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  1. Clinical implications of the CKD epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation compared with the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) study equation for the estimation of renal dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Tarantini, Luigi; Barbati, Giulia; Cioffi, Giovanni; McAlister, Finlay Aleck; Ezekowitz, Justin Adrian; Mazzone, Carmine; Faganello, Giorgio; Russo, Giulia; Franceschini Grisolia, Enrico; Di Lenarda, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The CKD-EPI equation is more accurate than the MDRD equation in the general population. We performed this study to establish whether chronic kidney disease (CKD) is commonly recognized by clinicians and whether the CKD-EPI equation improves prognosis estimation in patients with chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD). We analyzed data on 12394 CVD patients consecutively examined at the Cardiovascular Center of Trieste (Italy) between November 2009 and October 2013. The outcomes were all-cause death and a composite outcome of death/hospitalization for CV events (D+cvH). CKD-EPI formula reclassified 1786 (14.4 %) patients between KDIGO categories compared to the MDRD: 2.3 % (n = 280) placed in a lower risk and 12.1 % (n = 1506) into a higher risk group. CKD, defined as eGFR-CKD-EPI formula <60 ml/min, was present in 3083 patients (24.9 %) but not recognized by clinicians in 1946 (63.1 % of patients with CKD). The lack of recognition of CKD was inversely proportional to the KDIGO class for both equations. There were 986 deaths and 2726 D+cvH during 24 months follow-up. The incidence of death and D+cvH was about twice as high in patients with unrecognized CKD than in those with normal renal function (31 % vs. 17.1 %, aHR: 1.35, 95 % CI: 1.15 to 1.60), even in those patients with eGFR-MDRD >60 but eGFR-CKD-EPI formula <60 (31.1 % vs 17.1 %, p < 0.001). CKD-EPI equation provides more accurate risk stratification than MDRD equation in patients with CVD. CKD was unrecognized in nearly two-thirds of these patients but clinical outcomes were similar in those for patients with recognized CKD. PMID:26123617

  2. A retrospective analysis of kidney function and risk factors by Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation in elderly Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yu, Feng; Wu, Yanhua; Fang, Xiaowu; Hu, Wenxue; Chen, Jian; Zhou, Ruili; Lin, Xinge; Hao, Wenke

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease accounts for much of the increased mortality, especially in the elder population. The prevalence of this disease is expected to increase significantly as the society ages. Our aim was to evaluate the kidney function and risk factors of reduced renal function among elderly Chinese patients. This study retrospectively collected clinical data from a total of 1062 inpatients aged 65 years or over. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated with the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Renal function and risk factors were also analyzed. For all 1062 subjects, the mean eGFR was 71.0 ± 24.8 mL/min/1.73 m(2), and the incidence rates of reduced renal function, proteinuria, hematuria and leukocyturia were 31.1%, 11.8%, 6.6% and 8.7%, respectively. The eGFR values were 83.4 ± 28.4, 72.2 ± 22.9, 67.8 ± 24.3 and 58.8 ± 29.1 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in the groups of 60-69, 70-79, 80-89 and ≥90 years age group (F = 15.101, p = 0.000), respectively; while the incidences of reduced renal function were 12.8%, 27.0%, 37.8% and 51.7% (χ(2) = 36.143, p = 0.000). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that hyperuricemia (OR = 4.62, p = 0.000), proteinuria (OR = 3.96, p = 0.000), urinary tumor (OR = 2.92, p = 0.015), anemia (OR = 2.45, p = 0.000), stroke (OR = 1.96, p = 0.000), hypertension (OR = 1.83, p = 0.006), renal cyst (OR = 1.64, p = 0.018), female (OR = 1.54, p = 0.015), coronary artery disease (OR = 1.53, p = 0.008) and age (OR = 1.05, p = 0.000) were the risk factors of reduced renal function. In conclusion, eGFR values decreased by age, while the incidence of reduced renal function, proteinuria, hematuria and leukocyturia increased with age. Treatment and control of comorbidities may slow the decline of renal function in elderly patients. PMID:26211499

  3. Assessing Glomerular Filtration Rate in Hospitalized Patients: A Comparison Between CKD-EPI and Four Cystatin C-Based Equations

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Judith; Ramos, Natalia; Quiroz, Augusto; Garjau, Maria; Torres, Irina; Azancot, M. Antonia; López, Montserrat; Sobrado, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives A specific method is required for estimating glomerular filtration rate GFR in hospitalized patients. Our objective was to validate the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation and four cystatin C (CysC)–based equations in this setting. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was an epidemiologic, cross-sectional study in a random sample of hospitalized patients (n = 3114). We studied the accuracy of the CKD-EPI and four CysC-based equations—based on (1) CysC alone or (2) adjusted by gender; (3) age, gender, and race; and (4) age, gender, race, and creatinine, respectively—compared with GFR measured by iohexol clearance (mGFR). Clinical, biochemical, and nutritional data were also collected. Results The CysC equation 3 significantly overestimated the GFR (bias of 7.4 ml/min per 1.73 m2). Most of the error in creatinine-based equations was attributable to calculated muscle mass, which depended on patient's nutritional status. In patients without malnutrition or reduced body surface area, the CKD-EPI equation adequately estimated GFR. Equations based on CysC gave more precise mGFR estimates when malnutrition, extensive reduction of body surface area, or loss of muscle mass were present (biases of 1 and 1.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2 for equations 2 and 4, respectively, versus 5.9 ml/min per 1.73 m2 for CKD-EPI). Conclusions These results suggest that the use of equations based on CysC and gender, or CysC, age, gender, and race, is more appropriate in hospitalized patients to estimate GFR, since these equations are much less dependent on patient's nutritional status or muscle mass than the CKD-EPI equation. PMID:21852668

  4. Comparison of the Schwartz and CKD-EPI Equations for Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate in Children, Adolescents, and Adults: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Selistre, Luciano; Rabilloud, Muriel; Cochat, Pierre; de Souza, Vandréa; Iwaz, Jean; Lemoine, Sandrine; Beyerle, Françoise; Poli-de-Figueiredo, Carlos E.; Dubourg, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimating kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is of utmost importance in many clinical conditions. However, very few studies have evaluated the performance of GFR estimating equations over all ages and degrees of kidney impairment. We evaluated the reliability of two major equations for GFR estimation, the CKD-EPI and Schwartz equations, with urinary clearance of inulin as gold standard. Methods and Findings The study included 10,610 participants referred to the Renal and Metabolic Function Exploration Unit of Edouard Herriot Hospital (Lyon, France). GFR was measured by urinary inulin clearance (only first measurement kept for analysis) then estimated with isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS)–traceable CKD-EPI and Schwartz equations. The participants’ ages ranged from 3 to 90 y, and the measured GFRs from 3 to 160 ml/min/1.73 m2. A linear mixed-effects model was used to model the bias (mean ratio of estimated GFR to measured GFR). Equation reliability was also assessed using precision (interquartile range [IQR] of the ratio) and accuracy (percentage of estimated GFRs within the 10% [P10] and 30% [P30] limits above and below the measured GFR). In the whole sample, the mean ratio with the CKD-EPI equation was significantly higher than that with the Schwartz equation (1.17 [95% CI 1.16; 1.18] versus 1.08 [95% CI 1.07; 1.09], p < 0.001, t-test). At GFR values of 60–89 ml/min/1.73 m2, the mean ratios with the Schwartz equation were closer to 1 than the mean ratios with the CKD-EPI equation whatever the age class (1.02 [95% CI 1.01; 1.03] versus 1.15 [95% CI 1.13; 1.16], p < 0.001, t-test). In young adults (18–40 y), the Schwartz equation had a better precision and was also more accurate than the CKD-EPI equation at GFR values under 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 (IQR: 0.32 [95% CI 0.28; 0.33] versus 0.40 [95% CI 0.36; 0.44]; P30: 81.4 [95% CI 78.1; 84.7] versus 63.8 [95% CI 59.7; 68.0]) and also at GFR values of 60–89 ml/min/1.73 m2. In all patients

  5. The relationship between estimated GFR based on the CKD-EPI formula and renal inulin clearance in potential kidney donors

    PubMed Central

    Schück, Otto; Teplan, Vladimir; Maly, Jan; Franekova, Janka; Malinska, Hana; Stollova, Milena; Latova, Irena; Urbanova, Jana; Skibova, Jelena; Viklicky, Ondrej

    2014-01-01

    It is not yet clear whether or not renal function in the living donor can be sufficiently assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using creatinine-based equations. The present paper investigates the relationship between GFR values determined using renal inulin clearance (Cin) and those estimated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) formula. Our study was performed in 287 potential kidney donors with a mean age of 48 ± 10 years. Mean Cin was 1.47 ± 0.28 (1.10 – 2.50) mL/s/1.73 m2. Total bias when using the CKD-EPI formula was –0.0183 mL/s/1.73 m2, precision 0.263 mL/s/1.73 m2, and accuracy 90.6% within ± 30% of Cin. The sensitivity of CKD-EPI to estimate a decrease in Cin below 1.33 mL/s/1.73 m2 was 50.5%, with an 85% specificity of detecting a value above the cutoff. Receiver-operating curve analysis for the above produced an area under the curve of 0.766 ± 0.0285 (CI 0.712 – 0.813). For donor screening purposes, CKD-EPI should be interpreted with great caution. PMID:25345381

  6. The Power of Renal Function Estimation Equations for Predicting Long-Term Kidney Graft Survival

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon Young; Joo, Dong Jin; Song, Mi Kyung; Kim, Myoung Soo; Park, Hyeong Cheon; Kim, Yu Seun; Kim, Beom Seok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Evaluation of renal function using an accurate estimation equation is important for predicting long-term graft survival. We designed this retrospective cohort study to evaluate the predictive power of renal function estimation by the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) and the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study equations for graft survival. We reviewed data of 3290 adult kidney transplant recipients who underwent transplantation at a single center between April 1979 and September 2012. The reliability and agreement of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) as calculated by the CKD-EPI and MDRD equations were evaluated using Bland–Altman plots and Cohen weighted kappa analyses. The predictive power of CKD stages as classified by each equation for graft survival was investigated using Cox regression models. Additionally, Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients were used to reveal the relationship between graft survival and eGFR equations. Of 3290 kidney transplant recipients, 3040 were included in the analysis. The mean follow-up duration was 128.08 ± 83.54 months, and 29.8% of participants were reclassified to higher eGFR categories by the CKD-EPI equation compared to the category classification by the MDRD equation. eGFR calculated using the MDRD equation was underestimated compared to that calculated using the CKD-EPI equation, based on the Bland–Altman plot. In Cohen weighted kappa analysis, agreement across CKD stages classified using the 2 equations was reliable, but all CKD stages classified using the MDRD equation appeared to be in lower eGFR categories than those classified using the CKD-EPI equation. Pearson and Spearman correlation analyses indicated that the CKD stage as classified by the CKD-EPI equation, but not the MDRD equation, was significantly correlated with the risk of graft failure. In multivariable Cox regression analysis for

  7. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation improves the detection of hyperfiltration in Chinese diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fangya; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Junxi; Guo, Kaifeng; Wu, Mian; Yu, Haoyong; Zhang, Mingliang; Bao, Yuqian; Chen, Haibing; Jia, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Hyperfiltration confers an increased risk of diabetic nephropathy. Early detection can ensure timely intervention and improved treatment outcomes. Because GFR is known to be affected by hyperglycemia, the aim of this study was to compare the influence of hyperglycemia on GFR estimations calculated by the CKD-EPI equation, the CG equation, and the MDRD equations in estimating hyperfiltration in Chinese diabetic patients. Materials and methods: The performance of the equations, compared with the measured 99mTc-DTPA glomerular filtration rate was analyzed in 3492 diabetic patients. Bias, precision, and accuracies were compared with respect to HbA1c status. The Bland-Altman method was used to evaluate the agreement among the equations with respect to the mGFR, and the receiver-operating characteristic curve method was used to evaluate diagnostic value of the three equations with respect to the detection of moderate renal failure and hyperfiltration. Results: The mean absolute bias was the smallest for the CKD-EPI equation in the HbA1c < 7.2% cohort, and the highest accuracy within ± 15% and ± 30% was also reached with the CKD-EPI equation in both cohorts. For the detection of hyperfiltration, the CKD-EPI equation exhibited the best performance with the greatest combination of sensitivity and specificity. The biases of the three equations were significantly higher in the HbA1c ≥ 10.5% subgroup compared with the HbA1c < 7.2% cohort. Conclusion: The CKD-EPI equation can be used as a screening tool for hyperfiltration and appears to be a more generalizable and accurate equation for estimating GFR in Chinese diabetic patients. PMID:26885183

  8. Mortality Prediction in the Oldest Old with Five Different Equations to Estimate Glomerular Filtration Rate: The Health and Anemia Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Mandelli, Sara; Riva, Emma; Tettamanti, Mauro; Detoma, Paolo; Giacomin, Adriano; Lucca, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    Background Kidney function declines considerably with age, but little is known about its clinical significance in the oldest-old. Objectives To study the association between reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimated according to five equations with mortality in the oldest-old. Design Prospective population-based study. Setting Municipality of Biella, Piedmont, Italy. Participants 700 subjects aged 85 and older participating in the “Health and Anemia” Study in 2007–2008. Measurements GFR was estimated using five creatinine-based equations: the Cockcroft-Gault (C-G), Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD), MAYO Clinic, Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) and Berlin Initiative Study-1 (BIS-1). Survival analysis was used to study mortality in subjects with reduced eGFR (<60 mL/min/1.73m2) compared to subjects with eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73m2. Results Prevalence of reduced GFR was 90.7% with the C-G, 48.1% with MDRD, 23.3% with MAYO, 53.6% with CKD-EPI and 84.4% with BIS-1. After adjustment for confounders, two-year mortality was significantly increased in subjects with reduced eGFR using BIS-1 and C-G equations (adjusted HRs: 2.88 and 3.30, respectively). Five-year mortality was significantly increased in subjects with eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2 using MAYO, CKD-EPI and, in a graduated fashion in reduced eGFR categories, MDRD. After 5 years, oldest old with an eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73m2 showed a significantly higher risk of death whichever equation was used (adjusted HRs between 2.04 and 2.70). Conclusion In the oldest old, prevalence of reduced eGFR varies noticeably depending on the equation used. In this population, risk of mortality was significantly higher for reduced GFR estimated with the BIS-1 and C-G equations over the short term. Though after five years the MDRD appeared on the whole a more consistent predictor, differences in mortality prediction among equations over the long term were less apparent. Noteworthy, subjects with

