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Sample records for collaboration ckd-epi equations

  1. Comparison of Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate by the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) Equations with and without Cystatin C for Predicting Clinical Outcomes in Elderly Women

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Robin M.; Lim, Ee M.; Thompson, Peter L.; Prince, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using the cystatin-C derived equations might be a better predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality compared with the creatinine-derived equations, but this association remains unclear in elderly individuals. Aim The aims of this study were to compare the predictive values of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI)-creatinine, CKD-EPI-cystatin C and CKD-EPI-creatinine-cystatin C eGFR equations for all-cause mortality and CVD events (hospitalizations±mortality). Methods Prospective cohort study of 1165 elderly women aged>70 years. Associations between eGFR and outcomes were examined using Cox regression analysis. Test accuracy of eGFR equations for predicting outcomes was examined using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Results Risk of all-cause mortality for every incremental reduction in eGFR determined using CKD-EPI-creatinine, CKD-EPI-cystatin C and the CKD-EPI-creatinine-cystatic C equations was similar. Areas under the ROC curves of CKD-EPI-creatinine, CKD-EPI-cystatin C and CKD-EPI-creatinine-cystatin C equations for all-cause mortality were 0.604 (95%CI 0.561–0.647), 0.606 (95%CI 0.563–0.649; p?=?0.963) and 0.606 (95%CI 0.563–0.649; p?=?0.894) respectively. For all-cause mortality, there was no improvement in the reclassification of eGFR categories using the CKD-EPI-cystatin C (NRI -4.1%; p?=?0.401) and CKD-EPI-creatinine-cystatin C (NRI -1.2%; p?=?0.748) compared with CKD-EPI-creatinine equation. Similar findings were observed for CVD events. Conclusion eGFR derived from CKD-EPI cystatin C and CKD-EPI creatinine-cystatin C equations did not improve the accuracy or predictive ability for clinical events compared to CKD-EPI-creatinine equation in this cohort of elderly women. PMID:25265151

  2. Clinical implications of the CKD epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation compared with the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) study equation for the estimation of renal dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Tarantini, Luigi; Barbati, Giulia; Cioffi, Giovanni; McAlister, Finlay Aleck; Ezekowitz, Justin Adrian; Mazzone, Carmine; Faganello, Giorgio; Russo, Giulia; Grisolia, Enrico Franceschini; Di Lenarda, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The CKD-EPI equation is more accurate than the MDRD equation in the general population. We performed this study to establish whether chronic kidney disease (CKD) is commonly recognized by clinicians and whether the CKD-EPI equation improves prognosis estimation in patients with chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD). We analyzed data on 12394 CVD patients consecutively examined at the Cardiovascular Center of Trieste (Italy) between November 2009 and October 2013. The outcomes were all-cause death and a composite outcome of death/hospitalization for CV events (D+cvH). CKD-EPI formula reclassified 1786 (14.4 %) patients between KDIGO categories compared to the MDRD: 2.3 % (n = 280) placed in a lower risk and 12.1 % (n = 1506) into a higher risk group. CKD, defined as eGFR-CKD-EPI formula <60 ml/min, was present in 3083 patients (24.9 %) but not recognized by clinicians in 1946 (63.1 % of patients with CKD). The lack of recognition of CKD was inversely proportional to the KDIGO class for both equations. There were 986 deaths and 2726 D+cvH during 24 months follow-up. The incidence of death and D+cvH was about twice as high in patients with unrecognized CKD than in those with normal renal function (31 % vs. 17.1 %, aHR: 1.35, 95 % CI: 1.15 to 1.60), even in those patients with eGFR-MDRD >60 but eGFR-CKD-EPI formula <60 (31.1 % vs 17.1 %, p < 0.001). CKD-EPI equation provides more accurate risk stratification than MDRD equation in patients with CVD. CKD was unrecognized in nearly two-thirds of these patients but clinical outcomes were similar in those for patients with recognized CKD. PMID:26123617

  3. Evaluation of the CKD-EPI Equation in Multiple Races and Ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Lesley A.; Claybon, Marcie A.; Schmid, Christopher H.; Chen, Jing; Horio, Masaru; Imai, Enyu; Nelson, Robert G.; Van Deventer, Manuel; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zuo, Li; Zhang, Yaping (Lucy); Levey, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The CKD-EPI equation reduces bias and improves accuracy for GFR estimation compared to the MDRD Study equation. Creatinine generation differs among racial-ethnic groups but both equations only consider Blacks vs other. We developed and validated a GFR-estimating equation that includes a 4-level race variable. Methods Equations were developed in pooled data from 10 studies (N=8254) and validated in 17 additional studies from the US and Europe [CKD-EPI validation database (N=4014)], and in studies from China (N=675), Japan (N=248) and South Africa (N=99). Race was defined as a 2-level variable (Black vs other) and a 4-level variable (Black, Asian, Native American and Hispanic vs other). Results Coefficients for Black, Asian and Native American and Hispanic resulted in 15%, 5% and 1% higherlevels of estimated GFR, respectively, compared to others. The 2-level race equation had minimal bias in Blacks, Native Americans, Hispanics and others [−0.8 (−2.0,0.6), 2.3 (−2.1,5.1), and 2.8 (2.4,3.2) ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively) in the CKD-EPI validation database. The 4-level race equation improved bias in CKD-EPI Asians (0.8 (−2.2,2.6) vs 2.1 (0.3,4.4) ml/min/1.73 m2) and in Chinese (1.3 (0.6,2.2) vs 2.7 (1.9,3.7) ml/min/1.73 m2). Both equations had a large bias in Japanese [−17.8 (−0.1,−14.7) and −21.4 (−23.2,−18.2) ml/min/1.73 m2)] and South Africans [−12.4 (−18.3,−7.6) and −12.5 (−18.3,−7.6) ml/min/1.73 m2. Conclusions A multilevel variable for race developed in one geographic region may not be applicable in other regions. The 2-level race variable in the CKD-EPI equation can be used for all racial-ethnic groups in the US and Europe. PMID:21107446

  4. Comparison of risk prediction using the CKD-EPI equation and the MDRD Study equation for estimated glomerular filtration rate

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Mahmoodi, Bakhtawar K.; Woodward, Mark; Emberson, Jonathan R.; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Jee, Sun Ha; Polkinghorne, Kevan R.; Shankar, Anoop; Smith, David H.; Tonelli, Marcello; Warnock, David G.; Wen, Chi-Pang; Coresh, Josef; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Levey, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    Context The CKD-EPI equation more accurately estimates glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) than the MDRD Study equation using the same variables, especially at higher GFR, but definitive evidence of its risk implications in diverse settings is lacking. Objective To evaluate risk implications of eGFRCKD-EPI compared to eGFRMDRD in populations with a broad range of demographic and clinical characteristics. Design, Setting, and Participants Meta-analyses based on data from 1,130,472 adults (aged 18 years or older) from 25 general population, 7 high-risk (of vascular disease), and 13 chronic kidney disease (CKD) cohorts. Data transfer and analyses were conducted between March 2011 and March 2012. Main Outcome Measures All-cause mortality (84,482 deaths from 40 cohorts), cardiovascular mortality (22,176 events from 28 cohorts), and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (7,644 events from 21 cohorts) during 9.4 million person-years of follow-up (median of mean follow-up time across cohorts was 7.4 years). Results eGFR was classified into six categories (?90, 60-89, 45-59, 30-44, 15-29, and <15 ml/min/1.73m2) by both equations. Compared to eGFRMDRD, 24.4% and 0.6% of participants from general population cohorts were reclassified to a higher and lower eGFR category by the CKD-EPI equation, respectively, and the prevalence of CKD stage 3-5 (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2) was reduced from 8.7% to 6.3%. 34.7% of participants with eGFRMDRD 45-59 were reclassified to eGFRCKD-EPI 60-89 and had lower incidence rates (per 1,000 person-years) of outcomes compared to those not reclassified (9.9 vs. 34.5 for all-cause mortality, 2.7 vs. 13.0 for cardiovascular mortality, and 0.5 vs. 0.8 for ESRD). The corresponding adjusted hazard ratios were 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.74 to 0.86) for all-cause mortality, 0.73 (0.65 to 0.82) for cardiovascular mortality, and 0.49 (0.27 to 0.88) for ESRD. Similar findings were observed in other eGFRMDRD categories. Net reclassification improvement (NRI) based on eGFR categories was significantly positive for all outcomes (range from 0.06 to 0.13, all P<0.001). NRI was similarly positive in most subgroups defined by age (< and ?65 years), sex, race/ethnicity (white, Asian, and black), and presence or absence of diabetes and hypertension. The results in high-risk and CKD cohorts were largely consistent with the general population cohorts. Conclusions The CKD-EPI equation classified fewer individuals as CKD and more accurately categorized the risk for mortality and ESRD than did the MDRD Study equation across a broad range of populations. PMID:22570462

  5. Comparing GFR Estimating Equations Using Cystatin C and Creatinine in Elderly Individuals.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Levey, Andrew S; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Andresdottir, Margret B; Gudmundsdottir, Hrefna; Indridason, Olafur S; Palsson, Runolfur; Mitchell, Gary; Inker, Lesley A

    2015-08-01

    Current guidelines recommend reporting eGFR using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations unless other equations are more accurate, and recommend the combination of creatinine and cystatin C (eGFRcr-cys) as more accurate than either eGFRcr or eGFRcys alone. However, preferred equations and filtration markers in elderly individuals are debated. In 805 adults enrolled in the community-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study, we measured GFR (mGFR) using plasma clearance of iohexol, standardized creatinine and cystatin C, and eGFR using the CKD-EPI, Japanese, Berlin Initiative Study (BIS), and Caucasian and Asian pediatric and adult subjects (CAPA) equations. We evaluated equation performance using bias, precision, and two measures of accuracy. We first compared the Japanese, BIS, and CAPA equations with the CKD-EPI equations to determine the preferred equations, and then compared eGFRcr and eGFRcys with eGFRcr-cys using the preferred equations. Mean (SD) age was 80.3 (4.0) years. Median (25th, 75th) mGFR was 64 (52, 73) ml/min per 1.73 m(2), and the prevalence of decreased GFR was 39% (95% confidence interval, 35.8 to 42.5). Among 24 comparisons with the other equations, CKD-EPI equations performed better in 9, similar in 13, and worse in 2. Using the CKD-EPI equations, eGFRcr-cys performed better than eGFRcr in four metrics, better than eGFRcys in two metrics, and similar to eGFRcys in two metrics. In conclusion, neither the Japanese, BIS, nor CAPA equations were superior to the CKD-EPI equations in this cohort of community-dwelling elderly individuals. Using the CKD-EPI equations, eGFRcr-cys performed better than eGFRcr or eGFRcys. PMID:25527647

  6. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation improves the detection of hyperfiltration in Chinese diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fangya; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Junxi; Guo, Kaifeng; Wu, Mian; Yu, Haoyong; Zhang, Mingliang; Bao, Yuqian; Chen, Haibing; Jia, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Hyperfiltration confers an increased risk of diabetic nephropathy. Early detection can ensure timely intervention and improved treatment outcomes. Because GFR is known to be affected by hyperglycemia, the aim of this study was to compare the influence of hyperglycemia on GFR estimations calculated by the CKD-EPI equation, the CG equation, and the MDRD equations in estimating hyperfiltration in Chinese diabetic patients. Materials and methods: The performance of the equations, compared with the measured 99mTc-DTPA glomerular filtration rate was analyzed in 3492 diabetic patients. Bias, precision, and accuracies were compared with respect to HbA1c status. The Bland-Altman method was used to evaluate the agreement among the equations with respect to the mGFR, and the receiver-operating characteristic curve method was used to evaluate diagnostic value of the three equations with respect to the detection of moderate renal failure and hyperfiltration. Results: The mean absolute bias was the smallest for the CKD-EPI equation in the HbA1c < 7.2% cohort, and the highest accuracy within ± 15% and ± 30% was also reached with the CKD-EPI equation in both cohorts. For the detection of hyperfiltration, the CKD-EPI equation exhibited the best performance with the greatest combination of sensitivity and specificity. The biases of the three equations were significantly higher in the HbA1c ≄ 10.5% subgroup compared with the HbA1c < 7.2% cohort. Conclusion: The CKD-EPI equation can be used as a screening tool for hyperfiltration and appears to be a more generalizable and accurate equation for estimating GFR in Chinese diabetic patients. PMID:26885183

  7. Cystatin C enhances GFR estimating Equations in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Kukla, Aleksandra; Issa, Naim; Jackson, Scott; Spong, Richard; Foster, Meredith C.; Matas, Arthur J.; Mauer, Michael S.; Eckfeldt, John H.; Ibrahim, Hassan N.

    2014-01-01

    Background The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating equation incorporating both cystatin C and creatinine perform better than those using creatinine or cystatin C alone in patients with reduced GFR. Whether this equation performs well in kidney transplant recipients cross-sectionally, and more importantly, over time has not been addressed. Methods We analyzed four GFR estimating equations in participants of the Angiotensin II Blockade for Chronic Allograft Nephropathy Trial (NCT 00067990): Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equations based on serum cystatin C and creatinine (eGFR (CKD-EPI-Creat+CysC)), cystatin C alone (eGFR (CKD-EPI-CysC)), creatinine alone (eGFR (CKD-EPI-Creat)) and the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study equation (eGFR(MDRD)). Iothalamate GFR served as a standard (mGFR). Results mGFR, serum creatinine, and cystatin C shortly after transplant were 56.1 ± 17.0 mL/min/1.73 m2, 1.2 ± 0.4 mg/dL, and 1.2 ± 0.3 mg/L respectively. eGFR (CKD-EPI-Creat+CysC) was most precise (R2=0.50) but slightly more biased than eGFR (MDRD); 9.0 ± 12.7 ml/min/1.73m2 vs. 6.4 ± 15.8 ml/min/1.73m2, respectively. This improved precision was most evident in recipients with mGFR >60 ml/min/1.73m2. For relative accuracy, eGFR (MDRD) and eGFR (CKD-EPI-Creat+CysC) had the highest percentage of estimates falling within 30% of mGFR; 75.8% and 68.9%, respectively. Longitudinally, equations incorporating cystatin C most closely paralleled the change in mGFR. Conclusion eGFR (CKD-EPI-Creat+CysC) is more precise and reflects GFR change over time reasonably well. eGFR (MDRD) had superior performance in recipients with mGFR between 30–60 ml/min/1.73m2. PMID:24457184

  8. Performance of Creatinine and Cystatin C GFR Estimating Equations in an HIV-positive population on Antiretrovirals

    PubMed Central

    INKER, Lesley A; WYATT, Christina; CREAMER, Rebecca; HELLINGER, James; HOTTA, Matthew; LEPPO, Maia; LEVEY, Andrew S; OKPARAVERO, Aghogho; GRAHAM, Hiba; SAVAGE, Karen; SCHMID, Christopher H; TIGHIOUART, Hocine; WALLACH, Fran; KRISHNASAMI, Zipporah

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of CKD-EPI creatinine, cystatin C and creatinine-cystatin C estimating equations in HIV-positive patients. Methods We evaluated the performance of the MDRD Study and CKD-EPI creatinine 2009, CKD-EPI cystatin C 2012 and CKD-EPI creatinine-cystatin C 2012 glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating equations compared to GFR measured using plasma clearance of iohexol in 200 HIV-positive patients on stable antiretroviral therapy. Creatinine and cystatin C assays were standardized to certified reference materials. Results Of the 200 participants, median (IQR) CD4 count was 536 (421) and 61% had an undetectable HIV-viral load. Mean (SD) measured GFR (mGFR) was 87 (26) ml/min/1.73m2. All CKD-EPI equations performed better than the MDRD Study equation. All three CKD-EPI equations had similar bias and precision. The cystatin C equation was not more accurate than the creatinine equation. The creatinine-cystatin C equation was significantly more accurate than the cystatin C equation and there was a trend toward greater accuracy than the creatinine equation. Accuracy was equal or better in most subgroups with the combined equation compared to either alone. Conclusions The CKD-EPI cystatin C equation does not appear to be more accurate than the CKD-EPI creatinine equation in patients who are HIV-positive, supporting the use of the CKD-EPI creatinine equation for routine clinical care for use in North American populations with HIV. The use of both filtration markers together as a confirmatory test for decreased estimated GFR based on creatinine in individuals who are HIV-positive requires further study. PMID:22842844

  9. Comparison of estimated glomerular filtration rate equations at the time of hemodialysis initiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Jeong; Kim, Seirhan; Park, Inwhee; Kim, Heungsoo; Shin, Gyu-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Background Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is one of the most important guidelines in deciding the optimal timing of dialysis initiation. In the present study, we calculated the eGFR at the time of hemodialysis (HD) initiation using 5 commonly used equations to relate them with clinical and laboratory characteristics of the patients and to evaluate which of these equations best define the eGFR at HD initiation. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 409 end-stage renal disease patients who were newly started on HD treatment in our institution. The eGFR was calculated using the Cockcroft–Gault equation, the Cockcroft–Gault equation corrected for body surface area, the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation, and the Nankivell equation. Results The mean eGFRs at HD start were significantly different across the equations. The mean eGFR was 7.8 mL/min for the corrected Cockcroft–Gault equation, 7.7 mL/min for the Cockcroft–Gault equation, 6.2 mL/min/1.73 m2 for the MDRD equation, and 5.6 mL/min/1.73 m2 for the CKD-EPI equation. The corrected Cockcroft–Gault, the MDRD, and the CKD-EPI equations were well correlated with all CKD-specific complications including hypertension, anemia, hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis, hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hyperparathyroidism. The mean eGFR calculated by the corrected Cockcroft–Gault equation showed the lowest coefficient of variation among all the equations. Conclusions The eGFR at HD initiation are significantly different according to the used eGFR equations, and the corrected Cockcroft–Gault equation may be the best in defining the eGFR at HD initiation. PMID:26779423

  10. Evaluation of creatinine, cystatin C and eGFR by different equations in professional cyclists during the Giro d'Italia 3-weeks stage race.

    PubMed

    Colombini, Alessandra; Corsetti, Roberto; Graziani, Rosa; Lombardi, Giovanni; Lanteri, Patrizia; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    Abstract In this study, creatinine-based equations to evaluate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were proposed to more accurately assess kidney function, and cystatin C, a parameter not dependent on muscular mass, was introduced to improve GFR calculation in professional cyclists during a long-lasting race. Nine cyclists participating in the 2011 Giro d'Italia were recruited. Blood and anthropometrical data were collected the day before (T-1) the race, on the 12th day (T 12) and on the 22nd day (T 22) of the race. Haemoglobin and haematocrit were registered. Haemodilution was observed at T 12, whilst stabilization was evident at T 22. Creatinine, cystatin C concentrations and eGFR values were not modified during the observed period; only GFR evaluated with the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) formula and expressed as ml/min/1.73 m(2) significantly decreased (p < 0.05) at T 22 in comparison with T-1, probably as a consequence of weight decrease. Cystatin C levels were in the reference range, while creatinine concentrations were lower. The lowest eGFR values were observed with CG normalized and the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formulas. A good correlation was observed between the MDRD and the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations and between CG normalized and both CKD-EPI and MDRD formulas. The worst correlation was registered between CKD-EPI creatinine and cystatin C and all the other equations. In conclusion, adaptive mechanisms of renal function allow athletes to maintain stable creatinine, cystatin C and eGFR values during a long-lasting race. The use of GFR equations to evaluate general health status of sportsmen should be recommended with caution, considering also weight modification during competition. PMID:22201455

  11. Is the new GFR equation using inulin clearance a more accurate method for Asian patients?

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Seok; Lee, Yong Kyu; Choi, Hoon Young; Choi, Seung Ok; Shin, Sug Kyun; Ha, Sung Kyu; Lee, Kang Wook; Kim, Yang Wook; Kim, Yong Lim; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Imai, Enyu; Horio, Masaru; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Matsuo, Seiichi; Lee, Ho Yung

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a new glomerular filtration rate (GFR) equation for the Japanese population was proposed using measured inulin clearance. To expand its applicability to other Asian populations, we performed a comparative study in the Korean population. Inulin clearance was measured in 166 patients from seven participating medical centers in Korea. Patient's sera and urine were collected, and baseline clinical characteristics were measured to provide an estimated GFR (eGFR) by the Japanese GFR equation using inulin clearance (Japanese-GFR equation), the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study equation, and the Chronic Kidney Disease - Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. We compared the results to determine which equation best estimated the measured GFR (mGFR). Accuracy (95% CI) within 30% of mGFR by the Japanese-GFR equation, the CKD-EPI equation and the MDRD study equation were 66 (58 - 72), 51 (43 - 58), and 55 (47 - 62)%, respectively. Bias (mGFR minus eGFR) were 3.4 ± 22.4, -12.0 ± 22.1, and -9.7 ± 23.8 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively. The accuracy of the Japanese-GFR equation was significantly better than MDRD study equation in subjects with mGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and in total subjects. The bias of the Japanese-GFR equation was significantly smaller compared with other two equations in total subjects. The Japanese-GFR equation has a higher accuracy with less bias than the other equations in estimating GFR in Korean populations. Further studies are required to determine if the current Japanese-GFR equation could represent the standard eGFR for other Asian populations. PMID:26558368

  12. Comparison of Various Equations for Estimating GFR in Malawi: How to Determine Renal Function in Resource Limited Settings?

    PubMed Central

    Phiri, Sam; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Neuhann, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a probably underrated public health problem in Sub-Saharan-Africa, in particular in combination with HIV-infection. Knowledge about the CKD prevalence is scarce and in the available literature different methods to classify CKD are used impeding comparison and general prevalence estimates. Methods This study assessed different serum-creatinine based equations for glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) and compared them to a cystatin C based equation. The study was conducted in Lilongwe, Malawi enrolling a population of 363 adults of which 32% were HIV-positive. Results Comparison of formulae based on Bland-Altman-plots and accuracy revealed best performance for the CKD-EPI equation without the correction factor for black Americans. Analyzing the differences between HIV-positive and –negative individuals CKD-EPI systematically overestimated eGFR in comparison to cystatin C and therefore lead to underestimation of CKD in HIV-positives. Conclusions Our findings underline the importance for standardization of eGFR calculation in a Sub-Saharan African setting, to further investigate the differences with regard to HIV status and to develop potential correction factors as established for age and sex. PMID:26083345

  13. Cystatin C and Creatinine-based eGFR equation performance depends on patient characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W.; Rule, Andrew D.; Voskoboev, Nikolay; Baumann, Nikola A.; Lieske, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guideline recommends use of a cystatin C-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to confirm creatinine-based eGFR between 45–59 mL/min/1.73m2. Prior studies have demonstrated that comorbidities such as solid-organ transplant strongly influence the relationship between measured GFR, creatinine and cystatin C. Our objective was to evaluate the performance of cystatin C based eGFR equations compared to creatinine-based eGFR and measured GFR across different clinical presentations. Methods The performance of the CKD-EPI 2009 creatinine-based estimated GFR equation (eGFRCr) and the newer CKD-EPI 2012 cystatin C-based equations (eGFRCys and eGFRCr-Cys) were compared with measured GFR (iothalamate renal clearance) across defined patient populations. Patients (n = 1,652) were categorized as transplant recipients (n=568 kidney; n=319 other organ [non-kidney]), known chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients (n=618), or potential kidney donors (n=147). Results eGFRCr-Cys showed the most consistent performance across different clinical populations. Among potential kidney donors without CKD (stage 2 or higher; eGFR >60mL/min/1.73m2), eGFRCys and eGFRCr-Cys demonstrated significantly less bias than eGFRCr, however, all three equations substantially underestimated GFR when eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2. Among transplant recipients with CKD stage 3B or lower (eGFR <45mL/min/1.73m2), eGFRCys was significantly more biased than eGFRCr. No clear differences among eGFR bias between equations were observed among known CKD patients regardless of eGFR range, or in any patient group with a GFR between 45–59 mL/min/1.73m2. Conclusions The performance of eGFR equations depends on patient characteristics readily apparent upon presentation. Among the three CKD-EPI equations, eGFRCr-Cys performed most consistently across the studied patient populations. PMID:26240296

  14. Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Meme; Pryor, Boori Monty

    2000-01-01

    Describes, in the words of two Australian authors (one Aboriginal and one European-Australian), how they work together when they write books together, and how their collaboration goes beyond the two of them. (SR)

  15. [New topics regarding equations for GFR estimation based on serum creatinine and cystatin C].

    PubMed

    Horio, Masaru

    2014-02-01

    Japanese GFR equations and CKD-EPI equations based on standardized serum creatinine and standardized cystatin C are recommended in recent Japanese CKD guides and KDIGO guidelines for CKD management, respectively. CKD-EPIcreat overestimates GFR in Japanese subjects, probably due to the difference in muscle mass between Japanese and Caucasians. Unlike CKD-EPIcreat, CKD-EPIcys performs well in Japanese subjects, indicating the advantages of using cystatin C as a GFR marker. KDIGO guidelines suggest measuring eGFRcys in adults with eGFRcreat of 45-59 ml/min/1.73 m2 who do not have markers of kidney damage if confirmation of CKD is required. Creatinine is excreted by glomerular filtration, but also secreted by the tubules. Alteration of the tubular secretion of creatinine may influence the performance of GFR equations based on serum creatinine. Multivariate analysis showed that GFR and serum albumin levels were independent parameters affecting the fractional excretion of creatinine (FE-Cr). Alteration of FE-Cr according to the serum albumin levels may be one of the reasons for the bias of GFR equations based on serum creatinine. Low GFR is a risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in a general population. However, the relationship between eGFR and the hazard risk of events is different depending on whether cystatin C or creatinine is used to calculate eGFR. The association between eGFRcys and the hazard risk is much stronger compared with eGFRcreat. Cystatin C may be a useful alternative to creatinine for detecting a high risk of complications in a general population and subjects with CKD. PMID:24800491

  16. A Collaboration on Collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent

    2004-01-01

    NASA's 2003-2004 Leadership Development Program class recognized that effective collaborations are often the key to achieving mission success. Personal connections and common goals were key elements of their work together and key findings of their collaboration benchmarking within the agency.

  17. Chronic kidney disease in older people with intellectual disability: results of the HA-ID study.

    PubMed

    de Winter, C F; Echteld, M A; Evenhuis, H M

    2014-03-01

    With increasing longevity and cardiovascular events, chronic kidney disease may also become a significant problem in older people with intellectual disability (ID). We studied prevalence and associations of chronic kidney disease as part of the Healthy Ageing and Intellectual Disability (HA-ID) study, a large Dutch cross-sectional study among people with ID aged 50 years and over, using creatinine and cystatin-C measurement in plasma. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations. Equations based on creatinine (as the MDRD equation) may underestimate kidney dysfunction in people with sarcopenia, because low muscle mass leads to a low creatinine production. Therefore, also prevalence of chronic kidney disease was studied in the sarcopenic group, using different GFR equations. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease, among 635 participants, was 15.3%, which equals prevalence in the general Dutch population. In the group of participants with sarcopenia (n=82), the CKD-EPI equation based on creatinine and cystatin-C gave a higher prevalence of chronic kidney disease than did the MDRD equation, but confidence intervals were very wide. Chronic kidney disease was associated with higher age, Down syndrome, obesity, hypercholesterolemia and hypothyroid disease. GFR should be measured in all older people with ID and polypharmacy, and in older people with ID and Down syndrome as part of the regular health checks. Moreover, if sarcopenia is present and information on GFR is required, this should not be measured based on creatinine only, but additional measures, such as cystatin-C, should be taken into account. PMID:24287320

  18. Kidney Function, Endothelial Activation and Atherosclerosis in Black and White Africans with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dessein, Patrick H.; Hsu, Hon-Chun; Tsang, Linda; Millen, Aletta M. E.; Woodiwiss, Angela J.; Norton, Gavin R.; Solomon, Ahmed; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether kidney function independently relates to endothelial activation and ultrasound determined carotid atherosclerosis in black and white Africans with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods We calculated the Jelliffe, 5 Cockcroft-Gault equations, Salazar-Corcoran, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) estimated glomerular filtration rate (EGFR) equations in 233 (112 black) RA patients. Results The CKD-EPI eGFR was <90 ml/min/1.73m2 in 49.1% and 30.6% of black and white patients, respectively (odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 2.19 (1.28–3.75), p = 0.004). EGFRs were overall consistently associated with monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and angiopoietin 2 concentrations in white patients, and with carotid intima-media thickness and plaque in black participants. Amongst black patients, plaque prevalence was 36.7% and the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was not associated with plaque presence for the MDRD equation (p = 0.3), whereas the respective relationship was significant or borderline significant (p = 0.003 to 0.08) and of similar extent (p>0.1 for comparisons of AUC (SE)) for the other 8 equations. Based on optimal eGFR cutoff values with sensitivities and specificities ranging from 42 to 60% and 70 to 91% respectively, as determined in ROC curve analysis, a low eGFR increased the odds ratio for plaque 2.2 to 4.0 fold. Conclusion Reduced kidney function is independently associated with atherosclerosis and endothelial activation in black and white Africans with RA, respectively. CKD is highly prevalent in black Africans with RA. Apart from the MDRD, eGFR equations are useful in predicting carotid plaque presence, a coronary heart disease equivalent, amongst black African RA patients. PMID:25806966

  19. Influence of Renal Function Estimation on Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Vancomycin in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Glatard, Anaïs; Bourguignon, Laurent; Jelliffe, Roger W.; Maire, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Vancomycin is a renally excreted drug, and its body clearance correlates with creatinine clearance. However, the renal function estimation equation that best predicts vancomycin clearance has not been established yet. The objective of this study was to compare the abilities of different renal function estimation equations to describe vancomycin pharmacokinetics in elderly patients. The NPAG algorithm was used to perform population pharmacokinetic analysis of vancomycin concentrations in 78 elderly patients. Six pharmacokinetic models of vancomycin clearance were built, based on the following equations: Cockcroft-Gault (CG), Jelliffe (JEL), Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD), Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) (both in milliliters per minute per 1.73 m2), and modified MDRD and CKD-EPI equations (both in milliliters per minute). Goodness-of-fit and predictive performances of the six PK models were compared in a learning set (58 subjects) and a validation set (20 patients). Final analysis was performed to estimate population parameters in the entire population. In the learning step, the MDRD-based model best described the data, but the CG- and JEL-based models were the least biased. The mean weighted errors of prediction were significantly different between the six models (P = 0.0071). In the validation group, predictive performances were not significantly different. However, the use of a renal function estimation equation different from that used in the model building could significantly alter predictive performance. The final analysis showed important differences in parameter distributions and AUC estimation across the six models. This study shows that methods used to estimate renal function should not be considered interchangeable for pharmacokinetic modeling and model-based estimation of vancomycin concentrations in elderly patients. PMID:25753640

  20. Collaborative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy-Reiner, Sherry, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Descriptions of 10 college programs involving collaborative learning are presented, along with Karen T. Romer's essay, "Collaboration: New Forms of Learning, New Ways of Thinking." The essay identifies various kinds of collaborative learning as well as the benefits of collaborative models. The following programs and schools are described: the…

  1. Collaborative Arrangements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cota-Robles, Eugene; Doby, Winston

    Two conference papers describing various collaborative arrangements within the educational community among teachers, students and others are presented in this document. The first paper, "Successful Collaborations" (Eugene Cota-Robles), describes the following projects in California that seek to forge collaborations to improve the education of…

  2. Collaborative Attack vs. Collaborative Defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shouhuai

    We have witnessed many attacks in the cyberspace. However, most attacks are launched by individual attackers even though an attack may involve many compromised computers. In this paper, we envision what we believe to be the next generation cyber attacks — collaborative attacks. Collaborative attacks can be launched by multiple attackers (i.e., human attackers or criminal organizations), each of which may have some specialized expertise. This is possible because cyber attacks can become very sophisticated and specialization of attack expertise naturally becomes relevant. To counter collaborative attacks, we might need collaborative defense because each “chain” in a collaborative attack may be only adequately dealt with by a different defender. In order to understand collaborative attack and collaborative defense, we present a high-level abstracted framework for evaluating the effectiveness of collaborative defense against collaborative attacks. As a first step towards realizing and instantiating the framework, we explore a characterization of collaborative attacks and collaborative defense from the relevant perspectives.

  3. Collaborative Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karr, Jo Ann

    This paper discusses the development of collaborative assessment models, using a laboratory study of rocks by middle school students as an example. It focuses on the use of collaborative assessment as part of an ongoing classroom process that involves the teacher, student, peers, and a family member. A schedule of checkpoints can be developed for


  4. A comparison of cystatin C- and creatinine-based prediction equations for the estimation of glomerular filtration rate in black South Africans

    PubMed Central

    van Deventer, Hendrick E.; Paiker, Janice E.; Katz, Ivor J.; George, Jaya A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Serum creatinine (S-Cr)-based prediction equations are commonly used for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, S-Cr concentration is also affected by other factors such as tubular secretion, muscle mass, diet, gender and age. Serum cystatin C (S-Cys C)-based prediction equations have been proposed as an improved potential alternative as S-Cys C levels are not influenced by many of the factors that affect creatinine concentration other than GFR. This may be of great benefit to patients with low muscle mass such as those infected with human immunodeficiency virus who are at increased risk for the development of renal impairment. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a S-Cys C-based prediction equation for different stages of renal disease in black South Africans. Methods. One hundred patients with varying degrees of renal function were enrolled in the study. The plasma clearance of 51Cr-EDTA, a gold standard method, was used to measure GFR (mGFR). In addition, serum was analysed for S-Cr and S-Cys C on each participant. This dataset was split into a development dataset (n = 50) and a test dataset (n = 50). The development dataset was used to formulate a S-Cys C- and S-Cr-based prediction equation using multiple linear regression analysis. These equations together with the four-variable MDRD and CKD-EPI equation were then tested on the test dataset. Results. In the test dataset, accuracy within 15% of measured GFR was 68% for the S-Cys C equation and 48% for the S-Cr equation. Root mean square error for S-Cr eGFR was 10.7 mL/min/1.73 m2 for those patients with mGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and 25.5 mL/min/1.73 m2 for those patients with mGFR > 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Root mean square error for S-Cys C eGFR was 10.2 mL/min/1.73 m2 for those patients with mGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and 11.9 mL/min/1.73 m2 for those patients with mGFR > 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Conclusions. In this study, S-Cys C-based prediction equations appear to be more precise than those of S-Cr for those patients with mGFR > 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and may therefore be of benefit in the earlier detection of renal impairment. PMID:20961892

  5. ALICE Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; AdamovĂĄ, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; AppelshĂ€user, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; BadalĂ , A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; BielčíkovĂĄ, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; BĂžggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; BoldizsĂĄr, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; BossĂș, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; CortĂ©s Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; DĂ©nes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; DiviĂ , R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; DĂžrheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; FernĂĄndez TĂ©llez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; GaardhĂžje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; GlĂ€ssel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; GonzĂĄlez-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; JachoƂkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil SVN, M.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; KrĂĄlik, I.; KravčákovĂĄ, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; LeĂłn MonzĂłn, I.; LĂ©vai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; LĂłpez Torres, E.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; MareĆĄ, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; MarĂ­n, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; MartĂ­nez, M. I.; MartĂ­nez GarcĂ­a, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado PĂ©rez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miƛkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; MĂŒhlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; MĂŒller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; PĂ©rez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; PƂoskoƄ, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; RĂ€sĂ€nen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; RodrĂ­guez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; RĂžed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Ć afaƙík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; SĂĄnchez RodrĂ­guez, F. J.; Ć ĂĄndor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; SĂžgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Ć umbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; ThĂ€der, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara LimĂłn, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; VrlĂĄkovĂĄ, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; ZĂĄvada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-11-01

    The ALICE Collaboration would like to thank all its engineers and technicians for their invaluable contributions to the construction of the experiment and the CERN accelerator teams for the outstanding performance of the LHC complex.

  6. Differences in estimation of creatinine generation between renal function estimating equations in an Indian population: cross-sectional data from the Hyderabad arm of the Indian migration study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Creatinine based formulae for estimating renal function developed in white populations may be less valid in other ethnic groups. We assessed the performance of various estimating formulae in an Indian population. Methods 917 subjects were recruited from the Hyderabad arm of the Indian Migration Study. Data were collected on comorbidity, serum creatinine and body composition from DXA scans. Renal function was compared using the modified Cockcroft-Gault, MDRD and CKD-EPI formulae. 24-hour creatinine production was derived from each estimate and the agreement with measured muscle mass examined. 24-hour creatinine production estimates were compared to that derived from a formula by Rule incorporating DXA measured muscle mass. Potential systematic biases were examined by age and eGFR. We assessed the association of renal function by each formula with hypertension and self-reported measures of vascular disease. Results Mean modified Cockcroft-Gault eCCl was 98.8?ml/min/1.73?m2, MDRD eGFR 91.2?ml/min/1.73?m2 and CKD-EPI eGFR 96.3?ml/min/1.73?m2. MDRD derived 24-hour creatinine production showed the least age-related underestimation compared to the Rule formula. CKD-EPI showed a marked bias at higher eGFRs. All formulae showed similar strength associations with vascular disease and hypertension. Conclusions Our analyses support the use of MDRD for estimating renal function in Indian populations. Further work is required to assess the predictive value of formulae for incident disease and complications of CKD. PMID:23379609

  7. Collaborative Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippman, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    When architects discuss the educational facilities of the next century and beyond, the conversation turns to collaborative spaces. They envision flexible and fluid spaces that will encourage creative and critical thinking, and free students to communicate clearly about the task at hand. While these are admirable ideals, there are some fundamental…

  8. Collaboration Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Danielle; Otero, Valerie K.

    2005-01-01

    What happens when university curriculum developers are mixed with motivated elementary teachers? ? An awesome learning collaboration that benefits researchers, teachers, and students! That's what the authors discovered when they--university researchers involved in the Physics for Elementary Teachers (PET) project--teamed up with local elementary…

  9. Collaborative engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Robert L.; Reames, Joseph M.

    2004-09-01

    A need exists for United States military forces to perform collaborative engagement operations between unmanned systems. This capability has the potential to contribute significant tactical synergy to the Joint Force operating in the battlespace of the future. Collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. Collaborative engagements can also add considerably to force survivability by reducing soldier and equipment exposure during critical operations. This paper will address a multiphase U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC) Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL) program to assess information requirements, Joint Architecure for Unmanned Systems (JAUS), on-going Science and Technology initiatives, and conduct simulation based experiments to identify and resolve technical risks required to conduct collaborative engagements using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGV). The schedule outlines an initial effort to expand, update and exercise JAUS, provide early feedback to support user development of Concept of Operations (CONOPs) and Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTPs), and develop a Multiple Unified Simulation Environment (MUSE) system with JAUS interfaces necessary to support an unmanned system of systems collaboartive engagement.

