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Sample records for colitis collagenous colitis

  1. Collagenous Colitis and Spondylarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ben Abdelghani, Kaouther; Sahli, Hana; Souabni, Leila; Chekili, Selma; Belhadj, Salwa; Kassab, Selma; Laatar, Ahmed; Zakraoui, Leith

    2012-01-01

    Collagenous colitis is a recent cause of chronic diarrhea. Cooccurrence with spondylarthropathy is rare. We describe two cases: one man and one woman of 33 and 20 years old were suffering from spondylarthropathy. They then developed collagenous colitis, 4 and 14 years after the onset of spondylarthropathy. The diagnosis was based on histological features. A sicca syndrome and vitiligo were observed with the female case. The presence of colitis leads to therapeutic problems. This association suggests a systemic kind of rheumatic disease of collagenous colitis. PMID:22701491

  2. Collagenous colitis: new diagnostic possibilities with endomicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A.; Goetz, M.; Biesterfeld, S.; Galle, P. R.; Neurath, M. F.; Kiesslich, R.

    2006-02-01

    Collagenous colitis is a kind of microscopic colitis. It is characterized by chronic watery diarrhea and abdominal pain. The etiology is still unknown. So far, for the diagnose a histological evaluation was necessary with the presence of thickened subepithelial collagneous bands in the lamina propria. A new developed endoscope with a confocal laser allows analysing cellular and subcellular details of the mucosal layer at high resolution in vivo. In this case report we describe for the first time to diagnose collagenous colitis during ongoing colonoscopy by using this confocal endomicroscopy. In a 67 year old female patient with typical symptoms the characteristic histological changes could be identified in the endomicroscopic view. Biopsies could be targeted to affected areas and endomicroscopic prediction of the presence of collagenous bands could be confirmed in all targeted biopsies. First endomicroscopic experience in microscopic colitis could be confirmed in four additional patients. Future prospective studies are warranted to further evaluate these initial findings. However, collagenous colitis is frequently missed and endomicroscopy seems to be the ideal tool for accurate diagnosing collagenous colitis during ongoing endoscopy.

  3. Pseudomembranous collagenous colitis with superimposed drug damage.

    PubMed

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Cristina, Silvia; Muscarà, Maurizio; Saettone, Silvia; Broglia, Laura; Antonelli, Elisabetta; Salemme, Marianna; Occhipinti, Pietro; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2013-11-01

    Pseudomembranous collagenous colitis is a rare pathological condition, not related to infectious agents, and characterized by thickening of the subepithelial collagen and formation of pseudomembranes. We report one such case, which responded to budesonide treatment after failures of previous approaches given, being unaware of the correct diagnosis. PMID:24080283

  4. Long-term natural history and complications of collagenous colitis

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh J

    2012-01-01

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis, a possibly heterogeneous disorder. Collagenous colitis most often appears to have an entirely benign clinical course that usually responds to limited treatment. Sometimes significant extracolonic disorders, especially arthritis, spondylitis, thyroiditis and skin disorders, such as pyoderma gangrenosum, dominate the clinical course and influence the treatment strategy. However, rare fatalities have been reported and several complications, some severe, have been attributed directly to the colitis. Toxic colitis and toxic megacolon may develop. Concomitant gastric and small intestinal inflammatory disorders have been described including celiac disease and more extensive collagenous inflammatory disease. Colonic ulceration has been associated with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease, may evolve directly from collagenous colitis. Submucosal ‘dissection’, colonic fractures, or mucosal tears and perforation, possibly from air insufflation during colonoscopy, have been reported. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressures that may occur during radiological imaging of the colon. Neoplastic disorders of the colon may also occur during the course of collagenous colitis, including colon carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumours (ie, carcinoids). Finally, lymphoproliferative disease has been reported. PMID:22993735

  5. Optimal management of collagenous colitis: a review

    PubMed Central

    O’Toole, Aoibhlinn

    2016-01-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is an increasingly recognized cause of chronic inflammatory bowel disease characterized by watery non-bloody diarrhea. As a lesser studied inflammatory bowel disease, many aspects of the CC’s natural history are poorly understood. This review discusses strategies to optimally manage CC. The goal of therapy is to induce clinical remission, <3 stools a day or <1 watery stool a day with subsequent improved quality of life (QOL). Antidiarrheal can be used as monotherapy or with other medications to control diarrhea. Budesonide therapy has revolutionized treatment and is superior to prednisone, however, the treatment is associated with high-relapse rates and the management of refractory disease is challenging. Ongoing trials will address the safety and efficacy of low-dose maintenance therapy. For those with refractory disease, case reports and case series support the role of biologic agents. Diversion of the fecal stream normalizes colonic mucosal changes and ileostomy may be considered where anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents are contraindicated. Underlying celiac disease, bile salt diarrhea, and associated thyroid dysfunction should be ruled out. The author recommends smoking cessation as well as avoidance of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories as well as other associated medications. PMID:26929656

  6. Optimal management of collagenous colitis: a review.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Aoibhlinn

    2016-01-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is an increasingly recognized cause of chronic inflammatory bowel disease characterized by watery non-bloody diarrhea. As a lesser studied inflammatory bowel disease, many aspects of the CC's natural history are poorly understood. This review discusses strategies to optimally manage CC. The goal of therapy is to induce clinical remission, <3 stools a day or <1 watery stool a day with subsequent improved quality of life (QOL). Antidiarrheal can be used as monotherapy or with other medications to control diarrhea. Budesonide therapy has revolutionized treatment and is superior to prednisone, however, the treatment is associated with high-relapse rates and the management of refractory disease is challenging. Ongoing trials will address the safety and efficacy of low-dose maintenance therapy. For those with refractory disease, case reports and case series support the role of biologic agents. Diversion of the fecal stream normalizes colonic mucosal changes and ileostomy may be considered where anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents are contraindicated. Underlying celiac disease, bile salt diarrhea, and associated thyroid dysfunction should be ruled out. The author recommends smoking cessation as well as avoidance of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories as well as other associated medications. PMID:26929656

  7. A COLLAGENOUS COLITIS-LIKE CONDITION IN IMMUNOSUPPRESSED INFANT BABOONS

    PubMed Central

    Dons, Eefje M.; Echeverri, Gabriel J.; Rigatti, Lora H.; Klein, Edwin; Montoya, Claudia; Wolf, Roman F.; Ijzermans, Jan N.M.; Cooper, David K.C.; Wagner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Background Collagenous colitis is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. It is fairly common in adult humans, but rare in infants, and has been associated with autoimmune disorders. Case Reports We report four infant baboons (age 7–12 months) that had received a transplant at three months of age and subsequent immunosuppressive therapy for periods of 4–10 months. All presented identical symptoms within a period of four weeks, including weight loss associated with chronic watery diarrhea that was unresponsive to standard antimicrobial treatment. Clinical chemistry evaluations were within normal ranges, viral causes were ruled out, and fecal and blood cultures were repeatedly negative. At necropsy, two infant baboons were found to have a form of collagenous colitis. In the remaining two baboons that had identical clinical features, immunosuppressive therapy was discontinued and treatment with budesonide was initiated. Both baboons recovered and remained well on no medication until the end of follow-up (24 months). Conclusions Collagenous colitis has occasionally been reported in patients with organ transplants. It has been reported only once previously in baboons. The four cases reported here strongly suggest that (i) clinical features as well as histopathological findings of collagenous colitis in baboons are very similar to those in human patients; (ii) it was associated with the immunocompromised state of the baboons, as two non-immunosuppressed age-matched baboons in close proximity did not develop the condition, and (iii) it may have had an infectious origin as all four cases developed within a four week period of time. PMID:22294413

  8. Pseudomembranous collagenous colitis: an unusual cause of chronic diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Khan-Kheil, Ayisha Mehtab; Disney, Benjamin; Ruban, Ernie; Wood, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman presented with a history of severe chronic diarrhoea resulting in an admission with syncope and electrolyte abnormalities. Imaging studies of the bowel were normal. However, biopsies taken during colonoscopy enabled a diagnosis to be made and effective treatment to be initiated. This case report details the presentation, diagnosis and management of a rare injury pattern affecting the bowel: pseudomembranous collagenous colitis. PMID:24526204

  9. Pseudomembranous collagenous colitis: an unusual cause of chronic diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Khan-Kheil, Ayisha Mehtab; Disney, Benjamin; Ruban, Ernie; Wood, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman presented with a history of severe chronic diarrhoea resulting in an admission with syncope and electrolyte abnormalities. Imaging studies of the bowel were normal. However, biopsies taken during colonoscopy enabled a diagnosis to be made and effective treatment to be initiated. This case report details the presentation, diagnosis and management of a rare injury pattern affecting the bowel: pseudomembranous collagenous colitis. PMID:24526204

  10. Pseudomembranous Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Priya D.; Urrunaga, Nathalie H.; Tang, Derek M.; von Rosenvinge, Erik C.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomembranous colitis is an inflammatory condition of the colon characterized by elevated yellow-white plaques that coalesce to form pseudomembranes on the mucosa. Patients with the condition commonly present with abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, and leukocytosis. Because pseudomembranous colitis is often associated with C. difficile infection, stool testing and empiric antibiotic treatment should be initiated when suspected. When results of C. difficile testing are negative and symptoms persist despite escalating empiric treatment, early gastroenterology consultation and lower endoscopy would be the next step in the appropriate clinical setting. If pseudomembranous colitis is confirmed endoscopically, colonic biopsies should be obtained, as histology can offer helpful clues to the underlying diagnosis. The less common non-C. difficile causes of pseudomembranous colitis should be entertained, as a number of etiologies can result in this condition. Examples include Behcet’s disease, collagenous colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, ischemic colitis, other infections organisms (e.g. bacteria, parasites, viruses), and a handful of drugs and toxins. Pinpointing the correct underlying etiology would better direct patient care and disease management. Surgical specialists would be most helpful in colonic perforation, gangrenous colon, or severe disease. PMID:25769243

  11. [Microscopic colitis: update 2014].

    PubMed

    Burgmann, Konstantin; Fraga, Montserrat; Schoepfer, Alain M; Yun, Pu

    2014-09-01

    Microscopic colitis, which includes lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis, represents a frequent cause of chronic watery diarrhea especially in the elderly population. Several medications, such as nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, proton pump inhibitors or antidepressants, as well as cigarette smoking have been recognized as risk factors for microscopic colitis. The diagnosis of microscopic colitis is based on a macroscopically normal ileo-colonoscopy and several biopsies from the entire colon, which demonstrate the pathognomonic histopathologic findings. Therapy is mainly based on the use of budesonide. Other medications, such as mesalazine, cholestyramine and bismuth, have been evaluated as well but the evidence is less solid. PMID:25276996

  12. Microscopic colitis.

    PubMed

    Pardi, Darrell S

    2014-02-01

    Microscopic colitis is a frequent cause of chronic watery diarrhea, especially in older persons. Common associated symptoms include abdominal pain, arthralgias, and weight loss. The incidence of microscopic colitis had been increasing, although more recent studies have shown a stabilization of incidence rates. The diagnosis is based on characteristic histologic findings in a patient with diarrhea. Microscopic colitis can occur at any age, including in children, but it is primarily seen in the elderly. Several treatment options exist to treat the symptoms of microscopic colitis, although only budesonide has been well studied in randomized clinical trials. PMID:24267602

  13. Automated image analysis in the study of collagenous colitis

    PubMed Central

    Fiehn, Anne-Marie Kanstrup; Kristensson, Martin; Engel, Ulla; Munck, Lars Kristian; Holck, Susanne; Engel, Peter Johan Heiberg

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to develop an automated image analysis software to measure the thickness of the subepithelial collagenous band in colon biopsies with collagenous colitis (CC) and incomplete CC (CCi). The software measures the thickness of the collagenous band on microscopic slides stained with Van Gieson (VG). Patients and methods A training set consisting of ten biopsies diagnosed as CC, CCi, and normal colon mucosa was used to develop the automated image analysis (VG app) to match the assessment by a pathologist. The study set consisted of biopsies from 75 patients. Twenty-five cases were primarily diagnosed as CC, 25 as CCi, and 25 as normal or near-normal colonic mucosa. Four pathologists individually reassessed the biopsies and categorized all into one of the abovementioned three categories. The result of the VG app was correlated with the diagnosis provided by the four pathologists. Results The interobserver agreement for each pair of pathologists ranged from κ-values of 0.56–0.81, while the κ-value for the VG app vs each of the pathologists varied from 0.63 to 0.79. The overall agreement between the four pathologists was κ=0.69, while the overall agreement between the four pathologists and the VG app was κ=0.71. Conclusion In conclusion, the Visiopharm VG app is able to measure the thickness of a sub-epithelial collagenous band in colon biopsies with an accuracy comparable to the performance of a pathologist and thereby provides a promising supplementary tool for the diagnosis of CC and CCi and in particular for research. PMID:27114713

  14. Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the lining of the rectum and colon. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. UC can happen at ...

  15. Ulcerative colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of nonhospitalized ulcerative colitis: the Toronto consensus. Gastroenterology . 2015;148(5):1035-58. PMID: 25747596 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25747596 . Burger D, Travis S. Conventional medical management of inflammatory bowel ...

  16. [Ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Lopetuso, Loris; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorders of the digestive tract resulting from dysregulated immune responses toward environmental factors in genetically predisposed individuals. This review focus on what is the state of the art of UC pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment and how any future findings could drive our clinical practice. PMID:27362722

  17. Increased Production of Lysozyme Associated with Bacterial Proliferation in Barrett's Esophagitis, Chronic Gastritis, Gluten-induced Atrophic Duodenitis (Celiac Disease), Lymphocytic Colitis, Collagenous Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Colitis.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Carlos A

    2015-12-01

    The mucosa of the esophagus, the stomach, the small intestine, the large intestine and rectum are unremittingly challenged by adverse micro-environmental factors, such as ingested pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria, and harsh secretions with digestive properties with disparate pH, as well as bacteria and secretions from upstream GI organs. Despite the apparently inauspicious mixture of secretions and bacteria, the normal GI mucosa retains a healthy state of cell renewal. To by-pass the tough microenvironment, the epithelia of the GI react by speeding-up cell exfoliation, by increasing peristalsis, eliminating bacteria through secretion of plasma cell-immunoglobulins and by increasing production of natural antibacterial enzymes (lysozyme) and host defense peptides (defensin-5). Lysozyme was recently found up-regulated in Barrett's esophagitis, in chronic gastritis, in gluten-induced atrophic duodenitis (celiac disease), in collagenous colitis, in lymphocytic colitis and in Crohn's colitis. This up-regulation is a response directed towards the special types of bacteria thriving in the microenvironment in each of the aforementioned clinical inflammatory maladies. The purpose of that up-regulation is to protect the mucosa affected by the ongoing chronic inflammation. Bacterial antibiotic resistance continues to exhaust our supply of effective antibiotics. The future challenge is how to solve the increasing menace of bacterial resistance to anti-bacterial drugs. Further research on natural anti-bacterial enzymes such as lysozyme, appears mandatory. PMID:26637845

  18. Anti-PD1-induced collagenous colitis in a melanoma patient.

    PubMed

    Baroudjian, Barouyr; Lourenco, Nelson; Pagès, Cécile; Chami, Ichrak; Maillet, Marianne; Bertheau, Philippe; Bagot, Martine; Gornet, Jean-Marc; Lebbé, Céleste; Allez, Matthieu

    2016-06-01

    Targeted immunotherapy has markedly improved the survival of melanoma patients. We report the case of a melanoma patient who developed a collagenous colitis under an anti-PD1 regimen. A 68-year-old woman was treated for a stage IV melanoma. An anti-PD1, pembrolizumab, was introduced after the failure of a first-line therapy with an anti-CTLA4. At cycle 14, pembrolizumab was interrupted because of grade 3 diarrhea. Histologic analysis of colon mucosa showed a thickened apical subepithelial collagen layer with irregular collagen deposition of more than 25 µm thickness. Budesonide 9 mg/day and cholestyramin 8 g/day were then introduced, leading to a decrease in the number of stools to grade 2. Because of the prognosis of the disease, the efficacy of pembrolizumab in this patient and the lack of other efficient treatments, pembrolizumab was restarted, with no worsening of the diarrhea after a follow-up of 8 weeks. In the era of immunotherapy, a new type of drug-induced colitis has emerged because of monoclonal antibodies targeting immune checkpoints such as CTLA-4 and PD1. Gastrointestinal tract immune-mediated adverse effects are now well described with ipilimumab. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a collagenous colitis in a patient treated with pembrolizumab, thus suggesting a new mechanism of toxicity. Classically, collagenous colitis first-line treatment is based on discontinuation of the suspected treatment. However, there may be a strong benefit to maintaining an anti-PD1 regimen in our patients. In this case, symptomatic management associated with budesonide and cholestyramin enabled continuation of pembrolizumab. PMID:26990271

  19. Ischemic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, James F.; Hernandez III, Luis O.

    2015-01-01

    Most clinicians associate ischemic colitis with elderly patients who have underlying cardiovascular comorbidities. While the majority of cases probably occur in this population, the disease can present in younger patients as a result of different risk factors, making the diagnosis challenging. While a majority of patients respond to medical management, surgery is required in approximately 20% of the cases and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. PMID:26034405

  20. Fecal stream diversion and mucosal cytokine levels in collagenous colitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Daferera, Niki; Kumawat, Ashok Kumar; Hultgren-Hörnquist, Elisabeth; Ignatova, Simone; Ström, Magnus; Münch, Andreas

    2015-05-21

    In this case report, we examined the levels of cytokines expressed before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored in a patient with collagenous colitis. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman with chronic, active collagenous colitis who either failed to achieve clinical remission or experienced adverse effects with the following drugs: loperamide, cholestyramine, budesonide, methotrexate and adalimumab. Due to the intractable nature of the disease and because the patient was having up to 15 watery bowel movements per day, she underwent a temporary ileostomy. Colonic biopsies were analyzed for mucosal cytokine protein levels before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored. Mucosal protein levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-17 A, IL-23, TNF, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 were all higher during active disease and decreased to non-detectable or considerably lower levels during fecal stream diversion. One month after the restoration of bowel continuity, when the patient experienced a relapse of symptoms, IL-2, IL-23 and IL-21 levels were again increased. Our results indicate that fecal stream diversion in this patient suppressed the levels of all cytokines analyzed in colonic biopsies. With the recurrence of clinical symptoms and histological changes after bowel reconstruction, the levels of primarily proinflammatory cytokines increased. Our findings support the hypothesis that a luminal factor triggers the inflammation observed in collagenous colitis. PMID:26019474

  1. Fecal stream diversion and mucosal cytokine levels in collagenous colitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Daferera, Niki; Kumawat, Ashok Kumar; Hultgren-Hörnquist, Elisabeth; Ignatova, Simone; Ström, Magnus; Münch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this case report, we examined the levels of cytokines expressed before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored in a patient with collagenous colitis. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman with chronic, active collagenous colitis who either failed to achieve clinical remission or experienced adverse effects with the following drugs: loperamide, cholestyramine, budesonide, methotrexate and adalimumab. Due to the intractable nature of the disease and because the patient was having up to 15 watery bowel movements per day, she underwent a temporary ileostomy. Colonic biopsies were analyzed for mucosal cytokine protein levels before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored. Mucosal protein levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-17 A, IL-23, TNF, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 were all higher during active disease and decreased to non-detectable or considerably lower levels during fecal stream diversion. One month after the restoration of bowel continuity, when the patient experienced a relapse of symptoms, IL-2, IL-23 and IL-21 levels were again increased. Our results indicate that fecal stream diversion in this patient suppressed the levels of all cytokines analyzed in colonic biopsies. With the recurrence of clinical symptoms and histological changes after bowel reconstruction, the levels of primarily proinflammatory cytokines increased. Our findings support the hypothesis that a luminal factor triggers the inflammation observed in collagenous colitis. PMID:26019474

  2. Eosinophilic colitis.

    PubMed

    Dionísio de Sousa, Isabel José; Bonito, Nuno; Pais, Ana; Gervásio, Helena

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old man, diagnosed with colon cancer stage III in July/2010, underwent surgery and received adjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX 4 (5-fluorouracil; calcium folinate and oxaliplatin), which ended in March/2011 after 12-cycles. It was then decided to maintain periodical surveillance. About 1 year later, the patient developed several episodes of diarrhoea, mainly during the night, and presented persistent peripheral eosinophilia in the blood count (range 585-1300 eosinophils/µL). Colonoscopy was performed, with the histological result showing eosinophilic infiltration of the colon, compatible with eosinophilic colitis. The patient was treated with a short course of budesonide, achieving resolution of symptoms, and has remained asymptomatic. PMID:26957036

  3. [Collagenous gastritis and colitis in a 10-year-old girl].

    PubMed

    Hangard, P; Lasfargue, M; Rubio, A

    2016-07-01

    There are few data in the literature on microscopic gastritis and colitis in the pediatric population. The diagnosis is often made after the occurrence of complications. We report the case of a 10.5 year-old girl for whom the diagnosis was made several years after the initial symptoms. Test for infections, inflammation, and auto-immunity yielded normal results. Upper endoscopy and colonoscopy revealed an abnormal mucosa. However, histology showed microscopic inflammation and fibrotic lesions in the lamina propria, and a thick subepithelial collagenous band. This led to the diagnosis of collagenous gastritis and colitis. Budesonide treatment resulted in the cessation of diarrhea and significant weight gain. Treatment by oral budesonide indeed seems to be highly effective but relapses are frequent when the treatment is stopped. This case shows the importance of being vigilant regarding transit disorders with impact on growth kinetics. Upper endoscopy and colonoscopy need to be carried out when children have organic diarrhea with normal blood tests. PMID:27266639

  4. Ulcerative Colitis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, Andre

    1990-01-01

    Idiopathic ulcerative colitis primarily affects young adults. Colonic symptoms are the most annoying. In severe colitis, systemic and extraintestinal inflammatory manifestations can be disabling. Proximal extension of colitis is demonstrated by double-contrast barium enema and total colonoscopy. Bacterial and parasitic colitis must be excluded by appropriate microbiological studies. Colonoscopy is recommended to screen for high-grade dysplasia or neoplasia in cases of chronic diffuse colitis (after seven years). Severe colitis can benefit from hospitalization, parenteral nutritional support, and high doses of corticosteroids that are progressively tapered. Mild or moderate cases or severe cases in remission respond well to rest, low-irritant diets, mild symptomatic medication, oral sulfasalazine, or more recent 5-acetylsalicylic derivatives. Long-term maintenance with reduced dosages will control more than 80% of cases. PMID:21234051

  5. Type I collagen and its daughter peptides for targeting mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis: A new treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Ramadass, Satiesh Kumar; Jabaris, Sugin Lal; Perumal, Ramesh Kannan; HairulIslam, Villianur Ibrahim; Gopinath, Arun; Madhan, Balaraman

    2016-08-25

    Ulcerative colitis, particularly the chronic persistent form is characterized by the presence of active inflammation and extensive areas of ulceration in the colonic mucosa. The existing treatment protocol aims at only reducing intestinal inflammation, rather than targeting mucosal ulceration. In this study, type I collagen and its daughter peptides called collagen hydrolysate, highly popular reconstructive materials for tissue engineering applications, are hypothesized as healing matrices to target the recuperation of internal mucosal ulceration. The clinical assessments on day 10 of dextran sodium sulfate induced colitis in mice model revealed that both the collagen (1.56±0.29) and collagen hydrolysate treatments (1.33±0.33) showed a significant reduction in the rectal bleeding compared to the reference mesalamine treatment (2.50±0.33) and untreated negative control (2.40±0.40). VEGF, a potent angiogenic growth factor, over expressed during UC was down-regulated by collagen hydrolysate (1.06±0.25) and collagen (1.76±0.45) to a greater extent than by mesalamine (2.59±0.51) and untreated control (4.17±0.15). The down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 also follows the same pattern. Histological observations were in accordance with the clinical indicators. Both collagen and collagen hydrolysate treatments showed significant reduction in mucosal damage score and facilitated faster regeneration of damaged mucosa. PMID:27185300

  6. Lubiprostone induced ischemic colitis.

    PubMed

    Sherid, Muhammed; Sifuentes, Humberto; Samo, Salih; Deepak, Parakkal; Sridhar, Subbaramiah

    2013-01-14

    Ischemic colitis accounts for 6%-18% of the causes of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. It is often multifactorial and more commonly encountered in the elderly. Several medications have been implicated in the development of colonic ischemia. We report a case of a 54-year old woman who presented with a two-hour history of nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and bloody stool. The patient had recently used lubiprostone with close temporal relationship between the increase in the dose and her symptoms of rectal bleeding. The radiologic, colonoscopic and histopathologic findings were all consistent with ischemic colitis. Her condition improved without any serious complications after the cessation of lubiprostone. This is the first reported case of ischemic colitis with a clear relationship with lubiprostone (Naranjo score of 10). Clinical vigilance for ischemic colitis is recommended for patients receiving lubiprostone who are presenting with abdominal pain and rectal bleeding. PMID:23345954

  7. Types of Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colitis Types of Medications What’s available to treat IBD and what you should know about these medications. ... Info Specialist Teen Website Understand How To Manage IBD Learn about IBD treatments, diet, complications, and quality ...

  8. Acyclovir-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Wardle, T D; Finnerty, J P; Swale, V; Beer, T

    1997-04-01

    Three patients developed acute colitis, either de novo, or as an exacerbation of pre-existing colitis, following the use of oral acyclovir, prescribed for Herpes zoster or Herpes simplex infection. Rechallenge with oral acyclovir was performed in one patient, and resulted in a recurrence of colitic symptoms. It is speculated that acyclovir can have a direct irritant effect on large bowel mucosa. PMID:9146784

  9. Sustained Release Myofascial Release as Treatment for a Patient with Complications of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Collagenous Colitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cubick, Erin E.; Quezada, Vanessa Y.; Schumer, Ariel D.; Davis, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Myofascial release (MFR) is a manual therapeutic technique used to release fascial restrictions, which may cause neuromusculoskeletal and systemic pathology. Purpose: This case report describes the use of sustained release MFR techniques in a patient with a primary diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and a secondary diagnosis of collagenous colitis. Changes in pain, cervical range of motion, fatigue, and gastrointestinal tract function, as well as the impact of RA on daily activities, were assessed. Methods: A 54-year-old white woman presented with signs and symptoms attributed to RA and collagenous colitis. Pre and post measurements were taken with each treatment and during the interim between the initial and final treatment series. The patient recorded changes in pain, fatigue, gastrointestinal tract function, and quality of life. Cervical range of motion was assessed. Six sustained release MFR treatment sessions were provided over a 2-week period. Following an 8-week interim, two more treatments were performed. Results: The patient showed improvements in pain, fatigue, gastrointestinal tract function, cervical range of motion, and quality of life following the initial treatment series of six sessions. The patient maintained positive gains for 5 weeks following the final treatment, after which her symptoms returned to near baseline measurements. Following two more treatments, positive gains were achieved once again. Conclusions: In a patient with RA and collagenous colitis, the application of sustained release MFR techniques in addition to standard medical treatment may provide short-term and long-term improvements in comorbid symptoms and overall quality of life. PMID:22016756

  10. Contemporary methods for the diagnosis and treatment of microscopic colitis.

    PubMed

    Jauregui-Amezaga, Aranzazu; Vermeire, Séverine; Geboes, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic colitis is a common cause of chronic diarrhea. It is characterized by non-bloody watery diarrhea with macroscopically normal colonic mucosa. Its specific histological characteristics confirm the diagnosis. Two distinct histological forms can be identified, namely, collagenous colitis and lymphocytic colitis. In collagenous colitis, a thick colonic subepithelial collagenous deposit can be observed, whereas in lymphocytic colitis, a pronounced intraepithelial lymphocytic inflammation in the absence of a thickened collagen band can be identified. Microscopic colitis occurs more frequently in elderly females and its etiology is believed to be multifactorial, although smoking and consumption of several drugs have been identified as risks factors for the development of the disease. The treatment is based on avoiding the risks factors and administration of oral budesonide. PMID:26470823

  11. Microscopic Colitis: Collagenous Colitis and Lymphocytic Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... scans use a combination of x rays and computer technology to create images. For a CT scan, ... video image of the intestinal lining to a computer screen, allowing the gastroenterologist to carefully examine the ...

  12. Microscopic Colitis: Collagenous Colitis and Lymphocytic Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... images. A patient does not need anesthesia. Health care providers use imaging tests to show physical abnormalities and to diagnose certain ... prep instructions to follow at home before the test. The health care provider will also explain what the patient can ...

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of microscopic colitis.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Negi, Mariko; Tomii, Syohei; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-08-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) designates two types of chronic diarrhea diseases, which are lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The prevalence of microscopic colitis is increasing in both Western and Eastern countries, possibly due to the high incidence of colonoscopic survey in chronic diarrhea patients. Although the overall prognosis of MC patients is mostly good, it should be noted that appropriate diagnosis and choice of treatment is required to assure a good clinical outcome for MC patients. Also, a certain population of MC patients may take a severe and refractory clinical course, and thus require advanced clinical care using medications supported by less evidence. In this review, we would like to feature the essential points regarding the diagnosis of MC, and also describe the current standard of treatments for MC patients. In addition, we would like to add some findings from the national survey and research carried out in Japan, to compare those data with the western countries. PMID:27271790

  14. Low-dose budesonide for maintenance of clinical remission in collagenous colitis: a randomised, placebo-controlled, 12-month trial

    PubMed Central

    Münch, Andreas; Bohr, Johan; Miehlke, Stephan; Benoni, Cecilia; Olesen, Martin; Öst, Åke; Strandberg, Lars; Hellström, Per M; Hertervig, Erik; Armerding, Peter; Stehlik, Jiri; Lindberg, Greger; Björk, Jan; Lapidus, Annika; Löfberg, Robert; Bonderup, Ole; Avnström, Sören; Rössle, Martin; Dilger, Karin; Mueller, Ralph; Greinwald, Roland; Tysk, Curt; Ström, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective This 1-year study aimed to assess low-dose budesonide therapy for maintenance of clinical remission in patients with collagenous colitis. Design A prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled study beginning with an 8-week open-label induction phase in which patients with histologically confirmed active collagenous colitis received budesonide (Budenofalk, 9 mg/day initially, tapered to 4.5 mg/day), after which 92 patients in clinical remission were randomised to budesonide (mean dose 4.5 mg/day; Budenofalk 3 mg capsules, two or one capsule on alternate days) or placebo in a 12-month double-blind phase with 6 months treatment-free follow-up. Primary endpoint was clinical remission throughout the double-blind phase. Results Clinical remission during open-label treatment was achieved by 84.5% (93/110 patients). The median time to remission was 10.5 days (95% CI (9.0 to 14.0 days)). The maintenance of clinical remission at 1 year was achieved by 61.4% (27/44 patients) in the budesonide group versus 16.7% (8/48 patients) receiving placebo (treatment difference 44.5% in favour of budesonide; 95% CI (26.9% to 62.7%), p<0.001). Health-related quality of life was maintained during the 12-month double-blind phase in budesonide-treated patients. During treatment-free follow-up, 82.1% (23/28 patients) formerly receiving budesonide relapsed after study drug discontinuation. Low-dose budesonide over 1 year resulted in few suspected adverse drug reactions (7/44 patients), all non-serious. Conclusions Budesonide at a mean dose of 4.5 mg/day maintained clinical remission for at least 1 year in the majority of patients with collagenous colitis and preserved health-related quality of life without safety concerns. Treatment extension with low-dose budesonide beyond 1 year may be beneficial given the high relapse rate after budesonide discontinuation. Trial registration numbers http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01278082) and http

  15. Fulminant amebic colitis.

    PubMed

    Aristizábal, H; Acevedo, J; Botero, M

    1991-01-01

    Amebiasis is the acute and chronic disease produced by Entamoeba histolytica, an entity which occurs in endemic fashion in many of the tropical and subtropical areas of the world, capable of affecting diverse organs of the body, especially the colon. Amebiasis has different clinical forms of presentation, varying from the asymptomatic carrier state to severe, although not frequent, fulminant or necrotizing colitis, characteristically associated with high morbidity and mortality. We hereby report a series of 50 adult patients with fulminating amebic colitis managed at our institution between January, 1971 and July, 1989, with a global mortality of 60%. Early diagnosis, treatment with effective antiamebic agents--specifically metronidazole--and opportune aggressive surgical intervention have resulted in better survival rates. We had no survivors prior to 1970; our current survival rate is still a dismal 40%, indicating the very severe nature of the disease. PMID:2031357

  16. Management of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Fell, John M; Muhammed, Rafeeq; Spray, Chris; Crook, Kay; Russell, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) in children is increasing. The range of treatments available has also increased too but around 1 in 4 children still require surgery to control their disease. An up-to-date understanding of treatments is essential for all clinicians involved in the care of UC patients to ensure appropriate and timely treatment while minimising the risk of complications and side effects. PMID:26553909

  17. Diversion colitis: a trigger for ulcerative colitis in the in-stream colon?

    PubMed Central

    Lim, A; Langmead, F; Feakins, R; Rampton, D

    1999-01-01

    The aetiology of ulcerative colitis is unknown. Two patients without pre-existing inflammatory bowel disease in whom end colostomy for faecal incontinence was complicated by diversion colitis in the defunctioned rectosigmoid colon, are described. In both instances, colitis with the clinical, colonoscopic, and microscopic features of ulcerative colitis developed about a year later in the previously normal in-stream colon proximal to the colostomy. These cases suggest that diversion colitis may be a risk factor for ulcerative colitis in predisposed individuals and that ulcerative colitis can be triggered by anatomically discontinuous inflammation elsewhere in the large intestine. 