  9. GFR Estimation: From Physiology to Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Levey, Andrew S.; Inker, Lesley A.; Coresh, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is essential for clinical practice, research, and public health. Appropriate interpretation of estimated GFR (eGFR) requires understanding the principles of physiology, laboratory medicine, epidemiology and biostatistics used in the development and validation of GFR estimating equations. Equations developed in diverse populations are less biased at higher GFR than equations developed in CKD populations and are more appropriate for general use. Equations that include multiple endogenous filtration markers are more precise than equations including a single filtration marker. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations are the most accurate GFR estimating equations that have been evaluated in large, diverse populations and are applicable for general clinical use. The 2009 CKD-EPI creatinine equation is more accurate in estimating GFR and prognosis than the 2006 Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation and provides lower estimates of prevalence of decreased eGFR. It is useful as a “first” test for decreased eGFR and should replace the MDRD Study equation for routine reporting of serum creatinine–based eGFR by clinical laboratories. The 2012 CKD-EPI cystatin C equation is as accurate as the 2009 CKD-EPI creatinine equation in estimating eGFR, does not require specification of race, and may be more accurate in patients with decreased muscle mass. The 2012 CKD-EPI creatinine–cystatin C equation is more accurate than the 2009 CKD-EPI creatinine and 2012 CKD-EPI cystatin C equations and is useful as a confirmatory test for decreased eGFR as determined by an equation based on serum creatinine. Further improvement in GFR estimating equations will require development in more broadly representative populations, including diverse racial and ethnic groups, use of multiple filtration markers, and evaluation using statistical techniques to compare eGFR to “true GFR”. PMID

  10. Undergraduate Students' Perceptions of Collaborative Learning in a Differential Equations Mathematics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajra, Sayonita Ghosh; Das, Ujjaini

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses collaborative learning strategies to examine students' perceptions in a differential equations mathematics course. Students' perceptions were analyzed using three collaborative learning strategies including collaborative activity, group-quiz and online discussion. The study results show that students identified both strengths and…

  11. Comparison of Various Equations for Estimating GFR in Malawi: How to Determine Renal Function in Resource Limited Settings?

    PubMed Central

    Phiri, Sam; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Neuhann, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a probably underrated public health problem in Sub-Saharan-Africa, in particular in combination with HIV-infection. Knowledge about the CKD prevalence is scarce and in the available literature different methods to classify CKD are used impeding comparison and general prevalence estimates. Methods This study assessed different serum-creatinine based equations for glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) and compared them to a cystatin C based equation. The study was conducted in Lilongwe, Malawi enrolling a population of 363 adults of which 32% were HIV-positive. Results Comparison of formulae based on Bland-Altman-plots and accuracy revealed best performance for the CKD-EPI equation without the correction factor for black Americans. Analyzing the differences between HIV-positive and –negative individuals CKD-EPI systematically overestimated eGFR in comparison to cystatin C and therefore lead to underestimation of CKD in HIV-positives. Conclusions Our findings underline the importance for standardization of eGFR calculation in a Sub-Saharan African setting, to further investigate the differences with regard to HIV status and to develop potential correction factors as established for age and sex. PMID:26083345

  12. Development and validation of GFR-estimating equations using diabetes, transplant and weight

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Lesley A.; Schmid, Christopher H.; Zhang, Yaping L.; Coresh, Josef; Manzi, Jane; Landis, Richard; Bakoush, Omran; Contreras, Gabriel; Genuth, Saul; Klintmalm, Goran B.; Poggio, Emilio; Rossing, Peter; Rule, Andrew D.; Weir, Matthew R.; Kusek, John; Greene, Tom; Levey, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    Background. We have reported a new equation (CKD-EPI equation) that reduces bias and improves accuracy for GFR estimation compared to the MDRD study equation while using the same four basic predictor variables: creatinine, age, sex and race. Here, we describe the development and validation of this equation as well as other equations that incorporate diabetes, transplant and weight as additional predictor variables. Methods. Linear regression was used to relate log-measured GFR (mGFR) to sex, race, diabetes, transplant, weight, various transformations of creatinine and age with and without interactions. Equations were developed in a pooled database of 10 studies [2/3 (N = 5504) for development and 1/3 (N = 2750) for internal validation], and final model selection occurred in 16 additional studies [external validation (N = 3896)]. Results. The mean mGFR was 68, 67 and 68 ml/min/ 1.73 m2 in the development, internal validation and external validation datasets, respectively. In external validation, an equation that included a linear age term and spline terms in creatinine to account for a reduction in the magnitude of the slope at low serum creatinine values exhibited the best performance (bias = 2.5, RMSE = 0.250) among models using the four basic predictor variables. Addition of terms for diabetes and transplant did not improve performance. Equations with weight showed a small improvement in the subgroup with BMI <20 kg/m2. Conclusions. The CKD-EPI equation, based on creatinine, age, sex and race, has been validated and is more accurate than the MDRD study equation. The addition of weight, diabetes and transplant does not significantly improve equation performance. PMID:19793928

  13. Cystatin C and Creatinine-based eGFR equation performance depends on patient characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W.; Rule, Andrew D.; Voskoboev, Nikolay; Baumann, Nikola A.; Lieske, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guideline recommends use of a cystatin C-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to confirm creatinine-based eGFR between 45–59 mL/min/1.73m2. Prior studies have demonstrated that comorbidities such as solid-organ transplant strongly influence the relationship between measured GFR, creatinine and cystatin C. Our objective was to evaluate the performance of cystatin C based eGFR equations compared to creatinine-based eGFR and measured GFR across different clinical presentations. Methods The performance of the CKD-EPI 2009 creatinine-based estimated GFR equation (eGFRCr) and the newer CKD-EPI 2012 cystatin C-based equations (eGFRCys and eGFRCr-Cys) were compared with measured GFR (iothalamate renal clearance) across defined patient populations. Patients (n = 1,652) were categorized as transplant recipients (n=568 kidney; n=319 other organ [non-kidney]), known chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients (n=618), or potential kidney donors (n=147). Results eGFRCr-Cys showed the most consistent performance across different clinical populations. Among potential kidney donors without CKD (stage 2 or higher; eGFR >60mL/min/1.73m2), eGFRCys and eGFRCr-Cys demonstrated significantly less bias than eGFRCr, however, all three equations substantially underestimated GFR when eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2. Among transplant recipients with CKD stage 3B or lower (eGFR <45mL/min/1.73m2), eGFRCys was significantly more biased than eGFRCr. No clear differences among eGFR bias between equations were observed among known CKD patients regardless of eGFR range, or in any patient group with a GFR between 45–59 mL/min/1.73m2. Conclusions The performance of eGFR equations depends on patient characteristics readily apparent upon presentation. Among the three CKD-EPI equations, eGFRCr-Cys performed most consistently across the studied patient populations. PMID:26240296

  14. Cystatin C-Based Renal Function Changes After Antiretroviral Initiation: A Substudy of a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Samir K.; Kitch, Douglas; Tierney, Camlin; Daar, Eric S.; Sax, Paul E.; Melbourne, Kathleen; Ha, Belinda; McComsey, Grace A.

    2014-01-01

    Background.  The effects of antiretrovirals on cystatin C-based renal function estimates are unknown. Methods.  We analyzed changes in renal function using creatinine and cystatin C-based estimating equations in 269 patients in A5224s, a substudy of study A5202, in which treatment-naive patients were randomized to abacavir/lamivudine or tenofovir/emtricitabine with open-label atazanavir/ritonavir or efavirenz. Results.  Changes in renal function significantly improved (or declined less) with abacavir/lamivudine treatment compared with tenofovir/emtricitabine using the Cockcroft-Gault formula (P = .016) and 2009 Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI; P = .030) and 2012 CKD-EPI cystatin C-creatinine (P = .025). Renal function changes significantly improved (or declined less) with efavirenz compared with atazanavir/ritonavir (P < .001 for all equations). Mean (95% confidence interval) renal function changes specifically for tenofovir/emtricitabine combined with atazanavir/ritonavir were −8.3 (−14.0, −2.6) mL/min with Cockcroft-Gault; −14.9 (−19.7, −10.1) mL/min per 1.732 with Modification of Diet in Renal Disease; −12.8 (−16.5, −9.0) mL/min per 1.732 with 2009 CKD-EPI; +8.9 (4.2, 13.7) mL/min per 1.732 with 2012 CKD-EPI cystatin C; and −1.2 (−5.1, 2.6) mL/min per 1.732 with 2012 CKD-EPI cystatin C-creatinine. Renal function changes for the other treatment arms were more favorable but similarly varied by estimating equation. Conclusions.  Antiretroviral-associated changes in renal function vary in magnitude and direction based on the estimating equation used. PMID:25734077

  15. [New tools for the management of renal function in the elderly: Berlin Initiative Study equation and hematocrit, urea and gender formulae].

    PubMed

    Heras, Manuel; Fernández-Reyes, María José

    2016-05-20

    In the last few years a debate has emerged on the range of normal renal function in the elderly, and if every elderly person with a glomerular filtration rate estimated using formulas (Cockroft-Gault, MDRD, CKD-EPI) of less than 60ml/min/1.73m(2) has kidney disease. In this review we analysed, based on the results of the study Elderly people with chronic kidney disease of the Hospital de Segovia, the new equations to measure kidney function in the elderly: the Berlin Initiative Study equation designed to estimate the glomerular filtration rate in people aged 70 or more, and the hematocrit, urea and gender formula to establish whether an elderly person with a glomerular filtration rate lower than 60mL/min/1.73m(2) has kidney disease. PMID:26971975

  16. Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores collaboration between library media educators and regular classroom teachers. The article focuses on the context of the issue, positions on the issue, the impact of collaboration, and how to implement effective collaboration into the school system. Various books and professional journals are used to support conclusions…

  17. Collaborate!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2007-01-01

    This article explores different approaches that facilitate online collaboration. The newest efforts in collaboration revolve around wikis. These websites allow visitors to add, remove, edit, and change content directly online. Another fairly affordable approach involves open source, a programming language that is, in many ways, collaborative…

  18. Validation of estimated renal function measurements compared with the isotopic glomerular filtration rate in an HIV-infected cohort.

    PubMed

    Bonjoch, Anna; Bayés, Beatriz; Riba, Joaquim; Puig, Jordi; Estany, Carla; Perez-Alvarez, Núria; Clotet, Bonaventura; Negredo, Eugènia

    2010-12-01

    We performed a cross-sectional study to determine the best method for estimating the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in HIV-infected subjects. Isotopic GFR was correlated with 24-h urine creatinine clearance, cystatin C levels, and 3 creatinine-based equations-the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD), Cockcroft-Gault (CG), and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI)-in 15 patients. Cystatin C showed the strongest correlation with isotopic GFR (r=-0.760, p=0.001). When cystatin C was used as the reference variable for all 106 patients, CKD-EPI proved to be superior to the other equations (r=-0.671, p<0.001). Time with HIV infection, unsuppressed viral load, low CD4 T-cell counts, and use of protease inhibitors are related to an increased risk of renal impairment, leading us to recommend early initiation of antiretroviral therapy accompanied by a regular renal study. PMID:20887753

  19. Early Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Rewers, Marian; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major cause of mortality in type 1 diabetes. Reduced insulin sensitivity is a well-documented component of type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that baseline insulin sensitivity would predict development of DN over 6 years. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We assessed the relationship between insulin sensitivity at baseline and development of early phenotypes of DN—microalbuminuria (albumin-creatinine ratio [ACR] ≥30 mg/g) and rapid renal function decline (glomerular filtration rate [GFR] loss >3 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year)—with three Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations over 6 years. Subjects with diabetes (n = 449) and without diabetes (n = 565) in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study had an estimated insulin sensitivity index (ISI) at baseline and 6-year follow-up. RESULTS The ISI was lower in subjects with diabetes than in those without diabetes (P < 0.0001). A higher ISI at baseline predicted a lower odds of developing an ACR ≥30 mg/g (odds ratio 0.65 [95% CI 0.49–0.85], P = 0.003) univariately and after adjusting for HbA1c (0.69 [0.51–0.93], P = 0.01). A higher ISI at baseline conferred protection from a rapid decline of GFR as assessed by CKD-EPI cystatin C (0.77 [0.64–0.92], P = 0.004) and remained significant after adjusting for HbA1c and age (0.80 [0.67–0.97], P = 0.02). We found no relation between ISI and rapid GFR decline estimated by CKD-EPI creatinine (P = 0.38) or CKD-EPI combined cystatin C and creatinine (P = 0.50). CONCLUSIONS Over 6 years, a higher ISI independently predicts a lower odds of developing microalbuminuria and rapid GFR decline as estimated with cystatin C, suggesting a relationship between insulin sensitivity and early phenotypes of DN. PMID:24026551

  20. Prevalence and Determinants of Chronic Kidney Disease Among Hypertensive Cameroonians According to Three Common Estimators of the Glomerular Filtration Rate.

