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Sample records for coli mg1655 flagellar

  1. Engineering Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 to use starch

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To attain a sustainable bioeconomy, fuel, or valuable product, production must use biomass as substrate. Starch is one of the most abundant biomass resources and is present as waste or as a food and agroindustry by-product. Unfortunately, Escherichia coli, one of the most widely used microorganisms in biotechnological processes, cannot use starch as a carbon source. Results We engineered an E. coli strain capable of using starch as a substrate. The genetic design employed the native capability of the bacterium to use maltodextrins as a carbon source plus expression and secretion of its endogenous α-amylase, AmyA, in an adapted background. Biomass production improved using 35% dissolved oxygen and pH 7.2 in a controlled bioreactor. Conclusion The engineered E. coli strain can use starch from the milieu and open the possibility of optimize the process to use agroindustrial wastes to produce biofuels and other valuable chemicals. PMID:24886307

  2. Identification of riboflavin: revealing different metabolic characteristics between Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinran; Wang, Qian; Qi, Qingsheng

    2015-06-01

    There are many physiological differences between Escherichia coli B and K-12 strains, owing to their different origins. Deeper insight into the metabolic and regulative mechanisms of these strains will inform improved usage of these industrial workhorses. In the present study, we observed that BL21 fermentation broth gradually turned yellow during cultivation. By spectral analysis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry identification, we confirmed for the first time that the yellow substance accumulated in the fermentation broth is riboflavin. Comparing the enzyme sequences involved in riboflavin metabolism between BL21 and MG1655, we identified a site mutation on the 115 residue of bifunctional riboflavin kinase/FMN adenylyltransferase (RibF) in BL21. This His115Leu mutation was found to reduce enzyme activity to 55% of that of MG1655, which is probably one reason for riboflavin accumulation in BL21. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that genes of the entire branch of the riboflavin and FAD biosynthesis pathways in BL21 were up-regulated. Several physiological and metabolic characteristics of BL21 and MG1655 were found to be different, and may also be related to the riboflavin accumulation. PMID:25926527

  3. Global Gene Expression Analysis of Long-Term Stationary Phase Effects in E. coli K12 MG1655

    PubMed Central

    Arunasri, Kotakonda; Adil, Mohammed; Khan, Pathan Akbar Ali; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2014-01-01

    Global gene expression was monitored in long-term stationary phase (LSP) cells of E. coli K12 MG1655 and compared with stationary phase (SP) cells that were sub-cultured without prolonged delay to get an insight into the survival strategies of LSP cells. The experiments were carried out using both LB medium and LB supplemented with 10% of glycerol. In both the media the LSP cells showed decreased growth rate compared to SP cells. DNA microarray analysis of LSP cells in both the media resulted in the up- and down-regulation of several genes in LSP cells compared to their respective SP cells in the corresponding media. In LSP cells grown in LB 204 genes whereas cells grown in LB plus glycerol 321 genes were differentially regulated compared to the SP cells. Comparison of these differentially regulated genes indicated that irrespective of the medium used for growth in LSP cells expression of 95 genes (22 genes up-regulated and 73 down-regulated) were differentially regulated. These 95 genes could be associated with LSP status of the cells and are likely to influence survival and growth characteristics of LSP cells. This is indeed so since the up- and down-regulated genes include genes that protect E. coli LSP cells from stationary phase stress and genes that would help to recover from stress when transferred into fresh medium. The growth phenotype in LSP cells could be attributed to up-regulation of genes coding for insertion sequences that confer beneficial effects during starvation, genes coding for putative transposases and simultaneous down-regulation of genes coding for ribosomal protein synthesis, transport-related genes, non-coding RNA genes and metabolic genes. As yet we still do not know the role of several unknown genes and genes coding for hypothetical proteins which are either up- or down-regulated in LSP cells compared to SP cells. PMID:24858919

  4. Adaptive laboratory evolution of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 for growth at high hydrostatic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Marietou, Angeliki; Nguyen, Alice T. T.; Allen, Eric E.; Bartlett, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    Much of microbial life on Earth grows and reproduces under the elevated hydrostatic pressure conditions that exist in deep-ocean and deep-subsurface environments. In this study adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) experiments were conducted to investigate the possible modification of the piezosensitive Escherichia coli for improved growth at high pressure. After approximately 500 generations of selection, a strain was isolated that acquired the ability to grow at pressure non-permissive for the parental strain. Remarkably, this strain displayed growth properties and changes in the proportion and regulation of unsaturated fatty acids that indicated the acquisition of multiple piezotolerant properties. These changes developed concomitantly with a change in the gene encoding the acyl carrier protein, which is required for fatty acid synthesis. PMID:25610434

  5. A genome-scale metabolic reconstruction for Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 that accounts for 1260 ORFs and thermodynamic information

    PubMed Central

    Feist, Adam M; Henry, Christopher S; Reed, Jennifer L; Krummenacker, Markus; Joyce, Andrew R; Karp, Peter D; Broadbelt, Linda J; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2007-01-01

    An updated genome-scale reconstruction of the metabolic network in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 is presented. This updated metabolic reconstruction includes: (1) an alignment with the latest genome annotation and the metabolic content of EcoCyc leading to the inclusion of the activities of 1260 ORFs, (2) characterization and quantification of the biomass components and maintenance requirements associated with growth of E. coli and (3) thermodynamic information for the included chemical reactions. The conversion of this metabolic network reconstruction into an in silico model is detailed. A new step in the metabolic reconstruction process, termed thermodynamic consistency analysis, is introduced, in which reactions were checked for consistency with thermodynamic reversibility estimates. Applications demonstrating the capabilities of the genome-scale metabolic model to predict high-throughput experimental growth and gene deletion phenotypic screens are presented. The increased scope and computational capability using this new reconstruction is expected to broaden the spectrum of both basic biology and applied systems biology studies of E. coli metabolism. PMID:17593909

  6. Genome-wide Reconstruction of OxyR and SoxRS Transcriptional Regulatory Networks under Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-08-25

    Three transcription factors (TFs), OxyR, SoxR, and SoxS, play a critical role in transcriptional regulation of the defense system for oxidative stress in bacteria. However, their full genome-wide regulatory potential is unknown. Here, we perform a genome-scale reconstruction of the OxyR, SoxR, and SoxS regulons in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 68 genes in 51 transcription units (TUs) belong to these regulons. Among them, 48 genes showed more than 2-fold changes in expression level under single-TF-knockout conditions. This reconstruction expands the genome-wide roles of these factors to include direct activation of genes related to amino acid biosynthesis (methionine and aromatic amino acids), cell wall synthesis (lipid A biosynthesis and peptidoglycan growth), and divalent metal ion transport (Mn(2+), Zn(2+), and Mg(2+)). Investigating the co-regulation of these genes with other stress-response TFs reveals that they are independently regulated by stress-specific TFs. PMID:26279566

  7. Use of adaptive laboratory evolution to discover key mutations enabling rapid growth of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 on glucose minimal medium.

    PubMed

    LaCroix, Ryan A; Sandberg, Troy E; O'Brien, Edward J; Utrilla, Jose; Ebrahim, Ali; Guzman, Gabriela I; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O; Feist, Adam M

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) has emerged as an effective tool for scientific discovery and addressing biotechnological needs. Much of ALE's utility is derived from reproducibly obtained fitness increases. Identifying causal genetic changes and their combinatorial effects is challenging and time-consuming. Understanding how these genetic changes enable increased fitness can be difficult. A series of approaches that address these challenges was developed and demonstrated using Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 on glucose minimal media at 37°C. By keeping E. coli in constant substrate excess and exponential growth, fitness increases up to 1.6-fold were obtained compared to the wild type. These increases are comparable to previously reported maximum growth rates in similar conditions but were obtained over a shorter time frame. Across the eight replicate ALE experiments performed, causal mutations were identified using three approaches: identifying mutations in the same gene/region across replicate experiments, sequencing strains before and after computationally determined fitness jumps, and allelic replacement coupled with targeted ALE of reconstructed strains. Three genetic regions were most often mutated: the global transcription gene rpoB, an 82-bp deletion between the metabolic pyrE gene and rph, and an IS element between the DNA structural gene hns and tdk. Model-derived classification of gene expression revealed a number of processes important for increased growth that were missed using a gene classification system alone. The methods described here represent a powerful combination of technologies to increase the speed and efficiency of ALE studies. The identified mutations can be examined as genetic parts for increasing growth rate in a desired strain and for understanding rapid growth phenotypes. PMID:25304508

  8. Flagellar region 3b supports strong expression of integrated DNA and the highest chromosomal integration efficiency of the Escherichia coli flagellar regions

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli is routinely used as the chassis for a variety of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Identification and analysis of reliable chromosomal integration and expression target loci is crucial for E. coli engineering. Chromosomal loci differ significantly in their ability to support integration and expression of the integrated genetic circuits. In this study, we investigate E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar regions 2 and 3b. Integration of the genetic circuit into seven and nine highly conserved genes of the flagellar regions 2 (motA, motB, flhD, flhE, cheW, cheY and cheZ) and 3b (fliE, F, G, J, K, L, M, P, R), respectively, showed significant variation in their ability to support chromosomal integration and expression of the integrated genetic circuit. While not reducing the growth of the engineered strains, the integrations into all 16 target sites led to the loss of motility. In addition to high expression, the flagellar region 3b supports the highest efficiency of integration of all E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar regions and is therefore potentially the most suitable for the integration of synthetic genetic circuits. PMID:26074421

  9. Emergence of Hyper-Resistant Escherichia coli MG1655 Derivative Strains after Applying Sub-Inhibitory Doses of Individual Constituents of Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Chueca, Beatriz; Berdejo, Daniel; Gomes-Neto, Nelson J; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The improvement of food preservation by using essential oils (EOs) and their individual constituents (ICs) is attracting enormous interest worldwide. Until now, researchers considered that treatments with such antimicrobial compounds did not induce bacterial resistance via a phenotypic (i.e., transient) response. Nevertheless, the emergence of genotypic (i.e., stable) resistance after treatment with these compounds had not been previously tested. Our results confirm that growth of Escherichia coli MG1655 in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs carvacrol, citral, and (+)-limonene oxide do not increase resistance to further treatments with either the same IC (direct resistance) or with other preservation treatments (cross-resistance) such as heat or pulsed electric fields (PEF). Bacterial mutation frequency was likewise lower when those IC's were applied; however, after 10 days of re-culturing cells in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs, we were able to isolate several derivative strains (i.e., mutants) displaying an increased minimum inhibitory concentration to those ICs. Furthermore, when compared to the wild type (WT) strain, they also displayed direct resistance and cross-resistance. Derivative strains selected with carvacrol and citral also displayed morphological changes involving filamentation along with cell counts at late-stationary growth phase that were lower than the WT strain. In addition, co-cultures of each derivative strain with the WT strain resulted in a predominance of the original strain in absence of ICs, indicating that mutants would not out-compete WT cells under optimal growth conditions. Nevertheless, growth in the presence of ICs facilitated the selection of these resistant mutants. Thus, as a result, subsequent food preservation treatments of these bacterial cultures might be less effective than expected for WT cultures. In conclusion, this study recommends that treatment with ICs at sub

  10. Emergence of Hyper-Resistant Escherichia coli MG1655 Derivative Strains after Applying Sub-Inhibitory Doses of Individual Constituents of Essential Oils

    PubMed Central

    Chueca, Beatriz; Berdejo, Daniel; Gomes-Neto, Nelson J.; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The improvement of food preservation by using essential oils (EOs) and their individual constituents (ICs) is attracting enormous interest worldwide. Until now, researchers considered that treatments with such antimicrobial compounds did not induce bacterial resistance via a phenotypic (i.e., transient) response. Nevertheless, the emergence of genotypic (i.e., stable) resistance after treatment with these compounds had not been previously tested. Our results confirm that growth of Escherichia coli MG1655 in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs carvacrol, citral, and (+)-limonene oxide do not increase resistance to further treatments with either the same IC (direct resistance) or with other preservation treatments (cross-resistance) such as heat or pulsed electric fields (PEF). Bacterial mutation frequency was likewise lower when those IC's were applied; however, after 10 days of re-culturing cells in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs, we were able to isolate several derivative strains (i.e., mutants) displaying an increased minimum inhibitory concentration to those ICs. Furthermore, when compared to the wild type (WT) strain, they also displayed direct resistance and cross-resistance. Derivative strains selected with carvacrol and citral also displayed morphological changes involving filamentation along with cell counts at late-stationary growth phase that were lower than the WT strain. In addition, co-cultures of each derivative strain with the WT strain resulted in a predominance of the original strain in absence of ICs, indicating that mutants would not out-compete WT cells under optimal growth conditions. Nevertheless, growth in the presence of ICs facilitated the selection of these resistant mutants. Thus, as a result, subsequent food preservation treatments of these bacterial cultures might be less effective than expected for WT cultures. In conclusion, this study recommends that treatment with ICs at sub

  11. Transcriptional and Physiological Characterizations of Escherichia coli MG1655 that have been grown under Low Shear Stress Environment for 1000 Generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouia, Fathi; Tirumalai, Madhan R.; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Ott, Mark C.; Pierson, Duane L.; Fofanov, Yuriy; Willson, Richard C.; Fox, George E.

    Human space travelers experience a unique environment that affects homeostasis and physio-logic adaptation. One of the important regulatory biology interactions affected by space flight is the alteration of the immune response. As such, the impairment of the immune system may lead to higher risk of bacterial and/or viral infection during human space flight missions. Mi-crobiological contaminants have been a source of concern over the years for NASA and there is evidence to suggest that microbes in space do not behave like they do on Earth. Previ-ous studies have examined the physiological response of bacteria when exposed to short-term microgravity either during spaceflight or in a Low Shear Modeled Microgravity (LSMMG) en-vironment. Exposure to these environments has been found to induce increased resistance to stresses and antibiotics, and in one case increase of virulence. As NASA increases the duration of space flight missions and is starting to envision human presence on the lunar surface and Mars, it becomes legitimate to question the long-term effects of microgravity on bacteria. The effect of long-term exposure to LSMMG on microbial gene expression and physiology in Escherichia coli (E. coli) is being examined using functional genomics, and molecular tech-niques. In previous E. coli short term studies, reproducible changes in transcription were seen but no direct responses to changes in the gravity vector were identified. Instead, absence of shear and a randomized gravity vector appeared to cause local extra-cellular environmental changes, which elicited cellular responses. In order to evaluate the long-term effects of micro-gravity on bacteria, E. coli was grown under simulated microgravity for 1000 generations and gene expression patterns and cellular physiology were analyzed in comparison with short-term exposure. The analysis revealed that the long-term response differed significantly from the short-term exposure and 357 genes were expressed

  12. An individual-based modeling approach to simulate the effects of cellular nutrient competition on Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 colony behavior and interactions in aerobic structured food systems.

    PubMed

    Tack, Ignace L M M; Logist, Filip; Noriega Fernández, Estefanía; Van Impe, Jan F M

    2015-02-01

    Traditional kinetic models in predictive microbiology reliably predict macroscopic dynamics of planktonically-growing cell cultures in homogeneous liquid food systems. However, most food products have a semi-solid structure, where microorganisms grow locally in colonies. Individual colony cells exhibit strongly different and non-normally distributed behavior due to local nutrient competition. As a result, traditional models considering average population behavior in a homogeneous system do not describe colony dynamics in full detail. To incorporate local resource competition and individual cell differences, an individual-based modeling approach has been applied to Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 colonies, considering the microbial cell as modeling unit. The first contribution of this individual-based model is to describe single colony growth under nutrient-deprived conditions. More specifically, the linear and stationary phase in the evolution of the colony radius, the evolution from a disk-like to branching morphology, and the emergence of a starvation zone in the colony center are simulated and compared to available experimental data. These phenomena occur earlier at more severe nutrient depletion conditions, i.e., at lower nutrient diffusivity and initial nutrient concentration in the medium. Furthermore, intercolony interactions have been simulated. Higher inoculum densities lead to stronger intercolony interactions, such as colony merging and smaller colony sizes, due to nutrient competition. This individual-based model contributes to the elucidation of characteristic experimentally observed colony behavior from mechanistic information about cellular physiology and interactions. PMID:25500383

  13. A model-driven quantitative metabolomics analysis of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in E. coli K-12 MG1655 that is biochemically and thermodynamically consistent.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Douglas; Gangoiti, Jon A; King, Zachary A; Naviaux, Robert K; Barshop, Bruce A; Palsson, Bernhard O; Feist, Adam M

    2014-04-01

    The advent of model-enabled workflows in systems biology allows for the integration of experimental data types with genome-scale models to discover new features of biology. This work demonstrates such a workflow, aimed at establishing a metabolomics platform applied to study the differences in metabolomes between anaerobic and aerobic growth of Escherichia coli. Constraint-based modeling was utilized to deduce a target list of compounds for downstream method development. An analytical and experimental methodology was developed and tailored to the compound chemistry and growth conditions of interest. This included the construction of a rapid sampling apparatus for use with anaerobic cultures. The resulting genome-scale data sets for anaerobic and aerobic growth were validated by comparison to previous small-scale studies comparing growth of E. coli under the same conditions. The metabolomics data were then integrated with the E. coli genome-scale metabolic model (GEM) via a sensitivity analysis that utilized reaction thermodynamics to reconcile simulated growth rates and reaction directionalities. This analysis highlighted several optimal network usage inconsistencies, including the incorrect use of the beta-oxidation pathway for synthesis of fatty acids. This analysis also identified enzyme promiscuity for the pykA gene, that is critical for anaerobic growth, and which has not been previously incorporated into metabolic models of E coli. PMID:24249002

  14. The plasticity of global proteome and genome expression analyzed in closely related W3110 and MG1655 strains of a well-studied model organism, Escherichia coli-K12.

    PubMed

    Vijayendran, Chandran; Polen, Tino; Wendisch, Volker F; Friehs, Karl; Niehaus, Karsten; Flaschel, Erwin

    2007-03-10

    The use of Escherichia coli as a model organism has provided a great deal of basic information in biomolecular sciences. Examining trait differences among closely related strains of the same species addresses a fundamental biological question: how much diversity is there at the single species level? The main aim of our research was to identify significant differences in the activities of groups of genes between two laboratory strains of an organism closely related in genome structure. We demonstrate that despite strict and controlled growth conditions, there is high plasticity in the global proteome and genome expression in two closely related E. coli K12 sub-strains (W3110 and MG1655), which differ insignificantly in genome structure. The growth patterns of these two sub-strains were very similar in a well-equipped bioreactor, and their genome structures were shown to be almost identical by DNA microarray. However, detailed profiling of protein and gene expression by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and microarray analysis showed many differentially expressed genes and proteins, combinations of which were highly correlated. The differentially regulated genes and proteins belonged to the following functional categories: genes regulated by sigma subunit of RNA polymerase (RpoS), enterobactin-related genes, and genes involved in central metabolism. Genes involved in central cell metabolism - the glycolysis pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glyoxylate bypass - were differentially regulated at both the mRNA and proteome levels. The strains differ significantly in central metabolism and thus in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy. This high plasticity probably represents a universal feature of metabolic activities in closely related species, and has the potential to reveal differences in regulatory networks. We suggest that unless care is taken in the choice of strains for any validating experiment, the results might be misleading. PMID

  15. Incomplete flagellar structures in Escherichia coli mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Komeda, Y

    1981-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants with defects in 29 flagellar genes identified so far were examined by electron microscopy for possession of incomplete flagellar structures in membrane-associated fractions. The results are discussed in consideration of the known transcriptional interaction of flagellar genes. Hook-basal body structures were detected in flaD, flaS, flaT, flbC, and hag mutants. The flaE mutant had a polyhook-basal body structure. An intact basal body appeared in flaK mutants. Putative precursors of the basal body were detected in mutants with defects in flaM, flaU, flaV, and flaY. No structures homologous to the flagellar basal body or its parts were detected in mutants with defects in flaA, flaB, flaC, flaG, flaH, flaI, flaL, flaN, flaO, flaP, flaQ, flaR, flaW, flaX, flbA, flbB, and flbD. One flaZ mutant had an incomplete flagellar basal body structure and another formed no significant structure, suggesting that flaZ is responsible for both basal body assembly and the transcription of the hag gene. Images PMID:7007337

  16. Comprehensive Mapping of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Devon M.; Bonocora, Richard P.; Wade, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellar synthesis is a highly regulated process in all motile bacteria. In Escherichia coli and related species, the transcription factor FlhDC is the master regulator of a multi-tiered transcription network. FlhDC activates transcription of a number of genes, including some flagellar genes and the gene encoding the alternative Sigma factor FliA. Genes whose expression is required late in flagellar assembly are primarily transcribed by FliA, imparting temporal regulation of transcription and coupling expression to flagellar assembly. In this study, we use ChIP-seq and RNA-seq to comprehensively map the E. coli FlhDC and FliA regulons. We define a surprisingly restricted FlhDC regulon, including two novel regulated targets and two binding sites not associated with detectable regulation of surrounding genes. In contrast, we greatly expand the known FliA regulon. Surprisingly, 30 of the 52 FliA binding sites are located inside genes. Two of these intragenic promoters are associated with detectable noncoding RNAs, while the others either produce highly unstable RNAs or are inactive under these conditions. Together, our data redefine the E. coli flagellar regulatory network, and provide new insight into the temporal orchestration of gene expression that coordinates the flagellar assembly process. PMID:25275371

  17. Identification of Escherichia coli region III flagellar gene products and description of two new flagellar genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, D H; Matsumura, P

    1984-01-01

    Region III flagellar genes in Escherichia coli are involved with the assembly and rotation of the flagella, as well as taxis. We subcloned the flaB operon from a lambda fla transducing phage onto plasmid pMK2004. Two additional genes were found at the flaB locus, and we subdivided the flaB gene into flaB1, flaBII, and flaBIII. The cheY suppressor mutations which have previously been mapped to flaB were further localized to flaB11 (Parkinson et al., J. Bacteriol. 155:265-274, 1983). Until now, gene product identification has not been possible for these genes because of their low levels of gene expression. Overexpression of the flagellar genes was accomplished by placing the flaB operon under the control of the lacUV5 or tac promoters. Plasmid-encoded proteins were examined in a minicell expression system. By correlating various deletions and insertions in the flaB operon with the ability to complement specific flagellar mutants and code for polypeptides, we made the following gene product assignments: flaB 1, 60 kilodaltons; flaB 11, 38 kilodaltons; flaB111, 28 kilodaltons; flaC, 56 kilodaltons; fla0, 16 kilodaltons; and flaE, 54 kilodaltons. Images PMID:6094477

  18. Hybrid-fuel bacterial flagellar motors in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Homma, Michio; Ishijima, Akihiko; Berry, Richard M

    2014-03-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor rotates driven by an electrochemical ion gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane, either H(+) or Na(+) ions. The motor consists of a rotor ∼50 nm in diameter surrounded by multiple torque-generating ion-conducting stator units. Stator units exchange spontaneously between the motor and a pool in the cytoplasmic membrane on a timescale of minutes, and their stability in the motor is dependent upon the ion gradient. We report a genetically engineered hybrid-fuel flagellar motor in Escherichia coli that contains both H(+)- and Na(+)-driven stator components and runs on both types of ion gradient. We controlled the number of each type of stator unit in the motor by protein expression levels and Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]), using speed changes of single motors driving 1-μm polystyrene beads to determine stator unit numbers. De-energized motors changed from locked to freely rotating on a timescale similar to that of spontaneous stator unit exchange. Hybrid motor speed is simply the sum of speeds attributable to individual stator units of each type. With Na(+) and H(+) stator components expressed at high and medium levels, respectively, Na(+) stator units dominate at high [Na(+)] and are replaced by H(+) units when Na(+) is removed. Thus, competition between stator units for spaces in a motor and sensitivity of each type to its own ion gradient combine to allow hybrid motors to adapt to the prevailing ion gradient. We speculate that a similar process may occur in species that naturally express both H(+) and Na(+) stator components sharing a common rotor. PMID:24550452

  19. Polar features in the flagellar propulsion of E. coli bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, S.; Saglimbeni, F.; Lepore, A.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2015-06-01

    E. coli bacteria swim following a run and tumble pattern. In the run state all flagella join in a single helical bundle that propels the cell body along approximately straight paths. When one or more flagellar motors reverse direction the bundle unwinds and the cell randomizes its orientation. This basic picture represents an idealization of a much more complex dynamical problem. Although it has been shown that bundle formation can occur at either pole of the cell, it is still unclear whether these two run states correspond to asymmetric propulsion features. Using holographic microscopy we record the 3D motions of individual bacteria swimming in optical traps. We find that most cells possess two run states characterized by different propulsion forces, total torque, and bundle conformations. We analyze the statistical properties of bundle reversal and compare the hydrodynamic features of forward and backward running states. Our method is naturally multi-particle and opens up the way towards controlled hydrodynamic studies of interacting swimming cells.

  20. Zipping and entanglement in flagellar bundle of E. coli: Role of motile cell body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhyapak, Tapan Chandra; Stark, Holger

    2015-11-01

    The course of a peritrichous bacterium, such as E. coli, crucially depends on the level of synchronization and self-organization of several rotating flagella. However, the rotation of each flagellum generates countermovements of the body which in turn affect the flagellar dynamics. Using a detailed numerical model of an E. coli, we demonstrate that flagellar entanglement, besides fluid flow relative to the moving body, dramatically changes the dynamics of flagella from that compared to anchored flagella. In particular, bundle formation occurs through a zipping motion in a remarkably rapid time, affected little by initial flagellar orientation. A simplified analytical model supports our observations. Finally, we illustrate how entanglement, hydrodynamic interactions, and body movement contribute to zipping and bundling.

  1. A novel non-homologous recombination-mediated mechanism for Escherichia coli unilateral flagellar phase variation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Hu, Bo; Zhou, Zhemin; Guo, Dan; Guo, Xi; Ding, Peng; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2012-05-01

    Flagella contribute to the virulence of bacteria through chemotaxis, adhesion to and invasion of host surfaces. Flagellar phase variation is believed to facilitate bacterial evasion of the host immune response. In this study, the flnA gene that encodes Escherichia coli H17 flagellin was examined by whole genome sequencing and genetic deletion analysis. Unilateral flagellar phase variation has been reported in E. coli H3, H47 and H17 strains, although the mechanism for phase variation in the H17 strain has not been previously understood. Analysis of phase variants indicated that the flagellar phase variation in the H17 strain was caused by the deletion of an ∼35 kb DNA region containing the flnA gene from diverse excision sites. The presence of covalently closed extrachromosomal circular forms of this excised 35 kb region was confirmed by the two-step polymerase chain reaction. The deletion and complementation test revealed that the Int1157 integrase, a tyrosine recombinase, mediates the excision of this region. Unlike most tyrosine recombinases, Int1157 is suggested to recognize diverse sites and mediate recombination between non-homologous DNA sequences. This is the first report of non-homologous recombination mediating flagellar phase variation. PMID:22287625

  2. Escherichia coli flagellar genes as target sites for integration and expression of genetic circuits.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario; Evans, Lewis D B; Frost, Joe; Davenport, Peter W; Yarkoni, Orr; Fraser, Gillian M; Ajioka, James W

    2014-01-01

    E. coli is a model platform for engineering microbes, so genetic circuit design and analysis will be greatly facilitated by simple and effective approaches to introduce genetic constructs into the E. coli chromosome at well-characterised loci. We combined the Red recombinase system of bacteriophage λ and Isothermal Gibson Assembly for rapid integration of novel DNA constructs into the E. coli chromosome. We identified the flagellar region as a promising region for integration and expression of genetic circuits. We characterised integration and expression at four candidate loci, fliD, fliS, fliT, and fliY, of the E. coli flagellar region 3a. The integration efficiency and expression from the four integrations varied considerably. Integration into fliD and fliS significantly decreased motility, while integration into fliT and fliY had only a minor effect on the motility. None of the integrations had negative effects on the growth of the bacteria. Overall, we found that fliT was the most suitable integration site. PMID:25350000

  3. Escherichia coli Flagellar Genes as Target Sites for Integration and Expression of Genetic Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Evans, Lewis D. B.; Frost, Joe; Davenport, Peter W.; Yarkoni, Orr; Fraser, Gillian M.; Ajioka, James W.

    2014-01-01

    E. coli is a model platform for engineering microbes, so genetic circuit design and analysis will be greatly facilitated by simple and effective approaches to introduce genetic constructs into the E. coli chromosome at well-characterised loci. We combined the Red recombinase system of bacteriophage λ and Isothermal Gibson Assembly for rapid integration of novel DNA constructs into the E. coli chromosome. We identified the flagellar region as a promising region for integration and expression of genetic circuits. We characterised integration and expression at four candidate loci, fliD, fliS, fliT, and fliY, of the E. coli flagellar region 3a. The integration efficiency and expression from the four integrations varied considerably. Integration into fliD and fliS significantly decreased motility, while integration into fliT and fliY had only a minor effect on the motility. None of the integrations had negative effects on the growth of the bacteria. Overall, we found that fliT was the most suitable integration site. PMID:25350000

  4. Torque generated by the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, H C; Turner, L

    1993-01-01

    Cells of the bacterium Escherichia coli were tethered and spun in a high-frequency rotating electric field at a series of discrete field strengths. This was done first at low field strengths, then at field strengths generating speeds high enough to disrupt motor function, and finally at low field strengths. Comparison of the initial and final speed versus applied-torque plots yielded relative motor torque. For backward rotation, motor torque rose steeply at speeds close to zero, peaking, on average, at about 2.2 times the stall torque. For forward rotation, motor torque remained approximately constant up to speeds of about 60% of the zero-torque speed. Then the torque dropped linearly with speed, crossed zero, and reached a minimum, on average, at about -1.7 times the stall torque. The zero-torque speed increased with temperature (about 90 Hz at 11 degrees C, 140 Hz at 16 degrees C, and 290 Hz at 23 degrees C), while other parameters remained approximately constant. Sometimes the motor slipped at either extreme (delivered constant torque over a range of speeds), but eventually it broke. Similar results were obtained whether motors broke catastrophically (suddenly and completely) or progressively or were de-energized by brief treatment with an uncoupler. These results are consistent with a tightly coupled ratchet mechanism, provided that elastic deformation of force-generating elements is limited by a stop and that mechanical components yield at high applied torques. PMID:8298044

  5. Characterization of Escherichia coli Flagellar Mutants That are Insensitive to Catabolite Repression

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Michael; Simon, Melvin

    1974-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the synthesis of the flagellar organelle is sensitive to catabolite repression. Synthesis requires the presence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate receptor protein (Crp) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP); i.e., mutants that lack Crp or adenylcyclase (Cya) synthesize no flagella. We isolated and characterized a series of mutants (cfs) that restored flagella-forming ability in a Crp strain of E. coli. The mutations in these strains were transferred onto episomes and they were then introduced into a variety of other strains. The presence of the mutation resulted in flagella synthesis in Cya and Crp strains as well as in the wild type grown under conditions of catabolite repression. Deletion analysis and other genetic studies indicated that: (i) the cfs mutations had a dominant effect when they were in the transconfiguration in merodiploids: (ii) they occurred in or very close to the flaI gene: and (iii) their expression required the presence of an intact flaI gene adjacent to the cfs mutation. Biochemical studies showed that the synthesis of at least two flagellar polypeptides, the hook subunit and an amber fragment of flagellin, were absent in strains that carried a cya mutation. Their synthesis was depressed in strains grown under conditions of catabolite repression. The presence of the cfs mutation restored the specific synthesis of these two polypeptides. We suggest that the formation of the flaI gene product is the step in flagellar synthesis that is catabolite sensitive and requires cAMP. We propose a regulatory function for the product of the flaI gene. Images PMID:4373438

  6. Flagellar Cap Protein FliD Mediates Adherence of Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to Enterocyte Microvilli.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Suely C F; Luiz, Wilson B; Vieira, Mônica A M; Ferreira, Rita C C; Garcia, Bruna G; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Sampaio, Jorge L M; Ferreira, Luís C S; Gomes, Tânia A T

    2016-04-01

    The expression of flagella correlates with different aspects of bacterial pathogenicity, ranging from adherence to host cells to activation of inflammatory responses by the innate immune system. In the present study, we investigated the role of flagella in the adherence of an atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strain (serotype O51:H40) to human enterocytes. Accordingly, isogenic mutants deficient in flagellin (FliC), the flagellar structural subunit; the flagellar cap protein (FliD); or the MotAB proteins, involved in the control of flagellar motion, were generated and tested for binding to differentiated Caco-2 cells. Binding of the aEPEC strain to enterocytes was significantly impaired in strains with the fliCa nd fliD genes deleted, both of which could not form flagella on the bacterial surface. A nonmotile but flagellated MotAB mutant also showed impaired adhesion to Caco-2 cells. In accordance with these observations, adhesion of a EPEC strain 1711-4 to Caco-2 cells was drastically reduced after the treatment of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD. In addition, incubation of a EPEC bacteria with specific anti-FliD serum impaired binding to Caco-2 cells. Finally, incubation of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD, followed by immunolabeling, showed that the protein was specifically bound to the microvillus tips of differentiated Caco-2 cells. The a EPEC FliD or anti-FliD serum also reduced the adherence of prototype typical enteropathogenic, enterohemorrhagic, and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains to Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, our findings further strengthened the role of flagella in the adherence of a EPEC to human enterocytes and disclosed the relevant structural and functional involvement of FliD in the adhesion process. PMID:26831466

  7. Coordinated Switching of Bacterial Flagellar Motors in a Single E. Coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Tu, Yuhai

    2013-03-01

    The swimming of Escherichia coli is propelled by its multiple flagellar motors. Each motor spins either clockwise or counterclockwise, under the control of an intracellular regulator, CheY-P. A long standing question is whether these motors work independently or not. There can be two mechanisms (extrinsic and intrinsic) to coordinate the switching of bacterial motors. The extrinsic one arises from the fact that different motors in the same cell sense a common biochemical signal (CheY-P) which fluctuates near the motors' response threshold. An alternative, intrinsic mechanism is direct motor-motor coupling which makes synchronized switching energetically favorable. Here, we develop simple models for both mechanisms and uncover their different hallmarks. A quantitative comparison to the recent experiments suggest that the direct coupling mechanism may be accountable for the observed sharp correlation between motors in a single E. coli. Possible origins of this coupling are discussed. This research is supported by the NIH Grant GM081747

  8. High hydrostatic pressure induces counterclockwise to clockwise reversals of the Escherichia coli flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Kimura, Yoshifumi; Homma, Michio; Ishijima, Akihiko; Terazima, Masahide

    2013-04-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a reversible rotary machine that rotates a left-handed helical filament, allowing bacteria to swim toward a more favorable environment. The direction of rotation reverses from counterclockwise (CCW) to clockwise (CW), and vice versa, in response to input from the chemotaxis signaling circuit. CW rotation is normally caused by binding of the phosphorylated response regulator CheY (CheY-P), and strains lacking CheY are typically locked in CCW rotation. The detailed mechanism of switching remains unresolved because it is technically difficult to regulate the level of CheY-P within the concentration range that produces flagellar reversals. Here, we demonstrate that high hydrostatic pressure can induce CW rotation even in the absence of CheY-P. The rotation of single flagellar motors in Escherichia coli cells with the cheY gene deleted was monitored at various pressures and temperatures. Application of >120 MPa pressure induced a reversal from CCW to CW at 20°C, although at that temperature, no motor rotated CW at ambient pressure (0.1 MPa). At lower temperatures, pressure-induced changes in direction were observed at pressures of <120 MPa. CW rotation increased with pressure in a sigmoidal fashion, as it does in response to increasing concentrations of CheY-P. Application of pressure generally promotes the formation of clusters of ordered water molecules on the surfaces of proteins. It is possible that hydration of the switch complex at high pressure induces structural changes similar to those caused by the binding of CheY-P. PMID:23417485

  9. DNA sequence analysis, gene product identification, and localization of flagellar motor components of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Malakooti, J; Komeda, Y; Matsumura, P

    1989-01-01

    The Escherichia coli operon designated flaA contains seven flagellar genes; among them are two switch protein genes whose products are believed to interface with the motility and chemotaxis machinery of the cell. Complementation analysis using several plasmids carrying different portions of the flaA operon and analysis of expression of these plasmids in minicells allowed the identification of two flagellar gene products. The MotD (now called FliN) protein, a flagellar switch protein, was determined to have an apparent molecular weight of 16,000, and the FlaAI (FliL) protein, encoded by a previously unidentified gene, had an apparent molecular weight of 17,000. DNA sequence analysis of the motD gene revealed an open reading frame of 414 base pairs. There were two possible initiation codons (ATG) for motD translation, the first of which overlapped with the termination codon of the upstream gene, flaAII (fliN). The wild-type flaAI gene on the chromosome was replaced with a flaAI gene mutated in vitro. Loss of the flaAI gene product resulted in a nonmotile and nonflagellated phenotype. The subcellular location for both the MotD and FlaAI proteins was determined; the FlaAI protein partitioned exclusively in the insoluble fraction of a whole minicell sonic extract, whereas the MotD protein remained in both the soluble and insoluble fractions. In addition, we subcloned a 2.2-kilobase-pair DNA fragment capable of complementing the remaining four genes of the flaA operon (flbD [fliO], flaR [fliP], flaQ [fliQ], and flaP [fliR]). Images PMID:2651416

  10. DksA and ppGpp Directly Regulate Transcription of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Justin J.; Durfee, Tim; Gourse, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    The components of the Escherichia coli flagella apparatus are synthesized in a three-level transcriptional cascade activated by the master regulator FlhDC. The cascade coordinates the synthesis rates of a large number of gene products with each other and with nutritional conditions. Recent genome-wide studies have reported that flagellar transcription is altered in cells lacking the transcription regulators DksA or ppGpp, but some or all reported effects could be indirect, and some are contradictory. We report here that the activities of promoters at all three levels of the cascade are much higher in strains lacking dksA, resulting in overproduction of flagellin and hyperflagellated cells. In vitro, DksA/ppGpp inhibits the flhDC promoter and the σ70-dependent fliA promoter transcribing the gene for σ28. However, DksA and ppGpp do not affect the σ28-dependent fliA promoter or the σ28-dependent fliC promoter in vitro, suggesting that the dramatic effects on expression of those genes in vivo are mediated indirectly through direct effects of DksA/ppGpp on FlhDC and σ28 expression. We conclude that DksA/ppGpp inhibits expression of the flagellar cascade during stationary phase and following starvation, thereby coordinating flagella and ribosome assembly and preventing expenditure of scarce energy resources on synthesis of two of the cell’s largest macromolecular complexes. PMID:19889089

  11. Fluctuations in rotation rate of the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kara-Ivanov, M; Eisenbach, M; Caplan, S R

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the changes in rotation rate of the bacterial motor and to try to discriminate between various sources of these changes with the aim of understanding the mechanism of force generation better. To this end Escherichia coli cells were tethered and videotaped with brief stroboscopic light flashes. The records were scanned by means of a computerized motion analysis system, yielding cell size, radius of rotation, and accumulated angle of rotation as functions of time for each cell selected. In conformity with previous studies, fluctuations in the rotation rate of the flagellar motor were invariably found. Employing an exclusively counterclockwise rotating mutant ("gutted" RP1091 strain) and using power spectral density, autocorrelation and residual mean square angle analysis, we found that a simple superposition of rotational diffusion on a steady rotary motion is insufficient to describe the observed rotation. We observed two additional rotational components, one fluctuating (0.04-0.6 s) and one oscillating (0.8-7 s). However, the effective rotational diffusion coefficient obtained after taking these two components into account generally exceeded that calculated from external friction by two orders of magnitude. This is consistent with a model incorporating association and dissociation of force-generating units. PMID:7669902

  12. Estimation of the adhesive force distribution for the flagellar adhesion of Escherichia coli on a glass surface.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Akinori; Nobuhira, Noritaka; Narahara, Hisaya; Toyoda, Syunsuke; Tokumoto, Hayato; Konishi, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Toshiyuki

    2015-07-01

    The effects of the presence or absence of microbial flagella and the microbial motility on the colloidal behaviors of microbial cells were quantitatively evaluated. The microbial cell attachment and detachment processes on a glass surface were observed directly using a parallel-plate flow chamber. Wild-type, flagellar paralyzed, and nonflagellated Escherichia coli strains were used as model microbial cells. In the cell attachment tests, the microbial adhesion rate in a 160mM NaCl solution was approximately 10 times higher than that in a 10mM solution, for all E. coli strains. The colloidal behavior of the microbial cells agreed well with the predictions of the DLVO theory. In addition, the microbial flagella and motility did not significantly affect the cell attachment, regardless of the existence of a potential barrier between the cell and the glass substratum. In the cell detachment tests, the cumulative number of microbial cells detached from the glass substratum with increasing flow rate was fit well with the Weibull distribution function. The list of strains arranged in order of increasing median drag force required to remove them was nonflagellated strain, flagellar paralyzed strain, and wild-type strain. These results indicated that the flagella and the flagellar motility inhibited the cell detachment from the glass substratum. Furthermore, a large external force would likely be required to inhibit the microbial adhesion in the early stage of the biofilm formation. PMID:25956746

  13. Cloning, expression and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of Helicobacter pylori in Escherichia coli host as a vaccination target

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Helicobacter pylori is a widely distributed gram-negative bacterium that infects the human stomach and duodenum. HpaA is a H. pylori–specific lipoprotein that has been shown to be an effective protective antigen against H. pylori infection. HpaA of H. pylori as a vaccine antigen is fully competent for stimulation of immune responses. The aim of this project is cloning, expression, and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of H. pylori in Escherichia coli host by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) as a vaccination target. Materials and Methods The hpaA gene was inserted into pET28a (+) as cloning and expression vectors respectively. The recombinant plasmid (pET-hpaA) was subjected to sequencing other than polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and digestion analysis. Protein expression was induced by adding 1 mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside to cultures of E. coli strain BL21 transformed with pET-hpaA. Protein expression assessed with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis. Protein purification of flagellar sheath adhesion was by FPLC. Results The restriction endonuclease digestion, PCR amplification analysis showed that the hpaA gene of 730 bp was amplified from H. pylori DNA and sequencing analysis of the pET-hpaA confirmed the cloning accuracy and in frame insertion of hpaA fragment. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the expression of an approximately 29,000 Da protein. Conclusion Sequencing results along with SDS-PAGE analysis confirms the expression of recombinant hpaA in the heterologous E. coli BL21. Conclusion A prokaryotic expression system for hpaA gene was successfully constructed. These results indicate that production of a specific recombinant protein is an alternative and potentially more expeditious strategy for development of H. pylori vaccine. PMID:26866020

  14. pH regulates genes for flagellar motility, catabolism, and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Lisa M; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Bondurant, Sandra S; Radmacher, Michael; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of Escherichia coli K-12 W3110 were compared as a function of steady-state external pH. Cultures were grown to an optical density at 600 nm of 0.3 in potassium-modified Luria-Bertani medium buffered at pH 5.0, 7.0, and 8.7. For each of the three pH conditions, cDNA from RNA of five independent cultures was hybridized to Affymetrix E. coli arrays. Analysis of variance with an alpha level of 0.001 resulted in 98% power to detect genes showing a twofold difference in expression. Normalized expression indices were calculated for each gene and intergenic region (IG). Differential expression among the three pH classes was observed for 763 genes and 353 IGs. Hierarchical clustering yielded six well-defined clusters of pH profiles, designated Acid High (highest expression at pH 5.0), Acid Low (lowest expression at pH 5.0), Base High (highest at pH 8.7), Base Low (lowest at pH 8.7), Neutral High (highest at pH 7.0, lower in acid or base), and Neutral Low (lowest at pH 7.0, higher at both pH extremes). Flagellar and chemotaxis genes were repressed at pH 8.7 (Base Low cluster), where the cell's transmembrane proton potential is diminished by the maintenance of an inverted pH gradient. High pH also repressed the proton pumps cytochrome o (cyo) and NADH dehydrogenases I and II. By contrast, the proton-importing ATP synthase F1Fo and the microaerophilic cytochrome d (cyd), which minimizes proton export, were induced at pH 8.7. These observations are consistent with a model in which high pH represses synthesis of flagella, which expend proton motive force, while stepping up electron transport and ATPase components that keep protons inside the cell. Acid-induced genes, on the other hand, were coinduced by conditions associated with increased metabolic rate, such as oxidative stress. All six pH-dependent clusters included envelope and periplasmic proteins, which directly experience external pH. Overall, this study showed that (i) low pH accelerates acid

  15. CheY’s acetylation sites responsible for generating clockwise flagellar rotation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fraiberg, Milana; Afanzar, Oshri; Cassidy, C. Keith; Gabashvili, Alexandra; Schulten, Klaus; Levin, Yishai; Eisenbach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stimulation of Escherichia coli with acetate elevates the acetylation level of the chemotaxis response regulator CheY. This elevation, in an unknown mechanism, activates CheY to generate clockwise rotation. Here, using quantitative selective reaction monitoring mass spectrometry and high-resolution targeted mass spectrometry, we identified K91 and K109 as the major sites whose acetylation level in vivo increases in response to acetate. Employing single and multiple lysine replacements in CheY, we found that K91 and K109 are also the sites mainly responsible for acetate-dependent clockwise generation. Furthermore, we showed that clockwise rotation is repressed when residue K91 is non-modified, as evidenced by an increased ability of CheY to generate clockwise rotation when K91 was acetylated or replaced by specific amino acids. Using molecular dynamics simulations we show that K91 repression is manifested in the conformational dynamics of the β4α4 loop, shifted towards an active state upon mutation. Removal of β4α4 loop repression may represent a general activation mechanism in CheY, pertaining also to the canonical phosphorylation activation pathway as suggested by crystal structures of active and inactive CheY from Thermotoga maritima. By way of elimination we further suggest that K109 acetylation is actively involved in generating clockwise rotation. PMID:25388160

  16. Genetic Analysis and Detection of fliCH1 and fliCH12 Genes Coding for Serologically Closely Related Flagellar Antigens in Human and Animal Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The E. coli flagellar types H1 and H12 show a high serological cross-reactivity and molecular serotyping appears an advantageous method to establish a clear discrimination between these flagellar types. Analysis of fliCH1 and fliCH12 gene sequences showed that they were 97.5% identical at the nucleotide level. Because of this high degree of homology we developed a two-step real-time PCR detection procedure for reliable discrimination of H1 and H12 flagellar types in E. coli. In the first step, a real-time PCR assay for common detection of both fliCH1 and fliCH12 genes is used, followed in a second step by real-time PCR assays for specific detection of fliCH1 and fliCH12, respectively. The real-time PCR for common detection of fliCH1 and fliCH12 demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity as it reacted with all tested E. coli H1 and H12 strains and not with any of the reference strains encoding all the other 51 flagellar antigens. The fliCH1 and fliCH12 gene specific assays detected all E. coli H1 and all E. coli H12 strains, respectively (100% sensitivity). However, both assays showed cross-reactions with some flagellar type reference strains different from H1 and H12. The real-time PCR assays developed in this study can be used in combination for the detection and identification of E. coli H1 and H12 strains isolated from different sources. PMID:26913025

  17. Repression of Flagellar Genes in Exponential Phase by CsgD and CpxR, Two Crucial Modulators of Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Dudin, Omaya; Geiselmann, Johannes; Ogasawara, Hiroshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli adapts its lifestyle to the variations of environmental growth conditions, swapping between swimming motility or biofilm formation. The stationary-phase sigma factor RpoS is an important regulator of this switch, since it stimulates adhesion and represses flagellar biosynthesis. By measuring the dynamics of gene expression, we show that RpoS inhibits the transcription of the flagellar sigma factor, FliA, in exponential growth phase. RpoS also partially controls the expression of CsgD and CpxR, two transcription factors important for bacterial adhesion. We demonstrate that these two regulators repress the transcription of fliA, flgM, and tar and that this regulation is dependent on the growth medium. CsgD binds to the flgM and fliA promoters around their −10 promoter element, strongly suggesting direct repression. We show that CsgD and CpxR also affect the expression of other known modulators of cell motility. We propose an updated structure of the regulatory network controlling the choice between adhesion and motility. PMID:24272779

  18. An Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 missense mutant colonizes the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine better than the wild type but is not a better probiotic.

    PubMed

    Adediran, Jimmy; Leatham-Jensen, Mary P; Mokszycki, Matthew E; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Krogfelt, Karen A; Kazmierczak, Krystyna; Kenney, Linda J; Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2014-02-01

    Previously we reported that the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine selected for two different Escherichia coli MG1655 mutants with improved colonizing ability: nonmotile E. coli MG1655 flhDC deletion mutants that grew 15% faster in vitro in mouse cecal mucus and motile E. coli MG1655 envZ missense mutants that grew slower in vitro in mouse cecal mucus yet were able to cocolonize with the faster-growing flhDC mutants. The E. coli MG1655 envZ gene encodes a histidine kinase that is a member of the envZ-ompR two-component signal transduction system, which regulates outer membrane protein profiles. In the present investigation, the envZP41L gene was transferred from the intestinally selected E. coli MG1655 mutant to E. coli Nissle 1917, a human probiotic strain used to treat gastrointestinal infections. Both the E. coli MG1655 and E. coli Nissle 1917 strains containing envZP41L produced more phosphorylated OmpR than their parents. The E. coli Nissle 1917 strain containing envZP41L also became more resistant to bile salts and colicin V and grew 50% slower in vitro in mucus and 15% to 30% slower on several sugars present in mucus, yet it was a 10-fold better colonizer than E. coli Nissle 1917. However, E. coli Nissle 1917 envZP41L was not better at preventing colonization by enterohemorrhagic E. coli EDL933. The data can be explained according to our "restaurant" hypothesis for commensal E. coli strains, i.e., that they colonize the intestine as sessile members of mixed biofilms, obtaining the sugars they need for growth locally, but compete for sugars with invading E. coli pathogens planktonically. PMID:24478082

  19. Novel Single-Tube Agar-Based Test System for Motility Enhancement and Immunocapture of Escherichia coli O157:H7 by H7 Flagellar Antigen-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Murinda, Shelton E.; Nguyen, Lien T.; Ivey, Susan J.; Almeida, Raul A.; Oliver, Stephen P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a novel single-tube agar-based technique for motility enhancement and immunoimmobilization of Escherichia coli O157:H7. Motility indole ornithine medium and agar (0.4%, wt/vol) media containing either nutrient broth, tryptone broth, or tryptic soy broth (TSBA) were evaluated for their abilities to enhance bacterial motility. Twenty-six E. coli strains, including 19 O157:H7 strains, 1 O157:H− strain, and 6 generic E. coli strains, were evaluated. Test bacteria were stab inoculated in the center of the agar column, and tubes were incubated at 37°C for 18 to 96 h. Nineteen to 24 of the 26 test strains (73.1 to 92.3%) were motile in the different media. TSBA medium performed best and was employed in subsequent studies of motility enhancement and H7 flagellar immunocapture. H7 flagellar antiserum (30 and 60 μl) mixed with TSBA was placed as a band (1 ml) in the middle of an agar column separating the top (3-ml) and bottom (3-ml) agar layers. The top agar layer was inoculated with the test bacterial strains. The tubes were incubated at 37°C for 12 to 18 h and for 18 to 96 h. The specificity and sensitivity of the H7 flagellar immunocapture tests were 75 and 100%, respectively. The procedure described is simple and sensitive and could be adapted easily for routine use in laboratories that do not have sophisticated equipment and resources for confirming the presence of H7 flagellar antigens. Accurate and rapid identification of H7 flagellar antigen is critical for the complete characterization of E. coli O157:H7, owing to the immense clinical, public health, and economic significance of this food-borne pathogen. PMID:12454173

  20. Roles of cheY and cheZ gene products in controlling flagellar rotation in bacterial chemotaxis of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, S C; Koshland, D E

    1987-01-01

    To understand output control in bacterial chemotaxis, we varied the levels of expression of cellular cheY and cheZ genes and found that the overproduction of the corresponding proteins affected Escherichia coli swimming behavior. In the absence of other signal-transducing gene products, CheY overproduction made free-swimming cells tumble more frequently. A plot of the fraction of the population that are tumbling versus the CheY concentration was hyperbolic, with half of the population tumbling at 30 microM (25,000 copies per cell) CheY monomers in the cytosol. Overproduction of aspartate receptor (Tar) by 30-fold had a negligible effect on CheY-induced tumbling, so Tar does not sequester CheY. CheZ overproduction decreased tumbling in all tumbling mutants except certain flaAII(cheC) mutants. In the absence of other chemotaxis gene products, CheZ overproduction inhibited CheY-induced tumbling. Models for CheY as a tumbling signal and CheZ as a smooth-swimming signal to control flagellar rotation are discussed. Images PMID:3546269

  1. The Escherichia coli O157 Flagellar Regulatory Gene flhC and Not the Flagellin Gene fliC Impacts Colonization of Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Dobbin, Heather S.; Hovde, Carolyn J.; Williams, Christopher J.; Minnich, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    A virulent European Escherichia coli O157:H− isolate is nonmotile due to a 12-bp deletion in the flagellar regulatory gene flhC. To investigate the contribution of flhC in the relationship between E. coli O157:H7 and cattle, we constructed a similar flhC regulatory mutant in the well-characterized strain ATCC 43894. There was no difference in the growth rate between the wild type and this regulatory mutant, but phenotypic arrays showed substrate utilization differences. Survival in the bovine gastrointestinal tract and colonization of the rectoanal junction mucosa were assessed. Mixtures of both strains were given orally or rectally to steers or administered into the rumen of cattle dually cannulated at the rumen and duodenum. One day post-oral dose, most rectal/fecal isolates (74%) were the regulatory mutant, but by 3 days post-oral dose and throughout the 42-day experiment, ≥80% of the isolates were wild type. Among steers given a rectal application of both strains, wild-type isolates were the majority of isolates recovered on all days. The regulatory mutant survived better than the wild type in both the rumen and duodenum. To test the role of motility, a filament mutant (ΔfliC) was constructed and similar cattle experiments were performed. On all days post-oral dose, the majority of isolates (64% to 98%) were the filament mutant. In contrast, both strains were recovered equally post-rectal application. Thus, the regulatory mutant survived passage through the bovine gastrointestinal tract better than the wild type but failed to efficiently colonize cattle, and the requirement of flhC for colonization was not dependent on a functional flagellum. PMID:16622228

  2. Cells of Escherichia coli are protected against severe chemical stress by co-habiting cell aggregates formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Jagmann, Nina; Henke, Sebastian Franz; Philipp, Bodo

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial cells within biofilms and cell aggregates show increased resistance against chemical stress compared with suspended cells. It is not known whether bacteria that co-habit biofilms formed by other bacteria also acquire such resistance. This scenario was investigated in a proof-of-principle experiment with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 as cell aggregate-forming bacterium and Escherichia coli strain MG1655 as potential co-habiting bacterium equipped with an inducible bioluminescence system. Cell aggregation of strain PAO1 can be induced by the toxic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). In single cultures of strain MG1655, bioluminescence was inhibited by the protonophor carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) but the cells were still viable. By applying CCCP and SDS together, cells of strain MG1655 lost their bioluminescence and viability indicating the importance of energy-dependent resistance mechanisms against SDS. In co-suspensions with strain PAO1, bioluminescence of strain MG1655 was sustained in the presence of SDS and CCCP. Image analysis showed that bioluminescent cells were located in cell aggregates formed by strain PAO1. Thus, cells of strain MG1655 that co-habited cell aggregates formed by strain PAO1 were protected against a severe chemical stress that was lethal to them in single cultures. Co-habiting could lead to increased survival of pathogens in clinical settings and could be employed in biotechnological applications involving toxic milieus. PMID:26066844

  3. Reversal of flagellar rotation is important in initial attachment of Escherichia coli to glass in a dynamic system with high- and low-ionic-strength buffers.

    PubMed

    McClaine, Jennifer W; Ford, Roseanne M

    2002-03-01

    The attachment rates of wild-type, smooth-swimming, tumbly, and paralyzed Escherichia coli to glass was measured at fluid velocities of 0.0044 and 0.044 cms(-1) (corresponding to shear rates of 0.34 and 3.4 s(-1), respectively), in 0.02 and 0.2 M buffer solutions. At the highest ionic strength, we did not observe a significant difference in the attachment rate of wild-type and paralyzed cells at either fluid velocity. However, when the ionic strength was reduced, paralyzed bacteria attached at rates 4 and 10 times lower than that of the wild type under fluid velocities of 0.0044 and 0.044 cms(-1), respectively. This suggested that the rotation of the flagella assisted in attachment. We then compared the attachment rates of smooth-swimming (counterclockwise rotation only) and tumbly (clockwise rotation only) cells to the wild type to determine whether the direction of rotation was important to cell attachment. At 0.0044 cms(-1), the smooth-swimming cells attached at rates similar to that of the wild type in both buffer solutions but significantly less at the higher fluid velocity. Tumbly cells attached at much lower rates under all conditions. Thus, the combination of clockwise and counterclockwise flagellar rotation and their coupling appeared to be important in cell attachment. We considered a number of hypotheses to interpret these observations, including a residence time analysis and a comparison of traditional Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory to soft-particle theory. PMID:11872478

  4. Sequence Variations in the Flagellar Antigen Genes fliCH25 and fliCH28 of Escherichia coli and Their Use in Identification and Characterization of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O145:H25 and O145:H28

    PubMed Central

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) serogroup O145 is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. EHEC O145 encompasses motile and non-motile strains of serotypes O145:H25 and O145:H28. Sequencing the fliC-genes associated with the flagellar antigens H25 and H28 revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH25 and fliCH28 gene sequences in E. coli. Based on allele discrimination of these fliC-genes real-time PCR tests were designed for identification of EHEC O145:H25 and O145:H28. The fliCH25 genes present in O145:H25 were found to be very similar to those present in E. coli serogroups O2, O100, O165, O172 and O177 pointing to their common evolution but were different from fliCH25 genes of a multiple number of other E. coli serotypes. In a similar way, EHEC O145:H28 harbor a characteristic fliCH28 allele which, apart from EHEC O145:H28, was only found in enteropathogenic (EPEC) O28:H28 strains that shared some common traits with EHEC O145:H28. The real time PCR-assays targeting these fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] alleles allow better characterization of EHEC O145:H25 and EHEC O145:H28. Evaluation of these PCR assays in spiked ready-to eat salad samples resulted in specific detection of both types of EHEC O145 strains even when low spiking levels of 1–10 cfu/g were used. Furthermore these PCR assays allowed identification of non-motile E. coli strains which are serologically not typable for their H-antigens. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O145wzy) and detection of the respective fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] allele types contributes to improve identification and molecular serotyping of E. coli O145 isolates. PMID:26000885

  5. Genetic Diversity of the fliC Genes Encoding the Flagellar Antigen H19 of Escherichia coli and Application to the Specific Identification of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli O121:H19

    PubMed Central

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O121:H19 belong to a specific clonal type distinct from other classical EHEC and major enteropathogenic E. coli groups and is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. Sequencing of the fliC genes associated with the flagellar antigen H19 (fliCH19) revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH19 gene sequences in E. coli. A cluster analysis of 12 fliCH19 sequences, 4 from O121 and 8 from non-O121 E. coli strains, revealed five different genotypes. All O121:H19 strains fell into one cluster, whereas a second cluster was formed by five non-O121:H19 strains. Cluster 1 and cluster 2 strains differ by 27 single nucleotide exchanges in their fliCH19 genes (98.5% homology). Based on allele discrimination of the fliCH19 genes, a real-time PCR test was designed for specific identification of EHEC O121:H19. The O121 fliCH19 PCR tested negative in 73 E. coli H19 strains that belonged to serogroups other than O121, including 28 different O groups, O-nontypeable H19, and O-rough:H19 strains. The O121 fliCH19 PCR reacted with all 16 tested O121:H19 strains and 1 O-rough:H19 strain which was positive for the O121 wzx gene. A cross-reaction was observed only with E. coli H32 strains which share sequence similarities in the target region of the O121 fliCH19 PCR. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O121 wzx) and the detection of O121 fliCH19 allele type contributes to improving the identification and molecular serotyping of EHEC O121:H19 motile and nonmotile strains and variants of these strains lacking stx genes. PMID:25862232

  6. Adaptation of Escherichia coli to elevated sodium concentrations increases cation tolerance and enables greater lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianghao; Altman, Ronni; Eiteman, Mark A; Altman, Elliot

    2014-05-01

    Adaptive evolution was employed to generate sodium (Na(+))-tolerant mutants of Escherichia coli MG1655. Four mutants with elevated sodium tolerance, designated ALS1184, ALS1185, ALS1186, and ALS1187, were independently isolated after 73 days of serial transfer in medium containing progressively greater Na(+) concentrations. The isolates also showed increased tolerance of K(+), although this cation was not used for selective pressure. None of the adapted mutants showed increased tolerance to the nonionic osmolyte sucrose. Several physiological parameters of E. coli MG1655 and ALS1187, the isolate with the greatest Na(+) tolerance, were calculated and compared using glucose-limited chemostats. Genome sequencing showed that the ALS1187 isolate contained mutations in five genes, emrR, hfq, kil, rpsG, and sspA, all of which could potentially affect the ability of E. coli to tolerate Na(+). Two of these genes, hfq and sspA, are known to be involved in global regulatory processes that help cells endure a variety of cellular stresses. Pyruvate formate lyase knockouts were constructed in strains MG1655 and ALS1187 to determine whether increased Na(+) tolerance afforded increased anaerobic generation of lactate. In fed-batch fermentations, E. coli ALS1187 pflB generated 76.2 g/liter lactate compared to MG1655 pflB, which generated only 56.3 g/liter lactate. PMID:24584246

  7. Hydrodynamic interaction of bacterial flagella - flagellar bundling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sookkyung

    2013-11-01

    Flagellar bundling is an important aspect of locomotion in bacteria such as Escherichia coli. To study the hydrodynamic behavior of helical flagella, we present a computational model that is based on the geometry of the bacterial flagellar filament at the micrometer scale. We consider two model flagella, each of which has a rotary motor at its base with the rotation rate of the motor set at 100 Hz. Bundling occurs when both flagella are left-handed helices turning counterclockwise (when viewed from the nonmotor end of the flagellum looking back toward the motor) or when both flagella are right-handed helices turning clockwise. Helical flagella of the other combinations of handedness and rotation direction do not bundle. In this work we use the generalized immersed boundary method combined with the unconstrained Kirchhoff rod theory, which allows us to study the complicated hydrodynamics of flagellar behavior. This is a joint work with Charlie Peskin at NYU. NSF

  8. Influence of cyclopropane fatty acids on heat, high pressure, acid and oxidative resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan Yao; Gänzle, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Heat and high pressure resistant strains of Escherichia coli are a challenge to food safety. This study investigated effects of cyclopropane fatty acids (CFAs) on stress tolerance in the heat- and pressure-resistant strain E. coli AW1.7 and the sensitive strain E. coli MG1655. The role of CFAs was explored by disruption of cfa coding for CFA synthase with an in-frame, unmarked deletion method. Both wild-type strains consumed all the unsaturated fatty acids (C16:1 and C18:1) that were mostly converted to CFAs and a low proportion to saturated fatty acid (C16:0). Moreover, E. coli AW1.7 contained a higher proportion of membrane C19:0 cyclopropane fatty acid than E. coli MG1655 (P<0.05). The Δcfa mutant strains did not produce CFAs, and the corresponding substrates C16:1 and C18:1 accumulated in membrane lipids. The deletion of cfa did not alter resistance to H2O2 but increased the lethality of heat, high pressure and acid treatments in E. coli AW1.7, and E. coli MG1655. E. coli AW1.7 and its Δcfa mutant were more resistant to pressure and heat but less resistant to acid stress than E. coli MG1655. Heat resistance of wild-type strains and their Δcfa mutant was also assessed in beef patties grilled to an internal temperature of 71 °C. After treatment, cell counts of wild type strains were higher than those of the Δcfa mutant strains. In conclusion, CFA synthesis in E. coli increases heat, high pressure and acid resistance, and increases heat resistance in food. This knowledge on mechanisms of stress resistance will facilitate the design of intervention methods for improved pathogen control in food production. PMID:26828814

  9. Protective role of E. coli outer membrane vesicles against antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Heramb M; Nagaraj, R; Jagannadham, Medicharla V

    2015-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from bacteria are known to posses both defensive and protective functions and thus participate in community related functions. In the present study, outer membrane vesicles have been shown to protect the producer bacterium and two other bacterial species from the growth inhibitory effects of some antibiotics. The OMVs isolated from E. coli MG1655 protected the bacteria against membrane-active antibiotics colistin, melittin. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 could also protect P. aeruginosa NCTC6751 and A. radiodioresistens MMC5 against these membrane-active antibiotics. However, OMVs could not protect any of these bacteria against the other antibiotics ciprofloxacin, streptomycin and trimethoprim. Hence, OMVs appears to protect the bacterial community against membrane-active antibiotics and not other antibiotics, which have different mechanism of actions. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 sequester the antibiotic colistin, whereas their protein components degrade the antimicrobial peptide melittin. Proteomic analysis of OMVs revealed the presence of proteases and peptidases which appear to be involved in this process. Thus, the protection of bacteria by OMVs against antibiotics is situation dependent and the mechanism differs for different situations. These studies suggest that OMVs of bacteria form a common defense for the bacterial community against specific antibiotics. PMID:26640046

  10. Flagellar flows around bacterial swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauparas, Justas; Lauga, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Flagellated bacteria on nutrient-rich substrates can differentiate into a swarming state and move in dense swarms across surfaces. A recent experiment measured the flow in the fluid around an Escherichia coli swarm [Wu, Hosu, and Berg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 4147 (2011)], 10.1073/pnas.1016693108. A systematic chiral flow was observed in the clockwise direction (when viewed from above) ahead of the swarm with flow speeds of about 10 μ m /s , about 3 times greater than the radial velocity at the edge of the swarm. The working hypothesis is that this flow is due to the action of cells stalled at the edge of a colony that extend their flagellar filaments outward, moving fluid over the virgin agar. In this work we quantitatively test this hypothesis. We first build an analytical model of the flow induced by a single flagellum in a thin film and then use the model, and its extension to multiple flagella, to compare with experimental measurements. The results we obtain are in agreement with the flagellar hypothesis. The model provides further quantitative insight into the flagella orientations and their spatial distributions as well as the tangential speed profile. In particular, the model suggests that flagella are on average pointing radially out of the swarm and are not wrapped tangentially.

  11. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response of Chemostat-Cultured Escherichia coli to Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lucy J.; Barrett, Jason A.; Poole, Robert K.

    2005-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace metal ion for growth, but an excess of Zn is toxic and microorganisms express diverse resistance mechanisms. To understand global bacterial responses to excess Zn, we conducted transcriptome profiling experiments comparing Escherichia coli MG1655 grown under control conditions and cells grown with a toxic, sublethal ZnSO4 concentration (0.2 mM). Cultures were grown in a defined medium lacking inorganic phosphate, permitting maximum Zn bioavailability, and in glycerol-limited chemostats at a constant growth rate and pH. Sixty-four genes were significantly up-regulated by Zn stress, including genes known to be involved in Zn tolerance, particularly zntA, zraP, and hydG. Microarray transcriptome profiling was confirmed by real-time PCR determinations of cusF (involved in Ag and Cu efflux), ais (an Al-inducible gene), asr (encoding an acid shock-inducible periplasmic protein), cpxP (a periplasmic chaperone gene), and basR. Five up-regulated genes, basR and basS [encoding a sensor-regulator implicated in Salmonella in Fe(III) sensing and antibiotic resistance], fliM (flagellar synthesis), and ycdM and yibD (both with unknown functions), are important for growth resistance to zinc, since mutants with mutations in these genes exhibited zinc sensitivity in liquid media and on metal gradient plates. Fifty-eight genes were significantly down-regulated by Zn stress; notably, several of these genes were involved in protection against acid stress. Since the mdt operon (encoding a multidrug resistance pump) was also up-regulated, these findings have important implications for understanding not only Zn homeostasis but also how bacterial antibiotic resistance is modulated by metal ions. PMID:15659689

  12. Campylobacter jejuni Increases Flagellar Expression and Adhesion of Noninvasive Escherichia coli: Effects on Enterocytic Toll-Like Receptor 4 and CXCL-8 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Reti, Kristen L.; Tymensen, Lisa D.; Davis, Shevaun P.; Amrein, Matthias W.

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterium-induced gastroenteritis, and while typically self-limiting, C. jejuni infections are associated with postinfectious intestinal disorders, including flares in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS), via mechanisms that remain obscure. Based on the hypothesis that acute campylobacteriosis may cause pathogenic microbiota dysbiosis, we investigated whether C. jejuni may activate dormant virulence genes in noninvasive Escherichia coli and examined the epithelial pathophysiological consequences of these alterations. Microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that E. coli adhesin, flagellum, and hemolysin gene expression were increased when E. coli was exposed to C. jejuni-conditioned medium. Increased development of bacterial flagella upon exposure to live C. jejuni or C. jejuni-conditioned medium was observed under transmission electron microscopy. Atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the forces of bacterial adhesion to colonic T84 enterocytes, and the work required to rupture this adhesion, were significantly increased in E. coli exposed to C. jejuni-conditioned media. Finally, C. jejuni-modified E. coli disrupted TLR4 gene expression and induced proinflammatory CXCL-8 gene expression in colonic enterocytes. Together, these data suggest that exposure to live C. jejuni, and/or to its secretory-excretory products, may activate latent virulence genes in noninvasive E. coli and that these alterations may directly trigger proinflammatory signaling in intestinal epithelia. These observations shed new light on mechanisms that may contribute, at least in part, to postcampylobacteriosis inflammatory disorders. PMID:26371123

  13. Campylobacter jejuni increases flagellar expression and adhesion of noninvasive Escherichia coli: effects on enterocytic Toll-like receptor 4 and CXCL-8 expression.

