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1

Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study and CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) Equations for Taiwanese Adults  

PubMed Central

Background Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study or the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations may not be accurate for Asians; thus, we developed modified eGFR equations for Taiwanese adults. Methods This cross-sectional study compared the Taiwanese eGFR equations, the MDRD study, and the CKD-EPI equations with inulin clearance (Cin). A total of 695 adults including 259 healthy volunteers and 436 CKD patients were recruited. Participants from the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital were used as the development set (N?=?556) to develop the Taiwanese eGFR equations, whereas participants from the National Taiwan University Hospital were used as the validation set (N?=?139) for external validation. Results The Taiwanese eGFR equations were developed by using the extended Bland-Altman plot in the development set. The Taiwanese MDRD equation was 1.309×MDRD0.912, Taiwanese CKD-EPI was 1.262×CKD-EPI0.914 and Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI was 1.205×four-level CKD-EPI0.914. In the validation set, the Taiwanese equations had the lowest bias, the Taiwanese equations and the Japanese CKD-EPI equation had the lowest RMSE, whereas the Taiwanese and the Japanese equations had the best precision and the highest P30 among all equations. However, the Taiwanese MDRD equation had higher concordance correlation than did the Taiwanese CKD-EPI, the Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI and the Japanese equations. Moreover, only the Taiwanese equations had no proportional bias among all of the equations. Finally, the Taiwanese MDRD equation had the best diagnostic performance in terms of ordinal logistic regression among all of the equations. Conclusion The Taiwanese MDRD equation is better than the MDRD, CKD-EPI, Japanese, Asian, Thai, Taiwanese CKD-EPI, and Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI equations for Taiwanese adults.

Wu, Kwan-Dun; Chen, Yung-Ming; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Tzu-Hui; Chen, Hung-Chun

2014-01-01

2

Assessing Glomerular Filtration Rate in Hospitalized Patients: A Comparison Between CKD-EPI and Four Cystatin C-Based Equations  

PubMed Central

Summary Background and objectives A specific method is required for estimating glomerular filtration rate GFR in hospitalized patients. Our objective was to validate the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation and four cystatin C (CysC)–based equations in this setting. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was an epidemiologic, cross-sectional study in a random sample of hospitalized patients (n = 3114). We studied the accuracy of the CKD-EPI and four CysC-based equations—based on (1) CysC alone or (2) adjusted by gender; (3) age, gender, and race; and (4) age, gender, race, and creatinine, respectively—compared with GFR measured by iohexol clearance (mGFR). Clinical, biochemical, and nutritional data were also collected. Results The CysC equation 3 significantly overestimated the GFR (bias of 7.4 ml/min per 1.73 m2). Most of the error in creatinine-based equations was attributable to calculated muscle mass, which depended on patient's nutritional status. In patients without malnutrition or reduced body surface area, the CKD-EPI equation adequately estimated GFR. Equations based on CysC gave more precise mGFR estimates when malnutrition, extensive reduction of body surface area, or loss of muscle mass were present (biases of 1 and 1.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2 for equations 2 and 4, respectively, versus 5.9 ml/min per 1.73 m2 for CKD-EPI). Conclusions These results suggest that the use of equations based on CysC and gender, or CysC, age, gender, and race, is more appropriate in hospitalized patients to estimate GFR, since these equations are much less dependent on patient's nutritional status or muscle mass than the CKD-EPI equation.

de la Torre, Judith; Ramos, Natalia; Quiroz, Augusto; Garjau, Maria; Torres, Irina; Azancot, M. Antonia; Lopez, Montserrat; Sobrado, Ana

2011-01-01

3

Comparison of CKD-EPI Cystatin C and Creatinine Glomerular Filtration Rate Estimation Equations in Asian Indians  

PubMed Central

Background. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is identified in the general population using estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) calculated from a serum creatinine-based equation, the chronic kidney disease-epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Using serum cystatin C in combination may improve eGFR accuracy. We evaluated the new CKD-EPI equations incorporating cystatin C in a population of Asian Indians in classifying CKD across body mass index, diabetes, and hypertension status. Methods. We retrieved standardized serum creatinine and serum cystatin C data from a cohort of 2877 Asian Indians aged 40–80 years from the Singapore Indian Eye Study and calculated eGFR (in?mL/min/1.73?m2) with the new CKD-EPI equations and serum creatinine only equation. Results. The creatinine only equation mean eGFR (88 ± 17) was similar to using spline Log cystatin C (88 ± 22). The lowest mean eGFR (81 ± 21) was obtained with the spline Log cystatin C—age, sex, and weight equation. The creatinine only equation had the fewest participants (7.1%) with eGFR <60 and spline Log cystatin C—age, sex, and weight equation had the most (16.1%). Conclusions. Using serum cystatin C resulted in widely varying eGFR which significantly affected the classification of chronic kidney disease.

Teo, Boon Wee; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Liao, Jiemin; Toh, Qi Chun; Saw, Sharon; Wong, Tien Yin; Sethi, Sunil

2014-01-01

4

Impact of creatinine production on the agreement between glomerular filtration rate estimates using cystatin C-derived, and 4- and 6-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD), and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations  

PubMed Central

Background. It has recently been reported that patient selection has a strong impact on the agreement between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimates from serum cystatin C and creatinine. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of creatinine production rate (CPR) on this subject. Material and methods. GFR was estimated from serum cystatin C and from creatinine using the 4- and 6-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD), and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations in 50 healthy subjects, 43 patients with renal failure, 794 kidney and 104 liver transplant recipients, 61 patients with heart failure, 59 patients with biliary obstruction, and 113 critically ill patients. Results. In the 295 patients with impaired CPR (< 900 mg/24 h/1.73 m2), discordances of more than 40% between GFRMDRD4 and GFRcystatinC were observed in 38% of cases, between GFRMDRD6 and GFRcystatinC in 22%, and between GFRCKD-EPI and GFRcystatinC in 27% (in all cases due to GFR overestimation from creatinine). In the 929 patients with maintained CPR (> 900 mg/24 h/1.73 m2), greater discordances than 40% between GFRMDRD4 and GFRcystatinC were observed in 8% of cases, between GFRMDRD6 and GFRcystatinC in 9%, and between GFRCKD-EPI and GFRcystatinC in 7% (in the major part of cases due to GFR overestimation from cystatin C). Conclusion. The main source of differences of more than 40% between GFR estimates from serum creatinine and cystatin C is a GFR overestimation in patients with low CPR and GFR underestimation in patients with high CPR by the creatinine-derived equations.

Hermida-Cadahia, Esperanza F.; Lampon, Natalia

2012-01-01

5

CKD-EPI and Cockcroft-Gault Equations Identify Similar Candidates for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer  

PubMed Central

Clinical guidelines suggest neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy prior to cystectomy in the setting of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). A creatinine clearance (CrCl) >60 mL/min is frequently used to characterize cisplatin-eligible patients, and use of the CKD-EPI equation to estimate CrCl has been advocated. From a prospectively maintained institutional database, patients with MIBC who received cystectomy were identified and clinicopathologic information was ascertained. CrCl prior to surgery was computed using three equations: (1) Cockcroft-Gault (CG), (2) CKD-EPI, and (3) MDRD. The primary objective was to determine if the CG and CKD-EPI equations identified a different proportion of patients who were cisplatin-eligible, based on an estimated CrCl of >60 mL/min. Cisplatin-eligibility was also assessed in subsets based on age, CCI score and race. Actuarial rates of neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy use were also reported. Of 126 patients, 70% and 71% of patients were found to be cisplatin-eligible by the CKD-EPI and CG equations, respectively (P?=?0.9). The MDRD did not result in significantly different characterization of cisplatin-eligibility as compared to the CKD-EPI and CG equations. In the subset of patients age >80, the CKD-EPI equation identified a much smaller proportion of cisplatin-eligible patients (25%) as compared to the CG equation (50%) or the MDRD equation (63%). Only 34 patients (27%) received neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Of the 92 patients who did not receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 64% had a CrCl >60 mL/min by CG. In contrast to previous reports, the CKD-EPI equation does not appear to characterize a broader span of patients as cisplatin-eligible. Older patients (age >80) may less frequently be characterized as cisplatin-eligible by CKD-EPI. The discordance between actual rates of neoadjuvant chemotherapy use and rates of cisplatin eligibility suggest that other factors (e.g., patient and physician preference) may guide clinical decision-making.

Pal, Sumanta K.; Ruel, Nora; Villegas, Sergio; Chang, Mark; DeWalt, Kara; Wilson, Timothy G.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Yuh, Bertram E.

2014-01-01

6

CKD-EPI and Cockcroft-Gault Equations Identify Similar Candidates for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer.  

PubMed

Clinical guidelines suggest neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy prior to cystectomy in the setting of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). A creatinine clearance (CrCl) >60 mL/min is frequently used to characterize cisplatin-eligible patients, and use of the CKD-EPI equation to estimate CrCl has been advocated. From a prospectively maintained institutional database, patients with MIBC who received cystectomy were identified and clinicopathologic information was ascertained. CrCl prior to surgery was computed using three equations: (1) Cockcroft-Gault (CG), (2) CKD-EPI, and (3) MDRD. The primary objective was to determine if the CG and CKD-EPI equations identified a different proportion of patients who were cisplatin-eligible, based on an estimated CrCl of >60 mL/min. Cisplatin-eligibility was also assessed in subsets based on age, CCI score and race. Actuarial rates of neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy use were also reported. Of 126 patients, 70% and 71% of patients were found to be cisplatin-eligible by the CKD-EPI and CG equations, respectively (P?=?0.9). The MDRD did not result in significantly different characterization of cisplatin-eligibility as compared to the CKD-EPI and CG equations. In the subset of patients age >80, the CKD-EPI equation identified a much smaller proportion of cisplatin-eligible patients (25%) as compared to the CG equation (50%) or the MDRD equation (63%). Only 34 patients (27%) received neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Of the 92 patients who did not receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 64% had a CrCl >60 mL/min by CG. In contrast to previous reports, the CKD-EPI equation does not appear to characterize a broader span of patients as cisplatin-eligible. Older patients (age >80) may less frequently be characterized as cisplatin-eligible by CKD-EPI. The discordance between actual rates of neoadjuvant chemotherapy use and rates of cisplatin eligibility suggest that other factors (e.g., patient and physician preference) may guide clinical decision-making. PMID:24722472

Pal, Sumanta K; Ruel, Nora; Villegas, Sergio; Chang, Mark; Dewalt, Kara; Wilson, Timothy G; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Yuh, Bertram E

2014-01-01

7

The revised Lund-Malmö GFR estimating equation outperforms MDRD and CKD-EPI across GFR, age and BMI intervals in a large Swedish population.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: The performance of creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating equations may vary in subgroups defined by GFR, age and body mass index (BMI). This study compares the performance of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations with the revised Lund-Malmö equation (LM Revised), a new equation that can be expected to handle changes in GFR across the life span more accurately. Methods: The study included 3495 examinations in 2847 adult Swedish patients referred for measurement of GFR (mGFR) 2008-2010 by plasma clearance of iohexol (median 52 mL/min/1.73 m2). Bias, precision [interquartile range (IQR)] and accuracy [percentage of estimates ±10% (P10) and ±30% (P30) of mGFR] were compared. Results: The overall results of LM Revised/MDRD/CKD-EPI were: median bias 2%/8%/11%, IQR 12/14/14 mL/min/1.73 m2, P10 40%/35%/35% and P30 84%/75%/76%. LM Revised was the most stable equation in terms of bias, precision and accuracy across mGFR, age and BMI intervals irrespective of gender. MDRD and CKD-EPI overestimated mGFR in patients with decreased kidney function, young adults and elderly. All three equations overestimated mGFR and had low accuracy in patients with BMI <20 kg/m2, most pronounced among men. Conclusions: In settings similar to the investigated cohort LM Revised should be preferred to MDRD and CKD-EPI due to its higher accuracy and more stable performance across GFR, age and BMI intervals. PMID:24334413

Nyman, Ulf; Grubb, Anders; Larsson, Anders; Hansson, Lars-Olof; Flodin, Mats; Nordin, Gunnar; Lindström, Veronica; Björk, Jonas

2014-06-01

8

Comparison of risk prediction using the CKD-EPI equation and the MDRD Study equation for estimated glomerular filtration rate  

PubMed Central

Context The CKD-EPI equation more accurately estimates glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) than the MDRD Study equation using the same variables, especially at higher GFR, but definitive evidence of its risk implications in diverse settings is lacking. Objective To evaluate risk implications of eGFRCKD-EPI compared to eGFRMDRD in populations with a broad range of demographic and clinical characteristics. Design, Setting, and Participants Meta-analyses based on data from 1,130,472 adults (aged 18 years or older) from 25 general population, 7 high-risk (of vascular disease), and 13 chronic kidney disease (CKD) cohorts. Data transfer and analyses were conducted between March 2011 and March 2012. Main Outcome Measures All-cause mortality (84,482 deaths from 40 cohorts), cardiovascular mortality (22,176 events from 28 cohorts), and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (7,644 events from 21 cohorts) during 9.4 million person-years of follow-up (median of mean follow-up time across cohorts was 7.4 years). Results eGFR was classified into six categories (?90, 60-89, 45-59, 30-44, 15-29, and <15 ml/min/1.73m2) by both equations. Compared to eGFRMDRD, 24.4% and 0.6% of participants from general population cohorts were reclassified to a higher and lower eGFR category by the CKD-EPI equation, respectively, and the prevalence of CKD stage 3-5 (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2) was reduced from 8.7% to 6.3%. 34.7% of participants with eGFRMDRD 45-59 were reclassified to eGFRCKD-EPI 60-89 and had lower incidence rates (per 1,000 person-years) of outcomes compared to those not reclassified (9.9 vs. 34.5 for all-cause mortality, 2.7 vs. 13.0 for cardiovascular mortality, and 0.5 vs. 0.8 for ESRD). The corresponding adjusted hazard ratios were 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.74 to 0.86) for all-cause mortality, 0.73 (0.65 to 0.82) for cardiovascular mortality, and 0.49 (0.27 to 0.88) for ESRD. Similar findings were observed in other eGFRMDRD categories. Net reclassification improvement (NRI) based on eGFR categories was significantly positive for all outcomes (range from 0.06 to 0.13, all P<0.001). NRI was similarly positive in most subgroups defined by age (< and ?65 years), sex, race/ethnicity (white, Asian, and black), and presence or absence of diabetes and hypertension. The results in high-risk and CKD cohorts were largely consistent with the general population cohorts. Conclusions The CKD-EPI equation classified fewer individuals as CKD and more accurately categorized the risk for mortality and ESRD than did the MDRD Study equation across a broad range of populations.

Matsushita, Kunihiro; Mahmoodi, Bakhtawar K.; Woodward, Mark; Emberson, Jonathan R.; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Jee, Sun Ha; Polkinghorne, Kevan R.; Shankar, Anoop; Smith, David H.; Tonelli, Marcello; Warnock, David G.; Wen, Chi-Pang; Coresh, Josef; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Levey, Andrew S.

2013-01-01

9

Is the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration creatinine-cystatin C equation useful for glomerular filtration rate estimation in the elderly?  

PubMed Central

Background We aimed to evaluate the performance of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) creatinine–cystatin C equation in a cohort of elderly Chinese participants. Materials and methods Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was measured in 431 elderly Chinese participants by the technetium-99m diethylene-triamine-penta-acetic acid (99mTc-DTPA) renal dynamic imaging method, and was calibrated equally to the dual plasma sample 99mTc-DTPA-GFR. Performance of the CKD-EPI creatinine–cystatin C equation was compared with the Cockcroft–Gault equation, the re-expressed 4-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation, and the CKD-EPI creatinine equation. Results Although the bias of the CKD-EPI creatinine–cystatin C equation was greater than with the other equations (median difference, 5.7 mL/minute/1.73 m2 versus a range from 0.4–2.5 mL/minute/1.73 m2; P<0.001 for all), the precision was improved with the CKD-EPI creatinine–cystatin C equation (interquartile range for the difference, 19.5 mL/minute/1.73 m2 versus a range from 23.0–23.6 mL/minute/1.73 m2; P<0.001 for all comparisons), leading to slight improvement in accuracy (median absolute difference, 10.5 mL/minute/1.73 m2 versus 12.2 and 11.4 mL/minute/1.73 m2 for the Cockcroft–Gault equation and the re-expressed 4-variable MDRD equation, P=0.04 for both; 11.6 mL/minute/1.73 m2 for the CKD-EPI creatinine equation, P=0.11), as the optimal scores of performance (6.0 versus a range from 1.0–2.0 for the other equations). Higher GFR category and diabetes were independent factors that negatively correlated with the accuracy of the CKD-EPI creatinine–cystatin C equation (?=?0.184 and ?0.113, P<0.001 and P=0.02, respectively). Conclusion Compared with the creatinine-based equations, the CKD-EPI creatinine–cystatin C equation is more suitable for the elderly Chinese population. However, the cost-effectiveness of the CKD-EPI creatinine–cystatin C equation for clinical use should be considered.

Liu, Xun; Ma, Huijuan; Huang, Hui; Wang, Cheng; Tang, Hua; Li, Ming; Wang, Yanni; Lou, Tanqi

2013-01-01

10

Performance of chronic kidney disease epidemiology collaboration creatinine-cystatin C equation for estimating kidney function in cirrhosis.  

PubMed

Conventional creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR) equations are insufficiently accurate for estimating GFR in cirrhosis. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) recently proposed an equation to estimate GFR in subjects without cirrhosis using both serum creatinine and cystatin C levels. Performance of the new CKD-EPI creatinine-cystatin C equation (2012) was superior to previous creatinine- or cystatin C-based GFR equations. To evaluate the performance of the CKD-EPI creatinine-cystatin C equation in subjects with cirrhosis, we compared it to GFR measured by nonradiolabeled iothalamate plasma clearance (mGFR) in 72 subjects with cirrhosis. We compared the "bias," "precision," and "accuracy" of the new CKD-EPI creatinine-cystatin C equation to that of 24-hour urinary creatinine clearance (CrCl), Cockcroft-Gault (CG), and previously reported creatinine- and/or cystatin C-based GFR-estimating equations. Accuracy of CKD-EPI creatinine-cystatin C equation as quantified by root mean squared error of difference scores (differences between mGFR and estimated GFR [eGFR] or between mGFR and CrCl, or between mGFR and CG equation for each subject) (RMSE = 23.56) was significantly better than that of CrCl (37.69, P = 0.001), CG (RMSE = 36.12, P = 0.002), and GFR-estimating equations based on cystatin C only. Its accuracy as quantified by percentage of eGFRs that differed by greater than 30% with respect to mGFR was significantly better compared to CrCl (P = 0.024), CG (P = 0.0001), 4-variable MDRD (P = 0.027), and CKD-EPI creatinine 2009 (P = 0.012) equations. However, for 23.61% of the subjects, GFR estimated by CKD-EPI creatinine-cystatin C equation differed from the mGFR by more than 30%. Conclusion: The diagnostic performance of CKD-EPI creatinine-cystatin C equation (2012) in patients with cirrhosis was superior to conventional equations in clinical practice for estimating GFR. However, its diagnostic performance was substantially worse than reported in subjects without cirrhosis. PMID:23744636

Mindikoglu, Ayse L; Dowling, Thomas C; Weir, Matthew R; Seliger, Stephen L; Christenson, Robert H; Magder, Laurence S

2014-04-01

11

Comparison between Three Different Equations for the Estimation of Glomerular Filtration Rate in Omani Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is an important component of a patient’s renal function profile. The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation and the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation are both commonly used. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the original MDRD186, revised MDRD175 and CKD-EPI equations in calculating eGFR in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in Oman. Methods: The study included 607 T2DM patients (275 males and 332 females, mean age ± standard deviation 56 ± 12 years) who visited primary health centres in Muscat, Oman, during 2011 and whose renal function was assessed based on serum creatinine measurements. The eGFR was calculated using the three equations and the patients were classified based on chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages according to the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines. A performance comparison was undertaken using the weighted kappa test. Results: The median eGFR (mL/min/1.73 m2) was 92.9 for MDRD186, 87.4 for MDRD175 and 93.7 for CKD-EPI. The prevalence of CKD stage 1 was 55.4%, 44.7% and 57% while for stages 2 and 3 it was 43.2%, 54% and 41.8%, based on MDRD186, MDRD175 and CKD-EPI, respectively. The agreement between MDRD186 and CKD-EPI (? 0.868) was stronger than MDRD186 and MDRD175 (? 0.753) and MDRD175 and CKD-EPI (? 0.730). Conclusion: The performances of MDRD186 and CKD-EPI were comparable. Considering that CKD-EPI-based eGFR is known to be close to isotopically measured GFR, the use of MDRD186 rather than MDRD175 may be recommended.

Al-Maqbali, Salima R. S.; Mula-Abed, Waad-Allah S.

2014-01-01

12

Performance of Creatinine and Cystatin C GFR Estimating Equations in an HIV-positive population on Antiretrovirals  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the performance of CKD-EPI creatinine, cystatin C and creatinine-cystatin C estimating equations in HIV-positive patients. Methods We evaluated the performance of the MDRD Study and CKD-EPI creatinine 2009, CKD-EPI cystatin C 2012 and CKD-EPI creatinine-cystatin C 2012 glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating equations compared to GFR measured using plasma clearance of iohexol in 200 HIV-positive patients on stable antiretroviral therapy. Creatinine and cystatin C assays were standardized to certified reference materials. Results Of the 200 participants, median (IQR) CD4 count was 536 (421) and 61% had an undetectable HIV-viral load. Mean (SD) measured GFR (mGFR) was 87 (26) ml/min/1.73m2. All CKD-EPI equations performed better than the MDRD Study equation. All three CKD-EPI equations had similar bias and precision. The cystatin C equation was not more accurate than the creatinine equation. The creatinine-cystatin C equation was significantly more accurate than the cystatin C equation and there was a trend toward greater accuracy than the creatinine equation. Accuracy was equal or better in most subgroups with the combined equation compared to either alone. Conclusions The CKD-EPI cystatin C equation does not appear to be more accurate than the CKD-EPI creatinine equation in patients who are HIV-positive, supporting the use of the CKD-EPI creatinine equation for routine clinical care for use in North American populations with HIV. The use of both filtration markers together as a confirmatory test for decreased estimated GFR based on creatinine in individuals who are HIV-positive requires further study.

INKER, Lesley A; WYATT, Christina; CREAMER, Rebecca; HELLINGER, James; HOTTA, Matthew; LEPPO, Maia; LEVEY, Andrew S; OKPARAVERO, Aghogho; GRAHAM, Hiba; SAVAGE, Karen; SCHMID, Christopher H; TIGHIOUART, Hocine; WALLACH, Fran; KRISHNASAMI, Zipporah

2013-01-01

13

The impact of different GFR estimating equations on the prevalence of CKD and risk groups in a Southeast Asian cohort using the new KDIGO guidelines  

PubMed Central

Background Recently, the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) group recommended that patients with CKD should be assigned to stages and composite relative risk groups according to GFR (G) and proteinuria (A) criteria. Asians have among the highest rates of ESRD in the world, but establishing the prevalence and prognosis CKD is a problem for Asian populations since there is no consensus on the best GFR estimating (eGFR) equation. We studied the effects of the choice of new Asian and Caucasian eGFR equations on CKD prevalence, stage distribution, and risk categorization using the new KDIGO classification. Methods The prevalence of CKD and composite relative risk groups defined by eGFR from with Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI); standard (S) or Chinese(C) MDRD; Japanese CKD-EPI (J-EPI), Thai GFR (T-GFR) equations were compared in a Thai cohort (n = 5526) Results There was a 7 fold difference in CKD3-5 prevalence between J-EPI and the other Asian eGFR formulae. CKD3-5 prevalence with S-MDRD and CKD-EPI were 2 - 3 folds higher than T-GFR or C-MDRD. The concordance with CKD-EPI to diagnose CKD3-5 was over 90% for T-GFR or C-MDRD, but they only assigned the same CKD stage in 50% of the time. The choice of equation also caused large variations in each composite risk groups especially those with mildly increased risks. Different equations can lead to a reversal of male: female ratios. The variability of different equations is most apparent in older subjects. Stage G3aA1 increased with age and accounted for a large proportion of the differences in CKD3-5 between CKD-EPI, S-MDRD and C-MDRD. Conclusions CKD prevalence, sex ratios, and KDIGO composite risk groupings varied widely depending on the equation used. More studies are needed to define the best equation for Asian populations.

2012-01-01

14

Evaluation of creatinine, cystatin C and eGFR by different equations in professional cyclists during the Giro d'Italia 3-weeks stage race.  

PubMed

Abstract In this study, creatinine-based equations to evaluate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were proposed to more accurately assess kidney function, and cystatin C, a parameter not dependent on muscular mass, was introduced to improve GFR calculation in professional cyclists during a long-lasting race. Nine cyclists participating in the 2011 Giro d'Italia were recruited. Blood and anthropometrical data were collected the day before (T-1) the race, on the 12th day (T 12) and on the 22nd day (T 22) of the race. Haemoglobin and haematocrit were registered. Haemodilution was observed at T 12, whilst stabilization was evident at T 22. Creatinine, cystatin C concentrations and eGFR values were not modified during the observed period; only GFR evaluated with the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) formula and expressed as ml/min/1.73 m(2) significantly decreased (p < 0.05) at T 22 in comparison with T-1, probably as a consequence of weight decrease. Cystatin C levels were in the reference range, while creatinine concentrations were lower. The lowest eGFR values were observed with CG normalized and the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formulas. A good correlation was observed between the MDRD and the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations and between CG normalized and both CKD-EPI and MDRD formulas. The worst correlation was registered between CKD-EPI creatinine and cystatin C and all the other equations. In conclusion, adaptive mechanisms of renal function allow athletes to maintain stable creatinine, cystatin C and eGFR values during a long-lasting race. The use of GFR equations to evaluate general health status of sportsmen should be recommended with caution, considering also weight modification during competition. PMID:22201455

Colombini, Alessandra; Corsetti, Roberto; Graziani, Rosa; Lombardi, Giovanni; Lanteri, Patrizia; Banfi, Giuseppe

2012-04-01

15

Proteinuria, 99mTc-DTPA Scintigraphy, Creatinine-, Cystatin- and Combined-Based Equations in the Assessment of Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Background. Precise estimation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the identification of markers of progression are important. We compared creatinine, cystatin, and combined CKD-EPI equations with 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy to measure GFR and proteinuria as markers of progression. Methods. Cross-sectional, observational study including 300 subjects. CKD was classified by 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy. Determinations. Creatinine, 24-hour creatinine clearance, cystatin, Hoek formula, and creatinine, cystatin, and combined CKD-EPI equations. Results. In the global assessment, creatinine CKD-EPI and combined CKD-EPI equations yielded the highest correlations with 99mTc-DTPA: ? = 0.839, P < 0.0001 and ? = 0.831, P < 0.0001. Intergroup analysis versus 99mTc-DTPA: control G, creatinine clearance ? = 0.414, P = 0.013; G3, combined CKD-EPI ? = 0.5317, P < 0.0001; G4, Hoek ? = 0.618, P < 0.0001, combined CKD-EPI ? = 0.4638, P < 0.0001; and G5, creatinine clearance ? = 0.5414, P < 0.0001, combined CKD-EPI ? = 0.5288, P < 0.0001. In the global assessment, proteinuria displayed the highest significant correlations with cystatin (? = 0.5433, P < 0.0001) and cystatin-based equations (Hoek: ? = ?0.5309, P < 0.0001). When GFR < 60?mL/min: in stage 3, proteinuria-cystatin (? = 0.4341, P < 0.0001); proteinuria-Hoek (? = ?0.4105, P < 0.0001); in stage 4, proteinuria-cystatin (? = 0.4877, P < 0.0001); proteinuria-Hoek (? = ?0.4877, P = 0.0026). Conclusions. At every stage of GFR < 60?mL/min, cystatin-based equations displayed better correlations with 99mTc-DTPA. Proteinuria and cystatin-based equations showed strong associations and high degrees of correlation.

Trimarchi, Hernan; Muryan, Alexis; Toscano, Agostina; Martino, Diana; Forrester, Mariano; Pomeranz, Vanesa; Lombi, Fernando; Young, Pablo; Rana, Maria Soledad; Karl, Alejandra; Alonso, M.; Dicugno, Mariana; Fitzsimons, Clara

2014-01-01

16

Using Mathematical Algorithms to Modify Glomerular Filtration Rate Estimation Equations  

PubMed Central

Background The equations provide a rapid and low-cost method of evaluating glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Previous studies indicated that the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD), Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology (CKD-EPI) and MacIsaac equations need further modification for application in Chinese population. Thus, this study was designed to modify the three equations, and compare the diagnostic accuracy of the equations modified before and after. Methodology With the use of 99 mTc-DTPA renal dynamic imaging as the reference GFR (rGFR), the MDRD, CKD-EPI and MacIsaac equations were modified by two mathematical algorithms: the hill-climbing and the simulated-annealing algorithms. Results A total of 703 Chinese subjects were recruited, with the average rGFR 77.14±25.93 ml/min. The entire modification process was based on a random sample of 80% of subjects in each GFR level as a training sample set, the rest of 20% of subjects as a validation sample set. After modification, the three equations performed significant improvement in slop, intercept, correlated coefficient, root mean square error (RMSE), total deviation index (TDI), and the proportion of estimated GFR (eGFR) within 10% and 30% deviation of rGFR (P10 and P30). Of the three modified equations, the modified CKD-EPI equation showed the best accuracy. Conclusions Mathematical algorithms could be a considerable tool to modify the GFR equations. Accuracy of all the three modified equations was significantly improved in which the modified CKD-EPI equation could be the optimal one.

Zhu, Bei; Wu, Jianqing; Zhu, Jin; Zhao, Weihong

2013-01-01

17

GFR estimation: from physiology to public health.  

PubMed

Estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is essential for clinical practice, research, and public health. Appropriate interpretation of estimated GFR (eGFR) requires understanding the principles of physiology, laboratory medicine, epidemiology, and biostatistics used in the development and validation of GFR estimating equations. Equations developed in diverse populations are less biased at higher GFRs than equations developed in chronic kidney disease (CKD) populations and are more appropriate for general use. Equations that include multiple endogenous filtration markers are more precise than equations including a single filtration marker. The CKD-EPI (CKD Epidemiology Collaboration) equations are the most accurate GFR estimating equations that have been evaluated in large diverse populations and are applicable for general clinical use. The 2009 CKD-EPI creatinine equation is more accurate in estimating GFR and prognosis than the 2006 MDRD (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease) Study equation and provides lower estimates of prevalence of decreased eGFR. It is useful as a "first test" for decreased eGFR and should replace the MDRD Study equation for routine reporting of serum creatinine-based eGFR by clinical laboratories. The 2012 CKD-EPI cystatin C equation is as accurate as the 2009 CKD-EPI creatinine equation in estimating GFR, does not require specification of race, and may be more accurate in patients with decreased muscle mass. The 2012 CKD-EPI creatinine-cystatin C equation is more accurate than the 2009 CKD-EPI creatinine and 2012 CKD-EPI cystatin C equations and is useful as a confirmatory test for decreased eGFR as determined by serum creatinine-based eGFR. Further improvement in GFR estimating equations will require development in more broadly representative populations, including diverse racial and ethnic groups, use of multiple filtration markers, and evaluation using statistical techniques to compare eGFR to "true GFR." PMID:24485147

Levey, Andrew S; Inker, Lesley A; Coresh, Josef

2014-05-01

18

Glomerular filtration rate equations for liver-kidney transplantation in patients with cirrhosis: validation of current recommendations.  

PubMed

Simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation (SLKT) remains the procedure of choice for patients with both endstage liver disease and kidney failure. Stringent guidelines are needed to avoid unnecessary kidney transplantation. A recent consensus meeting proposed criteria based on the Modified Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD)-6 equation to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The aims of this study were to compare GFR equations to true GFR in candidates for liver transplantation (LT) and to determine the impact of inaccuracies on the current guidelines for SLKT. Three hundred stable cirrhosis patients evaluated for LT were studied. All patients had iohexol clearance to measure GFR at evaluation under stable conditions. Measured GFR (mGFR) was compared to MDRD-4, MDRD-6, and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations. MDRD-6 was the most accurate equation to predict GFR. In the 290 patients with mGFR >30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), 15 patients (7%) had estimated GFR (eGFR) ?40 mL/min/1.73 m(2) based on the MDRD-6 equation, defining "discordant" patients. Among them, two underwent SLKT and 13 underwent LT alone. None of those who survived more than 1 year after LT alone (n?=?8) developed renal dysfunction thereafter. In multivariate analysis, discordant patients were older (P?=?0.03) and had lower sodium level (P?=?0.02). Conclusion: The MDRD-6 equation was superior to other equations at identifying cirrhosis patients with true GFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2). However, the MDRD-6 equation also tended to underestimate renal function in a subgroup of patients with true GFR >30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), with a potential risk of unnecessary kidney transplantation if applying current U.S. recommendations for SLKT. PMID:24037821

Francoz, Claire; Nadim, Mitra K; Baron, Aurore; Prié, Dominique; Antoine, Corinne; Belghiti, Jacques; Valla, Dominique; Moreau, Richard; Durand, François

2014-04-01

19

Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores collaboration between library media educators and regular classroom teachers. The article focuses on the context of the issue, positions on the issue, the impact of collaboration, and how to implement effective collaboration into the school system. Various books and professional journals are used to support conclusions…

King, Michelle L.

2010-01-01

20

Accuracy of a GFR Estimating Equation Over Time in People With a Wide Range of Kidney Function  

PubMed Central

Background Change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is important for clinical decision making. GFR estimates from serum creatinine provide an unbiased but imprecise estimate of GFR at single time points. However, the accuracy of estimated GFR over time is not well known. Study Design Longitudinal study of diagnostic test accuracy Settings and participants Four clinical trials with longitudinal measures of GFR and serum creatinine on the same day, including subjects with and without kidney disease, with a wide range of kidney function, diverse racial backgrounds and varied clinical characteristics. Index test GFR estimated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Reference test GFR measured using urinary clearance of 125I-iothalamate Results Data included 19,735 GFR measurements in 3531 subjects over mean follow up of 2.6 years. Mean at baseline for measured and estimated GFR and error (measured GFR – estimated GFR) were 73.1 (95% CI, 71.6 to 74.5), 72.7 (95% CI, 71.5 to 74.0) and 0.14 (95% CI, ?0.35 to 0.63) ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively. The mean rate of change in measured and estimated GFR and error was ?2.3 (95% CI, ?2.4 to ?2.1), ?2.2 (95% CI, ?2.4 to ?2.1) and ?0.09 (95% CI, ?0.24 to 0.05) ml/min/1.73 m2 per year (p <.001, p <.001, and p = 0.2 respectively). The variability (ie, SD) among subjects in rate of change in measured GFR, estimated GFR and error was 4.3, 3.4 and 3.3 ml/min/1.73 m2 per year, respectively. Only 15% of subjects had a rate of change in error of more than 3 ml/min/1.73 m2 per year, and only 2% had a rate of change in error larger than 5% per year. Limitations Subject characteristics were not available over time. Conclusion Accuracy of GFR estimates did not change over time. Clinicians should interpret changes in estimated GFR over time as reflecting changes in measured GFR rather than changes in errors in the GFR estimates in most individuals.

Padala, Smita; Tighiouart, Hocine; Inker, Lesley A.; Contreras, Gabriel; Beck, Gerald J.; Lewis, Julia; Steffes, Michael; Rodby, Roger A.; Schmid, Christopher H; Levey, Andrew S.

2012-01-01

21

Estimated GFR and Incident Cardiovascular Disease Events in American Indians: The Strong Heart Study  

PubMed Central

Background In populations with high prevalence of diabetes and obesity, estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation may predict cardiovascular disease risk better than by using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation. Study design Longitudinal cohort study comparing the association of GFR estimated using either the CKD-EPI or MDRD Study equations with incident cardiovascular disease outcomes. Setting and participants American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Study, a longitudinal population-based cohort with high prevalences of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and CKD. Predictor or factor eGFR predicted using the CKD-EPI and MDRD Study equations. Outcomes Fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events, consisting of coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart failure. Measurements The association between eGFR and outcomes was explored in Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for traditional risk factors and albuminuria; the net reclassification index and integrated discrimination improvement were determined for the CKD-EPI versus MDRD Study equations. Results Among 4549 participants, diabetes was present in 45%, cardiovascular disease in 7%, and stage 3–5 CKD in 10%. Over a median of 15 years, there were 1280 cases of incident CVD, 929 of incident coronary heart disease, 305 of incident stroke, and 381 of incident heart failure. Reduced eGFR (<90 mL/min/1.73 m2) was associated with adverse events in most models. Compared with the MDRD Study equation, the CKD-EPI equation correctly reclassified 17.0% of 2,151 participants without incident CVD to a lower risk (higher eGFR) category and 1.3% (n=28) were incorrectly reclassified to a higher risk (lower eGFR) category. Limitations Single measurements of eGFR and albuminuria at study visits. Conclusions Although eGFR based on either equation had similar associations with incident cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart failure events, among those not having events, reclassification of participants to eGFR categories was superior using the CKD-EPI equation compared with the MDRD Study equation.