  10. Collaborative Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Debora

    2014-01-01

    This practitioner research study investigates the power of multimodal texts within a real-world context and argues that a participatory culture focused on literary arts offers marginalized high school students opportunities for collaborative design and authoring. Additionally, this article invites educators to rethink the at-risk label. This


  11. Collaborative Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Debora

    2014-01-01

    This practitioner research study investigates the power of multimodal texts within a real-world context and argues that a participatory culture focused on literary arts offers marginalized high school students opportunities for collaborative design and authoring. Additionally, this article invites educators to rethink the at-risk label. This…

  12. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) during and after STEMI: a single-centre, methodological study comparing estimated and measured GFR

    PubMed Central

    Venetsanos, Dimitrios; Alfredsson, Joakim; Segelmark, Mćrten; Swahn, Eva; Lawesson, Sofia Sederholm

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To validate the performance of the most commonly used formulas for estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) against measured GFR during the index hospitalisation for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Setting Single centre, methodological study. Participants 40 patients with percutaneous coronary intervention-treated STEMI were included between November 2011 and February 2013. Patients on dialysis, cardiogenic shock or known allergy to iodine were excluded. Outcome measures Creatinine and cystatin C were determined at admission and before discharge in 40 patients with STEMI. Clearance of iohexol was measured (mGFR) before discharge. We evaluated and compared the Cockcroft-Gault (CG), the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD-IDMS), the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology (CKD-EPI) and the Grubb relative cystatin C (rG-CystC) with GFR regarding correlation, bias, precision and accuracy (P30). Agreement between eGFR and mGFR to discriminate CKD was assessed by Cohen's ? statistics. Results MDRD-IDMS and CKD-EPI demonstrated good performance to estimate GFR (correlation 0.78 vs 0.81%, bias ?1.3% vs 1.5%, precision 17.9 vs 17.1?mL/min 1.73?m2 and P30 82.5% vs 82.5% for MDRD-IDMS vs CKD-EPI). CKD was best classified by CKD-EPI (? 0.83). CG showed the worst performance (correlation 0.73%, bias ?1% to 3%, precision 22.5?mL/min 1.73?m2 and P30 75%). The rG-CystC formula had a marked bias of ?17.8% and significantly underestimated mGFR (p=0.03). At arrival, CKD-EPI and rG-CystC had almost perfect agreement in CKD classification (?=0.87), whereas at discharge agreement was substantially lower (?=0.59) and showed a significant discrepancy in CKD classification (p=0.02). Median cystatin C concentration increased by 19%. Conclusions In acute STEMI, CKD-EPI showed the best CKD-classification ability followed by MDRD-IDMS, whereas CG performed the worst. STEMI altered the performance of the cystatin C equation during the acute phase, suggesting that other factors might be involved in the rise of cystatin C. PMID:26399570

  13. Update on Estimation of Kidney Function in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Cherney, David Z; Maahs, David M

    2015-09-01

    The American Diabetes Association recommends annual assessment of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) to screen for diabetic nephropathy. GFR is measured indirectly using markers that, ideally, are eliminated only by glomerular filtration. Measured GFR, although the gold standard, remains cumbersome and expensive. GFR is therefore routinely estimated using creatinine and/or cystatin C and clinical variables. In pediatrics, the Schwartz creatinine-based equation is most frequently used even though combined creatinine and cystatin C-based equations demonstrate stronger agreement with measured GFR. In adults, the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations with creatinine and/or cystatin C are the most accurate and precise estimating equations. Despite recent advances, current estimates of GFR lack precision and accuracy before chronic kidney disease stage 3 (GFR?

  14. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  15. Collaborative Understanding of Cyanobacteria in Lake Ecosystems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Meredith L.; Ewing, Holly A.; Cottingham, Kathryn L.; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a collaboration between mathematicians and ecologists studying the cyanobacterium "Gloeotrichia echinulata" and its possible role in eutrophication of New England lakes. The mathematics includes compartmental modeling, differential equations, difference equations, and testing models against high-frequency data. The ecology…

  16. Collaborative Understanding of Cyanobacteria in Lake Ecosystems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Meredith L.; Ewing, Holly A.; Cottingham, Kathryn L.; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a collaboration between mathematicians and ecologists studying the cyanobacterium "Gloeotrichia echinulata" and its possible role in eutrophication of New England lakes. The mathematics includes compartmental modeling, differential equations, difference equations, and testing models against high-frequency data. The ecology


  17. Solidarity through Collaborative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Stephen M.; Rigano, Donna L.

    2007-01-01

    While numerous publications signal the merits of collaborative research, few studies provide interpretive analyses of collaborative-research practices or collaborative relationships. Through this multiple case study design of collaborative-research teams, the authors attempt to provide such an analysis by focusing on the collaborative-research…

  18. Solidarity through Collaborative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Stephen M.; Rigano, Donna L.

    2007-01-01

    While numerous publications signal the merits of collaborative research, few studies provide interpretive analyses of collaborative-research practices or collaborative relationships. Through this multiple case study design of collaborative-research teams, the authors attempt to provide such an analysis by focusing on the collaborative-research


  19. Collaboration. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacey, Susan; Eaton, Deborah E.; Albrecht, Kay; Bergman, Roberta

    2000-01-01

    Presents four articles on collaboration for use in staff development in childcare settings: (1) "Facilitating Collaborations among Children" (Susan Stacey); (2) "One Size Doesn't Fit All in Collaborations with Parents" (Deborah E. Eaton); (3) "Supporting Collaboration among Teachers" (Kay Albrecht); and (4) "Building Collaborations between…

  20. Collaboration rules.

    PubMed

    Evans, Philip; Wolf, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Corporate leaders seeking to boost growth, learning, and innovation may find the answer in a surprising place: the Linux open-source software community. Linux is developed by an essentially volunteer, self-organizing community of thousands of programmers. Most leaders would sell their grandmothers for workforces that collaborate as efficiently, frictionlessly, and creatively as the self-styled Linux hackers. But Linux is software, and software is hardly a model for mainstream business. The authors have, nonetheless, found surprising parallels between the anarchistic, caffeinated, hirsute world of Linux hackers and the disciplined, tea-sipping, clean-cut world of Toyota engineering. Specifically, Toyota and Linux operate by rules that blend the self-organizing advantages of markets with the low transaction costs of hierarchies. In place of markets' cash and contracts and hierarchies' authority are rules about how individuals and groups work together (with rigorous discipline); how they communicate (widely and with granularity); and how leaders guide them toward a common goal (through example). Those rules, augmented by simple communication technologies and a lack of legal barriers to sharing information, create rich common knowledge, the ability to organize teams modularly, extraordinary motivation, and high levels of trust, which radically lowers transaction costs. Low transaction costs, in turn, make it profitable for organizations to perform more and smaller transactions--and so increase the pace and flexibility typical of high-performance organizations. Once the system achieves critical mass, it feeds on itself. The larger the system, the more broadly shared the knowledge, language, and work style. The greater individuals' reputational capital, the louder the applause and the stronger the motivation. The success of Linux is evidence of the power of that virtuous circle. Toyota's success is evidence that it is also powerful in conventional companies. PMID:16028820

  1. Serum Cystatin C as an Indicator of Renal Function and Mortality in Liver Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Alina M; Kim, W Ray; Larson, Joseph J; Colby, Colin; Therneau, Terry M; Rule, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important comorbidity after liver transplantation (LT); however, reliable tools with which to evaluate these patients are limited. In this work, we examine the extent to which the addition of serum cystatin C improves GFR estimation and mortality prediction, in comparison to various GFR-estimating equations. Methods GFR was measured in LT recipients by iothalamate clearance. Concurrent serum cystatin C was assayed in banked serum samples. Performance of GFR-estimating equations with and without cystatin-C, including the MDRD (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease) and CKD-EPI (Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration) formulas was assessed. The proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to determine the association between serum cystatin-C and mortality. Results A total of 586 iothalamate results were obtained in 401 patients after a mean of 4 years post-LT. When compared to measured GFR, the formula with both creatinine and cystatin-C, namely CKD-EPIcr-cys, outperformed those with either marker alone. Performance of creatinine-based models was similar to one another. Serum cystatin-C, by itself or as a part of eGFR was a significant predictor of mortality. Conclusion Serum cystatin-C has an important role in enhancing accuracy of GFR estimation and predicting mortality in LT recipients. PMID:25654627

  2. Network Collaboration with UNIX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Wm. Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Discusses networking as a collaboration tool in the teaching of technical writing. Argues that some degree of collaboration is innate to all writing, that word processing already facilitates that collaboration, and that networking is the next enhancement to the collaborative process. (RS)

  3. Collaborative Systems Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pocatilu, Paul; Ciurea, Cristian

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative systems are widely used today in various activity fields. Their complexity is high and the development involves numerous resources and costs. Testing collaborative systems has a very important role for the systems' success. In this paper we present taxonomy of collaborative systems. The collaborative systems are classified in many…

  4. Prevalence, determinants, and management of chronic kidney disease in Karachi, Pakistan - a community based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing being recognized as a global public health problem. However, there is dearth of information on the prevalence, determinants, and management of CKD from low- and middle-income countries. The objectives of the study were to determine the 1) prevalence of CKD; 2) socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with CKD; and 3) the existing management of these patients with regards to blood pressure control, and use of antihypertensive medications. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study on 2873 participants aged ?40 years in 12 representative communities in Karachi, Pakistan. The primary outcome was clinically significant CKD defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 estimated by CKD-EPI (CKD Epidemiology Collaboration) Pakistan equation (0.686?Ś?CKD-EPI1.059) or urinary albumin to creatinine ratio ?3 mg/mmol (i.e. KDOQI CKD stage G3, A2 or worse). Results The overall prevalence (95% CI) of CKD was 12.5% (11.4 – 13.8%). The factors independently associated with CKD were older age, hypertension, diabetes, elevated systolic blood pressure, raised fasting plasma glucose, raised triglycerides, and history of stroke (p?

  5. Online Collaboration: Making It Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathorn, Lesley G.; Ingram, Albert L.

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of computer-mediated communication in education focuses on online collaboration. Highlights include characteristics of a collaborative group, including participation, interaction, and interdependence; collaborative situations; non-collaborative groups, including cooperation without collaboration; factors that promote or inhibit…

  6. Penetration equations

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.W.

    1997-10-01

    In 1967, Sandia National Laboratories published empirical equations to predict penetration into natural earth materials and concrete. Since that time there have been several small changes to the basic equations, and several more additions to the overall technique for predicting penetration into soil, rock, concrete, ice, and frozen soil. The most recent update to the equations was published in 1988, and since that time there have been changes in the equations to better match the expanding data base, especially in concrete penetration. This is a standalone report documenting the latest version of the Young/Sandia penetration equations and related analytical techniques to predict penetration into natural earth materials and concrete. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

  7. Bortezomib-based therapy combined with high cut-off hemodialysis is highly effective in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients with severe renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Zannetti, Beatrice Anna; Zamagni, Elena; Santostefano, Marisa; De Sanctis, Lucia Barbara; Tacchetti, Paola; Mancini, Elena; Pantani, Lucia; Brioli, Annamaria; Rizzo, Raffaella; Mancuso, Katia; Rocchi, Serena; Pezzi, Annalisa; Borsi, Enrica; Terragna, Carolina; Marzocchi, Giulia; Santoro, Antonio; Cavo, Michele

    2015-07-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is often associated with renal insufficiency (RI) which adversely influences the prognosis. Several studies demonstrated that bortezomib can improve both renal function and outcome. We prospectively evaluated 21 newly diagnosed MM patients with severe renal impairment secondary to tubular-interstitial damage, most of them due to myeloma kidney, who were primarily treated with bortezomib-based therapy combined with high cut-off hemodialysis (HCOD). The median serum creatinine level at baseline was 6.44 mg dL(-1) and calculated median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), according to Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) creatinine equation, was 8 mL/min/1.73 m(2) . Serum free light chain (sFLC) median concentration was 6,040 mg L(-1) . Post induction and best stringent complete response rates were 19 and 38%, respectively. Responses were fast, occurring within a median of 1.4 months. The combination of bortezomib and HCOD led to a prompt and remarkable (>90%) decrease in sFLC levels. Sixteen patients (76%) became dialysis independent within a median of 32 days. With a median follow up of 17.2 months, the 3-year PFS and OS were 76 and 67%, respectively. No early deaths were observed. This study demonstrates that incorporation of bortezomib into induction therapy combined with HCOD is a highly effective strategy in rescuing renal function and improving outcomes in patients with MM and RI. PMID:25858483

  8. NCI Drug Development Collaborative

    Cancer.gov

    The Drug Development Collaborative provides the infrastructure to enhance collaborative basic, translational, and clinical research on molecular targets or pathways. The DDC along with the the Molecular Targets Laboratory strive to provide intramural inve

  9. Theme: Collaborative Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briers, Gary E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Seven articles present models for collaboration between business and education, agriscience and extension, agribusiness and agricultural education, as well as a collaborative waterfowl refuge project and the political process and public relations. (SK)

  10. Collaboration and Team Science

    Cancer.gov

    Questions for Scientific Collaborators Download Agreement Template PDF Although each research project has unique features, certain core issues are common to most of them and can be addressed by collaborators posing the following questions: Overall Goals W

  11. Writing: A Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Margaret, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Noting that while collaborative writing is commonplace in the "real" world it is seldom practiced in classrooms, the articles in this focused journal explore the place of collaboration in the writing process and the ways in which collaboration can be fostered in an instructional setting. Following an introduction by the editor, which describes…

  12. Experiences of Collaborative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahneman, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The author's personal history of the research that led to his recognition in economics is described, focusing on the process of collaboration and on the experience of controversy. The author's collaboration with Amos Tversky dealt with 3 major topics: judgment under uncertainty, decision making, and framing effects. A subsequent collaboration

  13. Beautiful equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljamaa, Panu; Jacobs, J. Richard; Chris; JamesHyman; Halma, Matthew; EricNolan; Coxon, Paul

    2014-07-01

    In reply to a Physics World infographic (part of which is given above) about a study showing that Euler's equation was deemed most beautiful by a group of mathematicians who had been hooked up to a functional magnetic-resonance image (fMRI) machine while viewing mathematical expressions (14 May, http://ow.ly/xHUFi).

  14. Some Aspects of Mathematical Model of Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Yasutake, Koichi; Yamakawa, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    There are some mathematical learning models of collaborative learning, with which we can learn how students obtain knowledge and we expect to design effective education. We put together those models and classify into three categories; model by differential equations, so-called Ising spin and a stochastic process equation. Some of the models do not


  15. Ethics of international collaboration.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Jharna; Dinoop, Kp; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Education and research together are vital components of academic institutions and globalization has improved health care education and research in numerous ways, one of which is multinational/transnational research/international collaboration. Usually academic institutions of high-income countries and institutions in low-income countries participate in collaboration. These collaborative research are guided by international ethics codes proposed by the international ethics committee to avoid stringent follow/unethical practices. PMID:25709946

  16. Experiences of collaborative research.

    PubMed

    Kahneman, Daniel

    2003-09-01

    The author's personal history of the research that led to his recognition in economics is described, focusing on the process of collaboration and on the experience of controversy. The author's collaboration with Amos Tversky dealt with 3 major topics: judgment under uncertainty, decision making, and framing effects. A subsequent collaboration, with the economist Richard Thaler, played a role in the development of behavioral economics. Procedures to make controversies more productive and constructive are suggested. PMID:14584989

  17. Marcus equation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1998-09-21

    In the late 1950s to early 1960s Rudolph A. Marcus developed a theory for treating the rates of outer-sphere electron-transfer reactions. Outer-sphere reactions are reactions in which an electron is transferred from a donor to an acceptor without any chemical bonds being made or broken. (Electron-transfer reactions in which bonds are made or broken are referred to as inner-sphere reactions.) Marcus derived several very useful expressions, one of which has come to be known as the Marcus cross-relation or, more simply, as the Marcus equation. It is widely used for correlating and predicting electron-transfer rates. For his contributions to the understanding of electron-transfer reactions, Marcus received the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. This paper discusses the development and use of the Marcus equation. Topics include self-exchange reactions; net electron-transfer reactions; Marcus cross-relation; and proton, hydride, atom and group transfers.

  18. Toward Collaboration Sensing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Bertrand; Pea, Roy

    2014-01-01

    We describe preliminary applications of network analysis techniques to eye-tracking data collected during a collaborative learning activity. This paper makes three contributions: first, we visualize collaborative eye-tracking data as networks, where the nodes of the graph represent fixations and edges represent saccades. We found that those…

  19. Solo Librarians Working Collaboratively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickel, Robbie

    2011-01-01

    The Elko County School District in Nevada has elementary school librarians that are "solo" librarians. Over the last several years they have worked to collaborate on meeting monthly--even though the district covers 17,100 square miles--and on providing professional development face to face and online. Sharing and collaboration help them to problem


  20. Solo Librarians Working Collaboratively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickel, Robbie

    2011-01-01

    The Elko County School District in Nevada has elementary school librarians that are "solo" librarians. Over the last several years they have worked to collaborate on meeting monthly--even though the district covers 17,100 square miles--and on providing professional development face to face and online. Sharing and collaboration help them to problem…

  1. Teachers' Collaborative Curriculum Deliberations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kaye M.

    This study took an in-depth look at the collaborative work of teachers engaged in curriculum restructuring, and explored how individual teachers' perceptions inform and are informed by such collaboration. The objective of the study was to explore how teachers' individual knowledge, experiences, and curriculum orientations affected their…

  2. Toward Collaboration Sensing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Bertrand; Pea, Roy

    2014-01-01

    We describe preliminary applications of network analysis techniques to eye-tracking data collected during a collaborative learning activity. This paper makes three contributions: first, we visualize collaborative eye-tracking data as networks, where the nodes of the graph represent fixations and edges represent saccades. We found that those


  3. Design for Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Canan; Scanlon, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Online learning environments offer new opportunities for learning and over the last decade or so a variety of online learning environments have been developed by researchers to facilitate collaborative learning among students. In this paper we will present a case study of a successful collaborative learning design. This involves a near synchronous


  4. Collaborating with Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzendorf, David W.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the importance of collaborations between organizations specializing in child care, such as the YMCA and the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, and public schools for enhancing the quality of after-school programs. Describes the collaborative efforts of elementary schools in Georgia with a Boys and Girls Club and state and county…

  5. Advances in Collaborative Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Campos, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative evaluation is an approach that offers, among others, many advantages in terms of access to information, quality of information gathered, opportunities for creative problem-solving, and receptivity to findings. In the last decade, collaborative evaluation has grown in popularity along with similar participatory, empowerment, and…

  6. Creating Collaborative Advantage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huxham, Chris, Ed.

    Although interorganizational collaboration is becoming increasingly significant as a means of achieving organizational objectives, it is not an easy process to implement. Drawing on the work of authors with extensive experience, an accessible introduction to the theory and practice of creating collaborative advantage is presented in this volume.…

  7. School-Community Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focus in Change, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Collaborations between schools and parents, and schools and other institutions, seek to improve or expand available resources. This issue of "Focus in Change" focuses on two elementary schools with different models of collaboration in place. At Columbia Park Elementary School (Maryland) parents have been involved in site-based management teams…

  8. Collaboration and Team Science

    Cancer.gov

    Collaboration and Team Science: A Field Guide Wins an NIH Plain Language Award Collaboration & Team Science: A Field Guide, co-written by Dr. L. Michelle Bennett, Dr. Howard Gadlin, and Samantha Levine-Finley, won a 2011 NIH Plain Language/Clear Communica

  9. Assessing Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Desmond

    2006-01-01

    This paper is informed by one clear guiding principle: collaborative learning provides the platform on which independent learning is nurtured. The nature of collaborative learning in musicology as well as performance is considered. The focus is on learning rather than achievement, on process rather than presentation, on how students are encouraged…

  10. Jump-Start Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohmiller, Darcy

    2010-01-01

    When teachers and school librarians work together, student achievement increases. Librarians know this and have made sure their teachers and administrators know this as well. But it's a giant leap from knowing the value of collaboration and actually collaborating. The only way to convince teachers to take that step is to convince them that the…

  11. Collaboration: Assumed or Taught?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Sandra N.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between collaboration and gifted and talented students often is assumed to be an easy and successful learning experience. However, the transition from working alone to working with others necessitates an understanding of issues related to ability, sociability, and mobility. Collaboration has been identified as both an asset and a…

  12. Collaborative Writing Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yong Mei Fung

    2010-01-01

    As part of a research study on collaborative writing, this paper discusses defining and facilitating features that occur during face-to-face collaboration, based on the literature and research. The defining features are mutual interaction, negotiations, conflict, and shared expertise. Facilitating features include affective factors, use of L1,…

  13. OGC Collaborative Platform undercover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, G.; Arctur, D. K.; Bermudez, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    The mission of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is to serve as a global forum for the collaboration of developers and users of spatial data products and services, and to advance the development of international standards for geospatial interoperability. The OGC coordinates with over 400 institutions in the development of geospatial standards. OGC has a dedicated staff supported by a Collaborative Web Platform to enable sophisticated and successful coordination among its members. Since its origins in the early 1990s, the OGC Collaborative Web Platform has evolved organically to be the collaboration hub for standards development in the exchange of geospatial and related types of information, among a global network of thousands of technical, scientific and management professionals spanning numerous disparate application domains. This presentation describes the structure of this collaboration hub, the relationships enabled (both among and beyond OGC members), and how this network fits in a broader ecosystem of technology development and information standards organizations.

  14. Collaboration in psychopharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Simos, Gregoris

    2012-02-01

    Collaboration in pharmacotherapy implies a professional willing to prescribe an effective medication and a patient willing to adhere to the therapeutic regimen in order for both to achieve their common goal. This relationship requires trust in the relationship, collaboration in goal setting, and effective means for promoting and restoring mental health. Variables like illness insight and patients' attitudes towards medication should be dealt within a collaborative relationship. Several methods of shared decision making, culled from the research literature and clinical experience, promote such prescriber-patient collaboration and, even more specifically, medication adherence. Detailed physician-patient interactions in 2 cases, one of a depressed patient and one of a patient suffering from schizophrenia, serve to highlight common difficulties in the management of pharmacotherapy in the context of a collaborative relationship. PMID:23616300

  15. GFR-estimating models in kidney transplant recipients on a steroid-free regimen

    PubMed Central

    Kukla, Aleksandra; El-Shahawi, Yasser; Leister, Erin; Kasiske, Bertram; Mauer, Michael; Matas, Arthur; Ibrahim, Hassan N.

    2010-01-01

    Background. How to best estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in kidney transplant recipients on steroid-free immunosuppression has not been established. Methods. Within 3 months of transplantation, iothalamate GFR (iGFR) was measured in 107 recipients on steroid-free and 27 on steroid-maintenance immunosuppression. A year later, a second GFR was performed. Serum creatinine was calibrated against a reference laboratory, and GFR was estimated (eGFR) using the re-expressed Cockcroft–Gault equation, eGFRCG; the Mayo Clinic equation, eGFRMC; the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study equation, eGFRMDRD; and the newly introduced Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Results. All models overestimated GFR regardless of steroid use or timing of GFR. In those not receiving steroids, eGFRCG was least biased: 1.85 ± 15.2 ml/min at the first GFR and 0.23 ± 15.2 ml/min at the second. eGFRMC and eGFRCKD-EPI were most biased and were within 30% of iGFR less than 60% of the time in contrast to eGFRCG which was within 30% of iGFR 80.2% of the time. eGFRMDRD was intermediate in its performance at the first GFR but was comparable to eGFRCG at the second measurement. Importantly, the four models had comparable but poor precision. Exposure to steroids for a whole year did not appreciably alter the models’ bias or relative accuracy but resulted in a dramatic fall in their precision, R2 = 0.05–0.12. Conclusions. GFR prediction equations overestimate measured GFR in recipients on and off steroid regimens. Long-term exposure to steroids results in a marked reduction in the precision of all models. In all, eGFRCG and eGFRMDRD are the two best available models. PMID:20118486

  16. Collaborations: Challenging, but Key

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2009-10-01

    Collaborations are becoming increasing important in biology because of the need to apply multiple technologies to tackle the most complex current problems. The U.S. National Institutes of Health recognizes this need, and has created the “multi-investigator” granting mechanism to facilitate this process. I have reviewed a number of proposals that utilize the multi-investigator mechanism and have generally found them to be superior to individual investigator grants. Setting up a good collaboration, however, can be extremely difficult. Like any relationship, collaborations take time and energy. Still, there is nothing that can accelerate your research faster or expand your intellectual horizons more.

  17. The LCOGT Science Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Timothy M.; Boroson, T. A.; Howell, D. A.; Street, R.; Lister, T.

    2014-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) has deployed a global network of 1-m and 2m optical telescopes, optimized for work in time-domain astronomy. Since our scientific staff is rather small, and since network operation necessarily involves close collaborations with other astronomical institutions, we aim to extend the scientific depth and scope of the Observatory by creating a formal Science Collaboration. This poster explains the structure and membership of the Collaboration, with emphasis on the notion of Key Projects that we intend as vehicles to perform scientific programs for which LCOGT's facilities are uniquely suited, and which will have the greatest scientific impact. The general subjects of these projects are already defined (Supernovae, Extrasolar Planets, Solar System, AGN, and Stellar Astrophysics). A Collaboration-wide proposal process to be carried out in early 2014 will determine which problems within these categories will be addressed in the first round of Key Projects.

  18. Collaborative engagement experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullens, Katherine; Troyer, Bradley; Wade, Robert; Skibba, Brian; Dunn, Michael

    2006-05-01

    Unmanned ground and air systems operating in collaboration have the potential to provide future Joint Forces a significant capability for operations in complex terrain. Collaborative Engagement Experiment (CEE) is a consolidation of separate Air Force, Army and Navy collaborative efforts within the Joint Robotics Program (JRP) to provide a picture of the future of unmanned warfare. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Material and Manufacturing Directorate, Aerospace Expeditionary Force Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRL/MLQF), The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC)/Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL), and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center - San Diego (SSC San Diego) are conducting technical research and proof of principle experiments for an envisioned operational concept for extended range, three dimensional, collaborative operations between unmanned systems, with enhanced situational awareness for lethal operations in complex terrain. This paper describes the work by these organizations to date and outlines some of the plans for future work.

  19. Collaboration and Team Science

    Cancer.gov

    Who is Referencing "Collaboration and Team Science: A Field Guide"? NIH Intramural Research Program Blog Team Science Toolkit Time Ideas Compass - Ohio University The Current - UC Santa Barbara Huffington Post Scripps Translational Science Institute Stanf

  20. A Collaboration for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCreedy, Dale; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes collaborative efforts where museums and community organizations encourage family involvement in science, including the Girls at the Center (GAC) and Community Connections programs. Discusses challenges, strengths of partnerships, outreach efforts, and museum-based events. Contains 12 references. (JRH)

  1. Collaborations in fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.; Davis, S.; Roney, P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews current experimental collaborative efforts in the fusion community and extrapolates to operational scenarios for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Current requirements, available technologies and tools, and problems, issues and concerns are discussed. This paper specifically focuses on the issues that apply to experimental operational collaborations. Special requirements for other types of collaborations, such as theoretical or design and construction efforts, will not be addressed. Our current collaborative efforts have been highly successful, even though the tools in use will be viewed as primitive by tomorrow`s standards. An overview of the tools and technologies in today`s collaborations can be found in the first section of this paper. The next generation of fusion devices will not be primarily institutionally based, but will be national (TPX) and international (ITER) in funding, management, operation and in ownership of scientific results. The TPX will present the initial challenge of real-time remotely distributed experimental data analysis for a steady state device. The ITER will present new challenges with the possibility of several remote control rooms all participating in the real-time operation of the experimental device. A view to the future of remote collaborations is provided in the second section of this paper.

  2. Joint collaborative technology experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, Michael; Ciccimaro, Donny; Yee, See; Denewiler, Thomas; Stroumtsos, Nicholas; Messamore, John; Brown, Rodney; Skibba, Brian; Clapp, Daniel; Wit, Jeff; Shirts, Randy J.; Dion, Gary N.; Anselmo, Gary S.

    2009-05-01

    Use of unmanned systems is rapidly growing within the military and civilian sectors in a variety of roles including reconnaissance, surveillance, explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), and force-protection and perimeter security. As utilization of these systems grows at an ever increasing rate, the need for unmanned systems teaming and inter-system collaboration becomes apparent. Collaboration provides a means of enhancing individual system capabilities through relevant data exchange that contributes to cooperative behaviors between systems and enables new capabilities not possible if the systems operate independently. A collaborative networked approach to development holds the promise of adding mission capability while simultaneously reducing the workload of system operators. The Joint Collaborative Technology Experiment (JCTE) joins individual technology development efforts within the Air Force, Navy, and Army to demonstrate the potential benefits of interoperable multiple system collaboration in a force-protection application. JCTE participants are the Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Airbase Technologies Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRL/RXQF); the Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center Software Engineering Directorate (AMRDEC SED); and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center - Pacific (SSC Pacific) Unmanned Systems Branch operating with funding provided by the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise (JGRE). This paper will describe the efforts to date in system development by the three partner organizations, development of collaborative behaviors and experimentation in the force-protection application, results and lessons learned at a technical demonstration, simulation results, and a path forward for future work.

  3. Ideas for Teacher Collaboration. What Happens When Teachers Collaborate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeken, Lois A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Research reports show that in many schools, teachers are isolated and have little chance for professional collaboration with fellow teachers. However, research also demonstrates that when teachers collaborate, instruction improves. Seven examples of teacher collaboration throughout the United States show how collaboration can be implemented and…

  4. Collaborative engagement experiment (CEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Robert L.; Reames, Joseph M.

    2005-05-01

    Unmanned ground and air systems operating in collaboration have the potential to provide future Joint Forces a significant capability for operations in complex terrain. Ground and air collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. These engagements can also add considerably to force survivability by reducing soldier and equipment exposure during critical operations. The Office of the Secretary of Defense, Joint Robotics Program (JRP) sponsored Collaborative Engagement Experiment (CEE) is a consolidation of separate Air Force, Army and Navy collaborative efforts to provide a Joint capability. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Material and Manufacturing Directorate, Aerospace Expeditionary Force Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRLMLQF), The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC)/Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL), and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center-San Diego (SSC San Diego) are conducting technical research and proof of principle for an envisioned operational concept for extended range, three dimensional, collaborative operations between unmanned systems, with enhanced situational awareness for lethal operations in complex terrain. This program will assess information requirements and conduct experiments to identify and resolve technical risks for collaborative engagements using Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). It will research, develop and physically integrate multiple unmanned systems and conduct live collaborative experiments. Modeling and Simulation systems will be upgraded to reflect engineering fidelity levels to greater understand technical challenges to operate as a team. This paper will provide an update of a multi-year program and will concentrate primarily on the JTC/SIL efforts. Other papers will outline in detail the Air Force and Navy portions of this effort.

  5. Battlefield agent collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budulas, Peter P.; Young, Stuart H.; Emmerman, Philip J.

    2001-09-01

    Small air and ground physical agents (robots) will be ubiquitous on the battlefield of the 21st century, principally to lower the exposure to harm of our ground forces in urban and open terrain scenarios. Teams of small collaborating physical agents conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA), intelligence, chemical and biological agent detection, logistics, decoy, sentry; and communications relay will have advanced sensors, communications, and mobility characteristics. It is anticipated that there will be many levels of individual and team collaboration between the soldier and robot, robot to robot, and robot to mother ship. This paper presents applications and infrastructure components that illustrate each of these levels. As an example, consider the application where a team of twenty small robots must rapidly explore and define a building complex. Local interactions and decisions require peer to peer collaboration. Global direction and information fusion warrant a central team control provided by a mother ship. The mother ship must effectively deliver/retrieve, service, and control these robots as well as fuse the information gathered by these highly mobile robot teams. Any level of collaboration requires robust communications, specifically a mobile ad hoc network. The application of fixed ground sensors and mobile robots is also included in this paper. This paper discusses on going research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that supports the development of multi-robot collaboration. This research includes battlefield visualization, intelligent software agents, adaptive communications, sensor and information fusion, and multi-modal human computer interaction.

  6. Distance collaborations with industry

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, A.; Swyler, K.

    1998-06-01

    The college industry relationship has been identified as a key policy issue in Engineering Education. Collaborations between academic institutions and the industrial sector have a long history and a bright future. For Engineering and Engineering Technology programs in particular, industry has played a crucial role in many areas including advisement, financial support, and practical training of both faculty and students. Among the most important and intimate interactions are collaborative projects and formal cooperative education arrangements. Most recently, such collaborations have taken on a new dimension, as advances in technology have made possible meaningful technical collaboration at a distance. There are several obvious technology areas that have contributed significantly to this trend. Foremost is the ubiquitous presence of the Internet. Perhaps almost as important are advances in computer based imaging. Because visual images offer a compelling user experience, it affords greater knowledge transfer efficiency than other modes of delivery. Furthermore, the quality of the image appears to have a strongly correlated effect on insight. A good visualization facility offers both a means for communication and a shared information space for the subjects, which are among the essential features of both peer collaboration and distance learning.

  7. Collaborative protein filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Debnath; Löwe, Jan

    2015-01-01

    It is now well established that prokaryotic cells assemble diverse proteins into dynamic cytoskeletal filaments that perform essential cellular functions. Although most of the filaments assemble on their own to form higher order structures, growing evidence suggests that there are a number of prokaryotic proteins that polymerise only in the presence of a matrix such as DNA, lipid membrane or even another filament. Matrix-assisted filament systems are frequently nucleotide dependent and cytomotive but rarely considered as part of the bacterial cytoskeleton. Here, we categorise this family of filament-forming systems as collaborative filaments and introduce a simple nomenclature. Collaborative filaments are frequent in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes and are involved in vital cellular processes including chromosome segregation, DNA repair and maintenance, gene silencing and cytokinesis to mention a few. In this review, we highlight common principles underlying collaborative filaments and correlate these with known functions. PMID:26271102

  8. Entanglement of collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Gour, Gilad

    2006-11-15

    The entanglement of collaboration (EOC) quantifies the maximum amount of entanglement that can be generated between two parties, A and B, given collaboration with N-2 other parties, when the N parties share a multipartite (possibly mixed) state and where the collaboration consists of local operations and classical communication by all parties. The localizable entanglement (LE) is defined similarly except that A and B do not participate in the effort to generate bipartite entanglement. We compare between these two operational definitions and find sufficient conditions for which the EOC is equal to the LE. In particular, we find that the two are equal whenever they are measured by the concurrence or by one of its generalizations called the G-concurrence. We also find a simple expression for the LE in terms of the Jamiolkowski isomorphism and prove that it is convex.

  9. The collaboration imperative.

    PubMed

    Nidumolu, Ram; Ellison, Jib; Whalen, John; Billman, Erin

    2014-04-01

    Addressing global sustainability challenges--including climate change, resource depletion, and ecosystem loss--is beyond the individual capabilities of even the largest companies. To tackle these threats, and unleash new value, companies and other stakeholders must collaborate in new ways that treat fragile and complex ecosystems as a whole. In this article, the authors draw on cases including the Latin American Water Funds Partnership, the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (led by Nike, Patagonia, and Walmart), and Action to Accelerate Recycling (a partnership between Alcoa, consumer packaged goods companies, and local governments, among others) to describe four new collaboration models that create shared value and address environmental protection across the value stream. Optimal collaborations focus on improving either business processes or outcomes. They start with a small group of key organizations, bring in project management expertise, link self-interest to shared interest, encourage productive competition, create quick wins, and, above all, build and maintain trust. PMID:24830283

  10. Securing collaborative environments

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Deborah; Jackson, Keith; Thompson, Mary

    2002-05-16

    The diverse set of organizations and software components involved in a typical collaboratory make providing a seamless security solution difficult. In addition, the users need support for a broad range of frequency and locations for access to the collaboratory. A collaboratory security solution needs to be robust enough to ensure that valid participants are not denied access because of its failure. There are many tools that can be applied to the task of securing collaborative environments and these include public key infrastructure, secure sockets layer, Kerberos, virtual and real private networks, grid security infrastructure, and username/password. A combination of these mechanisms can provide effective secure collaboration capabilities. In this paper, we discuss the requirements of typical collaboratories and some proposals for applying various security mechanisms to collaborative environments.

  11. Communication and collaboration technologies.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    This is the third in a series of columns exploring health information technology (HIT) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The first column provided background information on the implementation of information technology throughout the health care delivery system, as well as the requisite informatics competencies needed for nurses to fully engage in the digital era of health care. The second column focused on information and resources to master basic computer competencies described by the TIGER initiative (Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform) as learning about computers, computer networks, and the transfer of data.1 This column will provide additional information related to basic computer competencies, focusing on communication and collaboration technologies. Computers and the Internet have transformed the way we communicate and collaborate. Electronic communication is the ability to exchange information through the use of computer equipment and software.2 Broadly defined, any technology that facilitates linking one or more individuals together is a collaborative tool. Collaboration using technology encompasses an extensive range of applications that enable groups of individuals to work together including e-mail, instant messaging (IM ), and several web applications collectively referred to as Web 2.0 technologies. The term Web 2.0 refers to web applications where users interact and collaborate with each other in a collective exchange of ideas generating content in a virtual community. Examples of Web 2.0 technologies include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, video sharing sites, and mashups. Many organizations are developing collaborative strategies and tools for employees to connect and interact using web-based social media technologies.3. PMID:22397797

  12. Collaborative Movie Annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zad, Damon Daylamani; Agius, Harry

    In this paper, we focus on metadata for self-created movies like those found on YouTube and Google Video, the duration of which are increasing in line with falling upload restrictions. While simple tags may have been sufficient for most purposes for traditionally very short video footage that contains a relatively small amount of semantic content, this is not the case for movies of longer duration which embody more intricate semantics. Creating metadata is a time-consuming process that takes a great deal of individual effort; however, this effort can be greatly reduced by harnessing the power of Web 2.0 communities to create, update and maintain it. Consequently, we consider the annotation of movies within Web 2.0 environments, such that users create and share that metadata collaboratively and propose an architecture for collaborative movie annotation. This architecture arises from the results of an empirical experiment where metadata creation tools, YouTube and an MPEG-7 modelling tool, were used by users to create movie metadata. The next section discusses related work in the areas of collaborative retrieval and tagging. Then, we describe the experiments that were undertaken on a sample of 50 users. Next, the results are presented which provide some insight into how users interact with existing tools and systems for annotating movies. Based on these results, the paper then develops an architecture for collaborative movie annotation.