    PubMed

    Reti, Kristen L; Tymensen, Lisa D; Davis, Shevaun P; Amrein, Matthias W; Buret, Andre G

    2015-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterium-induced gastroenteritis, and while typically self-limiting, C. jejuni infections are associated with postinfectious intestinal disorders, including flares in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS), via mechanisms that remain obscure. Based on the hypothesis that acute campylobacteriosis may cause pathogenic microbiota dysbiosis, we investigated whether C. jejuni may activate dormant virulence genes in noninvasive Escherichia coli and examined the epithelial pathophysiological consequences of these alterations. Microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that E. coli adhesin, flagellum, and hemolysin gene expression were increased when E. coli was exposed to C. jejuni-conditioned medium. Increased development of bacterial flagella upon exposure to live C. jejuni or C. jejuni-conditioned medium was observed under transmission electron microscopy. Atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the forces of bacterial adhesion to colonic T84 enterocytes, and the work required to rupture this adhesion, were significantly increased in E. coli exposed to C. jejuni-conditioned media. Finally, C. jejuni-modified E. coli disrupted TLR4 gene expression and induced proinflammatory CXCL-8 gene expression in colonic enterocytes. Together, these data suggest that exposure to live C. jejuni, and/or to its secretory-excretory products, may activate latent virulence genes in noninvasive E. coli and that these alterations may directly trigger proinflammatory signaling in intestinal epithelia. These observations shed new light on mechanisms that may contribute, at least in part, to postcampylobacteriosis inflammatory disorders. PMID:26371123

  14. Evolution of Escherichia coli to 42 °C and subsequent genetic engineering reveals adaptive mechanisms and novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Troy E; Pedersen, Margit; LaCroix, Ryan A; Ebrahim, Ali; Bonde, Mads; Herrgard, Markus J; Palsson, Bernhard O; Sommer, Morten; Feist, Adam M

    2014-10-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) has emerged as a valuable method by which to investigate microbial adaptation to a desired environment. Here, we performed ALE to 42 °C of ten parallel populations of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 grown in glucose minimal media. Tightly controlled experimental conditions allowed selection based on exponential-phase growth rate, yielding strains that uniformly converged toward a similar phenotype along distinct genetic paths. Adapted strains possessed as few as 6 and as many as 55 mutations, and of the 144 genes that mutated in total, 14 arose independently across two or more strains. This mutational recurrence pointed to the key genetic targets underlying the evolved fitness increase. Genome engineering was used to introduce the novel ALE-acquired alleles in random combinations into the ancestral strain, and competition between these engineered strains reaffirmed the impact of the key mutations on the growth rate at 42 °C. Interestingly, most of the identified key gene targets differed significantly from those found in similar temperature adaptation studies, highlighting the sensitivity of genetic evolution to experimental conditions and ancestral genotype. Additionally, transcriptomic analysis of the ancestral and evolved strains revealed a general trend for restoration of the global expression state back toward preheat stressed levels. This restorative effect was previously documented following evolution to metabolic perturbations, and thus may represent a general feature of ALE experiments. The widespread evolved expression shifts were enabled by a comparatively scant number of regulatory mutations, providing a net fitness benefit but causing suboptimal expression levels for certain genes, such as those governing flagellar formation, which then became targets for additional ameliorating mutations. Overall, the results of this study provide insight into the adaptation process and yield lessons important for the future

  15. Molecular Architecture of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The flagellum is one of the most sophisticated self-assembling molecular machines in bacteria. Powered by the proton-motive force, the flagellum rapidly rotates in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction, which ultimately controls bacterial motility and behavior. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica have served as important model systems for extensive genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of the flagellum, providing unparalleled insights into its structure, function, and gene regulation. Despite these advances, our understanding of flagellar assembly and rotational mechanisms remains incomplete, in part because of the limited structural information available regarding the intact rotor–stator complex and secretion apparatus. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) has become a valuable imaging technique capable of visualizing the intact flagellar motor in cells at molecular resolution. Because the resolution that can be achieved by cryo-ET with large bacteria (such as E. coli and S. enterica) is limited, analysis of small-diameter bacteria (including Borrelia burgdorferi and Campylobacter jejuni) can provide additional insights into the in situ structure of the flagellar motor and other cellular components. This review is focused on the application of cryo-ET, in combination with genetic and biophysical approaches, to the study of flagellar structures and its potential for improving the understanding of rotor–stator interactions, the rotational switching mechanism, and the secretion and assembly of flagellar components. PMID:24697492

  16. Optimisation of engineered Escherichia coli biofilms for enzymatic biosynthesis of l-halotryptophans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Engineered biofilms comprising a single recombinant species have demonstrated remarkable activity as novel biocatalysts for a range of applications. In this work, we focused on the biotransformation of 5-haloindole into 5-halotryptophan, a pharmaceutical intermediate, using Escherichia coli expressing a recombinant tryptophan synthase enzyme encoded by plasmid pSTB7. To optimise the reaction we compared two E. coli K-12 strains (MC4100 and MG1655) and their ompR234 mutants, which overproduce the adhesin curli (PHL644 and PHL628). The ompR234 mutation increased the quantity of biofilm in both MG1655 and MC4100 backgrounds. In all cases, no conversion of 5-haloindoles was observed using cells without the pSTB7 plasmid. Engineered biofilms of strains PHL628 pSTB7 and PHL644 pSTB7 generated more 5-halotryptophan than their corresponding planktonic cells. Flow cytometry revealed that the vast majority of cells were alive after 24 hour biotransformation reactions, both in planktonic and biofilm forms, suggesting that cell viability was not a major factor in the greater performance of biofilm reactions. Monitoring 5-haloindole depletion, 5-halotryptophan synthesis and the percentage conversion of the biotransformation reaction suggested that there were inherent differences between strains MG1655 and MC4100, and between planktonic and biofilm cells, in terms of tryptophan and indole metabolism and transport. The study has reinforced the need to thoroughly investigate bacterial physiology and make informed strain selections when developing biotransformation reactions. PMID:24188712

  17. Comparative reaction engineering studies for succinic acid production from sucrose by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli in fed-batch-operated stirred tank bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hoefel, Torben; Faust, Georg; Reinecke, Liv; Rudinger, Nicolas; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2012-10-01

    This study presents a comparative reaction engineering analysis of metabolically engineered sucrose-utilizing Escherichia coli derived from E. coli K12 MG1655 for the anaerobic production of succinic acid. Production capacities of 16 different recombinant strains were evaluated in 48 parallel fed-batch-operated milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactors (10 mL) with continuous CO₂ sparging. The effects of recombinant sucrose-utilization systems (csc-operon or scr-operon), enhancements of anaplerotic reactions (pck, ppc, maeA, maeB or heterologous pyc) and gene deletions (ldhA, adhE, ack-pta and ptsG) were studied with respect to the overall process performances of the respective recombinant strains. Both sucrose-utilization systems enabled the production of succinic acid from sucrose in E. coli K12 MG1655. Maximum succinate production was observed by overexpressing the pyruvate carboxylase from Corynebacterium glutamicum resulting in a succinate concentration of 26.8 g L⁻¹ after 48 h and a cell-specific productivity of 0.14 g g⁻¹ h⁻¹. Further experiments in a fed-batch-operated laboratory-scale stirred tank bioreactor (2 L) showed that micro-aerobic conditions preceding the anaerobic phase enhance succinic acid production of E. coli K12 MG1655-derived strains. The work demonstrates the importance of parallel approaches within the scope of applied metabolic engineering studies. PMID:22588847

  18. Flagellar motor based micro hybrid devices.

    PubMed

    Tung, S; Kim, J-W

    2004-01-01

    We are in the process of developing a series of micro hybrid devices based on tethered flagellar motors. Examples of the devices include a microfluidic pump and a micro AC dynamo. The microfluidic pump is realized through the tethering of a harmless strain of Escherichia coli cells to a MEMS based micro channel. Each E. coli cell is about 3 mum long and 1 mum in diameter, with several flagella that are driven at the base by molecular rotary motors. The operational principle of the micro pump is based on the viscous pumping effect where continuous rotation of the tethered cells forms a fluidic conveyor belt that 'drags' fluid from one end of the channel to the other. We used hydrodynamic loading to synchronize cell rotation in order to maximize the fluid pumping capability. The micro dynamo is realized through the integration of tethered flagellar motors with micro ferromagnetic beads and micro copper coils. The micro dynamo generates AC power by using the tethered cells to create a rotating magnetic field around the copper coils. Preliminary result indicates a high power density when compared to other biologically based micro power generators. PMID:17270806

  19. Determining the Relative Contribution and Hierarchy of hha and qseBC in the Regulation of Flagellar Motility of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay K.; Casey, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    In recent studies, we demonstrated that a deletion of hha caused increased secretion of locus of enterocyte encoded adherence proteins and reduced motility of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7. In addition to the importance of hha in positive regulation of motility, a two-component quorum sensing pathway encoded by the qseBC genes has been shown to activate bacterial motility in response to mammalian stress hormones epinephrine and norepinephrine as well as bacterially produced autoinducer-3. In this study, we compared regulatory contribution and hierarchy of hha, a member of the Hha/YmoA family of nucleoid-associated proteins, to that of qseBC in the expression of EHEC O157:H7 motility. Since norepinephrine affects motility of EHEC O157:H7 through a qseBC-encoded two-component quorum sensing signaling, we also determined whether the hha-mediated regulation of motility is affected by norepinephrine and whether this effect is qseBC dependent. We used single (Δhha or ΔqseC) and double (Δhha ΔqseC) deletion mutants to show that hha exerts a greater positive regulatory effect in comparison to qseBC on the expression of motility by EHEC O157:H7. We also show that Hha is hierarchically superior in transcriptional regulation of motility than QseBC because transcription of qseC was significantly reduced in the hha deletion mutant compared to that in the parental and the hha-complemented mutant strains. These results suggest that hha regulates motility of EHEC O157:H7 directly as well as indirectly by controlling the transcription of qseBC. PMID:24465756

  20. Reconstitution of flagellar sliding.

    PubMed

    Alper, Joshua; Geyer, Veikko; Mukundan, Vikram; Howard, Jonathon

    2013-01-01

    The motile structure within eukaryotic cilia and flagella is the axoneme. This structure typically consists of nine doublet microtubules arranged around a pair of singlet microtubules. The axoneme contains more than 650 different proteins that have structural, force-generating, and regulatory functions. Early studies on sea urchin sperm identified the force-generating components, the dynein motors. It was shown that dynein can slide adjacent doublet microtubules in the presence of ATP. How this sliding gives rise to the beating of the axoneme is still unknown. Reconstitution assays provide a clean system, free from cellular effects, to elucidate the underlying beating mechanisms. These assays can be used to identify the components that are both necessary and sufficient for the generation of flagellar beating. PMID:23498749

  1. Escherichia coli EDL933 requires gluconeogenic nutrients to successfully colonize the intestines of streptomycin-treated mice precolonized with E. coli Nissle 1917.

    PubMed

    Schinner, Silvia A C; Mokszycki, Matthew E; Adediran, Jimmy; Leatham-Jensen, Mary; Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2015-05-01

    Escherichia coli MG1655, a K-12 strain, uses glycolytic nutrients exclusively to colonize the intestines of streptomycin-treated mice when it is the only E. coli strain present or when it is confronted with E. coli EDL933, an O157:H7 strain. In contrast, E. coli EDL933 uses glycolytic nutrients exclusively when it is the only E. coli strain in the intestine but switches in part to gluconeogenic nutrients when it colonizes mice precolonized with E. coli MG1655 (R. L. Miranda et al., Infect Immun 72:1666-1676, 2004, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.72.3.1666-1676.2004). Recently, J. W. Njoroge et al. (mBio 3:e00280-12, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00280-12) reported that E. coli 86-24, an O157:H7 strain, activates the expression of virulence genes under gluconeogenic conditions, suggesting that colonization of the intestine with a probiotic E. coli strain that outcompetes O157:H7 strains for gluconeogenic nutrients could render them nonpathogenic. Here we report that E. coli Nissle 1917, a probiotic strain, uses both glycolytic and gluconeogenic nutrients to colonize the mouse intestine between 1 and 5 days postfeeding, appears to stop using gluconeogenic nutrients thereafter in a large, long-term colonization niche, but continues to use them in a smaller niche to compete with invading E. coli EDL933. Evidence is also presented suggesting that invading E. coli EDL933 uses both glycolytic and gluconeogenic nutrients and needs the ability to perform gluconeogenesis in order to colonize mice precolonized with E. coli Nissle 1917. The data presented here therefore rule out the possibility that E. coli Nissle 1917 can starve the O157:H7 E. coli strain EDL933 of gluconeogenic nutrients, even though E. coli Nissle 1917 uses such nutrients to compete with E. coli EDL933 in the mouse intestine. PMID:25733524

  2. Flagellar apparatus structure of choanoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Karpov, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    Phylum choanoflagellata is the nearest unicellular neighbor of metazoa at the phylogenetic tree. They are single celled or form the colonies, can be presented by naked cells or live in theca or lorica, but in all cases they have a flagellum surrounded by microvilli of the collar. They have rather uniform and peculiar flagellar apparatus structure with flagellar basal body (FB) producing a flagellum, and non-flagellar basal body (NFB) lying orthogonal to the FB. Long flagellar transition zone contains a unique structure among eukaryotes, the central filament, which connects central microtubules to the transversal plate. Both basal bodies are composed of triplets and interconnected with fibrillar bridge. They also contain the internal arc-shaped connectives between the triplets. The FB has prominent transitional fibers similar to those of chytrid zoospores and choanocytes of sponges, and a radial microtubular root system. The ring-shaped microtubule organizing center (MTOC) produces radial root microtubules, but in some species a MTOC is represented by separate foci. The NFB has a narrow fibrillar root directed towards the Golgi apparatus in association with membrane-bounded sac. Prior to cell division, the basal bodies replicate and migrate to poles of elongated nucleus. The basal bodies serve as MTOCs for the spindle microtubules during nuclear division by semiopen orthomitosis. PMID:27148446

  3. YbcL of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Suppresses Transepithelial Neutrophil Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Megan E.; Loughman, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains suppress the acute inflammatory response in the urinary tract to ensure access to the intracellular uroepithelial niche that supports the propagation of infection. Our understanding of this initial cross talk between host and pathogen is incomplete. Here we report the identification of a previously uncharacterized periplasmic protein, YbcL, encoded by UPEC that contributes to immune modulation in the urinary tract by suppressing acute neutrophil migration. In contrast to wild-type UPEC, an isogenic strain lacking ybcL expression (UTI89 ΔybcL) failed to suppress transepithelial polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) migration in vitro, a defect complemented by expressing ybcL episomally. YbcL homologs are present in many E. coli genomes; expression of the YbcL variant encoded by nonpathogenic E. coli K-12 strain MG1655 (YbcLMG) failed to complement the UTI89 ΔybcL defect, whereas expression of the UPEC YbcL variant (YbcLUTI) in MG1655 conferred the capacity for suppressing PMN migration. This phenotypic difference was due to a single amino acid difference (V78T) between the two YbcL homologs, and a majority of clinical UPEC strains examined were found to encode the suppressive YbcL variant. Purified YbcLUTI protein suppressed PMN migration in response to live or killed MG1655, and YbcLUTI was detected in the supernatant during UPEC infection of bladder epithelial cells or PMNs. Lastly, early PMN influx to murine bladder tissue was augmented upon in vivo infection with UTI89 ΔybcL compared with wild-type UPEC. Our findings demonstrate a role for UPEC YbcL in suppression of the innate immune response during urinary tract infection. PMID:22966043

  4. Long-Term Evolution Studies of E. Coli under Combined Effects of Simulated Microgravity and Antibiotic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouia, Fathi; Tirumalai, Madhan R.; Ott, Mark C.; Pierson, Duane L.; Fox, George E.; Tran, Quyen

    2016-07-01

    Multiple spaceflight and simulated microgravity experiments have shown changes in phenotypic microbial characteristics such as microbial growth, morphology, metabolism, genetic transfer, antibiotic and stress susceptibility, and an increase in virulence factors. However, while these studies have contributed to expand our understanding of the short-term effects of spaceflight or simulated microgravity on biological systems, it remains unclear the type of responses subsequent to long-term exposure to space environment and microgravity in particular. As such, organisms exposed to the space environment for extended periods of time may evolve in unanticipated ways thereby negatively impacting long duration space missions. We report here for the first time, an experimental study of microbial evolution in which the effect of long-term exposure to Low Shear Modeled MicroGravity (LSMMG) on microbial gene expression and physiology in Escherichia coli (E. coli) MG1655 was examined using functional genomics, and molecular techniques with and without simultaneous exposure to broad spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol. E. coli cells were grown under simulated microgravity for 1000 generations in High Aspect Ratio Vessels (HARVs) that were either heat-sterilized (115 deg C, 15 min) or by using/rinsing the HARVs with a saturated solution of the broad-spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol. In the case of the cells evolved using the antibiotic sterilized HARVs, the expression levels of 357 genes were significantly changed. In particular, fimbriae encoding genes were significantly up-regulated whereas genes encoding the flagellar motor complex were down-regulated. Re-sequencing of the genome revealed that a number of the flagellar genes were actually deleted. The antibiotic resistance levels of the evolved strains were analyzed using VITEK analyzer. The evolved strain was consistently resistant to the antibiotics used (viz., Ampicillin, Cefalotin, Cefurox-ime, Cefuroxime Axetil

  5. Fusions of flagellar operons to lactose genes on a mu lac bacteriophage.

    PubMed Central

    Komeda, Y

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies have defined 29 genes necessary for synthesis of the Escherichia coli flagellar apparatus. This study analyzed the transcriptional control of flagellar genes, using Mu d (Apr lac) phage to generate flagellar mutants by insertion. These mutants contained operon fusions of flagellar genes to the lac genes of the Mu d phage and allowed the measurement of flagellar operon expression by detection of beta-galactosidase activity. These fusion mutants expressed the enzyme activity constitutively, and an autogenous regulation mechanism was not revealed. Lambda transducing phages carrying these chromosomal fla-lac fusions were also isolated and used to examine the effect of different fla mutations on expression of each flagellar operon. The results showed that flagellar operons are divided into six classes; (class 1) the flbB operon, which controls all of the other flagellar operons; (class 2) the flaU and flbC operons, which are controlled by the flbB operon gene products and are not required for the expression of other Fla operons; (class 3) the flbA, flaG, flaD, flaN, flaB, and flaA operons, which are under flbB operon control and are required for the expression of other fla operons; (class4) the flaZ operon, which is controlled by the gene products of the group 1 and 3 operons and is required for hag transcription; (class 5) the mocha and flaS operons, which are controlled by the gene products of the group 1 and 3 operons; and (class 6) the hag operon. These results are discussed with respect to the possible assembly sequence of the fla gene products. PMID:7037746

  6. Torque-generating units of the bacterial flagellar motor step independently.

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, A D; Berg, H C

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the variance in rotation period of tethered cells as a function of mean rotation rate have shown that the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a stepping motor. Here, by measurement of the variance in rotation period as a function of the number of active torque-generating units, it is shown that each unit steps independently. PMID:8842231

  7. Robust Parameter Identification to Perform the Modeling of pta and poxB Genes Deletion Effect on Escherichia Coli.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Torres, V; Rios-Lozano, M; Badillo-Corona, J A; Chairez, I; Garibay-Orijel, C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to design a robust parameter identification algorithm to characterize the effect of gene deletion on Escherichia coli (E. coli) MG1655. Two genes (pta and poxB) in the competitive pathways were deleted from this microorganism to inhibit pyruvate consumption. This condition deviated the E. coli metabolism toward the Krebs cycle. As a consequence, the biomass, substrate (glucose), lactic, and acetate acids as well as ethanol concentrations were modified. A hybrid model was proposed to consider the effect of gene deletion on the metabolism of E. coli. The model parameters were estimated by the application of a least mean square method based on the instrument variable technique. To evaluate the parametric identifier method, a set of robust exact differentiators, based on the super-twisting algorithm, was implemented. The hybrid model was successfully characterized by the parameters obtained from experimental information of E. coli MG1655. The significant difference between parameters obtained with wild-type strain and the modified (with deleted genes) justifies the application of the parametric identification algorithm. This characterization can be used to optimize the production of different byproducts of commercial interest. PMID:27093969

  8. Multiple kinetic states for the flagellar motor switch.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, S C; Koshland, D E

    1989-01-01

    By means of a computerized video processing system, the flagellar motors of Escherichia coli were shown to have multiple kinetic states for each rotational direction. High-resolution analysis of flagellar motors revealed new kinetic states both in wild-type cells and in a strain deleted of other signal-transducing genes to which CheY had been introduced. This strain, RP1091, retained residual kinase activity that could phosphorylate CheY, complicating the biochemical identification of certain kinetic states. The behavioral effect of CheY on single flagellar motors was ultrasensitive, with an apparent Hill coefficient of 5.5 +/- 1.9 (SD) and a half-maximal effect at 10.1 +/- 0.5 (SD) microM CheY. Based on the CheY concentration dependence, a two-state model is clearly excluded, even for the simpler system of CheY-induced rotational reversals in the deletion strain. The data are best described by a four-state model, with two clockwise and two counterclockwise states. Images PMID:2681161

  9. Reduced Protein Synthesis Fidelity Inhibits Flagellar Biosynthesis and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongqiang; Evans, Christopher R.; Ling, Jiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Accurate translation of the genetic information from DNA to protein is maintained by multiple quality control steps from bacteria to mammals. Genetic and environmental alterations have been shown to compromise translational quality control and reduce fidelity during protein synthesis. The physiological impact of increased translational errors is not fully understood. While generally considered harmful, translational errors have recently been shown to benefit cells under certain stress conditions. In this work, we describe a novel regulatory pathway in which reduced translational fidelity downregulates expression of flagellar genes and suppresses bacterial motility. Electron microscopy imaging shows that the error-prone Escherichia coli strain lacks mature flagella. Further genetic analyses reveal that translational errors upregulate expression of a small RNA DsrA through enhancing its transcription, and deleting DsrA from the error-prone strain restores motility. DsrA regulates expression of H-NS and RpoS, both of which regulate flagellar genes. We demonstrate that an increased level of DsrA in the error-prone strain suppresses motility through the H-NS pathway. Our work suggests that bacteria are capable of switching on and off the flagellar system by altering translational fidelity, which may serve as a previously unknown mechanism to improve fitness in response to environmental cues. PMID:27468805

  10. Dynamics of flagellar bundling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Pieter; Graham, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Flagella are long thin appendages of microscopic organisms used for propulsion in low-Reynolds environments. For E. coli the flagella are driven by a molecular motor, which rotates the flagella in a counter-clockwise motion (CCM). When in a forward swimming motion, all flagella bundle up. If a motor reverses rotation direction, the flagella unbundle and the cell makes a tumbling motion. When all motors turn in the same CC direction again, the flagella bundle up, and forward swimming continues. To investigate the bundling, we consider two flexible helices next to each other, as well as several flagella attached to a spherical body. Each helix is modeled as several prolate spheroids connected at the tips by springs. For hydrodynamic interactions, we consider the flagella to made up of point forces, while the finite size of the body is incorporated via Fax'en's laws. We show that synchronization occurs quickly relative to the bundling process. For flagella next to each other, the initial deflection is generated by rotlet interactions generated by the rotating helices. At longer times, simulations show the flagella only wrap once around each other, but only for flagella that are closer than about 4 helix radii. Finally, we show a run-and-tumble motion of the body with attached flagella.

  11. Motility protein interactions in the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed Central

    Garza, A G; Harris-Haller, L W; Stoebner, R A; Manson, M D

    1995-01-01

    Five proteins (MotA, MotB, FliG, FliM, and FliN) have been implicated in energizing flagellar rotation in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. One model for flagellar function envisions that MotA and MotB comprise the stator of a rotary motor and that FliG, FliM, and FliN are part of the rotor. MotA probably functions as a transmembrane proton channel, and MotB has been proposed to anchor MotA to the peptidoglycan of the cell wall. To study interactions between the Mot proteins themselves and between them and other components of the flagellar motor, we attempted to isolate extragenic suppressors of 13 dominant or partially dominant motB missense mutations. Four of these yielded suppressors, which exhibited widely varying efficiencies of suppression. The pattern of suppression was partially alleles-specific, but no suppressor seriously impaired motility in a motB+ strain. Of 20 suppressors from the original selection, 15 were characterized by DNA sequencing. Fourteen of these cause single amino acid changes in MotA. Thirteen alter residues in, or directly adjacent to, the putative periplasmic loops of MotA, and the remaining one alters a residue in the middle of the fourth predicted transmembrane helix of MotA. We conclude that the MotA and MotB proteins form a complex and that their interaction directly involves or is strongly influenced by the periplasmic loops of MotA. The 15th suppressor from the original selection and 2 motB suppressors identified during a subsequent search cause single amino acid substitutions in FliG. This finding suggests that the postulated Mot-protein complex may be in close proximity to FliG at the stator-rotor interface of the flagellar motor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7892209

  12. Sodium-driven energy conversion for flagellar rotation of the earliest divergent hyperthermophilic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Takekawa, Norihiro; Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Kaneseki, Tsuyoshi; Kanai, Tamotsu; Atomi, Haruyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Aquifex aeolicus is a hyperthermophilic, hydrogen-oxidizing and carbon-fixing bacterium that can grow at temperatures up to 95 °C. A. aeolicus has an almost complete set of flagellar genes that are conserved in bacteria. Here we observed that A. aeolicus has polar flagellum and can swim with a speed of 90 μm s−1 at 85 °C. We expressed the A. aeolicus mot genes (motA and motB), which encode the torque generating stator proteins of the flagellar motor, in a corresponding mot nonmotile mutant of Escherichia coli. Its motility was slightly recovered by expression of A. aeolicus MotA and chimeric MotB whose periplasmic region was replaced with that of E. coli. A point mutation in the A. aeolicus MotA cytoplasmic region remarkably enhanced the motility. Using this system in E. coli, we demonstrate that the A. aeolicus motor is driven by Na+. As motor proteins from hyperthermophilic bacteria represent the earliest motor proteins in evolution, this study strongly suggests that ancient bacteria used Na+ for energy coupling of the flagellar motor. The Na+-driven flagellar genes might have been laterally transferred from early-branched bacteria into late-branched bacteria and the interaction surfaces of the stator and rotor seem not to change in evolution. PMID:26244427

  13. Sodium-driven energy conversion for flagellar rotation of the earliest divergent hyperthermophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Takekawa, Norihiro; Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Kaneseki, Tsuyoshi; Kanai, Tamotsu; Atomi, Haruyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Aquifex aeolicus is a hyperthermophilic, hydrogen-oxidizing and carbon-fixing bacterium that can grow at temperatures up to 95 °C. A. aeolicus has an almost complete set of flagellar genes that are conserved in bacteria. Here we observed that A. aeolicus has polar flagellum and can swim with a speed of 90 μm s(-1) at 85 °C. We expressed the A. aeolicus mot genes (motA and motB), which encode the torque generating stator proteins of the flagellar motor, in a corresponding mot nonmotile mutant of Escherichia coli. Its motility was slightly recovered by expression of A. aeolicus MotA and chimeric MotB whose periplasmic region was replaced with that of E. coli. A point mutation in the A. aeolicus MotA cytoplasmic region remarkably enhanced the motility. Using this system in E. coli, we demonstrate that the A. aeolicus motor is driven by Na(+). As motor proteins from hyperthermophilic bacteria represent the earliest motor proteins in evolution, this study strongly suggests that ancient bacteria used Na(+) for energy coupling of the flagellar motor. The Na(+)-driven flagellar genes might have been laterally transferred from early-branched bacteria into late-branched bacteria and the interaction surfaces of the stator and rotor seem not to change in evolution. PMID:26244427

  14. Complete Genome Sequence and Comparative Analysis of the Wild-type Commensal Escherichia coli Strain SE11 Isolated from a Healthy Adult

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Kenshiro; Toh, Hidehiro; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Sasamoto, Hiroyuki; Morita, Hidetoshi; Park, Sang-Hee; Ooka, Tadasuke; Iyoda, Sunao; Taylor, Todd D.; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Itoh, Kikuji; Hattori, Masahira

    2008-01-01

    We sequenced and analyzed the genome of a commensal Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain SE11 (O152:H28) recently isolated from feces of a healthy adult and classified into E. coli phylogenetic group B1. SE11 harbored a 4.8 Mb chromosome encoding 4679 protein-coding genes and six plasmids encoding 323 protein-coding genes. None of the SE11 genes had sequence similarity to known genes encoding phage- and plasmid-borne virulence factors found in pathogenic E. coli strains. The comparative genome analysis with the laboratory strain K-12 MG1655 identified 62 poorly conserved genes between these two non-pathogenic strains and 1186 genes absent in MG1655. These genes in SE11 were mostly encoded in large insertion regions on the chromosome or in the plasmids, and were notably abundant in genes of fimbriae and autotransporters, which are cell surface appendages that largely contribute to the adherence ability of bacteria to host cells and bacterial conjugation. These data suggest that SE11 may have evolved to acquire and accumulate the functions advantageous for stable colonization of intestinal cells, and that the adhesion-associated functions are important for the commensality of E. coli in human gut habitat. PMID:18931093

  15. Mechanobiology of Antimicrobial Resistant Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua

    PubMed Central

    Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Harrison, Scott H.; Hung, Albert M.; Graves, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    A majority of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in the United States are associated with biofilms. Nanoscale biophysical measures are increasingly revealing that adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play essential roles across multiple stages of biofilm development. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) applied to strains with variation in antimicrobial resistance enables new opportunities for investigating the function of adhesive forces (stickiness) in biofilm formation. AFM force spectroscopy analysis of a field strain of Listeria innocua and the strain Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 revealed differing adhesive forces between antimicrobial resistant and nonresistant strains. Significant increases in stickiness were found at the nanonewton level for strains of Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli in association with benzalkonium chloride and silver nanoparticle resistance respectively. This advancement in the usage of AFM provides for a fast and reliable avenue for analyzing antimicrobial resistant cells and the molecular dynamics of biofilm formation as a protective mechanism. PMID:26914334

  16. The evolution of metabolic networks of E. coli

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of numerous complete genome sequences from E. coli strains, published genome-scale metabolic models exist only for two commensal E. coli strains. These models have proven useful for many applications, such as engineering strains for desired product formation, and we sought to explore how constructing and evaluating additional metabolic models for E. coli strains could enhance these efforts. Results We used the genomic information from 16 E. coli strains to generate an E. coli pangenome metabolic network by evaluating their collective 76,990 ORFs. Each of these ORFs was assigned to one of 17,647 ortholog groups including ORFs associated with reactions in the most recent metabolic model for E. coli K-12. For orthologous groups that contain an ORF already represented in the MG1655 model, the gene to protein to reaction associations represented in this model could then be easily propagated to other E. coli strain models. All remaining orthologous groups were evaluated to see if new metabolic reactions could be added to generate a pangenome-scale metabolic model (iEco1712_pan). The pangenome model included reactions from a metabolic model update for E. coli K-12 MG1655 (iEco1339_MG1655) and enabled development of five additional strain-specific genome-scale metabolic models. These additional models include a second K-12 strain (iEco1335_W3110) and four pathogenic strains (two enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 and two uropathogens). When compared to the E. coli K-12 models, the metabolic models for the enterohemorrhagic (iEco1344_EDL933 and iEco1345_Sakai) and uropathogenic strains (iEco1288_CFT073 and iEco1301_UTI89) contained numerous lineage-specific gene and reaction differences. All six E. coli models were evaluated by comparing model predictions to carbon source utilization measurements under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and to batch growth profiles in minimal media with 0.2% (w/v) glucose. An ancestral genome

  17. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the genome-wide GadEWX transcriptional regulatory network and RpoS involvement in E. coli K-12 MG1655 under acidic stress. Integrative data analysis reveals that GadEWX regulons consist of 45 genes in 31 transcription units and 28 of these genes were associated with RpoS-binding sites. We demonstrate that GadEWX directly and coherently regulate several proton-generating/consuming enzymes with pairs of negative-feedback loops for pH homeostasis. In addition, GadEWX regulate genes with assorted functions, including molecular chaperones, acid resistance, stress response and other regulatory activities. These results show how GadEWX simultaneously coordinate many cellular processes to produce the overall response of E. coli to acid stress. PMID:26258987

  18. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J.; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the genome-wide GadEWX transcriptional regulatory network and RpoS involvement in E. coli K-12 MG1655 under acidic stress. Integrative data analysis reveals that GadEWX regulons consist of 45 genes in 31 transcription units and 28 of these genes were associated with RpoS-binding sites. We demonstrate that GadEWX directly and coherently regulate several proton-generating/consuming enzymes with pairs of negative-feedback loops for pH homeostasis. In addition, GadEWX regulate genes with assorted functions, including molecular chaperones, acid resistance, stress response and other regulatory activities. These results show how GadEWX simultaneously coordinate many cellular processes to produce the overall response of E. coli to acid stress. PMID:26258987

  19. Metabolic engineering of the Stevia rebaudiana ent-kaurene biosynthetic pathway in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kong, Min Kyung; Kang, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Jin Ho; Oh, Soon Hwan; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2015-11-20

    The ent-kaurene is a dedicated precursor pool and is responsible for synthesizing natural sweeteners such as steviol glycosides. In this study, to produce ent-kaurene in Escherichia coli, we modularly constructed and expressed two ent-kaurene genes encoding ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPPS) and ent-kaurene synthase (KS) from Stevia rebaudiana known as a typical plant producing steviol glycoside. The CPPS and KS from S. rebaudiana were functionally expressed in a heterologous host E. coli. Furthermore, in order to enhance ent-kaurene production in E. coli, six geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthases (GGPPS) from various microorganisms and eight strains of E. coli as host were compared by measuring ent-kaurene production. The highest ent-kaurene production of approximately 41.1mg/L was demonstrated in E. coli strain MG1655 co-expressing synthetic CPPS-KS module and GGPPS from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The ent-kaurene production was further increased up to 179.6 mg/L by overexpression of the three key enzymes for isoprenoid precursor, 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS), farnesyl diphosphate synthase (IspA) and isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI) from E. coli. Finally, the highest titer of ent-kaurene (578 mg/L) with a specific yield of ent-kaurene of 143.5mg/g dry cell weight was obtained by culturing E. coli strain MG1655 co-expressing the ent-kaurene module, DXS, IDI and IspA in 1L bioreactor containing 20 g/L glycerol. PMID:26392384

  20. Comparative analysis of envelope proteomes in Escherichia coli B and K-12 strains.

    PubMed

    Han, Mee-Jung; Lee, Sang Yup; Hong, Soon Ho

    2012-04-01

    Recent genome comparisons of E. coli B and K-12 strains have indicated that the makeup of the cell envelopes in these two strains is quite different. Therefore, we analyzed and compared the envelope proteomes of E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655. A total of 165 protein spots, including 62 nonredundant proteins, were unambiguously identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Of these, 43 proteins were conserved between the two strains, whereas 4 and 16 strain-specific proteins were identified only in E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655, respectively. Additionally, 24 proteins showed more than 2-fold differences in intensities between the B and K-12 strains. The reference envelope proteome maps showed that E. coli envelope mainly contained channel proteins and lipoproteins. Interesting proteomic observations between the two strains were as follows: (i) B produced more OmpF porin with a larger pore size than K-12, indicating an increase in the membrane permeability; (ii) B produced higher amounts of lipoproteins, which facilitates the assembly of outer membrane beta-barrel proteins; and (iii) motility- (FliC) and chemotaxis-related proteins (CheA and CheW) were detected only in K-12, which showed that E. coli B is restricted with regard to migration under unfavorable conditions. These differences may influence the permeability and integrity of the cell envelope, showing that E. coli B may be more susceptible than K-12 to certain stress conditions. Thus, these findings suggest that E. coli K-12 and its derivatives will be more favorable strains in certain biotechnological applications, such as cell surface display or membrane engineering studies. PMID:22534293

  1. The Complete Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli DH10B: Insights into the Biology of a Laboratory Workhorse▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Durfee, Tim; Nelson, Richard; Baldwin, Schuyler; Plunkett, Guy; Burland, Valerie; Mau, Bob; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Qin, Xiang; Muzny, Donna M.; Ayele, Mulu; Gibbs, Richard A.; Csörgő, Bálint; Pósfai, György; Weinstock, George M.; Blattner, Frederick R.

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli DH10B was designed for the propagation of large insert DNA library clones. It is used extensively, taking advantage of properties such as high DNA transformation efficiency and maintenance of large plasmids. The strain was constructed by serial genetic recombination steps, but the underlying sequence changes remained unverified. We report the complete genomic sequence of DH10B by using reads accumulated from the bovine sequencing project at Baylor College of Medicine and assembled with DNAStar's SeqMan genome assembler. The DH10B genome is largely colinear with that of the wild-type K-12 strain MG1655, although it is substantially more complex than previously appreciated, allowing DH10B biology to be further explored. The 226 mutated genes in DH10B relative to MG1655 are mostly attributable to the extensive genetic manipulations the strain has undergone. However, we demonstrate that DH10B has a 13.5-fold higher mutation rate than MG1655, resulting from a dramatic increase in insertion sequence (IS) transposition, especially IS150. IS elements appear to have remodeled genome architecture, providing homologous recombination sites for a 113,260-bp tandem duplication and an inversion. DH10B requires leucine for growth on minimal medium due to the deletion of leuLABCD and harbors both the relA1 and spoT1 alleles causing both sensitivity to nutritional downshifts and slightly lower growth rates relative to the wild type. Finally, while the sequence confirms most of the reported alleles, the sequence of deoR is wild type, necessitating reexamination of the assumed basis for the high transformability of DH10B. PMID:18245285

  2. An Element of Determinism in a Stochastic Flagellar Motor Switch

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Li; Altindal, Tuba; Wu, Xiao-Lun

    2015-01-01

    Marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus uses a single polar flagellum to navigate in an aqueous environment. Similar to Escherichia coli cells, the polar flagellar motor has two states; when the motor is counter-clockwise, the cell swims forward and when the motor is clockwise, the cell swims backward. V. alginolyticus also incorporates a direction randomization step at the start of the forward swimming interval by flicking its flagellum. To gain an understanding on how the polar flagellar motor switch is regulated, distributions of the forward Δf and backward Δb intervals are investigated herein. We found that the steady-state probability density functions, P(Δf) and P(Δb), of freely swimming bacteria are strongly peaked at a finite time, suggesting that the motor switch is not Poissonian. The short-time inhibition is sufficiently strong and long lasting, i.e., several hundred milliseconds for both intervals, which is readily observed and characterized. Treating motor reversal dynamics as a first-passage problem, which results from conformation fluctuations of the motor switch, we calculated P(Δf) and P(Δb) and found good agreement with the measurements. PMID:26554590

  3. Resurrection of the flagellar rotary motor near zero load

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Junhua; Berg, Howard C.

    2008-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, are propelled by helical flagellar filaments, each driven at its base by a reversible rotary motor, powered by a transmembrane proton flux. Torque is generated by the interaction of stator proteins, MotA and MotB, with a rotor protein FliG. The physiology of the motor has been studied extensively in the regime of relatively high load and low speed, where it appears to operate close to thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we describe an assay that allows systematic study of the motor near zero load, where proton translocation and movement of mechanical components are rate limiting. Sixty-nanometer-diameter gold spheres were attached to hooks of cells lacking flagellar filaments, and light scattered from a sphere was monitored at the image plane of a microscope through a small pinhole. Paralyzed motors of cells carrying a motA point mutation were resurrected at 23°C by expression of wild-type MotA, and speeds jumped from zero to a maximum value (≈300 Hz) in one step. Thus, near zero load, the speed of the motor is independent of the number of torque-generating units. Evidently, the units act independently (they do not interfere with one another), and there are no intervals during which a second unit can add to the speed generated by the first (the duty ratio is close to 1). PMID:18202173

  4. Global gene expression analysis of glucose overflow metabolism in Escherichia coli and reduction of aerobic acetate formation.

    PubMed

    Veit, Andrea; Polen, Tino; Wendisch, Volker F

    2007-02-01

    During aerobic growth on glucose, Escherichia coli produces acetate in the so-called overflow metabolism. DNA microarray analysis was used to determine the global gene expression patterns of chemostat cultivations of E. coli MG1655 that were characterized by different acetate formation rates during aerobic growth on glucose. A correlation analysis identified that expression of ten genes (sdhCDAB, sucB, sucC, acnB, lpdA, fumC and mdh) encoding the TCA cycle enzymes succinate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinyl-CoA synthetase, aconitase, fumarase and malate dehydrogenase, respectively, and of the acs-yjcH-actP operon for acetate utilization correlated negatively with acetate formation. Relieving transcriptional control of the sdhCDAB-b0725-sucABCD operon by chromosomal promoter exchange mutagenesis yielded a strain with increased specific activities of the TCA cycle enzymes succinate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA synthetase, which are encoded by this operon. The resulting strain produced less acetate and directed more carbon towards carbon dioxide formation than the parent strain MG1655 while maintaining high growth and glucose consumption rates. PMID:17273855

  5. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by high-pressure homogenisation is influenced by fluid viscosity but not by water activity and product composition.

    PubMed

    Diels, Ann M J; Callewaert, Lien; Wuytack, Elke Y; Masschalck, Barbara; Michiels, Chris W

    2005-06-15

    The inactivation of Escherichia coli MG1655 by high-pressure homogenisation (HPH) at pressures ranging from 100 to 300 MPa was studied in buffered suspensions adjusted to different relative viscosities (1.0, 1.3, 1.7, 2.7 and 4.9) with polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG 6000). The water activity of these suspensions was not significantly affected by this high molecular weight solute. Bacterial inactivation was found to decrease with increasing viscosity of the suspensions, an effect that was more pronounced at higher pressures. To study the effect of water activity, series of E. coli suspensions having a different water activity (0.953-1.000) but the same relative viscosity (1.3, 1.7, 2.7 and 4.9) were made using PEG of different molecular weights (400, 600, 1000 and 6000), and subjected to HPH treatment. The results indicated that water activity does not influence inactivation. Finally, inactivation of E. coli MG1655 by HPH in skim milk, soy milk and strawberry-raspberry milk drink was found to be the same as in PEG containing buffer of the corresponding viscosity. These results identify fluid viscosity as a major environmental parameter affecting bacterial inactivation by HPH, as opposed to water activity and product composition, and should contribute to the development of HPH applications for the purpose of bacterial inactivation. PMID:15925711

  6. Monitoring bacterial chemotaxis by using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer: Absence of feedback from the flagellar motors

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Thomas S.; Delalez, Nicolas; Pichler, Klemens; Berg, Howard C.

    2006-01-01

    We looked for a feedback system in Escherichia coli that might sense the rotational bias of flagellar motors and regulate the activity of the chemotaxis receptor kinase. Our search was based on the assumption that any machinery that senses rotational bias will be perturbed if flagellar rotation stops. We monitored the activity of the kinase in swimming cells by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between Renilla luciferase fused to the phosphatase, CheZ, and yellow fluorescent protein fused to the response regulator, CheY. Then we jammed the flagellar motors by adding an antifilament antibody that crosslinks adjacent filaments in flagellar bundles. At steady state, the rate of phosphorylation of CheY is equal to the rate of dephosphorylation of CheY-P, which is proportional to the degree of association between CheZ and CheY-P, the quantity sensed by BRET. No changes were observed, even upon addition of an amount of antibody that stopped the swimming of >95% of cells within a few seconds. So, the kinase does not appear to be sensitive to motor output. The BRET technique is complementary to one based on FRET, described previously. Its reliability was confirmed by measurements of the response of cells to the addition of attractants. PMID:16452163

  7. Energy source of flagellar type III secretion.

    PubMed

    Paul, Koushik; Erhardt, Marc; Hirano, Takanori; Blair, David F; Hughes, Kelly T

    2008-01-24

    Bacterial flagella contain a specialized secretion apparatus that functions to deliver the protein subunits that form the filament and other structures to outside the membrane. This apparatus is related to the injectisome used by many gram-negative pathogens and symbionts to transfer effector proteins into host cells; in both systems this export mechanism is termed 'type III' secretion. The flagellar secretion apparatus comprises a membrane-embedded complex of about five proteins, and soluble factors, which include export-dedicated chaperones and an ATPase, FliI, that was thought to provide the energy for export. Here we show that flagellar secretion in Salmonella enterica requires the proton motive force (PMF) and does not require ATP hydrolysis by FliI. The export of several flagellar export substrates was prevented by treatment with the protonophore CCCP, with no accompanying decrease in cellular ATP levels. Weak swarming motility and rare flagella were observed in a mutant deleted for FliI and for the non-flagellar type-III secretion ATPases InvJ and SsaN. These findings show that the flagellar secretion apparatus functions as a proton-driven protein exporter and that ATP hydrolysis is not essential for type III secretion. PMID:18216859

  8. Increasing recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli K12 through metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Waegeman, Hendrik; De Lausnay, Stijn; Beauprez, Joeri; Maertens, Jo; De Mey, Marjan; Soetaert, Wim

    2013-01-25

    Escherichia coli strains are widely used as host for the production of recombinant proteins. Compared to E. coli K12, E. coli BL21 (DE3) has several biotechnological advantages, such as a lower acetate yield and a higher biomass yield, which have a beneficial effect on protein production. In a previous study (BMC Microbiol. 2011, 11:70) we have altered the metabolic fluxes of a K12 strain (i.e. E. coli MG1655) by deleting the regulators ArcA and IclR in such a way that the biomass yield is remarkably increased, while the acetate production is decreased to a similar value as for BL21 (DE3). In this study we show that the increased biomass yield beneficially influences recombinant protein production as a higher GFP yield was observed for the double knockout strain compared to its wild type. However, at higher cell densities (>2 g L(-1) CDW), the GFP concentration decreases again, due to the activity of proteases which obstructs the application of the strain in high cell density cultivations. By further deleting the genes lon and ompT, which encode for proteases, this degradation could be reduced. Consequently, higher GFP yields were observed in the quadruple knockout strain as opposed to the double knockout strain and the MG1655 wild type and its yield approximates the GFP yield of E. coli BL21 (DE3), that is, 27±5 mg g(CDW)(-1) vs. 30±5 mg g(CDW)(-1), respectively. PMID:22115732

  9. Flagellar waveform analysis of swimming algal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtuldu, Huseyin; Johnson, Karl; Gollub, Jerry

    2011-11-01

    The twin flagella of the green alga Chlamydomas reinhardtii are driven by dynein molecular motors to oscillate at about 50-60 Hz in a breaststroke motion. For decades, Chlamydomas has been used as a model organism for studies of flagellar motility, and of genetic disorders of ciliary motion. However, little is known experimentally about the flagellar waveforms, and the resulting time-dependent force distribution along the 250 nm diameter flagella. Here, we study flagellar dynamics experimentally by confining cells in quasi-2D liquid films. From simultaneous measurements of the cell body velocity and the time-dependent velocities along the center lines of the two flagella, we determine the drag coefficients, and estimate the power expended by the body and the flagella, comparing our findings with measurements based on the induced fluid flow field. We contrast the results for the quite different beating patterns of synchronous and asynchronous flagella, respectively. Supported by NSF Grant DMR-0803153.

  10. Rhythmicity, recurrence, and recovery of flagellar beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats with apparently unfailing periodicity, yet responds rapidly to stimuli. Like the human heartbeat, flagellar oscillations are now known to be noisy. Using the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we explore three aspects of nonuniform flagellar beating. We report the existence of rhythmicity, waveform noise peaking at transitions between power and recovery strokes, and fluctuations of interbeat intervals that are correlated and even recurrent, with memory extending to hundreds of beats. These features are altered qualitatively by physiological perturbations. Further, we quantify the recovery of periodic breaststroke beating from transient hydrodynamic forcing. These results will help constrain microscopic theories on the origins and regulation of flagellar beating. Financial support is acknowledged from the EPSRC, ERC Advanced Investigator Grant No. 247333, and a Senior Investigator Award from the Wellcome Trust.

  11. Mesoscopic modeling of bacterial flagellar microhydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gebremichael, Yeshitila; Ayton, Gary S; Voth, Gregory A

    2006-11-15

    A particle-based hybrid method of elastic network model and smooth-particle hydrodynamics has been employed to describe the propulsion of bacterial flagella in a viscous hydrodynamic environment. The method explicitly models the two aspects of bacterial propulsion that involve flagellar flexibility and long-range hydrodynamic interaction of low-Reynolds-number flow. The model further incorporates the molecular organization of the flagellar filament at a coarse-grained level in terms of the 11 protofilaments. Each of these protofilaments is represented by a collection of material points that represent the flagellin proteins. A computational model of a single flexible helical segment representing the filament of a bacterial flagellum is presented. The propulsive dynamics and the flow fields generated by the motion of the model filament are examined. The nature of flagellar deformation and the influence of hydrodynamics in determining the shape of deformations are examined based on the helical filament. PMID:16935949

  12. Identification and relative quantification of proteins in Escherichia coli proteome by "up-front" collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Arike, Liisa; Nahku, Ranno; Borrisova, Maria; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivu

    2010-01-01

    A method for identifying and quantifying proteins with relatively low-cost orthogonal acceleration time-of- flight mass spectrometry (oa-ToF-MS) was tested. Escherichia coli (E. coli) K12 MG1655 cell lysate was separated by 1D gel-electrophoresis; fractions were digested and separated fast and reproducibly by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). Peptides were identified using oa-ToF-MS to measure exact masses of parent ions and the fragment ions generated by up-front collision-induced dissociation. Fragmentation of all compounds was achieved by rapidly cycling between high- and low values of energy applied to ions. More than 100 proteins from E. coli K12 proteome were identified and relatively quantified. Results were found to correlate with transcriptome data determined by DNA microarrays. PMID:20212332

  13. The response of Escherichia coli to exposure to the biocide polyhexamethylene biguanide.

    PubMed

    Allen, Michael J; White, Graham F; Morby, Andrew P

    2006-04-01

    The global response of Escherichia coli to the broad-spectrum biocide polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) was investigated using transcriptional profiling. The transcriptional analyses were validated by direct determination of the PHMB-tolerance phenotypes of derivatives of E. coli MG1655 carrying either insertionally inactivated genes and/or plasmids expressing the cognate open reading frames from a heterologous promoter in the corresponding chromosomally inactivated strains. The results showed that a wide range of genes was altered in transcriptional activity and that all of the corresponding knockout strains subsequently challenged with biocide were altered in tolerance. Of particular interest was the induction of the rhs genes and the implication of enzymes involved in the repair/binding of nucleic acids in the generation of tolerance, suggesting a novel dimension in the mechanism of action of PHMB based on its interaction with nucleic acids. PMID:16549663

  14. EchoBASE: an integrated post-genomic database for Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Misra, Raju V; Horler, Richard S P; Reindl, Wolfgang; Goryanin, Igor I; Thomas, Gavin H

    2005-01-01

    EchoBASE (http://www.ecoli-york.org) is a relational database designed to contain and manipulate information from post-genomic experiments using the model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12. Its aim is to collate information from a wide range of sources to provide clues to the functions of the approximately 1500 gene products that have no confirmed cellular function. The database is built on an enhanced annotation of the updated genome sequence of strain MG1655 and the association of experimental data with the E.coli genes and their products. Experiments that can be held within EchoBASE include proteomics studies, microarray data, protein-protein interaction data, structural data and bioinformatics studies. EchoBASE also contains annotated information on 'orphan' enzyme activities from this microbe to aid characterization of the proteins that catalyse these elusive biochemical reactions. PMID:15608209

  15. Deciphering Fur transcriptional regulatory network highlights its complex role beyond iron metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Latif, Haythem; O'Brien, Edward J; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism. However, the full regulatory potential of Fur remains undefined. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the Fur transcriptional regulatory network in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in response to iron availability using genome-wide measurements. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 81 genes in 42 transcription units are directly regulated by three different modes of Fur regulation, including apo- and holo-Fur activation and holo-Fur repression. We show that Fur connects iron transport and utilization enzymes with negative-feedback loop pairs for iron homeostasis. In addition, direct involvement of Fur in the regulation of DNA synthesis, energy metabolism and biofilm development is found. These results show how Fur exhibits a comprehensive regulatory role affecting many fundamental cellular processes linked to iron metabolism in order to coordinate the overall response of E. coli to iron availability. PMID:25222563

  16. CEP290 tethers flagellar transition zone microtubules to the membrane and regulates flagellar protein content

    PubMed Central

    Craige, Branch; Tsao, Che-Chia; Diener, Dennis R.; Hou, Yuqing; Lechtreck, Karl-Ferdinand; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in human CEP290 cause cilia-related disorders that range in severity from isolated blindness to perinatal lethality. Here, we describe a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant in which most of the CEP290 gene is deleted. Immunoelectron microscopy indicated that CEP290 is located in the flagellar transition zone in close association with the prominent microtubule–membrane links there. Ultrastructural analysis revealed defects in these microtubule–membrane connectors, resulting in loss of attachment of the flagellar membrane to the transition zone microtubules. Biochemical analysis of isolated flagella revealed that the mutant flagella have abnormal protein content, including abnormal levels of intraflagellar transport proteins and proteins associated with ciliopathies. Experiments with dikaryons showed that CEP290 at the transition zone is dynamic and undergoes rapid turnover. The results indicate that CEP290 is required to form microtubule–membrane linkers that tether the flagellar membrane to the transition zone microtubules, and is essential for controlling flagellar protein composition. PMID:20819941

  17. Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli for Enhanced Production of (R)- and (S)-3-Hydroxybutyrate▿

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hsien-Chung; Martin, Collin H.; Nielsen, David R.; Prather, Kristala L. Jones

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic metabolic pathways have been constructed for the production of enantiopure (R)- and (S)-3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) from glucose in recombinant Escherichia coli strains. To promote maximal activity, we profiled three thiolase homologs (BktB, Thl, and PhaA) and two coenzyme A (CoA) removal mechanisms (Ptb-Buk and TesB). Two enantioselective 3HB-CoA dehydrogenases, PhaB, producing the (R)-enantiomer, and Hbd, producing the (S)-enantiomer, were utilized to control the 3HB chirality across two E. coli backgrounds, BL21Star(DE3) and MG1655(DE3), representing E. coli B- and K-12-derived strains, respectively. MG1655(DE3) was found to be superior for the production of each 3HB stereoisomer, although the recombinant enzymes exhibited lower in vitro specific activities than BL21Star(DE3). Hbd in vitro activity was significantly higher than PhaB activity in both strains. The engineered strains achieved titers of enantiopure (R)-3HB and (S)-3HB as high as 2.92 g liter−1 and 2.08 g liter−1, respectively, in shake flask cultures within 2 days. The NADPH/NADP+ ratio was found to be two- to three-fold higher than the NADH/NAD+ ratio under the culture conditions examined, presumably affecting in vivo activities of PhaB and Hbd and resulting in greater production of (R)-3HB than (S)-3HB. To the best of our knowledge, this study reports the highest (S)-3HB titer achieved in shake flask E. coli cultures to date. PMID:19304817

  18. Arsenate arrests flagellar rotation in cytoplasm-free envelopes of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Y; Barak, R; Eisenbach, M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of arsenate on flagellar rotation in cytoplasm-free flagellated envelopes of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium was investigated. Flagellar rotation ceased as soon as the envelopes were exposed to arsenate. Inclusion of phosphate intracellularly (but not extracellular) prevented the inhibition by arsenate. In a parallel experiment, the rotation was not affected by inclusion of an ATP trap (hexokinase and glucose) within the envelopes. It is concluded that arsenate affects the motor in a way other than reversible deenergization. This may be an irreversible damage to the cell or direct inhibition of the motor by arsenate. The latter possibility suggests that a process of phosphorylation or phosphate binding is involved in the motor function. PMID:8071237

  19. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 enhances bioavailability of serotonin in gut tissues through modulation of synthesis and clearance.

    PubMed

    Nzakizwanayo, Jonathan; Dedi, Cinzia; Standen, Guy; Macfarlane, Wendy M; Patel, Bhavik A; Jones, Brian V

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows indigenous gut microbes can interact with the human host through modulation of serotonin (5-HT) signaling. Here we investigate the impact of the probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) on 5-HT signalling in gut tissues. Ex-vivo mouse ileal tissue sections were treated with either EcN or the human gut commensal MG1655, and effects on levels of 5-HT, precursors, and metabolites, were evaluated using amperometry and high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). Exposure of tissue to EcN cells, but not MG1655 cells, was found to increase levels of extra-cellular 5-HT. These effects were not observed when tissues were treated with cell-free supernatant from bacterial cultures. In contrast, when supernatant recovered from untreated ileal tissue was pre-incubated with EcN, the derivative cell-free supernatant was able to elevate 5-HT overflow when used to treat fresh ileal tissue. Measurement of 5-HT precursors and metabolites indicated EcN also increases intracellular 5-HTP and reduces 5-HIAA. The former pointed to modulation of tryptophan hydroxylase-1 to enhance 5-HT synthesis, while the latter indicates an impact on clearance into enterocytes through SERT. Taken together, these findings show EcN is able to enhance 5-HT bioavailability in ileal tissues through interaction with compounds secreted from host tissues. PMID:26616662

  20. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 enhances bioavailability of serotonin in gut tissues through modulation of synthesis and clearance

    PubMed Central

    Nzakizwanayo, Jonathan; Dedi, Cinzia; Standen, Guy; Macfarlane, Wendy M.; Patel, Bhavik A.; Jones, Brian V.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows indigenous gut microbes can interact with the human host through modulation of serotonin (5-HT) signaling. Here we investigate the impact of the probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) on 5-HT signalling in gut tissues. Ex-vivo mouse ileal tissue sections were treated with either EcN or the human gut commensal MG1655, and effects on levels of 5-HT, precursors, and metabolites, were evaluated using amperometry and high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). Exposure of tissue to EcN cells, but not MG1655 cells, was found to increase levels of extra-cellular 5-HT. These effects were not observed when tissues were treated with cell-free supernatant from bacterial cultures. In contrast, when supernatant recovered from untreated ileal tissue was pre-incubated with EcN, the derivative cell-free supernatant was able to elevate 5-HT overflow when used to treat fresh ileal tissue. Measurement of 5-HT precursors and metabolites indicated EcN also increases intracellular 5-HTP and reduces 5-HIAA. The former pointed to modulation of tryptophan hydroxylase-1 to enhance 5-HT synthesis, while the latter indicates an impact on clearance into enterocytes through SERT. Taken together, these findings show EcN is able to enhance 5-HT bioavailability in ileal tissues through interaction with compounds secreted from host tissues. PMID:26616662

  1. Vaccination with recombinant flagellar proteins FlgJ and FliN induce protection against Brucella abortus 544 infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianbo; Xu, Jie; Xie, Yongfei; Qiu, Yefeng; Fu, Simei; Yuan, Xitong; Ke, Yuehua; Yu, Shuang; Du, Xinying; Cui, Mingquan; Chen, Yanfen; Wang, Tongkun; Wang, Zhoujia; Yu, Yaqing; Huang, Kehe; Huang, Liuyu; Peng, Guangneng; Chen, Zeliang; Wang, Yufei

    2012-12-28

    Brucella has been considered as a non-motile, facultative intracellular pathogenic bacterium. However, the genome sequences of different Brucella species reveal the presence of the flagellar genes needed for the construction of a functional flagellum. Due to its roles in the interaction between pathogen and host, we hypothesized that some of the flagellar proteins might induce protective immune responses and these proteins will be good subunit vaccine candidates. This study was conducted to screening of protective antigens among these flagellar proteins. Firstly, according to the putative functional roles, a total of 30 flagellar genes of Brucella abortus were selected for in vitro expression. 15 of these flagellar genes were successfully expressed as his-tagged recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli ER2566. Then, these proteins were purified and used to analyze their T cell immunity induction activity by an in vitro gamma interferon (IFN-γ) assay. Five of the flagellar proteins could stimulate significantly higher levels of IFN-γ secretion in splenocytes from S19 immunized mice, indicating their T cell induction activity. Finally, immunogenicity and protection activity of these 5 flagellar proteins were evaluated in BALB/c mice. Results showed that immunization with FlgJ (BAB1_0260) or FliN (BAB2_0122) plus adjuvant could provide protection against B. abortus 544 infection. Furthermore, mice immunized with FlgJ and FliN developed a vigorous immunoglobulin G response, and in vitro stimulation of their splenocytes with immunizing proteins induced the secretion of IFN-γ. Altogether, these data suggest that flagellar proteins FlgJ and FliN are protective antigens that could produce humoral and cell-mediated responses in mice and candidates for use in future studies of vaccination against brucellosis. PMID:22854331

  2. Protein turbines. I: The bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed Central

    Elston, T C; Oster, G

    1997-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is driven by a flux of ions between the cytoplasm and the periplasmic lumen. Here we show how an electrostatic mechanism can convert this ion flux into a rotary torque. We demonstrate that, with reasonable parameters, the model can reproduce many of the experimental measurements. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 p720-a PMID:9251788

  3. Flagellar Synchronization Independent of Hydrodynamic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Jülicher, Frank

    2012-09-01

    Inspired by the coordinated beating of the flagellar pair of the green algae Chlamydomonas, we study theoretically a simple, mirror-symmetric swimmer, which propels itself at low Reynolds number by a revolving motion of a pair of spheres. We show that perfect synchronization between these two driven spheres can occur due to the motion of the swimmer and local hydrodynamic friction forces. Hydrodynamic interactions, though crucial for net propulsion, contribute little to synchronization for this free-moving swimmer.

  4. Studies on flagellar shortening in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Cherniack, J.

    1985-01-01

    Flagellar shortening of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was promoted by sodium chloride, pyrophosphate (sodium, potassium and ammonium salts), EDTA and EGTA, succinate, citrate and oxalate (sodium salts), caffeine and aminophylline. Removal of calcium from the medium potentiated the effects of these agents in inducing shortening. Investigations of the release of phosphorylated compounds to the medium during pyrophosphate-induced flagellar shortening of cells pre-labelled with /sup 32/P, revealed an as yet unidentified /sup 32/P-labelled compound with distinct chromatographic properties. Chromatography and electrophoresis indicates that it is a small, highly polar molecule with a high charge to mass ratio, containing thermo- and acid-labile phosphate linkages. Investigations showed of the release of /sup 35/S-labelled protein to the medium from cells pre-labelled with /sup 35/S-sulfate showed that flagellated cells released two prominent polypeptides which comigrated with ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-flagellar tubulin on SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, while deflagellated cells did not.

  5. Regulation of flagellar motility during biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Sarah B.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria swim in liquid or swarm over solid surfaces by synthesizing rotary flagella. The same bacteria that are motile also commonly form non-motile multicellular aggregates held together by an extracellular matrix called biofilms. Biofilms are an important part of the lifestyle of pathogenic bacteria and it is assumed that there is a motility-to-biofilm transition wherein the inhibition of motility promotes biofilm formation. The transition is largely inferred from regulatory mutants that reveal the opposite regulation of the two phenotypes. Here we review the regulation of motility during biofilm formation in Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, and Escherichia, and we conclude that the motility-to-biofilm transition, if necessary, likely involves two steps. In the short term, flagella are functionally regulated to either inhibit rotation or modulate the basal flagellar reversal frequency. Over the long term, flagellar gene transcription is inhibited and in the absence of de novo synthesis, flagella are likely diluted to extinction through growth. Both short term and long term control is likely important to the motility-to-biofilm transition to stabilize aggregates and optimize resource investment. We emphasize the newly discovered classes of flagellar functional regulators and speculate that others await discovery in the context of biofilm formation. PMID:23480406

  6. Aeromonas hydrophila Lateral Flagellar Gene Transcriptional Hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelms, Markus; Gonzalez, Victor; Merino, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila AH-3 lateral flagella are not assembled when bacteria grow in liquid media; however, lateral flagellar genes are transcribed. Our results indicate that A. hydrophila lateral flagellar genes are transcribed at three levels (class I to III genes) and share some similarities with, but have many important differences from, genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. A. hydrophila lateral flagellum class I gene transcription is σ70 dependent, which is consistent with the fact that lateral flagellum is constitutively transcribed, in contrast to the characteristics of V. parahaemolyticus. The fact that multiple genes are included in class I highlights that lateral flagellar genes are less hierarchically transcribed than polar flagellum genes. The A. hydrophila lafK-fliEJL gene cluster (where the subscript L distinguishes genes for lateral flagella from those for polar flagella) is exclusively from class I and is in V. parahaemolyticus class I and II. Furthermore, the A. hydrophila flgAMNL cluster is not transcribed from the σ54/LafK-dependent promoter and does not contain class II genes. Here, we propose a gene transcriptional hierarchy for the A. hydrophila lateral flagella. PMID:23335410

  7. Structure and Function of the Bi-Directional Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Minamino, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is a locomotive organelle that propels the bacterial cell body in liquid environments. The flagellum is a supramolecular complex composed of about 30 different proteins and consists of at least three parts: a rotary motor, a universal joint, and a helical filament. The flagellar motor of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica is powered by an inward-directed electrochemical potential difference of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane. The flagellar motor consists of a rotor made of FliF, FliG, FliM and FliN and a dozen stators consisting of MotA and MotB. FliG, FliM and FliN also act as a molecular switch, enabling the motor to spin in both counterclockwise and clockwise directions. Each stator is anchored to the peptidoglycan layer through the C-terminal periplasmic domain of MotB and acts as a proton channel to couple the proton flow through the channel with torque generation. Highly conserved charged residues at the rotor–stator interface are required not only for torque generation but also for stator assembly around the rotor. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of the structure and function of the proton-driven bacterial flagellar motor. PMID:24970213

  8. Automated Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography System for Enrichment of Escherichia coli Phosphoproteome

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Yi; Wu, Si; Zhao, Rui; Zink, Erika M.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Meng, Da; Clauss, Therese RW; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2013-06-05

    Enrichment of bacterial phosphopeptides is an essential step prior to bottom-up mass spectrometry-based analysis of the phosphoproteome, which is fundamental to understanding the role of phosphoproteins in cell signaling and regulation of protein activity. We developed an automated IMAC system to enrich strong cation exchange-fractionated phosphopeptides from the soluble proteome of Escherichia coli MG1655 grown on minimal medium. Initial demonstration of the system resulted in identification of 75 phosphopeptides covering 52 phosphoproteins. Consistent with previous studies, many of these phosphoproteins are involved in the carbohydrate portion of central metabolism. The automated system utilizes a large capacity IMAC column that can effectively enrich phosphopeptides from a bacterial sample by increasing peptide loading and reducing the wash time. An additional benefit of the automated IMAC system is reduced labor and associated costs.

  9. A Non-Poissonian Flagellar Motor Switch Increases Bacterial Chemotactic Potential.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; He, Jing; Altindal, Tuba; Xie, Li; Wu, Xiao-Lun

    2015-09-01

    We investigate bacterial chemotactic strategies using run-tumble and run-reverse-flick motility patterns. The former is typically observed in enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella and the latter was recently observed in the marine bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus and is possibly exhibited by other polar flagellated species. It is shown that although the three-step motility pattern helps the bacterium to localize near hot spots, an exploitative behavior, its exploratory potential in short times can be significantly enhanced by employing a non-Poissonian regulation scheme for its flagellar motor switches. PMID:26331263

  10. A chemotactic signaling surface on CheY defined by suppressors of flagellar switch mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Roman, S J; Meyers, M; Volz, K; Matsumura, P

    1992-01-01

    CheY is the response regulator protein that interacts with the flagellar switch apparatus to modulate flagellar rotation during chemotactic signaling. CheY can be phosphorylated and dephosphorylated in vitro, and evidence indicates that CheY-P is the activated form that induces clockwise flagellar rotation, resulting in a tumble in the cell's swimming pattern. The flagellar switch apparatus is a complex macromolecular structure composed of at least three gene products, FliG, FliM, and FliN. Genetic analysis of Escherichia coli has identified fliG and fliM as genes in which mutations occur that allele specifically suppress cheY mutations, indicating interactions among these gene products. We have generated a class of cheY mutations selected for dominant suppression of fliG mutations. Interestingly, these cheY mutations dominantly suppressed both fliG and fliM mutations; this is consistent with the idea that the CheY protein interacts with both switch gene products during signaling. Biochemical characterization of wild-type and suppressor CheY proteins did not reveal altered phosphorylation properties or evidence for phosphorylation-dependent CheY multimerization. These data indicate that suppressor CheY proteins are specifically altered in the ability to transduce chemotactic signals to the switch at some point subsequent to phosphorylation. Physical mapping of suppressor amino acid substitutions on the crystal structure of CheY revealed a high degree of spatial clustering, suggesting that this region of CheY is a signaling surface that transduces chemotactic signals to the switch. Images PMID:1400175

  11. Small Intestine Early Innate Immunity Response during Intestinal Colonization by Escherichia coli Depends on Its Extra-Intestinal Virulence Status

    PubMed Central

    Willing, Benjamin P.; Croxen, Matthew A.; Dufour, Nicolas; Dion, Sara; Wachtel, Sarah; Denamur, Erick; Finlay, B. Brett

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains live as commensals in the digestive tract of the host, but they can also initiate urinary tract infections. The aim of this work was to determine how a host detects the presence of a new UPEC strain in the digestive tract. Mice were orally challenged with UPEC strains 536 and CFT073, non-pathogenic strain K12 MG1655, and ΔPAI-536, an isogenic mutant of strain 536 lacking all 7 pathogenicity islands whose virulence is drastically attenuated. Intestinal colonization was measured, and cytokine expression was determined in various organs recovered from mice after oral challenge. UPEC strain 536 efficiently colonized the mouse digestive tract, and prior Enterobacteriaceae colonization was found to impact strain 536 colonization efficiency. An innate immune response, detected as the production of TNFα, IL-6 and IL-10 cytokines, was activated in the ileum 48 hours after oral challenge with strain 536, and returned to baseline within 8 days, without a drop in fecal pathogen load. Although inflammation was detected in the ileum, histology was normal at the time of cytokine peak. Comparison of cytokine secretion 48h after oral gavage with E. coli strain 536, CFT073, MG1655 or ΔPAI-536 showed that inflammation was more pronounced with UPECs than with non-pathogenic or attenuated strains. Pathogenicity islands also seemed to be involved in host detection, as IL-6 intestinal secretion was increased after administration of E. coli strain 536, but not after administration of ΔPAI-536. In conclusion, UPEC colonization of the mouse digestive tract activates acute phase inflammatory cytokine secretion but does not trigger any pathological changes, illustrating the opportunistic nature of UPECs. This digestive tract colonization model will be useful for studying the factors controlling the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity. PMID:27096607

  12. The bacterial flagellar protein export apparatus processively transports flagellar proteins even with extremely infrequent ATP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Kinoshita, Miki; Aldridge, Phillip D.; Namba, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    For self-assembly of the bacterial flagellum, a specific protein export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) as the energy source to transport component proteins to the distal growing end. The export apparatus consists of a transmembrane PMF-driven export gate and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex composed of FliH, FliI and FliJ. The FliI6FliJ complex is structurally similar to the α3β3γ complex of FOF1-ATPase. FliJ allows the gate to efficiently utilize PMF to drive flagellar protein export but it remains unknown how. Here, we report the role of ATP hydrolysis by the FliI6FliJ complex. The export apparatus processively transported flagellar proteins to grow flagella even with extremely infrequent or no ATP hydrolysis by FliI mutation (E211D and E211Q, respectively). This indicates that the rate of ATP hydrolysis is not at all coupled with the export rate. Deletion of FliI residues 401 to 410 resulted in no flagellar formation although this FliI deletion mutant retained 40% of the ATPase activity, suggesting uncoupling between ATP hydrolysis and activation of the gate. We propose that infrequent ATP hydrolysis by the FliI6FliJ ring is sufficient for gate activation, allowing processive translocation of export substrates for efficient flagellar assembly. PMID:25531309

  13. Molecular Serotyping of Escherichia coli O111:H8

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate Escherichia coli serotyping is critical for pathogen diagnosis and surveillance of non-O157 shiga-toxigenic strains, however, few laboratories have this capacity. The molecular serotyping protocol described in this paper targets the somatic and flagellar antigens of E. coli O111:H8 used in...

  14. Molecular serotyping of Escherichia coli: A verification and reclassification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Serotyping of E. coli, based on the O- (polysaccharide side chain) and H- (flagellar) antigens using antisera is a common practice for diagnostics, outbreak investigations, and epidemiological surveillance. The full set of E. coli serogroups comprises O-groups O1 to O181, with several O...