Shara, Nawar M.; Wang, Hong; Mete, Mihriye; Al-Balha, Yaman Rai; Azalddin, Nameer; Lee, Elisa T.; Franceschini, Nora; Jolly, Stacey E.; Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.

2012-01-01

22

Chronic kidney diseases in mixed ancestry south African populations: prevalence, determinants and concordance between kidney function estimators  

PubMed Central

Background Population-based data on the burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in sub-Saharan Africa is still very limited. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of CKD, and evaluated the concordance of commonly advocated estimators of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in a mixed ancestry population from South Africa. Methods Participants were a population-based sample of adults selected from the Bellville-South community in the metropolitan city of Cape Town. eGFR was based on the Cockroft-Gault (CG), Modification of Diet in Kidney Disease (MDRD) and CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations (with and without adjustment for ethnicity). Kidney function staging used the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) classification. Logistic regressions and kappa statistic were used to investigate determinants of CKD and assess the agreement between different estimators. Results The crude prevalence of CKD stage 3–5 was 14.8% for Cockcroft-Gault, 7.6% and 23.9% respectively for the MDRD with and without ethnicity correction, and 7.4% and 17.3% for the CKD-EPI equations with and without ethnicity correction. The highest agreement between GFR estimators was between MDRD and CKD-EPI equations, both with ethnicity correction, Kappa 0.91 (95% CI: 0.86-0.95), correlation coefficient 0.95 (95% CI: 0.94-0.96). In multivariable logistic regression models, sex, age and known hypertension were consistently associated with CKD stage 3–5 across the 5 estimators. Conclusions The prevalence of CKD stages greater than 3 is the highest reported in Africa. This study provides evidence for support of the CKD-EPI equation for eGFR reporting and CKD classification.

2013-01-01

23

A Collaboration on Collaboration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's 2003-2004 Leadership Development Program class recognized that effective collaborations are often the key to achieving mission success. Personal connections and common goals were key elements of their work together and key findings of their collaboration benchmarking within the agency.

Cobleigh, Brent

2004-01-01

24

Collaboration on Collaboration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

NASA's 2003-2004 Leadership Development Program class recognized that effective collaborations are often the key to achieving mission success. Personal connections and common goals were key elements of their work together and key findings of their collabo...

B. Cobleigh

2004-01-01

25

Race Adjustment for Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate Is Not Always Necessary  

PubMed Central

Background Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is very important in clinical practice, although it is not adequately tested in different populations. We aimed at establishing the best eGFR formulas for a Brazilian population with emphasis on the need for race correction. Methods We evaluated 202 individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and 42 without previously known renal lesions that were additionally screened by urinalysis. Serum creatinine and plasma clearance of iohexol were measured in all cases. GFR was estimated by the Mayo Clinic, abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) formulas, and creatinine clearance was estimated by the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) formula. Plasma clearance of iohexol was used as the gold standard for GFR determination and for the development of a Brazilian formula (BreGFR). Results Measured and estimated GFR were compared in 244 individuals, 57% female, with a mean age of 41 years (range 18–82). Estimates of intraclass correlation coefficients among the plasma clearance of iohexol and eGFR formulas were all significant (p < 0.001) and corresponded to the following scores: CG 0.730; obesity-adjusted CG 0.789; Mayo Clinic 0.804; MDRD 0.848; MDRD1 (without race adjustment) 0.846; CKD-EPI 0.869; CKD-EPI1 (without race adjustment) 0.876, and BreGFR 0.844. Conclusions All cited eGFR formulas showed a good correlation with the plasma clearance of iohexol in the healthy and diseased conditions. The formulas that best detected reduced eGFR were the BreGFR, CKD-EPI, and CKD-EPI1 formulas. Notably, the race correction included in the MDRD and CKD-EPI formulas was not necessary for this population, as it did not contribute to more accurate results.

Zanocco, Juliana A.; Nishida, Sonia K.; Passos, Michelle Tiveron; Pereira, Amelia Rodrigues; Silva, Marcelo S.; Pereira, Aparecido B.; Kirsztajn, Gianna Mastroianni

2012-01-01

26

Collaborative Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Descriptions of 10 college programs involving collaborative learning are presented, along with Karen T. Romer's essay, "Collaboration: New Forms of Learning, New Ways of Thinking." The essay identifies various kinds of collaborative learning as well as the benefits of collaborative models. The following programs and schools are described: the…

Levy-Reiner, Sherry, Ed.

1985-01-01

27

Industry Collaborations  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Content Home | Investigator Resources | Protocol Development | Initiatives/Programs/Collaborations | Links to More Resources | Funding Opportunities | About CTEP Home | Sitemap | Contact CTEP Search this site Industry Collaborations Guidelines

28

TA Collaborations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper highlights several current collaborative activities of the National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC). There are many specific examples of TA (Technical Assistance) collaborations that take place on a regular basis; the seven examples presented here were selected to represent different types of collaboration. The…

Diefendorf, Martha

2010-01-01

29

Collaborative Arrangements.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two conference papers describing various collaborative arrangements within the educational community among teachers, students and others are presented in this document. The first paper, "Successful Collaborations" (Eugene Cota-Robles), describes the following projects in California that seek to forge collaborations to improve the education of…

Cota-Robles, Eugene; Doby, Winston

30

Teacher Collaboration in Collaboration Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although teacher teacher collaboration as a way of schools delivering services for student with learning disabilities is much described, in fact, little literature grounded in data or theory is available. This leaves us with a gap in knowing what collaboration is or could be. In this article, one of the few theories of collaboration is presented,…

Miller, Maurice

2007-01-01

31

Cystatin C- and creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate, vascular disease, and mortality in persons with diabetes in the u.s.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE Serum cystatin C is an alternative to serum creatinine for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR), since cystatin C is less influenced by age and muscle mass. Among persons with diabetes, we compared the performance of GFR estimated using cystatin C (eGFRcys) with that using creatinine (eGFRcr) for the identification of reduced kidney function and its association with diabetes complications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed data from adult participants from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with available cystatin C (N = 4,457). Kidney function was dichotomized as preserved (eGFR ?60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) or reduced (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) using the 2012 Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) cystatin C and the 2009 CKD-EPI creatinine equations. RESULTS Among 778 persons with diabetes, the prevalence of reduced kidney function was 16.5% using eGFRcr and 22.0% using eGFRcys. More persons with diabetes were reclassified from preserved kidney function by eGFRcr to reduced kidney function by eGFRcys than persons without diabetes (odds ratio 3.1 [95% CI 1.9-4.9], P < 0.001). The associations between lower eGFR and higher prevalence of albuminuria, retinopathy, peripheral arterial disease, and coronary artery disease were robust regardless of filtration marker. Similarly, the risk of all-cause mortality increased with lower eGFRcr and eGFRcys. Only lower eGFRcys was significantly associated with cardiovascular mortality. CONCLUSIONS More persons with diabetes had reduced kidney function by eGFRcys than by eGFRcr, and lower eGFRcys was strongly associated with diabetes complications. Whether eGFRcys is superior to eGFRcr in approximating true kidney function in a diabetic population requires additional study. PMID:24271191

Tsai, Ching-Wei; Grams, Morgan E; Inker, Lesley A; Coresh, Josef; Selvin, Elizabeth

2014-04-01

32

Industry Collaboration  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Content Home | Investigator Resources | Protocol Development | Initiatives/Programs/Collaborations | Links to More Resources | Funding Opportunities | About CTEP Home | Sitemap | Contact CTEP Search this site Initiatives / Programs National

33

Collaborative engagement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A need exists for United States military forces to perform collaborative engagement operations between unmanned systems. This capability has the potential to contribute significant tactical synergy to the Joint Force operating in the battlespace of the future. Collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. Collaborative engagements can also add considerably to force survivability by reducing soldier and equipment exposure during critical operations. This paper will address a multiphase U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC) Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL) program to assess information requirements, Joint Architecure for Unmanned Systems (JAUS), on-going Science and Technology initiatives, and conduct simulation based experiments to identify and resolve technical risks required to conduct collaborative engagements using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGV). The schedule outlines an initial effort to expand, update and exercise JAUS, provide early feedback to support user development of Concept of Operations (CONOPs) and Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTPs), and develop a Multiple Unified Simulation Environment (MUSE) system with JAUS interfaces necessary to support an unmanned system of systems collaboartive engagement.

Wade, Robert L.; Reames, Joseph M.

2004-09-01

34

Creating Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Today, teachers and administrators are continuing to recognize that learning is a social function, and that students do indeed learn better when working with others. The author agrees with this concept, but she wants to sigh deeply when she hears of one more person or company who has marketed the best approach to collaboration in the classroom. In…

Atkins, Janet

2010-01-01

35

Industry Collaboration  

Cancer.gov

The goal of the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) is to facilitate the process of bringing promising, novel, investigational anticancer and anti-HIV agents to the public as quickly and as safely as possible. CTEP offers a unique combination of resources and expertise to assist an Industry Collaborator in clinical development of new therapeutic agents and the ability to evaluate investigational agents in a wide variety of tumor types and disease settings.

36

Industry Collaboration  

Cancer.gov

Phase 2 N01 Program The Phase 2 N01 Program is a CTEP-CIP collaboration includes 7 contractors, most of whom consist of multi-institutional consortia, and includes a total of 22 NCI-designated Cancer Centers. These sites carry out early clinical trials with CTEP and CIP-held IND agents, with an emphasis on phase 2 trials, but including phase 1 trials as well. These trials include the evaluation of novel imaging agents and methods to enhance the evaluation of novel therapeutics.

37

Collaborative Statistics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Collaborative Statistics was written by Barbara Illowsky and Susan Dean, faculty members at De Anza College in Cupertino, California. The textbook was developed over several years and has been used in regular and honors-level classroom settings and in distance learning classes. This textbook is intended for introductory statistics courses being taken by students at twoâ and fourâÂÂyear colleges who are majoring in fields other than math or engineering. Intermediate algebra is the only prerequisite. The book focuses on applications of statistical knowledge rather than the theory behind it.

Dean, Susan; Illowsky, Barbara

2009-11-17

38

Differences in estimation of creatinine generation between renal function estimating equations in an Indian population: cross-sectional data from the Hyderabad arm of the Indian migration study  

PubMed Central

Background Creatinine based formulae for estimating renal function developed in white populations may be less valid in other ethnic groups. We assessed the performance of various estimating formulae in an Indian population. Methods 917 subjects were recruited from the Hyderabad arm of the Indian Migration Study. Data were collected on comorbidity, serum creatinine and body composition from DXA scans. Renal function was compared using the modified Cockcroft-Gault, MDRD and CKD-EPI formulae. 24-hour creatinine production was derived from each estimate and the agreement with measured muscle mass examined. 24-hour creatinine production estimates were compared to that derived from a formula by Rule incorporating DXA measured muscle mass. Potential systematic biases were examined by age and eGFR. We assessed the association of renal function by each formula with hypertension and self-reported measures of vascular disease. Results Mean modified Cockcroft-Gault eCCl was 98.8?ml/min/1.73?m2, MDRD eGFR 91.2?ml/min/1.73?m2 and CKD-EPI eGFR 96.3?ml/min/1.73?m2. MDRD derived 24-hour creatinine production showed the least age-related underestimation compared to the Rule formula. CKD-EPI showed a marked bias at higher eGFRs. All formulae showed similar strength associations with vascular disease and hypertension. Conclusions Our analyses support the use of MDRD for estimating renal function in Indian populations. Further work is required to assess the predictive value of formulae for incident disease and complications of CKD.

2013-01-01

39

Solidarity through Collaborative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While numerous publications signal the merits of collaborative research, few studies provide interpretive analyses of collaborative-research practices or collaborative relationships. Through this multiple case study design of collaborative-research teams, the authors attempt to provide such an analysis by focusing on the collaborative-research…

Ritchie, Stephen M.; Rigano, Donna L.

2007-01-01

40

Collaboration. Beginnings Workshop.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents four articles on collaboration for use in staff development in childcare settings: (1) "Facilitating Collaborations among Children" (Susan Stacey); (2) "One Size Doesn't Fit All in Collaborations with Parents" (Deborah E. Eaton); (3) "Supporting Collaboration among Teachers" (Kay Albrecht); and (4) "Building Collaborations between…

Stacey, Susan; Eaton, Deborah E.; Albrecht, Kay; Bergman, Roberta

2000-01-01

41

Collaborative Understanding of Cyanobacteria in Lake Ecosystems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We describe a collaboration between mathematicians and ecologists studying the cyanobacterium "Gloeotrichia echinulata" and its possible role in eutrophication of New England lakes. The mathematics includes compartmental modeling, differential equations, difference equations, and testing models against high-frequency data. The ecology…

Greer, Meredith L.; Ewing, Holly A.; Cottingham, Kathryn L.; Weathers, Kathleen C.

2013-01-01

42

Is an estimated glomerular filtration rate better than creatinine to be incorporated into the end-stage liver disease score?  

PubMed Central

AIM: To incorporate estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) into the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score to evaluate the predictive value. METHODS: From January 2004 to October 2008, the records of 4127 admitted cirrhotic patients were reviewed. Patients who survived and were followed up as outpatients were defined as survivors and their most recent available laboratory data were collected. Patients whose records indicated death at any time during the hospital stay were defined as non-survivors (in-hospital mortality). Patients with incomplete data or with cirrhosis due to a congenital abnormality such as primary biliary cirrhosis were excluded; thus, a total of 3857 patients were enrolled in the present study. The eGFR, which was calculated by using either the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) equation or the chronic kidney disease epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation, was incorporated into the MELD score after adjustment with the original MELD equation by logistic regression analysis [bilirubin and international normalized ratio (INR) were set at 1.0 for values less than 1.0]. RESULTS: Patients defined as survivors were significantly younger, had a lower incidence of hepatoma, lower Child-Pugh and MELD scores, and better renal function. The underlying causes of cirrhosis were very different from those in Western countries. In Taiwan, most cirrhotic patients were associated with the hepatitis virus, especially hepatitis B. There were 16 parameters included in univariate logistic regression analysis to predict in-hospital mortality and those with significant predicting values were included in further multivariate analysis. Both 4-variable MDRD eGFR and 6-variable MDRD eGFR, rather than creatinine, were significant predictors of in-hospital mortality. Three new equations were constructed (MELD-MDRD-4, MELD-MDRD-6, MELD-CKD-EPI). As expected, original MELD score was a significant predictor of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio = 1.25, P < 0.001). MELD-MDRD-4 excluded serum creatinine, with the coefficients refit among the remaining 3 variables, i.e., total bilirubin, INR and 4-variable MDRD eGFR. This model represented an exacerbated outcome over MELD score, as suggested by a decrease in chi-square (2161.45 vs 2198.32) and an increase in -2 log (likelihood) (2810.77 vs 2773.90). MELD-MDRD-6 included 6-variable MDRD eGFR as one of the variables and showed an improvement over MELD score, as suggested by an increase in chi-square (2293.82 vs 2198.32) and a decrease in -2 log (likelihood) (2810.77 vs 2664.79). Finally, when serum creatinine was replaced by CKD-EPI eGFR, it showed a slight improvement compared to the original MELD score (chi-square: 2199.16, -2 log (likelihood): 2773.07). In the receiver-operating characteristic curve, the MELD-MDRD-6 score showed a marginal improvement in area under the curve (0.909 vs 0.902), sensitivity (0.854 vs 0.819) and specificity (0.818 vs 0.839) compared to the original MELD equation. In patients with a different eGFR, the MELD-MDRD-6 equation showed a better predictive value in patients with eGFR ? 90, 60-89, 30-59 and 15-29. CONCLUSION: Incorporating eGFR obtained by the 6-variable MDRD equation into the MELD score showed an equal predictive performance in in-hospital mortality compared to a creatinine-based MELD score.

Chen, Yu-Wei; Chang, Ching-Wei; Chang, Chen-Wang; Wang, Tsang-En; Wu, Chih-Jen; Chen, Han-Hsiang

2012-01-01

43

Collaboration rules.  

PubMed

Corporate leaders seeking to boost growth, learning, and innovation may find the answer in a surprising place: the Linux open-source software community. Linux is developed by an essentially volunteer, self-organizing community of thousands of programmers. Most leaders would sell their grandmothers for workforces that collaborate as efficiently, frictionlessly, and creatively as the self-styled Linux hackers. But Linux is software, and software is hardly a model for mainstream business. The authors have, nonetheless, found surprising parallels between the anarchistic, caffeinated, hirsute world of Linux hackers and the disciplined, tea-sipping, clean-cut world of Toyota engineering. Specifically, Toyota and Linux operate by rules that blend the self-organizing advantages of markets with the low transaction costs of hierarchies. In place of markets' cash and contracts and hierarchies' authority are rules about how individuals and groups work together (with rigorous discipline); how they communicate (widely and with granularity); and how leaders guide them toward a common goal (through example). Those rules, augmented by simple communication technologies and a lack of legal barriers to sharing information, create rich common knowledge, the ability to organize teams modularly, extraordinary motivation, and high levels of trust, which radically lowers transaction costs. Low transaction costs, in turn, make it profitable for organizations to perform more and smaller transactions--and so increase the pace and flexibility typical of high-performance organizations. Once the system achieves critical mass, it feeds on itself. The larger the system, the more broadly shared the knowledge, language, and work style. The greater individuals' reputational capital, the louder the applause and the stronger the motivation. The success of Linux is evidence of the power of that virtuous circle. Toyota's success is evidence that it is also powerful in conventional companies. PMID:16028820

Evans, Philip; Wolf, Bob

2005-01-01

44

Theorizing collaboration practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides an overview of the theory of collaborative advantage. This is a practice-oriented theory concerned with enhancing practical understanding of the management isssues involved in joint working across organizations. Two contrasting concepts are central to it: collaborative advantage which is concerned with the potential for synergy from working collaboratively; and, collaborative inertia which relates to the often disappointing

Chris Huxham

2003-01-01

45

What is research collaboration?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although there have been many previous studies of research collaboration, comparatively little attention has been given to the concept of ‘collaboration’ or to the adequacy of attempting to measure it through co-authorship. In this paper, we distinguish between collaboration at different levels and show that inter-institutional and international collaboration need not necessarily involve inter-individual collaboration. We also show that co-authorship

J. Sylvan Katz; Ben R. Martin

1997-01-01

46

Reliability of estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients treated with platinum containing therapy.  

PubMed

Estimates of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) are widely used when administering nephrotoxic chemotherapy. No studies performed in oncology patients have shown whether eGFR can safely substitute a measured GFR (mGFR) based on a marker method. We aimed to assess the validity of four major formulas based on PCr (Cockcroft-Gault, MDRD, Wright and CKD-EPI) in comparison to mGFR in an oncology setting. Patients included had disseminated germ cell cancer and received conventional chemotherapy: bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin. The mGFR of the patients was compared to all estimates with focus on bias (median percentage error), precision (median absolute percentage error) and accuracy (p10 and p30). The precision of carboplatin dosage based on eGFR was calculated. Data on mGFR, eGFR, and PCr were available in 390 patients, with a total of ?1,600 measurements. Median PCr and mGFR synchronically decreased after chemotherapy, yielding high bias and low precision of most estimates. Post-chemotherapy, bias ranged from -0.2% (MDRD after four cycles) to 33.8% (CKD-EPI after five cycles+), precision ranged from 11.6% (MDRD after four cycles) to 33.8% (CKD-EPI after five cycles+) and accuracy (p30) ranged from 37.5% (CKD-EPI after five cycles+) to 86.9% (MDRD after four cycles). Although MDRD appeared acceptable after chemotherapy because of high accuracy, this equation underestimated GFR in all other measurements. Before and years after treatment, Cockcroft-Gault and Wright offered best results. Precision of carboplatin dosage was low. In conclusion, bias, precision and accuracy were unacceptable in all equations due to a synchronous decrease of PCr and mGFR during chemotherapy. PMID:24585507

Lauritsen, Jakob; Gundgaard, Maria G; Mortensen, Mette S; Oturai, Peter S; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Daugaard, Gedske

2014-10-01

47

Association of apolipoprotein A1 and B with kidney function and chronic kidney disease in two multiethnic population samples  

PubMed Central

Background Circulating lipoproteins and their protein constituents, apolipoproteins, are risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD). The associations between apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B and their ratio with glomerular filtration rate estimated from the new CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation (eGFR) are not well studied in the general population. Methods Associations between apolipoprotein A1, B and their ratio with the outcomes of eGFR, CKD (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2) and albuminuria were examined in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study (ARIC, n = 10 292, 1996–98) and the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III, n = 7023, 1988–91). Cross-sectional multivariable-adjusted analyses were performed using linear and logistic regression. Prospective analyses related baseline apolipoprotein levels to subsequent CKD incidence over 10 years using the ARIC Carotid MRI follow-up cohort (n = 1659). Results Higher apolipoprotein A1 quartiles were associated with a lower prevalence of CKD [Q4 versus Q1: odds ratio (OR) 0.73, P-trend = 0.02 in ARIC; Q4 versus Q1: OR 0.53, P-trend <0.01 in NHANES III] as well as with higher eGFR (P-trend <0.01 in ARIC and NHANES III). No consistent significant associations were found for apolipoprotein B in either study. The apolipoprotein B/A1 ratio was significantly associated with eGFR across quartiles in both studies (P-trend <0.01) and with CKD in ARIC (Q4 versus Q1: OR 1.23, P-trend = 0.01). Prospectively, there were trends for the association of apolipoproteins with incident CKD [Q4 versus Q1: incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 0.68 for apolipoprotein A1, P-trend = 0.1; Q4 versus Q1: IRR = 1.35 for apolipoprotein B, P-trend = 0.2]. Associations were not systematically stronger when comparing traditional lipids (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein or high-density lipoprotein) to apolipoproteins. Conclusions Higher serum apolipoprotein A1 was associated with lower prevalence of CKD and higher eGFR estimated by the CKD-EPI equation in two large multiethnic population-based samples. While apolipoprotein B showed no consistent associations, a higher apolipoprotein B/A1 ratio was significantly associated with lower eGFR in both studies. The direction and magnitude of the longitudinal associations between apolipoproteins and CKD incidence were overall similar to those observed cross-sectionally. No consistent differences became apparent between traditional lipids and apolipoproteins.

Goek, Oemer-Necmi; Kottgen, Anna; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Coresh, Josef; Astor, Brad C.

2012-01-01

48

Industry Collaboration — Model Agreements  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Content Home | Investigator Resources | Protocol Development | Initiatives/Programs/Collaborations | Links to More Resources | Funding Opportunities | About CTEP Home | Sitemap | Contact CTEP Search this site Industry Collaborations Guidelines

49

The use of biomarkers for assessing HAART-associated renal toxicity in HIV-infected patients.  

PubMed

Renal toxicity has become an important issue in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Several biomarkers are available for monitoring renal function, although no consensus exists on how best to apply these tools in HIV infection. The best biomarker is the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and several creatinine-based estimates equations of GFR are widely used in HIV infection, with clinical advantages for the equation developed by Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI). Although serum cystatin C has been proposed as a more sensitive marker of renal dysfunction in HIV infection, it may be affected by ongoing inflammation. Tubular dysfunction can be simple or complex, depending on whether the tubular transport of one or more substances is affected. Multiple renal tubular dysfunction or Fanconi syndrome is characterized by alterations in the reabsorption of glucose, amino acids, phosphate and often also bicarbonate. Therefore, Fanconi syndrome would be the tip of the iceberg, and the most unusual and severe manifestation. In the last years, several low molecular weight proteins as markers of tubular alteration, including retinol-binding protein, b2-microglobulin, and neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin have become available. Different studies have shown differences in urine concentrations of these proteins in patients receiving tenofovir, but again, no consistent data have shown their clinical usefulness in predicting the clinical consequences of tubular alteration. Thus, we review findings from recent studies performed in this area to describe the performance of new biomarkers for renal damage in HIV-infected patients. PMID:22716111

del Palacio, María; Romero, Sara; Casado, Jose L

2012-09-01

50

Experiences of Collaborative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author's personal history of the research that led to his recognition in economics is described, focusing on the process of collaboration and on the experience of controversy. The author's collaboration with Amos Tversky dealt with 3 major topics: judgment under uncertainty, decision making, and framing effects. A subsequent collaboration,…

Kahneman, Daniel

2003-01-01

51

Studies in scientific collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

From a historical and sociological perspective, this essay presents and develops the first comprehensive theory of scientific collaboration: collaborative scientific research, formally acknowledged by co-authorships of scientific papers, originated, developed, and continues to be practiced as a response to the professionalization of science. Following an overview of the origins and early history of collaboration in the 17th and 18th centuries,

D. deB Beaver; R. Rosen

1978-01-01

52

Collaboration in Art Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators are familiar with working together to produce curriculum packages, to team teach a unit, to host a parent event, to put on a school-wide concert, or to plan a conference. Collaboration in art education as presented in this publication is a team effort that is slightly different and beyond ordinary collaboration. Collaborative art-making…

McCoubrey, Sharon, Ed.

2000-01-01

53

Collaborative engagement experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unmanned ground and air systems operating in collaboration have the potential to provide future Joint Forces a significant capability for operations in complex terrain. Collaborative Engagement Experiment (CEE) is a consolidation of separate Air Force, Army and Navy collaborative efforts within the Joint Robotics Program (JRP) to provide a picture of the future of unmanned warfare. The Air Force Research

Katherine Mullens; Bradley Troyer; Robert Wade; Brian Skibba; Michael Dunn

2006-01-01

54

Investing in Forecast Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the strategic interaction between supply chain partners involved in collaborative forecasting. Motivated by the mixed results of collaborative forecasting initiatives in the consumer goods sector, we analyze the potential of Collaborative Planning, Forecasting, and Replenishment (CPFR) as well as possible barriers to its implementation. We model a supplier and retailer who can invest in improving the quality of

Mumin Kurtulu; Mike Shor; Beril Toktay

55

Heterogeneous Collaboration Using XML  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent proliferation of computing devices and use contexts demand equivalent diversity in collaborative applications. Our work on the DISCIPLE and Manifold frameworks supports the development of collaborative applications for these heterogeneous environments. Using eXtensible Markup Language (XML) for the communication medium provides for the heterogeneity. Collaborators share the same data or a subset of the data, represented in XML,

Ivan Marsic; Allan Krebs; Helmuth Trefftz; Bogdan Dorohonceanu; Marilyn Tremaine

2000-01-01

56

A Macroscopic Analytical Model of Collaboration in Distributed Robotic Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we present a macroscopic analytical model of collaboration in a group of reactive robots. The model consists of a series of coupled differential equations that describe the dynamics of group behavior. After presenting the general model, we analyze in detail a case study of collaboration, the stick-pulling experiment, studied experimentally and in simulation by Ijspeert et al.

Kristina Lerman; Aram Galstyan; Alcherio Martinoli; Auke Ijspeert

2002-01-01

57

Prevalence, determinants, and management of chronic kidney disease in Karachi, Pakistan - a community based cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing being recognized as a global public health problem. However, there is dearth of information on the prevalence, determinants, and management of CKD from low- and middle-income countries. The objectives of the study were to determine the 1) prevalence of CKD; 2) socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with CKD; and 3) the existing management of these patients with regards to blood pressure control, and use of antihypertensive medications. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study on 2873 participants aged ?40 years in 12 representative communities in Karachi, Pakistan. The primary outcome was clinically significant CKD defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 estimated by CKD-EPI (CKD Epidemiology Collaboration) Pakistan equation (0.686?×?CKD-EPI1.059) or urinary albumin to creatinine ratio ?3 mg/mmol (i.e. KDOQI CKD stage G3, A2 or worse). Results The overall prevalence (95% CI) of CKD was 12.5% (11.4 – 13.8%). The factors independently associated with CKD were older age, hypertension, diabetes, elevated systolic blood pressure, raised fasting plasma glucose, raised triglycerides, and history of stroke (p?

2014-01-01

58

Collaborative research: Accomplishments & potential  

PubMed Central

Although a substantial part of scientific research is collaborative and increasing globalization will probably lead to its increase, very few studies actually investigate the advantages, disadvantages, experiences and lessons learned from collaboration. In environmental epidemiology interdisciplinary collaboration is essential and the contrasting geographical patterns in exposure and disease make multi-location projects essential. This paper is based on a presentation given at the Annual Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology, Paris 2006, and is attempting to initiate a discussion on a framework for studying collaborative research. A review of the relevant literature showed that indeed collaborative research is rising, in some countries with impressive rates. However, there are substantial differences between countries in their outlook, need and respect for collaboration. In many situations collaborative publications receive more citations than those based on national authorship. The European Union is the most important host of collaborative research, mainly driven by the European Commission through the Framework Programmes. A critical assessment of the tools and trends of collaborative networks under FP6, showed that there was a need for a critical revision, which led to changes in FP7. In conclusion, it is useful to study the characteristics of collaborative research and set targets for the future. The added value for science and for the researchers involved may be assessed. The motivation for collaboration could be increased in the more developed countries. Particular ways to increase the efficiency and interaction in interdisciplinary and intercultural collaboration may be developed. We can work towards "the principles of collaborative research" in Environmental Epidemiology.

Katsouyanni, Klea

2008-01-01

59

An analysis of the relationship between ankle-brachial index and estimated glomerular filtration rate in type 2 diabetes.  

PubMed

We investigated the relationship between peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We enrolled 2057 hospitalized patients with T2DM and measured kidney function and ankle-brachial index (ABI). The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was derived using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation and ABI was grouped as low (<0.9), low-normal (0.9-1.09), normal (1.1-1.3), and high (>1.3). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations of eGFR with ABI. Generally speaking, the ABI was negatively correlated with systolic blood pressure, fasting C-peptide, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol while positively correlated with body mass index (P < .05 to <.01). Only a low ABI was positively correlated with eGFR (P < .01). In addition to the association of the ABI with cardiovascular events, stroke, and PAD, ABI may also predict the change in renal function in patients with T2DM. PMID:23162006

Jin, Xing; Ma, Jian-hua; Shen, Yun; Luo, Yong; Su, Xiao-fei; Chen, Ying-yue; Qi, Shao-kang; Wu, Jin-dan

2013-04-01

60

The Effect of Renal Dysfunction on Circulating Sclerostin Level in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Objective. Sclerostin is a Wnt inhibitor produced specifically by osteocytes. However, it is not currently clear whether renal dysfunction has an effect on circulating sclerostin level in patients with type 2 diabetes. The aim of the study was to evaluate this relationship. Design and Patients. We conducted a cross-sectional observational study of 302 type 2 diabetic patients with or without chronic kidney disease. Serum sclerostin level was analyzed by ELISA, and renal function was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using chronic kidney disease epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Results. There was a strong correlation between sclerostin level with renal function presented as serum creatinine (r = 0.745, P < 0.001) and eGFR (r = ?0.590, P < 0.001). Serum sclerostin level was significantly higher in patients with CKD-G3 stage than those with CKD-G1/2 stages after adjusting for age, sex, and BMI (P = 0.011). Patients with CKD-G4/5 stages had dramatically increased level of circulating sclerostin. Multiple regression analyses found that age, sex, and eGFR were independent determining factors for circulating sclerostin level. Conclusion. Our data showed that serum sclerostin levels start to increase in diabetic patients with CKD-G3 stage. Further studies are needed to establish the potential role of elevated sclerostin in diabetic patients with CKD.

Kim, Se Hwa; Yoon, Soo Young; Lim, Sung-Kil; Rhee, Yumie

2014-01-01

61

Nurse-physician collaboration.  

PubMed

The literature indicates that collaboration between nurses and physicians has become more sophisticated as these relationships have become collegial in nature and as nurses have become assertive, autonomous, and accountable. On an individual level, physicians and nurses now entering collaborative relationships are successful at minimizing the obstacles of turf and territoriality as well as at managing practice boundaries. However, both need to consciously examine their patterns of communication in order to effect clinical interaction styles that maintain unequal or hierarchical relationships. Studies of interprofessional communication, including style of clinical interaction, conflict resolution, use of humor, and negotiation, contribute support for nurses and physicians in collaborative relationships (Balzer, 1993; Campbell, Mauksch, Neikirk, & Hosokawa, 1990; Feiger & Schmitt, 1979; Lenkman & Gribbins, 1994; Pike, 1991). Research on differences in health outcomes of patients cared for in the traditional and collaborative models of health care delivery, identification of the unique product of collaborative practice models, and further identification of the type of attitudinal climate in which collaborative relationships can be nurtured should be undertaken if the elusive nature of collaboration is to be captured (Siegler, Whitney, & Schmitt, 1994). Providing collaborative, interdisciplinary clinical experiences for students, as well as role modeling of collaborative relationships in nurse-physician faculty practice, can contribute to a greater understanding and acceptance of each professional's role in health care delivery (Campbell, 1993; Forbes & Fitzsimons, 1993; Larson, 1995). Tradition and professionalism and progressive concern about practice boundaries continue to be obstacles to collaborative practice. These need to be addressed by medical and nursing professionals on the institutional level and in the political arena. Collaboration between nurses and physicians need not remain only a researchable issue; its viability and vitality are crucial to the changing health care scene. Understanding the issues that affect collaboration, as well as the historical background in which it has developed, can help nurses and physicians in their joint effort to improve health care delivery. PMID:10085849

Taylor-Seehafer, M

1998-09-01

62

Supporting collaboration in notecards  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a project underway to investigate computer support for collaboration. In particular, we focus on experience with and extensions to NoteCards, a hypertext-based idea structuring system. The forms of collaboration discussed include draft-passing, simultaneous sharing and online presentations. The requirement that mutual intelligibility be maintained between collaborators leads to the need for support of annotative and procedural as

Randall H. Trigg; Lucy A. Suchman; Frank G. Halasz

1986-01-01

63

Commentary: Community Collaborations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Science Education Standards offer the first assurance that community collaborations can be meaningful as they describe science instruction that educates students to "engage intelligently in public discourse and debate about matters of scientific and technological concern" (NRC 1996, p. 13). Community collaborations, if facilitated in a manner consistent with the Standards, can allow students to learn from and along with the community. The coeditor for this Community Collaborations issue of The Science Teacher (TST) hopes that as teachers read this issue of TST they will see the potential for engaging their own students in such collaborations in the coming year and look to share those experiences in next year's issue.

Campbell, Todd

2007-04-01

64

COLLABORATIVE DESIGN, COLLABORATIVE PRODUCT COMMERCE, CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT, WORKFLOW MANAGEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this research is to define the collaborative environment, analyze and design the architecture of a collaborative system, and prototype a web-based collaborative system as a generalized methodology for loosely coupled collaboration enabling platform. There are three unique models depicted in the paper for the collaborative platform development. In the organizational model, the roles and the authorities of

Ching-Jen Huang; Amy Trappey; Yin-Ho Yao

2003-01-01

65

Solo Librarians Working Collaboratively  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Elko County School District in Nevada has elementary school librarians that are "solo" librarians. Over the last several years they have worked to collaborate on meeting monthly--even though the district covers 17,100 square miles--and on providing professional development face to face and online. Sharing and collaboration help them to problem…

Nickel, Robbie

2011-01-01

66

Mobility in collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Is paper addresses an issue that has received fitie attention witiln CSCW - the requirements to suppoti mobifity within collaborative activities. By examining three quite different settings each with differing technologicsd suppo~ we examine tie ways in which mobility is critical to collaborative work. We suggest that t=lng mobility seriously may not only contribute our understanding of current support for

Paul Luff; Christian Heath

1998-01-01

67

Creating a Collaborative Culture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More and more research is focusing on the importance of a healthy work environment and its impact on workers' well-being and productivity. A culture of collaboration has been shown to have an important impact on school-reform efforts and is recognized by several authors as an effective platform for progress within an organization. A collaborative

Edmonson, Stacey; Fisher, Alice; Brown, Genevieve; Irby, Beverly; Lunenburg, Fred; Creighton, Ted; Czaja, Marion; Merchant, Jimmy; Christianson, Judy

68

Proficiency and Collaborative Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports on the effect of different levels of proficiency on the students' achievements in collaborative learning instruction among 30 Persian-speaking EFL college students. Having been divided into dyads with different levels of proficiency, these subjects participated in nine sessions of collaborative instruction based on the…

Shokouhi, Hossein; Alishaei, Zahra

2009-01-01

69

Curriculum-Based Collaboration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a teacher collaboration model called curriculum-based collaboration (CBC), which utilizes the differing expertise and perspectives of general and special education teachers. CBC includes several steps: (1) identify key content; (2) hold a planning meeting; (3) deliver instruction; (4) conduct an interim assessment; (5)…

Nolet, Victor; Tindal, Gerald

1994-01-01

70

Advances in Collaborative Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Collaborative evaluation is an approach that offers, among others, many advantages in terms of access to information, quality of information gathered, opportunities for creative problem-solving, and receptivity to findings. In the last decade, collaborative evaluation has grown in popularity along with similar participatory, empowerment, and…

Rodriguez-Campos, Liliana

2012-01-01

71

School-Community Collaboration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Collaborations between schools and parents, and schools and other institutions, seek to improve or expand available resources. This issue of "Focus in Change" focuses on two elementary schools with different models of collaboration in place. At Columbia Park Elementary School (Maryland) parents have been involved in site-based management teams…

Focus in Change, 1991

1991-01-01

72

Collaborative engagement experiment (CEE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unmanned ground and air systems operating in collaboration have the potential to provide future Joint Forces a significant capability for operations in complex terrain. Ground and air collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. These engagements can also add considerably to force survivability

Robert L. Wade; Joseph M. Reames

2005-01-01

73

Joint collaborative technology experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Use of unmanned systems is rapidly growing within the military and civilian sectors in a variety of roles including reconnaissance, surveillance, explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), and force-protection and perimeter security. As utilization of these systems grows at an ever increasing rate, the need for unmanned systems teaming and inter-system collaboration becomes apparent. Collaboration provides a means of enhancing individual system

Michael Wills; Donny Ciccimaro; See Yee; Thomas Denewiler; Nicholas Stroumtsos; John Messamore; Rodney Brown; Brian Skibba; Daniel Clapp; Jeff Wit; Randy J. Shirts; Gary N. Dion; Gary S. Anselmo

2009-01-01

74

Collaborative Forecasting in Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment (CPFR) process model developed by the Voluntary Inter-Industry Standards (VICS) association has received significant attention from both practitioners and academics. However, despite promising pilots, the adoption rate of CPFR has been slower than expected, especially in Europe. The reason seems to be that the proposed collaboration process is currently too labour-intensive for many European

Johanna Småros

2002-01-01

75

Negotiating Collaboration across Differences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through auto-ethnographic approach, this article extends contemporary debates on the need to further conceptualize and practice collaborative approaches to research. By exploring the complex dimensions of collaboration, this discussion traces the challenges of researching communities one affiliates with, particularly in relation to ethnic,…

Subedi, Binaya; Rhee, Jeong-eun

2008-01-01

76

Jump-Start Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When teachers and school librarians work together, student achievement increases. Librarians know this and have made sure their teachers and administrators know this as well. But it's a giant leap from knowing the value of collaboration and actually collaborating. The only way to convince teachers to take that step is to convince them that the…

Lohmiller, Darcy

2010-01-01

77

OGC Collaborative Platform undercover  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mission of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is to serve as a global forum for the collaboration of developers and users of spatial data products and services, and to advance the development of international standards for geospatial interoperability. The OGC coordinates with over 400 institutions in the development of geospatial standards. OGC has a dedicated staff supported by a Collaborative Web Platform to enable sophisticated and successful coordination among its members. Since its origins in the early 1990s, the OGC Collaborative Web Platform has evolved organically to be the collaboration hub for standards development in the exchange of geospatial and related types of information, among a global network of thousands of technical, scientific and management professionals spanning numerous disparate application domains. This presentation describes the structure of this collaboration hub, the relationships enabled (both among and beyond OGC members), and how this network fits in a broader ecosystem of technology development and information standards organizations.