  13. A Call for Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Carl

    2009-01-01

    In this digital world, being a "viewer" is passe. Web 2.0 tools--social networks, wikis, blogs, voicestream, YouTube, Google Docs--allow users to be participants. Instead of creating isolated users, such technologies foster community and collaboration. In this article, the author describes how schools in New York, Florida, New Jersey, and North…

  14. Cultivating Labor Management Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    In many districts, the notion of labor groups and district administration working together conjures descriptions of war and battle rather than cooperation and collaboration. However, in San Juan Unified School District, the headline, "Union and District Exhibit Positive Partnership" exemplifies the changing relationship between teacher leaders and…

  15. Collaborative Learning, Circa 1880.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Theodora Penny

    Collaborative learning, such as student-team learning or work-group learning, has become the focus of inservice workshops for teachers, a theme in professional journals, and the daily routine in an increasing number of classrooms. The women's study clubs in late 19th-century United States used a similar pedagogy. By the early 1900s, perhaps as…

  16. Learning Music from Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, R. Keith

    2008-01-01

    I draw on two traditions of research: the social psychology of collaborative groups, and the ethnographic study of improvisational performance. I outline a general model of group creativity derived from these traditions. I show how the model can be used to better understand musical competence and performance, and I provide recommendations for how…

  17. Collaborative Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Harry; Fidel, Raya

    1999-01-01

    Researchers from the University of Washington, Microsoft Research, Boeing, and Risoe National Laboratory in Denmark have embarked on a project to explore the manifestations of Collaborative Information Retrieval (CIR) in work settings and to propose technological innovations and organizational changes that can support, facilitate, and improve CIR.…

  18. Collaborating for Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrzeniecki, Aimee; Poole, Ken; Troppe, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Collaborating to define clear roles, responsibilities, and expectations can help a college and its partners avoid misunderstandings and "turf" problems. In this article, the authors describe vital partnerships between community colleges and economic development organizations to foster economic growth. The authors also share some lessons learned…

  19. A Failure to Collaborate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Based on a successful scholarly collaboration experience, the writer assigned a group project in a graduate seminar that confronted a wave of resentment. Small clusters of students were to tackle a multi-layered research assignment requiring textual decisions, bibliographic work, critical theory, historical research, and editorial design. As the…

  20. Building Collaborative Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madigan, Jennifer C.; Schroth-Cavataio, Georganne

    2011-01-01

    Communication and professional dialogue are essential elements of a high-quality education environment in which all students can succeed. Such an environment is especially important for the success of students with special needs. Unfortunately, collaboration between special educators, general educators, and other professionals is often hindered by…

  1. Collaborative Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    This collection consists of 41 collaborative lesson plans developed by 99 Virginia teachers at 18 primarily High Schools that Work (HSTW) and tech prep sites. It is divided into three sections: career connection, community connection, and consumer connection. Two types of lesson descriptions which support HSTW key practices, and Virginia's Tech


  2. Home Alone! Still Collaborating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Mary Ann; Kuon, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    When the authors taught in traditional classroom settings, collaboration and communication were understood to be important. Part of every class session was spent in discussion because they knew the importance of students teaching students, and they believed that the teacher as a facilitator, rather than the supreme encyclopedia of knowledge, was a


  3. Furthering the Collaborative Collage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Eileen

    Writing instructors who would like to move beyond the collaboration provided by workshops and peer-response groups might consider asking groups of students to write a collage together. According to Peter Elbow, a collage "consists not of a single perfectly connected train of explicit thinking or narrative but rather of fragments: arranged how


  4. Collaborative Learning in Wikis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yun-Ke; Morales-Arroyo, Miguel Angel; Than, Hla; Tun, Zarchi; Wang, Zhujun

    2011-01-01

    Wikis are a supporting tool for pupils' learning and collaboration. Tasks such as cooperative authoring, joined workbooks creation, document review, group assignments, reflection notes and others have been tried out using wikis as a facilitating tool [1]. However, few studies have reported how students actually perceive some well-claimed benefits.…

  5. Collaboration and Team Science

    Cancer.gov

    Adler, L. (2007). Hire with your head: using performance-based hiring to build great teams. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Bennett and Gadlin (2012). Collaboration and Team Science: From Theory to Practice. J Investig Med, 60: 768-775. Berman, S., Burt,

  6. Collaboration and Team Science

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Center for Cancer Research Criteria for Evaluating Contributions to Team Science If the PI is involved in collaborative, multidisciplinary, or interdisciplinary research: What is his/her role in driving the project(s) forward? Is she/he leading a majo

  7. Team Collaboration Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Schrock, Mitchell; Baldwin, John R.; Borden, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    The Ground Resource Allocation and Planning Environment (GRAPE 1.0) is a Web-based, collaborative team environment based on the Microsoft SharePoint platform, which provides Deep Space Network (DSN) resource planners tools and services for sharing information and performing analysis.

  8. Building Collaborative Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madigan, Jennifer C.; Schroth-Cavataio, Georganne

    2011-01-01

    Communication and professional dialogue are essential elements of a high-quality education environment in which all students can succeed. Such an environment is especially important for the success of students with special needs. Unfortunately, collaboration between special educators, general educators, and other professionals is often hindered by


  9. Home Alone! Still Collaborating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Mary Ann; Kuon, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    When the authors taught in traditional classroom settings, collaboration and communication were understood to be important. Part of every class session was spent in discussion because they knew the importance of students teaching students, and they believed that the teacher as a facilitator, rather than the supreme encyclopedia of knowledge, was a…

  10. Online Collaboration: Curriculum Unbound!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2007-01-01

    Freed from the nuisances of paper-based methods, districts are making creative use of digital tools to move their curricular documents online, where educators can collaborate on course development and lesson planning. Back in 2003, Amarillo Independent School District (Texas) had begun using the Blackboard Content System to provide lessons online.…

  11. Collaboration 101 Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Dept. of Human Services, East St. Louis. Head Start State Collaboration Office.

    Head Start has a long history of providing comprehensive child and family development services to low-income children and families. Noting that this history can serve as a model as early childhood and care programs work toward greater collaboration with other programs and agencies to improve child well-being and help move families toward…

  12. Learning Music from Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, R. Keith

    2008-01-01

    I draw on two traditions of research: the social psychology of collaborative groups, and the ethnographic study of improvisational performance. I outline a general model of group creativity derived from these traditions. I show how the model can be used to better understand musical competence and performance, and I provide recommendations for how


  13. Physical Activity Is not Associated with Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate among Young and Middle-Aged Adults: Results from the Population-Based Longitudinal Doetinchem Study

    PubMed Central

    Herber-Gast, Gerrie-Cor M.; Hulsegge, Gerben; Hartman, Linda; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Spijkerman, Annemieke M. W.

    2015-01-01

    There is debate as to whether physical inactivity is associated with reduced kidney function. We studied the prospective association of (changes in) physical activity with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in adult men and women. We included 3,935 participants aged 26 to 65 years from the Doetinchem Cohort study, examined every 5 years for 15 years. Physical activity was assessed at each round using the Cambridge Physical Activity Index. Using the CKD-EPI (Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration) equation, GFR was estimated from routinely measured cystatin C concentrations, examining all available samples per participant in one assay run. We determined the association between 1) physical activity and eGFR and 2) 5-year changes in physical activity (becoming inactive, staying inactive, staying active, becoming active) and eGFR, using time-lagged generalized estimating equation analyses. At baseline, 3.6% of the participants were inactive, 18.5% moderately inactive, 26.0% moderately active, and 51.9% active. The mean (± SD) eGFR was 107.9 (± 14.5) mL/min per 1.73 m2. Neither physical activity nor 5-year changes in physical activity were associated with eGFR at the subsequent round. The multivariate adjusted ÎČeGFR was 0.57 mL/min per 1.73 m2 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) -1.70, 0.56) for inactive compared to active participants. Studying changes in physical activity between rounds, the adjusted ÎČeGFR was -1.10 mL/min per 1.73 m2 (95% CI -4.50, 2.30) for those who stayed inactive compared with participants who became active. Physical activity was not associated with eGFR in this population-based study of adults. PMID:26465150

  14. Exploring How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Synchronous Collaborative Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Hui-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative writing (CW) research has gained prevalence in recent years. However, the ways in which students interact socially to produce written texts through synchronous collaborative writing (SCW) is rarely studied. This study aims to investigate the effects of SCW on students' writing products and how collaborative dialogues facilitate…

  15. Using Wikis for Collaborative Learning: Assessing Collaboration through Contribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Terry; Kennedy, Gregor; Cropper, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Wikis are widely promoted as collaborative writing tools and are gaining in popularity in educational settings. However, while wikis include features that are designed to facilitate collaboration, it does not necessarily follow that their use will ensure or even encourage collaborative learning behaviour. The few empirical studies that have…

  16. Basic lubrication equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Lubricants, usually Newtonian fluids, are assumed to experience laminar flow. The basic equations used to describe the flow are the Navier-Stokes equation of motion. The study of hydrodynamic lubrication is, from a mathematical standpoint, the application of a reduced form of these Navier-Stokes equations in association with the continuity equation. The Reynolds equation can also be derived from first principles, provided of course that the same basic assumptions are adopted in each case. Both methods are used in deriving the Reynolds equation, and the assumptions inherent in reducing the Navier-Stokes equations are specified. Because the Reynolds equation contains viscosity and density terms and these properties depend on temperature and pressure, it is often necessary to couple the Reynolds with energy equation. The lubricant properties and the energy equation are presented. Film thickness, a parameter of the Reynolds equation, is a function of the elastic behavior of the bearing surface. The governing elasticity equation is therefore presented.

  17. Developing Biomedical Ontologies Collaboratively

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Natalya F.; Tudorache, Tania; de Coronado, Sherri; Musen, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    The development of ontologies that define entities and relationships among them has become essential for modern work in biomedicine. Ontologies are becoming so large in their coverage that no single centralized group of people can develop them effectively and ontology development becomes a community-based enterprise. In this paper we present Collaborative ProtĂ©gé—a prototype tool that supports many aspects of community-based development, such as discussions integrated with ontology-editing process, chats, and annotation of changes. We have evaluated Collaborative ProtĂ©gĂ© in the context of the NCI Thesaurus development. Users have found the tool effective for carrying out discussions and recording design rationale. PMID:18998901

  18. The LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Gabriela

    2015-04-01

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC) is a self-governing collaboration seeking to detect gravitational waves, use them to explore the fundamental physics of gravity, and develop gravitational wave observations as a tool of astronomical discovery. The LSC works toward this goal through research on, and development of techniques for, gravitational wave detection; and the development, commissioning and exploitation of gravitational wave detectors. The LSC, funded in 1997, has now many hundreds of scientists in 16 countries, with a diverse range of skills and background. The LSC is preparing for a discovery era with Advanced LIGO detectors starting in the next few years; we will describe the features and challenges of the LSC organization in such an exciting time.

  19. Equal collaboration in HUSK.

    PubMed

    Eide, Solveig Botnen

    2015-01-01

    Equality emerges as a key value for collaboration between academics, practitioners, and users in HUSK. The aim of the author in this analysis is to explore how the norm of equality is reflected in the HUSK projects, the strategies used to promote equality, and issues that emerge when equality is challenged by the participants involved. Particular attention is given to the roles of the service users who saw themselves as being "in the same boat" as all the other HUSK project participants. Strategies to promote equality include the redistribution of tasks carried out by participants and serious recognition of the different contributions made by the participants. In addition to focusing on the role of collaborative research and shared work, the author draws upon the moral philosophy elaborated by Skjervheim and the meaning of vulnerability elaborated by the phenomenological moral philosopher Lűgstrup. PMID:25662085

  20. A Holographic Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Ana Maria

    2013-02-01

    In the Fall of '87 Rudie Berkhout and myself started a very intense and fruitful collaboration producing a series of holographic art pieces that were experimental but that reflected our different artistic sensibilities. The masters were made in my portrait studio in the Museum of Holography in New York using a pulse laser and later transferred in my Long Island City Studio. These pieces were shown at the Holocenter in 2009 and poignantly, it was the last show that Rudie had while he was alive. My paper details the process of an artistic collaboration, its pitfalls and advantages, its conflicts and compromises. It will illuminate the creative process that from two separate and very different streams melded into beautiful and evocative art.

  1. Robust Collaborative Recommendation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Robin; O'Mahony, Michael P.; Hurley, Neil J.

    Collaborative recommender systems are vulnerable to malicious users who seek to bias their output, causing them to recommend (or not recommend) particular items. This problem has been an active research topic since 2002. Researchers have found that the most widely-studied memory-based algorithms have significant vulnerabilities to attacks that can be fairly easily mounted. This chapter discusses these findings and the responses that have been investigated, especially detection of attack profiles and the implementation of robust recommendation algorithms.

  2. Collaboration to partnerships.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Sandra L; Kornet, Terese M; Lawson, Diane R; Major, Katherine; May, Linda; Rich, Victoria L; Riley-Wasserman, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Partnerships are at the center of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania Nursing Excellence Professional Practice (HUP-NEPP) model. Through the use of collaboration, skilled communication, and respectful workplace, partnerships can be formed, leading ultimately to world-class patient care. At HUP, interdisciplinary partnerships are evidenced by the clinical nurses through shared governance. This article describes the components necessary to form successful partnerships. PMID:20023561

  3. Modeling Sustainability through Collaboratively Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This project explores collaborative efforts involving the United States Forest Service and the communities it serves. By contributing to our understanding leadership dynamics within collaborative groups in this setting, this project provides resource managers and communities with a more refined insight into how collaborative groups are maintained


  4. Interagency Collaboration and Welfare Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Tara

    2000-01-01

    This issue of WIN (Welfare Information Network) Issue Notes raises some major issues that agencies may want to address as they consider expanding collaborative efforts. It describes collaborative efforts and identifies resources that could prove useful in designing successful collaborations. Section 1 offers background. Section 2 answers these


  5. Modeling Sustainability through Collaboratively Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This project explores collaborative efforts involving the United States Forest Service and the communities it serves. By contributing to our understanding leadership dynamics within collaborative groups in this setting, this project provides resource managers and communities with a more refined insight into how collaborative groups are maintained…

  6. Measuring Collaboration among Grant Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Bruce B.; Lohmeier, Jill H.; Lee, Stephen W.; Tollefson, Nona

    2006-01-01

    Collaboration is a prerequisite for the sustainability of interagency programs, particularly those programs initially created with the support of time-limited grant-funding sources. From the perspective of evaluators, however, assessing collaboration among grant partners is often difficult. It is also challenging to present collaboration data to…

  7. Collaborative Research: Why and How?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hafernik, Johnnie Johnson; Messerschmitt, Dorothy S.; Vandrick, Stephanie

    1997-01-01

    Argues for the use of collaborative research, not as a replacement for individual research but as a valuable alternative. Benefits and difficulties of collaborative research are outlined, obstacles to its conduct are reviewed, and ways to make it work are suggested, supplemented with descriptions of actual collaborative research. (SLD)

  8. Regulating Collaboration in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobber, Marjolein; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Verloop, Nico; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration in teacher education can be seen as a way to prepare student teachers for future social practices at school. When people collaborate with each other, they have to regulate their collaboration. In the Dutch teacher education programme that was investigated, student teachers were members of different types of groups, each of which had…

  9. Electronic Literacy, Critical Pedagogy, and Collaboration: A Case for Cyborg Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkelmann, Carol L.

    1995-01-01

    Argues that the combination of collaborative writing and electronic resources can produce a reaffirmation of literacy as a social process. Utilizes feminist theory to equate the postmodernist assumptions regarding the indeterminate nature of language with democratizing influences. Describes a class project where students produced a collaborative

  10. Cochrane Collaboration w Polsce.

    PubMed

    Ba?a, Ma?gorzata M; Le?niak, Wiktoria; Jaeschke, Roman

    2015-12-22

    Podej?cie oparte na zasadach evidence?based medicine (EBM) w podejmowaniu decyzji w praktyce klinicznej nie jest w Polsce nowe. Pierwsze warsztaty z zakresu EBM odby?y si? w Polsce pod koniec lat 90. Cochrane Collaboration, jedna z g?ównych inicjatyw wywodz?cych si? ze wspólnego pnia EBM, to mi?dzynarodowa organizacja non?for?profit dzia?aj?ca na zasadzie sieci wspó?pracuj?cych ze sob? osób zaanga?owanych w opiek? zdrowotn? (m.in. badaczy, praktyków, pacjentów). Cochrane Collaboration propaguje podejmowanie decyzji, opartych na wiarygodnych i aktualnych informacjach naukowych (EBM) poprzez przygotowywanie przez cz?onków organizacji wysokiej jako?ci przegl?dów systematycznych Cochrane. Organizacja powsta?a w 1993 roku i od tej pory nieprzerwanie si? rozwija. Nadal niewiele osób w Polsce uczestniczy w pracach nad przegl?dami Cochrane i w innych dzia?aniach organizacji. Dlatego pojawi?a si? potrzeba powo?ania o?rodka, który móg?by stymulowa? i wspiera? zaanga?owanie w prace Cochrane Collaboration równie? polskich badaczy, lekarzy i innych osób zajmuj?cych si? opiek? zdrowotn?. Artyku? zawiera opis struktury organizacji, jej celów i zasad, na których opiera si? jej dzia?alno?? oraz opis celów i aktywno?ci Filii Cochrane w Polsce. PMID:26794132

  11. From Collaboration to Publication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Jerry; Marshall, Jill

    2010-09-01

    As co-authors of a recent publication in Physical Review Special Topics- Physics Education Research, we have received inquiries about the publication process.2 We will describe the process of creating an article based on team work, in our case the work of the Texas Physics Assessment Team. Many physics teachers have opportunities to participate in collaborations for organizations like the AAPT and state education agencies. We may think of this work as service or professional development rather than research, but it can provide valuable information to the community as a whole and merits publication when presented in an appropriate format. Collaboration can provide a particularly important avenue toward publication for those of us at institutions dedicated primarily to teaching rather than research. Many data-gathering efforts require the collaboration of individuals and institutions at all degree levels. Community colleges have more diverse student populations than large research institutions, and may be able to provide different perspectives on common problems in teaching and learning physics. We will present suggestions for future team work publications, including prospective publications reporting the work of AAPT area committees.

  12. MMI: Increasing Community Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbraith, N. R.; Stocks, K.; Neiswender, C.; Maffei, A.; Bermudez, L.

    2007-12-01

    Building community requires a collaborative environment and guidance to help move members towards a common goal. An effective environment for community collaboration is a workspace that fosters participation and cooperation; effective guidance furthers common understanding and promotes best practices. The Marine Metadata Interoperability (MMI) project has developed a community web site to provide a collaborative environment for scientists, technologists, and data managers from around the world to learn about metadata and exchange ideas. Workshops, demonstration projects, and presentations also provide community-building opportunities for MMI. MMI has developed comprehensive online guides to help users understand and work with metadata standards, ontologies, and other controlled vocabularies. Documents such as "The Importance of Metadata Standards", "Usage vs. Discovery Vocabularies" and "Developing Controlled Vocabularies" guide scientists and data managers through a variety of metadata-related concepts. Members from eight organizations involved in marine science and informatics collaborated on this effort. The MMI web site has moved from Plone to Drupal, two content management systems which provide different opportunities for community-based work. Drupal's "organic groups" feature will be used to provide workspace for future teams tasked with content development, outreach, and other MMI mission-critical work. The new site is designed to enable members to easily create working areas, to build communities dedicated to developing consensus on metadata and other interoperability issues. Controlled-vocabulary-driven menus, integrated mailing-lists, member-based content creation and review tools are facets of the new web site architecture. This move provided the challenge of developing a hierarchical vocabulary to describe the resources presented on the site; consistent and logical tagging of web pages is the basis of Drupal site navigation. The new MMI web site presents enhanced opportunities for electronic discussions, focused collaborative work, and even greater community participation. The MMI project is beginning a new initiative to comprehensively catalog and document tools for marine metadata. The new MMI community-based web site will be used to support this work and to support the work of other ad-hoc teams in the future. We are seeking broad input from the community on this effort.

  13. Chemical Equation Balancing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakley, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews mathematical techniques for solving systems of homogeneous linear equations and demonstrates that the algebraic method of balancing chemical equations is a matter of solving a system of homogeneous linear equations. FORTRAN programs using this matrix method to chemical equation balancing are available from the author. (JN)

  14. Equations and closure methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Basic differential equations governing compressible turbulent boundary layer flow are reviewed, including conservation of mass and energy, momentum equations derived from Navier-Stokes equations, and equations of state. Closure procedures were broken down into: (1) simple or zeroth-order methods, (2) first-order or mean field closure methods, and (3) second-order or mean turbulence field methods.

  15. Equations of Geometric Figures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carl S.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    By translating inequalities into equations (e.g., x greater than 0 can be written x- absolute value of x = 0) and forming equations for unions and intersections of solution sets, students can develop equations for polygons. The method can be generalized to yield equations in three dimensions. (SD)

  16. KDIGO Guidelines and Kidney Transplantation: Is the Cystatin-C Based Recommendation Relevant?

    PubMed

    Masson, I; Maillard, N; Cavalier, E; Alamartine, E; Mariat, C; Delanaye, P

    2015-08-01

    The KDIGO guidelines propose a new approach to diagnose chronic kidney disease (CKD) based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). In patients with a GFR value comprised between 45 and 59?mL/min/1.73?m(2) as estimated by the CKD-EPI creatinine equation (eGFRcreat ), it is suggested to confirm the diagnosis with a second estimation using the CKD-EPI cystatin C-based equations (eGFRcys /eGFRcreat-cys) . We sought to determine whether this new diagnostic strategy might extend to kidney transplant recipients (KTR) and help to identify those with decreased GFR. In 670 KTR for whom a measured GFR was available, we simulated the detection of CKD using the two-steps approach recommended by the guidelines in comparison to the conventional approach relying on creatinine equation. One hundred forty-five patients with no albuminuria had eGFRcreat between 45 and 59?mL/min/1.73?m(2) . Among them, 23% had inulin clearance over 60?mL/min/1.73?m(2) and were thus incorrectly classified as CKD patients. When applying the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) strategy, 138 patients were confirmed as having a GFR below 60?mL/min with eGFRcreat-cys . However, 21% of them were misclassified in reference to measured GFR. Our data do no not support the use of cystatin C as a confirmatory test of stage 3?A CKD in KTR. PMID:25808194

  17. Triglyceride Levels Are Closely Associated with Mild Declines in Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rates in Middle-Aged and Elderly Chinese with Normal Serum Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuping; Zhao, Xiangmin; Wang, Yulian; Li, Chengqiao; Li, Mei; Wang, Shaoyuan; Yang, Weifang; Ma, Zeqiang; Ma, Aixia; Zheng, Huizhen; Wu, Jiahui; Sun, Yu; Song, Jun; Lin, Peng; Liang, Kai; Gong, Lei; Wang, Meijian; Liu, Fuqiang; Li, Wenjuan; Xiao, Juan; Yan, Fei; Yang, Junpeng; Wang, Lingshu; Tian, Meng; Liu, Jidong; Zhao, Ruxing; Chen, Shihong; Chen, Li

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between lipid profiles [including total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)] and a mild decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in subjects with normal serum lipid levels. Design and Methods In this study, we included 2647 participants who were ?40 years old and had normal serum lipid levels. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation was used to estimate the GFR. A mildly reduced eGFR was defined as 60–90 mL/min/1.73 m2. First, multiple linear regression analysis was used to estimate the association of lipid profiles with the eGFR. Then, the levels of each lipid component were divided into four groups, using the 25th, 50th and 75th percentiles as cut-off points. Finally, multiple logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association of different lipid components with the risk of mildly reduced eGFR. Results In the group with a mildly reduced eGFR, TG and LDL-C levels were significantly increased, but HDL-C levels were significantly decreased. After adjusting for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), smoking and drinking, only TC and TG were independently related to the eGFR. Additionally, only TG showed a linear relationship with an increased risk of a mildly reduced eGFR, with the highest quartile group (TG: 108–150 mg/dl [1.22–1.70 mmol/L]) having a significantly increased risk after adjusting for the above factors. Conclusions Triglyceride levels are closely associated with a mildly reduced eGFR in subjects with normal serum lipid levels. Dyslipidemia with lower TG levels could be used as new diagnostic criteria for subjects with mildly reduced renal function. PMID:25275610

  18. High prevalence of signs of renal damage despite normal renal function in a cohort of HIV-infected patients: evaluation of associated factors.

    PubMed

    Bonjoch, Anna; Juega, Javier; Puig, Jordi; Pérez-Alvarez, Nuria; Aiestarán, Aintzane; Echeverría, Patricia; Pérez, Vanessa; Clotet, Bonaventura; Romero, Ramon; Bonet, Josep; Negredo, Eugenia

    2014-10-01

    Renal disorders are an emerging problem in HIV-infected patients. We performed a cross-sectional study of the first 1000 HIV-infected patients attended at our HIV unit who agreed to participate. We determined the frequency of renal alterations and its related risk factors. Summary statistics and logistic regression were applied. The study sample comprised 970 patients with complete data. Most were white (94%) and men (76%). Median (IQR) age was 48 (42-53) years. Hypertension was diagnosed in 19%, dyslipidemia in 27%, and diabetes mellitus in 3%. According to the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD EPI) equation, 29 patients (3%) had an eGFR<60?ml/min/1.73?m(2); 18 of them (62%) presented altered albumin/creatinine and protein/creatinine (UPC or UAC) ratios. Of the patients with eGFR>60?mL/min, it was present in 293 (30%), 38 of whom (7.1%) had UPC>300?mg/g. Increased risk of renal abnormalities was correlated with hypertension (OR, 1.821 [95%CI, 1.292;2.564]; p=0.001), age (OR, 1.015 [95%CI, 1.001;1.030], per one year; p=0.040), and use of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) plus protease inhibitor (PI), (OR, 1.401 [95%CI, 1.078;1.821]; p=0.012). Current CD4 cell count was a protective factor (OR, 0.9995 [95%CI, 0.9991;0.9999], per one cell; p=0.035). A considerable proportion of patients presented altered UPC or UAC ratios, despite having an eGFR>60?mL/min. CD4 cell count was a protective factor; age, hypertension, and use of TDF plus PIs were risk factors for renal abnormalities. Based on our results, screen of renal abnormalities should be considered in all HIV-infected patients to detect these alterations early. PMID:25238104

  19. Documentation of renal glomerular and tubular impairment and glomerular hyperfiltration in multitransfused patients with beta thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Deveci, Burak; Kurtoglu, Aysegul; Kurtoglu, Erdal; Salim, Ozan; Toptas, Tayfur

    2016-02-01

    Urinary albumin to creatinine (ACR) and beta2 microglobulin to creatinine ratios (BCR) are the surrogate and robust markers of renal glomerulopathy and tubulopathy, respectively. These markers predict short-term renal deterioration and mortality in various conditions. We aimed to assess the frequency and predictors of glomerular and tubular defects, renal impairment, and hyperfiltration in 96 adult patients with beta thalassemia intermedia and major. ACR?>?300 mg/g creatinine and BCR?>?300 ?g/g creatinine were used to define the renal glomerular and tubular damages, respectively. Glomerular filtration rate (eGFRcreat) was estimated according to 2009 the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Decreased eGFRcreat was defined as less than 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Renal glomerular and/or tubular defects were observed in about 68.8 % of all patients. Forty percent of patients had glomerular hyperfiltration. None of the patients had a decreased eGFRcreat. T2* value ?20 msec on cardiac magnetic resonance (cMR) was the only independent predictor of glomerular damage (p?=?0.013). Use of alendronate was associated with less renal tubular damage (p?=?0.007). Female gender and previous history of splenectomy were the independent predictors of glomerular hyperfiltration in multivariate analysis (p?

  20. Long-Term Follow-Up of Proteinuria and Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in HIV-Infected Patients with Tubular Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Peyriere, Hélène; Cournil, Amandine; Casanova, Marie-Laure; Badiou, Stéphanie; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Reynes, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this prospective observational study was to describe the evolution of tubular proteinuria detected in HIV-infected patients, and to evaluate the impact of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) discontinuation. Methods Proteinuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were followed during a median duration of 32 months, in 81 HIV-infected patients with tubular proteinuria and eGFR ? 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 (determined using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology (CKD-EPI) Collaboration equation). Tubular proteinuria was defined by urine protein to creatinine ratio (uPCR) ?200 mg/g and albumin to protein ratio (uAPR) <0.4. Results Twenty per cent of patients had persistence of tubular proteinuria: TDF continuation was the main factor associated with this persistence [OR 9.0; 95%CI: 1.9–41.4; p = 0.01]. Among the 23 patients who discontinued TDF, uPCR returned below the threshold of 200 mg/g in 11 patients. Overall, eGFR decreased with a mean rate of decline of 3.8 ml/min/1.73m2/year. The decline in eGFR was lesser after discontinuation of TDF (5.8 ml/min/1.73m2/year during TDF exposure versus 3 ml/min/1.73m2/year after TDF discontinuation; p = 0.01). Conclusions The continuation of TDF was the main factor associated with the persistence of proteinuria. Moreover, proteinuria was normalized in only half of the patients who discontinued TDF. The clinical significance of TDF-related low level of proteinuria as a factor associated with renal disease progression and bone loss remains poorly understood. PMID:26571117

  1. THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN RENAL FUNCTION BIOMARKERS AND SUBCLINICAL CARDIOVASCULAR MEASURES IN AFRICAN CARIBBEAN FAMILIES

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Kuipers, AL; Kammerer, CM; Bunker, CH; Kuller, LH; Miljkovic, I; Patrick, AL; Wheeler, VW; Zmuda, JM

    2014-01-01

    Background Risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality are increased in people with subclinical CVD. The impact of ethnicity and race on subclinical CVD is substantial. Previous studies assessed the heritability of several renal function biomarkers and their relationship with subclinical CVD among populations of European ancestries, but no such data is available in African ancestry populations. Objective Our aim was to investigate the relationships between renal function biomarkers and subclinical CVD among Afro-Caribbeans residing on the island of Tobago. Design and Methods 402 participants aged 18 to 103 years from 7 large, multi-generation pedigrees (average family size: 50; range: 19 to 96; ~3500 relative pairs) were included in this study. Subclinical cardiovascular disease (SCVD) was assessed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Serum cystatin C, creatinine, and eGFR based on the CKD-EPI (Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration) equation were used to assess kidney function. The variance component approach, implemented in Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines (SOLAR), was used to assess heritability of these traits, and association with SCVD. Results Heritability of renal function biomarkers ranged from .19–.32 (all P< .001), and was highest for cystatin C (h2=.32, p<.0001). Serum cystatin C was independently associated with arterial stiffness (P=.04). This association was not found with other renal function biomarkers. No significant association between renal function and IMT was found. Conclusion Our data suggest that cystatin C is significantly heritable and associated with arterial stiffness among Afro-Caribbeans. PMID:24392614

  2. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy Resources, (5) Hydrogen Technology Learning Centers, (6) Fossil Energy, and (7) Rebuild America.

  3. The Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    Petermann, Nils

    2006-03-31

    The Efficient Windows Collaborative (EWC) is a coalition of manufacturers, component suppliers, government agencies, research institutions, and others who partner to expand the market for energy efficient window products. Funded through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, the EWC provides education, communication and outreach in order to transform the residential window market to 70% energy efficient products by 2005. Implementation of the EWC is managed by the Alliance to Save Energy, with support from the University of Minnesota and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  4. Advances in Collaborative Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Yehuda; Bell, Robert

    The collaborative filtering (CF) approach to recommenders has recently enjoyed much interest and progress. The fact that it played a central role within the recently completed Netflix competition has contributed to its popularity. This chapter surveys the recent progress in the field. Matrix factorization techniques, which became a first choice for implementing CF, are described together with recent innovations. We also describe several extensions that bring competitive accuracy into neighborhood methods, which used to dominate the field. The chapter demonstrates how to utilize temporal models and implicit feedback to extend models accuracy. In passing, we include detailed descriptions of some the central methods developed for tackling the challenge of the Netflix Prize competition.

  5. Kinetic energy equations for the average-passage equation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Important kinetic energy equations derived from the average-passage equation sets are documented, with a view to their interrelationships. These kinetic equations may be used for closing the average-passage equations. The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation used is formed by subtracting the mean kinetic energy equation from the averaged total instantaneous kinetic energy equation. The aperiodic kinetic energy equation, averaged steady kinetic energy equation, averaged unsteady kinetic energy equation, and periodic kinetic energy equation, are also treated.

  6. Collaborative editing within the pervasive collaborative computing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Marcia; Agarwal, Deb

    2003-09-11

    Scientific collaborations are established for a wide variety of tasks for which several communication modes are necessary, including messaging, file-sharing, and collaborative editing. In this position paper, we describe our work on the Pervasive Collaborative Computing Environment (PCCE) which aims to facilitate scientific collaboration within widely distributed environments. The PCCE provides a persistent space in which collaborators can locate each other, exchange messages synchronously and asynchronously and archive conversations. Our current interest is in exploring research and development of shared editing systems with the goal of integrating this technology into the PCCE. We hope to inspire discussion of technology solutions for an integrated approach to synchronous and asynchronous communication and collaborative editing.

  7. Generalized viscoelastic wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanghua

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a generalized wave equation which unifies viscoelastic and pure elastic cases into a single wave equation. In the generalized wave equation, the degree of viscoelasticity varies between zero and unity, and is defined by a controlling parameter. When this viscoelastic controlling parameter equals to 0, the viscous property vanishes and the generalized wave equation becomes a pure elastic wave equation. When this viscoelastic controlling parameter equals to 1, it is the Stokes equation made up of a stack of pure elastic and Newtonian viscous models. Given this generalized wave equation, an analytical solution is derived explicitly in terms of the attenuation and the velocity dispersion. It is proved that, for any given value of the viscoelastic controlling parameter, the attenuation component of this generalized wave equation perfectly satisfies the power laws of frequency. Since the power laws are the fundamental characteristics in physical observations, this generalized wave equation can well represent seismic wave propagation through subsurface media.

  8. Inferring Mathematical Equations Using Crowdsourcing.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Szymon; Fratczak, Filip; Krzyskow, Jakub; Wulnikowski, Jaroslaw

    2015-01-01

    Crowdsourcing, understood as outsourcing work to a large network of people in the form of an open call, has been utilized successfully many times, including a very interesting concept involving the implementation of computer games with the objective of solving a scientific problem by employing users to play a game-so-called crowdsourced serious games. Our main objective was to verify whether such an approach could be successfully applied to the discovery of mathematical equations that explain experimental data gathered during the observation of a given dynamic system. Moreover, we wanted to compare it with an approach based on artificial intelligence that uses symbolic regression to find such formulae automatically. To achieve this, we designed and implemented an Internet game in which players attempt to design a spaceship representing an equation that models the observed system. The game was designed while considering that it should be easy to use for people without strong mathematical backgrounds. Moreover, we tried to make use of the collective intelligence observed in crowdsourced systems by enabling many players to collaborate on a single solution. The idea was tested on several hundred players playing almost 10,000 games and conducting a user opinion survey. The results prove that the proposed solution has very high potential. The function generated during weeklong tests was almost as precise as the analytical solution of the model of the system and, up to a certain complexity level of the formulae, it explained data better than the solution generated automatically by Eureqa, the leading software application for the implementation of symbolic regression. Moreover, we observed benefits of using crowdsourcing; the chain of consecutive solutions that led to the best solution was obtained by the continuous collaboration of several players. PMID:26713846

  9. Inferring Mathematical Equations Using Crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Crowdsourcing, understood as outsourcing work to a large network of people in the form of an open call, has been utilized successfully many times, including a very interesting concept involving the implementation of computer games with the objective of solving a scientific problem by employing users to play a game—so-called crowdsourced serious games. Our main objective was to verify whether such an approach could be successfully applied to the discovery of mathematical equations that explain experimental data gathered during the observation of a given dynamic system. Moreover, we wanted to compare it with an approach based on artificial intelligence that uses symbolic regression to find such formulae automatically. To achieve this, we designed and implemented an Internet game in which players attempt to design a spaceship representing an equation that models the observed system. The game was designed while considering that it should be easy to use for people without strong mathematical backgrounds. Moreover, we tried to make use of the collective intelligence observed in crowdsourced systems by enabling many players to collaborate on a single solution. The idea was tested on several hundred players playing almost 10,000 games and conducting a user opinion survey. The results prove that the proposed solution has very high potential. The function generated during weeklong tests was almost as precise as the analytical solution of the model of the system and, up to a certain complexity level of the formulae, it explained data better than the solution generated automatically by Eureqa, the leading software application for the implementation of symbolic regression. Moreover, we observed benefits of using crowdsourcing; the chain of consecutive solutions that led to the best solution was obtained by the continuous collaboration of several players. PMID:26713846

  10. Collaborative research: a community approach.

    PubMed

    Woods, S S; Jensen, L B; Schulz, P; Barnason, S; Graham, J; Rasmussen, D; Carder, B; Wild, M C

    2000-01-01

    Collaborative nursing research is an effective means to increase research productivity. The essentials of collaborative research are contribution, communication, commitment, consensus, compatibility, and a cohesive approach toward a positive outcome. The purpose of the demonstration project was to describe a collaborative process in one community, culminating in a research utilization study and development of nursing standards pertaining to an aggregate population of patients. PMID:11188458

  11. Single wall penetration equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Five single plate penetration equations are compared for accuracy and effectiveness. These five equations are two well-known equations (Fish-Summers and Schmidt-Holsapple), two equations developed by the Apollo project (Rockwell and Johnson Space Center (JSC), and one recently revised from JSC (Cour-Palais). They were derived from test results, with velocities ranging up to 8 km/s. Microsoft Excel software was used to construct a spreadsheet to calculate the diameters and masses of projectiles for various velocities, varying the material properties of both projectile and target for the five single plate penetration equations. The results were plotted on diameter versus velocity graphs for ballistic and spallation limits using Cricket Graph software, for velocities ranging from 2 to 15 km/s defined for the orbital debris. First, these equations were compared to each other, then each equation was compared with various aluminum projectile densities. Finally, these equations were compared with test results performed at JSC for the Marshall Space Flight Center. These equations predict a wide variety of projectile diameters at a given velocity. Thus, it is very difficult to choose the 'right' prediction equation. The thickness of a single plate could have a large variation by choosing a different penetration equation. Even though all five equations are empirically developed with various materials, especially for aluminum alloys, one cannot be confident in the shield design with the predictions obtained by the penetration equations without verifying by tests.

  12. Supporting collaborative computing and interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Deborah; McParland, Charles; Perry, Marcia

    2002-05-22

    To enable collaboration on the daily tasks involved in scientific research, collaborative frameworks should provide lightweight and ubiquitous components that support a wide variety of interaction modes. We envision a collaborative environment as one that provides a persistent space within which participants can locate each other, exchange synchronous and asynchronous messages, share documents and applications, share workflow, and hold videoconferences. We are developing the Pervasive Collaborative Computing Environment (PCCE) as such an environment. The PCCE will provide integrated tools to support shared computing and task control and monitoring. This paper describes the PCCE and the rationale for its design.

  13. Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program started in 1966 and conducted epidemiologic research to quantify the potential adverse effects of prescription drugs, utilizing in-hospital monitoring.