 Keywords: ulcerative colitis, diversion colitis PMID:9895391

  18. Ischemic Colitis Revealing Polyarteritis Nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamzaoui, Amira; Litaiem, Noureddine; Smiti Khanfir, M.; Ayadi, Sofiene; Nfoussi, Haifa; Houman, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is one of the most common intestinal ischemic injuries. It results from impaired perfusion of blood to the bowel and is rarely caused by vasculitis. We report a case of ischemic colitis revealing polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) in a 55-year-old man. Histological examination of the resected colon led to the diagnosis of PAN. PMID:24382967

  19. Pyoderma gangrenosum in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, S P; Singh, S K; Chari, S T; Sarin, S K; Anand, B S

    1991-07-01

    We present a patient with pyoderma gangrenosum, a rare complication of ulcerative colitis. The patient's disease was limited to the distal colon, was clinically mild and responded quickly to treatment, and yet it was associated with pyoderma gangrenosum and arthritis, complications generally associated with more severe and extensive ulcerative colitis. PMID:1839305

  20. [Pseudomembranous colitis caused by antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Meyer, B; Geering, P

    1978-11-11

    A case of antibiotic-induced pseudomembranous colitis is presented. Following resection of a carcinoma of the colon, an 81-year old man was treated with clindamycin for 9 days and with epicillin for another 9 days. One week after discontinuation of antibiotics the patient developed progressively severe diarrhea. Death from central pulmonary embolism ensued 10 days after the onset of diarrhea. Autopsy revealed severe pseudomembranous colitis of the entire large intestine. Pseudomembranous colitis is often observed as a complication after the administration of different antibiotics. The Anglo-American literature contains several recent reports of clindamycin-induced pseudomembranous colitis. The etiopathology of this drug-induced disease is still unclear. A possible interpretation is an antibiotic-induced change in the intestinal flora. Recent observations suggest that toxin-producing clostridia are responsible for the pseudomembranous colitis. PMID:568308

  1. Tofacitinib in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Archer, Thomas P; Moran, Gordon W; Ghosh, Subrata

    2016-05-01

    Cytokines orchestrate immune and inflammatory responses involved in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC). Protein kinases are essential for signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. Janus kinases (JAKs) are a family of protein tyrosine kinases that play a pivotal role in cytokine receptor signaling. Indeed, a major subgroup of cytokines use Type I and II cytokine receptors which signal via the activation of JAKs. Tofacitinib is an oral JAK inhibitor that has been studied in autoimmune pathologies, including UC and rheumatoid arthritis with good overall efficacy and acceptable safety profile. This literature review was performed with the goal of summarizing the knowledge on JAK inhibitors in UC treatment. PMID:27140405

  2. Genetics Home Reference: ulcerative colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... colitis is unknown because many genetic and environmental factors are likely to be involved. Even though the ... Parkes M, Annese V, Hakonarson H, Radford-Smith G, Duerr RH, Vermeire S, Weersma RK, Rioux JD. Meta-analysis identifies ...

  3. Paternal chronic colitis causes epigenetic inheritance of susceptibility to colitis.

    PubMed

    Tschurtschenthaler, Markus; Kachroo, Priyadarshini; Heinsen, Femke-Anouska; Adolph, Timon Erik; Rühlemann, Malte Christoph; Klughammer, Johanna; Offner, Felix Albert; Ammerpohl, Ole; Krueger, Felix; Smallwood, Sébastien; Szymczak, Silke; Kaser, Arthur; Franke, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) arises by unknown environmental triggers in genetically susceptible individuals. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression may integrate internal and external influences and may thereby modulate disease susceptibility. Epigenetic modification may also affect the germ-line and in certain contexts can be inherited to offspring. This study investigates epigenetic alterations consequent to experimental murine colitis induced by dextran sodium sulphate (DSS), and their paternal transmission to offspring. Genome-wide methylome- and transcriptome-profiling of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and sperm cells of males of the F0 generation, which received either DSS and consequently developed colitis (F0(DSS)), or non-supplemented tap water (F0(Ctrl)) and hence remained healthy, and of their F1 offspring was performed using reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) and RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq), respectively. Offspring of F0(DSS) males exhibited aberrant methylation and expression patterns of multiple genes, including Igf1r and Nr4a2, which are involved in energy metabolism. Importantly, DSS colitis in F0(DSS) mice was associated with decreased body weight at baseline of their F1 offspring, and these F1 mice exhibited increased susceptibility to DSS-induced colitis compared to offspring from F0(Ctrl) males. This study hence demonstrates epigenetic transmissibility of metabolic and inflammatory traits resulting from experimental colitis. PMID:27538787

  4. Paternal chronic colitis causes epigenetic inheritance of susceptibility to colitis

    PubMed Central

    Tschurtschenthaler, Markus; Kachroo, Priyadarshini; Heinsen, Femke-Anouska; Adolph, Timon Erik; Rühlemann, Malte Christoph; Klughammer, Johanna; Offner, Felix Albert; Ammerpohl, Ole; Krueger, Felix; Smallwood, Sébastien; Szymczak, Silke; Kaser, Arthur; Franke, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) arises by unknown environmental triggers in genetically susceptible individuals. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression may integrate internal and external influences and may thereby modulate disease susceptibility. Epigenetic modification may also affect the germ-line and in certain contexts can be inherited to offspring. This study investigates epigenetic alterations consequent to experimental murine colitis induced by dextran sodium sulphate (DSS), and their paternal transmission to offspring. Genome-wide methylome- and transcriptome-profiling of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and sperm cells of males of the F0 generation, which received either DSS and consequently developed colitis (F0DSS), or non-supplemented tap water (F0Ctrl) and hence remained healthy, and of their F1 offspring was performed using reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) and RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq), respectively. Offspring of F0DSS males exhibited aberrant methylation and expression patterns of multiple genes, including Igf1r and Nr4a2, which are involved in energy metabolism. Importantly, DSS colitis in F0DSS mice was associated with decreased body weight at baseline of their F1 offspring, and these F1 mice exhibited increased susceptibility to DSS-induced colitis compared to offspring from F0Ctrl males. This study hence demonstrates epigenetic transmissibility of metabolic and inflammatory traits resulting from experimental colitis. PMID:27538787

  5. Fucoidan Extracts Ameliorate Acute Colitis.

    PubMed

    Lean, Qi Ying; Eri, Rajaraman D; Fitton, J Helen; Patel, Rahul P; Gueven, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are an important cause of morbidity and impact significantly on quality of life. Overall, current treatments do not sustain a long-term clinical remission and are associated with adverse effects, which highlight the need for new treatment options. Fucoidans are complex sulphated, fucose-rich polysaccharides, found in edible brown algae and are described as having multiple bioactivities including potent anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, the therapeutic potential of two different fucoidan preparations, fucoidan-polyphenol complex (Maritech Synergy) and depyrogenated fucoidan (DPF) was evaluated in the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) mouse model of acute colitis. Mice were treated once daily over 7 days with fucoidans via oral (Synergy or DPF) or intraperitoneal administration (DPF). Signs and severity of colitis were monitored daily before colons and spleens were collected for macroscopic evaluation, cytokine measurements and histology. Orally administered Synergy and DPF, but not intraperitoneal DPF treatment, significantly ameliorated symptoms of colitis based on retention of body weight, as well as reduced diarrhoea and faecal blood loss, compared to the untreated colitis group. Colon and spleen weight in mice treated with oral fucoidan was also significantly lower, indicating reduced inflammation and oedema. Histological examination of untreated colitis mice confirmed a massive loss of crypt architecture and goblet cells, infiltration of immune cells and oedema, while all aspects of this pathology were alleviated by oral fucoidan. Importantly, in this model, the macroscopic changes induced by oral fucoidan correlated significantly with substantially decreased production of at least 15 pro-inflammatory cytokines by the colon tissue. Overall, oral fucoidan preparations significantly reduce the inflammatory pathology associated with DSS-induced colitis and could therefore represent

  6. Fucoidan Extracts Ameliorate Acute Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lean, Qi Ying; Eri, Rajaraman D.; Fitton, J. Helen; Patel, Rahul P.; Gueven, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, are an important cause of morbidity and impact significantly on quality of life. Overall, current treatments do not sustain a long-term clinical remission and are associated with adverse effects, which highlight the need for new treatment options. Fucoidans are complex sulphated, fucose-rich polysaccharides, found in edible brown algae and are described as having multiple bioactivities including potent anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, the therapeutic potential of two different fucoidan preparations, fucoidan-polyphenol complex (Maritech Synergy) and depyrogenated fucoidan (DPF) was evaluated in the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) mouse model of acute colitis. Mice were treated once daily over 7 days with fucoidans via oral (Synergy or DPF) or intraperitoneal administration (DPF). Signs and severity of colitis were monitored daily before colons and spleens were collected for macroscopic evaluation, cytokine measurements and histology. Orally administered Synergy and DPF, but not intraperitoneal DPF treatment, significantly ameliorated symptoms of colitis based on retention of body weight, as well as reduced diarrhoea and faecal blood loss, compared to the untreated colitis group. Colon and spleen weight in mice treated with oral fucoidan was also significantly lower, indicating reduced inflammation and oedema. Histological examination of untreated colitis mice confirmed a massive loss of crypt architecture and goblet cells, infiltration of immune cells and oedema, while all aspects of this pathology were alleviated by oral fucoidan. Importantly, in this model, the macroscopic changes induced by oral fucoidan correlated significantly with substantially decreased production of at least 15 pro-inflammatory cytokines by the colon tissue. Overall, oral fucoidan preparations significantly reduce the inflammatory pathology associated with DSS-induced colitis and could therefore

  7. Colitis possibly induced by quetiapine.

    PubMed

    de Beaurepaire, Renaud; Trinh, Isabelle; Guirao, Sophie; Taieb, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    A 39-year-old man with bipolar disorder was hospitalised for depression. He was started on quetiapine (titrated up to 300 mg), lactulose (a laxative) and tropatepine (an anticholinergic). Valpromide (a mood stabiliser) and prazepam were later added and rapidly withdrawn. Seven days after quetiapine initiation, the patient reported abdominal pain and constipation; 2 days later, CT revealed an important distention of the colon including the caecum and a pre-perforation. A subtotal colectomy was performed and histology confirmed necrotising ischaemic colitis. The patient survived. This is the first case reported so far of ischaemic colitis related to quetiapine, in the absence of other antipsychotics simultaneously prescribed. Tropatepine likely acted as a cofactor to determine colitis. Clinicians need to be aware of the potential danger of the co-prescription of quetiapine with tropatepine (and possibly other anticholinergics). PMID:25721830

  8. Treatment of experimental ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, L B; Lychkova, A E; Knyazev, O V

    2012-10-01

    The effects of infliximab, an anticytokine drug, on the course of inflammatory process was studied on the model of ulcerative colitis induced by injection of picrylsulfonic acid. Infliximab prevented the development of toxic dilatation and a drop of bioelectric activity of smooth muscles via maintenance of activity of the intramural nervous system neurons. PMID:23113311

  9. Colonic motility in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Elisabetta; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldoni, Monia; Dore, Maria Pina

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammatory conditions affecting the gut may cause motility disturbances, and ulcerative colitis – one of the main disorders among the inflammatory bowel diseases – may display abnormal colonic motility. Aim To review the abnormalities of the large bowel in ulcerative colitis, by considering the motility, laboratory (in vitro) and pathological studies dealing with this topic. Methods A comprehensive online search of Medline and the Science Citation Index was carried out. Results Patients with ulcerative colitis frequently display colonic motor abnormalities, including lack of contractility, an increase of propulsive contractile waves, an excessive production of nitric oxide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide nerves, interleukin 1 beta, neurotensin, tachykinins levels and the weaker action of substance P, likely related to a neuromuscular dysfunction due to the inflammatory process. Conclusions A better understanding of the pathophysiological grounds of altered colonic motility in ulcerative colitis may lead to a more in-depth knowledge of the accompanying symptoms and to better and more targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:25452840

  10. Prevalence of microscopic colitis in patients with diarrhea of unknown etiology in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Levent; Yildirim, Sadik; Akbayir, Nihat; Yilmaz, Banu; Yenice, Necati; Gültekin, Orhan Sami; Peker, Önder

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and demography of microscopic colitis in patients with diarrhea of unknown etiology and normal colonoscopy in Turkey. METHODS: Between March, 1998 to July, 2005, 129 patients with chronic non-bloody diarrhea of unexplained etiology who had undergone full colonoscopy with no obvious abnormalities were included in the study. Two biopsies were obtained from all colonic segments and terminal ileum for diagnosis of microscopic colitis. On histopathologic examination, criteria for lymphocytic colitis (intraepithelial lymphocyte ≥ 20 per 100 intercryptal epithelial cells, change in surface epithelium, mononuclear infiltration of the lamina propria) and collagenous colitis (subepithelial collagen band thickness ≥ 10 μm) were explored. RESULTS: Lymphocytic colitis was diagnosed in 12 (9%) patients (Female/Male: 7/5, mean age: 45 year, range: 27-63) and collagenous colitis was diagnosed in only 3 (2.5%) patients (all female, mean age: 60 years, range: 54-65). CONCLUSION: Biopsy of Turkish patients with the diagnosis of chronic non-bloody diarrhea of unexplained etiology and normal colonoscopic findings will reveal microscopic colitis in approximately 10% of the patients. Lymphocytic colitis is 4 times more frequent than collagenous colitis in these patients. PMID:18666319

  11. β-lactam-associated eosinophilic colitis.

    PubMed

    Mogilevski, Tamara; Nickless, David; Hume, Sam

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old man with a history of childhood asthma presented with a 2-week history of watery diarrhoea and marked peripheral eosinophilia in the setting of recent use of cephalexin. His colonoscopy revealed patchy colitis. Biopsies were consistent with eosinophilic colitis. Two months later he received a course of amoxicillin resulting in recurrence of peripheral eosinophilia. Given the time-frame of β-lactam administration to symptom onset and elimination of all other precipitating causes, he was diagnosed with β-lactam-associated eosinophilic colitis. The patient's symptoms resolved and peripheral eosinophil count decreased with no specific treatment. Eosinophilic colitis is a rare heterogeneous condition, the pathogenesis of which is likely to be an interplay between environmental and genetic factors. It can be secondary to a helminthic infection or a drug reaction and has been associated with ulcerative colitis. If secondary causes of eosinophilic colitis have been excluded, the mainstay of treatment is with corticosteroids. PMID:26106168

  12. Substance P modulates colitis-associated fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Koon, Hon Wai; Shih, David; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Zhao, Dezheng; Fazelbhoy, Zafeer; Hing, Tressia; Xu, Hua; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Norma; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2010-11-01

    Substance P (SP) and the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) are involved in the development of colitis and mucosal healing after colonic inflammation. We studied whether SP modulates colonic fibrosis by using a chronic model of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in wild-type (WT) and NK-1R-deficient (NK-1R KD) mice. We found increased mRNA expression levels of collagen, vimentin, and the fibrogenic factors transforming growth factor β1 and insulin-like growth factor 1 in the chronically inflamed colons of WT mice treated with repeated intracolonic TNBS administrations. Fibrosis in TNBS-treated mice was also evident immunohistochemically by collagen deposition in the colon. Treatment of TNBS-exposed WT mice with the NK-1R antagonist CJ-12255 reduced colonic inflammation, colonic fibrosis, fibroblast accumulation, and expression levels of the fibrogenic factors. NK-1R knockout mice chronically exposed to TNBS had similar colonic inflammation compared with WT, but reduced colonic fibrosis, fibroblast accumulation, and expression levels of fibrogenic factors. Immunohistochemical staining also showed co-localization of NK-1R with fibroblasts in inflamed colons of mice and in colonic mucosa of patients with Crohn's disease. Exposure of human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts to SP (10 nmol/L) increased cell migration. SP stimulated collagen synthesis in CCD-18Co fibroblasts in the presence of transforming growth factor β1 and insulin-like growth factor 1, and this effect was reduced by Akt inhibition. Thus, SP, via NK-1R, promotes intestinal fibrogenesis after chronic colitis by stimulating fibrotic responses in fibroblasts. PMID:20889569

  13. [Diagnostic guideline of ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Hwan; Jung, Sung Ae; Lee, Bo In; Lee, Kang Moon; Kim, Joo Sung; Han, Dong Soo

    2009-03-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder causing mucosal inflammation of the colorectum with crypt abnormality on biopsy. It affects the rectum and a variable extent of the colon in continuity. Ulcerative colitis is characterized by a relapsing and remitting course. It arises from an interaction between genetic and environmental factors, but the precise etiology is unknown. The incidence and prevalence in Korea are still low compared with those of Western countries, but have increased in recent years. There are many challenging issues on the diagnosis of ulcerative colitis, and sometimes these lead to differences in practice between clinicians. Therefore, IBD Study Group of KASID set out the Korean diagnostic guideline of ulcerative colitis. The diagnosis is based on clinical, endoscopic, radiologic, and histologic criteria. The symptoms are dependent upon the extent and severity of disease and most commonly include bloody diarrhea, rectal bleeding, and/or urgency. The systemic symptoms of malaise, tachycardia, fever, or weight loss are features of a severe attack. The laboratory findings may reveal leucocytosis, thrombocytosis, iron deficiency anemia, hypoalbuminemia, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein indicating severe disease activity or chronicity. For the elimination of infectious causes, microbial investigation with stool specimens should be performed for common enteric pathogens including assays for Clostridium difficile toxin, and sometimes for amoeba or other parasites. The most typical endoscopic features are continuous, confluent, and concentric colonic involvement proximal to the anal verge. Endoscopic severity may be best well reflected by the presence of mucosal friability, spontaneous bleeding, and deep ulcerations. Typical pathologic findings are composed of widespread crypt architectural distortion (cryptitis, crypt abscess, and crypt atrophy), heavy, diffuse lamina propria cell infiltration, and basal

  14. Probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Dieleman, Levinus A; Hoentjen, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota is one of the key players in the etiology of ulcerative colitis. Manipulation of this microflora with probiotics and prebiotics is an attractive strategy in the management of ulcerative colitis. Several intervention studies for both the induction and maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis patients have been performed. Most of these studies evaluated VSL#3 or E. Coli Nissle 1917 and in general there is evidence for efficacy of these agents for induction and maintenance of remission. However, studies are frequently underpowered, lack a control group, and are very heterogeneous investigating different probiotic strains in different study populations. The absence of well-powered robust randomized placebo-controlled trials impedes the widespread use of probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis. However, given the promising results that are currently available, probiotics and prebiotics may find their way to the treatment algorithm for ulcerative colitis in the near future. PMID:27048897

  15. Study of a Monoclonal Antibody KHK4083 in Moderate Ulcerative Colitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    Ulcerative Colitis; Digestive System Diseases; Colitis, Ulcerative; Colitis; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Colonic Diseases; Autoimmune Disease; Abdominal Pain

  16. New insights and challenges in microscopic colitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) is described as an inflammatory bowel disease characterized by chronic, bloodless diarrhea with normal or close to normal endoscopic findings. Histopathological examination reveals two subtypes: collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC), which are indistinguishable clinically. The disease debuts typically in middle-aged patients, but can occur at all ages, including children. A female predominance is found in both CC and LC, but is not confirmed by others in LC. The etiology is unclear, but the disease has been assumed to be of autoimmune origin. However, several etiologies may render a microscopic inflammation in the mucosa; this is a common, universal reaction to a variety of irritants in contact with the intestinal lumen. Furthermore, some patients with a microscopic inflammation in their colonic mucosa have no symptoms, or are suffering from constipation or abdominal pain, rather than diarrhea. Recently, a discussion was initiated calling into question the overdiagnosing of symptoms and pointing out the danger of exacerbating people’s perception of their ailments, of weakening their eligibility in health insurance, of overprescription of drugs, and thus the increasing cost to the society of health care. In the light of this discussion, this review will highlight histopathological and clinical features of MC, and discuss the diagnosis and management of this disease. Perhaps, the intestinal mucosa has no other mode by which to react than an inflammatory response, irrespective of the presence or absence of autoimmunity. Thus, to better identify and classify subgroups of MC, and to clarify and correctly handle the inflammatory changes, this field of research stands to benefit from a review of the results and experience gained to date. PMID:25553078

  17. Status of colitis-associated cancer in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kinugasa, Tetsushi; Akagi, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Surgical therapy for ulcerative colitis (UC) depends on the medical therapy administered for the patient’s condition. UC is a benign disease. However, it has been reported that the rare cases of cancer in UC patients are increasing, and such cases have a worse prognosis. Recently, surgical therapy has greatly changed, there has been quite an increase in the number of UC patients with high-grade dysplasia and/or cancer. These lesions are known as colitis-associated cancer (CAC). The relationship between inflammation and tumorigenesis is well-established, and in the last decade, a great deal of supporting evidence has been obtained from genetic, pharmacological, and epidemiological studies. Inflammatory bowel disease, especially UC, is an important risk factor for the development of colon cancer. We should determine the risk factors for UC patients with cancer based on a large body of data, and we should attempt to prevent the increase in the number of such patients using these newly identified risk factors in the near future. Actively introducing the surgical treatment in addition to medical treatment should be considered. Several physicians should analyze UC from their unique perspectives in order to establish new clinically relevant diagnostic and treatment methods in the future. This article discusses CAC, including its etiology, mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment in UC patients. PMID:27096030

  18. Peculiar Presentation of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Amany; Ahmed, Ayman; Abohamad, Samar; Elgendy, Hala

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory and recurrent disorder that is characterized by bowel inflammation. Among the extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) that associate UC are the joints and renal manifestations. Joint affection in the form of arthritis can precede the intestinal manifestations of UC. However, renal affection with amyloidosis does not precede the UC diagnosis. Herein, we report a case of 26-year-old male diagnosed with UC after having peripheral arthritis for long time in addition to spondylitis and kidney amyloidosis. PMID:27042365

  19. Efficacy of Combined Mesalazine Plus Corticosteroid Enemas for Diversion Colitis after Subtotal Colectomy for Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Satohiro; Mashima, Hirosato

    2016-01-01

    Diversion colitis is a benign inflammatory process that occurs in any part of the large bowel excluded from the fecal stream by a diverting colostomy. While most of the patients with diversion colitis usually are asymptomatic, a minority has abdominal pain and rectal discharge of blood or mucus. A 65-year-old Japanese man was diagnosed as having diversion colitis with ulcerative colitis at 4 months after subtotal colectomy. Corticosteroid and mesalazine enemas were started nonsynchronously. A proctoscopy after 2 months showed no response. Prednisolone injections were started at 1.0 mg/kg daily, but the mucosal inflammation still failed to improve. A combined mesalazine 1 g plus prednisolone sodium phosphate 20 mg enema was started once daily. The rectal bleeding and endoscopic findings improved. Finally proctectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis were successfully performed. A combined mesalazine plus corticosteroid enema may be effective in patients with diversion colitis associated with ulcerative colitis.

  20. Melatonin improves experimental colitis with sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    PARK, YOUNG-SOOK; CHUNG, SOOK-HEE; LEE, SEONG-KYU; KIM, JA-HYUN; KIM, JUN-BONG; KIM, TAE-KYUN; KIM, DONG-SHIN; BAIK, HAING-WOON

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) is an epidemic phenomenon in modern countries, and its harmful effects are well known. SD acts as an aggravating factor in inflammatory bowel disease. Melatonin is a sleep-related neurohormone, also known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in the gastrointestinal tract; however, the effects of melatonin on colitis have been poorly characterized. Thus, in this study, we assessed the measurable effects of SD on experimental colitis and the protective effects of melatonin. For this purpose, male imprinting control region (ICR) mice (n=24) were used; the mice were divided into 4 experimental groups as follows: the control, colitis, colitis with SD and colitis with SD and melatonin groups. Colitis was induced by the administration of 5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water for 6 days. The mice were sleep-deprived for 3 days. Changes in body weight, histological analyses of colon tissues and the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and genes were evaluated. SD aggravated inflammation and these effects were reversed by melatonin in the mice with colitis. In addition, weight loss in the mice with colitis with SD was significantly reduced by the injection of melatonin. Treatment with melatonin led to high survival rates in the mice, in spite of colitis with SD. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the serum of mice were significantly increased by SD and reduced by melatonin treatment. The melatonin-treated group showed a histological improvement of inflammation. Upon gene analysis, the expression of the inflammatory genes, protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ) and calmodulin 3 (CALM3), was increased by SD, and the levels decreased following treatment with melatonin. The expression levels of the apoptosis-related inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 5A (Wnt5a) genes was

  1. Mindfulness May Be Helpful for People with Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... supported by NCCAM, was reported in the journal Digestion . Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease ... flare-up in patients with inactive ulcerative colitis . Digestion. 2014;89:142–155. Additional Resources Meditation Information ...

  2. Sonographic and Endoscopic Findings in Cocaine-Induced Ischemic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Leth, Thomas; Wilkens, Rune; Bonderup, Ole K.

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine-induced ischemic colitis is a recognized entity. The diagnosis is based on clinical and endoscopic findings. However, diagnostic imaging is helpful in the evaluation of abdominal symptoms and prior studies have suggested specific sonographic findings in ischemic colitis. We report sonographic and endoscopic images along with abdominal computed tomography in a case of cocaine-induced ischemic colitis. PMID:26798523

  3. Microscopic colitis: A review of etiology, treatment and refractory disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Tina; Cave, David; Marshall, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Microscopic colitis is a common cause of chronic, nonbloody diarrhea. Microscopic colitis is more common in women than men and usually affects patients in their sixth and seventh decade. This article reviews the etiology and medical management of microscopic colitis. The etiology of microscopic colitis is unknown, but it is associated with autoimmune disorders, such as celiac disease, polyarthritis, and thyroid disorders. Smoking has been identified as a risk factor of microscopic colitis. Exposure to medications, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, proton pump inhibitors, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, is suspected to play a role in microscopic colitis, although their direct causal relationship has not been proven. Multiple medications, including corticosteroids, anti-diarrheals, cholestyramine, bismuth, 5-aminosalicylates, and immunomodulators, have been used to treat microscopic colitis with variable response rates. Budesonide is effective in inducing and maintaining clinical remission but relapse rate is as high as 82% when budesonide is discontinued. There is limited data on management of steroid-dependent microscopic colitis or refractory microscopic colitis. Immunomodulators seem to have low response rate 0%-56% for patients with refractory microscopic colitis. Response rate 66%-100% was observed for use of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for refractory microscopic colitis. Anti-TNF and diverting ileostomy may be an option in severe or refractory microscopic colitis. PMID:26269669

  4. Adsorbents as antiendotoxin agents in experimental colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, K R; Anderson, N H; McCaigue, M D; Erwin, P J; Halliday, M I; Rowlands, B J

    1993-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa protects the body from a large reservoir of intraluminal pathogenic bacteria and endotoxins. This mucosal barrier is disrupted by the inflammation and ulceration of inflammatory bowel disease and may permit the absorption of toxic bacterial products. Systemic endotoxaemia has been demonstrated in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease and correlates with the extent and activity of disease. In this study the efficacy of absorbents as antiendotoxin agents in a hapten induced rat model of colitis is investigated. Induction of colitis was associated with systemic endotoxaemia. Enteral administration of terra fullonica and kaolin, but not of charcoal, significantly reduced systemic endotoxaemia (terra fullonica 4.2 (1.40) pg/ml; kaolin 5.29 (1.86) pg/ml; charcoal 32.7 (16.6) pg/ml; water 39.8 (12.6) pg/ml). Data expressed as mean (SE). With increasing severity of colitis, there was a decreasing ability of adsorbent therapy (terra fullonica) to control systemic endotoxaemia. Enteral administration of adsorbents controls gut derived systemic endotoxaemia in experimental colitis in animals and may be a useful antiendotoxin treatment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:8432452

  5. [Antibiotic treatment of clostridial colitis].

    PubMed

    Beneš, J; Polívková, S

    2016-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of various antibiotics used in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) are compared with respect to their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Recommendations are made for their optimal use in clinical practice. Metronidazole is suitable for the treatment of mild forms of CDI which are essentially self-limiting. Vancomycin kills clostridia reliably but the treatment is encumbered with considerable risk of recurrence. This can be decreased by shortening the treatment to seven days and then switching to a (pulse, taper, chaser) regimen to prevent recurrence or by active restoration of the intestinal ecosystem (fecal transplant). Fidaxomicin works faster than vancomycin and is associated with a lower risk of recurrence. Thus, it can be profitably used in patients with impending ileus and also in those whose medical condition does not allow prolonged treatment. The duration of fidaxomicin treatment could be reduced to as few as five days. Rifaximin does not have a clear place in the treatment of CDI because no compelling data are available on its efficacy in this disease. The risk of resistance is also important. Tigecycline is a promising antibiotic for parenteral use. According to the available data, it should be more effective than intravenous metronidazole which has been considered the drug of choice.Clostridial colitis is associated with intestinal dysmicrobia which is the major cause of recurrence. Severe dysmicrobia cannot be treated by antibiotics but only by gut flora restoration; stool transplant from a healthy donor is the only proven therapy for this condition. PMID:27246640

  6. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Bunyamin; Koca, Tugba; Yildiz, Ihsan; Gerek Celikden, Sevda; Ciris, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG) is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn's disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis. PMID:27051538

  7. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Bunyamin; Koca, Yavuz Savas; Koca, Tugba; Yildiz, Ihsan; Gerek Celikden, Sevda; Ciris, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG) is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn's disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis. PMID:27051538

  8. Cerebral venous thrombosis in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Bindu; Goyal, Rajeev; Nihal, Lalit; Reddy, Rajasekhar

    2013-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis has been reported to show hyper coagulation leading to peripheral and rarely central thrombosis. A 35-year-old female was admitted with chief complaints of increased frequency of bloody diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss for 2 months. The patient was diagnosed to have ulcerative colitis after sigmoidoscopy and biopsy and she was started on treatment. Two days later, the patient developed headache and seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain showed cerebral venous thrombosis with venous infarcts. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated. PMID:23546367

  9. CT findings in ulcerative, granulomatous, and indeterminate colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, R.M.; Marn, C.S.; Kirby, D.F.; Vogelzang, R.L.; Neiman, H.L.

    1984-08-01

    Eight patients with ulcerative colitis, three with colitis indeterminate, and 15 patients with Crohn disease were studied by computed tomography (CT) to establish CT criteria for each disorder in hopes of providing a new diagnostic perspective useful in the radiographic evaluation of inflammatory colitis. The CT findings in ulcerative colitis included thickening of the colon wall, which was characterized by inhomogeneous attenuation and a target appearance of the rectum, and proliferation of perirectal fat. Bowel wall thickening with homogeneous attenuation, fistula and abscess formation, and mesenteric abnormalities were observed in patients with Crohn colitis. Patients with colitis indeterminate showed colonic changes on CT observed in both disorders. Initial experience suggests that CT can differentiate patients with well established ulcerative and Crohn colitis.

