with fresh medium. The extent of cold-shock induction of cspA varies as a function of the growth phase, being inversely proportional to the pre-existing level of CspA which suggests feedback autorepression by this protein. Both transcriptional and post-transcriptional controls regulate cspA expression under non-stress conditions; transcription of cspA mRNA is under the antagonistic control of DNA-binding proteins Fis and H-NS both in vivo and in vitro, while its decreased half-life with increasing cell density contributes to its rapid disappearance. The cspA mRNA instability is due to its 5' untranslated leader and is counteracted in vivo by the cold-shock DeaD box RNA helicase (CsdA). PMID:10075935

  19. Development of an Escherichia coli-Lactobacillus casei shuttle vector for heterologous protein expression in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Suebwongsa, Namfon; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Mayo, Baltasar; Yotpanya, Panjamaporn; Panya, Marutpong

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing interest to develop various lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species as mucosal delivery vehicles, for which the development of a variety of cloning and expression systems for these bacteria is of primary importance. This study reports the complete nucleotide sequence of the cryptic plasmid pRCEID7.6 derived from the chicken probiotic LAB strain Lactobacillus casei TISTR1341. Sequence analysis and comparison showed that pRCEID7.6 is composed of nine putative open reading frames. The replicon origin of pRCEID7.6 consisted of untranslated origin of replication and translated replication protein B sequences. This region was used to construct Escherichia coli/L. casei shuttle vectors carrying erythromycin and chloramphenicol resistance genes as selective markers. Segregation and structural stability of the vectors in L. casei was sufficient for most genetic applications. The feasibility of this vector for heterologous protein expression in L. casei was determined by cloning in pRCEID-LC7.6, the gene encoding the nucleocapsid protein (NP), from the influenza A virus under the control of the homologous promoter from the lactate dehydrogenase gene. L. casei carrying this recombinant plasmid was shown to successfully express the NP protein. Therefore, this shuttle vector can be used for further study in the development of mucosal delivery vehicles. PMID:27026866

  20. Protein ProQ Influences Osmotic Activation of Compatible Solute Transporter ProP in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Kunte, H. Jörg; Crane, Rebecca A.; Culham, Doreen E.; Richmond, Deborah; Wood, Janet M.

    1999-01-01

    ProP is an osmoregulatory compatible solute transporter in Escherichia coli K-12. Mutation proQ220::Tn5 decreased the rate constant for and the extent of ProP activation by an osmotic upshift but did not alter proP transcription or the ProP protein level. Allele proQ220::Tn5 was isolated, and the proQ sequence was determined. Locus proQ is upstream from prc (tsp) at 41.2 centisomes on the genetic map. The proQ220::Tn5 and prc phenotypes were different, however. Gene proQ is predicted to encode a 232-amino-acid, basic, hydrophilic protein (molecular mass, 25,876 Da; calculated isoelectric point, 9.66; 32% D, E, R, or K; 54.5% polar amino acids). The insertion of PCR-amplified proQ into vector pBAD24 produced a plasmid containing the wild-type proQ open reading frame, the expression of which yielded a soluble protein with an apparent molecular mass of 30 kDa. Antibodies raised against the overexpressed ProQ protein detected cross-reactive material in proQ+ bacteria but not in proQ220::Tn5 bacteria. ProQ may be a structural element that influences the osmotic activation of ProP at a posttranslational level. PMID:10049386

  1. Online analysis of protein inclusion bodies produced in E. coli by monitoring alterations in scattered and reflected light.

    PubMed

    Ude, Christian; Ben-Dov, Nadav; Jochums, André; Li, Zhaopeng; Segal, Ester; Scheper, Thomas; Beutel, Sascha