    PubMed

    Kaze, Francois Folefack; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Magatsing, Carine Tchendjou; Halle, Marie-Patrice; Yiagnigni, Euloge; Ngu, Kathleen Blackett

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension is a risk factor for renal diseases, which, in turn, are precursors of hypertension. The authors assessed the prevalence and determinants of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among 336 hypertensive adult Cameroonians (mean age, 60.9±11.3 years; 63.4% women) at Yaoundé. Any participant with an estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) regardless of the equation used (Cockcroft-Gault [CG], Modification of Diet in Renal Disease [MDRD], and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration [CKD-EPI]) and/or dipstick proteinuria was reviewed 3 months later. Participants presented a high prevalence of diabetes (18.5%), dyslipidemia (17.6%), gout/hyperuricemia (10.7%), overweight/obesity (68.8%), self-medication (37.5%), and alcohol consumption (33.3%). Hypertension was uncontrolled in 265 patients (78.9%). The prevalence of CKD was 49.7%, 50.0%, and 52.1% according to MDRD, CKD-EPI, and CG equations, respectively. Advanced age, adiposity, and severity of hypertension were determinants of CKD. Nearly half of the hypertensive patients had CKD regardless of the estimators used, predicted by well-known risk factors. PMID:26791352

  1. A Collaboration on Collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent

    2004-01-01

    NASA's 2003-2004 Leadership Development Program class recognized that effective collaborations are often the key to achieving mission success. Personal connections and common goals were key elements of their work together and key findings of their collaboration benchmarking within the agency.

  2. Kidney Function, Endothelial Activation and Atherosclerosis in Black and White Africans with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dessein, Patrick H.; Hsu, Hon-Chun; Tsang, Linda; Millen, Aletta M. E.; Woodiwiss, Angela J.; Norton, Gavin R.; Solomon, Ahmed; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether kidney function independently relates to endothelial activation and ultrasound determined carotid atherosclerosis in black and white Africans with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods We calculated the Jelliffe, 5 Cockcroft-Gault equations, Salazar-Corcoran, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) estimated glomerular filtration rate (EGFR) equations in 233 (112 black) RA patients. Results The CKD-EPI eGFR was <90 ml/min/1.73m2 in 49.1% and 30.6% of black and white patients, respectively (odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 2.19 (1.28–3.75), p = 0.004). EGFRs were overall consistently associated with monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and angiopoietin 2 concentrations in white patients, and with carotid intima-media thickness and plaque in black participants. Amongst black patients, plaque prevalence was 36.7% and the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was not associated with plaque presence for the MDRD equation (p = 0.3), whereas the respective relationship was significant or borderline significant (p = 0.003 to 0.08) and of similar extent (p>0.1 for comparisons of AUC (SE)) for the other 8 equations. Based on optimal eGFR cutoff values with sensitivities and specificities ranging from 42 to 60% and 70 to 91% respectively, as determined in ROC curve analysis, a low eGFR increased the odds ratio for plaque 2.2 to 4.0 fold. Conclusion Reduced kidney function is independently associated with atherosclerosis and endothelial activation in black and white Africans with RA, respectively. CKD is highly prevalent in black Africans with RA. Apart from the MDRD, eGFR equations are useful in predicting carotid plaque presence, a coronary heart disease equivalent, amongst black African RA patients. PMID:25806966

  3. Effects of Serum Creatinine Calibration on Estimated Renal Function in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Young, Bessie A.; Fülöp, Tibor; de Boer, Ian H.; Boulware, L. Ebony; Katz, Ronit; Correa, Adolfo; Griswold, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The calibration to Isotope Dilution Mass Spectroscopy (IDMS) traceable creatinine is essential for valid use of the new Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Methods For 5,210 participants in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS), serum creatinine was measured with a multipoint enzymatic spectrophotometric assay at the baseline visit (2000–2004) and re-measured using the Roche enzymatic method, traceable to IDMS in a subset of 206 subjects. The 200 eligible samples (6 were excluded, 1 for failure of the re-measurement and 5 for outliers) were divided into three disjoint sets - training, validation, and test - to select a calibration model, estimate true errors, and assess performance of the final calibration equation. The calibration equation was applied to serum creatinine measurements of 5,210 participants to estimate GFR and the prevalence of CKD. Results The selected Deming regression model provided a slope of 0.968 (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 0.904 to 1.053) and intercept of −0.0248 (95% CI, −0.0862 to 0.0366) with R squared 0.9527. Calibrated serum creatinine showed high agreement with actual measurements when applying to the unused test set (concordance correlation coefficient 0.934, 95% CI, 0.894 to 0.960). The baseline prevalence of CKD in the JHS (2000–2004) was 6.30% using calibrated values, compared with 8.29% using non-calibrated serum creatinine with the CKD-EPI equation (P < 0.001). Conclusions A Deming regression model was chosen to optimally calibrate baseline serum creatinine measurements in the JHS and the calibrated values provide a lower CKD prevalence estimate. PMID:25806862

  4. Collaborative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy-Reiner, Sherry, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Descriptions of 10 college programs involving collaborative learning are presented, along with Karen T. Romer's essay, "Collaboration: New Forms of Learning, New Ways of Thinking." The essay identifies various kinds of collaborative learning as well as the benefits of collaborative models. The following programs and schools are described: the…

  5. Collaborative Arrangements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cota-Robles, Eugene; Doby, Winston

    Two conference papers describing various collaborative arrangements within the educational community among teachers, students and others are presented in this document. The first paper, "Successful Collaborations" (Eugene Cota-Robles), describes the following projects in California that seek to forge collaborations to improve the education of…

  6. TA Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diefendorf, Martha

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights several current collaborative activities of the National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC). There are many specific examples of TA (Technical Assistance) collaborations that take place on a regular basis; the seven examples presented here were selected to represent different types of collaboration. The…

  7. Collaborative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Jane L.

    2009-01-01

    Teachers can make better use of data when they work together than when they do it alone. Creating the conditions for such collaboration is a tall order. This article describes the idea behind the collaborative inquiry approach. It also mentions several studies that indicate its effectiveness. Tips on how collaborative inquiry can be implemented…

  8. Collaboration Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Carl A., II

    2008-01-01

    Of all the buzz words used in the school library media profession, "collaboration" evokes the strongest feelings--and not all of those feelings are positive. Some library media specialists are not convinced that collaboration is an essential part of their programs, yet collaboration seems to be essential in many other professions. In fact, there…

  9. Collaborative Attack vs. Collaborative Defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shouhuai

    We have witnessed many attacks in the cyberspace. However, most attacks are launched by individual attackers even though an attack may involve many compromised computers. In this paper, we envision what we believe to be the next generation cyber attacks — collaborative attacks. Collaborative attacks can be launched by multiple attackers (i.e., human attackers or criminal organizations), each of which may have some specialized expertise. This is possible because cyber attacks can become very sophisticated and specialization of attack expertise naturally becomes relevant. To counter collaborative attacks, we might need collaborative defense because each “chain” in a collaborative attack may be only adequately dealt with by a different defender. In order to understand collaborative attack and collaborative defense, we present a high-level abstracted framework for evaluating the effectiveness of collaborative defense against collaborative attacks. As a first step towards realizing and instantiating the framework, we explore a characterization of collaborative attacks and collaborative defense from the relevant perspectives.

  10. ALICE Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.

    2014-11-01

    The ALICE Collaboration would like to thank all its engineers and technicians for their invaluable contributions to the construction of the experiment and the CERN accelerator teams for the outstanding performance of the LHC complex.

  11. Collaborative engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Robert L.; Reames, Joseph M.

    2004-09-01

    A need exists for United States military forces to perform collaborative engagement operations between unmanned systems. This capability has the potential to contribute significant tactical synergy to the Joint Force operating in the battlespace of the future. Collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. Collaborative engagements can also add considerably to force survivability by reducing soldier and equipment exposure during critical operations. This paper will address a multiphase U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC) Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL) program to assess information requirements, Joint Architecure for Unmanned Systems (JAUS), on-going Science and Technology initiatives, and conduct simulation based experiments to identify and resolve technical risks required to conduct collaborative engagements using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGV). The schedule outlines an initial effort to expand, update and exercise JAUS, provide early feedback to support user development of Concept of Operations (CONOPs) and Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTPs), and develop a Multiple Unified Simulation Environment (MUSE) system with JAUS interfaces necessary to support an unmanned system of systems collaboartive engagement.

  12. Literacy Collaborative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Literacy Collaborative, a comprehensive, schoolwide program designed to provide long-term support to schools working toward successful literacy achievement for every child by the end of 2nd grade. There are currently (year 2000) 390 literacy coordinators or trainers serving 372 schools in 25 states. The…

  13. Collaboration Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Danielle; Otero, Valerie K.

    2005-01-01

    What happens when university curriculum developers are mixed with motivated elementary teachers? ? An awesome learning collaboration that benefits researchers, teachers, and students! That's what the authors discovered when they--university researchers involved in the Physics for Elementary Teachers (PET) project--teamed up with local elementary…

  14. Collaborative Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Debora

    2014-01-01

    This practitioner research study investigates the power of multimodal texts within a real-world context and argues that a participatory culture focused on literary arts offers marginalized high school students opportunities for collaborative design and authoring. Additionally, this article invites educators to rethink the at-risk label. This…

  15. Collaborative Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippman, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    When architects discuss the educational facilities of the next century and beyond, the conversation turns to collaborative spaces. They envision flexible and fluid spaces that will encourage creative and critical thinking, and free students to communicate clearly about the task at hand. While these are admirable ideals, there are some fundamental…

  16. Collaborative Practitioners, Collaborative Schools. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugach, Marleen C.; Johnson, Lawrence J.

    This book discusses collaboration as it occurs in all of its varying contexts in schools, such as consultation between special education and general classroom teachers, collaboration among classroom teachers, collaboration between university faculty in special and general education, and collaboration between institutions of higher education and…

  17. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  18. Collaborative Understanding of Cyanobacteria in Lake Ecosystems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Meredith L.; Ewing, Holly A.; Cottingham, Kathryn L.; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a collaboration between mathematicians and ecologists studying the cyanobacterium "Gloeotrichia echinulata" and its possible role in eutrophication of New England lakes. The mathematics includes compartmental modeling, differential equations, difference equations, and testing models against high-frequency data. The ecology…

  19. Collaboration. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacey, Susan; Eaton, Deborah E.; Albrecht, Kay; Bergman, Roberta

    2000-01-01

    Presents four articles on collaboration for use in staff development in childcare settings: (1) "Facilitating Collaborations among Children" (Susan Stacey); (2) "One Size Doesn't Fit All in Collaborations with Parents" (Deborah E. Eaton); (3) "Supporting Collaboration among Teachers" (Kay Albrecht); and (4) "Building Collaborations between…

  20. Solidarity through Collaborative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Stephen M.; Rigano, Donna L.

    2007-01-01

    While numerous publications signal the merits of collaborative research, few studies provide interpretive analyses of collaborative-research practices or collaborative relationships. Through this multiple case study design of collaborative-research teams, the authors attempt to provide such an analysis by focusing on the collaborative-research…

  1. Evaluation of Serum Cystatin C as a Marker of Early Renal Impairment in Patients with Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Mahmoud; Abdel-Razek, Wael; Abo-Raia, Gamal; Assem, Medhat; El-Azab, Gasser

    2015-01-01

    Background. Serum cystatin C (CysC) was proposed as an effective reflection of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, its role in patients with liver cirrhosis has not been extensively verified especially in the detection of early RI. Patients and Methods. Seventy consecutive potential candidates for living donor liver transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) <1.5 mg/dL were included. CysC, Cr, and estimated GFR [creatinine clearance (CCr), Cockcroft-Gault formula (C-G), MDRD equations with 4 and 6 variables, CKD-EPI-Cr, CKD-EPI-CysC, and CKD-EPI-Cr-CysC] were all correlated to isotopic GFR. Early RI was defined as GFR of 60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2. Results. Patients were 25.7% and 74.3% Child-Pugh classes B and C, respectively. GFR was ≥90, 60–89, and 30–59 mL/min/1.73 m2 in 31.4%, 64.3%, and 4.3% of the patients, respectively. All markers and equations, except C-G, were significantly correlated to GFR with CKD-EPI-Cr-CysC formula having the highest correlation (r = 0.474) and the largest area under the ROC curve (0.808) for discriminating early RI. At a cutoff value of 1.2 mg/L, CysC was 89.6% sensitive and 63.6% specific in detecting early RI. Conclusion. In patients with liver cirrhosis, CysC and CysC-based equations showed the highest significant correlation to GFR and were measures that best discriminated early RI. PMID:26550493

  2. Collaboration rules.

    PubMed

    Evans, Philip; Wolf, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Corporate leaders seeking to boost growth, learning, and innovation may find the answer in a surprising place: the Linux open-source software community. Linux is developed by an essentially volunteer, self-organizing community of thousands of programmers. Most leaders would sell their grandmothers for workforces that collaborate as efficiently, frictionlessly, and creatively as the self-styled Linux hackers. But Linux is software, and software is hardly a model for mainstream business. The authors have, nonetheless, found surprising parallels between the anarchistic, caffeinated, hirsute world of Linux hackers and the disciplined, tea-sipping, clean-cut world of Toyota engineering. Specifically, Toyota and Linux operate by rules that blend the self-organizing advantages of markets with the low transaction costs of hierarchies. In place of markets' cash and contracts and hierarchies' authority are rules about how individuals and groups work together (with rigorous discipline); how they communicate (widely and with granularity); and how leaders guide them toward a common goal (through example). Those rules, augmented by simple communication technologies and a lack of legal barriers to sharing information, create rich common knowledge, the ability to organize teams modularly, extraordinary motivation, and high levels of trust, which radically lowers transaction costs. Low transaction costs, in turn, make it profitable for organizations to perform more and smaller transactions--and so increase the pace and flexibility typical of high-performance organizations. Once the system achieves critical mass, it feeds on itself. The larger the system, the more broadly shared the knowledge, language, and work style. The greater individuals' reputational capital, the louder the applause and the stronger the motivation. The success of Linux is evidence of the power of that virtuous circle. Toyota's success is evidence that it is also powerful in conventional companies. PMID