Buehler, G.; Arctur, D. K.; Bermudez, L. E.

2012-12-01

78

COCA: collaborative objects coordination architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coordination policies vary from collaboration to collaboration and are even subject to evolution in different phases of the same collaboration. It is vital for collaborative systems to be flexible enough to accommodate changes to the coordination policies during development and the lifetime of the collaboration. Motivated by previous work of separating coordination and computation, we propose COCA as a generic

Du Li; Richard R. Muntz

1998-01-01

79

Some Aspects of Mathematical Model of Collaborative Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are some mathematical learning models of collaborative learning, with which we can learn how students obtain knowledge and we expect to design effective education. We put together those models and classify into three categories; model by differential equations, so-called Ising spin and a stochastic process equation. Some of the models do not…

Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Yasutake, Koichi; Yamakawa, Osamu

2012-01-01

80

Equation Games!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Several sites to practice solving equations. Play one of the following games: 1) algebra quiz/ alien millionaire 2) Battleship: solve equations to win! 3) connect four: solve equations to take a turn- 2 player game 4) Rags to Riches: millionaire type game asking questions about solving equations ...

Troff, Ms.

2008-06-23

81

Collaboration With the Pharmaceutical Industry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A recorded presentation from the EB 2007 Careers Symposium - Guide for Successful Collaboration: From the Handshake to the Collaborative Research Agreement a presentation on the why, what, and how of industry collaborations.

PhD Stephen A Douglas (GlaxoSmithKline)

2007-04-07

82

Collaboration With the Pharmaceutical Industry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A powerpoint presentation file from the EB 2007 Careers Symposium - Guide for Successful Collaboration: From the Handshake to the Collaborative Research Agreement a presentation on the why, what, and how of industry collaborations.

PhD Stephen A Douglas (GlaxoSmithKline)

2007-04-07

83

Collaborations: Challenging, but Key  

SciTech Connect

Collaborations are becoming increasing important in biology because of the need to apply multiple technologies to tackle the most complex current problems. The U.S. National Institutes of Health recognizes this need, and has created the “multi-investigator” granting mechanism to facilitate this process. I have reviewed a number of proposals that utilize the multi-investigator mechanism and have generally found them to be superior to individual investigator grants. Setting up a good collaboration, however, can be extremely difficult. Like any relationship, collaborations take time and energy. Still, there is nothing that can accelerate your research faster or expand your intellectual horizons more.

Wiley, H. S.

2009-10-01

84

Collaborating over Electronic Books  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this position paper we argue that electronic book and document readers (HUHDGHUV) open new avenues for com- puter supported collaborative work. This position draws on our experience building and e-reading with the XLibris \\

85

Product Roadmapping in Collaboration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Product roadmapping has not been widely examined, and particularly an intercompany collaboration perspective to product roadmapping is a fresh field of research. Therefore, the aim of this thesis is to research factors related to the product roadmapping p...

T. Kynkaanniemi

2007-01-01

86

Providers' perspectives on collaboration  

PubMed Central

Objective Changes in models of health care are required to better meet the needs of diverse, underserved patient populations. Collaboration among providers is one way to promote accessible, comprehensive and continuous care in healthcare organizations. This paper describes the quantitative findings from two time points that examined providers’ views of collaboration among a sample of diverse personnel (e.g. clinical nurses, social workers, dental providers, mental health providers, clerical staff, medical assistants, public health staff, and administrators) within a federally qualified nurse managed health care centre in the United States. Methods The quantitative arm of a mixed-method study is presented in this paper. Two instruments, the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale and the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (comprised of 4 subscales–Communication and Teamwork Scale, Interprofessional Learning Scale, Interprofessional Interaction Scale, and Interprofessional Relationships Scale) were administered to providers at baseline and three to eight months following six same discipline focus group discussions on collaboration, in order to evaluate whether participating in the focus group discussions changed providers’ views of collaboration. A summary of the focus group data which were published elsewhere is additionally summarized to help provide insight to the quantitative findings. Thirty-nine staff participated. Results Paired t-tests revealed that only one scale out of the five, Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (33.97 at time one and 37.45 at time two), significantly and positively changed after the focus group discussion (p=0.046). Providers’ views on collaboration ranged from positive to moderate views of collaboration; most measures revealed a non-significant improvement after the focus group discussions. Staff with some graduate school reported the greatest satisfaction with decisions for the patient, and those with high school reported the lowest satisfaction with decisions for the patient. Respondents with a graduate degree had the most positive views of interprofessional relationships, whilst those with either a high school degree or bachelor’s degree had the most negative views of interprofessional relationships. ANOVAs by professional role revealed the least positive views of collaboration for provider groups with lower levels of education, with upper administration reporting the most positive views on collaboration. Conclusion Although the discussion generated by the focus groups was expected to facilitate communication, and research has suggested that communication between providers facilitates collaboration, only one subscale evaluating providers’ views of collaboration positively and significantly changed after the focus group discussion. The wide range of views on collaboration suggests there are diverse perspectives on collaboration among the staff based on professional roles and levels of education, with upper administration and those with higher levels of education reporting the most positive views of collaboration and staff with lower levels of education reporting more negative views of collaboration. A major limitation of this study was a low time two return among support staff, comprised of primarily African American women. Due to their marginalized professional and racial status, future research needs to explore the perspectives of this important and often overlooked group of staff.

Bruner, Patricia; Waite, Roberta; Davey, Maureen P

2011-01-01

87

National Geothermal Collaborative.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report summarize the work conducted by the National Geothermal Collaborative (a consensus organization) to identify impediments to geothermal development and catalyze events and dialogues among stakeholders to over those impediments.

2006-01-01

88

Challenges of Interdisciplinary Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The realities of the 1990s, which include reduced funding and resources, the public's impatience with bureaucratic rigidity, and the empowerment of families who want timely and appropriate services, have created a favorable climate for collaborative, interdisciplinary practice. Collaborative, family-centered practice models are being promoted by family\\/child advocates and professionals. Yet child and family services, for the most part, continue to

John Powell; David Dosser; Dorothea Handron; Susan McCammon; Margaret Evans Temkin; Martha Kaufman

1999-01-01

89

Collaboration in social networks  

PubMed Central

The very notion of social network implies that linked individuals interact repeatedly with each other. This notion allows them not only to learn successful strategies and adapt to them, but also to condition their own behavior on the behavior of others, in a strategic forward looking manner. Game theory of repeated games shows that these circumstances are conducive to the emergence of collaboration in simple games of two players. We investigate the extension of this concept to the case where players are engaged in a local contribution game and show that rationality and credibility of threats identify a class of Nash equilibria—that we call “collaborative equilibria”—that have a precise interpretation in terms of subgraphs of the social network. For large network games, the number of such equilibria is exponentially large in the number of players. When incentives to defect are small, equilibria are supported by local structures whereas when incentives exceed a threshold they acquire a nonlocal nature, which requires a “critical mass” of more than a given fraction of the players to collaborate. Therefore, when incentives are high, an individual deviation typically causes the collapse of collaboration across the whole system. At the same time, higher incentives to defect typically support equilibria with a higher density of collaborators. The resulting picture conforms with several results in sociology and in the experimental literature on game theory, such as the prevalence of collaboration in denser groups and in the structural hubs of sparse networks.

Dall'Asta, Luca; Marsili, Matteo; Pin, Paolo

2012-01-01

90

Collaborations in fusion research  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews current experimental collaborative efforts in the fusion community and extrapolates to operational scenarios for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Current requirements, available technologies and tools, and problems, issues and concerns are discussed. This paper specifically focuses on the issues that apply to experimental operational collaborations. Special requirements for other types of collaborations, such as theoretical or design and construction efforts, will not be addressed. Our current collaborative efforts have been highly successful, even though the tools in use will be viewed as primitive by tomorrow`s standards. An overview of the tools and technologies in today`s collaborations can be found in the first section of this paper. The next generation of fusion devices will not be primarily institutionally based, but will be national (TPX) and international (ITER) in funding, management, operation and in ownership of scientific results. The TPX will present the initial challenge of real-time remotely distributed experimental data analysis for a steady state device. The ITER will present new challenges with the possibility of several remote control rooms all participating in the real-time operation of the experimental device. A view to the future of remote collaborations is provided in the second section of this paper.

Barnes, D.; Davis, S.; Roney, P.

1995-01-01

91

Collaborative engagement experiment (CEE)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unmanned ground and air systems operating in collaboration have the potential to provide future Joint Forces a significant capability for operations in complex terrain. Ground and air collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. These engagements can also add considerably to force survivability by reducing soldier and equipment exposure during critical operations. The Office of the Secretary of Defense, Joint Robotics Program (JRP) sponsored Collaborative Engagement Experiment (CEE) is a consolidation of separate Air Force, Army and Navy collaborative efforts to provide a Joint capability. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Material and Manufacturing Directorate, Aerospace Expeditionary Force Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRL\\MLQF), The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC)/Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL), and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center-San Diego (SSC San Diego) are conducting technical research and proof of principle for an envisioned operational concept for extended range, three dimensional, collaborative operations between unmanned systems, with enhanced situational awareness for lethal operations in complex terrain. This program will assess information requirements and conduct experiments to identify and resolve technical risks for collaborative engagements using Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). It will research, develop and physically integrate multiple unmanned systems and conduct live collaborative experiments. Modeling and Simulation systems will be upgraded to reflect engineering fidelity levels to greater understand technical challenges to operate as a team. This paper will provide an update of a multi-year program and will concentrate primarily on the JTC/SIL efforts. Other papers will outline in detail the Air Force and Navy portions of this effort.

Wade, Robert L.; Reames, Joseph M.

2005-05-01

92

Collaborative Coupling over Tabletop Displays  

Microsoft Academic Search

Designing collaborative interfaces for tabletops remains difficult because we do not fully understand how groups coordinate their actions when working collaboratively over tables. We present two observational studies of pairs completing independent and shared tasks that investigate collaborative coupling, or the manner in which collaborators are involved and occupied with each other's work. Our results indicate that individuals frequently and

Anthony Tang; Melanie Tory; Barry Po; Petra Neumann; M. Sheelagh T. Carpendale

2006-01-01

93

Culture-aware collaborative learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – In a collaborative learning environment there will be many learners with diverse cultures. These learners should be supported to communicate and collaborate among themselves. The variety of the communication and collaboration tools and modes available to each learner would depend on his\\/her personal cultural background. The purpose of this paper is to suggest the adaptation of the collaborative

Anastasios A. Economides

2008-01-01

94

Collaborative Processes in esupply Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper, which outlines research in progress, will attempt to provide an overview of collaborative relationships and processes within electronically-connected supply networks. These e-Supply Networks utilize the Internet to facilitate coordination and collaboration among multiple trading partners. We will look into the premises of interorganiza tional collaboration by delving into the new market landscape, trade exchanges and collaborative communities. Based

Chris Nøkkentved

95

Collaboration: Leveraging Resources and Expertise  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Successful collaboration is an art form but can be developed through several smart practices. The authors discuss the meaning of collaboration, stakeholder perceptions of collaborative partnerships, and the experience of Summer Scholars, a nonprofit community organization that successfully uses collaboration to accomplish its mission. Further,…

Byrne, Anne; Hansberry, Jane

2007-01-01

96

Distance collaborations with industry  

SciTech Connect

The college industry relationship has been identified as a key policy issue in Engineering Education. Collaborations between academic institutions and the industrial sector have a long history and a bright future. For Engineering and Engineering Technology programs in particular, industry has played a crucial role in many areas including advisement, financial support, and practical training of both faculty and students. Among the most important and intimate interactions are collaborative projects and formal cooperative education arrangements. Most recently, such collaborations have taken on a new dimension, as advances in technology have made possible meaningful technical collaboration at a distance. There are several obvious technology areas that have contributed significantly to this trend. Foremost is the ubiquitous presence of the Internet. Perhaps almost as important are advances in computer based imaging. Because visual images offer a compelling user experience, it affords greater knowledge transfer efficiency than other modes of delivery. Furthermore, the quality of the image appears to have a strongly correlated effect on insight. A good visualization facility offers both a means for communication and a shared information space for the subjects, which are among the essential features of both peer collaboration and distance learning.

Peskin, A.; Swyler, K.

1998-06-01

97

Indico: A Collaboration Hub  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 2009, the development of Indico has focused on usability, performance and new features, especially the ones related to meeting collaboration. Usability studies have resulted in the biggest change Indico has experienced up to now, a new web layout that makes user experience better. Performance improvements were also a key goal since 2010; the main features of Indico have been optimized remarkably. Along with usability and performance, new features have been added to Indico such as webchat integration, video services bookings, webcast and recording requests, designed to really reinforce Indico's position as the main hub for all CERN collaboration services, and many others which aim to complete the conference lifecycle management. Indico development is also moving towards a broader collaboration where other institutes, hosting their own Indico instance, can contribute to the project in order to make it a better and more complete tool.

Ferreira, P.; Baron, T.; Bossy, C.; Gonzalez, J. B.; Pugh, M.; Resco, A.; Trzaskoma, J.; Wachter, C.

2012-12-01

98

ECVAM's collaborations with academia.  

PubMed

The encouragement of ECVAM's connections with academia through direct collaboration and co-sponsored studentships has resulted in the successful achievement of higher degree qualifications for the young participants, and the development and promotion of alternative methods. So far, 26 students have been registered for higher degrees, of which 13 have been awarded so far, and 16 university departments in nine European countries have been directly involved. When other collaborations are included, the number of ECVAM's interactions with academic institutions rises to 33 departments in eleven countries, including the USA. In addition, through contracts awarded to academic institutions and other forms of collaboration, the prevalidation and validation of alternative methods have been progressed. PMID:12513670

Clothier, Richard

2002-12-01

99

The collaboration imperative.  

PubMed

Addressing global sustainability challenges--including climate change, resource depletion, and ecosystem loss--is beyond the individual capabilities of even the largest companies. To tackle these threats, and unleash new value, companies and other stakeholders must collaborate in new ways that treat fragile and complex ecosystems as a whole. In this article, the authors draw on cases including the Latin American Water Funds Partnership, the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (led by Nike, Patagonia, and Walmart), and Action to Accelerate Recycling (a partnership between Alcoa, consumer packaged goods companies, and local governments, among others) to describe four new collaboration models that create shared value and address environmental protection across the value stream. Optimal collaborations focus on improving either business processes or outcomes. They start with a small group of key organizations, bring in project management expertise, link self-interest to shared interest, encourage productive competition, create quick wins, and, above all, build and maintain trust. PMID:24830283

Nidumolu, Ram; Ellison, Jib; Whalen, John; Billman, Erin

2014-04-01

100

Student Teaching as Collaboration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For teachers who are trying to understand what their students think and how they feel, data can include notes found on the floor after class, the letters they as teachers write to their students, and the e-mails they send each other as they puzzle out the problems of teaching and learning. Claire Bove and Matt Reider use all of these data sources as they try to understand and respond to students' interests, strengths, experiences, and needs. In this story of their collaboration efforts to support a classroom community in which cooperation, shared responsibility, and respect among students are built upon their own collaboration as teachers.

Bove, Claire; Reider, Matthew

2007-01-01

101

Solving Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The activities on this site will help you practice solving one, two, and multi-step equations. 1. Solving an equation is like keeping a scale balanced. If you do something to one side, you must do it to the other side. Practice building and then solving "balanced" equations. Try at least 3 problems before moving on to the next activity. Balance Scale 2. Practice ...

Hbinggeli

2010-10-08

102

Equation Dictionary  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When equations are presented in class or in the context of textbook reading, students first evaluate whether the equation is appropriate for use in the dictionary (is it useful in many situations or specific to one problem? Is it a "final" version of an equation, or can it be simplified? Is it likely to be used in solving geophysical problems?) Once an equation is selected for the dictionary, students add a "definition" that includes (a) a short description of each variable and relevant constants, including appropriate units, (b) a written description of the process or relationships presented within the equation, and (c) any additional notes that help them understand the equation. The dictionary may be used on homework and exams, which encourages students to describe the equations in a manner that is meaningful to them. Thus, rather than simply write down the equation for seismic moment, a student might add "Seismic moment is a function of the size of the fault as well as the rigidity of the rock. The larger the fault or the displacement, the larger the earthquake". This activity allows students to evaluate their understanding of equations and the underlying physical processes. Addresses student fear of quantitative aspect and/or inadequate quantitative skills Addresses student misconceptions

Caplan-Auerbach, Jacqueline

103

Collaboration among Colleagues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In higher education, faculty are often encouraged to collaborate with their colleagues, to--as the "American Heritage Dictionary" defines it--"work together in a joint intellectual effort." The authors often think of such projects as occurring within a department or on a particular campus, but they have discovered that even faculty in similar…

Newtzie, Karen; Smith, Leslie

2005-01-01

104

Collaborative Teaching: Teaching Strangers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One calls people on the street strangers if he or she doesn't know who they are, so students whom the librarian has never dealt with are just that, strangers. When the school librarian gets involved in collaboration, most of the time they don't see the student's Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), language barriers, or anything else that…

Panter, Michael E.

2010-01-01

105

An Eco-Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As an elementary school library media specialist, the author has always tried to improve the authenticity of student research and increase collaboration with classroom teachers. Two years ago all those efforts came together and exceeded her highest expectations: a school-wide ecology fair showcased student research alongside the displays of…

Devlin, Jacquelin C.

2007-01-01

106

Crowded collaborative virtual environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce a framework for supporting crowds of participants in collaborative virtual environments (CVEs). The framework is realised as an extension to our previous spatial model of interaction and aims to provide greater scaleability and flexibility for communication between the inhabitants of virtual worlds. Our framework introduces an explicit crowd mechanism into CVEs in order to support the formation and

Steve Benford; Chris Greenhalgh; David Lloyd

1997-01-01

107

Online Collaboration: Curriculum Unbound!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Freed from the nuisances of paper-based methods, districts are making creative use of digital tools to move their curricular documents online, where educators can collaborate on course development and lesson planning. Back in 2003, Amarillo Independent School District (Texas) had begun using the Blackboard Content System to provide lessons online.…

Waters, John K.

2007-01-01

108

A Call for Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this digital world, being a "viewer" is passe. Web 2.0 tools--social networks, wikis, blogs, voicestream, YouTube, Google Docs--allow users to be participants. Instead of creating isolated users, such technologies foster community and collaboration. In this article, the author describes how schools in New York, Florida, New Jersey, and North…

Vogel, Carl

2009-01-01

109

Explaining collaborative filtering recommendations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Automated collaborative filtering (ACF) systems predict a person's affinity for items or information by connecting that person's recorded interests with the recorded interests of a community of people and sharing ratings between like-minded persons. However, current recommender systems are black boxes, providing no transparency into the working of the recommendation. Explanations provide that transparency, exposing the reasoning and data behind

Jonathan L. Herlocker; Joseph A. Konstan; John Riedl

2000-01-01

110

Can Colleges Really Collaborate?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seven small private colleges in three states have found a way to reduce their administrative technology costs and expand their technological capability at the same time. They have done it by choosing the common-sense, yet unconventional, college and university strategy of genuine collaboration. The result, the Independent College Enterprise (ICE),…

Welch, Edwin H.

2008-01-01

111

A Failure to Collaborate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on a successful scholarly collaboration experience, the writer assigned a group project in a graduate seminar that confronted a wave of resentment. Small clusters of students were to tackle a multi-layered research assignment requiring textual decisions, bibliographic work, critical theory, historical research, and editorial design. As the…

Sanders, Martin

2008-01-01

112

Collecting the Data: Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Collaboration is considered a key to the survival of the school library media specialist in the 21st century school. It is a measure of a library media specialist's abilities and successes as an educator. It is a means for illustrating the need for a professional in the school's library media center during difficult times when trying to save…

McGriff, Nancy; Harvey, Carl A.; Preddy, Leslie B.

2004-01-01

113

Collaborating for Impact  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Collaborating to define clear roles, responsibilities, and expectations can help a college and its partners avoid misunderstandings and "turf" problems. In this article, the authors describe vital partnerships between community colleges and economic development organizations to foster economic growth. The authors also share some lessons learned…

Dobrzeniecki, Aimee; Poole, Ken; Troppe, Mark

2006-01-01

114

Competitive Collaborative Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intuitively, it is clear that trust or shared taste enables a community of users to make better decisions over time, by learning cooperatively and avoiding one an- other's mistakes. However, it is also clear that the presence of malicious, dishon- est users in the community threatens the usefulness of such collaborative learning processes. We investigate this issue by developing algorithms

Baruch Awerbuch; Robert D. Kleinberg

2005-01-01

115

Competitive collaborative learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intuitively, it is clear that trust or shared taste enables a community of users to make better decisions over time, by learning cooperatively and avoiding one another's mistakes. However, it is also clear that the presence of malicious, dishonest users in the community threatens the usefulness of such collaborative learning processes. We investigate this issue by developing algorithms for a

Baruch Awerbuch; Robert Kleinberg

2008-01-01

116

The Art of Collaboration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses building collaborative teacher-librarian relationships, focusing on team-building experiences at Lincoln Elementary School (Hawaii). Highlights include: building trust; cooperating on curriculum; creating leadership teams; planning interactive meetings; valuing strengths; varying roles and responsibilities; and viewing planning as…

Muronaga, Karen; Harada, Violet

1999-01-01

117

The Collaborative Research Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a five-week English course in which pairs of students work collaboratively on team-building activities, library research, research-paper topic selection, outlining, paraphrasing and summarizing, and writing and editing a joint research paper. Presents the peer-evaluation techniques, which differentiate students' share of the work so that…

Bashore, Joy

1999-01-01

118

Learning Music from Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

I draw on two traditions of research: the social psychology of collaborative groups, and the ethnographic study of improvisational performance. I outline a general model of group creativity derived from these traditions. I show how the model can be used to better understand musical competence and performance, and I provide recommendations for how…

Sawyer, R. Keith

2008-01-01

119

Creative Conflict: Collaborative Playwriting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In some ways, the project which the author's class had undertaken--creating collaborative plays about issues important in students' lives--was going very well. The students, 20 high school seniors, seemed engaged and invested in the work, from brainstorming and improvising to writing and revising. The class had read and watched a variety of…

Melville, Kathleen

2013-01-01

120

Designing Collaborative Learning Contexts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes lessons learned across two programs of research which featured peer collaboration to promote advanced literacies, including text comprehension and scientific reasoning, identifying lessons learned from reciprocal teaching research and ways that this research influenced the design of cognitive tools and intellectual roles, which were…

Palincsar, Annemarie Sullivan; Herrenkohl, Leslie Rupert

2002-01-01

121

Collaborative research, knowledge and emergence.  

PubMed

We use the notion of emergence to consider the sorts of knowledge that can be produced in a collaborative research project. The notion invites us to see collaborative work as a developmental dynamic system in which various changes constantly occur. Among these we examine two sorts of knowledge that can be produced: scientific knowledge, and collaborative knowledge. We argue that collaborative knowledge can enable researchers to reflectively monitor their collaborative project, so as to encourage its most productive changes. On the basis of examples taken from this special issue, we highlight four modes of producing collaborative knowledge and discuss the possible uses of such knowledge. PMID:18193522

Zittoun, Tania; Baucal, Aleksandar; Cornish, Flora; Gillespie, Alex

2007-06-01

122

Linear Equations: One Step Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video, best for introductory algebra students, demonstrates solving linear equations by working backwards, using inverse or opposite operations. The video uses several examples to demonstrate balancing equations to solve them. This is an excellent resource to help students understand how to solve linear equations by undoing operations and balancing. Flash player is required to view the video. Running time for the video is 4:59.

Wallace, Tyler

2011-08-17

123

Equation Match  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Those crazy ancient mathematicians are back. In this online game, students find the matching pairs by solving equations to find the value of x in each equation. Correct answers reveal a hidden picture. Levels 1 and 2 are most appropriate for Grades 6-7 Level 3 is most appropriate for Grade 8

Corporation, British B.

2009-07-01

124

Linear Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This narrated demonstration introduces students to linear equations with one variable, their visual representation, and how to solve them. After the clear instructions, students are allowed to test what they've learned by solving two equations on their own. The lesson is concluded with a review of the objective and summary of the key points.

2004-01-01

125

Penetration equations  

SciTech Connect

In 1967, Sandia National Laboratories published empirical equations to predict penetration into natural earth materials and concrete. Since that time there have been several small changes to the basic equations, and several more additions to the overall technique for predicting penetration into soil, rock, concrete, ice, and frozen soil. The most recent update to the equations was published in 1988, and since that time there have been changes in the equations to better match the expanding data base, especially in concrete penetration. This is a standalone report documenting the latest version of the Young/Sandia penetration equations and related analytical techniques to predict penetration into natural earth materials and concrete. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

Young, C.W. [Applied Research Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-10-01

126

Equation poems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most challenging goals of a physics teacher is to help students see that the equations of physics are connected to each other, and that they logically unfold from a small number of basic ideas. Derivations contain the vital information on this connective structure. In a traditional physics course, there are many problem-solving exercises, but few, if any, derivation exercises. Creating an equation poem is an exercise to help students see the unity of the equations of physics, rather than their diversity. An equation poem is a highly refined and eloquent set of symbolic statements that captures the essence of the derivation of an equation. Such a poetic derivation is uncluttered by the extraneous details that tend to distract a student from understanding the essential physics of the long, formal derivation.

Prentis, Jeffrey J.

1996-05-01

127

Network Aware Tactical Collaborative Environments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The implications of using mobile wireless communications are significant for emerging peer-to-peer (P2P) collaborative environments. From a networking perspective, the use of wireless technologies to support collaboration may impact bandwidth and spectrum...

A. Bordetsky S. G. Hutchins E. Bourakov W. G. Kemple

2004-01-01

128

Stage Models for Collaboration, Levels of Collaboration Survey and Collaboration Map; Measuring Collaboration Among Grant Partners - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Collaboration is a prerequisite for the sustainability of interagency programs, particularly those programs initially created with the support of time-limited grant-funding sources. From the perspective of evaluators, however, assessing collaboration among grant partners is often difficult. It is also challenging to present collaboration data to stakeholders in a way that is meaningful. In this article, the authors introduce the Levels of Collaboration Scale, which was developed from existing models and instruments.

129

National Girls Collaborative Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Numerous programs and initiatives to create gender equity in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) have been implemented only to lose effectiveness or fade away. Had these programs had the benefit of collaboration with other girl-serving projects, organizations and institutions, and tools to assess and evaluate the impact of their efforts, their capacity for continuation and/or broader impact could have been substantially increased.The National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) is designed to reach girl-serving STEM organizations across the United States.The vision of the NGCP is to bring together organizations throughout the United States that are committed to informing and encouraging girls to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM.

2008-11-21

130

Teachers & Writers Collaborative  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Teachers & Writers Collaborative (T&W) was founded in 1967 as a non-profit organization by a group of writers and educators who believe that writers can make a unique contribution to the teaching of writing. T&W brings writers and educators together in collaborations that explore the connections between writing and reading literature, and that generate new ideas and materials. T&W writers' diaries, as well as articles from other writers and teachers around the country, are the source of T&W publications. T&W publishes a bimonthly magazine and books, distributed through the 200,000 catalogues they mail to educators and writers nationwide each year. Links are provided to various publications, such as new books for teachers & writers and books for creative teachers. http://www.twc.org/tmmain.htm

131

Collaborative interaction with volumetric displays  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volumetric displays possess a number of unique properties which potentially make them particularly suitable for collaborative 3D applications. Because such displays have only recently become available, interaction techniques for collaborative usage have yet to be explored. In this paper, we initiate this exploration. We present a prototype collaborative 3D model viewing application, which served as a platform for our explorations.

Tovi Grossman; Ravin Balakrishnan

2008-01-01

132

Territoriality in collaborative tabletop workspaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers seeking alternatives to traditional desktop computers have begun exploring the potential collaborative benefits of digital tabletop displays. However, there are still many open issues related to the design of collaborative tabletop interfaces, such as whether these systems should automatically orient workspace items or enforce ownership of workspace content. Understanding the natural interaction practices that people use during tabletop collaboration

Stacey D. Scott; T. Carpendale; Kori M. Inkpen

2004-01-01

133

Modeling Sustainability through Collaboratively Organizing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This project explores collaborative efforts involving the United States Forest Service and the communities it serves. By contributing to our understanding leadership dynamics within collaborative groups in this setting, this project provides resource managers and communities with a more refined insight into how collaborative groups are maintained…

Wood, Michael D.

2012-01-01

134

Preparing Future Teachers to Collaborate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors argue that teacher education programs should equip future teachers with skills for engaging in productive collaboration focused on improving instruction. Because little is known about pre-service teachers' beginning conceptions of collaboration and the ways in which collaboration skills can be developed, the authors…

Santagata, Rossella; Guarino, Jody

2012-01-01

135

Access control for collaborative environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Access control is an indispensable part of any informa- tion sharing system. Collaborative environments introduce new requirements for access control, which cannot be met by using existing models developed for non-collaborative domains. We have developed a new access control model for meeting these requirements. The model is based on a generalized editing model of collaboration, which assumes that users interact

HongHai Shen; Prasun Dewan

1992-01-01

136

The collaborative tokamak control room  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetic fusion experiments keep growing in size and complexity resulting in a concurrent growth in collaborations between experimental sites and laboratories worldwide. In the US, the National Fusion Collaboratory Project is developing a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for all aspects of magnetic fusion energy research by creating a robust, user-friendly collaborative environment and deploying this to the more

D. P. Schissel

2006-01-01

137

FACILITATING COLLABORATION IN ONLINE LEARNING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaboration entails working together toward a common goal, but what is the common goal we want students to work toward in classes? What kinds of interactions and outcomes do we value as collaboration, and how do we facilitate them? This paper addresses these questions, beginning with an examination of research on groups, community, and shared cognition that inform collaboration, and

Caroline Haythornthwaite

138

Collaborative Testing To Promote Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nursing students (n=24) took conventional individual unit and final exams; 25 others used collaborative testing for units and individual final exams. Overall comprehension was equivalent; collaboration improved unit exam scores. There was indirect evidence that collaboration altered test-taking skills. (SK)

Lusk, Marilyn; Conklin, Lynn

2003-01-01

139

Retailer Views on Forecasting Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forecasting collaboration between retailers and suppliers is suggested to bring significant benefits in the form of increased efficiency and improved customer service. Yet, only few companies seem to be engaged in collaborative relationships. Even in the grocery sector, which is one of the most active promoters of supply chain integration efforts such as Efficient Consumer Response (ECR) and Collaborative Planning,

Johanna Småros; Alfred Angerer; Giulio Zotteri

2004-01-01

140

Technological collaboration in industrial networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author considers how companies handle their technological development in relation to external clients and organizations, particularly in terms of collaborative projects. Using research undertaken on Swedish companies, Håkansson shows that collaborative relationships are of strategic importance to companies, these relationships are investment-intensive, that the type of counterpart used is important (suppliers and customers), and that collaborative relationships generally evolve

Håkan Håkansson

1990-01-01

141

Collaborative Courseware Authoring Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

We refined our knowledge classification and indexing approach applied in our previously developed system AIMS (Agent-based Information Management System) by introducing ontology-oriented support for collaborative courseware authoring. In order to provide a basis for formal semantics and reasoning in performing generic authoring tasks, we add ontology-based layers in the courseware authoring architecture. Ontological structuring also opens the way for cooperative

Darina Dicheva; Lora Aroyo; Alexandra Cristea

2002-01-01

142

Evaluating Collaborative Learning Processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding and analyzing collaborative learning processes require a fine-grained sequential analysis of the group interaction\\u000a in the context of learning goals. Several researchers in the area of cooperative work take as a success criterion the quality\\u000a of the group outcome. Nevertheless, recent findings are giving importance to the quality of the cooperation process itself.\\u000a This paper presents a set of

César A. Collazos; Luis A. Guerrero; José A. Pino; Sergio F. Ochoa

2002-01-01

143

Collaborative space surveillance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a space-based, space-surveillance study wherein the goal is to demonstrate the feasibility and scalability of the modeling and simulation of a distributed multi-agent multiple satellites tracking and prediction system. A flexible and modular system architecture that enables collaborative and efficient teaming among distributed agents is delineated. Hierarchical objective methodology is deployed to align the mission objectives with

Ching-Fang Lin; Khanh D. Pham

2009-01-01

144

Collaborative Information Technologies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Significant effort has been expended to provide infrastructure and to facilitate the remote collaborations within the fusion community and out. Through the Office of Fusion Energy Science Information Technology Initiative, communication technologies utilized by the fusion community are being improved. The initial thrust of the initiative has been collaborative seminars and meetings. Under the initiative 23 sites, both laboratory and university, were provided with hardware required to remotely view, or project, documents being presented. The hardware is capable of delivering documents to a web browser, or to compatible hardware, over ESNET in an access controlled manner. The ability also exists for documents to originate from virtually any of the collaborating sites. In addition, RealNetwork servers are being tested to provide audio and/or video, in a non-interactive environment with MBONE providing two-way interaction where needed. Additional effort is directed at remote distributed computing, file systems, security, and standard data storage and retrieval methods. This work supported by DoE contract No. W-7405-ENG-48

Meyer, William; Casper, Thomas

1999-11-01

145

MMI: Increasing Community Collaboration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Building community requires a collaborative environment and guidance to help move members towards a common goal. An effective environment for community collaboration is a workspace that fosters participation and cooperation; effective guidance furthers common understanding and promotes best practices. The Marine Metadata Interoperability (MMI) project has developed a community web site to provide a collaborative environment for scientists, technologists, and data managers from around the world to learn about metadata and exchange ideas. Workshops, demonstration projects, and presentations also provide community-building opportunities for MMI. MMI has developed comprehensive online guides to help users understand and work with metadata standards, ontologies, and other controlled vocabularies. Documents such as "The Importance of Metadata Standards", "Usage vs. Discovery Vocabularies" and "Developing Controlled Vocabularies" guide scientists and data managers through a variety of metadata-related concepts. Members from eight organizations involved in marine science and informatics collaborated on this effort. The MMI web site has moved from Plone to Drupal, two content management systems which provide different opportunities for community-based work. Drupal's "organic groups" feature will be used to provide workspace for future teams tasked with content development, outreach, and other MMI mission-critical work. The new site is designed to enable members to easily create working areas, to build communities dedicated to developing consensus on metadata and other interoperability issues. Controlled-vocabulary-driven menus, integrated mailing-lists, member-based content creation and review tools are facets of the new web site architecture. This move provided the challenge of developing a hierarchical vocabulary to describe the resources presented on the site; consistent and logical tagging of web pages is the basis of Drupal site navigation. The new MMI web site presents enhanced opportunities for electronic discussions, focused collaborative work, and even greater community participation. The MMI project is beginning a new initiative to comprehensively catalog and document tools for marine metadata. The new MMI community-based web site will be used to support this work and to support the work of other ad-hoc teams in the future. We are seeking broad input from the community on this effort.

Galbraith, N. R.; Stocks, K.; Neiswender, C.; Maffei, A.; Bermudez, L.