  14. Measuring and estimating GFR and treatment effect in ADPKD patients: results and implications of a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ruggenenti, Piero; Gaspari, Flavio; Cannata, Antonio; Carrara, Fabiola; Cella, Claudia; Ferrari, Silvia; Stucchi, Nadia; Prandini, Silvia; Ene-Iordache, Bogdan; Diadei, Olimpia; Perico, Norberto; Ondei, Patrizia; Pisani, Antonio; Buongiorno, Erasmo; Messa, Piergiorgio; Dugo, Mauro; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Trials failed to demonstrate protective effects of investigational treatments on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) reduction in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD). To assess whether above findings were explained by unreliable GFR estimates, in this academic study we compared GFR values centrally measured by iohexol plasma clearance with corresponding values estimated by Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-Epi) and abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (aMDRD) formulas in ADPKD patients retrieved from four clinical trials run by a Clinical Research Center and five Nephrology Units in Italy. Measured baseline GFRs and one-year GFR changes averaged 78.6±26.7 and 8.4±10.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in 111 and 71 ADPKD patients, respectively. CKD-Epi significantly overestimated and aMDRD underestimated baseline GFRs. Less than half estimates deviated by <10% from measured values. One-year estimated GFR changes did not detect measured changes. Both formulas underestimated GFR changes by 50%. Less than 9% of estimates deviated <10% from measured changes. Extent of deviations even exceeded that of measured one-year GFR changes. In ADPKD, prediction formulas unreliably estimate actual GFR values and fail to detect their changes over time. Direct kidney function measurements by appropriate techniques are needed to adequately evaluate treatment effects in clinics and research. PMID:22393413

  15. Collaborative Resource Allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Wax, Allan; Lam, Raymond; Baldwin, John; Borden, Chester

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative Resource Allocation Networking Environment (CRANE) Version 0.5 is a prototype created to prove the newest concept of using a distributed environment to schedule Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna times in a collaborative fashion. This program is for all space-flight and terrestrial science project users and DSN schedulers to perform scheduling activities and conflict resolution, both synchronously and asynchronously. Project schedulers can, for the first time, participate directly in scheduling their tracking times into the official DSN schedule, and negotiate directly with other projects in an integrated scheduling system. A master schedule covers long-range, mid-range, near-real-time, and real-time scheduling time frames all in one, rather than the current method of separate functions that are supported by different processes and tools. CRANE also provides private workspaces (both dynamic and static), data sharing, scenario management, user control, rapid messaging (based on Java Message Service), data/time synchronization, workflow management, notification (including emails), conflict checking, and a linkage to a schedule generation engine. The data structure with corresponding database design combines object trees with multiple associated mortal instances and relational database to provide unprecedented traceability and simplify the existing DSN XML schedule representation. These technologies are used to provide traceability, schedule negotiation, conflict resolution, and load forecasting from real-time operations to long-range loading analysis up to 20 years in the future. CRANE includes a database, a stored procedure layer, an agent-based middle tier, a Web service wrapper, a Windows Integrated Analysis Environment (IAE), a Java application, and a Web page interface.

  16. Collaborative Beamfocusing Radio (COBRA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Jeremy P.; Hsu, Mark J.; Smith, David; Husain, Anis

    2013-05-01

    A Ziva team has recently demonstrated a novel technique called Collaborative Beamfocusing Radios (COBRA) which enables an ad-hoc collection of distributed commercial off-the-shelf software defined radios to coherently align and beamform to a remote radio. COBRA promises to operate even in high multipath and non-line-of-sight environments as well as mobile applications without resorting to computationally expensive closed loop techniques that are currently unable to operate with significant movement. COBRA exploits two key technologies to achieve coherent beamforming. The first is Time Reversal (TR) which compensates for multipath and automatically discovers the optimal spatio-temporal matched filter to enable peak signal gains (up to 20 dB) and diffraction-limited focusing at the intended receiver in NLOS and severe multipath environments. The second is time-aligned buffering which enables TR to synchronize distributed transmitters into a collaborative array. This time alignment algorithm avoids causality violations through the use of reciprocal buffering. Preserving spatio-temporal reciprocity through the TR capture and retransmission process achieves coherent alignment across multiple radios at ~GHz carriers using only standard quartz-oscillators. COBRA has been demonstrated in the lab, aligning two off-the-shelf software defined radios over-the-air to an accuracy of better than 2 degrees of carrier alignment at 450 MHz. The COBRA algorithms are lightweight, with computation in 5 ms on a smartphone class microprocessor. COBRA also has low start-up latency, achieving high accuracy from a cold-start in 30 ms. The COBRA technique opens up a large number of new capabilities in communications, and electronic warfare including selective spatial jamming, geolocation and anti-geolocation.

  17. Reflections on Chemical Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Mel

    1981-01-01

    The issue of how much emphasis balancing chemical equations should have in an introductory chemistry course is discussed. The current heavy emphasis on finishing such equations is viewed as misplaced. (MP)

  18. Interpretation of Bernoulli's Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Robert P.; Schwaneberg, Rolf

    1994-01-01

    Discusses Bernoulli's equation with regards to: horizontal flow of incompressible fluids, change of height of incompressible fluids, gases, liquids and gases, and viscous fluids. Provides an interpretation, properties, terminology, and applications of Bernoulli's equation. (MVL)

  19. The HotQCD Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Soltz, R A

    2009-08-13

    We present results from recent calculations of the QCD equation of state by the HotQCD Collaboration and review the implications for hydrodynamic modeling. The equation of state of QCD at zero baryon density was calculated on a lattice of dimensions 32{sup 3} x 8 with m{sub l} = 0.1 m{sub s} (corresponding to a pion mass of {approx}220 MeV) using two improved staggered fermion actions, p4 and asqtad. Calculations were performed along lines of constant physics using more than 100M cpu-hours on BG/L supercomputers at LLNL, NYBlue, and SDSC. We present parameterizations of the equation of state suitable for input into hydrodynamics models of heavy ion collisions.

  20. Global and Local Collaborators: A Study of Scientific Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pao, Miranda Lee

    1992-01-01

    Describes an empirical study that was conducted to examine the relationship among scientific co-authorship (i.e., collaboration), research funding, and productivity. Bibliographic records from the MEDLINE database that used the subject heading for schistosomiasis are analyzed, global and local collaborators are discussed, and scientific…

  1. Make the Move from Collaboration to Data-Driven Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzzeo, Toni

    2008-01-01

    In data-driven collaboration, the teacher and library media specialist (LMS) have a prolonged and interdependent relationship as they do in all collaboration. Units and projects are team-planned, team-taught, and team-assessed. The partners share goals, have carefully defined roles in the process, and plan comprehensively based on the results of…

  2. Exploiting Publication Contents and Collaboration Networks for Collaborator Recommendation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangjie; Jiang, Huizhen; Yang, Zhuo; Xu, Zhenzhen; Xia, Feng; Tolba, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to the proliferation of online social networks, it has become conventional for researchers to communicate and collaborate with each other. Meanwhile, one critical challenge arises, that is, how to find the most relevant and potential collaborators for each researcher? In this work, we propose a novel collaborator recommendation model called CCRec, which combines the information on researchers' publications and collaboration network to generate better recommendation. In order to effectively identify the most potential collaborators for researchers, we adopt a topic clustering model to identify the academic domains, as well as a random walk model to compute researchers' feature vectors. Using DBLP datasets, we conduct benchmarking experiments to examine the performance of CCRec. The experimental results show that CCRec outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision, recall and F1 score. PMID:26849682

  3. Exploiting Publication Contents and Collaboration Networks for Collaborator Recommendation

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangjie; Jiang, Huizhen; Yang, Zhuo; Xu, Zhenzhen; Xia, Feng; Tolba, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to the proliferation of online social networks, it has become conventional for researchers to communicate and collaborate with each other. Meanwhile, one critical challenge arises, that is, how to find the most relevant and potential collaborators for each researcher? In this work, we propose a novel collaborator recommendation model called CCRec, which combines the information on researchers’ publications and collaboration network to generate better recommendation. In order to effectively identify the most potential collaborators for researchers, we adopt a topic clustering model to identify the academic domains, as well as a random walk model to compute researchers’ feature vectors. Using DBLP datasets, we conduct benchmarking experiments to examine the performance of CCRec. The experimental results show that CCRec outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision, recall and F1 score. PMID:26849682

  4. The Pendulum Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the pendulum equation [theta] + [lambda][squared] sin [theta] = 0 and two approximations for it. On the one hand, we suggest that the third and fifth-order Taylor series approximations for sin [theta] do not yield very good differential equations to approximate the solution of the pendulum equation unless the initial conditions are…

  5. Extended Hill equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhong Jin; Yao, Jie

    1990-10-01

    If J(z) is a periodic even function of z with period ?, the equation d 2u(z)/dz2 + J(z)u(z) = 0 is Hill's equation. The solution is obtained to an extended Hill equation where J(z) is a periodic real function of z, using Floquet's method.

  6. The Pendulum Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the pendulum equation [theta] + [lambda][squared] sin [theta] = 0 and two approximations for it. On the one hand, we suggest that the third and fifth-order Taylor series approximations for sin [theta] do not yield very good differential equations to approximate the solution of the pendulum equation unless the initial conditions are


  7. A Comparison of IRT Equating and Beta 4 Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Dong-In; Brennan, Robert; Kolen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Four equating methods (3PL true score equating, 3PL observed score equating, beta 4 true score equating, and beta 4 observed score equating) were compared using four equating criteria: first-order equity (FOE), second-order equity (SOE), conditional-mean-squared-error (CMSE) difference, and the equi-percentile equating property. True score…

  8. English Language Learner Engineering Collaborative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendergraft, Katy; Daugherty, Michael K.; Rossetti, Charles

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to develop an engineering design project that would deliver the necessary content and reach out to the English Language Learner (ELL) community, faculty in the Engineering Academy at Springdale High School in Springdale, Arkansas instituted the ELL Engineering Collaborative. The ELL Engineering Collaborative has four primary goals…

  9. Illinois: Child Care Collaboration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Care Collaboration Program promotes collaboration between child care and other early care and education providers, including Early Head Start (EHS), by creating policies to ease blending of funds to extend the day or year of existing services. While no funding is provided through the initiative, participating programs may take


  10. Collaborative Writing: Online versus Frontal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passig, David; Schwartz, Gali

    2007-01-01

    Students in higher education, most frequently, use the frontal approach while being asked to collaborate on a writing assignment. However, the difficulty in collaborative writing using conventional technologies such as pen and paper, board or computer is the limited ability to view the work of your peers during the process (Baeker, Glass,…

  11. Collaborative Relationships in Evaluation Consulting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maack, Stephen C.; Upton, Jan

    2006-01-01

    People are often driven to become "independent" as part of the desire to go out on their own. Independent evaluation consultants, however, frequently collaborate with others on evaluation projects. This chapter explores such collaborative relationships from both sides: those leading evaluations with subcontracted consultants and those who work as


  12. Community Collaboration for Inquiry Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Cherry; Kearley, Donna; Byerly, Gayla; Ramin, Lilly

    2014-01-01

    Synergy may be defined as the collaboration between two or more parties to produce a combined effect greater than the sum of their separate parts. That is exactly what happened in Denton, Texas, when all types of librarians collaborated on a community reading initiative. In 2007 Denton Reads--a One Book, One Community organization--was formed with


  13. Job Migration: A Collaborative Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers often change jobs several times during their careers. Reasons for job changes vary, but regardless, these changes bring a different set of challenges. Sharing knowledge and learning are part and parcel of collaboration. So what if, as education professionals, music teachers decided to collaborate during job migrations? For all music…

  14. The Web Resource Collaboration Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Joanna C.

    2004-01-01

    The Web Resource Collaboration Center (WRCC) is a web-based tool developed to help software engineers build their own web-based learning and performance support systems. Designed using various online communication and collaboration technologies, the WRCC enables people to: (1) build a learning and professional development resource that provides…

  15. Accounting Experiences in Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmond, Tracie; Tiggeman, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses incorporating collaborative learning into accounting classes as a response to the Accounting Education Change Commission's call to install a more active student learner in the classroom. Collaborative learning requires the students to interact with each other and with the material within the classroom setting. It is a…

  16. Children's Views of Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnard, Sandra; Sharp, John

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative learning is a widely used and popular strategy in many primary schools. In this article, the authors review the nature and purpose of collaborative learning and present a summary of how one small group of Year 5/6 children view its effectiveness. (Contains 3 tables.)

  17. Knowledge Convergence and Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Heisawn; Chi, Michelene T. H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper operationalized the notion of knowledge convergence and assessed quantitatively how much knowledge convergence occurred during collaborative learning. Knowledge convergence was defined as an increase in common knowledge where common knowledge referred to the knowledge that all collaborating partners had. Twenty pairs of college students


  18. Collaborating To Teach Prosocial Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsopp, David H.; Santos, Karen E.; Linn, Reid

    2000-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative prosocial skills program. Steps of the intervention include forming teams of educators, targeting necessary prosocial skills, developing an instructional plan, determining the setting and collaborative roles, delivery instruction, and providing opportunities for student practice, reinforcement, and…

  19. Collaborative interactive visualization: exploratory concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, Marielle; Lavigne, Valérie; Drolet, Frédéric

    2015-05-01

    Dealing with an ever increasing amount of data is a challenge that military intelligence analysts or team of analysts face day to day. Increased individual and collective comprehension goes through collaboration between people. Better is the collaboration, better will be the comprehension. Nowadays, various technologies support and enhance collaboration by allowing people to connect and collaborate in settings as varied as across mobile devices, over networked computers, display walls, tabletop surfaces, to name just a few. A powerful collaboration system includes traditional and multimodal visualization features to achieve effective human communication. Interactive visualization strengthens collaboration because this approach is conducive to incrementally building a mental assessment of the data meaning. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the envisioned collaboration architecture and the interactive visualization concepts underlying the Sensemaking Support System prototype developed to support analysts in the context of the Joint Intelligence Collection and Analysis Capability project at DRDC Valcartier. It presents the current version of the architecture, discusses future capabilities to help analyst(s) in the accomplishment of their tasks and finally recommends collaboration and visualization technologies allowing to go a step further both as individual and as a team.

  20. Designing Electronic Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschner, Paul; Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Kreijns, Karel; Beers, Pieter Jelle

    2004-01-01

    Electronic collaborative learning environments for learning and working are in vogue. Designers design them according to their own constructivist interpretations of what collaborative learning is and what it should achieve. Educators employ them with different educational approaches and in diverse situations to achieve different ends. Students use…

  1. Collaborative Learning as Professional Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuland, Mary Phyllis Alkire

    A study explored the nature of collaborative learning as a method to prepare future nurses for collaboration in health care. Qualitative research data collection and analysis methods were used. A constant comparative method occurred during and after the data were gathered. Semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and document review were the…

  2. A Model of Transformative Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Ann L.; Triscari, Jacqlyn S.

    2011-01-01

    Two collaborative writing partners sought to deepen their understanding of transformative learning by conducting several spirals of grounded theory research on their own collaborative relationship. Drawing from adult education, business, and social science literature and including descriptive analysis of their records of activity and interaction…

  3. Ethical issues surrounding interprofessional collaboration.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2013-10-01

    Global healthcare and health disciplines' education policy and position statements contain mandates for education that incorporates interprofessional collaboration. One of the popular educational technologies involves virtual simulation as tools for educating future generations of healthcare professionals. This article discusses potential ethical implications for interprofessional collaboration from a humanbecoming lens of understanding. PMID:24085666

  4. Collaborative Research and Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christianakis, Mary

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author explores how collaborative teacher research can reposition teachers to be powerful stakeholders and policymakers rather than skilled technicians and implementers. She begins with a brief review of the historical antecedents to collaborative teacher research in order to detail how teachers and their allies have fought…

  5. Job Migration: A Collaborative Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers often change jobs several times during their careers. Reasons for job changes vary, but regardless, these changes bring a different set of challenges. Sharing knowledge and learning are part and parcel of collaboration. So what if, as education professionals, music teachers decided to collaborate during job migrations? For all music


  6. Web-based collaboration tools.

    PubMed

    Wink, Diane M

    2009-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes Web-based collaboration tools and techniques to increase their effectiveness. PMID:19901730

  7. Knowledge Convergence and Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Heisawn; Chi, Michelene T. H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper operationalized the notion of knowledge convergence and assessed quantitatively how much knowledge convergence occurred during collaborative learning. Knowledge convergence was defined as an increase in common knowledge where common knowledge referred to the knowledge that all collaborating partners had. Twenty pairs of college students…

  8. Wikis and Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Binbin; Niiya, Melissa; Warschauer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    While collaborative learning and collaborative writing can be of great value to student learning, the implementation of a technology-supported collaborative learning environment is a challenge. With their built-in features for supporting collaborative writing and social communication, wikis are a promising platform for collaborative learning;…

  9. Collaboration Scripts--A Conceptual Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollar, Ingo; Fischer, Frank; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual analysis of collaboration scripts used in face-to-face and computer-mediated collaborative learning. Collaboration scripts are scaffolds that aim to improve collaboration through structuring the interactive processes between two or more learning partners. Collaboration scripts consist of at least five components:…

  10. Wikis and Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Binbin; Niiya, Melissa; Warschauer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    While collaborative learning and collaborative writing can be of great value to student learning, the implementation of a technology-supported collaborative learning environment is a challenge. With their built-in features for supporting collaborative writing and social communication, wikis are a promising platform for collaborative learning;


  11. Consistency equation hierarchy in single-field inflation models

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes, Marina; Liddle, Andrew R.

    2006-04-15

    Inflationary consistency equations relate the scalar and tensor perturbations. We elucidate the infinite hierarchy of consistency equations of single-field inflation, the first of which is the well-known relation A{sub T}{sup 2}/A{sub S}{sup 2}=-n{sub T}/2 between the amplitudes and the tensor spectral index. We write a general expression for all consistency equations both to first and second order in the slow-roll expansion. We discuss the relation to other consistency equations that have appeared in the literature, demonstrating in particular that the approximate consistency equation recently introduced by Chung and collaborators is equivalent to the second consistency equation of Lidsey et al. (1997)

  12. Collaborative space surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang; Pham, Khanh D.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents a space-based, space-surveillance study wherein the goal is to demonstrate the feasibility and scalability of the modeling and simulation of a distributed multi-agent multiple satellites tracking and prediction system. A flexible and modular system architecture that enables collaborative and efficient teaming among distributed agents is delineated. Hierarchical objective methodology is deployed to align the mission objectives with the diverse agents' capabilities and resources. A set of satellite platform and sensor configuration/models is considered. Detailed mathematical models of the satellite orbits including the mutual visibility function are simulated for combinations of GEO and LEO orbits. An Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF)/Distributed Unscented Information Filter (DUIF) for high-accuracy orbital determination and tracking is demonstrated to show that the LEO orbit estimation from the GEO satellite with only angle measurements based on UKF is an excellent approach. Simulation studies show that the rate of filter convergence depends on sample time period, initial error, process error, measurement errors as well as the relative geometry of the LEO and GEO satellite orbits.

  13. A collaborative wheelchair system.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Teo, Chee Leong; Rebsamen, Brice; Burdet, Etienne

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes a novel robotic wheelchair, and reports experiments to evaluate its efficiency and understand how human operators use it. The concept at the heart of the collaborative wheelchair assistant (CWA) is to rely on the user's motion planning skills while assisting the maneuvering with flexible path guidance. The user decides where to go and controls the speed (including start and stop), while the system guides the wheelchair along software-defined guide paths. An intuitive path editor allows the user to avoid dangers or obstacles online and to modify the guide paths at will. By using the human sensory and planning systems, no complex sensor processing or artificial decision system is needed, making the system safe, simple, and low-cost. We investigated the performance of the CWA on its interaction with able-bodied subjects and motion efficiency. The results show that path guidance drastically simplifies the control. Using the CWA, the wheelchair user needs little effort from the first trial, while moving efficiently with a conventional wheelchair requires adaptation. PMID:18403284

  14. Canadian family physicians' decision to collaborate: age, period and cohort effects.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Sisira; Devlin, Rose Anne; Thind, Amardeep; Chu, Man-Kee

    2012-11-01

    One of the core primary care reform initiatives seen across provinces in Canada is the introduction of inter-professional primary healthcare teams in which family physicians are encouraged to collaborate with other health professionals. Although a higher proportion of physicians are collaborating with various health professionals now compared to the previous decade, a substantial number of physicians still do not work in a collaborative setting. The objective of this paper is to examine the age, period and cohort effects of Canadian family physicians' decisions to collaborate with seven types of health professionals: specialists, nurse practitioners, nurses, dieticians, physiotherapists, psychologists and occupational therapists. To this end, this paper employs a multivariate probit model consisting of seven equations and a cross-classified fixed-effects strategy to explain the collaborative decisions of family physicians. Utilizing three cross-sectional physician surveys from Canada over the 2001-2007 period, cohorts are defined over five-year intervals according to their year of graduation from medical school. We find that newer cohorts of physicians are more likely to collaborate with dieticians, physiotherapists, psychologists and occupational therapists; newer female cohorts are more likely to collaborate with nurses while newer male cohorts are less likely to collaborate with nurses but more likely to collaborate with specialists. Older physicians are more likely to collaborate with specialists, physiotherapists, psychologists, and occupational therapists; the age effect for nurses is U-shaped for male physicians while it is inverse U-shaped for females. Family physicians are collaborating more with all seven health professionals in 2004 and 2007 compared to 2001. Belonging to a group practice has a largely positive influence on collaborations; and being paid by a fee-for-service remuneration scheme exerts a negative influence on collaboration, ceteris paribus. The findings suggest that combining a non-fee-for-service remuneration arrangement with a group practice structure would facilitate effective collaboration. PMID:22898720

  15. Adaptation in Collaborative Governance Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  16. Adaptation in collaborative governance regimes.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program. PMID:25073764

  17. Fractional chemotaxis diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Langlands, T A M; Henry, B I

    2010-05-01

    We introduce mesoscopic and macroscopic model equations of chemotaxis with anomalous subdiffusion for modeling chemically directed transport of biological organisms in changing chemical environments with diffusion hindered by traps or macromolecular crowding. The mesoscopic models are formulated using continuous time random walk equations and the macroscopic models are formulated with fractional order differential equations. Different models are proposed depending on the timing of the chemotactic forcing. Generalizations of the models to include linear reaction dynamics are also derived. Finally a Monte Carlo method for simulating anomalous subdiffusion with chemotaxis is introduced and simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the model equations. The model equations developed here could be used to replace Keller-Segel type equations in biological systems with transport hindered by traps, macromolecular crowding or other obstacles. PMID:20866180

  18. Fractional chemotaxis diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlands, T. A. M.; Henry, B. I.

    2010-05-01

    We introduce mesoscopic and macroscopic model equations of chemotaxis with anomalous subdiffusion for modeling chemically directed transport of biological organisms in changing chemical environments with diffusion hindered by traps or macromolecular crowding. The mesoscopic models are formulated using continuous time random walk equations and the macroscopic models are formulated with fractional order differential equations. Different models are proposed depending on the timing of the chemotactic forcing. Generalizations of the models to include linear reaction dynamics are also derived. Finally a Monte Carlo method for simulating anomalous subdiffusion with chemotaxis is introduced and simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the model equations. The model equations developed here could be used to replace Keller-Segel type equations in biological systems with transport hindered by traps, macromolecular crowding or other obstacles.

  19. Asynchronous Online Collaboration as a Flexible Learning Activity and an Authentic Assessment Method in an Undergraduate Mathematics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallet, Dann G.

    2008-01-01

    Online collaboration exercises were used as part of a diverse assessment package for an undergraduate differential equations course. Online collaboration served as a highly effective method for promoting and assessing generic graduate capabilities such as writing in a context-relevant manner and the development of self-awareness with regard to…

  20. Research: the bridge to collaboration.

    PubMed

    Reeb, R M; Rogers, B P; Richardson, B

    1992-01-01

    A faculty-staff research fair was used by a school of nursing and university hospital at a large Southern medical center as a way of promoting collaboration between nursing education and service. The end results were these: a nurse-theorist "room" in the school of nursing; development of collaborative studies; subsequent presentation of posters originally prepared for the fair at 12 local, 13 state, six regional, and three national meetings. The overwhelming positive response by participants verified that research could serve as a natural bridge to promote collaboration between research, education, and service. PMID:1589043

  1. Informatics for neglected diseases collaborations.

    PubMed

    Bost, Frederic; Jacobs, Robert T; Kowalczyk, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Many different public and private organizations from across the globe are collaborating on neglected diseases drug-discovery and development projects with the aim of identifying a cure for tropical infectious diseases. These neglected diseases collaborations require a global, secure, multi-organization data-management solution, combined with a platform that facilitates communication and supports collaborative work. This review discusses the solutions offered by 'Software as a Service' (SaaS) web-based platforms, despite notable challenges, and the evolution of these platforms required to foster efficient virtual research efforts by geographically dispersed scientists. PMID:20443162

  2. Solvable Hill equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casperson, L. W.

    1984-11-01

    The equation with a composite periodic function introduced by Mathieu (1868) is the only Hill equation that has been previously solved in terms of elementary functions (Smith, 1963). It is shown here that another Hill equation having a two-parameter continuous periodic function is also solvable analytically. As an illustration, the results are applied to the problem of an electron in a one-dimensional periodic potential.

  3. Generalized spin precession equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöckmann, Hans-Jürgen; Dubbers, Dirk

    2014-05-01

    The Bloch equations, which describe spin precession and relaxation in external magnetic fields, can be generalized to include the evolution of polarization tensors of various ranks in arbitrary multipole fields. We show applications of the generalized spin precession equations using simple examples from atomic, nuclear and condensed matter physics, and compare the various approaches found in the literature. The derivation of the generalized Bloch equations can be considerably simplified using a particular bra-ket notation for irreducible tensors.

  4. Solving Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Initial-value ordinary differential equation solution via variable order Adams method (SIVA/DIVA) package is collection of subroutines for solution of nonstiff ordinary differential equations. There are versions for single-precision and double-precision arithmetic. Requires fewer evaluations of derivatives than other variable-order Adams predictor/ corrector methods. Option for direct integration of second-order equations makes integration of trajectory problems significantly more efficient. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  5. What Makes a Chemical Equation an Equation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fensham, Peter J.; Lui, Julia

    2001-01-01

    Explores how well chemistry graduates preparing for teaching can recognize the similarities and differences between the uses of the word "equation" in mathematics and in chemistry. Reports that the conservation similarities were much less frequently recognized than those involved in the creation of new entities. (Author/MM)

  6. Octonic Gravitational Field Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Süleyman; Tani?li, Murat; Tolan, Tülay

    2013-08-01

    Generalized field equations of linear gravity are formulated on the basis of octons. When compared to the other eight-component noncommutative hypercomplex number systems, it is demonstrated that associative octons with scalar, pseudoscalar, pseudovector and vector values present a convenient and capable tool to describe the Maxwell-Proca-like field equations of gravitoelectromagnetism in a compact and simple way. Introducing massive graviton and gravitomagnetic monopole terms, the generalized gravitational wave equation and Klein-Gordon equation for linear gravity are also developed.

  7. Interdisciplinary Educational Collaborations: Chemistry and Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Ronald S.; Woo, Daniel T.; Hudson, Benjamin T.; Mori, Joji C.; Ngan, Evey S. M.; Pak, Wing-Yee

    2007-01-01

    Research collaborations between chemists and other scientists resulted in significant outcomes such as development of software. Such collaboration provided a realistic learning experience for computer science students.

  8. COLLABORATION ON NHEERL EPIDEMIOLOGY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task will continue ORD's efforts to develop a biologically plausible, quantitative health risk model for particulate matter (PM) based on epidemiological, toxicological, and mechanistic studies using matched exposure assessments. The NERL, in collaboration with the NHEERL, ...

  9. COLLABORATIONS AND SPECIALIZED CLIENT INTERACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this task is to improve our understanding of atmospheric modeling research applications through collaborations with the international air pollution community and to demonstrate the applicability of our AQ models for their utility through technical applications by clie...

  10. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Update (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.

    2013-10-01

    This presentation was given at the Sandia Reliability Workshop in August 2013 and provides information on current statistics, a status update, next steps, and other reliability research and development activities related to the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative.

  11. Data Dissemination and International Collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukahori, T.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Kondev, F. G.; Kratz, K.-L.; McLane, V.; Nichols, A. L.; Nouri, A.; Schwerer, O.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Winchell, D. F.

    2005-05-01

    Results from a panel discussion on Data Dissemination (Nuclear Data Web Sites and Publications, Nuclear Astrophysics) and International Collaborations (NRDC, NSDD, and WPEC) are presented. Challenges and exciting new developments in these areas are discussed.

  12. Data dissemination and international collaborations.

    SciTech Connect

    Kondev, F. G.; Fukahori, T.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Kratz, K. L.; McLan, V.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Winchell, D. F.; Nichols, A. L.; Schwerer, O.; Nouri, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering; Univ. of Mainz; BNL; IAEA; NEA

    2005-01-01

    Results from a panel discussion on Data Dissemination (Nuclear Data Web Sites and Publications, Nuclear Astrophysics) and International Collaborations (NRDC, NSDD, and WPEC) are presented. Challenges and exciting new developments in these areas are discussed.

  13. Data Dissemination and International Collaborations

    SciTech Connect

    Fukahori, T.; Ignatyuk, A.V.; Kondev, F.G.; Kratz, K.-L.; McLane, V.; Sonzogni, A.A.; Winchell, D.F.; Nichols, A.L.; Schwerer, O.; Nouri, A.

    2005-05-24

    Results from a panel discussion on Data Dissemination (Nuclear Data Web Sites and Publications, Nuclear Astrophysics) and International Collaborations (NRDC, NSDD, and WPEC) are presented. Challenges and exciting new developments in these areas are discussed.

  14. [Collaboration between academia and companies].

    PubMed

    Ueda, Minoru

    2008-05-01

    Recently the collaboration between academia and company has been recommended by the government and more than 1,000 venture companies have established since 2001. Indeed this situation caused the researchers active, on the other side many undesirable troubles has been increasing among researches in the university. In this paper the cause of these troubles related to the collaboration between academia and company has been analyzed and proposed the possible solutions for the problems. PMID:18464523

  15. University-Industry Research Collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Charles

    2000-03-01

    University-industry research collaborations take many forms. Perhaps the simplest is unsponsored one-on-one collaborations between individuals. A more formal but less intimate arrangement is industrial sponsorship of individual or collective work on campus, e.g., via an outright gift or membership in an industrial affiliates consortium. A more intimate institutional collaboration is a mutually sanctioned joint project, sponsored by either a governmental funding agency or an industrial entity, the terms and conditions of which (funds flows, reports, intellectual property ownership, etc.) are governed by formal arrangements. Partnerships, e.g., support of an on-campus joint venture funded in part by one or more firms and in part by a third party, are the most intimate and complex form of such collaborations. During the past two decades Xerox has engaged in all four forms of collaborations. I give examples of each, and indicate the attributes which distinguish the more successful from the less successful collaborations, as well as recent trends in their nature and purposes.

  16. Are you a collaborative leader?

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Herminia; Hansen, Morten T

    2011-01-01

    Social media and technologies have put connectivity on steroids and made collaboration more integral to business than ever. But without the right leadership, collaboration can go astray. Employees who try to collaborate on everything may wind up stuck in endless meetings, struggling to reach agreement. On the other side of the coin, executives who came of age during the heyday of "command and control" management can have trouble adjusting their style to fit the new realities. In their research on top-performing CEOs, Insead professors Ibarra and Hansen have examined what it takes to be a collaborative leader. They've found that it requires connecting people and ideas outside an organization to those inside it, leveraging diverse talent, modeling collaborative behavior at the top, and showing a strong hand to keep teams from getting mired in debate. In this article, they describe tactics that executives from Akamai, GE, Reckitt Benckiser, and other firms use in those four areas and how they foster high-performance collaborative cultures in their organizations. PMID:21800471

  17. Developing Structural Equation Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacker, Randall E.

    1993-01-01

    Structural equation models merge multiple regression, path analysis, and factor analysis techniques into a single data analytic framework. Measurement models are developed to define latent variables, and structural equations are then established among the latent variables. Explains the development of these models. (KS)

  18. Neutrino quantum kinetic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Neutrinos propagate in astrophysical and cosmological environments modifying their flavor in intriguing ways. The study of neutrino propagation in media is based on the mean-field, extended mean-field and Boltzmann equations. We summarize salient features of these evolution equations and the methods employed so far to derive them. We emphasize applications to situations of observational interest.

  19. Reduced Braginskii equations

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, M.; Horton, W.

    1993-11-01

    A set of reduced Braginskii equations is derived without assuming flute ordering and the Boussinesq approximation. These model equations conserve the physical energy. It is crucial at finite {beta} that we solve the perpendicular component of Ohm`s law to conserve the physical energy while ensuring the relation {del} {center_dot} j = 0.

  20. Maxwellians and the Remaking of Maxwell's Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Bruce

    2012-02-01

    Although James Clerk Maxwell first formulated his theory of the electromagnetic field in the early 1860s, it went through important changes before it gained general acceptance in the 1890s. Those changes were largely the work of a group of younger physicists, the Maxwellians, led by G. F. FitzGerald in Ireland, Oliver Lodge and Oliver Heaviside in England, and Heinrich Hertz in Germany. Together, they extended, refined, tested, and confirmed Maxwell's theory, and recast it into the set of four vector equations known ever since as ``Maxwell's equations.'' By tracing how the Maxwellians remade and disseminated Maxwell's theory between the late 1870s and the mid-1890s, we can gain a clearer understanding not just of how the electromagnetic field was understood at the end of the 19th century, but of the collaborative nature of work at the frontiers of physics.

  1. Determination of the best method to estimate glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine in adult patients with sickle cell disease: a prospective observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) leads to tissue hypoxia resulting in chronic organ dysfunction including SCD associated nephropathy. The goal of our study was to determine the best equation to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in SCD adult patients. Methods We conducted a prospective observational cohort study. Since 2007, all adult SCD patients in steady state, followed in two medical departments, have had their GFR measured using iohexol plasma clearance (gold standard). The Cockcroft-Gault, MDRD-v4, CKP-EPI and finally, MDRD and CKD-EPI equations without adjustment for ethnicity were tested to estimate GFR from serum creatinine. Estimated GFRs were compared to measured GFRs according to the graphical Bland and Altman method. Results Sixty-four SCD patients (16 men, median age 27.5 years [range 18.0-67.5], 41 with SS-genotype were studied. They were Sub-Saharan Africa and French West Indies natives and predominantly lean (median body mass index: 22 kg/m2 [16-33]). Hyperfiltration (defined as measured GFR >110 mL/min/1.73 m2) was detected in 53.1% of patients. Urinary albumin/creatinine ratio was higher in patients with hyperfiltration than in patients with normal GFR (4.05 mg/mmol [0.14-60] versus 0.4 mg/mmol [0.7-81], p = 0.01). The CKD-EPI equation without adjustment for ethnicity had both the lowest bias and the greatest precision. Differences between estimated GFRs using the CKP-EPI equation and measured GFRs decreased with increasing GFR values, whereas it increased with the Cockcroft-Gault and MDRD-v4 equations. Conclusions We confirm that SCD patients have a high rate of glomerular hyperfiltration, which is frequently associated with microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria. In non-Afro-American SCD patients, the best method for estimating GFR from serum creatinine is the CKD-EPI equation without adjustment for ethnicity. This equation is particularly accurate to estimate high GFR values, including glomerular hyperfiltration, and thus should be recommended to screen SCD adult patients at high risk for SCD nephropathy. PMID:22866669

  2. The Effective Equation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksin, Sergei; Maiocchi, Alberto

    In this chapter we present a general method of constructing the effective equation which describes the behavior of small-amplitude solutions for a nonlinear PDE in finite volume, provided that the linear part of the equation is a hamiltonian system with a pure imaginary discrete spectrum. The effective equation is obtained by retaining only the resonant terms of the nonlinearity (which may be hamiltonian, or may be not); the assertion that it describes the limiting behavior of small-amplitude solutions is a rigorous mathematical theorem. In particular, the method applies to the three- and four-wave systems. We demonstrate that different possible types of energy transport are covered by this method, depending on whether the set of resonances splits into finite clusters (this happens, e.g. in case of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation), or is connected (this happens, e.g. in the case of the NLS equation if the space-dimension is at least two). For equations of the first type the energy transition to high frequencies does not hold, while for equations of the second type it may take place. Our method applies to various weakly nonlinear wave systems, appearing in plasma, meteorology and oceanography.

  3. Nonlinear gyrokinetic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, D.H.E.; Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.; Lee, W.W.

    1983-03-01

    Nonlinear gyrokinetic equations are derived from a systematic Hamiltonian theory. The derivation employs Lie transforms and a noncanonical perturbation theory first used by Littlejohn for the simpler problem of asymptotically small gyroradius. For definiteness, we emphasize the limit of electrostatic fluctuations in slab geometry; however, there is a straight-forward generalization to arbitrary field geometry and electromagnetic perturbations. An energy invariant for the nonlinear system is derived, and various of its limits are considered. The weak turbulence theory of the equations is examined. In particular, the wave kinetic equation of Galeev and Sagdeev is derived from an asystematic truncation of the equations, implying that this equation fails to consider all gyrokinetic effects. The equations are simplified for the case of small but finite gyroradius and put in a form suitable for efficient computer simulation. Although it is possible to derive the Terry-Horton and Hasegawa-Mima equations as limiting cases of our theory, several new nonlinear terms absent from conventional theories appear and are discussed.

  4. Volterra difference equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Nasrin

    This dissertation consists of five papers in which discrete Volterra equations of different types and orders are studied and results regarding the behavior of their solutions are established. The first paper presents some fundamental results about subexponential sequences. It also illustrates the subexponential solutions of scalar linear Volterra sum-difference equations are asymptotically stable. The exact value of the rate of convergence of asymptotically stable solutions is found by determining the asymptotic behavior of the transient renewal equations. The study of subexponential solutions is also continued in the second and third articles. The second paper investigates the same equation using the same process as considered in the first paper. The discussion focuses on a positive lower bound of the rate of convergence of the asymptotically stable solutions. The third paper addresses the rate of convergence of the solutions of scalar linear Volterra sum-difference equations with delay. The result is proved by developing the rate of convergence of transient renewal delay difference equations. The fourth paper discusses the existence of bounded solutions on an unbounded domain of more general nonlinear Volterra sum-difference equations using the Schaefer fixed point theorem and the Lyapunov direct method. The fifth paper examines the asymptotic behavior of nonoscillatory solutions of higher-order integro-dynamic equations and establishes some new criteria based on so-called time scales, which unifies and extends both discrete and continuous mathematical analysis. Beside these five research papers that focus on discrete Volterra equations, this dissertation also contains an introduction, a section on difference calculus, a section on time scales calculus, and a conclusion.

  5. Assessment of (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strijbos, J. -W.

    2011-01-01

    Within the (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning (CS)CL research community, there has been an extensive dialogue on theories and perspectives on learning from collaboration, approaches to scaffold (script) the collaborative process, and most recently research methodology. In contrast, the issue of assessment of collaborative learning has…

  6. Recommending Research Profiles for Multidisciplinary Academic Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunawardena, Sidath Deepal

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates how data on multidisciplinary collaborative experiences can be used to solve a novel problem: recommending research profiles of potential collaborators to academic researchers seeking to engage in multidisciplinary research collaboration. As the current domain theories of multidisciplinary collaboration are insufficient…

  7. Collaboration for Diverse Learners: Viewpoints and Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risko, Victoria J., Ed.; Bromley, Karen, Ed.