    2016-05-01

    The online monitoring of recombinant protein aggregate inclusion bodies during microbial cultivation is an immense challenge. Measurement of scattered and reflected light offers a versatile and non-invasive measurement technique. Therefore, we investigated two methods to detect the formation of inclusion bodies and monitor their production: (1) online 180° scattered light measurement (λ = 625 nm) using a sensor platform during cultivation in shake flask and (2) online measurement of the light reflective interference using a porous Si-based optical biosensor (SiPA). It could be shown that 180° scattered light measurement allows monitoring of alterations in the optical properties of Escherichia coli BL21 cells, associated with the formation of inclusion bodies during cultivation. A reproducible linear correlation between the inclusion body concentration of the non-fluorescent protein human leukemia inhibitory factor (hLIF) carrying a thioredoxin tag and the shift ("Δamp") in scattered light signal intensity was observed. This was also observed for the glutathione-S-transferase-tagged green fluorescent protein (GFP-GST). Continuous online monitoring of reflective interference spectra reveals a significant increase in the bacterium refractive index during hLIF production in comparison to a non-induced reference that coincide with the formation of inclusion bodies. These online monitoring techniques could be applied for fast and cost-effective screening of different protein expression systems. PMID:26940052

  2. Different genome stability proteins underpin primed and naïve adaptation in E. coli CRISPR-Cas immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ivančić-Baće, Ivana; Cass, Simon D; Wearne, Stephen J; Bolt, Edward L

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is a prokaryotic immune system built from capture and integration of invader DNA into CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) loci, termed ‘Adaptation’, which is dependent on Cas1 and Cas2 proteins. In Escherichia coli, Cascade-Cas3 degrades invader DNA to effect immunity, termed ‘Interference’. Adaptation can interact with interference (‘primed’), or is independent of it (‘naïve’). We demonstrate that primed adaptation requires the RecG helicase and PriA protein to be present. Genetic analysis of mutant phenotypes suggests that RecG is needed to dissipate R-loops at blocked replication forks. Additionally, we identify that DNA polymerase I is important for both primed and naive adaptation, and that RecB is needed for naïve adaptation. Purified Cas1-Cas2 protein shows specificity for binding to and nicking forked DNA within single strand gaps, and collapsing forks into DNA duplexes. The data suggest that different genome stability systems interact with primed or naïve adaptation when responding to blocked or collapsed invader DNA replication. In this model, RecG and Cas3 proteins respond to invader DNA replication forks that are blocked by Cascade interference, enabling DNA capture. RecBCD targets DNA ends at collapsed forks, enabling DNA capture without interference. DNA polymerase I is proposed to fill DNA gaps during spacer integration. PMID:26578567

  3. Localization of Cell Division Protein FtsQ by Immunofluorescence Microscopy in Dividing and Nondividing Cells of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Buddelmeijer, Nienke; Aarsman, Mirjam E. G.; Kolk, Arend H. J.; Vicente, Miguel; Nanninga, Nanne

    1998-01-01

    The localization of cell division protein FtsQ in Escherichia coli wild-type cells was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy with specific monoclonal antibodies. FtsQ could be localized to the division site in constricting cells. FtsQ could also localize to the division site in ftsQ1(Ts) cells grown at the permissive temperature. A hybrid protein in which the cytoplasmic domain and the transmembrane domain were derived from the γ form of penicillin-binding protein 1B and the periplasmic domain was derived from FtsQ was also able to localize to the division site. This result indicates that the periplasmic domain of FtsQ determines the localization of FtsQ, as has also been concluded by others for the periplasmic domain of FtsN. Noncentral FtsQ foci were found in the area of the cell where the nucleoid resides and were therefore assumed to represent sites where the FtsQ protein is synthesized and simultaneously inserted into the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:9829918

  4. Expression of two human beta-adrenergic receptors in Escherichia coli: functional interaction with two forms of the stimulatory G protein.

    PubMed Central

    Freissmuth, M; Selzer, E; Marullo, S; Schütz, W; Strosberg, A D

    1991-01-01

    When expressed in Escherichia coli, the human beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors retain their ligand binding specificity. Their functional integrity was investigated by analyzing receptor-guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory (G) protein coupling by using two splice variants of the alpha subunit of the stimulatory G protein Gs synthesized in E. coli (rGs alpha-S and rGs alpha-L) and the beta gamma subunits of G protein purified from bovine brain. In competition binding experiments with (-)-[125I]iodocyanopindolol and (-)-isoproterenol, rGs alpha-S.beta gamma and rGs alpha-L.beta gamma reconstituted guanine nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding with comparable affinities, whereas rGs alpha PT, a mutant of rGs alpha-L with an altered carboxyl terminus, and a recombinant subtype of the alpha subunit of the inhibitory G protein, rGi alpha-1, were approximately 20- and approximately 200-fold less po