  3. Association of apolipoprotein A1 and B with kidney function and chronic kidney disease in two multiethnic population samples

    PubMed Central

    Goek, Oemer-Necmi; Köttgen, Anna; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Coresh, Josef; Astor, Brad C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Circulating lipoproteins and their protein constituents, apolipoproteins, are risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD). The associations between apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B and their ratio with glomerular filtration rate estimated from the new CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation (eGFR) are not well studied in the general population. Methods Associations between apolipoprotein A1, B and their ratio with the outcomes of eGFR, CKD (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2) and albuminuria were examined in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study (ARIC, n = 10 292, 1996–98) and the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III, n = 7023, 1988–91). Cross-sectional multivariable-adjusted analyses were performed using linear and logistic regression. Prospective analyses related baseline apolipoprotein levels to subsequent CKD incidence over 10 years using the ARIC Carotid MRI follow-up cohort (n = 1659). Results Higher apolipoprotein A1 quartiles were associated with a lower prevalence of CKD [Q4 versus Q1: odds ratio (OR) 0.73, P-trend = 0.02 in ARIC; Q4 versus Q1: OR 0.53, P-trend <0.01 in NHANES III] as well as with higher eGFR (P-trend <0.01 in ARIC and NHANES III). No consistent significant associations were found for apolipoprotein B in either study. The apolipoprotein B/A1 ratio was significantly associated with eGFR across quartiles in both studies (P-trend <0.01) and with CKD in ARIC (Q4 versus Q1: OR 1.23, P-trend = 0.01). Prospectively, there were trends for the association of apolipoproteins with incident CKD [Q4 versus Q1: incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 0.68 for apolipoprotein A1, P-trend = 0.1; Q4 versus Q1: IRR = 1.35 for apolipoprotein B, P-trend = 0.2]. Associations were not systematically stronger when comparing traditional lipids (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein or high-density lipoprotein) to apolipoproteins. Conclusions Higher serum apolipoprotein A1 was associated with lower prevalence of CKD

  4. Collaborative Systems Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pocatilu, Paul; Ciurea, Cristian

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative systems are widely used today in various activity fields. Their complexity is high and the development involves numerous resources and costs. Testing collaborative systems has a very important role for the systems' success. In this paper we present taxonomy of collaborative systems. The collaborative systems are classified in many…

  5. Teaching Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nibbelink, William H.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed is a gradual transition from arithmetic to the idea of an equation with variables in the elementary grades. Vertical and horizontal formats of open sentences, the instructional sequence, vocabulary, and levels of understanding are discussed in this article. (KR)

  6. Assessing Collaboratively Usable Applications to Collaborative Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipponen, Lasse; Lallimo, Jiri

    2004-01-01

    The continually increasing number of applications said to facilitate collaboration makes it very difficult for educators to identify and evaluate the ones that are suitable for educational purposes. In this paper we argue that from the educational point of view, it is meaningful to make a distinction between collaboratively usable applications and…

  7. Global Collaborative STEM Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meabh Kelly, Susan; Smith, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Global Collaborative STEM Education, as the name suggests, simultaneously supports two sets of knowledge and skills. The first set is STEM -- science, technology, engineering and math. The other set of content knowledge and skills is that of global collaboration. Successful global partnerships require awareness of one's own culture, the biases embedded within that culture, as well as developing awareness of the collaborators' culture. Workforce skills fostered include open-mindedness, perseverance when faced with obstacles, and resourceful use of technological "bridges" to facilitate and sustain communication. In respect for the 2016 GIFT Workshop focus, Global Collaborative STEM Education projects dedicated to astronomy research will be presented. The projects represent different benchmarks within the Global Collaborative STEM Education continuum, culminating in an astronomy research experience that fully reflects how the global STEM workforce collaborates. To facilitate wider engagement in Global Collaborative STEM Education, project summaries, classroom resources and contact information for established international collaborative astronomy research projects will be disseminated.

  8. Theme: Collaborative Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briers, Gary E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Seven articles present models for collaboration between business and education, agriscience and extension, agribusiness and agricultural education, as well as a collaborative waterfowl refuge project and the political process and public relations. (SK)

  9. Dreaming of Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston-Parsons, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    Marilyn Johnston-Parsons writes about collaboration. She describes several university-school collaborations with which she has been involved in terms of the tensions and the dialogue that has been associated with them. While she worries about the state of collaboration in this educational age, she admits to "cautious optimism" that more…

  10. Collaboration in Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoubrey, Sharon, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Educators are familiar with working together to produce curriculum packages, to team teach a unit, to host a parent event, to put on a school-wide concert, or to plan a conference. Collaboration in art education as presented in this publication is a team effort that is slightly different and beyond ordinary collaboration. Collaborative art-making…

  11. Experiences of Collaborative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahneman, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The author's personal history of the research that led to his recognition in economics is described, focusing on the process of collaboration and on the experience of controversy. The author's collaboration with Amos Tversky dealt with 3 major topics: judgment under uncertainty, decision making, and framing effects. A subsequent collaboration,…

  12. Beautiful equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljamaa, Panu; Jacobs, J. Richard; Chris; JamesHyman; Halma, Matthew; EricNolan; Coxon, Paul

    2014-07-01

    In reply to a Physics World infographic (part of which is given above) about a study showing that Euler's equation was deemed most beautiful by a group of mathematicians who had been hooked up to a functional magnetic-resonance image (fMRI) machine while viewing mathematical expressions (14 May, http://ow.ly/xHUFi).

  13. Collaborative Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyle, Steve

    Collaborative Data Mining is a setting where the Data Mining effort is distributed to multiple collaborating agents - human or software. The objective of the collaborative Data Mining effort is to produce solutions to the tackled Data Mining problem which are considered better by some metric, with respect to those solutions that would have been achieved by individual, non-collaborating agents. The solutions require evaluation, comparison, and approaches for combination. Collaboration requires communication, and implies some form of community. The human form of collaboration is a social task. Organizing communities in an effective manner is non-trivial and often requires well defined roles and processes. Data Mining, too, benefits from a standard process. This chapter explores the standard Data Mining process CRISP-DM utilized in a collaborative setting.

  14. Marcus equation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1998-09-21

    In the late 1950s to early 1960s Rudolph A. Marcus developed a theory for treating the rates of outer-sphere electron-transfer reactions. Outer-sphere reactions are reactions in which an electron is transferred from a donor to an acceptor without any chemical bonds being made or broken. (Electron-transfer reactions in which bonds are made or broken are referred to as inner-sphere reactions.) Marcus derived several very useful expressions, one of which has come to be known as the Marcus cross-relation or, more simply, as the Marcus equation. It is widely used for correlating and predicting electron-transfer rates. For his contributions to the understanding of electron-transfer reactions, Marcus received the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. This paper discusses the development and use of the Marcus equation. Topics include self-exchange reactions; net electron-transfer reactions; Marcus cross-relation; and proton, hydride, atom and group transfers.

  15. Marcus equation

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    In the late 1950s to early 1960s Rudolph A. Marcus developed a theory for treating the rates of outer-sphere electron-transfer reactions. Outer-sphere reactions are reactions in which an electron is transferred from a donor to an acceptor without any chemical bonds being made or broken. (Electron-transfer reactions in which bonds are made or broken are referred to as inner-sphere reactions.) Marcus derived several very useful expressions, one of which has come to be known as the Marcus cross-relation or, more simply, as the Marcus equation. It is widely used for correlating and predicting electron-transfer rates. For his contributions to the understanding of electron-transfer reactions, Marcus received the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. This paper discusses the development and use of the Marcus equation. Topics include self-exchange reactions; net electron-transfer reactions; Marcus cross-relation; and proton, hydride, atom and group transfers.

  16. Some Aspects of Mathematical Model of Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Yasutake, Koichi; Yamakawa, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    There are some mathematical learning models of collaborative learning, with which we can learn how students obtain knowledge and we expect to design effective education. We put together those models and classify into three categories; model by differential equations, so-called Ising spin and a stochastic process equation. Some of the models do not…

  17. Ethics of international collaboration.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Jharna; Dinoop, Kp; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Education and research together are vital components of academic institutions and globalization has improved health care education and research in numerous ways, one of which is multinational/transnational research/international collaboration. Usually academic institutions of high-income countries and institutions in low-income countries participate in collaboration. These collaborative research are guided by international ethics codes proposed by the international ethics committee to avoid stringent follow/unethical practices. PMID:25709946

  18. Collaborative Writing Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yong Mei Fung

    2010-01-01

    As part of a research study on collaborative writing, this paper discusses defining and facilitating features that occur during face-to-face collaboration, based on the literature and research. The defining features are mutual interaction, negotiations, conflict, and shared expertise. Facilitating features include affective factors, use of L1,…

  19. Proficiency and Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shokouhi, Hossein; Alishaei, Zahra

    2009-01-01

    This study reports on the effect of different levels of proficiency on the students' achievements in collaborative learning instruction among 30 Persian-speaking EFL college students. Having been divided into dyads with different levels of proficiency, these subjects participated in nine sessions of collaborative instruction based on the…

  20. Collaboration for Educational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Richard K.

    This paper comments on three aspects of the educational reform movement in America: the current reform movement's aims and goals, community collaborations to assist systemic reform, and problems in pedagogy associated with school reform. An important accomplishment of the movement included collaborative partnerships among the corporate community,…

  1. Collaborative Assessment: A Position.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Development Associate Consortium, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This paper, presented by the Black Advisory Task Force to the Child Development Associate (CDA) Consortium, reports on the development of the "collaborative process" approach to the examination and credentialing of CDA candidates. The collaborative approach was designed to be free from racial bias, to be predictive of job performance, and to be a…

  2. Design for Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Canan; Scanlon, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Online learning environments offer new opportunities for learning and over the last decade or so a variety of online learning environments have been developed by researchers to facilitate collaborative learning among students. In this paper we will present a case study of a successful collaborative learning design. This involves a near synchronous…

  3. Jump-Start Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohmiller, Darcy

    2010-01-01

    When teachers and school librarians work together, student achievement increases. Librarians know this and have made sure their teachers and administrators know this as well. But it's a giant leap from knowing the value of collaboration and actually collaborating. The only way to convince teachers to take that step is to convince them that the…

  4. Solo Librarians Working Collaboratively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickel, Robbie

    2011-01-01

    The Elko County School District in Nevada has elementary school librarians that are "solo" librarians. Over the last several years they have worked to collaborate on meeting monthly--even though the district covers 17,100 square miles--and on providing professional development face to face and online. Sharing and collaboration help them to problem…

  5. Collaboration: Assumed or Taught?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Sandra N.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between collaboration and gifted and talented students often is assumed to be an easy and successful learning experience. However, the transition from working alone to working with others necessitates an understanding of issues related to ability, sociability, and mobility. Collaboration has been identified as both an asset and a…

  6. Negotiating Collaboration across Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subedi, Binaya; Rhee, Jeong-eun

    2008-01-01

    Through auto-ethnographic approach, this article extends contemporary debates on the need to further conceptualize and practice collaborative approaches to research. By exploring the complex dimensions of collaboration, this discussion traces the challenges of researching communities one affiliates with, particularly in relation to ethnic,…

  7. Toward Collaboration Sensing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Bertrand; Pea, Roy

    2014-01-01

    We describe preliminary applications of network analysis techniques to eye-tracking data collected during a collaborative learning activity. This paper makes three contributions: first, we visualize collaborative eye-tracking data as networks, where the nodes of the graph represent fixations and edges represent saccades. We found that those…

  8. Collaborations: Challenging, but Key

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2009-10-01

    Collaborations are becoming increasing important in biology because of the need to apply multiple technologies to tackle the most complex current problems. The U.S. National Institutes of Health recognizes this need, and has created the “multi-investigator” granting mechanism to facilitate this process. I have reviewed a number of proposals that utilize the multi-investigator mechanism and have generally found them to be superior to individual investigator grants. Setting up a good collaboration, however, can be extremely difficult. Like any relationship, collaborations take time and energy. Still, there is nothing that can accelerate your research faster or expand your intellectual horizons more.

  9. Comprehensive multiplatform collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kundan; Wu, Xiaotao; Lennox, Jonathan; Schulzrinne, Henning G.

    2003-12-01

    We describe the architecture and implementation of our comprehensive multi-platform collaboration framework known as Columbia InterNet Extensible Multimedia Architecture (CINEMA). It provides a distributed architecture for collaboration using synchronous communications like multimedia conferencing, instant messaging, shared web-browsing, and asynchronous communications like discussion forums, shared files, voice and video mails. It allows seamless integration with various communication means like telephones, IP phones, web and electronic mail. In addition, it provides value-added services such as call handling based on location information and presence status. The paper discusses the media services needed for collaborative environment, the components provided by CINEMA and the interaction among those components.

  10. Collaboration during visual search.

    PubMed

    Malcolmson, Kelly A; Reynolds, Michael G; Smilek, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Two experiments examine how collaboration influences visual search performance. Working with a partner or on their own, participants reported whether a target was present or absent in briefly presented search displays. We compared the search performance of individuals working together (collaborative pairs) with the pooled responses of the individuals working alone (nominal pairs). Collaborative pairs were less likely than nominal pairs to correctly detect a target and they were less likely to make false alarms. Signal detection analyses revealed that collaborative pairs were more sensitive to the presence of the target and had a more conservative response bias than the nominal pairs. This pattern was observed even when the presence of another individual was matched across pairs. The results are discussed in the context of task-sharing, social loafing and current theories of visual search. PMID:17972737

  11. Collaborative engagement experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullens, Katherine; Troyer, Bradley; Wade, Robert; Skibba, Brian; Dunn, Michael

    2006-05-01

    Unmanned ground and air systems operating in collaboration have the potential to provide future Joint Forces a significant capability for operations in complex terrain. Collaborative Engagement Experiment (CEE) is a consolidation of separate Air Force, Army and Navy collaborative efforts within the Joint Robotics Program (JRP) to provide a picture of the future of unmanned warfare. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Material and Manufacturing Directorate, Aerospace Expeditionary Force Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRL/MLQF), The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC)/Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL), and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center - San Diego (SSC San Diego) are conducting technical research and proof of principle experiments for an envisioned operational concept for extended range, three dimensional, collaborative operations between unmanned systems, with enhanced situational awareness for lethal operations in complex terrain. This paper describes the work by these organizations to date and outlines some of the plans for future work.