    This book suggests that a solution to schools' lack of comprehensive literacy programs may be found through innovations in collaborative decision making about curriculum and instruction. It provides analyses of collaborative efforts, multiple ways to think about collaboration and its implementation, and examples of collaborative projects. After an


  8. Recommending Research Profiles for Multidisciplinary Academic Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunawardena, Sidath Deepal

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates how data on multidisciplinary collaborative experiences can be used to solve a novel problem: recommending research profiles of potential collaborators to academic researchers seeking to engage in multidisciplinary research collaboration. As the current domain theories of multidisciplinary collaboration are insufficient


  9. Evaluating Collaboration for Effectiveness: Conceptualization and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marek, Lydia I.; Brock, Donna-Jean P.; Savla, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Although collaboration is recognized as an effective means to address multifaceted community issues, successful collaboration is difficult to achieve and failure is prevalent. To effectively collaborate, collaborators must recognize the strengths and weaknesses within their own efforts. Using Mattessich and colleagues' work as a springboard,…

  10. Evaluating Collaboration for Effectiveness: Conceptualization and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marek, Lydia I.; Brock, Donna-Jean P.; Savla, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Although collaboration is recognized as an effective means to address multifaceted community issues, successful collaboration is difficult to achieve and failure is prevalent. To effectively collaborate, collaborators must recognize the strengths and weaknesses within their own efforts. Using Mattessich and colleagues' work as a springboard,


  11. Schrödinger equation revisited

    PubMed Central

    Schleich, Wolfgang P.; Greenberger, Daniel M.; Kobe, Donald H.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2013-01-01

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is a cornerstone of quantum physics and governs all phenomena of the microscopic world. However, despite its importance, its origin is still not widely appreciated and properly understood. We obtain the Schrödinger equation from a mathematical identity by a slight generalization of the formulation of classical statistical mechanics based on the Hamilton–Jacobi equation. This approach brings out most clearly the fact that the linearity of quantum mechanics is intimately connected to the strong coupling between the amplitude and phase of a quantum wave. PMID:23509260

  12. Schrödinger equation revisited.

    PubMed

    Schleich, Wolfgang P; Greenberger, Daniel M; Kobe, Donald H; Scully, Marlan O

    2013-04-01

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is a cornerstone of quantum physics and governs all phenomena of the microscopic world. However, despite its importance, its origin is still not widely appreciated and properly understood. We obtain the Schrödinger equation from a mathematical identity by a slight generalization of the formulation of classical statistical mechanics based on the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. This approach brings out most clearly the fact that the linearity of quantum mechanics is intimately connected to the strong coupling between the amplitude and phase of a quantum wave. PMID:23509260

  13. Stochastic Gauss equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierret, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    We derived the equations of Celestial Mechanics governing the variation of the orbital elements under a stochastic perturbation, thereby generalizing the classical Gauss equations. Explicit formulas are given for the semimajor axis, the eccentricity, the inclination, the longitude of the ascending node, the pericenter angle, and the mean anomaly, which are expressed in term of the angular momentum vector H per unit of mass and the energy E per unit of mass. Together, these formulas are called the stochastic Gauss equations, and they are illustrated numerically on an example from satellite dynamics.

  14. Stochastic Gauss equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierret, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    We derived the equations of Celestial Mechanics governing the variation of the orbital elements under a stochastic perturbation, thereby generalizing the classical Gauss equations. Explicit formulas are given for the semimajor axis, the eccentricity, the inclination, the longitude of the ascending node, the pericenter angle, and the mean anomaly, which are expressed in term of the angular momentum vector H per unit of mass and the energy E per unit of mass. Together, these formulas are called the stochastic Gauss equations, and they are illustrated numerically on an example from satellite dynamics.

  15. Nonlinear ordinary difference equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caughey, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Future space vehicles will be relatively large and flexible, and active control will be necessary to maintain geometrical configuration. While the stresses and strains in these space vehicles are not expected to be excessively large, their cumulative effects will cause significant geometrical nonlinearities to appear in the equations of motion, in addition to the nonlinearities caused by material properties. Since the only effective tool for the analysis of such large complex structures is the digital computer, it will be necessary to gain a better understanding of the nonlinear ordinary difference equations which result from the time discretization of the semidiscrete equations of motion for such structures.

  16. Collaboration platform for design agility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Pratap S.; Kamarthi, Sagar V.; Zeid, Ibrahim

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents a framework for a collaboration platform that facilitates agile design process. The paper specifies the drivers for building such a collaboration platform, identifies its attributes, and proposes the mechanisms for resolving its dilemmas. The primary force that is driving agile product design is the market demand for the 'right products,' which have three attributes: (1) right features, (2) right time to market, and (3) right cost. The success of a company in marketplace is decided by how well it strikes a balance between these three attributes while developing new products. There have been several productivity boosting techniques such as CAD, CAM, CAE tools to assist designers at each stage of product development. However, the total product development process has not benefitted much from them, because of the inherent delays between the stages that account for 30 to 90 percent of the total product development time. An innovative approach, which employs web- based collaboration tools, can offer dramatic improvements in the process of introducing 'right products' into the market. The paper contends that an ideal collaboration platform should enable any designer located anywhere to design products using any CAD and any PDM on any platform. Such a collaboration platform potentially (1) reduces product development time, (2) curtails product development cost, and (3) improves the chances for first to market.

  17. Implicit collaboration of sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Kenneth J.

    2004-08-01

    The concept of goal lattices for the evaluation of potential sensor actions can be used to cause a multiplicity of heterogeneous sensor systems to collaborate. Previously goal lattices have been used to compute the value to a sensor system of taking a particular action in terms of how well that action contributes to the accomplishment of the topmost goals. This assumes that each sensor system is autonomous and only responsible to itself. If the topmost goals of each sensor system's goal lattice has adjoined to it two additional goals, namely "collaboration" and "altruism", then the value system is extended to include servicing requests from other systems. Two aircraft on a common mission can each benefit from measurements taken by the other aircraft either to confirm their own measurements, to create a pseudo-sensor, or to extend the area of coverage. The altruism goal indicates how much weight a sensor management system (SMS) will give in responding to a measurement request from any other system. The collaboration goal indicates how much weight will be given to responding to a measurement request from specific systems which are defined as being part of a collaborating group. By varying the values of the altruism and collaboration goals of each system, either locally or globally, various levels of implicit cooperation among sensor systems can be caused to emerge.

  18. Collaborative explanation and biological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Melinda Bonnie

    2015-08-01

    This paper motivates and outlines a new account of scientific explanation, which I term 'collaborative explanation.' My approach is pluralist: I do not claim that all scientific explanations are collaborative, but only that some important scientific explanations are-notably those of complex organic processes like development. Collaborative explanation is closely related to what philosophers of biology term 'mechanistic explanation' (e.g., Machamer et al., Craver, 2007). I begin with minimal conditions for mechanisms: complexity, causality, and multilevel structure. Different accounts of mechanistic explanation interpret and prioritize these conditions in different ways. This framework reveals two distinct varieties of mechanistic explanation: causal and constitutive. The two have heretofore been conflated, with philosophical discussion focusing on the former. This paper addresses the imbalance, using a case study of modeling practices in Systems Biology to reveals key features of constitutive mechanistic explanation. I then propose an analysis of this variety of mechanistic explanation, in terms of collaborative concepts, and sketch the outlines of a general theory of collaborative explanation. I conclude with some reflections on the connection between this variety of explanation and social aspects of scientific practice. PMID:26193789

  19. Therapeutic alliance and collaborative interactions.

    PubMed

    Ponsi, M

    2000-08-01

    Since its original formulation the concept of therapeutic alliance has remained basically bound to the ego-psychology model. After a first phase of heated debate about its clinical utility and its theoretical foundation, interest in this concept has waned. Even though it refers to a relational dimension it plays a minor role in the contemporary relational trend in psychoanalysis. Starting from the premise that the concept of therapeutic alliance has made a distinctive contribution to the psychoanalytic theory of technique, the author addresses the issue of the interactive dimension involved in the regulation of the collaborative relationship, focusing on some aspects of patient-analyst interactions aimed at fostering the collaborative process. These, illustrated with clinical material, concern: (1) the use of analytic method, considered as an object shared by the patient and the analyst, (2) the existence of different levels in the collaborative relationship, (3) the analysis of the pragmatic meaning of verbal communication as a tool for constructing collaborative interactions. By shifting her attention from the symbolic content of words to the pragmatic meaning of discourse--the author highlights the continuity between fostering the collaborative relationship in the course of proper interpretive activity and dealing with it directly by non-interpretive interventions. PMID:11028234

  20. Gender differences in collaboration patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaohan; Duch, Jordi; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Radicchi, Filippo; Ribeiro, Haroldo V.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Amaral, Luis A. N.

    2014-03-01

    Collaboration plays an increasingly important role in research productivity and impact. However, it remains unclear whether female and male researchers in science, technology, engineering and mathematical (STEM) disciplines differ significantly from each other in their collaboration propensity. Here, we report on an empirical analysis of the complete publication records of 3,920 faculty members in six STEM disciplines at selected top U.S. research universities. We find that while female faculty have significantly fewer co-authors over their careers, this can be fully explained by their lower number of publications. Indeed, we also find that females tend to distribute their co-authoring opportunities among their co-authors more evenly than males do. Our results suggest that females have had a greater propensity to collaborate, in order to succeed in a historically men-dominated academic world. Surprisingly, we find evidence that in molecular biology there has been a gender segregation within sub-disciplines. Female faculty in molecular biology departments tend to collaborate with smaller teams and publish in journals and fields where typical team size is smaller. Our results identify gender-specific collaborative behaviors as well as disciplines with distinct patterns. The authors thank the support from the following grants: NSF SBE 0624318, NSF IIS 0830388, and Spanish DGICYT under project FIS2010-18639.

  1. Equations For Rotary Transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, Phil M.; Wiktor, Peter J.; Marchetto, Carl A.

    1988-01-01

    Equations derived for input impedance, input power, and ratio of secondary current to primary current of rotary transformer. Used for quick analysis of transformer designs. Circuit model commonly used in textbooks on theory of ac circuits.

  2. SIMULTANEOUS DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION COMPUTER

    DOEpatents

    Collier, D.M.; Meeks, L.A.; Palmer, J.P.

    1960-05-10

    A description is given for an electronic simulator for a system of simultaneous differential equations, including nonlinear equations. As a specific example, a homogeneous nuclear reactor system including a reactor fluid, heat exchanger, and a steam boiler may be simulated, with the nonlinearity resulting from a consideration of temperature effects taken into account. The simulator includes three operational amplifiers, a multiplier, appropriate potential sources, and interconnecting R-C networks.

  3. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  4. Hypoallometric scaling in international collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiehchen, David; Espinoza, Magdalena; Hsieh, Antony

    2016-02-01

    Collaboration is a vital process and dominant theme in knowledge production, although the effectiveness of policies directed at promoting multinational research remains ambiguous. We examined approximately 24 million research articles published over four decades and demonstrated that the scaling of international publications to research productivity for each country obeys a universal and conserved sublinear power law. Inefficient mechanisms in transborder team dynamics or organization as well as increasing opportunity costs may contribute to the disproportionate growth of international collaboration rates with increasing productivity among nations. Given the constrained growth of international relationships, our findings advocate a greater emphasis on the qualitative aspects of collaborations, such as with whom partnerships are forged, particularly when assessing research and policy outcomes.

  5. Team Collaboration: Lessons Learned Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arterberrie, Rhonda Y.; Eubanks, Steven W.; Kay, Dennis R.; Prahst, Stephen E.; Wenner, David P.

    2005-01-01

    An Agency team collaboration pilot was conducted from July 2002 until June 2003 and then extended for an additional year. The objective of the pilot was to assess the value of collaboration tools and adoption processes as applied to NASA teams. In an effort to share knowledge and experiences, the lessons that have been learned thus far are documented in this report. Overall, the pilot has been successful. An entire system has been piloted - tools, adoption, and support. The pilot consisted of two collaboration tools, a team space and a virtual team meeting capability. Of the two tools that were evaluated, the team meeting tool has been more widely accepted. Though the team space tool has been met with a lesser degree of acceptance, the need for such a tool in the NASA environment has been evidenced. Both adoption techniques and support were carefully developed and implemented in a way that has been well received by the pilot participant community.

  6. Collaborating Virtually: Using "Second Life" to Teach Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Lynnette; Withers, Lesley A.; Sherblom, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-User Virtual Environment (MUVE), such as Second Life (SL), can serve as important pedagogical tools that provide students and faculty members with unique opportunities for online group collaboration. Specifically, MUVEs provide an experience that, due to the visual component offered by the technology, helps students feel more connection and…

  7. Improving Virtual Team Collaboration Outcomes through Collaboration Process Structuring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittman, Dawn R.; Hawkes, Mark; Deokar, Amit V.; Sarnikar, Surendra

    2010-01-01

    The ability to collaborate in a virtual team is a necessary skill set for today's knowledge workers and students to be effective in their work. Past research indicates that knowledge workers and students need to establish a formal process to perform work, develop clear goals and objectives, and facilitate better communication among team members.


  8. Improving Virtual Team Collaboration Outcomes through Collaboration Process Structuring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittman, Dawn R.; Hawkes, Mark; Deokar, Amit V.; Sarnikar, Surendra

    2010-01-01

    The ability to collaborate in a virtual team is a necessary skill set for today's knowledge workers and students to be effective in their work. Past research indicates that knowledge workers and students need to establish a formal process to perform work, develop clear goals and objectives, and facilitate better communication among team members.…

  9. Monitoring Collaborative Activities in Computer Supported Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persico, Donatella; Pozzi, Francesca; Sarti, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring the learning process in computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments is a key element for supporting the efficacy of tutor actions. This article proposes an approach for analysing learning processes in a CSCL environment to support tutors in their monitoring tasks. The approach entails tracking the interactions within


  10. Why Does Collaboration Work? Linking Positive Psychology and Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conoley, Jane Close; Conoley, Collie Wyatt

    2010-01-01

    Authors in this special issue edited by Cook and Friend provide analyses of many important relationships within a school: teacher to teacher; teacher to paraprofessional, educators, and home caregivers; and whole-building systems. Their focus on collaboration prompted these authors to reflect on a possible theoretical mechanism behind the success…

  11. School-Based Collaboration: An Introduction to the Collaboration Column

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, Kimberly J.

    2008-01-01

    The need for school-based collaboration has increased over the past decade, and with mandates from the 2004 Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) and the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001, this need will continue. The IDEIA requires that students with disabilities have access to the general education curriculum and…

  12. Texas Solar Collaboration Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Winland, Chris

    2013-02-14

    Texas Solar Collaboration Permitting and Interconenction Process Improvement Action Plan. San Antonio-specific; Investigate feasibility of using electronic signatures; Investigate feasibility of enabling other online permitting processes (e.g., commercial); Assess need for future document management and workflow/notification IT improvements; Update Information Bulletin 153 regarding City requirements and processes for PV; Educate contractors and public on CPS Energy’s new 2013 solar program processes; Continue to discuss “downtown grid” interconnection issues and identify potential solutions; Consider renaming Distributed Energy Resources (DER); and Continue to participate in collaborative actions.

  13. Introducing Chemical Formulae and Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Chris; Rowell, Jack

    1979-01-01

    Discusses when the writing of chemical formula and equations can be introduced in the school science curriculum. Also presents ways in which formulae and equations learning can be aided and some examples for balancing and interpreting equations. (HM)

  14. The Bernoulli-Poiseuille Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badeer, Henry S.; Synolakis, Costas E.

    1989-01-01

    Describes Bernoulli's equation and Poiseuille's equation for fluid dynamics. Discusses the application of the combined Bernoulli-Poiseuille equation in real flows, such as viscous flows under gravity and acceleration. (YP)

  15. Drama: An Interdisciplinary, Collaborative Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomas, Linda

    Teaching drama gave one instructor a chance to renew herself, and drama became an important part of a personal teaching renaissance. An elective class for grade 12 entitled "Humanities and the Arts" offered opportunity for collaborative teaching with colleagues in their areas of expertise. In a class on "Modern Drama" designed for honors students,…

  16. Collaborative Action Research: Historical Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smulyan, Lisa

    This paper presents a historical overview of the use of action research in education and describes the basic assumptions and expectations that continue to characterize collaborative research projects today. Action research was initiated in the 1930's by Kurt Lewin and adapted by educators in the 1940's. Interest in action research declined between…

  17. Actor Interdependence in Collaborative Telelearning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasson, Barbara; Bourdeau, Jacqueline

    This paper presents a model of collaborative telelearning and describes how coordination theory has provided a framework for the analysis of actor (inter)dependencies in this scenario. The model is intended to inform the instructional design of learning scenarios, the technological design of the telelearning environment, and the design of…

  18. Assessments That Promote Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watanabe, Maika; Evans, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses assessments that can be used to help encourage a collaborative classroom community, in which students help one another learn mathematics. The authors describe participation quizzes and explanation quizzes as assessment tools that encourage students to work together, share specific questions on challenging mathematics…

  19. The Community Collaboration Stakeholder Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Renee Guarriello

    2010-01-01

    Today's increasingly complex and diverse world demands 21st century communication skills to solve community and social justice problems. Interorganizational collaboration is at the heart of much community activism, such as that focused on solving environmental disputes, eradicating racially discriminating real estate practices, and bringing early…

  20. Blueprints for a Collaborative Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This book provides guidelines and suggested activities for collaborative learning for elementary grade students with a variety of abilities and disabilities. It is based on experiences at the Developmental Studies Center (Oakland, California). Activities are presented as blueprint formats that provide a comprehensive set of structures which can be…

  1. International Collaboration in Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bertram S., Ed.; Torrey, E. Fuller, Ed.

    Presented in five parts on research, services, training, drug abuse, and alcohol abuse are 31 reports of mental health studies and programs supported by the U.S. and other countries. Explained in the introduction are reasons the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has supported international collaboration. The following are among subjects


  2. Collaborative Learning in Engineering Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, Sigrin

    1990-01-01

    Described is a capstone experience for undergraduate biomedical engineering students in which student teams work with children and adults with cerebral palsy to produce devices that make their lives easier or more enjoyable. The collaborative approach, benefits to the clients, and evaluation of the projects are discussed. (CW)

  3. Collaborative Test Reviews: Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Anuradha; Makela, Carole J.

    2010-01-01

    A group study method proved helpful in improving senior-level students' performance on unit tests through collaborative learning. Students of a History of Textiles course voluntarily attended study sessions to review course content and prepare for unit tests. The students who attended the group reviews scored better on tests than those who did


  4. Library Collaboration Aids Global Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, G. J.; Howard, A. L.; Sommer, S.

    2005-12-01

    In the geosciences, organizational libraries and information centers are local sources for scientists, students, and members of the general public who are searching for current or historic information in their fields. They offer focused collections, rare materials, and knowledgeable librarians, but often issues caused by isolation and limited resources impede their ability to fulfill the researchers' needs. Unlike the local university libraries, these small special information centers are usually housed in the same building as their scientists' offices. To help overcome these problems of limited resources and isolation, while retaining the organizational focus and unique collections that are its strengths, the National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Information Center has begun to collaborate with similar libraries and information centers. This project has three major steps: 1. Catalog sharing through internet-based links. 2. Resource sharing. 3. Expansion of collaboration. NSIDC is creating catalog links with a sister library, the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) Information Center. Once the links are established, the two libraries will develop a plan for resource sharing and coordinated purchasing. This small collaborative effort will serve as a template for a network of special libraries within Colorado. Ultimately, they hope to expand the collaborative effort to small libraries with a similar focus around the globe. This poster will outline and graphically illustrate these steps, as well as provide a template for future expansion of the project.

  5. Collaborative Teaching: Reaping the Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Betty; Schaible, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    Guidelines for collaborative, interdisciplinary teaching at the college level are presented, including: restricting the team to two members, in general; agreeing on a trial period; selecting a coteacher with a healthy psyche; selecting course content fertile for interdisciplinary learning; discussing teaching philosophy and methods; reviewing


  6. Mapping the Collaborative Research Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochanek, Julie Reed; Scholz, Carrie; Garcia, Alicia N.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant federal investments in the production of high-quality education research, the direct use of that research in policy and practice is not evident. Some education researchers are increasingly employing collaborative research models that use structures and processes to integrate practitioners into the research process in an effort


  7. Collaborative Yearlong Teaching Experience (CYTE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deich, Randee

    This report describes the Collaborative Yearlong Teaching Experience (CYTE), an extensive 1-year internship program that promotes a coaching/mentoring model of preservice education and professional job-embedded staff development in Broward County, Florida. This student teacher program is intended to help preservice teachers meet the demands of the…

  8. Assessments That Promote Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watanabe, Maika; Evans, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses assessments that can be used to help encourage a collaborative classroom community, in which students help one another learn mathematics. The authors describe participation quizzes and explanation quizzes as assessment tools that encourage students to work together, share specific questions on challenging mathematics


  9. Dinner at Abigail's: Nurturing Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grumet, Madeleine R.

    1989-01-01

    Responsible education reform requires teachers to collaborate and break out of the many types of isolation imposed on them, as successfully evidenced by teachers at Mynderse Academy, New York. Teacher isolation affects the knowledge they can share with students, because curriculum involves the way the world enters the school. (SM)

  10. Assuring Quality in Collaborative Provision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bocock, Jean; Edwards, Judith

    1998-01-01

    This bulletin is intended to help British further education colleges clarify their rationale for entering into collaborative programs, assess prospective partners, define and implement good practice at all stages of provision, and establish rigorous quality assurance procedures. Following an introduction, Further Education Funding Council


  11. The Funding of Academic Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelau, Demaree K.; Poulin, Russell

    2008-01-01

    To leverage expertise and efficiencies in implementing educational technologies, higher education leaders often create centralized service organizations or inter-institutional partnerships. Defined as "academic collaborations," these organizations foster inter-institutional partnerships that share resources to increase institutional capacity for,


  12. International Collaboration in Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bertram S., Ed.; Torrey, E. Fuller, Ed.

    Presented in five parts on research, services, training, drug abuse, and alcohol abuse are 31 reports of mental health studies and programs supported by the U.S. and other countries. Explained in the introduction are reasons the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has supported international collaboration. The following are among subjects…

  13. Collaborative visualization for military planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Timothy; Butler, Sean

    2001-07-01

    So that a military commander has precise command, control, and planning information available for a given mission, information must be tailored for a particular area of operation, for a specific level of command, and for a specific time period. The commander must be able to quickly understand the information, query related information, and analyze the information in collaboration with others to plan and control a military operation. To provide such tailored information, we envision an environment in which customized agents traverse a diverse, distributed, frequently changing information space to identify relevant data. Once aware of the data, visual interfaces facilitate understanding and navigation. Geographically separated users manipulate a customized view to access a common information framework in which they can interactively collaborate with other users. We propose an architecture for achieving this vision that is well suited to implementation with Jini networking technologies. As a first step toward achieving this architecture we have developed a collaborative visualization framework that enables multiple distributed users to interact using shared visual interface components while simultaneously communicating via a text-based chat window. Our framework provides communications management and messaging support and well-defined Java class interfaces for integrating visualization components. Initial results indicate significant benefits for application development through reuse and extensibility. We achieved interactive performance and synchronized collaboration using JavaSpaces as the underlying distributed technology.

  14. Communication in Collaborative Discovery Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saab, Nadira; van Joolingen, Wouter R.; van Hout-Wolters, Bernadette H. A. M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Constructivist approaches to learning focus on learning environments in which students have the opportunity to construct knowledge themselves, and negotiate this knowledge with others. "Discovery learning" and "collaborative learning" are examples of learning contexts that cater for knowledge construction processes. We introduce a…

  15. Collaboration, Consensus, and "Dissoi Logoi."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Kerri K.; Mead, Dana Gulling

    Noting that the paper might never have been completed if the authors had not used Dissoi Logoi to allow themselves to disagree and converse on paper, this paper suggests that consensus in collaborative writing happens but that forced consensus is a bad influence on imaginative scholars. Written in a "double voice," this paper highlights some…

  16. The Community Collaboration Stakeholder Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Renee Guarriello

    2010-01-01

    Today's increasingly complex and diverse world demands 21st century communication skills to solve community and social justice problems. Interorganizational collaboration is at the heart of much community activism, such as that focused on solving environmental disputes, eradicating racially discriminating real estate practices, and bringing early


  17. Collaborative Stage Manual Part II

    Cancer.gov

    SEER Program Coding and Staging Manual 2004, Revision 1 Appendix C Site-Specific Coding Modules C-299 Collaborative Staging Codes Nasal Cavity C30.0 C30.0 Nasal cavity (excludes nose, NOS C76.0) Note: Laterality must be coded for this site,

  18. Interprofessional Care and Collaborative Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casto, R. Michael; And Others

    This book provides materials for those learning about the dynamics, techniques, and potential of interprofessional collaboration in health care and human services professions. Eight case studies thread their way through most chapters to unify and illustrate the text. Part 1 addresses the theoretical framework that forms the basis for…

  19. Collaborative Leadership and Partnership Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casile, William J.; Davison, Reeny D.

    1998-01-01

    ASSET (Allegheny Schools Science Education and Technology) Inc. is an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to improving science and technology achievement of all Pittsburgh-area students. Program elements include developing and articulating the vision, forming dynamic teams, sustaining collaborative support systems, and maintaining a…

  20. The Contemporary Art of Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Sheridan

    2008-01-01

    Predetermined assessment criteria and target levels threaten to constrain and limit teachers' desire to provide a balanced and innovative curriculum for their pupils. Through the collaborative production of annual installations, the fine art department at Trinity Catholic School has attempted to confound the effects of a comprehensive school's…

  1. Multiage Grouping and Student Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this action research project was to investigate students' social preferences and pro-social interactions in a multiage, high school classroom in order to better understand how to group students to maximize learning and collaboration. According to many educational experts and previous inquiries, mixed-age learning groups introduce…

  2. Flex Your Classroom's Collaborative Muscles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Bonnie

    1999-01-01

    Describes the use of Zebu, a software tool accessed via a standard Web browser that is designed for constructing online collaborative-learning projects, with seventh-grade students. Discusses learning outcomes, student motivation, peer assessment and feedback, and class projects in poetry, social studies, and science. (LRW)

  3. Collaborating with Forms in Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Aileen Pugliese

    2011-01-01

    Taking students outside is a great opportunity to make art. In this article, the author describes how her students collaborated with forms in nature to create their own visual structures to communicate ideas. This lesson can be done on the beach, in a sand box on the school playground, in grassy areas, or nature can even be brought into the…

  4. Communication in Collaborative Discovery Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saab, Nadira; van Joolingen, Wouter R.; van Hout-Wolters, Bernadette H. A. M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Constructivist approaches to learning focus on learning environments in which students have the opportunity to construct knowledge themselves, and negotiate this knowledge with others. "Discovery learning" and "collaborative learning" are examples of learning contexts that cater for knowledge construction processes. We introduce a


  5. Collaborative Test Reviews: Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Anuradha; Makela, Carole J.

    2010-01-01

    A group study method proved helpful in improving senior-level students' performance on unit tests through collaborative learning. Students of a History of Textiles course voluntarily attended study sessions to review course content and prepare for unit tests. The students who attended the group reviews scored better on tests than those who did…

  6. Nonreaders Anonymous: Reading History Collaboratively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the issue of teaching students in the U.S. history survey course to read historical works by shifting the focus from the lecture method to collaborative learning techniques. Describes various techniques that can be used in the classroom such as expert groups, Particulars into Generalizations (PIG), and making lists and evaluative…

  7. Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, June G.

    2002-01-01

    The feature story in this issue, "Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment," focuses on the growing emphasis on teamwork in the workplace. It discusses how the concept of empowering employees in the workplace is evolving and the benefits--faster decision making, lower costs and absenteeism, higher productivity and quality, and increased…

  8. Network-Based Collaborative Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trentin, Guglielmo

    1999-01-01

    Discusses telematics and the use of computer networks to support collaborative education, both among teachers for training and planning and among students in their learning process. Highlights include traditional class groups and groups using computer-mediated communication; teachers' roles; learning circles for teachers; online teacher training;…

  9. Therapists Value of Interprofessional Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vries, Dawn R.

    2012-01-01

    The work of occupational (OT), physical (PT), and recreational therapists (RT), as well as speech- language pathologists (SLP), is interrelated and requires effective teamwork and collaboration to optimize patient outcomes and satisfaction. Literature shows that health care professionals are ill prepared to work in an interprofessional manner due…

  10. Collaboration as an Instructional Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, May; And Others

    A preliminary study examined how collaboration could be successfully incorporated as an instructional strategy in a class of adult learners. The study was conducted in a graduate-level class on technology for teachers. The class was composed of 10 current and preservice teachers. The principal content of the class was how to select, design, and…

  11. Computer-Mediated Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Ken; Nunan, David

    2004-01-01

    The study reported here investigates collaborative learning at the computer. Ten pairs of students were presented with a series of comprehension questions about Mary Shelley's novel "Frankenstein or a Modern Prometheus" along with a CD-ROM, "Frankenstein Illuminated," containing the novel and a variety of source material. Five students worked with…

  12. The concept of collaborative health.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, HĂ„kan

    2010-11-01

    Based on empirical research about teamwork in human service organizations in Sweden, the concept of collaborative health (CH) encapsulates the physical, psychological and social health resources the individual uses in teamwork; resources which at the same time are influenced by the teamwork. My argument built on empirical research leading up to identifying and defining the core concept in this article, is that teamwork affects team members' health and this in turn affects the teamwork and its outcome. In this paper collaborative health is viewed from a social constructionism perspective and discussed in relation to earlier concepts developed in social psychology and working life research, including psychosocial stress and burnout. The paper also introduces the concept of functional synergy, which in this context is defined as the simultaneous presence of sharp goal-orientation and synergy in teamwork. The need for a holistic team theory is emphasized as a tool in research on teamwork. Such a theory relies on identifying sound and illuminating constituent concepts. I suggest that collaborative health could be a useful concept for better understanding the complex collaborative and co-operative teamwork of human service organizations of today. PMID:20807033

  13. Knowledge Management: The Collaboration Thread.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anklam, Patti

    2002-01-01

    Describes the evolution of knowledge management in businesses and in other organizations and discusses explicit knowledge versus tacit knowledge; communities and collaboration; measuring social capital; social network analysis; organizational change; individual and personal change; improving the network; and the next stage of knowledge management.…

  14. Indigenous Continuance: Collaboration and Syncretism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Simon J.

    2011-01-01

    In this keynote address, the author talks about Indigenous peoples who are presently in a dynamic circumstance of constant change that they are facing courageously with creative collaboration and syncretism. In the address, the author speaks "of" an Indigenous consciousness and he speaks "with" an Indigenous consciousness so that Indigenous…

  15. NBII Collaboration with Guyra Paraguay

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    NBII and Guyra Paraguay are collaborating on two biodiversity informatics projects in Paraguay. NBII is providing funding and expertise in metadata, cataloguing, and information delivery. Guyra Paraguay is a small NGO specializing in species and landscape-level conservation. Near 26°34’52&...

  16. Creative Collaborations with Health Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooley, Susan Frelick; Eberst, Richard M.; Bradley, Beverly J.

    2000-01-01

    Many U.S. schools offer a varied, often uncoordinated array of student support services. Improvement-oriented partnerships identified by the American School Health Association include collaborations with school psychologists, physical educators, social workers, and community and public-health agencies; and provision of parent-education and


  17. Stochastic morphological evolution equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloeden, Peter E.; Lorenz, Thomas

    The inadequacy of locally defined set-valued differential equations to describe the evolution of shapes and morphological forms in biology, which are usually neither convex or nondecreasing, was recognised by J.-P. Aubin, who introduced morphological evolution equations, which are essentially nonlocally defined set-valued differential equations with the inclusion vector field also depending on the entire reachable set. This concept is extended here to the stochastic setting of set-valued Itô evolution equations in Hilbert spaces. Due to the nonanticipative nature of Itô calculus, the evolving reachable sets are nonanticipative nonempty closed random sets. The existence of solutions and their dependence on initial data are established. The latter requires the introduction of a time-oriented semi-metric in time-space variables. As a consequence the stochastic morphological evolution equations generate a deterministic nonautonomous dynamical system formulated as a two-parameter semigroup with the complication that the random subsets take values in different spaces at different time instances due to the nonanticipativity requirement. It is also shown how nucleation processes can be handled in this conceptual framework.

  18. Incorporating Brokers within Collaboration Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekar, A.; Moore, R.; de Torcy, A.

    2013-12-01

    A collaboration environment, such as the integrated Rule Oriented Data System (iRODS - http://irods.diceresearch.org), provides interoperability mechanisms for accessing storage systems, authentication systems, messaging systems, information catalogs, networks, and policy engines from a wide variety of clients. The interoperability mechanisms function as brokers, translating actions requested by clients to the protocol required by a specific technology. The iRODS data grid is used to enable collaborative research within hydrology, seismology, earth science, climate, oceanography, plant biology, astronomy, physics, and genomics disciplines. Although each domain has unique resources, data formats, semantics, and protocols, the iRODS system provides a generic framework that is capable of managing collaborative research initiatives that span multiple disciplines. Each interoperability mechanism (broker) is linked to a name space that enables unified access across the heterogeneous systems. The collaboration environment provides not only support for brokers, but also support for virtualization of name spaces for users, files, collections, storage systems, metadata, and policies. The broker enables access to data or information in a remote system using the appropriate protocol, while the collaboration environment provides a uniform naming convention for accessing and manipulating each object. Within the NSF DataNet Federation Consortium project (http://www.datafed.org), three basic types of interoperability mechanisms have been identified and applied: 1) drivers for managing manipulation at the remote resource (such as data subsetting), 2) micro-services that execute the protocol required by the remote resource, and 3) policies for controlling the execution. For example, drivers have been written for manipulating NetCDF and HDF formatted files within THREDDS servers. Micro-services have been written that manage interactions with the CUAHSI data repository, the DataONE information catalog, and the GeoBrain broker. Policies have been written that manage transfer of messages between an iRODS message queue and the Advanced Message Queuing Protocol. Examples of these brokering mechanisms will be presented. The DFC collaboration environment serves as the intermediary between community resources and compute grids, enabling reproducible data-driven research. It is possible to create an analysis workflow that retrieves data subsets from a remote server, assemble the required input files, automate the execution of the workflow, automatically track the provenance of the workflow, and share the input files, workflow, and output files. A collaborator can re-execute a shared workflow, compare results, change input files, and re-execute an analysis.

  19. The open boundary equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederen, D.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Toffolon, M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a new equation describing the hydrodynamics in infinitely long tidal channels (i.e., no reflection) under the influence of oceanic forcing. The proposed equation is a simple relationship between partial derivatives of water level and velocity. It is formally derived for a progressive wave in a frictionless, prismatic, tidal channel with a horizontal bed. Assessment of a large number of numerical simulations, where an open boundary condition is posed at a certain distance landward, suggests that it can also be considered accurate in the more natural case of converging estuaries with nonlinear friction and a bed slope. The equation follows from the open boundary condition and is therefore a part of the problem formulation for an infinite tidal channel. This finding provides a practical tool for evaluating tidal wave dynamics, by reconstructing the temporal variation of the velocity based on local observations of the water level, providing a fully local open boundary condition and allowing for local friction calibration.

  20. Parallel tridiagonal equation solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Three parallel algorithms were compared for the direct solution of tridiagonal linear systems of equations. The algorithms are suitable for computers such as ILLIAC 4 and CDC STAR. For array computers similar to ILLIAC 4, cyclic odd-even reduction has the least operation count for highly structured sets of equations, and recursive doubling has the least count for relatively unstructured sets of equations. Since the difference in operation counts for these two algorithms is not substantial, their relative running times may be more related to overhead operations, which are not measured in this paper. The third algorithm, based on Buneman's Poisson solver, has more arithmetic operations than the others, and appears to be the least favorable. For pipeline computers similar to CDC STAR, cyclic odd-even reduction appears to be the most preferable algorithm for all cases.

  1. Kepler Equation solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    1995-01-01

    Kepler's Equation is solved over the entire range of elliptic motion by a fifth-order refinement of the solution of a cubic equation. This method is not iterative, and requires only four transcendental function evaluations: a square root, a cube root, and two trigonometric functions. The maximum relative error of the algorithm is less than one part in 10(exp 18), exceeding the capability of double-precision computer arithmetic. Roundoff errors in double-precision implementation of the algorithm are addressed, and procedures to avoid them are developed.

  2. The Statistical Drake Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We provide the statistical generalization of the Drake equation. From a simple product of seven positive numbers, the Drake equation is now turned into the product of seven positive random variables. We call this "the Statistical Drake Equation". The mathematical consequences of this transformation are then derived. The proof of our results is based on the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) of Statistics. In loose terms, the CLT states that the sum of any number of independent random variables, each of which may be ARBITRARILY distributed, approaches a Gaussian (i.e. normal) random variable. This is called the Lyapunov Form of the CLT, or the Lindeberg Form of the CLT, depending on the mathematical constraints assumed on the third moments of the various probability distributions. In conclusion, we show that: The new random variable N, yielding the number of communicating civilizations in the Galaxy, follows the LOGNORMAL distribution. Then, as a consequence, the mean value of this lognormal distribution is the ordinary N in the Drake equation. The standard deviation, mode, and all the moments of this lognormal N are also found. The seven factors in the ordinary Drake equation now become seven positive random variables. The probability distribution of each random variable may be ARBITRARY. The CLT in the so-called Lyapunov or Lindeberg forms (that both do not assume the factors to be identically distributed) allows for that. In other words, the CLT "translates" into our statistical Drake equation by allowing an arbitrary probability distribution for each factor. This is both physically realistic and practically very useful, of course. An application of our statistical Drake equation then follows. The (average) DISTANCE between any two neighboring and communicating civilizations in the Galaxy may be shown to be inversely proportional to the cubic root of N. Then, in our approach, this distance becomes a new random variable. We derive the relevant probability density function, apparently previously unknown and dubbed "Maccone distribution" by Paul Davies. DATA ENRICHMENT PRINCIPLE. It should be noticed that ANY positive number of random variables in the Statistical Drake Equation is compatible with the CLT. So, our generalization allows for many more factors to be added in the future as long as more refined scientific knowledge about each factor will be known to the scientists. This capability to make room for more future factors in the statistical Drake equation, we call the "Data Enrichment Principle," and we regard it as the key to more profound future results in the fields of Astrobiology and SETI. Finally, a practical example is given of how our statistical Drake equation works numerically. We work out in detail the case, where each of the seven random variables is uniformly distributed around its own mean value and has a given standard deviation. For instance, the number of stars in the Galaxy is assumed to be uniformly distributed around (say) 350 billions with a standard deviation of (say) 1 billion. Then, the resulting lognormal distribution of N is computed numerically by virtue of a MathCad file that the author has written. This shows that the mean value of the lognormal random variable N is actually of the same order as the classical N given by the ordinary Drake equation, as one might expect from a good statistical generalization.

  3. Evaluating Equating Results: Percent Relative Error for Chained Kernel Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Yanlin; von Davier, Alina A.; Chen, Haiwen

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a method for evaluating equating results. Within the kernel equating framework, the percent relative error (PRE) for chained equipercentile equating was computed under the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design. The method was applied to two data sets to obtain the PRE, which can be used to measure equating…

  4. Learning to Collaborate by Collaborating: A Face-to-Face Collaborative Activity for Measuring and Learning Basics about Teamwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortez, C.; Nussbaum, M.; Woywood, G.; Aravena, R.