  10. Fecal calprotectin and ulcerative colitis endoscopic activity index as indicators of mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Taghvaei, Tarang; Maleki, Iradj; Nagshvar, Farshad; Fakheri, Hafez; Hosseini, Vahid; Valizadeh, Seyed Mohammad; Neishaboori, Hassan

    2015-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic, idiopathic, inflammatory large bowel disease with recurrent variable periods of exacerbation. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the correlation of UCEIS with fecal calprotectin (FC) level to assess disease activity in UC patients in order to determine whether FC can prognosticate clinical outcome and disease activity of UC instead of colonoscopic evaluation. Our endoscopic investigations revealed the extension of UC as the following: proctitis (11.6%), procto-sigmoiditis (18.5%), left-sided colitis (15.8%), extensive colitis (11.7%), and normal endoscopy (42.4%). Conclusively, we suggest that FC can be used as a reliable tool to evaluate disease activity in ulcerative colitis patients. Moreover, our findings indicate a significant correlation between FC level and mucosal healing. PMID:25366383

  11. Rectocolectomy with anal conservation in inflammatory colitis

    PubMed Central

    Deane, A M; Celestin, L R

    1983-01-01

    Eleven patients with inflammatory colitis underwent total colectomy and rectal excision with conservation of the anus. This is a lesser procedure than proctocolectomy and achieves total extirpation of diseased large-bowel mucosa. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:6824297

  12. Why do patients with ulcerative colitis relapse?

    PubMed

    Riley, S A; Mani, V; Goodman, M J; Lucas, S

    1990-02-01

    To determine the factors responsible for ulcerative colitis relapse a cohort of 92 patients (18 to 78 years, 50 men) with clinically inactive disease have been followed for over 48 weeks. At 12 weekly intervals patients were asked, by means of standardised questionnaires, about infections, compliance with maintenance medication, new drug treatment, dietary changes, episodes of non-bloody diarrhoea, life stresses, and feelings of anxiety and depression. Thirty five patients (38%) relapsed (median interval 17 weeks, range three to 46 weeks). Patients who relapsed had a higher previous relapse rate than non-relapsers (p less than 0.001) and a shorter time from previous relapse to trial entry (p less than 0.05). Other clinical characteristics were equally matched in the two groups. Between and within group comparisons revealed that upper respiratory tract symptoms, antibiotic ingestion, analgesic intake, diarrhoeal episodes and stressful life events were no more common in the four weeks before relapse than before routine attendance. Anxiety and depression ratings were also similar in the two groups. The timing of ulcerative colitis relapse showed a clear seasonal pattern with 26 patients relapsing from August to January and only nine from January to July (p less than 0.001). In addition, a retrospective case note analysis revealed significant seasonality of onset of ulcerative colitis. We conclude that seasonal factors may contribute to both onset and relapse of ulcerative colitis. PMID:2311975

  13. Selenoprotein P in colitis-associated carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Short, Sarah P.; Whitten-Barrett, Caitlyn; Williams, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are often deficient in micronutrients such as selenium and have an increased risk of colon cancer. We tested whether the selenium transport protein, selenoprotein P, could modify colitis-associated cancer. Our results indicate that global SEPP1 haploinsufficiency augments tumorigenesis and mediates oxidative damage in the intestine. PMID:27314080

  14. Rectal mucocoele following subtotal colectomy for colitis

    PubMed Central

    Day, N; Walsh, C

    2014-01-01

    We present a unique case of a rectal mucocoele affecting a patient several years after his subtotal colectomy for ulcerative colitis. This was secondary to both a benign anorectal stenosis and a benign mucus secreting rectal adenoma. This case highlights the importance of surveillance in such patients. PMID:25198962

  15. Surveillance colonoscopy for colitis-associated dysplasia and cancer in ulcerative colitis patients.

    PubMed

    Hata, Keisuke; Kishikawa, Junko; Anzai, Hiroyuki; Shinagawa, Takahide; Kazama, Shinsuke; Ishii, Hiroaki; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-04-01

    Long-standing ulcerative colitis patients are known to be at high risk for the development of colorectal cancer. Therefore, surveillance colonoscopy has been recommended for these patients. Because colitis-associated colorectal cancer may be difficult to identify even by colonoscopy, a random biopsy method has been recommended. However, the procedure of carrying out a random biopsy is tedious and its effectiveness has also not yet been demonstrated. Instead, targeted biopsy with chromoendoscopy has gained popularity in European and Asian countries. Chromoendoscopy is generally considered to be an effective tool for ulcerative colitis surveillance and is recommended in the guidelines of the British Society of Gastroenterology and the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Although image-enhanced endoscopy, such as narrow-band imaging and autofluorescence imaging, has been investigated as a potential ulcerative colitis surveillance tool, it is not routinely applied for ulcerative colitis surveillance in its present form. The appropriate intervals of surveillance colonoscopy have yet to be determined. Although the Japanese and American guidelines recommend annual or biannual colonoscopy, the British Society of Gastroenterology and the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation stratified their guidelines according to the risks of colorectal cancer. A randomized controlled trial comparing random and targeted biopsy methods has been conducted in Japan and although the final analysis is still ongoing, the results of this study should address this issue. In the present review, we focus on the current detection methods and characterization of dysplasia/cancer and discuss the appropriate intervals of colonoscopy according to the stratified risks. PMID:26096182

  16. RNase-L deficiency exacerbates experimental colitis and colitis-associated cancer

    PubMed Central

    Long, Tiha M.; ArindamChakrabarti; Ezelle, Heather J.; E. Brennan-Laun, Sarah; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polyakova, Irina; H. Silverman, Robert; Hassel, Bret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The endoribonuclease RNase-L is a type-I interferon (IFN)-regulatedcomponent of the innate immune response that functions in antiviral, antibacterial and antiproliferative activities. RNase-L produces RNA agonists of RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), sensors of cytosolic pathogen-associated RNAs that induce cytokines including IFNβ. IFNβ and RLR signaling mediate protective responses against experimental colitis and colitis-associated cancer (CAC) and contribute to gastrointestinal (GI) homeostasis. Therefore, we investigated a role for RNase-L in murine colitis and CAC and its association with RLR signaling in response to bacterial RNA. Methods Colitis was induced in wild type (WT) and RNase-L-deficient mice (RNase-L−/−) by administration of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). CAC was induced by DSS and azoxymethane (AOM). Histological analysis and immunohistochemistry were performed on colon tissue to analyze immune cell infiltration and tissue damage following induction of colitis. Expression of cytokines was measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA. Results DSS-treated RNase-L−/− mice exhibited a significantly higher clinical score, delayed leukocyte infiltration, reduced expression of IFNβ, TNFα, IL-1β and IL-18at early times post-DSS exposure and increased mortalityas compared to WT mice. DSS/AOM-treated RNase-L−/−mice displayed an increased tumor burden. Bacterial RNA triggeredIFNβproductionin an RNase-L-dependent manner and provided a potential mechanism by whichRNase-L contributes to the GI immune response to microbiota and protects against experimental colitis and CAC. Conclusions RNase-L promotes the innate immune response to intestinal damage and ameliorates murine colitis and CAC. The RNase-L-dependent production of IFNβ stimulated by bacterial RNA may be a mechanism to protectagainst GI inflammatory disease. PMID:23567782

  17. Cytomegalovirus-associated colitis causing diarrhea in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan; Olchovsky, David; Pokroy, Russell; Ezra, David

    2006-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis rarely occurs in immunocompetent patients. We report a case of disabling and life threatening diarrhea in an immunocompetent elderly woman due to CMV colitis. The diagnosis of CMV was based on histological examination of tissues biopsied at colonoscopy, positive CMV antigen and high CMV-IgM titer in peripheral blood samples and a good response to systemic gancyclovir treatment. We conclude that CMV should be considered in the differential diagnosis of colitis in elderly immunocompetent patients. PMID:17106945

  18. Intestinal epithelial vitamin D receptor signaling inhibits experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weicheng; Chen, Yunzi; Golan, Maya Aharoni; Annunziata, Maria L.; Du, Jie; Dougherty, Urszula; Kong, Juan; Musch, Mark; Huang, Yong; Pekow, Joel; Zheng, Changqing; Bissonnette, Marc; Hanauer, Stephen B.; Li, Yan Chun

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of vitamin D on colitis have been previously documented. Global vitamin D receptor (VDR) deletion exaggerates colitis, but the relative anticolitic contribution of epithelial and nonepithelial VDR signaling is unknown. Here, we showed that colonic epithelial VDR expression was substantially reduced in patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Moreover, targeted expression of human VDR (hVDR) in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) protected mice from developing colitis. In experimental colitis models induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid, dextran sulfate sodium, or CD4+CD45RBhi T cell transfer, transgenic mice expressing hVDR in IECs were highly resistant to colitis, as manifested by marked reductions in clinical colitis scores, colonic histological damage, and colonic inflammation compared with WT mice. Reconstitution of Vdr-deficient IECs with the hVDR transgene completely rescued Vdr-null mice from severe colitis and death, even though the mice still maintained a hyperresponsive Vdr-deficient immune system. Mechanistically, VDR signaling attenuated PUMA induction in IECs by blocking NF-κB activation, leading to a reduction in IEC apoptosis. Together, these results demonstrate that gut epithelial VDR signaling inhibits colitis by protecting the mucosal epithelial barrier, and this anticolitic activity is independent of nonepithelial immune VDR actions. PMID:23945234

  19. Intractable colitis associated with chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Yoshiaki; Goto, Akira; Yamashita, Kentaro; Endo, Takao; Ikeda, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kaori; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Imai, Kohzoh

    2006-11-01

    The case of a 20-year-old Japanese man, diagnosed as having autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), who was being treated with corticosteroids for intractable unclassified colitis, is described. He died from multiple organ failure following disseminated intravascular coagulation secondary to disseminated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection. He was diagnosed as an index case of CGD when 2 years old, was inoculated against VZV at the age of 5 years and had had an unremarkable course for 19 years. He was admitted to hospital because of a third episode of recurrent bloody diarrhoea. Clinical remission for each episode was achieved by intravenous corticosteroid therapy. Unclassified colitis associated with CGD was diagnosed based on a colonic biopsy demonstrating characteristic macrophages with lipofuscin deposits. From a treatment viewpoint, idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) should be differentiated from secondary IBD occurring in CGD, in which immunosuppressive drugs including corticosteroids, still the mainstay of IBD treatment, should be avoided. PMID:17030921

  20. Varied Clinical Manifestations of Amebic Colitis.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Chad J; Fleming, Rhonda; Boman, Darius A; Zuckerman, Marc J

    2015-11-01

    Invasive amebiasis is common worldwide, but infrequently observed in the United States. It is associated with considerable morbidity in patients residing in or traveling to endemic areas. We review the clinical and endoscopic manifestations of amebic colitis to alert physicians to the varied clinical manifestations of this potentially life-threatening disease. Copyright ©Most patients present with watery or bloody diarrhea. Less common presentations of amebic colitis include abdominal pain, overt gastrointestinal bleeding, exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease, or the incidental association with colon cancer. Amebic liver abscesses are the most frequent complication. Rectosigmoid involvement may be found on colonoscopy; however, most case series have reported that the cecum is the most commonly involved site, followed by the ascending colon. Endoscopic evaluation should be used to assist in the diagnosis, with attention to the observation of colonic inflammation, ulceration, and amebic trophozoites on histopathological examination. PMID:26539949

  1. Histiocytic ulcerative colitis in a Boxer dog.

    PubMed

    Hill, F W; Sullivan, N D

    1978-09-01

    A 2-year-old male Boxer dog had passed loose faeces mixed with fresh blood and mucus for 8 months. Tenesmus after defaecation was a feature. Colitis was diagnosed from the proctoscopic appearance of the recto-colonic mucosa and confirmed from a biopsy. The disorder proved unresponsive to sulphasalazine therapy, but oral chloramphenicol, betamethasone and prednisolone enemas administered over a 6-week period produced a satisfactory clinical improvement, which persisted for a further 3 weeks without treatment. However, follow-up proctoscopy showed only a marginal improvement in the appearance of the mucosa and appeared to exacerbate further bloody diarrhoea, which persisted. The dog was destroyed and histiocytic ulcerative colitis confirmed at autopsy. PMID:743058

  2. Ischemic Colitis in an Endurance Runner

    PubMed Central

    Grames, Chase; Berry-Cabán, Cristóbal S.

    2012-01-01

    A 20-year-old female running the Marine Corps Marathon developed diarrhea at mile 12. After finishing the race she noted that she was covered in bloody stool. A local emergency department suspected ischemic colitis. After discharge, her primary care physician instructed her to discontinue the use of all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Her symptoms resolved and she returned to running without any complications. This paper describes the pathophysiology, diagnostic approach, and management options. PMID:23091744

  3. Herpes simplex virus colitis in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Daley, Andrew J; Craven, Paul; Holland, Andrew J A; Jones, Cheryl A; Badawi, Nadia; Isaacs, David

    2002-09-01

    Involvement of the gastrointestinal tract in neonates with congenital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is rarely described. We report a case of a newborn with disseminated HSV infection associated with profuse hematochezia and late sigmoid colon perforation. Histologic examination showed patchy areas of ulceration with multinucleated giant cells and HSV nucleic acid was detected by polymerase chain reaction in colonic tissue. No clinically apparent episodes of recurrent colitis occurred in the first year of life. PMID:12380594

  4. Pyostomatitis vegetans. Clinical marker of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Jornet, P; Gomez-Garcia, F; Camacho-Alonso, F

    2012-03-01

    Pyodermatitis-pyostomatitis vegetans (PV), a rare disorder of the skin and oral mucosa, is considered a highly specific marker for inflammatory bowel disease, especially ulcerative colitis. We have presented the case of a patient with PV. This report emphasizes the relationship of PV to inflammatory bowel disease and the importance of the oral lesions as initial presenting signs of systemic disease or activity. PMID:22685913

  5. Resveratrol Pretreatment Ameliorates TNBS Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Gulserap; Yildiz, Yuksel; Ulutas, Pinar A; Yaylali, Asl; Ural, Muruvvet

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in humans constituting a major health concern today whose prevalence has been increasing over the world. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and disturbed capacity of antioxidant defense in IBD subjects have been reported. Antioxidants may play a significant role in IBD treatment. This study aimed at evaluating ameliorative effects of intraperitoneal resveratrol pretreatment on trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. Thirty five Wistar-Albino female rats were divided equally into five groups. Inflammation was induced by the intrarectal administration of TNBS under anesthesia. Intraperitoneal administration of resveratrol (RSV) at a concentration of 10mg/kg/day for 5 days before the induction of colitis significantly reduced microscopy score and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and increased glutathione peroxidase (GSH Px) activity compared to TNBS and vehicle groups. Also an insignificant increase in catalase (CAT) activity was observed in the RSV treated group compared to TNBS and vehicle groups. In this paper, the most recent patent on the identification and treatment of IBD was indicated. In conclusion, antioxidant RSV proved to have a beneficial effect on TNBS colitis in rats. In light of these advantageous results, the RSV can be considered as adjuvant agent in IBD treatments. PMID:26246013

  6. Animal Models of Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kanneganti, Manasa; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic inflammatory disorders that affect individuals throughout life. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of IBD are largely unknown, studies with animal models of colitis indicate that dysregulation of host/microbial interactions are requisite for the development of IBD. Patients with long-standing IBD have an increased risk for developing colitis-associated cancer (CAC), especially 10 years after the initial diagnosis of colitis, although the absolute number of CAC cases is relatively small. The cancer risk seems to be not directly related to disease activity, but is related to disease duration/extent, complication of primary sclerosing cholangitis, and family history of colon cancer. In particular, high levels and continuous production of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, by colonic epithelial cells (CECs) and immune cells in lamina propria may be strongly associated with the pathogenesis of CAC. In this article, we have summarized animal models of CAC and have reviewed the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlining the development of carcinogenic changes in CECs secondary to the chronic inflammatory conditions in the intestine. It may provide us some clues in developing a new class of therapeutic agents for the treatment of IBD and CAC in the near future. PMID:21274454

  7. Resveratrol Pretreatment Ameliorates TNBS Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Gulserap; Yildiz, Yuksel; Ulutas, Pinar A.; Yaylali, Aslı; Ural, Muruvvet

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in humans constituting a major health concern today whose prevalence has been increasing over the world. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and disturbed capacity of antioxidant defense in IBD subjects have been reported. Antioxidants may play a significant role in IBD treatment. This study aimed at evaluating ameliorative effects of intraperitoneal resveratrol pretreatment on trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. Thirty five Wistar-Albino female rats were divided equally into five groups. Inflammation was induced by the intrarectal administration of TNBS under anesthesia. Intraperitoneal administration of resveratrol (RSV) at a concentration of 10mg/kg/day for 5 days before the induction of colitis significantly reduced microscopy score and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and increased glutathione peroxidase (GSH Px) activity compared to TNBS and vehicle groups. Also an insignificant increase in catalase (CAT) activity was observed in the RSV treated group compared to TNBS and vehicle groups. In this paper, the most recent patent on the identification and treatment of IBD was indicated. In conclusion, antioxidant RSV proved to have a beneficial effect on TNBS colitis in rats. In light of these advantageous results, the RSV can be considered as adjuvant agent in IBD treatments. PMID:26246013

  8. Herpes simplex virus colitis complicating ulcerative colitis: A case report and brief review on superinfections.

    PubMed

    Schunter, Marco Oliver; Walles, Thorsten; Fritz, Peter; Meyding-Lamadé, Uta; Thon, Klaus-Peter; Fellermann, Klaus; Stange, Eduard Friedrich; Lamadé, Wolfram

    2007-09-01

    In patients with inflammatory bowel disease herpes simplex virus infection has been described as a major cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in immunocompromised individuals. Here we present the case of a 35-year old woman with an exacerbation of ulcerative colitis caused by herlpes simplex virus infection (HSV-2). The diagnosis was confirmed histologically following subtotal colectomy. After intravenous treatment with aciclovir for 2 weeks postoperative hematochezia stopped. Herpes simplex virus colitis is a rare but potentially fatal complication of immunosuppressive treatment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Prompt diagnosis and efficient antiviral therapy are mandatory to improve prognosis. PMID:21172183

  9. Fulminant herpes colitis in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    el-Serag, H B; Zwas, F R; Cirillo, N W; Eisen, R N

    1996-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a well-recognized cause of gastrointestinal infection, most commonly in patients with underlying immunodeficiency. The esophagus, perianum, and rectum are the most common sites of involvement; however, extensive colitis is rare. We describe a woman with Crohn's disease who developed pathologically proven HSV colitis. We review the literature and present the possible implications of the diagnosis. PMID:8724263

  10. Prostaglandin ethanolamides attenuate damage in a human explant colitis model.

    PubMed

    Nicotra, Lauren L; Vu, Megan; Harvey, Benjamin S; Smid, Scott D

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are protective in animal colitis models. As endocannabinoids also form novel prostaglandin ethanolamides (prostamides) via COX-2, we investigated the effects of prostamides and other COX-2 mediators on tissue damage in an ex vivo human mucosal explant colitis model. Healthy human colonic mucosae were incubated with pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β to elicit colitis-like tissue damage. The PGF-ethanolamide analogue, bimatoprost decreased colitis scores which were reversed by a prostamide-specific antagonist AGN 211334, but not the FP receptor antagonist AL-8810. PGF-ethanolamide and PGE-ethanolamide also reduced cytokine-evoked epithelial damage. Anandamide was protective in the explant colitis model; however COX-2 inhibition did not alter its effects, associated with a lack of COX-2 induction in explant mucosal tissue. These findings support an anti-inflammatory role for prostamides and endocannabinoids in the human colon. PMID:23380599

  11. Acute ischaemic colitis associated with oral phenylephrine decongestant use.

    PubMed

    Ward, Paul W; Shaneyfelt, Terrence M; Roan, Ronald M

    2014-01-01

    In this case, the authors have presented for the first time that ischaemic colitis may be associated with phenylephrine use. Since phenylephrine is the more common active ingredient in over-the-counter (OTC) cold medications, other presentations may follow this case. A MEDLINE search was performed for all case reports or case series of ischaemic colitis secondary to pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine use published between 1966 and 2013. The search resulted in four case reports and one case series describing patients with acute onset ischaemic colitis with exposure to pseudoephedrine immediately prior to onset. However, we found no case reports of ischaemic colitis associated with phenylephrine use. We present this case as an unexpected clinical outcome of phenylephrine, which has not been associated with ischaemic colitis in the literature. Also, this case serves as a reminder of the important clinical lesson to question all patients' use of OTC and prescribed medications. PMID:24895387

  12. Arthropathy, ankylosing spondylitis, and clubbing of fingers in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, K. N.; Prescott, R. J.; Walker, R. J.; Sircus, W.; McManus, J. P. A.; Card, W. I.

    1970-01-01

    In a retrospective study of 399 patients with ulcerative colitis, 27 patients had colitic arthritis, 17 had ankylosing spondylitis, and 20 had clubbing of the fingers. Colitic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis were not related to severity, extent of involvement, or duration of colitis. A significant association between colitic arthropathy and other complications of ulcerative colitis, such as pseudopolyposis, perianal disease, eye lesions, skin eruptions, aphthous ulceration, and liver disease has been demonstrated. The outcome of the first referred attack of colitis in the presence of colitic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis remained uninfluenced. Clubbing of fingers was related to severity, extent of involvement, and length of the history of colitis. A significant association between clubbing of the fingers and carcinoma of the colon, pseudopolyposis, toxic dilatation, and arthropathy has been shown. The frequency of surgical intervention in patients with clubbing was higher but the overall mortality was not significantly different from the patients without clubbing. PMID:5473606

  13. Acute ischaemic colitis associated with oral phenylephrine decongestant use

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Paul W; Shaneyfelt, Terrence M; Roan, Ronald M

    2014-01-01

    In this case, the authors have presented for the first time that ischaemic colitis may be associated with phenylephrine use. Since phenylephrine is the more common active ingredient in over-the-counter (OTC) cold medications, other presentations may follow this case. A MEDLINE search was performed for all case reports or case series of ischaemic colitis secondary to pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine use published between 1966 and 2013. The search resulted in four case reports and one case series describing patients with acute onset ischaemic colitis with exposure to pseudoephedrine immediately prior to onset. However, we found no case reports of ischaemic colitis associated with phenylephrine use. We present this case as an unexpected clinical outcome of phenylephrine, which has not been associated with ischaemic colitis in the literature. Also, this case serves as a reminder of the important clinical lesson to question all patients’ use of OTC and prescribed medications. PMID:24895387

  14. Temporal Comorbidity of Mental Disorder and Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Cawthorpe, David; Davidson, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease that rarely exists in isolation in affected patients. We examined the association of ulcerative colitis and International Classification of Diseases mental disorder, as well as the temporal comorbidity of three broad International Classification of Diseases groupings of mental disorders in patients with ulcerative colitis to determine if mental disorder is more likely to occur before or after ulcerative colitis. Methods: We used physician diagnoses from the regional health zone of Calgary, Alberta, for patient visits from fiscal years 1994 to 2009 for treatment of any presenting concern in that Calgary health zone (763,449 patients) to identify 5113 patients age younger than 1 year to age 92 years (2120 males, average age = 47 years; 2993 females, average age = 48 years) with a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis. Results: The 16-year cumulative prevalence of ulcerative colitis was 0.0058%, or 58 cases per 10,000 persons (95% confidence interval = 56–60 per 10,000). Although the cumulative prevalence of mental disorder in the overall sample was 5390 per 10,000 (53.9%), we found that 4192 patients with ulcerative colitis (82%) also had a diagnosis of a mental disorder. By annual rate of ulcerative colitis, patients with mental disorder had a significantly higher annual prevalence. The mental disorder grouping neuroses/depressive disorders was most likely to arise before ulcerative colitis (odds ratio = 1.87 for males; 2.24 for females). Conclusions: A temporal association was observed between specific groups of International Classification of Diseases mental disorder and ulcerative colitis, indicating a possible etiologic relationship between the disorders or their treatments, or both. PMID:25663206

  15. Mice deficient in Muc4 are resistant to experimental colitis and colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, S; Rachagani, S; Sheinin, Y; Smith, L M; Gurumurthy, C B; Roy, H K; Batra, S K

    2016-05-19

    MUC4, a large transmembrane mucin normally expressed in the small and large intestine, is differentially expressed during inflammatory and malignant conditions of the colon. However, the expression pattern and the role of MUC4 in colitis and colorectal cancer (CRC) are inconclusive. Therefore, the aim of this study was to understand the role of Muc4 during inflammatory and malignant conditions of the colon. Here, we generated Muc4(-/-) mice and addressed its role in colitis and colitis-associated CRC using dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) and azoxymethane (AOM)-DSS experimental models, respectively. Muc4(-/-) mice were viable, fertile with no apparent defects. Muc4(-/-) mice displayed increased resistance to DSS-induced colitis compared with wild-type (WT) littermates that was evaluated by survival rate, body weight loss, diarrhea and fecal blood score, and histological score. Reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells, that is, CD3(+) lymphocytes and F4/80(+) macrophages was observed in the inflamed mucosa along with reduction in the mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and anti-microbial genes Lysozyme M and SLPI in the colon of Muc4(-/-) mice compared with WT littermates. Compensatory upregulation of Muc2 and Muc3 mucins under basal and DSS treatment conditions partly explains the resistance observed in Muc4(-/-) mice. Accordingly, Muc4(-/-) mice exhibited significantly reduced tumor burden compared with WT mice assessed in a colitis-induced tumor model using AOM/DSS. An increased percentage of Ki67(+) nuclei was observed in the tumors from WT compared with Muc4(-/-) mice suggesting Muc4 to be critical in intestinal cell proliferation during tumorigenesis. Taken together, we conclusively demonstrate for the first time the role of Muc4 in driving intestinal inflammation and inflammation-associated tumorigenesis using a novel Muc4(-/-) mouse model. PMID:26364605

  16. Crohn's and colitis in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Day, Andrew S; Ledder, Oren; Leach, Steven T; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2012-11-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis can be grouped as the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These conditions have become increasingly common in recent years, including in children and young people. Although much is known about aspects of the pathogenesis of these diseases, the precise aetiology is not yet understood, and there remains no cure. Recent data has illustrated the importance of a number of genes-several of these are important in the onset of IBD in early life, including in infancy. Pain, diarrhoea and weight loss are typical symptoms of paediatric Crohn's disease whereas bloody diarrhoea is more typical of colitis in children. However, atypical symptoms may occur in both conditions: these include isolated impairment of linear growth or presentation with extra-intestinal manifestations such as erythema nodosum. Growth and nutrition are commonly compromised at diagnosis in both Crohn's disease and colitis. Consideration of possible IBD and completion of appropriate investigations are essential to ensure prompt diagnosis, thereby avoiding the consequences of diagnostic delay. Patterns of disease including location and progression of IBD in childhood differ substantially from adult-onset disease. Various treatment options are available for children and adolescents with IBD. Exclusive enteral nutrition plays a central role in the induction of remission of active Crohn's disease. Medical and surgical therapies need to considered within the context of a growing and developing child. The overall management of these chronic conditions in children should include multi-disciplinary expertise, with focus upon maintaining control of gut inflammation, optimising nutrition, growth and quality of life, whilst preventing disease or treatment-related complications. PMID:23139601

  17. Cerebral venous thrombosis revealing an ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Taous, Abdellah; Berri, Maha Aït; Lamsiah, Taoufik; Zainoun, Brahim; Ziadi, Tarik; Rouimi, Abdelhadi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has been reported as an uncommon and devastating complication of ulcerative colitis (UC), with an annual incidence varying between 0,5 to 6,7%. It is suspected to be a consequence of the hypercoagulable state occurring during disease relapse. We report a case of 22-year-old female patient presenting with CVT revealing an UC. Our case raises the awareness among health professionals about the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) as a rare etiology of CVT, and signifies the importance of considering antithrombotic prophylaxis in all hospitalised IBD patients, especially those with active disease. PMID:27279947

  18. Grim19 Attenuates DSS Induced Colitis in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-kyung; Lee, Seung Hoon; Lee, Seon-Young; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kwon, Jeong-Eun; Seo, Hyeon-Beom; Lee, Han Hee; Lee, Bo-In; Park, Sung-Hwan; Cho, Mi-La

    2016-01-01

    DSS induced colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract, which destabilizes the gut and induces an uncontrolled immune response. Although DSS induced colitis is generally thought to develop as a result of an abnormally active intestinal immune system, its pathogenesis remains unclear. Gene associated with retinoid interferon induced mortality (Grim) 19 is an endogenous specific inhibitor of STAT3, which regulates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. In this study, we investigated the influence of GRIM19 in a DSS induced colitis mouse model. We hypothesized that Grim19 would ameliorate DSS induced colitis by altering STAT3 activity and intestinal inflammation. Grim19 ameliorated DSS induced colitis severity and protected intestinal tissue. The expression of STAT3 and proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and TNF-α in colon and lymph nodes was decreased significantly by Grim19. Moreover, DSS induced colitis progression in a Grim19 transgenic mouse line was inhibited in association with a reduction in STAT3 and IL-17 expression. These results suggest that Grim19 attenuates DSS induced colitis by suppressing the excessive inflammatory response mediated by STAT3 activation. PMID:27258062

  19. Serum antibodies to Escherichia coli in subjects with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Heddle, R. J.; Shearman, D. J. C.

    1979-01-01

    It has been proposed that in ulcerative colitis the intestinal flora stimulates autoimmune reactions to colonic epithelium through shared specificities exposed in a `common antigen' found in most Enterobacteriaceae. The present experiments aimed to resolve conflicting data as to whether patients with ulcerative colitis have selectively increased serum antibody titres to enterobacterial common antigen or E. coli 014, which is rich in enterobacterial common antigen. Antibody titres to enterobacterial common antigen and lipopolysaccharides of E. coli 014 and of five serotypes of E. coli which occur frequently in human faeces were measured by passive haemagglutination. Sera were obtained from patients with ulcerative colitis, age- and sex-matched controls and subjects with other gastrointestinal disorders. Serum titres to enterobacterial common antigen and E. coli 014 lipopolysaccharide were not increased significantly in subjects with ulcerative colitis but significant increases were observed in subjects with chronic liver disease without colitis. Patients with active ulcerative colitis, patients with chronic liver disease and subjects convalescent from Salmonella or Shigella infections all had significantly increased serum titres to the antigens as a group. Class-specific enhancement of passive haemagglutination indicated that the class distribution of serum antibodies was similar in subjects with ulcerative colitis and controls. PMID:93528

  20. Epithelial IL-18 Equilibrium Controls Barrier Function in Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Nowarski, Roni; Jackson, Ruaidhrí; Gagliani, Nicola; de Zoete, Marcel R.; Palm, Noah W.; Bailis, Will; Low, Jun Siong; Harman, Christian C.D.; Graham, Morven; Elinav, Eran; Flavell, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The intestinal mucosal barrier controlling the resident microbiome is dependent on a protective mucus layer generated by goblet cells, impairment of which is a hallmark of the inflammatory bowel disease Ulcerative Colitis. Here we show that IL-18 is critical in driving the pathologic breakdown of barrier integrity in a model of colitis. Deletion of Il18 or its receptor Il18r1 in intestinal epithelial cells (Δ/EC) conferred protection from colitis and mucosal damage in mice. In contrast, deletion of the IL-18 negative regulator Il18bp resulted in severe colitis associated with loss of mature goblet cells. Colitis and goblet cell loss were rescued in Il18bp−/−;Il18rΔ/EC mice, demonstrating that colitis severity is controlled at the level of IL-18 signaling in intestinal epithelial cells. IL-18 inhibited goblet cell maturation by regulating the transcriptional program instructing goblet cell development. These results inform on the mechanism of goblet cell dysfunction which underlies the pathology of Ulcerative Colitis. PMID:26638073

  1. Intestinal permeability and contractility in murine colitis.

    PubMed Central

    van Meeteren, M E; van Bergeijk, J D; van Dijk, A P; Tak, C J; Meijssen, M A; Zijlstra, F J

    1998-01-01

    We developed an in vitro organ bath method to measure permeability and contractility simultaneously in murine intestinal segments. To investigate whether permeability and contractility are correlated and influenced by mucosal damage owing to inflammation, BALB/c mice were exposed to a 10% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) solution for 8 days to induce colitis. The effect of pharmacologically induced smooth muscle relaxation and contraction on permeability was tested in vitro. Regional permeability differences were observed in both control and 10% DSS-treated mice. Distal colon segments were less permeable to 3H-mannitol and 14C-PEG 400 molecules compared with proximal colon and ileum. Intestinal permeability in control vs. 10% DSS mice was not altered, although histologic inflammation score and IFN-gamma pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were significantly increased in proximal and distal colon. IL-1beta levels were enhanced in these proximal and distal segments, but not significantly different from controls. Any effect of pharmacologically induced contractility on intestinal permeability could not be observed. In conclusion, intestinal permeability and contractility are not correlated in this model of experimentally induced colitis in mice. Although simultaneous measurement in a physiological set-up is possible, this method has to be further validated. PMID:9705603

  2. [Surgery of ulcerative colitis using ileoanal anastomosis].

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, J; Oota, M; Matsumoto, M; Natori, H

    1985-09-01

    The ideal surgical treatment for ulcerative colitis is the ileoanal anastomosis (IAA), which, however, is not yet generally accepted as a practical procedure because of a suboptimal fecal function, frequent postoperative complications and technical difficulties. Based on one (U.) of the authors experiences on 36(34) polyposis and 19(12) colitis (paracentesis indicate the number of cases in (U.)'s previous appointment, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1977-1983). The practical procedure of IAA can be achieved by combining the following basic principles; a direct anastomosis of J-shape ileal pouch to the anal sphincteric mechanism, temporarily exclusion of the anastomosis by a loop-ileostomy, mucosectomy confined to the lower rectum leaving the short muscular cuff, and meticulous dissection of inflamed mucosa of the anal canal minimizing the damage to the internal sphincter which is achieved by the prone ano-abdominal approach. At elective operation, the procedure can be performed either as primary surgery or as the secondary following rectum preserving operation, in which, coeco-rectal anastomosis is advisable for preserving the ileocolic vessels that is helpful for J-pouch construction. In emergency surgical program, IAA is still be preserved as a final restructive surgery following colectomy with an open rectal exclusion or Turnbull' s total colonic exclusion. In this occasion, an ascendicostomy is advisable for preserving the ileocolic vessels. PMID:4088260

  3. Golimumab: clinical update on its use for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Gilardi, D; Fiorino, G; Allocca, M; Bravatà, I; Danese, S

    2015-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α agents) have dramatically changed the therapeutical approach to inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. A new anti-TNF drug, golimumab, has recently been approved for patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis. Its efficacy has been demonstrated by preclinical and clinical studies and the drug showed an efficacy and safety profile in line with the other anti-TNF agents, such as infliximab and adalimumab. This review gives an overview on golimumab in the treatment of moderate to severe ulcerative colitis. PMID:25876561

  4. Ileorectal Anastomosis and Proctocolectomy with End Ileostomy for Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Andre da Luz; Lavery, Ian C.

    2010-01-01

    Until the development of the ileal pouch-anal anastomosis in the early 1980s, proctocolectomy with end ileostomy was the only definitive surgery for ulcerative colitis and colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis was the procedure of choice for affected patients who were reluctant to have a permanent ileostomy. Currently, ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is the most common procedure for patients with ulcerative colitis requiring surgical treatment. However, there is still a role for ileorectal anastomosis and proctocolectomy with end ileostomy for a selected group of patients. In this review, the authors summarize the current indications for ileorectal anastomosis and proctocolectomy with end ileostomy in patients with ulcerative colitis. PMID:22131897

  5. Cytomegalovirus Colitis: An Uncommon Mimicker of Common Colitides.

    PubMed

    Baniak, Nick; Kanthan, Rani

    2016-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus latency, though ubiquitous in the human population, is known to cause colitis in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts. Furthermore, the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic appearance of cytomegalovirus colitis can mimic that of inflammatory bowel disease, an extremely well-documented disease. In this context, though many reports have looked at inflammatory bowel disease with superimposed cytomegalovirus infection, less attention has been paid to cytomegalovirus as a primary cause of isolated colitis. Owing to the rarity of this phenomenon, it is important to consider this diagnosis and implement proper testing to avoid misdiagnosis and mismanagement. PMID:27472242

  6. [The potentials of echography in the diagnosis of chronic colitis].