  12. Collaboration through clinical integration.

    PubMed

    McKay, Cheryl A; Crippen, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Rising healthcare costs and the nursing shortage have affected the ability of healthcare organizations to provide a collaborative environment for high-quality care. Recent studies show that the nursing shortage has resulted in increased work loads, fewer support resources, and nurse dissatisfaction, resulting in difficulty providing quality care. Henneman cited a lack of collaboration as a contributing factor to the fragmentation of care and poor outcomes which plague our healthcare system. Knaus et al found that hospitals where collaboration was present reported 41% lower mortality than predicted number of deaths. Hospitals where there was a little collaboration exceeded predicted mortality by 58%. Positive collaborative relations have also been tied to a decrease in negative patient outcomes, increased organizational commitment, and nurse satisfaction as well as reduced cost and greater responsiveness for healthcare providers. The aim of this discussion is to introduce the participant to the concept of collaboration and use of the Donabedian structure-process-outcome model to provide a framework for embedding best practice components necessary for multidisciplinary collaboration in an acute care setting. The National Joint Practice Commission recommendations and the work of Schmalenberg et al were utilized to establish structural and process components necessary for a collaborative practice environment. Trinity Regional Health System utilized this information in conjunction with the Center for Case Management to develop a care model and improve patient outcomes. The average length of stay (LOS) decreased from 4.24 to 3.37 days and cost per admission from $6723 to $5919 in just over 1 year. PMID:18360207

  13. The Rome Paris collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signore, M.

    2007-03-01

    Since the first "Twinning CEE Project" between the Group of Francesco Mechiorri and our Laboratory at Observatoire de Paris and Ecole Normale Supérieure, and then through several European Networks and NASA Collaborations on the Cosmic Microwave Background, a long-term and fruitful cooperation has existed between Rome and Paris. This contribution will focus on the human story, the principal results and the possible prospects of this wonderful collaboration.

  14. Joint collaborative technology experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, Michael; Ciccimaro, Donny; Yee, See; Denewiler, Thomas; Stroumtsos, Nicholas; Messamore, John; Brown, Rodney; Skibba, Brian; Clapp, Daniel; Wit, Jeff; Shirts, Randy J.; Dion, Gary N.; Anselmo, Gary S.

    2009-05-01

    Use of unmanned systems is rapidly growing within the military and civilian sectors in a variety of roles including reconnaissance, surveillance, explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), and force-protection and perimeter security. As utilization of these systems grows at an ever increasing rate, the need for unmanned systems teaming and inter-system collaboration becomes apparent. Collaboration provides a means of enhancing individual system capabilities through relevant data exchange that contributes to cooperative behaviors between systems and enables new capabilities not possible if the systems operate independently. A collaborative networked approach to development holds the promise of adding mission capability while simultaneously reducing the workload of system operators. The Joint Collaborative Technology Experiment (JCTE) joins individual technology development efforts within the Air Force, Navy, and Army to demonstrate the potential benefits of interoperable multiple system collaboration in a force-protection application. JCTE participants are the Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Airbase Technologies Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRL/RXQF); the Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center Software Engineering Directorate (AMRDEC SED); and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center - Pacific (SSC Pacific) Unmanned Systems Branch operating with funding provided by the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise (JGRE). This paper will describe the efforts to date in system development by the three partner organizations, development of collaborative behaviors and experimentation in the force-protection application, results and lessons learned at a technical demonstration, simulation results, and a path forward for future work.

  15. Collaboration in social networks

    PubMed Central

    Dall’Asta, Luca; Marsili, Matteo; Pin, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The very notion of social network implies that linked individuals interact repeatedly with each other. This notion allows them not only to learn successful strategies and adapt to them, but also to condition their own behavior on the behavior of others, in a strategic forward looking manner. Game theory of repeated games shows that these circumstances are conducive to the emergence of collaboration in simple games of two players. We investigate the extension of this concept to the case where players are engaged in a local contribution game and show that rationality and credibility of threats identify a class of Nash equilibria—that we call “collaborative equilibria”—that have a precise interpretation in terms of subgraphs of the social network. For large network games, the number of such equilibria is exponentially large in the number of players. When incentives to defect are small, equilibria are supported by local structures whereas when incentives exceed a threshold they acquire a nonlocal nature, which requires a “critical mass” of more than a given fraction of the players to collaborate. Therefore, when incentives are high, an individual deviation typically causes the collapse of collaboration across the whole system. At the same time, higher incentives to defect typically support equilibria with a higher density of collaborators. The resulting picture conforms with several results in sociology and in the experimental literature on game theory, such as the prevalence of collaboration in denser groups and in the structural hubs of sparse networks. PMID:22383559

  16. Extended rate equations

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.

    1981-01-30

    The equations of motion are discussed which describe time dependent population flows in an N-level system, reviewing the relationship between incoherent (rate) equations, coherent (Schrodinger) equations, and more general partially coherent (Bloch) equations. Approximations are discussed which replace the elaborate Bloch equations by simpler rate equations whose coefficients incorporate long-time consequences of coherence.

  17. Collaborative engagement experiment (CEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Robert L.; Reames, Joseph M.

    2005-05-01

    Unmanned ground and air systems operating in collaboration have the potential to provide future Joint Forces a significant capability for operations in complex terrain. Ground and air collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. These engagements can also add considerably to force survivability by reducing soldier and equipment exposure during critical operations. The Office of the Secretary of Defense, Joint Robotics Program (JRP) sponsored Collaborative Engagement Experiment (CEE) is a consolidation of separate Air Force, Army and Navy collaborative efforts to provide a Joint capability. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Material and Manufacturing Directorate, Aerospace Expeditionary Force Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRLMLQF), The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC)/Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL), and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center-San Diego (SSC San Diego) are conducting technical research and proof of principle for an envisioned operational concept for extended range, three dimensional, collaborative operations between unmanned systems, with enhanced situational awareness for lethal operations in complex terrain. This program will assess information requirements and conduct experiments to identify and resolve technical risks for collaborative engagements using Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). It will research, develop and physically integrate multiple unmanned systems and conduct live collaborative experiments. Modeling and Simulation systems will be upgraded to reflect engineering fidelity levels to greater understand technical challenges to operate as a team. This paper will provide an update of a multi-year program and will concentrate primarily on the JTC

  18. Collaboration: Leveraging Resources and Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Anne; Hansberry, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Successful collaboration is an art form but can be developed through several smart practices. The authors discuss the meaning of collaboration, stakeholder perceptions of collaborative partnerships, and the experience of Summer Scholars, a nonprofit community organization that successfully uses collaboration to accomplish its mission. Further,…

  19. Collaboration: Where Does It Begin?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Ruth V.

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of collaboration in K-12 education focuses on the need for collaboration between teachers and librarians. Gives examples of successful teacher-librarian collaboration; considers reasons for unsuccessful attempts or lack of opportunities; and suggests that preservice teacher educators and librarian educators need to collaborate to…

  20. Distance collaborations with industry

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, A.; Swyler, K.

    1998-06-01

    The college industry relationship has been identified as a key policy issue in Engineering Education. Collaborations between academic institutions and the industrial sector have a long history and a bright future. For Engineering and Engineering Technology programs in particular, industry has played a crucial role in many areas including advisement, financial support, and practical training of both faculty and students. Among the most important and intimate interactions are collaborative projects and formal cooperative education arrangements. Most recently, such collaborations have taken on a new dimension, as advances in technology have made possible meaningful technical collaboration at a distance. There are several obvious technology areas that have contributed significantly to this trend. Foremost is the ubiquitous presence of the Internet. Perhaps almost as important are advances in computer based imaging. Because visual images offer a compelling user experience, it affords greater knowledge transfer efficiency than other modes of delivery. Furthermore, the quality of the image appears to have a strongly correlated effect on insight. A good visualization facility offers both a means for communication and a shared information space for the subjects, which are among the essential features of both peer collaboration and distance learning.

  1. Battlefield agent collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budulas, Peter P.; Young, Stuart H.; Emmerman, Philip J.

    2001-09-01

    Small air and ground physical agents (robots) will be ubiquitous on the battlefield of the 21st century, principally to lower the exposure to harm of our ground forces in urban and open terrain scenarios. Teams of small collaborating physical agents conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA), intelligence, chemical and biological agent detection, logistics, decoy, sentry; and communications relay will have advanced sensors, communications, and mobility characteristics. It is anticipated that there will be many levels of individual and team collaboration between the soldier and robot, robot to robot, and robot to mother ship. This paper presents applications and infrastructure components that illustrate each of these levels. As an example, consider the application where a team of twenty small robots must rapidly explore and define a building complex. Local interactions and decisions require peer to peer collaboration. Global direction and information fusion warrant a central team control provided by a mother ship. The mother ship must effectively deliver/retrieve, service, and control these robots as well as fuse the information gathered by these highly mobile robot teams. Any level of collaboration requires robust communications, specifically a mobile ad hoc network. The application of fixed ground sensors and mobile robots is also included in this paper. This paper discusses on going research at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory that supports the development of multi-robot collaboration. This research includes battlefield visualization, intelligent software agents, adaptive communications, sensor and information fusion, and multi-modal human computer interaction.

  2. Collaboration and Networking.

    PubMed

    Husson, O; Manten-Horst, E; van der Graaf, W T A

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the need for collaboration across pediatric and adult cancer to care for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) arose from the recognition of the unique characteristics of AYAs with cancer. Neither pediatric nor adult oncology hospital departments are able to provide age-appropriate care single handedly. The best way to bridge the gap in care of AYA cancer patients is to centralize aspects of their care within dedicated AYA care programs, including the following essential components: provision of developmentally appropriate and multidisciplinary (supportive) care, availability of AYA inpatient and outpatient facilities and healthcare professional AYA expertise as collaboration between adult and pediatric departments. Barriers are related to the slowly emerging evidence of benefit, cultural differences (collaboration between pediatric and adult oncology professionals), administrative and logistic challenges (small number of AYAs makes it difficult to create an AYA program in every hospital) and financial aspects (dependency on philanthropic funds). The sustainable development of an AYA program requires acceptance as a standard of care at the clinical and patient community and at government level. To improve the quality, equity and quantity of research and innovation in AYA cancer care across the world, it is necessary to join forces and collaborate in international networks to study issues such as the features of quality care, collaboration between pediatric and adult clinical teams, trial groups and professional societies, and AYA-specific groups such as Critical Mass, Canteen or European Network for Teenagers and Young Adults with Cancer. PMID:27595356

  3. Trust in interprofessional collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Paul A. M.; Austin, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trust is integral to effective interprofessional collaboration. There has been scant literature characterizing how trust between practitioners is formed, maintained or lost. The objective of this study was to characterize the cognitive model of trust that exists between pharmacists and family physicians working in collaborative primary care settings. Methods: Pharmacists and family physicians who work collaboratively in primary care were participants in this study. Family health teams were excluded from this study because of the distinct nature of these settings. Through a snowball convenience sampling method, a total of 11 pharmacists and 8 family physicians were recruited. A semistructured interview guide was used to guide discussion around trust, relationships and collaboration. Constant-comparative coding was used to identify themes emerging from these data. Results: Pharmacists and family physicians demonstrate different cognitive models of trust in primary care collaboration. For pharmacists, trust appears to be conferred on physicians based on title, degree, status and positional authority. For family physicians, trust appears to be earned based on competency and performance. These differences may lead to interprofessional tension when expectations of reciprocal trust are not met. Conclusions: Further work in characterizing how trust is developed in interprofessional relationships is needed to support effective team formation and functioning. PMID:27540406

  4. Securing collaborative environments

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Deborah; Jackson, Keith; Thompson, Mary

    2002-05-16

    The diverse set of organizations and software components involved in a typical collaboratory make providing a seamless security solution difficult. In addition, the users need support for a broad range of frequency and locations for access to the collaboratory. A collaboratory security solution needs to be robust enough to ensure that valid participants are not denied access because of its failure. There are many tools that can be applied to the task of securing collaborative environments and these include public key infrastructure, secure sockets layer, Kerberos, virtual and real private networks, grid security infrastructure, and username/password. A combination of these mechanisms can provide effective secure collaboration capabilities. In this paper, we discuss the requirements of typical collaboratories and some proposals for applying various security mechanisms to collaborative environments.

  5. The collaboration imperative.

    PubMed

    Nidumolu, Ram; Ellison, Jib; Whalen, John; Billman, Erin

    2014-04-01

    Addressing global sustainability challenges--including climate change, resource depletion, and ecosystem loss--is beyond the individual capabilities of even the largest companies. To tackle these threats, and unleash new value, companies and other stakeholders must collaborate in new ways that treat fragile and complex ecosystems as a whole. In this article, the authors draw on cases including the Latin American Water Funds Partnership, the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (led by Nike, Patagonia, and Walmart), and Action to Accelerate Recycling (a partnership between Alcoa, consumer packaged goods companies, and local governments, among others) to describe four new collaboration models that create shared value and address environmental protection across the value stream. Optimal collaborations focus on improving either business processes or outcomes. They start with a small group of key organizations, bring in project management expertise, link self-interest to shared interest, encourage productive competition, create quick wins, and, above all, build and maintain trust. PMID:24830283

  6. Indico: A Collaboration Hub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, P.; Baron, T.; Bossy, C.; Gonzalez, J. B.; Pugh, M.; Resco, A.; Trzaskoma, J.; Wachter, C.