  15. Regulation of Flagellar Length in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nedra F.; Iyer, Janaki Kannan; Buchheim, Julie A.; Meek, William

    2008-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has two apically localized flagella that are maintained at an equal and appropriate length. Assembly and maintenance of flagella requires a microtubule-based transport system known as intraflagellar transport (IFT). During IFT, proteins destined for incorporation into or removal from a flagellum are carried along doublet microtubules via IFT particles. Regulation of IFT activity therefore is pivotal in determining the length of a flagellum. Reviewed is our current understanding of the role of IFT and signal transduction pathways in the regulation of flagellar length. PMID:18692148

  16. A Complete Set of Flagellar Genes Acquired by Horizontal Transfer Coexists with the Endogenous Flagellar System in Rhodobacter sphaeroides▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Sebastian; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Fabela, Salvador; Osorio, Aurora; Dreyfus, Georges; Vinuesa, Pablo; Camarena, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria swim in liquid environments by means of a complex rotating structure known as the flagellum. Approximately 40 proteins are required for the assembly and functionality of this structure. Rhodobacter sphaeroides has two flagellar systems. One of these systems has been shown to be functional and is required for the synthesis of the well-characterized single subpolar flagellum, while the other was found only after the genome sequence of this bacterium was completed. In this work we found that the second flagellar system of R. sphaeroides can be expressed and produces a functional flagellum. In many bacteria with two flagellar systems, one is required for swimming, while the other allows movement in denser environments by producing a large number of flagella over the entire cell surface. In contrast, the second flagellar system of R. sphaeroides produces polar flagella that are required for swimming. Expression of the second set of flagellar genes seems to be positively regulated under anaerobic growth conditions. Phylogenic analysis suggests that the flagellar system that was initially characterized was in fact acquired by horizontal transfer from a γ-proteobacterium, while the second flagellar system contains the native genes. Interestingly, other α-proteobacteria closely related to R. sphaeroides have also acquired a set of flagellar genes similar to the set found in R. sphaeroides, suggesting that a common ancestor received this gene cluster. PMID:17293429

  17. Loss of the lac operon contributes to Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells through derepression of flagellar synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lingyan; Ni, Zhiwei; Wang, Lei; Feng, Lu; Liu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella, a genus that is closely related to Escherichia coli, includes many pathogens of humans and other animals. A notable feature that distinguishes Salmonella from E. coli is lactose negativity, because the lac operon is lost in most Salmonella genomes. Here, we expressed the lac operon in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and compared the virulence of the Lac(+) strain to that of the wild-type strain in a murine model, invasion assays, and macrophage replication assays. We showed that the Lac(+) strain is attenuated in vivo and the attenuation of virulence is caused by its defect in epithelial cell invasion. However, the invasion-defective phenotype is unrelated to lactose utilization. Through sequencing and the comparison of the transcriptome profile between the Lac(+) and wild-type strains during invasion, we found that most flagellar genes were markedly downregulated in the Lac(+) strain, while other genes associated with invasion, such as the majority of genes encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1, were not differentially expressed. Moreover, we discovered that lacA is the major repressor of flagellar gene expression in the lac operon. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the lac operon decreases Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells through repression of flagellar biosynthesis. As the ability to invade epithelial cells is a critical virulence determinant of Salmonella, our results provide important evidence that the loss of the lac operon contributes to the evolution of Salmonella pathogenicity. PMID:25362512

  18. Structural diversity of bacterial flagellar motors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songye; Beeby, Morgan; Murphy, Gavin E; Leadbetter, Jared R; Hendrixson, David R; Briegel, Ariane; Li, Zhuo; Shi, Jian; Tocheva, Elitza I; Müller, Axel; Dobro, Megan J; Jensen, Grant J

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is one of nature's most amazing and well-studied nanomachines. Its cell-wall-anchored motor uses chemical energy to rotate a microns-long filament and propel the bacterium towards nutrients and away from toxins. While much is known about flagellar motors from certain model organisms, their diversity across the bacterial kingdom is less well characterized, allowing the occasional misrepresentation of the motor as an invariant, ideal machine. Here, we present an electron cryotomographical survey of flagellar motor architectures throughout the Bacteria. While a conserved structural core was observed in all 11 bacteria imaged, surprisingly novel and divergent structures as well as different symmetries were observed surrounding the core. Correlating the motor structures with the presence and absence of particular motor genes in each organism suggested the locations of five proteins involved in the export apparatus including FliI, whose position below the C-ring was confirmed by imaging a deletion strain. The combination of conserved and specially-adapted structures seen here sheds light on how this complex protein nanomachine has evolved to meet the needs of different species. PMID:21673657

  19. Flagellar synchronization through direct hydrodynamic interactions.

    PubMed

    Brumley, Douglas R; Wan, Kirsty Y; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01

    Flows generated by ensembles of flagella are crucial to development, motility and sensing, but the mechanisms behind this striking coordination remain unclear. We present novel experiments in which two micropipette-held somatic cells of Volvox carteri, with distinct intrinsic beating frequencies, are studied by high-speed imaging as a function of their separation and orientation. Analysis of time series shows that the interflagellar coupling, constrained by lack of connections between cells to be hydrodynamical, exhibits a spatial dependence consistent with theory. At close spacings it produces robust synchrony for thousands of beats, while at increasing separations synchrony is degraded by stochastic processes. Manipulation of the relative flagellar orientation reveals in-phase and antiphase states, consistent with dynamical theories. Flagellar tracking with exquisite precision reveals waveform changes that result from hydrodynamic coupling. This study proves unequivocally that flagella coupled solely through a fluid can achieve robust synchrony despite differences in their intrinsic properties.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02750.001. PMID:25073925

  20. Flagellar synchronization through direct hydrodynamic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brumley, Douglas R; Wan, Kirsty Y; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01

    Flows generated by ensembles of flagella are crucial to development, motility and sensing, but the mechanisms behind this striking coordination remain unclear. We present novel experiments in which two micropipette-held somatic cells of Volvox carteri, with distinct intrinsic beating frequencies, are studied by high-speed imaging as a function of their separation and orientation. Analysis of time series shows that the interflagellar coupling, constrained by lack of connections between cells to be hydrodynamical, exhibits a spatial dependence consistent with theory. At close spacings it produces robust synchrony for thousands of beats, while at increasing separations synchrony is degraded by stochastic processes. Manipulation of the relative flagellar orientation reveals in-phase and antiphase states, consistent with dynamical theories. Flagellar tracking with exquisite precision reveals waveform changes that result from hydrodynamic coupling. This study proves unequivocally that flagella coupled solely through a fluid can achieve robust synchrony despite differences in their intrinsic properties. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02750.001 PMID:25073925

  1. Coordinated Switching of Bacterial Flagellar Motors: Evidence for Direct Motor-Motor Coupling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Tu, Yuhai

    2013-04-01

    The swimming of Escherichia coli is powered by its multiple flagellar motors. Each motor spins either clockwise or counterclockwise, under the control of an intracellular regulator, CheY-P. There can be two mechanisms (extrinsic and intrinsic) to coordinate the switching of bacterial motors. The extrinsic one arises from the fact that different motors in the same cell sense a common input (CheY-P) which fluctuates near the motors’ response threshold. An alternative, intrinsic mechanism is direct motor-motor coupling which makes synchronized switching energetically favorable. Here, we develop simple models for both mechanisms and uncover their different hallmarks. A quantitative comparison to the recent experiments suggests that the direct coupling mechanism may be accountable for the observed sharp correlation between motors in a single Escherichia coli. Possible origins of this coupling (e.g., hydrodynamic interaction) are discussed.

  2. Persistence of Escherichia coli in batch and continuous vermicomposting systems.

    PubMed

    Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Martin, Vincent J J; Gélinas, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Vermicomposting is a biooxidation process in which epigeicearthworms act in synergy with microbial populations to degrade organic matter. Vermicomposting does not go through a thermophilic stage as required by North American legislations for pathogen eradication. We examined the survival of a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) labeled Escherichia coli MG1655 as a model for the survival of pathogenic bacteria in both small-scale batch and medium-scale continuously-operated systems to discern the influence of the earthworm Eisenia fetida, nutrient content and the indigenous vermicompost microbial community on pathogen abundance. In batch systems, the microbial community had the greatest influence on the rapid decline of E. coli populations, and the effect of earthworms was only visible in microbially-impoverishedvermicomposts. No significant earthworm density-dependent relationship was observed on E. coli survival under continuous operation. E. coli numbers decreased below the US EPA compost sanitation guidelines of 10(3)Colony Forming Units (CFU)/g (dry weight) within 18-21days for both the small-scale batch and medium-scale continuous systems, but it took up to 51days without earthworms and with an impoverished microbial community to reach the legal limit. Nutrient replenishment (i.e. organic carbon) provided by continuous feed input did not appear to extend E. coli survival. In fact, longer survival of E. coli was noticed in treatments where less total and labile sugars were available, suggesting that sugars may support potentially antagonist bacteria in the vermicompost. Total N, pH and humidity did not appear to affect E. coli survival. Several opportunistic human pathogens may be found in vermicompost, and their populations are likely kept in check by antagonists. PMID:27499290

  3. Studies on the mechanism of bacterial flagellar rotation and the flagellar number regulation.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Many motile bacteria have the motility organ, the flagellum. It rotates by the rotary motor driven by the ion-motive force and is embedded in the cell surface at the base of each flagellar filament. Many researchers have been studying its rotary mechanism for years, but most of the energy conversion processes have been remained in mystery. We focused on the flagellar stator, which works at the core process of energy conversion, and found that the periplasmic region of the stator changes its conformation to be activated only when the stator units are incorporated into the motor and anchored at the cell wall. Meanwhile, the physiologically important supramolecular complex is localized in the cell at the right place and the right time with a proper amount. How the cell achieves such a proper localization is the fundamental question for life science, and we undertake this problem by analyzing the mechanism for biogenesis of a single polar flagellum of Vibrio alginolyticus. Here I describe the molecular mechanism of how the flagellum is generated at the specific place with a proper number, and also how the flagellar stator is incorporated into the motor to complete the functional motor assembly, based on our studies. PMID:27581279

  4. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. PMID:25611733

  5. Xylan-Degrading Catalytic Flagellar Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ágnes; Szabó, Veronika; Kovács, Mátyás; Patkó, Dániel; Tóth, Balázs; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2015-09-01

    Flagellin, the main component of flagellar filaments, is a protein possessing polymerization ability. In this work, a novel fusion construct of xylanase A from B. subtilis and Salmonella flagellin was created which is applicable to build xylan-degrading catalytic nanorods of high stability. The FliC-XynA chimera when overexpressed in a flagellin deficient Salmonella host strain was secreted into the culture medium by the flagellum-specific export machinery allowing easy purification. Filamentous assemblies displaying high surface density of catalytic sites were produced by ammonium sulfate-induced polymerization. FliC-XynA nanorods were resistant to proteolytic degradation and preserved their enzymatic activity for a long period of time. Furnishing enzymes with self-assembling ability to build catalytic nanorods offers a promising alternative approach to enzyme immobilization onto nanostructured synthetic scaffolds. PMID:25966869

  6. Proteomic Adaptations to Starvation Prepare Escherichia coli for Disinfection Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhe; Nandakumar, Renu; Nickerson, Kenneth; Li, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Despite the low nutrient level and constant presence of secondary disinfectants, bacterial re-growth still occurs in drinking water distribution systems. The molecular mechanisms that starved bacteria use to survive low-level chlorine-based disinfectants are not well understood. The objective of this study is to investigate these molecular mechanisms at the protein level that prepare starved cells for disinfection tolerance. Two commonly used secondary disinfectants chlorine and monochloramine, both at 1 mg/L, were used in this study. The proteomes of normal and starved Escherichia coli (K12 MG1655) cells were studied using quantitative proteomics. Over 60-min disinfection, starved cells showed significantly higher disinfection tolerance than normal cells based on the inactivation curves for both chlorine and monochloramine. Proteomic analyses suggest that starvation may prepare cells for the oxidative stress that chlorine-based disinfection will cause by affecting glutathione metabolism. In addition, proteins involved in stress regulation and stress responses were among the ones up-regulated under both starvation and chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. By comparing the fold changes under different conditions, it is suggested that starvation prepares E. coli for disinfection tolerance by increasing the expression of enzymes that can help cells survive chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. Protein co-expression analyses show that proteins in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway that were up-regulated under starvation are also involved in disinfection tolerance. Finally, the production and detoxification of methylglyoxal may be involved in the chlorine-based disinfection and cell defense mechanisms. PMID:25463932

  7. Seven gene deletions in seven days: Fast generation of Escherichia coli strains tolerant to acetate and osmotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Sheila I.; Lennen, Rebecca M.; Herrgård, Markus J.; Nielsen, Alex T.

    2015-01-01

    Generation of multiple genomic alterations is currently a time consuming process. Here, a method was established that enables highly efficient and simultaneous deletion of multiple genes in Escherichia coli. A temperature sensitive plasmid containing arabinose inducible lambda Red recombineering genes and a rhamnose inducible flippase recombinase was constructed to facilitate fast marker-free deletions. To further speed up the procedure, we integrated the arabinose inducible lambda Red recombineering genes and the rhamnose inducible FLP into the genome of E. coli K-12 MG1655. This system enables growth at 37 °C, thereby facilitating removal of integrated antibiotic cassettes and deletion of additional genes in the same day. Phosphorothioated primers were demonstrated to enable simultaneous deletions during one round of electroporation. Utilizing these methods, we constructed strains in which four to seven genes were deleted in E. coli W and E. coli K-12. The growth rate of an E. coli K-12 quintuple deletion strain was significantly improved in the presence of high concentrations of acetate and NaCl. In conclusion, we have generated a method that enables efficient and simultaneous deletion of multiple genes in several E. coli variants. The method enables deletion of up to seven genes in as little as seven days. PMID:26643270

  8. Exchange of rotor components in functioning bacterial flagellar motor

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuoka, Hajime; Inoue, Yuichi; Terasawa, Shun; Takahashi, Hiroto; Ishijima, Akihiko

    2010-03-26

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a rotary motor driven by the electrochemical potential of a coupling ion. The interaction between a rotor and stator units is thought to generate torque. The overall structure of flagellar motor has been thought to be static, however, it was recently proved that stators are exchanged in a rotating motor. Understanding the dynamics of rotor components in functioning motor is important for the clarifying of working mechanism of bacterial flagellar motor. In this study, we focused on the dynamics and the turnover of rotor components in a functioning flagellar motor. Expression systems for GFP-FliN, FliM-GFP, and GFP-FliG were constructed, and each GFP-fusion was functionally incorporated into the flagellar motor. To investigate whether the rotor components are exchanged in a rotating motor, we performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. After photobleaching, in a tethered cell producing GFP-FliN or FliM-GFP, the recovery of fluorescence at the rotational center was observed. However, in a cell producing GFP-FliG, no recovery of fluorescence was observed. The transition phase of fluorescence intensity after full or partially photobleaching allowed the turnover of FliN subunits to be calculated as 0.0007 s{sup -1}, meaning that FliN would be exchanged in tens of minutes. These novel findings indicate that a bacterial flagellar motor is not a static structure even in functioning state. This is the first report for the exchange of rotor components in a functioning bacterial flagellar motor.

  9. Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirody, Jasmine; Berry, Richard; Oster, George

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) drives swimming in a wide variety of bacterial species, making it crucial for several fundamental biological processes including chemotaxis and community formation. Recent experiments have shown that the structure of this nanomachine is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating units (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding invalidates the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. Here, we put forward a model for the torque generation mechanism of this motor and propose that the maximum speed of the motor increases as additional torque-generators are recruited. This is contrary to the current widely-held belief that there is a universal upper limit to the speed of the BFM. Our result arises from the assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence and consolidate our predictions with arguments that a processive motor must have a high duty ratio at high loads.

  10. Flagellar transcriptional activators FlbB and FlaI: gene sequences and 5' consensus sequences of operons under FlbB and FlaI control.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, D H; Frantz, B B; Matsumura, P

    1988-01-01

    The regulation of the expression of the operons in the flagella-chemotaxis regulon in Escherichia coli has been shown to be a highly ordered cascade which closely parallels the assembly of the flagellar structure and the chemotaxis machinery (T. Iino, Annu. Rev. Genet. 11:161-182, 1977; Y. Komeda, J. Bacteriol. 168: 1315-1318). The master operon, flbB, has been sequenced, and one of its gene products (FlaI) has been identified. On the basis of the deduced amino acid sequence, the FlbB protein has similarity to an alternate sigma factor which is responsible for expression of flagella in Bacillus subtilis. In addition, we have sequenced the 5' regions of a number of flagellar operons and compared these sequences with the 5' region of flagellar operons directly and indirectly under FlbB and FlaI control. We found both a consensus sequence which has been shown to be in all other flagellar operons (J. D. Helmann and M. J. Chamberlin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:6422-6424) and a derivative consensus sequence, which is found only in the 5' region of operons directly under FlbB and FlaI control. Images PMID:2832369

  11. Negative transcriptional regulation in the Caulobacter flagellar hierarchy.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H; Dingwall, A; Shapiro, L

    1989-01-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus flagellum is formed at a specific time in the cell cycle and its assembly requires the ordered expression of a large number of genes. These genes are controlled in a positive trans-acting hierarchy that reflects the order of assembly of the flagellum. Using plasmids carrying transcriptional fusions of either a neo or a lux reporter gene to the promoters of three flagellar genes representing different ranks in the hierarchy (the hook operon, a basal body gene flbN, and the flaO gene), we have measured the level of chimeric gene expression in 13 flagellar mutant backgrounds. Mutants in the hook operon or in basal body genes caused overproduction of both hook operon and basal body gene chimeric mRNAs, suggesting that negative regulation is superimposed on the positive trans-acting control for these early events in the flagellar hierarchy. Mutants in the structural genes and in genes involved in flagellar assembly had no effect on flaO expression, placing the flaO gene near the top of the hierarchy. However, flaO expression appears to be under negative control by two regulatory genes flaS and flaW. Negative control, as a response to the completion of specific steps in the assembly process, may be an important mechanism used by the cell to turn off flagellar gene expression once the gene product is no longer needed. Images PMID:2771950

  12. Flagellar apparatus gene sequences of Aeromonas hydrophila AL09-73 isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flagellar apparatus genes of recent outbreak Aeromonas hydrophila AL09-73 isolate were sequenced and characterized. Total 28 flagellar genes were identified. The sizes of the genes range from 318 to 2001 nucleotides, which potentially encode different complex flagellar proteins. At nucleotide and...

  13. Variability of the tandem repeat region of the Escherichia coli tolA gene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kai; Vanoirbeek, Kristof; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2012-06-01

    An intragenic tandem repeat (TR) region has been previously reported in the tolA gene of Escherichia coli. In silico analysis of 123 E. coli tolA sequences from Genbank and PCR analysis of the tolA TR region from 111 additional E. coli strains revealed that this TR region is highly variable. Nine different TR sizes with 8 up to 16 repeat units were found in in silico analysis and 6 of these were also found by PCR analysis. The 13-unit TR emerged as the predominant type using both approaches (47.2% and 86.5%, respectively). Remarkably, TRs in pathogenic strains appeared to be more variable than those in non-pathogens. To demonstrate the occurrence of TR variation in a clonal population, a selection system for TR deletion events was constructed by inserting the 13-unit TR region of MG1655 in frame into a plasmid-borne chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene. The resulting cat gene no longer conferred chloramphenicol resistance unless the insert size was reduced by TR contraction. Using this system, Cm-resistant revertants with a TR contraction were recovered at a frequency of 1.1 × 10(-7), and contraction was shown to be recA-dependent and enhanced in a DNA repair-deficient mutS background. PMID:22659144

  14. Engineering Escherichia coli for selective geraniol production with minimized endogenous dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Wang, Chonglong; Yoon, Sang-Hwal; Jang, Hui-Jeong; Choi, Eui-Sung; Kim, Seon-Won

    2014-01-01

    Geraniol, a monoterpene alcohol, has versatile applications in the fragrance industry, pharmacy and agrochemistry. Moreover, geraniol could be an ideal gasoline alternative. In this study, recombinant overexpression of geranyl diphosphate synthase and the bottom portion of a foreign mevalonate pathway in Escherichia coli MG1655 produced 13.3mg/L of geraniol. Introduction of Ocimum basilicum geraniol synthase increased geraniol production to 105.2mg/L. However, geraniol production encountered a loss from its endogenous dehydrogenization and isomerization into other geranoids (nerol, neral and geranial). Three E. coli enzymes (YjgB, YahK and YddN) were identified with high sequence identity to plant geraniol dehydrogenases. YjgB was demonstrated to be the major one responsible for geraniol dehydrogenization. Deletion of yjgB increased geraniol production to 129.7mg/L. Introduction of the whole mevalonate pathway for enhanced building block synthesis from endogenously synthesized mevalonate improved geraniol production up to 182.5mg/L in the yjgB mutant after 48h of culture, which was a double of that obtained in the wild type control (96.5mg/L). Our strategy for improving geraniol production in engineered E. coli should be generalizable for addressing similar problems during metabolic engineering. PMID:24269531

  15. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials. PMID:26821214

  16. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles.

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander M; Weig, Cornelius; Oswald, Peter; Frey, Erwin; Fischer, Peer; Liedl, Tim

    2016-02-10

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials. PMID:26821214

  17. The Transcription Unit Architecture of the Escherichia Coli Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Byung-Kwan; Zengler, Karsten; Qiu, Yu; Park, Young S.; Knight, Eric M.; Barrett, Christian; Gao, Yuan; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2009-11-01

    Under EMSL User Proposal 25660, the authors reported that bacterial genomes are organized by structural and functional elements, including promoters, transcription start and termination sites, open reading frames, regulatory noncoding regions, untranslated regions and transcription units. Here, we iteratively integrate high-throughput, genome-wide measurements of RNA polymerase binding locations and mRNA transcript abundance, 5' sequences and translation into proteins to determine the organizational structure of the Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 genome. Integration of the organizational elements provides an experimentally annotated transcription unit architecture, including alternative transcription start sites, 5' untranslated region, boundaries and open reading frames of each transcription unit. A total of 4,661 transcription units were identified, representing an increase of >530% over current knowledge. This comprehensive transcription unit architecture allows for the elucidation of condition-specific uses of alternative sigma factors at the genome scale. Furthermore, the transcription unit architecture provides a foundation on which to construct genome-scale transcriptional and translational regulatory networks.

  18. Flagellar force production during regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukich, John N.; Clodfelter, Catherine; Bernd, Karen K.

    2009-11-01

    Several respiratory, digestive, and reproductive disorders originate with motional dysfunction of cilia and flagella. The usefulness of cilia and flagella is understood, but the internal mechanism for creating their breast stroke-like motion is not. This study reports on standardization of calibration, trapping and cell movement recording methods. Our techniques permit us to measure the flagellar swimming force of Chlamydomonas during flagella regeneration. We find that as flagella length increases, the flagellar force is maximized after 50% of full length is achieved except for a significant dip at 75% of full length. These results raise many questions regarding the flagella infrastructure.

  19. The flaA locus of Bacillus subtilis is part of a large operon coding for flagellar structures, motility functions, and an ATPase-like polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, A M; Caramori, T; Crabb, W D; Scoffone, F; Galizzi, A

    1991-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced 8.3 kb of Bacillus subtilis DNA corresponding to the flaA locus involved in flagellar biosynthesis, motility, and chemotaxis. The DNA sequence revealed the presence of 10 complete and 2 incomplete open reading frames. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences to data banks showed similarities of nine of the deduced products to a number of proteins of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium for which a role in flagellar functioning has been directly demonstrated. In particular, the sequence data suggest that the flaA operon codes for the M-ring protein, components of the motor switch, and the distal part of the basal-body rod. The gene order is remarkably similar to that described for region III of the enterobacterial flagellar regulon. One of the open reading frames was translated into a protein with 48% amino acid identity to S. typhimurium FliI and 29% identity to the beta subunit of E. coli ATP synthase. PMID:1828465

  20. Functional Activation of the Flagellar Type III Secretion Export Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Andrew M.; Calvo, Rebecca A.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Flagella are assembled sequentially from the inside-out with morphogenetic checkpoints that enforce the temporal order of subunit addition. Here we show that flagellar basal bodies fail to proceed to hook assembly at high frequency in the absence of the monotopic protein SwrB of Bacillus subtilis. Genetic suppressor analysis indicates that SwrB activates the flagellar type III secretion export apparatus by the membrane protein FliP. Furthermore, mutants defective in the flagellar C-ring phenocopy the absence of SwrB for reduced hook frequency and C-ring defects may be bypassed either by SwrB overexpression or by a gain-of-function allele in the polymerization domain of FliG. We conclude that SwrB enhances the probability that the flagellar basal body adopts a conformation proficient for secretion to ensure that rod and hook subunits are not secreted in the absence of a suitable platform on which to polymerize. PMID:26244495

  1. Novel Components of the Flagellar System in Epsilonproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Beile; Lara-Tejero, Maria; Lefebre, Matthew; Goodman, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Motility is essential for the pathogenesis of many bacterial species. Most bacteria move using flagella, which are multiprotein filaments that rotate propelled by a cell wall-anchored motor using chemical energy. Although some components of the flagellar apparatus are common to many bacterial species, recent studies have shown significant differences in the flagellar structures of different bacterial species. The molecular bases for these differences, however, are not understood. The flagella from epsilonproteobacteria, which include the bacterial pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter pylori, are among the most divergent. Using next-generation sequencing combined with transposon mutagenesis, we have conducted a comprehensive high-throughput genetic screen in Campylobacter jejuni, which identified several novel components of its flagellar system. Biochemical analyses detected interactions between the identified proteins and known components of the flagellar machinery, and in vivo imaging located them to the bacterial poles, where flagella assemble. Most of the identified new components are conserved within but restricted to epsilonproteobacteria. These studies provide insight into the divergent flagella of this group of bacteria and highlight the complexity of this remarkable structure, which has adapted to carry out its conserved functions in the context of widely diverse bacterial species. PMID:24961693

  2. Divalent Cation Control of Flagellar Motility in African Trypanosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westergard, Anna M.; Hutchings, Nathan R.

    2005-03-01

    Changes in calcium concentration have been shown to dynamically affect flagellar motility in several eukaryotic systems. The African trypanosome is a monoflagellated protozoan parasite and the etiological agent of sleeping sickness. Although cell motility has been implicated in disease progression, very little is currently known about biochemical control of the trypanosome flagellum. In this study, we assess the effects of extracellular changes in calcium and nickel concentration on trypanosome flagellar movement. Using a flow through chamber, we determine the relative changes in motility in individual trypanosomes in response to various concentrations of calcium and nickel, respectively. Extracellular concentrations of calcium and nickel (as low as 100 micromolar) significantly inhibit trypanosome cell motility. The effects are reversible, as indicated by the recovery of motion after removal of the calcium or nickel from the chamber. We are currently investigating the specific changes in flagellar oscillation and coordination that result from calcium and nickel, respectively. These results verify the presence of a calcium-responsive signaling mechanism(s) that regulates flagellar beat in trypanosomes.

  3. Identification and characterization of flagellar biosynthetic genes in Yersinia ruckeri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using transposon mutagenesis we have identified a Yersinia ruckeri serovar I mutant defective in both motility and production of secreted lipase activity. Sequence analysis of this mutant revealed a single transposon insertion in an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to flhA, a flagellar biosynt...

  4. Flagellar motility is necessary for Aeromonas hydrophila adhesion.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yingxue; Lin, Guifang; Chen, Wenbo; Xu, Xiaojin; Yan, Qingpi

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion to host surface or cells is the initial step in bacterial pathogenesis, and the adhesion mechanisms of the fish pathogenic bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila were investigated in this study. First, a mutagenesis library of A. hydrophila that contained 332 random insertion mutants was constructed via mini-Tn10 Km mutagenesis. Four mutants displayed the most attenuated adhesion. Sequence analysis revealed that the mini-Tn10 insertion sites in the four mutant strains were flgC(GenBank accession numbers KX261880), cytb4(GenBank accession numbers JN133621), rbsR(GenBank accession numbers KX261881) and flgE(GenBank accession numbers JQ974982). To further study the roles of flgC and flgE in the adhesion of A. hydrophila, some biological characteristics of the wild-type strain B11, the mutants M121 and M240, and the complemented strains C121 and C240 were investigated. The results showed that the mutation in flgC or flgE led to the flagellar motility of A. hydrophila significant reduction or abolishment. flgC was not necessary for flagellar biosynthesis but was necessary for the full motility of A. hydrophila, flgE was involved in both flagellar biosynthesis and motility. The flagellar motility is necessary for A. hydrophila to adhere to the host mucus, which suggests flagellar motility plays crucial roles in the early infection process of this bacterium. PMID:27432325

  5. Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 reduces growth, Shiga toxin expression, release and thus cytotoxicity of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Mashkoor; Guenther, Sebastian; Schierack, Peter; Tedin, Karsten; Wieler, Lothar H

    2015-01-01

    Due to increased release or production of Shiga toxin by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) after exposure to antimicrobial agents, the role of antimicrobial agents in EHEC mediated infections remains controversial. Probiotics are therefore rapidly gaining interest as an alternate therapeutic option. The well-known probiotic strain Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) was tested in vitro to determine its probiotic effects on growth, Shiga toxin (Stx) gene expression, Stx amount and associated cytotoxicity on the most important EHEC strains of serotype O104:H4 and O157:H7. Following co-culture of EcN:EHEC in broth for 4 and 24 h, the probiotic effects on EHEC growth, toxin gene expression, Stx amount and cytotoxicity were determined using quantitative real time-PCR, Stx-ELISA and Vero cytotoxicity assays. Probiotic EcN strongly reduced EHEC numbers (cfu) of O104:H4 up to (68%) and O157:H7 to (72.2%) (p<0.05) in LB broth medium whereas the non-probiotic E. coli strain MG1655 had no effect on EHEC growth. The level of stx expression was significantly down-regulated, particularly for the stx2a gene. The stx down-regulation in EcN co-culture was not due to reduced numbers of EHEC. A significant inhibition in Stx amounts and cytotoxicity were also observed in sterile supernatants of EcN:EHEC co-cultures. These findings indicate that probiotic EcN displays strong inhibitory effects on growth, Shiga toxin gene expression, amount and cytotoxicity of EHEC strains. Thus, EcN may be considered as a putative therapeutic candidate, in particular against EHEC O104:H4 and O157:H7. PMID:25465158

  6. Effects of various agents on flagellar activity, flagellar autotomy and cell viability in four species of Chlamydomonas (chlorophyta: volvocales).

    PubMed

    Lewin, R A; Lee, T H; Fang, L S

    1982-01-01

    Over 200 strains of green algal flagellates, representing about 100 species, were examined for their suitability as experimental organisms for studies of flagellar activity. The cells of all species shed their flagella under unfavourable conditions of temperature or pH, or in the presence of alcohols, detergents or toxic agents of various kinds. For further studies of flagellar activity, motility and autotomy (biologically induced shedding) in particular, we selected four species of Chlamydomonas: C. dysosmos Moewus, C. moewusii Gerloff, C. monoica Strehlow and C. reinhardtii Dangeard. Agents found to inhibit motility without inducing death or flagellar autotomy included azide, arsenite, thiosulphate, cyanide, ferricyanide, hydroxylamine, chloral hydrate, malonate, p-chloro-mercury benzoate and cytochalasin-B, each in a limited range of concentrations which differed according to species and strain. Higher concentrations of these agents caused the flagella to be shed. Since flagellar autotomy is a means by which a cell can quickly reduce the area of its permeable surface, it may have a positive survival value for species liable to be subjected to unfavourable physicochemical conditions. PMID:6764045

  7. A new custom microarray for sRNA profiling in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Larrabeiti, Olatz; Plágaro, Ander Hernández; Gracia, Celine; Sevillano, Elena; Gallego, Lucía; Hajnsdorf, Eliane; Kaberdin, Vladimir R

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) play essential roles in the post-transcriptional control of gene expression. To improve their detection by conventional microarrays, we designed a custom microarray containing a group of probes targeting known and some putative Escherichia coli sRNAs. To assess its potential in detection of sRNAs, RNA profiling experiments were performed with total RNA extracted from E. coli MG1655 cells exponentially grown in rich (Luria-Bertani) and minimal (M9/glucose) media. We found that many sRNAs could yield reasonably strong and statistically significant signals corresponding to nearly all sRNAs annotated in the EcoCyc database. Besides differential expression of two sRNAs (GcvB and RydB), expression of other sRNAs was less affected by the composition of the growth media. Other examples of the differentially expressed sRNAs were revealed by comparing gene expression of the wild-type strain and its isogenic mutant lacking functional poly(A) polymerase I (pcnB). Further, northern blot analysis was employed to validate these data and to assess the existence of new putative sRNAs. Our results suggest that the use of custom microarrays with improved capacities for detection of sRNAs can offer an attractive opportunity for efficient gene expression profiling of sRNAs and their target mRNAs at the whole transcriptome level. PMID:27190161

  8. Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) oligosaccharides decrease biofilm formation by uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiadong; Marais, Jannie P. J.; Khoo, Christina; LaPlante, Kerry; Vejborg, Rebecca M.; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Seeram, Navindra P.; Rowley, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The preventive effects of the American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) against urinary tract infections are supported by extensive studies which have primarily focused on its phenolic constituents. Herein, a phenolic-free carbohydrate fraction (designated cranf1b-F2) was purified from cranberry fruit using ion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. MALDI-TOF-MS analysis revealed that the cranf1b-F2 constituents are predominantly oligosaccharides possessing various degrees of polymerisation and further structural analysis (by GC-MS and NMR) revealed mainly xyloglucan and arabinan residues. In antimicrobial assays, cranf1b-F2 (at 1.25 mg/mL concentration) reduced biofilm production by the uropathogenic Escherichia coli CFT073 strain by over 50% but did not inhibit bacterial growth. Cranf1b-F2 (ranging from 0.625 - 10 mg/mL) also inhibited biofilm formation of the non-pathogenic E. coli MG1655 strain up to 60% in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that cranberry oligosaccharides, in addition to its phenolic constituents, may play a role in its preventive effects against urinary tract infections. PMID:26613004

  9. Metabolic Response of Escherichia coli upon Treatment with Hypochlorite at Sub-Lethal Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jeannette; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Hypochlorite is a reactive oxygen species that is worldwide as an antibacterial disinfectant. Hypochlorite exposure is known to cause oxidative damage to DNA and proteins. As a response to these effects, the metabolite profiles of organisms treated with sub-lethal doses of hypochlorite are assumed to be severely modified; however, the nature of these changes is hardly understood. Therefore, using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry, we analyzed the time-dependent impact of hypochlorite exposure with a sub-lethal concentration (50 µM) on the metabolite profile of the Escherichia coli strain MG1655. Principle component analysis clearly distinguished between the metabolite profiles of bacteria treated for 0, 5,10, 20, 40, or 60 min. Major changes in the relative amounts of fatty acids, acetic acid, and formic acid occurred within the first 5 min. Comparative gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry analyses revealed that the amounts of free methionine and alanine were significantly decreased in the treated cells, demonstrating their susceptibility to hypochlorite exposure. The concentrations of succinate, urea, orotic acid, 2-aminobutyric acid, and 2-hydroxybutyric acid were also severely affected, indicating general changes in the metabolic network by hypochlorite. However, most metabolite levels relaxed to the reference values of untreated cells after 40–60 min, reflecting the capability of E. coli to rapidly adapt to environmental stress factors such as the presence of sub-lethal oxidant levels. PMID:25932918

  10. Deciphering Fur transcriptional regulatory network highlights its complex role beyond iron metabolism in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Latif, Haythem; O’Brien, Edward J.; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2014-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism. However, the full regulatory potential of Fur remains undefined. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the Fur transcriptional regulatory network in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in response to iron availability using genome-wide measurements (ChIP-exo and RNA-seq). Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 81 genes in 42 transcription units are directly regulated by three different modes of Fur regulation, including apo- and holo-Fur activation and holo-Fur repression. We show that Fur connects iron transport and utilization enzymes with negative-feedback loop pairs for iron homeostasis. In addition, direct involvement of Fur in the regulation of DNA synthesis, energy metabolism, and biofilm development is found. These results show how Fur exhibits a comprehensive regulatory role affecting many fundamental cellular processes linked to iron metabolism in order to coordinate the overall response of E. coli to iron availability. PMID:25222563

  11. Screening of an Escherichia coli promoter library for a phenylalanine biosensor.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Regina; von Boeselager, Raphael Freiherr; Wiechert, Johanna; Frunzke, Julia

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the application of transcription factor-based biosensors for the engineering of microbial production strains opened up new opportunities for industrial biotechnology. However, the design of synthetic regulatory circuits depends on the selection of suitable transcription factor-promoter pairs to convert the concentration of effector molecules into a measureable output. Here, we present an efficient strategy to screen promoter libraries for appropriate parts for biosensor design. To this end, we pooled the strains of the Alon library containing about 2000 different Escherichia coli promoter-gfpmut2 fusions, and enriched galactose- and L-phenylalanine-responsive promoters by toggled rounds of positive and negative selection using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). For both effectors, responsive promoters were isolated and verified by cultivation in microtiter plates. The promoter of mtr, encoding an L-tryptophan-specific transporter, was identified as suitable part for the construction of an L-phenylalanine biosensor. In the following, we performed a comparative analysis of different biosensor constructs based on the mtr promoter. The obtained data revealed a strong influence of the biosensor architecture on the performance characteristics. For proof-of-principle, the mtr sensor was applied in a FACS high-throughput screening of an E. coli MG1655 mutant library for the isolation of L-phenylalanine producers. These results emphasize the developed screening approach as a convenient strategy for the identification of effector-responsive promoters for the design of novel biosensors. PMID:27170323

  12. Acetoin Synthesis Acquisition Favors Escherichia coli Growth at Low pH

    PubMed Central

    Vivijs, Bram; Moons, Pieter; Aertsen, Abram

    2014-01-01

    Some members of the family Enterobacteriaceae ferment sugars via the mixed-acid fermentation pathway. This yields large amounts of acids, causing strong and sometimes even lethal acidification of the environment. Other family members employ the 2,3-butanediol fermentation pathway, which generates comparatively less acidic and more neutral end products, such as acetoin and 2,3-butanediol. In this work, we equipped Escherichia coli MG1655 with the budAB operon, encoding the acetoin pathway, from Serratia plymuthica RVH1 and investigated how this affected the ability of E. coli to cope with acid stress during growth. Acetoin fermentation prevented lethal medium acidification by E. coli in lysogeny broth (LB) supplemented with glucose. It also supported growth and higher stationary-phase cell densities in acidified LB broth with glucose (pH 4.10 to 4.50) and in tomato juice (pH 4.40 to 5.00) and reduced the minimal pH at which growth could be initiated. On the other hand, the acetoin-producing strain was outcompeted by the nonproducer in a mixed-culture experiment at low pH, suggesting a fitness cost associated with acetoin production. Finally, we showed that acetoin production profoundly changes the appearance of E. coli on several diagnostic culture media. Natural E. coli strains that have laterally acquired budAB genes may therefore have escaped detection thus far. This study demonstrates the potential importance of acetoin fermentation in the ecology of E. coli in the food chain and contributes to a better understanding of the microbiological stability and safety of acidic foods. PMID:25063653

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of ER2796, a DNA Methyltransferase-Deficient Strain of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Anton, Brian P; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Agrawal, Sonia; Fomenkov, Alexey; Byrd, Devon R; Roberts, Richard J; Raleigh, Elisabeth A

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete sequence of ER2796, a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli K-12 that is completely defective in DNA methylation. Because of its lack of any native methylation, it is extremely useful as a host into which heterologous DNA methyltransferase genes can be cloned and the recognition sequences of their products deduced by Pacific Biosciences Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing. The genome was itself sequenced from a long-insert library using the SMRT platform, resulting in a single closed contig devoid of methylated bases. Comparison with K-12 MG1655, the first E. coli K-12 strain to be sequenced, shows an essentially co-linear relationship with no major rearrangements despite many generations of laboratory manipulation. The comparison revealed a total of 41 insertions and deletions, and 228 single base pair substitutions. In addition, the long-read approach facilitated the surprising discovery of four gene conversion events, three involving rRNA operons and one between two cryptic prophages. Such events thus contribute both to genomic homogenization and to bacteriophage diversification. As one of relatively few laboratory strains of E. coli to be sequenced, the genome also reveals the sequence changes underlying a number of classical mutant alleles including those affecting the various native DNA methylation systems. PMID:26010885

  14. Simulation of the rate of transfer of antibiotic resistance between Escherichia coli strains cultured under well controlled environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Smelt, Jan P; Hoefsloot, Huub C; de Koster, Chris G; Schuurmans, Jasper M; ter Kuile, Benno H; Brul, Stanley

    2015-02-01

    It was demonstrated that the tetracycline resistance plasmid in Escherichia coli resembling K-12 23:06 containing the E. coli plasmid DM0133 could be transferred to tetracycline sensitive E. coli K-12 MG1655 YFP. The sensitive recipient strain has a slight metabolic advantage in continuous fermentation in absence of tetracycline pressure and as a result the numbers of the resistant recipient strain increase during fermentation. In presence of tetracycline pressure the sensitive strain is eliminated, but when it acquires tetracycline resistance the strain has still the same metabolic advantage as its sensitive parent strain in absence of tetracycline. Here a model will be shown that could explain the rate of transformation of a sensitive into a resistant recipient strain and its subsequent growth during continuous fermentation. According to the model the probability of formation of mutants would be much higher at the dilution rate of 0.09 compared to 0.28, whereas the growth of mutants would be much faster at high dilution rate. The growth model shows how the recipient mutants and the donor cells behave in relation to the dilution rate and the number of mutants. Apart from a deterministic model describing the growth rate of both the donor strain and the resistant recipient strain a stochastic model was developed that is particularly useful when low numbers of mutants are formed. PMID:25500384

  15. A novel transducible chimeric phage from Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai strain encoding Stx1 production.

    PubMed

    Sváb, Domonkos; Bálint, Balázs; Maróti, Gergely; Tóth, István

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), and especially enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are important, highly virulent zoonotic and food-borne pathogens. The genes encoding their key virulence factors, the Shiga toxins, are distributed by converting bacteriophages, the Stx phages. In this study we isolated a new type of inducible Stx phage carrying the stx1 gene cluster from the prototypic EHEC O157:H7 Sakai strain. The phage showed Podoviridae morphology, and was capable of converting the E. coli K-12 MG1655 strain to Shiga toxin-producing phenotype. The majority of the phage genes originate from the stx2-encoding Sakai prophage Sp5, with major rearrangements in its genome. Beside certain minor recombinations, the genomic region originally containing the stx2 genes in Sp5 was replaced by a region containing six open reading frames from prophage Sp15 including stx1 genes. The rearranged genome, together with the carriage of stx1 genes, the morphology and the capability of lysogenic conversion represent a new type of recombinant Stx1 converting phage from the Sakai strain. PMID:25445656

  16. The flagellar motor of Caulobacter crescentus generates more torque when a cell swims backwards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lele, Pushkar P.; Roland, Thibault; Shrivastava, Abhishek; Chen, Yihao; Berg, Howard C.

    2016-02-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus swims by rotating a single right-handed helical filament. These cells have two swimming modes: a pusher mode, in which clockwise (CW) rotation of the filament thrusts the cell body forwards, and a puller mode, in which counterclockwise (CCW) rotation pulls it backwards. The situation is reversed in Escherichia coli, a bacterium that rotates several left-handed filaments CCW to drive the cell body forwards. The flagellar motor in E. coli generates more torque in the CCW direction than the CW direction in swimming cells. However, C. crescentus and other bacteria with single filaments swim forwards and backwards at similar speeds, prompting the assumption that motor torques in the two modes are the same. Here, we present evidence that motors in C. crescentus develop higher torques in the puller mode than in the pusher mode, and suggest that the anisotropy in torque generation is similar in the two species, despite the differences in filament handedness and motor bias.

  17. The flagellar motor of Caulobacter crescentus generates more torque when a cell swims backward

    PubMed Central

    Lele, Pushkar P.; Roland, Thibault; Shrivastava, Abhishek; Chen, Yihao; Berg, Howard C.

    2016-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus, a monotrichous bacterium, swims by rotating a single right-handed helical filament. CW motor rotation thrusts the cell forward 1, a mode of motility known as the pusher mode; CCW motor rotation pulls the cell backward, a mode of motility referred to as the puller mode 2. The situation is opposite in E. coli, a peritrichous bacterium, where CCW rotation of multiple left-handed filaments drives the cell forward. The flagellar motor in E. coli generates more torque in the CCW direction than the CW direction in swimming cells 3,4. However, monotrichous bacteria including C. crescentus swim forward and backward at similar speeds, prompting the assumption that motor torques in the two modes are the same 5,6. Here, we present evidence that motors in C. crescentus develop higher torques in the puller mode than in the pusher mode, and suggest that the anisotropy in torque-generation is similar in two species, despite the differences in filament handedness and motor bias (probability of CW rotation). PMID:27499800

  18. Gate-controlled proton diffusion and protonation-induced ratchet motion in the stator of the bacterial flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Yasutaka; Kitao, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The proton permeation process of the stator complex MotA/B in the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli was investigated. The atomic model structure of the transmembrane part of MotA/B was constructed based on the previously published disulfide cross-linking and tryptophan scanning mutations. The dynamic permeation of hydronium/sodium ions and water molecule through the channel formed in MotA/B was observed using a steered molecular dynamics simulation. During the simulation, Leu46 of MotB acts as the gate for hydronium ion permeation, which induced the formation of water wire that may mediate the proton transfer to Asp32 on MotB. Free energy profiles for permeation were calculated by umbrella sampling. The free energy barrier for H3O+ permeation was consistent with the proton transfer rate deduced from the flagellar rotational speed and number of protons per rotation, which suggests that the gating is the rate-limiting step. Structure and dynamics of the MotA/B with nonprotonated and protonated Asp32, Val43Met, and Val43Leu mutants in MotB were investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. A narrowing of the channel was observed in the mutants, which is consistent with the size-dependent ion selectivity. In MotA/B with the nonprotonated Asp32, the A3 segment in MotA maintained a kink whereas the protonation induced a straighter shape. Assuming that the cytoplasmic domain not included in the atomic model moves as a rigid body, the protonation/deprotonation of Asp32 is inferred to induce a ratchet motion of the cytoplasmic domain, which may be correlated to the motion of the flagellar rotor. PMID:26056313

  19. Gate-controlled proton diffusion and protonation-induced ratchet motion in the stator of the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Yasutaka; Kitao, Akio

    2015-06-23

    The proton permeation process of the stator complex MotA/B in the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli was investigated. The atomic model structure of the transmembrane part of MotA/B was constructed based on the previously published disulfide cross-linking and tryptophan scanning mutations. The dynamic permeation of hydronium/sodium ions and water molecule through the channel formed in MotA/B was observed using a steered molecular dynamics simulation. During the simulation, Leu46 of MotB acts as the gate for hydronium ion permeation, which induced the formation of water wire that may mediate the proton transfer to Asp32 on MotB. Free energy profiles for permeation were calculated by umbrella sampling. The free energy barrier for H3O(+) permeation was consistent with the proton transfer rate deduced from the flagellar rotational speed and number of protons per rotation, which suggests that the gating is the rate-limiting step. Structure and dynamics of the MotA/B with nonprotonated and protonated Asp32, Val43Met, and Val43Leu mutants in MotB were investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. A narrowing of the channel was observed in the mutants, which is consistent with the size-dependent ion selectivity. In MotA/B with the nonprotonated Asp32, the A3 segment in MotA maintained a kink whereas the protonation induced a straighter shape. Assuming that the cytoplasmic domain not included in the atomic model moves as a rigid body, the protonation/deprotonation of Asp32 is inferred to induce a ratchet motion of the cytoplasmic domain, which may be correlated to the motion of the flagellar rotor. PMID:26056313

  20. A mutation that uncouples flagellum assembly from transcription alters the temporal pattern of flagellar gene expression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Mangan, E K; Bartamian, M; Gober, J W

    1995-01-01

    The transcription of flagellar genes in Caulobacter crescentus is regulated by cell cycle events that culminate in the synthesis of a new flagellum once every cell division. Early flagellar gene products regulate the expression of late flagellar genes at two distinct stages of the flagellar trans-acting hierarchy. Here we investigate the coupling of early flagellar biogenesis with middle and late flagellar gene expression. We have isolated mutants (bfa) that do not require early class II flagellar gene products for the transcription of middle or late flagellar genes. bfa mutant strains are apparently defective in a negative regulatory pathway that couples early flagellar biogenesis to late flagellar gene expression. The bfa regulatory pathway functions solely at the level of transcription. Although flagellin promoters are transcribed in class II/bfa double mutants, there is no detectable flagellin protein on immunoblots prepared from mutant cell extracts. This finding suggests that early flagellar biogenesis is coupled to gene expression by two distinct mechanisms: one that negatively regulates transcription, mediated by bfa, and another that functions posttranscriptionally. To determine whether bfa affects the temporal pattern of late flagellar gene expression, cell cycle experiments were performed in bfa mutant strains. In a bfa mutant strain, flagellin expression fails to shut off at its normal time in the cell division cycle. This experimental result indicates that bfa may function as a regulator of flagellar gene transcription late in the cell cycle, after early flagellar structures have been assembled. PMID:7768816

  1. Escherichia coli modulates its motor speed on sensing an attractant.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Richa; Naaz, Farha; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S; Venkatesh, K V

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that Escherichia coli achieves chemotaxis by modulating the bias of the flagellar motor. Recent experiments have shown that the bacteria vary their swimming speeds as well in presence of attractants. However, this increase in the swimming speed in response to the attractants has not been correlated with the increase in the flagellar motor speed. Using flickering dark-field microscopy, we measure the head-rotation speed of a large population of cells to correlate it with the flagellar motor speed. Experiments performed with wild-type and trg-deletion mutant strains suggest that the cells are capable of modulating the flagellar motor speed via mere sensing of a ligand. The motor speed can be further correlated with the swimming speed of the cells and was found to be linear. These results suggest the existence of a hitherto unknown intra-cellular pathway that modulates the flagellar motor speed in response to sensing of chemicals, thereby making chemotaxis more efficient than previously known. PMID:27318664

  2. Alternative flagellar filament types in the haloarchaeon Haloarcula marismortui.

    PubMed

    Pyatibratov, Michael G; Beznosov, Sergey N; Rachel, Reinhard; Tiktopulo, Elizabeth I; Surin, Alexei K; Syutkin, Alexei S; Fedorov, Oleg V

    2008-10-01

    Many Archaea use rotation of helical flagellar filaments for swimming motility. We isolated and characterized the flagellar filaments of Haloarcula marismortui, an archaeal species previously considered to be nonmotile. Two Haloarcula marismortui phenotypes were discriminated--their filaments are composed predominantly of either FlaB or FlaA2 flagellin, and the corresponding genes are located on different replicons. FlaB and FlaA2 filaments differ in antigenicity and thermostability. FlaA2 filaments are distinctly thicker (20-22 nm) than FlaB filaments (16-18 nm). The observed filaments are nearly twice as thick as those of other characterized euryarchaeal filaments. The results suggest that the helicity of Haloarcula marismortui filaments is provided by a mechanism different from that in the related haloarchaeon Halobacterium salinarum, where 2 different flagellin molecules present in comparable quantities are required to form a helical filament. PMID:18923552

  3. Incomplete flagellar structures in nonflagellate mutants of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Iino, T; Horiguchi, T; Yamaguchi, S

    1978-01-01

    Incomplete flagellar structures were detected in osmotically shocked cells or membrane-associated fraction of many nonflagellate mutants of Salmonella typhimurium by electron microscopy. The predominant types of these structures in the mutants were cistron specific. The incomplete basal bodies were detected in flaFI, flaFIV, flaFVIII, and flaFIX mutants, the structure homologous to a basal body in flaFV mutants, the polyhook-basal body complex in flaR mutants, and the hook-basal body complex in flaL and flaU mutants. No structures homologous to flagellar bases or their parts were detected in the early-fla group nonflagellate mutants of flaAI, flaAII, flaAIII, flaB, flaC, flaD, flaE, flaFII, flaFIII, flaFVI, flaFVII, flaFX, flaK, and flaM. From these observations, a process of flagellar morphogenesis was postulated. The functions of the early-fla group are essential to the formation of S ring-M ring-rod complexes bound to the membrane. The completion of basal bodies requires succeeding functions of flaFI, flaFIV, flaFVIII, and flaFIX. Next, the formation of hooks attached to basal bodies proceeds by the function of flaFV and by flaR, which controls the hook length. Flagellar filaments appear at the tips of hooks because of the functions of flaL, flaU, and flagellin genes. Images PMID:342514

  4. Quorum sensing in Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Vibrio harveyi: A new family of genes responsible for autoinducer production

    PubMed Central

    Surette, Michael G.; Miller, Melissa B.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    1999-01-01

    In bacteria, the regulation of gene expression in response to changes in cell density is called quorum sensing. Quorum-sensing bacteria produce, release, and respond to hormone-like molecules (autoinducers) that accumulate in the external environment as the cell population grows. In the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi two parallel quorum-sensing systems exist, and each is composed of a sensor–autoinducer pair. V. harveyi reporter strains capable of detecting only autoinducer 1 (AI-1) or autoinducer 2 (AI-2) have been constructed and used to show that many species of bacteria, including Escherichia coli MG1655, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium 14028, and S. typhimurium LT2 produce autoinducers similar or identical to the V. harveyi system 2 autoinducer AI-2. However, the domesticated laboratory strain E. coli DH5α does not produce this signal molecule. Here we report the identification and analysis of the gene responsible for AI-2 production in V. harveyi, S. typhimurium, and E. coli. The genes, which we have named luxSV.h., luxSS.t., and luxSE.c. respectively, are highly homologous to one another but not to any other identified gene. E. coli DH5α can be complemented to AI-2 production by the introduction of the luxS gene from V. harveyi or E. coli O157:H7. Analysis of the E. coli DH5α luxSE.c. gene shows that it contains a frameshift mutation resulting in premature truncation of the LuxSE.c. protein. Our results indicate that the luxS genes define a new family of autoinducer-production genes. PMID:9990077

  5. Motility and Flagellar Glycosylation in Clostridium difficile▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Twine, Susan M.; Reid, Christopher W.; Aubry, Annie; McMullin, David R.; Fulton, Kelly M.; Austin, John; Logan, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, intact flagellin proteins were purified from strains of Clostridium difficile and analyzed using quadrupole time of flight and linear ion trap mass spectrometers. Top-down studies showed the flagellin proteins to have a mass greater than that predicted from the corresponding gene sequence. These top-down studies revealed marker ions characteristic of glycan modifications. Additionally, diversity in the observed masses of glycan modifications was seen between strains. Electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry was used to demonstrate that the glycan was attached to the flagellin protein backbone in O linkage via a HexNAc residue in all strains examined. Bioinformatic analysis of C. difficile genomes revealed diversity with respect to glycan biosynthesis gene content within the flagellar biosynthesis locus, likely reflected by the observed flagellar glycan diversity. In C. difficile strain 630, insertional inactivation of a glycosyltransferase gene (CD0240) present in all sequenced genomes resulted in an inability to produce flagellar filaments at the cell surface and only minor amounts of unmodified flagellin protein. PMID:19749038

  6. Approaches for functional analysis of flagellar proteins in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Oberholzer, Michael; Lopez, Miguel A.; Ralston, Katherine S.; Hill, Kent L.

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum is a highly conserved organelle serving motility, sensory and transport functions. Although genetic, genomic and proteomic studies have led to the identification of hundreds of flagellar and putative flagellar proteins, precisely how these proteins function individually and collectively to drive flagellum motility and other functions remains to be determined. In this chapter we provide an overview of tools and approaches available for studying flagellum protein function in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. We begin by outlining techniques for in vitro cultivation of both T. brucei lifecycle stages, as well as transfection protocols for the delivery of DNA constructs. We then describe specific assays used to assess flagellum function including flagellum preparation and quantitative motility assays. We conclude the chapter with a description of molecular genetic approaches for manipulating gene function. In summary, the availability of potent molecular tools, as well as the health and economic relevance of T. brucei as a pathogen, combine to make the parasite an attractive and integral experimental system for the functional analysis of flagellar proteins. PMID:20409810

  7. Direct evidence of flagellar synchronization through hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumley, Douglas; Polin, Marco; Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella exhibit striking coordination, from the synchronous beating of two flagella in Chlamydomonas to the metachronal waves and large-scale flows displayed by carpets of cilia. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for flagellar synchronization remain unclear. We perform a series of experiments involving two individual flagella in a quiescent fluid. Cells are isolated from the colonial alga Volvox carteri, held in place at a fixed distance d, and oriented so that their flagellar beating planes coincide. In this fashion, we are able to explicitly assess the role of hydrodynamics in achieving synchronization. For closely separated cells, the flagella are capable of exhibiting a phase-locked state for thousands of beats at a time, despite significant differences in their intrinsic frequencies. For intermediate values of d, synchronous periods are interrupted by brief phase slips, while for d >> 1 the flagellar phase difference drifts almost linearly with time. The coupling strength extracted through analysis of the synchronization statistics exhibits excellent agreement with hydrodynamic predictions. This study unambiguously reveals that flagella coupled only through hydrodynamics are capable of exhibiting robust synchrony.

  8. A Bacillus Flagellar Motor That Can Use Both Na+ and K+ as a Coupling Ion Is Converted by a Single Mutation to Use Only Na+

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    In bacteria, the sodium ion (Na+) cycle plays a critical role in negotiating the challenges of an extremely alkaline and sodium-rich environment. Alkaliphilic bacteria that grow optimally at high pH values use Na+ for solute uptake and flagellar rotation because the proton (H+) motive force is insufficient for use at extremely alkaline pH. Only three types of electrically driven rotary motors exist in nature: the F-type ATPase, the V-type ATPase, and the bacterial flagellar motor. Until now, only H+ and Na+ have been reported as coupling ions for these motors. Here, we report that the alkaliphilic bacterium Bacillus alcalophilus Vedder 1934 can grow not only under a Na+-rich and potassium ion (K+)-poor condition but also under the opposite condition in an extremely alkaline environment. In this organism, swimming performance depends on concentrations of Na+, K+ or Rb+. In the absence of Na+, swimming behavior is clearly K+- dependent. This pattern was confirmed in swimming assays of stator-less Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli mutants expressing MotPS from B. alcalophilus (BA-MotPS). Furthermore, a single mutation in BA-MotS was identified that converted the naturally bi-functional BA-MotPS to stators that cannot use K+ or Rb+. This is the first report that describes a flagellar motor that can use K+ and Rb+ as coupling ions. The finding will affect the understanding of the operating principles of flagellar motors and the molecular mechanisms of ion selectivity, the field of the evolution of environmental changes and stresses, and areas of nanotechnology. PMID:23049994

  9. Temporal and spatial regulation of fliP, an early flagellar gene of Caulobacter crescentus that is required for motility and normal cell division.

    PubMed Central

    Gober, J W; Boyd, C H; Jarvis, M; Mangan, E K; Rizzo, M F; Wingrove, J A

    1995-01-01

    In Caulobacter crescentus, the genes encoding a single polar flagellum are expressed under cell cycle control. In this report, we describe the characterization of two early class II flagellar genes contained in the orfX-fliP locus. Strains containing mutations in this locus exhibit a filamentous growth phenotype and fail to express class III and IV flagellar genes. A complementing DNA fragment was sequenced and found to contain two potential open reading frames. The first, orfX, is predicted to encode a 105-amino-acid polypeptide that is similar to MopB, a protein which is required for both motility and virulence in Erwinia carotovora. The deduced amino acid sequence of the second open reading frame, fliP, is 264 amino acids in length and shows significant sequence identity with the FliP protein of Escherichia coli as well as virulence proteins of several plant and mammalian pathogens. The FliP homolog in pathogenic organisms has been implicated in the secretion of virulence factors, suggesting that the export of virulence proteins and some flagellar proteins share a common mechanism. The 5' end of orfX-fliP mRNA was determined and revealed an upstream promoter sequence that shares few conserved features with that of other early Caulobacter flagellar genes, suggesting that transcription of orfX-fliP may require a different complement of trans-acting factors. In C. crescentus, orfX-fliP is transcribed under cell cycle control, with a peak of transcriptional activity in the middle portion of the cell cycle. Later in the cell cycle, orfX-fliP expression occurs in both poles of the predivisional cell. Protein fusions to a lacZ reporter gene indicate that FliP is specifically targeted to the swarmer compartment of the predivisional cell. PMID:7601828

  10. SILAC-based comparative analysis of pathogenic Escherichia coli secretomes.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Borch, Jonas; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Hjernø, Karin; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2015-09-01

    Comparative studies of pathogenic bacteria and their non-pathogenic counterparts has led to the discovery of important virulence factors thereby generating insight into mechanisms of pathogenesis. Protein-based antigens for vaccine development are primarily selected among unique virulence-related factors produced by the pathogen of interest. However, recent work indicates that proteins that are not unique to the pathogen but instead selectively expressed compared to its non-pathogenic counterpart could also be vaccine candidates or targets for drug development. Modern methods in quantitative proteome analysis have the potential to discover both classes of proteins and hence form an important tool for discovering therapeutic targets. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) and Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are pathogenic variants of E. coli which cause intestinal disease in humans. AIEC is associated with Crohn's disease (CD), a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract whereas ETEC is the major cause of human diarrhea which affects hundreds of millions annually. In spite of the disease burden associated with these pathogens, effective vaccines conferring long-term protection are still needed. In order to identify proteins with therapeutic potential, we have used mass spectrometry-based Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) quantitative proteomics method which allows us to compare the proteomes of pathogenic strains to commensal E. coli. In this study, we grew the pathogenic strains ETEC H10407, AIEC LF82 and the non-pathogenic reference strain E. coli K-12 MG1655 in parallel and used SILAC to compare protein levels in OMVs and culture supernatant. We have identified well-known virulence factors from both AIEC and ETEC, thus validating our experimental approach. In addition we find proteins that are not unique to the pathogenic strains but expressed at levels different from the commensal strain, including the

  11. Bacterial flagellar microhydrodynamics: Laminar flow over complex flagellar filaments, analog archimedean screws and cylinders, and its perturbations.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, Shlomo; Fishelov, Dalia; Ben-Artzi, Matania

    2003-09-01

    The flagellar filament, the bacterial organelle of motility, is the smallest rotary propeller known. It consists of 1), a basal body (part of which is the proton driven rotary motor), 2), a hook (universal joint-allowing for off-axial transmission of rotary motion), and 3), a filament (propeller-a long, rigid, supercoiled helical assembly allowing for the conversion of rotary motion into linear thrust). Helically perturbed (so-called "complex") filaments have a coarse surface composed of deep grooves and ridges following the three-start helical lines. These surface structures, reminiscent of a turbine or Archimedean screw, originate from symmetry reduction along the six-start helical lines due to dimerization of the flagellin monomers from which the filament self assembles. Using high-resolution electron microscopy and helical image reconstruction methods, we calculated three-dimensional density maps of the complex filament of Rhizobium lupini H13-3 and determined its surface pattern and boundaries. The helical symmetry of the filament allows viewing it as a stack of identical slices spaced axially and rotated by constant increments. Here we use the closed outlines of these slices to explore, in two dimensions, the hydrodynamic effect of the turbine-like boundaries of the flagellar filament. In particular, we try to determine if, and under what conditions, transitions from laminar to turbulent flow (or perturbations of the laminar flow) may occur on or near the surface of the bacterial propeller. To address these questions, we apply the boundary element method in a manner allowing the handling of convoluted boundaries. We tested the method on several simple, well-characterized cylindrical structures before applying it to real, highly convoluted biological surfaces and to simplified mechanical analogs. Our results indicate that under extreme structural and functional conditions, and at low Reynolds numbers, a deviation from laminar flow might occur on the flagellar

  12. FlaA, a putative flagellar outer sheath protein, is not an immunodominant antigen associated with Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Y; Charon, N W

    1997-01-01

    FlaA was recently found to be associated with flagellar filaments of Borrelia burgdorferi. We tested whether antibodies to this protein are a good indicator of infection, as antibodies to FlaA proteins in other spirochetal infections show an increase in titer. Although overproduction of intact FlaA was highly toxic to Escherichia coli, truncated proteins which lacked the N-terminal signal sequence could be successfully overexpressed. Immunoblotting with sera from mammalian hosts infected with B. burgdorferi indicated that FlaA is not an immunodominant antigen in Lyme disease. However, sera from two patients reacted with both recombinant and native FlaA protein, suggesting that B. burgdorferi FlaA was antigenic and expressed in vivo. PMID:9199479

  13. The effect of pyrite on Escherichia coli in water: proof-of-concept for the elimination of waterborne bacteria by reactive minerals.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Lonia R; Puri, Neha; Schoonen, Martin A A; Wali Karzai, A

    2015-03-01

    We present proof-of-concept results for the elimination of waterborne bacteria by reactive minerals. We exposed Escherichia coli MG1655 suspended in water to the reactive mineral pyrite (FeS₂) at room temperature and ambient light. This slurry eliminates 99.9% of bacteria in fewer than 4 hours. We also exposed Escherichia coli to pyrite leachate (supernatant liquid from slurry after 24 hours), which eliminates 99.99% of bacteria over the same time-scale. Unlike SOlar water DISinfection (SODIS), our results do not depend on the presence of ultraviolet (UV) light. We confirmed this by testing proposed SODIS additive and known photo-catalyst anatase (TiO₂) for antibacterial properties and found that, in contrast to pyrite, it does not eliminate E. coli under our experimental conditions. Previous investigations of naturally antibiotic minerals have focused on the medical applications of antibiotic clays, and thus have not been conducted under experimental conditions resembling those found in water purification. In our examination of the relevant literature, we have not found previously reported evidence for the use of reactive minerals in water sanitization. The results from this proof-of-concept experiment may have important implications for future directions in household water purification research. PMID:25719464

  14. Flow-cytometric study of vital cellular functions in Escherichia coli during solar disinfection (SODIS).

    PubMed

    Berney, Michael; Weilenmann, Hans-Ulrich; Egli, Thomas

    2006-06-01

    The effectiveness of solar disinfection (SODIS), a low-cost household water treatment method for developing countries, was investigated with flow cytometry and viability stains for the enteric bacterium Escherichia coli. A better understanding of the process of injury or death of E. coli during SODIS could be gained by investigating six different cellular functions, namely: efflux pump activity (Syto 9 plus ethidium bromide), membrane potential [bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid)trimethine oxonol; DiBAC4(3)], membrane integrity (LIVE/DEAD BacLight), glucose uptake activity (2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-d-glucose; 2-NBDG), total ATP concentration (BacTiter-Glo) and culturability (pour-plate method). These variables were measured in E. coli K-12 MG1655 cells that were exposed to either sunlight or artificial UVA light. The inactivation pattern of cellular functions was very similar for both light sources. A UVA light dose (fluence) of <500 kJ m(-2) was enough to lower the proton motive force, such that efflux pump activity and ATP synthesis decreased significantly. The loss of membrane potential, glucose uptake activity and culturability of >80 % of the cells was observed at a fluence of approximately 1500 kJ m(-2), and the cytoplasmic membrane of bacterial cells became permeable at a fluence of >2500 kJ m(-2). Culturable counts of stressed bacteria after anaerobic incubation on sodium pyruvate-supplemented tryptic soy agar closely correlated with the loss of membrane potential. The results strongly suggest that cells exposed to >1500 kJ m(-2) solar UVA (corresponding to 530 W m(-2) global sunlight intensity for 6 h) were no longer able to repair the damage and recover. Our study confirms the lethal effect of SODIS with cultivation-independent methods and gives a detailed picture of the 'agony' of E. coli when it is stressed with sunlight. PMID:16735735

  15. YbiV from E. coli K12 is a HAD phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Anne; Lee, Seok-Yong; McCullagh, Emma; Silversmith, Ruth E.; Wemmer, David E.

    2004-03-16

    The protein YbiV from Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 is a hypothetical protein with sequence homology to the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily of proteins. Although numerous members of this family have been identified, the functions of few are known. Using the crystal structure, sequence analysis, and biochemical assays, we have characterized ybiV as a HAD phosphatase. The crystal structure of YbiV reveals a two domain protein, one with the characteristic HAD hydrolase fold, the other an inserted a/b fold. In an effort to understand the mechanism we also solved and report the structures of YbiV in complex with beryllofluoride (BeF3-) and aluminum trifluoride (AlF3) which have been shown to mimic the phosphorylated intermediate and transition state for hydrolysis, respectively, in analogy to other HAD phosphatases. Analysis of the structures reveals the substrate binding cavity, which is hydrophilic in nature. Both structure and sequence homology indicate ybiV may be a sugar phosphatase, which is supported by biochemical assays which measured the release of free phosphate on a number of sugar-like substrates. We also investigated available genomic and functional data in an effort to determine the physiological substrate.

  16. Analysis of Escherichia coli RNase E and RNase III activity in vivo using tiling microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Stead, Mark B.; Marshburn, Sarah; Mohanty, Bijoy K.; Mitra, Joydeep; Castillo, Lourdes Peňa; Ray, Debashish; van Bakel, Harm; Hughes, Timothy R.; Kushner, Sidney R.

    2011-01-01

    Tiling microarrays have proven to be a valuable tool for gaining insights into the transcriptomes of microbial organisms grown under various nutritional or stress conditions. Here, we describe the use of such an array, constructed at the level of 20 nt resolution for the Escherichia coli MG1655 genome, to observe genome-wide changes in the steady-state RNA levels in mutants defective in either RNase E or RNase III. The array data were validated by comparison to previously published results for a variety of specific transcripts as well as independent northern analysis of additional mRNAs and sRNAs. In the absence of RNase E, 60% of the annotated coding sequences showed either increases or decreases in their steady-state levels. In contrast, only 12% of the coding sequences were affected in the absence of RNase III. Unexpectedly, many coding sequences showed decreased abundance in the RNase E mutant, while more than half of the annotated sRNAs showed changes in abundance. Furthermore, the steady-state levels of many transcripts showed overlapping effects of both ribonucleases. Data are also presented demonstrating how the arrays were used to identify potential new genes, RNase III cleavage sites and the direct or indirect control of specific biological pathways. PMID:21149258

  17. Application of genomic technologies for characterization, typing, and detection of E. coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotyping using polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits has been the gold standard for classification of E. coli based on the O- (somatic) and H- (flagellar) antigens; however, problems associated with serotyping are that the procedure is time consuming and labor intensive, cross reactions among di...

  18. Temperature dependences of torque generation and membrane voltage in the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuichi; Baker, Matthew A B; Fukuoka, Hajime; Takahashi, Hiroto; Berry, Richard M; Ishijima, Akihiko

    2013-12-17

    In their natural habitats bacteria are frequently exposed to sudden changes in temperature that have been shown to affect their swimming. With our believed to be new methods of rapid temperature control for single-molecule microscopy, we measured here the thermal response of the Na(+)-driven chimeric motor expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Motor torque at low load (0.35 μm bead) increased linearly with temperature, twofold between 15°C and 40°C, and torque at high load (1.0 μm bead) was independent of temperature, as reported for the H(+)-driven motor. Single cell membrane voltages were measured by fluorescence imaging and these were almost constant (∼120 mV) over the same temperature range. When the motor was heated above 40°C for 1-2 min the torque at high load dropped reversibly, recovering upon cooling below 40°C. This response was repeatable over as many as 10 heating cycles. Both increases and decreases in torque showed stepwise torque changes with unitary size ∼150 pN nm, close to the torque of a single stator at room temperature (∼180 pN nm), indicating that dynamic stator dissociation occurs at high temperature, with rebinding upon cooling. Our results suggest that the temperature-dependent assembly of stators is a general feature of flagellar motors. PMID:24359752

  19. MotX, the channel component of the sodium-type flagellar motor.

    PubMed Central

    McCarter, L L

    1994-01-01

    Thrust for propulsion of flagellated bacteria is generated by rotation of a propeller, the flagellum. The power to drive the polar flagellar rotary motor of Vibrio parahaemolyticus is derived from the transmembrane potential of sodium ions. Force is generated by the motor on coupling of the movement of ions across the membrane to rotation of the flagellum. A gene, motX, encoding one component of the torque generator has been cloned and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence is 212 amino acids in length. MotX was localized to the membrane and shown to interact with MotY, which is the presumed stationary component of the motor. Overproduction of MotX, but not that of a nonfunctional mutant MotX, was lethal to Escherichia coli. The rate of lysis caused by induction of motX was proportional to the sodium ion concentration. Li+ and K+ substituted for Na+ to promote lysis, while Ca2+ did not enhance lysis. Protection from the lethal effects of induction of motX was afforded by the sodium channel blocker amiloride. The data suggest that MotX forms a sodium channel. The deduced protein sequence for MotX shows no homology to its ion-conducting counterpart in the proton-driven motor; however, in possessing only one hydrophobic domain, it resembles other channels formed by small proteins with single membrane-spanning domains. Images PMID:7928960

  20. Switching of Bacterial Flagellar Motors Is Triggered by Mutant FliG

    PubMed Central

    Lele, Pushkar P.; Berg, Howard C.