    2009-01-01

    In today's fast-changing business environment, teams have emerged as a requirement for business success. However, in schools and universities, students are usually not taught teamwork skills. In this paper, we introduce learning to collaborate by collaborating, a process that enables collaboration and teamwork skills to be taught and measured…

  5. Complex PT-symmetric nonlinear Schrödinger equation and Burgers equation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenya

    2013-04-28

    The complex -symmetric nonlinear wave models have drawn much attention in recent years since the complex -symmetric extensions of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation were presented in 2007. In this review, we focus on the study of the complex -symmetric nonlinear Schrödinger equation and Burgers equation. First of all, we briefly introduce the basic property of complex symmetry. We then report on exact solutions of one- and two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equations (known as the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in Bose-Einstein condensates) with several complex -symmetric potentials. Finally, some complex -symmetric extension principles are used to generate some complex -symmetric nonlinear wave equations starting from both -symmetric (e.g. the KdV equation) and non- -symmetric (e.g. the Burgers equation) nonlinear wave equations. In particular, we discuss exact solutions of some representative ones of the complex -symmetric Burgers equation in detail. PMID:23509385

  6. A Quadratic Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2010-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]


  7. Structural Equation Model Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree…

  8. Equating Practical Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunz, Mary E.; And Others

    This paper describes and illustrates a method for equating examinations with multiple facets (i.e., items, examinees, judges, tasks, and rating scales). The data are from the practical section of two histotechnology certification examinations. The first practical examination involved 210 examinees, 14 judges, 15 slides, 3 tasks, and 2 rating…

  9. Parallel Multigrid Equation Solver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-09-07

    Prometheus is a fully parallel multigrid equation solver for matrices that arise in unstructured grid finite element applications. It includes a geometric and an algebraic multigrid method and has solved problems of up to 76 mullion degrees of feedom, problems in linear elasticity on the ASCI blue pacific and ASCI red machines.

  10. Equation Plotter I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masalski, William J.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a classroom-tested, easy-to-use, multipurpose program (written in Applesoft BASIC) for graphing equations. A complete listing of the program (which is suitable for a wide range of applications in grades 7-12 mathematics classrooms) is included. (JN)

  11. A Quadratic Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2010-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]…

  12. Structural Equation Model Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree


  13. Do Differential Equations Swing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    One of the units of in a standard differential equations course is a discussion of the oscillatory motion of a spring and the associated material on forcing functions and resonance. During the presentation on practical resonance, the instructor may tell students that it is similar to when they take their siblings to the playground and help them on…

  14. Modelling by Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaachoua, Hamid; Saglam, Ayse

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to show the close relation between physics and mathematics taking into account especially the theory of differential equations. By analysing the problems posed by scientists in the seventeenth century, we note that physics is very important for the emergence of this theory. Taking into account this analysis, we show the…

  15. Modelling by Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaachoua, Hamid; Saglam, Ayse

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to show the close relation between physics and mathematics taking into account especially the theory of differential equations. By analysing the problems posed by scientists in the seventeenth century, we note that physics is very important for the emergence of this theory. Taking into account this analysis, we show the


  16. Do Differential Equations Swing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    One of the units of in a standard differential equations course is a discussion of the oscillatory motion of a spring and the associated material on forcing functions and resonance. During the presentation on practical resonance, the instructor may tell students that it is similar to when they take their siblings to the playground and help them on


  17. TREATMENT OF DEPRESSION COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (TDCRP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NIMH Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program (TDCRP) was a collaborative agreement between NIMH (Mood, Anxiety and Personality Disorder Research Branch) and three research sites, George Washington University, University of Oklahoma and the University of Pittsbu...

  18. Collaborative Learning: How Well Does It Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tebo-Messina, Margaret

    1993-01-01

    Describes how students in three college-level writing groups viewed their collaborative learning experience. Suggests that collaborative learning works (or does not work) in complex ways that cannot be reduced to a field manual of identifying behaviors. (RS)

  19. Factors Affecting Teachers' Perceived Readiness for Online Collaborative Learning: A Case Study in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koo, Ah-Choo

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates factors affecting the perceived readiness for online collaborative learning (OCL) of a sample of 86 mathematics teachers from 12 secondary schools. Descriptive analysis, factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and structure equation modeling were used to analyze the data. A moderately fit model was generated and able…

  20. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Bearing Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, J.

    2011-10-01

    NREL has initiated the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) to investigate the root cause of the low wind turbine gearbox reliability. The GRC follows a multi-pronged approach based on a collaborative of manufacturers, owners, researchers and consultants. The project combines analysis, field testing, dynamometer testing, condition monitoring, and the development and population of a gearbox failure database. At the core of the project are two 750kW gearboxes that have been redesigned and rebuilt so that they are representative of the multi-megawatt gearbox topology currently used in the industry. These gearboxes are heavily instrumented and are tested in the field and on the dynamometer. This report discusses the bearing calibrations of the gearboxes.

  1. International Collaboration: Promises and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, R. Jay; Widmer, Jocelyn M.; Lerman, Amir

    2015-01-01

    We currently face a myriad of grand global challenges in fields such as poverty, the environment, education, science, and medicine. However, our current means of dealing with such challenges has fallen short, and ingenious solutions are required to overcome the inherent resistance to progress toward ameliorating such difficulties. Here, we highlight the promises and challenges of international collaboration in achieving success toward these trials. We note prior successes in fields such as education, medicine, science, and environmental issues made to date, yet at the same time we do note deficiencies and shortcomings in these efforts. Hence, the notion of international collaboration should be strengthened and encouraged by governments, non-profit organizations, and others moving forward using creative means to bring talented teams together to tackle these challenges across the globe. PMID:25973264

  2. Comparative analysis of collaboration networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Progulova, Tatiana; Gadjiev, Bahruz

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we carry out a comparative analysis of the word network as the collaboration network based on the novel by M. Bulgakov "Master and Margarita", the synonym network of the Russian language as well as the Russian movie actor network. We have constructed one-mode projections of these networks, defined degree distributions for them and have calculated main characteristics. In the paper a generation algorithm of collaboration networks has been offered which allows one to generate networks statistically equivalent to the studied ones. It lets us reveal a structural correlation between word network, synonym network and movie actor network. We show that the degree distributions of all analyzable networks are described by the distribution of q-type.

  3. Comparative analysis of collaboration networks

    SciTech Connect

    Progulova, Tatiana; Gadjiev, Bahruz

    2011-03-14

    In this paper we carry out a comparative analysis of the word network as the collaboration network based on the novel by M. Bulgakov 'Master and Margarita', the synonym network of the Russian language as well as the Russian movie actor network. We have constructed one-mode projections of these networks, defined degree distributions for them and have calculated main characteristics. In the paper a generation algorithm of collaboration networks has been offered which allows one to generate networks statistically equivalent to the studied ones. It lets us reveal a structural correlation between word network, synonym network and movie actor network. We show that the degree distributions of all analyzable networks are described by the distribution of q-type.

  4. Collaboration technology and space science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiner, Barry M.; Brown, R. L.; Haines, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    A summary of available collaboration technologies and their applications to space science is presented as well as investigations into remote coaching paradigms and the role of a specific collaboration tool for distributed task coordination in supporting such teleoperations. The applicability and effectiveness of different communication media and tools in supporting remote coaching are investigated. One investigation concerns a distributed check-list, a computer-based tool that allows a group of people, e.g., onboard crew, ground based investigator, and mission control, to synchronize their actions while providing full flexibility for the flight crew to set the pace and remain on their operational schedule. This autonomy is shown to contribute to morale and productivity.

  5. The collaborative roots of corruption.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Ori; Shalvi, Shaul

    2015-08-25

    Cooperation is essential for completing tasks that individuals cannot accomplish alone. Whereas the benefits of cooperation are clear, little is known about its possible negative aspects. Introducing a novel sequential dyadic die-rolling paradigm, we show that collaborative settings provide fertile ground for the emergence of corruption. In the main experimental treatment the outcomes of the two players are perfectly aligned. Player A privately rolls a die, reports the result to player B, who then privately rolls and reports the result as well. Both players are paid the value of the reports if, and only if, they are identical (e.g., if both report 6, each earns €6). Because rolls are truly private, players can inflate their profit by misreporting the actual outcomes. Indeed, the proportion of reported doubles was 489% higher than the expected proportion assuming honesty, 48% higher than when individuals rolled and reported alone, and 96% higher than when lies only benefited the other player. Breaking the alignment in payoffs between player A and player B reduced the extent of brazen lying. Despite player B's central role in determining whether a double was reported, modifying the incentive structure of either player A or player B had nearly identical effects on the frequency of reported doubles. Our results highlight the role of collaboration-particularly on equal terms-in shaping corruption. These findings fit a functional perspective on morality. When facing opposing moral sentiments-to be honest vs. to join forces in collaboration-people often opt for engaging in corrupt collaboration. PMID:26261341

  6. Conditions for Successful Online Document Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallance, Michael; Towndrow, Phillip A.; Wiz, Charles

    2010-01-01

    With the development of Web 2.0 technologies, online document collaboration tools are becoming increasingly available, often free of charge. Although the technology is considered interactive and collaborative, it does not necessarily mean learners themselves will interact and collaborate. This paper discusses the conditions required for successful…

  7. Educators' Views of Collaboration with Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Chankook; Fortner, Rosanne

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated educators' views of collaboration with scientists, a baseline for COSEE Great Lakes efforts in facilitating dynamic collaborative relationships between Great Lakes researchers and educators. Three research questions guided the study: (1) how are educators in the Great Lakes region involved in collaboration with scientists,


  8. Online Collaborative Learning: Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Tim, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Online Collaborative Learning: Theory and Practice" provides a resource for researchers and practitioners in the area of online collaborative learning (also known as CSCL, computer-supported collaborative learning), particularly those working within a tertiary education environment. It includes articles of relevance to those interested in both…

  9. Utilizing Collaboration Theory to Evaluate Strategic Alliances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gajda, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly, "collaboration" between business, non-profit, health and educational agencies is being championed as a powerful strategy to achieve a vision otherwise not possible when independent entities work alone. But the definition of collaboration is elusive and it is often difficult for organizations to put collaboration into practice and…

  10. Improving Teaching through Collaborative Reflective Teaching Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Reflection and collaboration are two activities teachers can use to change and improve their practice. However, finding the time and space to do so can be challenging. The collaborative reflective teaching cycle is a structured activity teachers can use to engage in reflection and collaboration. This article describes how a seventh grade teaching


  11. Aligning Collaborative and Culturally Responsive Evaluation Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askew, Karyl; Beverly, Monifa Green; Jay, Michelle L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors, three African-American women trained as collaborative evaluators, offer a comparative analysis of collaborative evaluation (O'Sullivan, 2004) and culturally responsive evaluation approaches (Frierson, Hood, & Hughes, 2002; Kirkhart & Hopson, 2010). Collaborative evaluation techniques immerse evaluators in the cultural milieu of the


  12. Understanding How Novice Teachers Utilize Online Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Morgan E.

    2012-01-01

    This investigation focused on the different forms of online collaboration used by current novice teachers in rural districts in Illinois. Two main research questions guided this study: 1) How do novice teachers use online collaboration? and 2) How does online collaboration affect their teaching practice? This study consisted of four qualitative…

  13. Aligning Collaborative and Culturally Responsive Evaluation Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askew, Karyl; Beverly, Monifa Green; Jay, Michelle L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors, three African-American women trained as collaborative evaluators, offer a comparative analysis of collaborative evaluation (O'Sullivan, 2004) and culturally responsive evaluation approaches (Frierson, Hood, & Hughes, 2002; Kirkhart & Hopson, 2010). Collaborative evaluation techniques immerse evaluators in the cultural milieu of the…

  14. Forging Collaborative Partnerships: The Waterloo Neighborhood Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruenewald, Anne

    The Forging Collaborative Partnerships Project in Waterloo, Iowa is a collaborative venture to assist voluntary agencies in developing tools and strategies to strengthen collaborative relationships among public and nonprofit child welfare agencies and other key stakeholders as they adopt a family-focused philosophy. This monograph details how the…

  15. Improving Teaching through Collaborative Reflective Teaching Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Reflection and collaboration are two activities teachers can use to change and improve their practice. However, finding the time and space to do so can be challenging. The collaborative reflective teaching cycle is a structured activity teachers can use to engage in reflection and collaboration. This article describes how a seventh grade teaching…

  16. 5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Continuing collaboration. 9701.105... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a) In... determine the number of employee representatives to be engaged in the continuing collaboration process....

  17. 5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Continuing collaboration. 9701.105... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a) In... determine the number of employee representatives to be engaged in the continuing collaboration process....

  18. 5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Continuing collaboration. 9701.105... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a) In... determine the number of employee representatives to be engaged in the continuing collaboration process....

  19. New Library Facilities: Opportunities for Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippincott, Joan K.

    2004-01-01

    As academic libraries renovate or build new spaces that provide services to users, they should consider opportunities to collaborate with other units on campus to develop collaborative services in the new space. These collaborative spaces, such as information commons, teaching and learning centers, and multi-media studios, offer advantages such as…

  20. Rocinante, a virtual collaborative visualizer

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.J.; Ice, L.G.

    1996-12-31

    With the goal of improving the ability of people around the world to share the development and use of intelligent systems, Sandia National Laboratories` Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center is developing new Virtual Collaborative Engineering (VCE) and Virtual Collaborative Control (VCC) technologies. A key area of VCE and VCC research is in shared visualization of virtual environments. This paper describes a Virtual Collaborative Visualizer (VCV), named Rocinante, that Sandia developed for VCE and VCC applications. Rocinante allows multiple participants to simultaneously view dynamic geometrically-defined environments. Each viewer can exclude extraneous detail or include additional information in the scene as desired. Shared information can be saved and later replayed in a stand-alone mode. Rocinante automatically scales visualization requirements with computer system capabilities. Models with 30,000 polygons and 4 Megabytes of texture display at 12 to 15 frames per second (fps) on an SGI Onyx and at 3 to 8 fps (without texture) on Indigo 2 Extreme computers. In its networked mode, Rocinante synchronizes its local geometric model with remote simulators and sensory systems by monitoring data transmitted through UDP packets. Rocinante`s scalability and performance make it an ideal VCC tool. Users throughout the country can monitor robot motions and the thinking behind their motion planners and simulators.

  1. Distributed and Collaborative Software Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzi, Giacomo; Gall, Harald C.

    Throughout the years software engineers have come up with a myriad of specialized tools and techniques that focus on a certain type of software analysissoftware analysis such as source code analysis, co-change analysis or bug prediction. However, easy and straight forward synergies between these analyses and tools rarely exist because of their stand-alone nature, their platform dependence, their different input and output formats and the variety of data to analyze. As a consequence, distributed and collaborative software analysiscollaborative software analysis scenarios and in particular interoperability are severely limited. We describe a distributed and collaborative software analysis platform that allows for a seamless interoperability of software analysis tools across platform, geographical and organizational boundaries. We realize software analysis tools as services that can be accessed and composed over the Internet. These distributed analysis services shall be widely accessible in our incrementally augmented Software Analysis Broker software analysis broker where organizations and tool providers can register and share their tools. To allow (semi-) automatic use and composition of these tools, they are classified and mapped into a software analysis taxonomy and adhere to specific meta-models and ontologiesontologies for their category of analysis.

  2. Advanced engineering environment collaboration project.

    SciTech Connect

    Lamph, Jane Ann; Pomplun, Alan R.; Kiba, Grant W.; Dutra, Edward G.; Dankiewicz, Robert J.; Marburger, Scot J.

    2008-12-01

    The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a model for an engineering design and communications system that will enhance project collaboration throughout the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) worked together on a prototype project to evaluate the suitability of a portion of PTC's Windchill 9.0 suite of data management, design and collaboration tools as the basis for an AEE. The AEE project team implemented Windchill 9.0 development servers in both classified and unclassified domains and used them to test and evaluate the Windchill tool suite relative to the needs of the NWC using weapons project use cases. A primary deliverable was the development of a new real time collaborative desktop design and engineering process using PDMLink (data management tool), Pro/Engineer (mechanical computer aided design tool) and ProductView Lite (visualization tool). Additional project activities included evaluations of PTC's electrical computer aided design, visualization, and engineering calculations applications. This report documents the AEE project work to share information and lessons learned with other NWC sites. It also provides PTC with recommendations for improving their products for NWC applications.

  3. Supersymmetric fifth order evolution equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, K.; Liu, Q. P.

    2010-03-08

    This paper considers supersymmetric fifth order evolution equations. Within the framework of symmetry approach, we give a list containing six equations, which are (potentially) integrable systems. Among these equations, the most interesting ones include a supersymmetric Sawada-Kotera equation and a novel supersymmetric fifth order KdV equation. For the latter, we supply some properties such as a Hamiltonian structures and a possible recursion operator.

  4. Exceptional Solutions of Hill Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbert, A.; Neuman, F.

    A unified global classification of Hill equations summarizing classical and other results is presented. Connection between Lyapunov exponent and the rotation number of Hill equation is explained. It is shown that the notion of exceptional solutions introduced in [Elbert et al., Differential Integral Equations5 (1992), 945-960] is applicable to every Hill equation. A complete list of exceptional solutions for all Hill equations is given.

  5. Developing Adaptive Collaboration Support: The Example of an Effective Training for Collaborative Inferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deiglmayr, Anne; Spada, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive support for computer-mediated collaboration aims at supporting learners' collaboration in a way that is tailored to their actual needs and by fostering their self-regulation, leading to the acquisition of new collaboration skills. This review gives an example of developing support for a specific collaboration skill: the co-construction of…

  6. Collaborative Partnerships between Educational Organizations: Extent of Independence-Interdependence and Satisfaction with Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Merrill L.; Wiersma, William; Riffle, M. Joy S.

    Collaboration between and among educational organizations is much discussed and often required by funding agencies, but measuring such collaboration is discussed much less. Collaboration has been characterized as a continuum of interdependence between partners that ranges from cooperation to coordination to collaboration. Seven features have been…

  7. Designing Facilities for Collaborative Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Powell, Mark; Backes, Paul; Steinke, Robert; Tso, Kam; Wales, Roxana

    2003-01-01

    A methodology for designing operational facilities for collaboration by multiple experts has begun to take shape as an outgrowth of a project to design such facilities for scientific operations of the planned 2003 Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission. The methodology could also be applicable to the design of military "situation rooms" and other facilities for terrestrial missions. It was recognized in this project that modern mission operations depend heavily upon the collaborative use of computers. It was further recognized that tests have shown that layout of a facility exerts a dramatic effect on the efficiency and endurance of the operations staff. The facility designs (for example, see figure) and the methodology developed during the project reflect this recognition. One element of the methodology is a metric, called effective capacity, that was created for use in evaluating proposed MER operational facilities and may also be useful for evaluating other collaboration spaces, including meeting rooms and military situation rooms. The effective capacity of a facility is defined as the number of people in the facility who can be meaningfully engaged in its operations. A person is considered to be meaningfully engaged if the person can (1) see, hear, and communicate with everyone else present; (2) see the material under discussion (typically data on a piece of paper, computer monitor, or projection screen); and (3) provide input to the product under development by the group. The effective capacity of a facility is less than the number of people that can physically fit in the facility. For example, a typical office that contains a desktop computer has an effective capacity of .4, while a small conference room that contains a projection screen has an effective capacity of around 10. Little or no benefit would be derived from allowing the number of persons in an operational facility to exceed its effective capacity: At best, the operations staff would be underutilized; at worst, operational performance would deteriorate. Elements of this methodology were applied to the design of three operations facilities for a series of rover field tests. These tests were observed by human-factors researchers and their conclusions are being used to refine and extend the methodology to be used in the final design of the MER operations facility. Further work is underway to evaluate the use of personal digital assistant (PDA) units as portable input interfaces and communication devices in future mission operations facilities. A PDA equipped for wireless communication and Ethernet, Bluetooth, or another networking technology would cost less than a complete computer system, and would enable a collaborator to communicate electronically with computers and with other collaborators while moving freely within the virtual environment created by a shared immersive graphical display.

  8. Collaborative Clustering for Sensor Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff. Loro :/; Green Jillian; Lane, Terran

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, nodes in a sensor network simply collect data and then pass it on to a centralized node that archives, distributes, and possibly analyzes the data. However, analysis at the individual nodes could enable faster detection of anomalies or other interesting events, as well as faster responses such as sending out alerts or increasing the data collection rate. There is an additional opportunity for increased performance if individual nodes can communicate directly with their neighbors. Previously, a method was developed by which machine learning classification algorithms could collaborate to achieve high performance autonomously (without requiring human intervention). This method worked for supervised learning algorithms, in which labeled data is used to train models. The learners collaborated by exchanging labels describing the data. The new advance enables clustering algorithms, which do not use labeled data, to also collaborate. This is achieved by defining a new language for collaboration that uses pair-wise constraints to encode useful information for other learners. These constraints specify that two items must, or cannot, be placed into the same cluster. Previous work has shown that clustering with these constraints (in isolation) already improves performance. In the problem formulation, each learner resides at a different node in the sensor network and makes observations (collects data) independently of the other learners. Each learner clusters its data and then selects a pair of items about which it is uncertain and uses them to query its neighbors. The resulting feedback (a must and cannot constraint from each neighbor) is combined by the learner into a consensus constraint, and it then reclusters its data while incorporating the new constraint. A strategy was also proposed for cleaning the resulting constraint sets, which may contain conflicting constraints; this improves performance significantly. This approach has been applied to collaborative clustering of seismic and infrasonic data collected by the Mount Erebus Volcano Observatory in Antarctica. Previous approaches to distributed clustering cannot readily be applied in a sensor network setting, because they assume that each node has the same view of the data set. A view is the set of features used to represent each object. When a single data set is partitioned across several computational nodes, distributed clustering works; all objects have the same view. But when the data is collected from different locations, using different sensors, a more flexible approach is needed. This approach instead operates in situations where the data collected at each node has a different view (e.g., seismic vs. infrasonic sensors), but they observe the same events. This enables them to exchange information about the likely cluster membership relations between objects, even if they do not use the same features to represent the objects.

  9. International Collaboration for Venus Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutts, James; Limaye, Sanjay; Zasova, Ludmila; Wilson, Colin; Ocampo, Adriana; Glaze, Lori; Svedhem, H.; Nakamura, Masato; Widemann, Thomas

    The Venus Exploration Analysis Group (VEXAG) was established by NASA in July 2005 to identify scientific priorities and strategy for exploration of Venus. From the outset, VEXAG has been open to the international community participation and has followed the progress of the ESA Venus Express Mission and the JAXA Akasuki mission as well exploring potential broad international partnerships for Venus exploration through coordinated science and missions. This paper discussed three mechanisms through which these collaborations are being explored in which VEXAG members participate One pathway for international collaboration has been through COSPAR. The International Venus Exploration Working Group (IVEWG) was formed during the 2012 COSPAR general assembly in Mysore, India. Another potentially significant outcome has been the IVEWG’s efforts to foster a formal dialog between IKI and NASA/PSD on the proposed Venera D mission resulting in a meeting in June 2013 to be followed by a discussion at the 4MS3 conference in October 2013. This has now resulted in an agreement between NASA/PSD and IKI to form a joint Science Definition Team for Venera D. A second pathway has been through an international focus on comparative climatology. Scientists from the established space faring nations participated in a first international conference on Comparative Climatology for Terrestrial Planet (CCTP) in Boulder Colorado in June 2012 sponsored by several international scientific organizations. A second conference is planned for 2015. The Planetary Robotics Exploration Coordinating Group (PRECG) of International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) the IAA has been focusing on exploring affordable contributions to the robotic exploration by non-space-faring nations wishing to get involved in planetary exploration. PRECG has sponsored a two year study of Comparative Climatology for which Venus is the focal point and focused on engaging nations without deep space exploration capabilities. A third area of interchange has been the International Planetary Probe Workshop (IPPW) , now in its eleventh year, which brings together scientists, technologists and mission designers interested in the exploration of planets with atmospheres and particularly in the challenges of entry, descent and landing and sustained flight on other planets. IPPW has been an opportunity for developing the collaborations at a grass roots level. With both NASA and ESA favoring competitive rather than strategic approaches for selecting planetary missions (except for Moon and Mars), future collaboration on Venus exploration will involve flexible partnerships. However, international standards for proximity communication frequencies and protocols will be vital to international collaboration.

  10. Nikolaevskiy equation with dispersion.

    PubMed

    Simbawa, Eman; Matthews, Paul C; Cox, Stephen M

    2010-03-01

    The Nikolaevskiy equation was originally proposed as a model for seismic waves and is also a model for a wide variety of systems incorporating a neutral "Goldstone" mode, including electroconvection and reaction-diffusion systems. It is known to exhibit chaotic dynamics at the onset of pattern formation, at least when the dispersive terms in the equation are suppressed, as is commonly the practice in previous analyses. In this paper, the effects of reinstating the dispersive terms are examined. It is shown that such terms can stabilize some of the spatially periodic traveling waves; this allows us to study the loss of stability and transition to chaos of the waves. The secondary stability diagram ("Busse balloon") for the traveling waves can be remarkably complicated. PMID:20365845

  11. Causal electromagnetic interaction equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zinoviev, Yury M.

    2011-02-15

    For the electromagnetic interaction of two particles the relativistic causal quantum mechanics equations are proposed. These equations are solved for the case when the second particle moves freely. The initial wave functions are supposed to be smooth and rapidly decreasing at the infinity. This condition is important for the convergence of the integrals similar to the integrals of quantum electrodynamics. We also consider the singular initial wave functions in the particular case when the second particle mass is equal to zero. The discrete energy spectrum of the first particle wave function is defined by the initial wave function of the free-moving second particle. Choosing the initial wave functions of the free-moving second particle it is possible to obtain a practically arbitrary discrete energy spectrum.

  12. Multinomial diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, Ariel I.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-06-24

    We describe a new, microscopic model for diffusion that captures diffusion induced fluctuations at scales where the concept of concentration gives way to discrete particles. We show that in the limit as the number of particles N {yields} {infinity}, our model is equivalent to the classical stochastic diffusion equation (SDE). We test our new model and the SDE against Langevin dynamics in numerical simulations, and show that our model successfully reproduces the correct ensemble statistics, while the classical model fails.

  13. Nonequilibrium superoperator GW equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbola, Upendra; Mukamel, Shaul

    2006-01-01

    Hedin's equations [Phys. Rev. 139, 796 (1965)] for the one-particle equilibrium Green's function of a many-electron system are generalized to nonequilibrium open systems using two fields that separately control the evolution of the bra and the ket of the density matrix. A closed hierarchy is derived for the Green's function, the self-energy, the screened potential, the polarization, and the vertex function, all expressed as Keldysh matrices in Liouville space.

  14. Equation of State from Lattice QCD Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Rajan

    2011-01-01

    We provide a status report on the calculation of the Equation of State (EoS) of QCD at finite temperature using lattice QCD. Most of the discussion will focus on comparison of recent results obtained by the HotQCD and Wuppertal-Budapest collaborations. We will show that very significant progress has been made towards obtaining high precision results over the temperature range of T = 150-700 MeV. The various sources of systematic uncertainties will be discussed and the differences between the two calculations highlighted. Our final conclusion is that these lattice results of EoS are precise enough to be used in the phenomenological analysis of heavy ion experiments at RHIC and LHC.

  15. Supporting Dynamic Ad hoc Collaboration Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Deborah A.; Berket, Karlo

    2003-07-14

    Modern HENP experiments such as CMS and Atlas involve as many as 2000 collaborators around the world. Collaborations this large will be unable to meet often enough to support working closely together. Many of the tools currently available for collaboration focus on heavy-weight applications such as videoconferencing tools. While these are important, there is a more basic need for tools that support connecting physicists to work together on an ad hoc or continuous basis. Tools that support the day-to-day connectivity and underlying needs of a group of collaborators are important for providing light-weight, non-intrusive, and flexible ways to work collaboratively. Some example tools include messaging, file-sharing, and shared plot viewers. An important component of the environment is a scalable underlying communication framework. In this paper we will describe our current progress on building a dynamic and ad hoc collaboration environment and our vision for its evolution into a HENP collaboration environment.

  16. Double-Plate Penetration Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    This report compares seven double-plate penetration predictor equations for accuracy and effectiveness of a shield design. Three of the seven are the Johnson Space Center original, modified, and new Cour-Palais equations. The other four are the Nysmith, Lundeberg-Stern-Bristow, Burch, and Wilkinson equations. These equations, except the Wilkinson equation, were derived from test results, with the velocities ranging up to 8 km/sec. Spreadsheet software calculated the projectile diameters for various velocities for the different equations. The results were plotted on projectile diameter versus velocity graphs for the expected orbital debris impact velocities ranging from 2 to 15 km/sec. The new Cour-Palais double-plate penetration equation was compared to the modified Cour-Palais single-plate penetration equation. Then the predictions from each of the seven double-plate penetration equations were compared to each other for a chosen shield design. Finally, these results from the equations were compared with test results performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Because the different equations predict a wide range of projectile diameters at any given velocity, it is very difficult to choose the "right" prediction equation for shield configurations other than those exactly used in the equations' development. Although developed for various materials, the penetration equations alone cannot be relied upon to accurately predict the effectiveness of a shield without using hypervelocity impact tests to verify the design.

  17. Foundations for a multiscale collaborative Earth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Michael; Peter, Daniel; Sager, Korbinian; Simutė, Saulė; Ermert, Laura; Krischer, Lion; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational framework for the assimilation of local to global seismic data into a consistent model describing Earth structure on all seismically accessible scales. This Collaborative Seismic Earth Model (CSEM) is designed to meet the following requirements: (i) Flexible geometric parametrization, capable of capturing topography and bathymetry, as well as all aspects of potentially resolvable structure, including small-scale heterogeneities and deformations of internal discontinuities. (ii) Independence of any particular wave equation solver, in order to enable the combination of inversion techniques suitable for different types of seismic data. (iii) Physical parametrization that allows for full anisotropy and for variations in attenuation and density. While not all of these parameters are always resolvable, the assimilation of data that constrain any parameter subset should be possible. (iv) Ability to accommodate successive refinements through the incorporation of updates on any scale as new data or inversion techniques become available. (v) Enable collaborative Earth model construction. The structure of the initial CSEM is represented on a variable-resolution tetrahedral mesh. It is assembled from a long-wavelength 3-D global model into which several regional-scale tomographies are embedded. We illustrate the CSEM workflow of successive updating with two examples from Japan and the Western Mediterranean, where we constrain smaller scale structure using full-waveform inversion. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of the CSEM to act as a vehicle for the combination of different tomographic techniques with a joint full-waveform and traveltime ray tomography of Europe. This combination broadens the exploitable frequency range of the individual techniques, thereby improving resolution. We perform two iterations of a whole-Earth full-waveform inversion using a long-period reference data set from 225 globally recorded earthquakes. At this early stage of the CSEM development, the broad global updates mostly act to remove artefacts from the assembly of the initial CSEM. During the future evolution of the CSEM, the reference data set will be used to account for the influence of small-scale refinements on large-scale global structure. The CSEM as a computational framework is intended to help bridging the gap between local, regional and global tomography, and to contribute to the development of a global multiscale Earth model. While the current construction serves as a first proof of concept, future refinements and additions will require community involvement, which is welcome at this stage already.

  18. Young's equation revisited.

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Lasse

    2016-04-01

    Young's construction for a contact angle at a three-phase intersection forms the basis of all fields of science that involve wetting and capillary action. We find compelling evidence from recent experimental results on the deformation of a soft solid at the contact line, and displacement of an elastic wire immersed in a liquid, that Young's equation can only be interpreted by surface energies, and not as a balance of surface tensions. It follows that the a priori variable in finding equilibrium is not the position of the contact line, but the contact angle. This finding provides the explanation for the pinning of a contact line. PMID:26940644

  19. Shared Understanding for Collaborative Control

    SciTech Connect

    David Bruemmer; Douglas Few; Ronald Boring; Julie Marble; Miles Walton; Curtis Nielsen

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents results from three experiments in which human operators were teamed with a mixed-initiative robot control system to accomplish various indoor search and exploration tasks. By assessing human workload and error together with overall performance, these experiments provide an objective means to contrast different modes of robot autonomy and to evaluate both the usability of the interface and the effectiveness of autonomous robot behavior. The first experiment compares the performance achieved when the robot takes initiative to support human driving with the opposite case when the human takes initiative to support autonomous robot driving. The utility of robot autonomy is shown through achievement of better performance when the robot is in the driver’s seat. The second experiment introduces a virtual three-dimensional (3-D) map representation that supports collaborative understanding of the task and environment. When used in place of video, the 3-D map reduced operator workload and navigational error. By lowering bandwidth requirements, use of the virtual 3-D interface enables long-range, nonline-of-sight communication. Results from the third experiment extend the findings of experiment 1 by showing that collaborative control can increase performance and reduce error even when the complexity of the environment is increased and workload is distributed amongst multiple operators.

  20. Fluxnet Synthesis Dataset Collaboration Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Deborah A.; Humphrey, Marty; van Ingen, Catharine; Beekwilder, Norm; Goode, Monte; Jackson, Keith; Rodriguez, Matt; Weber, Robin

    2008-02-06

    The Fluxnet synthesis dataset originally compiled for the La Thuile workshop contained approximately 600 site years. Since the workshop, several additional site years have been added and the dataset now contains over 920 site years from over 240 sites. A data refresh update is expected to increase those numbers in the next few months. The ancillary data describing the sites continues to evolve as well. There are on the order of 120 site contacts and 60proposals have been approved to use thedata. These proposals involve around 120 researchers. The size and complexity of the dataset and collaboration has led to a new approach to providing access to the data and collaboration support and the support team attended the workshop and worked closely with the attendees and the Fluxnet project office to define the requirements for the support infrastructure. As a result of this effort, a new website (http://www.fluxdata.org) has been created to provide access to the Fluxnet synthesis dataset. This new web site is based on a scientific data server which enables browsing of the data on-line, data download, and version tracking. We leverage database and data analysis tools such as OLAP data cubes and web reports to enable browser and Excel pivot table access to the data.

  1. Distributed and collaborative synthetic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L.; Bernardini, Fausto

    1995-01-01

    Fast graphics workstations and increased computing power, together with improved interface technologies, have created new and diverse possibilities for developing and interacting with synthetic environments. A synthetic environment system is generally characterized by input/output devices that constitute the interface between the human senses and the synthetic environment generated by the computer; and a computation system running a real-time simulation of the environment. A basic need of a synthetic environment system is that of giving the user a plausible reproduction of the visual aspect of the objects with which he is interacting. The goal of our Shastra research project is to provide a substrate of geometric data structures and algorithms which allow the distributed construction and modification of the environment, efficient querying of objects attributes, collaborative interaction with the environment, fast computation of collision detection and visibility information for efficient dynamic simulation and real-time scene display. In particular, we address the following issues: (1) A geometric framework for modeling and visualizing synthetic environments and interacting with them. We highlight the functions required for the geometric engine of a synthetic environment system. (2) A distribution and collaboration substrate that supports construction, modification, and interaction with synthetic environments on networked desktop machines.

  2. A northwest collaborative practice model.

    PubMed

    Darlington, Ann; McBroom, Kelly; Warwick, Susan

    2011-09-01

    Collaborative practice between obstetrician-gynecologists and certified nurse-midwives has been successful at the Family Beginnings obstetric unit at Group Health for at least three reasons. Each provider group is able to practice independently and thus give the kind of maternity and women's health care sought by the local community. The legal framework in Washington State supports a wide range of maternity care practices and includes a reasonable provider insurance scheme. The boundaries between different groups operating within distinct scopes of practice are well-defined and communicated. This allows providers to smoothly share or transfer clients from midwife to obstetrician and back as needed in each case. The success of the Family Beginnings model is demonstrated by a favorable comparison with national and Washington State metrics of delivery outcomes. Replicating the model elsewhere depends on building support for collaborative maternity care across the obstetric and midwifery professions in states where an appropriate legal framework exists, and in institutions where policies for credentialing nurse midwives are in place. Where these supports do not exist, all practitioners jointly advocating for more enlightened approaches is recommended. PMID:21860299

  3. Collaborative virtual environments art exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinsky, Margaret; Anstey, Josephine; Pape, Dave E.; Aguilera, Julieta C.; Kostis, Helen-Nicole; Tsoupikova, Daria

    2005-03-01

    This panel presentation will exhibit artwork developed in CAVEs and discuss how art methodologies enhance the science of VR through collaboration, interaction and aesthetics. Artists and scientists work alongside one another to expand scientific research and artistic expression and are motivated by exhibiting collaborative virtual environments. Looking towards the arts, such as painting and sculpture, computer graphics captures a visual tradition. Virtual reality expands this tradition to not only what we face, but to what surrounds us and even what responds to our body and its gestures. Art making that once was isolated to the static frame and an optimal point of view is now out and about, in fully immersive mode within CAVEs. Art knowledge is a guide to how the aesthetics of 2D and 3D worlds affect, transform, and influence the social, intellectual and physical condition of the human body through attention to psychology, spiritual thinking, education, and cognition. The psychological interacts with the physical in the virtual in such a way that each facilitates, enhances and extends the other, culminating in a "go together" world. Attention to sharing art experience across high-speed networks introduces a dimension of liveliness and aliveness when we "become virtual" in real time with others.

  4. Comment on ``Solvable Hill equation''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, M. J.

    1986-06-01

    It is shown that the recently published class of Hill equations with exact analytical solutions is in fact an example of a much broader class of second-order differential equations which admit exact WKB-like solutions.

  5. Conservational PDF Equations of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have revisited the traditional probability density function (PDF) equations for the velocity and species in turbulent incompressible flows. They are all unclosed due to the appearance of various conditional means which are modeled empirically. However, we have observed that it is possible to establish a closed velocity PDF equation and a closed joint velocity and species PDF equation through conditions derived from the integral form of the Navier-Stokes equations. Although, in theory, the resulted PDF equations are neither general nor unique, they nevertheless lead to the exact transport equations for the first moment as well as all higher order moments. We refer these PDF equations as the conservational PDF equations. This observation is worth further exploration for its validity and CFD application

  6. Solitons and nonlinear wave equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, Roger K.; Eilbeck, J. Chris; Gibbon, John D.; Morris, Hedley C.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of the theory and applications of classical solitons is presented with a brief treatment of quantum mechanical effects which occur in particle physics and quantum field theory. The subjects addressed include: solitary waves and solitons, scattering transforms, the Schroedinger equation and the Korteweg-de Vries equation, and the inverse method for the isospectral Schroedinger equation and the general solution of the solvable nonlinear equations. Also considered are: isolation of the Korteweg-de Vries equation in some physical examples, the Zakharov-Shabat/AKNS inverse method, kinks and the sine-Gordon equation, the nonlinear Schroedinger equation and wave resonance interactions, amplitude equations in unstable systems, and numerical studies of solitons. 45 references.