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, B A; Tkach, S M; Klymenko, O P; Babko, S O; Denysova, M F

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic signs of colitis were studied in 24 adults aged 20 to 53 yr and 38 children aged 3-16 yr in whom chronic colitis was diagnosed. 2 adults and three children had ulcerative colitis. The results obtained showed that with the aid of echography it is possible to detect inflammatory lesions in the large intestine as well as to observe the time course of changes in its wall during the course of treatment. Ultrasonic investigation can be of screening type in detecting an inflammatory process in the large intestine, on the one hand, and a method of profound study of changes in its wall, on the other. PMID:7831876

  7. Characterization of colonic cellular glycoconjugates in colitis and cancer-prone tamarins versus colitis and cancer-resistant primates.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R.; King, N.; Alroy, J.

    1988-01-01

    Differences in colonic secretory glycoconjugates (ie, mucin) between normal and ulcerative colitis-prone patients have been noted. Similar differences may occur in a corresponding primate model, the cotton-top tamarin (CTT), Saguinus oedipus, a New World monkey which suffers from spontaneous chronic colitis and colon cancer. Lectin reagents were used to characterize and compare colonic cell surface, cytoplasmic, and secretory glycoconjugates of 9 clinically healthy cotton-top tamarins, 7 colitis-susceptible, cancer-resistant tamarins (Callithrix jacchus, Saguinus fuscicollis), and 8 colitis and cancer-resistant primates (Aotus trivirgatus, Saimiri sciureus, Macaca fascicularis, and Macaca mulatta). Paraffin-embedded colonic sections were labeled with ten different biotinylated lectins and visualized by the avidin-biotin peroxidase (ABC) method. Significant differences were demonstrated in the pattern of lectin staining between the colitis-resistant and colitis-prone groups of primates. The differences were noted with Griffonia simplicifolia-I (GS-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), peanut agglutinin (PNA) before and after neuraminidase, Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I), soybean agglutinin (SBA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and succinylated WGA (S-WGA). Significant differences between the CTT and phylogenetically related colitis-prone but cancer-resistant tamarins were demonstrated with SBA, UEA-I, and PNA after desialylation with neuraminidase. These results suggest that differences in colonic cellular glycoconjugates between colitis- and cancer-susceptible species versus colitis-susceptible, cancer-resistant species may be associated with risk of cancer. Images Figure 2 PMID:3132857

  8. Characterization of colonic cellular glycoconjugates in colitis and cancer-prone tamarins versus colitis and cancer-resistant primates.

    PubMed

    Moore, R; King, N; Alroy, J

    1988-06-01

    Differences in colonic secretory glycoconjugates (ie, mucin) between normal and ulcerative colitis-prone patients have been noted. Similar differences may occur in a corresponding primate model, the cotton-top tamarin (CTT), Saguinus oedipus, a New World monkey which suffers from spontaneous chronic colitis and colon cancer. Lectin reagents were used to characterize and compare colonic cell surface, cytoplasmic, and secretory glycoconjugates of 9 clinically healthy cotton-top tamarins, 7 colitis-susceptible, cancer-resistant tamarins (Callithrix jacchus, Saguinus fuscicollis), and 8 colitis and cancer-resistant primates (Aotus trivirgatus, Saimiri sciureus, Macaca fascicularis, and Macaca mulatta). Paraffin-embedded colonic sections were labeled with ten different biotinylated lectins and visualized by the avidin-biotin peroxidase (ABC) method. Significant differences were demonstrated in the pattern of lectin staining between the colitis-resistant and colitis-prone groups of primates. The differences were noted with Griffonia simplicifolia-I (GS-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), peanut agglutinin (PNA) before and after neuraminidase, Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I), soybean agglutinin (SBA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and succinylated WGA (S-WGA). Significant differences between the CTT and phylogenetically related colitis-prone but cancer-resistant tamarins were demonstrated with SBA, UEA-I, and PNA after desialylation with neuraminidase. These results suggest that differences in colonic cellular glycoconjugates between colitis- and cancer-susceptible species versus colitis-susceptible, cancer-resistant species may be associated with risk of cancer. PMID:3132857

  9. Apolipoprotein A-I inhibits experimental colitis and colitis-propelled carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gkouskou, K K; Ioannou, M; Pavlopoulos, G A; Georgila, K; Siganou, A; Nikolaidis, G; Kanellis, D C; Moore, S; Papadakis, K A; Kardassis, D; Iliopoulos, I; McDyer, F A; Drakos, E; Eliopoulos, A G

    2016-05-12

    In both humans with long-standing ulcerative colitis and mouse models of colitis-associated carcinogenesis (CAC), tumors develop predominantly in the distal part of the large intestine but the biological basis of this intriguing pathology remains unknown. Herein we report intrinsic differences in gene expression between proximal and distal colon in the mouse, which are augmented during dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)/azoxymethane (AOM)-induced CAC. Functional enrichment of differentially expressed genes identified discrete biological pathways operating in proximal vs distal intestine and revealed a cluster of genes involved in lipid metabolism to be associated with the disease-resistant proximal colon. Guided by this finding, we have further interrogated the expression and function of one of these genes, apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I), a major component of high-density lipoprotein. We show that ApoA-I is expressed at higher levels in the proximal compared with the distal part of the colon and its ablation in mice results in exaggerated DSS-induced colitis and disruption of epithelial architecture in larger areas of the large intestine. Conversely, treatment with an ApoA-I mimetic peptide ameliorated the phenotypic, histopathological and inflammatory manifestations of the disease. Genetic interference with ApoA-I levels in vivo impacted on the number, size and distribution of AOM/DSS-induced colon tumors. Mechanistically, ApoA-I was found to modulate signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and nuclear factor-κB activation in response to the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide with concomitant impairment in the production of the pathogenic cytokine interleukin-6. Collectively, these data demonstrate a novel protective role for ApoA-I in colitis and CAC and unravel an unprecedented link between lipid metabolic processes and intestinal pathologies. PMID:26279300

  10. Faecal mucus degrading glycosidases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, J M; Gallimore, R; Elias, E; Allan, R N; Kennedy, J F

    1985-08-01

    Because the normal faecal flora includes bacteria which can produce mucus-digesting glycosidases, it follows that increased digestion of colonic mucus by these bacterial enzymes could be important in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Faecal activities of potential mucus-degrading glycosidases have therefore been assayed in samples from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and normal controls. The enzymes alpha-D-galactosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, beta-NAc-D-glucosaminidase alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase were assayed. Considerable glycosidase activity was present in most faecal samples. Similar activities of all the enzymes assayed were found in faeces from patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and normal controls and there was no significant correlation with disease activity. These results imply that relapse of ulcerative colitis is not initiated by increased degradation of colonic mucus by faecal glycosidases but do not exclude a role for bacterial mucus degradation in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. PMID:2991089

  11. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease tissue cytotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, L.C.; Gitnick, G.

    1982-06-01

    Bowel-wall tissue filtrates from patients with inflammatory bowel disease produce cytopathic effects in tissue culture. The cytopathic effects inducers have been reported to have the characteristics of a small RNA virus. Clostridium difficile toxin also produces cytopathic effects and has been found in the stools of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The present study concerns the further characterization of the cytopathic inducers in tissues of inflammatory bowel disease patients. It was found that they are nonsedimentable at 148,000 g for 2 h and resistant to inactivation by UV light. They are proteins that are distinct from C. difficile toxin and are unique cytotoxins which are associated with the early cytopathic effects observed in Riff-free chick embryo and rabbit ileum cell cultures. These results suggest that the early cytopathic effects previously described are not produced by a virus. They do not explain the delayed cytopathic effects seen in rabbit ileum or WI-38 cells.

  12. Probiotics in the Management of Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Chibbar, Richa; Dieleman, Levinus A

    2015-01-01

    Rapid progress has been made to understand the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases and to identify new treatments. Interaction of the gut microbiota on the host inflammatory response has suggested that alternative therapies, such as probiotics, might have a complementary role in treating and preventing disease flares. Multiple probiotics and their formulations have been studied for both the induction and maintenance of remission of ulcerative colitis (UC); however, mainly Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and VSL#3 have been shown to provide significant benefits for the prevention and treatment of mild to moderate UC. Although these data are promising, there is still a paucity of robust, randomized-controlled trials to suggest that probiotics be utilized as part of a standard treatment regimen. With continued research and a movement toward carefully selected, individualized management based on an individual's specific microbiota composition and function, probiotics may become an integral part of tailored therapy for UC. PMID:26447965

  13. Kefir treatment ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Senol, Altug; Isler, Mehmet; Sutcu, Recep; Akin, Mete; Cakir, Ebru; Ceyhan, Betul M; Kockar, M Cem

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the preventive effect of kefir on colitis induced with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in rats. METHODS: Twenty-four male Wistar-albino rats were randomized into four groups: normal control, kefir-control, colitis, and kefir-colitis groups. Rats in the normal and kefir-control groups were administered tap water as drinking water for 14 d. Rats in the colitis and kefir-colitis groups were administered a 3% DSS solution as drinking water for 8-14 d to induce colitis. Rats in the kefir-control and kefir-colitis groups were administered 5 mL kefir once a day for 14 d while rats in the normal control and colitis group were administered an identical volume of the placebo (skim milk) using an orogastric feeding tube. Clinical colitis was evaluated with reference to the disease activity index (DAI), based on daily weight loss, stool consistency, and presence of bleeding in feces. Rats were sacrificed on the 15th day, blood specimens were collected, and colon tissues were rapidly removed. Levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-10, malondialdehyde, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were measured in colon tissue. RESULTS: The DAI was lower in the kefir-colitis group than in the colitis group (on the 3rd and 5th days of colitis induction; P < 0.01). The DAI was also significantly higher in the colitis group between days 2 and 6 of colitis induction when compared to the normal control and kefir-control groups. The DAI was statistically higher only on the 6th day in the kefir-colitis group when compared to that in the normal control groups. Increased colon weight and decreased colon length were observed in colitis-induced rats. Mean colon length in the colitis group was significantly shorter than that of the kefir-control group. Kefir treatment significantly decreased histologic colitis scores (P < 0.05). MPO activity in the colitis group was significantly higher than in the kefir-control group (P < 0

  14. Medical Therapy of Active Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bürger, Martin; Schmidt, Carsten; Teich, Niels; Stallmach, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Medical therapy of mild and moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) of any extent is evidence-based and standardized by national and international guidelines. However, patients with steroid-refractory UC still represent a challenge. Methods A literature search using PubMed (search terms: ulcerative colitis, therapy, new, 1-2008-2015) resulted in 821 publications. For the current article, 88 citations were extracted including 36 randomized controlled studies, 18 reviews, and 8 meta-analyses. Results In steroid-refractory UC, early intensive therapy using anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies or the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine and tacrolimus is indicated in any case to prevent progression to a toxic megacolon and/or to avoid proctocolectomy. In patients with chronic disease activity, treatment with anti-TNF antibodies has a higher level of evidence than azathioprine therapy and should therefore be preferred. However, there is a subgroup of UC patients who may achieve prolonged steroid-free remission on azathioprine monotherapy. The importance of vedolizumab, a newly registered inhibiting antibody against integrin, has not yet been fully clarified since direct comparison studies are lacking, in particular in relation to anti-TNF antibodies. Conclusion There is a great need for additional innovative therapies, especially in cases of primary non-response or secondary loss of response to anti-TNF antibodies. New small molecules (Janus kinase inhibitors) are promising with an acceptable safety profile and efficacy in UC. Further, strategies that target the intestinal microbiome are currently considered for patients with active or relapsing UC, and may in the future open up new therapeutic options. PMID:26557831

  15. Activation of the Renin-Angiotensin System Promotes Colitis Development

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yongyan; Liu, Tianjing; He, Lei; Dougherty, Urszula; Chen, Li; Adhikari, Sarbani; Alpert, Lindsay; Zhou, Guolin; Liu, Weicheng; Wang, Jiaolong; Deb, Dilip K.; Hart, John; Liu, Shu Q.; Kwon, John; Pekow, Joel; Rubin, David T.; Zhao, Qun; Bissonnette, Marc; Li, Yan Chun

    2016-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays pathogenic roles in renal and cardiovascular disorders, but whether it is involved in colitis is unclear. Here we show that RenTgMK mice that overexpress active renin from the liver developed more severe colitis than wild-type controls. More than 50% RenTgMK mice died whereas all wild-type mice recovered. RenTgMK mice exhibited more robust mucosal TH17 and TH1/TH17 responses and more profound colonic epithelial cell apoptosis compared to wild-type controls. Treatment with aliskiren (a renin inhibitor), but not hydralazine (a smooth muscle relaxant), ameliorated colitis in RenTgMK mice, although both drugs normalized blood pressure. Chronic infusion of angiotensin II into wild-type mice mimicked the severe colitic phenotype of RenTgMK mice, and treatment with losartan [an angiotensin type 1 receptor blocker (ARB)] ameliorated colitis in wild-type mice, confirming a colitogenic role for the endogenous RAS. In human biopsies, pro-inflammatory cytokines were suppressed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease who were on ARB therapy compared to patients not receiving ARB therapy. These observations demonstrate that activation of the RAS promotes colitis in a blood pressure independent manner. Angiotensin II appears to drive colonic mucosal inflammation by promoting intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and mucosal TH17 responses in colitis development. PMID:27271344

  16. An In Vitro Model to Evaluate the Impact of the Soluble Factors from the Colonic Mucosa of Collagenous Colitis Patients on T Cells: Enhanced Production of IL-17A and IL-10 from Peripheral CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nyhlin, Nils; Wickbom, Anna; Bohr, Johan; Hultgren, Olof; Hultgren Hörnquist, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Soluble factors from intestinal mucosal cells contribute to immune homeostasis in the gut. We have established an in vitro model to investigate the regulatory role of soluble factors from inflamed intestinal mucosa of collagenous colitis (CC) patients in the differentiation of T cells. Peripheral blood CD4+ T cells from healthy donors were polyclonally activated in the presence of conditioned medium (CM) generated from denuded biopsies (DNB) or isolated lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) from mucosal biopsies from CC patients compared to noninflamed controls, to determine proliferation and secretion of cytokines involved in T-cell differentiation. Compared to controls, we observed significantly increased production of the proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-17A, IL-6, and IL-1β and the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in the presence of CC-DNB-CM. The most pronounced effect of CC-LPMC-CM on peripheral CD4+ T cells was a trend towards increased production of IL-17A and IL-10. A trend towards reduced inhibition of T-cell proliferation was noted in the presence of CC-DNB-CM. In conclusion, our in vitro model reveals implications of soluble factors from CC colonic mucosa on peripheral T cells, enhancing their production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25332518

  17. Loss of n-6 fatty acid induced pediatric obesity protects against acute murine colitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary influences may affect microbiome composition and host immune responses, thereby modulating propensity toward inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. Dietary n-6 fatty acids have been associated with ulcetative colitis in prospective studies. However, the critical d...

  18. Refractory ulcerative colitis accompanied with cytomegalovirus colitis and multiple liver abscesses: a case report.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takuya; Hirata, Ichiro; Egashira, Yutaro; Ishida, Kumi; Kawakami, Ken; Morita, Eijiro; Murano, Naoko; Yasumoto, Shingo; Murano, Mitsuyuki; Toshina, Ken; Nishikawa, Takashi; Hamamoto, Norihiro; Nakagawa, Ken; Katsu, Ken-Ichi

    2005-09-01

    Various hepato-biliary complications are an increased incidence in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and portal bacteremia is well documented in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). However, few reports mention UC in association with liver abscesses. Recently, there are several reports describing cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in association with disease exacerbation and steroid refractoriness in patients with UC. Here we present a case of refractory UC accompanied with multiple liver abscesses and CMV colitis. The patient, a 72-year-old male, with a five-year history of repeated admissions to our hospital for UC, presented with an exacerbation of his UC. Sigmoidoscopy performed on admission suggested that his UC was exacerbated, then he was given prednisolone and mesalazine orally, and betamethasone enemas. However, he had exacerbated symptoms. Repeat sigmoidoscopy revealed multiple longitudinal ulcers and pseudopolyps in the rectosigmoid colon. Although immunohistochemical staining of biopsy specimens and the serum testing for antigenemia were negative on admission and after the repeat sigmoidoscopy, they became histologically positive for CMV. Nonetheless, the patient developed spiking fevers, soon after ganciclovir was administered. Laboratory studies revealed an increased white cell count with left shift, and Enterococcus fecalis grew in blood cultures. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan was obtained and the diagnosis of liver abscesses associated with UC was made, based on CT results. The hepatic abscesses were successfully treated with intravenous meropenem for 6 wk, without further percutaneous drainage. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of multiple liver abscesses that develop during UC exacerbation complicated by CMV colitis. PMID:16127763

  19. The NLRP1 Inflammasome Attenuates Colitis and Colitis-Associated Tumorigenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tere M.; Leeth, Rachel A.; Rothschild, Daniel E.; Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl L.; McDaniel, Dylan K.; Simmons, Alysha E.; Heid, Bettina; Cecere, Thomas E.; Allen, Irving C.

    2015-01-01

    NLR proteins are a diverse family of pattern recognition receptors that are essential mediators of inflammation and host defense in the gastrointestinal system. Recent studies have identified a sub-group of inflammasome forming NLRs that modulate the mucosal immune response during inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colitis associated tumorigenesis. To better elucidate the contribution of NLR family members in IBD and cancer, we conducted a retrospective analysis of gene expression metadata from human patients. These data revealed that NLRP1, an inflammasome forming NLR, was significantly dysregulated in IBD and colon cancer. To better characterize the function of NLRP1 in disease pathogenesis, we utilized Nlrp1b−/− mice in colitis and colitis associated cancer models. Here, we report that NLRP1 attenuates gastrointestinal inflammation and tumorigenesis. Nlrp1b−/− mice demonstrated significant increases in morbidity, inflammation and tumorigenesis compared to wild type animals. Similar to data previously reported for related inflammsome forming NLRs, the increased inflammation and tumor burden was correlated with attenuated levels of IL-1β and IL-18. Further mechanistic studies utilizing bone marrow reconstitution experiments revealed that the increased disease pathogenesis in the Nlrp1b−/− mice was associated with non-hematopoietic derived cells and suggests that NLRP1 functions in the colon epithelial cell compartment to attenuate tumorigenesis. Together, these data identify NLRP1 as an essential mediator of the host immune response during IBD and cancer. These findings are consistent with a model whereby multiple NLR inflammasomes attenuate disease pathobiology through modulating IL-1β and IL-18 levels in the colon. PMID:25725098

  20. The NLRP1 inflammasome attenuates colitis and colitis-associated tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tere M; Leeth, Rachel A; Rothschild, Daniel E; Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl L; McDaniel, Dylan K; Simmons, Alysha E; Heid, Bettina; Cecere, Thomas E; Allen, Irving C

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins are a diverse family of pattern recognition receptors that are essential mediators of inflammation and host defense in the gastrointestinal system. Recent studies have identified a subgroup of inflammasome forming NLRs that modulate the mucosal immune response during inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colitis associated tumorigenesis. To better elucidate the contribution of NLR family members in IBD and cancer, we conducted a retrospective analysis of gene expression metadata from human patients. These data revealed that NLRP1, an inflammasome forming NLR, was significantly dysregulated in IBD and colon cancer. To better characterize the function of NLRP1 in disease pathogenesis, we used Nlrp1b(-/-) mice in colitis and colitis-associated cancer models. In this paper, we report that NLRP1 attenuates gastrointestinal inflammation and tumorigenesis. Nlrp1b(-/-) mice demonstrated significant increases in morbidity, inflammation, and tumorigenesis compared with wild-type animals. Similar to data previously reported for related inflammasome forming NLRs, the increased inflammation and tumor burden was correlated with attenuated levels of IL-1β and IL-18. Further mechanistic studies using bone marrow reconstitution experiments revealed that the increased disease pathogenesis in the Nlrp1b(-/-) mice was associated with nonhematopoietic-derived cells and suggests that NLRP1 functions in the colon epithelial cell compartment to attenuate tumorigenesis. Taken together, these data identify NLRP1 as an essential mediator of the host immune response during IBD and cancer. These findings are consistent with a model whereby multiple NLR inflammasomes attenuate disease pathobiology through modulating IL-1β and IL-18 levels in the colon. PMID:25725098

  1. Clostridium difficile associated infection, diarrhea and colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hookman, Perry; Barkin, Jamie S

    2009-01-01

    A new, hypervirulent strain of Clostridium difficile, called NAP1/BI/027, has been implicated in C. difficile outbreaks associated with increased morbidity and mortality since the early 2000s. The epidemic strain is resistant to fluoroquinolones in vitro, which was infrequent prior to 2001. The name of this strain reflects its characteristics, demonstrated by different typing methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (NAP1), restriction endonuclease analysis (BI) and polymerase chain reaction (027). In 2004 and 2005, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) emphasized that the risk of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is increased, not only by the usual factors, including antibiotic exposure, but also gastrointestinal surgery/manipulation, prolonged length of stay in a healthcare setting, serious underlying illness, immune-compromising conditions, and aging. Patients on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have an elevated risk, as do peripartum women and heart transplant recipients. Before 2002, toxic megacolon in C. difficile-associated colitis (CDAC), was rare, but its incidence has increased dramatically. Up to two-thirds of hospitalized patients may be infected with C. difficile. Asymptomatic carriers admitted to healthcare facilities can transmit the organism to other susceptible patients, thereby becoming vectors. Fulminant colitis is reported more frequently during outbreaks of C. difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). C. difficile infection with IBD carries a higher mortality than without underlying IBD. This article reviews the latest information on C. difficile infection, including presentation, vulnerable hosts and choice of antibiotics, alternative therapies, and probiotics and immunotherapy. We review contact precautions for patients with known or suspected C. difficile-associated disease. Healthcare institutions require accurate and rapid diagnosis for early detection of possible outbreaks, to initiate

  2. Fulminant Amebic Colitis after Corticosteroid Therapy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Debbie-Ann; Moonah, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Background Amebic colitis, caused by intestinal infection with the parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, is a common cause of diarrhea worldwide. Fulminant amebic colitis is the most devastating complication of this infection, associated with both high mortality and morbidity. We conducted a review of the English literature to describe cases of fulminant amebic colitis associated with exposure to corticosteroid medications in order to identify the risk factors for poor outcome and determine difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. Methodology and Principal Findings Articles reporting severe and fulminant forms of amebic colitis between 1991 and 2016 were collected. 525 records were screened to identify 24 cases for qualitative analysis associated with corticosteroid use. Cases arose from areas of high endemicity or travel to such areas. Most cases (14 of 24, 58%) were given corticosteroids for initially misdiagnosed colitis, mainly inflammatory bowel, resulting in rapid progression of disease. Nearly half of all cases underwent surgical intervention, and 25% of cases died, despite all patients eventually receiving treatment with metronidazole. The odds of death did not differ significantly by prior misdiagnosis, co-morbidities, bowel perforation or need for surgery. Conclusions and Significance Infection with E. histolytica should be considered prior to the administration of corticosteroids, in particular for patients residing in endemic areas or those with appropriate travel history, especially prior to the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. The development of preventative and treatment interventions are needed to improve outcomes of fulminant disease. PMID:27467600

  3. Radical induction theory of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pravda, Jay

    2005-01-01

    To propose a new pathogenesis called Radical Induction to explain the genesis and progression of ulcerative colitis (UC). UC is an inflammatory bowel disease. Colonic inflammation in UC is mediated by a buildup of white blood cells (WBCs) within the colonic mucosal lining; however, to date there is no answer for why WBCs initially enter the colonic mucosa to begin with. A new pathogenesis termed “Radical Induction Theory” is proposed to explain this and states that excess un-neutralized hydrogen peroxide, produced within colonic epithelial cells as a result of aberrant cellular metabolism, diffuses through cell membranes to the extracellular space where it is converted to the highly damaging hydroxyl radical resulting in oxidative damage to structures comprising the colonic epithelial barrier. Once damaged, the barrier is unable to exclude highly immunogenic fecal bacterial antigens from invading the normally sterile submucosa. This antigenic exposure provokes an initial immune response of WBC infiltration into the colonic mucosa. Once present in the mucosa, WBCs are stimulated to secrete toxins by direct exposure to fecal bacteria leading to mucosal ulceration and bloody diarrhea characteristic of this disease. PMID:15832404

  4. Relapsing and refractory ulcerative colitis in children.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half of the children with ulcerative colitis (UC) have refractory, relapsing or steroid-dependent disease. UC in children is more extensive than in adults, presents more often with severe attacks and carries a more aggressive disease course. Therefore, although a step-up approach is usually recommended in UC, aggressive therapy will often be indicated in children since steroid dependency should never be tolerated. It is vital to ensure that in every resistant case, the symptoms are truly related to the inflammatory disease activity and not to other conditions such as poor adherence to treatment, infections, adverse reactions to drugs, irritable bowel syndrome, lactose intolerance, celiac disease and bacterial overgrowth. The clinician should be ready to escalate therapy in a timely manner but only after ensuring optimization of current treatments. Optimization may include, among others, appropriate dosage, utilization of assays that determine thiopurine, calcineurin inhibitors and anti-tumor necrosis factor levels, introduction of combination therapy when indicated (enemas and immunomodulators) and a long enough time for treatment to become effective. Colectomy is always a valid option and should be discussed before major treatment escalations. Experimental therapies can be considered when all else fails and the family prefers to avoid colectomy. The management of refractory and relapsing disease is particularly challenging in children, and this review summarizes the available evidence to guide treatment decisions in this setup. PMID:24969290

  5. Cytomegalovirus Colitis in a Burn Patient.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Jeff T; Zieger, Madeline; Sood, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cytomegalovirus in the burn population is high. However, its role in the clinical management of burn patients is still being defined. This report documents a 41-year-old man who developed cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis after being admitted with a 72% burn. Before the administration of ganciclovir, the authors had difficulty controlling his quantitative wound cultures with serial debridements, topical agents, and systemic antibiotics for known pathogens, which led to graft loss. After the ganciclovir was given, his quantitative wound cultures improved without changing the authors' topical agents or systemic antibiotics and had improved graft take. Whether CMV infection alone contributed to an increased morbidity in this patient or the combination of bacteria/fungal infection with CMV led to a synergistic effect is still not clearly understood. CMV may have contributed to a dysfunction in his cell mediated immunity, which, in turn, lowered the bacterial and fungal load necessary to cause graft loss. Patients who continue to do poorly despite adequate treatment for known pathogens may need to be screened for CMV and treated. PMID:26056763

  6. Integrating Immunologic Signaling Networks: The JAK/STAT Pathway in Colitis and Colitis-Associated Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zundler, Sebastian; Neurath, Markus F

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines are believed to be crucial mediators of chronic intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Many of these cytokines trigger cellular effects and functions through signaling via janus kinase (JAK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) molecules. In this way, JAK/STAT signaling controls important events like cell differentiation, secretion of cytokines or proliferation and apoptosis in IBD in both adaptive and innate immune cells. Moreover, JAK/STAT signaling, especially via the IL-6/STAT3 axis, is believed to be involved in the transition of inflammatory lesions to tumors leading to colitis-associated cancer (CAC). In this review, we will introduce the main cellular players and cytokines that contribute to pathogenesis of IBD by JAK/STAT signaling, and will highlight the integrative function that JAK/STATs exert in this context as well as their divergent role in different cells and processes. Moreover, we will explain current concepts of the implication of JAK/STAT signaling in CAC and finally discuss present and future therapies for IBD that interfere with JAK/STAT signaling. PMID:26938566

  7. Integrating Immunologic Signaling Networks: The JAK/STAT Pathway in Colitis and Colitis-Associated Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zundler, Sebastian; Neurath, Markus F.

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines are believed to be crucial mediators of chronic intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Many of these cytokines trigger cellular effects and functions through signaling via janus kinase (JAK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) molecules. In this way, JAK/STAT signaling controls important events like cell differentiation, secretion of cytokines or proliferation and apoptosis in IBD in both adaptive and innate immune cells. Moreover, JAK/STAT signaling, especially via the IL-6/STAT3 axis, is believed to be involved in the transition of inflammatory lesions to tumors leading to colitis-associated cancer (CAC). In this review, we will introduce the main cellular players and cytokines that contribute to pathogenesis of IBD by JAK/STAT signaling, and will highlight the integrative function that JAK/STATs exert in this context as well as their divergent role in different cells and processes. Moreover, we will explain current concepts of the implication of JAK/STAT signaling in CAC and finally discuss present and future therapies for IBD that interfere with JAK/STAT signaling. PMID:26938566

  8. Characteristic endoscopic findings and risk factors for cytomegalovirus-associated colitis in patients with active ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Yutaka; Ando, Takafumi; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Watanabe, Osamu; Miyahara, Ryoji; Nakamura, Masanao; Yamamura, Takeshi; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify characteristic endoscopic findings and risk factors for cytomegalovirus (CMV)-associated colitis in patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: A total of 149 UC patients admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology, Nagoya University Hospital, from January 2004 to December 2013 with exacerbation of UC symptoms were enrolled in this retrospective study. All medical records, including colonoscopy results, were reviewed. CMV infection was determined by the presence of CMV antigen, CMV inclusion bodies in biopsy specimens, or positive specific immunohistochemical staining for CMV. Multivariate analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for CMV colitis. RESULTS: Multivariate analysis indicated independent associations with the extent of disease (pancolitis) and use of > 400 mg corticosteroids for the previous 4 wk. In contrast, no association was seen with sex, age at UC diagnosis, immunomodulator use, or infliximab use. Punched-out ulceration was also significantly associated with CMV infection in patients with active UC (odds ratio = 12.672, 95%CI: 4.210-38.143). CONCLUSION: Identification of a total corticosteroid dose > 400 mg for 4 wk, extensive colitis and a specific endoscopic finding of punched-out ulcer might facilitate the more rapid diagnosis and timely initiation of antiviral therapy for CMV-associated colitis in patients with active UC. PMID:27014426

  9. Endoscopic Characteristics of the Healing Process of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Hideyuki

    1998-01-01

    This study compared the histologic characteristics of ulcerative colitis with findings on conventional colonoscopy and on magnification and dye application for 70 sites that underwent biopsy. The primary objective was to study the correspondence between histologic findings and endoscopic findings with respect to glandular restructuring and the resolution of inflammation from the active to the remission phase of ulcerative colitis. Widened grooves, as assessed by the endoscopic staining technique and magnified observation, most closely correlated with histologic evidence of resolution of inflammation, and vascular markings and color tone of the mucosa on general colonoscopy most closely correlated with histologic evidence of glandular restructuring, such as glandular maturity. Magnifying endoscopy after dye application, in addition to conventional endoscopy, is therefore considered essential in the evaluation of ulcerative colitis during the resolving phase. PMID:18493478

  10. Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa Extract Attenuates DSS-Induced Murine Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jong-Chan; Lee, Kang Min

    2016-01-01

    We examined the protective effects of Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa (AAK) extract on a murine model of acute experimental colitis. Colitis was induced by 4% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water of male C57BL/6 mice, for 7 consecutive days. Oral administration of AAK extract (500 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated DSS-induced symptoms such as anorexia, weight loss, events of diarrhea or bloody stools, and colon shortening. Histological damage was also ameliorated, as evidenced by the architectural preservation and suppression of inflammatory cell infiltration in colonic samples. Treatment improved the colonic mRNA expression of different inflammatory markers: cytokines, inducible enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases, and tight junction-related proteins. In the isolated serum, IgE levels were downregulated. Collectively, these findings indicate the therapeutic potentials of AAK as an effective complementary or alternative modality for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. PMID:27293323

  11. Microscopic colitis: a new cause of chronic diarrhea in children?

    PubMed

    Mashako, M N; Sonsino, E; Navarro, J; Mougenot, J F; Gargouri, A; Boige, N; Cezard, J P

    1990-01-01

    From a retrospective study on children who underwent colonoscopy or rectosigmoidoscopy with multiple level biopsies, we selected five patients whose rectocolonic endoscopic aspect was normal and contrasting with the presence of a microscopic colitis on biopsies. These five children had chronic diarrhea (mean duration of 14 months), associated with vomiting (three cases), abdominal pain (two cases), anorexia (two cases), abdominal distension (two cases), and weight loss (four cases). Symptomatic treatment was used in all children: loperamide (one case), trimebutine (three cases), and aluminium and magnesium silicate (two cases). One child received sulfasalazine for 2 months. After 1 year, all patients had normal stools. Rectosigmoidoscopy was performed in four patients and was normal. Biopsies obtained in three cases were normal in two cases and showed a persistent microscopic colitis in one case. Microscopic colitis may be a distinct cause of chronic diarrhea in children. PMID:2324876

  12. [Meloxicam-induced colitis revealed by acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Seddik, H; Rabhi, M

    2013-03-01

    Whether intestinal toxicity of preferential or selective COX-2 inhibitors is reduced compared with that of standard NSAIDs is controversial. A 26-year-old woman presented with acute abdominal pain and bloody diarrhoea a few days after beginning meloxicam treatment. Endoscopic examination of the colon showed erythematous and ulcerative lesions involving 15 cm of the left colon. No aetiology has been found for colitis. Diarrhea disappeared 1 week after meloxicam was stopped. Total colonoscopy 3 months and 2 years later was normal. The role of meloxicam in the etiology of colitis was considered plausible. This report and a few other cases in the literature suggest that cyclooxygenase-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug inhibitor toxicity should be investigated in case of unexplained acute colitis. PMID:23537413

  13. Matrine ameliorates spontaneously developed colitis in interleukin-10-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cong; Xu, Zheng; Gai, Renhua; Huang, Kehe