    2015-01-01

    Binding of the chemotaxis response regulator CheY-P promotes switching between rotational states in flagellar motors of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Here, we induced switching in the absence of CheY-P by introducing copies of a mutant FliG locked in the clockwise (CW) conformation (FliGCW). The composition of the mixed FliG ring was estimated via fluorescence imaging, and the probability of CW rotation (CWbias) was determined from the rotation of tethered cells. The results were interpreted in the framework of a 1D Ising model. The data could be fit by assuming that mutant subunits are more stable in the CW conformation than in the counterclockwise conformation. We found that CWbias varies depending on the spatial arrangement of the assembled subunits in the FliG ring. This offers a possible explanation for a previous observation of hysteresis in the switch function in analogous mixed FliM motors—in motors containing identical fractions of mutant FliMCW in otherwise wild-type motors, the CWbias differed depending on whether mutant subunits were expressed in strains with native motors or native subunits were expressed in strains with mutant motors. PMID:25762339

  1. Temperature Dependences of Torque Generation and Membrane Voltage in the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yuichi; Baker, Matthew A.B.; Fukuoka, Hajime; Takahashi, Hiroto; Berry, Richard M.; Ishijima, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    In their natural habitats bacteria are frequently exposed to sudden changes in temperature that have been shown to affect their swimming. With our believed to be new methods of rapid temperature control for single-molecule microscopy, we measured here the thermal response of the Na+-driven chimeric motor expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Motor torque at low load (0.35 μm bead) increased linearly with temperature, twofold between 15°C and 40°C, and torque at high load (1.0 μm bead) was independent of temperature, as reported for the H+-driven motor. Single cell membrane voltages were measured by fluorescence imaging and these were almost constant (∼120 mV) over the same temperature range. When the motor was heated above 40°C for 1–2 min the torque at high load dropped reversibly, recovering upon cooling below 40°C. This response was repeatable over as many as 10 heating cycles. Both increases and decreases in torque showed stepwise torque changes with unitary size ∼150 pN nm, close to the torque of a single stator at room temperature (∼180 pN nm), indicating that dynamic stator dissociation occurs at high temperature, with rebinding upon cooling. Our results suggest that the temperature-dependent assembly of stators is a general feature of flagellar motors. PMID:24359752

  2. Transcription of foreign DNA in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Warren, René L.; Freeman, John D.; Levesque, Roger C.; Smailus, Duane E.; Flibotte, Stephane; Holt, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Propagation of heterologous DNA in E. coli host cells is central to molecular biology. DNA constructs are often engineered for expression of recombinant protein in E. coli, but the extent of incidental transcription arising from natural regulatory sequences in cloned DNA remains underexplored. Here, we have used programmable microarrays and RT-PCR to measure, comprehensively, the transcription of H. influenzae, P. aeruginosa, and human DNA propagating in E. coli as bacterial artificial chromosomes. We find evidence that at least half of all H. influenzae genes are transcribed in E. coli. Highly transcribed genes are principally involved in energy metabolism, and their proximal promoter regions are significantly enriched with E. coli σ70 (also known as RpoD) binding sites. H. influenzae genes acquired from an ancient bacteriophage Mu insertion are also highly transcribed. Compared with H. influenzae, a smaller proportion of P. aeruginosa genes are transcribed in E. coli, and in E. coli there is punctuated transcription of human DNA. The presence of foreign DNA in E. coli disturbs the host transcriptional profile, with expression of the E. coli phage shock protein operon and the flagellar gene cluster being particularly strongly up-regulated. While cross-species transcriptional activation is expected to be enabling for horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, incidental expression of toxic genes can be problematic for DNA cloning. Ongoing characterization of cross-expression will help inform the design of biosynthetic gene clusters and synthetic microbial genomes. PMID:18701636

  3. Involvement of the flagellar assembly pathway in Vibrio alginolyticus adhesion under environmental stresses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Huang, Lixing; Su, Yongquan; Qin, Yingxue; Kong, Wendi; Ma, Ying; Xu, Xiaojin; Lin, Mao; Zheng, Jiang; Yan, Qingpi

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion is an important virulence factor of Vibrio alginolyticus. This factor may be affected by environmental conditions; however, its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In our previous research, adhesion deficient strains were obtained by culturing V. alginolyticus under stresses including Cu, Pb, Hg, and low pH. With RNA-seq and bioinformatics analysis, we found that all of these stress treatments significantly affected the flagellar assembly pathway, which may play an important role in V. alginolyticus adhesion. Therefore, we hypothesized that the environmental stresses of the flagellar assembly pathway may be one way in which environmental conditions affect adhesion. To verify our hypothesis, a bioinformatics analysis, QPCR, RNAi, in vitro adhesion assay and motility assay were performed. Our results indicated that (1) the flagellar assembly pathway was sensitive to environmental stresses, (2) the flagellar assembly pathway played an important role in V. alginolyticus adhesion, and (3) motility is not the only way in which the flagellar assembly pathway affects adhesion. PMID:26322276

  4. Individual Flagellar Waveform Affects Collective Behavior of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kage, Azusa; Mogami, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    Bioconvection is a form of collective motion that occurs spontaneously in the suspension of swimming microorganisms. In a previous study, we quantitatively described the "pattern transition," a phase transition phenomenon that so far has exclusively been observed in bioconvection of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas. We suggested that the transition could be induced by changes in the balance between the gravitational and shear-induced torques, both of which act to determine the orientation of the organism in the shear flow. As both of the torques should be affected by the geometry of the Chlamydomonas cell, alteration in the flagellar waveform might change the extent of torque generation by altering overall geometry of the cell. Based on this working hypothesis, we examined bioconvection behavior of two flagellar mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, ida1 and oda2, making reference to the wild type. Flagella of ida1 beat with an abnormal waveform, while flagella of oda2 show a normal waveform but lower beat frequency. As a result, both mutants had swimming speed of less than 50% of the wild type. ida1 formed bioconvection patterns with smaller spacing than those of wild type and oda2. Two-axis view revealed the periodic movement of the settling blobs of ida1, while oda2 showed qualitatively similar behavior to that of wild type. Unexpectedly, ida1 showed stronger negative gravitaxis than did wild type, while oda2 showed relatively weak gravitaxis. These findings suggest that flagellar waveform, not swimming speed or beat frequency, strongly affect bioconvection behavior in C. reinhardtii. PMID:26245228

  5. Second-Chance Signal Transduction Explains Cooperative Flagellar Switching

    PubMed Central

    Zot, Henry G.; Hasbun, Javier E.; Van Minh, Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    The reversal of flagellar motion (switching) results from the interaction between a switch complex of the flagellar rotor and a torque-generating stationary unit, or stator (motor unit). To explain the steeply cooperative ligand-induced switching, present models propose allosteric interactions between subunits of the rotor, but do not address the possibility of a reaction that stimulates a bidirectional motor unit to reverse direction of torque. During flagellar motion, the binding of a ligand-bound switch complex at the dwell site could excite a motor unit. The probability that another switch complex of the rotor, moving according to steady-state rotation, will reach the same dwell site before that motor unit returns to ground state will be determined by the independent decay rate of the excited-state motor unit. Here, we derive an analytical expression for the energy coupling between a switch complex and a motor unit of the stator complex of a flagellum, and demonstrate that this model accounts for the cooperative switching response without the need for allosteric interactions. The analytical result can be reproduced by simulation when (1) the motion of the rotor delivers a subsequent ligand-bound switch to the excited motor unit, thereby providing the excited motor unit with a second chance to remain excited, and (2) the outputs from multiple independent motor units are constrained to a single all-or-none event. In this proposed model, a motor unit and switch complex represent the components of a mathematically defined signal transduction mechanism in which energy coupling is driven by steady-state and is regulated by stochastic ligand binding. Mathematical derivation of the model shows the analytical function to be a general form of the Hill equation (Hill AV (1910) The possible effects of the aggregation of the molecules of haemoglobin on its dissociation curves. J Physiol 40: iv–vii). PMID:22844429

  6. Stoichiometry and turnover of the bacterial flagellar switch protein FliN.

    PubMed

    Delalez, Nicolas J; Berry, Richard M; Armitage, Judith P

    2014-01-01

    Some proteins in biological complexes exchange with pools of free proteins while the complex is functioning. Evidence is emerging that protein exchange can be part of an adaptive mechanism. The bacterial flagellar motor is one of the most complex biological machines and is an ideal model system to study protein dynamics in large multimeric complexes. Recent studies showed that the copy number of FliM in the switch complex and the fraction of FliM that exchanges vary with the direction of flagellar rotation. Here, we investigated the stoichiometry and turnover of another switch complex component, FliN, labeled with the fluorescent protein CyPet, in Escherichia coli. Our results confirm that, in vivo, FliM and FliN form a complex with stoichiometry of 1:4 and function as a unit. We estimated that wild-type motors contained 120 ± 26 FliN molecules. Motors that rotated only clockwise (CW) or counterclockwise (CCW) contained 114 ± 17 and 144 ± 26 FliN molecules, respectively. The ratio of CCW-to-CW FliN copy numbers was 1.26, very close to that of 1.29 reported previously for FliM. We also measured the exchange of FliN molecules, which had a time scale and dependence upon rotation direction similar to those of FliM, consistent with an exchange of FliM-FliN as a unit. Our work confirms the highly dynamic nature of multimeric protein complexes and indicates that, under physiological conditions, these machines might not be the stable, complete structures suggested by averaged fixed methodologies but, rather, incomplete rings that can respond and adapt to changing environments. Importance: The flagellum is one of the most complex structures in a bacterial cell, with the core motor proteins conserved across species. Evidence is now emerging that turnover of some of these motor proteins depends on motor activity, suggesting that turnover is important for function. The switch complex transmits the chemosensory signal to the rotor, and we show, by using single

  7. Rapid evolution of silver nanoparticle resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Joseph L.; Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Cunningham, Quincy; Campbell, Adero; Nonga, Herve; Harrison, Scott H.; Barrick, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    The recent exponential increase in the use of engineered nanoparticles (eNPs) means both greater intentional and unintentional exposure of eNPs to microbes. Intentional use includes the use of eNPs as biocides. Unintentional exposure results from the fact that eNPs are included in a variety of commercial products (paints, sunscreens, cosmetics). Many of these eNPs are composed of heavy metals or metal oxides such as silver, gold, zinc, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide. It is thought that since metallic/metallic oxide NPs impact so many aspects of bacterial physiology that it will difficult for bacteria to evolve resistance to them. This study utilized laboratory experimental evolution to evolve silver nanoparticle (AgNP) resistance in the bacterium Escherichia coli (K-12 MG1655), a bacterium that does not harbor any known silver resistance elements. After 225 generations of exposure to the AgNP environment, the treatment populations demonstrated greater fitness vs. control strains as measured by optical density (OD) and colony forming units (CFU) in the presence of varying concentrations of 10 nm citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNP) or silver nitrate (AgNO3). Genomic analysis shows that changes associated with AgNP resistance were already accumulating within the treatment populations by generation 100, and by generation 200 three mutations had swept to high frequency in the AgNP resistance stocks. This study indicates that despite previous claims to the contrary bacteria can easily evolve resistance to AgNPs, and this occurs by relatively simple genomic changes. These results indicate that care should be taken with regards to the use of eNPs as biocides as well as with regards to unintentional exposure of microbial communities to eNPs in waste products. PMID:25741363

  8. Modular engineering of L-tyrosine production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Juminaga, Darmawi; Baidoo, Edward E K; Redding-Johanson, Alyssa M; Batth, Tanveer S; Burd, Helcio; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Petzold, Christopher J; Keasling, Jay D

    2012-01-01

    Efficient biosynthesis of L-tyrosine from glucose is necessary to make biological production economically viable. To this end, we designed and constructed a modular biosynthetic pathway for L-tyrosine production in E. coli MG1655 by encoding the enzymes for converting erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to L-tyrosine on two plasmids. Rational engineering to improve L-tyrosine production and to identify pathway bottlenecks was directed by targeted proteomics and metabolite profiling. The bottlenecks in the pathway were relieved by modifications in plasmid copy numbers, promoter strength, gene codon usage, and the placement of genes in operons. One major bottleneck was due to the bifunctional activities of quinate/shikimate dehydrogenase (YdiB), which caused accumulation of the intermediates dehydroquinate (DHQ) and dehydroshikimate (DHS) and the side product quinate; this bottleneck was relieved by replacing YdiB with its paralog AroE, resulting in the production of over 700 mg/liter of shikimate. Another bottleneck in shikimate production, due to low expression of the dehydroquinate synthase (AroB), was alleviated by optimizing the first 15 codons of the gene. Shikimate conversion to L-tyrosine was improved by replacing the shikimate kinase AroK with its isozyme, AroL, which effectively consumed all intermediates formed in the first half of the pathway. Guided by the protein and metabolite measurements, the best producer, consisting of two medium-copy-number, dual-operon plasmids, was optimized to produce >2 g/liter L-tyrosine at 80% of the theoretical yield. This work demonstrates the utility of targeted proteomics and metabolite profiling in pathway construction and optimization, which should be applicable to other metabolic pathways. PMID:22020510

  9. Experimental evolution of silver nanoparticle resistance in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajkarimi, Mehrdad

    The recent exponential increase in the use of engineered nanoparticles (eNPs) means both greater intentional and unintentional exposure of eNPs to microbes. Intentional use includes the use of eNPs as biocides; unintentional exposure results from the fact that eNPs are included in a variety of commercial products (paints, sunscreens, cosmetics.) Many of these eNPs include heavy metals or metal oxides such as titanium dioxide, silver, gold, zinc and zinc oxide. The fact that early studies of the impact of metallic nanoparticles achieved approximately 90% lethality to Ag, Cu eNPs, suggests that genetic variants are already circulating in bacteria that can be co-opted to provide heavy metal eNP resistance. This project has utilized laboratory experimental evolution to evolve eNP resistance in the bacterium Escherichia coli (K12 MG1655 strain.). This is currently being validated by demonstrating the greater fitness of evolved strains versus ancestral strains in the presence of different sized and coated silver nanoparticles (10nm, 40nm, citrate-coated, PVP-coated) as well as phenotypic changes in the bacterial cell wall (as measured by Atomic Force Microscopy, AFM.). Finally, the bacterial genomes of the evolved and ancestral strains were resequenced. The genomic basis of this complex phenotype was determined. The practical application of such knowledge cannot be underestimated since nature is already evolving nanoparticle resistant bacteria. Thus knowledge of the nature of the physiological, morphological, and genomic mechanisms of resistance will be essential to deploy sustainable use of NPs as biocides, and to prevent unintentional environmental damage.

  10. Rapid evolution of silver nanoparticle resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Graves, Joseph L; Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Cunningham, Quincy; Campbell, Adero; Nonga, Herve; Harrison, Scott H; Barrick, Jeffrey E

    2015-01-01

    The recent exponential increase in the use of engineered nanoparticles (eNPs) means both greater intentional and unintentional exposure of eNPs to microbes. Intentional use includes the use of eNPs as biocides. Unintentional exposure results from the fact that eNPs are included in a variety of commercial products (paints, sunscreens, cosmetics). Many of these eNPs are composed of heavy metals or metal oxides such as silver, gold, zinc, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide. It is thought that since metallic/metallic oxide NPs impact so many aspects of bacterial physiology that it will difficult for bacteria to evolve resistance to them. This study utilized laboratory experimental evolution to evolve silver nanoparticle (AgNP) resistance in the bacterium Escherichia coli (K-12 MG1655), a bacterium that does not harbor any known silver resistance elements. After 225 generations of exposure to the AgNP environment, the treatment populations demonstrated greater fitness vs. control strains as measured by optical density (OD) and colony forming units (CFU) in the presence of varying concentrations of 10 nm citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNP) or silver nitrate (AgNO3). Genomic analysis shows that changes associated with AgNP resistance were already accumulating within the treatment populations by generation 100, and by generation 200 three mutations had swept to high frequency in the AgNP resistance stocks. This study indicates that despite previous claims to the contrary bacteria can easily evolve resistance to AgNPs, and this occurs by relatively simple genomic changes. These results indicate that care should be taken with regards to the use of eNPs as biocides as well as with regards to unintentional exposure of microbial communities to eNPs in waste products. PMID:25741363

  11. Quorum sensing positively regulates flagellar motility in pathogenic Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Vibrios belonging to the Harveyi clade are among the major pathogens of aquatic organisms. Quorum sensing (QS) is essential for virulence of V. harveyi towards different hosts. However, most virulence factors reported to be controlled by QS to date are negatively regulated by QS, therefore suggesting that their impact on virulence is limited. In this study, we report that QS positively regulates flagellar motility. We found that autoinducer synthase mutants showed significantly lower swimming motility than the wild type, and the swimming motility could be restored by adding synthetic signal molecules. Further, motility of a luxO mutant with inactive QS (LuxO D47E) was significantly lower than that of the wild type and of a luxO mutant with constitutively maximal QS activity (LuxO D47A). Furthermore, we found that the expression of flagellar genes (both early, middle and late genes) was significantly lower in the luxO mutant with inactive QS when compared with wild type and the luxO mutant with maximal QS activity. Motility assays and gene expression also revealed the involvement of the quorum-sensing master regulator LuxR in the QS regulation of motility. Finally, the motility inhibitor phenamil significantly decreased the virulence of V. harveyi towards gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae. PMID:24528485

  12. Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Mandadapu, Kranthi K.; Nirody, Jasmine A.; Berry, Richard M.; Oster, George

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify roles for two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, whereas steric forces comprise the actual “power stroke.” Specifically, we propose that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline “hinge” residue in a stator α-helix are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions fit well with recent experiments on a single-stator motor. The proposed model provides a mechanical explanation for several fundamental properties of the flagellar motor, including torque–speed and speed–ion motive force relationships, backstepping, variation in step sizes, and the effects of key mutations in the stator. PMID:26216959

  13. Flagellar Glycosylation in Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis▿

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Andrew E.; Twine, Susan M.; Fulton, Kelly M.; Titball, Richard W.; Essex-Lopresti, Angela E.; Atkins, Timothy P.; Prior, Joann L.

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylation of proteins is known to impart novel physical properties and biological roles to proteins from both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In this study, gel-based glycoproteomics were used to identify glycoproteins of the potential biothreat agent Burkholderia pseudomallei and the closely related but nonpathogenic B. thailandensis. Top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry (MS) analyses identified that the flagellin proteins of both species were posttranslationally modified by novel glycans. Analysis of proteins from two strains of each species demonstrated that B. pseudomallei flagellin proteins were modified with a glycan with a mass of 291 Da, while B. thailandensis flagellin protein was modified with related glycans with a mass of 300 or 342 Da. Structural characterization of the B. thailandensis carbohydrate moiety suggests that it is an acetylated hexuronic acid. In addition, we have identified through mutagenesis a gene from the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen biosynthetic cluster which is involved in flagellar glycosylation, and inactivation of this gene eliminates flagellar glycosylation and motility in B. pseudomallei. This is the first report to conclusively demonstrate the presence of a carbohydrate covalently linked to a protein in B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis, and it suggests new avenues to explore in order to examine the marked differences in virulence between these two species. PMID:21602339

  14. Interacting Protein Kinases Involved in the Regulation of Flagellar Length

    PubMed Central

    Erdmann, Maja; Scholz, Anne; Melzer, Inga M.; Schmetz, Christel; Wiese, Martin

    2006-01-01

    A striking difference of the life stages of the protozoan parasite Leishmania is a long flagellum in the insect stage promastigotes and a rudimentary organelle in the mammalian amastigotes. LmxMKK, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase from Leishmania mexicana, is required for growth of a full-length flagellum. We identified LmxMPK3, a MAP kinase homologue, with a similar expression pattern as LmxMKK being not detectable in amastigotes, up-regulated during the differentiation to promastigotes, constantly expressed in promastigotes, and shut down during the differentiation to amastigotes. LmxMPK3 null mutants resemble the LmxMKK knockouts with flagella reduced to one-fifth of the wild-type length, stumpy cell bodies, and vesicles and membrane fragments in the flagellar pocket. A constitutively activated recombinant LmxMKK activates LmxMPK3 in vitro. Moreover, LmxMKK is likely to be directly involved in the phosphorylation of LmxMPK3 in vivo. Finally, LmxMPK3 is able to phosphorylate LmxMKK, indicating a possible feedback regulation. This is the first time that two interacting components of a signaling cascade have been described in the genus Leishmania. Moreover, we set the stage for the analysis of reversible phosphorylation in flagellar morphogenesis. PMID:16467378

  15. Constraints on models for the flagellar rotary motor.

    PubMed

    Berg, H C

    2000-04-29

    Most bacteria that swim are propelled by flagellar filaments, each driven at its base by a rotary motor embedded in the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane. A motor is about 45 nm in diameter and made up of about 20 different kinds of parts. It is assembled from the inside out. It is powered by a proton (or in some species, a sodium-ion) flux. It steps at least 400 times per revolution. At low speeds and high torques, about 1000 protons are required per revolution, speed is proportional to protonmotive force, and torque varies little with temperature or hydrogen isotope. At high speeds and low torques, torque increases with temperature and is sensitive to hydrogen isotope. At room temperature, torque varies remarkably little with speed from about -100 Hz (the present limit of measurement) to about 200 Hz, and then it declines rapidly reaching zero at about 300 Hz. These are facts that motor models should explain. None of the existing models for the flagellar rotary motor completely do so. PMID:10836502

  16. Sensitivity to Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 in mice is dependent on environment and genetic background

    PubMed Central

    Bleich, Andre; Sundberg, John P; Smoczek, Anna; von Wasielewski, Reinhard; de Buhr, Maike F; Janus, Lydia M; Julga, Gwen; Ukena, Sya N; Hedrich, Hans-J; Gunzer, Florian

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a well-characterized probiotic bacterium. Although genomic comparisons of EcN with the uropathogenic E. coli strain CFT073 revealed high degrees of similarity, EcN is generally considered a non-pathogenic organism. However, as recent evidence suggests that EcN is capable of inducing inflammatory responses in host intestinal epithelial cells, we aimed to investigate potential pathogenic properties of EcN in an in vivo model using various germ-free (GF) mouse strains. With the exception of C3H/HeJZtm mice, which carry a defective toll-like receptor (TLR)4-allele, no lesions were obvious in mice of different strains orally inoculated with EcN for 1 week, although organ cultures (blood, lung, mesenteric lymph node, pancreas, spleen, liver and kidney) tested positive to various degrees. C3H/HeJZtm mice inoculated with EcN became clinically ill and the majority died or had to be euthanized. Organs of all gnotobiotic C3H/HeJZtm mice were positive for EcN by culture; major histological findings were moderate to severe pyogranulomatous serositis, typhlitis and pancreatitis. Histological findings were corroborated by highly elevated tumour necrosis factor (TNF) serum levels. Lesions were not detected in specified pathogen free maintained C3H/HeJZtm mice, GF C3H/HeJ mice lacking the interleukin-10 gene, or GF C3H/HeJZtm mice that were inoculated with E. coli K12 strain MG1655 as a control. In addition, mild histological lesions were detected in Ztm:NMRI mice 3 months after oral inoculation with EcN. This study shows that EcN is capable of displaying a virulent phenotype in GF C3H/HeJZtm mice. Whether this phenotype is linked to the bacterium’s probiotic nature should be the focus of further studies. PMID:18005134

  17. Step-Wise Loss of Bacterial Flagellar Torsion Confers Progressive Phagocytic Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Lovewell, Rustin R.; Collins, Ryan M.; Acker, Julie L.; O'Toole, George A.; Wargo, Matthew J.; Berwin, Brent

    2011-01-01

    Phagocytosis of bacteria by innate immune cells is a primary method of bacterial clearance during infection. However, the mechanisms by which the host cell recognizes bacteria and consequentially initiates phagocytosis are largely unclear. Previous studies of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa have indicated that bacterial flagella and flagellar motility play an important role in colonization of the host and, importantly, that loss of flagellar motility enables phagocytic evasion. Here we use molecular, cellular, and genetic methods to provide the first formal evidence that phagocytic cells recognize bacterial motility rather than flagella and initiate phagocytosis in response to this motility. We demonstrate that deletion of genes coding for the flagellar stator complex, which results in non-swimming bacteria that retain an initial flagellar structure, confers resistance to phagocytic binding and ingestion in several species of the gamma proteobacterial group of Gram-negative bacteria, indicative of a shared strategy for phagocytic evasion. Furthermore, we show for the first time that susceptibility to phagocytosis in swimming bacteria is proportional to mot gene function and, consequently, flagellar rotation since complementary genetically- and biochemically-modulated incremental decreases in flagellar motility result in corresponding and proportional phagocytic evasion. These findings identify that phagocytic cells respond to flagellar movement, which represents a novel mechanism for non-opsonized phagocytic recognition of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21949654

  18. Escherichia coli (E. coli)

    MedlinePlus

    ... so you might hear about E. coli being found in drinking water, which are not themselves harmful, but indicate the ... at CDC Foodborne disease Travelers' Health: Safe Food & Water Healthy Swimming E. coli Infection & Farm ... Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple ...

  19. Differential Mechanism of Escherichia coli Inactivation by (+)-Limonene as a Function of Cell Physiological State and Drug's Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Chueca, Beatriz; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    (+)-limonene is a lipophilic antimicrobial compound, extracted from citrus fruits' essential oils, that is used as a flavouring agent and organic solvent by the food industry. A recent study has proposed a common and controversial mechanism of cell death for bactericidal antibiotics, in which hydroxyl radicals ultimately inactivated cells. Our objective was to determine whether the mechanism of Escherichia coli MG1655 inactivation by (+)-limonene follows that of bactericidal antibiotics. A treatment with 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene inactivated 4 log10 cycles of exponentially growing E. coli cells in 3 hours. On one hand, an increase of cell survival in the ΔacnB mutant (deficient in a TCA cycle enzyme), or in the presence of 2,2′-dipyridyl (inhibitor of Fenton reaction by iron chelation), thiourea, or cysteamine (hydroxyl radical scavengers) was observed. Moreover, the ΔrecA mutant (deficient in an enzyme involved in SOS response to DNA damage) was more sensitive to (+)-limonene. Thus, this indirect evidence indicates that the mechanism of exponentially growing E. coli cells inactivation by 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene is due to the TCA cycle and Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical formation that caused oxidative DNA damage, as observed for bactericidal drugs. However, several differences have been observed between the proposed mechanism for bactericidal drugs and for (+)-limonene. In this regard, our results demonstrated that E. coli inactivation was influenced by its physiological state and the drug's concentration: experiments with stationary-phase cells or 4,000 μL/L (+)-limonene uncovered a different mechanism of cell death, likely unrelated to hydroxyl radicals. Our research has also shown that drug's concentration is an important factor influencing the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by antibiotics, such as kanamycin. These results might help in improving and spreading the use of (+)-limonene as an antimicrobial compound, and in clarifying the controversy

  20. Differential mechanism of Escherichia coli Inactivation by (+)-limonene as a function of cell physiological state and drug's concentration.

    PubMed

    Chueca, Beatriz; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    (+)-limonene is a lipophilic antimicrobial compound, extracted from citrus fruits' essential oils, that is used as a flavouring agent and organic solvent by the food industry. A recent study has proposed a common and controversial mechanism of cell death for bactericidal antibiotics, in which hydroxyl radicals ultimately inactivated cells. Our objective was to determine whether the mechanism of Escherichia coli MG1655 inactivation by (+)-limonene follows that of bactericidal antibiotics. A treatment with 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene inactivated 4 log10 cycles of exponentially growing E. coli cells in 3 hours. On one hand, an increase of cell survival in the ΔacnB mutant (deficient in a TCA cycle enzyme), or in the presence of 2,2'-dipyridyl (inhibitor of Fenton reaction by iron chelation), thiourea, or cysteamine (hydroxyl radical scavengers) was observed. Moreover, the ΔrecA mutant (deficient in an enzyme involved in SOS response to DNA damage) was more sensitive to (+)-limonene. Thus, this indirect evidence indicates that the mechanism of exponentially growing E. coli cells inactivation by 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene is due to the TCA cycle and Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical formation that caused oxidative DNA damage, as observed for bactericidal drugs. However, several differences have been observed between the proposed mechanism for bactericidal drugs and for (+)-limonene. In this regard, our results demonstrated that E. coli inactivation was influenced by its physiological state and the drug's concentration: experiments with stationary-phase cells or 4,000 μL/L (+)-limonene uncovered a different mechanism of cell death, likely unrelated to hydroxyl radicals. Our research has also shown that drug's concentration is an important factor influencing the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by antibiotics, such as kanamycin. These results might help in improving and spreading the use of (+)-limonene as an antimicrobial compound, and in clarifying the controversy about

  1. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  2. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  3. Kinetically resolved states of the Halobacterium halobium flagellar motor switch and modulation of the switch by sensory rhodopsin I.

    PubMed Central

    McCain, D A; Amici, L A; Spudich, J L

    1987-01-01

    Spontaneous switching of the rotation sense of the flagellar motor of the archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium and modulation of the switch by attractant and repellent photostimuli were analyzed by using a computerized cell-tracking system with 67-ms resolution coupled to electronic shutters. The data fit a three-state model of the switch, in which a Poisson process governs the transition from state N (nonreversing) to state R (reversing). After a reversal, the switch returns to state N, passing through an intermediate state I (inactive), which produces a ca. 2-s period of low reversal frequency before the state N Poisson rate is restored. The stochastic nature of the H. halobium switch reveals a close similarity to Escherichia coli flagellar motor properties as elucidated previously. Sensory modulation of the switch by both photoattractant and photorepellent signals can be interpreted in terms of modulation of the single forward rate constant of the N to R transition. Insight into the mechanism of modulation by the phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I (SR-I) was gained by increasing the lifetime of the principal photointermediate of the SR-I photochemical reaction cycle, S373, by replacing the native chromophore, all-trans-retinal, with the acyclic analog, 3,7,11-trimethyl-2,4,6,8-dodecapentaenal. Flash photolysis of analog-containing cells revealed an eightfold decrease in the rate of thermal decay of S373, and behavioral analysis showed longer periods of reversal suppression than that of cells with the native chromophore over similar ranges of illumination intensities. This indicates that attractant signaling is governed by the lifetime of the S373 intermediate rather than by the frequency of photocycling. In this sense, SR-I is similar to rhodopsin, whose function depends on an active photoproduct (Meta-II). PMID:3654583

  4. The Helicobacter pylori flbA flagellar biosynthesis and regulatory gene is required for motility and virulence and modulates urease of H. pylori and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    McGee, David J; Coker, Christopher; Testerman, Traci L; Harro, Janette M; Gibson, Susan V; Mobley, Harry L T

    2002-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori and Proteus mirabilis ureases are nickel-requiring metallo-enzymes that hydrolyse urea to NH3 and CO2. In both H. pylori and in an Escherichia coli model of H. pylori urease activity, a high affinity nickel transporter, NixA, is required for optimal urease activity, whereas the urea-dependent UreR positive transcriptional activator governs optimal urease expression in P. mirabilis. The H. pylori flbA gene is a flagellar biosynthesis and regulatory gene that modulates urease activity in the E. coli model of H. pylori urease activity. All flbA mutants of eight strains of H. pylori were non-motile and five had a strain-dependent alteration in urease activity. The flbA gene decreased urease activity 15-fold when expressed in E. coli containing the H. pylori urease locus and the nixA gene; this was reversed by disruption of flbA. The flbA gene decreased nixA transcription. flbA also decreased urease activity three-fold in E. coli containing the P. mirabilis urease locus in a urea- and UreR-dependent fashion. Here the flbA gene repressed the P. mirabilis urease promoter. Thus, FlbA decreased urease activity of both H. pylori and P. mirabilis, but through distinct mechanisms. H. pylori wild-type strain SS1 colonised gerbils at a mean of 5.4 x 10(6) cfu/g of antrum and caused chronic gastritis and lesions in the antrum. In contrast, the flbA mutant did not colonise five of six gerbils and caused no lesions, indicating that motility mediated by flbA was required for colonisation. Because FlbA regulates flagellar biosynthesis and secretion, as well as forming a structural component of the flagellar secretion apparatus, two seemingly unrelated virulence attributes, motility and urease, may be coupled in H. pylori and P. mirabilis and possibly also in other motile, ureolytic bacteria. PMID:12448680

  5. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Qin, B.; Gopinath, A.; Yang, J.; Gollub, J. P.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes. PMID:25778677

  6. Composition and sensory function of the trypanosome flagellar membrane

    PubMed Central

    Maric, Danijela; Epting, Conrad L.; Engman, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A cilium is an extension of the cell that contains an axonemal complex of microtubules and associated proteins bounded by a membrane which is contiguous with the cell body membrane. Cilia may be nonmotile or motile, the latter having additional specific roles in cell or fluid movement. The term flagellum refers to the motile cilium of free-living single cells (e.g., bacteria, archaea, spermatozoa and protozoa). In eukaryotes, both nonmotile and motile cilia possess sensory functions. The ciliary interior (cilioplasm) is separated from the cytoplasm by a selective barrier that prevents passive diffusion of molecules between the two domains. The sensory functions of cilia reside largely in the membrane and signals generated in the cilium are transduced into a variety of cellular responses. In this review we discuss the structure and biogenesis of the cilium, with special attention to the trypanosome flagellar membrane, its lipid and protein composition and its proposed roles in sensing and signaling. PMID:20580599

  7. The Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirody, Jasmine A.; Berry, Richard M.; Oster, George

    2016-08-01

    Recent experiments on the bacterial flagellar motor have shown that the structure of this nanomachine, which drives locomotion in a wide range of bacterial species, is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating units (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding invalidates the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. Here, we propose that, contrary to previous assumptions, the maximum speed of the motor is not universal, but rather increases as additional torque-generators are recruited. This result arises from our assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence and consolidate our predictions with arguments that a processive motor must have a high duty ratio at high loads.

  8. Flagellar kinematics and swimming of algal cells in viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Qin, B; Gopinath, A; Yang, J; Gollub, J P; Arratia, P E

    2015-01-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes. PMID:25778677

  9. Flagellar generated flow mediates attachment of Giardia lamblia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Jeffrey; Luo, Haibei; Picou, Theodore; McAllister, Ryan; Elmendorf, Heidi

    2011-03-01

    Giardia lamblia is a protozoan parasite responsible for widespread diarrheal disease in humans and animals worldwide. Attachment to the host intestinal mucosa and resistance to peristalsis is necessary for establishing infection, but the physical basis for this attachment is poorly understood. We report results from TIRF and confocal fluorescence microscopy that demonstrate that the regular beating of the posterior flagella generate a flow through the ventral disk, a suction-cup shaped structure that is against the substrate during attachment. Finite element simulations are used to compare the negative pressure generated by the flow to the measured attachment force and the expected performance of the flagellar pump. NIH grant 1R21AI062934-0.

  10. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, B.; Gopinath, A.; Yang, J.; Gollub, J. P.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-03-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes.

  11. Antiphase Synchronization in a Flagellar-Dominance Mutant of Chlamydomonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leptos, Kyriacos C.; Wan, Kirsty Y.; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Pesci, Adriana I.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-10-01

    Groups of beating flagella or cilia often synchronize so that neighboring filaments have identical frequencies and phases. A prime example is provided by the unicellular biflagellate Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which typically displays synchronous in-phase beating in a low-Reynolds number version of breaststroke swimming. We report the discovery that ptx1, a flagellar-dominance mutant of C. reinhardtii, can exhibit synchronization in precise antiphase, as in the freestyle swimming stroke. High-speed imaging shows that ptx1 flagella switch stochastically between in-phase and antiphase states, and that the latter has a distinct waveform and significantly higher frequency, both of which are strikingly similar to those found during phase slips that stochastically interrupt in-phase beating of the wild-type. Possible mechanisms underlying these observations are discussed.

  12. Flagellar swimmers oscillate between pusher- and puller-type swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klindt, Gary S.; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2015-12-01

    Self-propulsion of cellular microswimmers generates flow signatures, commonly classified as pusher and puller type, which characterize hydrodynamic interactions with other cells or boundaries. Using experimentally measured beat patterns, we compute that the flagellated green alga Chlamydomonas oscillates between pusher and puller, rendering it an approximately neutral swimmer, when averaging over its full beat cycle. Beyond a typical distance of 100 μ m from the cell, inertia attenuates oscillatory microflows. We show that hydrodynamic interactions between cells oscillate in time and are of similar magnitude as stochastic swimming fluctuations. From our analysis, we also find that the rate of hydrodynamic dissipation varies in time, which implies that flagellar beat patterns are not optimized with respect to this measure.

  13. The Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor.

    PubMed

    Nirody, Jasmine A; Berry, Richard M; Oster, George

    2016-08-01

    Recent experiments on the bacterial flagellar motor have shown that the structure of this nanomachine, which drives locomotion in a wide range of bacterial species, is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating complexes (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding brings under scrutiny the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. In this study, we propose that, contrary to previous assumptions, the maximum speed of the motor increases as additional stators are recruited. This result arises from our assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence in chimeric motors, as well as with the requirement that a processive motor driving a large load via an elastic linkage must have a high duty ratio. PMID:27508439

  14. Life with eight flagella: flagellar assembly and division in Giardia

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Scott C.; House, Susan A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances Flagellar movement in Giardia, a common intestinal parasitic protist, is critical to its survival in the host. Each axoneme is unique in possessing a long, cytoplasmic portion as well as a membrane-bound portion. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for the assembly of membrane-bound regions, yet the cytoplasmic regions may be assembled by IFT-independent mechanisms. Steady-state axoneme length is maintained by IFT and by intrinsic and active microtubule dynamics. Following mitosis and prior to their segregation, giardial flagella undergo a multigenerational division cycle in which the parental eight flagella migrate and reposition to different cellular locations; eight new flagella are assembled de novo. Each daughter cell thus inherits four mature and four newly synthesized flagella. PMID:20580308

  15. Protein export through the bacterial flagellar type III export pathway.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru

    2014-08-01

    For construction of the bacterial flagellum, which is responsible for bacterial motility, the flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes both ATP and proton motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane and exports flagellar proteins from the cytoplasm to the distal end of the nascent structure. The export apparatus consists of a membrane-embedded export gate made of FlhA, FlhB, FliO, FliP, FliQ, and FliR and a water-soluble ATPase ring complex consisting of FliH, FliI, and FliJ. FlgN, FliS, and FliT act as substrate-specific chaperones that do not only protect their cognate substrates from degradation and aggregation in the cytoplasm but also efficiently transfer the substrates to the export apparatus. The ATPase ring complex facilitates the initial entry of the substrates into the narrow pore of the export gate. The export gate by itself is a proton-protein antiporter that uses the two components of proton motive force, the electric potential difference and the proton concentration difference, for different steps of the export process. A specific interaction of FlhA with FliJ located in the center of the ATPase ring complex allows the export gate to efficiently use proton motive force to drive protein export. The ATPase ring complex couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to its assembly-disassembly cycle for rapid and efficient protein export cycle. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein trafficking and secretion in bacteria. Guest Editors: Anastassios Economou and Ross Dalbey. PMID:24064315

  16. Biochemical, immunological, metabolic, and molecular studies on flagellar development in Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Levasseur, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The emergent flagellum of Euglena gracilis arises from an anterior invagination of the organism and possesses, along with the typical eukaryotic axoneme, a glycoprotein surface layer, a complement of structurally complex mastigonemes and a paraxial rod. Nonionic detergent extraction of isolated flagella yielded a fraction containing 21% of the flagellar protein. This fraction contained at least 25 components. In vivo radiolabeling experiments indicated that Euglena possessed a pool of flagellar precursors. This was evidence by the observation that flagellar proteins radiolabeled during an initial regeneration could be mobilized to flagella of a subsequent regeneration. At least one component in the pool was present in sufficient quantity to support an entire regeneration. This protein was tentatively identified as a mastigonemal protein of M{sub r} {approximately} 220,000. A cDNA library was constructed to investigate flagellar gene expression in Euglena.

  17. TbFlabarin, a flagellar protein of Trypanosoma brucei, highlights differences between Leishmania and Trypanosoma flagellar-targeting signals.

    PubMed

    Tetaud, Emmanuel; Lefebvre, Michèle; M'Bang-Benet, Diane-Ethna; Crobu, Lucien; Blancard, Corinne; Sterkers, Yvon; Pages, Michel; Bastien, Patrick; Merlin, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    TbFlabarin is the Trypanosoma brucei orthologue of the Leishmania flagellar protein LdFlabarin but its sequence is 33% shorter than LdFlabarin, as it lacks a C-terminal domain that is indispensable for LdFlabarin to localize to the Leishmania flagellum. TbFlabarin is mainly expressed in the procyclic forms of the parasite and localized to the flagellum, but only when two palmitoylable cysteines at positions 3 and 4 are present. TbFlabarin is more strongly attached to the membrane fraction than its Leishmania counterpart, as it resists complete solubilization with as much as 0.5% NP-40. Expression ablation by RNA interference did not change parasite growth in culture, its morphology or apparent motility. Heterologous expression showed that neither TbFlabarin in L. amazonensis nor LdFlabarin in T. brucei localized to the flagellum, revealing non-cross-reacting targeting signals between the two species. PMID:27060615

  18. Real-Time Imaging of Fluorescent Flagellar Filaments of Rhizobium lupini H13-3: Flagellar Rotation and pH-Induced Polymorphic Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Birgit

    2002-01-01

    The soil bacterium Rhizobium lupini H13-3 has complex right-handed flagellar filaments with unusual ridged, grooved surfaces. Clockwise (CW) rotation propels the cells forward, and course changes (tumbling) result from changes in filament speed instead of the more common change in direction of rotation. In view of these novelties, fluorescence labeling was used to analyze the behavior of single flagellar filaments during swimming and tumbling, leading to a model for directional changes in R. lupini. Also, flagellar filaments were investigated for helical conformational changes, which have not been previously shown for complex filaments. During full-speed CW rotation, the flagellar filaments form a propulsive bundle that pushes the cell on a straight path. Tumbling is caused by asynchronous deceleration and stops of individual filaments, resulting in dissociation of the propulsive bundle. R. lupini tumbles were not accompanied by helical conformational changes as are tumbles in other organisms including enteric bacteria. However, when pH was experimentally changed, four different polymorphic forms were observed. At a physiological pH of 7, normal flagellar helices were characterized by a pitch angle of 30°, a pitch of 1.36 μm, and a helical diameter of 0.50 μm. As pH increased from 9 to 11, the helices transformed from normal to semicoiled to straight. As pH decreased from 5 to 3, the helices transformed from normal to curly to straight. Transient conformational changes were also noted at high viscosity, suggesting that the R. lupini flagellar filament may adapt to high loads in viscous environments (soil) by assuming hydrodynamically favorable conformations. PMID:12374832

  19. E. Coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... E. coli is short for the medical term Escherichia coli . The strange thing about these bacteria — and lots ... cause a very serious infection. Someone who has E. coli infection may have these symptoms: bad stomach cramps and ...

  20. Synthesis and accumulation of aromatic aldehydes in an engineered strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kunjapur, Aditya M; Tarasova, Yekaterina; Prather, Kristala L J

    2014-08-20

    Aromatic aldehydes are useful in numerous applications, especially as flavors, fragrances, and pharmaceutical precursors. However, microbial synthesis of aldehydes is hindered by rapid, endogenous, and redundant conversion of aldehydes to their corresponding alcohols. We report the construction of an Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 strain with reduced aromatic aldehyde reduction (RARE) that serves as a platform for aromatic aldehyde biosynthesis. Six genes with reported activity on the model substrate benzaldehyde were rationally targeted for deletion: three genes that encode aldo-keto reductases and three genes that encode alcohol dehydrogenases. Upon expression of a recombinant carboxylic acid reductase in the RARE strain and addition of benzoate during growth, benzaldehyde remained in the culture after 24 h, with less than 12% conversion of benzaldehyde to benzyl alcohol. Although individual overexpression results demonstrated that all six genes could contribute to benzaldehyde reduction in vivo, additional experiments featuring subset deletion strains revealed that two of the gene deletions were dispensable under the conditions tested. The engineered strain was next investigated for the production of vanillin from vanillate and succeeded in preventing formation of the byproduct vanillyl alcohol. A pathway for the biosynthesis of vanillin directly from glucose was introduced and resulted in a 55-fold improvement in vanillin titer when using the RARE strain versus the wild-type strain. Finally, synthesis of the chiral pharmaceutical intermediate L-phenylacetylcarbinol (L-PAC) was demonstrated from benzaldehyde and glucose upon expression of a recombinant mutant pyruvate decarboxylase in the RARE strain. Beyond allowing accumulation of aromatic aldehydes as end products in E. coli, the RARE strain expands the classes of chemicals that can be produced microbially via aldehyde intermediates. PMID:25076127

  1. Real-time observation of Escherichia coli cells under irradiation with a 2-MeV H{sup +} microbeam

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Mikio; Meissl, Walter; Ikeda, Tokihiro; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Umezawa, Kenji

    2012-05-07

    A high-energy H{sup +} microbeam generated by tapered glass capillary optics was applied to a single Escherichia coli cell, in order to evaluate the effects of irradiation on the activity of the flagellar motor and cell growth in real time. The flagellar motor of the tethered cells was stopped by irradiation with an average ion fluence of 2.0 x 10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2}. When a lower dose was applied to the cells attached to the substrate, an elongated cell, which seemed ready to divide, divided into two daughter cells; however, the daughter cells did not elongate, neither did further cell division occur.

  2. Differential substrate specificity and kinetic behavior of Escherichia coli YfdW and Oxalobacter formigenes formyl coenzyme A transferase.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Cory G; Berthold, Catrine L; Gruez, Arnaud; Jónsson, Stefán; Lindqvist, Ylva; Cambillau, Christian; Richards, Nigel G J

    2008-04-01

    The yfdXWUVE operon appears to encode proteins that enhance the ability of Escherichia coli MG1655 to survive under acidic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenotypic behavior remain to be elucidated, findings from structural genomic studies have shown that the structure of YfdW, the protein encoded by the yfdW gene, is homologous to that of the enzyme that mediates oxalate catabolism in the obligate anaerobe Oxalobacter formigenes, O. formigenes formyl coenzyme A transferase (FRC). We now report the first detailed examination of the steady-state kinetic behavior and substrate specificity of recombinant, wild-type YfdW. Our studies confirm that YfdW is a formyl coenzyme A (formyl-CoA) transferase, and YfdW appears to be more stringent than the corresponding enzyme (FRC) in Oxalobacter in employing formyl-CoA and oxalate as substrates. We also report the effects of replacing Trp-48 in the FRC active site with the glutamine residue that occupies an equivalent position in the E. coli protein. The results of these experiments show that Trp-48 precludes oxalate binding to a site that mediates substrate inhibition for YfdW. In addition, the replacement of Trp-48 by Gln-48 yields an FRC variant for which oxalate-dependent substrate inhibition is modified to resemble that seen for YfdW. Our findings illustrate the utility of structural homology in assigning enzyme function and raise the question of whether oxalate catabolism takes place in E. coli upon the up-regulation of the yfdXWUVE operon under acidic conditions. PMID:18245280

  3. Influence of csgD and ompR on Nanomechanics, Adhesion Forces, and Curli Properties of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Perni, Stefano; Preedy, Emily Callard; Landini, Paolo; Prokopovich, Polina

    2016-08-01

    Curli are bacterial appendages involved in the adhesion of cells to surfaces; their synthesis is regulated by many genes such as csgD and ompR. The expression of the two curli subunits (CsgA and CsgB) in Escherichia coli (E. coli) is regulated by CsgD; at the same time, csgD transcription is under the control of OmpR. Therefore, both genes are involved in the control of curli production. In this work, we elucidated the role of these genes in the nanomechanical and adhesive properties of E. coli MG1655 (a laboratory strain not expressing significant amount of curli) and its curli-producing mutants overexpressing OmpR and CsgD, employing atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nanomechanical analysis revealed that the expression of these genes gave origin to cells with a lower Young's modulus (E) and turgidity (P0), whereas the adhesion forces were unaffected when genes involved in curli formation were expressed. AFM was also employed to study the primary structure of the curli expressed through the freely jointed chain (FJC) model for polymers. CsgD increased the number of curli on the surface more than OmpR did, and the overexpression of both genes did not result in a greater number of curli. Neither of the genes had an impact on the structure (total length of the polymer and number and length of Kuhn segments) of the curli. Our results further suggest that, despite the widely assumed role of curli in cell adhesion, cell adhesion force is also dictated by surface properties because no relation between the number of curli expressed on the surface and cell adhesion was found. PMID:27434665

  4. Identification and characterization of the products of six region III flagellar genes (flaAII.3 through flaQII) of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Homma, M; Iino, T; Macnab, R M

    1988-01-01

    A portion of flagellar region III of the Salmonella typhimurium genome has been cloned and shown to contain six genes: flaAII.3, flaAIII, flaS, flaR, flaQI, and flaQII. Of these, all but flaQI were known to exist from mutant studies; the former flaQ has been renamed flaQII. The genes were shown by minicell analysis to encode proteins with apparent molecular masses of 28, 48, 15, 46, 17, and 37 kilodaltons, respectively. The presence of a flagellar-gene-specific promoter in the vicinity of flaQI was established by testing expression of the plasmid-encoded tetracycline resistance gene in artificial constructions. In minicell preparations, the flaAII.3 and flaR products were found principally in the cytoplasmic fraction; the rest were found principally in the membrane fraction. A comparison between the homologous genes of S. typhimurium and Escherichia coli confirmed that their genomic organizations were similar and that their products had similar molecular masses and isoelectric points. Images PMID:2834334

  5. Transcriptomic Analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and K-12 Cultures Exposed to Inorganic and Organic Acids in Stationary Phase Reveals Acidulant- and Strain-Specific Acid Tolerance Responses ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    King, Thea; Lucchini, Sacha; Hinton, Jay C. D.; Gobius, Kari

    2010-01-01

    The food-borne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 is commonly exposed to organic acid in processed and preserved foods, allowing adaptation and the development of tolerance to pH levels otherwise lethal. Since little is known about the molecular basis of adaptation of E. coli to organic acids, we studied K-12 MG1655 and O157:H7 Sakai during exposure to acetic, lactic, and hydrochloric acid at pH 5.5. This is the first analysis of the pH-dependent transcriptomic response of stationary-phase E. coli. Thirty-four genes and three intergenic regions were upregulated by both strains during exposure to all acids. This universal acid response included genes involved in oxidative, envelope, and cold stress resistance and iron and manganese uptake, as well as 10 genes of unknown function. Acidulant- and strain-specific responses were also revealed. The acidulant-specific response reflects differences in the modes of microbial inactivation, even between weak organic acids. The two strains exhibited similar responses to lactic and hydrochloric acid, while the response to acetic acid was distinct. Acidulant-dependent differences between the strains involved induction of genes involved in the heat shock response, osmoregulation, inorganic ion and nucleotide transport and metabolism, translation, and energy production. E. coli O157:H7-specific acid-inducible genes were identified, suggesting that the enterohemorrhagic E. coli strain possesses additional molecular mechanisms contributing to acid resistance that are absent in K-12. While E. coli K-12 was most resistant to lactic and hydrochloric acid, O157:H7 may have a greater ability to survive in more complex acidic environments, such as those encountered in the host and during food processing. PMID:20709847

  6. The Histone-Like Nucleoid Structuring Protein (H-NS) Is a Negative Regulator of the Lateral Flagellar System in the Deep-Sea Bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    PubMed

    Jian, Huahua; Xu, Guanpeng; Gai, Yingbao; Xu, Jun; Xiao, Xiang

    2016-04-01

    Although the histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS) is well known for its involvement in the adaptation of mesophilic bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, to cold environments and high-pressure stress, an understanding of the role of H-NS in the cold-adapted benthic microorganisms that live in the deep-sea ecosystem, which covers approximately 60% of the earth's surface, is still lacking. In this study, we characterized the function of H-NS in Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, which was isolated from West Pacific sediment at a depth of 1,914 m. Anhns gene deletion mutant (WP3Δhns) was constructed, and comparative whole-genome microarray analysis was performed. H-NS had a significant influence (fold change, >2) on the expression of a variety of WP3 genes (274 and 280 genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively), particularly genes related to energy production and conversion. Notably, WP3Δhnsexhibited higher expression levels of lateral flagellar genes than WP3 and showed enhanced swarming motility and lateral flagellar production compared to those of WP3. The DNA gel mobility shift experiment showed that H-NS bound specifically to the promoter of lateral flagellar genes. Moreover, the high-affinity binding sequences of H-NS were identified by DNase I protection footprinting, and the results support the "binding and spreading" model for H-NS functioning. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to characterize the function of the universal regulator H-NS in a deep-sea bacterium. Our data revealed that H-NS has a novel function as a repressor of the expression of genes related to the energy-consuming secondary flagellar system and to swarming motility. PMID:26873312

  7. The Gearbox of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor Switch.

    PubMed

    Pandini, Alessandro; Morcos, Faruck; Khan, Shahid

    2016-07-01

    Switching of flagellar motor rotation sense dictates bacterial chemotaxis. Multi-subunit FliM-FliG rotor rings couple signal protein binding in FliM with reversal of a distant FliG C-terminal (FliGC) helix involved in stator contacts. Subunit dynamics were examined in conformer ensembles generated by molecular simulations from the X-ray structures. Principal component analysis extracted collective motions. Interfacial loop immobilization by complex formation coupled elastic fluctuations of the FliM middle (FliMM) and FliG middle (FliGM) domains. Coevolved mutations captured interfacial dynamics as well as contacts. FliGM rotation was amplified via two central hinges to the FliGC helix. Intrinsic flexibility, reported by the FliGMC ensembles, reconciled conformers with opposite FliGC helix orientations. FliG domain stacking deformed the inter-domain linker and reduced flexibility; but conformational changes were not triggered by engineered linker deletions that cause a rotation-locked phenotype. These facts suggest that binary rotation states arise from conformational selection by stacking interactions. PMID:27345932

  8. Model Studies of the Dynamics of Bacterial Flagellar Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, F; Lo, C; Berry, R; Xing, J

    2009-03-19

    The Bacterial Flagellar Motor is a rotary molecular machine that rotates the helical filaments which propel swimming bacteria. Extensive experimental and theoretical studies exist on the structure, assembly, energy input, power generation and switching mechanism of the motor. In our previous paper, we explained the general physics underneath the observed torque-speed curves with a simple two-state Fokker-Planck model. Here we further analyze this model. In this paper we show (1) the model predicts that the two components of the ion motive force can affect the motor dynamics differently, in agreement with the latest experiment by Lo et al.; (2) with explicit consideration of the stator spring, the model also explains the lack of dependence of the zero-load speed on stator number in the proton motor, recently observed by Yuan and Berg; (3) the model reproduces the stepping behavior of the motor even with the existence of the stator springs and predicts the dwelling time distribution. Predicted stepping behavior of motors with two stators is discussed, and we suggest future experimental verification.

  9. Genome Sequence and Analysis of Escherichia coli MRE600, a Colicinogenic, Nonmotile Strain that Lacks RNase I and the Type I Methyltransferase, EcoKI

    PubMed Central

    Kurylo, Chad M.; Alexander, Noah; Dass, Randall A.; Parks, Matthew M.; Altman, Roger A.; Vincent, C. Theresa; Mason, Christopher E.; Blanchard, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli strain MRE600 was originally identified for its low RNase I activity and has therefore been widely adopted by the biomedical research community as a preferred source for the expression and purification of transfer RNAs and ribosomes. Despite its widespread use, surprisingly little information about its genome or genetic content exists. Here, we present the first de novo assembly and description of the MRE600 genome and epigenome. To provide context to these studies of MRE600, we include comparative analyses with E. coli K-12 MG1655 (K12). Pacific Biosciences Single Molecule, Real-Time sequencing reads were assembled into one large chromosome (4.83 Mb) and three smaller plasmids (89.1, 56.9, and 7.1 kb). Interestingly, the 7.1-kb plasmid possesses genes encoding a colicin E1 protein and its associated immunity protein. The MRE600 genome has a G + C content of 50.8% and contains a total of 5,181 genes, including 4,913 protein-encoding genes and 268 RNA genes. We identified 41,469 modified DNA bases (0.83% of total) and found that MRE600 lacks the gene for type I methyltransferase, EcoKI. Phylogenetic, taxonomic, and genetic analyses demonstrate that MRE600 is a divergent E. coli strain that displays features of the closely related genus, Shigella. Nevertheless, comparative analyses between MRE600 and E. coli K12 show that these two strains exhibit nearly identical ribosomal proteins, ribosomal RNAs, and highly homologous tRNA species. Substantiating prior suggestions that MRE600 lacks RNase I activity, the RNase I-encoding gene, rna, contains a single premature stop codon early in its open-reading frame. PMID:26802429

  10. The EcoKI type I restriction-modification system in Escherichia coli affects but is not an absolute barrier for conjugation.

    PubMed

    Roer, Louise; Aarestrup, Frank M; Hasman, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    The rapid evolution of bacteria is crucial to their survival and is caused by exchange, transfer, and uptake of DNA, among other things. Conjugation is one of the main mechanisms by which bacteria share their DNA, and it is thought to be controlled by varied bacterial immune systems. Contradictory results about restriction-modification systems based on phenotypic studies have been presented as reasons for a barrier to conjugation with and other means of uptake of exogenous DNA. In this study, we show that inactivation of the R.EcoKI restriction enzyme in strain Escherichia coli K-12 strain MG1655 increases the conjugational transfer of plasmid pOLA52, which carriers two EcoKI recognition sites. Interestingly, the results were not absolute, and uptake of unmethylated pOLA52 was still observed in the wild-type strain (with an intact hsdR gene) but at a reduction of 85% compared to the uptake of the mutant recipient with a disrupted hsdR gene. This leads to the conclusion that EcoKI restriction-modification affects the uptake of DNA by conjugation but is not a major barrier to plasmid transfer. PMID:25384481

  11. Escherichia coli nfuA is essential for maintenance of Shiga toxin phage Min27 lysogeny under iron-depleted condition.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dongmei; Ji, Wenhui; Fu, Qiang; Lu, Chenping; Wang, Hengan; Sun, Jianhe; Yan, Yaxian

    2015-10-01

    It has been earlier hypothesized that lysogenic infection with Stx-encoding phages influences protein expression in the bacterial host, and therefore, some differentially expressed proteins could affect survival characteristics and pathogenicity. We compared the protein expression profiles of the host MG1655 and lysogens by 2D electrophoresis. Four different genes identified were all related to Fe/S subunit production, namely, nfuA, fdoH, sdhB and ftnA. To explore the role of nfuA in the biology of Stx prophage lysogeny, gene knockout experiments and phage lysogenic conversion were performed. The inactivation of nfuA caused the prophage to enter its lytic life cycle, especially under an iron-depleted condition. A similar activity was also detected in the Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain from which the Stx phage Min 27 was originally isolated. NfuA might be the positive regulator of genes controlling lysogenic cycle such as cI, cII and cIII since their transcriptional level was significantly reduced in nfuA deletion mutant as shown by qRT-PCR. We conclude that NfuA is essential for maintenance of Stx phage lysogeny in host's genetic reservoir under iron-deficient condition. PMID:26337151

  12. Flagellar apparatus absolute orientations and the phylogeny of the green algae.

    PubMed

    O'Kelly, C J; Floyd, G L

    The absolute orientation of the flagellar apparatus in green algal motile cells is a feature of considerable value in studies of green algal systematics and phylogeny. The absolute orientation patterns found in those algae for which this feature is known or can be deduced are reviewed. Counterclockwise absolute orientation occurs in all classes except the Chlorophyceae and is considered primitive, while the clockwise absolute orientation present in most members of the Chlorophyceae is the result of progressive clockwise rotation of components during evolution. Extant intermediates documenting this rotation include Hafniomonas vegetative cells, which show counterclockwise absolute orientation, and Chaetopeltis quadriflagellate zoospores, in which the flagellar apparatus is strictly cruciate except for a slight clockwise offset of the microtubular rootlets. The V-shaped arrangement of the basal bodies in the flagellar apparatus, as well as the presence of proximal sheaths and of two layers of scales on the cell body, further identifies the Chaetopeltis zoospore as a primitive cell type within the Chlorophyceae . Trends towards the exsertion of basal bodies from a flagellar pit, either apically or laterally, the elimination of quadriflagellate cells, and, in the Chlorophyceae , an increasing amount of basal body offset, indicate advancement within the classes. Absolute orientation is conserved during flagellar apparatus replication and development. Events after flagellar apparatus division in the algae studied may be subdivided into component assembly, which is universal and preserves phylogenetically-useful features, and component reorientation, which occurs in relatively few green algae and adapts the flagellar apparatus to specialized functions. From these flagellar apparatus orientation studies, a major reevaluation of evolution within the Chlorophyceae is proposed, with weakly- thalloid algae possessing desmoschisis (e.g. Chaetopeltis ) considered primitive, and

  13. Giardia Flagellar Motility Is Not Directly Required to Maintain Attachment to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    House, Susan A.; Richter, David J.; Pham, Jonathan K.; Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia trophozoites attach to the intestinal microvilli (or inert surfaces) using an undefined “suction-based” mechanism, and remain attached during cell division to avoid peristalsis. Flagellar motility is a key factor in Giardia's pathogenesis and colonization of the host small intestine. Specifically, the beating of the ventral flagella, one of four pairs of motile flagella, has been proposed to generate a hydrodynamic force that results in suction-based attachment via the adjacent ventral disc. We aimed to test this prevailing “hydrodynamic model” of attachment mediated by flagellar motility. We defined four distinct stages of attachment by assessing surface contacts of the trophozoite with the substrate during attachment using TIRF microscopy (TIRFM). The lateral crest of the ventral disc forms a continuous perimeter seal with the substrate, a cytological indication that trophozoites are fully attached. Using trophozoites with two types of molecularly engineered defects in flagellar beating, we determined that neither ventral flagellar beating, nor any flagellar beating, is necessary for the maintenance of attachment. Following a morpholino-based knockdown of PF16, a central pair protein, both the beating and morphology of flagella were defective, but trophozoites could still initiate proper surface contacts as seen using TIRFM and could maintain attachment in several biophysical assays. Trophozoites with impaired motility were able to attach as well as motile cells. We also generated a strain with defects in the ventral flagellar waveform by overexpressing a dominant negative form of alpha2-annexin::GFP (D122A, D275A). This dominant negative alpha2-annexin strain could initiate attachment and had only a slight decrease in the ability to withstand normal and shear forces. The time needed for attachment did increase in trophozoites with overall defective flagellar beating, however. Thus while not directly required for attachment, flagellar motility is

  14. Glucose induces delocalization of a flagellar biosynthesis protein from the flagellated pole.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyoung; Park, Young-Ha; Lee, Chang-Ro; Kim, Yeon-Ran; Seok, Yeong-Jae

    2016-09-01

    To survive in a continuously changing environment, bacteria sense concentration gradients of attractants or repellents, and purposefully migrate until a more favourable habitat is encountered. While glucose is known as the most effective attractant, the flagellar biosynthesis and hence chemotactic motility has been known to be repressed by glucose in some bacteria. To date, the only known regulatory mechanism of the repression of flagellar synthesis by glucose is via downregulation of the cAMP level, as shown in a few members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Here we show that, in Vibrio vulnificus, the glucose-mediated inhibition of flagellar motility operates by a completely different mechanism. In the presence of glucose, EIIA(Glc) is dephosphorylated and inhibits the polar localization of FapA (flagellar assembly protein A) by sequestering it from the flagellated pole. A loss or delocalization of FapA results in a complete failure of the flagellar biosynthesis and motility. However, when glucose is depleted, EIIA(Glc) is phosphorylated and releases FapA such that free FapA can be localized back to the pole and trigger flagellation. Together, these data provide new insight into a bacterial strategy to reach and stay in the glucose-rich area. PMID:27218601

  15. FlgM is secreted by the flagellar export apparatus in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Rebecca A; Kearns, Daniel B

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is assembled from over 20 structural components, and flagellar gene regulation is morphogenetically coupled to the assembly state by control of the anti-sigma factor FlgM. In the Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica, FlgM inhibits late-class flagellar gene expression until the hook-basal body structural intermediate is completed and FlgM is inhibited by secretion from the cytoplasm. Here we demonstrate that FlgM is also secreted in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis and is degraded extracellularly by the proteases Epr and WprA. We further demonstrate that, like in S. enterica, the structural genes required for the flagellar hook-basal body are required for robust activation of σ(D)-dependent gene expression and efficient secretion of FlgM. Finally, we determine that FlgM secretion is strongly enhanced by, but does not strictly require, hook-basal body completion and instead demands a minimal subset of flagellar proteins that includes the FliF/FliG basal body proteins, the flagellar type III export apparatus components FliO, FliP, FliQ, FliR, FlhA, and FlhB, and the substrate specificity switch regulator FliK. PMID:25313396

  16. High-speed holographic microscopy of malaria parasites reveals ambidextrous flagellar waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laurence G.; Carter, Lucy M.; Reece, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    Axonemes form the core of eukaryotic flagella and cilia, performing tasks ranging from transporting fluid in developing embryos to the propulsion of sperm. Despite their abundance across the eukaryotic domain, the mechanisms that regulate the beating action of axonemes remain unknown. The flagellar waveforms are 3D in general, but current understanding of how axoneme components interact stems from 2D data; comprehensive measurements of flagellar shape are beyond conventional microscopy. Moreover, current flagellar model systems (e.g., sea urchin, human sperm) contain accessory structures that impose mechanical constraints on movement, obscuring the “native” axoneme behavior. We address both problems by developing a high-speed holographic imaging scheme and applying it to the (male) microgametes of malaria (Plasmodium) parasites. These isolated flagella are a unique, mathematically tractable model system for the physics of microswimmers. We reveal the 3D flagellar waveforms of these microorganisms and map the differential shear between microtubules in their axonemes. Furthermore, we overturn claims that chirality in the structure of the axoneme governs the beat pattern [Hirokawa N, et al. (2009) Ann Rev Fluid Mech 41:53–72], because microgametes display a left- or right-handed character on alternate beats. This breaks the link between structural chirality in the axoneme and larger scale symmetry breaking (e.g., in developing embryos), leading us to conclude that accessory structures play a critical role in shaping the flagellar beat. PMID:24194551

  17. Flagellar pocket restructuring through the Leishmania life cycle involves a discrete flagellum attachment zone.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Richard J; Sunter, Jack D; Gull, Keith

    2016-02-15

    Leishmania promastigote parasites have a flagellum, which protrudes from the flagellar pocket at the cell anterior, yet, surprisingly, have homologs of many flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) proteins--proteins used in the related Trypanosoma species to laterally attach the flagellum to the cell body from the flagellar pocket to the cell posterior. Here, we use seven Leishmania mexicana cell lines that expressed eYFP fusions of FAZ protein homologs to show that the Leishmania flagellar pocket includes a FAZ structure. Electron tomography revealed a precisely defined 3D organisation for both the flagellar pocket and FAZ, with striking similarities to those of Trypanosoma brucei. Expression of two T. brucei FAZ proteins in L. mexicana showed that T. brucei FAZ proteins can assemble into the Leishmania FAZ structure. Leishmania therefore have a previously unrecognised FAZ structure, which we show undergoes major structural reorganisation in the transition from the promastigote (sandfly vector) to amastigote (in mammalian macrophages). Morphogenesis of the Leishmania flagellar pocket, a structure important for pathogenicity, is therefore intimately associated with a FAZ; a finding with implications for understanding shape changes involving component modules during evolution. PMID:26746239

  18. Flagellar pocket restructuring through the Leishmania life cycle involves a discrete flagellum attachment zone

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Richard J.; Sunter, Jack D.; Gull, Keith

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leishmania promastigote parasites have a flagellum, which protrudes from the flagellar pocket at the cell anterior, yet, surprisingly, have homologs of many flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) proteins – proteins used in the related Trypanosoma species to laterally attach the flagellum to the cell body from the flagellar pocket to the cell posterior. Here, we use seven Leishmania mexicana cell lines that expressed eYFP fusions of FAZ protein homologs to show that the Leishmania flagellar pocket includes a FAZ structure. Electron tomography revealed a precisely defined 3D organisation for both the flagellar pocket and FAZ, with striking similarities to those of Trypanosoma brucei. Expression of two T. brucei FAZ proteins in L. mexicana showed that T. brucei FAZ proteins can assemble into the Leishmania FAZ structure. Leishmania therefore have a previously unrecognised FAZ structure, which we show undergoes major structural reorganisation in the transition from the promastigote (sandfly vector) to amastigote (in mammalian macrophages). Morphogenesis of the Leishmania flagellar pocket, a structure important for pathogenicity, is therefore intimately associated with a FAZ; a finding with implications for understanding shape changes involving component modules during evolution. PMID:26746239

  19. A MORN Repeat Protein Facilitates Protein Entry into the Flagellar Pocket of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The parasite Trypanosoma brucei lives in the bloodstream of infected mammalian hosts, fully exposed to the adaptive immune system. It relies on a very high rate of endocytosis to clear bound antibodies from its cell surface. All endo- and exocytosis occurs at a single site on its plasma membrane, an intracellular invagination termed the flagellar pocket. Coiled around the neck of the flagellar pocket is a multiprotein complex containing the repeat motif protein T. brucei MORN1 (TbMORN1). In this study, the phenotypic effects of TbMORN1 depletion in the mammalian-infective form of T. brucei were analyzed. Depletion of TbMORN1 resulted in a rapid enlargement of the flagellar pocket. Dextran, a polysaccharide marker for fluid phase endocytosis, accumulated inside the enlarged flagellar pocket. Unexpectedly, however, the proteins concanavalin A and bovine serum albumin did not do so, and concanavalin A was instead found to concentrate outside it. This suggests that TbMORN1 may have a role in facilitating the entry of proteins into the flagellar pocket. PMID:26318396

  20. Entosiphon sulcatum (Euglenophyceae): flagellar roots of the basal body complex and reservoir region

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, J.A.; Walne, P.L.; Kivic, P.A.

    1987-03-01

    The flagellar root system of Entosiphon sulcatum (Dujardin) Stein (Euglenophyceae) is described and compared with kinetoplastid and other euglenoid systems. An asymmetric pattern of three microtubular roots, one between the two flagellar basal bodies and one on either side (here called the intermediate, dorsal, and ventral roots), is consistent within the euglenoid flagellates studied thus far. The dorsal root is associated with the basal body of the anterior flagellum (F1) and lies on the left dorsal side of the basal body complex. Originating between the two flagellar basal bodies, and associated with the basal body of the trailing flagellum (F2), the intermediate root is morphologically distinguished by fibrils interconnecting the individual microtubules to one another and to the overlying reservoir membrane. The intermediate root is often borne on a ridge projecting into the reservoir. The ventral root originates near the F2 basal body and lies on the right ventral side of the cell. Fibrillar connections link the membrane of F2 with the reservoir membrane at the reservoir-canal transition level. A large cross-banded fiber joins the two flagellar basal bodies, and a series of smaller striated fibers links the anterior accessory and flagellar basal bodies. Large nonstriated fibers extend from the basal body complex posteriorly into the cytoplasm.