  7. Reciprocal Transformations of Two Camassa–Holm Type Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Min; Li, Yu-Qi; Chen, Yong

    2015-12-01

    The relation between the Camassa–Holm equation and the Olver–Rosenau–Qiao equation is obtained, and we connect a new Camassa–Holm type equation proposed by Qiao etc. with the first negative flow of the KdV hierarchy by a reciprocal transformation. Supported by the Global Change Research Program of China under Grant No. 2015CB953904, National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos.11275072, 11375090 and 11435005, Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120076110024), The Network Information Physics Calculation of basic research innovation research group of China under Grant No. 61321064, Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center of Trustworthy Software for Internet of Things under Grant No. ZF1213, Shanghai Minhang District talents of high level scientific research project.

  8. Nonlinear SCHRÖDINGER-PAULI Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Wei Khim; Parwani, Rajesh R.

    2011-11-01

    We obtain novel nonlinear Schrüdinger-Pauli equations through a formal non-relativistic limit of appropriately constructed nonlinear Dirac equations. This procedure automatically provides a physical regularisation of potential singularities brought forward by the nonlinear terms and suggests how to regularise previous equations studied in the literature. The enhancement of contributions coming from the regularised singularities suggests that the obtained equations might be useful for future precision tests of quantum nonlinearity.

  9. Solvable Hill-Harper equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urumov, Viktor

    1988-11-01

    Analytically solvable second-order linear differential equations with periodic or quasiperiodic coefficients, common in many areas of physics, are constructed. The equations may contain an arbitrary number of independent parameters. If the equation is interpreted as a Schrödinger equation with a quasiperiodic potential, the solution that is obtained represents an extended wave state. This is the case even if the potential has arbitrarily large positive values.

  10. ``Riemann equations'' in bidifferential calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvartatskyi, O.; MĂŒller-Hoissen, F.; Stoilov, N.

    2015-10-01

    We consider equations that formally resemble a matrix Riemann (or Hopf) equation in the framework of bidifferential calculus. With different choices of a first-order bidifferential calculus, we obtain a variety of equations, including a semi-discrete and a fully discrete version of the matrix Riemann equation. A corresponding universal solution-generating method then either yields a (continuous or discrete) Cole-Hopf transformation, or leaves us with the problem of solving Riemann equations (hence an application of the hodograph method). If the bidifferential calculus extends to second order, solutions of a system of "Riemann equations" are also solutions of an equation that arises, on the universal level of bidifferential calculus, as an integrability condition. Depending on the choice of bidifferential calculus, the latter can represent a number of prominent integrable equations, like self-dual Yang-Mills, as well as matrix versions of the two-dimensional Toda lattice, Hirota's bilinear difference equation, (2+1)-dimensional Nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS), Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, and Davey-Stewartson equations. For all of them, a recent (non-isospectral) binary Darboux transformation result in bidifferential calculus applies, which can be specialized to generate solutions of the associated "Riemann equations." For the latter, we clarify the relation between these specialized binary Darboux transformations and the aforementioned solution-generating method. From (arbitrary size) matrix versions of the "Riemann equations" associated with an integrable equation, possessing a bidifferential calculus formulation, multi-soliton-type solutions of the latter can be generated. This includes "breaking" multi-soliton-type solutions of the self-dual Yang-Mills and the (2+1)-dimensional NLS equation, which are parametrized by solutions of Riemann equations.

  11. Java virtual collaboration development environment for building synchronous collaborative application in heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ju Byoung; Kim, Jin Suk; Kim, Hye K.

    1999-11-01

    In this paper, we describe Java Virtual Collaboration Development Environment (JVCDE) for building synchronous collaborative application in heterogeneous environments. The meaning of collaboration in this paper is an application sharing mechanism that allows multiple users to simultaneously work in an existing single user application. In collaboration system, one of the major problems is to support interoperability in multiple environments, where, all the participants of collaboration can share the same results. But In heterogeneous environments, it is more difficult to guarantee interoperability than homogenous environments. To solve these interoperability problems, we design and implement Java Virtual Collaboration Development Environment using JAVA language. We develop a prototype system based on the proposed framework.

  12. Successfully Transitioning to Linear Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colton, Connie; Smith, Wendy M.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010) asks students in as early as fourth grade to solve word problems using equations with variables. Equations studied at this level generate a single solution, such as the equation x + 10 = 25. For students in fifth grade, the Common Core standard for algebraic thinking expects them to


  13. The Forced Hard Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, various examples of the Duffing type forced spring equation with epsilon positive, are studied. Since [epsilon] is positive, all solutions to the associated homogeneous equation are periodic and the same is true with the forcing applied. The damped equation exhibits steady state trajectories with the interesting


  14. The Forced Hard Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, various examples of the Duffing type forced spring equation with epsilon positive, are studied. Since [epsilon] is positive, all solutions to the associated homogeneous equation are periodic and the same is true with the forcing applied. The damped equation exhibits steady state trajectories with the interesting…

  15. Successfully Transitioning to Linear Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colton, Connie; Smith, Wendy M.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010) asks students in as early as fourth grade to solve word problems using equations with variables. Equations studied at this level generate a single solution, such as the equation x + 10 = 25. For students in fifth grade, the Common Core standard for algebraic thinking expects them to…

  16. Evaluating Cross-Lingual Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Joel; Allalouf, Avi

    This study examined the cross-lingual equating process adopted by a large scale testing system in which target language (TL) forms are equated to the source language (SL) forms using a set of translated items. The focus was on evaluating the degree of error inherent in the routine cross-lingual equating of the Verbal Reasoning subtest of the…

  17. Solving Nonlinear Coupled Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, L.; David, J.

    1986-01-01

    Harmonic balance method developed to obtain approximate steady-state solutions for nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations. Method usable with transfer matrices commonly used to analyze shaft systems. Solution to nonlinear equation, with periodic forcing function represented as sum of series similar to Fourier series but with form of terms suggested by equation itself.

  18. A special feature on collaboration in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Kellis, Elke

    2012-02-01

    Collaboration between a psychotherapist and a patient occurs at the intersection of the therapeutic relationship and treatment method. Many methods contribute to collaboration, which is then experienced as a respectful, mutual, cooperative relationship. Despite its noble history and its empirical evidence as an important attribute in psychotherapy, collaboration has rarely been operationalized and illustrated in ways that might concretely guide clinical practice. This article introduces an issue of the Journal of clinical psychology: In Session designed to describe and illustrate the role of the psychotherapist in facilitating collaboration. Expert practitioners present case examples of collaboration in psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, experiential therapy, family therapy, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, multicultural therapy, and in the context of pharmacotherapy. In the final article, a practitioner-friendly review of empirical research on collaboration is offered. PMID:23616293

  19. Tie strength distribution in scientific collaboration networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Qing; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2014-09-01

    Science is increasingly dominated by teams. Understanding patterns of scientific collaboration and their impacts on the productivity and evolution of disciplines is crucial to understand scientific processes. Electronic bibliography offers a unique opportunity to map and investigate the nature of scientific collaboration. Recent studies have demonstrated a counterintuitive organizational pattern of scientific collaboration networks: densely interconnected local clusters consist of weak ties, whereas strong ties play the role of connecting different clusters. This pattern contrasts itself from many other types of networks where strong ties form communities while weak ties connect different communities. Although there are many models for collaboration networks, no model reproduces this pattern. In this paper, we present an evolution model of collaboration networks, which reproduces many properties of real-world collaboration networks, including the organization of tie strengths, skewed degree and weight distribution, high clustering, and assortative mixing.

  20. Collaborative Analytical Toolbox version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-08-21

    The purpose of the Collaborative Analytical Toolbox (CAT) is to provide a comprehensive, enabling, collaborative problem solving environment that enables users to more effectively apply and improve their analytical and problem solving capabilities. CAT is a software framework for integrating other tools and data sources. It includes a set of core services for collaboration and information exploration and analysis, and a framework that facilitates quickly integrating new ideas, techniques, and tools with existing data sources.

  1. Collaborative work between the West and Asia

    PubMed Central

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Bart, Gavin; Li, Li; Giang, Le Minh

    2013-01-01

    The “Collaborative Work between the West and Asia” session was chaired by Dr. Yih-Ing Hser and had three speakers. The speakers (and their topics) were: Dr. Gavin Bart (Collaborative Addiction Research in Asian Populations Home and Abroad), Dr. Li Li (Implementing Intervention Research Projects in Asia), and Dr. Le Minh Giang (Building Research Infrastructure for International Collaborative Studies on Substance Use Disorder and HIV: The Case of Hanoi Medical University/Vietnam). PMID:25132788

  2. Collaborative Visualization: Definition, Challenges, and Research Agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Isenberg, Petra; Elmqvist, Niklas; Scholtz, Jean; Cernea, Daniel; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Hagen, Hans

    2011-10-01

    Collaborative visualization has emerged as a new research direction which offers the opportunity to reach new audiences and application areas for visualization tools and techniques. Technology now allows us to easily connect and collaborate with one another - in settings as diverse as over networked computers, across mobile devices, or using shared displays such as interactive walls and tabletop surfaces. Any of these collaborative settings carries a set of challenges and opportunities for visualization research. Digital information is already regularly accessed by multiple people together in order to share information, to view it together, to analyze it, or to form decisions. However, research on how to best support collaboration with and around visualizations is still in its infancy and has so far focused only on a small subset of possible application scenarios. The purpose of this article is (1) to provide a clear scope, definition, and overview of the evolving field of collaborative visualization, (2) to help pinpoint the unique focus of collaborative visualization with its specific aspects, challenges, and requirements within the intersection of general computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW) and visualization research, and (3) to draw attention to important future research questions to be addressed by the community. Thus, the goal of the paper is to discuss a research agenda for future work on collaborative visualization, including our vision for how to meet the grand challenge and to urge for a new generation of visualization tools that were designed with collaboration in mind from their very inception.

  3. Accountability and values in radically collaborative research.

    PubMed

    Winsberg, Eric; Huebner, Bryce; Kukla, Rebecca

    2014-06-01

    This paper discusses a crisis of accountability that arises when scientific collaborations are massively epistemically distributed. We argue that social models of epistemic collaboration, which are social analogs to what Patrick Suppes called a "model of the experiment," must play a role in creating accountability in these contexts. We also argue that these social models must accommodate the fact that the various agents in a collaborative project often have ineliminable, messy, and conflicting interests and values; any story about accountability in a massively distributed collaboration must therefore involve models of such interests and values and their methodological and epistemic effects. PMID:25051867

  4. Computational Approaches for Predicting Biomedical Research Collaborations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Yu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research is increasingly collaborative, and successful collaborations often produce high impact work. Computational approaches can be developed for automatically predicting biomedical research collaborations. Previous works of collaboration prediction mainly explored the topological structures of research collaboration networks, leaving out rich semantic information from the publications themselves. In this paper, we propose supervised machine learning approaches to predict research collaborations in the biomedical field. We explored both the semantic features extracted from author research interest profile and the author network topological features. We found that the most informative semantic features for author collaborations are related to research interest, including similarity of out-citing citations, similarity of abstracts. Of the four supervised machine learning models (naïve Bayes, naïve Bayes multinomial, SVMs, and logistic regression), the best performing model is logistic regression with an ROC ranging from 0.766 to 0.980 on different datasets. To our knowledge we are the first to study in depth how research interest and productivities can be used for collaboration prediction. Our approach is computationally efficient, scalable and yet simple to implement. The datasets of this study are available at https://github.com/qingzhanggithub/medline-collaboration-datasets. PMID:25375164

  5. Research, practice and the Cochrane Collaboration.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, A

    1995-01-01

    The Cochrane Collaboration coordinates the efforts of health care professionals and researchers around the world to prepare, maintain and disseminate systematic reviews of health care research. In carrying out the first two tasks the collaboration employs a rigorous method for analysing the findings of randomized controlled trials; this method was developed in the 1980s and has undergone continual improvement since then. The collaborators believe their work will consolidate and make available the accumulated results of sound research assessing the effectiveness of health care interventions and thus steer health care professionals and consumers toward the right treatments and help guide research into new therapies. Since the collaboration began, in 1993, Cochrane centres have been set up in the British Isles, Canada, Denmark, Italy, the Netherlands and the United States, and many new Cochrane review groups have been registered. Canadian scientists have played an important role in the collaboration. They have prepared and maintained systematic reviews, hosted the collaboration's second annual colloquium and are currently in the vanguard of efforts to facilitate the dissemination of collaboration documents. Although the collaboration uses new modes of communication it has not abandoned traditional ones. Nor has it underestimated the work that remains to be done to bring review findings to the attention of health care providers. Early indications suggest, however, that the collaboration's basic message about the importance of evidence-based practice is getting through. Images p885-a PMID:7697581

  6. Mobile serious games for collaborative problem solving.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jaime; Mendoza, Claudia; Salinas, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from the implementation of a series of learning activities based on mobile serious games (MSG) for the development of problem-solving and collaborative skills in Chilean 8th grade students. Three MSGs were developed and played by teams of four students, who had to solve the problems posed by the game collaboratively. The data shows that the experimental group had a higher perception of their own skills of collaboration and of the plan execution dimension of problem solving than the control group, providing empirical evidence regarding the contribution of MSGs to the development of collaborative problem-solving skills. PMID:19592762

  7. Completing Maxwell's equations by symmetrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    Maxwell's equations have allowed to obtain, for more than 100 years, a large number of results in electricity, magnetism, optics, wave theory, etc. But the antisymmetry between electric and magnetic fields is not completely respected in Maxwell's equations. By developing a theory where this antisymmetry is respected, a more complete set of equations is obtained in which the electromagnetic tensor is the divergence of a third-order tensor made up from electric and magnetic potentials. In particular, the Lorentz equations are included in these divergence equations and do not appear as a necessary trick. Electric fields produced by rotating magnets are then deduced.

  8. Structural Equation Model Trees

    PubMed Central

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2015-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree structures that separate a data set recursively into subsets with significantly different parameter estimates in a SEM. SEM Trees provide means for finding covariates and covariate interactions that predict differences in structural parameters in observed as well as in latent space and facilitate theory-guided exploration of empirical data. We describe the methodology, discuss theoretical and practical implications, and demonstrate applications to a factor model and a linear growth curve model. PMID:22984789

  9. On nonautonomous Dirac equation

    SciTech Connect

    Hovhannisyan, Gro; Liu Wen

    2009-12-15

    We construct the fundamental solution of time dependent linear ordinary Dirac system in terms of unknown phase functions. This construction gives approximate representation of solutions which is useful for the study of asymptotic behavior. Introducing analog of Rayleigh quotient for differential equations we generalize Hartman-Wintner asymptotic integration theorems with the error estimates for applications to the Dirac system. We also introduce the adiabatic invariants for the Dirac system, which are similar to the adiabatic invariant of Lorentz's pendulum. Using a small parameter method it is shown that the change in the adiabatic invariants approaches zero with the power speed as a small parameter approaches zero. As another application we calculate the transition probabilities for the Dirac system. We show that for the special choice of electromagnetic field, the only transition of an electron to the positron with the opposite spin orientation is possible.

  10. Collaborating Fuzzy Reinforcement Learning Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1997-01-01

    Earlier, we introduced GARIC-Q, a new method for doing incremental Dynamic Programming using a society of intelligent agents which are controlled at the top level by Fuzzy Relearning and at the local level, each agent learns and operates based on ANTARCTIC, a technique for fuzzy reinforcement learning. In this paper, we show that it is possible for these agents to compete in order to affect the selected control policy but at the same time, they can collaborate while investigating the state space. In this model, the evaluator or the critic learns by observing all the agents behaviors but the control policy changes only based on the behavior of the winning agent also known as the super agent.

  11. Atrial fibrillation care improvement collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Robelia, Paul; Kopecky, Stephen; Thacher, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly common cardiac arrhythmia. Many patients with new onset or recurrent AF present to the emergency department and are subsequently admitted to the hospital and seen by cardiology specialists for follow up. In an attempt to address this high utilization of acute health care resources, reduce costs, and improve patient care, our institution instituted a collaborative project between the departments of emergency medicine, cardiology, family medicine, and primary care internal medicine. The project team oversaw development of a new emergency department AF order set, encouraged utilization of a new oral anticoagulant (dabigatran), improved the primary care follow up connection, and deployed a multimodal education plan for primary care providers. Between 2012 and 2014, these interventions resulted in a 17% reduction in total AF per member per month (PMPM) cost, a 28% reduction in AF PMPM inpatient cost, and a 24% reduction in inpatient admissions for AF.

  12. ATLAS Live: Collaborative Information Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Steven; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    I report on a pilot project launched in 2010 focusing on facilitating communication and information exchange within the ATLAS Collaboration, through the combination of digital signage software and webcasting. The project, called ATLAS Live, implements video streams of information, ranging from detailed detector and data status to educational and outreach material. The content, including text, images, video and audio, is collected, visualised and scheduled using digital signage software. The system is robust and flexible, utilizing scripts to input data from remote sources, such as the CERN Document Server, Indico, or any available URL, and to integrate these sources into professional-quality streams, including text scrolling, transition effects, inter and intra-screen divisibility. Information is published via the encoding and webcasting of standard video streams, viewable on all common platforms, using a web browser or other common video tool. Authorisation is enforced at the level of the streaming and at the web portals, using the CERN SSO system.

  13. Author Credit for Transdisciplinary Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Ding, Ying; Malic, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Transdisciplinary collaboration is the key for innovation. An evaluation mechanism is necessary to ensure that academic credit for this costly process can be allocated fairly among coauthors. This paper proposes a set of quantitative measures (e.g., t_credit and t_index) to reflect authors’ transdisciplinary contributions to publications. These measures are based on paper-topic probability distributions and author-topic probability distributions. We conduct an empirical analysis of the information retrieval domain which demonstrates that these measures effectively improve the results of harmonic_credit and h_index measures by taking into account the transdisciplinary contributions of authors. The definitions of t_credit and t_index provide a fair and effective way for research organizations to assign credit to authors of transdisciplinary publications. PMID:26375678

  14. Collaborative observations of HDE 332077

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ake, T.

    1995-01-01

    IUE low dispersion observations were made of the Tc-deficient peculiar red giant (PRG) star, HDE 332077, to test the hypothesis that Tc--poor PRG's are formed as a result of mass transfer from a binary companion rather than from internal thermal pulsing while on the asymptotic red giant branch. Previous ground-based observations of this star indicated that it is a binary, but the secondary star was too massive for an expected white dwarf. A deep, SWP exposure was needed to search for evidence of an A-type main-sequence companion. We obtained a 120 minute LWP exposure (LWP 23479), followed by a collaborative 120 minute SWP exposure (SWP 45113). These observations were combined with our earlier IUE and optical data on this PRG star to model the spectral energy distribution of the system.

  15. PCCR: Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Whitcomb, David C.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ghiorzo, Paola; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Sasson, Aaron R.; Grizzle, William E.; Haynatzki, Gleb; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Kinarsky, Leo; Brand, Randall E.

    2011-01-01

    The Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry (PCCR) is a multi-institutional web-based system aimed to collect a variety of data on pancreatic cancer patients and high-risk subjects in a standard and efficient way. The PCCR was initiated by a group of experts in medical oncology, gastroenterology, genetics, pathology, epidemiology, nutrition, and computer science with the goal of facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies against pancreatic cancer. The PCCR is a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java/JSP technology and has Oracle 10 g database as a back-end. The PCCR uses a “confederation model” that encourages participation of any interested center, irrespective of its size or location. The PCCR utilizes a standardized approach to data collection and reporting, and uses extensive validation procedures to prevent entering erroneous data. The PCCR controlled vocabulary is harmonized with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT). The PCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in cancer research and healthcare. Currently, seven cancer centers in the USA, as well as one center in Italy are participating in the PCCR. At present, the PCCR database contains data on more than 2,700 subjects (PC patients and individuals at high risk of getting this disease). The PCCR has been certified by the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG¼) Bronze Compatible product. The PCCR provides a foundation for collaborative PC research. It has all the necessary prerequisites for subsequent evolution of the developed infrastructure from simply gathering PC-related data into a biomedical computing platform vital for successful PC studies, care and treatment. Studies utilizing data collected in the PCCR may engender new approaches to disease prognosis, risk factor assessment, and therapeutic interventions. PMID:21552494

  16. Collaborative Planetary GIS with JMARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickenshied, S.; Christensen, P. R.; Edwards, C. S.; Prashad, L. C.; Anwar, S.; Engle, E.; Noss, D.; Jmars Development Team

    2010-12-01

    Traditional GIS tools have allowed users to work locally with their own datasets in their own computing environment. More recently, data providers have started offering online repositories of preprocessed data which helps minimize the learning curve required to access new datasets. The ideal collaborative GIS tool provides the functionality of a traditional GIS and easy access to preprocessed data repositories while also enabling users to contribute data, analysis, and ideas back into the very tools they're using. JMARS (Java Mission-planning and Analysis for Remote Sensing) is a suite of geospatial applications developed by the Mars Space Flight Facility at Arizona State University. This software is used for mission planning and scientific data analysis by several NASA missions, including Mars Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. It is used by scientists, researchers and students of all ages from more than 40 countries around the world. In addition to offering a rich set of global and regional maps and publicly released orbiter images, the JMARS software development team has been working on ways to encourage the creation of collaborative datasets. Bringing together users from diverse teams and backgrounds allows new features to be developed with an interest in making the application useful and accessible to as wide a potential audience as possible. Actively engaging the scientific community in development strategy and hands on tasks allows the creation of user driven data content that would not otherwise be possible. The first community generated dataset to result from this effort is a tool mapping peer-reviewed papers to the locations they relate to on Mars with links to ancillary data. This allows users of JMARS to browse to an area of interest and then quickly locate papers corresponding to that area. Alternately, users can search for published papers over a specified time interval and visually see what areas of Mars have received the most attention over the requested time span.

  17. The collaborative roots of corruption

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Ori; Shalvi, Shaul

    2015-01-01

    Cooperation is essential for completing tasks that individuals cannot accomplish alone. Whereas the benefits of cooperation are clear, little is known about its possible negative aspects. Introducing a novel sequential dyadic die-rolling paradigm, we show that collaborative settings provide fertile ground for the emergence of corruption. In the main experimental treatment the outcomes of the two players are perfectly aligned. Player A privately rolls a die, reports the result to player B, who then privately rolls and reports the result as well. Both players are paid the value of the reports if, and only if, they are identical (e.g., if both report 6, each earns €6). Because rolls are truly private, players can inflate their profit by misreporting the actual outcomes. Indeed, the proportion of reported doubles was 489% higher than the expected proportion assuming honesty, 48% higher than when individuals rolled and reported alone, and 96% higher than when lies only benefited the other player. Breaking the alignment in payoffs between player A and player B reduced the extent of brazen lying. Despite player B's central role in determining whether a double was reported, modifying the incentive structure of either player A or player B had nearly identical effects on the frequency of reported doubles. Our results highlight the role of collaboration—particularly on equal terms—in shaping corruption. These findings fit a functional perspective on morality. When facing opposing moral sentiments—to be honest vs. to join forces in collaboration—people often opt for engaging in corrupt collaboration. PMID:26261341

  18. PCCR: Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Ketcham, Marsha A; Anderson, Michelle A; Whitcomb, David C; Lynch, Henry T; Ghiorzo, Paola; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sasson, Aaron R; Grizzle, William E; Haynatzki, Gleb; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Kinarsky, Leo; Brand, Randall E

    2011-01-01

    The Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry (PCCR) is a multi-institutional web-based system aimed to collect a variety of data on pancreatic cancer patients and high-risk subjects in a standard and efficient way. The PCCR was initiated by a group of experts in medical oncology, gastroenterology, genetics, pathology, epidemiology, nutrition, and computer science with the goal of facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies against pancreatic cancer. The PCCR is a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java/JSP technology and has Oracle 10 g database as a back-end. The PCCR uses a "confederation model" that encourages participation of any interested center, irrespective of its size or location. The PCCR utilizes a standardized approach to data collection and reporting, and uses extensive validation procedures to prevent entering erroneous data. The PCCR controlled vocabulary is harmonized with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT). The PCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in cancer research and healthcare. Currently, seven cancer centers in the USA, as well as one center in Italy are participating in the PCCR. At present, the PCCR database contains data on more than 2,700 subjects (PC patients and individuals at high risk of getting this disease). The PCCR has been certified by the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(ź)) Bronze Compatible product. The PCCR provides a foundation for collaborative PC research. It has all the necessary prerequisites for subsequent evolution of the developed infrastructure from simply gathering PC-related data into a biomedical computing platform vital for successful PC studies, care and treatment. Studies utilizing data collected in the PCCR may engender new approaches to disease prognosis, risk factor assessment, and therapeutic interventions. PMID:21552494

  19. PBL and beyond: trends in collaborative learning.

    PubMed

    Pluta, William J; Richards, Boyd F; Mutnick, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Building upon the disruption to lecture-based methods triggered by the introduction of problem-based learning, approaches to promote collaborative learning are becoming increasingly diverse, widespread and generally well accepted within medical education. Examples of relatively new, structured collaborative learning methods include team-based learning and just-in-time teaching. Examples of less structured approaches include think-pair share, case discussions, and the flipped classroom. It is now common practice in medical education to employ a range of instructional approaches to support collaborative learning. We believe that the adoption of such approaches is entering a new and challenging era. We define collaborate learning by drawing on the broader literature, including Chi's ICAP framework that emphasizes the importance of sustained, interactive explanation and elaboration by learners. We distinguish collaborate learning from constructive, active, and passive learning and provide preliminary evidence documenting the growth of methods that support collaborative learning. We argue that the rate of adoption of collaborative learning methods will accelerate due to a growing emphasis on the development of team competencies and the increasing availability of digital media. At the same time, the adoption collaborative learning strategies face persistent challenges, stemming from an overdependence on comparative-effectiveness research and a lack of useful guidelines about how best to adapt collaborative learning methods to given learning contexts. The medical education community has struggled to consistently demonstrate superior outcomes when using collaborative learning methods and strategies. Despite this, support for their use will continue to expand. To select approaches with the greatest utility, instructors must carefully align conditions of the learning context with the learning approaches under consideration. Further, it is critical that modifications are made with caution and that instructors verify that modifications do not impede the desired cognitive activities needed to support meaningful collaborative learning. PMID:24246112

  20. Current status of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) equations for Asians and an approach to create a common eGFR equation.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Seiichi; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Imai, Enyu; Horio, Masaru

    2010-06-01

    CKD is now recognized as life-threatening disease and various countermeasures are implemented worldwide. The most important step to overcome CKD is early detection and evaluation. Equation for estimating GFR is the necessary tool for this step. This is also useful to follow-up CKD patients in routine clinical settings. Currently, most commonly used equation is original and re-expressed MDRD formula. For Asians, ethnic co-efficient is needed when applying these formulas. Ethnic co-efficient is different among Asian countries. Recently, different original equations have been developed in several Asian countries. At the present time, it is not clear to develop a single common eGFR equation fit for Asians. There are several factors that affect GFR estimation. These include ethnicity, reference method to measure GFR, method of creatinine measurement and calibration. Towards the future, Asian collaborative study is necessary to validate and standardize eGFR equations. PMID:20586948

  1. A Data Mining Approach to Reveal Representative Collaboration Indicators in Open Collaboration Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anaya, Antonio R.; Boticario, Jesus G.

    2009-01-01

    Data mining methods are successful in educational environments to discover new knowledge or learner skills or features. Unfortunately, they have not been used in depth with collaboration. We have developed a scalable data mining method, whose objective is to infer information on the collaboration during the collaboration process in a


  2. Use of an Interculturally Enriched Collaboration Script in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popov, Vitaliy; Biemans, Harm J. A.; Kuznetsov, Andrei N.; Mulder, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the authors introduced an interculturally enriched collaboration script (IECS) for working in culturally diverse groups within a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environment and then assessed student online collaborative behaviour, learning performance and experiences. The question was if and how these


  3. Redesigning for Collaboration in Learning Initiatives: An Examination of Four Highly Collaborative Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna J.

    2006-01-01

    Much has been written about the barriers to collaborative work, but little research has been conducted on how to foster collaboration within higher education. This article presents the results of a case study of four campuses that have organized to enable collaboration. The study builds on earlier literature from the corporate sector using a model…

  4. Perceptions of Collaborative Process in a Professional Learning Focused University-Community-School Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Psimas, Lynnae L.

    2012-01-01

    The current study explored the collaborative processes present in a collaboration between an urban university in the Southeast United States, a state-funded educational support agency, and several urban and suburban school districts served by the state agency. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of the collaboration and relevant practices,…

  5. The Downtown Education Collaborative: A New Model for Collaborative Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobus, Michelle Vazquez; Tiemann, Maryli; Reed, Erin

    2011-01-01

    The Downtown Education Collaborative (DEC) is an innovative collaborative which includes public and private colleges working with community organizations in interdisciplinary community service learning. This article reviews DEC's development, from its inception as a shared vision aspired to by its partners, to a functioning collaborative. We…

  6. Use of an Interculturally Enriched Collaboration Script in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popov, Vitaliy; Biemans, Harm J. A.; Kuznetsov, Andrei N.; Mulder, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the authors introduced an interculturally enriched collaboration script (IECS) for working in culturally diverse groups within a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environment and then assessed student online collaborative behaviour, learning performance and experiences. The question was if and how these…

  7. Exact discretization of Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2016-01-01

    There are different approaches to discretization of the Schrödinger equation with some approximations. In this paper we derive a discrete equation that can be considered as exact discretization of the continuous Schrödinger equation. The proposed discrete equation is an equation with difference of integer order that is represented by infinite series. We suggest differences, which are characterized by power-law Fourier transforms. These differences can be considered as exact discrete analogs of derivatives of integer orders. Physically the suggested discrete equation describes a chain (or lattice) model with long-range interaction of power-law form. Mathematically it is a uniquely highlighted difference equation that exactly corresponds to the continuous Schrödinger equation. Using the Young's inequality for convolution, we prove that suggested differences are operators on the Hilbert space of square-summable sequences. We prove that the wave functions, which are exact discrete analogs of the free particle and harmonic oscillator solutions of the continuous Schrödinger equations, are solutions of the suggested discrete Schrödinger equations.

  8. Langevin equation approach to reactor noise analysis: stochastic transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Akcasu, A.Z. ); Stolle, A.M. )

    1993-01-01

    The application of the Langevin equation method to the study of fluctuations in the space- and velocity-dependent neutron density as well as in the detector outputs in nuclear reactors is presented. In this case, the Langevin equation is the stochastic linear neutron transport equation with a space- and velocity-dependent random neutron source, often referred to as the noise equivalent source (NES). The power spectral densities (PSDs) of the NESs in the transport equation, as well as in the accompanying detection rate equations, are obtained, and the cross- and auto-power spectral densities of the outputs of pairs of detectors are explicitly calculated. The transport-level expression for the R([omega]) ratio measured in the [sup 252]Cf source-driven noise analysis method is also derived. Finally, the implementation of the Langevin equation approach at different levels of approximation is discussed, and the stochastic one-speed transport and one-group P[sub 1] equations are derived by first integrating the stochastic transport equation over speed and then eliminating the angular dependence by a spherical harmonics expansion. By taking the large transport rate limit in the P[sub 1] description, the stochastic diffusion equation is obtained as well as the PSD of the NES in it. This procedure also leads directly to the stochastic Fick's law.

  9. Fluid equations with nonlinear wave-particle resonances^

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattor, Nathan

    1997-11-01

    We have derived fluid equations that include linear and nonlinear wave-particle resonance effects. This greatly extends previous ``Landau-fluid'' closures, which include linear Landau damping. (G.W. Hammett and F.W. Perkins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64,) 3019 (1990).^, (Z. Chang and J. D. Callen, Phys. Fluids B 4,) 1167 (1992). The new fluid equations are derived with no approximation regarding nonlinear kinetic interaction, and so additionally include numerous nonlinear kinetic effects. The derivation starts with the electrostatic drift kinetic equation for simplicity, with a Maxwellian distribution function. Fluid closure is accomplished through a simple integration trick applied to the drift kinetic equation, using the property that the nth moment of Maxwellian distribution is related to the nth derivative. The result is a compact closure term appearing in the highest moment equation, a term which involves a plasma dispersion function of the electrostatic field and its derivatives. The new term reduces to the linear closures in appropriate limits, so both approaches retain linear Landau damping. But the nonlinearly closed equations have additional desirable properties. Unlike linear closures, the nonlinear closure retains the time-reversibility of the original kinetic equation. We have shown directly that the nonlinear closure retains at least two nonlinear resonance effects: wave-particle trapping and Compton scattering. Other nonlinear kinetic effects are currently under investigation. The new equations correct two previous discrepancies between kinetic and Landau-fluid predictions, including a propagator discrepancy (N. Mattor, Phys. Fluids B 4,) 3952 (1992). and a numerical discrepancy for the 3-mode shearless bounded slab ITG problem. (S. E. Parker et al.), Phys. Plasmas 1, 1461 (1994). ^* In collaboration with S. E. Parker, Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder. ^ Work performed at LLNL under DoE contract No. W7405-ENG-48.

  10. Mode decomposition evolution equations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2012-03-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be easily used for secondary processing. Various simplifications of the proposed MoDEEs, including a linearized version, and an algebraic version, are discussed for computational convenience. The Fourier pseudospectral method, which is unconditionally stable for linearized the high order MoDEEs, is utilized in our computation. Validation is carried out to mode separation of high frequency adjacent modes. Applications are considered to signal and image denoising, image edge detection, feature extraction, enhancement etc. It is hoped that this work enhances the understanding of high order PDEs and yields robust and useful tools for image and signal analysis. PMID:22408289

  11. Mode decomposition evolution equations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be easily used for secondary processing. Various simplifications of the proposed MoDEEs, including a linearized version, and an algebraic version, are discussed for computational convenience. The Fourier pseudospectral method, which is unconditionally stable for linearized the high order MoDEEs, is utilized in our computation. Validation is carried out to mode separation of high frequency adjacent modes. Applications are considered to signal and image denoising, image edge detection, feature extraction, enhancement etc. It is hoped that this work enhances the understanding of high order PDEs and yields robust and useful tools for image and signal analysis. PMID:22408289

  12. Raising the Profile of Innovative Teaching in Higher Education? Reflections on the EquATE Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Sue; Wall, Kate; Lofthouse, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology developed by members of the Research Centre for Learning and Teaching (RCfLAT) to collaborate with university teaching colleagues to produce theoretically- and pedagogically-based case studies of innovations in teaching and learning. The Equal Acclaim for Teaching Excellence (EquATE) project investigates…

  13. Collaborative Problem Solving in Shared Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lin; Mills, Leila A.; Ifenthaler, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine collaborative problem solving in a shared virtual space. The main question asked was: How will the performance and processes differ between collaborative problem solvers and independent problem solvers over time? A total of 104 university students (63 female and 41 male) participated in an experimental…

  14. Elearn: A Collaborative Educational Virtual Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michailidou, Anna; Economides, Anastasios A.

    Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) that support collaboration are one of the new technologies that have attracted great interest. VLEs are learning management software systems composed of computer-mediated communication software and online methods of delivering course material. This paper presents ELearn, a collaborative VLE for teaching…

  15. Lessons Learned from the Collaborative Writing Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhavsar, Victoria; Ahn, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    We reflect on how to implement the instrumental aspect of collaborative writing in such a way that the developmental aspect of collaborative writing is maximally fostered, based on conditions necessary for socially constructed learning. We discuss four instrumental strategies that bolster mutual ownership of the writing and protect the social


  16. Collaboration using roles. [in computer network security

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Matt

    1990-01-01

    Segregation of roles into alternative accounts is a model which provides not only the ability to collaborate but also enables accurate accounting of resources consumed by collaborative projects, protects the resources and objects of such a project, and does not introduce new security vulnerabilities. The implementation presented here does not require users to remember additional passwords and provides a very simple consistent interface.

  17. Collaborative Administrative Record Matching in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseley, W. Charles

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the collaboration among the California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office, the California Employment Development Department and community college practitioners to develop an administrative data-matching system to meet accountability mandates of the 1990 Perkins Act. Reviews the benefits of collaboration when matching student records…

  18. Collaborative Interaction for Improvement of Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Nancy E.

    1990-01-01

    Relationships are explored between elementary school teachers' (N=13) collaborative interactions and implementation of a complex instructional program ("Finding Out/Descubrimiento") in science and mathematics developed for bilingual classrooms. Findings revealed an association between frequency of teacher collaboration and quality of


  19. Negotiating a River: Four Reflections on Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Dorothy Y.; Pearson, Carol; Ratliff, Joanne; Hillsman, Sandra; Miller, Ginger T.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the experiences of a team of teacher educators embarking on a collaboration effort during their methods courses for pre-service early childhood education teachers, using the metaphor of a first experience in white water rafting. The article describes how the collaboration was set up, discusses the expectations and interpretations of the…

  20. Collaborative Inquiry: Working toward Shared Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Mary; Adams, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    Working cooperatively in groups can help students connect learning with experience and build relationships at the same time. In collaborative inquiry, student questions can connect the big ideas that cut across disciplines. This paper describes how collaboration promotes social skills and a sense of partnership; discusses the appropriate learning…

  1. Teaching Primary & Secondary Sources: An Earthshaking Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Does history have to be boring and dry? Not if a person takes the familiar and adds an earthshaking twist! To begin the collaborative process, work with a willing teacher. This article talks about a teaching collaboration between the author as a library media specialist and Beth who was interested in literature circle titles for her 6th grade


  2. Cross Course Collaboration in Undergraduate Sociology Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltermaurer, Eve; Obach, Brian

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a cross course collaborative research project designed to provide students with an opportunity to integrate aspects of sociological study that are typically addressed in a compartmentalized course by course manner. They used this approach on two separate occasions. The first involved collaboration between a…

  3. Communication and Collaboration with Schools: Pediatricians' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley-Klug, Kathy L.; Sundman, Ashley N.; Nadeau, Joshua; Cunningham, Jennifer; Ogg, Julia

    2010-01-01

    The multifaceted effect of chronic illness in children has created a need for pediatricians and school personnel, specifically school psychologists, to engage in collaborative problem solving. However, the extent to which this collaboration actually occurs in practice is unknown. A survey was developed and administered to a national sample of


  4. Collaboration by Design: Context, Structure, and Medium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiessen, Esther L.; Ward, Douglas R.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an instructional unit integrating three educational innovations: a problem-solving video (Adventures of Jasper Woodbury), a structure for collaborative learning, Fostering Communities of Learners (FCL), and Computer-Supported Intentional Learning Environments (CSILE). Argues that each innovation supports collaboration in a distinct way…

  5. Common Ground. Feminist Collaboration in the Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Elizabeth G., Ed.; Mink, JoAnna Stephens, Ed.