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10)-deficient mice spontaneously develop T cell-mediated colitis. Previous reports have shown that Matrine may reduce the symptoms of acute colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). However, whether Matrine impacts chronic colitis remains unknown. In this study, we investigated whether Matrine could limit the symptoms of spontaneously developed colitis and its potential molecular mechanisms. IL-10 deficient mice were given Matrine or a PBS control by oral gavage daily for 4weeks and were euthanized at week 2 or week 4. We measured body weight, colon length and weight, and histological scores. We also evaluated the spontaneous secretion of IL-12/23p40, IFN-γ and IL-17 in colon explant cultures as well as IFN-γ and IL-17 secretion in unseparated mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells, and assessed IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expression in colon tissue. In addition, we analyzed the proportions of CD4-positive and CD8-positive cells in unseparated MLN cells. Our results show that Matrine-treated mice exhibited better body weight recovery than controls and that histological scores and spontaneously secreted IL-12/23p40, IFN-γ and IL-17 in colon tissue were significantly decreased in treated mice compared with controls. The proportion of CD4-positive cells of MLNs in treated mice was significantly smaller than that in controls at week 4. Both cytokine production and mRNA expression of IFN-γ and IL-17 were significantly reduced in treated mice compared with controls. Taken together, our results indicate that Matrine may ameliorate spontaneously developed chronic colitis and could be considered as a therapeutic alternative for chronic colitis. PMID:27179305

  14. The Role of CXCR3 in DSS-Induced Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chami, Belal; Yeung, Amanda W. S.; van Vreden, Caryn; King, Nicholas J. C.; Bao, Shisan

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of disorders that are characterized by chronic, uncontrolled inflammation in the intestinal mucosa. Although the aetiopathogenesis is poorly understood, it is widely believed that IBD stems from a dysregulated immune response towards otherwise harmless commensal bacteria. Chemokines induce and enhance inflammation through their involvement in cellular trafficking. Reducing or limiting the influx of these proinflammatory cells has previously been demonstrated to attenuate inflammation. CXCR3, a chemokine receptor in the CXC family that binds to CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11, is strongly overexpressed in the intestinal mucosa of IBD patients. We hypothesised that CXCR3 KO mice would have impaired cellular trafficking, thereby reducing the inflammatory insult by proinflammatory cell and attenuating the course of colitis. To investigate the role of CXCR3 in the progression of colitis, the development of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis was investigated in CXCR3−/− mice over 9 days. This study demonstrated attenuated DSS-induced colitis in CXCR3−/− mice at both the macroscopic and microscopic level. Reduced colitis correlated with lower recruitment of neutrophils (p = 0.0018), as well as decreased production of IL-6 (p<0.0001), TNF (p = 0.0038), and IFN-γ (p = 0.0478). Overall, our results suggest that CXCR3 plays an important role in recruiting proinflammatory cells to the colon during colitis and that CXCR3 may be a therapeutic target to reduce the influx of proinflammatory cells in the inflamed colon. PMID:24992040

  15. Report of a Rare Case of Nasal Mucosa Pyoderma Vegetans in a Patient with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Vahedi, Homayoon; Nozari, Neda; Sotoudeh, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Some dermatologic manifestations are common in ulcerative colitis (UC). Herein, we present a 36-year-old woman with ulcerative colitis and uncommon nasal mucosa pyoderma vegetans. The patient presented to our hospital with symptoms of active colitis and a concomitant 3×4×5 cm dermato-mucosal lesion in her left nasal lumen. After surgery of the mucosal lesion, the treatment for her active colitis was initiated with intravenous infliximab and oral asacol. After a 1-year follow-up, no sign of recurrence favoring mucosal lesion was noted and symptoms of ulcerative colitis were managed properly. PMID:26106471

  16. The Role of Neuropeptides in Mouse Models of Colitis.

    PubMed

    Padua, David; Vu, John P; Germano, Patrizia M; Pisegna, Joseph R

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) constitutes an important clinically significant condition that results in morbidity and mortality. IBD can be generally classified into either ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) that differs in the clinical and histopathology. The role of neuropeptides in the pathogenesis of these conditions is becoming increasingly recognized for their importance in modulating the inflammatory state. Animal models provide the greatest insight to better understand the pathophysiology of both disorders which will hopefully allow for improved treatment strategies. This review will provide a better understanding of the role of murine models for studying colitis. PMID:26646243

  17. Bowel obsession syndrome in a patient with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Piero; Leandro, Gioacchino

    2007-01-01

    Gastroenterologists are often faced with the diagnostic problem of differentiating acute symptoms of ulcerative colitis from functional intestinal disorders. Bowel obsession syndrome (BOS) is an OCD-like, functional syndrome characterized by fear of fecal incontinence and compulsive behaviors of evacuation-checking. Only sparse case studies on treatment of BOS with antidepressants have been published. This is the first study on successful psychotherapy of a male patient with ulcerative colitis overlapping functional bowel symptoms and marked symptoms of BOS. Clinical recognition of BOS may help clinicians in differential diagnosis, prevent unnecessary investigations, and give patients the most appropriate treatment. PMID:17878507

  18. A case of herpes zoster associated with colitis.

    PubMed

    Okimura, H; Muto, M; Ichimiya, M; Mogami, S; Takahata, H; Asagami, C

    1996-09-01

    A 58-year-old Japanese woman who had herpes zoster in association with colitis was successfully treated with intravenously administrated acyclovir. Vesicular lesions with red haloes ranged from the left side of her buttock to the left extremity, corresponding to the L4 to S2 dermatomes. Her colitis was considered to have been induced by varicella-zoster virus, based on the facts that the clinical courses were correlated and that the innervation of the affected site of the colon corresponded to an infected dermatome (S2). PMID:8916665

  19. Refractory ulcerative colitis and iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Girelli, C M; Serio, G; Rocca, E; Rocca, F

    2009-02-01

    Colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpes virus-8 associated mesenchymal tumour, is exceedingly rare in human immunodeficiency virus-negative subjects and almost always reported in association with severe, refractory, inflammatory bowel disease. In this paper we report a case--the second from Italy--of a colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative, heterosexual man with severe refractory ulcerative colitis. Kaposi's sarcoma developed after starting glucocorticosteroid therapy, supporting the theory that colorectal Kaposi's sarcoma associated with ulcerative colitis is iatrogenic. PMID:18054849

  20. Ischemic colitis after mesotherapy combined with anti-obesity medications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Bin; Moon, Won; Park, Seun Ja; Park, Moo In; Kim, Kyu-Jong; Lee, Jae Nam; Kang, Seong Joo; Jang, Lee La; Chang, Hee Kyung

    2010-03-28

    Mesotherapy and anti-obesity medications are gradually gaining worldwide popularity for purposes of body contouring and weight loss. Their adverse effects are various, but there is a tendency to disregard them. Ischemic colitis is one of the most common diseases associated with non-obstructive blood vessel disorders. However, there have been no case reports about the adverse effects resulting from mesotherapy only or in combination with anti-obesity medications. We report on an interesting case of ischemic colitis after mesotherapy combined with anti-obesity medications in a 39-year-old female who had no risk factors. PMID:20333798

  1. [Neutrophilic dermatosis in ulcerative colitis occurring in advanced age].

    PubMed

    López Maldonado, M D; Calvo Catalá, J; Ronda Gasulla, A; Hortelano Martínez, E; Herrera Ballester, A; Febrer Bosch, I

    1994-08-01

    The Neutrophilic dermatosis (ND) is considered as an independent entity with diverse clinical manifestations among which there are: gangrenous pyoderma, nodous erythema, Sweets Syndrome, vesiculopustula eruptions associated to ulcerous colitis and intestinal short circuit syndrome with or without short circuit. Histologically, they are characterized by infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, generally at the dermic level, but also at the epidermic. They are usually associated to systemic diseases, especially to chronic intestinal inflammatory disease. Our aim was to describe two forms of clinical presentation of neutrophilic dermatosis: gangrenous pyoderma and vesiculopustula eruption, associated to ulcerous colitis starting at advances ages. PMID:7772690

  2. Protective effects of citicoline on TNBS-induced experimental colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ek, Rauf Onur; Serter, Mukadder; Ergin, Kemal; Cecen, Serpil; Unsal, Cengiz; Yildiz, Yuksel; Bilgin, Mehmet D

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of citicoline on the development of colitis and antioxidant parameters in rats subjected to tribenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Twenty four Wistar Albino female rats were divided into four subgroups (n=6) (control, colitis control, colitis + 50 mg/kg citicoline, colitis + 250 mg/kg citicoline). Colitis was induced using an enema of TNBS and ethanol; following which citicoline was administrated for 3 days and effects of citicoline was subsequently evaluated. Based on microscopic damage scores, there was no difference between rats of the TNBS-colitis and 50 mg/kg citicoline treated groups, whereas treatment with 250 mg/kg citicoline, caused significant reduction in colon injury compared to that observed in rats of TNBS-colitis group. In terms of the biochemical analyses, myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and IL-6 levels in rats from 250 mg/kg citicoline group were significantly different from that TNBS-colitis group. The levels of MPO, MDA, GSH and IL-6 in control rats were also significantly different those of rats in the TNBS-colitis group. Citicoline may have a positive protective effect on the inflammatory bowel disease treatment process and could, therefore, be used as an adjunct therapy in colitis. These effects of citicoline may exist through anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanism. PMID:24955172

  3. Protective effects of citicoline on TNBS-induced experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ek, Rauf Onur; Serter, Mukadder; Ergin, Kemal; Cecen, Serpil; Unsal, Cengiz; Yildiz, Yuksel; Bilgin, Mehmet D

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of citicoline on the development of colitis and antioxidant parameters in rats subjected to tribenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Twenty four Wistar Albino female rats were divided into four subgroups (n=6) (control, colitis control, colitis + 50 mg/kg citicoline, colitis + 250 mg/kg citicoline). Colitis was induced using an enema of TNBS and ethanol; following which citicoline was administrated for 3 days and effects of citicoline was subsequently evaluated. Based on microscopic damage scores, there was no difference between rats of the TNBS-colitis and 50 mg/kg citicoline treated groups, whereas treatment with 250 mg/kg citicoline, caused significant reduction in colon injury compared to that observed in rats of TNBS-colitis group. In terms of the biochemical analyses, myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and IL-6 levels in rats from 250 mg/kg citicoline group were significantly different from that TNBS-colitis group. The levels of MPO, MDA, GSH and IL-6 in control rats were also significantly different those of rats in the TNBS-colitis group. Citicoline may have a positive protective effect on the inflammatory bowel disease treatment process and could, therefore, be used as an adjunct therapy in colitis. These effects of citicoline may exist through anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanism. PMID:24955172

  4. Managing osteoporosis in ulcerative colitis: Something new?

    PubMed Central

    Piodi, Luca Petruccio; Poloni, Alessandro; Ulivieri, Fabio Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The authors revise the latest evidence in the literature regarding managing of osteoporosis in ulcerative colitis (UC), paying particular attention to the latest tendency of the research concerning the management of bone damage in the patient affected by UC. It is wise to assess vitamin D status in ulcerative colitis patients to recognize who is predisposed to low levels of vitamin D, whose deficiency has to be treated with oral or parenteral vitamin D supplementation. An adequate dietary calcium intake or supplementation and physical activity, if possible, should be guaranteed. Osteoporotic risk factors, such as smoking and excessive alcohol intake, must be avoided. Steroid has to be prescribed at the lowest possible dosage and for the shortest possible time. Moreover, conditions favoring falling have to been minimized, like carpets, low illumination, sedatives assumption, vitamin D deficiency. It is advisable to assess the fracture risk in all UC patient by the fracture assessment risk tool (FRAX® tool), that calculates the ten years risk of fracture for the population aged from 40 to 90 years in many countries of the world. A high risk value could indicate the necessity of treatment, whereas a low risk value suggests a follow-up only. An intermediate risk supports the decision to prescribe bone mineral density (BMD) assessment and a subsequent patient revaluation for treatment. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry bone densitometry can be used not only for BMD measurement, but also to collect data about bone quality by the means of trabecular bone score and hip structural analysis assessment. These two indices could represent a method of interesting perspectives in evaluating bone status in patients affected by diseases like UC, which may present an impairment of bone quality as well as of bone quantity. In literature there is no strong evidence for instituting pharmacological therapy of bone impairment in UC patients for clinical indications other than those that

  5. Prevalence of Microscopic Colitis in Patients with Chronic Diarrhea in Egypt: A Single-center Study

    PubMed Central

    Gado, Ahmed S.; Ebeid, Basel A.; El Hindawi, Ali A.; Akl, Maha M.; Axon, Anthony T.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: Microscopic colitis (MC) is diagnosed when a patient with chronic watery non-bloody diarrhea (CWND) has an endoscopically normal colon, but colonic biopsies show unique inflammatory changes characteristic of lymphocytic or collagenous colitis. MC is a disorder of unknown etiology. Studies comparing the prevalence of the disease in developing countries as compared to developed countries may shed more light on the possibility of a post-infectious etiology. Most data on the incidence and prevalence of MC are from developed countries where it accounts for 4-13% of cases of CWND. There are only a few reports from developing countries. Two studies from Peru and Tunis, with high prevalence of infectious gastroenteritis, revealed MC in 40% and 29.3% of cases of CWND, respectively. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MC in patients presenting with CWND in Egypt. Materials and Methods: A total of 44 patients with CWND of unexplained etiology who had undergone full colonoscopy with no macroscopic abnormalities between January 2000 and January 2010 were assessed retrospectively. Results: The histological appearance of MC was identified in 22 (50%) patients. Twelve (55%) patients were male and 10 (45%) female. Mean age was 40 years (range: 20-65 years). Twenty (91%) of MC cases had lymphocytic colitis and 2 (9%) had collagenous colitis. Conclusions: The prevalence of MC in Egyptian patients with CWND is high when compared to that in developed countries. MC mainly affects young and middle-aged patients and it is more commonly of the lymphocytic type. PMID:22064335

  6. Differential immune and genetic responses in rat models of Crohn's colitis and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xuan-Zheng; Winston, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are clinically, immunologically, and morphologically distinct forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, smooth muscle function is impaired similarly in both diseases, resulting in diarrhea. We tested the hypothesis that differential cellular, genetic, and immunological mechanisms mediate smooth muscle dysfunction in two animal models believed to represent the two diseases. We used the rat models of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)- and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colonic inflammations, which closely mimic the clinical and morphological features of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, respectively. DSS inflammation induced oxidative stress initially in mucosa/submucosa, which then propagated to the muscularis externa to impair smooth muscle function. The muscularis externa showed no increase of cytokines/chemokines. On the other hand, TNBS inflammation almost simultaneously induced oxidative stress, recruited or activated immune cells, and generated cytokines/chemokines in both mucosa/submucosa and muscularis externa. The generation of cytokines/chemokines did not correlate with the recruitment and activation of immune cells. Consequently, the impairment of smooth muscle function in DSS inflammation was primarily due to oxidative stress, whereas that in TNBS inflammation was due to both oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokines. The impairment of smooth muscle function in DSS inflammation was due to suppression of Gαq protein of the excitation-contraction coupling. In TNBS inflammation, it was due to suppression of the α1C1b subunit of Cav1.2b channels, CPI-17 and Gαq. TNBS inflammation increased IGF-1 and TGF-β time dependently in the muscularis externa. IGF-1 induced smooth muscle hyperplasia; both IGF-1 and TGF-β induced hypertrophy. In conclusion, both TNBS and DSS induce transmural inflammation, albeit with different types of inflammatory mediators. The recruitment or activation of

  7. Familial cutaneous photosensitivity and colitis with lethal outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Labrune, P; Huguet, P; Alagille, D; Odievre, M

    1991-01-01

    Three sibs out of four, born to unrelated parents, developed early cutaneous photosensitivity and severe colitis. All of them died from untreatable diarrhoea. A fourth boy, whose father was different, did not have the same symptoms. The origin of this syndrome remains unclear and, in particular, no metabolic defect could be detected. PMID:2002480

  8. Cellulose supplementation early in life ameliorates colitis in adult mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decreased consumption of dietary fibers, such as cellulose, has been proposed to promote the emergence of inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis) where intestinal microbes are recognized to play an etiologic role. However, it is not known if transient fiber consumption dur...

  9. CCR9 Antagonists in the Treatment of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bekker, Pirow; Ebsworth, Karen; Walters, Matthew J.; Berahovich, Robert D.; Ertl, Linda S.; Charvat, Trevor T.; Punna, Sreenivas; Powers, Jay P.; Campbell, James J.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Jaen, Juan C.; Schall, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    While it has long been established that the chemokine receptor CCR9 and its ligand CCL25 are essential for the movement of leukocytes into the small intestine and the development of small-intestinal inflammation, the role of this chemokine-receptor pair in colonic inflammation is not clear. Toward this end, we compared colonic CCL25 protein levels in healthy individuals to those in patients with ulcerative colitis. In addition, we determined the effect of CCR9 pharmacological inhibition in the mdr1a−/− mouse model of ulcerative colitis. Colon samples from patients with ulcerative colitis had significantly higher levels of CCL25 protein compared to healthy controls, a finding mirrored in the mdr1a−/− mice. In the mdr1a−/− mice, CCR9 antagonists significantly decreased the extent of wasting and colonic remodeling and reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the colon. These findings indicate that the CCR9:CCL25 pair plays a causative role in ulcerative colitis and suggest that CCR9 antagonists will provide a therapeutic benefit in patients with colonic inflammation. PMID:26457007

  10. Soluble CD83 ameliorates experimental colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, J; Kreiser, S; Döbbeler, M; Nicolette, C; DeBenedette, M A; Tcherepanova, I Y; Ostalecki, C; Pommer, A J; Becker, C; Günther, C; Zinser, E; Mak, T W; Steinkasserer, A; Lechmann, M

    2014-07-01

    The physiological balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory processes is dysregulated in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) as in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Conventional therapy uses anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive corticosteroids to treat acute-phase symptoms. However, low remission rate and strong side effects of these therapies are not satisfying. Thus, there is a high medical need for new therapeutic strategies. Soluble CD83, the extracellular domain of the transmembrane CD83 molecule, has been reported to have interesting therapeutic and immunosuppressive properties by suppressing dendritic cell (DC)-mediated T-cell activation and inducing tolerogenic DCs. However, the expression and function of CD83 in IBD is still unknown. Here, we show that CD83 expression is upregulated by different leukocyte populations in a chemical-induced murine colitis model. Furthermore, in this study the potential of sCD83 to modulate colitis using an experimental murine colitis model was investigated. Strikingly, sCD83 ameliorated the clinical disease symptoms, drastically reduced mortality, and strongly decreased inflammatory cytokine expression in mesenteric lymph nodes and colon. The infiltration of macrophages and granulocytes into colonic tissues was vigorously inhibited. Mechanistically, we could show that sCD83-induced expression of indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase is essential for its protective effects. PMID:24424524

  11. Adolescents' Lived Experiences While Hospitalized After Surgery for Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Susanne; Larsen, Lene; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents are in a transitional phase of life characterized by major physical, emotional, and psychological challenges. Living with ulcerative colitis is experienced as a reduction of their life quality. Initial treatment of ulcerative colitis is medical, but surgery may be necessary when medical treatment ceases to have an effect. No research-based studies of adolescents' experience of the hospital period after surgery for ulcerative colitis exist. The objective of the study was to identify and describe adolescents' lived experiences while hospitalized after surgery for ulcerative colitis. This qualitative study was based on interviews with eight adolescents. Analysis and interpretation were based on a hermeneutic interpretation of meaning. Three themes were identified: Body: Out of order; Seen and understood; and Where are all the others? The adolescents experience a postoperative period characterized by physical and mental impairment. Being mentally unprepared for such challenges, they shun communication and interaction. The findings demonstrate the importance of individualized nursing care on the basis of the adolescent's age, maturity, and individual needs. Further study of adolescent patients' hospital stay, focusing on the implications of being young and ill at the same time, is needed. PMID:26425861

  12. Adolescents' Lived Experiences While Hospitalized After Surgery for Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ida Østrup; Jensen, Susanne; Larsen, Lene; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents are in a transitional phase of life characterized by major physical, emotional, and psychological challenges. Living with ulcerative colitis is experienced as a reduction of their life quality. Initial treatment of ulcerative colitis is medical, but surgery may be necessary when medical treatment ceases to have an effect. No research-based studies of adolescents' experience of the hospital period after surgery for ulcerative colitis exist. The objective of the study was to identify and describe adolescents' lived experiences while hospitalized after surgery for ulcerative colitis. This qualitative study was based on interviews with eight adolescents. Analysis and interpretation were based on a hermeneutic interpretation of meaning. Three themes were identified: Body: Out of order; Seen and understood; and Where are all the others? The adolescents experience a postoperative period characterized by physical and mental impairment. Being mentally unprepared for such challenges, they shun communication and interaction. The findings demonstrate the importance of individualized nursing care on the basis of the adolescent's age, maturity, and individual needs. Further study of adolescent patients' hospital stay, focusing on the implications of being young and ill at the same time, is needed. PMID:26425861

  13. Association of lymphocytic colitis and lactase deficiency in pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jihong; Lin, Jingmei; Parashette, Kalayan; Zhang, Jianjun; Fan, Rong

    2015-02-01

    Characterized by colonic mucosa intraepithelial lymphocytosis, lymphocytic colitis is primarily an entity presented in the middle-aged to elderly patient population. Very few large series of lymphocytic colitis of childhood occurrence are available in the medical literature. Ten cases each of lymphocytic colitis and of colonic lymphocytosis of other diagnosis, all with duodenal disaccharidases analysis data, were collected from the files of our institution. The electronic medical records were reviewed and multiple variables were analyzed. The ten patients with lymphocytic colitis presented with diarrhea. Of these, three had abdominal pain. The age range was 2-18 years. Nearly all patients were Caucasian (90%) and 70% were female. Endoscopically, most had normal appearing colonic mucosa. Significant past medical history, family medical history and associated comorbidities included celiac disease, Down syndrome, juvenile arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the most revealing observation was that the majority of cases (80%) were associated with lactase deficiency and, for the most part, gastrointestinal symptoms improved simply by treatment with Lactaid or avoidance of dairy products. This association is statistically significant. Our clinicopathological study indicates that the typical pediatric patient is a female Caucasian. A large of portion of the patients had associated lactase deficiency and improved on Lactaid supplement alone. PMID:25523228

  14. Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease: Implications for College Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelphi, A. P.

    1977-01-01

    The author reviews clinical patterns of inflammatory bowel disorders, establishes a perspective for recognizing ulcerative colitis, ulcerative proctitis, and Crohn's disease in relation to other bowel inflammations, and suggests some epidemiologic strategies for studying etiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of the diseases. (MJB)

  15. Diagnostic imaging advances in murine models of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Brückner, Markus; Lenz, Philipp; Mücke, Marcus M; Gohar, Faekah; Willeke, Peter; Domagk, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic-remittent inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract still evoking challenging clinical diagnostic and therapeutic situations. Murine models of experimental colitis are a vital component of research into human IBD concerning questions of its complex pathogenesis or the evaluation of potential new drugs. To monitor the course of colitis, to the present day, classical parameters like histological tissue alterations or analysis of mucosal cytokine/chemokine expression often require euthanasia of animals. Recent advances mean revolutionary non-invasive imaging techniques for in vivo murine colitis diagnostics are increasingly available. These novel and emerging imaging techniques not only allow direct visualization of intestinal inflammation, but also enable molecular imaging and targeting of specific alterations of the inflamed murine mucosa. For the first time, in vivo imaging techniques allow for longitudinal examinations and evaluation of intra-individual therapeutic response. This review discusses the latest developments in the different fields of ultrasound, molecularly targeted contrast agent ultrasound, fluorescence endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy as well as tomographic imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence-mediated tomography, discussing their individual limitations and potential future diagnostic applications in the management of human patients with IBD. PMID:26811642

  16. Quality of Methods Reporting in Animal Models of Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bramhall, Michael; Flórez-Vargas, Oscar; Stevens, Robert; Brass, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current understanding of the onset of inflammatory bowel diseases relies heavily on data derived from animal models of colitis. However, the omission of information concerning the method used makes the interpretation of studies difficult or impossible. We assessed the current quality of methods reporting in 4 animal models of colitis that are used to inform clinical research into inflammatory bowel disease: dextran sulfate sodium, interleukin-10−/−, CD45RBhigh T cell transfer, and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Methods: We performed a systematic review based on PRISMA guidelines, using a PubMed search (2000–2014) to obtain publications that used a microarray to describe gene expression in colitic tissue. Methods reporting quality was scored against a checklist of essential and desirable criteria. Results: Fifty-eight articles were identified and included in this review (29 dextran sulfate sodium, 15 interleukin-10−/−, 5 T cell transfer, and 16 TNBS; some articles use more than 1 colitis model). A mean of 81.7% (SD = ±7.038) of criteria were reported across all models. Only 1 of the 58 articles reported all essential criteria on our checklist. Animal age, gender, housing conditions, and mortality/morbidity were all poorly reported. Conclusions: Failure to include all essential criteria is a cause for concern; this failure can have large impact on the quality and replicability of published colitis experiments. We recommend adoption of our checklist as a requirement for publication to improve the quality, comparability, and standardization of colitis studies and will make interpretation and translation of data to human disease more reliable. PMID:25989337

  17. Eosinophil-mediated signalling attenuates inflammatory responses in experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Masterson, Joanne C; McNamee, Eóin N; Fillon, Sophie A; Hosford, Lindsay; Harris, Rachel; Fernando, Shahan D; Jedlicka, Paul; Iwamoto, Ryo; Jacobsen, Elizabeth; Protheroe, Cheryl; Eltzschig, Holger K; Colgan, Sean P; Arita, Makoto; Lee, James J; Furuta, Glenn T

    2015-01-01

    Objective Eosinophils reside in the colonic mucosa and increase significantly during disease. Although a number of studies have suggested that eosinophils contribute to the pathogenesis of GI inflammation, the expanding scope of eosinophil-mediated activities indicate that they also regulate local immune responses and modulate tissue inflammation. We sought to define the impact of eosinophils that respond to acute phases of colitis in mice. Design Acute colitis was induced in mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium, 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid or oxazolone to C57BL/6J (control) or eosinophil deficient (PHIL) mice. Eosinophils were also depleted from mice using antibodies against interleukin (IL)-5 or by grafting bone marrow from PHIL mice into control mice. Colon tissues were collected and analysed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and reverse transcription PCR; lipids were analysed by mass spectroscopy. Results Eosinophil-deficient mice developed significantly more severe colitis, and their colon tissues contained a greater number of neutrophils, than controls. This compensatory increase in neutrophils was accompanied by increased levels of the chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2, which attract neutrophils. Lipidomic analyses of colonic tissue from eosinophil-deficient mice identified a deficiency in the docosahexaenoic acid-derived anti-inflammatory mediator 10, 17- dihydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (diHDoHE), namely protectin D1 (PD1). Administration of an exogenous PD1-isomer (10S, 17S-DiHDoHE) reduced the severity of colitis in eosinophil-deficient mice. The PD1-isomer also attenuated neutrophil infiltration and reduced levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and inducible NO-synthase in colons of mice. Finally, in vitro assays identified a direct inhibitory effect of PD1-isomer on neutrophil transepithelial migration. Conclusions Eosinophils exert a protective effect in acute mouse colitis, via production of anti-inflammatory lipid

  18. Altered response to hydrogen sulphide during experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Steidle, J; Würner, L; Diener, M

    2012-09-10

    Hydrogen sulphide (H(2) S) is produced in the intestine by sulphate-reducing bacteria and during metabolism of L-cysteine within the mucosa. This gasotransmitter induces anion secretion by stimulating enteric neurons and by a direct effect on epithelial cells. As H(2) S is discussed to exert both pro- and anti-inflammatory actions, we aimed to investigate the role of H(2) S during experimental colitis by comparing the effects of blockade of H(2) S-forming endogenous enzymes with the effect of a S-reduced diet to diminish microbial production of H(2) S. Rectal application of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) was used to induce chronic colitis. The level of inflammation was assessed macroscopically and histologically. In Ussing chamber experiments, colonic specimens from TNBS-treated animals exhibited a higher tissue conductance, that is, a higher epithelial permeability, and a slightly reduced basal short-circuit current (a measure of net ion transport) in relation to non-inflamed control tissue. Analgetic treatment with flupirtine, a central antinociceptive analgetic, did not interfere with the induction of the inflammatory response so that all animals were treated with flupirtine to reduce pain and distress during the development of colitis. The secretory response evoked by an exogenous H(2) S donor, NaHS, was significantly decreased after induction of colitis, whereas the response to Ca(2+) - or cAMP-dependent secretagogues was unaltered. This downregulation was not observed in the colitis group fed on a S-reduced diet. The decreased NaHS response indicates a desensitization of the tissue by inflammation, which might be explained by an upregulation of colonic H(2) S production as described in some models of inflammation. PMID:22963333

  19. Effect of cyclosporine in a murine model of experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Banić, Marko; Anić, Branimir; Brkić, Tomislav; Ljubicić, Neven; Plesko, Sanja; Dohoczky, Csaba; Erceg, Damir; Petrovecki, Mladen; Stipancić, Igor; Rotkvić, Ivo

    2002-06-01

    The use of immunosuppressive therapy may be associated with significant toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cyclosporine A (CsA) in murine model of experimental colitis. Experimental colitis was induced in NMRI mice using an enema of 0.2% solution of dinitrofluorobenzene, combined with skin sensitization. After inducing colitis, experimental groups of animals were treated with CsA (1, 3, 5, 10, 25, 50 mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally (i.p.) or intracolonically (i.c.), and control groups were treated with phosphate-buffered saline intraperitoneally or intracolonically, respectively. Colonic inflammatory changes were assessed using a histopathologic score of 0-30, and pooled whole blood samples were processed with monoclonal antibodies for cyclosporine concentration. In addition, two groups of animals with experimental colitis were treated intraperitoneally or intracolonically with 3 mg/kg/day of CsA, and the colons were also taken for immunohistochemistry for CD25. CsA diminished the extent of colitis in groups treated with 3, 5, 10, or 25 mg/kg intraperitoneally or intracolonically, and in groups treated with 1 and 50 mg/kg intracolonically (P < 0.05). The effect of intracolonic application of CsA was not related to whole blood cyclosporine concentrations. In addition, the effect of CsA at 3 mg/kg, applied intraperitoneally or intracolonically was, in part, expressed in decreasing the numbers of CD25+ cells within colonic mucosa/submucosa (P < 0.05). In conclusions, the results of this study indicate the possibility of intracolonic application of cyclosporine in order to widen the therapeutic window for effective, but possibly toxic drug, such as cyclosporine. PMID:12064814

  20. Opposing roles of nuclear receptor HNF4α isoforms in colitis and colitis-associated colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Chellappa, Karthikeyani; Deol, Poonamjot; Evans, Jane R; Vuong, Linh M; Chen, Gang; Briançon, Nadege; Bolotin, Eugene; Lytle, Christian; Nair, Meera G; Sladek, Frances M

    2016-01-01

    HNF4α has been implicated in colitis and colon cancer in humans but the role of the different HNF4α isoforms expressed from the two different promoters (P1 and P2) active in the colon is not clear. Here, we show that P1-HNF4α is expressed primarily in the differentiated compartment of the mouse colonic crypt and P2-HNF4α in the proliferative compartment. Exon swap mice that express only P1- or only P2-HNF4α have different colonic gene expression profiles, interacting proteins, cellular migration, ion transport and epithelial barrier function. The mice also exhibit altered susceptibilities to experimental colitis (DSS) and colitis-associated colon cancer (AOM+DSS). When P2-HNF4α-only mice (which have elevated levels of the cytokine resistin-like β, RELMβ, and are extremely sensitive to DSS) are crossed with Retnlb(-/-) mice, they are rescued from mortality. Furthermore, P2-HNF4α binds and preferentially activates the RELMβ promoter. In summary, HNF4α isoforms perform non-redundant functions in the colon under conditions of stress, underscoring the importance of tracking them both in colitis and colon cancer. PMID:27166517

  1. Opposing roles of nuclear receptor HNF4α isoforms in colitis and colitis-associated colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chellappa, Karthikeyani; Deol, Poonamjot; Evans, Jane R; Vuong, Linh M; Chen, Gang; Briançon, Nadege; Bolotin, Eugene; Lytle, Christian; Nair, Meera G; Sladek, Frances M

    2016-01-01

    HNF4α has been implicated in colitis and colon cancer in humans but the role of the different HNF4α isoforms expressed from the two different promoters (P1 and P2) active in the colon is not clear. Here, we show that P1-HNF4α is expressed primarily in the differentiated compartment of the mouse colonic crypt and P2-HNF4α in the proliferative compartment. Exon swap mice that express only P1- or only P2-HNF4α have different colonic gene expression profiles, interacting proteins, cellular migration, ion transport and epithelial barrier function. The mice also exhibit altered susceptibilities to experimental colitis (DSS) and colitis-associated colon cancer (AOM+DSS). When P2-HNF4α-only mice (which have elevated levels of the cytokine resistin-like β, RELMβ, and are extremely sensitive to DSS) are crossed with Retnlb-/- mice, they are rescued from mortality. Furthermore, P2-HNF4α binds and preferentially activates the RELMβ promoter. In summary, HNF4α isoforms perform non-redundant functions in the colon under conditions of stress, underscoring the importance of tracking them both in colitis and colon cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10903.001 PMID:27166517

  2. Ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis: a rare association--case report.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Vitor Alves; Yamaguchi, Lúcio; Ribeiro, Carolina Nazeozeno; Magalhães, Vanessa de Oliveira; Rego, Jozelia; Silva, Nilzio Antonio da

    2012-08-01

    Ulcerative colitis is an autoimmune disorder of unknown etiology. Although the large intestine is the major focus of autoimmunity, resulting in chronic diarrhea, that is actually a systemic disease, with numerous extraintestinal manifestations, such as articular involvement. The frequent association of a number of autoimmune diseases in the same patient has been described. However, the coexistence of ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis is rare. The authors report a case of ulcerative colitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis, in which colitis occurred 12 years before the onset of inflammatory arthropathy. PMID:22885429

  3. PGRN protects against colitis progression in mice in an IL-10 and TNFR2 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fanhua; Zhang, Yuying; Jian, Jinlong; Mundra, Jyoti Joshi; Tian, Qingyun; Lin, Jiqiang; Lafaille, Juan Jose; Tang, Wei; Zhao, Weiming; Yu, Xiuping; Liu, Chuan-Ju

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine the role and regulation of progranulin (PGRN) in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)−, picrylsulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced, bone marrow chimera and CD4+CD45Rbhi T cell transfer colitis model were established and analyzed in wild-type and several genetically-modified mice, including PGRN, IL-10 and TNFR2 deficient mice. Elevated levels of PGRN were found in colitis samples from human IBD patients and mouse colitis models in comparison to the corresponding controls. PGRN-deficient mice became highly susceptible to DSS- and TNBS-induced colitis, whereas recombinant PGRN ameliorated the pathology and reduced the histological score in both DSS and TNBS colitis models. In addition, hematopoietic-derived PGRN was critical for protection against DSS-induced colitis, and lack of PGRN signaling in CD4+ T cells also exacerbated experimental colitis. PGRN-mediated protective effect in colitis was compromised in the absence of IL-10 signaling. In addition, PGRN's effect was also largely lost in the TNFR2-deficient colitis model. Collectively, these findings not only provide the new insight into PGRN's anti-inflammatory action in vivo, but may also present PGRN and its derivatives as novel biological agent for treating IBD. PMID:25387791

  4. American ginseng suppresses inflammation and DNA damage associated with mouse colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yu; Kotakadi, Venkata S.; Ying, Lei; Cui, Xiangli; Wood, Patricia A.; Windust, Anthony; Matesic, Lydia E.; Pena, Edsel A.; Chiuzan, Codruta; Singh, Narendra P.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.; Wargovich, Michael J.; Hofseth, Lorne J.