2007-12-01

146

Electronic Literacy, Critical Pedagogy, and Collaboration: A Case for Cyborg Writing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that the combination of collaborative writing and electronic resources can produce a reaffirmation of literacy as a social process. Utilizes feminist theory to equate the postmodernist assumptions regarding the indeterminate nature of language with democratizing influences. Describes a class project where students produced a collaborative,…

Winkelmann, Carol L.

1995-01-01

147

Male sex and vascular risk factors affect cystatin C-derived renal function in older people without diabetes or overt vascular disease  

PubMed Central

Background/objectives: to explore the effect of ageing on renal function with cystatin C as the marker of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in the general population without vascular disease or diabetes. Design: a cross-sectional analysis of a healthy subset from the Good Aging in Skåne-cohort study representative of the Swedish general population. Subjects: 1252 participants without vascular disease and diabetes (43.9% men) of whom 203 were over 80 years old were included from the original cohort of 2931. Methods: plasma cystatin C and plasma creatinine were used as markers for GFR. Estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated with three chronic kidney disease epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI) formulas involving cystatin C, creatinine or both. Results: the median for plasma cystatin C was 0.93 mg/l (60–69 years old), 1.04 (70–79 years old) and 1.24 (80+ years old). The difference in mg/l between the 5th and 95th percentile was 0.46, 0.62 and 0.90 for these age groups. Male sex increased the age effect on plasma cystatin C levels with 0.004 mg/l/year (P = 0.03), adjusted for vascular risk factors. Smoking, lower HDL and higher diastolic blood pressure were associated with higher cystatin C levels. 54.7% (CKD-EPI creatinine) to 73.9% (CKD-EPI cystatin C) of the 80+ had an eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Conclusion: non-diabetics without overt vascular disease exhibit an age related but heterogeneous decline in renal function. The ageing effect is more pronounced in men. At least half of healthy 80+ years old could be expected to have at least CKD Stage 3 with eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2.

Werner, Karin Birgitta; Elmstahl, Solve; Christensson, Anders; Pihlsgard, Mats

2014-01-01

148

State Technologies Advancement Collaborative  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy Resources, (5) Hydrogen Technology Learning Centers, (6) Fossil Energy, and (7) Rebuild America.

David S. Terry

2012-01-30

149

Collaborative Hypertext of Radiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Medical College of WisconsinâÂÂs Collaborative Hypertext of Radiology (CHORUS) website contains over one thousand documents and images related to anatomy and physiology, radiological findings, diagnostics, and diseases. The site links headings and reference information with images, providing access to case study images in a variety of formats. Not only are the documents and images helpful reference sources, but they are also great tool for those looking to practice their diagnostic skills. This is a valuable tool for students studying the basics of radiology and related fields.

2007-04-10

150

Collaborative editing within the pervasive collaborative computing environment  

SciTech Connect

Scientific collaborations are established for a wide variety of tasks for which several communication modes are necessary, including messaging, file-sharing, and collaborative editing. In this position paper, we describe our work on the Pervasive Collaborative Computing Environment (PCCE) which aims to facilitate scientific collaboration within widely distributed environments. The PCCE provides a persistent space in which collaborators can locate each other, exchange messages synchronously and asynchronously and archive conversations. Our current interest is in exploring research and development of shared editing systems with the goal of integrating this technology into the PCCE. We hope to inspire discussion of technology solutions for an integrated approach to synchronous and asynchronous communication and collaborative editing.

Perry, Marcia; Agarwal, Deb

2003-09-11

151

Differential Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Differential Equations are the language in which the laws of nature are expressed. Understanding properties of solutions of differential equations is fundamental to much of contemporary science and engineering. Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) deal with functions of one variable, which can often be thought of as time.Topics include: Solution of first-order ODE's by analytical, graphical and numerical methods; Linear ODE's, especially second order with constant coefficients; Undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters; Sinusoidal and exponential signals: oscillations, damping, resonance; Complex numbers and exponentials; Fourier series, periodic solutions; Delta functions, convolution, and Laplace transform methods; Matrix and first order linear systems: eigenvalues and eigenvectors; and Non-linear autonomous systems: critical point analysis and phase plane diagrams.

Mattuck, Arthur

2010-12-08

152

Building collaborative enterprise.  

PubMed

Can large companies be both innovative and efficient? Yes, argue Adler, of the University of Southern California; Heckscher, of Rutgers; and Prusak, an independent consultant. But they must develop new organizational capabilities that will create the atmosphere of trust that knowledge work requires--and the coordinating mechanisms to make it scalable. Specifically, such organizations must learn to: Define a shared purpose that guides what people at all levels of the organization are trying to achieve together; Cultivate an ethic of contribution in which the highest value is accorded to people who look beyond their specific roles and advance the common purpose; Develop scalable procedures for coordinating people's efforts so that process-management activities become truly interdependent; and Create an infrastructure in which individuals' spheres of influence overlap and collaboration is both valued and rewarded. These four goals may sound idealized, but the imperative to achieve them is practical, say the authors. Only the truly collaborative enterprises that can tap into everyone's ideas---in an organized way--will compete imaginatively, quickly, and cost-effectively enough to become the household names of this century. PMID:21800474

Adler, Paul; Heckscher, Charles; Prusak, Laurence

2011-01-01

153

Serum cystatin C predicts vancomycin trough levels better than serum creatinine in hospitalized patients: a cohort study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Serum cystatin C can improve glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimation over creatinine alone, but whether this translates into clinically relevant improvements in drug dosing is unclear. Methods This prospective cohort study enrolled adults receiving scheduled intravenous vancomycin while hospitalized at the Mayo Clinic in 2012. Vancomycin dosing was based on weight, serum creatinine with the Cockcroft-Gault equation, and clinical judgment. Cystatin C was later assayed from the stored serum used for the creatinine-based dosing. Vancomycin trough prediction models were developed by using factors available at therapy initiation. Residuals from each model were used to predict the proportion of patients who would have achieved the target trough with the model compared with that observed with usual care. Results Of 173 patients enrolled, only 35 (20%) had a trough vancomycin level within their target range (10 to 15 mg/L or 15 to 20 mg/L). Cystatin C-inclusive models better predicted vancomycin troughs than models based upon serum creatinine alone, although both were an improvement over usual care. The optimal model used estimated GFR by the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaborative (CKD-EPI) creatinine-cystatin C equation (R2?=?0.580). This model is expected to yield 54% (95% confidence interval 45% to 61%) target trough attainment (P <0.001 compared with the 20% with usual care). Conclusions Vancomycin dosing based on standard care with Cockcroft-Gault creatinine clearance yielded poor trough achievement. The developed dosing model with estimated GFR from CKD-EPIcreatinine-cystatin C could yield a 2.5-fold increase in target trough achievement compared with current clinical practice. Although this study is promising, prospective validation of this or similar cystatin C-inclusive dosing models is warranted.

2014-01-01

154

Automating and estimating glomerular filtration rate for dosing medications and staging chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this paper is to serve as a review for primary care providers on the bedside methods for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) for dosing and chronic kidney disease (CKD) staging and to discuss how automated health information technologies (HIT) can enhance clinical documentation of staging and reduce medication errors in patients with CKD. Methods A nonsystematic search of PubMed (through March 2013) was conducted to determine the optimal approach to estimate GFR for dosing and CKD staging and to identify examples of how automated HITs can improve health outcomes in patients with CKD. Papers known to the authors were included, as were scientific statements. Articles were chosen based on the judgment of the authors. Results Drug-dosing decisions should be based on the method used in the published studies and package labeling that have been determined to be safe, which is most often the Cockcroft–Gault formula unadjusted for body weight. Although Modification of Diet in Renal Disease is more commonly used in practice for staging, the CKD–Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD–EPI) equation is the most accurate formula for estimating the CKD staging, especially at higher GFR values. Automated HITs offer a solution to the complexity of determining which equation to use for a given clinical scenario. HITs can educate providers on which formula to use and how to apply the formula in a given clinical situation, ultimately improving appropriate medication and medical management in CKD patients. Conclusion Appropriate estimation of GFR is key to optimal health outcomes. HITs assist clinicians in both choosing the most appropriate GFR estimation formula and in applying the results of the GFR estimation in practice. Key limitations of the recommendations in this paper are the available evidence. Further studies are needed to better understand the best method for estimating GFR.

Trinkley, Katy E; Nikels, S Michelle; Page, Robert L; Joy, Melanie S

2014-01-01

155

Sensemaking in Collaborative Web Search  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sensemaking is an important aspect of information-seeking tasks but has mostly been studied at the individual level. We conducted a study of sensemaking in collaborative Web search using SearchTogether and found that collaborators face several challenges in making sense of information during collaborative search tasks. We built and evaluated a new tool, CoSense, which enhanced sensemaking in SearchTogether. The evaluation

Sharoda A. Paul; Meredith Ringel Morris

2011-01-01

156

Collaboration Supported Automatic Examination Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the past few years, automatic computer examination systems have been widely used for computer-based tests. But these systems are based on the traditional question-answer examination style which is limited for the collaborative examination. The collaborative examination needs multiple examinees and can be parallel performed. The collaborative examination also should consider the context of the examinee, e.g. the order of

Song Luo; Jianbin Hu; Zhong Chen

2009-01-01

157

Difference Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by David Smith for the Connected Curriculum Project, the purpose of this module is to apply linear algebra concepts to study the properties of sequences defined by difference equations. This is one within a much larger set of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

Smith, David

2010-05-03

158

Differential Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This series of lectures, created by Salman Khan of the Khan Academy, focuses on topics covered in a first year course in differential equations. A basic understanding of differentiation and integration from Calculus before starting here is necessary. Overall, the collection features 45 videos and is a quintessential guide to this broad topic.

Khan, Salman

2011-04-26

159

Differential Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This course, presented by MIT and taught by Professors Haynes Miller and Arthur Mattuck, provides undergraduate level calculus instruction. Focusing on differential equations, the materials include video lectures, lecture notes, exams and assignments (with solutions). MIT presents OpenCourseWare as free educational material online. No registration or enrollment is required to use the materials.

Mattuck, Arthur; Miller, Haynes R., 1948-

2010-12-09

160

Supporting collaborative computing and interaction  

SciTech Connect

To enable collaboration on the daily tasks involved in scientific research, collaborative frameworks should provide lightweight and ubiquitous components that support a wide variety of interaction modes. We envision a collaborative environment as one that provides a persistent space within which participants can locate each other, exchange synchronous and asynchronous messages, share documents and applications, share workflow, and hold videoconferences. We are developing the Pervasive Collaborative Computing Environment (PCCE) as such an environment. The PCCE will provide integrated tools to support shared computing and task control and monitoring. This paper describes the PCCE and the rationale for its design.

Agarwal, Deborah; McParland, Charles; Perry, Marcia

2002-05-22

161

National Girls Collaborative Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The goal of the National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) "is to bring together organizations throughout the United States that are committed to informing and encouraging girls to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)." The Project started as a regional organization in the Pacific Northwest in 2002, and the National Science Foundation funded the creation of the national group in 2004. Visitors interested in reading about how the NGCP has positively impacted STEM education for girls and women, should definitely read the NGCP Evaluation Summary PDF in the "Project Evaluation" link under the "About" tab. Visitors can find an archive of the NGCP e-newsletter dating back to 2006 under the "Resources" tab. There are also more than a dozen webcast videos that share effective strategies from around the nation, for working with girls in STEM. The "Stories" link provides encouraging success stories of regional groups that work with girls in STEM areas.

162

Collaboration and collaborative information technologies: a review of the evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaborative information technologies have been claimed to enhance collaboration in organizations, under certain conditions. This claim was found problematic in several respects, also in the light of the results of 18 case studies of Lotus Notes use, taken from the literature. The cases may be split into three groups: (1) exploratory, conservative, or cautious use; (2) planned and expanding use;

Helena Karsten

1999-01-01

163

Global and Local Collaborators: A Study of Scientific Collaboration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an empirical study that was conducted to examine the relationship among scientific co-authorship (i.e., collaboration), research funding, and productivity. Bibliographic records from the MEDLINE database that used the subject heading for schistosomiasis are analyzed, global and local collaborators are discussed, and scientific…

Pao, Miranda Lee

1992-01-01

164

Collaborative spectrum sensing: Optimising the number of collaborating users  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the IEEE 802.22 standard, the spectrum sensing mechanism is identified as a key functionality of a cognitive radio. Due to the channel uncertainty, a single cognitive user, in most cases, can not make a reliable decision and hence collaboration or cooperation of and among multiple users is required. However, when large number of cognitive users are collaborating with each

Kamran Arshad; Klaus Moessner

2009-01-01

165

Collaborative Resource Allocation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Collaborative Resource Allocation Networking Environment (CRANE) Version 0.5 is a prototype created to prove the newest concept of using a distributed environment to schedule Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna times in a collaborative fashion. This program is for all space-flight and terrestrial science project users and DSN schedulers to perform scheduling activities and conflict resolution, both synchronously and asynchronously. Project schedulers can, for the first time, participate directly in scheduling their tracking times into the official DSN schedule, and negotiate directly with other projects in an integrated scheduling system. A master schedule covers long-range, mid-range, near-real-time, and real-time scheduling time frames all in one, rather than the current method of separate functions that are supported by different processes and tools. CRANE also provides private workspaces (both dynamic and static), data sharing, scenario management, user control, rapid messaging (based on Java Message Service), data/time synchronization, workflow management, notification (including emails), conflict checking, and a linkage to a schedule generation engine. The data structure with corresponding database design combines object trees with multiple associated mortal instances and relational database to provide unprecedented traceability and simplify the existing DSN XML schedule representation. These technologies are used to provide traceability, schedule negotiation, conflict resolution, and load forecasting from real-time operations to long-range loading analysis up to 20 years in the future. CRANE includes a database, a stored procedure layer, an agent-based middle tier, a Web service wrapper, a Windows Integrated Analysis Environment (IAE), a Java application, and a Web page interface.

Wang, Yeou-Fang; Wax, Allan; Lam, Raymond; Baldwin, John; Borden, Chester

2007-01-01

166

Characterizing the Photometric Response of the ANS Collaboration Monitoring Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ANS Collaboration uses the UBVR CI C filters from various commercial manufacturers (Omega Optical, Custom Scientific, Schuler, Optec, Astrodon) for its ongoing photometric monitoring of symbiotic stars. We measured their transmittance profiles over the range 2000 Å to 1.1 ? m for various operating conditions, and we are monitoring their evolution over time. Their field performance in terms of color equations has been evaluated by analyzing the transformations from local to standard system of the 14602 observing runs so far collected on symbiotic stars with the ANS Collaboration telescopes. Ageing effects, red leaks and transmittance vs. angle of incidence are also evaluated.

Munari, U.; Moretti, S.

167

Collaborative Argumentation in Academic Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes research that was conducted to discover principles for the design of educational tasks that provoke collaborative argumentation, concentrating on the relationship between question asking and argumentation. Discusses results from experiments with three different collaborative learning tasks involving university students and examines the…

Veerman, Arja; Andriessen, Jerry; Kanselaar, Gellof

2002-01-01

168

Towards Synchronous Collaborative Software Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

Caise, a collaborative software engineering architecture, provides ex- tensible real-time support for collaboration between participating tools and users. The architecture maintains a semantic project model con- structed incrementally from software artifacts as they are developed; this model is used to determine the impact of changes at a semantic level. This information is relayed to developers, providing them with awareness of

Carl Cook; Neville Churcher; Warwick Irwin

2004-01-01

169

Knowledge Convergence and Collaborative Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper operationalized the notion of knowledge convergence and assessed quantitatively how much knowledge convergence occurred during collaborative learning. Knowledge convergence was defined as an increase in common knowledge where common knowledge referred to the knowledge that all collaborating partners had. Twenty pairs of college students…

Jeong, Heisawn; Chi, Michelene T. H.

2007-01-01

170

A Model of Transformative Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two collaborative writing partners sought to deepen their understanding of transformative learning by conducting several spirals of grounded theory research on their own collaborative relationship. Drawing from adult education, business, and social science literature and including descriptive analysis of their records of activity and interaction…

Swartz, Ann L.; Triscari, Jacqlyn S.

2011-01-01

171

Collaboration for Inclusion: Practitioner Perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaboration as a cornerstone of effective school inclusion is an idea that has high theoretical currency among many scholars in the areas of special education and educational leadership. The challenge for educational practitioners is to find ways to implement high-quality special education programs collaboratively amid the public call for school efficiency and accountability. Accordingly, the primary purpose of the qualitative

Rebecca Smith; Pauline Leonard

2005-01-01

172

Training Health Professionals To Collaborate  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discover what we believe when we have to teach it. Late spring of 1997, Susan traveled to Germany to celebrate the German publication of Medical Family Therapy and to continue a collaboration with internists in the medical schools in Aachen and Freiburg. Our Aachen colleagues asked her to speak about the training we believe to be important for Collaborative

Susan H. McDaniel; Thomas L. Campbell

1997-01-01

173

Illinois: Child Care Collaboration Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Illinois Child Care Collaboration Program promotes collaboration between child care and other early care and education providers, including Early Head Start (EHS), by creating policies to ease blending of funds to extend the day or year of existing services. While no funding is provided through the initiative, participating programs may take…

Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

2012-01-01

174

Collaborative Testing and Test Anxiety  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prior research concluded that collaborative learning reduces test anxiety. Examination of the evidence used in that research, however, calls into question those conclusions. The present study used an empirical measure of test anxiety and an experimental design to provide an improved estimate of the effect of collaboration in an evaluative context…

Breedlove, William; Burkett, Tracy; Winfield, Idee

2004-01-01

175

Collaborative video editing for Wikipedia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaborative video for Wikipedia faces several challenges from social and community adoption to technology limitations. This presentation explores how each of these problems are being addressed. The presentation focuses on building a collaborative educational video community and how the html5 technology platform has evolved to better support rich media applications such as HTML5 video editing in the browser and standardization

Michael Dale

2011-01-01

176

Learning through Collaboration: Student Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research examines the effectiveness of collaborative learning pedagogies from the perspective of students. There is a rich history of research on collaborative learning demonstrating the effectiveness and this has led to indexing educational quality by student engagement. However, the findings from this study question the efficacy of…

Osman, Gihan; Duffy, Thomas M.; Chang, Ju-yu; Lee, Jieun

2011-01-01

177

ASSESSMENT AND COLLABORATION IN ONLINE LEARNING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessment can be seen as the engine that drives student course activity, online or off. It is particularly important in encouraging and shaping collaborative activity online. This paper discusses three sorts of online collaborative activity—collaborative discussion, small group collaboration, and collaborative exams. In each of these areas, it provides both theoretical grounding and practical advice for assessing, and so encouraging,

Karen Swan; Jia Shen; Starr Roxanne Hiltz

178

Online Collaborative Documents for Research and Coursework  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The increased use of the internet in higher education has helped researchers conduct collaborative research and enabled faculty to provide opportunities for students to work collaboratively in their courses. The authors of this article use online collaborative documents for conducting collaborative research and for learning collaboratively via the…

Murphy, Karen L.; Cifuentes, Lauren; Shih, Yu-Chih Doris

2004-01-01

179

Self-organization of collaboration networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study collaboration networks in terms of evolving, self-organizing bipartite graph models. We propose a model of a growing network, which combines preferential edge attachment with the bipartite structure, generic for collaboration networks. The model depends exclusively on basic properties of the network, such as the total number of collaborators and acts of collaboration, the mean size of collaborations, etc.

José J. Ramasco; S. N. Dorogovtsev; Romualdo Pastor-Satorras

2004-01-01

180

Collaborative space surveillance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a space-based, space-surveillance study wherein the goal is to demonstrate the feasibility and scalability of the modeling and simulation of a distributed multi-agent multiple satellites tracking and prediction system. A flexible and modular system architecture that enables collaborative and efficient teaming among distributed agents is delineated. Hierarchical objective methodology is deployed to align the mission objectives with the diverse agents' capabilities and resources. A set of satellite platform and sensor configuration/models is considered. Detailed mathematical models of the satellite orbits including the mutual visibility function are simulated for combinations of GEO and LEO orbits. An Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF)/Distributed Unscented Information Filter (DUIF) for high-accuracy orbital determination and tracking is demonstrated to show that the LEO orbit estimation from the GEO satellite with only angle measurements based on UKF is an excellent approach. Simulation studies show that the rate of filter convergence depends on sample time period, initial error, process error, measurement errors as well as the relative geometry of the LEO and GEO satellite orbits.

Lin, Ching-Fang; Pham, Khanh D.

2009-05-01

181

5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Continuing collaboration. 9701.105 Section 9701.105...Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a) In accordance with...representatives to be engaged in the continuing collaboration process. (3) Each national...

2010-01-01

182

5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-01-01 false Continuing collaboration. 9701.105 Section 9701.105...Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a) In accordance with...representatives to be engaged in the continuing collaboration process. (3) Each national...

2009-01-01

183

School and Workplace Collaboration: The Fourth C--Collaboration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An effective career planning program involves collaboration among schools, families, businesses, industries, and community. All stakeholders work together to design a program that will help each student establish and achieve goals through ongoing career planning. (SK)

Rogers, Zelda

1996-01-01

184

Collaborative writing: Tools and tips.  

PubMed

Majority of technical writing is done by groups of experts and various web based applications have made this collaboration easy. Email exchange of word processor documents with tracked changes used to be the standard technique for collaborative writing. However web based tools like Google docs and Spreadsheets have made the process fast and efficient. Various versioning tools and synchronous editors are available for those who need additional functionality. Having a group leader who decides the scheduling, communication and conflict resolving protocols is important for successful collaboration. PMID:18032878

Eapen, Bell Raj

2007-01-01

185

When is collaboration not collaboration? When it's militarized.  

PubMed

In adopting the medical lobby's preferred definition of collaboration where midwives are legally compelled to seek endorsement for their care plan from an obstetrician, Determination 2010 connotes a form of militarized collaboration and thus negates all that genuine collaboration stands for--equality, mutual trust and reciprocal respect. Using Critical Discourse Analysis, the first half of this paper analyses the submissions from medical, midwifery and consumer peak organisations to the Maternity Services Review and Senate reviews held between 2008 and 2010 showing that Determination 2010 privileges the medical lobby worldview in adopting a vertical definition of collaboration. The second half of the paper responds to the principal assumption of Determination 2010--that midwives do not voluntarily collaborate. It argues by reference to a qualitative inquiry conducted into select caseload maternity units in South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales during 2009-2010 that this presupposition is erroneous. The evidence shows that genuine collaboration is possible without legislative force but it requires a coalition of the willing among senior midwives and obstetricians to institute regular interdisciplinary meetings and clinical reviews and to model respectful behaviour to new entrants. PMID:21489895

Lane, Karen

2012-03-01

186

Interdisciplinary Educational Collaborations: Chemistry and Computer Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research collaborations between chemists and other scientists resulted in significant outcomes such as development of software. Such collaboration provided a realistic learning experience for computer science students.

Haines, Ronald S.; Woo, Daniel T.; Hudson, Benjamin T.; Mori, Joji C.; Ngan, Evey S. M.; Pak, Wing-Yee

2007-01-01

187

Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Update (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation was given at the Sandia Reliability Workshop in August 2013 and provides information on current statistics, a status update, next steps, and other reliability research and development activities related to the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative.

Sheng, S.

2013-10-01

188

Counselor Credentialing and Interprofessional Collaboration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents history and development of counselor credentialing, including dimensions of standards, accreditation, certification, and licensure. Analyzes unresolved issues critical to the success of interprofessional collaboration. Offers predictions for future of nonmedical health professions. (Author/ABL)

Brooks, David K., Jr.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.

1990-01-01

189

Interorganizational Arrangements for Collaborative Efforts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report, consolidating the findings from various stages of the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory project on interorganizational collaboration in the dissemination of information for educational improvement, includes theoretical considerations, ...

1980-01-01

190

Community collaboration--a weaving.  

PubMed

This article describes the collaborative efforts of the Sitka Turning Point Towards Health partnership in Sitka, Alaska. Key steps to its success include defining our terms, finding consensus, maintaining an attitude of respect, engaging people--building relationships, creating work groups, sharing leadership, committing to collaborative leadership, building in sustainability, and telling our story. We have chosen to interlace a weaving metaphor to reflect our Alaskan Native American culture and the vision of our partnership. PMID:11789032

Cavanaugh, Nancy; Cheney, Kaats Saa Waa Della

2002-01-01

191

Challenges in Collaborative Authoring Software  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaborative work with office suite documents demands new tools and methods for their control and ease-of-use. We identify twelve challenges to such collaborative software: time and space, awareness, communication, private and shared work spaces, intellectual property, simultaneity and locking, protection, workflow, security, file format, platform independence, and benefit. We use these challenges to measure the success of TellTable, a web-based

Andy Adler; John C. Nash; Sylvie Noël

192

Grouping in collaborative graphical editors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Often collaborative graphical systems lag behind well accepted single-user applications in terms of features supported. The frequently used operations of group\\/ungroup offered by almost every single-user graphical editor have not been considered by the collaborative graphical editing systems that try to preserve the intentions of the users involved in the concurrent editing. In this paper we present a novel algorithm

Claudia-Lavinia Ignat; Moira C. Norrie

2004-01-01

193

Supporting Distance Learners for Collaborative Problem Solving.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a computer-supported environment designed to facilitate distance learning through collaborative problem-solving. The goal is to encourage distance learning students to work together, in order to promote both learning of collaboration and learning through collaboration. Collaboration is defined as working together on a common…

Verdejo, M. F.; Barros, B.; Abad, M. T.

194

Evaluation of Collaborative Construction in Mixed Reality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaborative virtual and augmented reality are an active area of research and many systems supporting collab- oration have been presented. Just like there are many different systems for VR and AR, there are many different types of collaboration. In some cases, virtual reality is used to enhance an existing collaborative process. In other cases, it enables new types of collaboration

Breght R. Boschker; Jurriaan D. Mulder

2005-01-01

195

Looking Outward. Changing Organizations Through Collaboration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Community colleges have long relied on informal and unstructured collaborations for survival and success. This article describes the need for more complex collaborative relationships with external constituents. Examples of emerging types of structured collaboration are presented, as are the implications of these collaborations for faculty,…

Augustine, Catherine; Rosevear, Scott

1998-01-01

196

Situation awareness support for asynchronous engineering collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Engineering collaboration over the Internet using a CAD browser is analyzed, and a conceptual model is presented from the perspective of human-computer interaction. Based on process analysis and a theoretical model of engineering collaboration, major factors that affect engineering collaboration are identified. Six hypotheses are proposed to test the six agent-based features that are developed to support collaboration awareness, communication,

Yunlong Xie

2002-01-01

197

Examples of Collaboration Between Psychologists and Clergy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some psychologists may be interested in working collaboratively with clergy and yet may not know where to start. What kinds of collaborative projects are possible? A qualitative analysis of 77 narratives offered by psychologists and clergy involved in collaboration revealed that collaboration between psychologists and clergy currently takes place in at least four contexts: mental health services, parish life, community

Laura C. Edwards; Brian R. K. B. Lim; Mark R. McMinn; Amy W. Dominguez

1999-01-01

198

Specifying Computer-Supported Collaboration Scripts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Collaboration scripts facilitate social and cognitive processes of collaborative learning by shaping the way learners interact with each other. Computer-supported collaboration scripts generally suffer from the problem of being restrained to a specific learning platform. A standardization of collaboration scripts first requires a specification of…

Kobbe, Lars; Weinberger, Armin; Dillenbourg, Pierre; Harrer, Andreas; Hamalainen, Raija; Hakkinen, Paivi; Fischer, Frank

2007-01-01

199

Implicit collaboration of sensor systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The concept of goal lattices for the evaluation of potential sensor actions can be used to cause a multiplicity of heterogeneous sensor systems to collaborate. Previously goal lattices have been used to compute the value to a sensor system of taking a particular action in terms of how well that action contributes to the accomplishment of the topmost goals. This assumes that each sensor system is autonomous and only responsible to itself. If the topmost goals of each sensor system's goal lattice has adjoined to it two additional goals, namely "collaboration" and "altruism", then the value system is extended to include servicing requests from other systems. Two aircraft on a common mission can each benefit from measurements taken by the other aircraft either to confirm their own measurements, to create a pseudo-sensor, or to extend the area of coverage. The altruism goal indicates how much weight a sensor management system (SMS) will give in responding to a measurement request from any other system. The collaboration goal indicates how much weight will be given to responding to a measurement request from specific systems which are defined as being part of a collaborating group. By varying the values of the altruism and collaboration goals of each system, either locally or globally, various levels of implicit cooperation among sensor systems can be caused to emerge.

Hintz, Kenneth J.

2004-08-01

200

IDEAS - Benefits of Creative Collaboration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A key goal for the Initiative to Develop Education through Astronomy and Space Science (IDEAS) Grant Program is to enhance science education through astronomy and space science via creative collaboration between professional astronomers/space scientists and professional educators/informal science educators. Creative collaboration not only refers to the partnership formed by the team members of proposed programs team but also to the wider community of audiences and venues. There are many possible untapped audiences and/or communities that could be targeted with an astronomy/space science program. There are also dissemination possibilities, including publication in professional education journals, instruction and display, that could amplify the affect a program has on a broader community. The poster will provide examples of previous creative collaborations as well as information on the next proposal cycle.

Eisenhamer, B.

2001-05-01

201

Team Collaboration: Lessons Learned Report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An Agency team collaboration pilot was conducted from July 2002 until June 2003 and then extended for an additional year. The objective of the pilot was to assess the value of collaboration tools and adoption processes as applied to NASA teams. In an effort to share knowledge and experiences, the lessons that have been learned thus far are documented in this report. Overall, the pilot has been successful. An entire system has been piloted - tools, adoption, and support. The pilot consisted of two collaboration tools, a team space and a virtual team meeting capability. Of the two tools that were evaluated, the team meeting tool has been more widely accepted. Though the team space tool has been met with a lesser degree of acceptance, the need for such a tool in the NASA environment has been evidenced. Both adoption techniques and support were carefully developed and implemented in a way that has been well received by the pilot participant community.

Arterberrie, Rhonda Y.; Eubanks, Steven W.; Kay, Dennis R.; Prahst, Stephen E.; Wenner, David P.

2005-01-01

202

Heartland AEA's Technology Infusion Collaborative  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For this TIC presentation, Cappie will share various integrated technologies that aid visual art instruction, foster engagement and encourage collaboration and community. Some of the shared online resources will include social platforms, interactive posters and website use. Connections to the Visual Arts in the Iowa Core website will also be showcased. Technology Integration Matrix is a framework for ?defining and evaluating? whether use is active, collaborative, constructive, authentic and goal-directed. Technology Integration Matrix Art Educators of Iowa's Visual Arts in the Iowa Core website guides educators ...

Dobyns, Ms.

2012-11-12

203

Why Does Collaboration Work? Linking Positive Psychology and Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Authors in this special issue edited by Cook and Friend provide analyses of many important relationships within a school: teacher to teacher; teacher to paraprofessional, educators, and home caregivers; and whole-building systems. Their focus on collaboration prompted these authors to reflect on a possible theoretical mechanism behind the success…

Conoley, Jane Close; Conoley, Collie Wyatt

2010-01-01

204

Knowledge Management: The Collaboration Thread.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the evolution of knowledge management in businesses and in other organizations and discusses explicit knowledge versus tacit knowledge; communities and collaboration; measuring social capital; social network analysis; organizational change; individual and personal change; improving the network; and the next stage of knowledge management.…

Anklam, Patti

2002-01-01

205

Communication in Collaborative Discovery Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Constructivist approaches to learning focus on learning environments in which students have the opportunity to construct knowledge themselves, and negotiate this knowledge with others. "Discovery learning" and "collaborative learning" are examples of learning contexts that cater for knowledge construction processes. We introduce a…

Saab, Nadira; van Joolingen, Wouter R.; van Hout-Wolters, Bernadette H. A. M.

2005-01-01

206

Drama: An Interdisciplinary, Collaborative Exercise.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching drama gave one instructor a chance to renew herself, and drama became an important part of a personal teaching renaissance. An elective class for grade 12 entitled "Humanities and the Arts" offered opportunity for collaborative teaching with colleagues in their areas of expertise. In a class on "Modern Drama" designed for honors students,…

Tomas, Linda

207

International Collaboration in Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented in five parts on research, services, training, drug abuse, and alcohol abuse are 31 reports of mental health studies and programs supported by the U.S. and other countries. Explained in the introduction are reasons the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has supported international collaboration. The following are among subjects…

Brown, Bertram S., Ed.; Torrey, E. Fuller, Ed.

208

Evaluating Collaborative Filtering Recommender Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recommender systems have been evaluated in many, often incomparable, ways. In this article, we review the key decisions in evaluating collaborative filtering recommender systems: the user tasks being evaluated, the types of analysis and datasets being used, the ways in which prediction quality is measured, the evaluation of prediction attributes other than quality, and the user-based evaluation of the system

JONATHAN L. HERLOCKER; JOSEPH A. KONSTAN; LOREN G. TERVEEN; JOHN T. RIEDL

1998-01-01

209

Evaluating collaborative filtering recommender systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recommender systems have been evaluated in many, often incomparable, ways. In this article, we review the key decisions in evaluating collaborative filtering recommender systems: the user tasks being evaluated, the types of analysis and datasets being used, the ways in which prediction quality is measured, the evaluation of prediction attributes other than quality, and the user-based evaluation of the system

Jonathan L. Herlocker; Joseph A. Konstan; Loren G. Terveen; John T. Riedl

2004-01-01

210

Actor Interdependence in Collaborative Telelearning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a model of collaborative telelearning and describes how coordination theory has provided a framework for the analysis of actor (inter)dependencies in this scenario. The model is intended to inform the instructional design of learning scenarios, the technological design of the telelearning environment, and the design of…

Wasson, Barbara; Bourdeau, Jacqueline

211

The Funding of Academic Collaborations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To leverage expertise and efficiencies in implementing educational technologies, higher education leaders often create centralized service organizations or inter-institutional partnerships. Defined as "academic collaborations," these organizations foster inter-institutional partnerships that share resources to increase institutional capacity for,…

Michelau, Demaree K.; Poulin, Russell

2008-01-01

212

Library Collaboration Aids Global Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the geosciences, organizational libraries and information centers are local sources for scientists, students, and members of the general public who are searching for current or historic information in their fields. They offer focused collections, rare materials, and knowledgeable librarians, but often issues caused by isolation and limited resources impede their ability to fulfill the researchers' needs. Unlike the local university libraries, these small special information centers are usually housed in the same building as their scientists' offices. To help overcome these problems of limited resources and isolation, while retaining the organizational focus and unique collections that are its strengths, the National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Information Center has begun to collaborate with similar libraries and information centers. This project has three major steps: 1. Catalog sharing through internet-based links. 2. Resource sharing. 3. Expansion of collaboration. NSIDC is creating catalog links with a sister library, the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) Information Center. Once the links are established, the two libraries will develop a plan for resource sharing and coordinated purchasing. This small collaborative effort will serve as a template for a network of special libraries within Colorado. Ultimately, they hope to expand the collaborative effort to small libraries with a similar focus around the globe. This poster will outline and graphically illustrate these steps, as well as provide a template for future expansion of the project.

Hicks, G. J.; Howard, A. L.; Sommer, S.

2005-12-01

213

Blueprints for a Collaborative Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book provides guidelines and suggested activities for collaborative learning for elementary grade students with a variety of abilities and disabilities. It is based on experiences at the Developmental Studies Center (Oakland, California). Activities are presented as blueprint formats that provide a comprehensive set of structures which can be…

1997

214

Collaborative Learning through Wireless Grids  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we describe wireless grids, an emerging technology that enables ad hoc sharing of resources (such as screen, services and microphone) on edge devices (such as mobile Internet devices, laptops and mobile phones). As wireless devices have become common, and “smart,” wireless grids have become practical. To highlight the capabilities of wireless grids to support collaborative learning, projects

Angela Usha Ramnarine-Rieks; Lee W. McKnight; Ruth V. Small

2011-01-01

215

Dear Doc: advice for collaborators.  

PubMed

Years ago, when Doc was a junior faculty member she became aware of a situation that changed her life. An extremely well-known senior scientist in her department took the data of a graduate student and published it in a very significant, oft-cited paper without crediting the student in any way. That this action had the tacit approval of the department chair was confusing. Dismayed by this violation of trust and feeling powerless to intervene, she decided to become the Dear Abby of Science. Working in the lab during the day she was becoming a world-renowned researcher as well as a highly revered mentor to younger scientists. At night, disguised as Dr. Doc she began advising other researchers who were looking for help with their sticky situations. As word of mouth spread about Doc more and more researchers sought out her advice about a wide range of problems in their labs and in their collaborations. She is currently entertaining a proposal from a collaborative group of editors from high-impact journals to develop a web presence that would offer insightful advice to struggling scientific collaborators around the world. The following is a selection of letters from Doc's files focused on collaboration. The names and details in the letters have been changed to protect confidentiality. PMID:24073149

Gadlin, Howard; Bennett, Michelle

2012-12-01

216

The Math, Science, & Manufacturing Collaborative.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The concept of a collaborative math and science project grew out of the need expressed by Cleveland State University (Ohio) engineering faculty and junior and senior high school teachers. These groups sought to provide students with connections to "real world" situations that they will face as they transition into the workplace of the future. The…

Abate, Ronald J.