  1. Differentiation of Salmonella phase 1 flagellar antigen types by restriction of the amplified fliC gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kilger, G; Grimont, P A

    1993-01-01

    The large antigenic diversity (over 2,300 serotypes) expressed by Salmonella strains can probably be observed at the genetic level. The phase 1 flagellin gene fliC was amplified, and the amplified fragment was cleaved with a mixture of both endonucleases TaqI and ScaI. The restriction patterns observed allowed differentiation of flagellar types b, i, d, j, l,v, and z10. Flagellar group g (g,m, g,p, or g,m,s) could be differentiated from the other flagellar types. Flagellar types r and e,h could not be separated, although they could be distinguished from the other flagellar types studied. Practical applications of flagellar gene restriction are the distinction between serotype Gallinarum-Pullorum, which carries a cryptic gene for flagellar type g,m, and nonmotile Vi-negative variants of serotype Typhi, and the tentative assignation of nonmotile variants of Salmonella serotypes to a flagellar type. Images PMID:8388886

  2. FliG and FliM distribution in the Salmonella typhimurium cell and flagellar basal bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, R; Amsler, C D; Matsumura, P; Khan, S

    1996-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium FliG and FliM are two of three proteins known to be necessary for flagellar morphogenesis as well as energization and switching of flagellar rotation. We have determined FliG and FliM levels in cellular fractions and in extended flagellar basal bodies, using antibodies raised against the purified proteins. Both proteins were found predominantly in the detergent-solubilized particulate fraction containing flagellar structures. Basal flagellar fragments could be separated from partially constructed basal bodies by gel filtration chromatography. FliG and FliM were present in an approximately equimolar ration in all gel-filtered fractions. FliG and FliM copy numbers, estimated relative to that of the hook protein from the early fractions containing long, basal, flagellar fragments, were (means +/- standard errors) 41 +/- 10 and 37 +/- 13 per flagellum, respectively. Extended structures were present in the earliest identifiable basal bodies. Immunoelectron microscopy and immunoblot gel analysis suggested that the FliG and, to a less certain degree, the FliM contents of these structures were the same as those for the complete basal bodies. These facts are consistent with the postulate that FliG and FliM affect flagellar morphogenesis as part of the extended basal structure, formation of which is necessary for assembly of more-distal components of the flagellum. The determined stoichiometries will provide important constraints to modelling energization and switching of flagellar rotation. PMID:8550426

  3. Structural flexibility of the periplasmic protein, FlgA, regulates flagellar P-ring assembly in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Matsunami, Hideyuki; Yoon, Young-Ho; Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A; Namba, Keiichi; Samatey, Fadel A

    2016-01-01

    A periplasmic flagellar chaperone protein, FlgA, is required for P-ring assembly in bacterial flagella of taxa such as Salmonella enterica or Escherichia coli. The mechanism of chaperone-mediated P-ring formation is poorly understood. Here we present the open and closed crystal structures of FlgA from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, grown under different crystallization conditions. An intramolecular disulfide cross-linked form of FlgA caused a dominant negative effect on motility of the wild-type strain. Pull-down experiments support a specific protein-protein interaction between FlgI, the P-ring component protein, and the C-terminal domain of FlgA. Surface plasmon resonance and limited-proteolysis indicate that flexibility of the domain is reduced in the covalently closed form. These results show that the structural flexibility of the C-terminal domain of FlgA, which is related to the structural difference between the two crystal forms, is intrinsically associated with its molecular chaperone function in P-ring assembly. PMID:27273476

  4. Structural flexibility of the periplasmic protein, FlgA, regulates flagellar P-ring assembly in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Matsunami, Hideyuki; Yoon, Young-Ho; Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A.; Namba, Keiichi; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2016-01-01

    A periplasmic flagellar chaperone protein, FlgA, is required for P-ring assembly in bacterial flagella of taxa such as Salmonella enterica or Escherichia coli. The mechanism of chaperone-mediated P-ring formation is poorly understood. Here we present the open and closed crystal structures of FlgA from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, grown under different crystallization conditions. An intramolecular disulfide cross-linked form of FlgA caused a dominant negative effect on motility of the wild-type strain. Pull-down experiments support a specific protein-protein interaction between FlgI, the P-ring component protein, and the C-terminal domain of FlgA. Surface plasmon resonance and limited-proteolysis indicate that flexibility of the domain is reduced in the covalently closed form. These results show that the structural flexibility of the C-terminal domain of FlgA, which is related to the structural difference between the two crystal forms, is intrinsically associated with its molecular chaperone function in P-ring assembly. PMID:27273476

  5. Role of SbmA in the uptake of peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-peptide conjugates in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Vitali, Ally; Stach, James E M; Nielsen, Peter E

    2013-02-15

    Antisense PNA oligomers targeting essential genes (acpP or ftsZ) and conjugated to the delivery peptide L((KFF)(3)K) show complete growth inhibition of wild type E. coli strain (MG1655) with submicromolar MIC. In this study we show that resistant mutants generated against such PNA-peptide conjugates had disruptions in the region of sbmA, a gene encoding an inner membrane peptide transporter. The wild type sensitivity to the PNA conjugates was re-established in the resistance mutants by complementation with sbmA. Furthermore, deletion of sbmA in E. coli AS19, a strain that is sensitive to unmodified PNA, resulted in resistance to PNA. Finally, PNA conjugated with the corresponding non-biological H-D((KFF)(3)K) peptide retained antibacterial activity in sbmA deletion strains, whereas the same conjugate with a protease-sensitive linker did not. These results clearly identify SbmA as a carrier of naked PNA over the inner bacterial membrane and thereby infer that the peptide is transporting the PNA conjugates over the outer membrane. Strains lacking SbmA were used to screen novel peptide-PNA carriers that were SbmA-independent. Four such PNA-peptide conjugates, H-D((KFF)(3)K), H-(RFR)(4)-Ahx-βAla, H-(R-Ahx-R)(4)-Ahx-βAla, and H-(R-Ahx)(6)-βAla, were identified that utilize an alternative uptake mechanism but retain their antimicrobial potency. In addition SbmA is the first protein identified to recognize PNA. PMID:23138594

  6. Isolation and characterization of flagellar filaments from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Yuichi

    2014-12-01

    Isolated flagellar filaments from the type strain of Bacillus cereus, ATCC 14579, were shown to consist of 34, 32 and 31 kDa proteins in similar proportions as judged by band intensities on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of these three proteins of strain ATCC 14579 were identical with the deduced sequences of three flagellin genes BC1657, BC1658 and BC1659 in the whole genome sequence. Strain ATCC 14579 was classified into serotype T2 by a flagellar serotyping scheme for B. cereus strains that are untypeable into known flagellar serotypes H1 to H23. Flagellar filaments from a reference strain of serotype T2 contained two protein bands at 34 and 32 kDa, but a single protein band at 39 kDa was detected in flagellar filaments of a reference strain of serotype H1. Two murine monoclonal antibodies, 1A5 and 2A5, which recognize both the 34 and 32 kDa flagellins and a single flagellin of 32 kDa, respectively, were specifically reactive with B. cereus strains ATCC 14579 and serotype T2 in whole-cell ELISA and bacterial motility inhibition tests. In immunoelectron microscopy with monoclonal antibodies 1A5 and 2A5, colloidal gold spheres were shown to localize almost evenly over the entire part of flagellar filaments. Since strain ATCC 14579, and presumably strain serotype T2, are unusual among B. cereus strains in possessing multiple genes that encode flagellin subunits, a possible unique mechanism may contribute to assembly of multiple flagellin subunits into the filament over its entire length. PMID:25227778

  7. Knockdown of Inner Arm Protein IC138 in Trypanosoma brucei Causes Defective Motility and Flagellar Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Corinne S.; Chang, Alex J.; Greene, Rebecca; Machado, Sulynn; Parsons, Matthew W.; Takats, Taylor A.; Zambetti, Luke J.; Springer, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Motility in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is conferred by a single flagellum, attached alongside the cell, which moves the cell forward using a beat that is generated from tip-to-base. We are interested in characterizing components that regulate flagellar beating, in this study we extend the characterization of TbIC138, the ortholog of a dynein intermediate chain that regulates axonemal inner arm dynein f/I1. TbIC138 was tagged In situ-and shown to fractionate with the inner arm components of the flagellum. RNAi knockdown of TbIC138 resulted in significantly reduced protein levels, mild growth defect and significant motility defects. These cells tended to cluster, exhibited slow and abnormal motility and some cells had partially or fully detached flagella. Slight but significant increases were observed in the incidence of mis-localized or missing kinetoplasts. To document development of the TbIC138 knockdown phenotype over time, we performed a detailed analysis of flagellar detachment and motility changes over 108 hours following induction of RNAi. Abnormal motility, such as slow twitching or irregular beating, was observed early, and became progressively more severe such that by 72 hours-post-induction, approximately 80% of the cells were immotile. Progressively more cells exhibited flagellar detachment over time, but this phenotype was not as prevalent as immotility, affecting less than 60% of the population. Detached flagella had abnormal beating, but abnormal beating was also observed in cells with no flagellar detachment, suggesting that TbIC138 has a direct, or primary, effect on the flagellar beat, whereas detachment is a secondary phenotype of TbIC138 knockdown. Our results are consistent with the role of TbIC138 as a regulator of motility, and has a phenotype amenable to more extensive structure-function analyses to further elucidate its role in the control of flagellar beat in T. brucei. PMID:26555902

  8. Listeria monocytogenes DNA Glycosylase AdlP Affects Flagellar Motility, Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Bae, Dongryeoul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is structurally similar to the Bacillus cereus alkyl base DNA glycosylase (AlkD), was identified. This determinant was involved in the transcriptional repression of flagellar motility genes and was named adlP (encoding an AlkD-like protein [AdlP]). Deletion of adlP activated the expression of flagellar motility genes at 37°C and disrupted the temperature-dependent inhibition of L. monocytogenes motility. The adlP null strains demonstrated decreased survival in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells and less virulence in mice. Furthermore, the deletion of adlP significantly decreased biofilm formation and impaired the survival of bacteria under several stress conditions, including the presence of a DNA alkylation compound (methyl methanesulfonate), an oxidative agent (H2O2), and aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our findings strongly suggest that adlP may encode a bifunctional protein that transcriptionally represses the expression of flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. IMPORTANCE We discovered a novel protein that we named AlkD-like protein (AdlP). This protein affected flagellar motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. Our data suggest that AdlP may be a bifunctional protein that represses flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. PMID:27316964

  9. Enforced ATP futile cycling increases specific productivity and yield of anaerobic lactate production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hädicke, Oliver; Bettenbrock, Katja; Klamt, Steffen

    2015-10-01

    The manipulation of cofactor pools such as ATP or NAD(P)H has for long been recognized as key targets for metabolic engineering of microorganisms to improve yields and productivities of biotechnological processes. Several works in the past have shown that enforcing ATP futile cycling may enhance the synthesis of certain products under aerobic conditions. However, case studies demonstrating that ATP wasting may also have beneficial effects for anaerobic production processes are scarce. Taking lactic acid as an economically relevant product, we demonstrate that induction of ATP futile cycling in Escherichia coli leads to increased yields and specific production rates under anaerobic conditions, even in the case where lactate is already produced with high yields. Specifically, we constructed a high lactate producer strain KBM10111 (= MG1655 ΔadhE::Cam ΔackA-pta) and implemented an IPTG-inducible overexpression of ppsA encoding for PEP synthase which, together with pyruvate kinase, gives rise to an ATP consuming cycle. Under induction of ppsA, KBM10111 exhibits a 25% higher specific lactate productivity as well as an 8% higher lactate yield. Furthermore, the specific substrate uptake rate was increased by 14%. However, trade-offs between specific and volumetric productivities must be considered when ATP wasting strategies are used to shift substrate conversion from biomass to product synthesis and we discuss potential solutions to design optimal processes. In summary, enforced ATP futile cycling has great potential to optimize a variety of production processes and our study demonstrates that this holds true also for anaerobic processes. PMID:25899755

  10. Characterization of Calflagin, a Flagellar Calcium-Binding Protein from Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Eyford, Brett A.; Kaufman, Laura; Salama-Alber, Orly; Loveless, Bianca; Pope, Matthew E.; Burke, Robert D.; Matovu, Enock; Boulanger, Martin J.; Pearson, Terry W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of species-specific trypanosome molecules is important for laboratory- and field-based research into epidemiology and disease diagnosis. Although Trypanosoma congolense is the most important trypanosome pathogen of cattle in Africa, no species-specific molecules found in infective bloodstream forms (BSF) of the parasites have been identified, thus limiting development of diagnostic tests. Methods Immuno-mass spectrometric methods were used to identify a protein that is recognized by a T. congolense-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) Tc6/42.6.4. The identified molecule was expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli and was tested in several immunoassays for its ability to interact with the mAb. The three dimensional structure of the protein was modeled and compared to crystal- and NMR-structures of the homologous proteins from T. cruzi and T. brucei respectively, in order to examine structural differences leading to the different immunoreactivity of the T. congolense molecule. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to measure antibodies produced by trypanosome-infected African cattle in order to assess the potential for use of T. congolense calflagin in a serodiagnostic assay. Results The antigen recognized by the T. congolense-specific mAb Tc6/42.6.4 was identified as a flagellar calcium-binding protein, calflagin. The recombinant molecule showed immunoreactivity with the T. congolense-specific mAb confirming that it is the cognate antigen. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed that Ca2+ modulated the localization of the calflagin molecule in trypanosomes. Structural modelling and comparison with calflagin homologues from other trypanosomatids revealed four non-conserved regions on the surface of the T. congolense molecule that due to differences in surface chemistry and structural topography may form species-specific epitopes. ELISAs using the recombinant calflagin as antigen to detect antibodies in trypanosome

  11. Preparation and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of crystals of bacterial flagellar sigma factor σ{sup 28} in complex with the σ{sup 28}-binding region of its antisigma factor, FlgM

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Kengo; Ichihara, Hisako; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Ishihama, Akira; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2007-03-01

    A complex of E. coli flagellar and chemotaxis-specific sigma factor σ{sup 28} bound to the σ{sup 28}-binding region of its antisigma factor FlgM was crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å. The sigma 28 kDa (σ{sup 28}) factor is a transcription factor specific for the expression of bacterial flagellar and chemotaxis genes. Its antisigma factor, FlgM, binds σ{sup 28} factor and inhibits its activity as a transcription factor. In this study, crystals of the complex between Escherichia coli σ{sup 28} and the C-terminal σ{sup 28}-binding region of FlgM were obtained. The crystals belong to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.7 (2), c = 51.74 (3) Å, containing one complex in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. An X-ray intensity data set was collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å.

  12. The Bacterial Flagellar Type III Export Gate Complex Is a Dual Fuel Engine That Can Use Both H+ and Na+ for Flagellar Protein Export

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Hara, Noritaka; Aldridge, Phillip D.; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) to transport flagellar proteins to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure for self-assembly. The transmembrane export gate complex is a H+–protein antiporter, of which activity is greatly augmented by an associated cytoplasmic ATPase complex. Here, we report that the export gate complex can use sodium motive force (SMF) in addition to PMF across the cytoplasmic membrane to drive protein export. Protein export was considerably reduced in the absence of the ATPase complex and a pH gradient across the membrane, but Na+ increased it dramatically. Phenamil, a blocker of Na+ translocation, inhibited protein export. Overexpression of FlhA increased the intracellular Na+ concentration in the presence of 100 mM NaCl but not in its absence, suggesting that FlhA acts as a Na+ channel. In wild-type cells, however, neither Na+ nor phenamil affected protein export, indicating that the Na+ channel activity of FlhA is suppressed by the ATPase complex. We propose that the export gate by itself is a dual fuel engine that uses both PMF and SMF for protein export and that the ATPase complex switches this dual fuel engine into a PMF-driven export machinery to become much more robust against environmental changes in external pH and Na+ concentration. PMID:26943926

  13. A genome-scale metabolic flux model of Escherichia coli K–12 derived from the EcoCyc database

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Constraint-based models of Escherichia coli metabolic flux have played a key role in computational studies of cellular metabolism at the genome scale. We sought to develop a next-generation constraint-based E. coli model that achieved improved phenotypic prediction accuracy while being frequently updated and easy to use. We also sought to compare model predictions with experimental data to highlight open questions in E. coli biology. Results We present EcoCyc–18.0–GEM, a genome-scale model of the E. coli K–12 MG1655 metabolic network. The model is automatically generated from the current state of EcoCyc using the MetaFlux software, enabling the release of multiple model updates per year. EcoCyc–18.0–GEM encompasses 1445 genes, 2286 unique metabolic reactions, and 1453 unique metabolites. We demonstrate a three-part validation of the model that breaks new ground in breadth and accuracy: (i) Comparison of simulated growth in aerobic and anaerobic glucose culture with experimental results from chemostat culture and simulation results from the E. coli modeling literature. (ii) Essentiality prediction for the 1445 genes represented in the model, in which EcoCyc–18.0–GEM achieves an improved accuracy of 95.2% in predicting the growth phenotype of experimental gene knockouts. (iii) Nutrient utilization predictions under 431 different media conditions, for which the model achieves an overall accuracy of 80.7%. The model’s derivation from EcoCyc enables query and visualization via the EcoCyc website, facilitating model reuse and validation by inspection. We present an extensive investigation of disagreements between EcoCyc–18.0–GEM predictions and experimental data to highlight areas of interest to E. coli modelers and experimentalists, including 70 incorrect predictions of gene essentiality on glucose, 80 incorrect predictions of gene essentiality on glycerol, and 83 incorrect predictions of nutrient utilization. Conclusion Significant

  14. Self-Sustained Oscillatory Sliding Movement of Doublet Microtubules and Flagellar Bend Formation.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the basis for flagellar and ciliary movements is ATP-dependent sliding between adjacent doublet microtubules. However, the mechanism for converting microtubule sliding into flagellar and ciliary movements has long remained unresolved. The author has developed new sperm models that use bull spermatozoa divested of their plasma membrane and midpiece mitochondrial sheath by Triton X-100 and dithiothreitol. These models enable the observation of both the oscillatory sliding movement of activated doublet microtubules and flagellar bend formation in the presence of ATP. A long fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by synchronous sliding of the sperm flagella and a short fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by metachronal sliding exhibited spontaneous oscillatory movements and constructed a one beat cycle of flagellar bending by alternately actuating. The small sliding displacement generated by metachronal sliding formed helical bends, whereas the large displacement by synchronous sliding formed planar bends. Therefore, the resultant waveform is a half-funnel shape, which is similar to ciliary movements. PMID:26863204

  15. Self-Sustained Oscillatory Sliding Movement of Doublet Microtubules and Flagellar Bend Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ishijima, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the basis for flagellar and ciliary movements is ATP-dependent sliding between adjacent doublet microtubules. However, the mechanism for converting microtubule sliding into flagellar and ciliary movements has long remained unresolved. The author has developed new sperm models that use bull spermatozoa divested of their plasma membrane and midpiece mitochondrial sheath by Triton X-100 and dithiothreitol. These models enable the observation of both the oscillatory sliding movement of activated doublet microtubules and flagellar bend formation in the presence of ATP. A long fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by synchronous sliding of the sperm flagella and a short fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by metachronal sliding exhibited spontaneous oscillatory movements and constructed a one beat cycle of flagellar bending by alternately actuating. The small sliding displacement generated by metachronal sliding formed helical bends, whereas the large displacement by synchronous sliding formed planar bends. Therefore, the resultant waveform is a half-funnel shape, which is similar to ciliary movements. PMID:26863204

  16. A novel type bacterial flagellar motor that can use divalent cations as a coupling ion.

    PubMed

    Imazawa, Riku; Takahashi, Yuka; Aoki, Wataru; Sano, Motohiko; Ito, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a sophisticated nanomachine embedded in the cell envelope and powered by an electrochemical gradient of H(+), Na(+), or K(+)across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we describe a new member of the bacterial flagellar stator channel family (MotAB1 of Paenibacillus sp. TCA20 (TCA-MotAB1)) that is coupled to divalent cations (Ca(2+)and Mg(2+)). In the absence of divalent cations of alkaline earth metals, no swimming was observed in Paenibacillus sp. TCA20, which grows optimally in Ca(2+)-rich environments. This pattern was confirmed by swimming assays of a stator-free Bacillus subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1. Both a stator-free and major Mg(2+)uptake system-deleted B. subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1 complemented both growth and motility deficiency under low Mg(2+)conditions and exhibited [Mg(2+)]in identical to that of the wild-type. This is the first report of a flagellar motor that can use Ca(2+)and Mg(2+)as coupling ions. These findings will promote the understanding of the operating principles of flagellar motors and molecular mechanisms of ion selectivity. PMID:26794857

  17. Swimming performance of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is an emergent property of its two flagellar systems.

    PubMed

    Quelas, J Ignacio; Althabegoiti, M Julia; Jimenez-Sanchez, Celia; Melgarejo, Augusto A; Marconi, Verónica I; Mongiardini, Elías J; Trejo, Sebastián A; Mengucci, Florencia; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio; Lodeiro, Aníbal R

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial species use flagella for self-propulsion in aqueous media. In the soil, which is a complex and structured environment, water is found in microscopic channels where viscosity and water potential depend on the composition of the soil solution and the degree of soil water saturation. Therefore, the motility of soil bacteria might have special requirements. An important soil bacterial genus is Bradyrhizobium, with species that possess one flagellar system and others with two different flagellar systems. Among the latter is B. diazoefficiens, which may express its subpolar and lateral flagella simultaneously in liquid medium, although its swimming behaviour was not described yet. These two flagellar systems were observed here as functionally integrated in a swimming performance that emerged as an epistatic interaction between those appendages. In addition, each flagellum seemed engaged in a particular task that might be required for swimming oriented toward chemoattractants near the soil inner surfaces at viscosities that may occur after the loss of soil gravitational water. Because the possession of two flagellar systems is not general in Bradyrhizobium or in related genera that coexist in the same environment, there may be an adaptive tradeoff between energetic costs and ecological benefits among these different species. PMID:27053439

  18. Identification of flagellar motility genes in Yersinia ruckeri by transposon mutagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we demonstrate that flagellar secretion is required for production of secreted lipase activity in the fish pathogen Yersinia ruckeri and that neither of these activities is necessary for virulence in rainbow trout. Our results suggest a possible molecular mechanism for the emergence of non-mot...

  19. DRC3 connects the N-DRC to dynein g to regulate flagellar waveform

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Junya; Song, Kangkang; Lin, Jianfeng; King, Stephen M.; Sanderson, Michael J.; Nicastro, Daniela; Witman, George B.

    2015-01-01

    The nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC), which is a major hub for the control of flagellar motility, contains at least 11 different subunits. A major challenge is to determine the location and function of each of these subunits within the N-DRC. We characterized a Chlamydomonas mutant defective in the N-DRC subunit DRC3. Of the known N-DRC subunits, the drc3 mutant is missing only DRC3. Like other N-DRC mutants, the drc3 mutant has a defect in flagellar motility. However, in contrast to other mutations affecting the N-DRC, drc3 does not suppress flagellar paralysis caused by loss of radial spokes. Cryo–electron tomography revealed that the drc3 mutant lacks a portion of the N-DRC linker domain, including the L1 protrusion, part of the distal lobe, and the connection between these two structures, thus localizing DRC3 to this part of the N-DRC. This and additional considerations enable us to assign DRC3 to the L1 protrusion. Because the L1 protrusion is the only non-dynein structure in contact with the dynein g motor domain in wild-type axonemes and this is the only N-DRC–dynein connection missing in the drc3 mutant, we conclude that DRC3 interacts with dynein g to regulate flagellar waveform. PMID:26063732

  20. A Protein Methylation Pathway in Chlamydomonas Flagella Is Active during Flagellar Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Mark J.; Ulland, Megan

    2008-01-01

    During intraflagellar transport (IFT), the regulation of motor proteins, the loading and unloading of cargo and the turnover of flagellar proteins all occur at the flagellar tip. To begin an analysis of the protein composition of the flagellar tip, we used difference gel electrophoresis to compare long versus short (i.e., regenerating) flagella. The concentration of tip proteins should be higher relative to that of tubulin (which is constant per unit length of the flagellum) in short compared with long flagella. One protein we have identified is the cobalamin-independent form of methionine synthase (MetE). Antibodies to MetE label flagella in a punctate pattern reminiscent of IFT particle staining, and immunoblot analysis reveals that the amount of MetE in flagella is low in full-length flagella, increased in regenerating flagella, and highest in resorbing flagella. Four methylated proteins have been identified in resorbing flagella, using antibodies specific for asymmetrically dimethylated arginine residues. These proteins are found almost exclusively in the axonemal fraction, and the methylated forms of these proteins are essentially absent in full-length and regenerating flagella. Because most cells resorb cilia/flagella before cell division, these data indicate a link between flagellar protein methylation and progression through the cell cycle. PMID:18701702

  1. Modulation of toxin production by the flagellar regulon in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Annie; Hussack, Greg; Chen, Wangxue; KuoLee, Rhonda; Twine, Susan M; Fulton, Kelly M; Foote, Simon; Carrillo, Catherine D; Tanha, Jamshid; Logan, Susan M

    2012-10-01

    We show in this study that toxin production in Clostridium difficile is altered in cells which can no longer form flagellar filaments. The impact of inactivation of fliC, CD0240, fliF, fliG, fliM, and flhB-fliR flagellar genes upon toxin levels in culture supernatants was assessed using cell-based cytotoxicity assay, proteomics, immunoassay, and immunoblotting approaches. Each of these showed that toxin levels in supernatants were significantly increased in a fliC mutant compared to that in the C. difficile 630 parent strain. In contrast, the toxin levels in supernatants secreted from other flagellar mutants were significantly reduced compared with that in the parental C. difficile 630 strain. Transcriptional analysis of the pathogenicity locus genes (tcdR, tcdB, tcdE, and tcdA) revealed a significant increase of all four genes in the fliC mutant strain, while transcription of all four genes was significantly reduced in fliM, fliF, fliG, and flhB-fliR mutants. These results demonstrate that toxin transcription in C. difficile is modulated by the flagellar regulon. More significantly, mutant strains showed a corresponding change in virulence compared to the 630 parent strain when tested in a hamster model of C. difficile infection. This is the first demonstration of differential flagellum-related transcriptional regulation of toxin production in C. difficile and provides evidence for elaborate regulatory networks for virulence genes in C. difficile. PMID:22851750

  2. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A; Porter, Mary E

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms. PMID:27251063

  3. Xenocin Export by the Flagellar Type III Pathway in Xenorhabdus nematophila

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Preeti; Park, Dongjin; Forst, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The xenocin operon of Xenorhabdus nematophila consists of xciA and ximB genes encoding a 64-kDa xenocin and 42-kDa immunity protein to kill competing microbes in the insect larva. The catalytic domain of xenocin has RNase activity and is responsible for its cytotoxicity. Under SOS conditions, xenocin is produced with immunity protein as a complex. Here, we show that xenocin and immunity protein complex are exported through the flagellar type III system of X. nematophila. Secretion of xenocin complex was abolished in an flhA strain but not in an fliC strain. The xenocin operon is not linked to the flagellar operon transcriptionally. The immunity protein is produced alone from a second, constitutive promoter and is targeted to the periplasm in a flagellum-independent manner. For stable expression of xenocin, coexpression of immunity protein was necessary. To examine the role of immunity protein in xenocin export, an enzymatically inactive protein was produced by site-directed mutagenesis in the active site of the catalytic domain. Toxicity was abolished in D535A and H538A variants of xenocin, which were expressed alone without an immunity domain and secreted in the culture supernatant through flagellar export. Secretion of xenocin through the flagellar pathway has important implications in the evolutionary success of X. nematophila. PMID:23335409

  4. Characterization of polymer release from the flagellar pocket of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Stierhof, Y D; Ilg, T; Russell, D G; Hohenberg, H; Overath, P

    1994-04-01

    Trypanosomatids contain a unique compartment, the flagellar pocket, formed by an invagination of the plasma membrane at the base of the flagellum, which is considered to be the sole cellular site for endocytosis and exocytosis of macromolecules. The culture supernatant of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes, the insect stage of this protozoan parasite, contains two types of polymers: a filamentous acid phosphatase (sAP) composed of a 100-kD phosphoglycoprotein with non-covalently associated proteo high molecular weight phosphoglycan (proteo-HMWPG) and fibrous material termed network consisting of complex phosphoglycans. Secretion of both polymers is investigated using mAbs and a combination of light and electron microscopic techniques. Long filaments of sAP are detectable in the lumen of the flagellar pocket. Both sAP filaments and network material emerge from the ostium of the flagellar pocket. While sAP filaments detach from the cells, the fibrous network frequently remains associated with the anterior end of the parasites and can be found in the center of cell aggregates. The related species L. major forms similar networks. Since polymeric structures cannot be detected in intracellular compartments, it is proposed that monomeric or, possibly, oligomeric subunits synthesized in the cells are secreted into the flagellar pocket. Polymer formation from subunits is suggested to occur in the lumen of the pocket before release into the culture medium or, naturally, into the gut of infected sandflies. PMID:8163549

  5. Swimming performance of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is an emergent property of its two flagellar systems

    PubMed Central

    Quelas, J. Ignacio; Althabegoiti, M. Julia; Jimenez-Sanchez, Celia; Melgarejo, Augusto A.; Marconi, Verónica I.; Mongiardini, Elías J.; Trejo, Sebastián A.; Mengucci, Florencia; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio; Lodeiro, Aníbal R.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial species use flagella for self-propulsion in aqueous media. In the soil, which is a complex and structured environment, water is found in microscopic channels where viscosity and water potential depend on the composition of the soil solution and the degree of soil water saturation. Therefore, the motility of soil bacteria might have special requirements. An important soil bacterial genus is Bradyrhizobium, with species that possess one flagellar system and others with two different flagellar systems. Among the latter is B. diazoefficiens, which may express its subpolar and lateral flagella simultaneously in liquid medium, although its swimming behaviour was not described yet. These two flagellar systems were observed here as functionally integrated in a swimming performance that emerged as an epistatic interaction between those appendages. In addition, each flagellum seemed engaged in a particular task that might be required for swimming oriented toward chemoattractants near the soil inner surfaces at viscosities that may occur after the loss of soil gravitational water. Because the possession of two flagellar systems is not general in Bradyrhizobium or in related genera that coexist in the same environment, there may be an adaptive tradeoff between energetic costs and ecological benefits among these different species. PMID:27053439

  6. Dual stator dynamics in the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Paulick, Anja; Delalez, Nicolas J; Brenzinger, Susanne; Steel, Bradley C; Berry, Richard M; Armitage, Judith P; Thormann, Kai M

    2015-06-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is an intricate nanomachine which converts ion gradients into rotational movement. Torque is created by ion-dependent stator complexes which surround the rotor in a ring. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 expresses two distinct types of stator units: the Na(+)-dependent PomA4 B2 and the H(+)-dependent MotA4 B2. Here, we have explored the stator unit dynamics in the MR-1 flagellar system by using mCherry-labeled PomAB and MotAB units. We observed a total of between 7 and 11 stator units in each flagellar motor. Both types of stator units exchanged between motors and a pool of stator complexes in the membrane, and the exchange rate of MotAB, but not of PomAB, units was dependent on the environmental Na(+)-levels. In 200 mM Na(+), the numbers of PomAB and MotAB units in wild-type motors was determined to be about 7:2 (PomAB:MotAB), shifting to about 6:5 without Na(+). Significantly, the average swimming speed of MR-1 cells at low Na(+) conditions was increased in the presence of MotAB. These data strongly indicate that the S. oneidensis flagellar motors simultaneously use H(+) and Na(+) driven stators in a configuration governed by MotAB incorporation efficiency in response to environmental Na(+) levels. PMID:25727785

  7. Kinesin-13 regulates flagellar, interphase, and mitotic microtubule dynamics in Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Scott C; Sagolla, Meredith S; Mancuso, Joel J; Woessner, David J; House, Susan A; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian; Cande, W Zacheus

    2007-12-01

    Microtubule depolymerization dynamics in the spindle are regulated by kinesin-13, a nonprocessive kinesin motor protein that depolymerizes microtubules at the plus and minus ends. Here we show that a single kinesin-13 homolog regulates flagellar length dynamics, as well as other interphase and mitotic dynamics in Giardia intestinalis, a widespread parasitic diplomonad protist. Both green fluorescent protein-tagged kinesin-13 and EB1 (a plus-end tracking protein) localize to the plus ends of mitotic and interphase microtubules, including a novel localization to the eight flagellar tips, cytoplasmic anterior axonemes, and the median body. The ectopic expression of a kinesin-13 (S280N) rigor mutant construct caused significant elongation of the eight flagella with significant decreases in the median body volume and resulted in mitotic defects. Notably, drugs that disrupt normal interphase and mitotic microtubule dynamics also affected flagellar length in Giardia. Our study extends recent work on interphase and mitotic kinesin-13 functioning in metazoans to include a role in regulating flagellar length dynamics. We suggest that kinesin-13 universally regulates both mitotic and interphase microtubule dynamics in diverse microbial eukaryotes and propose that axonemal microtubules are subject to the same regulation of microtubule dynamics as other dynamic microtubule arrays. Finally, the present study represents the first use of a dominant-negative strategy to disrupt normal protein function in Giardia and provides important insights into giardial microtubule dynamics with relevance to the development of antigiardial compounds that target critical functions of kinesins in the giardial life cycle. PMID:17766466

  8. Listeria monocytogenes DNA glycosylase AdiP affects flagellar motility, biofilm formation, virulence, and stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is struct...

  9. A novel type bacterial flagellar motor that can use divalent cations as a coupling ion

    PubMed Central

    Imazawa, Riku; Takahashi, Yuka; Aoki, Wataru; Sano, Motohiko; Ito, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a sophisticated nanomachine embedded in the cell envelope and powered by an electrochemical gradient of H+, Na+, or K+across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we describe a new member of the bacterial flagellar stator channel family (MotAB1 of Paenibacillus sp. TCA20 (TCA-MotAB1)) that is coupled to divalent cations (Ca2+and Mg2+). In the absence of divalent cations of alkaline earth metals, no swimming was observed in Paenibacillus sp. TCA20, which grows optimally in Ca2+-rich environments. This pattern was confirmed by swimming assays of a stator-free Bacillus subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1. Both a stator-free and major Mg2+uptake system-deleted B. subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1 complemented both growth and motility deficiency under low Mg2+conditions and exhibited [Mg2+]in identical to that of the wild-type. This is the first report of a flagellar motor that can use Ca2+and Mg2+as coupling ions. These findings will promote the understanding of the operating principles of flagellar motors and molecular mechanisms of ion selectivity. PMID:26794857

  10. Isolation and characterization of flagellar filament from zoospores of Dermatophilus congolensis.

    PubMed

    Hiraizumi, Mieko; Tagawa, Yuichi

    2014-09-17

    Highly motile zoospores from Dermatophilus congolensis bovine isolates from clinical dermatophilosis in Japan were obtained by culturing at 27°C in an ambient atmosphere on heart infusion agar supplemented with 5% defibrinated sheep blood for 72h or in heart infusion broth for 48h with gentle shaking. After vigorous mechanical agitation of the zoospore suspension, the flagellar filaments detached from motile zoospores and were isolated in the clear gelatinous part of the final pellet by differential centrifugation. Typical morphology of a flagellar filament, with a width of approximately 15nm, was observed in the isolated flagellar filament by electron microscopy. A single major protein (flagellin) band with an apparent molecular mass of 35kDa was detected in the flagellar filament of D. congolensis strain AM-1 and that of 33kDa was detected in strain IT-2 by SDS-PAGE. In immunoblot analysis of whole-cell proteins from seven isolates of D. congolensis, antiserum to strain AM-1 zoospores reacted with the 35-kDa antigen band of strain AM-1, but not with any antigen band of other strains in a similar molecular mass range. In contrast, antiserum to strain IT-2 zoospores reacted with antigen bands at 33kDa from six strains, except strain AM-1. Similar strain-specific reactions of these anti-zoospore sera with isolated flagellar filaments from strains AM-1 and IT-2 were confirmed by immunoblot, indicating the presence of antigenic variations of flagellins of D. congolensis zoospores. PMID:25132009

  11. Advances in molecular serotyping and subtyping of Escherichia coli

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fratamico, Pina M.; DebRoy, Chitrita; Liu, Yanhong; Needleman, David S.; Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Feng, Peter

    2016-05-03

    Escherichia coli plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. E. coli have traditionally been serotyped using antisera against the ca. 186 O-antigens and 53 H-flagellar antigens. Phenotypic methods, including bacteriophage typing and O- and H- serotyping for differentiating and characterizing E. coli have been used for many years; however, these methods are generally time consuming and not always accurate. Advances in next generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to develop genetic-based subtypingmore » and molecular serotyping methods for E. coli, which are more discriminatory compared to phenotypic typing methods. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of E. coli is replacing established subtyping methods such as pulsedfield gel electrophoresis, providing a major advancement in the ability to investigate food-borne disease outbreaks and for trace-back to sources. Furthermore, a variety of sequence analysis tools and bioinformatic pipelines are being developed to analyze the vast amount of data generated by WGS and to obtain specific information such as O- and H-group determination and the presence of virulence genes and other genetic markers.« less

  12. Roles of Lon protease and its substrate MarA during sodium salicylate-mediated growth reduction and antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bhaskarla, Chetana; Das, Mrinmoy; Verma, Taru; Kumar, Anujith; Mahadevan, S; Nandi, Dipankar

    2016-05-01

    The cellular proteolytic machinery orchestrates protein turnover and regulates several key biological processes. This study addresses the roles of Lon, a major ATP-dependent protease, in modulating the responses of Escherichia coli strain MG1655 to low and high amounts of sodium salicyclate (NaSal), a widely used clinically relevant analgesic. NaSal affects several bacterial responses, including growth and resistance to multiple antibiotics. The loss of lon reduces growth in response to high, but not low, amounts of NaSal. From amongst a panel of Lon substrates, MarA was identified to be the downstream target of Lon. Thus, stabilization of MarA in the absence of lon lowers growth of the strain in the presence of higher amounts of NaSal. The steady-state transcript levels of marA and its target genes, acrA, acrB and tolC, are higher in the Δlon strain compared with the WT strain. Consequently, the resistance to antibiotics, e.g. tetracycline and nalidixic acid, is enhanced in Δlon in a marA-dependent manner. Furthermore, the target genes of MarA, i.e. acrB and tolC, are responsible for NaSal-mediated antibiotic resistance. Studies using atomic force microscopy demonstrated that ciprofloxacin led to greater cell filamentation, which is lower in the Δlon strain due to higher levels of MarA. Overall, this study delineates the roles of Lon protease, its substrate MarA and downstream targets of MarA, e.g. acrB and tolC, during NaSal-mediated growth reduction and antibiotic resistance. The implications of these observations in the adaptation of E. coli under different environmental conditions are discussed. PMID:26944926

  13. Basal Body Structures Differentially Affect Transcription of RpoN- and FliA-Dependent Flagellar Genes in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Flagellar biogenesis in Helicobacter pylori is regulated by a transcriptional hierarchy governed by three sigma factors, RpoD (σ80), RpoN (σ54), and FliA (σ28), that temporally coordinates gene expression with the assembly of the flagellum. Previous studies showed that loss of flagellar protein export apparatus components inhibits transcription of flagellar genes. The FlgS/FlgR two-component system activates transcription of RpoN-dependent genes though an unknown mechanism. To understand better the extent to which flagellar gene regulation is coupled to flagellar assembly, we disrupted flagellar biogenesis at various points and determined how these mutations affected transcription of RpoN-dependent (flaB and flgE) and FliA-dependent (flaA) genes. The MS ring (encoded by fliF) is one of the earliest flagellar structures assembled. Deletion of fliF resulted in the elimination of RpoN-dependent transcripts and an ∼4-fold decrease in flaA transcript levels. FliH is a cytoplasmic protein that functions with the C ring protein FliN to shuttle substrates to the export apparatus. Deletions of fliH and genes encoding C ring components (fliM and fliY) decreased transcript levels of flaB and flgE but had little or no effect on transcript levels of flaA. Transcript levels of flaB and flgE were elevated in mutants where genes encoding rod proteins (fliE and flgBC) were deleted, while transcript levels of flaA was reduced ∼2-fold in both mutants. We propose that FlgS responds to an assembly checkpoint associated with the export apparatus and that FliH and one or more C ring component assist FlgS in engaging this flagellar structure. IMPORTANCE The mechanisms used by bacteria to couple transcription of flagellar genes with assembly of the flagellum are poorly understood. The results from this study identified components of the H. pylori flagellar basal body that either positively or negatively affect expression of RpoN-dependent flagellar genes. Some of these

  14. RpoE may promote flagellar gene expression in Salmonella enterica serovar typhi under hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Du, Hong; Sheng, Xiumei; Zhang, Haifang; Zou, Xin; Ni, Bin; Xu, Shungao; Zhu, Xueming; Xu, Huaxi; Huang, Xinxiang

    2011-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi z66 positive strain contains a fljBA-like operon on a linear plasmid. The operon contains the gene fljB:z66 which encodes the z66 antigen. RpoE is a sigma factor σ(E) that initiates transcription of a series of genes in Escherichia and Salmonella under environmental stresses. To investigate whether the gene fljB:z66 is regulated by RpoE (σ(E)), a rpoE deletion mutant of S. enterica serovar Typhi (ΔrpoE) was prepared in this study. The defective motility of the ΔrpoE was confirmed firstly. Transcriptional expression of flagellar genes was screened using a genomic DNA microarray. Some class-2 and most class-3 flagellar genes were downregulated in the ΔrpoE after 30 min of hyperosmotic stress. The expression of fliA and fljB:z66, a class-2 flagellar gene and a class-3 flagellar gene, obviously decreased; however, expression of the class-1 flagellar genes flhDC did not change obviously in the ΔrpoE compared to the wild-type strain in the same conditions. Results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that the expression levels of fliA and fljB:z66 in the ΔrpoE after 30 min of hyperosmotic stress decreased about five and eightfold, respectively, compared to the wild-type strain. Similar results were observed at 120 min of hyperosmotic stress. Western blotting and qRT-PCR analysis showed that expression of fliA and fljB:z66 was significantly increased after supplemental expression of rpoE with a recombinant plasmid pBADrpoE in the ΔrpoE strain. These results demonstrated that RpoE promoted the expression of class-3 flagellar genes and it might be performed by initiating the expression of fliA in S. enterica serovar Typhi under hyperosmotic stress. PMID:20717675

  15. Transcriptional regulation of coordinate changes in flagellar mRNAs during differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amoebae into flagellates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Walsh, C.J.

    1988-06-01

    The nuclear run-on technique was used to measure the rate of transcription of flagellar genes during the differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amebae into flagellates. Synthesis of mRNAs for the axonemal proteins ..cap alpha..- and BETA-tubulin and flagellar calmodulin, as well as a coordinately regulated poly(A)/sup +/ RNA that codes for an unidentified protein, showed transient increases averaging 22-fold. The rate of synthesis of two poly(A)/sup +/ RNAs common to ameobae and flagellates was low until the transcription of the flagellar genes began to decline, at which time synthesis of the RNAs found in ameobae increased 3- to 10-fold. The observed changes in the rate of transcription can account quantitatively for the 20-fold increase in flagellar mRNA concentration during the differentiation. The data for the flagellar calmodulin gene demonstrate transcriptional regulation for a nontubulin axonemal protein. The data also demonstrate at least two programs of transcriptional regulation during the differentiation and raise the intriguing possibility that some significant fraction of the nearly 200 different proteins of the flagellar axoneme is transcriptionally regulated during the 1 h it takes N. gruberi amebae to form visible flagella.

  16. Actin-interacting and flagellar proteins in Leishmania spp.: Bioinformatics predictions to functional assignments in phagosome formation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Several motile processes are responsible for the movement of proteins into and within the flagellar membrane, but little is known about the process by which specific proteins (either actin-associated or not) are targeted to protozoan flagellar membranes. Actin is a major cytoskeleton protein, while polymerization and depolymerization of parasite actin and actin-interacting proteins (AIPs) during both processes of motility and host cell entry might be key events for successful infection. For a better understanding the eukaryotic flagellar dynamics, we have surveyed genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of pathogenic Leishmania spp. to identify pertinent genes/proteins and to build in silico models to properly address their putative roles in trypanosomatid virulence. In a search for AIPs involved in flagellar activities, we applied computational biology and proteomic tools to infer from the biological meaning of coronins and Arp2/3, two important elements in phagosome formation after parasite phagocytosis by macrophages. Results presented here provide the first report of Leishmania coronin and Arp2/3 as flagellar proteins that also might be involved in phagosome formation through actin polymerization within the flagellar environment. This is an issue worthy of further in vitro examination that remains now as a direct, positive bioinformatics-derived inference to be presented. PMID:21637533

  17. Actin-interacting and flagellar proteins in Leishmania spp.: Bioinformatics predictions to functional assignments in phagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Michely C; Costa, Marcília P; Pacheco, Ana C L; Kamimura, Michel T; Silva, Samara C; Carneiro, Laura D G; Sousa, Ana P L; Soares, Carlos E A; Souza, Celeste S F; de Oliveira, Diana Magalhães

    2009-07-01

    Several motile processes are responsible for the movement of proteins into and within the flagellar membrane, but little is known about the process by which specific proteins (either actin-associated or not) are targeted to protozoan flagellar membranes. Actin is a major cytoskeleton protein, while polymerization and depolymerization of parasite actin and actin-interacting proteins (AIPs) during both processes of motility and host cell entry might be key events for successful infection. For a better understanding the eukaryotic flagellar dynamics, we have surveyed genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of pathogenic Leishmania spp. to identify pertinent genes/proteins and to build in silico models to properly address their putative roles in trypanosomatid virulence. In a search for AIPs involved in flagellar activities, we applied computational biology and proteomic tools to infer from the biological meaning of coronins and Arp2/3, two important elements in phagosome formation after parasite phagocytosis by macrophages. Results presented here provide the first report of Leishmania coronin and Arp2/3 as flagellar proteins that also might be involved in phagosome formation through actin polymerization within the flagellar environment. This is an issue worthy of further in vitro examination that remains now as a direct, positive bioinformatics-derived inference to be presented. PMID:21637533

  18. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials - towards an efficient lithium battery anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznosov, Sergei N.; Veluri, Pavan S.; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G.; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Macfarlane, Douglas R.; Fedorov, Oleg V.; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g-1 at 5 A g-1 (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future.

  19. Rotational speed control of Na +-driven flagellar motor by dual pipettes.

    PubMed

    Nogawa, Kousuke; Kojima, Masaru; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2009-12-01

    Single cell analysis has attracted much attention to reveal the detailed and localized biological information. Local environmental control technique is desired to analyze the detailed and localized properties of single cells. In this paper, we propose the local environmental control system with nano/micro dual pipettes to control the local reagent concentration dynamically and arbitrarily. Local environmental control by dual pipettes is applied to the rotational speed control of bacterial flagellar motor, which is a rotary molecular machine. We demonstrate quick response and iterative rotational speed control of Na (+)-driven flagellar motor in both accelerating and relaxing directions by switching the local spout between Na (+)-containing and Na (+) -free solutions with dual pipettes. It is shown that the rotational speed might be controllable by changing the spouting velocity of Na (+)-containing solution with multiplying the applied dc voltage. PMID:19887330

  20. The phylogeny of swimming kinematics: The environment controls flagellar waveforms in sperm motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Burton, Lisa; Zimmer, Richard; Hosoi, Anette; Stocker, Roman

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, phylogenetic and molecular analyses have dominated the study of ecology and evolution. However, physical interactions between organisms and their environment, a fundamental determinant of organism ecology and evolution, are mediated by organism form and function, highlighting the need to understand the mechanics of basic survival strategies, including locomotion. Focusing on spermatozoa, we combined high-speed video microscopy and singular value decomposition analysis to quantitatively compare the flagellar waveforms of eight species, ranging from marine invertebrates to humans. We found striking similarities in sperm swimming kinematics between genetically dissimilar organisms, which could not be uncovered by phylogenetic analysis. The emergence of dominant waveform patterns across species are suggestive of biological optimization for flagellar locomotion and point toward environmental cues as drivers of this convergence. These results reinforce the power of quantitative kinematic analysis to understand the physical drivers of evolution and as an approach to uncover new solutions for engineering applications, such as micro-robotics.

  1. Amphipathic helical ordering of the flagellar secretion signal of Salmonella flagellin.

    PubMed

    Tőke, Orsolya; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2016-08-01

    Export of external flagellar proteins requires a signal located within their N-terminal disordered part, however, these regions do not share any significant sequence similarity suggesting that the secondary/tertiary structure might be important for recognition by the export gate. NMR experiments were performed to reveal the conformational properties of the flagellin signal sequence in vitro. It assumed a largely disordered fluctuating structure in aqueous environment, but acquired a folded structure containing an amphipathic helical portion in 50% MeOH or upon addition of SDS micelles which are known to promote hydrophobic interactions. Our observations raise the possibility that the signal sequence may partially undergo amphipathic helical ordering upon interaction with the recognition unit of the flagellar export machinery in a similar way as revealed for protein import into intracellular eukaryotic organelles mediated by targeting signals of high diversity. PMID:27264954

  2. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials - towards an efficient lithium battery anode.

    PubMed

    Beznosov, Sergei N; Veluri, Pavan S; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G; Chatterjee, Abhijit; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Fedorov, Oleg V; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g(-1) after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g(-1) at 5 A g(-1) (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future. PMID:25583370

  3. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials – towards an efficient lithium battery anode

    PubMed Central

    Beznosov, Sergei N.; Veluri, Pavan S.; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G.; Chatterjee, Abhijit; MacFarlane, Douglas R.; Fedorov, Oleg V.; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g−1 after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g−1 at 5 A g−1 (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future. PMID:25583370

  4. Cross talk between type III secretion and flagellar assembly systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Soscia, Chantal; Hachani, Abderrahman; Bernadac, Alain; Filloux, Alain; Bleves, Sophie

    2007-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytotoxicity is linked to a type III secretion system (T3SS) that delivers effectors into the host cell. We show here that a negative cross-control exists between T3SS and flagellar assembly. We observed that, in a strain lacking flagella, T3SS gene expression, effector secretion, and cytotoxicity were increased. Conversely, we revealed that flagellar-gene expression and motility were decreased in a strain overproducing ExsA, the T3SS master regulator. Interestingly, a nonmotile strain lacking the flagellar filament (DeltafliC) presented a hyperefficient T3SS and a nonmotile strain assembling flagella (DeltamotAB) did not. More intriguingly, a strain lacking motCD genes is a flagellated strain with a slight defect in swimming. However, in this strain, T3SS gene expression was up-regulated. These results suggest that flagellar assembly and/or mobility antagonizes the T3SS and that a negative cross talk exists between these two systems. An illustration of this is the visualization by electron microscopy of T3SS needles in a nonmotile P. aeruginosa strain, needles which otherwise are not detected. The molecular basis of the cross talk is complex and remains to be elucidated, but proteins like MotCD might have a crucial role in signaling between the two processes. In addition, we found that the GacA response regulator negatively affects the T3SS. In a gacA mutant, the T3SS effector ExoS is hypersecreted. Strikingly, GacA was previously reported as a positive regulator for motility. Globally, our data document the idea that some virulence factors are coordinately but inversely regulated, depending on the bacterial colonization phase and infection types. PMID:17307856

  5. Bio-Hybrid Micro/Nanodevices Powered by Flagellar Motor: Challenges and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Tung, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Molecular motors, which are precision engineered by nature, offer exciting possibilities for bio-hybrid engineered systems. They could enable real applications ranging from micro/nano fluidics, to biosensing, to medical diagnoses. This review describes the fundamental biological insights and fascinating potentials of these remarkable sensing and actuation machines, in particular, bacterial flagellar motors, as well as their engineering perspectives with regard to applications in bio-engineered hybrid systems. PMID:26284237

  6. Flagellar phenotypic plasticity in volvocalean algae correlates with Péclet number.

    PubMed

    Solari, Cristian A; Drescher, Knut; Ganguly, Sujoy; Kessler, John O; Michod, Richard E; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2011-10-01

    Flagella-generated fluid stirring has been suggested to enhance nutrient uptake for sufficiently large micro-organisms, and to have played a role in evolutionary transitions to multicellularity. A corollary to this predicted size-dependent benefit is a propensity for phenotypic plasticity in the flow-generating mechanism to appear in large species under nutrient deprivation. We examined four species of volvocalean algae whose radii and flow speeds differ greatly, with Péclet numbers (Pe) separated by several orders of magnitude. Populations of unicellular Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and one- to eight-celled Gonium pectorale (Pe ∼ 0.1-1) and multicellular Volvox carteri and Volvox barberi (Pe ∼ 100) were grown in diluted and undiluted media. For C. reinhardtii and G. pectorale, decreasing the nutrient concentration resulted in smaller cells, but had no effect on flagellar length and propulsion force. In contrast, these conditions induced Volvox colonies to grow larger and increase their flagellar length, separating the somatic cells further. Detailed studies on V. carteri found that the opposing effects of increasing beating force and flagellar spacing balance, so the fluid speed across the colony surface remains unchanged between nutrient conditions. These results lend further support to the hypothesized link between the Péclet number, nutrient uptake and the evolution of biological complexity in the Volvocales. PMID:21367778

  7. Correlation between Supercoiling and Conformational Motions of the Bacterial Flagellar Filament

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Andreas M.; Unruh, Tobias; Namba, Keiichi; Samatey, Fadel; Zaccai, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar filament is a very large macromolecular assembly of a single protein, flagellin. Various supercoiled states of the filament exist, which are formed by two structurally different conformations of flagellin in different ratios. We investigated the correlation between supercoiling of the protofilaments and molecular dynamics in the flagellar filament using quasielastic and elastic incoherent neutron scattering on the picosecond and nanosecond timescales. Thermal fluctuations in the straight L- and R-type filaments were measured and compared to the resting state of the wild-type filament. Amplitudes of motion on the picosecond timescale were found to be similar in the different conformational states. Mean-square displacements and protein resilience on the 0.1 ns timescale demonstrate that the L-type state is more flexible and less resilient than the R-type, whereas the wild-type state lies in between. Our results provide strong support that supercoiling of the protofilaments in the flagellar filament is determined by the strength of molecular forces in and between the flagellin subunits. PMID:24209861

  8. Diverse high-torque bacterial flagellar motors assemble wider stator rings using a conserved protein scaffold.

    PubMed

    Beeby, Morgan; Ribardo, Deborah A; Brennan, Caitlin A; Ruby, Edward G; Jensen, Grant J; Hendrixson, David R

    2016-03-29

    Although it is known that diverse bacterial flagellar motors produce different torques, the mechanism underlying torque variation is unknown. To understand this difference better, we combined genetic analyses with electron cryo-tomography subtomogram averaging to determine in situ structures of flagellar motors that produce different torques, from Campylobacter and Vibrio species. For the first time, to our knowledge, our results unambiguously locate the torque-generating stator complexes and show that diverse high-torque motors use variants of an ancestrally related family of structures to scaffold incorporation of additional stator complexes at wider radii from the axial driveshaft than in the model enteric motor. We identify the protein components of these additional scaffold structures and elucidate their sequential assembly, demonstrating that they are required for stator-complex incorporation. These proteins are widespread, suggesting that different bacteria have tailored torques to specific environments by scaffolding alternative stator placement and number. Our results quantitatively account for different motor torques, complete the assignment of the locations of the major flagellar components, and provide crucial constraints for understanding mechanisms of torque generation and the evolution of multiprotein complexes. PMID:26976588

  9. Flagellar Biosynthesis Exerts Temporal Regulation of Secretion of Specific Campylobacter jejuni Colonization and Virulence Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Barrero-Tobon, Angelica M.; Hendrixson, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The Campylobacter jejuni flagellum exports both proteins that form the flagellar organelle for swimming motility and colonization and virulence factors that promote commensal colonization of the avian intestinal tract or invasion of human intestinal cells, respectively. We explored how the C. jejuni flagellum is a versatile secretory organelle by examining molecular determinants that allow colonization and virulence factors to exploit the flagellum for their own secretion. Flagellar biogenesis was observed to exert temporal control of secretion of these proteins, indicating that a bolus of secretion of colonization and virulence factors occurs during hook biogenesis with filament polymerization itself reducing secretion of these factors. Furthermore, we found that intramolecular and intermolecular requirements for flagellar-dependent secretion of these proteins were most reminiscent to those for flagellin secretion. Importantly, we discovered that secretion of one colonization and virluence factor, CiaI, was not required for invasion of human colonic cells, which counters previous hypotheses for how this protein functions during invasion. Instead, secretion of CiaI was essential for C. jejuni to facilitate commensal colonization of the natural avian host. Our work provides insight into the versatility of the bacterial flagellum as a secretory machine that can export proteins promoting diverse biological processes. PMID:25041103

  10. Flagellar cells and ciliary cells in the renal tubule of elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Lacy, E R; Luciano, L; Reale, E

    1989-01-01

    Flagella or cilia are present on most epithelial cells in the renal tubule of elasmobranch fishes (little skate, spiny dogfish, smooth dogfish, Atlantic sharpnose, scalloped hammerhead, cow-nosed ray). Flagellar cells, those with numerous flagella ordered in one, two, or more rows on the luminal surface, are shown here for the first time in a vertebrate. The flagellar cells are intercalated among other epithelial cells, each bearing a single cilium, from Bowman's capsule to the third subdivision of the intermediate segment of the nephron. The flagella form undulated ribbons up to 55 microns long. In every ribbon the axis of the central pair of microtubules in the axoneme is oriented parallel to the long axis of the flagellar row. This suggests a beat perpendicular to these two axes. The arrangement of the flagella in ribbons most likely promotes movement of glomerular filtrate down the renal tubule. Cells bearing numerous cilia occur in the large collecting ducts of spiny dogfish but without apparent preferential orientation of the cilia. PMID:2575649

  11. Selective Purification of Recombinant Neuroactive Peptides Using the Flagellar Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Hanna M.; Erhardt, Marc; Steiner, Andrew M.; Zhang, Min-Min; Yoshikami, Doju; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Hughes, Kelly T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The structure, assembly, and function of the bacterial flagellum involves about 60 different proteins, many of which are selectively secreted via a specific type III secretion system (T3SS) (J. Frye et al., J. Bacteriol. 188:2233–2243, 2006). The T3SS is reported to secrete proteins at rates of up to 10,000 amino acid residues per second. In this work, we showed that the flagellar T3SS of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium could be manipulated to export recombinant nonflagellar proteins through the flagellum and into the surrounding medium. We translationally fused various neuroactive peptides and proteins from snails, spiders, snakes, sea anemone, and bacteria to the flagellar secretion substrate FlgM. We found that all tested peptides of various sizes were secreted via the bacterial flagellar T3SS. We subsequently purified the recombinant μ-conotoxin SIIIA (rSIIIA) from Conus striatus by affinity chromatography and confirmed that T3SS-derived rSIIIA inhibited mammalian voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.2 comparably to chemically synthesized SIIIA. PMID:22647788

  12. A developmentally regulated Caulobacter flagellar promoter is activated by 3' enhancer and IHF binding elements.

    PubMed Central

    Gober, J W; Shapiro, L

    1992-01-01

    The transcription of a group of flagellar genes is temporally and spatially regulated during the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle. These genes all share the same 5' cis-regulatory elements: a sigma 54 promoter, a binding site for integration host factor (IHF), and an enhancer sequence, known as the ftr element. We have partially purified the ftr-binding proteins, and we show that they require the same enhancer sequences for binding as are required for transcriptional activation. We have also partially purified the Caulobacter homolog of IHF and demonstrate that it can facilitate in vitro integrase-mediated lambda recombination. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we provide the first demonstration that natural enhancer sequences and IHF binding elements that reside 3' to the sigma 54 promoter of a bacterial gene, flaNQ, are required for transcription of the operon, in vivo. The IHF protein and the ftr-binding protein is primarily restricted to the predivisional cell, the cell type in which these promoters are transcribed. flaNQ promoter expression is localized to the swarmer pole of the predivisional cell, as are other flagellar promoters that possess these regulatory sequences 5' to the start site. The requirement for an IHF binding site and an ftr-enhancer element in spatially transcribed flagellar promoters indicates that a common mechanism may be responsible for both temporal and polar transcription. Images PMID:1392079

  13. Diverse high-torque bacterial flagellar motors assemble wider stator rings using a conserved protein scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Ribardo, Deborah A.; Brennan, Caitlin A.; Ruby, Edward G.; Jensen, Grant J.; Hendrixson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is known that diverse bacterial flagellar motors produce different torques, the mechanism underlying torque variation is unknown. To understand this difference better, we combined genetic analyses with electron cryo-tomography subtomogram averaging to determine in situ structures of flagellar motors that produce different torques, from Campylobacter and Vibrio species. For the first time, to our knowledge, our results unambiguously locate the torque-generating stator complexes and show that diverse high-torque motors use variants of an ancestrally related family of structures to scaffold incorporation of additional stator complexes at wider radii from the axial driveshaft than in the model enteric motor. We identify the protein components of these additional scaffold structures and elucidate their sequential assembly, demonstrating that they are required for stator-complex incorporation. These proteins are widespread, suggesting that different bacteria have tailored torques to specific environments by scaffolding alternative stator placement and number. Our results quantitatively account for different motor torques, complete the assignment of the locations of the major flagellar components, and provide crucial constraints for understanding mechanisms of torque generation and the evolution of multiprotein complexes. PMID:26976588

  14. Bimodal rheotactic behavior reflects flagellar beat asymmetry in human sperm cells

    PubMed Central

    Bukatin, Anton; Kukhtevich, Igor; Stoop, Norbert; Dunkel, Jörn; Kantsler, Vasily

    2015-01-01

    Rheotaxis, the directed response to fluid velocity gradients, has been shown to facilitate stable upstream swimming of mammalian sperm cells along solid surfaces, suggesting a robust physical mechanism for long-distance navigation during fertilization. However, the dynamics by which a human sperm orients itself relative to an ambient flow is poorly understood. Here, we combine microfluidic experiments with mathematical modeling and 3D flagellar beat reconstruction to quantify the response of individual sperm cells in time-varying flow fields. Single-cell tracking reveals two kinematically distinct swimming states that entail opposite turning behaviors under flow reversal. We constrain an effective 2D model for the turning dynamics through systematic large-scale parameter scans, and find good quantitative agreement with experiments at different shear rates and viscosities. Using a 3D reconstruction algorithm to identify the flagellar beat patterns causing left or right turning, we present comprehensive 3D data demonstrating the rolling dynamics of freely swimming sperm cells around their longitudinal axis. Contrary to current beliefs, this 3D analysis uncovers ambidextrous flagellar waveforms and shows that the cell’s turning direction is not defined by the rolling direction. Instead, the different rheotactic turning behaviors are linked to a broken mirror symmetry in the midpiece section, likely arising from a buckling instability. These results challenge current theoretical models of sperm locomotion. PMID:26655343

  15. Complex spatial organization and flagellin composition of flagellar propeller from marine magnetotactic ovoid strain MO-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Jia; Santini, Claire-Lise; Bernadac, Alain; Ruan, Juanfang; Zhang, Sheng-Da; Kato, Takayuki; Li, Ying; Namba, Keiichi; Wu, Long-Fei

    2012-03-01

    Marine magnetotactic ovoid bacterium MO-1 is capable of swimming along the geomagnetic field lines by means of its two sheathed flagellar bundles at a speed up to 300 μm/s. In this study, by using electron microscopy, we showed that, in each bundle, six individual flagella were organized in hexagon with a seventh in the middle. We identified 12 flagellin paralogs and 2 putative flagellins in the genome of MO-1. Among them, 13 were tandemly located on an ~ 17-kb segment while the 14th was on a separated locus. Using reverse transcription PCR and quantitative PCR, we found that all the 14 flagellin or putative flagellin genes were transcribed and that 2 of them were more abundantly expressed than others. A nLC (nanoliquid chromatography)-ESI (electrospray ionization)-MS/MS (mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) mass spectrometry analysis identified all the 12 flagellin proteins in three glycosylated polypeptide bands resolved by one-dimensional denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 10 of them in 21 spots obtained by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis of flagellar extracts. Most spots contained more than one flagellin, and eight of the ten identified flagellins existed in multiple isoforms. Taken together, these results show unprecedented complexity in the spatial organization and flagellin composition of the flagellar propeller. Such architecture is observed only for ovoid-coccoid, bilophotrichously flagellated magnetotactic bacteria living in marine sediments, suggesting a species and environmental specificity. PMID:22245577

  16. Coproduction of Acetaldehyde and Hydrogen during Glucose Fermentation by Escherichia coli ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huilin; Gonzalez, Ramon; Bobik, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 strain MG1655 was engineered to coproduce acetaldehyde and hydrogen during glucose fermentation by the use of exogenous acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) reductase (for the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde) and the native formate hydrogen lyase. A putative acetaldehyde dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA reductase from Salmonella enterica (SeEutE) was cloned, produced at high levels, and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. In vitro assays showed that this enzyme had both acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (68.07 ± 1.63 μmol min−1 mg−1) and the desired acetyl-CoA reductase activity (49.23 ± 2.88 μmol min−1 mg−1). The eutE gene was engineered into an E. coli mutant lacking native glucose fermentation pathways (ΔadhE, ΔackA-pta, ΔldhA, and ΔfrdC). The engineered strain (ZH88) produced 4.91 ± 0.29 mM acetaldehyde while consuming 11.05 mM glucose but also produced 6.44 ± 0.26 mM ethanol. Studies showed that ethanol was produced by an unknown alcohol dehydrogenase(s) that converted the acetaldehyde produced by SeEutE to ethanol. Allyl alcohol was used to select for mutants with reduced alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Three allyl alcohol-resistant mutants were isolated; all produced more acetaldehyde and less ethanol than ZH88. It was also found that modifying the growth medium by adding 1 g of yeast extract/liter and lowering the pH to 6.0 further increased the coproduction of acetaldehyde and hydrogen. Under optimal conditions, strain ZH136 converted glucose to acetaldehyde and hydrogen in a 1:1 ratio with a specific acetaldehyde production rate of 0.68 ± 0.20 g h−1 g−1 dry cell weight and at 86% of the maximum theoretical yield. This specific production rate is the highest reported thus far and is promising for industrial application. The possibility of a more efficient “no-distill” ethanol fermentation procedure based on the coproduction of acetaldehyde and hydrogen is discussed. PMID:21803884

  17. E. Coli and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... care provider. What is E. coli? E. coli (Escherichia coli) is a bacterium that lives in your colon ( ... 10):1411-1413. Jones B, et al. 2004. Escherichia coli: a growing problem in early onset neonatal sepsis. ...

  18. E. Coli Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is E. coli? E. coli is short for Escherichia coli -- bacteria (germs) that cause severe cramps and diarrhea. E. ... and especially in people who have another illness. E. coli infection is more common during the summer months and ...

  19. Mutations in the Borrelia burgdorferi Flagellar Type III Secretion System Genes fliH and fliI Profoundly Affect Spirochete Flagellar Assembly, Morphology, Motility, Structure, and Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lihui; Zhao, Xiaowei; Liu, Jun; Norris, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi migrates to distant sites in the tick vectors and mammalian hosts through robust motility and chemotaxis activities. FliH and FliI are two cytoplasmic proteins that play important roles in the type III secretion system (T3SS)-mediated export and assembly of flagellar structural proteins. However, detailed analyses of the roles of FliH and FliI in B. burgdorferi have not been reported. In this study, fliH and fliI transposon mutants were utilized to dissect the mechanism of the Borrelia type III secretion system. The fliH and fliI mutants exhibited rod-shaped or string-like morphology, greatly reduced motility, division defects (resulting in elongated organisms with incomplete division points), and noninfectivity in mice by needle inoculation. Mutants in fliH and fliI were incapable of translational motion in 1% methylcellulose or soft agar. Inactivation of either fliH or fliI resulted in the loss of the FliH-FliI complex from otherwise intact flagellar motors, as determined by cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Flagellar assemblies were still present in the mutant cells, albeit in lower numbers than in wild-type cells and with truncated flagella. Genetic complementation of fliH and fliI mutants in trans restored their wild-type morphology, motility, and flagellar motor structure; however, full-length flagella and infectivity were not recovered in these complemented mutants. Based on these results, disruption of either fliH or fliI in B. burgdorferi results in a severe defect in flagellar structure and function and cell division but does not completely block the export and assembly of flagellar hook and filament proteins. PMID:25968649

  20. Expression, purification and biochemical characterization of the cytoplasmic loop of PomA, a stator component of the Na+ driven flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Abe-Yoshizumi, Rei; Kobayashi, Shiori; Gohara, Mizuki; Hayashi, Kokoro; Kojima, Chojiro; Kojima, Seiji; Sudo, Yuki; Asami, Yasuo; Homma, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Flagellar motors embedded in bacterial membranes are molecular machines powered by specific ion flows. Each motor is composed of a stator and a rotor and the interactions of those components are believed to generate the torque. Na+ influx through the PomA/PomB stator complex of Vibrio alginolyticus is coupled to torque generation and is speculated to trigger structural changes in the cytoplasmic domain of PomA that interacts with a rotor protein in the C-ring, FliG, to drive the rotation. In this study, we tried to overproduce the cytoplasmic loop of PomA (PomA-Loop), but it was insoluble. Thus, we made a fusion protein with a small soluble tag (GB1) which allowed us to express and characterize the recombinant protein. The structure of the PomA-Loop seems to be very elongated or has a loose tertiary structure. When the PomA-Loop protein was produced in E. coli, a slight dominant effect was observed on motility. We conclude that the cytoplasmic loop alone retains a certain function. PMID:27493537

  1. Two Distinct Ca2+ Signaling Pathways Modulate Sperm Flagellar Beating Patterns in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Haixin; Suarez, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperactivation, a swimming pattern of mammalian sperm in the oviduct, is essential for fertilization. It is characterized by asymmetrical flagellar beating and an increase of cytoplasmic Ca2+. We observed that some mouse sperm swimming in the oviduct produce high-amplitude pro-hook bends (bends in the direction of the hook on the head), whereas other sperm produce high-amplitude anti-hook bends. Switching direction of the major bends could serve to redirect sperm toward oocytes. We hypothesized that different Ca2+ signaling pathways produce high-amplitude pro-hook and anti-hook bends. In vitro, sperm that hyperactivated during capacitation (because of activation of CATSPER plasma membrane Ca2+ channels) developed high-amplitude pro-hook bends. The CATSPER activators procaine and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) also induced high-amplitude pro-hook bends. Thimerosal, which triggers a Ca2+ release from internal stores, induced high-amplitude anti-hook bends. Activation of CATSPER channels is facilitated by a pH rise, so both Ca2+ and pH responses to treatments with 4-AP and thimerosal were monitored. Thimerosal triggered a Ca2+ increase that initiated at the base of the flagellum, whereas 4-AP initiated a rise in the proximal principal piece. Only 4-AP triggered a flagellar pH rise. Proteins were extracted from sperm for examination of phosphorylation patterns induced by Ca2+ signaling. Procaine and 4-AP induced phosphorylation of proteins on threonine and serine, whereas thimerosal primarily induced dephosphorylation of proteins. Tyrosine phosphorylation was unaffected. We concluded that hyperactivation, which is associated with capacitation, can be modulated by release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores to reverse the direction of the dominant flagellar bend and, thus, redirect sperm. PMID:21389347

  2. Adenine Nucleotide Metabolism and a Role for AMP in Modulating Flagellar Waveforms in Mouse Sperm1

    PubMed Central

    Vadnais, Melissa L.; Cao, Wenlei; Aghajanian, Haig K.; Haig-Ladewig, Lisa; Lin, Angel M.; Al-Alao, Osama; Gerton, George L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT While most ATP, the main energy source driving sperm motility, is derived from glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, the metabolic demands of the cell require the efficient use of power stored in high-energy phosphate bonds. In times of high energy consumption, adenylate kinase (AK) scavenges one ATP molecule by transphosphorylation of two molecules of ADP, simultaneously yielding one molecule of AMP as a by-product. Either ATP or ADP supported motility of detergent-modeled cauda epididymal mouse sperm, indicating that flagellar AKs are functional. However, the ensuing flagellar waveforms fueled by ATP or ADP were qualitatively different. Motility driven by ATP was rapid but restricted to the distal region of the sperm tail, whereas ADP produced slower and more fluid waves that propagated down the full flagellum. Characterization of wave patterns by tracing and superimposing the images of the flagella, quantifying the differences using digital image analysis, and computer-assisted sperm analysis revealed differences in the amplitude, periodicity, and propagation of the waves between detergent-modeled sperm treated with either ATP or ADP. Surprisingly, addition of AMP to the incubation medium containing ATP recapitulated the pattern of sperm motility seen with ADP alone. In addition to AK1 and AK2, which we previously demonstrated are present in outer dense fibers and mitochondrial sheath of the mouse sperm tail, we show that another AK, AK8, is present in a third flagellar compartment, the axoneme. These results extend the known regulators of sperm motility to include AMP, which may be operating through an AMP-activated protein kinase. PMID:24740601

  3. Biochemical Characterization of the Flagellar Rod Components of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: Properties and Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Osorio-Valeriano, Manuel; de la Mora, Javier; Camarena, Laura

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The flagellar basal body is a rotary motor that spans the cytoplasmic and outer membranes. The rod is a drive shaft that transmits torque generated by the motor through the hook to the filament that propels the bacterial cell. The assembly and structure of the rod are poorly understood. In a first attempt to characterize this structure in the alphaproteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, we overexpressed and purified FliE and the four related rod proteins (FlgB, FlgC, FlgF, and FlgG), and we analyzed their ability to form homo-oligomers. We found that highly purified preparations of these proteins formed high-molecular-mass oligomers that tended to dissociate in the presence of NaCl. As predicted by in silico modeling, the four rod proteins share architectural features. Using affinity blotting, we detected the heteromeric interactions between these proteins. In addition, we observed that deletion of the N- and C-terminal regions of FlgF and FlgG severely affected heteromeric but not homomeric interactions. On the basis of our findings, we propose a model of rod assembly in this bacterium. IMPORTANCE Despite the considerable amount of research on the structure and assembly of other flagellar axial structures that has been conducted, the rod has been barely studied. An analysis of the biochemical characteristics of the flagellar rod components of the Fla1 system of R. sphaeroides is presented in this work. We also analyze the interactions of these proteins with each other and with their neighbors, and we propose a model for the order in which they are assembled. PMID:26574514

  4. Synthetic brominated furanone F202 prevents biofilm formation by potentially human pathogenic Escherichia coli O103:H2 and Salmonella ser. Agona on abiotic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Vestby, LK; Johannesen, KCS; Witsø, IL; Habimana, O; Scheie, AA; Urdahl, AM; Benneche, T; Langsrud, S; Nesse, LL

    2014-01-01

    Aims Investigate the use of a synthetic brominated furanone (F202) against the establishment of biofilm by Salmonella ser. Agona and E. coli O103:H2 under temperature conditions relevant for the food and feed industry as well as under temperature conditions optimum for growth. Methods and Results Effect of F202 on biofilm formation by Salmonella ser. Agona and E. coli O103:H2 was evaluated using a microtiter plate assay and confocal microscopy. Effect of F202 on bacterial motility was investigated using swimming and swarming assays. Influence on flagellar synthesis by F202 was examined by flagellar staining. Results showed that F202 inhibited biofilm formation without being bactericidal. F202 was found to affect both swimming and swarming motility without, however, affecting the expression of flagella. Conclusions F202 showed its potential as a biofilm inhibitor of Salmonella ser. Agona and E. coli O103:H2 under temperature conditions relevant for the feed and food industry as well as temperatures optimum for growth. One potential mode of action of F202 was found to be by targeting flagellar function. Significance and Impact of the Study The present study gives valuable new knowledge to the potential use of furanones as a tool in biofilm management in the food and feed industry. PMID:24118802

  5. Escherichia Coli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  6. E. coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure that ground beef has reached a safe internal temperature of 160° F. Wash hands before preparing food, after diapering infants, and after contact with cows, sheep, or goats, their food or treats, or their living environment . General Information E. coli Infections (NIH MedlinePlus) Trusted ...