    2008-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a dynamic, idiopathic, chronic inflammatory condition associated with a high colon cancer risk. American ginseng has antioxidant properties and targets many of the players in inflammation. The aim of this study was to test whether American ginseng extract prevents and treats colitis. Colitis in mice was induced by the presence of 1% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water or by 1% oxazolone rectally. American ginseng extract was mixed in the chow at levels consistent with that currently consumed by humans as a supplement (75 p.p.m., equivalent to 58 mg daily). To test prevention of colitis, American ginseng extract was given prior to colitis induction. To test treatment of colitis, American ginseng extract was given after the onset of colitis. In vitro studies were performed to examine mechanisms. Results indicate that American ginseng extract not only prevents but it also treats colitis. Inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (markers of inflammation) and p53 (induced by inflammatory stress) are also downregulated by American ginseng. Mucosal and DNA damage associated with colitis is at least in part a result of an oxidative burst from overactive leukocytes. We therefore tested the hypothesis that American ginseng extract can inhibit leukocyte activation and subsequent epithelial cell DNA damage in vitro and in vivo. Results are consistent with this hypothesis. The use of American ginseng extract represents a novel therapeutic approach for the prevention and treatment of UC. PMID:18802031

  5. Pulmonary embolism in an immunocompetent patient with acute cytomegalovirus colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurs commonly in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients, but is usually asymptomatic in the latter. Vascular events associated with acute CMV infection have been described, but are rare. Hence, such events are rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of pulmonary embolism secondary to acute CMV colitis in an immunocompetent 78-year-old man. The patient presented with fever and diarrhea. Colonic ulcers were diagnosed based on colonoscopy findings, and CMV was the proven etiology on pathological examination. The patient subsequently experienced acute respiratory failure. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed based on the chest radiography and computed tomography findings. A diagnosis of acute CMV colitis complicated by pulmonary embolism was made. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous administration of unfractionated heparin and intravenous ganciclovir. PMID:27175121

  6. A Case of Cerebral Vasculitis Associated with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Naveen; Arkebauer, Matthew; Waters, Barry; Dickinson, Brucha

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic, debilitating condition characterized by inflammation of the colonic mucosa. It is regarded as a systemic inflammatory disorder that can affect a number of organ systems. Central nervous system disease associated with UC is a rare sequela of inflammatory bowel disease, occurring in less than 5% of cases. These manifestations include arterial and venous thrombosis, leukoencephalitis, seizures, and vasculitis. We present a case of a 61-year-old female with a two-year history of well-controlled ulcerative colitis, who developed altered mental status and weakness. On brain imaging, she was found to have cerebral lesions which were biopsied. Histopathology subsequently revealed coagulative necrosis and inflammation characteristic of vasculitis. Rheumatology serologies were negative, and the patient was started on steroids that dramatically improved her neurological function, with no residual deficits, and led to resolution of the brain lesions. PMID:26557402

  7. [Ischemic colitis: an uncommon manifestation in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Medina, Viviana; Bulgach, Valeria; Lagandara, Pamela; Berner, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    We present the case of an adolescent with ischemic colitis, an infrequent pathology in this age group, worsened in the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The patient, aged 20, was diagnosed SLE at 6. She consulted for fever, abdominal pain in the side and right iliac fossa and diarrhea lasting 48 hours. It was assumed as acute gastroenteritis but given the persistent pain, incoercible vomiting and abdominal distension she was hospitalized. The abdominal X-ray showed distended loops, abundant feces, without air-fluid levels. The ultrasound showed erosions and ulcerations, edema and bleeding in the descending colon submucosal layer. The CT scan evidenced an ischemic lesion in the right colon. Ischemic colitis is a severe condition, infrequent in young individuals. Signs, symptoms, abdominal CT scan and colonoscopy are the elements of choice for the diagnosis. PMID:23568076

  8. Acute Myocardial Infarction Complicating Active Ulcerative Colitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Papadimitraki, Eva D.; Ahamed, Mubarak; Bunce, Nicholas H.

    2011-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease that predominantly affects the gastrointestinal (GI) tract but can involve extraintestinal organs including musculoskeletal system and skin. The most frequent cardiac manifestations of UC are pericarditis and myocarditis. Patients display an increased risk for venous thromboembolic complications and mesenteric ischemia, but the association with ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction is uncertain. We present the case of a 27-year-old man with anti-PRIII ANCA-positive ulcerative colitis and increased factor VIII activity who presented with an acute myocardial infarction. We discuss possible causative links between these clinical entities and demonstrate the role of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with underlying inflammatory conditions who present with chest pain and evidence of myocardial damage. PMID:24826231

  9. Ulcerative colitis associated with chronic granulomatous disease: case report.

    PubMed

    Imanzade, Farid; Sayarri, Aliakbar; Tajik, Pantea

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an inherited primary immunodeficiency disease which increases the body's susceptibility to infections caused by certain bacteria and fungi. CGD is a rare disease, caused by four genes, one type is 1X linked and the other three are "autosomal recessive". Although clinical presentation is variable, but characteristic features are recurrent pneumonia, lymphadenitis, hepatic or other abscesses. Gastrointestinal tract symptoms are common in x-linked recessive form of CGD. These include gastric and esophageal obstruction and inflammatory bowel disease. GI involvement including small and large intestines, the findings of luminal narrowing and the presence of granuloma can make it difficult to distinguish from Crohn's disease. On the other hands according to the literature ulcerative colitis is rarely reported in patients with CGD. Our case presented with ulcerative colitis with CGD. PMID:26328046

  10. Opposing roles of Prostaglandin D2 receptors in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Eva M.; Radnai, Balazs; Jandl, Katharina; Stančić, Angela; Parzmair, Gerald P.; Högenauer, Christoph; Kump, Patrizia; Wenzl, Heimo; Petritsch, Wolfgang; Pieber, Thomas R.; Schuligoi, Rufina; Marsche, Gunther; Ferreirós, Nerea; Heinemann, Akos; Schicho, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Pro-resolution functions were reported for Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) in colitis, but the role of its two receptors, DP and in particular CRTH2 are less well defined. We investigated DP and CRTH2 expression and function during human and murine ulcerative colitis (UC). Expression of receptors was measured by flow cytometry on peripheral blood leukocytes, and by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting in colon biopsies of patients with active UC and healthy individuals. Receptor involvement in UC was evaluated in a mouse model of DSS colitis. DP and CRTH2 expression changed in leukocytes of patients with active UC in a differential manner. In UC patients, DP showed higher expression in neutrophils but lower in monocytes as compared to control subjects. In contrast, CRTH2 was decreased in eosinophils, NK and CD3+ T cells but not in monocytes and CD3+/CD4+ T cells. The decrease of CRTH2 on blood eosinophils clearly correlated with disease activity. DP correlated positively with disease activity in eosinophils but inversely in neutrophils. CRTH2 internalized upon treatment with PGD2 and 11-dehydroTXB2 in eosinophils of controls. Biopsies of UC patients revealed an increase of CRTH2-positive cells in the colonic mucosa and high CRTH2 protein content. The CRTH2 antagonist CAY10595 improved while the DP antagonist MK0524 worsened inflammation in murine colitis. DP and CRTH2 play differential roles in UC. Although expression of CRTH2 on blood leukocytes is downregulated in UC, CRTH2 is present in colon tissue where it may contribute to inflammation whereas DP likely promotes anti-inflammatory actions. PMID:24929001

  11. Opposing roles of prostaglandin D2 receptors in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Eva M; Radnai, Balazs; Jandl, Katharina; Stančić, Angela; Parzmair, Gerald P; Högenauer, Christoph; Kump, Patrizia; Wenzl, Heimo; Petritsch, Wolfgang; Pieber, Thomas R; Schuligoi, Rufina; Marsche, Gunther; Ferreirós, Nerea; Heinemann, Akos; Schicho, Rudolf

    2014-07-15

    Proresolution functions were reported for PGD2 in colitis, but the role of its two receptors, D-type prostanoid (DP) and, in particular, chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells (CRTH2), is less well defined. We investigated DP and CRTH2 expression and function during human and murine ulcerative colitis (UC). Expression of receptors was measured by flow cytometry on peripheral blood leukocytes and by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting in colon biopsies of patients with active UC and healthy individuals. Receptor involvement in UC was evaluated in a mouse model of dextran sulfate sodium colitis. DP and CRTH2 expression changed in leukocytes of patients with active UC in a differential manner. In UC patients, DP showed higher expression in neutrophils but lower in monocytes as compared with control subjects. In contrast, CRTH2 was decreased in eosinophils, NK, and CD3(+) T cells but not in monocytes and CD3(+)/CD4(+) T cells. The decrease of CRTH2 on blood eosinophils clearly correlated with disease activity. DP correlated positively with disease activity in eosinophils but inversely in neutrophils. CRTH2 internalized upon treatment with PGD2 and 11-dehydro TXB2 in eosinophils of controls. Biopsies of UC patients revealed an increase of CRTH2-positive cells in the colonic mucosa and high CRTH2 protein content. The CRTH2 antagonist CAY10595 improved, whereas the DP antagonist MK0524 worsened inflammation in murine colitis. DP and CRTH2 play differential roles in UC. Although expression of CRTH2 on blood leukocytes is downregulated in UC, CRTH2 is present in colon tissue, where it may contribute to inflammation, whereas DP most likely promotes anti-inflammatory actions. PMID:24929001

  12. Thrombin drives tumorigenesis in colitis-associated colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeldt, Leah; Kombrinck, Keith; Flick, Matthew J.; Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Harmel-Laws, Eleana; Mullins, Eric S.; Shaw, Maureen; Witte, David P.; Revenko, Alexey; Monia, Brett; Palumbo, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    The established association between inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer underscores the importance of inflammation in colon cancer development. Based on evidence that hemostatic proteases are powerful modifiers of both inflammatory pathologies and tumor biology, gene-targeted mice carrying low levels of prothrombin were used to directly test the hypothesis that prothrombin contributes to tumor development in colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC). Remarkably, imposing a modest 50% reduction in circulating prothrombin in fII+/− mice, a level that carries no significant bleeding risk, dramatically decreased adenoma formation following an azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate challenge. Similar results were obtained with pharmacological inhibition of prothrombin expression or inhibition of thrombin proteolytic activity. Detailed longitudinal analyses showed that the role of thrombin in tumor development in CAC was temporally associated with the antecedent inflammatory colitis. However, direct studies of the antecedent colitis showed that mice carrying half-normal prothrombin levels were comparable to control mice in mucosal damage, inflammatory cell infiltration and associated local cytokine levels. These results suggest that thrombin supports early events coupled to inflammation-mediated tumorigenesis in CAC that are distinct from overall inflammation-induced tissue damage and inflammatory cell trafficking. That prothrombin is linked to early events in CAC was strongly inferred by the observation that prothrombin deficiency dramatically reduced the formation of very early, pre-cancerous aberrant crypt foci. Given the importance of inflammation in the development of colon cancer, these studies suggest that therapeutic interventions at the level of hemostatic factors may be an effective means to prevent and/or impede colitis-associated colon cancer progression. PMID:24710407

  13. Perioperative Considerations in Crohn Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, T Paul; Merchea, Amit

    2016-06-01

    The management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is medically and surgically complex. Numerous patient- and disease-oriented factors must be considered in treating patients with IBD, including nutritional replenishment/support, effect of immunosuppressive medications, extent of resection, and use of proximal diversion. Perioperative planning and optimization of the patient is imperative to ensuring favorable outcomes and limiting morbidity. These perioperative considerations in Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis are reviewed here. PMID:27247531

  14. A budesonide prodrug accelerates treatment of colitis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cui, N; Friend, D R; Fedorak, R N

    1994-01-01

    Although oral glucocorticoids are the treatment of choice for moderate to severe ulcerative pancolitis, their systemic side effects and adrenal suppression account for considerable morbidity. An oral glucocorticoid-conjugate (prodrug), budesonide-beta-D-glucuronide, which is not absorbed in the small intestine but is hydrolysed by colonic bacterial and mucosal beta-glucuronidase to release free budesonide into the colon was synthesised. The objective of this study was to compare treatment with budesonide-beta-D-glucuronide with treatment with free budesonide by examining: (1) the healing of experimental colitis and (2) the extent of adrenal suppression. Pancolitis was induced with 4% acetic acid. Animals were then randomised to receive oral therapy for 72 hours with (1) budesonide-beta-D-glucuronide, (2) free budesonide, or (3) vehicle. Drug efficacy and colitic healing was determined by measuring gross colonic ulceration, myeloperoxidase activity, and in vivo colonic fluid absorption. Adrenal suppression was determined by measuring plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone and serum corticosterone. Vehicle-treated colitis animals had gross ulceration, increased myeloperoxidase activity, and net colonic fluid secretion. Treatment with oral budesonide-beta-D-glucuronide accelerated all measures of colitis healing at a fourfold lower dose than did free budesonide. Furthermore, treatment with budesonide-beta-D-glucuronide did not result in adrenal suppression whereas free budesonide treatment did. A newly synthesised orally administered glucocorticoid-conjugate accelerates colitis healing with limited adrenal suppression. Development of an orally administered colon-specific steroid delivery system represents a novel approach to inflammatory bowel disease treatment. PMID:7959202

  15. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  16. Vitiligo in a patient receiving infliximab for refractory ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Waleed A; Al-Enzy, Saleh A; Alsurayei, Saqer A; Ismail, Ali E

    2011-06-01

    Infliximab is a chimerical monoclonal antibody that inhibits pro-inflammatory activity of tumour-necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and it is the primary biological agent used in the treatment of moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis (UC). We report a case of vitiligo following infliximab administration in a patient with refractory UC. The case serves as a reminder of adverse cutaneous reactions induced by TNFα-antagonist therapy. PMID:21684486

  17. Inflammatory cells’ role in acetic acid-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Sanei, Mohammad H.; Hadizadeh, Fatemeh; Adibi, Peyman; Alavi, Sayyed Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Free radicals are the known mechanisms responsible for inducing colitis with two origins: Inflammatory cells and tissues. Only the inflammatory cells can be controlled by corticosteroids. Our aim was to assess the importance of neutrophils as one of the inflammatory cells in inducing colitis and to evaluate the efficacy of corticosteroids in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Materials and Methods: Thirty-six mice were divided into six groups of six mice each. Colitis was induced in three groups by exposing them to acetic acid through enema (group 1), ex vivo (group 3), and enema after immune suppression (group 5). Each group had one control group that was exposed to water injection instead of acetic acid. Tissue samples were evaluated and compared based on macroscopic damages and biochemical and pathological results. Results: Considering neutrophilic infiltration, there were significant differences between groups 1, 3, 5, and the control of group 1. Groups 3, 5, and their controls, and group 1 and the control of group 3 had significant differences in terms of goblet depletion. Based on tissue originated H2O2, we found significant differences between group 1 and its control and group 3, and also between groups 5 and the control of group 3. All the three groups were significantly different from their controls based on Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP) and such differences were also seen between group 1 with two other groups. Conclusion: Neutrophils may not be the only cause of oxidation process in colitis, and also makes the effectiveness of corticosteroids in the treatment of this disease doubtful. PMID:25337523

  18. Antioxidants as novel therapy in a murine model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Oz, Helieh S; Chen, Theresa S; McClain, Craig J; de Villiers, Willem J S

    2005-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are increased in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and have been implicated as mediators of intestinal inflammation. We investigated the hypothesis that antioxidants with diverse properties attenuate disease progression in a murine dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis model. These antioxidants were (A) S-adenosylmethionine, a glutathione (GSH) precursor; (B) green tea polyphenols, a well-known antioxidant; and (C) 2(R,S)-n-propylthiazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acid (PTCA), a cysteine prodrug, involved in GSH biosynthesis. BALB/c mice were divided into four groups and provided with the above mentioned antioxidants or the vehicle incorporated into chow. The animals were further divided into two subgroups and given normal drinking water (control) or water supplemented with DSS (to induce colitis), and the progression of the disease was studied. DSS-treated mice developed severe colitis as shown by bloody diarrhea, weight loss and pathological involvement (P<.001). However, all the antioxidants significantly improved diarrhea and colon lesions (P<.01), and increased body weights (P<.05). Hematocrits were significantly less affected in DSS-treated animals receiving antioxidants (P<.01). Colon lengths were significantly decreased due to mucosal inflammation in DSS-treated animals, but antioxidant therapy normalized this pathological finding (P<.001). The blood level of reduced GSH was decreased in DSS-treated mice (P<.05) and returned to normal when treated with antioxidants. Serum amyloid A (acute phase protein; P=.0015) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha; pro-inflammatory cytokine; P<.01) were significantly increased in DSS-treated animals (161+/-40 pg/ml) and improved with antioxidant treatment (P<.01). Finally, actin cytoskeleton was distorted and fragmented in the mucosa of DSS-treated mice and improved with antioxidant therapy. In conclusion, three structurally dissimilar antioxidants provided protection against DSS

  19. Crucial role of macrophage selenoproteins in experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Naveen; Kudva, Avinash K.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Chiaro, Christopher; Kennett, Mary J.; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu; Carlson, Bradley A.; Cantorna, Margherita T.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that involves macrophages. Given the inverse link between selenium (Se) status and IBD-induced inflammation, our objective was to demonstrate that selenoproteins in macrophages were essential to suppress pro-inflammatory mediators, in part, by the modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. Acute colitis was induced using 4% DSS in wild type mice maintained on Se-deficient (<0.01 ppm Se), Se-adequate (0.1 ppm; sodium selenite), and two supraphysiological levels in the form of Se-supplemented (0.4 ppm; sodium selenite) and high Se (1.0 ppm; sodium selenite) diets. Transfer RNASec (tRNA[sec]) knockout mice (Trspfl/flLysMCre) were used to examine the role of selenoproteins in macrophages on disease progression and severity using histopathological evaluation, expression of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory genes, and modulation of prostaglandin (PG) metabolites in urine and plasma. While Se-deficient and Se-adequate mice showed increased colitis and exhibited poor survival, Se supplementation at 0.4 and 1.0 ppm increased survival of mice and decreased colitis-associated inflammation with an up-regulation of expression of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory genes. Metabolomic profiling of urine suggested increased oxidation of PGE2 at supraphysiological levels of Se that also correlated well with Se-dependent upregulation of 15-hydroxy-PG dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) in macrophages. Pharmacological inhibition of 15-PGDH, lack of selenoprotein expression in macrophages, and depletion of infiltrating macrophages indicated that macrophage-specific selenoproteins and upregulation of 15-PGDH expression were key for Se-dependent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving effects. Selenoproteins in macrophages protect mice from DSS-colitis by enhancing 15-PGDH-dependent oxidation of PGE2 to alleviate inflammation, suggesting a therapeutic role for Se in IBD. PMID:25187657

  20. Risk factors for complications in patients with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Borovicka, Jan; Seibold, Frank; Vavricka, Stephan R; Lakatos, Peter L; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with ulcerative colitis may develop extraintestinal manifestations like erythema nodosum or primary sclerosing cholangitis or extraintestinal complications like anaemia, malabsorption or they may have to undergo surgery. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate potential risk factors for complications like anaemia, malabsorption or surgery in ulcerative colitis. Methods Data on 179 patients with ulcerative colitis were retrieved from our cross-sectional and prospective Swiss Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort Study data base for a median observational time of 4.2 years. Data were compared between patients with (n = 140) or without (n = 39) complications. Gender, age at diagnosis, smoking status, disease extent, delay of diagnosis or therapy, mesalamine (5-ASA) systemic and topical therapy, as well as other medication were analysed as potential impact factors. Results In the multivariate regression analysis a delay of 5-ASA treatment by at least two months (odds ratio (OR) 6.21 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.13–18.14), p = 0.001) as well as a delay with other medication with thiopurines (OR 6.48 (95% CI 2.01–20.91), p = 0.002) were associated with a higher risk for complications. This significant impact of a delay of 5-ASA therapy was demonstrated for extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) as well as extraintestinal complications (EICs). Extensive disease as well as therapy with methotrexate showed a significantly increased risk for surgery (extensive disease: OR 2.62 (1.02–6.73), p = 0.05, methotrexate: OR 5.36 (1.64–17.58), p = 0.006). Conclusions A delay of 5-ASA therapy of more than two months in the early stage of ulcerative colitis (UC) constitutes a risk for complications during disease course. Extensive disease is associated with a higher risk for surgery. PMID:27087958

  1. AOM/DSS Model of Colitis-Associated Cancer.

    PubMed

    Parang, Bobak; Barrett, Caitlyn W; Williams, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of colitis-associated carcinoma (CAC) has benefited substantially from mouse models that faithfully recapitulate human CAC. Chemical models, in particular, have enabled fast and efficient analysis of genetic and environmental modulators of CAC without the added requirement of time-intensive genetic crossings. Here we describe the Azoxymethane (AOM)/Dextran Sodium Sulfate (DSS) mouse model of inflammatory colorectal cancer. PMID:27246042

  2. TRPV1 sensitization mediates postinflammatory visceral pain following acute colitis.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Tamia K; Basso, Lilian; Iftinca, Mircea C; Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Dietrich, Gilles; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Altier, Christophe

    2015-07-15

    Quiescent phases of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are often accompanied by chronic abdominal pain. Although the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel has been postulated as an important mediator of visceral hypersensitivity, its functional role in postinflammatory pain remains elusive. This study aimed at establishing the role of TRPV1 in the peripheral sensitization underlying chronic visceral pain in the context of colitis. Wild-type and TRPV1-deficient mice were separated into three groups (control, acute colitis, and recovery), and experimental colitis was induced by oral administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Recovery mice showed increased chemically and mechanically evoked visceral hypersensitivity 5 wk post-DSS discontinuation, at which point inflammation had completely resolved. Significant changes in nonevoked pain-related behaviors could also be observed in these animals, indicative of persistent discomfort. These behavioral changes correlated with elevated colonic levels of substance P (SP) and TRPV1 in recovery mice, thus leading to the hypothesis that SP could sensitize TRPV1 function. In vitro experiments revealed that prolonged exposure to SP could indeed sensitize capsaicin-evoked currents in both cultured neurons and TRPV1-transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, a mechanism that involved TRPV1 ubiquitination and subsequent accumulation at the plasma membrane. Importantly, although TRPV1-deficient animals experienced similar disease severity and pain as wild-type mice in the acute phase of colitis, TRPV1 deletion prevented the development of postinflammatory visceral hypersensitivity and pain-associated behaviors. Collectively, our results suggest that chronic exposure of colon-innervating primary afferents to SP could sensitize TRPV1 and thus participate in the establishment of persistent abdominal pain following acute inflammation. PMID:26021808

  3. Pseudomembranous colitis: an unusual cause of neutrocytic ascites.

    PubMed

    Spahr, L; de Saussure, P; Felley, C; Pugin, J; Hadengue, A

    1999-07-01

    Severe cases of pseudomembranous colitis (PMC) may be associated with intraperitoneal fluid accumulation. However, the characteristics of the liquid are seldom described. Specifically, neutrocytic ascites has only been reported once. We report a case of a severe PMC complicated by a highly neutrocytic ascites which remained culture-negative. We discuss the possible mechanisms leading to ascites formation in this condition and review ascitic fluid characteristics in patients with PMC. PMID:10445802

  4. [Management of diagnosis and treatment in ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Klotz, Caroline; Barret, Maximilien; Dhooge, Marion; Oudjit, Ammar; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain; Abitbol, Vered

    2015-02-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease limited to the mucosa and affecting the rectum and the colon continuously. Salicylates are the first line treatment for moderate forms. Corticosteroids are used to induce remission, but are not given as maintenance therapy. Thiopurines are indicated as maintenance therapy in case of failure of salicylates or cortico-dependence. Anti TNF alpha are indicated in cortico-resistant severe flares or if cortico- dependence. Vedolizumab (anti-integrin) is the first non anti-TNF alpha biotherapy available for the treatment of UC. Severe acute colitis is a medical emergency; diagnosis is based on Lichtiger score. An emergency colectomy for severe acute colitis is indicated in cases of surgical complication or resistance to medical therapy. UC patients with extension beyond splenic flexure are at risk of colorectal cancer, increasing with the duration of the disease, severity of mucosal inflammation, family history of colorectal cancer, and the existence of sclerosing cholangitis. Annual surveillance colonoscopy is required in patients with sclerosing cholangitis regardless of the extension of their UC. PMID:25534469

  5. Quality of life in patients with ulcerative colitis treated surgically

    PubMed Central

    Kozłowska, Katarzyna A.; Krokowicz, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ulcerative colitis belongs to the group of inflammatory bowel diseases. The specific symptoms and chronic nature of the disease significantly affect the quality of patients’ lives. Quality-of-life assessment helps to define its determining factors as well as the efficiency of surgical procedures. Aim Quality-of-life evaluation of patients with ulcerative colitis treated surgically. Material and methods A retrospective review was carried out on 35 patients with ulcerative colitis, who were treated surgically in the Clinic of General and Colorectal Surgery, University of Medical Sciences in Poznan. The research tools used to assess the quality of life consisted of: the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, a Polish version of the Short Form Health Survey-36, and a questionnaire. Results The mean of the IBDQ scale was 152.51, and the median was 161. In this scale, a higher score indicates better quality of life. The situation in the subjective SF-36 scale is reversed: a lower score indicates better quality of life. The mean of the SF-36 was 115.94, and the median was 58. Many discrepancies in the field (e.g. the influence of determining factors) create a niche for further studies. Conclusions Moreover, quality-of-life evaluation may lead to better patient care, understanding their problems or treatment modifications, and finally may become a kind of therapy efficiency parameter. PMID:25276253

  6. β-Arrestin-1 deficiency protects mice from experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taehyung; Lee, Eunhee; Irwin, Regina; Lucas, Peter C; McCabe, Laura R; Parameswaran, Narayanan

    2013-04-01

    β-Arrestins are intracellular scaffolding proteins that modulate specific cell signaling pathways. Recent studies, in both cell culture and in vivo models, have demonstrated an important role for β-arrestin-1 in inflammation. However, the role of β-arrestin-1 in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not known. Our goal was to investigate the role of β-arrestin-1 in IBD using mouse models of colitis. To this end, we subjected wild-type (WT) and β-arrestin-1 knockout (β-arr-1(-/-)) mice to colitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid or dextran sulfate sodium and examined the clinical signs, gross pathology, and histopathology of the colon, as well as inflammatory components. The β-arr-1(-/-) mice displayed significantly attenuated colitis, compared with WT mice, in both models. Consistent with the phenotypic observations, histological examination of the colon revealed attenuated disease pathology in the β-arr-1(-/-) mice. Our results further demonstrate that β-arr-1(-/-) mice are deficient in IL-6 expression in the colon, but have higher expression of the anti-inflammatory IL-10 family of cytokines. Our results also demonstrate diminished ERK and NFκB pathways in the colons of β-arr-1(-/-) mice, compared with WT mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that decreased IL-6 production and enhanced IL-10 and IL-22 production in β-arrestin-1-deficient mice likely lead to attenuated gut inflammation. PMID:23395087

  7. Ulcerative colitis and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in Hong Kong Chinese.

    PubMed

    Sung, J Y; Chan, K L; Hsu, R; Liew, C T; Lawton, J W

    1993-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are known to be rare among the Chinese. The diagnosis of ulcerative colitis has been difficult in some of the Asian countries where infective colitis is more prevalent. Twenty-three Hong Kong Chinese patients diagnosed to have ulcerative colitis were reviewed. The symptoms were relatively mild and extraintestinal manifestation had been rare. Patients responded well to steroid therapy and sulfasalazine. Three patients in this series were found to have cyst and/or trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica in stool. In this series, 19 patients were tested for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). Fourteen patients (73.5%) were positive, of which six (31.5%) showed a perinuclear staining pattern and eight (42%) demonstrated a cytoplasmic pattern. Five patients (26.5%) were negative for any ANCA, and none was positive for both. Sera of these patients were also tested for anti-alpha granules, anti-myeloperoxidase, and anti-lactoferrin activities. None was positive. Control sera collected from 16 patients with irritable bowel syndrome were all negative for the tests. In conclusion, testing of ANCAs may help in making the diagnosis of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease in difficult situations. PMID:8503382

  8. Octreotide effectively decreases mucosal damage in experimental colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Eliakim, R; Karmeli, F; Okon, E; Rachmilewitz, D

    1993-01-01

    The effect of octreotide, a synthetic analogue of somatostatin, on the modulation of the acetic acid model of experimental colitis was examined. Colitis was induced by intracolonic administration of 2 ml of 5% acetic acid. The inflammatory response elicited by the acetic acid resulted in increased colonic synthesis of platelet activating factor, leukotriene B4 and decreased mucosal somatostatin levels. Subcutaneous administration of octreotide (10 micrograms/rat) 1 hour before or immediately after damage induction, as well as 1 and 23 hours after acetic acid application, resulted in a significant reduction in mucosal damage. The protective effect was accompanied by a significant reduction in platelet activating factor activity, leukotriene B4, and vasoactive intestinal peptide concentrations. There were no significant changes in mucosal leukotriene C4 and calcitonin gene related peptide levels. This study shows that acetic acid induced colitis is pharmacologically manipulated by octreotide. The mechanism of action of octreotide has not yet been fully determined. The potential use of octreotide in treating active inflammatory bowel disease remains to be evaluated. Images Figure 5 PMID:8381760

  9. IL-9 antibody injection suppresses the inflammation in colitis mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Aping; Yang, Hang; Qi, Haili; Cui, Jing; Hua, Wei; Li, Can; Pang, Zhigang; Zheng, Wei; Cui, Guanglin

    2015-12-25

    Diverse T help (Th) cells play a crucial role in the processing and maintaining of chronic inflammation as seen in ulcerative colitis (UC). Th9, a novel subset of Th cells that primarily produces interleukin (IL)-9, has recently been associated with the development of inflammatory diseases. In this study, we evaluated the presentation of Th9 cells in inflamed tissues of human and experimental mouse UC, and examined the therapeutic efficiency of anti Th9 cytokine IL-9 in the experimental mouse UC. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC), we evaluated the presentation of Th9 cells labelled by transcriptional factor PU.1 in both human and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced mouse colitis biopsies. The results showed that increased PU.1 positive Th9 cells were mainly located in the lamina propria in relative with the controls, intraepithelial Th9 cells can also be observed but at low density. Double IHCs revealed that most of PU.1 positive cells were CD3 positive lymphocytes in human UC specimens. Anti-IL-9 antibody injection for 2 weeks reduced the severity of inflammation in DSS induced colitis mice. Our results suggest that The Th9/IL-9 is involved in the pathogenesis of UC. PMID:26603936

  10. Escherichia coli 0157 enterohaemorrhagic colitis associated with pyelonephritis: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, E; Chatur, N; Zwirewich, C

    2009-04-01

    Escherichia coli 0157:H7 is increasingly being recognized as a cause of infectious colitis, which typically results in bloody diarrhoea in an afebrile patient. The absence of fever often means that an infectious process is not considered in the differential diagnosis, particularly as this organism will not be detected in routine stool cultures. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy may increase the risk of development of haemolytic uraemic syndrome, a potentially fatal complication of this form of colitis, hence the importance of accurate diagnosis. On CT, it is characterized by severe diffuse colonic wall thickening, with little or no pericolic inflammatory changes. The radiologist may be the first to suspect the correct diagnosis and so should be aware of its imaging appearances. We report the case of a 19-year-old man who presented with typical radiological findings of enterohaemorrhagic colitis and whose CT also showed evidence of acute pyelonephritis; we suggest that this combination of abnormalities should further heighten radiologists' suspicions of infection due to E. coli 0157:H7, despite the absence of fever. PMID:19325040