    The fifteen articles in this anthology examine the process of collaboration as it fits into questions of gender. Articles include: "Educate, Organize, and Agitate: A Historical Overview of Feminist Collaboration in Great Britain and America, 1640-1930" (Melodie Andrews); "Beyond Feminism: An Intercultural Challenge for Transforming the Academy"…

  6. Preparing Entry-Level Counselors for Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Stanley B.; Grimmett, Marc A.; Cannon, Sharon McMillen; Ting, Siu-Man Raymond; Nassar-McMillan, Sylvia C.; Gerler, Edwin R.; Maxwell, Millie; Edwards-Joseph, Arline R. A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Over a period of 5 years, faculty members from the North Carolina State University's Counselor Education Program have integrated a curriculum enhancement to promote collaboration behaviors among program graduates across the master's degree options for training school, college, and community counselors. The School-College-Community Collaboration…

  7. Developing Collaborative Partnerships. Practice Application Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Collaboration has become a pervasive strategy for systemic change in human services, education, government, and community agencies. Collaborative partnerships require a change in thinking and in operating. Such changes can be intimidating or threatening. In addition, other barriers must be overcome to make partnerships work. Examples of successful


  8. Measuring Heedful Interrelating in Collaborative Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Sarah R.; Jordan, Michelle E.

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative group work plays an important part in postsecondary education, and the ability to assess the quality of such group work is useful for both students and instructors. The purpose of this study was to develop a self-report measure of students' perceptions of the quality of their interactions during collaborative educational tasks.


  9. Harnessing Collaborative Annotations on Online Formative Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jian-Wei; Lai, Yuan-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This paper harnesses collaborative annotations by students as learning feedback on online formative assessments to improve the learning achievements of students. Through the developed Web platform, students can conduct formative assessments, collaboratively annotate, and review historical records in a convenient way, while teachers can generate…

  10. Collaboration Works! Preparing Teachers for Urban Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Theresa E.

    1990-01-01

    This article describes the philosophy and programmatic elements that make the Cooperative Urban Teacher Education (CUTE) program a successful model of collaborative urban teacher education. It also provides a brief overview of a follow-up study of CUTE student teachers (N=103) from a collaborating university. (IAH)

  11. Learning during a Collaborative Final Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlstrom, Orjan

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative testing has been suggested to serve as a good learning activity, for example, compared to individual testing. The aim of the present study was to measure learning at different levels of knowledge during a collaborative final exam in a course in basic methods and statistical procedures. Results on pre- and post-tests taken…

  12. How Collaborative Is Structural Family Therapy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Ryan T.; Nichols, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the charge by "collaborative" therapies, such as solution focused and narrative, that structural family therapy is an aggressive, confrontational, and impositional approach, this investigation examines the role of therapist empathy in creating a collaborative partnership in structural family therapy. Twenty-four videotaped therapy…

  13. Collaborative Strategic Planning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanaghan, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    This book outlines a simple, five-phase collaborative approach to strategic planning that has worked effectively on many campuses. Specifically, Collaborative Strategic Planning (CSP) refers to the disciplined and thoughtful process of meaningfully engaging relevant stakeholders in creating a shared future vision and goals for their institution.


  14. Understanding Children's Collaborative Interactions in Shared Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Stacey D.; Mandryk, R. L.; Inkpen, K. M.

    2003-01-01

    Explores how various collaborative settings affect elementary school children's interactions with each other and with technology. Describes the development of co-located groupware systems offering support for concurrent, multi-user interactions around a shared display, which offer a collaborative environment in which users share both the physical…

  15. It's a Fit: Collaboration and Gifted Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Julie; Campbell, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the collaboration among preservice teacher students that occurs during the Academy for Young Scholars in Arkansas, a summer enrichment program for gifted students ages 4-15. The benefits of the teacher collaboration are described, including benefits to students, increased confidence, and borrowed strategies. (Contains 6…

  16. Collaborators' Attitudes about Differences of Opinion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creamer, Elizabeth G.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how long-term collaborators interpret substantive differences of opinion and the strategies they use to negotiate them. Long-term collaborators are coauthors who have had a working relationship for ten or more years. Differences of opinion refer to differences in interpretation about substantive issues related to research…

  17. Promoting Creative Tension within Collaborative Writing Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewald, Helen Rothschild; MacCallum, Virginia

    1990-01-01

    Describes a collaborative writing assignment which features a series of interconnected business messages arising out of a case study and including inhouse memos and an analytical report. Shows how the design of a collaborative writing assignment can foster creative rather than debilitative tension. (RS)

  18. Harnessing Collaborative Annotations on Online Formative Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jian-Wei; Lai, Yuan-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This paper harnesses collaborative annotations by students as learning feedback on online formative assessments to improve the learning achievements of students. Through the developed Web platform, students can conduct formative assessments, collaboratively annotate, and review historical records in a convenient way, while teachers can generate


  19. Collaborative Strategic Planning: Myth or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbugua, Flora; Rarieya, Jane F. A.

    2014-01-01

    The concept and practice of strategic planning, while entrenched in educational institutions in the West, is just catching on in Kenya. While literature emphasizes the importance of collaborative strategic planning, it does not indicate the challenges presented by collaboratively engaging in strategic planning. This article reports on findings of…

  20. Understanding Together: Sensemaking in Collaborative Information Seeking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Sharoda A.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years researchers have found that people often collaborate during information seeking activities. Collaborative information seeking (CIS) is composed of multiple different activities like seeking, sharing, understanding, and using information together. However, most studies of CIS have focused on how people find and retrieve information


  1. A Handbook for Rural Arts Collaborations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Mary; Caddy, John

    A strong rural arts project should be collaborative. Collaborative projects accommodate diverse needs and agendas, develop non-school project advocates, are sustained by and rely on several sources, and strengthen communities. Because local artists are accessible, have a special commitment to improving education in their communities, and…

  2. Examining Peer Collaboration in Online Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castek, Jill; Coiro, Julie; Guzniczak, Lizbeth; Bradshaw, Carlton

    2012-01-01

    This study examines peer collaboration among four pairs of seventh graders who read online to determine what caused the downfall of the Mayan civilization. More and less productive collaborative interactions are presented through snippets of dialogue in which pairs negotiated complex texts. Few examples of how teachers can skillfully facilitate…

  3. Collaborative Translations: Designing Bilingual Instructional Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyes, Christopher S.; Puzio, Kelly; Jiménez, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the role of collaboration and multilingual literacy as 21st-century skills, the authors used design research methods to present, analyze, and refine a strategic reading approach for bilingual students. The collaborative translation strategy involves reading an academic text, translating key passages, and evaluating these translations.…

  4. Elearn: A Collaborative Educational Virtual Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michailidou, Anna; Economides, Anastasios A.

    Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) that support collaboration are one of the new technologies that have attracted great interest. VLEs are learning management software systems composed of computer-mediated communication software and online methods of delivering course material. This paper presents ELearn, a collaborative VLE for teaching


  5. Mock Interdisciplinary Staffing: Educating for Interprofessional Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quealy-Berge, Diana; Caldwell, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Training for interprofessional collaboration is important because professionals are increasingly required to work together in a coordinated and collaborative manner to meet the complex needs of clients. However, few published reports exist on interprofessional training for community counselors and marriage and family therapists. The authors…

  6. International Collaborative Learning--The Facilitation Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clear, A. G.

    International collaborative learning is becoming more viable through a variety of Internet enabled software products. Group Support Systems appear to offer promise. But it is not well understood how to facilitate the teaching and learning process in electronic environments. If education is to involve an interactive process of collaborative inquiry…

  7. Collaborating for Change: Building Partnerships among Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs-Richardson, Rita; Rivers, Eileen S.

    Building partnerships among teachers is essential to enhance student learning. The Richardson-Rivers Collaboration Model emphasizes the importance of relationship building and describes procedures for successful classroom collaboration among teachers. The model combines theoretical constructs based on the Johari window and Jung's personality


  8. Collaborative Writing Support Tools on the Cloud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, R. A.; O'Rourke, S. T.; Jones, J.; Yacef, K.; Reimann, P.

    2011-01-01

    Academic writing, individual or collaborative, is an essential skill for today's graduates. Unfortunately, managing writing activities and providing feedback to students is very labor intensive and academics often opt out of including such learning experiences in their teaching. We describe the architecture for a new collaborative writing support


  9. Practices and Strategies of Distributed Knowledge Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudaravalli, Srinivas

    2010-01-01

    Information Technology is enabling large-scale, distributed collaboration across many different kinds of boundaries. Researchers have used the label new organizational forms to describe such collaborations and suggested that they are better able to meet the demands of flexibility, speed and adaptability that characterize the knowledge economy.…

  10. Collaborative Strategic Planning: Myth or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbugua, Flora; Rarieya, Jane F. A.

    2014-01-01

    The concept and practice of strategic planning, while entrenched in educational institutions in the West, is just catching on in Kenya. While literature emphasizes the importance of collaborative strategic planning, it does not indicate the challenges presented by collaboratively engaging in strategic planning. This article reports on findings of


  11. June 1992 Hall B collaboration meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Lawrence

    1992-06-01

    The Hall B collaboration meeting at the CEBAF 1992 Summer Workshop consisted of technical and physics working group meetings, a special beam line devices working group meeting the first meeting of the membership committee, a technical representatives meeting and a full collaboration meeting. Highlights of these meetings are presented in this report.

  12. Modeling Collaboration for ESL Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DelliCarpini, Margo

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a semester-long project where a TESOL professor and English Education professor modeled collaborative teaching and explicitly taught collaboration skills to a coscheduled teaching methods class consisting of TESOL and Secondary English teacher candidates. Data were collected in the form of pre- and postsemester surveys. In…

  13. Collaborative Job Training in Rural Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Gary Paul; Galetto, Valeria; Haines, Anna

    2003-01-01

    We examine collaborative efforts by employers to provide job training in rural areas and assess how this collaboration affects the willingness of employers to train workers. Data are drawn from a telephone survey conducted in 2001 of a stratified random sample of 1,590 nonmetropolitan firms in the U.S. The literature on job training suggests that…

  14. Minnesota Family Service Collaboratives: 1998 Outcome Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement.

    In 1993 the Minnesota Legislature provided funding to establish local collaborative initiatives to integrate services and improve outcomes for children and families. This report is based on the individual outcome reports mandated for the 24 collaboratives that first received implementation grants in 1995 or 1996. Information from a variety of…

  15. Using Wikis to Promote Collaborative EFL Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Zelilha; Yildiz, Senem

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the use of wikis in collaborative writing projects in foreign language learning classrooms. A total of 34 intermediate level university students learning English as a foreign language (EFL) were asked to accomplish three different wiki-based collaborative writing tasks, (argumentative, informative and decision-making) working…

  16. Collaborative Elder Abuse Prevention Project Quarterly Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Garry L.

    The Texas Department of Human Services, in collaboration with 13 other public and private organizations, co-sponsored a statewide collaborative elder abuse prevention project, to prevent abuse of elderly and disabled adults. The goal of this project is to develop a comprehensive, long-range plan for the prevention of elder abuse, a method for…

  17. Collaborative Virtual Gaming Worlds in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitton, Nicola; Hollins, Paul

    2008-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use of virtual gaming worlds in education, supported by the increased use of multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) and massively multi-player online role-playing games (MMORPGs) for collaborative learning. However, this paper argues that collaborative gaming worlds have been in use much longer and are much wider


  18. Administrators as Advocates for Teacher Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketterlin-Geller, Leanne R.; Baumer, Patricia; Lichon, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    This column contends that administrators are responsible for constructing a culture of collaboration in their schools and that ultimately, the facilitation of collaboration affects students' academic achievement. Within the context of a leadership scenario, this article outlines the need for, function of, and logistical implementation of…

  19. Crossing Boundaries: Virtual Collaboration Across Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Peggy; Oakes, Phyllis B.; Corley, Donna; Lindell, Calvin O.

    1998-01-01

    In an experiment in cross-disciplinary collaboration involving three courses at Morehead State University during spring semester, 1997, small groups worked collaboratively within a virtual environment to define solutions for children's health issues as described by an early childhood education class. The instructors and a consultant utilized


  20. Collaborative Reasoning in China and Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Ting; Anderson, Richard C.; Kim, Il-Hee; Li, Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Students at two sites in China and one site in Korea engaged in Collaborative Reasoning, an approach to discussion that requires self-management, free participation, and critical thinking. The discontinuity between the usual adult-dominated discourse of Chinese and Korean homes and classrooms and the expected discourse of Collaborative Reasoning…

  1. Lessons Learned from the Collaborative Writing Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhavsar, Victoria; Ahn, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    We reflect on how to implement the instrumental aspect of collaborative writing in such a way that the developmental aspect of collaborative writing is maximally fostered, based on conditions necessary for socially constructed learning. We discuss four instrumental strategies that bolster mutual ownership of the writing and protect the social…

  2. 5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Continuing collaboration. 9701.105 Section 9701.105 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a)...

  3. Collaborative Job Training in Rural Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Gary Paul; Galetto, Valeria; Haines, Anna

    2003-01-01

    We examine collaborative efforts by employers to provide job training in rural areas and assess how this collaboration affects the willingness of employers to train workers. Data are drawn from a telephone survey conducted in 2001 of a stratified random sample of 1,590 nonmetropolitan firms in the U.S. The literature on job training suggests that


  4. Using Communication to Solve Roadblocks to Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzzeo, Toni

    2004-01-01

    Despite the mandate of our national professional organizations to teach collaboratively, and the well-documented wisdom of doing so, roadblocks frequently litter the path to collaborative practice. Most teacher-librarians have encountered several; some still struggle daily. Suggestions offered in this article include: start by talking to teachers;…

  5. Collaborative Learning: A Sourcebook for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, Anne S.; And Others

    This sourcebook contains nine papers on various aspects of collaborative learning for students with emphasis on college level instruction (though some material relevant to secondary elementary education is also included). Contributors address what collaborative learning is, how is it implemented, how to assess it, and where it is used. Each


  6. Teaching Primary & Secondary Sources: An Earthshaking Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Does history have to be boring and dry? Not if a person takes the familiar and adds an earthshaking twist! To begin the collaborative process, work with a willing teacher. This article talks about a teaching collaboration between the author as a library media specialist and Beth who was interested in literature circle titles for her 6th grade…

  7. Peer Interaction in Three Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staarman, Judith Kleine; Krol, Karen; Meijden, Henny van der

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to gain insight into the occurrence of different types of peer interaction and particularly the types of interaction beneficial for learning in different collaborative learning environments. Based on theoretical notions related to collaborative learning and peer interaction, a coding scheme was developed to analyze the


  8. Collaborative Writing Support Tools on the Cloud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, R. A.; O'Rourke, S. T.; Jones, J.; Yacef, K.; Reimann, P.

    2011-01-01

    Academic writing, individual or collaborative, is an essential skill for today's graduates. Unfortunately, managing writing activities and providing feedback to students is very labor intensive and academics often opt out of including such learning experiences in their teaching. We describe the architecture for a new collaborative writing support…

  9. Consorting and Collaborating in the Education Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, David, Ed.; Husbands, Chris, Ed.

    This book describes one of the somewhat paradoxical consequences of the development of the education market place--the development of collaborative relations and infrastructures between competing institutions. Fourteen chapters written by participants in collaborative arrangements describe and analyze their responses to the market place and…

  10. Practices and Strategies of Distributed Knowledge Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudaravalli, Srinivas

    2010-01-01

    Information Technology is enabling large-scale, distributed collaboration across many different kinds of boundaries. Researchers have used the label new organizational forms to describe such collaborations and suggested that they are better able to meet the demands of flexibility, speed and adaptability that characterize the knowledge economy.


  11. English 4090: Collaborative Writing at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Mark

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a course design of English 4090: Collaborative Writing at Work. The course is a senior-level elective designed to reinforce students' existing knowledge of professional writing and to teach students how to apply that knowledge effectively in collaborative contexts. Here, the author focuses on the Spring 2006 class and…

  12. Collaborative Teaching of an Integrated Methods Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, George; Kim, Jinyoung; Kerekes, Judit

    2011-01-01

    With an increasing diversity in American schools, teachers need to be able to collaborate in teaching. University courses are widely considered as a stage to demonstrate or model the ways of collaboration. To respond to this call, three authors team taught an integrated methods course at an urban public university in the city of New York.…

  13. Collaborative Instructional Strategies to Enhance Knowledge Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Darryl C.

    2015-01-01

    To promote knowledge convergence through collaborative learning activities in groups, this qualitative case study involved a layered approach for the design and delivery of a highly collaborative learning environment incorporating various instructional technologies grounded in learning theory. In a graduate-level instructional technology course,


  14. Cultures of Collaboration: Leveraging Classroom Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    A primary task of teachers is to promote the culture of collaboration in classrooms. That's because we are smarter together than we are alone. But for teachers to leverage the unique social capacity of classrooms, they need to understand how to create situations requiring and rewarding collaboration (like that of inquiry), how to structure groups,…

  15. Collaborative Instructional Strategies to Enhance Knowledge Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Darryl C.

    2015-01-01

    To promote knowledge convergence through collaborative learning activities in groups, this qualitative case study involved a layered approach for the design and delivery of a highly collaborative learning environment incorporating various instructional technologies grounded in learning theory. In a graduate-level instructional technology course,…

  16. Writing Together: An Arendtian Framework for Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Restaino, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This essay considers the long-standing challenges, in both practice and theory, to collaborative writing in the first-year classroom. I argue that Hannah Arendt's concepts of plurality and natality are useful frameworks for thinking constructively and practically about teaching argumentative writing through collaboration. I explore these


  17. Relationship Between Renal Function and Physical Performance in Elderly Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lattanzio, Fabrizia; Abbatecola, Angela Marie; Volpato, Stefano; Pedone, Claudio; Pranno, Luigi; Laino, Irma; Garasto, Sabrina; Corica, Francesco; Passarino, Giuseppe; Antonelli Incalzi, Raffaele

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly recognized as a cause of worsening physical functioning in older patients. The Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) is highly reliable in older populations, but no data on older hospitalized patients with different degrees of kidney function are available. We aimed at testing the association between estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and SPPB, either global score (range 0–12) or its individual components (muscle strength, balance, and walking speed, each ranging from 0 to 4), in a sample of older hospitalized patients. Our series consisted of 486 patients aged 65 or more consecutively enrolled in 11 acute care medical wards participating to a multicenter observational study. eGFR was obtained by the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiological Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Physical performance was objectively measured by the SPPB. The relationship between eGFR and SPPB was investigated by multiple linear regression analysis. Physically impaired patients (SPPB total score<5) were older, had lower serum albumin and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores as well as higher overall co-morbidity, prevalence of stroke, cancer, and anemia compared to those with intermediate (SPPB=5–8) and good physical performance (SPPB=9–12). Fully adjusted multivariate models showed that eGFR (modeled as 10?mL/min per 1.73?m2 intervals) was independently associated with the SPPB total score (B=0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.18–0.66; p=0.003), balance (B=0.30; 95% CI=0.10–0.49; p=0.005), and muscle strength (B=0.06; 95% CI=0.01–0.10; p=0.043), but not with walking speed (B=?0.04; 95% CI=?0.09–0.11; p=0.107). In conclusion, reduced renal function is associated with poorer physical performance in older hospitalized patients. SPPB is worthy of testing to monitor changes in physical performance in elderly CKD patients. PMID:22950422

  18. Fluctuation between Fasting and 2-H Postload Glucose State Is Associated with Chronic Kidney Disease in Previously Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Patients with HbA1c ? 7%

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zeqiang; Yang, Weifang; Li, Chengqiao; Zhang, Xiuping; Hou, Xinguo; Sun, Yu; Lin, Peng; Liang, Kai; Gong, Lei; Wang, Meijian; Liu, Fuqiang; Li, Wenjuan; Yan, Fei; Yang, Junpeng; Wang, Lingshu; Tian, Meng; Liu, Jidong; Zhao, Ruxing; Chen, Li

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate how the glucose variability between fasting and a 2-h postload glucose state (2-h postload plasma glucose [2hPG]-fasting plasma glucose [FPG]) is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in middle-aged and elderly Chinese patients previously diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Design and Methods This cross-sectional study included 1054 previously diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients who were 40 years of age and older. First, the subjects were divided into two groups based on a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) value of 7%. Each group was divided into two subgroups, with or without CKD. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation was used to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). CKD was defined as eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to estimate the association between the 2hPG-FPG and eGFR. The 2hPG-FPG value was divided into four groups increasing in increments of 36 mg/dl (2.0 mmol/L): 0–72, 72–108, 108–144 and ?144 mg/dl, based on the quartiles of patients with HbA1c levels ?7%; then, binary logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association between 2hPG-FPG and the risk of CKD. Results In the patients with HbA1c levels ?7%, the 2hPG-FPG was significantly associated with decreased eGFR and an increased risk of CKD independent of age, gender, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, smoking, and drinking, as well as fasting insulin, cholesterol, triglyceride, and HbA1c levels. The patients with 2hPG-FPG values ?144 mg/dl showed an increased odds ratio (OR) of 2.640 (P?=?0.033). Additionally, HbA1c was associated with an increased risk of CKD in patients with HbA1c values ?7%. Conclusions The short-term glucose variability expressed by 2hPG-FPG is closely associated with decreased eGFR and an increased risk of CKD in patients with poor glycemic control (HbA1c?7%). PMID:25047354

  19. Fluctuation between Fasting and 2-H Postload Glucose State Is Associated with Glomerular Hyperfiltration in Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients with HbA1c < 7%

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xinguo; Wang, Chuan; Wang, Shaoyuan; Yang, Weifang; Ma, Zeqiang; Wang, Yulian; Li, Chengqiao; Li, Mei; Zhang, Xiuping; Zhao, Xiangmin; Sun, Yu; Song, Jun; Lin, Peng; Liang, Kai; Gong, Lei; Wang, Meijian; Liu, Fuqiang; Li, Wenjuan; Yan, Fei; Yang, Junpeng; Wang, Lingshu; Tian, Meng; Liu, Jidong; Zhao, Ruxing; Chen, Shihong; Chen, Li

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether fluctuations between the fasting and 2-h postload glucose ([2-hPBG]-fasting blood glucose [FBG]) states are associated with glomerular hyperfiltration (GHF) in middle-aged and elderly Chinese patients with newly diagnosed diabetes. Design and Methods In this study, we included 679 newly diagnosed diabetes patients who were ?40 years old. All the subjects were divided into two groups; those with HbA1c<7% and ?7%. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation was used to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). GHF was defined as an eGFR ? the 90th percentile. First, a multiple linear regression analysis was used to estimate the association of 2-hPBG-FBG with eGFR. Then, a generalized additive model was used to explore the possible nonlinear relationship between 2-hPBG-FBG and eGFR. Next, the 2-hPBG-FBG values were divided into four groups as follows: 0–36, 36–72, 72–108 and ?108 mg/dl. Finally, a multiple logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association of 2-hPBG-FBG with the risk of GHF. Results For the group with HbA1c<7%, the eGFR and the percentage of GHF were significantly higher compared with the group with HbA1c?7%. After adjusting for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, fasting insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, smoking, drinking and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), 2-hPBG-FBG was significantly associated with increased eGFR and an increased risk of GHF (the GHF risk increased by 64.9% for every 36.0 mg/dl [2.0 mmol/L] 2-hPBG-FBG increase) only in those patients with HbA1c<7%. Additionally, 2-hPBG-FBG and eGFR showed a nonlinear association (P<0.001). Conclusions Increased fluctuations between the fasting and 2-h postload glucose states are closely associated with increased eGFR and an increased risk of GHF in newly diagnosed diabetes patients with HbA1c<7%. PMID:25360521

  20. JWL Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-15

    The JWL equation of state (EOS) is frequently used for the products (and sometimes reactants) of a high explosive (HE). Here we review and systematically derive important properties. The JWL EOS is of the Mie-Grueneisen form with a constant Grueneisen coefficient and a constants specific heat. It is thermodynamically consistent to specify the temperature at a reference state. However, increasing the reference state temperature restricts the EOS domain in the (V, e)-plane of phase space. The restrictions are due to the conditions that P ≄ 0, T ≄ 0, and the isothermal bulk modulus is positive. Typically, this limits the low temperature regime in expansion. The domain restrictions can result in the P-T equilibrium EOS of a partly burned HE failing to have a solution in some cases. For application to HE, the heat of detonation is discussed. Example JWL parameters for an HE, both products and reactions, are used to illustrate the restrictions on the domain of the EOS.

  1. FRACTIONAL WAVE EQUATIONS WITH ATTENUATION

    PubMed Central

    Straka, Peter; Meerschaert, Mark M.; McGough, Robert J.; Zhou, Yuzhen

    2013-01-01

    Fractional wave equations with attenuation have been proposed by Caputo [5], Szabo [27], Chen and Holm [7], and Kelly et al. [11]. These equations capture the power-law attenuation with frequency observed in many experimental settings when sound waves travel through inhomogeneous media. In particular, these models are useful for medical ultrasound. This paper develops stochastic solutions and weak solutions to the power law wave equation of Kelly et al. [11]. PMID:25045309

  2. Concerning a singular Hill equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahon, F.

    Consideration is given to a singular Hill equation which arises in the variational equation for homothetic solutions (the only explicitly known solutions for triple collision in the three body problem). A transformed form, i.e., a singular Ince equation, is used, and the theory is given by means of periodic solutions expanded in Fourier series. A comparison is made with the forms given by Waldvogel (1977) and Mac Gehee (1974).

  3. Solving Differential Equations in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soetaert, Karline; Meysman, Filip; Petzoldt, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The open-source software R has become one of the most widely used systems for statistical data analysis and for making graphs, but it is also well suited for other disciplines in scientific computing. One of the fields where considerable progress has been made is the solution of differential equations. Here we first give an overview of the types of differential equations that R can solve, and then demonstrate how to use R for solving a 2-Dimensional partial differential equation.

  4. Fractional Schrödinger equation in optics.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Stefano

    2015-03-15

    In quantum mechanics, the space-fractional Schrödinger equation provides a natural extension of the standard Schrödinger equation when the Brownian trajectories in Feynman path integrals are replaced by Levy flights. Here an optical realization of the fractional Schrödinger equation, based on transverse light dynamics in aspherical optical cavities, is proposed. As an example, a laser implementation of the fractional quantum harmonic oscillator is presented in which dual Airy beams can be selectively generated under off-axis longitudinal pumping. PMID:25768196

  5. A note on "Kepler's equation".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutka, J.

    1997-07-01

    This note briefly points out the formal similarity between Kepler's equation and equations developed in Hindu and Islamic astronomy for describing the lunar parallax. Specifically, an iterative method for calculating the lunar parallax has been developed by the astronomer Habash al-Hasib al-Marwazi (about 850 A.D., Turkestan), which is surprisingly similar to the iterative method for solving Kepler's equation invented by Leonhard Euler (1707 - 1783).

  6. Collaborative PLM - The Next Generation AKA Cars on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderstrom, Tom; Stefanini, Mike

    2007-01-01

    In this slide presentation the importance of collaboration in developing the next systems for space exploration is stressed. The mechanism of this collaboration are reviewed, and particular emphasis is given to our planned exploration of Mars and how this will require a great deal of collaboration. A system architecture for this collaboration is shown and the diagram for the collaborative environment is conceptualized.

  7. Building a global teledermatology collaboration.

    PubMed

    Bobbs, Melanie; Bayer, Michelle; Frazer, Tifany; Humphrey, Stephen; Wilson, Barbara; Olasz, Edit; Holland, Kristen; Kuzminski, Jacquelyn

    2016-04-01

    Skin disease is common in low-resource countries and is associated with significant morbidity. The disease burden is often heightened by lack of access to adequate diagnosis and treatment. Teledermatology is a growing healthcare delivery modality that allows access to subspecialty care at a distance. This article describes how a low-cost teledermatology program was launched through collaboration between the Medical College of Wisconsin and Hillside Healthcare International. Several factors are required for a teledermatology program to be successful, beginning with a partnership between two entities that targets a locally identified need and is mutually beneficial to invested partners. The program should utilize the expertise of each partner, be based on an agreed upon process with clearly defined objectives, and protect patient privacy. After a program is implemented, adaptation to address challenges and best meet the needs of all parties involved will allow for continued success and sustainability. This process can serve as a model for other programs desiring to establish similar teledermatology partnerships in an academic setting. PMID:26873427

  8. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  9. Regional Interagency Disaster Response Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, K.; Sullivan, D.; Butow, S.; Beilin, P.

    2008-12-01

    In affiliation with the "Great Worden Quake II" (GWQII) disaster preparedness exercise, the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field California, the Air Force National Guard (ANG) 129th Rescue Wing, Moffett Field, California, and the Bay Area Automated Mapping Association,led by the IT group for the City of Walnut Creek, California, will engage in a technology transfer demonstration utilizing the collaborative environment developed for NASA's very successful wildfire mapping campaigns during the years 2006-2008. The aircraft platform will be the ANG C-130, a viable candidate to substitute for the Ikana UAV, which cannot fly from Ames because of FAA restrictions on UAV flights over populated areas. In this technology transfer demonstration, we will: (1) Prove, document and train Regional Fire departments how to link and use NASA real-time data with existing software (ESRI, IRRIS, etc). (2) Demonstrate how to access and use this data as a bridge between the real-time (3) Refine the questions and capabilities that would be involved and developed with this type of real-time data available This paper describes this exercise.

  10. Collaborative Planning of Robotic Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Backes, Paul; Powell, Mark; Vona, Marsette; Steinke, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The Science Activity Planner (SAP) software system includes an uplink-planning component, which enables collaborative planning of activities to be undertaken by an exploratory robot on a remote planet or on Earth. Included in the uplink-planning component is the SAP-Uplink Browser, which enables users to load multiple spacecraft activity plans into a single window, compare them, and merge them. The uplink-planning component includes a subcomponent that implements the Rover Markup Language Activity Planning format (RML-AP), based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML) format that enables the representation, within a single document, of planned spacecraft and robotic activities together with the scientific reasons for the activities. Each such document is highly parseable and can be validated easily. Another subcomponent of the uplink-planning component is the Activity Dictionary Markup Language (ADML), which eliminates the need for two mission activity dictionaries - one in a human-readable format and one in a machine-readable format. Style sheets that have been developed along with the ADML format enable users to edit one dictionary in a user-friendly environment without compromising

  11. Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIGź) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  12. Stereoscopic medical imaging collaboration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Fumio; Hirano, Takenori; Nakabayasi, Yuusuke; Minoura, Hirohito; Tsuruoka, Shinji

    2007-02-01

    The computerization of the clinical record and the realization of the multimedia have brought improvement of the medical service in medical facilities. It is very important for the patients to obtain comprehensible informed consent. Therefore, the doctor should plainly explain the purpose and the content of the diagnoses and treatments for the patient. We propose and design a Telemedicine Imaging Collaboration System which presents a three dimensional medical image as X-ray CT, MRI with stereoscopic image by using virtual common information space and operating the image from a remote location. This system is composed of two personal computers, two 15 inches stereoscopic parallax barrier type LCD display (LL-151D, Sharp), one 1Gbps router and 1000base LAN cables. The software is composed of a DICOM format data transfer program, an operation program of the images, the communication program between two personal computers and a real time rendering program. Two identical images of 512×768 pixcels are displayed on two stereoscopic LCD display, and both images show an expansion, reduction by mouse operation. This system can offer a comprehensible three-dimensional image of the diseased part. Therefore, the doctor and the patient can easily understand it, depending on their needs.

  13. Multicenter breast cancer collaborative registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(ź)) Bronze Compatible product.The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  14. Collaboration in Complex Medical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, Yan; Mankenzie, Colin F.

    1998-01-01

    Improving our understanding of collaborative work in complex environments has the potential for developing effective supporting technologies, personnel training paradigms, and design principles for multi-crew workplaces. USing a sophisticated audio-video-data acquisition system and a corresponding analysis system, the researchers at University of Maryland have been able to study in detail team performance during real trauma patient resuscitation. The first study reported here was on coordination mechanisms and on characteristics of coordination breakdowns. One of the key findings was that implicit communications were an important coordination mechanism (e.g. through the use of shared workspace and event space). The second study was on the sources of uncertainty during resuscitation. Although incoming trauma patients' status is inherently uncertain, the findings suggest that much of the uncertainty felt by care providers was related to communication and coordination. These two studies demonstrate the value of and need for creating a real-life laboratory for studying team performance with the use of comprehensive and integrated data acquisition and analysis tools.

  15. Langevin equation approach to reactor noise analysis: stochastic transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Akcasu, A.Z.; Stolle, A.M. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper is concerned with an application of the Langevin equation method to the study of fluctuations in the space- and velocity-dependent neutron density, as well as in the detector outputs, in nuclear reactors. The Langevin equation in this case is the stochastic linear neutron transport equation with a space- and velocity-dependent random neutron source, often referred to as the noise equivalent source (NES). The power spectral density (PSD) of the NES is evaluated in nuclear engineering applications by adopting a generalization of the Shottky formula. In this paper, the authors extend calculations to include the space and velocity dependence of neutron density by starting from the stochastic transport equation and the stochastic detection rate equations within the detectors. In addition, they discuss the implementation of the Langevin equation approach at different levels of approximation and explicitly obtain the stochastic one-speed transport and one-group P{sub 1} equations by first integrating the transport equation over speed and then eliminating in the angular dependence by spherical harmonic expansion.

  16. Building Collaborative Structures for Teachers' Autonomy and Self-Efficacy: The Mediating Role of Participative Management and Learning Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Jiafang; Jiang, Xinhui; Yu, Huen; Li, Dongyu

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the collaborative structure-building behavior of school principals and examined how such behavior affects teacher empowerment. More important, it tested the mediating effects of participative management and learning culture. By collecting nested data from 104 schools in Hong Kong and adopting multilevel structural equation…

  17. ARTEMIS: a collaborative framework for health care.

    PubMed

    Reddy, R; Jagannathan, V; Srinivas, K; Karinthi, R; Reddy, S M; Gollapudy, C; Friedman, S

    1993-01-01

    Patient centered healthcare delivery is an inherently collaborative process. This involves a wide range of individuals and organizations with diverse perspectives: primary care physicians, hospital administrators, labs, clinics, and insurance. The key to cost reduction and quality improvement in health care is effective management of this collaborative process. The use of multi-media collaboration technology can facilitate timely delivery of patient care and reduce cost at the same time. During the last five years, the Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC), under the sponsorship of DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, recently renamed ARPA) developed a number of generic key subsystems of a comprehensive collaboration environment. These subsystems are intended to overcome the barriers that inhibit the collaborative process. Three subsystems developed under this program include: MONET (Meeting On the Net)--to provide consultation over a computer network, ISS (Information Sharing Server)--to provide access to multi-media information, and PCB (Project Coordination Board)--to better coordinate focussed activities. These systems have been integrated into an open environment to enable collaborative processes. This environment is being used to create a wide-area (geographically distributed) research testbed under DARPA sponsorship, ARTEMIS (Advance Research Testbed for Medical Informatics) to explore the collaborative health care processes. We believe this technology will play a key role in the current national thrust to reengineer the present health-care delivery system. PMID:8130536

  18. Multicenter Epidemiological Study to Assess the Population of CKD Patients in Greece: Results from the PRESTAR Study

    PubMed Central

    Sombolos, Konstantinos; Tsakiris, Demitrios; Boletis, John; Vlahakos, Demetrios; Siamopoulos, Kostas C.; Vargemezis, Vassilios; Nikolaidis, Pavlos; Iatrou, Christos; Dafnis, Eugene; Xynos, Konstantinos; Argyropoulos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a relatively common condition not only associated with increased morbidity and mortality but also fuelling End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). Among developed nations, Greece has one of the highest ESRD incidence rates, yet there is limited understanding of the epidemiology of earlier stages of CKD. Methods Cross-sectional survey of pre-dialysis CKD outpatients in nephrology clinics in the National Health Care system between October 2009 and October 2010. Demographics, cause of CKD, blood pressure, level of renal function, duration of CKD and nephrology care, and specialty of referral physician were collected and analyzed. Different methods for estimating renal function (Cockroft-Gault [CG], CKD-Epi and MDRD) and staging CKD were assessed for agreement. Results A total of 1,501 patients in 9 centers were enrolled. Diabetic nephropathy was the most common nephrologist assigned cause of CKD (29.7%). In total, 36.5% of patients had self-referred to the nephrologist; patients with diabetes or serum creatinine above 220 ”mol/l (eGFR<40 ml/min/1.73 m2) were more likely to have been referred by a physician. Agreement between MDRD and CKD-Epi, but not between CG, the other estimating equations, was excellent. There was substantial heterogeneity with respect to renal diagnoses, referral patterns and blood pressure among participating centers. Conclusions In this first epidemiologic assessment of CKD in Greece, we documented delayed referral and high rates of self-referral among patients with CKD. eGFR reporting, currently offered by a limited number of laboratories, may facilitate detection of CKD at an earlier, more treatable stage. PMID:25406080

  19. The Influence of Learning Methods on Collaboration: Prior Repeated Retrieval Enhances Retrieval Organization, Abolishes Collaborative Inhibition, and Promotes Post-Collaborative Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congleton, Adam R.; Rajaram, Suparna

    2011-01-01

    Research on collaborative memory has unveiled the counterintuitive yet robust phenomenon that collaboration impairs group recall. A candidate explanation for this "collaborative inhibition" effect is the disruption of people's idiosyncratic retrieval strategies during collaboration, and it is hypothesized that employing methods that improve one's…

  20. Global Collaborations - Prospects and Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Ian

    2005-04-01

    International collaboration has long been a feature of science. Collaborative investments in joint facilities and projects have grown considerably over the past 20-40 years, and many projects have been multinational from the start. This has been particularly true in Europe, where intergovernmental organizations such as CERN, ESA, and ESO have enabled European countries to carry out forefront science with state-of-art facilites which would have been beyond the capabilities of any one country. A brief survey of these organizations, their structure, and the possible reasons behind their success is given. The transition from regional to global creates new problems. Global scale projects face a range of generic issues which must be addressed and overcome if the project is to be a success. Each project has its own specific boundary conditions and each adopts an approach best fitted to its own objectives and constraints. Experience with billion dollar projects such as the SSC, LHC, and ITER shows the key problem areas and demonstrates the importance of preparatory work in the early stages to settle issues such as schedule, funding, location, legal and managerial structure, and oversight. A range of current and proposed intercontinental or global projects - so- called ``Megascience Projects" - is reviewed. Such projects, originally a feature of space and particle physics, are now becoming more common, and very large projects in astronomy, for example ALMA and 50 - 100m telescopes, and other areas of physics now fall into the `global' category. These projects are on such a large scale, from any scientific, managerial, financial or political perspective, and have such global importance, that they have necessarily been conceived as international from the outset. Increasing financial pressures on governments and funding agencies in the developed countries place additional demands on the project planning. The contrasting approaches, problems faced, and progress made in various projects will be analyzed and possible lessions drawn out. The role which can be played in the early stages by bodies such as the OECD Global Science Forum and G-8 Carnegie Meetings, where science policy makers meet, is examined. Experience shows that these valuable `scene setting' discussions have to be informed by coordinated input from the scientific community and must be followed up by more detailed discussions between funding agencies or their equivalent, because decision making requires the development of a consensus amongst the participants. This process can be illustrated most effectively by the care with which the ideas for the International Linear Collider have been and are being developed. Agreement on building and operating a facility is not the end of the story. The legitimate desire of scientists in all other countries to be able to participate in exploiting a major new facility has to be taken into account, and that introduces a range of proprietary and sociological issues over data access and rights, and now, with the explosion in computing and storage powers, in data archiving support. These are issues which can be addressed within the scientific community and taken to the political arena via such bodies as the OECD Global Science Forum.