  7. Analysis of an engineered Salmonella flagellar fusion protein, FliR-FlhB.

    PubMed

    Van Arnam, John S; McMurry, Jonathan L; Kihara, May; Macnab, Robert M

    2004-04-01

    Salmonella FliR and FlhB are membrane proteins necessary for flagellar export. In Clostridium a fliR-flhB fusion gene exists. We constructed a similar Salmonella fusion gene which is able to complement fliR, flhB, and fliR flhB null strains. Western blotting revealed that the FliR-FlhB fusion protein retains the FlhB protein's cleavage properties. We conclude that the FliR and FlhB proteins are physically associated in the wild-type Salmonella basal body, probably in a 1:1 ratio. PMID:15060055

  8. Transcription Profiling of the Stringent Response in Escherichia coli▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Durfee, Tim; Hansen, Anne-Marie; Zhi, Huijun; Blattner, Frederick R.; Jin, Ding Jun

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response serves as a paradigm for understanding global regulatory processes. It can be triggered by nutrient downshifts or starvation and is characterized by a rapid RelA-dependent increase in the alarmone (p)ppGpp. One hallmark of the response is the switch from maximum-growth-promoting to biosynthesis-related gene expression. However, the global transcription patterns accompanying the stringent response in Escherichia coli have not been analyzed comprehensively. Here, we present a time series of gene expression profiles for two serine hydroxymate-treated cultures: (i) MG1655, a wild-type E. coli K-12 strain, and (ii) an isogenic relAΔ251 derivative defective in the stringent response. The stringent response in MG1655 develops in a hierarchical manner, ultimately involving almost 500 differentially expressed genes, while the relAΔ251 mutant response is both delayed and limited in scope. We show that in addition to the down-regulation of stable RNA-encoding genes, flagellar and chemotaxis gene expression is also under stringent control. Reduced transcription of these systems, as well as metabolic and transporter-encoding genes, constitutes much of the down-regulated expression pattern. Conversely, a significantly larger number of genes are up-regulated. Under the conditions used, induction of amino acid biosynthetic genes is limited to the leader sequences of attenuator-regulated operons. Instead, up-regulated genes with known functions, including both regulators (e.g., rpoE, rpoH, and rpoS) and effectors, are largely involved in stress responses. However, one-half of the up-regulated genes have unknown functions. How these results are correlated with the various effects of (p)ppGpp (in particular, RNA polymerase redistribution) is discussed. PMID:18039766

  9. Dynamics of a tightly coupled mechanism for flagellar rotation. Bacterial motility, chemiosmotic coupling, protonmotive force.

    PubMed

    Meister, M; Caplan, S R; Berg, H C

    1989-05-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a molecular engine that couples the flow of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane to rotation of the flagellar filament. We analyze the steady-state behavior of an explicit mechanical model in which a fixed number of protons carries the filament through one revolution. Predictions of this model are compared with experimentally determined relationships between protonmotive force, proton flux, torque, and speed. All such tightly coupled mechanisms produce the same torque when the motor is stalled but vary greatly in their behavior at high speed. The speed at zero load predicted by our model is limited by the rates of association and dissociation of protons at binding sites on the rotor and by the mobility of force generators containing transmembrane channels that interact with these sites. Our analysis suggests that more could be learned about the motor if it were driven by an externally applied torque backwards (at negative speed) or forwards at speeds greater than the zero-load speed. PMID:2720081

  10. A “Mechanistic” Explanation of the Multiple Helical Forms Adopted by Bacterial Flagellar Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Calladine, C.R.; Luisi, B.F.; Pratap, J.V.

    2013-01-01

    The corkscrew-like flagellar filaments emerging from the surface of bacteria such as Salmonella typhimurium propel the cells toward nutrient and away from repellents. This kind of motility depends upon the ability of the flagellar filaments to adopt a range of distinct helical forms. A filament is typically constructed from ~ 30,000 identical flagellin molecules, which self-assemble into a tubular structure containing 11 near-longitudinal protofilaments. A “mechanical” model, in which the flagellin building block has the capacity to switch between two principal interfacial states, predicts that the filament can assemble into a “canonical” family of 12 distinct helical forms, each having unique curvature and twist: these include two “extreme” straight forms having left- and right-handed twists, respectively, and 10 intermediate helical forms. Measured shapes of the filaments correspond well with predictions of the model. This report is concerned with two unanswered questions. First, what properties of the flagellin determine which of the 12 discrete forms is preferred? Second, how does the interfacial “switch” work, at a molecular level? Our proposed solution of these problems is based mainly on a detailed examination of differences between the available electron cryo-microscopy structures of the straight L and R filaments, respectively. PMID:23274110

  11. Pseudomonas syringae Coordinates Production of a Motility-Enabling Surfactant with Flagellar Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Adrien Y.; Shimada, Briana K.; Mullin, Sean W. A.; Dunlap, Christopher A.; Bowman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Using a sensitive assay, we observed low levels of an unknown surfactant produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a that was not detected by traditional methods yet enabled swarming motility in a strain that exhibited deficient production of syringafactin, the main characterized surfactant produced by P. syringae. Random mutagenesis of the syringafactin-deficient strain revealed an acyltransferase with homology to rhlA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that was required for production of this unidentified surfactant, subsequently characterized by mass spectrometry as 3-(3-hydroxyalkanoyloxy) alkanoic acid (HAA). Analysis of other mutants with altered surfactant production revealed that HAA is coordinately regulated with the late-stage flagellar gene encoding flagellin; mutations in genes involved in early flagellar assembly abolish or reduce HAA production, while mutations in flagellin or flagellin glycosylation genes increase its production. When colonizing a hydrated porous surface, the bacterium increases production of both flagellin and HAA. P. syringae was defective in porous-paper colonization without functional flagella and was slightly inhibited in this movement when it lacked surfactant production. Loss of HAA production in a syringafactin-deficient strain had no effect on swimming but abolished swarming motility. In contrast, a strain that lacked HAA but retained syringafactin production exhibited broad swarming tendrils, while a syringafactin-producing strain that overproduced HAA exhibited slender swarming tendrils. On the basis of further analysis of mutants altered in HAA production, we discuss its regulation in Pseudomonas syringae. PMID:22194459

  12. Nonlinear instability in flagellar dynamics: a novel modulation mechanism in sperm migration?

    PubMed Central

    Gadêlha, H.; Gaffney, E. A.; Smith, D. J.; Kirkman-Brown, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout biology, cells and organisms use flagella and cilia to propel fluid and achieve motility. The beating of these organelles, and the corresponding ability to sense, respond to and modulate this beat is central to many processes in health and disease. While the mechanics of flagellum–fluid interaction has been the subject of extensive mathematical studies, these models have been restricted to being geometrically linear or weakly nonlinear, despite the high curvatures observed physiologically. We study the effect of geometrical nonlinearity, focusing on the spermatozoon flagellum. For a wide range of physiologically relevant parameters, the nonlinear model predicts that flagellar compression by the internal forces initiates an effective buckling behaviour, leading to a symmetry-breaking bifurcation that causes profound and complicated changes in the waveform and swimming trajectory, as well as the breakdown of the linear theory. The emergent waveform also induces curved swimming in an otherwise symmetric system, with the swimming trajectory being sensitive to head shape—no signalling or asymmetric forces are required. We conclude that nonlinear models are essential in understanding the flagellar waveform in migratory human sperm; these models will also be invaluable in understanding motile flagella and cilia in other systems. PMID:20462879

  13. Metachronal waves in the flagellar beating of Volvox and their hydrodynamic origin

    PubMed Central

    Brumley, Douglas R.; Polin, Marco; Pedley, Timothy J.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    Groups of eukaryotic cilia and flagella are capable of coordinating their beating over large scales, routinely exhibiting collective dynamics in the form of metachronal waves. The origin of this behaviour—possibly influenced by both mechanical interactions and direct biological regulation—is poorly understood, in large part due to a lack of quantitative experimental studies. Here we characterize in detail flagellar coordination on the surface of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri, an emerging model organism for flagellar dynamics. Our studies reveal for the first time that the average metachronal coordination observed is punctuated by periodic phase defects during which synchrony is partial and limited to specific groups of cells. A minimal model of hydrodynamically coupled oscillators can reproduce semi-quantitatively the characteristics of the average metachronal dynamics, and the emergence of defects. We systematically study the model's behaviour by assessing the effect of changing intrinsic rotor characteristics, including oscillator stiffness and the nature of their internal driving force, as well as their geometric properties and spatial arrangement. Our results suggest that metachronal coordination follows from deformations in the oscillators' limit cycles induced by hydrodynamic stresses, and that defects result from sufficiently steep local biases in the oscillators' intrinsic frequencies. Additionally, we find that random variations in the intrinsic rotor frequencies increase the robustness of the average properties of the emergent metachronal waves. PMID:26040592

  14. Differentiation of the major flagellar antigens of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the slide coagglutination technique.

    PubMed

    Ansorg, R A; Knoche, M E; Spies, A F; Kraus, C J

    1984-07-01

    Antisera against the two major flagellar antigens of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were obtained by immunization of rabbits with isolated flagella and absorption of contaminating antisomatic antibodies. In the conventional slide agglutination test, the pure H antisera did not agglutinate the flagellated cells of the homologous strains. The addition of protein A-bearing staphylococci to H antiserum and homologous flagellated cells, the so-called slide coagglutination, results in a rapid development of flaky clumps. H coagglutination tests of reference strains, which formerly have been H typed by long-term tube agglutination and by the indirect fluorescent-antibody technique, yielded exactly the same subdivision of the strains in H type a and H type b as the more laborious and time-consuming methods. O grouping and H typing of 181 isolates from clinical specimens revealed a free combination of the somatic and flagellar antigens. 25 OH serovars were found. The simple and rapid coagglutination technique can promote the serovar determination of P. aeruginosa, particularly for the purpose of hospital infection control. PMID:6430957

  15. The Trypanosome Flagellar Pocket Collar and Its Ring Forming Protein—TbBILBO1

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Doranda; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R.

    2016-01-01

    Sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei are the causal agents of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in domesticated livestock. These pathogens have developed an organelle-like compartment called the flagellar pocket (FP). The FP carries out endo- and exocytosis and is the only structure this parasite has evolved to do so. The FP is essential for parasite viability, making it an interesting structure to evaluate as a drug target, especially since it has an indispensible cytoskeleton component called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC). The FPC is located at the neck of the FP where the flagellum exits the cell. The FPC has a complex architecture and division cycle, but little is known concerning its organization. Recent work has focused on understanding how the FP and the FPC are formed and as a result of these studies an important calcium-binding, polymer-forming protein named TbBILBO1 was identified. Cellular biology analysis of TbBILBO1 has demonstrated its uniqueness as a FPC component and until recently, it was unknown what structural role it played in forming the FPC. This review summarizes the recent data on the polymer forming properties of TbBILBO1 and how these are correlated to the FP cytoskeleton. PMID:26950156

  16. The Trypanosome Flagellar Pocket Collar and Its Ring Forming Protein-TbBILBO1.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Doranda; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R

    2016-01-01

    Sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei are the causal agents of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in domesticated livestock. These pathogens have developed an organelle-like compartment called the flagellar pocket (FP). The FP carries out endo- and exocytosis and is the only structure this parasite has evolved to do so. The FP is essential for parasite viability, making it an interesting structure to evaluate as a drug target, especially since it has an indispensible cytoskeleton component called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC). The FPC is located at the neck of the FP where the flagellum exits the cell. The FPC has a complex architecture and division cycle, but little is known concerning its organization. Recent work has focused on understanding how the FP and the FPC are formed and as a result of these studies an important calcium-binding, polymer-forming protein named TbBILBO1 was identified. Cellular biology analysis of TbBILBO1 has demonstrated its uniqueness as a FPC component and until recently, it was unknown what structural role it played in forming the FPC. This review summarizes the recent data on the polymer forming properties of TbBILBO1 and how these are correlated to the FP cytoskeleton. PMID:26950156

  17. Unexpected flagellar movement patterns and epithelial binding behavior of mouse sperm in the oviduct.

    PubMed

    Chang, Haixin; Suarez, Susan S

    2012-05-01

    In order to better understand how sperm movement is regulated in the oviduct, we mated wild-type female mice with Acr-EGFP males that produce sperm with fluorescent acrosomes. The fluorescence improved our ability to detect sperm within the oviduct. Oviducts were removed shortly before or after ovulation and placed in chambers on a warm microscope stage for video recording. Hyperactivated sperm in the isthmic reservoir detached frequently from the epithelium and then reattached. Unexpectedly, most sperm found in the ampulla remained bound to epithelium throughout the observation period of several minutes. In both regions, most sperm produced deep flagellar bends in the direction opposite the hook of the sperm head. This was unexpected, because mouse sperm incubated under capacitating conditions in vitro primarily hyperactivate by producing deep flagellar bends in the same direction as the hook of the head. In vitro, sperm that are treated with thimerosal to release Ca(2+) from internal stores produce deep anti-hook bends; however, physical factors such as viscous oviduct fluid could also have influenced bending in oviductal sperm. Some sperm detached from epithelium in both the ampulla and isthmus during strong contractions of the oviduct. Blockage of oviduct contractions with nicardipine, however, did not stop sperm from forming a storage reservoir in the isthmus or prevent sperm from reaching the ampulla. These observations indicate that sperm continue to bind to oviductal epithelium after they leave the isthmic reservoir and that sperm motility is crucial in the transport of sperm to the fertilization site. PMID:22337334

  18. Flagellar localization of a novel isoform of myosin, myosin XXI, in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Katta, Santharam S; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A; Gupta, Chhitar M

    2009-04-01

    Leishmania major genome analysis revealed the presence of putative genes corresponding to two myosins, which have been designated to class IB and a novel class, class XXI, specifically present in kinetoplastids. To characterize these myosin homologs in Leishmania, we have cloned and over-expressed the full-length myosin XXI gene and variable region of myosin IB gene in bacteria, purified the corresponding proteins, and then used the affinity purified anti-sera to analyze the expression and intracellular distribution of these proteins. Whereas myosin XXI was expressed in both the promastigote and amastigote stages, no expression of myosin IB could be detected in any of the two stages of these parasites. Further, myosin XXI expression was more predominant in the promastigote stage where it was preferentially localized in the proximal region of the flagellum. The observed flagellar localization was not dependent on the myosin head region or actin but was exclusively determined by the myosin tail region, as judged by over-expressing GFP conjugates of full-length myosin XXI, its head domain and its tail domain separately in Leishmania. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and immuno-gold electron microscopy analyses revealed that this protein was partly associated with paraflagellar rod proteins but not with tubulins in the flagellar axoneme. Our results, for the first time, report the expression and detailed analysis of cellular localization of a novel class of myosin, myosin XXI in trypanosomatids. PMID:19121339

  19. Metachronal waves in the flagellar beating of Volvox and their hydrodynamic origin.

    PubMed

    Brumley, Douglas R; Polin, Marco; Pedley, Timothy J; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2015-07-01

    Groups of eukaryotic cilia and flagella are capable of coordinating their beating over large scales, routinely exhibiting collective dynamics in the form of metachronal waves. The origin of this behavior--possibly influenced by both mechanical interactions and direct biological regulation--is poorly understood, in large part due to a lack of quantitative experimental studies. Here we characterize in detail flagellar coordination on the surface of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri, an emerging model organism for flagellar dynamics. Our studies reveal for the first time that the average metachronal coordination observed is punctuated by periodic phase defects during which synchrony is partial and limited to specific groups of cells. A minimal model of hydrodynamically coupled oscillators can reproduce semi-quantitatively the characteristics of the average metachronal dynamics, and the emergence of defects. We systematically study the model's behaviour by assessing the effect of changing intrinsic rotor characteristics, including oscillator stiffness and the nature of their internal driving force, as well as their geometric properties and spatial arrangement. Our results suggest that metachronal coordination follows from deformations in the oscillators' limit cycles induced by hydrodynamic stresses, and that defects result from sufficiently steep local biases in the oscillators' intrinsic frequencies. Additionally, we find that random variations in the intrinsic rotor frequencies increase the robustness of the average properties of the emergent metachronal waves. PMID:26040592

  20. Defects in the Flagellar Motor Increase Synthesis of Poly-γ-Glutamate in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jia Mun; Guttenplan, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis swims in liquid media and swarms over solid surfaces, and it encodes two sets of flagellar stator homologs. Here, we show that B. subtilis requires only the MotA/MotB stator during swarming motility and that the residues required for stator force generation are highly conserved from the Proteobacteria to the Firmicutes. We further find that mutants that abolish stator function also result in an overproduction of the extracellular polymer poly-γ-glutamate (PGA) to confer a mucoid colony phenotype. PGA overproduction appeared to be the result of an increase in the expression of the pgs operon that encodes genes for PGA synthesis. Transposon mutagenesis was conducted to identify insertions that abolished colony mucoidy and disruptions in known transcriptional regulators of PGA synthesis (Com and Deg two-component systems) as well as mutants defective in transcription-coupled DNA repair (Mfd)-reduced expression of the pgs operon. A final class of insertions disrupted proteins involved in the assembly of the flagellar filament (FliD, FliT, and FlgL), and these mutants did not reduce expression of the pgs operon, suggesting a second mechanism of PGA control. PMID:24296669

  1. Characterization of non-Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 strains isolated from dogs.

    PubMed

    Bentancor, A; Vilte, D A; Rumi, M V; Carbonari, C C; Chinen, I; Larzábal, M; Cataldi, A; Mercado, E C

    2010-01-01

    Shiga toxin-negative Escherichia coli O157 strains of various H types have been associated with diarrhea in children and are considered potentially pathogenic for humans. In this study, we describe non-Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157 E. coli strains previously obtained from dogs in Argentina. Different E. coli phylogenetic lineages corresponding to flagellar types H16, H29 and H45 were identified. E. coli serotypes O157:H16 and O157:H45 contained intimin subtypes epsilon and alpha 1, respectively. Serotype O157:H45 carried the bfp gene encoding the bundle-forming pilus. Localized adherence-like patterns to HEp-2 cells were observed in O157:H16 strains, while O157:H45 adhered in a typical localized pattern. A total of eight different XbaI-pulse field electrophoresis patterns with more than 74 % similarity were identified among the nine E. coli O157:H16 strains. Our data emphasized the fact that dogs may harbor human pathogenic E. coli O157 which do not correspond to Shiga toxin-producing strains and whose potential human health hazard should not be underestimated. PMID:20461294

  2. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identifies orthologs of ciliary disease genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2005-01-01

    The important role that cilia and flagella play in human disease creates an urgent need to identify genes involved in ciliary assembly and function. The strong and specific induction of flagellar-coding genes during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suggests that transcriptional profiling of such cells would reveal new flagella-related genes. We have conducted a genome-wide analysis of RNA transcript levels during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas by using maskless photolithography method-produced DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with unique probe sequences for all exons of the 19,803 predicted genes. This analysis represents previously uncharacterized whole-genome transcriptional activity profiling study in this important model organism. Analysis of strongly induced genes reveals a large set of known flagellar components and also identifies a number of important disease-related proteins as being involved with cilia and flagella, including the zebrafish polycystic kidney genes Qilin, Reptin, and Pontin, as well as the testis-expressed tubby-like protein TULP2.

  3. Chemoreceptors and Flagellar Motors Are Subterminally Located in Close Proximity at the Two Cell Poles in Spirochetes ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongbin; Raddi, Gianmarco; Liu, Jun; Charon, Nyles W.; Li, Chunhao

    2011-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions, immunofluorescence microscopy, and cryo-electron tomography revealed that the chemoreceptors of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi form long, thin arrays near both cell poles. These arrays are in close proximity to the flagellar motors. This information provides a basis for further understanding motility, chemotaxis, and protein localization in spirochetes. PMID:21441520

  4. Expression of an early gene in the flagellar regulatory hierarchy is sensitive to an interruption in DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Dingwall, A; Zhuang, W Y; Quon, K; Shapiro, L

    1992-01-01

    Genes involved in the biogenesis of the flagellum in Caulobacter crescentus are expressed in a temporal order and are controlled by a trans-acting regulatory hierarchy. Strains with mutations in one of these genes, flaS, cannot transcribe flagellar structural genes and divide abnormally. This gene was cloned, and it was found that its transcription is initiated early in the cell cycle. Subclones that restored motility to FlaS mutants also restored normal cell division. Although transcription of flaS was not dependent on any other known gene in the flagellar hierarchy, it was autoregulated and subject to mild negative control by other genes at the same level of the hierarchy. An additional level of control was revealed when it was found that an interruption of DNA replication caused the inhibition of flaS transcription. The flaS transcript initiation site was identified, and an apparently unique promoter sequence was found to be highly conserved among the genes at the same level of the hierarchy. The flagellar genes with this conserved 5' region all initiate transcription early in the cell cycle and are all sensitive to a disruption in DNA replication. Mutations in these genes also cause an aberrant cell division phenotype. Therefore, flagellar genes at or near the top of the hierarchy may be controlled, in part, by a unique transcription factor and may be responsive to the same DNA replication cues that mediate other cell cycle events, such as cell division. Images PMID:1372311

  5. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identifies orthologs of ciliary disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Stolc, Viktor; Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2005-01-01

    The important role that cilia and flagella play in human disease creates an urgent need to identify genes involved in ciliary assembly and function. The strong and specific induction of flagellar-coding genes during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suggests that transcriptional profiling of such cells would reveal new flagella-related genes. We have conducted a genome-wide analysis of RNA transcript levels during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas by using maskless photolithography method-produced DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with unique probe sequences for all exons of the 19,803 predicted genes. This analysis represents previously uncharacterized whole-genome transcriptional activity profiling study in this important model organism. Analysis of strongly induced genes reveals a large set of known flagellar components and also identifies a number of important disease-related proteins as being involved with cilia and flagella, including the zebrafish polycystic kidney genes Qilin, Reptin, and Pontin, as well as the testis-expressed tubby-like protein TULP2. PMID:15738400

  6. Insect Stage-Specific Receptor Adenylate Cyclases Are Localized to Distinct Subdomains of the Trypanosoma brucei Flagellar Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Saada, Edwin A.; Kabututu, Z. Pius; Lopez, Miguel; Shimogawa, Michelle M.; Langousis, Gerasimos; Oberholzer, Michael; Riestra, Angelica; Jonsson, Zophonias O.; Wohlschlegel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the Trypanosoma brucei flagellum (synonymous with cilium) plays important roles in host-parasite interactions. Several studies have identified virulence factors and signaling proteins in the flagellar membrane of bloodstream-stage T. brucei, but less is known about flagellar membrane proteins in procyclic, insect-stage parasites. Here we report on the identification of several receptor-type flagellar adenylate cyclases (ACs) that are specifically upregulated in procyclic T. brucei parasites. Identification of insect stage-specific ACs is novel, as previously studied ACs were constitutively expressed or confined to bloodstream-stage parasites. We show that procyclic stage-specific ACs are glycosylated, surface-exposed proteins that dimerize and possess catalytic activity. We used gene-specific tags to examine the distribution of individual AC isoforms. All ACs examined localized to the flagellum. Notably, however, while some ACs were distributed along the length of the flagellum, others specifically localized to the flagellum tip. These are the first transmembrane domain proteins to be localized specifically at the flagellum tip in T. brucei, emphasizing that the flagellum membrane is organized into specific subdomains. Deletion analysis reveals that C-terminal sequences are critical for targeting ACs to the flagellum, and sequence comparisons suggest that differential subflagellar localization might be specified by isoform-specific C termini. Our combined results suggest insect stage-specific roles for a subset of flagellar adenylate cyclases and support a microdomain model for flagellar cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling in T. brucei. In this model, cAMP production is compartmentalized through differential localization of individual ACs, thereby allowing diverse cellular responses to be controlled by a common signaling molecule. PMID:24879126

  7. Oxygenated monoterpenes citral and carvacrol cause oxidative damage in Escherichia coli without the involvement of tricarboxylic acid cycle and Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Chueca, Beatriz; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2014-10-17

    Oxygenated monoterpenes citral and carvacrol are common constituents of many essential oils (EOs) that have been extensively studied as antimicrobial agents but whose mechanisms of microbial inactivation have not been totally elucidated. A recent study described a mechanism of Escherichia coli death for (+)-limonene, a hydrocarbon monoterpene also frequently present in EOs, similar to the common mechanism proposed for bactericidal antibiotics. This mechanism involves the formation of Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical, a reactive oxygen species (ROS), via tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which would ultimately inactivate cells. Our objective was to determine whether E. coli MG1655 inactivation by citral and carvacrol follows a similar mechanism of cell death. Challenging experiments with 300μL/L citral and 100μL/L carvacrol inactivated at least 2.5log10cycles of exponentially growing cells in 3h under aerobic conditions. The presence of thiourea (an ROS scavenger) reduced cell inactivation in 2log10cycles, demonstrating the role of ROS in cell death. Decreased resistance of a ΔrecA mutant (deficient in an enzyme involved in SOS response to DNA damage) indicated that citral and carvacrol caused oxidative damage to DNA. Although the mechanism of E. coli inactivation by carvacrol and citral was similarly mediated by ROS, their formation did not follow the same pathways described for (+)-limonene and bactericidal drugs because neither Fenton reaction nor NADH production via the TCA cycle was involved in cell death. Moreover, further experiments demonstrated antimicrobial activity of citral and carvacrol in anaerobic environments without the involvement of ROS. As a consequence, cell death by carvacrol and citral in anaerobiosis follows a different mechanism than that observed under aerobic conditions. These results demonstrated a different mechanism of inactivation by citral and carvacrol with regard to (+)-limonene and bactericidal antibiotics, indicating the

  8. E. coli enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Traveler's diarrhea - E. coli ; Food poisoning - E. coli ; E. coli diarrhea; Hamburger disease ... infected. The most common symptom is sudden, severe diarrhea that is often bloody. Other symptoms may include: ...

  9. Heterogeneity of a Campylobacter jejuni Protein That Is Secreted through the Flagellar Filament▿

    PubMed Central

    Poly, Frédéric; Ewing, Cheryl; Goon, Scarlett; Hickey, Thomas E.; Rockabrand, David; Majam, Gary; Lee, Lanfong; Phan, Julie; Savarino, Nicholas J.; Guerry, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Cj0859c, or FspA, is a small, acidic protein of Campylobacter jejuni that is expressed by a σ28 promoter. Analysis of the fspA gene in 41 isolates of C. jejuni revealed two overall variants of the predicted protein, FspA1 and FspA2. Secretion of FspA occurs in broth-grown bacteria and requires a minimum flagellar structure. The addition of recombinant FspA2, but not FspA1, to INT407 cells in vitro resulted in a rapid induction of apoptosis. These data define a novel C. jejuni virulence factor, and the observed heterogeneity among fspA alleles suggests alternate virulence potential among different strains. PMID:17517862

  10. Human cord blood contains an IGM antibody to the 41KD flagellar antigen of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Cooke, W D; Orr, A S; Wiseman, B L; Rouse, S B; Murray, W C; Ranck, S G

    1993-10-01

    Natural antibodies are the IgM products of fetal and neonatal B cells. These are germline encoded low affinity antibodies with multiple specificities to self and exogenous antigens. Lyme borreliosis is the disease resulting from infection with the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. The humoral response to this organism is brisk, directed at multiple proteins, and persistent. Antibody to the 41kd flagellar antigen is found early in disease, but may also be found in non-exposed individuals. These properties suggest that the anti-41kd antibody may be a natural antibody. We report here the finding of an IgM anti-41kd reactivity in 29% of cord blood samples from patients in an area non-endemic for Lyme disease. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that antibody to flagellin may be a germline encoded natural antibody, and could be important in the immunopathogenesis of Lyme arthritis and other arthritides. PMID:8211003

  11. Evolution. Evolutionary resurrection of flagellar motility via rewiring of the nitrogen regulation system.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Tiffany B; Mulley, Geraldine; Dills, Alexander H; Alsohim, Abdullah S; McGuffin, Liam J; Studholme, David J; Silby, Mark W; Brockhurst, Michael A; Johnson, Louise J; Jackson, Robert W

    2015-02-27

    A central process in evolution is the recruitment of genes to regulatory networks. We engineered immotile strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens that lack flagella due to deletion of the regulatory gene fleQ. Under strong selection for motility, these bacteria consistently regained flagella within 96 hours via a two-step evolutionary pathway. Step 1 mutations increase intracellular levels of phosphorylated NtrC, a distant homolog of FleQ, which begins to commandeer control of the fleQ regulon at the cost of disrupting nitrogen uptake and assimilation. Step 2 is a switch-of-function mutation that redirects NtrC away from nitrogen uptake and toward its novel function as a flagellar regulator. Our results demonstrate that natural selection can rapidly rewire regulatory networks in very few, repeatable mutational steps. PMID:25722415

  12. Viscous Dynamics of Lyme Disease and Syphilis Spirochetes Reveal Flagellar Torque and Drag

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Michael; Vig, Dhruv K.; Radolf, Justin D.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    The spirochetes that cause Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi) and syphilis (Treponema pallidum) swim through viscous fluids, such as blood and interstitial fluid, by undulating their bodies as traveling, planar waves. These undulations are driven by rotation of the flagella within the periplasmic space, the narrow (∼20–40 nm in width) compartment between the inner and outer membranes. We show here that the swimming speeds of B. burgdorferi and T. pallidum decrease with increases in viscosity of the external aqueous milieu, even though the flagella are entirely intracellular. We then use mathematical modeling to show that the measured changes in speed are consistent with the exertion of constant torque by the spirochetal flagellar motors. Comparison of simulations, experiments, and a simple model for power dissipation allows us to estimate the torque and resistive drag that act on the flagella of these major spirochetal pathogens. PMID:24268139

  13. A common assembly module in injectisome and flagellar type III secretion sorting platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notti, Ryan Q.; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Lilic, Mirjana; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2015-05-01

    Translocating proteins across the double membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, type III secretion systems (T3SS) occur in two evolutionarily related forms: injectisomes, delivering virulence factors into host cells, and the flagellar system, secreting the polymeric filament used for motility. While both systems share related elements of a cytoplasmic sorting platform that facilitates the hierarchical secretion of protein substrates, its assembly and regulation remain unclear. Here we describe a module mediating the assembly of the sorting platform in both secretion systems, and elucidate the structural basis for segregation of homologous components among these divergent T3SS subtypes sharing a common cytoplasmic milieu. These results provide a foundation for the subtype-specific assembly of T3SS sorting platforms and will support further mechanistic analysis and anti-virulence drug design.

  14. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming Behavior of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, Paulo; Yang, Jing; Gollub, Jerry

    2013-11-01

    The motility behavior of microorganisms can be significantly affected by the rheology of their fluidic environment. In this talk, we experimentally investigate the effects of fluid elasticity on both the flagella kinematics and swimming dynamics of the microscopic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We find that the flagellar beating frequency and wave speed are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Interestingly, the swimming speeds during the alga power and recovery strokes are enhanced by fluid elasticity for De>1. Despite such enhancements, however, the alga net forward speed is hindered by fluid elasticity by as much as 30% compared to Newtonian fluids of similar shear viscosities. The motility enhancements could be explained by the mechanism of stress accumulation in the viscoelastic fluid. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation - DMR-1104705.

  15. Anatomical and Molecular Design of the Drosophila Antenna as a Flagellar Auditory Organ

    PubMed Central

    TODI, SOKOL V.; SHARMA, YASHODA; EBERL, DANIEL F.

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis of hearing is less well understood than many other senses. However, recent studies in Drosophila have provided some important steps towards a molecular understanding of hearing. In this report, we summarize these findings and their implications on the relationship between hearing and touch. In Drosophila, hearing is accomplished by Johnston’s Organ, a chordotonal organ containing over 150 scolopidia within the second antennal segment. We will discuss anatomical features of the antenna and how they contribute to the function of this flagellar auditory receptor. The effects of several mutants, identified through mutagenesis screens or as homologues of vertebrate auditory genes, will be summarized. Based on evidence gathered from these studies, we propose a speculative model for how the chordotonal organ might function. PMID:15252880

  16. Flagellar hydrodynamics. A comparison between resistive-force theory and slender-body theory.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R E; Brokaw, C J

    1979-01-01

    This paper investigates the accuracy of the resistive-force theory (Gray and Hancock method) which is commonly used for hydrodynamic analysis of swimming flagella. We made a comparison between the forces, bending moments, and shear moments calculated by resistive-force theory and by the more accurate slender-body theory for large-amplitude, planar wave forms computed for a flagellar model. By making an upward empirical adjustment, by about 35%, of the classical drag coefficient values used in the resistive-force theory calculations, we obtained good agreement between the distributions of the forces and moments along the length of the flagellum predicted by the two methods when the flagellum has no cell body attached. After this adjustment, we found the rate of energy expenditure calculated by the two methods for the few typical test cases to be almost identical. The resistive-force theory is thus completely satisfactory for use in analysis of mechanisms for the control of flagellar bending, at the current level of sophistication of this analysis. We also examined the effects of the presence of a cell body attached to one end of the flagellum, which modifies the flow field experienced by the flagellum. This interaction, which is not considered in resistive-force theory, is probably insignificant for small cell bodies, such as the heads of simple spermatozoa, but for larger cell bodies, or cell bodies that have large-amplitude motions transverse to the swimming direction, use of slender-body theory is required for accurate analysis. PMID:262381

  17. Flagellar membrane fusion and protein exchange in trypanosomes; a new form of cell-cell communication?

    PubMed Central

    Imhof, Simon; Fragoso, Cristina; Hemphill, Andrew; von Schubert, Conrad; Li, Dong; Legant, Wesley; Betzig, Eric; Roditi, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Diverse structures facilitate direct exchange of proteins between cells, including plasmadesmata in plants and tunnelling nanotubes in bacteria and higher eukaryotes.  Here we describe a new mechanism of protein transfer, flagellar membrane fusion, in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. When fluorescently tagged trypanosomes were co-cultured, a small proportion of double-positive cells were observed. The formation of double-positive cells was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was enhanced by placing cells in medium supplemented with fresh bovine serum. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that double-positive cells arose by bidirectional protein exchange in the absence of nuclear transfer.  Furthermore, super-resolution microscopy showed that this process occurred in ≤1 minute, the limit of temporal resolution in these experiments. Both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins could be transferred provided they gained access to the flagellum. Intriguingly, a component of the RNAi machinery (Argonaute) was able to move between cells, raising the possibility that small interfering RNAs are transported as cargo. Transmission electron microscopy showed that shared flagella contained two axonemes and two paraflagellar rods bounded by a single membrane. In some cases flagellar fusion was partial and interactions between cells were transient. In other cases fusion occurred along the entire length of the flagellum, was stable for several hours and might be irreversible. Fusion did not appear to be deleterious for cell function: paired cells were motile and could give rise to progeny while fused. The motile flagella of unicellular organisms are related to the sensory cilia of higher eukaryotes, raising the possibility that protein transfer between cells via cilia or flagella occurs more widely in nature. PMID:27239276

  18. A Single-Domain FlgJ Contributes to Flagellar Hook and Filament Formation in the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Tong, Brian A.; Liu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    FlgJ plays a very important role in flagellar assembly. In the enteric bacteria, flgJ null mutants fail to produce the flagellar rods, hooks, and filaments but still assemble the integral membrane-supramembrane (MS) rings. These mutants are nonmotile. The FlgJ proteins consist of two functional domains. The N-terminal rod-capping domain acts as a scaffold for rod assembly, and the C-terminal domain acts as a peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolase (PGase), which allows the elongating flagellar rod to penetrate through the PG layer. However, the FlgJ homologs in several bacterial phyla (including spirochetes) often lack the PGase domain. The function of these single-domain FlgJ proteins remains elusive. Herein, a single-domain FlgJ homolog (FlgJBb) was studied in the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Cryo-electron tomography analysis revealed that the flgJBb mutant still assembled intact flagellar basal bodies but had fewer and disoriented flagellar hooks and filaments. Consistently, Western blots showed that the levels of flagellar hook (FlgE) and filament (FlaB) proteins were substantially decreased in the flgJBb mutant. Further studies disclosed that the decreases of FlgE and FlaB in the mutant occurred at the posttranscriptional level. Microscopic observation and swarm plate assay showed that the motility of the flgJBb mutant was partially deficient. The altered phenotypes were completely restored when the mutant was complemented. Collectively, these results indicate that FlgJBb is involved in the assembly of the flagellar hook and filament but not the flagellar rod in B. burgdorferi. The observed phenotype is different from that of flgJ mutants in the enteric bacteria. PMID:22155773

  19. CRIS—A Novel cAMP-Binding Protein Controlling Spermiogenesis and the Development of Flagellar Bending

    PubMed Central

    Krähling, Anke Miriam; Alvarez, Luis; Debowski, Katharina; Van, Qui; Gunkel, Monika; Irsen, Stephan; Al-Amoudi, Ashraf; Strünker, Timo; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Krause, Eberhard; Voigt, Ingo; Wörtge, Simone; Waisman, Ari; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Kaupp, Ulrich Benjamin; Wachten, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    The second messengers cAMP and cGMP activate their target proteins by binding to a conserved cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). Here, we identify and characterize an entirely novel CNBD-containing protein called CRIS (cyclic nucleotide receptor involved in sperm function) that is unrelated to any of the other members of this protein family. CRIS is exclusively expressed in sperm precursor cells. Cris-deficient male mice are either infertile due to a lack of sperm resulting from spermatogenic arrest, or subfertile due to impaired sperm motility. The motility defect is caused by altered Ca2+ regulation of flagellar beat asymmetry, leading to a beating pattern that is reminiscent of sperm hyperactivation. Our results suggest that CRIS interacts during spermiogenesis with Ca2+-regulated proteins that—in mature sperm—are involved in flagellar bending. PMID:24339785

  20. Cell cycle-controlled proteolysis of a flagellar motor protein that is asymmetrically distributed in the Caulobacter predivisional cell.

    PubMed Central

    Jenal, U; Shapiro, L

    1996-01-01

    Flagellar biogenesis and release are developmental events tightly coupled to the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. A single flagellum is assembled at the swarmer pole of the predivisional cell and is released later in the cell cycle. Here we show that the MS-ring monomer FliF, a central motor component that anchors the flagellum in the cell membrane, is synthesized only in the predivisional cell and is integrated into the membrane at the incipient swarmer cell pole, where it initiates flagellar assembly. FliF is proteolytically turned over during swarmer-to-stalked cell differentiation, coinciding with the loss of the flagellum, suggesting that its degradation is coupled to flagellar release. The membrane topology of FliF was determined and a region of the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain was shown to be required for the interaction with a component of the motor switch. The very C-terminal end of FliF contains a turnover determinant, required for the cell cycle-dependent degradation of the MS-ring. The cell cycle-dependent proteolysis of FliF and the targeting of FliF to the swarmer pole together contribute to the asymmetric localization of the MS-ring in the predivisional cell. Images PMID:8665847

  1. Deduction of upstream sequences of Xanthomonas campestris flagellar genes responding to transcription activation by FleQ

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, R.-M.; Yang, T.-C.; Yang, S.-H.; Tseng, Y.-H. . E-mail: yhtseng@chtai.ctc.edu.tw

    2005-10-07

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), a close relative to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is the pathogen causing black rot in cruciferous plants. In P. aeruginosa, FleQ serves as a cognate activator of {sigma}{sup 54} in transcription from several {sigma}{sup 54}-dependent promoters of flagellar genes. These P. aeruginosa promoters have been analyzed for FleQ-binding sequences; however, no consensus was deduced. Xcc, although lacks fleSR, has a fleQ homologue residing among over 40 contiguously clustered flagellar genes. A fleQ mutant, Xc17fleQ, constructed by insertional mutation is deficient in FleQ protein, non-flagellated, and immobile. Transcriptional fusion assays on six putative {sigma}{sup 54}-dependent promoters of the flagellar genes, fliE, fliQ, fliL, flgG, flgB, and flhF, indicated that each of them is also FleQ dependent. Each of these promoters has a sequence with weak consensus to 5'-gaaacCCgccgCcgctTt-3', immediately upstream of the predicted {sigma}{sup 54}-binding site, with an imperfect inverted repeat containing a GC-rich center flanked by several A and T at 5'- and 3'-ends, respectively. Replacing this region in fliE promoter with a HindIII recognition sequence abolished the transcription, indicating that this region responds to transcription activation by FleQ.

  2. Molecular Characterization of fliD Gene Encoding Flagellar Cap and Its Expression among Clostridium difficile Isolates from Different Serogroups

    PubMed Central

    Tasteyre, Albert; Karjalainen, Tuomo; Avesani, Véronique; Delmée, Michel; Collignon, Anne; Bourlioux, Pierre; Barc, Marie-Claude

    2001-01-01

    The fliD gene encoding the flagellar cap protein (FliD) of Clostridium difficile was studied in 46 isolates belonging to serogroups A, B, C, D, F, G, H, I, K, X, and S3, including 30 flagellated strains and 16 nonflagellated strains. In all but three isolates, amplification by PCR and reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the fliD gene is present and transcribed in both flagellated and nonflagellated strains. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of amplified fliD gene products revealed interstrain homogeneity, with one of two major patterns (a and b) found in all but one of the strains, which had pattern c. A polyclonal monospecific antiserum raised to the recombinant FliD protein reacted in immunoblots with crude flagellar preparations from 28 of 30 flagellated strains but did not recognize FliD from nonflagellated strains. The fliD genes from five strains representative of the three different RFLP groups were sequenced, and sequencing revealed 100% identity between the strains with the same pattern and 88% identity among strains with different patterns. Our results show that even though FliD is a structure exposed to the outer environment, the flagellar cap protein is very well conserved, and this high degree of conservation suggests that it has a very specific function in attachment to cell or mucus receptors. PMID:11230454

  3. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nataro, James P.; Kaper, James B.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the predominant nonpathogenic facultative flora of the human intestine. Some E. coli strains, however, have developed the ability to cause disease of the gastrointestinal, urinary, or central nervous system in even the most robust human hosts. Diarrheagenic strains of E. coli can be divided into at least six different categories with corresponding distinct pathogenic schemes. Taken together, these organisms probably represent the most common cause of pediatric diarrhea worldwide. Several distinct clinical syndromes accompany infection with diarrheagenic E. coli categories, including traveler’s diarrhea (enterotoxigenic E. coli), hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (enterohemorrhagic E. coli), persistent diarrhea (enteroaggregative E. coli), and watery diarrhea of infants (enteropathogenic E. coli). This review discusses the current level of understanding of the pathogenesis of the diarrheagenic E. coli strains and describes how their pathogenic schemes underlie the clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and epidemiologic investigation of these important pathogens. PMID:9457432

  4. Bacterial flagellar motility on hydrated rough surfaces controlled by aqueous film thickness and connectedness.

    PubMed

    Tecon, Robin; Or, Dani

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that rates of bacterial dispersion in soils are controlled by hydration conditions that define size and connectivity of the retained aqueous phase. Despite the ecological implications of such constraints, microscale observations of this phenomenon remain scarce. Here, we quantified aqueous film characteristics and bacterial flagellated motility in response to systematic variations in microhydrological conditions on porous ceramic surfaces that mimic unsaturated soils. We directly measured aqueous film thickness and documented its microscale heterogeneity. Flagellar motility was controlled by surface hydration conditions, as cell velocity decreased and dispersion practically ceased at water potentials exceeding -2 kPa (resulting in thinner and disconnected liquid films). The fragmentation of aquatic habitats was delineated indirectly through bacterial dispersal distances within connected aqueous clusters. We documented bacterial dispersal radii ranging from 100 to 10 μm as the water potential varied from 0 to -7 kPa, respectively. The observed decrease of flagellated velocity and dispersal ranges at lower matric potentials were in good agreement with mechanistic model predictions. Hydration-restricted habitats thus play significant role in bacterial motility and dispersal, which has potentially important impact on soil microbial ecology and diversity. PMID:26757676

  5. Stochastic and Deterministic Flagellar Dynamics Provide a Mechanism for Eukaryotic Swimming Reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond

    2009-03-01

    The biflagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a good model organism to study the origin of flagellar synchronization. Here we employ high-speed imaging to study the beating of the two flagella of Chlamydomonas, and show that a single cell can alternate between two distinct dynamical regimes: asynchronous and synchronous. The asynchronous state is characterized by a large interflagellar frequency difference. In the synchronous state, the flagella beat in phase for lengthy periods, interrupted episodically by an extra beat of either flagellum. The statistics of these events are consistent with a model of hydrodynamically coupled noisy oscillators. Previous observations have suggested that the two flagella have well separated intrinsic beat frequencies, and are synchronized by their mutual coupling. Our analysis shows instead that the synchronized state is incompatible with coupling-induced synchronization of flagella with those intrinsic frequencies. This suggests that the beat frequencies themselves are under the control of the cell. Moreover, high-resolution three-dimensional tracking of swimming cells provides strong evidence that these dynamical states are related to non-phototactic reorientation events in the trajectories, yielding a eukaryotic equivalent of the ``run and tumble'' motion of peritrichously flagellated bacteria.

  6. Independent Control of the Static and Dynamic Components of the Chlamydomonas Flagellar Beat.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Veikko F; Sartori, Pablo; Friedrich, Benjamin M; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-04-25

    When the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii swims, it uses the breaststroke beat of its two flagella to pull itself forward [1]. The flagellar waveform can be decomposed into a static component, corresponding to an asymmetric time-averaged shape, and a dynamic component, corresponding to the time-varying wave [2]. Extreme lightening conditions photoshock the cell, converting the breaststroke beat into a symmetric sperm-like beat, which causes a reversal of the direction of swimming [3]. Waveform conversion is achieved by a reduction in magnitude of the static component, whereas the dynamic component remains unchanged [2]. The coupling between static and dynamic components, however, is poorly understood, and it is not known whether the static component requires the dynamic component or whether it can exist independently. We used isolated and reactivated axonemes [4] to investigate the relation between the two beat components. We discovered that, when reactivated in the presence of low ATP concentrations, axonemes displayed the static beat component in absence of the dynamic component. Furthermore, we found that the amplitudes of the two components depend on ATP in qualitatively different ways. These results show that the decomposition into static and dynamic components is not just a mathematical concept but that the two components can independently control different aspects of cell motility: the static component controls swimming direction, whereas the dynamic component provides propulsion. PMID:27040779

  7. Energy transduction in the bacterial flagellar motor. Effects of load and pH.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, S; Dapice, M; Humayun, I

    1990-01-01

    The effect of load and pH on the relation between proton potential and flagellar rotation has been studied in cells of a smooth-swimming Streptococcus strain. The driving potential, speeds of free-swimming bacteria, and rotation rates of bacteria tethered to glass by a single flagellum were measured. The relation between rotation rate of tethered bacteria and potential was remarkably linear up to nearly -200 mV. The relation between swimming speed and potential exhibited both saturation and threshold, as previously observed in other species. The form of these relations depended on pH. The equivalence of the electrical and chemical potential components of the proton potential in enabling swimming depended on the voltage. Our observations may be most simply accommodated by a kinetic scheme that links transmembrane proton transits to a tightly coupled work cycle. The properties of this scheme were elucidated by computer simulations of the experimental plots. These simulations indicated that the protonable groups that participate in the rate limiting reactions have a fractional electrical distance between three-fourths to all of the way toward the cytoplasm with a corresponding mean proton binding affinity of 10(-7.3)-10(-7.0) M, respectively. PMID:2160845

  8. Microtubule-severing proteins are involved in flagellar length control and mitosis in Trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Magali; Crobu, Lucien; Blaineau, Christine; Bourgeois, Nathalie; Bastien, Patrick; Pagès, Michel

    2009-03-01

    Microtubules are key players in the biology of Trypanosomatid parasites, not only as classical components of the mitotic spindle, microtubule-organizing centres and flagellum but also as the essential constituent of the cytoskeleton. Their length dynamics are regulated by, among others, microtubule-severing proteins. Four and six genes encoding microtubule-severing proteins can be found bioinformatically in the Leishmania major and Trypanosoma brucei genome respectively. We investigated all these proteins in these organisms, which include the katanin, katanin-like, spastin and fidgetin, and looked at their subcellular localization as well as their putative function by examining 'loss-of-function' phenotypes. The katanin-like KAT60b was found implicated in flagellar length reduction, but not in its size increase, while the katanin p80 subunit appeared clearly involved in cytokinesis. Fidgetin and spastin homologues were both localized in the nucleus: the first as a discrete and variable number of dots during most of the cell cycle, redistributing to the spindle and midbody during mitosis; the second concentrated as < or = 5 perinucleolar punctuations, similar to the electron-dense plaques identified in T. brucei, which were assimilated to kinetochores. This first study of microtubule-severing proteins in 'divergent' eukaryotes gives further insight into the multiple functions of these proteins identified in the hitherto studied models. PMID:19183280

  9. Mechanics of the eukaryotic flagellar axoneme: Evidence for structural distortion during bending.

    PubMed

    Lesich, Kathleen A; dePinho, Tania G; Pelle, Dominic W; Lindemann, Charles B

    2016-05-01

    The sliding doublet mechanism is the established explanation that allows us to understand the process of ciliary and flagellar bending. In this study, we apply the principles of the sliding doublet mechanism to analyze the mechanics of the counterbend phenomenon in sea urchin sperm flagella. When a passive, vanadate-treated, flagellum is forced into a bend with a glass microprobe, the portion of the flagellum distal to the probe exhibits a bend of opposite curvature (counterbend) to the imposed bend. This phenomenon was shown to be caused by the induction of inter-doublet shear and is dependent on the presence of an inter-doublet shear resistance. Here we report that in sea urchin flagella there is systematically less shear induced in the distal flagellum than is predicted by the sliding doublet mechanism, if we follow the assumption that the diameter of the flagellum is uniform. To account for the reduced shear that is observed, the likeliest and most direct interpretation is that the portion of the axoneme that is forced to bend undergoes substantial compression of the axoneme in the bending plane. A compression of 30-50 nm would be sufficient to account for the shear reduction from a bend of 2 radians. A compression of this magnitude would require considerable flexibility in the axoneme structure. This would necessitate that the radial spokes and/or the central pair apparatus are easily compressed by transverse stress. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27001352

  10. Bacterial flagellar motility on hydrated rough surfaces controlled by aqueous film thickness and connectedness

    PubMed Central

    Tecon, Robin; Or, Dani

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that rates of bacterial dispersion in soils are controlled by hydration conditions that define size and connectivity of the retained aqueous phase. Despite the ecological implications of such constraints, microscale observations of this phenomenon remain scarce. Here, we quantified aqueous film characteristics and bacterial flagellated motility in response to systematic variations in microhydrological conditions on porous ceramic surfaces that mimic unsaturated soils. We directly measured aqueous film thickness and documented its microscale heterogeneity. Flagellar motility was controlled by surface hydration conditions, as cell velocity decreased and dispersion practically ceased at water potentials exceeding –2 kPa (resulting in thinner and disconnected liquid films). The fragmentation of aquatic habitats was delineated indirectly through bacterial dispersal distances within connected aqueous clusters. We documented bacterial dispersal radii ranging from 100 to 10 μm as the water potential varied from 0 to –7 kPa, respectively. The observed decrease of flagellated velocity and dispersal ranges at lower matric potentials were in good agreement with mechanistic model predictions. Hydration-restricted habitats thus play significant role in bacterial motility and dispersal, which has potentially important impact on soil microbial ecology and diversity. PMID:26757676

  11. Maf-dependent bacterial flagellin glycosylation occurs before chaperone binding and flagellar T3SS export

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jennifer L; Lowry, Rebecca C; Couto, Narciso A S; Wright, Phillip C; Stafford, Graham P; Shaw, Jonathan G

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial swimming is mediated by rotation of a filament that is assembled via polymerization of flagellin monomers after secretion via a dedicated flagellar Type III secretion system. Several bacteria decorate their flagellin with sialic acid related sugars that is essential for motility. Aeromonas caviae is a model organism for this process as it contains a genetically simple glycosylation system and decorates its flagellin with pseudaminic acid (Pse). The link between flagellin glycosylation and export has yet to be fully determined. We examined the role of glycosylation in the export and assembly process in a strain lacking Maf1, a protein involved in the transfer of Pse onto flagellin at the later stages of the glycosylation pathway. Immunoblotting, established that glycosylation is not required for flagellin export but is essential for filament assembly since non-glycosylated flagellin is still secreted. Maf1 interacts directly with its flagellin substrate in vivo, even in the absence of pseudaminic acid. Flagellin glycosylation in a flagellin chaperone mutant (flaJ) indicated that glycosylation occurs in the cytoplasm before chaperone binding and protein secretion. Preferential chaperone binding to glycosylated flagellin revealed its crucial role, indicating that this system has evolved to favour secretion of the polymerization competent glycosylated form. PMID:24527847

  12. An energy transduction mechanism used in bacterial flagellar type III protein export

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Hara, Noritaka; Namba, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Flagellar proteins of bacteria are exported by a specific export apparatus. FliI ATPase forms a complex with FliH and FliJ and escorts export substrates from the cytoplasm to the export gate complex, which is made up of six membrane proteins. The export gate complex utilizes proton motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane for protein translocation, but the mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that the export gate complex by itself is a proton–protein antiporter that uses the two components of proton motive force, Δψ and ΔpH, for different steps of the protein export process. However, in the presence of FliH, FliI and FliJ, a specific binding of FliJ with an export gate membrane protein, FlhA, is brought about by the FliH–FliI complex, which turns the export gate into a highly efficient, Δψ-driven protein export apparatus. PMID:21934659

  13. Regulation and biological function of a flagellar glucose transporter in Leishmania mexicana: a potential glucose sensor.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Contreras, Dayana; Aslan, Hamide; Feng, Xiuhong; Tran, Khoa; Yates, Phillip A; Kamhawi, Shaden; Landfear, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    In Leishmania mexicana parasites, a unique glucose transporter, LmxGT1, is selectively targeted to the flagellar membrane, suggesting a possible sensory role that is often associated with ciliary membrane proteins. Expression of LmxGT1 is down-regulated ∼20-fold by increasing cell density but is up-regulated ∼50-fold by depleting glucose from the medium, and the permease is strongly down-regulated when flagellated insect-stage promastigotes invade mammalian macrophages and transform into intracellular amastigotes. Regulation of LmxGT1 expression by glucose and during the lifecycle operates at the level of protein stability. Significantly, a ∆lmxgt1 null mutant, grown in abundant glucose, undergoes catastrophic loss of viability when parasites deplete glucose from the medium, a property not exhibited by wild-type or add-back lines. These results suggest that LmxGT1 may function as a glucose sensor that allows parasites to enter the stationary phase when they deplete glucose and that in the absence of this sensor, parasites do not maintain viability when they run out of glucose. However, alternate roles for LmxGT1 in monitoring glucose availability are considered. The absence of known sensory receptors with defined ligands and biologic functions in Leishmania and related kinetoplastid parasites underscores the potential significance of these observations. PMID:25300620

  14. Quantitative ultrastructural analysis of sperm tails reveals flagellar defects associated with persistent asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Wilton, L J; Temple-Smith, P D; de Kretser, D M

    1992-04-01

    Sperm tail morphology was examined in 10 infertile asthenozoospermic men to determine whether poor sperm motility was caused by ultrastructural defects of the flagellum. In this quantitative analysis, the numbers of outer doublet and central pair microtubules, outer and inner dynein arms and radial spokes were counted in transverse sections of 75 axonemes from each patient and compared with similar data previously collected from 10 men with normal semen characteristics. Four patients had axonemal defects: two had severe microtubule abnormalities and two had more subtle but statistically significant deficiencies of dynein arms. These abnormalities would not have been detected by more commonly used qualitative examination. Three patients had no detectable ultrastructural abnormalities of the sperm tail, possibly indicating a metabolic deficiency. A further three patients had mid-piece abnormalities. Two had few, if any, flagellar mitochondria and the third patient had irregular and disorganized mitochondria. Quantitative ultrastructural analysis has revealed axonemal abnormalities in seven of 10 patients with previously unexplained asthenozoospermia. PMID:1522195

  15. Flagellar antigen based CI-ELISA for sero-surveillance of surra.

    PubMed

    Ligi, M; Sengupta, P P; Rudramurthy, G R; Rahman, H

    2016-03-30

    Trypanosoma evansi causes a disease known as 'surra' in wide range of domesticated and wild animals including cattle, buffaloes, horses, camels etc. The disease is transmitted through the bites of haematophagous tabanid flies and is characterized by undulating fever, chronic progressive weakness, and hypoglycemia leading to low productivity in animals. In the present study, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been produced (IgG3 sub-type) against purified flagellar (FLA) protein of T. evansi and its immunoreactivity was evaluated by serological tests. MAb and purified protein were then exploited in the development of CI-ELISA and the diagnostic potentiality of the new ELISA test has been evaluated using 1230 sera samples from field animals including cattle, buffaloes, camels, horses and donkeys. The statistical analysis of the data showed optimum combination of sensitivity and specificity at 95.8 and 94.4, respectively. The positive-negative cut off percentage inhibition (PI) value was found to be >55, with a Cohen's Kappa value of 0.83. The study showed that the new assay has potential for application in sero-diagnosis as well as sero-surveillance of surra. PMID:26921034

  16. Constitutively signaling fragments of Tsr, the Escherichia coli serine chemoreceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ames, P; Parkinson, J S

    1994-01-01

    Tsr, the serine chemoreceptor of Escherichia coli, has two signaling modes. One augments clockwise (CW) flagellar rotation, and the other augments counterclockwise (CCW) rotation. To identify the portion of the Tsr molecule responsible for these activities, we isolated soluble fragments of the Tsr cytoplasmic domain that could alter the flagellar rotation patterns of unstimulated wild-type cells. Residues 290 to 470 from wild-type Tsr generated a CW signal, whereas the same fragment with a single amino acid replacement (alanine 413 to valine) produced a CCW signal. The soluble components of the chemotaxis phosphorelay system needed for expression of these Tsr fragment signals were identified by epistasis analysis. Like full-length receptors, the fragments appeared to generate signals through interactions with the CheA autokinase and the CheW coupling factor. CheA was required for both signaling activities, whereas CheW was needed only for CW signaling. Purified Tsr fragments were also examined for effects on CheA autophosphorylation activity in vitro. Consistent with the in vivo findings, the CW fragment stimulated CheA, whereas the CCW fragment inhibited CheA. CheW was required for stimulation but not for inhibition. These findings demonstrate that a 180-residue segment of the Tsr cytoplasmic domain can produce two active signals. The CCW signal involves a direct contact between the receptor and the CheA kinase, whereas the CW signal requires participation of CheW as well. The correlation between the in vitro effects of Tsr signaling fragments on CheA activity and their in vivo behavioral effects lends convincing support to the phosphorelay model of chemotactic signaling. Images PMID:7929006

  17. E. Coli Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults with weak immune systems. You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. Symptoms of ... pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 ...

  18. LrhA as a new transcriptional key regulator of flagella, motility and chemotaxis genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lehnen, D; Blumer, C; Polen, T; Wackwitz, B; Wendisch, V F; Unden, G

    2002-07-01

    The function of the LysR-type regulator LrhA of Escherichia coli was defined by comparing whole-genome mRNA profiles from wild-type E. coli and an isogenic lrhA mutant on a DNA microarray. In the lrhA mutant, a large number (48) of genes involved in flagellation, motility and chemotaxis showed relative mRNA abundances increased by factors between 3 and 80. When a representative set of five flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes was tested in lacZ reporter gene fusions, similar factors for derepression were found in the lrhA mutant. In gel retardation experiments, the LrhA protein bound specifically to flhD and lrhA promoter DNA (apparent K(D) approximately 20 nM), whereas the promoters of fliC, fliA and trg were not bound by LrhA. The expression of flhDC (encoding FlhD(2)C(2)) was derepressed by a factor of 3.5 in the lrhA mutant. FlhD(2)C(2) is known as the master regulator for the expression of flagellar and chemotaxis genes. By DNase I footprinting, LrhA binding sites at the flhDC and lrhA promoters were identified. The lrhA gene was under positive autoregulation by LrhA as shown by gel retardation and lrhA expression studies. It is suggested that LrhA is a key regulator controlling the transcription of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes by regulating the synthesis and concentration of FlhD(2)C(2). PMID:12123461

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Salmonella FliI, the ATPase component of the type III flagellar protein-export apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Minamino, Tohru; Imada, Katsumi; Tahara, Aiko; Kihara, May; Macnab, Robert M.; Namba, Keiichi

    2006-10-01

    Crystals of an N-terminally truncated variant of the Salmonella flagellar ATPase FliI, which exports substrate proteins into the central channel of the growing flagellar structure by utilizing the energy of ATP hydrolysis, have been obtained and characterized by X-ray diffraction. Most of the structural components making up the bacterial flagellum are translocated through the central channel of the growing flagellar structure by the type III flagellar protein-export apparatus in an ATPase-driven manner and are assembled at the growing end. FliI is the ATPase that drives flagellar protein export using the energy of ATP hydrolysis. FliI forms an oligomeric ring structure in order to attain maximum ATPase activity. In this study, FliI(Δ1–18), an N-terminally truncated variant of FliI lacking the first 18 residues, was purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique with PEG 8000 as a precipitant. FliI(Δ1–18) crystals grew in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 48, b = 73, c = 126 Å, β = 94°, and diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution. Anomalous difference Patterson maps of Os-derivative and Pt-derivative crystals showed significant peaks in their Harker sections, indicating that both derivatives are suitable for structure determination.

  20. T-POP array identifies EcnR and PefI-SrgD as novel regulators of flagellar gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Christopher E; Lee, Changhan; Hughes, Kelly T

    2009-03-01

    The T-POP transposon was employed in a general screen for tetracycline (Tet)-induced chromosomal loci that exhibited Tet-activated or Tet-repressed expression of a fliC-lac transcriptional fusion. Insertions that activated flagellar transcription were located in flagellar genes. T-POP insertions that exhibited Tet-dependent fliC-lac inhibition were isolated upstream of the ecnR, fimZ, pefI-srgD, rcsB, and ydiV genes and in the flagellar gene flgA, which is located upstream of the anti-sigma(28) factor gene flgM. When expressed from the chromosomal P(araBAD) promoter, EcnR, FimZ, PefI-SrgD, and RcsB inhibited the transcription of the flagellar class 1 flhDC operon. YdiV, which is weakly homologous to EAL domain proteins involved in cyclic-di-GMP regulation, appears to act at a step after class 1 transcription. By using a series of deletions of the regulatory genes to try to disrupt each pathway, these regulators were found to act largely independently of one another. These results identify EcnR and PefI-SrgD as additional components of the complex regulatory network controlling flagellar expression. PMID:19114490

  1. T-POP Array Identifies EcnR and PefI-SrgD as Novel Regulators of Flagellar Gene Expression▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Christopher E.; Lee, Changhan; Hughes, Kelly T.