  11. Protective effect of Laminaria japonica with probiotics on murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seok-Jae; Bu, Youngmin; Bae, Jinhyun; Bang, Yu-mi; Kim, Jinsung; Lee, Hyejung; Beom-Joon, Lee; Hyun, Yoo Hye; Park, Jae-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronically relapsing inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. Most IBD treatments are unsatisfactory; therefore, various dietary supplements have emerged as promising interventions. Laminaria japonica (LJ) is an edible seaweed used to regulate digestive symptoms. Probiotics have been reported to improve digestive problems and their simultaneous administration with seaweeds has been shown to produce synergistic therapeutic effects. Here, we investigated the effect of LJ combination with probiotics on dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model in mice. Aqueous LJ extracts (LJE) at doses from 100 to 300 mg/kg and probiotics at a dose of 300 mg/kg were orally administered for 7 days. Body weight, colon length, histological score, macroscopic damage, and the levels of cytokines IFN- γ , IL-1 β , IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 (P40), IL-12 (P70), IL-17, and TNF- α were assessed. LJE alone caused a significant improvement of colitis signs such as colon length, histological score, and IL-1 β and IL-6 production. LJE and probiotics demonstrated a synergistic effect by the histological score and levels of IL-1 β , IL-6, and IL-12 (P40) but not IFN- γ , IL-10, and IL-12 (P70). In conclusion, LJE was effective in inducing protection against colitis in mice and acted synergistically with probiotics. PMID:24948848

  12. What's the Clinical Features of Colitis in Elderly People in Long-Term Care Facilities?

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, So Yoon; Na, Sun-Kyung; Ryu, Jae-In; Yun, Hye-Won; Lee, Min-Jin; Song, Eun-Mi; Kim, Seong-Eun; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Shim, Ki-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims As life expectancy has increased, the number of elderly patients who need long-term care has grown rapidly. Mortality in patients with colitis in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) is increasing. We intend to investigate the main causes of colitis in LTCFs compared to those of colitis in local communities, and to identify the clinical features and risk factors of patients with colitis in LTCFs. Methods We retrospectively analyzed epidemiology, medical conditions, laboratory values, diagnoses, and clinical courses of elderly patients aged ≥65 who were admitted to the Ewha Womans University hospital with colitis between January 2007 and July 2012. Results Patients with colitis in LTCFs (n=20) were compared with elderly patients with colitis in local communities (n=154). Fifty-five percent of colitis in LTCFs was caused by Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), 30% was due to ischemic colitis, and 15% was due to non-specific colitis. Non-specific colitis was the most common (63%) in the community group. Clinical outcomes were also significantly different between both groups: higher mortality (10.0% vs. 0.64%, P=0.021), higher requirement for intensive care units care (50.0% vs. 18.8%, P<0.01) in LTCFs group. In univariate analysis, the most significant risk factor for death in patients in LTCFs was decreased mental faculties. Conclusions Patients in LTCFs showed worse clinical outcomes and a much higher prevalence of CDI compared to patients from local communities. We suggest early and active evaluation, such as endoscopic examination, for differential diagnosis in patients in LTCFs. PMID:25931997

  13. Preventive and Therapeutic Euphol Treatment Attenuates Experimental Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Allisson F.; Marcon, Rodrigo; Schmidt, Éder C.; Bouzon, Zenilda L.; Pianowski, Luiz F.; Calixto, João B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The tetracyclic triterpene euphol is the main constituent found in the sap of Euphorbia tirucalli. This plant is widely known in Brazilian traditional medicine for its use in the treatment of several kinds of cancer, including leukaemia, prostate and breast cancers. Here, we investigated the effect of euphol on experimental models of colitis and the underlying mechanisms involved in its action. Methodology/Principal Findings Colitis was induced in mice either with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS), and the effect of euphol (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg) on colonic injury was assessed. Pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines were measured by immunohistochemistry, enzyme-Linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA), real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry. Preventive and therapeutic oral administration of euphol attenuated both DSS- and TNBS-induced acute colitis as observed by a significant reduction of the disease activity index (DAI), histological/microscopic damage score and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in colonic tissue. Likewise, euphol treatment also inhibited colon tissue levels and expression of IL-1β, CXCL1/KC, MCP-1, MIP-2, TNF-α and IL-6, while reducing NOS2, VEGF and Ki67 expression in colonic tissue. This action seems to be likely associated with inhibition of activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, euphol decreased LPS-induced MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ, but increased IL-10 secretion from bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. Of note, euphol, at the same schedule of treatment, markedly inhibited both selectin (P- and E-selectin) and integrin (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and LFA-1) expression in colonic tissue. Conclusions/Significance Together, these results clearly demonstrated that orally-administered euphol, both preventive or therapeutic treatment were effective in reducing the severity of colitis in two models of chemically-induced mouse colitis and suggest this plant

  14. Essential roles of high-mobility group box 1 in the development of murine colitis and colitis-associated cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Shin . E-mail: shinmaeda2-gi@umin.ac.jp; Hikiba, Yohko; Shibata, Wataru; Ohmae, Tomoya; Yanai, Ayako; Ogura, Keiji; Yamada, Shingo; Omata, Masao

    2007-08-24

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear factor released extracellularly as a proinflammatory cytokine. We measured the HMGB1 concentration in the sera of mice with chemically induced colitis (DSS; dextran sulfate sodium salt) and found a marked increase. Inhibition of HMGB1 by neutralizing anti-HMGB1 antibody resulted in reduced inflammation in DSS-treated colons. In macrophages, HMGB1 induces several proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, which are regulated by NF-{kappa}B activation. Two putative sources of HMGB1 were explored: in one, bacterial factors induce HMGB1 secretion from macrophages and in the other, necrotic epithelial cells directly release HMGB1. LPS induced a small amount of HMGB1 in macrophages, but macrophages incubated with supernatant prepared from necrotic cells and containing large amounts of HMGB1 activated NF-{kappa}B and induced IL-6. Using the colitis-associated cancer model, we demonstrated that neutralizing anti-HMGB1 antibody decreases tumor incidence and size. These observations suggest that HMGB1 is a potentially useful target for IBD treatment and the prevention of colitis-associated cancer.

  15. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa. PMID:26798415

  16. Herpes simplex colitis in a child with combined liver and small bowel transplant.

    PubMed

    Delis, S; Kato, T; Ruiz, P; Mittal, N; Babinski, L; Tzakis, A

    2001-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has been a rare cause of gastrointestinal (GI) infection, especially in immunocompromised patients. A variety of GI sites may be involved; however, only three reported cases of HSV colitis have been documented in the literature. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HSV colitis in a small bowel transplant recipient. PMID:11560759

  17. Systemic lupus erythematosus in association with ulcerative colitis: related autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Stevens, H P; Ostlere, L S; Rustin, M H

    1994-03-01

    We report a patient who developed urticaria, angio-oedema and polyarthropathy secondary to the hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, a year prior to the onset of ulcerative colitis. Ten years later, primary sclerosing cholangitis and the antiphospholipid syndrome developed concomitantly. We believe this patient represents only the second reported case of idiopathic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) occurring in association with ulcerative colitis. PMID:8148283

  18. A precordial rub in a boy with a severe attack of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Badina, Laura; Ferrara, Giovanna; Guastalla, Pierpaolo; Barbi, Egidio

    2014-04-01

    A case of a pneumomediastinum mimicking a pericarditis in a boy with an occult perforation due to ulcerative colitis is reported. Pneumomediastinum is a rare complication of severe attacks of ulcerative colitis, with or without the previous development of a toxic megacolon, that should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:24694884

  19. IL-17/IFN-γ interactions regulate intestinal inflammation in TNBS-induced acute colitis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yu; Lin, Yan; Lin, Lianjie; Zheng, Changqing

    2012-11-01

    Colonic administration of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced acute colitis in mice and elicited a Th1 immune response. Th17 cells are believed to play a major role in TNBS-induced colitis. The aim of this study is to investigate the roles of interleukin (IL)-17 and interferon (IFN)-γ in the pathogenesis of TNBS-induced acute colitis. We assessed the inflammation scores of TNBS-induced acute colitis in wild-type (WT), IL-17 knockout (KO), and IFN-γ KO mice and measured the levels of inflammatory cytokines using real-time PCR and ELISAs. Histology data showed that IL-17 KO mice with TNBS-induced colitis had significantly lower neutrophil infiltration and inflammatory macroscopic scores compared to the IFN-γ KO mice and WT mice. Intraperitoneal injection of anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibody confirmed a specific role for IL-17 in TNBS-induced acute colitis in the 3 strains of mice. The severity of colitis was higher in IFN-γ KO mice and lower in IL-17 KO mice compared to WT mice. Our data suggested that IL-17 signaling plays a critical role in the local inflammation of TNBS-induced colitis, while IFN-γ was not an important mediator of the local inflammation response. IL-17 may represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory bowel disease patients. PMID:23030668

  20. Colorectal cancers in ulcerative colitis from a low-prevalence area for colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Devendra; Shah, Sudeep; Deshmukh, Abhijit; Abraham, Philip; Joshi, Anand; Gupta, Tarun; Deshpande, Ramesh; Khandagale, Varun; George, Siji

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the incidence and risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients with ulcerative colitis from a low prevalence region for CRC. METHODS: Our prospective database yielded a cohort of 430 patients [age: 44 ± 14.6 years; 248 men (57.7%)] with ulcerative colitis (median disease duration 6, range: 1-39 years) for analysis. Of these, 131 (30.5%) had left-sided colitis and 159 (37%) extensive colitis. Patients with histologically confirmed CRC within the segment with colitis were compared with those without CRC, to determine the risk factors for the development of CRC. RESULTS: Twelve patients (2.8%) developed CRC. The overall incidence density was 3.56/1000 patient-years of disease - 3/1000 in the first 10 years, 3.3/1000 at 10 to 20 years, and 7/1000 at > 20 years. Three of our 12 patients developed CRC within 8 years of disease onset. On univariate analysis, extensive colitis, longer duration of disease, and poor control of disease were associated with development of CRC. On multivariate analysis, duration of disease and extent of colitis remained significant. CONCLUSION: CRC occurred in 2.8% of patients with ulcerative colitis in our population - an incidence density similar to that in Western countries in spite of a low overall prevalence of colon cancer in our population. The risk increased with extent and duration of disease. PMID:25834332

  1. Successful treatment of ulcerative colitis with leukocytapheresis using non-woven polyester filter.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiromi; Kawamura, Naoyuki; Horie, Takashi; Ohizumi, Hiroko; Tamaki, Tohru; Kukita, Kazutaka; Meguro, Jun-ichi; Yonekawa, Motoki; Saitoh, Masao; Kawamura, Akio

    2003-12-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the rectum and colon. Although the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis is not fully elucidated, cell-mediated immunity plays an important role in disease pathogenesis. Leukocytapheresis is a newly emerging therapy to eliminate activated leukocyte from systemic circulation. We have studied the effects of leukocytapheresis on patients with ulcerative colitis who had failed to respond to conventional therapy. A total of 51 patients with ulcerative colitis were treated with apheresis using a non-woven polyester fiber filter (Finecell, Asahi Medical Co.,Tokyo, Japan) originally developed as a microcoagulation elimination filter for massive transfusion. Of the 51 patients, 33 (64.7%) achieved clinical remission manifested by clinical activity and colonoscopic findings without any adverse effects. This result suggested that leukocytapheresis using Finecell might serve as an alternative therapy for ulcerative colitis as other leukocytapheresis using centrifugation or column. PMID:15018240

  2. Effects of Malva sylvestris and Its Isolated Polysaccharide on Experimental Ulcerative Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hamedi, Azadeh; Rezaei, Hossein; Azarpira, Negar; Jafarpour, Mehrnaz; Ahmadi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Malva sylvestris is an edible plant that is consumed as a herbal supplement for its antiulcer and colon cleansing properties in traditional Persian medicine. This study was designed to evaluate its effects on ulcerative colitis, which is a chronic gastrointestinal inflammation. Colitis was induced by rectal instillation of acetic acid solution. Rats in different groups received aqueous, n-hexane, or ethanolic fractions of the plant before induction of colitis. Isolated polysaccharide of plant was also tested in 2 groups before and after induction of colitis. Macroscopic and microscopic evaluation of colitis showed that the aqueous fraction was very effective in preventing the inflammation and efficacy was lower for ethanolic and n-hexane fractions. Polysaccharide was effective in reducing signs of inflammation, especially as pretreatment. These beneficial effects provide evidences that this plant can be suggested for patients with this disease to improve their health condition or to reduce adverse effects of their medication. PMID:26045553

  3. Relationship between Mast Cells and the Colitis with Relapse Induced by Trinitrobenzesulphonic Acid in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Luchini, Ana Carolina; Costa de Oliveira, Déborah Mara; Pellizzon, Cláudia Helena; Di Stasi, Luiz Claudio; Gomes, José Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed to clarify the role of mast cells in colitis with relapse induced in Wistar rats by trinitrobenzenosulphonic acid. Colitis induction increased the histamine concentration in the colon, which peaked on day 26. The number of mast cells, probably immature, was ten times higher on day 8. Different from animals infected with intestinal parasites, after colitis remission, mast cells do not migrate to the spleen, showing that mast cell proliferation presents different characteristics depending on the inflammation stimuli. Treatment with sulfasalazine, doxantrazole, quercetin, or nedocromil did not increase the histamine concentration or the mast cell number in the colon on day 26, thereby showing absence of degranulation of these cells. In conclusion, although mast cell proliferation is associated with colitis, these cells and their mediators appear to play no clear role in the colitis with relapses. PMID:19436763

  4. Light-emitting diodes at 940nm attenuate colitis-induced inflammatory process in mice.

    PubMed

    Belém, Mônica O; de Andrade, Giovana M M; Carlos, Thalita M; Guazelli, Carla F S; Fattori, Victor; Toginho Filho, Dari O; Dias, Ivan F L; Verri, Waldiceu A; Araújo, Eduardo J A

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) presents intense inflammatory infiltrate, crypt abscesses, ulceration and even loss of function. Despite the clinical relevance of IBD, its current therapy remains poorly effective. Infrared wavelength phototherapy shows therapeutic potential on inflammation. Our goal was to evaluate whether light-emitting diodes (LED) at 940nm are capable of mitigating the colitis-induced inflammatory process in mice. Forty male Swiss mice were assigned into five groups: control; control treated with LED therapy; colitis without treatment; colitis treated with LED therapy; colitis treated with Prednisolone. Experimental colitis was induced by acetic acid 7.5% (pH2.5) rectal administration. LED therapy was performed with light characterized by wavelength of 940nm, 45nm bandwidth, intensity of 4.05J/cm(2), total power of 270mW and total dose of 64.8J for 4min in a single application. Colitis-induced intestinal transit delay was inhibited by LED therapy. Colitis caused an increase of colon dimensions (length, diameter, total area) and colon weight (edema), which were inhibited by LED therapy. LED therapy also decreased colitis-induced tissue gross lesion, myeloperoxidase activity, microscopic tissue damage score and the presence of inflammatory infiltrate in all intestinal layers. Furthermore, LED therapy inhibited colitis-induced IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 production. We conclude LED therapy at 940nm inhibited experimental colitis-induced colon inflammation in mice, therefore, rendering it a promising therapeutic approach that deserves further investigation. PMID:27424097

  5. Vitamin D treatment attenuates 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis but not oxazolone-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianjing; Shi, Yongyan; Du, Jie; Ge, Xin; Teng, Xu; Liu, Lu; Wang, Enbo; Zhao, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) have different immunological mechanisms, while both of them are potential targets of vitamin D treatment. In this study, we have tried to address the role of vitamin D in CD and UC using two mouse models. Mice of C57B6L were given vitamin D before the induction of colitis. Our results showed that vitamin D attenuated 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis but not oxazolone-induced colitis. Vitamin D could preserve the local histology, alleviate inflammation, suppress apoptosis, maintain tight junction function and decrease permeability. Interestingly, it has more of an effect on local structure preservation and inflammation inhibition in CD than in UC mice. Vitamin D blocked the increase of helper T-cell type 1 (Th1)- and helper T-cell type 17 (Th17)-related cytokines in TNBS-induced colitis. But the increase of helper T-cell type 2 (Th2)- and regulatory T cells (Treg)-related cytokines was augmented at the same time in oxazolone-induced colitis which counteracted each other. Our study helps elucidate the differential protective effects of vitamin D on CD and UC patients, as reported in literature. PMID:27620138

  6. Crohn’s and colitis in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Day, Andrew S; Ledder, Oren; Leach, Steven T; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis can be grouped as the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These conditions have become increasingly common in recent years, including in children and young people. Although much is known about aspects of the pathogenesis of these diseases, the precise aetiology is not yet understood, and there remains no cure. Recent data has illustrated the importance of a number of genes-several of these are important in the onset of IBD in early life, including in infancy. Pain, diarrhoea and weight loss are typical symptoms of paediatric Crohn’s disease whereas bloody diarrhoea is more typical of colitis in children. However, atypical symptoms may occur in both conditions: these include isolated impairment of linear growth or presentation with extra-intestinal manifestations such as erythema nodosum. Growth and nutrition are commonly compromised at diagnosis in both Crohn’s disease and colitis. Consideration of possible IBD and completion of appropriate investigations are essential to ensure prompt diagnosis, thereby avoiding the consequences of diagnostic delay. Patterns of disease including location and progression of IBD in childhood differ substantially from adult-onset disease. Various treatment options are available for children and adolescents with IBD. Exclusive enteral nutrition plays a central role in the induction of remission of active Crohn’s disease. Medical and surgical therapies need to considered within the context of a growing and developing child. The overall management of these chronic conditions in children should include multi-disciplinary expertise, with focus upon maintaining control of gut inflammation, optimising nutrition, growth and quality of life, whilst preventing disease or treatment-related complications. PMID:23139601

  7. Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitor C75 Ameliorates Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Shingo; Yang, Weng-Lang; Aziz, Monowar; Kameoka, Shingo; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities of lipid metabolism through overexpression of fatty acid synthase (FASN), which catalyzes the formation of long-chain fatty acids, are associated with the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). C75 is a synthetic α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone compound that inhibits FASN activity. We hypothesized that C75 treatment could effectively reduce the severity of experimental colitis. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed 4% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) for 7 d. C75 (5 mg/kg body weight) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (vehicle) was administered intraperitoneally from d 2 to 6. Clinical parameters were monitored daily. Mice were euthanized on d 8 for histological evaluation and measurements of colon length, chemokine, cytokine and inflammatory mediator expression. C75 significantly reduced body weight loss from 23% to 15% on d 8, compared with the vehicle group. The fecal bleeding, diarrhea and colon histological damage scores in the C75-treated group were significantly lower than scores in the vehicle animals. Colon shortening was significantly improved after C75 treatment. C75 protected colon tissues from DSS-induced apoptosis by inhibiting caspase-3 activity. Macrophage inflammatory protein 2, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, myeloperoxidase activity and proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin [IL]-1β and IL-6) in the colon were significantly downregulated in the C75-treated group, compared with the vehicle group. Treatment with C75 in colitis mice inhibited the elevation of FASN, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression as well as IκB degradation in colon tissues. C75 administration alleviates the severity of colon damage and inhibits the activation of inflammatory pathways in DSS-induced colitis. Thus, inhibition of FASN may represent an attractive therapeutic potential for treating IBD. PMID:24306512

  8. Fecal transplantation indications in ulcerative colitis. Preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    LASZLO, MIHAELA; CIOBANU, LIDIA; ANDREICA, VASILE; PASCU, OLIVIU

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Fecal microbiota transplantation is used with success in persistent (more than two episodes) Clostridium Difficile Infection; it has also gained importance and started to be used in inflammatory bowel disease. There are theoretical arguments that justify its use in ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. Based on our clinical cases we tried to evaluate the indications of fecal microbiota transplantation young patients with ulcerative colitis and multiple relapses, in which biological or immunosuppressive treatment were ineffective. Methods Five patients with moderate-severe ulcerative colitis or Clostridium Difficile infection who ceased to have a therapeutic response to biological therapy, were given fecal microbiota transplant as an alternative to biological therapy and/or immunosuppression. Fecal microbiota transplant was administered via colonoscopy using healthy donors from their family. Results The results were favorable and spectacular in all patients and complete remission was achieved for at least 10 months. Clinical remission was achieved in all patients. Endoscopic appearance of ulcers in patients improved. In 2 patients the effect of the fecal microbiota transplant diminished after 10–12 months and the tendency to relapse appeared (3–4 stools/day, blood streaks present sometimes in the stool). Reintroduction of systemic therapy or immunosuppression demonstrated that patients regained the therapeutic response to these treatments, and remission was maintained. Conclusion Fecal microbiota transplantation can be used as salvage therapy in patients refractory to biological therapy, as elective therapy in clostridium difficile infection or as an alternative therapy in young patients with multiple relapses who have reservations regarding biological or immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:27152073

  9. Retarded release phosphatidylcholine benefits patients with chronic active ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Stremmel, W; Merle, U; Zahn, A; Autschbach, F; Hinz, U; Ehehalt, R

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: We examined the hypothesis of an anti-inflammatory effect of phosphatidylcholine in ulcerative colitis. Methods: A phase IIA, double blind, randomised, placebo controlled study was performed in 60 patients with chronic active, non steroid dependent, ulcerative colitis, with a clinical activity index (CAI) of ⩾4. Retarded release phosphatidylcholine rich phospholipids and placebo were administered at a dose of 6 g daily over three months. The primary end point was a change in CAI towards clinical remission (CAI ⩽3) or CAI improvement by ⩾50%. Secondary end points included ⩾50% changes in endoscopic activity index (EAI), histology, and quality of life scores. Results: Induction of clinical remission (CAI ⩽3) as the primary outcome variable was attained by 16 (53%) patients in the phosphatidylcholine treated group compared with three (10%) in the placebo group (p<0.00001). The rate of clinical remission and CAI improvement was 90% in the phosphatidylcholine group and only 10% in the placebo group. A median drop of seven points in the CAI score (70% improvement) was recorded in the phosphatidylcholine group compared with no change in the placebo group. Secondary end point analysis revealed concomitant drops in EAI and histology scores (p = 0.00016 and p = 0.0067 compared with placebo, respectively). Improvement in quality of life was reported by 16 of 29 evaluated patients in the phosphatidylcholine group compared with two of 30 in the placebo group (p = 0.00005). Conclusion: Retarded release oral phosphatidylcholine is effective in alleviating inflammatory activity caused by ulcerative colitis. PMID:15951544

  10. Pivotal Role of Carbohydrate Sulfotransferase 15 in Fibrosis and Mucosal Healing in Mouse Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kenji; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Yokoyama, Junji; Kawauchi, Yusuke; Honda, Yutaka; Sato, Hiroki; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Suzuki, Yasuo; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Atreya, Raja; Neurath, Markus F.; Watanabe, Kenichi; Hashiguchi, Taishi; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Asakura, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Induction of mucosal healing (MH) is an important treatment goal in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although the molecular mechanisms underlying MH in IBD is not fully explored, local fibrosis would contribute to interfere mucosal repair. Carbohydrate sulfotransferase 15 (CHST15), which catalyzes sulfation of chondroitin sulfate to produce rare E-disaccharide units, is a novel mediator to create local fibrosis. Here we have used siRNA-based approach of silencing CHST15 in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced colitis in mice, human colon fibroblasts and cancer cell lines. In a DSS-induced acute colitis model, CHST15 siRNA reduced CHST15 mRNA in the colon, serum IL-6, disease activity index (DAI) and accumulation of F4/80+ macrophages and ER-TR7+ fibroblasts, while increased Ki-67+ epithelial cells. In DSS-induced chronic colitis models, CHST15 siRNA reduced CHST15 mRNA in the colon, DAI, alpha-smooth muscle actin+ fibroblasts and collagen deposition, while enhanced MH as evidenced by reduced histological and endoscopic scores. We also found that endoscopic submucosal injection achieved effective pancolonic delivery of CHST15 siRNA in mice. In human CCD-18 Co cells, CHST15 siRNA inhibited the expression of CHST15 mRNA and selectively reduced E-units, a specific product biosynthesized by CHST15, in the culture supernatant. CHST15 siRNA significantly suppressed vimentin in both TGF-ß-stimulated CCD18-Co cells and HCT116 cells while up-regulated BMP7 and E-cadherin in HCT116 cells. The present study demonstrated that blockade CHST15 represses colonic fibrosis and enhances MH partly though reversing EMT pathway, illustrating a novel therapeutic opportunity to refractory and fibrotic lesions in IBD. PMID:27410685

  11. Ulcerative colitis: ultrastructure of interstitial cells in myenteric plexus.

    PubMed

    Rumessen, J J; Vanderwinden, J-M; Horn, T

    2010-10-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are key regulatory cells in the gut. In the colon of patients with severe ulcerative colitis (UC), myenteric ICC had myoid ultrastructural features and were in close contact with nerve terminals. In all patients as opposed to controls, some ICC profiles showed degenerative changes, such as lipid droplets and irregular vacuoles. Nerve terminals often appeared swollen and empty. Glial cells, muscle cells, and fibroblast-like cells (FLC) showed no alterations. FLC enclosed macrophages (MLC), which were in close contact with naked axon terminals. The organization and cytological changes may be of pathophysiological significance in patients with UC. PMID:20568987

  12. Chronic eosinophilic pancreatitis and ulcerative colitis in a horse.

    PubMed

    Breider, M A; Kiely, R G; Edwards, J F

    1985-04-15

    A generalized debilitating disease in a horse was believed to be related to hypersensitivity to migrating strongyle larvae. The clinical signs included weight loss, diarrhea, and ulcers on all 4 coronary bands. The mare's condition deteriorated rapidly, so the mare was euthanatized and necropsied. The major histopathologic findings were chronic multifocal eosinophilic pancreatitis, hepatic portal fibrosis, biliary hyperplasia, and chronic ulcerative eosinophilic colitis. This case was similar to previously reported cases of chronic eosinophilic gastroenteritis in horses. Although the etiologic agent was not evident, the distribution and character of the lesions were consistent with a hypersensitivity response to migrating parasitic larvae, most probably Strongylus equinus. PMID:3997643

  13. Colitis cystica profunda of the rectum: An unexpected operative finding

    PubMed Central

    Ayantunde, Abraham A; Strauss, Claire; Sivakkolunthu, Malathi; Malhotra, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Colitis cystic profunda is a rare entity benign condition of the colon and rectum that can mimic suspicious polyps or malignancy. The commonest sites of affectation are the rectum and the sigmoid colon but it can be unusually widely distributed in the colon. The aetiology of this condition is not fully elucidated and confident diagnosis can only be made on histological features. We hereby describe a patient who presented with significant rectal symptoms and an unexpected finding of a submucosal mucous cyst mimicking a suspicious rectal polyp and highlighted its significance and the review of the literature. PMID:27458593

  14. Acute colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium progresses to chronicity in C57BL/6 but not in BALB/c mice: correlation between symptoms and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Melgar, Silvia; Karlsson, Agneta; Michaëlsson, Erik

    2005-06-01

    Exposure to dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induces acute colitis, which is normally resolved after DSS removal. To study chronicity, mice are typically subjected to three to five cycles of weekly DSS exposures, each followed by a 1- to 2-wk rest period. Here, we describe a novel and convenient way of inducing chronic, progressive colitis by a single exposure to DSS. C57BL/6 mice exposed to DSS for 5 days developed acute colitis that progressed to severe chronic inflammation. The plasma haptoglobin levels remained high during the chronic phase, showing that the inflammation was active. Surprisingly, the mice regained their original weight along with the progression of colitis, and the only apparent symptom was loose feces. Histopathological changes 4 wk after DSS removal were dense infiltrates of mononuclear cells, irregular epithelial structure, and persistent deposits of collagen. A progressive production of the cytokines IL-1beta, IL-12 p70, and IL-17 correlated with the extensive cellular infiltration, whereas high IFN-gamma production was mainly found late in the chronic phase. Similar to C57BL/6 mice, BALB/c mice exposed to 5 days of DSS developed acute colitis as previously described. The acute colitis was accompanied by elevated plasma levels of haptoglobin and increased colonic levels of IL-1alpha/beta, IL-6, IL-18, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. However, soon after DSS removal, BALB/c mice recovered and were symptom free within 2 wk and completely recovered 4 wk after DSS removal in terms of histopathology, haptoglobin levels, and local cytokine production. In summary, these data stress the effect of genetic background on the outcome of DSS provocation. We believe that the present protocol to induce chronic colitis in C57BL/6 mice offers a robust model for validating future therapies for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:15637179

  15. Alkaline ceramidase 3 deficiency aggravates colitis and colitis-associated tumorigenesis in mice by hyperactivating the innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K; Xu, R; Snider, A J; Schrandt, J; Li, Y; Bialkowska, A B; Li, M; Zhou, J; Hannun, Y A; Obeid, L M; Yang, V W; Mao, C

    2016-01-01

    Increasing studies suggest that ceramides differing in acyl chain length and/or degree of unsaturation have distinct roles in mediating biological responses. However, still much remains unclear about regulation and role of distinct ceramide species in the immune response. Here, we demonstrate that alkaline ceramidase 3 (Acer3) mediates the immune response by regulating the levels of C18:1-ceramide in cells of the innate immune system and that Acer3 deficiency aggravates colitis in a murine model by augmenting the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in myeloid and colonic epithelial cells (CECs). According to the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, ACER3 is downregulated in immune cells in response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a potent inducer of the innate immune response. Consistent with these data, we demonstrated that LPS downregulated both Acer3 mRNA levels and its enzymatic activity while elevating C18:1-ceramide, a substrate of Acer3, in murine immune cells or CECs. Knocking out Acer3 enhanced the elevation of C18:1-ceramide and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in immune cells and CECs in response to LPS challenge. Similar to Acer3 knockout, treatment with C18:1-ceramide, but not C18:0-ceramide, potentiated LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in immune cells. In the mouse model of dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis, Acer3 deficiency augmented colitis-associated elevation of colonic C18:1-ceramide and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Acer3 deficiency aggravated diarrhea, rectal bleeding, weight loss and mortality. Pathological analyses revealed that Acer3 deficiency augmented colonic shortening, immune cell infiltration, colonic epithelial damage and systemic inflammation. Acer3 deficiency also aggravated colonic dysplasia in a mouse model of colitis-associated colorectal cancer. Taken together, these results suggest that Acer3 has an important anti-inflammatory role by suppressing cellular or tissue C18:1-ceramide, a

  16. Indeterminate colitis: a review of the concept--what's in a name?

    PubMed

    Geboes, Karel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Greenstein, Adrian; Jewell, Derek P; Sandborn, William J; Vatn, Morten H; Warren, Bryan; Riddell, Robert H

    2008-06-01

    The precise diagnosis of colitis cannot always be established with the available diagnostic tools. The subgroup of patients with an uncertain diagnosis has been classified as "indeterminate colitis" (IC). The definition of "indeterminate," however, has changed over the years. Originally, IC was proposed by pathologists for colectomy specimens, usually from patients operated on for severe colitis, showing overlapping features of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Later, the same terminology was used for patients showing no clear clinical, endoscopic, histologic, and other features allowing a diagnosis of either UC or CD. Therefore, it is difficult to compare different studies. An International Organization of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IOIBD) working party confirmed 1) the ambiguous nature of the term, and 2) proposes an updated classification for the category of patients with an unclear diagnosis. According to this, the term IBD unclassified (IBDU) is confirmed, as suggested by the Montreal Working Party 2005 for patients with clinically chronic colitis, that clearly have IBD but when definitive features of CD or UC are absent. In resected specimens the term "colitis of uncertain type or etiology" (CUTE) is preferred. It is accepted that most of the time this may have a prefix, such as severe, chronic. The classification of IBD varies when based only on biopsies rather than on a colectomy specimen. The vast majority of these have severe colitis. For those that cannot bear to abandon the highly ambiguous term IC, if it is used at all, this is where it can be used parenthetically. PMID:18213696

  17. Ulcerative colitis with inflammatory polyposis in a teenage boy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jin-Shan; Ye, Ying; Guo, Can-Can; Luo, Bo-Tao; Zheng, Xue-Bao

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis in addition to inflammatory polyposis is common. The benign sequel of ulcerative colitis can sometimes mimic colorectal carcinoma. This report describes a rare case of inflammatory polyposis with hundreds of inflammatory polyps in ulcerative colitis which was not easy to distinguish from other polyposis syndromes. A 16-year-old Chinese male suffering from ulcerative colitis for 6 mo underwent colonoscopy, and hundreds of polyps were observed in the sigmoid, causing colonic stenosis. The polyps were restricted to the sigmoid. Although rectal inflammation was detected, no polyps were found in the rectum. A diagnosis of inflammatory polyposis and ulcerative colitis was made. The patient underwent total colectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis. The patient recovered well and was discharged on postoperative day 8. Endoscopic surveillance after surgery is crucial as ulcerative colitis with polyposis is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. Recognition of polyposis requires clinical, endoscopic and histopathologic correlation, and helps with chemoprophylaxis of colorectal cancer, as the drugs used postoperatively for colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis and polyposis are different. PMID:25624746

  18. Anti-inflammatory effect of elemental diets with different fat composition in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Papada, E; Kaliora, A C; Gioxari, A; Papalois, A; Forbes, A

    2014-04-14

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two isoenergetic elemental formulae with different fat content in the rat model of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) colitis that mimics human inflammatory bowel disease. A total of forty-five male Wistar rats were assigned to five groups: (1) control group; (2) TNBS-induced colitis group; (3) TNBS-induced colitis group fed a long-chain TAG (LCT)-rich diet; (4) TNBS-induced colitis group fed a medium-chain TAG (MCT)-rich diet; (5) TNBS-induced colitis group fed a baseline diet and administered infliximab. Nutritional management lasted 12 d before and 4 d after rectal administration of TNBS. Subsequently, the rats were killed, and colonic tissue samples were collected for the assessment of histology, inflammation and oxidative stress. The MCT-rich diet decreased IL-6, IL-8 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) levels and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, while the LCT-rich diet reduced only ICAM-1 levels and GST activity (P<0.05). Neither elemental formula affected IL-10 levels. Infliximab reduced IL-8 and ICAM-1 levels and GST activity and increased IL-10 levels (P<0.05). No significant differences were detected in oxidative stress. Histological damage scores differed significantly only between the control and the TNBS-induced colitis group. A MCT-rich formula seems to exert stronger anti-inflammatory effects than a LCT-rich formula in TNBS colitis. PMID:24229480