    2012-12-01

    Since 2009, the development of Indico has focused on usability, performance and new features, especially the ones related to meeting collaboration. Usability studies have resulted in the biggest change Indico has experienced up to now, a new web layout that makes user experience better. Performance improvements were also a key goal since 2010; the main features of Indico have been optimized remarkably. Along with usability and performance, new features have been added to Indico such as webchat integration, video services bookings, webcast and recording requests, designed to really reinforce Indico's position as the main hub for all CERN collaboration services, and many others which aim to complete the conference lifecycle management. Indico development is also moving towards a broader collaboration where other institutes, hosting their own Indico instance, can contribute to the project in order to make it a better and more complete tool.

  7. Collaboration in Family Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tuerk, Elena Hontoria; McCart, Michael R.; Henggeler, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes and illustrates the collaboration strategies used by several family therapies. The strategies used within multisystemic therapy (MST) are emphasized because it has demonstrated high rates of treatment completion and favorable outcomes in multiple clinical trials. Many of the collaboration strategies in family work are common to other forms of evidence-based psychotherapy (e.g., reflective listening, empathy, reframing, and displays of authenticity and flexibility); however, some strategies are unique to family systems treatments, such as the identification of strengths across multiple systems in the youth’s social ecology and the maintenance of a family (versus a child) focus during treatment. A case example illustrates collaboration and engagement in the context of MST. PMID:23616297

  8. Communication and collaboration technologies.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    This is the third in a series of columns exploring health information technology (HIT) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The first column provided background information on the implementation of information technology throughout the health care delivery system, as well as the requisite informatics competencies needed for nurses to fully engage in the digital era of health care. The second column focused on information and resources to master basic computer competencies described by the TIGER initiative (Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform) as learning about computers, computer networks, and the transfer of data.1 This column will provide additional information related to basic computer competencies, focusing on communication and collaboration technologies. Computers and the Internet have transformed the way we communicate and collaborate. Electronic communication is the ability to exchange information through the use of computer equipment and software.2 Broadly defined, any technology that facilitates linking one or more individuals together is a collaborative tool. Collaboration using technology encompasses an extensive range of applications that enable groups of individuals to work together including e-mail, instant messaging (IM ), and several web applications collectively referred to as Web 2.0 technologies. The term Web 2.0 refers to web applications where users interact and collaborate with each other in a collective exchange of ideas generating content in a virtual community. Examples of Web 2.0 technologies include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, video sharing sites, and mashups. Many organizations are developing collaborative strategies and tools for employees to connect and interact using web-based social media technologies.3. PMID:22397797

  9. Collaborative research networks work.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Anamaria A; Simpson, Andrew J G

    2003-08-01

    Brazil was heralded for completion of the first genome sequence of a plant pathogen following the development of a virtual research center - a collaborative network of laboratories throughout the state of São Paulo, drawing on the expertise of a dispersed and diverse scientific community and on investment from both the government and the private sector. Strategies key to the success of this model are discussed here in the context of continuing collaborative scientific endeavors in both developed and developing countries. PMID:12925684

  10. Collaborating Across Borders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatten, Amy

    Physicists transcend national boundaries, ethnic differences, and scientific disciplines to address globally shared problems and questions. This talk will highlight how scientists have collaborated across borders - both geographic and scientific - to achieve ground-breaking discoveries through international scientific cooperation. The speaker also will address how international collaborations will be even more crucial for addressing future challenges faced by the physics community, such as building large-scale research facilities, strengthening scientific capacity in developing countries, fostering ''science for diplomacy'' in times of political tensions and other critical issues.

  11. Collaborative Learning in Wikis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yun-Ke; Morales-Arroyo, Miguel Angel; Than, Hla; Tun, Zarchi; Wang, Zhujun

    2011-01-01

    Wikis are a supporting tool for pupils' learning and collaboration. Tasks such as cooperative authoring, joined workbooks creation, document review, group assignments, reflection notes and others have been tried out using wikis as a facilitating tool [1]. However, few studies have reported how students actually perceive some well-claimed benefits.…

  12. Cultivating Labor Management Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    In many districts, the notion of labor groups and district administration working together conjures descriptions of war and battle rather than cooperation and collaboration. However, in San Juan Unified School District, the headline, "Union and District Exhibit Positive Partnership" exemplifies the changing relationship between teacher leaders and…

  13. Leadership through Professional Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeil, Jessica; Hirsch, Jenna

    2013-01-01

    Leaders in mathematics are responsible for implementing positive change within their school districts and motivating teachers of mathematics to improve their practices. One way mathematics leaders can achieve this goal is by establishing professional collaborations. We analyzed the research and summarized the common attributes found in successful…

  14. Collaborative Teaching in Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Marian Wynne

    Recently, the Communication Department at the University of Texas at Arlington offered an innovative news editing course taught collaboratively by a journalism professor and an editor of the "Fort Worth Star-Telegram," a metropolitan daily newspaper. In 1990 the course was continued on the model describes by R. L. Gates (1989), and in this class…

  15. A Failure to Collaborate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Based on a successful scholarly collaboration experience, the writer assigned a group project in a graduate seminar that confronted a wave of resentment. Small clusters of students were to tackle a multi-layered research assignment requiring textual decisions, bibliographic work, critical theory, historical research, and editorial design. As the…

  16. Vertical Alignment and Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Donna; Calzada, Lucio; LaPointe, Nancy; Lee, Audra; Sullivan, Lynn

    This study investigated whether vertical (grade level sequence) alignment of the curriculum in conjunction with teacher collaboration would enhance student performance on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) test in south Texas school districts of various sizes. Surveys were mailed to the office of the superintendent of 47 school…

  17. Team Collaboration Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Schrock, Mitchell; Baldwin, John R.; Borden, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    The Ground Resource Allocation and Planning Environment (GRAPE 1.0) is a Web-based, collaborative team environment based on the Microsoft SharePoint platform, which provides Deep Space Network (DSN) resource planners tools and services for sharing information and performing analysis.

  18. Using Collaborative Strategic Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Janette K.; Vaughn, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    Describes collaborative strategic reading (CSR), a technique for teaching students, such as those with learning disabilities, reading comprehension and vocabulary skills in a cooperative setting. Covers teaching the four strategies of CSR (preview, click and clunk, get the gist, and wrap up), as well as teaching students cooperative learning group…

  19. Collaborating To Cut Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strosnider, Kim

    1998-01-01

    Private colleges across the country are collaborating to cut costs, streamline services, and increase efficiency. An ambitious Ohio project, involving 35 colleges, to redesign business operations hopes to save $20-25 million. Other efforts include joint classes using interactive television, shared library resources, cross-registration, jointly…

  20. Learning Music from Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, R. Keith

    2008-01-01

    I draw on two traditions of research: the social psychology of collaborative groups, and the ethnographic study of improvisational performance. I outline a general model of group creativity derived from these traditions. I show how the model can be used to better understand musical competence and performance, and I provide recommendations for how…

  1. A Call for Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Carl

    2009-01-01

    In this digital world, being a "viewer" is passe. Web 2.0 tools--social networks, wikis, blogs, voicestream, YouTube, Google Docs--allow users to be participants. Instead of creating isolated users, such technologies foster community and collaboration. In this article, the author describes how schools in New York, Florida, New Jersey, and North…

  2. Collaborative Teaching: Teaching Strangers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panter, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    One calls people on the street strangers if he or she doesn't know who they are, so students whom the librarian has never dealt with are just that, strangers. When the school librarian gets involved in collaboration, most of the time they don't see the student's Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), language barriers, or anything else that…

  3. Building Collaborative Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madigan, Jennifer C.; Schroth-Cavataio, Georganne

    2011-01-01

    Communication and professional dialogue are essential elements of a high-quality education environment in which all students can succeed. Such an environment is especially important for the success of students with special needs. Unfortunately, collaboration between special educators, general educators, and other professionals is often hindered by…

  4. Collaborative Movie Annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zad, Damon Daylamani; Agius, Harry

    In this paper, we focus on metadata for self-created movies like those found on YouTube and Google Video, the duration of which are increasing in line with falling upload restrictions. While simple tags may have been sufficient for most purposes for traditionally very short video footage that contains a relatively small amount of semantic content, this is not the case for movies of longer duration which embody more intricate semantics. Creating metadata is a time-consuming process that takes a great deal of individual effort; however, this effort can be greatly reduced by harnessing the power of Web 2.0 communities to create, update and maintain it. Consequently, we consider the annotation of movies within Web 2.0 environments, such that users create and share that metadata collaboratively and propose an architecture for collaborative movie annotation. This architecture arises from the results of an empirical experiment where metadata creation tools, YouTube and an MPEG-7 modelling tool, were used by users to create movie metadata. The next section discusses related work in the areas of collaborative retrieval and tagging. Then, we describe the experiments that were undertaken on a sample of 50 users. Next, the results are presented which provide some insight into how users interact with existing tools and systems for annotating movies. Based on these results, the paper then develops an architecture for collaborative movie annotation.

  5. Creating a Collaborative Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonson, Stacey; Fisher, Alice; Brown, Genevieve; Irby, Beverly; Lunenburg, Fred; Creighton, Ted; Czaja, Marion; Merchant, Jimmy; Christianson, Judy

    More and more research is focusing on the importance of a healthy work environment and its impact on workers' well-being and productivity. A culture of collaboration has been shown to have an important impact on school-reform efforts and is recognized by several authors as an effective platform for progress within an organization. A collaborative…

  6. Collaborative Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Harry; Fidel, Raya

    1999-01-01

    Researchers from the University of Washington, Microsoft Research, Boeing, and Risoe National Laboratory in Denmark have embarked on a project to explore the manifestations of Collaborative Information Retrieval (CIR) in work settings and to propose technological innovations and organizational changes that can support, facilitate, and improve CIR.…

  7. Collaborative Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    This collection consists of 41 collaborative lesson plans developed by 99 Virginia teachers at 18 primarily High Schools that Work (HSTW) and tech prep sites. It is divided into three sections: career connection, community connection, and consumer connection. Two types of lesson descriptions which support HSTW key practices, and Virginia's Tech…

  8. Spin field equations and Heun's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Min; Wang, Xuejing; Li, Zhongheng

    2015-06-01

    The Kerr-Newman-(anti) de Sitter metric is the most general stationary black hole solution to the Einstein-Maxwell equation with a cosmological constant. We study the separability of the equations of the massless scalar (spin s=0), neutrino ( s=1/2), electromagnetic ( s=1), Rarita-Schwinger ( s=3/2), and gravitational ( s=2) fields propagating on this background. We obtain the angular and radial master equations, and show that the master equations are transformed to Heun's equation. Meanwhile, we give the condition of existence of event horizons for Kerr-Newman-(anti) de Sitter spacetime by using Sturm theorem.

  9. Basic lubrication equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Lubricants, usually Newtonian fluids, are assumed to experience laminar flow. The basic equations used to describe the flow are the Navier-Stokes equation of motion. The study of hydrodynamic lubrication is, from a mathematical standpoint, the application of a reduced form of these Navier-Stokes equations in association with the continuity equation. The Reynolds equation can also be derived from first principles, provided of course that the same basic assumptions are adopted in each case. Both methods are used in deriving the Reynolds equation, and the assumptions inherent in reducing the Navier-Stokes equations are specified. Because the Reynolds equation contains viscosity and density terms and these properties depend on temperature and pressure, it is often necessary to couple the Reynolds with energy equation. The lubricant properties and the energy equation are presented. Film thickness, a parameter of the Reynolds equation, is a function of the elastic behavior of the bearing surface. The governing elasticity equation is therefore presented.

  10. Exploring How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Synchronous Collaborative Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Hui-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative writing (CW) research has gained prevalence in recent years. However, the ways in which students interact socially to produce written texts through synchronous collaborative writing (SCW) is rarely studied. This study aims to investigate the effects of SCW on students' writing products and how collaborative dialogues facilitate…

  11. Gender, Persuasion Techniques, and Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raign, Kathryn Rosser; Sims, Brenda R.

    1993-01-01

    Examines preconceptions of four proposal developers about three factors: effective and ineffective collaboration; gender's effects on collaboration; and gender's effect on persuasion. Finds the discourse techniques used by men and women do not parallel a person's gender. (RS)

  12. Collaborative testing to promote learning.

    PubMed

    Lusk, Marilyn; Conklin, Lynn

    2003-03-01

    This pilot study examined the adequacy of collaborative testing to test students' knowledge, as well as a teaching tool for critical thinking, collaboration, and test-taking ability. The results indicated students using collaborative testing for unit examinations scored equally well on a cumulative final examination as students who did not use collaborative testing. There were some indications that the test-taking skills of students using collaborative testing improved, producing more effective testing of knowledge. Finally, collaborative testing provided students with the opportunity to become more proficient with critical thinking and collaboration skills, and all students reported decreased test anxiety. Instructors desiring to provide more classroom opportunities for learning these valuable skills may want to consider using collaborative testing as a learning experience, as well as an effective testing method. PMID:12661712

  13. Collaboration to partnerships.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Sandra L; Kornet, Terese M; Lawson, Diane R; Major, Katherine; May, Linda; Rich, Victoria L; Riley-Wasserman, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Partnerships are at the center of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania Nursing Excellence Professional Practice (HUP-NEPP) model. Through the use of collaboration, skilled communication, and respectful workplace, partnerships can be formed, leading ultimately to world-class patient care. At HUP, interdisciplinary partnerships are evidenced by the clinical nurses through shared governance. This article describes the components necessary to form successful partnerships. PMID:20023561

  14. Robust Collaborative Recommendation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Robin; O'Mahony, Michael P.; Hurley, Neil J.

    Collaborative recommender systems are vulnerable to malicious users who seek to bias their output, causing them to recommend (or not recommend) particular items. This problem has been an active research topic since 2002. Researchers have found that the most widely-studied memory-based algorithms have significant vulnerabilities to attacks that can be fairly easily mounted. This chapter discusses these findings and the responses that have been investigated, especially detection of attack profiles and the implementation of robust recommendation algorithms.