217

Collaborative Learning Comes of Age.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The emergence of collaborative/cooperative learning (CL) in higher education from intuitive practice to a conscious and well-developed approach is reviewed. Three salient issues are identified: the need for more theoretical understanding of CL; the need to increase its institutional impact; and the use of CL for enhancing democracy and civic…

Gamson, Zelda F.

1994-01-01

218

Architectural patterns for collaborative applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is currently little reuse of either design or code in the development of collaborative applications. Though there are some application frameworks for this domain, they tend to be rather inflexible in the functionality they offer. This paper seeks to provide design reuse in the form of architectural patterns that focus on low-level horizontal issues: distribution, message exchange, functional decomposition,

Peter Tandler

2006-01-01

219

Collaborative Test Reviews: Student Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A group study method proved helpful in improving senior-level students' performance on unit tests through collaborative learning. Students of a History of Textiles course voluntarily attended study sessions to review course content and prepare for unit tests. The students who attended the group reviews scored better on tests than those who did…

Bhatia, Anuradha; Makela, Carole J.

2010-01-01

220

Collaborative planning, forecasting, and replenishment.  

PubMed

This article highlights Procter & Gamble's (P&G's) current success and future direction of creating consumer value and improving trading partner relationships through electronic data communication, including the future vision of the company's ultimate supply system and CPFR--Collaborative Planning, Forecasting, and Replenishment. PMID:10623137

Williams, S H

1999-11-01

221

Research Collaboration - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

See Mâsse, LC, Moser, RP, Stokols, D, Taylor, BK, MA, Marcus, SE, Morgan, GD, Hall, KL, Croyle, RT, Trochim, WM (2008). Measuring Collaboration and Transdisciplinary Integration in Team Science. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 35(2S), S151-160.

222

Collaborative Action Research: Historical Trends.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a historical overview of the use of action research in education and describes the basic assumptions and expectations that continue to characterize collaborative research projects today. Action research was initiated in the 1930's by Kurt Lewin and adapted by educators in the 1940's. Interest in action research declined between…

Smulyan, Lisa

223

Collaboration, Consensus, and "Dissoi Logoi."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that the paper might never have been completed if the authors had not used Dissoi Logoi to allow themselves to disagree and converse on paper, this paper suggests that consensus in collaborative writing happens but that forced consensus is a bad influence on imaginative scholars. Written in a "double voice," this paper highlights some…

Morris, Kerri K.; Mead, Dana Gulling

224

Clustering Methods for Collaborative Filtering  

Microsoft Academic Search

Grouping people into clusters based on the items they have pur- chased allows accurate recommendations of new items for purchase: if you and I have liked many of the same movies, then I will prob- ably enjoy other movies that you like. Recommending items based on similarity of interest (a.k.a. collaborative filtering) is attractive for many domains: books, CDs, movies,

Lyle H. Ungar; Dean P. Foster

1998-01-01

225

Agent-based collaborative manufacturing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current rapidly changing market requires unprecedented levels of interoperability between enterprises. The framework presented in this paper allows the implementation of highly flexible distributed agent-based supply chain systems. Starting from the customer's initial request an entire network of suppliers is generated automatically. Agents in our framework can change roles dynamically, collaborate and compete against each other to offer the

Liviu Cotfas; Andreea Diosteanu; Ion Smeureanu

2010-01-01

226

The LSST Galaxies Science Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present extragalactic research plans that are developing for the LSST sky survey. The LSST Galaxies Science Collaboration team is a working group with several goals. One goal is to identify science use cases for the enormous LSST survey data archive and database that either stretch the capabilities of the system or else are missing from current LSST science use

Henry Closson Ferguson; K. Borne; M. Dickinson; E. Gawiser; K. Gilmore; G. Fabio; R. Jimenez; V. Margoniner; D. Norman; M. Obric; A. Rasmussen; R. Roskar; M. Seigar; A. Stanford; M. Strauss; R. Wechsler

2007-01-01

227

Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The feature story in this issue, "Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment," focuses on the growing emphasis on teamwork in the workplace. It discusses how the concept of empowering employees in the workplace is evolving and the benefits--faster decision making, lower costs and absenteeism, higher productivity and quality, and increased…

Wagner, June G.

2002-01-01

228

Equating Error in Observed-Score Equating  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditionally, error in equating observed scores on two versions of a test is defined as the difference between the transformations that equate the quantiles of their distributions in the sample and population of test takers. But it is argued that if the goal of equating is to adjust the scores of test takers on one version of the test to

Linden van der Wim J

2006-01-01

229

Equating Error in Observed-Score Equating  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traditionally, error in equating observed scores on two versions of a test is defined as the difference between the transformations that equate the quantiles of their distributions in the sample and population of test takers. But it is argued that if the goal of equating is to adjust the scores of test takers on one version of the test to make…

van der Linden, Wim J.

2006-01-01

230

systems of linear equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Solve a system of linear equations by graphing and finding the intersection of the lines of the equations. Create a system of equations, examine its graph, matrix, and table of values, and determine the solution of the system.

Exploremath.com; Sharp, Brian

2001-01-01

231

Basic lubrication equations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lubricants, usually Newtonian fluids, are assumed to experience laminar flow. The basic equations used to describe the flow are the Navier-Stokes equation of motion. The study of hydrodynamic lubrication is, from a mathematical standpoint, the application of a reduced form of these Navier-Stokes equations in association with the continuity equation. The Reynolds equation can also be derived from first principles, provided of course that the same basic assumptions are adopted in each case. Both methods are used in deriving the Reynolds equation, and the assumptions inherent in reducing the Navier-Stokes equations are specified. Because the Reynolds equation contains viscosity and density terms and these properties depend on temperature and pressure, it is often necessary to couple the Reynolds with energy equation. The lubricant properties and the energy equation are presented. Film thickness, a parameter of the Reynolds equation, is a function of the elastic behavior of the bearing surface. The governing elasticity equation is therefore presented.

Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

1981-01-01

232

Collaborative improvement as an inspiration for supply chain collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The battlefield of competition is today moving from the level of\\u000aindividual firms to the one of the extended enterprises, that is, networks of customers and their suppliers. This paper discusses how learning and continuous improvement today take place in processes based on daily collaboration at intercompany level, i.e. Extended Manufacturing Enterprises (EMEs). The purpose of the paper is to

Raffaella Cagliano; Federico Caniato; Mariano Corso; Rick Middel; José Gieskes; Gianluca Spina

2002-01-01

233

Medication safety and chronic kidney disease in older adults prescribed metformin: a cross-sectional analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Medication safety in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing concern. This is particularly relevant in older adults due to underlying CKD. Metformin use is contraindicated in patients with abnormal kidney function; however, many patients are potentially prescribed metformin inappropriately. We evaluated the prevalence of CKD among older adults prescribed metformin for type 2 diabetes mellitus using available equations to estimate kidney function and examined demographic characteristics of patients who were potentially inappropriately prescribed metformin. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of older adults aged ?65 years prescribed metformin from March 2008-March 2009 at an urban tertiary-care facility in Seattle, Washington, USA. CKD was defined using National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative criteria. Creatinine clearance was calculated using the Cockcroft-Gault equation; estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated using the abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and CKD-Epidemiology (EPI) Collaboration equations. Regression analyses were used to determine the associations between demographic characteristics and prevalent CKD. Results Among 356 subjects (median age 69 years, 52.5% female, 39.4% non-Hispanic black), prevalence of stage 3 or greater CKD calculated by any of the equations was 31.4%. The Cockcroft-Gault equation identified more subjects as having CKD (23.7%) than the abbreviated MDRD (21.1%) or CKD-EPI (21.7%) equations (P?equation to estimate kidney function may accurately identify CKD in this population. Medication safety deserves greater consideration among elderly patients due to the widespread prevalence of CKD.

2014-01-01

234

Perspectives on Studying Collaboration in Distributed Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes cognitive variables and frameworks that are useful in the investigation of network collaboration in Army environments. Network collaboration is currently under study by the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social S...

K. G. Ross

2004-01-01

235

Distributed Collaborations Using Network Mobile Agents  

Microsoft Academic Search

. This paper describes a mobile agent-based approach for supportingcoordination of user activities in distributed collaborations. Theapproach presented here uses XML to specify a collaboration plan interms of various participants\\

Anand R. Tripathi; Tanvir Ahmed; Vineet Kakani; Shremattie Jaman

2000-01-01

236

Supporting Collaborative Knowledge Building with Intelligent Agents  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In the process of collaborative knowledge building, it is usually difficult for students to be aware of others’ activities,\\u000a for instructors to overview the process and to regulate the collaboration In order to facilitate collaborative knowledge building,\\u000a intelligent agents were developed to support the awareness and regulate the collaboration. This paper discusses the role of\\u000a intelligent agents and how they

Weiqin Chen; Jan Dolonen; Barbara Wasson

2003-01-01

237

Novel Collaborative Automated Testing Framework Using DDF  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaborative testing is an effective way of distributed interoperability in pursuit of automated testing. In this paper,\\u000a a novel collaborative testing approach named Collaborative Automated Testing Framework (CATF) which meets the requirements\\u000a of not only automated testing but also collaborative operation is proposed. Through the abstract analysis in terms of extended\\u000a dynamic dataflow (DDF) model’s viewpoint incorporating with UML2.0 profile

Songwen Pei; Baifeng Wu; Qiang Yu; Kun Zhu

2007-01-01

238

The Emerging Discipline of Collaborative Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The process of creating a new scientific discipline for collaborative networks is addressed in this paper. Collaborative networks\\u000a manifest in a large variety of forms, including virtual organizations, virtual enterprises, dynamic supply chains, professional\\u000a virtual communities, collaborative virtual laboratories, etc. A large body of empiric knowledge related to collaborative networks\\u000a is becoming available, but there is an urgent need to

Luis M. Camarinha-matos; Hamideh Afsarmanesh

2004-01-01

239

Comparative analysis of collaboration networks  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we carry out a comparative analysis of the word network as the collaboration network based on the novel by M. Bulgakov 'Master and Margarita', the synonym network of the Russian language as well as the Russian movie actor network. We have constructed one-mode projections of these networks, defined degree distributions for them and have calculated main characteristics. In the paper a generation algorithm of collaboration networks has been offered which allows one to generate networks statistically equivalent to the studied ones. It lets us reveal a structural correlation between word network, synonym network and movie actor network. We show that the degree distributions of all analyzable networks are described by the distribution of q-type.

Progulova, Tatiana; Gadjiev, Bahruz [International University for Nature, Society and Man, 19 Universitetskaya Street, Dubna, 141980 (Russian Federation)

2011-03-14

240

Neuroscience thinks big (and collaboratively).  

PubMed

Despite cash-strapped times for research, several ambitious collaborative neuroscience projects have attracted large amounts of funding and media attention. In Europe, the Human Brain Project aims to develop a large-scale computer simulation of the brain, whereas in the United States, the Brain Activity Map is working towards establishing a functional connectome of the entire brain, and the Allen Institute for Brain Science has embarked upon a 10-year project to understand the mouse visual cortex (the MindScope project). US President Barack Obama's announcement of the BRAIN Initiative (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative) in April 2013 highlights the political commitment to neuroscience and is expected to further foster interdisciplinary collaborations, accelerate the development of new technologies and thus fuel much needed medical advances. In this Viewpoint article, five prominent neuroscientists explain the aims of the projects and how they are addressing some of the questions (and criticisms) that have arisen. PMID:23958663

Kandel, Eric R; Markram, Henry; Matthews, Paul M; Yuste, Rafael; Koch, Christof

2013-09-01

241

Interprofessional collaborative practice: a deconstruction.  

PubMed

This paper uses (and perhaps abuses) deconstruction to revisit the meanings of collaboration and practice. We start with a description of deconstruction itself, as espoused by Jacques Derrida, and then move onto challenging the notion that words, such as collaboration, can have fixed meanings. And, in the spirit of Derrida, "I can foresee the impatience of the bad reader: this is the way I name or accuse the fearful reader, the reader in a hurry to be determined, decided upon deciding (in order to annul, in other words to bring back to oneself, one has to wish to know in advance what to expect...)" (Derrida, 1987, p. 4--original italics), we move straight into the text. PMID:23126420

Thistlethwaite, Jill; Jackson, Ann; Moran, Monica

2013-01-01

242

Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging.  

PubMed

Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag cooccurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory, or aging of resources, in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users who, despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity, appear to follow simple activity patterns. PMID:17244704

Cattuto, Ciro; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

2007-01-30

243

Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging  

PubMed Central

Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag cooccurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory, or aging of resources, in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users who, despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity, appear to follow simple activity patterns.

Cattuto, Ciro; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

2007-01-01

244

Understanding tabletop collaborative interaction using hierarchy model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The area of human-computer interaction attracting research interest has evolved from one person with one computer, to individuals and groups collaborating with others supported by computers. In collaboration process, individual's information, knowledge and understanding are shared to all participants with collaborative interaction, and this is clearly a social process. In this paper, the social layer was added to the physical

Guohua Zhang; Xiang'an Heng; Songyang Lao; Yan Houyi

2011-01-01

245

Online Collaborative Learning: Theory and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Online Collaborative Learning: Theory and Practice" provides a resource for researchers and practitioners in the area of online collaborative learning (also known as CSCL, computer-supported collaborative learning), particularly those working within a tertiary education environment. It includes articles of relevance to those interested in both…

Roberts, Tim, Ed.

2004-01-01

246

Forging Collaborative Partnerships: The Waterloo Neighborhood Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Forging Collaborative Partnerships Project in Waterloo, Iowa is a collaborative venture to assist voluntary agencies in developing tools and strategies to strengthen collaborative relationships among public and nonprofit child welfare agencies and other key stakeholders as they adopt a family-focused philosophy. This monograph details how the…

Gruenewald, Anne

247

Making hospital-physician collaboration work.  

PubMed

Hospital-physician collaboration can reduce costs, alleviate unproductive competition, increase revenue, and foster productive working relationships. Using structured dialogue can improve communications. A hospital medical advisory panel of physicians can champion collaboration. A three-stage framework of proactivity, collaborative conflict, and containment can help resolve physician-hospital competition. PMID:16245624

Cohn, Kenneth H; Allyn, Thomas R

2005-10-01

248

Decision Support Framework for Supply Chain Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Supply chain collaboration is recognized as a powerful way for industries to achieve competitive advantage. Still, literature reveals different strategies of collaboration in buyer-supplier relationships and adds that a one-fits-all solution for supply chain collaboration does not exist. Naturally, managers often raise the question “how can I determine the most suitable supply

Ana Cristina Barros

249

An Application Server for Collaborative Work  

SciTech Connect

Remote collaboration involving development and execution of applications is currently difficult. Joint remote data visualization is often carried out through file transfers followed by separate viewing without coordination or collaborative capability. Joint editing of files, as is needed for code development or document generation, is also difficult. Additionally, asynchronous collaboration capabilities are needed.

Dr. Stevetiana Shasharina sveta@txcorp.com

2000-09-04

250

Educators' Views of Collaboration with Scientists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated educators' views of collaboration with scientists, a baseline for COSEE Great Lakes efforts in facilitating dynamic collaborative relationships between Great Lakes researchers and educators. Three research questions guided the study: (1) how are educators in the Great Lakes region involved in collaboration with scientists,…

Kim, Chankook; Fortner, Rosanne

2007-01-01

251

Collaborative Technology Use by Healthcare Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the literature on the use of collaborative technologies by healthcare teams between 1980 and 2003. Multiple databases were searched with explicit inclusion criteria that yielded 17 conceptual and empirical papers. The discussions of these literatures centered on the individual, team, and technological dimensions of collaborative technology use within healthcare teams. Results show that collaborative healthcare technologies can

Mowafa Said Househ; Francis Y. Lau

2005-01-01

252

Proposal of a Collaborative Learning Standardization  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on considerations and steps towards standardization (2) of the collaborative learning environment. This standardization will extend and widen the field of applications possible within the collaborative learning paradigm, and will make possible the usage of the fruits of years of research and individual implementations of the concept of collaborative learning, from our own laboratory and from others.

Toshio Okamoto; Mizue Kayama; Alexandra I. Cristea

2001-01-01

253

Learning Strategies in Online Collaborative Examinations  

Microsoft Academic Search

New forms of computer-mediated, online learning can benefit from new forms of assessment that fit the medium and the pedagogical style of the online environment. This paper investigates students' learning styles and learning strategies in taking online collaborative exams. Applying constructivist and collaborative learning theories, the collaborative examination features students' active participation in various phases of the exam process through

Jia Shen; Starr Roxanne Hiltz; Michael Bieber

2008-01-01

254

Usage patterns of collaborative tagging systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaborative tagging describes the process by which many users add metadata in the form of keywords to shared content. Recently, collaborative tagging has grown in popularity on the web, on sites that allow users to tag bookmarks, photographs and other content. In this paper we analyze the structure of collaborative tagging systems as well as their dynamic aspects. Specifically, we

Scott A. Golder; Bernardo A. Huberman

2006-01-01

255

Conditions for Successful Online Document Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the development of Web 2.0 technologies, online document collaboration tools are becoming increasingly available, often free of charge. Although the technology is considered interactive and collaborative, it does not necessarily mean learners themselves will interact and collaborate. This paper discusses the conditions required for successful…

Vallance, Michael; Towndrow, Phillip A.; Wiz, Charles

2010-01-01

256

The Structure of Collaborative Tagging Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaborative tagging describes the process by which many users add metadata in the form of keywords to shared content. Recently, collaborative tagging has grown in popularity on the web, on sites that allow users to tag bookmarks, photographs and other content. In this paper we analyze the structure of collaborative tagging systems as well as their dynamical aspects. Specifically, we

Scott A. Golder; Bernardo A. Huberman

2005-01-01

257

Aligning Collaborative and Culturally Responsive Evaluation Approaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors, three African-American women trained as collaborative evaluators, offer a comparative analysis of collaborative evaluation (O'Sullivan, 2004) and culturally responsive evaluation approaches (Frierson, Hood, & Hughes, 2002; Kirkhart & Hopson, 2010). Collaborative evaluation techniques immerse evaluators in the cultural milieu of the…

Askew, Karyl; Beverly, Monifa Green; Jay, Michelle L.

2012-01-01

258

Students Assessing Their Own Collaborative Knowledge Building  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We describe the design of a knowledge-building environment and examine the role of knowledge-building portfolios in characterizing and scaffolding collaborative inquiry. Our goal is to examine collaborative knowledge building in the context of exploring the alignment of learning, collaboration, and assessment in computer forums. The key design…

Lee, Eddy Y. C.; Chan, Carol K. K.; van Aalst, Jan

2006-01-01

259

Utilizing Collaboration Theory to Evaluate Strategic Alliances  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increasingly, "collaboration" between business, non-profit, health and educational agencies is being championed as a powerful strategy to achieve a vision otherwise not possible when independent entities work alone. But the definition of collaboration is elusive and it is often difficult for organizations to put collaboration into practice and…

Gajda, Rebecca

2004-01-01

260

Evaluation Framework for Collaborative Educational Virtual Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we will focus on a specific category of Collaborative Virtual Environments that aims to support Collaborative Learning. We call these environments Collaborative Educational Virtual Environments. Our aim is to analyze the evaluation process through the study of relevant bibliography and by doing so reveal the existing research gap…

Tsiatsos, Thrasyvoulos; Andreas, Konstantinidis; Pomportsis, Andreas

2010-01-01

261

Collaboration theory and community tourism planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper applies the theoretical constructs of collaboration to tourism destinations and offers insight into interorganizational collaboration for one specific tourism domain, the planning and development of local, community-based tourism destinations. Drawing primarily from the literature on interorganizational relations, the theoretical constructs of collaboration are discussed first. Challenges and considerations in the planning and development of local tourist destinations are

Tazim B. Jamal; Donald Getz

1995-01-01

262

New Library Facilities: Opportunities for Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As academic libraries renovate or build new spaces that provide services to users, they should consider opportunities to collaborate with other units on campus to develop collaborative services in the new space. These collaborative spaces, such as information commons, teaching and learning centers, and multi-media studios, offer advantages such as…

Lippincott, Joan K.

2004-01-01

263

Combination-forecasting modeling for CPFR collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Collaborative Planning, Forecasting and Replenishment (CPFR) is an application of Supply Chain Management concept in the retailing. In this paper, the collaborative forecasting process between retailers and manufacturers which is the core of CPFR is mainly discussed. A combination-forecasting model is created to improve forecasting accuracy and collaboration in CPFR process. Finally, the formulation results showed the effectiveness of

WenJie Wang; Glorious Sun

2011-01-01

264

Collaborative Learning (Grouping) in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This brief article from the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin describes the best practice of collaborative learning based on ideas from Dr. Spencer Kagan's book, Cooperative Learning. The article describes the basic four principles of collaborative learning and five thinking skills structures to implement collaborative learning.

2012-01-01

265

Adult Collaboration: The "Glue" for School Improvement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The act of collaboration is important when improving communication between administration and teachers, guiding school personnel to collectively clarify teaching and learning outcomes, and facilitating school stakeholders to engage in strategic institutional planning. As necessary as collaboration is, adults often do not know how to collaborate

Damore, Sharon; Wiggins, Kathryn

2006-01-01

266

Collaboration: A Framework for School Improvement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ability to work collaboratively with others is becoming an essential component of contemporary school reform. This article reviews current trends in school reform that embody collaborative principles and also draws on the literature to provide a theoretical overview of collaboration itself. The article then outlines the findings from a…

Slater, Lorraine

2004-01-01

267

Collaborative online learning: an exploratory case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

An investigation was carried out to determine the extent to which evidence of collaborative learning could be identified in students' textual interactions in an online learning environment. The literature on collaborative learning has identified a range of behaviours that characterise successful collaborative learning. Evidence of these behaviours was sought in the messages that were posted by students as they interacted

David Curtis

1999-01-01

268

Teacher Collaboration in a Networked Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we examine the collaboration problems teachers encountered in the course of instructing students using collaborative computer software to connect distributed classrooms. We describe issues surrounding teacher collaborations arising from three types of sources: Organizational chaos of teaching, physical and temporal dispersion of events and causes, and individualism in teaching practices. We illustrate how our situation presents new

Daniel R. Dunlap; Dennis C. Neale; John M. Carroll

2000-01-01

269

Collaborative networks: a new scientific discipline  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaborative networks manifest in a large variety of forms, including virtual organizations, virtual enterprises, dynamic supply chains, professional virtual communities, collaborative virtual laboratories, etc. A large body of empiric knowledge related to collaborative networks is already available, but there is an urgent need to consolidate this knowledge and build the foundations for a more sustainable development of this area. The

Luis M. Camarinha-Matos; Hamideh Afsarmanesh

2005-01-01

270

Optimal design in collaborative design network  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider a multiagent system whose task is to aid component-centered design by collaborative designers in a supply chain. In the earlier work, collaborative design networks are proposed as a decision-theoretic framework for such a system. In this work, we analyzes how choice of agent interface affects the computational complexity of collaborative design. Based on the analysis, we proposes a

Y. Xiang; J. Chen; William S. Havens

2005-01-01

271

Consultation Practice: Competition or Collaboration?  

PubMed Central

Concordance with recommendations, and two-way communication, are two prime factors in consultation. They tend to determine whether the consultation will be competitive or collaborative. The literature shows that privately consulted physicians tend to respond with written reports four times as frequently as residents on hospital services, or any teaching physician. The consultation process has three parts: preconsultation, consultation, and postconsultation. Different needs and problems arise at different stages. One large factor is respect, which needs to be taught and encouraged.

Grant, I. Neil

1982-01-01

272

Computer Support for Collaborative Designing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to examine how collaborative designing could be facilitated by a new generation networked\\u000a learning environment (Future Learning Environment, FLE-Tools) and to analyze whether and how students working in the environment\\u000a were able to share their design process. The study was carried out by analyzing qualitatively knowledge posted to FLE-Tools’\\u000a database by three courses

Pirita Seitamaa-Hakkarainen; Anna-Mari Raunio; Asta Raami; Hanni Muukkonen; Kai Hakkarainen

2001-01-01

273

ATBC Study - Research Collaboration Procedures  

Cancer.gov

The two international partners of this project - the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Institute for Health and Welfare of Finland (THL) - have primary responsibility for project research management, coordination, and oversight. The Nutritional Epidemiology Branch (NEB) represents the NCI in this regard. Study proposals for collaboration are submitted to the NCI or NPHI Principal Investigators (Dr. Albanes and Dr. Virtamo, respectively), and are reviewed at both institutions.

274

Collaborative Learning for Secure Logistics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Collaborative Learning Environment (CLE) for Secure Logistics, a project of NSF's Advanced Technological Education program, has created these five learning modules for undergraduates. "Each of the modules address a new technology in operational use by commercial and military organizations for securing global supply chains worldwide." The modules are: Post 9/11 Regulatory Environment, Spatial Logistics Technologies, RFID Online Aviation Module, EPCglobal: Standards for a Secure World, and Securing the Global Supply Chain.

2008-07-28

275

Pharmacist and physician collaborative prescribing  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine if there is improvement in medication management when pharmacists and family physicians collaborate to prescribe medication renewals requested by fax. DESIGN Prospective, non-randomized controlled trial. SETTING W est Winds Primary Health Centre, an interdisciplinary health centre that includes an academic family medicine practice, located in Saskatoon, Sask. PARTICIPANTS All patients whose pharmacies faxed the health centre requesting prescription renewals between October 2007 and February 2008 were selected to participate in the study. INTERVENTIONS Medication renewal requests were forwarded to the pharmacist (who works in the clinic part-time) on days when he was working (intervention group). The pharmacist assessed drug-therapy issues that might preclude safe and effective prescribing of the medication. The pharmacist and physician then made a collaborative decision to authorize the requested medication or to request additional interventions first (eg, perform laboratory tests). When the pharmacist was not working, the physicians managed the renewal requests independently (control group). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Medication renewals authorized with no recommendations, medication-related problems identified, new monitoring tests ordered, and new appointments scheduled with health providers. RESULTS A total of 181 renewal requests were included (94 in the control group and 87 in the intervention group). The control group had significantly more requests authorized with no recommendations (75.5% vs 52.9%, P = .001). Those in the intervention group had significantly more medication-related problems identified (26 vs 10, P = .031); medication changes made (24 vs 10, P = .044); and new appointments scheduled with their family physicians (31 vs 21, P = .049). CONCLUSION There is an improvement in medication management when a pharmacist collaborates with family physicians to prescribe medication renewals. The collaborative model created significantly more activity with each renewal request (ie, identification of medication-related problems, medication changes, and new appointments), which reflects an improvement in the process of care.

McKinnon, Angela; Jorgenson, Derek

2009-01-01

276

Fermilab-Latin America collaboration  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab`s program of collaboration with Latin America was initiated by then-Director Leon Lederman about 1980. His goal was to aid Latin American physics, and particularly its particle physics; this latter aim is in keeping with the Laboratory`s particle physics mission. The reasons for collaboration between institutions in the US and Latin America are many, including geographic and cultural, together with the existence of many talented scientists and many centers of excellence in the region. There are also broader reasons; for example, it has been stated frequently that physics is the basis of much technology, and advanced technology is a necessity for a country`s development. There is nothing unique about Fermilab`s program; other US institutions can carry out similar activities, and some have carried out individual items in the past. On the Latin American side, such collaboration enables institutions there to carry out forefront physics research, and also to have the advantages of particle physics spin-offs, both in expertise in related technologies and in scientist training. In addition to particle physics, collaboration is possible in many other related areas. Although particle physics is frequently viewed as {open_quotes}big science{close_quotes}, all of the large research groups in the field are composed of many small university groups, each of which contributes to the experiment, the analysis and the physics. Fermilab is an international laboratory, open to all users; a research proposal is accepted on scientific merit and technical competence, not on the country of origin of the scientists making the proposal. Currently, of Fermilab`s approximately 1400 users, about 30% are from non-US institutions. It should be noted here that Fermilab`s funds, which come from the US government, are for particle physics only; however, there is some flexibility in interpretation of this.

Rubinstein, R.

1994-12-31

277

Scope on Safety: Collaborating safely  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With the advent of inclusion legislation such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or PL 105-17 Reauthorization Action of 1997, many schools have focused on teaching partnerships between regular education and special education teachers. Science departments have been no exception to the trend toward team-teaching. This article describes five of the most popular models of team teaching. In addition, the legal implications and science safety issues concerning collaboration are addressed in this article.

Roy, Ken

2006-12-01

278

Facilitating Access to Information through Collaboration: Examination of the Role of Collaborative Technology in Competitive Intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few attempts have been made to establish conceptual links between collaboration, collaborative technology, information access and competitive intelligence. The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework and a number of starting premises for studying collaboration and the role of collaborative technology in the context of competitive intelligence. Résumé: Peu de tentatives ont été faites pour établir des liens

Tao Jin; France Bouthillier

279

The HotQCD Equation of State  

SciTech Connect

We present results from recent calculations of the QCD equation of state by the HotQCD Collaboration and review the implications for hydrodynamic modeling. The equation of state of QCD at zero baryon density was calculated on a lattice of dimensions 32{sup 3} x 8 with m{sub l} = 0.1 m{sub s} (corresponding to a pion mass of {approx}220 MeV) using two improved staggered fermion actions, p4 and asqtad. Calculations were performed along lines of constant physics using more than 100M cpu-hours on BG/L supercomputers at LLNL, NYBlue, and SDSC. We present parameterizations of the equation of state suitable for input into hydrodynamics models of heavy ion collisions.

Soltz, R A

2009-08-13

280

Collaborative Clustering for Sensor Networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Traditionally, nodes in a sensor network simply collect data and then pass it on to a centralized node that archives, distributes, and possibly analyzes the data. However, analysis at the individual nodes could enable faster detection of anomalies or other interesting events, as well as faster responses such as sending out alerts or increasing the data collection rate. There is an additional opportunity for increased performance if individual nodes can communicate directly with their neighbors. Previously, a method was developed by which machine learning classification algorithms could collaborate to achieve high performance autonomously (without requiring human intervention). This method worked for supervised learning algorithms, in which labeled data is used to train models. The learners collaborated by exchanging labels describing the data. The new advance enables clustering algorithms, which do not use labeled data, to also collaborate. This is achieved by defining a new language for collaboration that uses pair-wise constraints to encode useful information for other learners. These constraints specify that two items must, or cannot, be placed into the same cluster. Previous work has shown that clustering with these constraints (in isolation) already improves performance. In the problem formulation, each learner resides at a different node in the sensor network and makes observations (collects data) independently of the other learners. Each learner clusters its data and then selects a pair of items about which it is uncertain and uses them to query its neighbors. The resulting feedback (a must and cannot constraint from each neighbor) is combined by the learner into a consensus constraint, and it then reclusters its data while incorporating the new constraint. A strategy was also proposed for cleaning the resulting constraint sets, which may contain conflicting constraints; this improves performance significantly. This approach has been applied to collaborative clustering of seismic and infrasonic data collected by the Mount Erebus Volcano Observatory in Antarctica. Previous approaches to distributed clustering cannot readily be applied in a sensor network setting, because they assume that each node has the same view of the data set. A view is the set of features used to represent each object. When a single data set is partitioned across several computational nodes, distributed clustering works; all objects have the same view. But when the data is collected from different locations, using different sensors, a more flexible approach is needed. This approach instead operates in situations where the data collected at each node has a different view (e.g., seismic vs. infrasonic sensors), but they observe the same events. This enables them to exchange information about the likely cluster membership relations between objects, even if they do not use the same features to represent the objects.

Wagstaff. Loro :/; Green Jillian; Lane, Terran

2011-01-01

281

Designing Facilities for Collaborative Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A methodology for designing operational facilities for collaboration by multiple experts has begun to take shape as an outgrowth of a project to design such facilities for scientific operations of the planned 2003 Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission. The methodology could also be applicable to the design of military "situation rooms" and other facilities for terrestrial missions. It was recognized in this project that modern mission operations depend heavily upon the collaborative use of computers. It was further recognized that tests have shown that layout of a facility exerts a dramatic effect on the efficiency and endurance of the operations staff. The facility designs (for example, see figure) and the methodology developed during the project reflect this recognition. One element of the methodology is a metric, called effective capacity, that was created for use in evaluating proposed MER operational facilities and may also be useful for evaluating other collaboration spaces, including meeting rooms and military situation rooms. The effective capacity of a facility is defined as the number of people in the facility who can be meaningfully engaged in its operations. A person is considered to be meaningfully engaged if the person can (1) see, hear, and communicate with everyone else present; (2) see the material under discussion (typically data on a piece of paper, computer monitor, or projection screen); and (3) provide input to the product under development by the group. The effective capacity of a facility is less than the number of people that can physically fit in the facility. For example, a typical office that contains a desktop computer has an effective capacity of .4, while a small conference room that contains a projection screen has an effective capacity of around 10. Little or no benefit would be derived from allowing the number of persons in an operational facility to exceed its effective capacity: At best, the operations staff would be underutilized; at worst, operational performance would deteriorate. Elements of this methodology were applied to the design of three operations facilities for a series of rover field tests. These tests were observed by human-factors researchers and their conclusions are being used to refine and extend the methodology to be used in the final design of the MER operations facility. Further work is underway to evaluate the use of personal digital assistant (PDA) units as portable input interfaces and communication devices in future mission operations facilities. A PDA equipped for wireless communication and Ethernet, Bluetooth, or another networking technology would cost less than a complete computer system, and would enable a collaborator to communicate electronically with computers and with other collaborators while moving freely within the virtual environment created by a shared immersive graphical display.

Norris, Jeffrey; Powell, Mark; Backes, Paul; Steinke, Robert; Tso, Kam; Wales, Roxana

2003-01-01

282

Collaborative Software Engineering: Challenges and Prospects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much work is presently ongoing in collaborative software engineering research. This work is beginning to make serious inroads into our ability to more effectively practice collaborative software engineering, with best practices, processes, tools, metrics, and other techniques becoming available for day-to-day use. However, we have not yet reached the point where the practice of collaborative software engineering is routine, without surprises, and generally as optimal as possible. This chapter summarizes the main findings of this book, draws some conclusions on these findings and looks at the prospects for software engineers in dealing with the challenges of collaborative software development. The chapter ends with prospects for collaborative software engineering.

Mistrík, Ivan; Grundy, John; van der Hoek, André; Whitehead, Jim

283

Solving One Step equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Pre-Algebra Standard 3 Objective 2: Students will solve one step equations. The students will use addition and subtraction to solve the equations. When trying to solve a one step equation it is important to know how to undo an operation. You are to use inverse operations to solve each equation. * If the variable has a number added then you subtract that number from both sides of the equation. ...

Cefalo, Mr.

2008-09-29

284

Assessing Equating Results on Different Equating Criteria  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The performance of three equating methods--the presmoothed equipercentile method, the item response theory (IRT) true score method, and the IRT observed score method--were examined based on three equating criteria: the same distributions property, the first-order equity property, and the second-order equity property. The magnitude of the…

Tong, Ye; Kolen, Michael

2005-01-01

285

Cancer Vaccine Development Program collaborations.  

PubMed

Immunotherapy for cancer, which uses the body's immune system to fight the disease, is an increasingly active area of research. Successful therapies such as trastuzamab (Herceptin) for breast cancer and cytokine therapy for renal cell carcinoma and melanoma have validated the field as a viable area of investigation. However, the goal of developing an effective cancer vaccine has not yet been achieved. The military's Cancer Vaccine Development Program (CVDP) is collaborating with other military programs, along with civilian institutions, to advance scientific research surrounding cancer vaccines. PMID:23634481

Clifton, Travis; Pappas, Jennifer A; Pavlik, Maureen; Papay, Diane; Holmes, Jarrod P; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Peoples, George E

2010-07-01

286

Diagnosis of sustainable collaboration in health promotion – a case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Collaborations are important to health promotion in addressing multi-party problems. Interest in collaborative processes in health promotion is rising, but still lacks monitoring instruments. The authors developed the DIagnosis of Sustainable Collaboration (DISC) model to enable comprehensive monitoring of public health collaboratives. The model focuses on opportunities and impediments for collaborative change, based on evidence from interorganizational collaboration, organizational

Mariken TW Leurs; Ingrid M Mur-Veeman; Rosalie van der Sar; Herman P Schaalma; Nanne K de Vries

2008-01-01

287

Polymorphic collaboration in the global grid  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Next generation collaborative systems must be able to represent the same information in different forms on a broad spectrum of devices and resources from low end personal digital assistants (PDA) to high performance computers (HPC). Users might be on a desktop then switch to a laptop and then to a PDA while accessing the global grid. The user preference profile for a collaboration session should be capable of moving with them as well as be automatically adjusted for the device type. Collaborative systems must be capable of representing the same information in many forms for different domains and on many devices and thus be polymorphic. Polymorphic collaboration will provide an ability for multiple heterogeneous resources (human to human, human to machine and machine to machine) to share information and activities, as well as the ability to regulate collaborative sessions based on client characteristics and needs; reuse user profiles, tool category choices, and settings in future collaboration session by same or different users; use intelligent agents to assist collaborative systems in learning user/resource preferences and behaviors, and autonomously derive optimal information to provide to users and decision makers. This paper discusses ongoing research in next generation collaborative environments with the goal of making electronic collaboration as easy to use as the telephone - collaboration at the touch of the screen.

McQuay, William K.

2006-06-01

288

Alaska telemedicine: growth through collaboration.  