    2009-01-01

    The T-POP transposon was employed in a general screen for tetracycline (Tet)-induced chromosomal loci that exhibited Tet-activated or Tet-repressed expression of a fliC-lac transcriptional fusion. Insertions that activated flagellar transcription were located in flagellar genes. T-POP insertions that exhibited Tet-dependent fliC-lac inhibition were isolated upstream of the ecnR, fimZ, pefI-srgD, rcsB, and ydiV genes and in the flagellar gene flgA, which is located upstream of the anti-σ28 factor gene flgM. When expressed from the chromosomal ParaBAD promoter, EcnR, FimZ, PefI-SrgD, and RcsB inhibited the transcription of the flagellar class 1 flhDC operon. YdiV, which is weakly homologous to EAL domain proteins involved in cyclic-di-GMP regulation, appears to act at a step after class 1 transcription. By using a series of deletions of the regulatory genes to try to disrupt each pathway, these regulators were found to act largely independently of one another. These results identify EcnR and PefI-SrgD as additional components of the complex regulatory network controlling flagellar expression. PMID:19114490

  2. New enterovirulent Escherichia coli serogroup 64474 showing antigenic and genotypic relationships to Shigella boydii 16.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Armando; Eslava, Carlos; Perea, Luis Manuel; Inzunza, Alma; Delgado, Gabriela; Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Cheasty, Thomas; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2010-04-01

    Studies based on the analysis of housekeeping genes indicate that Escherichia coli and all Shigella species, except for Shigella boydii type 13, belong to a single species. This study analysed the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of 23 E. coli strains isolated in different countries from faecal specimens taken from children with diarrhoea. Strains were identified using the VITEK system and typed with rabbit sera obtained against 186 somatic and 53 flagellar E. coli antigens and against 45 Shigella somatic antigens. Biochemical analysis of these strains showed a typical E. coli profile with a defined reaction against both E. coli O179 and S. boydii 16 somatic antisera. Agglutination assays for flagellar antigens showed a response against H2 in 7 (30 %) strains, H10 in 2 (9 %) strains, H32 in 12 (52 %) strains and H34 in 2 (9 %) strains, demonstrating 4 serotypes associated with this new somatic antigen 64474. A serum against one of these E. coli strains (64474) was prepared. Absorption assays of S. boydii 16 and E. coli 64474 antisera with E. coli O179 antigen removed the agglutination response against this O179 antigen completely, while the agglutination titres against both S. boydii 16 and E. coli 64474 remained the same. Four (17 %) E. coli strains showed antimicrobial resistance to piperacillin only, one (4 %) to piperacillin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, one (4 %) to ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin and piperacillin, and two (9 %) strains were resistant to ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, piperacillin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. With regards to PCR assays, one (4 %) of the strains was positive for Shigella gene ipaH, one (4 %) for ipaA, two (9 %) for ipaB, one (4 %) for ipaD, two (9 %) for sepA and three (13 %) for ospF. The rfb gene cluster in the E. coli strains was analysed by RFLP and compared with the gene cluster obtained from S. boydii 16. The rfb-RFLP patterns for all 23 E. coli strains were similar to those obtained for S. boydii

  3. YjjQ Represses Transcription of flhDC and Additional Loci in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, Helene; Gürlebeck, Doreen; Groß, Jana; Dreck, Katrin; Pannen, Derk; Ewers, Christa; Wieler, Lothar H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The presumptive transcriptional regulator YjjQ has been identified as being virulence associated in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC). In this work, we characterize YjjQ as transcriptional repressor of the flhDC operon, encoding the master regulator of flagellar synthesis, and of additional loci. The latter include gfc (capsule 4 synthesis), ompC (outer membrane porin C), yfiRNB (regulated c-di-GMP synthesis), and loci of poorly defined function (ybhL and ymiA-yciX). We identify the YjjQ DNA-binding sites at the flhDC and gfc promoters and characterize a DNA-binding sequence motif present at all promoters found to be repressed by YjjQ. At the flhDC promoter, the YjjQ DNA-binding site overlaps the RcsA-RcsB DNA-binding site. RcsA-RcsB likewise represses the flhDC promoter, but the repression by YjjQ and that by RcsA-RcsB are independent of each other. These data suggest that YjjQ is an additional regulator involved in the complex control of flhDC at the level of transcription initiation. Furthermore, we show that YjjQ represses motility of the E. coli K-12 laboratory strain and of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains CFT073 and 536. Regulation of flhDC, yfiRNB, and additional loci by YjjQ may be features relevant for pathogenicity. IMPORTANCE Escherichia coli is a commensal and pathogenic bacterium causing intra- and extraintestinal infections in humans and farm animals. The pathogenicity of E. coli strains is determined by their particular genome content, which includes essential and associated virulence factors that control the cellular physiology in the host environment. However, the gene pools of commensal and pathogenic E. coli are not clearly differentiated, and the function of virulence-associated loci needs to be characterized. In this study, we characterize the function of yjjQ, encoding a transcription regulator that was identified as being virulence associated in avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC). We characterize YjjQ as transcriptional

  4. Genetic relationships among pathogenic Escherichia coli of serogroup O157.

    PubMed Central

    Whittam, T S; Wilson, R A

    1988-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains of serotype O157:H7 are a newly described clonal pathogenic form associated with recent outbreaks of hemorrhagic colitis in humans. Although O157 strains of various H types have long been recognized as enterotoxigenic in animals, little is known about how these pathogenic animal strains are related to those of serotype O157:H7. To determine the genetic relatedness of O157:H7 isolates to animal O157 strains, we examined 194 O157 isolates, representing 12 distinct flagellar antigens (H serotypes), obtained from a variety of animal and human infections. To characterize isolates, we assayed allelic variation at 19 enzyme loci by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Genotypic comparisons of isolates revealed extensive variation among 33 distinct clonal genotypes that differed, on average, at 44% of the enzyme loci. K88 fimbriae were expressed in 72% of the isolates and occurred in a diversity of chromosomal genotypic backgrounds. Five major clonal groups were recognized; one group was clearly associated with porcine colibacillosis, and another was associated with human urinary tract infections. The O157:H7 genotype was not closely allied with any of the major groups of clones. The results indicate that O157 E. coli are genetically diverse and strongly suggest that the O157:H7 lineage was not recently derived from other pathogenic strains of the O157 serogroup. PMID:2457555

  5. Nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli motB gene and site-limited incorporation of its product into the cytoplasmic membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Stader, J; Matsumura, P; Vacante, D; Dean, G E; Macnab, R M

    1986-01-01

    The motB gene product of Escherichia coli is an integral membrane protein required for rotation of the flagellar motor. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the motB region and find that it contains an open reading frame of 924 nucleotides which we ascribe to the motB gene. The predicted amino acid sequence of the gene product is 308 residues long and indicates an amphipathic protein with one major hydrophobic region, about 22 residues long, near the N terminus. There is no consensus signal sequence. We postulate that the protein has a short N-terminal region in the cytoplasm, an anchoring region in the membrane consisting of two spanning segments, and a large cytoplasmic C-terminal domain. By placing motB under control of the tryptophan operon promoter of Serratia marcescens, we have succeeded in overproducing the MotB protein. Under these conditions, the majority of MotB was found in the cytoplasm, indicating that the membrane has a limited capacity to incorporate the protein. We conclude that insertion of MotB into the membrane requires the presence of other more hydrophobic components, possibly including the MotA protein or other components of the flagellar motor. The results further reinforce the concept that the total flagellar motor consists of more than just the basal body. Images PMID:3007435

  6. A Novel Trypanosoma cruzi Protein Associated to the Flagellar Pocket of Replicative Stages and Involved in Parasite Growth

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Ignacio M.; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Buscaglia, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    The flagellar pocket constitutes an active and strategic site in the body of trypanosomatids (i.e. parasitic protozoa that cause important human and/or livestock diseases), which participates in several important processes such as cell polarity, morphogenesis and replication. Most importantly, the flagellar pocket is the unique site of surface protein export and nutrient uptake in trypanosomatids, and thus constitutes a key portal for the interaction with the host. In this work, we identified and characterized a novel Trypanosoma cruzi protein, termed TCLP 1, that accumulates at the flagellar pocket area of parasite replicative forms, as revealed by biochemical, immuno-cytochemistry and electron microscopy techniques. Different in silico analyses revealed that TCLP 1 is the founding member of a family of chimeric molecules restricted to trypanosomatids bearing, in addition to eukaryotic ubiquitin-like and protein-protein interacting domains, a motif displaying significant structural homology to bacterial multi-cargo chaperones involved in the secretion of virulence factors. Using the fidelity of an homologous expression system we confirmed TCLP 1 sub-cellular distribution and showed that TCLP 1-over-expressing parasites display impaired survival and accelerated progression to late stationary phase under starvation conditions. The reduced endocytic capacity of TCLP 1-over-expressors likely underlies (at least in part) this growth phenotype. TCLP 1 is involved in the uptake of extracellular macromolecules required for nutrition and hence in T. cruzi growth. Due to the bacterial origin, sub-cellular distribution and putative function(s), we propose TCLP 1 and related orthologs in trypanosomatids as appealing therapeutic targets for intervention against these health-threatening parasites. PMID:26086767

  7. Genetic characterization of conserved charged residues in the bacterial flagellar type III export protein FlhA.

    PubMed

    Hara, Noritaka; Namba, Keiichi; Minamino, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    For assembly of the bacterial flagellum, most of flagellar proteins are transported to the distal end of the flagellum by the flagellar type III protein export apparatus powered by proton motive force (PMF) across the cytoplasmic membrane. FlhA is an integral membrane protein of the export apparatus and is involved in an early stage of the export process along with three soluble proteins, FliH, FliI, and FliJ, but the energy coupling mechanism remains unknown. Here, we carried out site-directed mutagenesis of eight, highly conserved charged residues in putative juxta- and trans-membrane helices of FlhA. Only Asp-208 was an essential acidic residue. Most of the FlhA substitutions were tolerated, but resulted in loss-of-function in the ΔfliH-fliI mutant background, even with the second-site flhB(P28T) mutation that increases the probability of flagellar protein export in the absence of FliH and FliI. The addition of FliH and FliI allowed the D45A, R85A, R94K and R270A mutant proteins to work even in the presence of the flhB(P28T) mutation. Suppressor analysis of a flhA(K203W) mutation showed an interaction between FlhA and FliR. Taken all together, we suggest that Asp-208 is directly involved in PMF-driven protein export and that the cooperative interactions of FlhA with FlhB, FliH, FliI, and FliR drive the translocation of export substrate. PMID:21811603

  8. Assembly and stoichiometry of FliF and FlhA in Salmonella flagellar basal body.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yusuke V; Ito, Mariko; Hiraoka, Koichi D; Che, Yong-Suk; Bai, Fan; Kami-Ike, Nobunori; Namba, Keiichi; Minamino, Tohru

    2014-03-01

    The bacterial flagellar export apparatus is required for the construction of the bacterial flagella beyond the cytoplasmic membrane. The membrane-embedded part of the export apparatus, which consists of FlhA, FlhB, FliO, FliP, FliQ and FliR, is located in the central pore of the MS ring formed by 26 copies of FliF. The C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of FlhA is located in the centre of the cavity within the C ring made of FliG, FliM and FliN. FlhA interacts with FliF, but its assembly mechanism remains unclear. Here, we fused yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to the C-termini of FliF and FlhA and investigated their subcellular localization by fluorescence microscopy. The punctate pattern of FliF-YFP localization required FliG but neither FliM, FliN, FlhA, FlhB, FliO, FliP, FliQ nor FliR. In contrast, FlhA-CFP localization required FliF, FliG, FliO, FliP, FliQ and FliR. The number of FlhA-YFP molecules associated with the MS ring was estimated to be about nine. We suggest that FlhA assembles into the export gate along with other membrane components during the MS ring complex formation in a co-ordinated manner. PMID:24450479

  9. Independent evolution of neurotoxin and flagellar genetic loci in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T; Paul, Catherine J; Mason, David R; Twine, Susan M; Alston, Mark J; Logan, Susan M; Austin, John W; Peck, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum is the causative agent of botulism, a severe neuroparalytic illness. Given the severity of botulism, surprisingly little is known of the population structure, biology, phylogeny or evolution of C. botulinum. The recent determination of the genome sequence of C. botulinum has allowed comparative genomic indexing using a DNA microarray. Results Whole genome microarray analysis revealed that 63% of the coding sequences (CDSs) present in reference strain ATCC 3502 were common to all 61 widely-representative strains of proteolytic C. botulinum and the closely related C. sporogenes tested. This indicates a relatively stable genome. There was, however, evidence for recombination and genetic exchange, in particular within the neurotoxin gene and cluster (including transfer of neurotoxin genes to C. sporogenes), and the flagellar glycosylation island (FGI). These two loci appear to have evolved independently from each other, and from the remainder of the genetic complement. A number of strains were atypical; for example, while 10 out of 14 strains that formed type A1 toxin gave almost identical profiles in whole genome, neurotoxin cluster and FGI analyses, the other four strains showed divergent properties. Furthermore, a new neurotoxin sub-type (A5) has been discovered in strains from heroin-associated wound botulism cases. For the first time, differences in glycosylation profiles of the flagella could be linked to differences in the gene content of the FGI. Conclusion Proteolytic C. botulinum has a stable genome backbone containing specific regions of genetic heterogeneity. These include the neurotoxin gene cluster and the FGI, each having evolved independently of each other and the remainder of the genetic complement. Analysis of these genetic components provides a high degree of discrimination of strains of proteolytic C. botulinum, and is suitable for clinical and forensic investigations of botulism outbreaks. PMID:19298644

  10. Negative regulatory loci coupling flagellin synthesis to flagellar assembly in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, K L; Hughes, K T

    1991-01-01

    The complex regulation of flagellin gene expression in Salmonella typhimurium was characterized in vivo by using lac transcriptional fusions to the two flagellin structural genes (fliC [H1] and fljB [H2]). Phase variation was measured as the rate of switching of flagellin gene expression. Switching frequencies varied from 1/500 per cell per generation to 1/10,000 per cell per generation depending on the particular insertion and the direction of switching. There is a 4- to 20-fold bias in favor of switching from the fljB(On) to the fljB(Off) orientation. Random Tn10dTc insertions were isolated which failed to express flagellin. While most of these insertions mapped to loci known to be required for flagellin expression, several new loci were identified. The presence of functional copies of all of the genes responsible for complete flagellar assembly, except the hook-associated proteins (flgK, flgL, and fliD gene products), were required for expression of the fliC or fljB flagellin genes. Two novel loci involved in negative regulation of fliC and fljB in fla mutant backgrounds were identified. One of these loci, designated the flgR locus, mapped to the flg operon at 23 min on the Salmonella linkage map. An flgR insertion mutation resulted in relief of repression of the fliC and fljB genes in all fla mutant backgrounds except for mutants in the positive regulatory loci (flhC, flhD, and fliA genes). PMID:1848842

  11. FliZ is a global regulatory protein affecting the expression of flagellar and virulence genes in individual Xenorhabdus nematophila bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Jubelin, Grégory; Lanois, Anne; Severac, Dany; Rialle, Stéphanie; Longin, Cyrille; Gaudriault, Sophie; Givaudan, Alain

    2013-10-01

    Heterogeneity in the expression of various bacterial genes has been shown to result in the presence of individuals with different phenotypes within clonal bacterial populations. The genes specifying motility and flagellar functions are coordinately regulated and form a complex regulon, the flagellar regulon. Complex interplay has recently been demonstrated in the regulation of flagellar and virulence gene expression in many bacterial pathogens. We show here that FliZ, a DNA-binding protein, plays a key role in the insect pathogen, Xenorhabdus nematophila, affecting not only hemolysin production and virulence in insects, but efficient swimming motility. RNA-Seq analysis identified FliZ as a global regulatory protein controlling the expression of 278 Xenorhabdus genes either directly or indirectly. FliZ is required for the efficient expression of all flagellar genes, probably through its positive feedback loop, which controls expression of the flhDC operon, the master regulator of the flagellar circuit. FliZ also up- or downregulates the expression of numerous genes encoding non-flagellar proteins potentially involved in key steps of the Xenorhabdus lifecycle. Single-cell analysis revealed the bimodal expression of six identified markers of the FliZ regulon during exponential growth of the bacterial population. In addition, a combination of fluorescence-activated cell sorting and RT-qPCR quantification showed that this bimodality generated a mixed population of cells either expressing ("ON state") or not expressing ("OFF state") FliZ-dependent genes. Moreover, studies of a bacterial population exposed to a graded series of FliZ concentrations showed that FliZ functioned as a rheostat, controlling the rate of transition between the "OFF" and "ON" states in individuals. FliZ thus plays a key role in cell fate decisions, by transiently creating individuals with different potentials for motility and host interactions. PMID:24204316

  12. Rapid, Sensitive, and Specific Escherichia coli H Antigen Typing by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight-Based Peptide Mass Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Chui, Huixia; Chan, Michael; Hernandez, Drexler; Chong, Patrick; McCorrister, Stuart; Robinson, Alyssia; Walker, Matthew; Peterson, Lorea A. M.; Ratnam, Sam; Haldane, David J. M.; Bekal, Sadjia; Wylie, John; Chui, Linda; Westmacott, Garrett; Xu, Bianli; Drebot, Mike; Nadon, Celine; Knox, J. David

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has gained popularity in recent years for rapid bacterial identification, mostly at the genus or species level. In this study, a rapid method to identify the Escherichia coli flagellar antigen (H antigen) at the subspecies level was developed using a MALDI-TOF MS platform with high specificity and sensitivity. Flagella were trapped on a filter membrane, and on-filter trypsin digestion was performed. The tryptic digests of each flagellin then were collected and analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS through peptide mass fingerprinting. Sixty-one reference strains containing all 53 H types and 85 clinical strains were tested and compared to serotyping designations. Whole-genome sequencing was used to resolve conflicting results between the two methods. It was found that DHB (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid) worked better than CHCA (α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) as the matrix for MALDI-TOF MS, with higher confidence during protein identification. After method optimization, reference strains representing all 53 E. coli H types were identified correctly by MALDI-TOF MS. A custom E. coli flagellar/H antigen database was crucial for clearly identifying the E. coli H antigens. Of 85 clinical isolates tested by MALDI-TOF MS-H, 75 identified MS-H types (88.2%) matched results obtained from traditional serotyping. Among 10 isolates where the results of MALDI-TOF MS-H and serotyping did not agree, 60% of H types characterized by whole-genome sequencing agreed with those identified by MALDI-TOF MS-H, compared to only 20% by serotyping. This MALDI-TOF MS-H platform can be used for rapid and cost-effective E. coli H antigen identification, especially during E. coli outbreaks. PMID:26019207

  13. Expression of nipP.w of Pectobacterium wasabiae is dependent on functional flgKL flagellar genes.

    PubMed

    Laasik, Eve; Põllumaa, Lee; Pasanen, Miia; Mattinen, Laura; Pirhonen, Minna; Mäe, Andres

    2014-01-01

    While flagellum-driven motility is hypothesized to play a role in the virulence of Pectobacterium species, there is no direct evidence that genes involved in flagellum assembly regulate the synthesis of virulence factors. The purpose of this study was to identify genes that affect the production or secretion of necrosis-inducing protein (Nip) in the strain SCC3193. Transposon mutagenesis of an RpoS strain overexpressing NipP.w was performed, and a mutant associated with decreased necrosis of tobacco leaves was detected. The mutant contained a transposon in the regulatory region upstream of the flagellar genes flgK and flgL. Additional mutants were generated related to the flagellar genes fliC and fliA. The mutation in flgKL, but not those in fliC and fliA, inhibited nipP.w transcription. Moreover, the regulatory effect of the flgKL mutation on nipP.w transcription was partially dependent on the Rcs phosphorelay. Secretion of NipP.w was also dependent on a type II secretion mechanism. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the flgKL mutation is responsible for reduced motility and lower levels of nipP.w expression. PMID:24173527

  14. Analysis of the cytoplasmic domains of Salmonella FlhA and interactions with components of the flagellar export machinery.

    PubMed

    McMurry, Jonathan L; Van Arnam, John S; Kihara, May; Macnab, Robert M

    2004-11-01

    Most flagellar proteins are exported via a type III export apparatus which, in part, consists of the membrane proteins FlhA, FlhB, FliO, FliP, FliQ, and FliR and is housed within the membrane-supramembrane ring formed by FliF subunits. Salmonella FlhA is a 692-residue integral membrane protein with eight predicted transmembrane spans. Its function is not understood, but it is necessary for flagellar export. We have created mutants in which potentially important sequences were deleted. FlhA lacking the amino-terminal sequence prior to the first transmembrane span failed to complement and was dominant negative, suggesting that the sequence is required for function. Similar effects were seen in a variant lacking a highly conserved domain (FHIPEP) within a putative cytoplasmic loop. Scanning deletion analysis of the cytoplasmic domain (FlhAc) demonstrated that substantially all of FlhAc is required for efficient function. Affinity blotting showed that FlhA interacts with several other export apparatus membrane proteins. The implications of these findings are discussed, and a model of FlhA within the export apparatus is presented. PMID:15516571

  15. Following the Viterbi Path to Deduce Flagellar Actin-Interacting Proteins of Leishmania spp.: Report on Cofilins and Twinfilins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Ana Carolina L.; Araújo, Fabiana F.; Kamimura, Michel T.; Medeiros, Sarah R.; Viana, Daniel A.; Oliveira, Fátima de Cássia E.; Filho, Raimundo Araújo; Costa, Marcília P.; Oliveira, Diana M.

    2007-11-01

    For performing vital cellular processes, such as motility, eukaryotic cells rely on the actin cytoskeleton, whose structure and dynamics are tightly controlled by a large number of actin-interacting (AIP) or actin-related/regulating (ARP) proteins. Trypanosomatid protozoa, such as Leishmania, rely on their flagellum for motility and sensory reception, which are believed to allow parasite migration, adhesion, invasion and even persistence on mammalian host tissues to cause disease. Actin can determine cell stiffness and transmit force during mechanotransduction, cytokinesis, cell motility and other cellular shape changes, while the identification and analyses of AIPs can help to improve understanding of their mechanical properties on physiological architectures, such as the present case regarding Leishmania flagellar apparatus. This work conveniently apply bioinformatics tools in some refined pattern recognition techniques (such as hidden Markov models (HMMs) through the Viterbi algorithm/path) in order to improve the recognition of actin-binding/interacting activity through identification of AIPs in genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of Leishmania species. We here report cofilin and twinfilin as putative components of the flagellar apparatus, a direct bioinformatics contribution in the secondary annotation of Leishmania and trypanosomatid genomes.

  16. Depletion of plasma membrane PtdIns(4,5)P2 reveals essential roles for phosphoinositides in flagellar biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ho-Chun; Rollins, Janet; Fabian, Lacramioara; Hayes, Madeline; Polevoy, Gordon; Bazinet, Christopher; Brill, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Axonemes are microtubule-based organelles of crucial importance in the structure and function of eukaryotic cilia and flagella. Despite great progress in understanding how axonemes are assembled, the signals that initiate axoneme outgrowth remain unknown. Here, we identified phosphatidylinositol phosphates (phosphoinositides) as key regulators of early stages of axoneme outgrowth in Drosophila melanogaster spermatogenesis. In a study of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] function in developing Drosophila male germ cells, we depleted PtdIns(4,5)P2 by expression of a potent phosphoinositide phosphatase. Phosphatase expression dramatically inhibited sperm tail formation and perturbed microtubule organization in a manner reversible by co-expression of a PtdIns 4-phosphate 5-kinase. Depletion of PtdIns(4,5)P2 caused increased levels of basal body γ-tubulin and altered the distribution of proteins known to be required for axoneme assembly. Examination of PtdIns(4,5)P2-depleted spermatids by transmission electron microscopy revealed defects in basal body docking to the nuclear envelope, and in axoneme architecture and integrity of the developing flagellar axoneme and axial sheath. Our results provide the first evidence that phosphoinositides act at several steps during flagellar biogenesis, coordinately regulating microtubule and membrane organization. They further suggest that phosphoinositides play evolutionarily conserved roles in flagella and cilia, across phyla and in structurally diverse cell types. PMID:18334551

  17. Intracellular Na+ kinetically interferes with the rotation of the Na(+)-driven flagellar motors of Vibrio alginolyticus.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Sugiyama, S; Hojo, Y; Tokuda, H; Imae, Y

    1990-11-25

    To understand the mechanism of Na+ movement through the force-generating units of the Na(+)-driven flagellar motors of Vibrio alginolyticus, the effect of intracellular Na+ concentration on motor rotation was investigated. Control cells containing about 50 mM Na+ showed good motility even at 10 mM Na+ in the medium, i.e. in the absence of an inwardly directed Na+ gradient. In contrast, Na(+)-loaded cells containing about 400 mM Na+ showed very poor motility at 500 mM Na+ in the medium, i.e. even in the presence of an inwardly directed Na+ gradient. The membrane potential of the cells, which is a major driving force for the motor under these conditions, was not detectably altered, and consistently with this, Na(+)-coupled sucrose transport was only partly reduced in the Na(+)-loaded cells. Motility of the Na(+)-loaded cells was restored by decreasing the intracellular Na+ concentration, and the rate of restoration of motility correlated with the rate of the Na+ decrease. These results indicate that the absolute concentration of the intracellular Na+ is a determinant of the rotation rate of the Na(+)-driven flagellar motors of V. alginolyticus. A simple explanation for this phenomenon is that the force-generating unit of the motor has an intracellular Na(+)-binding site, at which the intracellular Na+ kinetically interferes with the rate of Na+ influx for motor rotation. PMID:2243095

  18. Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System 2 ATPase EivC Is Involved in the Motility and Virulence of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xuan; Yang, Denghui; Wang, Dong; Han, Xiangan; Shi, Yonghong; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are crucial for bacterial infections because they deliver effector proteins into host cells. The Escherichia coli type III secretion system 2 (ETT2) is present in the majority of E. coli strains, and although it is degenerate, ETT2 regulates bacterial virulence. An ATPase is essential for T3SS secretion, but the function of the ETT2 ATPase has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that EivC is homologous to the β subunit of F0F1 ATPases and it possesses ATPase activity. To investigate the effects of ETT2 ATPase EivC on the phenotype and virulence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), eivC mutant and complemented strains were constructed and characterized. Inactivation of eivC led to impaired flagella production and augmented fimbriae on the bacterial surface, and, consequently, reduced bacterial motility. In addition, the eivC mutant strain exhibited attenuated virulence in ducks, diminished serum resistance, reduced survival in macrophage cells and in ducks, upregulated fimbrial gene expression, and downregulated flagellar and virulence gene expression. The expression of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 were increased in HD-11 macrophages infected with the eivC mutant strain, compared with the wild-type strain. These virulence-related phenotypes were restored by genetic complementation. These findings demonstrate that ETT2 ATPase EivC is involved in the motility and pathogenicity of APEC.

  19. Coevolved Mutations Reveal Distinct Architectures for Two Core Proteins in the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Rasool, Shafqat; Khan, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Switching of bacterial flagellar rotation is caused by large domain movements of the FliG protein triggered by binding of the signal protein CheY to FliM. FliG and FliM form adjacent multi-subunit arrays within the basal body C-ring. The movements alter the interaction of the FliG C-terminal (FliGC) “torque” helix with the stator complexes. Atomic models based on the Salmonella entrovar C-ring electron microscopy reconstruction have implications for switching, but lack consensus on the relative locations of the FliG armadillo (ARM) domains (amino-terminal (FliGN), middle (FliGM) and FliGC) as well as changes during chemotaxis. The generality of the Salmonella model is challenged by the variation in motor morphology and response between species. We studied coevolved residue mutations to determine the unifying elements of switch architecture. Residue interactions, measured by their coevolution, were formalized as a network, guided by structural data. Our measurements reveal a common design with dedicated switch and motor modules. The FliM middle domain (FliMM) has extensive connectivity most simply explained by conserved intra and inter-subunit contacts. In contrast, FliG has patchy, complex architecture. Conserved structural motifs form interacting nodes in the coevolution network that wire FliMM to the FliGC C-terminal, four-helix motor module (C3-6). FliG C3-6 coevolution is organized around the torque helix, differently from other ARM domains. The nodes form separated, surface-proximal patches that are targeted by deleterious mutations as in other allosteric systems. The dominant node is formed by the EHPQ motif at the FliMMFliGM contact interface and adjacent helix residues at a central location within FliGM. The node interacts with nodes in the N-terminal FliGc α-helix triad (ARM-C) and FliGN. ARM-C, separated from C3-6 by the MFVF motif, has poor intra-network connectivity consistent with its variable orientation revealed by structural data. ARM-C could

  20. Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kaper, James B; Nataro, James P; Mobley, Harry L

    2004-02-01

    Few microorganisms are as versatile as Escherichia coli. An important member of the normal intestinal microflora of humans and other mammals, E. coli has also been widely exploited as a cloning host in recombinant DNA technology. But E. coli is more than just a laboratory workhorse or harmless intestinal inhabitant; it can also be a highly versatile, and frequently deadly, pathogen. Several different E. coli strains cause diverse intestinal and extraintestinal diseases by means of virulence factors that affect a wide range of cellular processes. PMID:15040260

  1. The 3D Structure of the Apical Complex and Association with the Flagellar Apparatus Revealed by Serial TEM Tomography in Psammosa pacifica, a Distant Relative of the Apicomplexa

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Noriko; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    The apical complex is one of the defining features of apicomplexan parasites, including the malaria parasite Plasmodium, where it mediates host penetration and invasion. The apical complex is also known in a few related lineages, including several non-parasitic heterotrophs, where it mediates feeding behaviour. The origin of the apical complex is unclear, and one reason for this is that in apicomplexans it exists in only part of the life cycle, and never simultaneously with other major cytoskeletal structures like flagella and basal bodies. Here, we used conventional TEM and serial TEM tomography to reconstruct the three dimensional structure of the apical complex in Psammosa pacifica, a predatory relative of apicomplexans and dinoflagellates that retains the archetype apical complex and the flagellar apparatus simultaneously. The P. pacifica apical complex is associated with the gullet and consists of the pseudoconoid, micronemes, and electron dense vesicles. The pseudoconoid is a convex sheet consisting of eight short microtubules, plus a band made up of microtubules that originate from the flagellar apparatus. The flagellar apparatus consists of three microtubular roots. One of the microtubular roots attached to the posterior basal body is connected to bypassing microtubular strands, which are themselves connected to the extension of the pseudoconoid. These complex connections where the apical complex is an extension of the flagellar apparatus, reflect the ancestral state of both, dating back to the common ancestor of apicaomplexans and dinoflagellates. PMID:24392150

  2. Bacillus subtilis Bactofilins Are Essential for Flagellar Hook- and Filament Assembly and Dynamically Localize into Structures of Less than 100 nm Diameter underneath the Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    El Andari, Jihad; Altegoer, Florian; Bange, Gert; Graumann, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a widely conserved protein family implicated in cell shape maintenance and in bacterial motility. We show that the bactofilins BacE and BacF from Bacillus subtilis are essential for motility. The proteins are required for the establishment of flagellar hook- and filament structures, but apparently not for the formation of basal bodies. Functional YFP fusions to BacE and to BacF localize as discrete assemblies at the B. subtilis cell membrane, and have a diameter of 60 to 70 nm. BacF assemblies are relatively static, and partially colocalize with flagellar basal bodies, while BacE assemblies are fewer per cell than those of BacF and are highly mobile. Tracking of BacE foci showed that the assemblies arrest at a single point for a few hundred milliseconds, showing that a putative interaction with flagellar structures would be transient and fast. When overexpressed or expressed in a heterologous cell system, bactofilins can form filamentous structures, and also form multimers as purified proteins. Our data reveal a propensity for bactofilins to form filaments, however, in B. subtilis cells, bactofilins assemble into defined size assemblies that show a dynamic localization pattern and play a role in flagellar assembly. PMID:26517549

  3. Isolation of the polar and lateral flagellum-defective mutants in Vibrio alginolyticus and identification of their flagellar driving energy sources.

    PubMed Central

    Kawagishi, I; Maekawa, Y; Atsumi, T; Homma, M; Imae, Y

    1995-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus has two types of flagella (polar and lateral) in one cell. We isolated mutants with only a polar flagellum (Pof+ Laf-) or only lateral flagella (Pof- Laf+). Using these mutants, we demonstrated that the energy sources of the lateral and polar flagellar motors in V. alginolyticus are H+ and Na+ motive forces, respectively, as in the related species V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:7665498

  4. A distant homologue of the FlgT protein interacts with MotB and FliL and is essential for flagellar rotation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Fabela, Salvador; Domenzain, Clelia; De la Mora, Javier; Osorio, Aurora; Ramirez-Cabrera, Victor; Poggio, Sebastian; Dreyfus, Georges; Camarena, Laura

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we describe a periplasmic protein that is essential for flagellar rotation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. This protein is encoded upstream of flgA, and its expression is dependent on the flagellar master regulator FleQ and on the class III flagellar activator FleT. Sequence comparisons suggest that this protein is a distant homologue of FlgT. We show evidence that in R. sphaeroides, FlgT interacts with the periplasmic regions of MotB and FliL and with the flagellar protein MotF, which was recently characterized as a membrane component of the flagellum in this bacterium. In addition, the localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-MotF is completely dependent on FlgT. The Mot(-) phenotype of flgT cells was weakly suppressed by point mutants of MotB that presumably keep the proton channel open and efficiently suppress the Mot(-) phenotype of motF and fliL cells, indicating that FlgT could play an additional role beyond the opening of the proton channel. The presence of FlgT in purified filament-hook-basal bodies of the wild-type strain was confirmed by Western blotting, and the observation of these structures under an electron microscope showed that the basal bodies from flgT cells had lost the ring that covers the LP ring in the wild-type structure. Moreover, MotF was detected by immunoblotting in the basal bodies obtained from the wild-type strain but not from flgT cells. From these results, we suggest that FlgT forms a ring around the LP ring, which anchors MotF and stabilizes the stator complex of the flagellar motor. PMID:24056105

  5. Structural Insights into Membrane Targeting by the Flagellar Calcium-binding Protein (FCaBP) a Myristoylated and Palmitoylated Calcium Sensor in Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    J Wingard; J Ladner; M Vanarotti; A Fisher; H Robinson; K Buchanan; D Engman; J Ames

    2011-12-31

    The flagellar calcium-binding protein (FCaBP) of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is targeted to the flagellar membrane where it regulates flagellar function and assembly. As a first step toward understanding the Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes important for membrane-targeting, we report here the x-ray crystal structure of FCaBP in the Ca{sup 2+}-free state determined at 2.2{angstrom} resolution. The first 17 residues from the N terminus appear unstructured and solvent-exposed. Residues implicated in membrane targeting (Lys-19, Lys-22, and Lys-25) are flanked by an exposed N-terminal helix (residues 26-37), forming a patch of positive charge on the protein surface that may interact electrostatically with flagellar membrane targets. The four EF-hands in FCaBP each adopt a 'closed conformation' similar to that seen in Ca{sup 2+}-free calmodulin. The overall fold of FCaBP is closest to that of grancalcin and other members of the penta EF-hand superfamily. Unlike the dimeric penta EF-hand proteins, FCaBP lacks a fifth EF-hand and is monomeric. The unstructured N-terminal region of FCaBP suggests that its covalently attached myristoyl group at the N terminus may be solvent-exposed, in contrast to the highly sequestered myristoyl group seen in recoverin and GCAP1. NMR analysis demonstrates that the myristoyl group attached to FCaBP is indeed solvent-exposed in both the Ca{sup 2+}-free and Ca{sup 2+}-bound states, and myristoylation has no effect on protein structure and folding stability. We propose that exposed acyl groups at the N terminus may anchor FCaBP to the flagellar membrane and that Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes may control its binding to membrane-bound protein targets..

  6. RflM mediates target specificity of the RcsCDB phosphorelay system for transcriptional repression of flagellar synthesis in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Kühne, Caroline; Singer, Hanna M; Grabisch, Eva; Codutti, Luca; Carlomagno, Teresa; Scrima, Andrea; Erhardt, Marc

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial flagellum enables directed movement of Salmonella enterica towards favorable conditions in liquid environments. Regulation of flagellar synthesis is tightly controlled by various environmental signals at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The flagellar master regulator FlhD4 C2 resides on top of the flagellar transcriptional hierarchy and is under autogenous control by FlhD4 C2 -dependent activation of the repressor rflM. The inhibitory activity of RflM depends on the presence of RcsB, the response regulator of the RcsCDB phosphorelay system. In this study, we elucidated the molecular mechanism of RflM-dependent repression of flhDC. We show that RcsB and RflM form a heterodimer that coordinately represses flhDC transcription independent of RcsB phosphorylation. RcsB-RflM complex binds to a RcsB box downstream the P1 transcriptional start site of the flhDC promoter with increased affinity compared to RcsB in the absence of RflM. We propose that RflM stabilizes binding of unphosphorylated RcsB to the flhDC promoter in absence of environmental cues. Thus, RflM is a novel auxiliary regulatory protein that mediates target specificity of RcsB for flhDC repression. The cooperative action of the RcsB-RflM repressor complex allows Salmonella to fine-tune initiation of flagellar gene expression and adds another level to the complex regulation of flagellar synthesis. PMID:27206164

  7. Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli, a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is a part of the normal flora of the intestinal tract of humans and a variety of animals. E. coli strains are classified on the basis of antigenic differences in two surface components (serotyping), the somatic antigen (O) of the lipopoly...

  8. PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species which inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of man and warm-blooded animals. Because of the ubiquity of this bacterium in the intestinal flora, it serves as an important indicator organism of fecal contamination. E. coli, aside from serving a...

  9. Polyphenols from olive mill waste affect biofilm formation and motility in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Lisa; Fasolato, Luca; Montemurro, Filomena; Martino, Maria Elena; Balzan, Stefania; Servili, Maurizio; Novelli, Enrico; Cardazzo, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Olive mill wastes are sources of phenolic compounds with a wide array of biological activities, including antimicrobial effects. A potential option for bioremediation to overcome ecological problems is the reutilization of these natural compounds in food production. The aim of this work was to gain a better understanding of the antimicrobial mode of action of a phenols extract from olive vegetation water (PEOVW) at molecular level by studying Escherichia coli as a model microorganism. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed on E. coli K-12 exposed to PEOVW. The repression of genes for flagellar synthesis and the involvement of genes linked to biofilm formation and stress response were observed. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of PEOVW significantly decreased biofilm formation, swarming and swimming motility, thus confirming the gene expression data. This study provides interesting insights on the molecular action of PEOVW on E. coli K-12. Given these anti-biofilm properties and considering that biofilm formation is a serious problem for the food industry and human health, PEOVW has proved to be a high-value natural product. PMID:24628798

  10. Seroprevalence in Chickens against Campylobacter jejuni Flagellar Capping Protein (FliD) in Selected Areas of the United States.

    PubMed

    Yeh, H-Y; Hiett, K L; Line, J E; Jagne, J F; Lauer, D C

    2016-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a causative pathogen of human acute bacterial gastroenteritis. Infected poultry products are regarded as a major source for human C. jejuni infection. The flagellar capping protein (FliD) is highly conserved among C. jejuni strains/isolates and is antigenic as analysed by immunoblot. In this study, we used the FliD protein as a probe to survey the prevalence of C. jejuni antibodies in chickens from two areas in the United States. A total of 394 samples were tested. Sera from layer breeders of 44-52 weeks of age tested 100% positive, while 4- to 6-week broilers from 22 premises showed 7-100% positivity. These results demonstrate that anti-FliD antibodies were prevalent in the poultry population in the areas of serum samples collected. PMID:26603949

  11. Structural insights into the interaction between the bacterial flagellar motor proteins FliF and FliG.

    PubMed

    Levenson, Robert; Zhou, Hongjun; Dahlquist, Frederick W

    2012-06-26

    The binding of the soluble cytoplasmic protein FliG to the transmembrane protein FliF is one of the first interactions in the assembly of the bacterial flagellum. Once established, this interaction is integral in keeping the flagellar cytoplasmic ring, responsible for both transmission of torque and control of the rotational direction of the flagellum, anchored to the central transmembrane ring on which the flagellum is assembled. Here we isolate and characterize the interaction between the N-terminal domain of Thermotoga maritima FliG (FliG(N)) and peptides corresponding to the conserved C-terminal portion of T. maritima FliF. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and other techniques, we show that the last ~40 amino acids of FliF (FliF(C)) interact strongly (upper bound K(d) in the low nanomolar range) with FliG(N). The formation of this complex causes extensive conformational changes in FliG(N). We find that T. maritima FliG(N) is homodimeric in the absence of the FliF(C) peptide but forms a heterodimeric complex with the peptide, and we show that this same change in oligomeric state occurs in full-length T. maritima FliG, as well. We relate previously observed phenotypic effects of FliF(C) mutations to our direct observation of binding. Lastly, on the basis of NMR data, we propose that the primary interaction site for FliF(C) is located on a conserved hydrophobic patch centered along helix 1 of FliG(N). These results provide new detailed information about the bacterial flagellar motor and support efforts to understand the cytoplasmic ring's precise molecular structure and mechanism of rotational switching. PMID:22670715

  12. Synthetic Cystic Fibrosis Sputum Medium Regulates Flagellar Biosynthesis through the flhF Gene in Burkholderia cenocepacia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Brijesh; Cardona, Silvia T.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia belongs to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), a group of at least 18 distinct species that establish chronic infections in the lung of people with the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). The sputum of CF patients is rich in amino acids and was previously shown to increase flagellar gene expression in B. cenocepacia. We examined flagellin expression and flagellar morphology of B. cenocepacia grown in synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium (SCFM) compared to minimal medium. We found that CF nutritional conditions induce increased motility and flagellin expression. Individual amino acids added at the same concentrations as found in SCFM also increased motility but not flagellin expression, suggesting a chemotactic effect of amino acids. Electron microscopy and flagella staining demonstrated that the increase in flagellin corresponds to a change in the number of flagella per cell. In minimal medium, the ratio of multiple: single: aflagellated cells was 2:3.5:4.5; while under SCFM conditions, the ratio was 7:2:1. We created a deletion mutant, ΔflhF, to study whether this putative GTPase regulates the flagellation pattern of B. cenocepacia K56-2 during growth in CF conditions. The ΔflhF mutant exhibited 80% aflagellated, 14% single and 6% multiple flagellated bacterial subpopulations. Moreover, the ratio of multiple to single flagella in WT and ΔflhF was 3.5 and 0.43, respectively in CF conditions. The observed differences suggest that FlhF positively regulates flagellin expression and the flagellation pattern in B. cenocepacia K56-2 during CF nutritional conditions. PMID:27379216

  13. Cationic Amino Acid Uptake Constitutes a Metabolic Regulation Mechanism and Occurs in the Flagellar Pocket of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, León A.; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Montserrat, Javier; Pereira, Claudio A.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosomatids' amino acid permeases are key proteins in parasite metabolism since they participate in the adaptation of parasites to different environments. Here, we report that TcAAP3, a member of a Trypanosoma cruzi multigene family of permeases, is a bona fide arginine transporter. Most higher eukaryotic cells incorporate cationic amino acids through a single transporter. In contrast, T. cruzi can recognize and transport cationic amino acids by mono-specific permeases since a 100-fold molar excess of lysine could not affect the arginine transport in parasites that over-express the arginine permease (TcAAP3 epimastigotes). In order to test if the permease activity regulates downstream processes of the arginine metabolism, the expression of the single T. cruzi enzyme that uses arginine as substrate, arginine kinase, was evaluated in TcAAP3 epimastigotes. In this parasite model, intracellular arginine concentration increases 4-folds and ATP level remains constant until cultures reach the stationary phase of growth, with decreases of about 6-folds in respect to the controls. Interestingly, Western Blot analysis demonstrated that arginine kinase is significantly down-regulated during the stationary phase of growth in TcAAP3 epimastigotes. This decrease could represent a compensatory mechanism for the increase in ATP consumption as a consequence of the displacement of the reaction equilibrium of arginine kinase, when the intracellular arginine concentration augments and the glucose from the medium is exhausted. Using immunofluorescence techniques we also determined that TcAAP3 and the specific lysine transporter TcAAP7 co-localize in a specialized region of the plasma membrane named flagellar pocket, staining a single locus close to the flagellar pocket collar. Taken together these data suggest that arginine transport is closely related to arginine metabolism and cell energy balance. The clinical relevance of studying trypanosomatids' permeases relies on the

  14. Putative channel components for the fast-rotating sodium-driven flagellar motor of a marine bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Y; Kojima, S; Kato, H; Nishioka, N; Kawagishi, I; Homma, M

    1997-01-01

    The polar flagellum of Vibrio alginolyticus rotates remarkably fast (up to 1,700 revolutions per second) by using a motor driven by sodium ions. Two genes, motX and motY, for the sodium-driven flagellar motor have been identified in marine bacteria, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus. They have no similarity to the genes for proton-driven motors, motA and motB, whose products constitute a proton channel. MotX was proposed to be a component of a sodium channel. Here we identified additional sodium motor genes, pomA and pomB, in V. alginolyticus. Unexpectedly, PomA and PomB have similarities to MotA and MotB, respectively, especially in the predicted transmembrane regions. These results suggest that PomA and PomB may be sodium-conducting channel components of the sodium-driven motor and that the motor part consists of the products of at least four genes, pomA, pomB, motX, and motY. Furthermore, swimming speed was controlled by the expression level of the pomA gene, suggesting that newly synthesized PomA proteins, which are components of a force-generating unit, were successively integrated into the defective motor complexes. These findings imply that Na+-driven flagellar motors may have similar structure and function as proton-driven motors, but with some interesting differences as well, and it is possible to compare and study the coupling mechanisms of the sodium and proton ion flux for the force generation. PMID:9260952

  15. Particle image velocimetry experiments on a macro-scale model for bacterial flagellar bundling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Jun; Kim, Mun Ju; Bird, James. C.; Park, Jinil; Powers, Thomas. R.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2004-12-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) and other bacteria are propelled through water by several helical flagella, which are rotated by motors embedded at random points on the cell wall. Depending on the handedness and rotation sense, the motion of the flagella induces a flow field that causes them to wrap around each other and form a bundle. Our objective is to understand and model the mechanics of this process. Full-scale flagella are 10 μm in length, 20 nm in diameter, and turn at a rate of 100 Hz. To accurately simulate bundling at a more easily observable scale, we built a scale model in which 20-cm-long helices are rotated in 100,000 cp silicone oil (Poly-di-methyl-siloxane). The highly viscous oil ensures an appropriately low Reynolds number. We developed a macro-scale particle image velocimetry (PIV) system to measure the full-field velocity distribution for rotating rigid helices and rotating flexible helices. In the latter case, the helices were made from epoxy-filled plastic tubing to give approximately the same ratio of elastic to viscous stresses as in the full-scale flagella. Comparison between PIV measurements and slender-body calculations shows good agreement for the case of rigid helices. For the flexible helices, we find that the flow field generated by a bundle in the steady state is well approximated by the flow generated by a single rigid helix with twice the filament radius.

  16. Molecular Profiling: Catecholamine Modulation of Gene Expression in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Bearson, Bradley L

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium have demonstrated that these bacterial pathogens can respond to the presence of catecholamines including norepinephrine and/or epinephrine in their environment by modulating gene expression and exhibiting various phenotypes. For example, one of the most intensively investigated phenotypes following exposure of E. coli and S. Typhimurium to norepinephrine is enhanced bacterial growth in a serum-based medium. Host-pathogen investigations have demonstrated that the mammalian host utilizes nutritional immunity to sequester iron and prevent extraintestinal growth by bacterial pathogens. However, Salmonella and certain E. coli strains have a genetic arsenal designed for subversion and subterfuge of the host. Norepinephrine enhances bacterial growth due, in part, to increased iron availability, and transcriptional profiling indicates differential expression of genes encoding iron acquisition and transport proteins. Bacterial motility of E. coli and S. Typhimurium is also enhanced in the presence of catecholamines and increased flagellar gene expression has been described. Furthermore, epinephrine and norepinephrine are chemoattractants for E. coli O157:H7. In S. Typhimurium, norepinephrine enhances horizontal gene transfer and increases expression of genes involved in plasmid transfer. Exposure of E. coli O157:H7 to norepinephrine increases expression of the genes encoding Shiga toxin and operons within the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). Alterations in the transcriptional response of enteric bacteria to catecholamine exposure in vivo are predicted to enhance bacterial colonization and pathogen virulence. This chapter will review the current literature on the transcriptional response of E. coli and S. Typhimurium to catecholamines. PMID:26589218

  17. E. Coli Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days. NIH: National Institute ...

  18. [Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC)].

    PubMed

    Goto, Tetsushi; Shirano, Michinori

    2012-08-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a bacterium that is commonly found in the gut of humans and warm-blooded animals. Most strains of E. coli are harmless. Some strains however, such as enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), can cause severe foodborne disease. It is transmitted to humans primarily through consumption of contaminated foods, such as raw meal. EHEC produces toxins, known as verotoxins. EHEC that induces bloody diarrhea leads to HUS in 10% of cases. The clinical manifestations of post-diarrheal HUS include acute renal failure, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. The verocytotoxin can directly damage renal and endothelial cells. Thrombocytopenia occurs as platelets are consumed by clotting. Hemolytic anemia results from intravascular fibrin deposition, increased fragility of red blood cells, and fragmentation. PMID:22894069

  19. Recurrent Escherichia coli bacteremia.

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, J N; Mulligan, M E; Arbeit, R D

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common gram-negative organism associated with bacteremia. While recurrent E. coli urinary tract infections are well-described, recurrent E. coli bacteremia appears to be uncommon, with no episodes noted in multiple series of patients with gram-negative bacteremias. We report on 5 patients with recurrent bloodstream infections identified from a series of 163 patients with E. coli bacteremia. For each patient, the isolates from each episode were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and ribotyping and for the presence of E. coli virulence factors. For each of four patients, the index and recurrent episodes of bacteremia represented the same strain as defined by PFGE, and the strains were found to carry one or more virulence factors. The remaining patient, with two episodes of bloodstream infection separated by a 4-year interval, was infected with two isolates that did not carry any virulence factors and that were clonally related by ribotype analysis but differed by PFGE. All five patients had either a local host defense defect (three patients) or impaired systemic defenses (one patient) or both (one patient). Thus, recurrent E. coli bacteremia is likely to represent a multifactorial process that occurs in patients with impaired host defenses who are infected with virulent isolates. Images PMID:7910828

  20. Flagellar Motor Switching in Caulobacter Crescentus Obeys First Passage Time Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Michael; Bell, Jordan; Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay X.

    2015-11-01

    A Caulobacter crescentus swarmer cell is propelled by a helical flagellum, which is rotated by a motor at its base. The motor alternates between rotating in clockwise and counterclockwise directions and spends variable intervals of time in each state. We measure the distributions of these intervals for cells either free swimming or tethered to a glass slide. A peak time of around one second is observed in the distributions for both motor directions with counterclockwise intervals more sharply peaked and clockwise intervals displaying a larger tail at long times. We show that distributions of rotation intervals fit first passage time statistics for a biased random walker and the dynamic binding of CheY-P to FliM motor subunits accounts for this behavior. Our results also suggest that the presence of multiple CheY proteins in C. crescentus may be responsible for differences between its switching behavior and that of the extensively studied E. coli.

  1. Induction of the lateral flagellar system of Vibrio shilonii is an early event after inhibition of the sodium ion flux in the polar flagellum.

    PubMed

    González, Yael; Camarena, Laura; Dreyfus, Georges

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we show the induction of lateral flagella by the action of the sodium channel blocker phenamil, in the marine bacterium Vibrio shilonii, a coral pathogen that causes bleaching. We analyzed the growth and morphology of cells treated with phenamil. A time course analysis showed that after 30 min of exposure to the sodium channel blocker, lateral flagella were present and could be detected by electron microscopy. Detection of the mRNA of the master regulator (lafK) and lateral flagellin (lafA) by RT-PCR confirmed the expression of lateral flagellar genes. We show the simultaneous isolation of polar and, for the first time, lateral flagellar hook-basal bodies. This allowed us to compare the dimensions and morphological characteristics of the 2 structures. PMID:25639364

  2. Inactivation of Serpulina hyodysenteriae flaA1 and flaB1 periplasmic flagellar genes by electroporation-mediated allelic exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Rosey, E L; Kennedy, M J; Petrella, D K; Ulrich, R G; Yancey, R J

    1995-01-01

    Serpulina hyodysenteriae, the etiologic agent of swine dysentery, contains complex periplasmic flagella which are composed of multiple class A and class B polypeptides. To examine the role these proteins play in flagellar synthesis, structure, and function and to develop strains which may provide insight into the importance of motility in the etiology of this pathogen, we constructed specific periplasmic flagellar mutations in S. hyodysenteriae B204. The cloned flaA1 and flaB1 genes were disrupted by replacement of internal fragments with chloramphenicol and/or kanamycin gene cassettes. Following delivery of these suicide plasmids into S. hyodysenteriae, homologous recombination and allelic exchange at the targeted chromosomal flaA1 and flaB1 genes was verified by PCR, sequence, and Southern analysis. The utility of a chloramphenicol resistance gene cassette for targeted gene disruption was demonstrated and found more amenable than kanamycin as a selective marker in S. hyodysenteriae. Immunoblots of cell lysates of the flagellar mutants with antiserum raised against purified FlaA or FlaB confirmed the absence of the corresponding sheath or core protein. Both mutations selectively abolished expression of the targeted gene without affecting synthesis of the other flagellar polypeptide. flaA1 and flaB1 mutant strains exhibited altered motility in vitro and were less efficient in movement through a liquid medium. Paradoxically, isogenic strains containing specifically disrupted flaA1 or flaB1 alleles were capable of assembling periplasmic flagella that were morphologically normal as evidenced by electron microscopy. This is the first report of specific inactivation of a motility-associated gene in spirochetes. PMID:7592350

  3. Effect of the MotB(D33N) mutation on stator assembly and rotation of the proton-driven bacterial flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Minamino, Tohru; Kami-ike, Nobunori; Kudo, Seishi; Namba, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor generates torque by converting the energy of proton translocation through the transmembrane proton channel of the stator complex formed by MotA and MotB. The MotA/B complex is thought to be anchored to the peptidoglycan (PG) layer through the PG-binding domain of MotB to act as the stator. The stator units dynamically associate with and dissociate from the motor during flagellar motor rotation, and an electrostatic interaction between MotA and a rotor protein FliG is required for efficient stator assembly. However, the association and dissociation mechanism of the stator units still remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the speed fluctuation of the flagellar motor of Salmonella enterica wild-type cells carrying a plasmid encoding a nonfunctional stator complex, MotA/B(D33N), which lost the proton conductivity. The wild-type motor rotated stably but the motor speed fluctuated considerably when the expression level of MotA/B(D33N) was relatively high compared to MotA/B. Rapid accelerations and decelerations were frequently observed. A quantitative analysis of the speed fluctuation and a model simulation suggested that the MotA/B(D33N) stator retains the ability to associate with the motor at a low affinity but dissociates more rapidly than the MotA/B stator. We propose that the stator dissociation process depends on proton translocation through the proton channel.

  4. Motor Rotation Is Essential for the Formation of the Periplasmic Flagellar Ribbon, Cellular Morphology, and Borrelia burgdorferi Persistence within Ixodes scapularis Tick and Murine Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Syed Z.; Sekar, Padmapriya; Zhao, Xiaowei; Manne, Akarsh; Liu, Jun; Wooten, R. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi must migrate within and between its arthropod and mammalian hosts in order to complete its natural enzootic cycle. During tick feeding, the spirochete transmits from the tick to the host dermis, eventually colonizing and persisting within multiple, distant tissues. This dissemination modality suggests that flagellar motor rotation and, by extension, motility are crucial for infection. We recently reported that a nonmotile flaB mutant that lacks periplasmic flagella is rod shaped and unable to infect mice by needle or tick bite. However, those studies could not differentiate whether motor rotation or merely the possession of the periplasmic flagella was crucial for cellular morphology and host persistence. Here, we constructed and characterized a motB mutant that is nonmotile but retains its periplasmic flagella. Even though ΔmotB bacteria assembled flagella, part of the mutant cell is rod shaped. Cryoelectron tomography revealed that the flagellar ribbons are distorted in the mutant cells, indicating that motor rotation is essential for spirochetal flat-wave morphology. The ΔmotB cells are unable to infect mice, survive in the vector, or migrate out of the tick. Coinfection studies determined that the presence of these nonmotile ΔmotB cells has no effect on the clearance of wild-type spirochetes during murine infection and vice versa. Together, our data demonstrate that while flagellar motor rotation is necessary for spirochetal morphology and motility, the periplasmic flagella display no additional properties related to immune clearance and persistence within relevant hosts. PMID:25690096

  5. The role of the Kinesin-13 family protein TbKif13-2 in flagellar length control of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kuan Yoow; Ersfeld, Klaus

    2010-12-01

    TbKif13-2, a member of the microtubule-depolymerising Kinesin-13 family was localised at the tip of the flagellum in Trypanosoma brucei. Its predicted activity suggested a role in the regulation of axonemal length. However, using gene deletion and overexpression of TbKif13-2 we show that, in procyclic T. brucei, this kinesin has only a very limited effect on flagellar length. Gene deletion resulted in no significant elongation of the flagellum and overexpression only slightly decreased flagellar length and the rate of growth of a new flagellum during cell division. This is in contrast to studies in Leishmania major, where overexpression of the TbKif13-2 homologue resulted in a significant length reduction of the flagellum. Knockout of TbKif13-2 has, however, an effect on the initial growth of the emerging new flagellum. In conclusion, we show that TbKif13-2 has only a marginal impact on flagellar length in T. brucei. PMID:20728476

  6. Development of a novel rapid immunodiagnostic kit based on flagellar 40 kDa antigen epitope for the detection of typhoid fever in Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Rahul; Bhan, Surya; Nath, Gopal; Kumar, Narender; Ali, Ziledar

    2013-01-01

    To aid the clinical diagnosis of typhoid fever in India, where most hospitals and primary health centres have no facilities for culture, we report on the development of a novel and rapid immunodiagnostic kit for the direct detection of Salmonella Typhi--specific IgG antibodies against S. Typhi flagellar H antigen. The disease often does not show a specific clinical picture, and can be confused with other febrile illness such as malaria, dengue fever and Staphylococcus aureus. To overcome the problem of cross reactivity specific epitope of the flagellar H antigen was immobilised on the testing kit strip eliminating chances of cross reactivity and false positive results thereby increasing the specificity of the test. Since the immunodiagnostic kit, uses the flagellar H antigen from bacteria present in our country, the antibodies present in the serum of patients of our country will have maximum binding affinity, enhancing the sensitivity of our test kit. The immunodiagnostic kit on analysis gave a positive result with clinically diagnosed typhoid positive patient serum and negative results were obtained with the sera of clinically diagnosed malaria, abscess of Staphylococcus aureus and Visceral leishmaniasis (Kala-azar) patients. PMID:23509434

  7. Role of the Escherichia coli O157:H7 O side chain in adherence and analysis of an rfb locus.

    PubMed Central

    Bilge, S S; Vary, J C; Dowell, S F; Tarr, P I

    1996-01-01

    Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli strains belonging to serotype O157 are important human pathogens, but the genetic basis of expression of the O157 antigen and the role played by the lipopolysaccharide O side chain in the adherence of this organism to epithelial cells are not understood. We performed TnphoA mutagenesis on E. coli O157:H7 strain 86-24 to identify a mutant (strain F12) deficient in O-antigen expression. Nucleotide sequence analysis demonstrated that the transposon inserted within an open reading frame with significant homology to rfbE of Vibrio cholerae O1 (U. H. Stroeher, L. E. Karageorgos, R. Morona, and P. A. Manning, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:2566-2570, 1992), which is postulated to encode perosamine synthetase. This open reading frame was designated rfbE(EcO157:H7). The guanine-plus-cytosine fraction (0.35) suggests that rfbE(EcO157:H7) may have originated in a species other than E. coli. rfbE(EcO157:H7) is conserved in nontoxigenic E. coli O157 strains expressing a variety of other flagellar antigens but is not found in E. coli O55:H7 strains, which are more closely related to E. coli O157:H7. Strain F12 was significantly more adherent to HeLa cells in a quantitative adherence assay than was its E. coli O157:H7 parent, but they did not differ in other phenotypes. Restoration of the expression of the O side chain by complementation of the TnphoA mutation in strain F12 by a plasmid expressing intact rfbE(EcO157:H7) reduced the adherence of the hyperadherent strain F12. We conclude that rfbE(EcO157:H7) is necessary for the expression of the O157 antigen, that acquisition of E. coli rfb genes occurred independently in E. coli O157:H7 and unrelated O157 strains, and that the O side chain of E. coli O157:H7 lipopolysaccharide interferes with the adherence of E. coli O157:H7 to epithelial cells. PMID:8890241

  8. A NIMA-Related Kinase Suppresses the Flagellar Instability Associated with the Loss of Multiple Axonemal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huawen; Zhang, Zhengyan; Guo, Suyang; Chen, Fan; Kessler, Jonathan M.; Wang, Yan Mei; Dutcher, Susan K.

    2015-01-01

    CCDC39 and CCDC40 were first identified as causative mutations in primary ciliary dyskinesia patients; cilia from patients show disorganized microtubules, and they are missing both N-DRC and inner dynein arms proteins. In Chlamydomonas, we used immunoblots and microtubule sliding assays to show that mutants in CCDC40 (PF7) and CCDC39 (PF8) fail to assemble N-DRC, several inner dynein arms, tektin, and CCDC39. Enrichment screens for suppression of pf7; pf8 cells led to the isolation of five independent extragenic suppressors defined by four different mutations in a NIMA-related kinase, CNK11. These alleles partially rescue the flagellar length defect, but not the motility defect. The suppressor does not restore the missing N-DRC and inner dynein arm proteins. In addition, the cnk11 mutations partially suppress the short flagella phenotype of N-DRC and axonemal dynein mutants, but do not suppress the motility defects. The tpg1 mutation in TTLL9, a tubulin polyglutamylase, partially suppresses the length phenotype in the same axonemal dynein mutants. In contrast to cnk11, tpg1 does not suppress the short flagella phenotype of pf7. The polyglutamylated tubulin in the proximal region that remains in the tpg1 mutant is reduced further in the pf7; tpg1 double mutant by immunofluorescence. CCDC40, which is needed for docking multiple other axonemal complexes, is needed for tubulin polyglutamylation in the proximal end of the flagella. The CCDC39 and CCDC40 proteins are likely to be involved in recruiting another tubulin glutamylase(s) to the flagella. Another difference between cnk11-1 and tpg1 mutants is that cnk11-1 cells show a faster turnover rate of tubulin at the flagellar tip than in wild-type flagella and tpg1 flagella show a slower rate. The double mutant shows a turnover rate similar to tpg1, which suggests the faster turnover rate in cnk11-1 flagella requires polyglutamylation. Thus, we hypothesize that many short flagella mutants in Chlamydomonas have increased

  9. pH dependence of CheA autophosphorylation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Conley, M P; Berg, H C; Tawa, P; Stewart, R C; Ellefson, D D; Wolfe, A J

    1994-01-01

    Chemotaxis by cells of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium depends upon the ability of chemoreceptors called transducers to communicate with switch components of flagellar motors to modulate swimming behavior. This communication requires an excitatory pathway composed of the cytoplasmic signal transduction proteins, CheAL, CheAS, CheW, CheY, and CheZ. Of these, the autokinase CheAL is most central. Modifications or mutations that affect the rate at which CheAL autophosphorylates result in profound chemotactic defects. Here we demonstrate that pH can affect CheAL autokinase activity in vitro. This activity exhibits a bell-shaped dependence upon pH within the range 6.5 to 10.0, consistent with the notion that two proton dissociation events affect CheAL autophosphorylation kinetics: one characterized by a pKa of about 8.1 and another exhibiting a pKa of about 8.9. These in vitro results predict a decrease in the rate of CheAL autophosphorylation in response to a reduction in intracellular pH, a decrease that should cause increased counterclockwise flagellar rotation. We observed such a response in vivo for cells containing a partially reconstituted chemotaxis system. Benzoate (10 mM, pH 7.0), a weak acid that when undissociated readily traverses the cytoplasmic membrane, causes a reduction of cytoplasmic pH from 7.6 to 7.3. In response to this reduction, cells expressing CheAL, CheAS, and CheY, but not transducers, exhibited a small but reproducible increase in the fraction of time that they spun their flagellar motors counterclockwise. The added presence of CheW and the transducers Tar and Trg resulted in a more dramatic response. The significance of our in vitro results, their relationships to regulation of swimming behavior, and the mechanisms by which transducers might affect the pH dependence of CheA autokinase activity are discussed. PMID:8021168

  10. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Sacher, Jessica C.; van Alphen, Lieke B.; Patry, Robert T.; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. PMID:26694450

  11. Flow visualization study on the near-surface motility of a flagellar propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Dongwook; Cho, Jaehyeong; Jin, Songwan; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2012-11-01

    Understanding of the near-surface motility of microorganisms is important in many bioengineering applications including the initial formation of biofilms and energy-efficient propulsion system which is the most important part of microrobots. In particular, a new type of propeller that is optimized for low Reynolds numbers is required to propel a small object in a medium where the flow is dominated by viscous force rather than inertial force. A propeller in the shape of a bacterial flagellum seems an appropriate choice for this purpose. Thus, in this study, we carried out a flow visualization study on the velocity field near the solid surface, induced by a spring-like propeller inspired by the E. coli flagellum, by using a macroscopic model and applying stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. Silicone oil, which has a kinematic viscosity 100,000 times that of water, was used as the working fluid to generate the low Reynolds number condition for the macroscopic model. Thrust, torque, and velocity were measured as functions of pitch and rotational speed, and the efficiency of the propeller was calculated from the measured results. The supports of the Basic Science Research Program (2009-0071117) and also by the Priority Research Centers Program (2011-0029613) through the NRF funded by the MEST, Republic of Korea are gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Internal and external components of the bacterial flagellar motor rotate as a unit.

    PubMed

    Hosu, Basarab G; Nathan, Vedavalli S J; Berg, Howard C

    2016-04-26

    Most bacteria that swim, including Escherichia coli, are propelled by helical filaments, each driven at its base by a rotary motor powered by a proton or a sodium ion electrochemical gradient. Each motor contains a number of stator complexes, comprising 4MotA 2MotB or 4PomA 2PomB, proteins anchored to the rigid peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. These proteins exert torque on a rotor that spans the inner membrane. A shaft connected to the rotor passes through the peptidoglycan and the outer membrane through bushings, the P and L rings, connecting to the filament by a flexible coupling known as the hook. Although the external components, the hook and the filament, are known to rotate, having been tethered to glass or marked by latex beads, the rotation of the internal components has remained only a reasonable assumption. Here, by using polarized light to bleach and probe an internal YFP-FliN fusion, we show that the innermost components of the cytoplasmic ring rotate at a rate similar to that of the hook. PMID:27071081

  13. A New Player at the Flagellar Motor: FliL Controls both Motor Output and Bias

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Jonathan D.; Nieto, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial flagellum is driven by a bidirectional rotary motor, which propels bacteria to swim through liquids or swarm over surfaces. While the functions of the major structural and regulatory components of the flagellum are known, the function of the well-conserved FliL protein is not. In Salmonella and Escherichia coli, the absence of FliL leads to a small defect in swimming but complete elimination of swarming. Here, we tracked single motors of these bacteria and found that absence of FliL decreases their speed as well as switching frequency. We demonstrate that FliL interacts strongly with itself, with the MS ring protein FliF, and with the stator proteins MotA and MotB and weakly with the rotor switch protein FliG. These and other experiments show that FliL increases motor output either by recruiting or stabilizing the stators or by increasing their efficiency and contributes additionally to torque generation at higher motor loads. The increased torque enabled by FliL explains why this protein is essential for swarming on an agar surface expected to offer increased resistance to bacterial movement. PMID:25714720

  14. Liberation of an interaction domain from the phosphotransfer region of CheA, a signaling kinase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, T B; Parkinson, J S

    1994-01-01

    The CheA protein of Escherichia coli is a histidine autokinase that donates its phosphate groups to two target proteins, CheY and CheB, to regulate flagellar rotation and sensory adaptation during chemotactic responses. The amino-terminal third of CheA contains the autophosphorylation site, determinants needed to interact with the catalytic center of the molecule, and determinants needed for specific recognition of its phosphorylation targets. To understand the structural basis for these activities, we examined the domain organization of the CheA phosphotransfer region by using DNA sequence analysis, limited proteolytic digestion, and a genetic technique called domain liberation. Comparison of the functionally interchangeable CheA proteins of E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium revealed two extensively mismatched segments within the phosphotransfer region, 22 and 25 aa long, with sequences characteristic of domain linkers. Both segments were readily susceptible to proteases, implying that they have an extended, flexible structure. In contrast, the intervening segments of the phosphotransfer region, designated P1 and P2 (roughly 140 and 65 aa, respectively), were relatively insensitive, suggesting they correspond to more compactly folded structural domains. Their functional properties were explored by identifying portions of the cheA coding region capable of interfering with chemotactic behavior when "liberated" and expressed as polypeptides. P1 fragments were not inhibitory, but P2 fragments blocked the interaction of CheY with the rotational switch at the flagellar motor, leading to incessant forward swimming. These results suggest that P2 contains CheY-binding determinants which are normally responsible for phosphotransfer specificity. Domain-liberation approaches should prove generally useful for analyzing multidomain proteins and their interaction targets. Images PMID:8202513

  15. Gastrointestinal antibody responses in axenic mice to topically administered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, J L; Molinari, J A

    1977-01-01

    Immunoglobulin levels were determined in gastrointestinal secretions of both conventional and axenic mice, as was the stability of the immunoglobulin classes in these secretions. Axenic animals were then administered nonviable Escherichia coli O111:B4 by topical application into the oral cavity. Immunoglobulin (Ig) A, IgG1, AND IgG2 were detected in the gastrointestinal secretions, with an apparent gradation in stability (IgA greater than IgG1 greater than IgG2) under the conditions investigated. Specific antibodies (IgA and IgG) to both the somatic and the flagellar antigens of E. coli were demonstrated. The time course of the responses to the polysaccharide and protein antigens suggested that a secondary response to lipolysaccharide was being observed in the secretions. Examination of the autoclaved diet fed to the germfree animals indicated the presence of antigenically intact polysaccharide materials (i.e., lipopolysaccharides), whereas antigenic bacterial proteins were uniformly undetectable. Therefore, endotoxin in the diet was apparently causing a primary type of sensitization in the mice, whereas the active oral immunization regimen induced a secondary antibacterial response in the secretions. PMID:330399

  16. Polyphenols from olive mill waste affect biofilm formation and motility in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Carraro, Lisa; Fasolato, Luca; Montemurro, Filomena; Martino, Maria Elena; Balzan, Stefania; Servili, Maurizio; Novelli, Enrico; Cardazzo, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Olive mill wastes are sources of phenolic compounds with a wide array of biological activities, including antimicrobial effects. A potential option for bioremediation to overcome ecological problems is the reutilization of these natural compounds in food production. The aim of this work was to gain a better understanding of the antimicrobial mode of action of a phenols extract from olive vegetation water (PEOVW) at molecular level by studying Escherichia coli as a model microorganism. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed on E. coli K-12 exposed to PEOVW. The repression of genes for flagellar synthesis and the involvement of genes linked to biofilm formation and stress response were observed. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of PEOVW significantly decreased biofilm formation, swarming and swimming motility, thus confirming the gene expression data. This study provides interesting insights on the molecular action of PEOVW on E. coli K-12. Given these anti-biofilm properties and considering that biofilm formation is a serious problem for the food industry and human health, PEOVW has proved to be a high-value natural product. Olive mill wastes are sources of phenolic compounds with a wide array of biological activities, including antimicrobial effects. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed on E. coli K-12 exposed to phenols extract from olive vegetation water (PEOVW). Sub-inhibitory concentrations of PEOVW significantly decreased biofilm formation, swarming and swimming motility. Given these anti-biofilm properties PEOVW has proved to be a high-value natural product. PMID:24628798

  17. Flagellar Movement in Two Bacteria of the Family Rickettsiaceae: A Re-Evaluation of Motility in an Evolutionary Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Claudia; Boscaro, Vittorio; Ferrantini, Filippo; Benken, Konstantin A.; Mironov, Timofei I.; Schweikert, Michael; Görtz, Hans-Dieter; Fokin, Sergei I.; Sabaneyeva, Elena V.; Petroni, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria of the family Rickettsiaceae have always been largely studied not only for their importance in the medical field, but also as model systems in evolutionary biology. In fact, they share a recent common ancestor with mitochondria. The most studied species, belonging to genera Rickettsia and Orientia, are hosted by terrestrial arthropods and include many human pathogens. Nevertheless, recent findings show that a large part of Rickettsiaceae biodiversity actually resides outside the group of well-known pathogenic bacteria. Collecting data on these recently described non-conventional members of the family is crucial in order to gain information on ancestral features of the whole group. Although bacteria of the family Rickettsiaceae, and of the whole order Rickettsiales, are formally described as non-flagellated prokaryotes, some recent findings renewed the debate about this feature. In this paper we report the first finding of members of the family displaying numerous flagella and active movement inside their host cells. These two new taxa are hosted in aquatic environments by protist ciliates and are described here by means of ultrastructural and molecular characterization. Data here reported suggest that the ancestor of Rickettsiales displayed flagellar movement and re-evaluate the hypothesis that motility played a key-role in the origin of mitochondria. Moreover, our study highlights that the aquatic environment represents a well exploited habitat for bacteria of the family Rickettsiaceae. Our results encourage a deep re-consideration of ecological and morphological traits of the family and of the whole order. PMID:24505307

  18. Function of FlhB, a membrane protein implicated in the bacterial flagellar type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A; Barker, Clive S; Kostyukova, Alla S; Samatey, Fadel A

    2013-01-01

    The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system, and it plays an active role in the regulation of protein export. In this study conserved properties of FlhB that are important for its function were investigated. Replacing the flhB gene (or part of the gene) in Salmonella typhimurium with the flhB gene of the distantly related bacterium Aquifex aeolicus greatly reduces motility. However, motility can be restored to some extent by spontaneous mutations in the part of flhB gene coding for the cytoplasmic domain of Aquifex FlhB. Structural analysis suggests that these mutations destabilize the structure. The secondary structure and stability of the mutated cytoplasmic fragments of FlhB have been studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results suggest that conformational flexibility could be important for FlhB function. An extragenic suppressor mutation in the fliS gene, which decreases the affinity of FliS to FliC, partially restores motility of the FlhB substitution mutants. PMID:23874605

  19. Serine 26 in the PomB Subunit of the Flagellar Motor Is Essential for Hypermotility of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Halang, Petra; Vorburger, Thomas; Steuber, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is motile by means of its single polar flagellum which is driven by the sodium-motive force. In the motor driving rotation of the flagellar filament, a stator complex consisting of subunits PomA and PomB converts the electrochemical sodium ion gradient into torque. Charged or polar residues within the membrane part of PomB could act as ligands for Na+, or stabilize a hydrogen bond network by interacting with water within the putative channel between PomA and PomB. By analyzing a large data set of individual tracks of swimming cells, we show that S26 located within the transmembrane helix of PomB is required to promote very fast swimming of V. cholerae. Loss of hypermotility was observed with the S26T variant of PomB at pH 7.0, but fast swimming was restored by decreasing the H+ concentration of the external medium. Our study identifies S26 as a second important residue besides D23 in the PomB channel. It is proposed that S26, together with D23 located in close proximity, is important to perturb the hydration shell of Na+ before its passage through a constriction within the stator channel. PMID:25874792

  20. A hydrodynamics approach to the evolution of multicellularity: flagellar motility and germ-soma differentiation in volvocalean green algae.

    PubMed

    Solari, Cristian A; Kessler, John O; Michod, Richard E

    2006-04-01

    During the unicellular-multicellular transition, there are opportunities and costs associated with larger size. We argue that germ-soma separation evolved to counteract the increasing costs and requirements of larger multicellular colonies. Volvocalean green algae are uniquely suited for studying this transition because they range from unicells to multicellular individuals with germ-soma separation. Because Volvocales need flagellar beating for movement and to avoid sinking, their motility is modeled and analyzed experimentally using standard hydrodynamics. We provide comparative hydrodynamic data of an algal lineage composed of organisms of different sizes and degrees of complexity. In agreement with and extending the insights of Koufopanou, we show that the increase in cell specialization as colony size increases can be explained in terms of increased motility requirements. First, as colony size increases, soma must evolve, the somatic-to-reproductive cell ratio increasing to keep colonies buoyant and motile. Second, increased germ-soma specialization in larger colonies increases motility capabilities because internalization of nonflagellated germ cells decreases colony drag. Third, our analysis yields a limiting maximum size of the volvocalean spheroid that agrees with the sizes of the largest species known. Finally, the different colony designs in Volvocales reflect the trade-offs between reproduction, colony size, and motility. PMID:16670996

  1. A novel flagellar sheath protein, FcpA, determines filament coiling, translational motility and virulence for the Leptospira spirochete.

    PubMed

    Wunder, Elsio A; Figueira, Cláudio P; Benaroudj, Nadia; Hu, Bo; Tong, Brian A; Trajtenberg, Felipe; Liu, Jun; Reis, Mitermayer G; Charon, Nyles W; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Picardeau, Mathieu; Ko, Albert I

    2016-08-01

    Leptospira are unique among bacteria based on their helical cell morphology with hook-shaped ends and the presence of periplasmic flagella (PF) with pronounced spontaneous supercoiling. The factors that provoke such supercoiling, as well as the role that PF coiling plays in generating the characteristic hook-end cell morphology and motility, have not been elucidated. We have now identified an abundant protein from the pathogen L. interrogans, exposed on the PF surface, and named it Flagellar-coiling protein A (FcpA). The gene encoding FcpA is highly conserved among Leptospira and was not found in other bacteria. fcpA(-) mutants, obtained from clinical isolates or by allelic exchange, had relatively straight, smaller-diameter PF, and were not able to produce translational motility. These mutants lost their ability to cause disease in the standard hamster model of leptospirosis. Complementation of fcpA restored the wild-type morphology, motility and virulence phenotypes. In summary, we identified a novel Leptospira 36-kDa protein, the main component of the spirochete's PF sheath, and a key determinant of the flagella's coiled structure. FcpA is essential for bacterial translational motility and to enable the spirochete to penetrate the host, traverse tissue barriers, disseminate to cause systemic infection and reach target organs. PMID:27113476

  2. The tetrameric MotA complex as the core of the flagellar motor stator from hyperthermophilic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Takekawa, Norihiro; Terahara, Naoya; Kato, Takayuki; Gohara, Mizuki; Mayanagi, Kouta; Hijikata, Atsushi; Onoue, Yasuhiro; Kojima, Seiji; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Namba, Keiichi; Homma, Michio

    2016-01-01

    Rotation of bacterial flagellar motor is driven by the interaction between the stator and rotor, and the driving energy is supplied by ion influx through the stator channel. The stator is composed of the MotA and MotB proteins, which form a hetero-hexameric complex with a stoichiometry of four MotA and two MotB molecules. MotA and MotB are four- and single-transmembrane proteins, respectively. To generate torque, the MotA/MotB stator unit changes its conformation in response to the ion influx, and interacts with the rotor protein FliG. Here, we overproduced and purified MotA of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. A chemical crosslinking experiment revealed that MotA formed a multimeric complex, most likely a tetramer. The three-dimensional structure of the purified MotA, reconstructed by electron microscopy single particle imaging, consisted of a slightly elongated globular domain and a pair of arch-like domains with spiky projections, likely to correspond to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, respectively. We show that MotA molecules can form a stable tetrameric complex without MotB, and for the first time, demonstrate the cytoplasmic structure of the stator. PMID:27531865

  3. The Three-Dimensional Structure of the Flagellar Rotor from a Clockwise-Locked Mutant of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dennis R.; Francis, Noreen R.; Xu, Chen; DeRosier, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional reconstructions from electron cryomicrographs of the rotor of the flagellar motor reveal that the symmetry of individual M rings varies from 24-fold to 26-fold while that of the C rings, containing the two motor/switch proteins FliM and FliN, varies from 32-fold to 36-fold, with no apparent correlation between the symmetries of the two rings. Results from other studies provided evidence that, in addition to the transmembrane protein FliF, at least some part of the third motor/switch protein, FliG, contributes to a thickening on the face of the M ring, but there was no evidence as to whether or not any portion of FliG also contributes to the C ring. Of the four morphological features in the cross section of the C ring, the feature closest to the M ring is not present with the rotational symmetry of the rest of the C ring, but instead it has the symmetry of the M ring. We suggest that this inner feature arises from a domain of FliG. We present a hypothetical docking in which the C-terminal motor domain of FliG lies in the C ring, where it can interact intimately with FliM. PMID:17015643

  4. The tetrameric MotA complex as the core of the flagellar motor stator from hyperthermophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Takekawa, Norihiro; Terahara, Naoya; Kato, Takayuki; Gohara, Mizuki; Mayanagi, Kouta; Hijikata, Atsushi; Onoue, Yasuhiro; Kojima, Seiji; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Namba, Keiichi; Homma, Michio

    2016-01-01

    Rotation of bacterial flagellar motor is driven by the interaction between the stator and rotor, and the driving energy is supplied by ion influx through the stator channel. The stator is composed of the MotA and MotB proteins, which form a hetero-hexameric complex with a stoichiometry of four MotA and two MotB molecules. MotA and MotB are four- and single-transmembrane proteins, respectively. To generate torque, the MotA/MotB stator unit changes its conformation in response to the ion influx, and interacts with the rotor protein FliG. Here, we overproduced and purified MotA of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. A chemical crosslinking experiment revealed that MotA formed a multimeric complex, most likely a tetramer. The three-dimensional structure of the purified MotA, reconstructed by electron microscopy single particle imaging, consisted of a slightly elongated globular domain and a pair of arch-like domains with spiky projections, likely to correspond to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, respectively. We show that MotA molecules can form a stable tetrameric complex without MotB, and for the first time, demonstrate the cytoplasmic structure of the stator. PMID:27531865

  5. Genetic recombination. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, F.W.

    1987-02-01

    The molecular pathways of gene recombination are explored and compared in studies of the model organisms, Escherichia coli and phase lambda. In the discussion of data from these studies it seems that recombination varies with the genetic idiosyncrasies of the organism and may also vary within a single organism.