  15. Preparing Future Teachers to Collaborate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santagata, Rossella; Guarino, Jody

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue that teacher education programs should equip future teachers with skills for engaging in productive collaboration focused on improving instruction. Because little is known about pre-service teachers' beginning conceptions of collaboration and the ways in which collaboration skills can be developed, the authors…

  16. Modeling Sustainability through Collaboratively Organizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This project explores collaborative efforts involving the United States Forest Service and the communities it serves. By contributing to our understanding leadership dynamics within collaborative groups in this setting, this project provides resource managers and communities with a more refined insight into how collaborative groups are maintained…

  17. Regulating Collaboration in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobber, Marjolein; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Verloop, Nico; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration in teacher education can be seen as a way to prepare student teachers for future social practices at school. When people collaborate with each other, they have to regulate their collaboration. In the Dutch teacher education programme that was investigated, student teachers were members of different types of groups, each of which had…

  18. Collaboration in a Pressure Cooker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Terry R.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the purpose and effects of collaborative writing in proposal development projects. Suggests how collaboration serves the larger social functions of the modern corporation. Discusses how the circumstances of proposal development affect collaboration. Describes storyboarding--a common and often highly effective tool for fostering…

  19. Collaboratively Sharing Scientific Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fusheng; Vergara-Niedermayr, Cristobal

    Scientific research becomes increasingly reliant on multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration through sharing experimental data. Indeed, data sharing is mandatory by government research agencies such as NIH. The major hurdles for data sharing come from: i) the lack of data sharing infrastructure to make data sharing convenient for users; ii) users’ fear of losing control of their data; iii) difficulty on sharing schemas and incompatible data from sharing partners; and iv) inconsistent data under schema evolution. In this paper, we develop a collaborative data sharing system SciPort, to support consistency preserved data sharing among multiple distributed organizations. The system first provides Central Server based lightweight data integration architecture, so data and schemas can be conveniently shared across multiple organizations. Through distributed schema management, schema sharing and evolution is made possible, while data consistency is maintained and data compatibility is enforced. With this data sharing system, distributed sites can now consistently share their research data and their associated schemas with much convenience and flexibility. SciPort has been successfully used for data sharing in biomedical research, clinical trials and large scale research collaboration.

  20. Chemical Equation Balancing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakley, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews mathematical techniques for solving systems of homogeneous linear equations and demonstrates that the algebraic method of balancing chemical equations is a matter of solving a system of homogeneous linear equations. FORTRAN programs using this matrix method to chemical equation balancing are available from the author. (JN)

  1. Equations and closure methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Basic differential equations governing compressible turbulent boundary layer flow are reviewed, including conservation of mass and energy, momentum equations derived from Navier-Stokes equations, and equations of state. Closure procedures were broken down into: (1) simple or zeroth-order methods, (2) first-order or mean field closure methods, and (3) second-order or mean turbulence field methods.

  2. MMI: Increasing Community Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbraith, N. R.; Stocks, K.; Neiswender, C.; Maffei, A.; Bermudez, L.

    2007-12-01

    Building community requires a collaborative environment and guidance to help move members towards a common goal. An effective environment for community collaboration is a workspace that fosters participation and cooperation; effective guidance furthers common understanding and promotes best practices. The Marine Metadata Interoperability (MMI) project has developed a community web site to provide a collaborative environment for scientists, technologists, and data managers from around the world to learn about metadata and exchange ideas. Workshops, demonstration projects, and presentations also provide community-building opportunities for MMI. MMI has developed comprehensive online guides to help users understand and work with metadata standards, ontologies, and other controlled vocabularies. Documents such as "The Importance of Metadata Standards", "Usage vs. Discovery Vocabularies" and "Developing Controlled Vocabularies" guide scientists and data managers through a variety of metadata-related concepts. Members from eight organizations involved in marine science and informatics collaborated on this effort. The MMI web site has moved from Plone to Drupal, two content management systems which provide different opportunities for community-based work. Drupal's "organic groups" feature will be used to provide workspace for future teams tasked with content development, outreach, and other MMI mission-critical work. The new site is designed to enable members to easily create working areas, to build communities dedicated to developing consensus on metadata and other interoperability issues. Controlled-vocabulary-driven menus, integrated mailing-lists, member-based content creation and review tools are facets of the new web site architecture. This move provided the challenge of developing a hierarchical vocabulary to describe the resources presented on the site; consistent and logical tagging of web pages is the basis of Drupal site navigation. The new MMI web site

  3. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy Resources, (5

  4. Advances in Collaborative Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Yehuda; Bell, Robert

    The collaborative filtering (CF) approach to recommenders has recently enjoyed much interest and progress. The fact that it played a central role within the recently completed Netflix competition has contributed to its popularity. This chapter surveys the recent progress in the field. Matrix factorization techniques, which became a first choice for implementing CF, are described together with recent innovations. We also describe several extensions that bring competitive accuracy into neighborhood methods, which used to dominate the field. The chapter demonstrates how to utilize temporal models and implicit feedback to extend models accuracy. In passing, we include detailed descriptions of some the central methods developed for tackling the challenge of the Netflix Prize competition.

  5. The Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    Petermann, Nils

    2006-03-31

    The Efficient Windows Collaborative (EWC) is a coalition of manufacturers, component suppliers, government agencies, research institutions, and others who partner to expand the market for energy efficient window products. Funded through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, the EWC provides education, communication and outreach in order to transform the residential window market to 70% energy efficient products by 2005. Implementation of the EWC is managed by the Alliance to Save Energy, with support from the University of Minnesota and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  6. Inferring Mathematical Equations Using Crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Crowdsourcing, understood as outsourcing work to a large network of people in the form of an open call, has been utilized successfully many times, including a very interesting concept involving the implementation of computer games with the objective of solving a scientific problem by employing users to play a game—so-called crowdsourced serious games. Our main objective was to verify whether such an approach could be successfully applied to the discovery of mathematical equations that explain experimental data gathered during the observation of a given dynamic system. Moreover, we wanted to compare it with an approach based on artificial intelligence that uses symbolic regression to find such formulae automatically. To achieve this, we designed and implemented an Internet game in which players attempt to design a spaceship representing an equation that models the observed system. The game was designed while considering that it should be easy to use for people without strong mathematical backgrounds. Moreover, we tried to make use of the collective intelligence observed in crowdsourced systems by enabling many players to collaborate on a single solution. The idea was tested on several hundred players playing almost 10,000 games and conducting a user opinion survey. The results prove that the proposed solution has very high potential. The function generated during weeklong tests was almost as precise as the analytical solution of the model of the system and, up to a certain complexity level of the formulae, it explained data better than the solution generated automatically by Eureqa, the leading software application for the implementation of symbolic regression. Moreover, we observed benefits of using crowdsourcing; the chain of consecutive solutions that led to the best solution was obtained by the continuous collaboration of several players. PMID:26713846

  7. Inferring Mathematical Equations Using Crowdsourcing.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Szymon; Fratczak, Filip; Krzyskow, Jakub; Wulnikowski, Jaroslaw

    2015-01-01

    Crowdsourcing, understood as outsourcing work to a large network of people in the form of an open call, has been utilized successfully many times, including a very interesting concept involving the implementation of computer games with the objective of solving a scientific problem by employing users to play a game-so-called crowdsourced serious games. Our main objective was to verify whether such an approach could be successfully applied to the discovery of mathematical equations that explain experimental data gathered during the observation of a given dynamic system. Moreover, we wanted to compare it with an approach based on artificial intelligence that uses symbolic regression to find such formulae automatically. To achieve this, we designed and implemented an Internet game in which players attempt to design a spaceship representing an equation that models the observed system. The game was designed while considering that it should be easy to use for people without strong mathematical backgrounds. Moreover, we tried to make use of the collective intelligence observed in crowdsourced systems by enabling many players to collaborate on a single solution. The idea was tested on several hundred players playing almost 10,000 games and conducting a user opinion survey. The results prove that the proposed solution has very high potential. The function generated during weeklong tests was almost as precise as the analytical solution of the model of the system and, up to a certain complexity level of the formulae, it explained data better than the solution generated automatically by Eureqa, the leading software application for the implementation of symbolic regression. Moreover, we observed benefits of using crowdsourcing; the chain of consecutive solutions that led to the best solution was obtained by the continuous collaboration of several players. PMID:26713846

  8. Collaborative editing within the pervasive collaborative computing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Marcia; Agarwal, Deb

    2003-09-11

    Scientific collaborations are established for a wide variety of tasks for which several communication modes are necessary, including messaging, file-sharing, and collaborative editing. In this position paper, we describe our work on the Pervasive Collaborative Computing Environment (PCCE) which aims to facilitate scientific collaboration within widely distributed environments. The PCCE provides a persistent space in which collaborators can locate each other, exchange messages synchronously and asynchronously and archive conversations. Our current interest is in exploring research and development of shared editing systems with the goal of integrating this technology into the PCCE. We hope to inspire discussion of technology solutions for an integrated approach to synchronous and asynchronous communication and collaborative editing.

  9. Single wall penetration equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Five single plate penetration equations are compared for accuracy and effectiveness. These five equations are two well-known equations (Fish-Summers and Schmidt-Holsapple), two equations developed by the Apollo project (Rockwell and Johnson Space Center (JSC), and one recently revised from JSC (Cour-Palais). They were derived from test results, with velocities ranging up to 8 km/s. Microsoft Excel software was used to construct a spreadsheet to calculate the diameters and masses of projectiles for various velocities, varying the material properties of both projectile and target for the five single plate penetration equations. The results were plotted on diameter versus velocity graphs for ballistic and spallation limits using Cricket Graph software, for velocities ranging from 2 to 15 km/s defined for the orbital debris. First, these equations were compared to each other, then each equation was compared with various aluminum projectile densities. Finally, these equations were compared with test results performed at JSC for the Marshall Space Flight Center. These equations predict a wide variety of projectile diameters at a given velocity. Thus, it is very difficult to choose the 'right' prediction equation. The thickness of a single plate could have a large variation by choosing a different penetration equation. Even though all five equations are empirically developed with various materials, especially for aluminum alloys, one cannot be confident in the shield design with the predictions obtained by the penetration equations without verifying by tests.

  10. Building collaborative enterprise.

    PubMed

    Adler, Paul; Heckscher, Charles; Prusak, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Can large companies be both innovative and efficient? Yes, argue Adler, of the University of Southern California; Heckscher, of Rutgers; and Prusak, an independent consultant. But they must develop new organizational capabilities that will create the atmosphere of trust that knowledge work requires--and the coordinating mechanisms to make it scalable. Specifically, such organizations must learn to: Define a shared purpose that guides what people at all levels of the organization are trying to achieve together; Cultivate an ethic of contribution in which the highest value is accorded to people who look beyond their specific roles and advance the common purpose; Develop scalable procedures for coordinating people's efforts so that process-management activities become truly interdependent; and Create an infrastructure in which individuals' spheres of influence overlap and collaboration is both valued and rewarded. These four goals may sound idealized, but the imperative to achieve them is practical, say the authors. Only the truly collaborative enterprises that can tap into everyone's ideas---in an organized way--will compete imaginatively, quickly, and cost-effectively enough to become the household names of this century. PMID:21800474

  11. Interpretation of Bernoulli's Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Robert P.; Schwaneberg, Rolf

    1994-01-01

    Discusses Bernoulli's equation with regards to: horizontal flow of incompressible fluids, change of height of incompressible fluids, gases, liquids and gases, and viscous fluids. Provides an interpretation, properties, terminology, and applications of Bernoulli's equation. (MVL)

  12. Reflections on Chemical Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Mel

    1981-01-01

    The issue of how much emphasis balancing chemical equations should have in an introductory chemistry course is discussed. The current heavy emphasis on finishing such equations is viewed as misplaced. (MP)

  13. Chronic Kidney Disease, Fluid Overload and Diuretics: A Complicated Triangle

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Yusra Habib; Sarriff, Azmi; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Khan, Amer Hayat; Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite promising role of diuretics to manage fluid overload among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, their use is associated with adverse renal outcomes. Current study aimed to determine the extent of renal deterioration with diuretic therapy. Methods A total 312 non-dialysis dependent CKD (NDD-CKD) patients were prospectively followed-up for one year. Fluid overload was assessed via bioimpedance spectroscopy. Estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated from serum creatinine values by using Chronic Kidney Disease- Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Results Out of 312 patients, 64 (20.5%) were hypovolemic while euvolemia and hypervolemia were observed in 113 (36.1%) and 135 (43.4%) patients. Overall 144 patients were using diuretics among which 98 (72.6%) were hypervolemic, 35 (30.9%) euvolemic and 11 (17.2%) were hypovolemic. The mean decline in estimated GFR of entire cohort was -2.5 ± 1.4 ml/min/1.73m2 at the end of follow up. The use of diuretics was significantly associated with decline in eGFR. A total of 36 (11.5%) patients initiated renal replacement therapy (RRT) and need of RRT was more profound among diuretic users. Conclusions The use of diuretics was associated with adverse renal outcomes indicated by decline in eGFR and increasing risk of RRT initiation in our cohort of NDD-CKD patients. Therefore, it is cautiously suggested to carefully prescribe diuretics by keeping in view benefit versus harm for each patient. PMID:27442587