PubMed

The last thirty years have brought the introduction and expansion of telecommunications to rural and remote Alaska. The intellectual and financial investment of earlier projects, the more recent AFHCAN Project and the Universal Service Administrative Company Rural Health Care Division (RHCD) has sparked a new era in telemedicine and telecommunication across Alaska. This spark has been flamed by the dedication and collaboration of leaders at he highest levels of organizations such as: AFHCAN member organizations, AFHCAN Office, Alaska Clinical Engineering Services, Alaska Federal Health Care Partnership, Alaska Federal Health Care Partnership Office, Alaska Native health Board, Alaska Native Tribal health Consortium, Alaska Telehealth Advisory Council, AT&T Alascom, GCI Inc., Health care providers throughout the state of Alaska, Indian Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of U.S. Senator Ted Steens, State of Alaska, U.S. Department of Homeland Security--United States Coast Guard, United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of Defense--Air Force and Army, United States Department of Veterans Affairs, University of Alaska, and University of Alaska Anchorage. Alaska now has one of the largest telemedicine programs in the world. As Alaska moves system now in place become self-sustaining, and 2) collaborating with all stakeholders in promoting the growth of an integrated, state-wide telemedicine network. PMID:15709313

Patricoski, Chris

2004-12-01

289

Fluxnet Synthesis Dataset Collaboration Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

The Fluxnet synthesis dataset originally compiled for the La Thuile workshop contained approximately 600 site years. Since the workshop, several additional site years have been added and the dataset now contains over 920 site years from over 240 sites. A data refresh update is expected to increase those numbers in the next few months. The ancillary data describing the sites continues to evolve as well. There are on the order of 120 site contacts and 60proposals have been approved to use thedata. These proposals involve around 120 researchers. The size and complexity of the dataset and collaboration has led to a new approach to providing access to the data and collaboration support and the support team attended the workshop and worked closely with the attendees and the Fluxnet project office to define the requirements for the support infrastructure. As a result of this effort, a new website (http://www.fluxdata.org) has been created to provide access to the Fluxnet synthesis dataset. This new web site is based on a scientific data server which enables browsing of the data on-line, data download, and version tracking. We leverage database and data analysis tools such as OLAP data cubes and web reports to enable browser and Excel pivot table access to the data.

Agarwal, Deborah A.; Humphrey, Marty; van Ingen, Catharine; Beekwilder, Norm; Goode, Monte; Jackson, Keith; Rodriguez, Matt; Weber, Robin

2008-02-06

290

Collaborative virtual environments art exhibition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This panel presentation will exhibit artwork developed in CAVEs and discuss how art methodologies enhance the science of VR through collaboration, interaction and aesthetics. Artists and scientists work alongside one another to expand scientific research and artistic expression and are motivated by exhibiting collaborative virtual environments. Looking towards the arts, such as painting and sculpture, computer graphics captures a visual tradition. Virtual reality expands this tradition to not only what we face, but to what surrounds us and even what responds to our body and its gestures. Art making that once was isolated to the static frame and an optimal point of view is now out and about, in fully immersive mode within CAVEs. Art knowledge is a guide to how the aesthetics of 2D and 3D worlds affect, transform, and influence the social, intellectual and physical condition of the human body through attention to psychology, spiritual thinking, education, and cognition. The psychological interacts with the physical in the virtual in such a way that each facilitates, enhances and extends the other, culminating in a "go together" world. Attention to sharing art experience across high-speed networks introduces a dimension of liveliness and aliveness when we "become virtual" in real time with others.

Dolinsky, Margaret; Anstey, Josephine; Pape, Dave E.; Aguilera, Julieta C.; Kostis, Helen-Nicole; Tsoupikova, Daria

2005-03-01

291

Shared Understanding for Collaborative Control  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents results from three experiments in which human operators were teamed with a mixed-initiative robot control system to accomplish various indoor search and exploration tasks. By assessing human workload and error together with overall performance, these experiments provide an objective means to contrast different modes of robot autonomy and to evaluate both the usability of the interface and the effectiveness of autonomous robot behavior. The first experiment compares the performance achieved when the robot takes initiative to support human driving with the opposite case when the human takes initiative to support autonomous robot driving. The utility of robot autonomy is shown through achievement of better performance when the robot is in the driver’s seat. The second experiment introduces a virtual three-dimensional (3-D) map representation that supports collaborative understanding of the task and environment. When used in place of video, the 3-D map reduced operator workload and navigational error. By lowering bandwidth requirements, use of the virtual 3-D interface enables long-range, nonline-of-sight communication. Results from the third experiment extend the findings of experiment 1 by showing that collaborative control can increase performance and reduce error even when the complexity of the environment is increased and workload is distributed amongst multiple operators.

David Bruemmer; Douglas Few; Ronald Boring; Julie Marble; Miles Walton; Curtis Nielsen

2005-07-01

292

Single wall penetration equations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Five single plate penetration equations are compared for accuracy and effectiveness. These five equations are two well-known equations (Fish-Summers and Schmidt-Holsapple), two equations developed by the Apollo project (Rockwell and Johnson Space Center (JSC), and one recently revised from JSC (Cour-Palais). They were derived from test results, with velocities ranging up to 8 km/s. Microsoft Excel software was used to construct a spreadsheet to calculate the diameters and masses of projectiles for various velocities, varying the material properties of both projectile and target for the five single plate penetration equations. The results were plotted on diameter versus velocity graphs for ballistic and spallation limits using Cricket Graph software, for velocities ranging from 2 to 15 km/s defined for the orbital debris. First, these equations were compared to each other, then each equation was compared with various aluminum projectile densities. Finally, these equations were compared with test results performed at JSC for the Marshall Space Flight Center. These equations predict a wide variety of projectile diameters at a given velocity. Thus, it is very difficult to choose the 'right' prediction equation. The thickness of a single plate could have a large variation by choosing a different penetration equation. Even though all five equations are empirically developed with various materials, especially for aluminum alloys, one cannot be confident in the shield design with the predictions obtained by the penetration equations without verifying by tests.

Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.

1991-01-01

293

Interpretation of Bernoulli's Equation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses Bernoulli's equation with regards to: horizontal flow of incompressible fluids, change of height of incompressible fluids, gases, liquids and gases, and viscous fluids. Provides an interpretation, properties, terminology, and applications of Bernoulli's equation. (MVL)

Bauman, Robert P.; Schwaneberg, Rolf

1994-01-01

294

On the London equations.  

PubMed Central

The classical London equations for superconductors are written in differential form notation and recast in relativistic form, where they yield the Proca equation. In particular, the field itself acts as its own charge carrier.

Sternberg, S

1992-01-01

295

Collaborative virtual learning environments: design and evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

E-learning systems have gone through a radical change from the initial text-based environments to more stimulating multimedia\\u000a systems. Such systems are Collaborative Virtual Environments, which could be used in order to support collaborative e-learning\\u000a scenarios. The main aim of this paper is to aid educational designers in selecting, designing and evaluating three dimensional\\u000a collaborative virtual environments in order to gain

Andreas Konstantinidis; Thrasyvoulos Tsiatsos; Andreas S. Pomportsis

2009-01-01

296

Collaborative Workflow Management for Interagency Crime Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

To strengthen homeland security, there is a critical need for new tools that can facilitate real time collaboration among\\u000a various law enforcement agencies. Through a field study, we find that law enforcement work is knowledge intensive and involves\\u000a complex collaborative processes interrelating a large number of disparate units in a loosely defined virtual organization.\\u000a To support knowledge intensive collaboration, we

J. Leon Zhao; Henry H. Bi; Hsinchun Chen

2003-01-01

297

Structural Supply Chain Collaboration Among Grocery Manufacturers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both academicians and practitioners have explored the important topic of supply chain collaboration, however, most have focused\\u000a on unilateral coordination via pricing signals or tactical opportunities such as Collaborative Planning, Forecasting and Replenishment\\u000a (CPFR). Our research fills a literature gap by quantifying the opportunity for strategic, multi-lateral collaboration through\\u000a a shared distribution network. Through cost modeling of a factorial combination

Timothy M. Laseter; Elliott N. Weiss

298

Collaboration planning in a supply chain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – To analyze how e-collaboration tools affect different partners along the supply chain, and to categorize firms according to their level of collaboration planning within a supply chain environment. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – First, a field study, which focuses on one large telecommunications equipment manufacturer and a few strategic first-tier suppliers, provides the basis to fully understand the e-collaboration methods and

Luc Cassivi

2006-01-01

299

Collaborative Decision Support for Layered Sensor Webs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaborative decision support is critical to providing the warfighter much-needed Universal situational awareness (USA) and a better understanding of information flowing from complex sensor webs. USA requires the ability to rapidly correlate sensor data and provide easy-to-understand collaborative decision support tools. The design knowledge company (TDKC) is currently developing the XTM collaborative argumentation toolkit (XCAT) for the air force research

E. Loomis; J. Walrath

2008-01-01

300

Sharing Viewpoints in Collaborative Virtual Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Inthis,paper ,we explore ,to what ,degree ,shared viewpoints,in three-dimensional ,collaborative virtual environments,enable effective collaboration. The paper applies research on shared,viewpoints and telepointers to 3Denvironments. A lightweight ,Java-based tool for creating,collaborative ,virtual ,environments ,was developed,and used in the study. The system is realized asan,application framework ,that can be customized ,to develop,new ,applications. We conducted ,a series ,of experiments,to assess ,the

Steven Valin; Andreea Francu; Helmuth Trefftz; Ivan Marsic

2001-01-01

301

The Pendulum Equation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We investigate the pendulum equation [theta] + [lambda][squared] sin [theta] = 0 and two approximations for it. On the one hand, we suggest that the third and fifth-order Taylor series approximations for sin [theta] do not yield very good differential equations to approximate the solution of the pendulum equation unless the initial conditions are…

Fay, Temple H.

2002-01-01

302

On the Heun equation.  

PubMed

A new approach to the theory of finite-gap integration for the Heun equation is constructed. As an application, global monodromies of the Heun equation are calculated and expressed as hyperelliptic integrals. The relationship between the Heun equation and the spectral problem for the BC1 Inozemtsev model is also discussed. PMID:17588864

Takemura, Kouichi

2008-03-28

303

Lesson 28: Radical Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The lesson begins with an emphasis on isolating the radical expression in a radical equation and then highlights the importance of checking for extraneous solutions that may be generated when the equation is solved by applying even powers. Equations containing two radical expressions and then presented, followed by coverage of taking the nth root of a^n.

2011-01-01

304

Solving Systems of Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learn how to solve systems of linear equations by graphing, substitution, and elimination. As we discovered in our Pet Sitters Unit, systems of equations are a useful way to model and solve real-world situations in business. They are also useful in science and social science applications. This online unit will help you become an expert at solving systems of linear equations. 1) ...

Ball, Mrs.

2012-09-13

305

Equation of a Circle  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The following activities will help you practice equation of a circle. Objective: You will practice equations of circles. Activitiy One: Follow the instructions, by opening the applet and completing the given activity on the site equation of a circle Upon finishing the activity, answer the following questions: 1. What effect does changing h have on the circle? 2. What effect does ...

Ilieva, Ms.

2006-08-21

306

Singular Semilinear Elliptical Equations  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We study the singular semilinear elliptic equation. This type of equation arises in the boundary layer theory of viscous fluids. From the results it follows that the equation has a unique classical solution within a bounded domain omega, where p(x) is a s...

A. W. Shaker

1991-01-01

307

A Comparison of IRT Equating and Beta 4 Equating  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four equating methods (3PL true score equating, 3PL observed score equating, beta 4 true score equating, and beta 4 observed score equating) were compared using four equating criteria: first-order equity (FOE), second-order equity (SOE), conditional-mean-squared-error (CMSE) difference, and the equi-percentile equating property. True score…

Kim, Dong-In; Brennan, Robert; Kolen, Michael

2005-01-01

308

Collaborative Visualization: Definition, Challenges, and Research Agenda  

SciTech Connect

Collaborative visualization has emerged as a new research direction which offers the opportunity to reach new audiences and application areas for visualization tools and techniques. Technology now allows us to easily connect and collaborate with one another - in settings as diverse as over networked computers, across mobile devices, or using shared displays such as interactive walls and tabletop surfaces. Any of these collaborative settings carries a set of challenges and opportunities for visualization research. Digital information is already regularly accessed by multiple people together in order to share information, to view it together, to analyze it, or to form decisions. However, research on how to best support collaboration with and around visualizations is still in its infancy and has so far focused only on a small subset of possible application scenarios. The purpose of this article is (1) to provide a clear scope, definition, and overview of the evolving field of collaborative visualization, (2) to help pinpoint the unique focus of collaborative visualization with its specific aspects, challenges, and requirements within the intersection of general computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW) and visualization research, and (3) to draw attention to important future research questions to be addressed by the community. Thus, the goal of the paper is to discuss a research agenda for future work on collaborative visualization, including our vision for how to meet the grand challenge and to urge for a new generation of visualization tools that were designed with collaboration in mind from their very inception.

Isenberg, Petra; Elmqvist, Niklas; Scholtz, Jean; Cernea, Daniel; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Hagen, Hans

2011-10-01

309

Assessing Equating Results on Different Equating Criteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performance of three equating methods— the presmoothed equipercentile method, the item response theory (IRT) true score method, and the IRT observed score method—were examined based on three equating criteria: the same distributions property, the first-order equity property, and the second-order equity property. The magnitude of the difficulty differences in the alternate forms was found to affect the extent to

Ye Tong; Michael J. Kolen

2005-01-01

310

Collaborative Planning Solutions: Using USMC Standard Collaboration Tools to Assist With Mission Planning and Execution.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study provides a baseline on collaborative solutions and tools, This thesis examines the current collaborative applications used within the United States Marine Corps (USMC). It demonstrates the strengths and weaknesses inherent to the current collab...

H. J. McKenna

2001-01-01

311

Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration in Dependability  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration in Dependability (DIRC) is a joint effort among researchers from five British Universities and various disciplines "to address the dependability of computer-based systems." They define dependability broadly to encompass many facets of dependability, including reliability, security and availability. Their use of the term "computer-based systems" is also intended to emphasize the involvement of human participants and the inclusion of disciplines such as sociology and psychology as well as computer scientists and statisticians. Their work is organized into five Research Themes (Structure, Diversity, Timeliness, Responsibility and Risk), each of which is described here. Their projects are described on this website, along with a list of the people and partners involved and a selection of publications available to download, such as conference papers and technical reports. A Publications section also makes it easy to search the database by author or browse by publication type or project activity.

312

Collaborative observations of HDE 332077  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

IUE low dispersion observations were made of the Tc-deficient peculiar red giant (PRG) star, HDE 332077, to test the hypothesis that Tc--poor PRG's are formed as a result of mass transfer from a binary companion rather than from internal thermal pulsing while on the asymptotic red giant branch. Previous ground-based observations of this star indicated that it is a binary, but the secondary star was too massive for an expected white dwarf. A deep, SWP exposure was needed to search for evidence of an A-type main-sequence companion. We obtained a 120 minute LWP exposure (LWP 23479), followed by a collaborative 120 minute SWP exposure (SWP 45113). These observations were combined with our earlier IUE and optical data on this PRG star to model the spectral energy distribution of the system.

Ake, T.

1995-01-01

313

Collaborative observations of HDE 332077  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

IUE low dispersion observations were made of the T(sub c)-deficient peculiar red giant (PRG) star, HDE 332077, to test the hypothesis that T(sub c)-poor PRG's are formed as a result of mass transfer from a binary companion rather than from internal thermal pulsing while on the asymptotic red giant branch. Previous ground-based observations of this star indicated that it is a binary, but the secondary star was too massive for an expected white dwarf. A deep, short wavelength prime (SWP) exposure was needed to search for evidence of an A-type main-sequence companion. We obtained a 120 minute LWP exposure (LWP 23479), followed by a collaborative 1230 minute SWP exposure (SWP 45113). These observations were combined with our earlier IUE and optical data on this PRG star to model the spectral energy distribution of the system.

Ake, Thomas B., III

1995-01-01

314

The ANS Collaboration Monitoring Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ANS Collaboration is a growing Italian network of small and medium size telescopes performing spectroscopy (low and medium resolution single dispersion, and Echelle high resolution modes) and UBVRC IC CCD photometry of symbiotic stars and novae mainly, but with interest also on other types of objects like optical transients, eclipsing binaries, X-ray source counterparts and on-call follow-up observations of selected targets from some surveys like IPHAS or RAVE. In the present form ANS started operations in 2005, and at the time of writing has logged on symbiotic stars 14602 photometric runs and a rich ensemble of low and high resolution, absolutely fluxed spectra. The paper describes the internal organization, operation modes and procedures, and presents sample data and performance statistics.

Munari, U.; Bacci, S.; Baldinelli, L.; Castellani, F.; Cetrulo, G.; Cherini, G.; Dallaporta, S.; Dallavia, G.; Englaro, A.; Frigo, A.; Graziani, M.; Luppi, V.; Maitan, A.; Marangoni, C.; Milani, A.; Moretti, S.; Moschini, F.; Ochner, P.; Siviero, A.; Righetti, G. L.; Tomaselli, S.; Tomasoni, S.; Vagnozzi, A.; Valisa, P.

315

Collaborating Fuzzy Reinforcement Learning Agents  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Earlier, we introduced GARIC-Q, a new method for doing incremental Dynamic Programming using a society of intelligent agents which are controlled at the top level by Fuzzy Relearning and at the local level, each agent learns and operates based on ANTARCTIC, a technique for fuzzy reinforcement learning. In this paper, we show that it is possible for these agents to compete in order to affect the selected control policy but at the same time, they can collaborate while investigating the state space. In this model, the evaluator or the critic learns by observing all the agents behaviors but the control policy changes only based on the behavior of the winning agent also known as the super agent.

Berenji, Hamid R.

1997-01-01

316

PCCR: Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry  

PubMed Central

The Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry (PCCR) is a multi-institutional web-based system aimed to collect a variety of data on pancreatic cancer patients and high-risk subjects in a standard and efficient way. The PCCR was initiated by a group of experts in medical oncology, gastroenterology, genetics, pathology, epidemiology, nutrition, and computer science with the goal of facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies against pancreatic cancer. The PCCR is a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java/JSP technology and has Oracle 10 g database as a back-end. The PCCR uses a “confederation model” that encourages participation of any interested center, irrespective of its size or location. The PCCR utilizes a standardized approach to data collection and reporting, and uses extensive validation procedures to prevent entering erroneous data. The PCCR controlled vocabulary is harmonized with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT). The PCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in cancer research and healthcare. Currently, seven cancer centers in the USA, as well as one center in Italy are participating in the PCCR. At present, the PCCR database contains data on more than 2,700 subjects (PC patients and individuals at high risk of getting this disease). The PCCR has been certified by the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The PCCR provides a foundation for collaborative PC research. It has all the necessary prerequisites for subsequent evolution of the developed infrastructure from simply gathering PC-related data into a biomedical computing platform vital for successful PC studies, care and treatment. Studies utilizing data collected in the PCCR may engender new approaches to disease prognosis, risk factor assessment, and therapeutic interventions.

Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Whitcomb, David C.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ghiorzo, Paola; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Sasson, Aaron R.; Grizzle, William E.; Haynatzki, Gleb; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Kinarsky, Leo; Brand, Randall E.

2011-01-01

317

PCCR: Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry.  

PubMed

The Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry (PCCR) is a multi-institutional web-based system aimed to collect a variety of data on pancreatic cancer patients and high-risk subjects in a standard and efficient way. The PCCR was initiated by a group of experts in medical oncology, gastroenterology, genetics, pathology, epidemiology, nutrition, and computer science with the goal of facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies against pancreatic cancer. The PCCR is a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java/JSP technology and has Oracle 10 g database as a back-end. The PCCR uses a "confederation model" that encourages participation of any interested center, irrespective of its size or location. The PCCR utilizes a standardized approach to data collection and reporting, and uses extensive validation procedures to prevent entering erroneous data. The PCCR controlled vocabulary is harmonized with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT). The PCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in cancer research and healthcare. Currently, seven cancer centers in the USA, as well as one center in Italy are participating in the PCCR. At present, the PCCR database contains data on more than 2,700 subjects (PC patients and individuals at high risk of getting this disease). The PCCR has been certified by the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product. The PCCR provides a foundation for collaborative PC research. It has all the necessary prerequisites for subsequent evolution of the developed infrastructure from simply gathering PC-related data into a biomedical computing platform vital for successful PC studies, care and treatment. Studies utilizing data collected in the PCCR may engender new approaches to disease prognosis, risk factor assessment, and therapeutic interventions. PMID:21552494

Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Ketcham, Marsha A; Anderson, Michelle A; Whitcomb, David C; Lynch, Henry T; Ghiorzo, Paola; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sasson, Aaron R; Grizzle, William E; Haynatzki, Gleb; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Kinarsky, Leo; Brand, Randall E

2011-01-01

318

PBL and beyond: trends in collaborative learning.  

PubMed

Building upon the disruption to lecture-based methods triggered by the introduction of problem-based learning, approaches to promote collaborative learning are becoming increasingly diverse, widespread and generally well accepted within medical education. Examples of relatively new, structured collaborative learning methods include team-based learning and just-in-time teaching. Examples of less structured approaches include think-pair share, case discussions, and the flipped classroom. It is now common practice in medical education to employ a range of instructional approaches to support collaborative learning. We believe that the adoption of such approaches is entering a new and challenging era. We define collaborate learning by drawing on the broader literature, including Chi's ICAP framework that emphasizes the importance of sustained, interactive explanation and elaboration by learners. We distinguish collaborate learning from constructive, active, and passive learning and provide preliminary evidence documenting the growth of methods that support collaborative learning. We argue that the rate of adoption of collaborative learning methods will accelerate due to a growing emphasis on the development of team competencies and the increasing availability of digital media. At the same time, the adoption collaborative learning strategies face persistent challenges, stemming from an overdependence on comparative-effectiveness research and a lack of useful guidelines about how best to adapt collaborative learning methods to given learning contexts. The medical education community has struggled to consistently demonstrate superior outcomes when using collaborative learning methods and strategies. Despite this, support for their use will continue to expand. To select approaches with the greatest utility, instructors must carefully align conditions of the learning context with the learning approaches under consideration. Further, it is critical that modifications are made with caution and that instructors verify that modifications do not impede the desired cognitive activities needed to support meaningful collaborative learning. PMID:24246112

Pluta, William J; Richards, Boyd F; Mutnick, Andrew

2013-01-01

319

Collaboration in Student Teaching: Introducing the Collaboration Self-Assessment Tool  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need to collaborate in the fields of business, health care, and technology is not a new concept. Educational institutions, however, have been slow to recognize the need to teach collaboration skills (Brownell & Walther-Thomas, 2002; Jackson, 2004). This article focuses on the development of the Collaboration Self-Assessment Tool (CSAT). The…

Ofstedal, Kathleen; Dahlberg, Kathryn

2009-01-01

320

The Downtown Education Collaborative: A New Model for Collaborative Community Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Downtown Education Collaborative (DEC) is an innovative collaborative which includes public and private colleges working with community organizations in interdisciplinary community service learning. This article reviews DEC's development, from its inception as a shared vision aspired to by its partners, to a functioning collaborative. We…

Jacobus, Michelle Vazquez; Tiemann, Maryli; Reed, Erin

2011-01-01

321

Students' experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes an explorative study carried out to gain response from distance students on their experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments. In addition, this study also attempts to have a good grip of crucial aspects concerning collaborative learning. The study was undertaken among distance learners from the Open University of the Netherlands who

Silvia Dewiyanti; Saskia Brand-Gruwel; Wim M. G. Jochems; Nick J. Broers

2007-01-01

322

When do researchers collaborate? Toward a model of collaboration propensity in science and engineering research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geographically distributed and multidisciplinary collaborations have proven invaluable in answering a range of important scientific questions, such as understanding and controlling disease threats like SARS and AIDS or exploring the nature of matter in particle physics. Despite this, however, collaboration can often be problematic. There are institutional obstacles, collaboration tools may be poorly designed, and group coordination is difficult. To

Jeremy P. Birnholtz

2005-01-01

323

Supporting Distributed Collaboration in IT Service Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

IT service providers face a great need to improve the quality of services by IT service management (ITSM) in highly complex IT Environments. This pressure demands a strong collaboration from both the external service providers and internal service providers. However, providers still lack the necessary support, in methodologies and tools, to achieve efficient collaboration strategies. This paper proposes an innovative

Wei Yan; Beijun Shen; Delai Chen

2010-01-01

324

Presence disparity in mixed presence collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the design of an experiment investigating presence disparity in mixed presence collaboration using digital tabletops. In an attempt to verify previous work and relate their results, we examined different presence representations of remote collaborators: audio, video, telepointers and video arms. Our early results show some interesting trends that we are currently investigating in more detail through further analysis

Anastasia Bezerianos; Gregor Mcewan

2008-01-01

325

Collaborative video searching on a tabletop  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractAlmost all system and application design for multimedia systems is based around a single user working in isolation to perform some task yet much,of the work for which we use computers to help us, is based on working collaboratively with colleagues. Groupware systems do support user collaboration but typically this is supported through software and users still physically work in

Alan F. Smeaton; Hyowon Lee; Colum Foley; Sinéad Mcgivney

2007-01-01

326

VisTACO: visualizing tabletop collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

As we design tabletop technologies, it is important to also understand how they are being used. Many prior researchers have developed visualizations of interaction data from their studies to illustrate ideas and concepts. In this work, we develop an interactional model of tabletop collaboration, which informs the design of VisTACO, an interactive visualization tool for tabletop collaboration. Using VisTACO, we

Anthony Tang; Michel Pahud; Sheelagh Carpendale; Bill Buxton

2010-01-01

327

Design Issues for Collaborative Touch Table Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes underlying principles that inf luence the creation of successful touch table collaboration so ftware. Scott et al's collaborative tabletop guidelines (2003) are u sed as the basis for discussion. A summary of each table guideline is offered, and applied with respect to current touch-table applica tions. Recommendations for authors of table applications a re provided on a

Craig McNulty

328

Designing Digital Tables for Highly Integrated Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Digital tabletop systems are currently receiving considerable attention, but present systems do not allow the fluid and natural work that is evident when people work around a traditional table. This fluidity is particularly obvious in highly-integrated collaboration , where people work together in a closely coordinated fashion. Highly-integrated collaboration is common on regular tables, but is not well supported in

David Pinelle; Carl Gutwin; Sriram Subramanian

329

Collaborative Learning: A Sourcebook for Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This sourcebook contains nine papers on various aspects of collaborative learning for students with emphasis on college level instruction (though some material relevant to secondary elementary education is also included). Contributors address what collaborative learning is, how is it implemented, how to assess it, and where it is used. Each…

Goodsell, Anne S.; And Others

330

Voyagers and voyeurs: Supporting asynchronous collaborative visualization  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes mechanisms for asynchronous collaboration in the context of information visualization, recasting visualizations as not just analytic tools, but social spaces. We contribute the design and implementation of sense.us, a Web site supporting asynchronous collaboration across a variety of visualization types. The site supports view sharing, discussion, graphical annotation, and social navigation and includes novel interaction elements. We

Jeffrey Heer; Fernanda B. Viégas; Martin Wattenberg

2009-01-01

331

Collaborative Multi-Agents for Workflow Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Workflow management helps organizations to organize their work on different activities in such a way that the predictable underlying processes are carried out effectively and efficiently in a distributed environment. We describe a business workflow management system with intelligent multi-agent support in a collaborative organization environment. With the help from multi-agent collaboration, our workflow management system can organize the organization's

Huaiqing Wang; Dongming Xu

2001-01-01

332

Emerging Themes in Inter-firm Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Whether between individuals, work groups or organisations, it is widely accepted that collaboration plays an important role in the process of knowledge creation and maintenance. Management journals began reporting case study and other research results on collaboration between firms in the 1980’s. The early focus of these papers was on joint ventures and strategic alliances. More recently, research results

David Pender

333

SHaRE: Collaborative materials science research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Shared Research Equipment (SHaRE) Program provides access to the wide range of advanced equipment and techniques available in the Metals and Ceramics Division of ORNL to researchers from universities, industry, and other national laboratories. All SHaRE projects are collaborative in nature and address materials science problems in areas of mutual interest to the internal and external collaborators. While all

E. A. Kenik; K. L. More

1988-01-01

334

Collaboration in Software Engineering: A Roadmap  

Microsoft Academic Search

Software engineering projects are inherently cooperative, requiring many software engineers to coordinate their efforts to produce a large software system. Integral to this effort is developing shared understanding surrounding multiple artifacts, each artifact embodying its own model, over the entire development process. This focus on model- oriented collaboration embedded within a larger process is what distinguishes collaboration research in software

Jim Whitehead

2007-01-01

335

Keystroke Dynamics Authentication For Collaborative Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present in this paper a study on the ability and the benefits of using a keystroke dynamics authentication method for collaborative systems. Authentication is a challenging issue in order to guarantee the security of use of collaborative systems during the access control step. Many solutions exist in the state of the art such as the use of one time

Romain Giot; Mohamad El-Abed; Christophe Rosenberger

2009-01-01

336

Collaboration: From Analogue to Digital & Back.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Situated at a place where art meets collaboration and speaking to the 1999 InSEA World Congress's "Cultures and Transitions" theme, this paper tells a collaborative story that began as an "art-i-fax/art-e-post" project initiated via the Getty Center's educational Web site and has led to combined art projects and exhibitions across the globe. The…

Burke, Gerald; Jaeger, Numo

337

Preparing Secondary Special Educators: Four Collaborative Initiatives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to share the results of multiphase initiatives funded by four separate grants. The projects were designed to improve and enhance collaborative teaching at the secondary level. Each project provided opportunities for increased collaboration between special education faculty, secondary education faculty, and…

Simmons, Kate D.; Carpenter, Laura Bowden; Dyal, Allen; Austin, Sheila; Shumack, Kellie

2012-01-01

338

Storytelling in Collaborative Augmented Reality Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe the several possibilities of using storytelling in an Augmented Reality Environment to support the collaborative experience of the users in those environments. We start with the motivation of a lack of storytelling and experience in Collaborative Virtual Environments. As an implication of the need for such experiences, we give a general definition of Interactive Storytelling and offer some

Norbert Braun

2003-01-01

339

Collaboration between Science and Agriculture Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The focus of this descriptive study was to determine the type and frequency of collaborative activities occurring between agriculture teachers and science teachers who taught in schools with agricultural education programs. Additional foci of this study included determining the extent to which science and agriculture teachers value collaborative

Stephenson, Lee G.; Warnick, Brian K.; Tarpley, Rudy S.

2008-01-01

340

Collaborating for Change: Building Partnerships among Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Building partnerships among teachers is essential to enhance student learning. The Richardson-Rivers Collaboration Model emphasizes the importance of relationship building and describes procedures for successful classroom collaboration among teachers. The model combines theoretical constructs based on the Johari window and Jung's personality…

Coombs-Richardson, Rita; Rivers, Eileen S.

341

Examining Collaboration on Interdisciplinary Sport Science Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The attainment of optimal sport performance,has become increasingly scientific and requires sport scientists to collaborate on training programs in order totake a holistic view of performance (Cherebetiu, 1980; Patrick, 2001). Collaborative approaches range from multidisciplinary teams - where sport scientists work with athletes in a singular fashion (Reid, Stewart, & Thorne, 2004; Thomas, 2001), to interdisciplinary teams - where

Lisa J. Rogerson; William B. Strean

342

The structure of scientic collaboration networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the structure of scientic collaboration networks. We consider two scientists to be connected if they have authored a paper together, and construct explicit networks of such connections using data drawn from a number of databases, including MEDLINE (biomedical research), the Los Alamos e-Print Archive (physics), and NCSTRL (computer science). We show that these collaboration networks form \\\\small worlds\\

M. E. J. Newman

2001-01-01

343

Messy Collaboration: Learning from a Learning Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Messy collaboration refers to complexity, unpredictability and management dilemmas when educators work together. Such messiness was evident in a Hong Kong English Learning Study, a structured cyclical process in which teachers and researcher-participants from a teacher education institution work collaboratively on effective student learning. This…

Adamson, Bob; Walker, Elizabeth

2011-01-01

344

The evolution of research on collaborative learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

For many years, theories of collaborative learning tended to focus on how individuals function in a group. More recently, the focus has shifted so that the group itself has become the unit of analysis. In terms of empirical research, the initial goal was to establish whether and under what circumstances collaborative learning was more effective than learning alone. Researchers controlled

P. Dillenbourg; M. Baker; A. Blaye; C. O'Malley

1996-01-01

345

Cultures of Collaboration: Leveraging Classroom Potential  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A primary task of teachers is to promote the culture of collaboration in classrooms. That's because we are smarter together than we are alone. But for teachers to leverage the unique social capacity of classrooms, they need to understand how to create situations requiring and rewarding collaboration (like that of inquiry), how to structure groups,…

Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

2012-01-01

346

Fostering Distributed Science Learning through Collaborative Technologies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

TACTICS (French and Spanish acronym standing for Collaborative Work and Learning in Science with Information and Communications Technologies) is an ongoing project aimed at investigating a distributed community of learning and practice in which information and communications technologies (ICT) take the role of collaborative tools to support social…

Vazquez-Abad, Jesus; Brousseau, Nancy; Guillermina, Waldegg C.; Vezina, Mylene; Martinez, Alicia D.; de Verjovsky, Janet Paul

2004-01-01

347

The affordances of media spaces for collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, I discuss the affordances offered by media spaces for collaboration, contrasting their properties with those of the everyday medium and exploring the implications for perception and interaction. Collaboration is situated in a physical environment which supports or constrains the various forms social interactions might take. An analysis of the affordances of the environment - the properties that

William W. Gaver

1992-01-01

348

Collaborative Job Training in Rural Areas  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examine collaborative efforts by employers to provide job training in rural areas and assess how this collaboration affects the willingness of employers to train workers. Data are drawn from a telephone survey conducted in 2001 of a stratified random sample of 1,590 nonmetropolitan firms in the U.S. The literature on job training suggests that…

Green, Gary Paul; Galetto, Valeria; Haines, Anna

2003-01-01

349

Creating and managing value in collaborative networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a theoretical paper that examines the interplay between individual and collective capabilities and competencies and value transactions in collaborative environments. The theory behind value creation is examined and two types of value are identified, internal value (shareholder value) and external value (value proposition). The literature on collaborative enterprises\\/network is also examined with particular emphasis on supply chains, extended\\/virtual

Umit S. Bititci; Veronica Martinez; Pavel Albores; Joniarto Parung

2004-01-01

350

Collaborative Physical Chemistry Projects Involving Computational Chemistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The physical chemistry classes from three colleges have collaborated on two computational chemistry projects using Quantum CAChe 3.0 and Gaussian 94W running on Pentium II PCs. Online communication by email and the World Wide Web was an important part of the collaboration. In the first project, students used molecular modeling to predict benzene derivatives that might be possible hair dyes.

David M. Whisnant; Jerry J. Howe; Lisa S. Lever

2000-01-01

351

Collaborative Interaction for Improvement of Teaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relationships are explored between elementary school teachers' (N=13) collaborative interactions and implementation of a complex instructional program ("Finding Out/Descubrimiento") in science and mathematics developed for bilingual classrooms. Findings revealed an association between frequency of teacher collaboration and quality of…

Ellis, Nancy E.

1990-01-01

352

Collaboration Works! Preparing Teachers for Urban Realities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the philosophy and programmatic elements that make the Cooperative Urban Teacher Education (CUTE) program a successful model of collaborative urban teacher education. It also provides a brief overview of a follow-up study of CUTE student teachers (N=103) from a collaborating university. (IAH)

McCormick, Theresa E.

1990-01-01

353

Roles for Technology in Collaborative Teaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a collaborative upper level Latin literature course taught at a secondary school and a university that used a variety of technologies, including a MOO and e-mail. The design of this course on Plautus'"Aulularia" is discussed, including objectives, learning goals, and collaborative assignments. Argues that informed use of technology can…

Bonvallet, Susan; De Luce, Judith

2001-01-01

354

Virtual Collaboration and Media Sharing using COSMOS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVE) are providing a powerful mechanism to companies, for training staff and customers in their products, improving their productivity, as well as reducing the cost of product development at the same time. Enhanced with their integration with media streams like audio and video, they can become the main way of collaboration among co-workers. But, the realization of

VASILIOS DARLAGIANNIS; NICOLAS D. GEORGANAS

2000-01-01

355

Building the extended enterprise: key collaboration factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore supply chain collaboration issues in the extended enterprise (EE) to develop a more complete understanding of the nature and effectiveness of collaboration in the transition towards, but also within, the EE paradigm. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper presents results from a three-company case study focusing on the civil aerospace industry, with

Christos Braziotis; James Tannock

2011-01-01

356

Assessment of collaborative learning in online discussions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper will examine how an online forum can be used in work integrated learning as a vehicle for students to demonstrate their learning in the workplace and to facilitate collaborative learning. Collaborative learning is valuable in work integrated learning subjects because it enables students to make linkages between their experiences and those of others, share positive and negative aspects

Judith McNamara; Catherine Brown

357

Assessing Online Collaborative Learning: Process and Product.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the role of assessment with respect to the processes and products of online collaborative study. Describes a qualitative case study of staff and student perspectives on two United Kingdom Open University courses, which have used online collaborative assessment, and discusses results which underline the importance of assessment in ensuring…

Macdonald, Janet

2003-01-01

358

Assessing online collaborative learning: process and product  

Microsoft Academic Search

The assessment of online collaborative study presents new opportunities and challenges, both in terms of separating the process and product of collaboration, and in the support of skills development. The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of assessment with respect to the processes and products of online col- laborative study. It describes a qualitative case study of

Janet Macdonald

2003-01-01

359

Space Exploration: A Frontier for American Collaboration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The importance of space exploration in inspiring collaboration between the nations of the world is discussed. It is of enormous value for the United States to collaborate with other nations to engage in the challenge of space exploration. Data from satell...