  6. Overproduction of the MotA protein of Escherichia coli and estimation of its wild-type level.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M L; Macnab, R M

    1988-01-01

    The motA gene of Escherichia coli was placed under the control of a high-level promoter, that of the tryptophan operon of Serratia marcescens. In the presence of the inducer beta-indoleacrylic acid, MotA was synthesized at greatly elevated levels and inserted without apparent limit into the inner membrane. Growth and motility were impaired, but not drastically so, indicating that MotA by itself does not act as a proton ionophore. Antibody raised against the overproduced protein was used to estimate that a wild-type cell contained 600 +/- 250 copies of MotA. This number is more than would be needed to surround each flagellar basal body with a single circlet of MotA protein; possible interpretations of the result are discussed. The antibody was also used to establish that the MotA protein of Salmonella typhimurium has a similar molecular weight to that of E. coli and is immunologically cross-reactive with it; functional complementation of S. typhimurium motA mutants by the E. coli gene was established. Images PMID:2828314

  7. Genome sequence of Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans strain 4834-R reveals that flagellar motility is not a general feature of xanthomonads

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Xanthomonads are plant-associated bacteria responsible for diseases on economically important crops. Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans (Xff) is one of the causal agents of common bacterial blight of bean. In this study, the complete genome sequence of strain Xff 4834-R was determined and compared to other Xanthomonas genome sequences. Results Comparative genomics analyses revealed core characteristics shared between Xff 4834-R and other xanthomonads including chemotaxis elements, two-component systems, TonB-dependent transporters, secretion systems (from T1SS to T6SS) and multiple effectors. For instance a repertoire of 29 Type 3 Effectors (T3Es) with two Transcription Activator-Like Effectors was predicted. Mobile elements were associated with major modifications in the genome structure and gene content in comparison to other Xanthomonas genomes. Notably, a deletion of 33 kbp affects flagellum biosynthesis in Xff 4834-R. The presence of a complete flagellar cluster was assessed in a collection of more than 300 strains representing different species and pathovars of Xanthomonas. Five percent of the tested strains presented a deletion in the flagellar cluster and were non-motile. Moreover, half of the Xff strains isolated from the same epidemic than 4834-R was non-motile and this ratio was conserved in the strains colonizing the next bean seed generations. Conclusions This work describes the first genome of a Xanthomonas strain pathogenic on bean and reports the existence of non-motile xanthomonads belonging to different species and pathovars. Isolation of such Xff variants from a natural epidemic may suggest that flagellar motility is not a key function for in planta fitness. PMID:24195767

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Intact Flagella of Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei Cells Identifies Novel Flagellar Proteins with Unique Sub-localization and Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Subota, Ines; Julkowska, Daria; Vincensini, Laetitia; Reeg, Nele; Buisson, Johanna; Blisnick, Thierry; Huet, Diego; Perrot, Sylvie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Duchateau, Magalie; Hourdel, Véronique; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Cayet, Nadège; Namane, Abdelkader; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are complex organelles made of hundreds of proteins of highly variable structures and functions. Here we report the purification of intact flagella from the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei using mechanical shearing. Structural preservation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that showed that flagella still contained typical elements such as the membrane, the axoneme, the paraflagellar rod, and the intraflagellar transport particles. It also revealed that flagella severed below the basal body, and were not contaminated by other cytoskeletal structures such as the flagellar pocket collar or the adhesion zone filament. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 751 proteins with high confidence, including 88% of known flagellar components. Comparison with the cell debris fraction revealed that more than half of the flagellum markers were enriched in flagella and this enrichment criterion was taken into account to identify 212 proteins not previously reported to be associated to flagella. Nine of these were experimentally validated including a 14-3-3 protein not yet reported to be associated to flagella and eight novel proteins termed FLAM (FLAgellar Member). Remarkably, they localized to five different subdomains of the flagellum. For example, FLAM6 is restricted to the proximal half of the axoneme, no matter its length. In contrast, FLAM8 is progressively accumulating at the distal tip of growing flagella and half of it still needs to be added after cell division. A combination of RNA interference and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching approaches demonstrated very different dynamics from one protein to the other, but also according to the stage of construction and the age of the flagellum. Structural proteins are added to the distal tip of the elongating flagellum and exhibit slow turnover whereas membrane proteins such as the arginine kinase show rapid turnover without a detectible polarity. PMID:24741115

  9. Protein kinase C is likely to be involved in zoosporogenesis and maintenance of flagellar motility in the peronosporomycete zoospores.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Tofazzal; von Tiedemann, Andreas; Laatsch, Hartmut

    2011-08-01

    The motility of zoospores is critical in the disease cycles of Peronosporomycetes that cause devastating diseases in plants, fishes, vertebrates, and microbes. In the course of screening for secondary metabolites, we found that ethyl acetate extracts of a marine Streptomyces sp. strain B5136 rapidly impaired the motility of zoospores of the grapevine downy mildew pathogen Plasmopara viticola at 0.1 μg/ml. The active principle in the extracts was identified as staurosporine, a known broad-spectrum inhibitor of protein kinases, including protein kinase C (PKC). In the presence of staurosporine (2 nM), zoospores moved very slowly in their axis or spun in tight circles, instead of displaying straight swimming in a helical fashion. Compounds such as K-252a, K-252b, and K-252c structurally related to staurosporine also impaired the motility of zoospores in a similar manner but at varying doses. Among the 22 known kinase inhibitors tested, the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine was the most potent to arrest the motility of zoospores at concentrations starting from 5 nM. Inhibitors that targeted kinase pathways other than PKC pathways did not practically show any activity in impairing zoospore motility. Interestingly, both staurosporine (5 nM) and chelerythrine (10 nM) also inhibited the release of zoospores from the P. viticola sporangia in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, staurosporine completely suppressed downy mildew disease in grapevine leaves at 2 μM, suggesting the potential of small-molecule PKC inhibitors for the control of peronosporomycete phytopathogens. Taken together, these results suggest that PKC is likely to be a key signaling mediator associated with zoosporogenesis and the maintenance of flagellar motility in peronosporomycete zoospores. PMID:21486142

  10. Timing of flagellar gene expression in the Caulobacter cell cycle is determined by a transcriptional cascade of positive regulatory genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, N; Chen, L S; Mullin, D A; Newton, A

    1991-01-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus flagellar (fla) genes are organized in a regulatory hierarchy in which genes at each level are required for expression of those at the next lower level. To determine the role of this hierarchy in the timing of fla gene expression, we have examined the organization and cell cycle regulation of genes located in the hook gene cluster. As shown here, this cluster is organized into four multicistronic transcription units flaN, flbG, flaO, and flbF that contain fla genes plus a fifth transcription unit II.1 of unknown function. Transcription unit II.1 is regulated independently of the fla gene hierarchy, and it is expressed with a unique pattern of periodicity very late in the cell cycle. The flaN, flbG, and flaO operons are all transcribed periodically, and flaO, which is near the top of the hierarchy and required in trans for the activation of flaN and flbG operons, is expressed earlier in the cell cycle than the other two transcription units. We have shown that delaying flaO transcription by fusing it to the II.1 promoter also delayed the subsequent expression of the flbG operon and the 27- and 25-kDa flagellin genes that are at the bottom of the regulatory hierarchy. Thus, the sequence and timing of fla gene expression in the cell cycle are determined in large measure by the positions of these genes in the regulatory hierarchy. These results also suggest that periodic transcription is a general feature of fla gene expression in C. crescentus. Images PMID:1847367

  11. ATG24 Represses Autophagy and Differentiation and Is Essential for Homeostasy of the Flagellar Pocket in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Brennand, Ana; Rico, Eva; Rigden, Daniel J.; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Michels, Paul A. M.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously identified homologs for nearly half of the approximately 30 known yeast Atg’s in the genome database of the human sleeping sickness parasite Trypanosoma brucei. So far, only a few of these homologs have their role in autophagy experimentally confirmed. Among the candidates was the ortholog of Atg24 that is involved in pexophagy in yeast. In T. brucei, the peroxisome-like organelles named glycosomes harbor core metabolic processes, especially glycolysis. In the autotrophic yeast, autophagy is essential for adaptation to different nutritional environments by participating in the renewal of the peroxisome population. We hypothesized that autophagic turnover of the parasite’s glycosomes plays a role in differentiation during its life cycle, which demands adaptation to different host environments and associated dramatic changes in nutritional conditions. We therefore characterized T. brucei ATG24, the T. brucei ortholog of yeast Atg24 and mammalian SNX4, and found it to have a regulatory role in autophagy and differentiation as well as endocytic trafficking. ATG24 partially localized on endocytic membranes where it was recruited via PI3-kinase III/VPS34. ATG24 silencing severely impaired receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin, but not adsorptive uptake of a lectin, and caused a major enlargement of the flagellar pocket. ATG24 silencing approximately doubled the number of autophagosomes, suggesting a role in repressing autophagy, and strongly accelerated differentiation, in accordance with a role of autophagy in parasite differentiation. Overexpression of the two isoforms of T. brucei ATG8 fused to GFP slowed down differentiation, possibly by a dominant-negative effect. This was overcome by ATG24 depletion, further supporting its regulatory role. PMID:26090847

  12. The predominant calcimedins from Trypanosoma brucei comprise a family of flagellar EF-hand calcium-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y; Haghighat, N G; Ruben, L

    1992-01-01

    The cellular complement of calcimedins was identified in Trypanosoma brucei by Ca(2+)-dependent association with phenyl-Sepharose. Predominant calcimedins with molecular mass of 23-26 kDa and 44 kDa, along with minor calcimedins of 96, 120 and 230 kDa, were obtained. The trypanosome calcimedins were unrelated to vertebrate annexins, based upon antibody cross-reactivity and an inability to associate in a Ca(2+)-dependent way with phospholipid vesicles comprised of phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylethanolamine/phosphatidylcholine (1:1, w/w). Partial sequence analysis demonstrated that 44 kDa calcimedin (Tb-44) contained an EF-hand calcium-binding loop. Five CNBr/tryptic fragments exhibited a total of 93% similarity with Tb-17, a 23 kDa EF-hand protein in T. brucei. The trypanosome calcimedins appeared to comprise a family of proteins, based on sequence similarities and antibody cross-reactivity of affinity-purified anti-Tb44 with the 23-26 kDa cluster. No evidence was found for Tb-44 in the related species T. cruzi, Leishmania taraentolae or Crithidia fasciculata. Antibodies against Tb-44 were localized by immunofluorescence along the flagellum of T. brucei. Immunoblot analysis of flagella-enriched preparations demonstrated that Tb-44 and the 23-26 kDa cluster were present in this structure. We conclude that annexin family members are not among the predominant trypanosome proteins that associate with phenyl-Sepharose in a Ca(2+)-dependent way. Instead, the major trypanosome calcimedins comprise a family of flagellar EF-hand calcium-binding proteins. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1417772

  13. β-carotene-producing bacteria residing in the intestine provide vitamin A to mouse tissues in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wassef, Lesley; Wirawan, Ruth; Chikindas, Michael; Breslin, Paul A S; Hoffman, Daniel J; Quadro, Loredana

    2014-05-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is an overwhelming public health problem that affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. A definitive solution to VAD has yet to be identified. Because it is an essential nutrient, vitamin A or its carotenoid precursor β-carotene can only be obtained from food or supplements. In this study, we wanted to establish whether β-carotene produced in the mouse intestine by bacteria synthesizing the provitamin A carotenoid could be delivered to various tissues within the body. To achieve this, we took advantage of the Escherichia coli MG1655*, an intestine-adapted spontaneous mutant of E. coli MG1655, and the plasmid pAC-BETA, containing the genes coding for the 4 key enzymes of the β-carotene biosynthetic pathway (geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase, phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, and lycopene cyclase) from Erwinia herbicola. We engineered the E. coli MG1655* to produce β-carotene during transformation with pAC-BETA (MG1655*-βC) and gavaged wild-type and knockout mice for the enzyme β-carotene 15,15'-oxygenase with this recombinant strain. Various regimens of bacteria administration were tested (single vs. multiple and low vs. high doses). β-Carotene concentration was measured by HPLC in mouse serum, liver, intestine, and feces. Enumeration of MG1655*-βC cells in the feces was performed to assess efficiency of intestinal colonization. We demonstrated in vivo that probiotic bacteria could be used to deliver vitamin A to the tissues of a mammalian host. These results have the potential to pave the road for future investigations aimed at identifying alternative, novel approaches to treat VAD. PMID:24598882

  14. Two new species of Piaroa (Arachnida: Schizomida, Hubbardiidae) from Colombia, with comments on the genus taxonomy and the flagellar setae pattern of Hubbardiinae.

    PubMed

    Moreno-González, Jairo A; Delgado-Santa, Leonardo; De Armas, Luis F

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of the genus Piaroa Villarreal, Tourinho & Giupponi, 2008, P. escalerete sp. nov. and P. bacata sp. nov. are described from Valle del Cauca, and Cundinamarca departments, Colombia, respectively. The female flagellum is fully illustrated for a Piaroa species for the first time; the generic diagnosis is also emended and the relationships of the new species with those previously described are discussed. New characters for Piaroa species, a new nomenclature for the chitinized arch and a reinterpretation of the Hubbardiinae flagellar setae pattern are proposed. A distribution map of the known species of Piaroa is provided.  PMID:25284395

  15. Comparison of ruminant and human attaching and effacing Escherichia coli (AEEC) strains.

    PubMed

    Horcajo, Pilar; Domínguez-Bernal, Gustavo; de la Fuente, Ricardo; Ruiz-Santa-Quiteria, José A; Blanco, Jesús E; Blanco, Miguel; Mora, Azucena; Dahbi, Ghizlane; López, Cecilia; Puentes, Beatriz; Alonso, María Pilar; Blanco, Jorge; Orden, José A

    2012-03-23

    The presence of 12 genes associated with virulence in human attaching and effacing Escherichia coli (AEEC) was studied within a collection of 20 enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) and 206 atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) isolated from ruminants. In addition, virulence genes and the clonal relationship of 49 atypical EPEC O26 strains isolated from humans and ruminants were compared to clarify whether ruminants serve as a reservoir of atypical EPEC for humans. A great diversity in the content of virulence gene was found. Thus, the espH, espG and map genes were detected in more than 85% of ruminant AEEC strains; the tccP2, espI, efa1/lifA, ehxA and paa genes were present in 50-70% of strains; and other genes such as tccP, espP, katP and toxB were detected in <25% of strains. EHEC strains contained more virulence genes than atypical EPEC strains. Our results suggest for the first time that the efa1/lifA gene is associated with diarrhea in newborn ruminants and that the AEEC strains with the H11 flagellar antigen are potentially more virulent than the non-H11 AEEC strains. Importantly, we identified a new intimin variant gene, eaeρ, in three ruminant atypical EPEC strains. The comparison of ruminant and human EPEC O26 strains showed that some ruminant strains possess virulence gene profiles and pulse-field gel electrophoresis pulsotypes similar to those of human strains. In conclusion, our data suggest that atypical EPEC is a heterogeneous group with different pathogenic potential and that ruminants could serve as a reservoir of atypical EPEC for humans. PMID:21958746

  16. Two distinct regions in the model protein Peb1 are critical for its heterologous transport out of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is frequently the first-choice host organism in expression of heterologous recombinant proteins in basic research as well as in production of commercial, therapeutic polypeptides. Especially the secretion of proteins into the culture medium of E. coli is advantageous compared to intracellular production due to the ease in recovery of the recombinant protein. Since E. coli naturally is a poor secretor of proteins, a few strategies for optimization of extracellular secretion have been described. We have previously reported efficient secretion of the diagnostically interesting model protein Peb1 of Campylobacter jejuni into the growth medium of Escherichia coli strain MKS12 (ΔfliCfliD). To generate a more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind this interesting heterologous secretion system with biotechnological implications, we here analyzed further the transport of Peb1 in the E. coli host. Results When mature Peb1 was expressed without its SecA-YEG -dependent signal sequence and without the putative signal peptidase II recognition sequence in E. coli MKS111ΔHBB lacking the flagellar secretion complex, the protein was found in the periplasm and growth medium which indicated a flagellum-independent translocation. We assessed the Peb1 secretion proficiency by an exhaustive search for transport-affecting regions using a transposition-based scanning mutagenesis strategy. Strikingly, insertion mutagenesis of only two segments, called TAR1 (residues 42 and 43) and TAR2 (residues 173 to 180), prevented Peb1 secretion individually. We confirmed the importance of TAR regions by subsequent site-specific mutagenesis and verified that the secretion deficiency of Peb1 mutants was not due to insolubility or aggregation of the proteins in the cytoplasm. We found by cell fractionation that the mutant proteins were present in the periplasm as well as in the cytoplasm of MKS12. Hence, mutagenesis of TAR regions did not affect export of

  17. Localization of the Salmonella typhimurium flagellar switch protein FliG to the cytoplasmic M-ring face of the basal body.

    PubMed Central

    Francis, N R; Irikura, V M; Yamaguchi, S; DeRosier, D J; Macnab, R M

    1992-01-01

    The direction of rotation of the bacterial flagellum is determined by the flagellar switch. We have localized FliG, one of the switch proteins of Salmonella typhimurium, to the cytoplasmic face of the M ring of the flagellar basal body. This localization was made possible by the discovery of two spontaneous mutants in which the fliF (M ring) and fliG (switch) genes were fused in-frame. In the first mutant, a deletion of 7 base pairs at the 3' end of fliF resulted in an essentially full-length fusion protein. In the second mutant, a larger deletion resulted in a fusion in which 56 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus of FliF and 94 amino acids from the amino terminus of FliG were lost. Both strains were motile and underwent switching; the first strain had a clockwise bias, and the second strain had a counterclockwise bias. Gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting of isolated hook-basal-body complexes verified that they contained the fusion proteins. Electron microscopy revealed additional mass at the cytoplasmic face of the M ring, which could be decorated with anti-FliG antibody. We conclude that the natural location for FliG is at the cytoplasmic face of the M ring and that the stoichiometric ratio between FliF and FliG in wild-type cells is probably 1:1. Images PMID:1631122

  18. The RcsCDB signaling system and swarming motility in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium: dual regulation of flagellar and SPI-2 virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingfeng; Zhao, Yifang; McClelland, Michael; Harshey, Rasika M

    2007-12-01

    The Rcs phosphorelay is a multicomponent signaling system that positively regulates colanic acid synthesis and negatively regulates motility and virulence. We have exploited a spontaneously isolated mutant, IgaA(T191P), that is nearly maximally activated for the Rcs system to identify a vast set of genes that respond to the stimulation, and we report new regulatory properties of this signaling system in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Microarray data show that the Rcs system normally functions as a positive regulator of SPI-2 and other genes important for the growth of Salmonella in macrophages, although when highly activated the system completely represses the SPI-1/SPI-2 virulence, flagellar, and fimbrial biogenesis pathways. The auxiliary protein RcsA, which works with RcsB to positively regulate colanic acid and other target genes, not only stimulates but also antagonizes the positive regulation of many genes in the igaA mutant. We show that RcsB represses motility through the RcsB box in the promoter region of the master operon flhDC and that RcsA is not required for this regulation. Curiously, RcsB selectively stimulates expression of the flagellar type 3 secretion genes fliPQR; an RcsAB box located downstream of fliR influences this regulation. We show that excess colanic acid impairs swimming and inhibits swarming motility, consistent with the inverse regulation of the two pathways by the Rcs system. PMID:17905992

  19. Emerging Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains?

    PubMed Central

    Irino, Kinue; Girão, Dennys M.; Girão, Valéria B.C.; Guth, Beatriz E.C.; Vaz, Tânia M.I.; Moreira, Fabiana C.; Chinarelli, Silvia H.; Vieira, Mônica A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains of nonenteropathogenic serogroups carrying eae but lacking the enteropathogenic E. coli adherence factor plasmid and Shiga toxin DNA probe sequences were isolated from patients (children, adults, and AIDS patients) with and without diarrhea in Brazil. Although diverse in phenotype and genotype, some strains are potentially diarrheagenic. PMID:15504277

  20. ArcA Controls Metabolism, Chemotaxis, and Motility Contributing to the Pathogenicity of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fengwei; An, Chunxia; Bao, Yinli; Zhao, Xuefeng; Jernigan, Robert L.; Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan; Li, Ling; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Nolan, Lisa K.; Lu, Chengping

    2015-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains cause one of the three most significant infectious diseases in the poultry industry and are also potential food-borne pathogens threating human health. In this study, we showed that ArcA (aerobic respiratory control), a global regulator important for E. coli's adaptation from anaerobic to aerobic conditions and control of that bacterium's enzymatic defenses against reactive oxygen species (ROS), is involved in the virulence of APEC. Deletion of arcA significantly attenuates the virulence of APEC in the duck model. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) analyses comparing the APEC wild type and the arcA mutant indicate that ArcA regulates the expression of 129 genes, including genes involved in citrate transport and metabolism, flagellum synthesis, and chemotaxis. Further investigations revealed that citCEFXG contributed to APEC's microaerobic growth at the lag and log phases when cultured in duck serum and that ArcA played a dual role in the control of citrate metabolism and transportation. In addition, deletion of flagellar genes motA and motB and chemotaxis gene cheA significantly attenuated the virulence of APEC, and ArcA was shown to directly regulate the expression of motA, motB, and cheA. The combined results indicate that ArcA controls metabolism, chemotaxis, and motility contributing to the pathogenicity of APEC. PMID:26099584

  1. Enhancing functional expression of heterologous lipase B in Escherichia coli by extracellular secretion.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Niju; Khan, Manal; Chou, C Perry

    2010-04-01

    Functional expression of recombinant Pseudozyma antarctica lipase B (PalB) in Escherichia coli has been technically problematic due to protein misfolding, ineffective disulfide bond formation, and protein instability associated with intracellular proteolysis. To overcome these problems, an alternative approach was explored in this study by extracellular secretion of PalB via two Sec-independent secretion systems, i.e., the alpha-hemolysin (type I) and the modified flagellar (type III) secretion systems, which can export proteins of interest from the cytoplasm directly to the exterior of the cell. Both shaker flask and bioreactor cultivations were performed to characterize the developed PalB expression/secretion systems. Bioactive PalB was expressed and secreted extracellularly either as a HlyA fusion (i.e., PalB-HlyA via type I system) or an intact protein (via type III system). However, the secretion intermediates in the intracellular fraction of culture samples were non-bioactive even though they were soluble, suggesting that the extracellular secretion did mediate the development of PalB activity. Also importantly, the secretion strategy appeared to have a minimum impact on cell physiology. PalB secretion via the type I system was fast with higher specific PalB activities but poor cell growth. On the other hand, the secretion via the type III system was slow with lower specific PalB activities but effective cell growth. PMID:20039191

  2. A Network Biology Approach to Decipher Stress Response in Bacteria Using Escherichia coli As a Model.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Shashwat Deepali; Aggarwal, Bhavye; Joon, Shikha; Bhatnagar, Rakesh; Bhatnagar, Sonika

    2016-05-01

    The development of drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria poses challenges to global health for their treatment and control. In this context, stress response enables bacterial populations to survive extreme perturbations in the environment but remains poorly understood. Specific modules are activated for unique stressors with few recognized global regulators. The phenomenon of cross-stress protection strongly suggests the presence of central proteins that control the diverse stress responses. In this work, Escherichia coli was used to model the bacterial stress response. A Protein-Protein Interaction Network was generated by integrating differentially expressed genes in eight stress conditions of pH, temperature, and antibiotics with relevant gene ontology terms. Topological analysis identified 24 central proteins. The well-documented role of 16 central proteins in stress indicates central control of the response, while the remaining eight proteins may have a novel role in stress response. Cluster analysis of the generated network implicated RNA binding, flagellar assembly, ABC transporters, and DNA repair as important processes during response to stress. Pathway analysis showed crosstalk of Two Component Systems with metabolic processes, oxidative phosphorylation, and ABC transporters. The results were further validated by analysis of an independent cross-stress protection dataset. This study also reports on the ways in which bacterial stress response can progress to biofilm formation. In conclusion, we suggest that drug targets or pathways disrupting bacterial stress responses can potentially be exploited to combat antibiotic tolerance and multidrug resistance in the future. PMID:27195968

  3. Investigation of in vivo cross-talk between key two-component systems of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Verhamme, Daniël T; Arents, Jos C; Postma, Pieter W; Crielaard, Wim; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2002-01-01

    Intracellular signal transfer in bacteria is dominated by phosphoryl transfer between conserved transmitter and receiver domains in regulatory proteins of so-called two-component systems. Escherichia coli contains 30 such systems, which allow it to modulate gene expression, enzyme activity and the direction of flagellar rotation. The authors have investigated whether, and to what extent, these separate systems form (an) interacting network(s) in vivo, focussing on interactions between four major systems, involved in the responses to the availability of phosphorylated sugars (Uhp), phosphate (Pho), nitrogen (Ntr) and oxygen (Arc). Significant cross-talk was not detectable in wild-type cells. Decreasing expression levels of succinate dehydrogenase (reporting Arc activation), upon activation of the Pho system, appeared to be independent of signalling through PhoR. Cross-talk towards NtrC did occur, however, in a ntrB deletion strain, upon joint activation of Pho, Ntr and Uhp. UhpT expression was demonstrated when cells were grown on pyruvate, through non-cognate phosphorylation of UhpA by acetyl phosphate. PMID:11782500

  4. Transcriptome analysis of all two-component regulatory system mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Taku; Aiba, Hirofumi; Masuda, Yasushi; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Sugiura, Masahito; Wanner, Barry L; Mori, Hirotada; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2002-10-01

    We have systematically examined the mRNA profiles of 36 two-component deletion mutants, which include all two-component regulatory systems of Escherichia coli, under a single growth condition. DNA microarray results revealed that the mutants belong to one of three groups based on their gene expression profiles in Luria-Bertani broth under aerobic conditions: (i) those with no or little change; (ii) those with significant changes; and (iii) those with drastic changes. Under these conditions, the anaeroresponsive ArcB/ArcA system, the osmoresponsive EnvZ/OmpR system and the response regulator UvrY showed the most drastic changes. Cellular functions such as flagellar synthesis and expression of the RpoS regulon were affected by multiple two-component systems. A high correlation coefficient of expression profile was found between several two-component mutants. Together, these results support the view that a network of functional interactions, such as cross-regulation, exists between different two-component systems. The compiled data are avail-able at our website (http://ecoli.aist-nara.ac.jp/xp_analysis/ 2_components). PMID:12366850

  5. The role of H4 flagella in Escherichia coli ST131 virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kakkanat, Asha; Totsika, Makrina; Schaale, Kolja; Duell, Benjamin L.; Lo, Alvin W.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Moriel, Danilo G.; Beatson, Scott A.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Ulett, Glen C.; Schembri, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is a globally dominant multidrug resistant clone associated with urinary tract and bloodstream infections. Most ST131 strains exhibit resistance to multiple antibiotics and cause infections associated with limited treatment options. The largest sub-clonal ST131 lineage is resistant to fluoroquinolones, contains the type 1 fimbriae fimH30 allele and expresses an H4 flagella antigen. Flagella are motility organelles that contribute to UPEC colonisation of the upper urinary tract. In this study, we examined the specific role of H4 flagella in ST131 motility and interaction with host epithelial and immune cells. We show that the majority of H4-positive ST131 strains are motile and are enriched for flagella expression during static pellicle growth. We also tested the role of H4 flagella in ST131 through the construction of specific mutants, over-expression strains and isogenic mutants that expressed alternative H1 and H7 flagellar subtypes. Overall, our results revealed that H4, H1 and H7 flagella possess conserved phenotypes with regards to motility, epithelial cell adhesion, invasion and uptake by macrophages. In contrast, H4 flagella trigger enhanced induction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 compared to H1 and H7 flagella, a property that may contribute to ST131 fitness in the urinary tract. PMID:26548325

  6. In Helicobacter pylori auto-inducer-2, but not LuxS/MccAB catalysed reverse transsulphuration, regulates motility through modulation of flagellar gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background LuxS may function as a metabolic enzyme or as the synthase of a quorum sensing signalling molecule, auto-inducer-2 (AI-2); hence, the mechanism underlying phenotypic changes upon luxS inactivation is not always clear. In Helicobacter pylori, we have recently shown that, rather than functioning in recycling methionine as in most bacteria, LuxS (along with newly-characterised MccA and MccB), synthesises cysteine via reverse transsulphuration. In this study, we investigated whether and how LuxS controls motility of H. pylori, specifically if it has its effects via luxS-required cysteine metabolism or via AI-2 synthesis only. Results We report that disruption of luxS renders H. pylori non-motile in soft agar and by microscopy, whereas disruption of mccAHp or mccBHp (other genes in the cysteine provision pathway) does not, implying that the lost phenotype is not due to disrupted cysteine provision. The motility defect of the ΔluxSHp mutant was complemented genetically by luxSHp and also by addition of in vitro synthesised AI-2 or 4, 5-dihydroxy-2, 3-pentanedione (DPD, the precursor of AI-2). In contrast, exogenously added cysteine could not restore motility to the ΔluxSHp mutant, confirming that AI-2 synthesis, but not the metabolic effect of LuxS was important. Microscopy showed reduced number and length of flagella in the ΔluxSHp mutant. Immunoblotting identified decreased levels of FlaA and FlgE but not FlaB in the ΔluxSHp mutant, and RT-PCR showed that the expression of flaA, flgE, motA, motB, flhA and fliI but not flaB was reduced. Addition of DPD but not cysteine to the ΔluxSHp mutant restored flagellar gene transcription, and the number and length of flagella. Conclusions Our data show that as well as being a metabolic enzyme, H. pylori LuxS has an alternative role in regulation of motility by modulating flagellar transcripts and flagellar biosynthesis through production of the signalling molecule AI-2. PMID:20691071

  7. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur containing heterocyclic molecules by mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which were selected for improved oxidation of furan and thiophene derivatives. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research as it appears to be of central importance in thiophene oxidation. We hope that analysis of the thd gene of E. coli will lead to improvement of our thiophene metabolizing bacterial strains.

  8. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur containing heterocyclic molecules such as those found in coal, by mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which were selected for improved oxidation of furan and thiophene derivatives. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research as it appears to be of central importance in thiophene oxidation. We hope that analysis of the thd genes of E. coli will lead to improvement of our thiophene metabolizing bacterial strains. 1 tab.

  9. Natural descriptions of motor behavior: examples from E. coli and C. elegans.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, William

    2007-03-01

    E. coli has a natural behavioral variable - the direction of rotation of its flagellar rotorary motor. Monitoring this one-dimensional behavioral response in reaction to chemical perturbation has been instrumental in the understanding of how E. coli performs chemotaxis at the genetic, physiological, and computational level. Here we apply this experimental strategy to the study of bacterial thermotaxis - a sensory mode that is less well understood. We investigate bacterial thermosensation by studying the motor response of single cells subjected to impulses of heat produced by an IR laser. A simple temperature dependent modification to an existing chemotaxis model can explain the observed temperature response. Higher organisms may have a more complicated behavioral response due to the simple fact that their motions have more degrees of freedom. Here we provide a principled analysis of motor behavior of such an organism -- the roundworm C. elegans. Using tracking video-microscopy we capture a worm's image and extract the skeleton of the shape as a head-to-tail ordered collection of tangent angles sampled along the curve. Applying principal components analysis we show that the space of shapes is remarkably low dimensional, with four dimensions accounting for > 95% of the shape variance. We also show that these dimensions align with behaviorally relevant states. As an application of this analysis we study the thermal response of worms stimulated by laser heating. Our quantitative description of C. elegans movement should prove useful in a wide variety of contexts, from the linking of motor output with neural circuitry to the genetic basis of adaptive behavior.

  10. Functional expression of adhesive peptides as fusions to Escherichia coli flagellin.

    PubMed

    Westerlund-Wikström, B; Tanskanen, J; Virkola, R; Hacker, J; Lindberg, M; Skurnik, M; Korhonen, T K

    1997-11-01

    An expression system for studying epitopes of adhesion proteins based on fusion of gene fragments into fliC(H7) of Escherichia coli is described. We constructed the system by an in-frame insertion of DNA fragments encoding one, two or three of the fibronectin-binding D repeats present in the fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA) of Staphylococcus aureus, into the fliC(H7) gene region encoding the variable domain of the H7 flagellin. The constructs were expressed by in trans complementation in the E. coli strain JT1 which harbours knock-out mutations for the expression of FliC as well as of the mannoside-binding fimbrial adhesin. The resulting chimeric flagella, which contained 39, 77 or 115 heterologous amino acid residues, efficiently bound soluble and immobilized human plasma and cellular fibronectin, and the binding was most efficient with the flagella containing the three D repeats of FnBPA. The chimeric flagella bound to frozen sections of human kidney and to cultured human cells. Antibodies raised against the chimeric flagella bound to Protein A-deficient S. aureus cells and inhibited the binding of staphylococci to immobilized fibronectin. We also expressed peptides, ranging in size between 48 and 302 amino acids, of the collagen-binding YadA adhesin of Yersinia enterocolitica. A fragment of 302 amino acids representing the middle region of YadA was needed for collagen binding. Chimeric flagellar filaments expressing hundreds of intimately associated adhesive epitopes offer versatile tools to analyze adhesin-receptor interactions and functional epitopes of adhesion proteins. PMID:9514121

  11. Vanadate-sensitized cleavage of dynein heavy chains by 365-nm irradiation of demembranated sperm flagella and its effect on the flagellar motility

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, B.H.; Gibbons, I.R.

    1987-06-15

    Irradiation of demembranated flagella of sea urchin sperm at 365 nm in the presence of 0.05-1 mM MgATP and 5-10 microM vanadate (Vi) cleaves the alpha and beta heavy chains of the outer arm dynein at the same site and at about the same rate as reported previously for the solubilized dynein. The decrease in intact alpha and beta heavy chain material is biphasic, with about 80% being lost with a half-time of 8-10 min, and the remainder more slowly. Five other axonemal polypeptides of Mr greater than 350,000 are lost similarly, concomitant with the appearance of at least 9 new peptides of Mr 150,000-250,000. The motility of irradiated sperm flagella upon subsequent dilution into reactivation medium containing 1 mM ATP and 2.5 mM catechol shows a progressive decrease in flagellar beat frequency for irradiation times that produce up to about 50% cleavage of the dynein heavy chains; more prolonged irradiation causes irreversible loss of motility. Competition between photocleaved and intact outer arm dynein for rebinding to dynein-depleted sperm flagella shows that cleavage has little effect upon the ability for rebinding, although the cleaved dynein partially inhibits subsequent motility. Substitution of MnATP for the MgATP in the irradiation medium prevents the loss of all of the axonemal polypeptides during irradiation for up to 60 min and also protects the potential for subsequent flagellar motility.

  12. Pneumatosis coli in a dog.

    PubMed

    Russell, Nicholas J; Tyrrell, Dayle; Irwin, Peter J; Beck, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    A 17-year-old, castrated male Maltese was presented with chronic polyphagia and a 2-week history of tenesmus, diarrhea, hematochezia, weight loss, and ribbon-like feces. Pneumatosis coli was diagnosed by abdominal radiography. Concurrent hyperadrenocorticism was suspected. The clinical signs of colorectal disease resolved within 2 days of initiating a lowresidue diet and oral metronidazole. Pneumatosis coli should be considered as a differential diagnosis for colorectal disease in dogs. PMID:18175797

  13. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Adhesins.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Brian D; Torres, Alfredo G

    2014-06-01

    Adhesins are a group of proteins in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) that are involved in the attachment or colonization of this pathogen to abiotic (plastic or steel) and biological surfaces, such as those found in bovine and human intestines. This review provides the most up-to-date information on these essential adhesion factors, summarizing important historical discoveries and analyzing the current and future state of this research. In doing so, the proteins intimin and Tir are discussed in depth, especially regarding their role in the development of attaching and effacing lesions and in EHEC virulence. Further, a series of fimbrial proteins (Lpf1, Lpf2, curli, ECP, F9, ELF, Sfp, HCP, and type 1 fimbria) are also described, emphasizing their various contributions to adherence and colonization of different surfaces and their potential use as genetic markers in detection and classification of different EHEC serotypes. This review also discusses the role of several autotransporter proteins (EhaA-D, EspP, Saa and Sab, and Cah), as well as other proteins associated with adherence, such as flagella, EibG, Iha, and OmpA. While these proteins have all been studied to varying degrees, all of the adhesins summarized in this article have been linked to different stages of the EHEC life cycle, making them good targets for the development of more effective diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:26103974

  14. The Orphan Gene ybjN Conveys Pleiotropic Effects on Multicellular Behavior and Survival of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongping; Calla, Bernarda; Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Wu, Xia; Korban, Schuyler S.; Huber, Steven C.; Clough, Steven J.; Zhao, Youfu

    2011-01-01

    YbjN, encoding an enterobacteria-specific protein, is a multicopy suppressor of temperature sensitivity in the ts9 mutant strain of Escherichia coli. In this study, we further explored the role(s) of ybjN. First, we demonstrated that the ybjN transcript was about 10-fold lower in the ts9 strain compared to that of E. coli strain BW25113 (BW). Introduction of multiple copies of ybjN in the ts9 strain resulted in over-expression of ybjN by about 10-fold as compared to that of BW. These results suggested that temperature sensitivity of the ts9 mutant of E. coli may be related to expression levels of ybjN. Characterization of E. coli ybjN mutant revealed that ybjN mutation resulted in pleiotropic phenotypes, including increased motility, fimbriation (auto-aggregation), exopolysaccharide production, and biofilm formation. In contrast, over-expression of ybjN (in terms of multiple copies) resulted in reduced motility, fimbriation, exopolysaccharide production, biofilm formation and acid resistance. In addition, our results indicate that a ybjN-homolog gene from Erwinia amylovora, a plant enterobacterial pathogen, is functionally conserved with that of E. coli, suggesting similar evolution of the YbjN family proteins in enterobacteria. A microarray study revealed that the expression level of ybjN was inversely correlated with the expression of flagellar, fimbrial and acid resistance genes. Over-expression of ybjN significantly down-regulated genes involved in citric acid cycle, glycolysis, the glyoxylate shunt, oxidative phosphorylation, amino acid and nucleotide metabolism. Furthermore, over-expression of ybjN up-regulated toxin-antitoxin modules, the SOS response pathway, cold shock and starvation induced transporter genes. Collectively, these results suggest that YbjN may play important roles in regulating bacterial multicellular behavior, metabolism, and survival under stress conditions in E. coli. These results also suggest that ybjN over

  15. Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Allen; Youngster, Ilan; McAdam, Alexander J

    2015-06-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is among the common causes of foodborne gastroenteritis. STEC is defined by the production of specific toxins, but within this pathotype there is a diverse group of organisms. This diversity has important consequences for understanding the pathogenesis of the organism, as well as for selecting the optimum strategy for diagnostic testing in the clinical laboratory. This review includes discussions of the mechanisms of pathogenesis, the range of manifestations of infection, and the several different methods of laboratory detection of Shiga toxin-producing E coli. PMID:26004641

  16. Experimental evolution of E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mengshi

    The evolution from unicellular to multicellular behavior is an essential step in the history of life. Our aim is to investigate the emergence of collective behavior in the model organism Escherichia coli (E. coli) and its selection advantages, such as better utilization of public goods. Our preliminary results suggest that the evolution of collective behavior may be a natural response to stressed conditions. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: mengshi0928@gmail.com.

  17. Serogroups of Escherichia coli from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ramteke, P W; Tewari, Suman

    2007-07-01

    Fifty seven isolates of thermotolerant E. coli were recovered from 188 drinking water sources, 45 (78.9%) were typable of which 15 (26.3%) were pathogenic serotypes. Pathogenic serogroup obtained were 04 (Uropathogenic E. coli, UPEC), 025 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC), 086 (Enteropathogenic E. coli, EPEC), 0103 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 0157 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 08 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC) and 0113 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC). All the pathogenic serotypes showed resistance to bacitracin and multiple heavy metal ions. Resistance to streptomycin and cotrimazole was detected in two strains whereas resistance to cephaloridine, polymixin-B and ampicillin was detected in one strain each. Transfer of resistances to drugs and metallic ions was observed in 9 out of 12 strains studied. Resistances to bacitracin were transferred in all nine strains. Among heavy metals resistance to As(3+) followed by Cr(6+) were transferred more frequently. PMID:17057960

  18. Molecular Ecology of Waterborne E. coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli is a common inhabitant of surface and ground waters in the developed and developing worlds. The majority of the E coli present in water are not particularly pathogenic to humans; however, there are E coli present in small proportion, that possess virulence genes that allow them to c...

  19. Size-, composition- and shape-dependent toxicological impact of metal oxide nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes toward bacteria.

    PubMed

    Simon-Deckers, Angélique; Loo, Sylvain; Mayne-L'hermite, Martine; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Menguy, Nicolas; Reynaud, Cécile; Gouget, Barbara; Carrière, Marie

    2009-11-01

    Ecotoxicological effects of nanoparticles (NP) are still poorly documented while their commercialization for industrial and household applications increases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of physicochemical characteristics on metal oxide NP and carbon nanotubes toxicological effects toward bacteria. Two strains of bacteria, Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and Escherichia coli MG1655 were exposed to TiO(2) or Al(2)O(3) NP or to multiwalled-carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Particular attention was paid on optimizing NP dispersion to obtain nonagglomerated suspensions. Our results show that NP toxicity depends on their chemical composition, size, surface charge, and shape but not on their crystalline phase. MWCNT toxicity does not depend on their purity. Toxicity also depends on the bacterial strain: E. coli MG1655 is sensitive to NP, whereas C. metallidurans CH34 is not. Interestingly, NP are accumulated in both bacterial strains, and association between NP and bacteria is necessary for bacterial death to occur. NP may then represent a danger for the environment, causing the disappearance of some sensitive bacterial strains such as E. coli MG1655, but also being mobilized by nonsensitive strains such as C. metallidurans CH34 and transported through the whole ecosystem. PMID:19924979

  20. EXTRAINTESTINAL PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI (EXPEC)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) possess virulence traits that allow them to invade, colonize, and induce disease in bodily sites outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Human diseases caused by ExPEC include urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, surgic...

  1. How Escherichia coli lands and forms cell clusters on a surface: a new role of surface topography

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huan; Chen, Aaron; Song, Xinran; Brasch, Megan E.; Henderson, James H.; Ren, Dacheng

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial response to surface topography during biofilm formation was studied using 5 μm tall line patterns of poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Escherichia coli cells attached on top of protruding line patterns were found to align more perpendicularly to the orientation of line patterns when the pattern narrowed. Consistently, cell cluster formation per unit area on 5 μm wide line patterns was reduced by 14-fold compared to flat PDMS. Contrasting the reduced colony formation, cells attached on narrow patterns were longer and had higher transcriptional activities, suggesting that such unfavorable topography may present a stress to attached cells. Results of mutant studies indicate that flagellar motility is involved in the observed preference in cell orientation on narrow patterns, which was corroborated by the changes in cell rotation pattern before settling on different surface topographies. These findings led to a set of new design principles for creating antifouling topographies, which was validated using 10 μm tall hexagonal patterns. PMID:27412365

  2. Mutational Analysis of the P1 Phosphorylation Domain in Escherichia coli CheA, the Signaling Kinase for Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, So-ichiro; Garzón, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The histidine autokinase CheA functions as the central processing unit in the Escherichia coli chemotaxis signaling machinery. CheA receives autophosphorylation control inputs from chemoreceptors and in turn regulates the flux of signaling phosphates to the CheY and CheB response regulator proteins. Phospho-CheY changes the direction of flagellar rotation; phospho-CheB covalently modifies receptor molecules during sensory adaptation. The CheA phosphorylation site, His-48, lies in the N-terminal P1 domain, which must engage the CheA ATP-binding domain, P4, to initiate an autophosphorylation reaction cycle. The docking determinants for the P1-P4 interaction have not been experimentally identified. We devised mutant screens to isolate P1 domains with impaired autophosphorylation or phosphotransfer activities. One set of P1 mutants identified amino acid replacements at surface-exposed residues distal to His-48. These lesions reduced the rate of P1 transphosphorylation by P4. However, once phosphorylated, the mutant P1 domains transferred phosphate to CheY at the wild-type rate. Thus, these P1 mutants appear to define interaction determinants for P1-P4 docking during the CheA autophosphorylation reaction. PMID:24163342

  3. How Escherichia coli lands and forms cell clusters on a surface: a new role of surface topography.

    PubMed

    Gu, Huan; Chen, Aaron; Song, Xinran; Brasch, Megan E; Henderson, James H; Ren, Dacheng

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial response to surface topography during biofilm formation was studied using 5 μm tall line patterns of poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Escherichia coli cells attached on top of protruding line patterns were found to align more perpendicularly to the orientation of line patterns when the pattern narrowed. Consistently, cell cluster formation per unit area on 5 μm wide line patterns was reduced by 14-fold compared to flat PDMS. Contrasting the reduced colony formation, cells attached on narrow patterns were longer and had higher transcriptional activities, suggesting that such unfavorable topography may present a stress to attached cells. Results of mutant studies indicate that flagellar motility is involved in the observed preference in cell orientation on narrow patterns, which was corroborated by the changes in cell rotation pattern before settling on different surface topographies. These findings led to a set of new design principles for creating antifouling topographies, which was validated using 10 μm tall hexagonal patterns. PMID:27412365

  4. Cinemicrographic analysis of the movement of flagellated bacteria. II. The ratio of the propulsive velocity to the frequency of the wave propagation along flagellar tail.

    PubMed

    Shimada, K; Ikkai, T; Yoshida, T; Asakura, S

    1976-03-01

    We took cinemicrographs of the movement of the flagellar tail of the peritrichously flagellated bacterium, Salmonella, swimming in a medium containing methylcellulose under a dark-ground microscope. By analysing the film, the velocity of translation u, the frequency of the propagation of helical waves along the tail fF and the frequency of the induced rotation of bacterial body fB of individual organism were measured and the experimental values of the ratios u/fF, u/fB and fF/fB were obtained. On the other hand, the theoretical values of these ratios were calculated by inserting the geometrical parameters describing the shapes and the sizes of the body and the tail of individual organism into the equations previously derived for the hydrodynamic model of the propulsion of flagellated bacteria (Holwill and Burge, 1963; Chwang and Wu, 1971). For four bacterial specimens presently analysed, the experimental values of u/fF ranged from 0.5 to 0.9, whereas the theoretical values were about 0.3. As reported by the preceding paper, such a tendency for the experimental values to exceed the theoretical ones by two or three times was also seen in u/fB and, consequently, the experimental and the theoretical values of fF/fB showed good agreement. From the results of these quantitative analyses of the movements of flagellated bacteria, it was concluded that the validity of the hydrodynamic model was further supported experimentally. PMID:932565

  5. Chlamydomonas IFT70/CrDYF-1 is a core component of IFT particle complex B and is required for flagellar assembly.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Behal, Robert H; Geimer, Stefan; Wang, Zhaohui; Williamson, Shana M; Zhang, Haili; Cole, Douglas G; Qin, Hongmin

    2010-08-01

    DYF-1 is a highly conserved protein essential for ciliogenesis in several model organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans, DYF-1 serves as an essential activator for an anterograde motor OSM-3 of intraflagellar transport (IFT), the ciliogenesis-required motility that mediates the transport of flagellar precursors and removal of turnover products. In zebrafish and Tetrahymena DYF-1 influences the cilia tubulin posttranslational modification and may have more ubiquitous function in ciliogenesis than OSM-3. Here we address how DYF-1 biochemically interacts with the IFT machinery by using the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, in which the anterograde IFT does not depend on OSM-3. Our results show that this protein is a stoichiometric component of the IFT particle complex B and interacts directly with complex B subunit IFT46. In concurrence with the established IFT protein nomenclature, DYF-1 is also named IFT70 after the apparent size of the protein. IFT70/CrDYF-1 is essential for the function of IFT in building the flagellum because the flagella of IFT70/CrDYF-1-depleted cells were greatly shortened. Together, these results demonstrate that IFT70/CrDYF-1 is a canonical subunit of IFT particle complex B and strongly support the hypothesis that the IFT machinery has species- and tissue-specific variations with functional ramifications. PMID:20534810

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a C-terminal fragment of FlgJ, a putative flagellar rod cap protein from Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Yuki; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Yamane, Midori; Imada, Katsumi; Namba, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    The formation of the bacterial flagellar axial structure, including the filament, the hook and the rod, requires the attachment of a cap complex to the distal end of the growing structure. Because the rod penetrates the peptidoglycan (PG) layer, the rod cap complex is thought to have PG-hydrolyzing activity. FlgJ is a putative rod cap protein whose C-terminal region shows sequence similarity to known muramidases. In this study, FlgJ120–316, a C-terminal fragment of FlgJ which contains the muramidase region, was overproduced, purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using PEG 3350 as a crystallizing agent and belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.8, b = 43.9, c = 108.5 Å. Anomalous difference Patterson maps calculated from the diffraction data set of a selenomethionine-labelled crystal showed significant peaks in the Harker sections, indicating that the data were suitable for structure determination. PMID:19153448

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a C-terminal fragment of FlgJ, a putative flagellar rod cap protein from Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yuki; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Yamane, Midori; Imada, Katsumi; Namba, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    The formation of the bacterial flagellar axial structure, including the filament, the hook and the rod, requires the attachment of a cap complex to the distal end of the growing structure. Because the rod penetrates the peptidoglycan (PG) layer, the rod cap complex is thought to have PG-hydrolyzing activity. FlgJ is a putative rod cap protein whose C-terminal region shows sequence similarity to known muramidases. In this study, FlgJ(120-316), a C-terminal fragment of FlgJ which contains the muramidase region, was overproduced, purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using PEG 3350 as a crystallizing agent and belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 38.8, b = 43.9, c = 108.5 A. Anomalous difference Patterson maps calculated from the diffraction data set of a selenomethionine-labelled crystal showed significant peaks in the Harker sections, indicating that the data were suitable for structure determination. PMID:19153448

  8. Homologues of the 24-kDa flagellar Ca(2+)-binding protein gene of Trypanosoma cruzi are present in other members of the Trypanosomatidae family.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, R A; Linss, J; Thomaz, N; Olson, C L; Engman, D M; Goldenberg, S

    1997-07-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding the 24-kDa flagellar Ca(2+)-binding protein (FCaBP) of the Dm28c clone of Trypanosoma cruzi was cloned and characterized. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with those of the FCaBPs of other T. cruzi strains revealed greater than 97% sequence conservation. FCaBP-like genes are found in Trypanosoma conorhini, Trypanosoma freitasi, Trypanosoma lewisi, Herpetomonas megaseliae, Leptomonas seymouri, and Phytomonas serpens, but not in Crithidia deanei, Leishmania amazonensis, or Endotrypanum schaudinni: Among various T. cruzi strains, FCaBP genes are located on chromosomes of different size, although all strains possess multiple FCaBP genes organized as tandemly arranged gene families. Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that FCaBP mRNAs are produced in all organisms possessing FCaBP-hybridizing sequences, indicating that expression of FCaBP or an FCaBP-like protein is common to a number of trypanosomatid species. PMID:9225770

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of FlgA, a periplasmic protein essential for flagellar P-­ring assembly

    PubMed Central

    Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.; Nagashima, Shigehiro; Imada, Katsumi; Namba, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella FlgA, a periplasmic protein essential for flagellar P-ring assembly, has been crystallized in two forms. The native protein crystallized in space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 107.5, b = 131.8, c = 49.4 Å, and diffracted to about 2.0 Å resolution (crystal form I). In this crystal, the asymmetric unit is likely to contain one molecule, with a solvent content of 66.8%. Selenomethionine-labelled FlgA protein crystallized in space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.2, b = 162.5, c = 103.5 Å, and diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution (crystal form II). In crystal form II, the asymmetric unit contained two molecules with a solvent content of 48.0%. The multiple-wavelength and single-wavelength anomalous dispersion methods allowed the visualization of the electron-density distributions of the form I and II crystals, respectively. The two maps suggested that FlgA is in two different conformations in the two crystals. PMID:22442230

  10. Crystal structure of the flagellar accessory protein FlaH of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii suggests a regulatory role in archaeal flagellum assembly.

    PubMed

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A; Wolf, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Archaeal flagella are unique structures that share functional similarity with bacterial flagella, but are structurally related to bacterial type IV pili. The flagellar accessory protein FlaH is one of the conserved components of the archaeal motility system. However, its function is not clearly understood. Here, we present the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of FlaH from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. The protein has a characteristic RecA-like fold, which has been found previously both in archaea and bacteria. We show that FlaH binds to immobilized ATP-however, it lacks ATPase activity. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrates that ATP affects the interaction between FlaH and the archaeal motor protein FlaI. In the presence of ATP, the FlaH-FlaI interaction becomes significantly weaker. A database search revealed similarity between FlaH and several DNA-binding proteins of the RecA superfamily. The closest structural homologs of FlaH are KaiC-like proteins, which are archaeal homologs of the circadian clock protein KaiC from cyanobacteria. We propose that one of the functions of FlaH may be the regulation of archaeal motor complex assembly. PMID:27060465

  11. Inactivation of a putative flagellar motor switch protein FliG1 prevents Borrelia burgdorferi from swimming in highly viscous media and blocks its infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunhao; Xu, Hongbin; Zhang, Kai; Liang, Fang Ting

    2015-01-01

    Summary The flagellar motor switch complex protein FliG plays an essential role in flagella biosynthesis and motility. In most motile bacteria, only one fliG homologue is present in the genome. However, several spirochete species have two putative fliG genes (referred to as fliG1 and fliG2) and their roles in flagella assembly and motility remain unknown. In this report, the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi was used as a genetic model to investigate the roles of these two fliG homologues. It was found that fliG2 encodes a typical motor switch complex protein that is required for the flagellation and motility of B. burgdorferi. In contrast, the function of fliG1 is quite unique. Disruption of fliG1 did not affect flagellation and the mutant was still motile but failed to translate in highly viscous media. GFP-fusion and motion tracking analyses revealed that FliG1 asymmetrically locates at one end of cells and the loss of fliG1 somehow impacted one bundle of flagella rotation. In addition, animal studies demonstrated that the fliG1− mutant was quickly cleared after inoculation into the murine host, which highlights the importance of the ability to swim in highly viscous media in the infectivity of B. burgdorferi and probably other pathogenic spirochetes. PMID:20180908

  12. Absence of Dp71 in mdx3cv mouse spermatozoa alters flagellar morphology and the distribution of ion channels and nNOS

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-González, Enrique O; Mornet, Dominique; Rendon, Alvaro; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila

    2005-01-01

    Summary In muscle, the absence of dystrophin alters the dystrophin associated protein complex (DAPC), which is involved in the clustering and anchoring of signaling proteins and ion and water channels. Here we show that mice spermatozoa express only dystrophin Dp71 and utrophin Up71. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of the absence of Dp71 on the morphology and membrane distribution of members of the DAPC, ion channels and signaling proteins of spermatozoa obtained from dystrophic mutant mdx3cv mice. Our work indicates that although the absence of Dp71 results in a dramatic decrease in β-dystroglycan, it induces membrane redistribution and an increase in the total level of a-syntrophin, voltage dependent Na+ (μ1) and K+ (Kv1.1) channels and neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). The short utrophin (Up71) was upregulated and redistributed in the spermatozoa of mdx3cv mice. A significant increase in abnormal flagella morphology was observed in the absence of Dp71, which was partially corrected when the plasma membrane was eliminated by detergent treatment. Our observations point to a new phenotype associated with the absence of Dp71. Abnormal flagellar structure and altered distribution of ion channels and signaling proteins may be responsible for the fertility problems of mdx3cv mice. PMID:15601658

  13. Two-ball structure of the flagellar hook-length control protein FliK as revealed by high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kodera, Noriyuki; Uchida, Kaoru; Ando, Toshio; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi

    2015-01-30

    The bacterial flagellar hook is a short and uniquely curved tube that connects the basal body to the filament. Hook length is controlled at 55 nm on average by a soluble protein FliK in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The N-terminal segment of FliK responsible for measuring the hook length is considered to be intrinsically disordered. Here, we show by high-speed atomic force microscopy that a FliK molecule in solution takes on a shape of two balls linked by a flexible string; the larger ball corresponds to the N-terminal region and the smaller one corresponds to the C-terminal region. The N-terminal domain is stable but the C-terminal domain fluctuates in shape. Based on these and other features of FliK, we propose that the folding of the N-terminal segment at the tip of the growing hook plays a major role in determining the minimal length of the hook. PMID:25463436

  14. Identification of flgZ as a Flagellar Gene Encoding a PilZ Domain Protein That Regulates Swimming Motility and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; González de Heredia, Elena; Baena, Irene; Martín-Martín, Irene; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC) and one phosphodiesterase (BifA) implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ. PMID:24504373

  15. The FLA3 KAP Subunit Is Required for Localization of Kinesin-2 to the Site of Flagellar Assembly and Processive Anterograde Intraflagellar TransportV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Joshua; Perrone, Catherine A.; Bower, Raqual; Cole, Douglas G.; Porter, Mary E.

    2005-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is a bidirectional process required for assembly and maintenance of cilia and flagella. Kinesin-2 is the anterograde IFT motor, and Dhc1b/Dhc2 drives retrograde IFT. To understand how either motor interacts with the IFT particle or how their activities might be coordinated, we characterized a ts mutation in the Chlamydomonas gene encoding KAP, the nonmotor subunit of Kinesin-2. The fla3-1 mutation is an amino acid substitution in a conserved C-terminal domain. fla3-1 strains assemble flagella at 21°C, but cannot maintain them at 33°C. Although the Kinesin-2 complex is present at both 21 and 33°C, the fla3-1 Kinesin-2 complex is not efficiently targeted to or retained in the basal body region or flagella. Video-enhanced DIC microscopy of fla3-1 cells shows that the frequency of anterograde IFT particles is significantly reduced. Anterograde particles move at near wild-type velocities, but appear larger and pause more frequently in fla3-1. Transformation with an epitope-tagged KAP gene rescues all of the fla3-1 defects and results in preferential incorporation of tagged KAP complexes into flagella. KAP is therefore required for the localization of Kinesin-2 at the site of flagellar assembly and the efficient transport of anterograde IFT particles within flagella. PMID:15616187

  16. Rearrangements of α-helical structures of FlgN chaperone control the binding affinity for its cognate substrates during flagellar type III export.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Miki; Nakanishi, Yuki; Furukawa, Yukio; Namba, Keiichi; Imada, Katsumi; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The bacterial flagellar type III export chaperones not only act as bodyguards to protect their cognate substrates from aggregation and proteolysis in the cytoplasm but also ensure the order of export through their interactions with an export gate protein FlhA. FlgN chaperone binds to FlgK and FlgL with nanomolar affinity and transfers them to FlhA for their efficient and rapid transport for the formation of the hook-filament junction zone. However, it remains unknown how FlgN releases FlgK and FlgL at the FlhA export gate platform in a timely manner. Here, we have solved the crystal structure of Salmonella FlgN at 2.3 Å resolution and carried out structure-based functional analyses. FlgN consists of three α helices, α1, α2 and α3. Helix α1 adopts two distinct, extended and bent conformations through the conformational change of N-loop between α1 and α2. The N-loop deletion not only increases the probability of FlgN dimer formation but also abolish the interaction between FlgN and FlgK. Highly conserved Asn-92, Asn-95 and Ile-103 residues in helix α3 are involved in the strong interaction with FlgK. We propose that the N-loop coordinates helical rearrangements of FlgN with the association and dissociation of its cognate substrates during their export. PMID:27178222

  17. Mobilisation of Ca2+ stores and flagellar regulation in human sperm by S-nitrosylation: a role for NO synthesised in the female tract

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Oliveira, Gisela; Lefièvre, Linda; Ford, Christopher; Herrero, M Belen; Barratt, Christopher; Connolly, Thomas J; Nash, Katherine; Morales-Garcia, Aduen; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson; Publicover, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Summary Generation of NO by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is implicated in gamete interaction and fertilisation. Exposure of human spermatozoa to NO donors caused mobilisation of stored Ca2+ by a mechanism that did not require activation of guanylate cyclase but was mimicked by S-nitroso-glutathione (GSNO; an S-nitrosylating agent). Application of dithiothreitol, to reduce protein –SNO groups, rapidly reversed the actions of NO and GSNO on [Ca2+]i. The effects of NO, GSNO and dithiothreitol on sperm protein S-nitrosylation, assessed using the biotin switch method, closely paralleled their actions on [Ca2+]i. Immunofluorescent staining revealed constitutive and inducible NOS in human oviduct and cumulus (the cellular layer investing the oocyte). 4,5-diaminofluorescein (DAF) staining demonstrated production of NO by these tissues. Incubation of human sperm with oviduct explants induced sperm protein S-nitrosylation resembling that induced by NO donors and GSNO. Progesterone (a product of cumulus cells) also mobilises stored Ca2+ in human sperm. Pre-treatment of sperm with NO greatly enhanced the effect of progesterone on [Ca2+]i, resulting in a prolonged increase in flagellar excursion. We conclude that NO regulates mobilisation of stored Ca2+ in human sperm by protein S-nitrosylation, that this action is synergistic with progesterone and that this synergism is potentially highly significant in gamete interactions leading to fertilisation. PMID:18842814

  18. Infection strategies of enteric pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Abigail; Young, Joanna C.; Constantinou, Nicholas; Frankel, Gad

    2012-01-01

    Enteric Escherichia coli (E. coli) are both natural flora of humans and important pathogens causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally enteric E. coli have been divided into 6 pathotypes, with further pathotypes often proposed. In this review we suggest expansion of the enteric E. coli into 8 pathotypes to include the emerging pathotypes of adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) and Shiga-toxin producing enteroaggregative E. coli (STEAEC). The molecular mechanisms that allow enteric E. coli to colonize and cause disease in the human host are examined and for two of the pathotypes that express a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) we discuss the complex interplay between translocated effectors and manipulation of host cell signaling pathways that occurs during infection. PMID:22555463

  19. Clinical Implications of Enteroadherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M.P.; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli enteropathogenic E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including non-intimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called “enteroadherent E. coli ” categories subsequently produced toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  20. Clinical implications of enteroadherent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M P; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G

    2012-10-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including nonintimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called "enteroadherent E. coli" categories subsequently produce toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  1. Collaborative Research: Metabolic Engineering of E. coli Sugar-Utilization Regulatory Systems for the Consumption of Plant Biomass Sugars.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramon Gonzalez; J. V. Shanks; K-Y. San .

    2006-03-31

    The overall objective of this project is to metabolically engineer the E. coli sugar-utilization regulatory systems (SURS) to utilize sugar mixtures obtained from plant biomass. Of particular relevance is the implementation of a metabolic engineering cycle aided by functional genomics and systems biology tools. Our findings will help in the establishment of a platform for the efficient production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic sugars. Our research has improved the understanding of the role of SURS in regulating sugar utilization and several other cellular functions. For example, we discovered that Mlc, a global regulatory protein, regulates the utilization of xylose and demonstrated the existence of an important link between catabolite repression and respiratory/fermentative metabolism. The study of SURS mutants also revealed a connection between flagellar biosynthesis and catabolite repression. Several tools were also developed as part of this project. A novel tool (Elementary Network Decomposition, END) to help elucidate the network topology of regulatory systems was developed and its utility as a discovery tool was demonstrated by applying it to the SURS in E. coli. A novel method (and software) to estimate metabolic fluxes that uses labeling experiments and eliminates reliance on extracellular fluxes was also developed. Although not initially considered in the scope of this project, we have developed a novel and superior method for optimization of HPLC separation and applied it to the simultaneous quantification of different functionalities (sugars, organic acids, ethanol, etc.) present in our fermentation samples. Currently under development is a genetic network driven metabolic flux analysis framework to integrate transcriptional and flux data.

  2. Extragenic suppression of motA missense mutations of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Garza, A G; Bronstein, P A; Valdez, P A; Harris-Haller, L W; Manson, M D

    1996-01-01

    The MotA and MotB proteins are thought to comprise elements of the stator component of the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli. In an effort to understand interactions among proteins within the motor, we attempted to identify extragenic suppressors of 31 dominant, plasmid-borne alleles of motA. Strains containing these mutations were either nonmotile or had severely impaired motility. Four of the mutants yielded extragenic suppressors mapping to the FlaII or FlaIIIB regions of the chromosome. Two types of suppression were observed. Suppression of one type (class I) probably results from increased expression of the chromosomal motB gene due to relief of polarity. Class I suppressors were partial deletions of Mu insertion sequences in the disrupted chromosomal motA gene. Class I suppression was mimicked by expressing the wild-type MotB protein from a second, compatible plasmid. Suppression of the other type (class II) was weaker, and it was not mimicked by overproduction of wild-type MotB protein. Class II suppressors were point mutations in the chromosomal motB or fliG genes. Among 14 independent class II suppressors characterized by DNA sequencing, we identified six different amino acid substitutions in MotB and one substitution in FliG. A number of the strongest class II suppressors had alterations of residues 136 to 138 of MotB. This particular region within the large, C-terminal periplasmic domain of MotB has previously not been associated with a specific function. We suggest that residues 136 to 138 of MotB may interact directly with the periplasmic face of MotA or help position the N-terminal membrane-spanning helix of MotB properly to interact with the membrane-spanning helices of the MotA proton channel. PMID:8892808

  3. Mutational analysis of the control cable that mediates transmembrane signaling in the Escherichia coli serine chemoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Kitanovic, Smiljka; Ames, Peter; Parkinson, John S

    2011-10-01

    During transmembrane signaling by Escherichia coli Tsr, changes in ligand occupancy in the periplasmic serine-binding domain promote asymmetric motions in a four-helix transmembrane bundle. Piston displacements of the signaling TM2 helix in turn modulate the HAMP bundle on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane to control receptor output signals to the flagellar motors. A five-residue control cable joins TM2 to the HAMP AS1 helix and mediates conformational interactions between them. To explore control cable structural features important for signal transmission, we constructed and characterized all possible single amino acid replacements at the Tsr control cable residues. Only a few lesions abolished Tsr function, indicating that the chemical nature and size of the control cable side chains are not individually critical for signal control. Charged replacements at I214 mimicked the signaling consequences of attractant or repellent stimuli, most likely through aberrant structural interactions of the mutant side chains with the membrane interfacial environment. Prolines at residues 214 to 217 also caused signaling defects, suggesting that the control cable has helical character. However, proline did not disrupt function at G213, the first control cable residue, which might serve as a structural transition between the TM2 and AS1 helix registers. Hydrophobic amino acids at S217, the last control cable residue, produced attractant-mimic effects, most likely by contributing to packing interactions within the HAMP bundle. These results suggest a helix extension mechanism of Tsr transmembrane signaling in which TM2 piston motions influence HAMP stability by modulating the helicity of the control cable segment. PMID:21803986

  4. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur-containing heterocyclic molecules by mutant strains of Escherichia coli K-12. We have previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which had gained the capacity to oxidize thiophene compounds and their furan analogs. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research, as this appears to be in a regulatory gene central to the thiophene/furan oxidation system. The thdF gene appears to be more directly involved in the oxidation reactions, whereas thdC and thdD are apparently required for increased protection against the toxic effects of thiophene and furan compounds. 4 tabs.

  5. Role of Catecholate Siderophores in Gram-Negative Bacterial Colonization of the Mouse Gut

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Hualiang; Jones, Shari A.; Mercer, Lynn E.; Meador, Jessica P.; Caughron, Joyce E.; Jordan, Lorne; Newton, Salete M.; Conway, Tyrrell; Klebba, Phillip E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the importance of the production of catecholate siderophores, and the utilization of their iron (III) complexes, to colonization of the mouse intestinal tract by Escherichia coli. First, a ΔtonB strain was completely unable to colonize mice. Next, we compared wild type E. coli MG1655 to its derivatives carrying site-directed mutations of genes for enterobactin synthesis (ΔentA::Cm; strain CAT0), ferric catecholate transport (Δfiu, ΔfepA, Δcir, ΔfecA::Cm; CAT4), or both (Δfiu, ΔfepA, ΔfecA, Δcir, ΔentA::Cm; CAT40) during colonization of the mouse gut. Competitions between wild type and mutant strains over a 2-week period in vivo showed impairment of all the genetically engineered bacteria relative to MG1655. CAT0, CAT4 and CAT40 colonized mice 101-, 105-, and 102-fold less efficiently, respectively, than MG1655. Unexpectedly, the additional inability of CAT40 to synthesize enterobactin resulted in a 1000-fold better colonization efficiency relative to CAT4. Analyses of gut mucus showed that CAT4 hyperexcreted enterobactin in vivo, effectively rendering the catecholate transport-deficient strain iron-starved. The results demonstrate that, contrary to prior reports, iron acquisition via catecholate siderophores plays a fundamental role in bacterial colonization of the murine intestinal tract. PMID:23209633

  6. Periplasmic Flagellar Export Apparatus Protein, FliH, Is Involved in Post-Transcriptional Regulation of FlaB, Motility and Virulence of the Relapsing Fever Spirochete Borrelia hermsii

    PubMed Central

    Guyard, Cyril; Raffel, Sandra J.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Dahlstrom, Eric; Sturdevant, Daniel; Ricklefs, Stacy M.; Martens, Craig; Hayes, Stanley F.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Hansen, Bryan T.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2013-01-01

    Spirochetes are bacteria characterized in part by rotating periplasmic flagella that impart their helical or flat-wave morphology and motility. While most other bacteria rely on a transcriptional cascade to regulate the expression of motility genes, spirochetes employ post-transcriptional mechanism(s) that are only partially known. In the present study, we characterize a spontaneous non-motile mutant of the relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia hermsii that was straight, non-motile and deficient in periplasmic flagella. We used next generation DNA sequencing of the mutant’s genome, which when compared to the wild-type genome identified a 142 bp deletion in the chromosomal gene encoding the flagellar export apparatus protein FliH. Immunoblot and transcription analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was linked to the posttranscriptional deficiency in the synthesis of the major periplasmic flagellar filament core protein FlaB. Despite the lack of FlaB, the amount of FlaA produced by the fliH mutant was similar to the wild-type level. The turnover of the residual pool of FlaB produced by the fliH mutant was comparable to the wild-type spirochete. The non-motile mutant was not infectious in mice and its inoculation did not induce an antibody response. Trans-complementation of the mutant with an intact fliH gene restored the synthesis of FlaB, a normal morphology, motility and infectivity in mice. Therefore, we propose that the flagellar export apparatus protein regulates motility of B. hermsii at the post-transcriptional level by influencing the synthesis of FlaB. PMID:24009690

  7. The C-terminal periplasmic domain of MotB is responsible for load-dependent control of the number of stators of the bacterial flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, David J.; Nakamura, Shuichi; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Che, Yong-Suk; Kami-ike, Nobunori; Kudo, Seishi; Minamino, Tohru; Namba, Keiichi

    2013-01-01