  19. Increased colonic apelin production in rodents with experimental colitis and in humans with IBD.

    PubMed

    Han, Song; Wang, Guiyun; Qiu, Suimin; de la Motte, Carol; Wang, Hui-Qun; Gomez, Guillermo; Englander, Ella W; Greeley, George H

    2007-08-16

    Apelin and its receptor, the APJ receptor, are expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. The aims of this study were to examine the effects of sodium dextran sulfate (DSS)-induced experimental colitis in rats and mice and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in humans on intestinal apelin production, and the influence of exogenous apelin on colonic epithelial cell proliferation in mice. In rodents with experimental colitis, colonic apelin mRNA levels were elevated during the inflammatory reaction as well as during the tissue repair phase that ensues after DSS withdrawal. Fluctuations in colonic apelin expression were paralleled by similar changes in apelin immunostaining. Apelin immunostaining was increased in the surface epithelium, in epithelial cells along the length of the tubular gland and in the stem cell region at the gland base. In ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease patients, apelin immunostaining revealed a pattern of increased intestinal apelin content similar to that observed in rodents with experimental colitis. Administration of synthetic apelin to mice during the recovery phase of DSS-induced colitis stimulated colonic epithelial cell proliferation significantly. Our observations that colonic apelin production is increased during and after DSS exposure indicate that apelin plays multiple roles during the different stages of colitis. Additionally, the stimulatory action of exogenous apelin on colonic epithelial proliferation suggests that the increased apelin production during intestinal recovery stage may contribute to the repair of the intestinal epithelium in experimental rodent models of colitis and in IBD patients. PMID:17391779

  20. The Influence of Ghrelin on the Development of Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Fyderek, Krzysztof; Gałązka, Krystyna; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Pihut, Małgorzata; Dembiński, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin has protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present studies was to investigate the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the development of colitis evoked by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Methods. Studies have been performed on rats. Colitis was induced by adding 5% DSS to the drinking water for 5 days. During this period animals were treated intraperitoneally twice a day with saline or ghrelin given at the dose of 8 nmol/kg/dose. On the sixth day, animals were anesthetized and the severity of colitis was assessed. Results. Treatment with ghrelin during administration of DSS reduced the development of colitis. Morphological features of colonic mucosa exhibited a reduction in the area and deep of mucosal damage. Ghrelin reversed the colitis-induced decrease in blood flow, DNA synthesis, and superoxide dismutase activity in colonic mucosa. These effects were accompanied by a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal concentration of interleukin-1β and malondialdehyde. Treatment with ghrelin reversed the DSS-induced reduction in body weight gain. Conclusions. Administration of ghrelin exhibits the preventive effect against the development of DSS-induced colitis. This effect seems to be related to ghrelin's anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. PMID:26713317

  1. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  2. Fecal calprotectin is a useful marker to diagnose ulcerative colitis from irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Hamid; Taheri, Akhtar; Yaran, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed to evaluate the predictive value of fecal calprotectin in patients with ulcerative colitis from patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Materials and Methods: Between May and October 2013, 88 adult patients, between the age 18 and 65 years with a history of chronic diarrhea of unknown origin were assessed. Standard colonoscopies were performed in all patients to assess ulcerative colitis. Before colonoscopies, they were asked to supply a stool specimen. Fecal calprotectin value was measured using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Results: The mean of age, gender combination, and body mass index were not significantly different between patients with ulcerative colitis or IBS. The duration of disease in ulcerative colitis patients was significantly higher than IBS patients (P < 0.0001). The level of calprotectin in ulcerative colitis patients was significantly higher than IBS patients (265.9 vs 115.8, respectively, P = 0.001). Also, cutoff value >164 μg/g with sensitivity and specify of 57 (CI: 41%–71.6%), and 75 (CI: 59.7%–56.8%), respectively, was the best for discrimination between patients with ulcerative colitis and those with IBS. Conclusion: Our results show that fecal calprotectin as a noninvasive method, which can be used to identify patients with ulcerative colitis from IBS patients has low sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26015911

  3. Laparoscopic surgery for ulcerative colitis: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hata, Keisuke; Kazama, Shinsuke; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-08-01

    Despite the development of new therapies, including anti-TNF alpha antibodies and immunosuppressants, a substantial proportion of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) still require surgery. Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal-pouch anal anastomosis is the standard surgical treatment of choice for UC. With the advent of laparoscopic techniques for colorectal surgery, ileal-pouch anal anastomosis has also been performed laparoscopically. This paper reviews the history and current trends in laparoscopic surgery for UC. The accumulation of experience and improvement of laparoscopic devices have shifted the paradigm of UC surgery towards laparoscopic surgery over the past decade. Although laparoscopic surgery requires a longer operation, it provides significantly better short and long-term outcomes. The short-term benefits of laparoscopic surgery over open surgery include shorter hospital stays and fasting times, as well as better cosmesis. The long-term benefits of laparoscopy include better fecundity in young females. Some surgeons favor laparoscopic surgery even for severe acute colitis. More efforts are being made to develop newer laparoscopic methods, such as reduced port surgery, including single incision laparoscopic surgery and robotic surgery. PMID:25346254

  4. Fulminant ulcerative colitis in a healthy pregnant woman.

    PubMed

    Orabona, Rossana; Valcamonico, Adriana; Salemme, Marianna; Manenti, Stefania; Tiberio, Guido A M; Frusca, Tiziana

    2015-05-21

    This case report concerns a 25-year-old patient with 6-7 bloody stools/d, abdominal pain, tachycardia, and weight loss occurring during the third trimester of pregnancy. Severe ulcerative colitis complicated by toxic megacolon and gravidic sepsis was diagnosed by clinical evaluation, colonoscopy, and rectal biopsy that were performed safely without risk for the mother or baby. The patient underwent a cesarean section at 28+6 wk gestation. The baby was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit of our hospital and survived without complications. Fulminant colitis was managed conservatively by combined colonoscopic decompression and medical treatment. Although current European guidelines describe toxic megacolon as an indication for emergency surgery for both pregnant and non-pregnant women, thanks to careful monitoring, endoscopic decompression, and intensive medical therapy with nutritional support, we prevented the woman from having to undergo emergency pancolectomy. Our report seems to suggest that conservative management may be a helpful tool in preventing pancolectomy if the patient's condition improves quickly. Otherwise, surgery is mandatory. PMID:26019473

  5. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis.

    PubMed

    Essenmacher, Alex C; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  6. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis

    PubMed Central

    Essenmacher, Alex C.; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  7. Cellulose Supplementation Early in Life Ameliorates Colitis in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagy-Szakal, Dorottya; Hollister, Emily B.; Luna, Ruth Ann; Szigeti, Reka; Tatevian, Nina; Smith, C. Wayne; Versalovic, James; Kellermayer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Decreased consumption of dietary fibers, such as cellulose, has been proposed to promote the emergence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD: Crohn disease [CD] and ulcerative colitis [UC]) where intestinal microbes are recognized to play an etiologic role. However, it is not known if transient fiber consumption during critical developmental periods may prevent consecutive intestinal inflammation. The incidence of IBD peaks in young adulthood indicating that pediatric environmental exposures may be important in the etiology of this disease group. We studied the effects of transient dietary cellulose supplementation on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis susceptibility during the pediatric period in mice. Cellulose supplementation stimulated substantial shifts in the colonic mucosal microbiome. Several bacterial taxa decreased in relative abundance (e.g., Coriobacteriaceae [p = 0.001]), and other taxa increased in abundance (e.g., Peptostreptococcaceae [p = 0.008] and Clostridiaceae [p = 0.048]). Some of these shifts persisted for 10 days following the cessation of cellulose supplementation. The changes in the gut microbiome were associated with transient trophic and anticolitic effects 10 days following the cessation of a cellulose-enriched diet, but these changes diminished by 40 days following reversal to a low cellulose diet. These findings emphasize the transient protective effect of dietary cellulose in the mammalian large bowel and highlight the potential role of dietary fibers in amelioration of intestinal inflammation. PMID:23437211

  8. Fulminant ulcerative colitis in a healthy pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Orabona, Rossana; Valcamonico, Adriana; Salemme, Marianna; Manenti, Stefania; Tiberio, Guido AM; Frusca, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    This case report concerns a 25-year-old patient with 6-7 bloody stools/d, abdominal pain, tachycardia, and weight loss occurring during the third trimester of pregnancy. Severe ulcerative colitis complicated by toxic megacolon and gravidic sepsis was diagnosed by clinical evaluation, colonoscopy, and rectal biopsy that were performed safely without risk for the mother or baby. The patient underwent a cesarean section at 28+6 wk gestation. The baby was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit of our hospital and survived without complications. Fulminant colitis was managed conservatively by combined colonoscopic decompression and medical treatment. Although current European guidelines describe toxic megacolon as an indication for emergency surgery for both pregnant and non-pregnant women, thanks to careful monitoring, endoscopic decompression, and intensive medical therapy with nutritional support, we prevented the woman from having to undergo emergency pancolectomy. Our report seems to suggest that conservative management may be a helpful tool in preventing pancolectomy if the patient’s condition improves quickly. Otherwise, surgery is mandatory. PMID:26019473

  9. Bax is downregulated in inflamed colonic mucosa of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Iimura, M; Nakamura, T; Shinozaki, S; Iizuka, B; Inoue, Y; Suzuki, S; Hayashi, N

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—One form of epithelial cell injury in inflamed colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis (UC) is reported to involve apoptosis of these cells. Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bcl-2 are the major regulators of apoptosis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the involvement of the Bax/Bcl-2 system in induction of apoptosis of the inflamed colonic epithelium in UC.
METHODS—Colonic epithelium was isolated from colonic biopsy specimens. Expression of CD95, Bax, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-2 proteins was determined by western blotting. Bax gene expression was assessed by both reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) followed by Southern hybridisation and a real time PCR assay.
RESULTS—Equal levels of expression of CD95, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-2 proteins were noted in normal and UC colonic epithelia. Equal levels of expression of Bax protein and mRNA were noted in epithelia of normal colon and inactive UC. Levels of expression of Bax protein and mRNA were markedly reduced in inflamed UC colonic epithelium.
CONCLUSIONS—Our study showed for the first time downregulation of Bax in inflamed colonic epithelium of UC. The Bax/Bcl-2 system did not seem to be involved in induction of apoptosis of epithelial cells in the inflamed colonic mucosa of UC.


Keywords: ulcerative colitis; apoptosis; Bax; Bcl-2; Bcl-xL; CD95 PMID:10896914

  10. Achilles tendinitis as a rare extraintestinal manifestation of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Zenda, Takahiro; Araki, Ichiro; Nakamiya, Otoyuki; Tokuumi, Yuji; Shimada, Yuka; Komai, Keigo; Taniuchi, Yukie

    2016-06-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease often have extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) involving almost all organ systems, but little has been reported on Achilles tendinitis. Herein, we present a unique case of Achilles tendinitis, which manifested shortly after initiation of mesalazine therapy for ulcerative colitis. A 26-year-old Japanese woman with bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps lasting for 7 days was referred to our hospital. The Lichtiger clinical activity index (CAI) score was 9 at the first visit. Based on the clinical symptoms and examination results, she was diagnosed with ulcerative pancolitis in the active phase, and treatment with mesalazine (2.4 g/day) and probiotics was initiated. Her symptoms resolved within 7 days of treatment (CAI 3). However, she then developed bilateral Achilles tendinitis without any apparent cause. The Achilles tendinitis subsided with conservative management within 2 weeks, despite continuation of mesalazine therapy. This case instructively suggests that Achilles tendinitis should be noted as an EIM of ulcerative colitis. PMID:27059338

  11. Atherogenic diets exacerbate colitis in mice deficient in glutathione peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Esworthy, R. Steven; Kim, Byung-Wook; Synold, Timothy W.; Smith, David D.; Chu, Fong-Fong

    2010-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory effect of high-fat diet has been observed beyond the cardiovascular system, but there is little evidence to support its role in triggering inflammatory bowel disease. GPx1/2-double knockout (DKO) mice deficient in two intracellular glutathione peroxidases, GPx1 and GPx2, on a C57BL/6 (B6) background, have mild ileocolitis on a conventional chow. We fed B6 DKO mice two atherogenic diets to test the dietary effect on atherosclerosis and ileocolitis. Both atherogenic diets have high cholesterol, the Chol+/CA diet has cholic acid (CA) and the Chol+ diet has no CA. The Chol+/CA diet induced severe colitis, but not ileitis, in the DKO mice compared with Chol+ and a Chol- control diet. On the Chol+/CA diet, the wild-type (WT) mice had similar levels of aortic lesions and hypercholesterolemia as DKO mice did, but had no intestinal pathology. The diet-associated inflammatory responses in the DKO mice included increase of colonic pro-inflammatory serum amyloid A 3 expression, plasma lipopolysaccharide and TNF-α levels. The Chol+/CA diet has lowered the expression of unfolded protein response genes, ATF6, CHOP, unspliced XbpU and Grp78/Bip, in WT and DKO mice on the Chol- diet. Thus, we conclude that cholesterol diet weakens colon unfolded protein response, which can aggravate spontaneous colitis leading to gut barrier breakdown. GPx has no impact on atherosclerosis without ultra-hypercholesterolemia. PMID:20848490

  12. Orally Administered Enoxaparin Ameliorates Acute Colitis by Reducing Macrophage-Associated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lean, Qi Ying; Eri, Rajaraman D.; Randall-Demllo, Sarron; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Stewart, Niall; Peterson, Gregory M.; Gueven, Nuri; Patel, Rahul P.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis, cause significant morbidity and decreased quality of life. The currently available treatments are not effective in all patients, can be expensive and have potential to cause severe side effects. This prompts the need for new treatment modalities. Enoxaparin, a widely used antithrombotic agent, is reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties and therefore we evaluated its therapeutic potential in a mouse model of colitis. Acute colitis was induced in male C57BL/6 mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Mice were treated once daily with enoxaparin via oral or intraperitoneal administration and monitored for colitis activities. On termination (day 8), colons were collected for macroscopic evaluation and cytokine measurement, and processed for histology and immunohistochemistry. Oral but not intraperitoneal administration of enoxaparin significantly ameliorated DSS-induced colitis. Oral enoxaparin-treated mice retained their body weight and displayed less diarrhea and fecal blood loss compared to the untreated colitis group. Colon weight in enoxaparin-treated mice was significantly lower, indicating reduced inflammation and edema. Histological examination of untreated colitis mice showed a massive loss of crypt architecture and goblet cells, infiltration of immune cells and the presence of edema, while all aspects of this pathology were alleviated by oral enoxaparin. Reduced number of macrophages in the colon of oral enoxaparin-treated mice was accompanied by decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Oral enoxaparin significantly reduces the inflammatory pathology associated with DSS-induced colitis in mice and could therefore represent a novel therapeutic option for the management of ulcerative colitis. PMID:26218284

  13. Investigation of pulmonary involvement in inflammatory bowel disease in an experimental model of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Bunyamin; Songur, Yıldıran; Songur, Necla; Aksu, Oğuzhan; Senol, Altug; Ciris, I. Metin; Sutcu, Recep

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may also involve various extra-intestinal organs. Clinical studies have found asymptomatic/symptomatic pulmonary involvement in 1% to 6% of patients with IBD. The present study histopathologically investigated pulmonary involvement in an experimental model of colitis in order to demonstrate pulmonary tissue involvement in IBD and to expose potential etiological factors. It also explored the relation between inflammation and tissue concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Methods: The study comprised 24 male Wistar albino rats. The rats were divided into four groups of six rats each. Acute colitis was induced in two separate groups using either the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) or trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) method, while the other two groups were used as controls for each model of colitis. Wallace scoring was used for macroscopic assessment of colitis, and the lungs were histopathologically examined. Concentrations of VEGF and TNF-α in pulmonary tissue were measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Results: The number of animals that had alveolar hemorrhage was significantly higher in the TNBS-induced colitis and DSS-induced colitis groups compared to their own control groups (p = 0.015 and p = 0.015, respectively). VEGF and TNF-α concentrations in pulmonary tissues were significantly increased in both the TNBS colitis and DSS colitis groups compared to their own control groups (p = 0.002 and p = 0.004, respectively; and p = 0.002 and p = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that significant and serious histopathological changes directly associated with colitis occur in the lungs in IBD. PMID:27539446

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ is downregulated in ulcerative colitis and is involved in experimental colitis-associated neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    DOU, XIAOTAN; XIAO, JUNHUA; JIN, ZILIANG; ZHENG, PING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and to also identify the association between PPAR-γ and the clinical features of patients with IBD. An azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) animal model of colitis-associated neoplasia was established to investigate the protective effect of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and to explore the changes in the expression of PPAR-γ during this process. A total of 66 specimens of colorectal tissue obtained from biopsy performed on IBD patients and 30 healthy control individuals were immunohistochemically stained for PPAR-γ. An AOM/DSS animal model of colitis-associated neoplasia was then established. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was conducted and it was found that, compared with the control group and patients with Crohn's disease (CD), the expression of PPAR-γ in the intestinal tissue of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) was significantly decreased (P=0.027 and 0.046, respectively). The expression of PPAR-γ was found to be negatively associated with the disease activity of UC and was not associated with the severity of disease, site of lesions or CD characteristics. Administration of 5-ASA decreased the colitis and tumor burden of colons. The expression level of PPAR-γ in the intestinal tissue was also increased in the AOM/DSS/5-ASA group compared with AOM/DSS group (P<0.001). PPAR-γ is an important factor in the pathogenesis of UC and colitis-associated cancer. The present study found that 5-ASA significantly alleviates the colitis and tumor burden in a mouse model of AOM/DSS-induced colitis-associated neoplasia, and promotes the expression of PPAR-γ in the intestinal tract. PMID:26622660

  15. Combined Arterial and Venous Thrombosis in Ulcerative Colitis- A Rare Vascular Manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpreet; Dewan, Richa; Anuradha, S; Singla, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Combined arterial and venous thrombosis in patients with ulcerative colitis is a rare extra vascular manifestation, which motivated the current report. Increased coagulability is a recognised feature of ulcerative colitis with frequency increasing during flares. We report the case of a 42-year-old lady who was a diagnosed case of ulcerative colitis, currently in remission. She presented with swelling followed by discolouration of left lower limb which later was diagnosed as deep venous thrombosis combined with femoral and popliteal artery thrombosis. This led to wet gangrene of the limb, sepsis, septic shock and death despite aggressive management with heparin infusion, ionotropes, and parenteral antibiotics therapy. PMID:27190869

  16. Apparent change of Rhesus blood group typing in a case of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Tien, S L; Ong, Y W; Ng, H S

    1991-08-01

    An interesting case of ulcerative colitis with an apparent change of Rhesus blood group typing is described. To our knowledge, this has not been reported before. We postulate that during the initial active phase of ulcerative colitis, an unknown D-like antigen, possibly bacterial in origin, could temporarily give rise to a Rhesus D-positive blood group typing in a patient with Rhesus D-negative blood type. Interestingly, with continuous immunosuppressive therapy for ulcerative colitis, the patient did not develop anti-D antibodies despite multiple transfusions with D-positive blood. PMID:1776013

  17. Ispaghula husk may relieve gastrointestinal symptoms in ulcerative colitis in remission.

    PubMed

    Hallert, C; Kaldma, M; Petersson, B G

    1991-07-01

    The efficiency of ispaghula husk in relieving gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with ulcerative colitis in remission was studied in a placebo-controlled trial running for 4 months. Twenty-nine patients (81%) completed the trial; four withdrew after colitis relapse (three while receiving placebo). Grading of symptoms judged ispaghula to be consistently superior to placebo (p less than 0.001) and associated with a significantly higher rate of improvement (69%) than placebo (24%) (p less than 0.001). The results show that ispaghula can be helpful in the management of gastrointestinal symptoms in quiescent ulcerative colitis. PMID:1654592

  18. Unfractionated Heparin and New Heparin Analogues from Ascidians (Chordate-Tunicate) Ameliorate Colitis in Rats*

    PubMed Central

    Belmiro, Celso L. R.; Castelo-Branco, Morgana T. L.; Melim, Leandra M. C.; Schanaider, Alberto; Elia, Celeste; Madi, Kalil; Pavão, Mauro S. G.; de Souza, Heitor S. P.

    2009-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of mammalian heparin analogues, named dermatan sulfate and heparin, isolated from the ascidian Styela plicata was accessed in a TNBS-induced colitis model in rats. Subcutaneous administration of the invertebrate compounds during a 7-day period drastically reduced inflammation as observed by the normalization of the macroscopic and histological characteristics of the colon. At the molecular level, a decrease in the production of TNF-α, TGF-β, and VEGF was observed, as well as a reduction of NF-κB and MAPK kinase activation. At the cellular level, the heparin analogues attenuated lymphocyte and macrophage recruitment and epithelial cell apoptosis. A drastic reduction in collagen-mediated fibrosis was also observed. No hemorrhagic events were observed after glycan treatment. These results strongly indicate the potential therapeutic use of these compounds for the treatment of colonic inflammation with a lower risk of hemorrhage when compared with mammalian heparin. PMID:19258310

  19. Enhanced Levels of Chemokines and Their Receptors in the Colon of Microscopic Colitis Patients Indicate Mixed Immune Cell Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Günaltay, Sezin; Bohr, Johan; Hultgren, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC), comprising collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC), is a common cause of chronic diarrhea. Various immune cell infiltrations in the epithelium and lamina propria are seen in MC immunopathology. We compared gene and protein expressions of different immune cell attracting chemokines and their receptors in colon biopsies from MC patients in active disease or histopathological remission (CC/LC-HR) with controls, using qRT-PCR and Luminex, respectively. CC and LC patients with active disease demonstrated a mixed chemokine profile with significantly enhanced gene and/or protein expressions of the chemokines CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CCL7, CCL22, CXCL8, CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and CX3CL1 and the receptors CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CXCR1, CXCR2, and CX3CR1. Enhanced chemokine/chemokine receptor gene and protein levels in LC-HR patients were similar to LC patients, whereas CC-HR patients demonstrated almost normalized levels. These findings expand the current understanding of the involvement of various immune cells in MC immunopathology and endorse chemokines as potential diagnostic markers as well as therapeutic candidates. Moreover, this study further supports the hypothesis that CC and LC are two different entities due to differences in their immunoregulatory responses. PMID:25948880

  20. Intestinal microbiome analyses identify melanoma patients at risk for checkpoint-blockade-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Krista; Callahan, Margaret K; Ren, Boyu; Khanin, Raya; Viale, Agnes; Ling, Lilan; No, Daniel; Gobourne, Asia; Littmann, Eric; Huttenhower, Curtis; Pamer, Eric G; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota influences the development of inflammatory disorders. However, associating inflammatory diseases with specific microbial members of the microbiota is challenging, because clinically detectable inflammation and its treatment can alter the microbiota's composition. Immunologic checkpoint blockade with ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) signalling, is associated with new-onset, immune-mediated colitis. Here we conduct a prospective study of patients with metastatic melanoma undergoing ipilimumab treatment and correlate the pre-inflammation faecal microbiota and microbiome composition with subsequent colitis development. We demonstrate that increased representation of bacteria belonging to the Bacteroidetes phylum is correlated with resistance to the development of checkpoint-blockade-induced colitis. Furthermore, a paucity of genetic pathways involved in polyamine transport and B vitamin biosynthesis is associated with an increased risk of colitis. Identification of these biomarkers may enable interventions to reduce the risk of inflammatory complications following cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26837003

  1. Treatment of ulcerative colitis in the cottontop tamarin using antibody to tumour necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, P E; Warren, B F; Stephens, S; Ward, P; Foulkes, R

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aetiology and pathophysiology of ulcerative colitis remains unclear; however, there is increasing recognition of the critical role of inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of this disease. Among these, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) seems to play an important role. AIM: To study the effects of an engineered human monoclonal antibody to TNF alpha (CDP571) in the treatment of idiopathic ulcerative colitis in the cottontop tamarin. METHODS: Six cottontop tamarins with confirmed ulcerative colitis received repeated doses of CDP571. Progression of disease was assessed by measuring both body weight and rectal biopsy pathology. RESULTS: All animals showed a rapid improvement in clinical condition and rectal biopsy pathology that was maintained following completion of the therapy. CONCLUSION: These studies indicate the efficacy of selective antibody therapy to TNF alpha for the treatment of ulcerative colitis in a primate and suggest that similar therapy in human could be of value. Images PMID:9203942

  2. Melatonin reduces bacterial translocation and apoptosis in trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis of rats

    PubMed Central

    Akcan, Alper; Kucuk, Can; Sozuer, Erdogan; Esel, Duygu; Akyildiz, Hizir; Akgun, Hulya; Muhtaroglu, Sabahattin; Aritas, Yucel

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of exogenous melatonin on bacterial translocation and apoptosis in a rat ulcerative colitis model. METHODS: Rats were randomly assigned to three groups: groupI: control, group II: experimental colitis, group III: colitis plus melatonin treatment. On d 11 after colitis, plasma tumor necrosis factor-α, portal blood endotoxin levels, colon tissue myeloperoxidase and caspase-3 activity were measured. Bacterial translocation was quantified by blood, lymph node, liver and spleen culture. RESULTS: We observed a significantly reduced incidence of bacterial translocation to the liver, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, portal and systemic blood in animals treated with melatonin. Treatment with melatonin significantly decreased the caspase-3 activity in colonic tissues compared to that in trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid- treated rats (16.11 ± 2.46 vs 32.97 ± 3.91, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Melatonin has a protective effect on bacterial translocation and apoptosis. PMID:18240350

  3. /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scanning in ampicillin-associated right-sided hemorrhagic colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Saverymuttu, S.H.; Chadwick, V.S.

    1984-07-01

    Hemorrhagic colitis is a rare but well-recognized complication with ampicillin or penicillin derivative treatment. Early colonoscopy has been advocated in establishing the diagnosis by demonstrating the characteristic pattern of only right-sided involvement and so distinguishing it from other colitides. The authors report a patient who developed colitis after amoxycillin therapy in whom /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scan demonstrated right-sided colitis which alerted them to the diagnosis. Discontinuation of the antibiotic resulting in rapid improvement, and return of the /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scan to normal in this patient suggests that ampicillin-associated colitis should not be considered purely as a hemorrhagic disease but may in some cases have an inflammatory component.

  4. Intestinal microbiome analyses identify melanoma patients at risk for checkpoint-blockade-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Krista; Callahan, Margaret K.; Ren, Boyu; Khanin, Raya; Viale, Agnes; Ling, Lilan; No, Daniel; Gobourne, Asia; Littmann, Eric; Huttenhower, Curtis; Pamer, Eric G.; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota influences the development of inflammatory disorders. However, associating inflammatory diseases with specific microbial members of the microbiota is challenging, because clinically detectable inflammation and its treatment can alter the microbiota's composition. Immunologic checkpoint blockade with ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) signalling, is associated with new-onset, immune-mediated colitis. Here we conduct a prospective study of patients with metastatic melanoma undergoing ipilimumab treatment and correlate the pre-inflammation faecal microbiota and microbiome composition with subsequent colitis development. We demonstrate that increased representation of bacteria belonging to the Bacteroidetes phylum is correlated with resistance to the development of checkpoint-blockade-induced colitis. Furthermore, a paucity of genetic pathways involved in polyamine transport and B vitamin biosynthesis is associated with an increased risk of colitis. Identification of these biomarkers may enable interventions to reduce the risk of inflammatory complications following cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26837003

  5. Effect of venlafaxine on experimental colitis in normal and reserpinised depressed rats

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Rabbani, Mohammad; Fattahian, Ehsan; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Psychological disorders such as depression have more prevalence in inflammatory bowel disease patients and can exacerbate the clinical course of the disease, so anti-depressant therapy may have a potential to positively impact the disease course. On the other hand several antidepressant drugs have shown anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. Thus, this study aimed to explore the beneficial effects of venlafaxine on experimental colitis in normal and reserpinised depressed rats. Acetic acid colitis was induced in both reserpinised and non-reserpinised rats. Reserpinised groups received reserpine at dose of 6 mg/kg i.p.1 h prior to colitis induction and then treated with venlafaxine at doses of 10, 20, 40 mg/kg given i.p. 2 h after induction of colitis and daily for 4 consecutive days. Non-reserpinised groups treated with 10, 20, 40 mg/kg venlafaxine i.p. 2 h after the induction of colitis and daily for 4 successive days. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was used as reference drug. Colonic inflammation was evaluated using macroscopic, histological and myeloperoxidase activity measurements. Results showed that reserpine at dose of 6 mg/kg exacerbated the colitis damage. Compared to acetic acid control, venlafaxine at dose of 40 mg/kg as well as dexamethasone significantly improved colitis parameters in both reserpinised and non-reserpinised animals. Venlafaxine reduced inflammatory injury in this animal model of induced ulcerative colitis. These effects are probably mediated first through depressive behavioral changes that could be mediated through the brain-gut axis and second for the anti-inflammatory effect of the drug. PMID:26600857

  6. Intractable colitis associated with chronic granulomatous disease in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Aytaç; Kuloğlu, Zarife; Doğu, Figen; İkincioğulları, Aydan; Ensari, Arzu; Çiftçi, Ergin; Kansu, Aydan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an autosomal recessive or X-linked disorder caused by NADPH oxidase deficiency leading to an impaired ability of reactive superoxide anion and metabolite formation and recurring severe bacterial and fungal infections, with a high mortality rate. Diarrhea, colitis, ileus, perirectal abscess formation and anal fissures are reported gastrointestinal findings in these patients. We report a case of intractable colitis associated with CGD in a young girl. PMID:26690604

  7. The effect of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort) on experimental colitis in rat.

    PubMed

    Dost, Turhan; Ozkayran, Hakan; Gokalp, Filiz; Yenisey, Cigdem; Birincioglu, Mustafa

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Hypericum perforatum (HP) on the inflammatory and immune response of colonic mucosa in rat with induced inflammatory bowel disease and that on various enzyme activities in blood and bowel tissue. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into three main groups: control, third day, and seventh day of colitis. Third-day and seventh-day groups were divided into four subgroups. Colitis was induced in all groups except the control group by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The colitis group received saline; treatment groups received HP extract (50, 150, and 300 mg/kg/day, respectively). Glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) activities in blood were measured. Catalase, myeloperoxidase (MPO), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR), malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide (NO) activities were measured from tissue samples. Colonic damage was significantly reduced by HP extract. Macroscopic scoring of colonic damage significantly reduced in groups given HP extract compared with in the colitis group (P < 0.001). Blood catalase levels were reduced in the HP (150 mg/kg/day) compared with the colitis group (P < 0.01). Blood GSH levels significantly increased in groups treated with HP compared with control (P < 0.001) on the third and seventh day. Tissue GR levels reduced in the colitis and HP (50 mg/kg/day) groups compared with control (P < 0.05). Tissue MPO activity increased in the colitis and treatment groups compared with control (P < 0.007). GSH-Px levels increased in the colitis group compared with control at day 3 (P = 0.006). HP has a protective effect on TNBS-induced inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), probably due to an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanism. PMID:18754092

  8. Successfully Treated Acute Fulminant Myocarditis Induced by Ulcerative Colitis with Extracorporeal Life Support and Infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han-Kyul; Kim, Kun Il; Jung, Sung Won; Mun, Hee-Sun; Cho, Jung Rae; Lee, Namho

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of successfully treated acute fulminant myocarditis induced by ulcerative colitis with extracorporeal life support and infliximab. Myocarditis is a rare but crucial complication during an exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease. In our case, we applied extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for cardiac rest under impression of acute myocarditis associated with ulcerative colitis, and added infliximab for uncontrolled inflammation by corticosteroid. As a result, our patient was completely recovered with successful weaning of ECMO. PMID:27358710

  9. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis as presenting feature of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ennaifer, R; Moussa, A; Mouelhi, L; Salem, M; Bouzaidi, S; Debbeche, R; Trabelsi, S; Najjar, T

    2009-01-01

    Thrombosis is a well recognized complication of inflammatory bowel disease that occurs in 1.3 to 6.4% of patients, however, cerebral vascular involvement is unusual. We present the case of a 16-year-old female in whom cerebral venous thrombosis was the presenting symptom of an active ulcerative pancolitis. Thrombophilia screen (plasma levels of proteins C and S, antithrombin, antibeta2-glycoprotein, lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies, activated protein C resistance, homocystein level antinuclear antibodies) was negative. The patient was successfully treated with anticoagulant therapy, phenobarbital and sulfasalazine. Cerebral venous thrombosis is an exceptional presenting feature of ulcerative colitis. Disease activity may play a major role in the occurrence of thrombosis. PMID:19902870

  10. Severe tracheobronchial stenosis and bronchiectasis complicating ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshio; Tsushima, Kenji; Sakairi, Yuichi; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Yoshino, Ichiro; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2014-03-01

    A 37-year-old woman with a 20-year history of ulcerative colitis (UC) was admitted with complaints of cough and increasing sputum production. Chest computed tomography showed severe stenosis of the left main bronchus and bronchiectasis of the left lower lobe. Biopsy specimens from the area of bronchial stenosis showed chronic inflammation with lymphocyte infiltration, and we diagnosed respiratory involvement of UC. The bronchial stenosis was successfully treated with yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser. UC is a systemic illness with occasional extraintestinal manifestations, but upper airway involvement is rare, and to our knowledge, this is the first published report of UC complicated with bronchopulmonary lesions with successful YAG laser treatment of the main bronchial stenosis. PMID:25473563