M. D. Griffin

2008-01-01

360

Google news personalization: scalable online collaborative filtering  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several approaches to collaborative filtering have been stud- ied but seldom have studies been reported for large (several million users and items) and dynamic (the underlying item set is continually changing) settings. In this paper we de- scribe our approach to collaborative filtering for generating personalized recommendations for users of Google News. We generate recommendations using three approaches: collabo- rative

Abhinandan S. Das; Mayur Datar; Ashutosh Garg; Shyamsundar Rajaram

2007-01-01

361

Communication and Collaboration with Schools: Pediatricians' Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The multifaceted effect of chronic illness in children has created a need for pediatricians and school personnel, specifically school psychologists, to engage in collaborative problem solving. However, the extent to which this collaboration actually occurs in practice is unknown. A survey was developed and administered to a national sample of…

Bradley-Klug, Kathy L.; Sundman, Ashley N.; Nadeau, Joshua; Cunningham, Jennifer; Ogg, Julia

2010-01-01

362

Training Synchronous Collaborative E-Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to promote cooperation among students who work separately on their computers at home, the University of Essen has developed training courses with experienced tutors to teach students the required sensitivity and practical skills for tele-collaboration in small groups. A core problem in synchronous collaborative e-learning with speech…

Bliesener, Thomas

2006-01-01

363

Learning during a Collaborative Final Exam  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Collaborative testing has been suggested to serve as a good learning activity, for example, compared to individual testing. The aim of the present study was to measure learning at different levels of knowledge during a collaborative final exam in a course in basic methods and statistical procedures. Results on pre- and post-tests taken…

Dahlstrom, Orjan

2012-01-01

364

Design of Social Group Collaborative Learning System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nowadays, the whole society is undergoing transformation on resources, groups, conceptions, contents and environments of learning, however, the current e-learning system cannot adapt to this transformation. The concept of social group collaborative learning (SGCL) was brought forward in our previous work. In this paper, we present a design of social group collaborative learning system. In our design, we try to

Rong Wang; Caihong Sun; Li Yu

2008-01-01

365

Collaborative forecasting: a selection of practical approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment (CPFR) process model developed by the Voluntary Inter-industry Commerce Standards (VICS) association has received significant attention from both practitioners and academics. However, despite promising pilots, the adoption rate of CPFR has been slower than expected, especially in Europe. The reason seems to be that the proposed collaboration process is currently too labour-intensive for many

Johanna Småros

2003-01-01

366

Exploring the experiences of collaborative planning initiatives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Supply chain integration (or synchronisation) is to a large extent still only a promise, despite many considerable efforts by organisations and their customers and suppliers. Lack of visibility of true consumer demand and collaborative relationships based upon joint decision making remain significant barriers to the goal of supply chain integration. Collaborative planning, forecasting and replenishment (CPFR) is a strategy which

Mark Barratt; Alexander Oliveira

2001-01-01

367

Cross-System Collaboration: Tools That Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph reports on a collaborative initiative between Four Oaks, a private nonprofit family service agency in Iowa, and the Iowa Department of Human Services. The collaboration provided a series of community forums of local representatives to examine services available to delinquent youth and their families, to increase community awareness…

Hoel, James L.

368

How Collaborative Is Structural Family Therapy?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to the charge by "collaborative" therapies, such as solution focused and narrative, that structural family therapy is an aggressive, confrontational, and impositional approach, this investigation examines the role of therapist empathy in creating a collaborative partnership in structural family therapy. Twenty-four videotaped therapy…

Hammond, Ryan T.; Nichols, Michael P.

2008-01-01

369

Collaborative Strategic Planning: Myth or Reality?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The concept and practice of strategic planning, while entrenched in educational institutions in the West, is just catching on in Kenya. While literature emphasizes the importance of collaborative strategic planning, it does not indicate the challenges presented by collaboratively engaging in strategic planning. This article reports on findings of…

Mbugua, Flora; Rarieya, Jane F. A.

2014-01-01

370

Risk Management for Collaborative Software Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaborative software development involving multiple organizational units, often spanning national, language, and cultural boundaries, raises new challenges and risks that can derail software development projects even when traditional risk factors are being controlled. This article presents a framework that can be used to manage collaborative software development projects, based on an extended set of risk management principles. Three risk factors

Mojgan Mohtashami; Thomas Marlowe; Vassilka Kirova; Fadi P. Deek

2006-01-01

371

Collaboration within Large Groups in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to show how a large group of students can work collaboratively in a synchronous way within the classroom using the cheapest possible technological support. Making use of the features of Single Display Groupware and of Multiple Mice we propose a computer-supported collaborative learning approach for big groups within…

Szewkis, Eyal; Nussbaum, Miguel; Rosen, Tal; Abalos, Jose; Denardin, Fernanda; Caballero, Daniela; Tagle, Arturo; Alcoholado, Cristian

2011-01-01

372

A Need-Based Collaboration Classification Framework  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research in collaboration has yielded a large number of tools and environments. A number of classification frameworks exist that organize these contributions, but none of them are comprehensive enough; they focus either on a particular aspect of collaboration or on the specific mechanism that the tools follow. We have de- veloped a new framework that is based on the collabo-

Anita Sarma; André van der Hoek; Li-Te Cheng

373

Corporate Portals for Supply Chain Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews the technological capabilities offered by the portal industry's key software vendors to support inter-firm design collaboration and supply chain integration. An analysis of the technology coverage and gaps is presented, with a focus on the opportunities available for portal software improvement. Challenges for collaboration and supply chain software, including security, external access and capabilities, bandwidth and communication

Scott Paquette; Linda Moffat

2005-01-01

374

MOBILITY SUPPORT FOR DISTRIBUTED COLLABORATIVE TEAMWORK  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY: Following the trend in computer and network architecture towards smaller and lighter devices that are more or less constantly connected to the Internet through wireless access networks, mobile computing has emerged as a promising means to improve the possibilities of distributed collaborative teamwork. However, the mobility support implemented in state of the art collaboration software has hitherto been rather

Mathias Johanson; Peter Törlind

375

Globule: a collaborative content delivery network  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present Globule, a collaborative content delivery network developed by our research group. Globule is composed of Web servers that cooperate across a wide area network to provide performance and availability guarantees to the sites they host. We discuss the issues involved in developing and setting up a large-scale collaborative CDN and provide solutions for many of its unique problems

Guillaume Pierre; Maarten van Steen

2006-01-01

376

Data replication in collaborative sensor network systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

When sensor networks overlap in their coverage areas, sensors in the common areas can be simultaneously shared among multiple networks. The shared sensors provide opportunities to support collaboration among sensor networks. Collaboration enriches functionality and enhances scalability and manageability of networked sensor systems, in particular those comprised of a large number of heterogeneous sensor networks deployed over a large area.

Denis Gracanin; Kevin P. Adams; Mohamed Eltoweissy

2006-01-01

377

Collaboration using roles. [in computer network security  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Segregation of roles into alternative accounts is a model which provides not only the ability to collaborate but also enables accurate accounting of resources consumed by collaborative projects, protects the resources and objects of such a project, and does not introduce new security vulnerabilities. The implementation presented here does not require users to remember additional passwords and provides a very simple consistent interface.

Bishop, Matt

1990-01-01

378

Collaborative teleoperation using networked spatial dynamic voting  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a networked teleoperation system that allows groups of participants to collaboratively explore live remote environments. Participants collaborate using a spatial dynamic voting (SDV) interface that allows them to vote on a sequence of images via a network such as the Internet. The SDV interface runs on each client computer and communicates with a central server that collects, displays,

KEN GOLDBERG; Dezhen Song; ANTHONY LEVANDOWSKI

2003-01-01

379

Collaborative Virtual Gaming Worlds in Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is growing interest in the use of virtual gaming worlds in education, supported by the increased use of multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) and massively multi-player online role-playing games (MMORPGs) for collaborative learning. However, this paper argues that collaborative gaming worlds have been in use much longer and are much wider…

Whitton, Nicola; Hollins, Paul

2008-01-01

380

Solution of the General Helmholtz Equation Starting from Laplace's Equation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this paper we illustrate how to solve the general Helmholtz equation starting from Laplace's equation. The interesting point is that the Helmholtz equation has a frequency term whereas Laplace's equation is the static solution of the same boundary valu...

M. S. Palma T. K. Sarkar Y. Chung

2002-01-01

381

The IPS supported employment learning collaborative.  

PubMed

Objective: Learning collaboratives aim to improve the quality and outcomes of health care. This paper updates the Johnson & Johnson-Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program, a 12-year learning collaborative on supported employment for people with mental illness. Methods: We gathered data from quarterly employment reports, monthly Individual Placement and Support (IPS) meetings, and presentations at the 2013 annual meeting of the learning collaborative. Results: The number of participant states or regions (and sites within these jurisdictions) was expanded to 16 jurisdictions in the United States and 3 in European countries. The quarterly rate of competitive employment has averaged 43% over 11 years in the U.S. sites. The collaborative has spawned numerous interactions, trainings, innovations, and research projects. Conclusions and Implications for Practice: Long-term learning collaboratives can produce high quality services, good outcomes, sustainability, and innovation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24512479

Becker, Deborah R; Drake, Robert E; Bond, Gary R

2014-06-01

382

Levels of Collaboration: Where Does Your Work Fit In?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To collaborate is to share--to collaborate at different levels is to share the responsibility for learning with more and more input. In this article, the author lists the academic areas enhanced by collaboration; the characteristics of collaboration behaviors between educators; and the six elements of successful collaboration. She briefly…

Marcoux, Betty L.

2007-01-01

383

Interprofessional Collaboration in Schools: Benefits and Barriers in Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interprofessional collaboration in the schools is discussed in terms of: major influences on collaboration (including social changes, legislation, and educational changes); practical aspects of teamwork; and parameters of collaboration in practice such as collaboration with students and their families, collaboration among school professionals, and…

Mostert, Mark P.

1996-01-01

384

Collaborative PLM - The Next Generation AKA Cars on Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this slide presentation the importance of collaboration in developing the next systems for space exploration is stressed. The mechanism of this collaboration are reviewed, and particular emphasis is given to our planned exploration of Mars and how this will require a great deal of collaboration. A system architecture for this collaboration is shown and the diagram for the collaborative environment is conceptualized.

Soderstrom, Tom; Stefanini, Mike

2007-01-01

385

Nonlinear gyrokinetic equations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nonlinear gyrokinetic equations are presently derived from a systematic Hamiltonian theory, by means of Lie transforms and a noncanonical perturbation theory first used by Littlejohn (1979, 1981) for the problem of asymptotically small gyroradius. An energy invariant for the nonlinear system is derived, and several limiting forms are considered. The weak turbulence theory of the equations is examined, and it is noted that the impossibility of deriving the wave kinetic equation of Galeev and Sagdeev (1969) except by an asystematic truncation of the equations implies a failure of the equation to consider all gyrokinetic effects. The equations are simplified for the case of a small but finite gyroradius, in a form suitable for efficient computer simulation.

Dubin, D. H. E.; Krommes, J. A.; Oberman, C.; Lee, W. W.

1983-12-01

386

Linear Partial Differential Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This course, presented by MIT and taught by professor Matthew Hancock, covers the partial differential equations of applied mathematics, including diffusion, Laplace/Poisson, and wave equations. Methods and tools for solving these equations are also taught. The course includes lecture notes as well as assignments and exams with solutions. MIT presents OpenCourseWare as free educational material online. No registration or enrollment is required to use the materials.

Hancock, Matthew

2011-01-11

387

Solving Ordinary Differential Equations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Initial-value ordinary differential equation solution via variable order Adams method (SIVA/DIVA) package is collection of subroutines for solution of nonstiff ordinary differential equations. There are versions for single-precision and double-precision arithmetic. Requires fewer evaluations of derivatives than other variable-order Adams predictor/ corrector methods. Option for direct integration of second-order equations makes integration of trajectory problems significantly more efficient. Written in FORTRAN 77.

Krogh, F. T.

1987-01-01

388

Famous Equations and Inequalities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An idiosyncratic and personal selection of particularly important or particularly intriguing mathematical equations, not all of them complicated. Mathematical Constants; The definition of Pi; The definition of e; A differential equation; The Pythagorean Theorem; The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; Taylor Series; Eigenvalue Problems; Linear Systems; A Variational Principle; The Mandelbrot Set; Loan Payments; The Triangle Inequality; Reverse Triangle Inequality; Cantor's Theorem. Also equations for physics: Energy, mass, and the speed of light; Gravity.

Alfeld, Peter

2007-04-08

389

Quantum Hydrodynamic Equations  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the previous chapters, we have derived quantum macroscopic models from a Wigner–Boltzmann equation using a diffusion scaling.\\u000a In this chapter, we show that, in analogy to the semi-classical situation, quantum hydrodynamic models can be derived by employing\\u000a a hydrodynamic scaling. We present two derivations: one from the (mixed-state) Schrödinger equation and one from a Wigner–Boltzmann\\u000a equation. This approach can

Ansgar Jüngel

390

Solving Linear Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage includes six examples of solving linear equations using balancing. Students learn to "keep the equation balanced by making the same changes to both sides of the equal sign." Six examples of this mathematical process are included, each one being slightly more challenging than the last. Equations include more than one operation, variables, multiple terms on the same side, parentheses and fractions. The process for solving each is explained step by step.

Murray, Michael

2012-01-01

391

Generalized spin precession equations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bloch equations, which describe spin precession and relaxation in external magnetic fields, can be generalized to include the evolution of polarization tensors of various ranks in arbitrary multipole fields. We show applications of the generalized spin precession equations using simple examples from atomic, nuclear and condensed matter physics, and compare the various approaches found in the literature. The derivation of the generalized Bloch equations can be considerably simplified using a particular bra-ket notation for irreducible tensors.

Stöckmann, Hans-Jürgen; Dubbers, Dirk

2014-05-01

392

Collaborative Planning of Robotic Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Science Activity Planner (SAP) software system includes an uplink-planning component, which enables collaborative planning of activities to be undertaken by an exploratory robot on a remote planet or on Earth. Included in the uplink-planning component is the SAP-Uplink Browser, which enables users to load multiple spacecraft activity plans into a single window, compare them, and merge them. The uplink-planning component includes a subcomponent that implements the Rover Markup Language Activity Planning format (RML-AP), based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML) format that enables the representation, within a single document, of planned spacecraft and robotic activities together with the scientific reasons for the activities. Each such document is highly parseable and can be validated easily. Another subcomponent of the uplink-planning component is the Activity Dictionary Markup Language (ADML), which eliminates the need for two mission activity dictionaries - one in a human-readable format and one in a machine-readable format. Style sheets that have been developed along with the ADML format enable users to edit one dictionary in a user-friendly environment without compromising

Norris, Jeffrey; Backes, Paul; Powell, Mark; Vona, Marsette; Steinke, Robert

2004-01-01

393

Collaboration in Complex Medical Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Improving our understanding of collaborative work in complex environments has the potential for developing effective supporting technologies, personnel training paradigms, and design principles for multi-crew workplaces. USing a sophisticated audio-video-data acquisition system and a corresponding analysis system, the researchers at University of Maryland have been able to study in detail team performance during real trauma patient resuscitation. The first study reported here was on coordination mechanisms and on characteristics of coordination breakdowns. One of the key findings was that implicit communications were an important coordination mechanism (e.g. through the use of shared workspace and event space). The second study was on the sources of uncertainty during resuscitation. Although incoming trauma patients' status is inherently uncertain, the findings suggest that much of the uncertainty felt by care providers was related to communication and coordination. These two studies demonstrate the value of and need for creating a real-life laboratory for studying team performance with the use of comprehensive and integrated data acquisition and analysis tools.

Xiao, Yan; Mankenzie, Colin F.

1998-01-01

394

Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry  

PubMed Central

The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC).

Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

2011-01-01

395

Multicenter breast cancer collaborative registry.  

PubMed

The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product.The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

2011-01-01

396

ARTEMIS: a collaborative framework for health care.  

PubMed

Patient centered healthcare delivery is an inherently collaborative process. This involves a wide range of individuals and organizations with diverse perspectives: primary care physicians, hospital administrators, labs, clinics, and insurance. The key to cost reduction and quality improvement in health care is effective management of this collaborative process. The use of multi-media collaboration technology can facilitate timely delivery of patient care and reduce cost at the same time. During the last five years, the Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC), under the sponsorship of DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, recently renamed ARPA) developed a number of generic key subsystems of a comprehensive collaboration environment. These subsystems are intended to overcome the barriers that inhibit the collaborative process. Three subsystems developed under this program include: MONET (Meeting On the Net)--to provide consultation over a computer network, ISS (Information Sharing Server)--to provide access to multi-media information, and PCB (Project Coordination Board)--to better coordinate focussed activities. These systems have been integrated into an open environment to enable collaborative processes. This environment is being used to create a wide-area (geographically distributed) research testbed under DARPA sponsorship, ARTEMIS (Advance Research Testbed for Medical Informatics) to explore the collaborative health care processes. We believe this technology will play a key role in the current national thrust to reengineer the present health-care delivery system. PMID:8130536

Reddy, R; Jagannathan, V; Srinivas, K; Karinthi, R; Reddy, S M; Gollapudy, C; Friedman, S

1993-01-01

397

Children, but not chimpanzees, prefer to collaborate.  

PubMed

Human societies are built on collaborative activities. Already from early childhood, human children are skillful and proficient collaborators. They recognize when they need help in solving a problem and actively recruit collaborators [1, 2]. The societies of other primates are also to some degree cooperative. Chimpanzees, for example, engage in a variety of cooperative activities such as border patrols, group hunting, and intra- and intergroup coalitionary behavior [3-5]. Recent studies have shown that chimpanzees possess many of the cognitive prerequisites necessary for human-like collaboration. Chimpanzees have been shown to recognize when they need help in solving a problem and to actively recruit good over bad collaborators [6, 7]. However, cognitive abilities might not be all that differs between chimpanzees and humans when it comes to cooperation. Another factor might be the motivation to engage in a cooperative activity. Here, we hypothesized that a key difference between human and chimpanzee collaboration-and so potentially a key mechanism in the evolution of human cooperation-is a simple preference for collaborating (versus acting alone) to obtain food. Our results supported this hypothesis, finding that whereas children strongly prefer to work together with another to obtain food, chimpanzees show no such preference. PMID:22000101

Rekers, Yvonne; Haun, Daniel B M; Tomasello, Michael

2011-10-25

398

48 CFR 970.5203-2 - Performance improvement and collaboration.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Performance improvement and collaboration. 970.5203-2 Section 970...5203-2 Performance improvement and collaboration. As prescribed in 970.0370-2...clause: Performance Improvement and Collaboration (MAY 2006) (a)...

2010-10-01

399

75 FR 10204 - Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Secretary Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of...establish the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Advisory Committee and call for nominations...establish the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Advisory Committee (Committee)...

2010-03-05

400

Measuring Collaboration in Criminal Justice Problem Solving Projects.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Overall the results of the evaluation suggested that criminal justice agencies could collaborate effectively. The findings indicated that all five dimensions of collaboration did not need to be present for a successful collaboration. Specifically, it was ...

M. W. Downing

2005-01-01

401

Experiential Collaborative Learning and Preferential Thinking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper presents a Project-Based Learning (shortly, PBL) approach in a collaborative educational environment aimed to develop design ability and creativity of students coming from different engineering disciplines. Three collaborative learning experiences in product design were conducted in order to study their impact on preferred thinking styles of students. Using a thinking style inventory, pre- and post-survey data was collected and successively analyzed through ANOVA techniques. Statistically significant results showed students successfully developed empathy and an openness to multiple perspectives. Furthermore, data analysis confirms that the proposed collaborative learning experience positively contributes to increase awareness in students' thinking styles.

Volpentesta, Antonio P.; Ammirato, Salvatore; Sofo, Francesco

402

Human Centered Hardware Modeling and Collaboration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to collaborate engineering designs among NASA Centers and customers, to in clude hardware and human activities from multiple remote locations, live human-centered modeling and collaboration across several sites has been successfully facilitated by Kennedy Space Center. The focus of this paper includes innovative a pproaches to engineering design analyses and training, along with research being conducted to apply new technologies for tracking, immersing, and evaluating humans as well as rocket, vehic le, component, or faci lity hardware utilizing high resolution cameras, motion tracking, ergonomic analysis, biomedical monitoring, wor k instruction integration, head-mounted displays, and other innovative human-system integration modeling, simulation, and collaboration applications.

Stambolian Damon; Lawrence, Brad; Stelges, Katrine; Henderson, Gena

2013-01-01

403

Student Collaborative Networks and Academic Performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Undergraduate physics students commonly collaborate with one another on homework assignments, especially in more challenging courses. However, there currently exists a dearth of empirical research directly comparing the structure of students' collaborative networks to their academic performances in lower and upper division physics courses. We investigate such networks and associated performances through a mandated collaboration reporting system in two sophomore level and three junior level physics courses during the Fall 2012 and Spring 2013 semesters. We employ social network analysis to quantify the structure and time evolution of networks involving approximately 140 students. Analysis includes analytical and numerical assignments in addition to homework and exam scores. Preliminary results are discussed.

Schmidt, David; Bridgeman, Ariel; Kohl, Patrick

2013-04-01

404

Global Collaborations - Prospects and Problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

International collaboration has long been a feature of science. Collaborative investments in joint facilities and projects have grown considerably over the past 20-40 years, and many projects have been multinational from the start. This has been particularly true in Europe, where intergovernmental organizations such as CERN, ESA, and ESO have enabled European countries to carry out forefront science with state-of-art facilites which would have been beyond the capabilities of any one country. A brief survey of these organizations, their structure, and the possible reasons behind their success is given. The transition from regional to global creates new problems. Global scale projects face a range of generic issues which must be addressed and overcome if the project is to be a success. Each project has its own specific boundary conditions and each adopts an approach best fitted to its own objectives and constraints. Experience with billion dollar projects such as the SSC, LHC, and ITER shows the key problem areas and demonstrates the importance of preparatory work in the early stages to settle issues such as schedule, funding, location, legal and managerial structure, and oversight. A range of current and proposed intercontinental or global projects - so- called ``Megascience Projects" - is reviewed. Such projects, originally a feature of space and particle physics, are now becoming more common, and very large projects in astronomy, for example ALMA and 50 - 100m telescopes, and other areas of physics now fall into the `global' category. These projects are on such a large scale, from any scientific, managerial, financial or political perspective, and have such global importance, that they have necessarily been conceived as international from the outset. Increasing financial pressures on governments and funding agencies in the developed countries place additional demands on the project planning. The contrasting approaches, problems faced, and progress made in various projects will be analyzed and possible lessions drawn out. The role which can be played in the early stages by bodies such as the OECD Global Science Forum and G-8 Carnegie Meetings, where science policy makers meet, is examined. Experience shows that these valuable `scene setting' discussions have to be informed by coordinated input from the scientific community and must be followed up by more detailed discussions between funding agencies or their equivalent, because decision making requires the development of a consensus amongst the participants. This process can be illustrated most effectively by the care with which the ideas for the International Linear Collider have been and are being developed. Agreement on building and operating a facility is not the end of the story. The legitimate desire of scientists in all other countries to be able to participate in exploiting a major new facility has to be taken into account, and that introduces a range of proprietary and sociological issues over data access and rights, and now, with the explosion in computing and storage powers, in data archiving support. These are issues which can be addressed within the scientific community and taken to the political arena via such bodies as the OECD Global Science Forum.

Corbett, Ian

2005-04-01

405

The more you remember the more you decide: collaborative memory in adolescents with intellectual disability and their assistants.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to investigate collaborative memory in adolescents with intellectual disabilities when collaborating with an assistant, and also the extent to which decisiveness is related to individual memory performance. Nineteen students with intellectual disabilities (mean age=18.5, SD=0.9) each collaborated with a teaching assistant (mean age 40.3, SD=12.1) familiar from everyday work in school. Pictures were presented individually. Recognition was performed in two parts, first individually and thereafter collaboratively. The design involved 2 settings, one natural (with equal encoding time) and another with equal individual memory performance (assistants had shorter encoding time than the students). Results showed collaborative inhibition in this previously uninvestigated collaboration setting with adolescents with intellectual disabilities and their assistants. The assistants both performed higher and decided more than the students with intellectual disabilities in the natural setting, but not in the equated performance setting. Inhibition was larger in the equated setting. The assistants' decisiveness was moderately correlated with individual memory performance. Implications for everyday life are discussed. PMID:21269804

Danielsson, Henrik; Dahlström, Orjan; Andersson, Jan

2011-01-01

406

Prentice's equation and generalizations.  

PubMed

The purpose of this note is to clarify confusion over the range of applicability of Prentice's equation for the calculation of prismatic effects in lenses. Making use of the concept of the ray transference in Gaussian and linear optics, the paper obtains generalized forms of Prentice's equation that apply in various situations. Redefinition of prismatic deviation as change in reduced direction of a ray makes Prentice's equation valid for thin systems in media of any index of refraction. In particular, the equation then holds for a single refracting surface. It does not hold in general for thick systems, although there are some special cases in which it does apply. The appropriate equation is presented for thick systems in general. The correct form of power to use in the equations is equivalent power and not back-vertex power. A generalized form of Prentice's equation applies to astigmatic systems, including single refracting surfaces and thin lenses. An analog of Prentice's equation gives the transverse displacement of a ray across a system as a function of the incident-reduced direction of the ray. PMID:10939315

Harris, W F

2000-07-01

407

Energy Conservation (Bernoulli's Equation)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Professor Chiang Shih's Thermal-Fluids I course at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering combines "the traditional thermal disciplines in Thermodynamics, heat transfer and fluid mechanics." This PowerPoint presentation, from Shih's lecture notes, illustrates Benoulli's Equation and energy conservation. Along with mathematical equations, there are also a number of illustrations and examples which show the concepts discussed.

Shih, Chiang

2008-09-24

408

Reduced Braginskii equations  

SciTech Connect

A set of reduced Braginskii equations is derived without assuming flute ordering and the Boussinesq approximation. These model equations conserve the physical energy. It is crucial at finite [beta] that the perpendicular component of Ohm's law be solved to ensure [del][center dot][bold j]=0 for energy conservation.

Yagi, M.; Horton, W. (Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States))

1994-07-01

409

Differential Equations Textbook  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a free textbook which covers material for an introductory course on differential equations with some partial differential equations material, though it assumes knowledge of matrix theory. It includes a section on computing Fourier series of polynomials. It also includes a link to the freely available student solutions manual.

Trench, William F.

2014-04-04

410

New equation for flooding  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explains how the flooding point in packed columns can be solved explicitly for either the gas flow rate or the liquid flow rate, depending upon the given application. The traditional trial-and-error procedure is avoided by using the new equation, as shown by a brief example. Presented equation was obtained from a regression analysis of 16 points taken from

H. C. Ward; J. T. Sommerfeld

1982-01-01

411

Linear Equations: Equivalence = Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ability to solve linear equations sets students up for success in many areas of mathematics and other disciplines requiring formula manipulations. There are many reasons why solving linear equations is a challenging skill for students to master. One major barrier for students is the inability to interpret the equals sign as anything other than…

Baratta, Wendy

2011-01-01

412

Dave's Equation Balancer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This on-line calculator lets you balance equations with the touch of a button. You enter the compounds or elements for both reactants and products and the program provides the balanced equation (note that it cannot handle ionic formulae). A nifty homework-helper for chemistry students.

2000-01-01

413

Decision equations and reverberations  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical analysis is given of systems of decision equations (such as typically arise in the study of switching networks), with particular regard to the study of self-sustaining periodic solutions, or reverberations, which are of special importance for the description, or simulation, of thought-processes in brains or analogues (“neuronic equations” of ref. 1 in the text). A special class of

Eduardo R. Caianiello

1966-01-01

414

DRINKING WATER COST EQUATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

This report presents capital, and operating and maintenance cost equations for 99 water treatment unit processes. The equations, derived from a cost data base developed for the Drinking Water Research Division can be used to provide preliminary cost estimates for individual unit ...

415

Model Boltzmann equations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is shown that the Boltzmann equation for isotropic scattering of Maxwell molecules, considered by Bobylev, Krook, and Wu (BKW), can be written in the form of an energy-space kinetic equation. A transformation leads to a new class of kinetic models, possessing exact solutions of the BKW type.

Ziff, Robert M.

1981-02-01

416

EB 2007 Careers Symposium - Guide for Successful Collaboration: From the Handshake to the Collaborative Research Agreement  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Successful collaborations foster successful scientific careers. Scientific collaboration is a critical feature of the research process. Not only is it a requirement for the advancement of scientific knowledge, but it is also an important skill for scientists to possess for a successful and productive career. Initiating a successful collaboration is a skill that many scientists have little experience with early in their careers. Collaboration is key to expanding ones scientific reach, potentially tapping into resources (technologies, reagents, ideas) that might not be immediately available. But, how do you take the first step? How does one collaborate with the pharmaceutical industry? How does one tap into VA/Military research dollars and resources? What are the legal issues of a formal collaboration? What types of collaborations are common? This Symposium will help to answer these questions by describing various types of collaborations within academia, between academia and industry, and between basic and clinical scientists, and how to initiate them. The Symposium will also discuss more non-traditional collaborations, such as those with the US government and Veterans Administration. Finally, it will also cover what to expect from the legal perspective, specifically the common reasons why collaborations fail or fall through.

Stephanie W Watts (Michigan State University); PhD Stephen A Douglas (GlaxoSmithKline); PhD Janet Harris (Director, US Army Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs); Jay B Winchester (Judge Advocate, US Army Medical Research and Material Command)

2007-04-07

417

When do researchers collaborate? Toward a model of collaboration propensity in science and engineering research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geographically distributed and multidisciplinary collaborations have proven invaluable in answering a range of important scientific questions, such as understanding and controlling disease threats like SARS and AIDS or exploring the nature of matter in particle physics. Despite this, however, collaboration can often be problematic. There are institutional obstacles, collaboration tools may be poorly designed, and group coordination is difficult. To better design technologies to support research activities, we need an improved understanding of why scientists collaborate and how their collaborations work. To achieve this improved understanding, this study compares two theoretical approaches to collaboration propensity---that is, the extent to which collaboration is perceived as useful by individual researchers. On one hand, cultural comparisons of disciplines suggest that collaboration propensity will be higher in disciplinary cultures that have a more collectivist orientation, as indicated by low levels of competition for individual recognition and few concerns about secrecy related to commercialization and intellectual property. In contrast, an approach based on social and organizational psychology suggests that collaboration propensity will vary as a function of resource concentration, fieldwide focus on a well-defined set of problems, and the need for and availability of help when difficult problems are encountered in day-to-day work. To explore this question, a mail survey of 900 academic researchers in three fields was conducted, along with 100 interviews with practicing researchers at 17 sites in the field. Results support a social and organizational psychological interpretation of collaboration propensity. That is, cultural factors such as competition for individual recognition and concerns about intellectual property were not perceived as significant impediments to collaboration. Instead, characteristics like resource concentration and frequent help-seeking behavior were more important in determining collaboration propensity. Implications of these findings include a call for more careful examination of the day-to-day work of scientists and engineers, and a suggestion that concerns about scientific competition impeding collaboration may be unwarranted.

Birnholtz, Jeremy P.

418

National Transport Code Collaboration (NTCC)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Progress continues toward achieving NTCC goals, which include the development of -- a library of modules which satisfy clearly defined standards, a framework using modern computer languages to write transport codes, a Web-invocable data server and demonstration code, and an education program to utilize modern computational tools. The development of a flexible framework (using five programming languages -- FORTRAN, C++, PYTHON, CORBA and JAVA, and modern software engineering) allows the design of new customizable, user-friendly, easily maintained transport codes that can address major physics issues facing the fusion program. The demo code runs on up to three computers simultaneously; the GUI Client runs on a local computer, the Physics server advances the transport equations, and the Data server accesses experimental data. The evolutions of plasma discharges using different transport models from the module library are compared using the demo code.

Kritz, A. H.; Bateman, G.; Kinsey, J.; Wiley, J.; Cary, J. R.; Luetkemeyer, K. G.; Cohen, R.; Jong, R.; Lodestro, L.; Yang, T. B.; Houlberg, W.; Greenwood, D.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.; Pletzer, A.; St. John, H.; Fredian, T.; Sugiyama, L.

1999-11-01

419

SNL/VNIIEF Storage Monitoring Collaboration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-All Russian Research Institute for Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)(also know as Arzamas-16) are collaborating on ways to assure the highest standards on safety, security, and internat...

B. P. Barkanov J. C. Bartberger S. V. Blagin C. D. Croessmann J. D. Gruda V. A. Lupsha

1999-01-01

420

Plutonium Test Plan ORNL-VNIIEF Collaboration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of this test is to collect the cross correlation and HOS signatures from four detectors, arranged in a tetrahedron about different plutonium objects during ORNL/VNIIEF collaborative measurements in Sarov, Russia. The four detectors will be arrang...

L. G. Chiang J. T. Mihalezo

2000-01-01

421

Interlaboratory Collaborations in the Undergraduate Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A novel approach to cross-disciplinary and group learning, known as interlaboratory collaborations, was developed. The method mimics an industrial or research setting, fosters teamwork, and emphasizes the importance of good communication skills in the sciences.

Megehee, Elise G.; Hyslop, Alison G.; Rosso, Richard J.

2005-01-01

422

Progress Report for C-Mod Collaboration  

SciTech Connect

The aims of the collaboration have not changed. The report describes progress in the areas of FRCECE system, charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, Beam-Emission spectroscopy (BES), as well as other contributions. A significant number of resulting publications are listed.

Dr. Kenneth W. Gentle, Dr. William Rowan, Dr. Perry Phillips

2008-09-30

423

Launching International Collaboration for Interpretation Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The expansion of interpretation research projects across national boundaries contributes to improved personal, professional, and intellectual outcomes for researchers and practitioners. Establishing and maintaining these collaborative teams may be especially beneficial to strengthening the research agenda of new researchers. Conducting…

Shaw, Sherry

2006-01-01

424

Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS). Study Forms.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) is a multicenter investigation designed to evaluate therapeutic interventions for patients who have choroidal melanoma. Two randomized controlled trials are currently being conducted. Eligible patients for th...

1991-01-01

425

Navy Collaborative Integrated Information Technology Initiative.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Quarterly progress report on NAVCIITI hardware and software configurations of smart antennas, multi-function antennas, secure configurable platform, command & control visualization, visualization and HCI, collaboration workspace, digital ships, mechanical...

K. Reifsnider R. Habayeb

2000-01-01

426

Navy Collaborative Integrated Information Technology Initiative (NAVCIITI).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Final Report for five year NAVCIITI effort on hardware and software configurations of smart antennas, multi-function antennas, secure configurable platform, command & control visualization, visualization and HCI, collaboration workspace, digital ships, me...

W. Stutzman R. Habayeb

2004-01-01

427

Seven Principles of Highly Collaborative PD  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Convening professionals--physically or virtually--is necessary but certainly not sufficient for meaningful collaboration and networking to occur. Professional development (PD) must be designed and carried out in ways that encourage a culture of sustained co

Lee, Michele H.

2010-07-01

428

A Persuasive Example of Collaborative Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the 12-week long collaborative learning project used in a persuasion and propaganda course. Explains that the students worked in groups on a persuasive campaign to change a target population. States that the student projects were persuasive. (CMK)

Carlsmith, Kevin M.; Cooper, Joel

2002-01-01

429

Collaborative Decision Environment for UAV Operations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

NASA is developing Intelligent Mission Management (IMM) technology for science missions employing long endurance unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV's). The IMM groundbased component is the Collaborative Decision Environment (CDE), a ground system that provides...

M. V. D'Ortenzio F. Y. Enomoto S. L. Johan

2005-01-01

430

SHARING RESOURCES THROUGH COLLABORATION USING TECHNOLOGY  

EPA Science Inventory

In response to changing social and economic conditions, instant communication, emerging technology, and decreasing resources for libraries, there is a need for librarians to use collaborative methods, strategies, and technologies to solve common problems or produce common produ...

431

Managing consistency in collaborative design environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In today's global economy, there is a significant paradigm shift to collaborative engineering design environments. One of key issues in the collaborative setting is the consistency model, which governs how to coordinate the activities of collaborators to ensure that they do not make inconsistent changes or updates to the shared objects. In this paper, we present a new consistency model which requires that all update operations will be executed in the casual order (causality) and all participants have the same view on the operations on the shared objects (view synchrony). A simple multicast-based protocol to implement the consistency model is presented. By employing vector time and token mechanisms, the protocol brings the shared objects from one consistent state to another, thus providing collaborators with a consistent view of the shared objects. A CORBA-based on-going prototyping implementation is outlined. Some of the related work are also discussed.

Miao, Chunyan; Yang, Zhonghua; Goh, Angela; Sun, Chengzheng; Sattar, Abdul

1999-08-01

432

Integrating Diverse Data Systems for International Collaboration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

International collaborations, especially ones that arise with little or no financial resources, still face challenges in opening up data collections via a wide variety of differing and often non-interoperable means. In turn, this hampers the collaborative process, slows or even prevents scientific exchange. Early efforts that proposed a centralized, and project specific data archive encountered many difficulties, ranging from little or no adoption, to the inability to provide required documentation and metadata to make the datasets findable or usable. In time, virtualized approaches appeared to gain traction, for e.g. virtual observatories. In this contribution, we report on several international collaboration case studies with distributed data systems; their needs, successes, challenges and failures and synthesize a set of suggested practices to inform future international collaboration efforts.

Fox, Peter

2014-05-01

433

Collaboration in mindfulness-based cognitive therapy.  

PubMed

In this article, we describe the nature of therapeutic collaboration between psychotherapist and group participants in mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), which occurs in a group format and incorporates cognitive therapy and mindfulness practices with the aim of preventing depression relapse. Collaboration is a central part of two components of MBCT: inquiry and leading mindfulness practices. During the process of inquiry, the therapist-initiated questions about the participant's moment-to-moment experience of the practice occurs in a context of curious, open, and warm attitudes. In addition, collaboration is maintained through co-participation in mindfulness practices. We provide a case illustration of collaboration in these contexts and conclude with recommendations for clinical practice. PMID:23616298

Felder, Jennifer N; Dimidjian, Sona; Segal, Zindel

2012-02-01

434

Collaborative care documentation by exception system.  

PubMed Central

Development of a workstation-based documentation system supporting collaborative care and nurse charting by exception has been underway for the last two and one-half years at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee. The Pathways system has undergone two major revisions and is currently implemented on three nursing units. The system supports collaborative care by providing a mechanism for entry and printing of collaborative care pathways and collection of exception data. Paper flowsheets for manual charting are generated based on the patient's collaborative pathway and individual needs. The Pathways system has significantly decreased nursing time and effort for documentation. This paper describes the development, implementation, and impact of the workstation-based documentation system.

Ashworth, G. B.; Aubrey, C.

1992-01-01

435

Promoting Collaboration Between Education and Service  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focuses on the conflict between nurse educators and nurse care practitioners and how this conflict was resolved between a university health center and school of nursing, suggesting planned change as a means to achieve collaboration. (TA)

MacPhail, Jannetta

1976-01-01

436

CNP Project: Southwest American Indian Collaborative Network  

Cancer.gov

The Inter Tribal Council of Arizona1 established the Southwest American Indian Collaborative Network (SAICN) to eliminate cancer health disparities among American Indians. Core partners in the project represent both local and regional programs and activities.

437

Achieving Collaborative Interaction with a Humanoid Robot.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

One of the great challenges of putting humanoid robots into space is developing cognitive capabilities for the robots with an interface that allows human astronauts to collaborate with the robots as naturally and efficiently as they would with other astro...

D. Sofge D. Perzanowski M. Skubic N. Cassimatis J. G. Trafton

2003-01-01

438

Interorganizational Arrangements for Collaborative Efforts: Commissioned Papers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The ten papers in this collection commissioned by the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory take positions and speculate about particular obstacles which collaboratives and intermediaries face in working toward the improvement of educational practice ...

1980-01-01

439

Interorganizational Arrangements for Collaborative Efforts: Literature Review.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This literature review examines four conceptual areas:(1) interorganizational collaboration; (2) the use of intermediary agencies; (3) the improvement of educational practice; and (4) the increase of educational equity. A focused review of the conceptual ...

1980-01-01

440

Services Based Collaboration/Coalition Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We propose a novel framework and a scalable architecture that can be used for rapid formation of coalitions and to perform collaborative transactions. Our framework combines the traditional theory of organizations with the theory of signaling from telepho...

K. Inivas R. Mikkilineni R. Reddy S. M. Reddy

2002-01-01

441

Collaborating on Evaluation for Youth Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Youth Development Learning Network's extended evaluation, a collaboration of funders, program administrators, youth workers, and evaluators, that illustrates the process of building capacity for youth and youth workers. (SLD)

Lau, Genevieve; Netherland, Nancy H.; Haywood, Mary L.

2003-01-01

442

A Comparative Evaluation of Collaborative Prenatal Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of an advanced-practice nurse-obstetrician collaborative prenatal practice.Methods: A group of 194 consecutively enrolled medically low-risk obstetric patients was identified between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 1994 at Neighborhood Pregnancy Care, a collaborative-practice site. An equal number of medically low-risk patients attending the Louisiana State University obstetric clinic at the Medical Center of Louisiana at

Mosanda M Mvula; Joseph M Miller

1998-01-01

443

NCI at Frederick: NICBR Research Collaboration Forum  

Cancer.gov

The National Interagency Confederation for Biomedical Research (NICBR) is soliciting papers for consideration for the NICBR Best Collaborative Publication Award. Any papers, published in 2013, will be considered for this award if the publications are a result of a collaboration between 2 or more NICBR partners at Ft. Detrick (e.g. NCI and USAMRIID). Papers submitted will be evaluated by the NICBR Scientific Interaction Subcommittee (SIS).

444

Leveraging Coordinative Conventions to Promote Collaboration Awareness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper discusses the conventions used by medical practitioners to improve their collaboration mediated by Clinical Records.\\u000a The case study focuses on the coordinative conventions identified in two wards of an Italian hospital and highlights their\\u000a role and importance in the definition of the requirements of any system supportive of collaborative work practices. These\\u000a requirements are expressed in terms of

Federico Cabitza; Carla Simone; Marcello Sarini

2009-01-01

445

US / Russia Collaboration in Plasma Astrophysics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US/Russia collaboration in plasma astrophysics combines the efforts of scientists from two groups -- the Russian Academy of Science Institutes and Cornell University -- to solve many of the complicated problems associated with the magnetohydrodynamical (MHD). Students and educators can find thorough descriptions about the collaboration's studies in wind accretion to dipoles, disk accretion to dipoles, the origin of jets, and the accretion disks theory. Researchers will also find numerous downloadable published papers from 1992 to present.

446

Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) Description and Loading  

SciTech Connect

This document describes simulated turbine load cases in accordance to the IEC 61400-1 Ed.3 standard, which is representative of the typical wind turbine design process. The information presented herein is intended to provide a broad understanding of the gearbox reliability collaborative 750kW drivetrain and turbine configuration. In addition, fatigue and ultimate strength drivetrain loads resulting from simulations are presented. This information provides the bases for the analytical work of the gearbox reliability collaborative effort.

Oyague, F.

2011-11-01

447

Collaborative Demand Forecasting in Service Chains  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Chap. 4, we have discussed in detail the concepts of Forecasting and Demand Planning where the focus was primarily forecasting\\u000a within the enterprise. With interdependencies of businesses it is imperative for organizations to engage in collaborative\\u000a demand forecasting across their service chains. This chapter defines collaborative forecasting and highlights the challenges\\u000a faced in carrying out this process across multiple

M. Shah; P. Stubbings

448

It's Not Easy Being Green: Supporting Collaborative \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the results of a study in which we contrast alternative forms of collaborative learning support in the midst of\\u000a a collaborative design task in which students negotiate between increasing power and increasing environmental friendliness.\\u000a In this context, we evaluated the instructional effectiveness of four alternative support conditions as well as a goal manipulation.\\u000a Both manipulations yield surprising findings,

Sourish Chaudhuri; Rohit Kumar; Mahesh Joshi; Elon Terrell; Fred Higgs; Vincent Aleven; Carolyn Penstein Rosé

2008-01-01

449

Collaborative dancing in tele-immersive environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a study of collaborative dancing between remote dancers in a tele-immersive environment which features 3D full and real body capturing, wide field of view, multi-display 3D rendering, and attachment free participant. We invite two professional dancers to perform collaborative dancing in the environment. The coordination requires one dancer to take the lead while the other follows by appropriate

Zhenyu Yang; Bin Yu; Wanmin Wu; Ross Diankov; Ruzena Bajcsy

2006-01-01

450

BIOGLYPHS: A Living Collaboration with Bioluminescent Organisms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

BIOGLYPHS is an art and science collaboration initiated by members of the Center for Biofilm Engineering and the Montana State University School of Art. This website features two BIOGLYPHS exhibitions of living bioluminescent paintings that were created by teams of student and staff artists, scientists and engineers in 2002. The site includes a gallery of BIOGLYPH paintings, information about collaborators, comments from the guest book, and links to media coverage and related web pages.

Art, Msu-Bozeman S.; Engineering, Center F.

451

Nonlinear gyrokinetic equations  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear gyrokinetic equations are derived from a systematic Hamiltonian theory. The derivation employs Lie transforms and a noncanonical perturbation theory first used by Littlejohn for the simpler problem of asymptotically small gyroradius. For definiteness, we emphasize the limit of electrostatic fluctuations in slab geometry; however, there is a straight-forward generalization to arbitrary field geometry and electromagnetic perturbations. An energy invariant for the nonlinear system is derived, and various of its limits are considered. The weak turbulence theory of the equations is examined. In particular, the wave kinetic equation of Galeev and Sagdeev is derived from an asystematic truncation of the equations, implying that this equation fails to consider all gyrokinetic effects. The equations are simplified for the case of small but finite gyroradius and put in a form suitable for efficient computer simulation. Although it is possible to derive the Terry-Horton and Hasegawa-Mima equations as limiting cases of our theory, several new nonlinear terms absent from conventional theories appear and are discussed.

Dubin, D.H.E.; Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.; Lee, W.W.

1983-03-01

452

Collaborative environments for capability-based planning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Distributed collaboration is an emerging technology for the 21st century that will significantly change how business is conducted in the defense and commercial sectors. Collaboration involves two or more geographically dispersed entities working together to create a "product" by sharing and exchanging data, information, and knowledge. A product is defined broadly to include, for example, writing a report, creating software, designing hardware, or implementing robust systems engineering and capability planning processes in an organization. Collaborative environments provide the framework and integrate models, simulations, domain specific tools, and virtual test beds to facilitate collaboration between the multiple disciplines needed in the enterprise. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is conducting a leading edge program in developing distributed collaborative technologies targeted to the Air Force's implementation of systems engineering for a simulation-aided acquisition and capability-based planning. The research is focusing on the open systems agent-based framework, product and process modeling, structural architecture, and the integration technologies - the glue to integrate the software components. In past four years, two live assessment events have been conducted to demonstrate the technology in support of research for the Air Force Agile Acquisition initiatives. The AFRL Collaborative Environment concept will foster a major cultural change in how the acquisition, training, and operational communities conduct business.

McQuay, William K.

2005-05-01

453

The Challenges of Collaboration Across Professional Cultures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I currently work as a cultural anthropologist researching and facilitating collaboration among members of a scientific "virtual institute." The NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) is focused on establishing a "culture of collaboration" that encourages and supports productive exchange among those representing a variety of disciplines who are pursuing key questions in the field of astrobiology. Within the context of NAI, interdisciplinary collaboration is important not only between those with expertise in the specific sciences that are part of the astrobiological research arena. Also very important is collaboration between these scientists and the educators who are striving to bring deeper awareness of and knowledge about astrobiological research findings to students of all ages and to the general public. As a member of this panel, I will offer an anthropological perspective on the diverse challenges that are associated with bridging across disciplinary, as well as geographical and institutional boundaries, and discuss the steps that are necessary to the development and maintenance of an effective culture of collaboration. Specific emphasis will be on the challenges that must be addressed in order to create effective collaborative relationships between those immersed in different professional cultures.

Faithorn, L.

2003-12-01

454

A Comparison of IRT Equating and Beta 4 Equating.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four equating methods were compared using four equating criteria: first-order equity (FOE), second-order equity (SOE), conditional mean squared error (CMSE) difference, and the equipercentile equating property. The four methods were: (1) three parameter logistic (3PL) model true score equating; (2) 3PL observed score equating; (3) beta 4 true…

Kim, Dong-In; Brennan, Robert; Kolen, Michael

455

Marchenko Equation for the Derivative Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple derivation of the Marchenko equation is given for the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The kernel of the Marchenko equation is demanded to satisfy the conditions given by the compatibility equations. The soliton solutions to the Marchenko equation are verified. The derivation is not concerned with the revisions of Kaup and Newell.

Huang, Nian-Ning

2007-04-01

456

2 Step Equation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Now that you know how to solve simple Algebra equations, we\\'re going to make it a little more challenging! These equations have two or more steps to solving them. Grab your worksheet and ready, set, go! Let\\'s start by doing a virtual hands-on activity. The object here is to add things to each side of the scale to make it balance, and then perform operations to reduce the equation until the variable is alone. After entering the site, place the appropriate objects on each ...

Elmer, Mr.

2011-06-10

457

Equations For Rotary Transformers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Equations derived for input impedance, input power, and ratio of secondary current to primary current of rotary transformer. Used for quick analysis of transformer designs. Circuit model commonly used in textbooks on theory of ac circuits.

Salomon, Phil M.; Wiktor, Peter J.; Marchetto, Carl A.

1988-01-01

458

Mathematica Tutor: Differential Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created for the Connected Curriculum Project, the purpose of this module is to learn the basics of Mathematica for use with the differential equations modules. This is one lesson within a larger set of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

Holden, Joshua; Moore, Lang; Smith, David; Tomberg, Jim

2010-04-29

459

Geometric Differential Equations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the report is to present, however briefly, the contributions of a few outstanding authors to the development of geometric differential equations. The first author considered is Poincare, the true founder of the topic.

S. Lefschetz

1971-01-01

460

Alternative Equations of Gravitation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

It is shown, through a new formalism, that the quantum fluctuation effects of the gravitational field in Einstein's equations are analogs to the effects of a continuum medium in Maxwell's Electrodynamics. Following, a real example of the applications of t...

N. Pinto Neto

1983-01-01

461

Einstein Equations and Electromagnetism.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Einstein's equations for infinitesimal gravitational fields are investigated from the standpoint of replacing Einstein's flat Minkowskian background space by a strongly agitated Riemannian lattice space, with the added demand that the perturbation field b...

C. Lanczos

1966-01-01

462

Unidirectional Optical Pulse Propagation Equation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A unidirectional optical pulse propagation equation, derived directly from Maxwell's equations, provides a seamless transition between various nonlinear envelope equations in the literature and the full vector Maxwell's equations. The equation is illustrated in the context of supercontinuum generation in air and is compared to a recent scalar model of Brabec and Krausz. Fully vectorial aspects of the model are

M. Kolesik; J. V. Moloney; M. Mlejnek

2002-01-01

463

Equations of Attack  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, "students will plot points on a coordinate grid to represent ships before playing a graphing equations game with a partner. Points along the y-axis represent cannons and slopes are chosen randomly to determine the line and equation of attacks. Students will have to use their math skills and strategy to sink their opponent's ships and win the game. After the game, an algebraic approach to the game is investigated." (from NCTM's Illuminations)

Mathematics, Illuminations N.

2009-02-12

464

Distributed tabletops: territoriality and orientation in distributed collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research has shown that orientation and territory serve key roles during tabletop collaboration. However, no one has yet investigated whether they can play similar roles in distributed collaboration. In this paper, we design and implement distributed tabletops to address this problem and hence improve distributed collaboration. We show that distributed tabletops allowgeographically-separated collaborators to use orientation and territory to

Philip Tuddenham

2007-01-01

465

Shared Encoding and the Costs and Benefits of Collaborative Recall  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We often remember in the company of others. In particular, we routinely collaborate with friends, family, or colleagues to remember shared experiences. But surprisingly, in the experimental collaborative recall paradigm, collaborative groups remember less than their potential, an effect termed "collaborative inhibition". Rajaram and…

Harris, Celia B.; Barnier, Amanda J.; Sutton, John

2013-01-01

466

Learning about Mason: A Collaborative Lesson with a Struggling Reader  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this "Struggling Readers" department, the author describes a collaborative lesson--a professional development strategy adapted from Reading Recovery. Collaborative lessons involve a small group of educators who collaborate to help a student who is struggling with reading. While collaborative lessons were initially designed by Reading Recovery…

Compton-Lilly, Catherine

2010-01-01

467

Librarian and Faculty Collaborative Instruction: A Phenomenological Self-Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several models of librarian and faculty collaboration are found in the professional librarian literature. The literature on collaborative self-study research in university settings suggests collaborative self-study research can improve interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches to teaching and research and facilitate the transfer of knowledge.…

Brown, Jennifer Diane; Duke, Thomas Scott

2005-01-01

468

Design and Evaluation of a Collaborative Learning Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Collaboration becomes an essential competency in the current knowledge society. In this study, a collaborative learning environment was designed to facilitate students in group collaboration. Instructional support strategies of friendship and meaningful learning tasks were applied to promote collaboration. Scaffolding strategies such as writing…

Wang, Qiyun

2009-01-01

469

Solving the Human Problem: Investigation of a Collaboration Culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is often acknowledged that group work efficiency can only be achieved if co-workers adopt an adequate group culture. Collaboration should therefore be supported by the right culture, and tools aiming at enhancing collaboration should also facilitate the adoption of this collaboration culture. This paper therefore explores the underlying concepts involved in the creation of a collaboration culture within a

Gilles Gautier; May Bassanino; Terrence Fernando; Sylvia Kubaski

2009-01-01

470

Collaboration Across Special Education and General Education: Preservice Teachers' Views.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined collaboration perceptions and patterns of collaboration between special and general-education preservice teachers. Participants were instructed to collaborate via e-mail, in-person contacts, and written products. Data from individual interviews, focus groups, and collaborative activities indicated that participants recognized personal…

O'Shea, Dorothy J.; Williams, A. Lee; Sattler, Robert O.

1999-01-01

471

Reflective Synergy: A Research Model for Collaborative Inquiry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A theoretical model for collaborative inquiry as a research methodology in adult education has been proposed. The model, which likens collaborative inquiry to the process of organic gardening, depicts a sphere in motion where the cycles of collaborative inquiry revolve in continuous motion. In the center of the sphere is a collaborative self that…

Mealman, Craig A.; Lawrence, Randee Lipson

472

Technical strategies for supporting the evolution of collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper describes a strategy for introducing collaborative technologies in a gradual and systematic way. It defines a framework to measure collaboration capabilities and then identifies technical strategic framework for systematically adding services to raise collaboration capabilities. The technical strategy adds services in a systematic manner to gradually raise collaboration levels. A way to implement the strategy is then outlined.

Igor T. Hawryszkiewycz

2007-01-01

473

Working Together and Working: Public and Private School Collaboration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How might independent schools play an effective role in educational reform through public-private collaborations? This study, a project of the Klingenstein Fellowship, surveys the types of partnerships, explores varying degrees of collaboration, and examines the impact of collaborations on schools and communities. Portraits of five collaborative

Lee, Alec, Jr.

474

CPM: A collaborative process modeling for cooperative manufacturers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a manufacturing system, we need to capture collaborative processes among its components in order to clearly define supporting functions of a system. However, pervasive process modeling techniques, including IDEF3, Petri Nets, and UML, are not sufficient for modeling collaborative processes. Therefore, we have developed a novel modeling method referred to as collaborative process modeling (CPM) to describe collaborative processes.

Kwangyeol Ryu; Enver Yücesan

2007-01-01

475

Evaluating Collaborative Learning Processes using System-based Measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much of the research on collaborative work focuses on the quality of the group outcome as a measure of success. There is less research on the collaboration process itself, but an understanding of the process should help to improve both the process and the outcomes of collaboration. Understanding and analyzing collaborative learning processes requires a fine-grained analysis of group interaction

César A. Collazos; Luis A. Guerrero; José A. Pino; Stefano Renzi; Jane E. Klobas; Manuel Ortega; Miguel A. Redondo; Crescencio Bravo

2007-01-01

476

The Effect of Individual and Group Characteristics on Remote Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaborative learning can be an effective instructional technique, but the results of studies of online collaboration are inconsistent. Our hypothesis is that student characteristics and group characteristics account for these inconsistencies. Studies investigating interactions during online collaboration have reported some unpredictable group behaviors. This raises important issues about the use of computer-mediated collaboration tools in educational settings. In this paper,

Jacqueline M. Flor; Susan Finger

2006-01-01

477

Collaboration requirements: a point of failure in protecting information  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is sometimes necessary to collaborate with individuals and organizations which should not be fully trusted. Collaborators must be authorized to access information systems some of the data in which, typically, should be withheld. New collaborations require dynamic alterations to security provisions. Solutions based on extending access control to deal with collaborations are either awkward and costly, or unreliable. An

Gio Wiederhold

2001-01-01

478

Federated enterprise and cloud-based collaboration services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of the variety of types of collaboration services used in enterprises today, there is difficulty in integrating related work threads from different collaboration environments. Each collaboration tool differs in storage model, APIs, content organization, content addressing, content formats, user authentication, and user interface. Nevertheless users prefer to be able to choose which collaboration tool they use for a given

John Buford; Kshiteej Mahajan; Venkatesh Krishnaswamy

2011-01-01

479

Distributed collaborative environments for virtual capability-based planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distributed collaboration is an emerging technology that will significantly change how decisions are made in the 21st century. Collaboration involves two or more geographically dispersed individuals working together to share and exchange data, information, knowledge, and actions. The marriage of information, collaboration, and simulation technologies provides the decision maker with a collaborative virtual environment for planning and decision support. This

William K. McQuay

2003-01-01

480

Supply chain collaboration performance metrics: a conceptual framework  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Successful implementation of supply chain collaboration (SCC) by Wal-Mart has encouraged many manufacturing companies, such as Procter & Gamble, Hewlett-Packard Co, and West Marine Products Inc., to initiate collaboration. Subsequently, collaboration between suppliers and retailers has become a common practice in many recent supply chains. However, measuring the benefits of collaboration is still a big challenge. Based on

Usha Ramanathan; Angappa Gunasekaran; Nachiappan Subramanian

2011-01-01

481

Fluctuation between Fasting and 2-H Postload Glucose State Is Associated with Chronic Kidney Disease in Previously Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Patients with HbA1c >= 7%  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate how the glucose variability between fasting and a 2-h postload glucose state (2-h postload plasma glucose [2hPG]-fasting plasma glucose [FPG]) is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in middle-aged and elderly Chinese patients previously diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Design and Methods This cross-sectional study included 1054 previously diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients who were 40 years of age and older. First, the subjects were divided into two groups based on a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) value of 7%. Each group was divided into two subgroups, with or without CKD. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation was used to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). CKD was defined as eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to estimate the association between the 2hPG-FPG and eGFR. The 2hPG-FPG value was divided into four groups increasing in increments of 36 mg/dl (2.0 mmol/L): 0–72, 72–108, 108–144 and ?144 mg/dl, based on the quartiles of patients with HbA1c levels ?7%; then, binary logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association between 2hPG-FPG and the risk of CKD. Results In the patients with HbA1c levels ?7%, the 2hPG-FPG was significantly associated with decreased eGFR and an increased risk of CKD independent of age, gender, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, smoking, and drinking, as well as fasting insulin, cholesterol, triglyceride, and HbA1c levels. The patients with 2hPG-FPG values ?144 mg/dl showed an increased odds ratio (OR) of 2.640 (P?=?0.033). Additionally, HbA1c was associated with an increased risk of CKD in patients with HbA1c values ?7%. Conclusions The short-term glucose variability expressed by 2hPG-FPG is closely associated with decreased eGFR and an increased risk of CKD in patients with poor glycemic control (HbA1c?7%).

Ma, Zeqiang; Yang, Weifang; Li, Chengqiao; Zhang, Xiuping; Hou, Xinguo; Sun, Yu; Lin, Peng; Liang, Kai; Gong, Lei; Wang, Meijian; Liu, Fuqiang; Li, Wenjuan; Yan, Fei; Yang, Junpeng; Wang, Lingshu; Tian, Meng; Liu, Jidong; Zhao, Ruxing; Chen, Li

2014-01-01

482

Illicit Drug Use, Hypertension, and Chronic Kidney Disease in the U.S. Adult Population  

PubMed Central

Illicit drug use has been associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in select populations but it is unknown if the same association exists in the general population. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2008, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 5,861 adults who were questioned about illicit drug use including cocaine, methamphetamines, or heroin during their lifetime. The primary outcome was CKD as defined by an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ?60mL/min/1.73m2 using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation or by microalbuminuria. We also examined the association between illicit drug use and blood pressure (BP) ?120/80, ?130/85, and ?140/90. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between illicit drug use and CKD and BP. Mean eGFR was similar between illicit drug users and non-users (100.7 vs. 101.4mL/min/1.73m2, p=0.4) as was albuminuria (5.7 vs. 6.0mg/g creatinine, p=0.5). Accordingly, illicit drug use was not significantly associated with CKD in logistic regression models (odds ratio [OR] 0.98, confidence interval [CI] 0.75-1.27) after adjusting for other important factors. However, illicit drug users had higher systolic (120 vs. 118mmHg, p=0.04) and diastolic BP (73 vs. 71mmHg, p=0.0003) compared to non-users. Also, cocaine use was independently associated with BP?130/85 (OR 1.24, CI 1.00-1.54), especially when used more during a lifetime (6-49 times, OR 1.42, CI 1.06-1.91). In a representative sample of the U.S. population, illicit drug use was not associated with CKD but cocaine users were more likely to have elevated blood pressures.

Akkina, Sanjeev K.; Ricardo, Ana C.; Patel, Amishi; Das, Arjun; Bazzano, Lydia A.; Brecklin, Carolyn; Fischer, Michael J.; Lash, James P.

2012-01-01

483

Renal function during treatment with adefovir plus peginterferon alfa-2a vs either drug alone in hepatitis B/D co-infection.  

PubMed

Long-term safety of treatment with hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase inhibitors is a concern. Adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) therapy has previously been associated with impairment of renal function. Limited data are available on the safety of combination therapy with nucleos(t)ide analogues and interferon alfa (IFN?). The aim of this analysis was to assess the renal function during combination therapy with peginterferon alfa-2a (PegIFN?-2a) plus ADV vs either drug alone in patients with hepatitis B/D co-infection. We performed a retrospective analysis of renal function data of patients treated in the Hep-Net/International Delta Hepatitis Intervention Trial 1(HIDIT-1-trial), a European multicenter study to investigate the efficacy of 48 weeks of therapy with PegIFN?-2a+ADV vs either drug alone in 90 patients with chronic hepatitis B/D co-infection. Glomerular filtration rates (GFR) were calculated by Cockcroft-Gault (CG), abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. After 48 weeks of therapy GFR values were significantly lower in patients receiving adefovir-containing treatment vs PegIFN?-2a alone [mean difference 16.1 mL/min (CG) and 10.2 mL/min (MDRD), respectively, P < 0.05] while no differences were observed between patients receiving adefovir alone vs combination treatment. Twenty-four weeks after treatment GFR values did not differ between treatment arms. A decrease in GFR ? 20% was observed more often in patients during adefovir-containing treatment vs PegIFN?-2a alone (P < 0.05) which was confirmed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Adefovir-containing but not PegIFN?-2a treatment was associated with a decrease in GFR values in about one-fifth of patients. Combination treatment of PegIFN?-2a+ADV in chronic hepatitis B/D co-infection did not lead to any further impairment of kidney function. PMID:22571900

Mederacke, I; Yurdaydin, C; Großhennig, A; Erhardt, A; Cakaloglu, Y; Yalcin, K; Gurel, S; Zeuzem, S; Zachou, K; Chatzikyrkou, C; Bozkaya, H; Dalekos, G N; Manns, M P; Wedemeyer, H

2012-06-01

484

CKD and Hospitalization in the Elderly: A Community-Based Cohort Study in the United Kingdom  

PubMed Central

Background We previously have shown that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in community-dwelling people 75 years and older. The present study addresses the hypothesis that CKD is associated with a higher rate of hospital admission at an older age. Study Design Cohort study. Setting & Participants 15,336 participants from 53 UK general practices underwent comprehensive health assessment between 1994 and 1999. Predictor Data for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, derived from creatinine levels using the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration [CKD-EPI] study equation) and dipstick proteinuria were available for 12,371 participants. Outcomes Hospital admissions collected from hospital discharge letters for 2 years after assessment. Measurements Age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, possible biochemical and health consequences of kidney disease (hemoglobin, phosphate, and albumin levels; physical and mental health problems). Results 2,310 (17%) participants had 1 hospital admission, and 981 (7%) had 2 or more. After adjusting for age, sex, and cardiovascular risk factors, HRs were 1.66 (95% CI, 1.21-2.27), 1.17 (95% CI, 0.95-1.43), 1.08 (95% CI, 0.90-1.30), and 1.11 (95% CI, 0.91-1.35) for eGFRs <30, 30-44, 45-59, and ?75 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively, compared with eGFRs of 60-74 mL/min/1.73 m2 for hospitalizations during <6 months of follow-up. HRs were weaker for follow-up of 6-18 months. Dipstick-positive proteinuria was associated with an increased HR throughout follow-up (HR, 1.29 [95% CI, 1.11-1.49], adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors). Dipstick-positive proteinuria and eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m2 were independently associated with 2 or more hospital admissions during the 2-year follow-up. Adjustment for other health factors and laboratory measurements attenuated the effect of eGFR, but not the effect of proteinuria. Limitations Follow-up limited to 2 years, selection bias due to nonparticipation in study, missing data for potential covariates, and single noncalibrated measurements from multiple laboratories. Conclusions The study indicates that community-dwelling older people who have dipstick-positive proteinuria and/or eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m2 are at increased risk of hospitalization.

Nitsch, Dorothea; Nonyane, Bareng A.S.; Smeeth, Liam; Bulpitt, Christopher J.; Roderick, Paul J.; Fletcher, Astrid

2011-01-01

485

The Bernoulli-Poiseuille Equation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Bernoulli's equation and Poiseuille's equation for fluid dynamics. Discusses the application of the combined Bernoulli-Poiseuille equation in real flows, such as viscous flows under gravity and acceleration. (YP)

Badeer, Henry S.; Synolakis, Costas E.

1989-01-01

486

Investing in Collaboration: Preservice Special Educators and Their Readiness for Home School Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Home-school collaborations offer the promise of increased social and academic outcomes for students with disabilities. This qualitative study examines the practices of 25 preservice special education teachers and their implementation of state standards to collaborate with families of children with disabilities in schools during student teaching.…

Latunde, Yvette; Louque, Angela

2012-01-01

487

An Examination of the Characteristics Impacting Collaborative Tool Efficacy: The Uncanny Valley of Collaborative Tools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As collaboration among teams that are distributed in time and space is becoming increasingly important, there is a need to understand the efficacy of tools available to support that collaboration. This study employs a combination of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and the Task-Technology Fit (TTF) model to compare four different technologies…

Dishaw, Mark T.; Eierman, Michael A.; Iversen, Jacob H.; Philip, George

2013-01-01

488

Deriving Process-Driven Collaborative Editing Pattern from Collaborative Learning Flow Patterns  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Collaborative Learning Flow Patterns (CLFPs) have recently emerged as a new method to formulate best practices in structuring the flow of activities within various collaborative learning scenarios. The term "learning flow" is used to describe coordination and sequencing of learning tasks. This paper adopts the existing concept of CLFP and argues…

Marjanovic, Olivera; Skaf-Molli, Hala; Molli, Pascal; Godart, Claude

2007-01-01

489

Learning Chemistry through Collaboration: A Wizard-of-Oz Study of Adaptive Collaboration Support 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chemistry students often learn to solve problems by applying well-practiced procedures, but such a mechanical approach is likely to hin- der conceptual understanding. We have developed a system aimed at pro- moting conceptual learning in chemistry by having dyads collaborate on problems in a virtual laboratory (VLab), assisted by a collaboration script. We conducted a small study to compare an

Bruce M. McLaren; Nikol Rummel; Niels Pinkwart

2008-01-01

490

Examining What We Mean by "Collaboration" in Collaborative Action Research: A Cross-Case Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to report on the nature of collaboration in a multi-year, large-scale collaborative action research project in which a teachers' federation (in Ontario, Canada), university researchers and teachers partnered to investigate teacher-selected topics for inquiry. Over two years, 14 case studies were generated involving six…

Bruce, Catherine D.; Flynn, Tara; Stagg-Peterson, Shelley

2011-01-01

491

The Discourse of Collaborative Creative Writing: Peer Collaboration as a Context for Mutual Inspiration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on socio-cultural theory, this paper focuses on children's classroom-based collaborative creative writing. The central aim of the reported research was to contribute to our understanding of young children's creativity, and describe ways in which peer collaboration can resource, stimulate and enhance classroom-based creative writing…

Vass, Eva; Littleton, Karen; Miell, Dorothy; Jones, Ann

2008-01-01

492

Users Experiences in Collaborative Writing Using Collaboratus: An Internet-Based Collaborative Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews several user experiences researchers at the University of Arizona have had in building Internet-based tools to support collaborative writing. First, the technological framework for an advanced collaborative writing tool called Collaboratus is presented. Next, we review the tools that make up Collaboratus, and then provide an overview of the various user experiences we have had. Finally, many

Paul Benjamin Lowry; Conan C. Albrecht; James D. Lee

2002-01-01

493

Collaborative planning forecasting and replenishment: new solutions needed for mass collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The challenge faced by supplier companies in the grocery supply chain for implementing collaborative planning, forecasting and replenishment (CPFR) is how to get the retailer to forecast, especially when it has not been necessary before. In this paper a solution that would allow collaboration on a wide scale is presented. The forecasting approach is called “rank and share” and uses

Jan Holmström; Kary Främling; Riikka Kaipia; Juha Saranen

2002-01-01

494

Learning to Collaborate: Designing Collaboration in a 3-D Game Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To respond to learning needs, Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) must provide instructional support. The particular focus of this paper is on designing collaboration in a 3-D virtual game environment intended to make learning more effective by promoting student opportunities for interaction. The empirical experiment eScape, which…

Hamalainen, Raija; Manninen, Tony; Jarvela, Sanna; Hakkinen, Paivi

2006-01-01

495

Scientific sketching for collaborative VR visualization design.  

PubMed

We present four studies investigating tools and methodologies for artist-scientist-technologist collaboration in designing multivariate, virtual reality (VR) visualizations. Design study 1 identifies the promise of 3D drawing-style interfaces for VR design and also establishes limitations of these tools with respect to precision and support for animation. Design study 2 explores animating artist-created visualization designs with scientific 3D fluid flow data. While results captured an accurate sense of flow that was advantageous as compared to the results of study 1, the potential for visual exploration using the design tools tested was limited. Design study 3 reveals the importance of a new 3D interface that overcomes the precision limitation found in study 1 while remaining accessible to artist collaborators. Drawing upon previous results, design study 4 engages collaborative teams in a design process that begins with traditional paper sketching and moves to animated, interactive, VR prototypes "sketched" by designers in VR using interactive 3D tools. Conclusions from these four studies identify important characteristics of effective artist-accessible VR visualization design tools and lead to a proposed formalized methodology for successful collaborative design that we expect to be useful in guiding future collaborations. We call this proposed methodology Scientific Sketching. PMID:18467758

Keefe, Daniel F; Acevedo, Daniel; Miles, Jadrian; Drury, Fritz; Swartz, Sharon M; Laidlaw, David H

2008-01-01

496

Collaboration and Command Tools for Crises Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Present collaboration tools are not suitable for the command process. The Collaboration tools, in the use of military entities, lack the elements for command and control and scheduling of resources. Available collaboration tools concentrate on uncontrolled distribution of information. They represent Situational Awareness (SA) tools for the cooperating entities, not the required solution for traceable and sophisticated Command and Control tools (C2-tools) applicable for the Crises Management Environment (CME) and Military Environment (ME). This paper presents tools for crises management, which enables the use of effective C2-tools, functioning along with the Resource Manager (RM) and scheduler. Given tasks need to be traceable afterwards for various purposes. On the base of collected data from the events, actions and reliability of different collaborating entities, a trustworth database of the characteristics of each entity can be formulated and utilized afterwards as a base knowledge on the collaborating entity. Collected data remains in the information repository and the collected data is used for identification purposes of an entity. C2-tools in ME and CME are systems of systems based on trusted entities, which will execute the commanded tasks reliably and in a given time. Reporting tools are out of the scope of this paper.

Saarelainen, Tapio; Jormakka, Jorma

497

A new security model for collaborative environments  

SciTech Connect

Prevalent authentication and authorization models for distributed systems provide for the protection of computer systems and resources from unauthorized use. The rules and policies that drive the access decisions in such systems are typically configured up front and require trust establishment before the systems can be used. This approach does not work well for computer software that moderates human-to-human interaction. This work proposes a new model for trust establishment and management in computer systems supporting collaborative work. The model supports the dynamic addition of new users to a collaboration with very little initial trust placed into their identity and supports the incremental building of trust relationships through endorsements from established collaborators. It also recognizes the strength of a users authentication when making trust decisions. By mimicking the way humans build trust naturally the model can support a wide variety of usage scenarios. Its particular strength lies in the support for ad-hoc and dynamic collaborations and the ubiquitous access to a Computer Supported Collaboration Workspace (CSCW) system from locations with varying levels of trust and security.

Agarwal, Deborah; Lorch, Markus; Thompson, Mary; Perry, Marcia

2003-06-06

498

Tools and collaborative environments for bioinformatics research.  

PubMed

Advanced research requires intensive interaction among a multitude of actors, often possessing different expertise and usually working at a distance from each other. The field of collaborative research