  14. Understanding CKD among patients with T2DM: prevalence, temporal trends, and treatment patterns—NHANES 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bingcao; Bell, Kelly; Stanford, Amy; Kern, David M; Tunceli, Ozgur; Vupputuri, Suma; Kalsekar, Iftekhar; Willey, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the estimated prevalence and temporal trends of chronic kidney disease (CKD) treatment patterns, and the association between CKD and potential factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in different demographic subgroups. Research design and methods This was a cross-sectional analysis of adults with T2DM based on multiple US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) datasets developed during 2007–2012. CKD severity was defined according to the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) 2012 guidelines using the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation: mild to moderate=stages 1–3a; moderate to kidney failure=stages 3b–5. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the associations between CKD and potential factors. Results Of the adult individuals with T2DM (n=2006), age-adjusted CKD prevalence was 38.3% during 2007–2012; 77.5% were mild-to-moderate CKD. The overall age-adjusted prevalence of CKD was 40.2% in 2007–2008, 36.9% in 2009–2010, and 37.6% in 2011–2012. The prevalence of CKD in T2DM was 58.7% in patients aged ≥65 years, 25.7% in patients aged <65 years, 43.5% in African-Americans and Mexican-Americans, and 38.7% in non-Hispanic whites. The use of antidiabetes and antihypertensive medications generally followed treatment guideline recommendations. Older age, higher hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and having hypertension were significantly associated with CKD presence but not increasing severity of CKD. Conclusions CKD continued to be prevalent in the T2DM population; prevalence remained fairly consistent over time, suggesting that current efforts to prevent CKD could be improved overall, especially by monitoring certain populations more closely. PMID:27110365

  15. Long-Term Follow-Up of Proteinuria and Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in HIV-Infected Patients with Tubular Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Peyriere, Hélène; Cournil, Amandine; Casanova, Marie-Laure; Badiou, Stéphanie; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Reynes, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this prospective observational study was to describe the evolution of tubular proteinuria detected in HIV-infected patients, and to evaluate the impact of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) discontinuation. Methods Proteinuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were followed during a median duration of 32 months, in 81 HIV-infected patients with tubular proteinuria and eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 (determined using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology (CKD-EPI) Collaboration equation). Tubular proteinuria was defined by urine protein to creatinine ratio (uPCR) ≥200 mg/g and albumin to protein ratio (uAPR) <0.4. Results Twenty per cent of patients had persistence of tubular proteinuria: TDF continuation was the main factor associated with this persistence [OR 9.0; 95%CI: 1.9–41.4; p = 0.01]. Among the 23 patients who discontinued TDF, uPCR returned below the threshold of 200 mg/g in 11 patients. Overall, eGFR decreased with a mean rate of decline of 3.8 ml/min/1.73m2/year. The decline in eGFR was lesser after discontinuation of TDF (5.8 ml/min/1.73m2/year during TDF exposure versus 3 ml/min/1.73m2/year after TDF discontinuation; p = 0.01). Conclusions The continuation of TDF was the main factor associated with the persistence of proteinuria. Moreover, proteinuria was normalized in only half of the patients who discontinued TDF. The clinical significance of TDF-related low level of proteinuria as a factor associated with renal disease progression and bone loss remains poorly understood. PMID:26571117

  16. Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease among Patients Attending a Specialist Diabetes Clinic in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, TS; Tulloch-Reid, MK; Younger-Coleman, NO; Wright-Pascoe, RA; Boyne, MS; Soyibo, AK; Wilks, RJ

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among patients attending the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic and to determine the proportion of patients at high risk for adverse outcomes. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among patients attending the UHWI Diabetes Clinic between 2009 and 2010. Trained nurses administered a questionnaire, reviewed dockets, and performed urinalyses. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Albuminuria was assessed using urine test strips for protein and microalbumin. Chronic kidney disease was defined as an eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2 or albuminuria ≥ 30 mg/g creatinine. Risk of adverse outcome (all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease and kidney failure) was determined using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcome (KDIGO) 2012 prognosis grid. Results: Participants included 100 women and 32 men (mean age, 55.4 ± 12.9 years, mean duration of diabetes, 16.7 ± 11.7 years). Twenty-two per cent of participants had eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2. Moderate albuminuria (30–300 mg/g) was present in 20.5% of participants and severe albuminuria (> 300 mg/g) in 62.1%. Overall prevalence of CKD was 86.3% (95% CI 80.4%, 92.2%). Based on KDIGO risk categories, 50.8% were at high risk and 17.4% at very high risk of adverse outcomes. Conclusion: Most patients at the UHWI Diabetes Clinic had CKD and were at high or very high risk of adverse outcomes. Further studies to determine the burden of CKD in other clinical settings and to identify the best strategies for preventing adverse outcomes in developing countries need to be conducted. PMID:26426170

  17. The Pendulum Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the pendulum equation [theta] + [lambda][squared] sin [theta] = 0 and two approximations for it. On the one hand, we suggest that the third and fifth-order Taylor series approximations for sin [theta] do not yield very good differential equations to approximate the solution of the pendulum equation unless the initial conditions are…

  18. Characterizing the Photometric Response of the ANS Collaboration Monitoring Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Moretti, S.

    The ANS Collaboration uses the UBVR CI C filters from various commercial manufacturers (Omega Optical, Custom Scientific, Schuler, Optec, Astrodon) for its ongoing photometric monitoring of symbiotic stars. We measured their transmittance profiles over the range 2000 Å to 1.1 μ m for various operating conditions, and we are monitoring their evolution over time. Their field performance in terms of color equations has been evaluated by analyzing the transformations from local to standard system of the 14602 observing runs so far collected on symbiotic stars with the ANS Collaboration telescopes. Ageing effects, red leaks and transmittance vs. angle of incidence are also evaluated.

  19. Supporting collaborative computing and interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Deborah; McParland, Charles; Perry, Marcia

    2002-05-22

    To enable collaboration on the daily tasks involved in scientific research, collaborative frameworks should provide lightweight and ubiquitous components that support a wide variety of interaction modes. We envision a collaborative environment as one that provides a persistent space within which participants can locate each other, exchange synchronous and asynchronous messages, share documents and applications, share workflow, and hold videoconferences. We are developing the Pervasive Collaborative Computing Environment (PCCE) as such an environment. The PCCE will provide integrated tools to support shared computing and task control and monitoring. This paper describes the PCCE and the rationale for its design.

  20. Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program started in 1966 and conducted epidemiologic research to quantify the potential adverse effects of prescription drugs, utilizing in-hospital monitoring.

  1. Collaborative Beamfocusing Radio (COBRA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Jeremy P.; Hsu, Mark J.; Smith, David; Husain, Anis

    2013-05-01

    A Ziva team has recently demonstrated a novel technique called Collaborative Beamfocusing Radios (COBRA) which enables an ad-hoc collection of distributed commercial off-the-shelf software defined radios to coherently align and beamform to a remote radio. COBRA promises to operate even in high multipath and non-line-of-sight environments as well as mobile applications without resorting to computationally expensive closed loop techniques that are currently unable to operate with significant movement. COBRA exploits two key technologies to achieve coherent beamforming. The first is Time Reversal (TR) which compensates for multipath and automatically discovers the optimal spatio-temporal matched filter to enable peak signal gains (up to 20 dB) and diffraction-limited focusing at the intended receiver in NLOS and severe multipath environments. The second is time-aligned buffering which enables TR to synchronize distributed transmitters into a collaborative array. This time alignment algorithm avoids causality violations through the use of reciprocal buffering. Preserving spatio-temporal reciprocity through the TR capture and retransmission process achieves coherent alignment across multiple radios at ~GHz carriers using only standard quartz-oscillators. COBRA has been demonstrated in the lab, aligning two off-the-shelf software defined radios over-the-air to an accuracy of better than 2 degrees of carrier alignment at 450 MHz. The COBRA algorithms are lightweight, with computation in 5 ms on a smartphone class microprocessor. COBRA also has low start-up latency, achieving high accuracy from a cold-start in 30 ms. The COBRA technique opens up a large number of new capabilities in communications, and electronic warfare including selective spatial jamming, geolocation and anti-geolocation.

  2. Collaborative Resource Allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Wax, Allan; Lam, Raymond; Baldwin, John; Borden, Chester

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative Resource Allocation Networking Environment (CRANE) Version 0.5 is a prototype created to prove the newest concept of using a distributed environment to schedule Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna times in a collaborative fashion. This program is for all space-flight and terrestrial science project users and DSN schedulers to perform scheduling activities and conflict resolution, both synchronously and asynchronously. Project schedulers can, for the first time, participate directly in scheduling their tracking times into the official DSN schedule, and negotiate directly with other projects in an integrated scheduling system. A master schedule covers long-range, mid-range, near-real-time, and real-time scheduling time frames all in one, rather than the current method of separate functions that are supported by different processes and tools. CRANE also provides private workspaces (both dynamic and static), data sharing, scenario management, user control, rapid messaging (based on Java Message Service), data/time synchronization, workflow management, notification (including emails), conflict checking, and a linkage to a schedule generation engine. The data structure with corresponding database design combines object trees with multiple associated mortal instances and relational database to provide unprecedented traceability and simplify the existing DSN XML schedule representation. These technologies are used to provide traceability, schedule negotiation, conflict resolution, and load forecasting from real-time operations to long-range loading analysis up to 20 years in the future. CRANE includes a database, a stored procedure layer, an agent-based middle tier, a Web service wrapper, a Windows Integrated Analysis Environment (IAE), a Java application, and a Web page interface.

  3. Global and Local Collaborators: A Study of Scientific Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pao, Miranda Lee

    1992-01-01

    Describes an empirical study that was conducted to examine the relationship among scientific co-authorship (i.e., collaboration), research funding, and productivity. Bibliographic records from the MEDLINE database that used the subject heading for schistosomiasis are analyzed, global and local collaborators are discussed, and scientific…

  4. Roy-Steiner equations for πN scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Elvira, J. Ruiz; Ditsche, C.; Hoferichter, M.; Kubis, B.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2015-10-01

    In this talk, we briefly review our ongoing collaboration to precisely determine the low-energy πN scattering amplitude by means of Roy-Steiner equations. After giving a brief overview of this system of dispersive equations and their application to πN scattering, we proceed to solve for the lower partial waves of the s-channel (πN → πN) and the t-channel l( {π π to bar NN} right) sub-problems.

  5. Exploiting Publication Contents and Collaboration Networks for Collaborator Recommendation

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangjie; Jiang, Huizhen; Yang, Zhuo; Xu, Zhenzhen; Xia, Feng; Tolba, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to the proliferation of online social networks, it has become conventional for researchers to communicate and collaborate with each other. Meanwhile, one critical challenge arises, that is, how to find the most relevant and potential collaborators for each researcher? In this work, we propose a novel collaborator recommendation model called CCRec, which combines the information on researchers’ publications and collaboration network to generate better recommendation. In order to effectively identify the most potential collaborators for researchers, we adopt a topic clustering model to identify the academic domains, as well as a random walk model to compute researchers’ feature vectors. Using DBLP datasets, we conduct benchmarking experiments to examine the performance of CCRec. The experimental results show that CCRec outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision, recall and F1 score. PMID:26849682

  6. Collaborative Workplace Development: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folinsbee, Sue; Jurmo, Paul

    This booklet, which is intended for educators, human resource specialists, and others responsible for training and education and workplace development, presents principles of good practice and steps for planning and implementing collaborative workplace development initiatives. A collaborative method of workplace development is detailed that…

  7. Job Migration: A Collaborative Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers often change jobs several times during their careers. Reasons for job changes vary, but regardless, these changes bring a different set of challenges. Sharing knowledge and learning are part and parcel of collaboration. So what if, as education professionals, music teachers decided to collaborate during job migrations? For all music…

  8. Information Literacy: A Collaborative Endeavor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Thomas P.; Jacobson, Trudi E.

    2005-01-01

    The authors propose that information literacy initiatives must be a shared concern of faculty and librarians. This position is reinforced by accreditation standards that view information literacy as central to student learning and best addressed within a collaborative framework. Two models for collaboration are posited and described: teaching…

  9. Children's Views of Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnard, Sandra; Sharp, John

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative learning is a widely used and popular strategy in many primary schools. In this article, the authors review the nature and purpose of collaborative learning and present a summary of how one small group of Year 5/6 children view its effectiveness. (Contains 3 tables.)

  10. Collaborative Learning as Professional Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuland, Mary Phyllis Alkire

    A study explored the nature of collaborative learning as a method to prepare future nurses for collaboration in health care. Qualitative research data collection and analysis methods were used. A constant comparative method occurred during and after the data were gathered. Semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and document review were the…

  11. Collaborative Programming in Nonformal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Hahmann, Gail

    The paper examines collaborative program development in participatory nonformal education, emphasizing the process of programming based on field experiences of the Center for International Education of the University of Massachusetts. The objective is to serve as an initial step in the development of collaborative programming theory and practice.…

  12. Collaborative interactive visualization: exploratory concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, Marielle; Lavigne, Valérie; Drolet, Frédéric

    2015-05-01

    Dealing with an ever increasing amount of data is a challenge that military intelligence analysts or team of analysts face day to day. Increased individual and collective comprehension goes through collaboration between people. Better is the collaboration, better will be the comprehension. Nowadays, various technologies support and enhance collaboration by allowing people to connect and collaborate in settings as varied as across mobile devices, over networked computers, display walls, tabletop surfaces, to name just a few. A powerful collaboration system includes traditional and multimodal visualization features to achieve effective human communication. Interactive visualization strengthens collaboration because this approach is conducive to incrementally building a mental assessment of the data meaning. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the envisioned collaboration architecture and the interactive visualization concepts underlying the Sensemaking Support System prototype developed to support analysts in the context of the Joint Intelligence Collection and Analysis Capability project at DRDC Valcartier. It presents the current version of the architecture, discusses future capabilities to help analyst(s) in the accomplishment of their tasks and finally recommends collaboration and visualization technologies allowing to go a step further both as individual and as a team.

  13. Tele-Collaboration and Groupware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Betty; Heeren, Elske

    1993-01-01

    Describes the development of strategies and software to help people work collaboratively while at a distance from one another. The importance of collaborative activities, the shared spaces concept behind groupware, examples of software that support synchronous and asynchronous group activities, and design issues for educational groupware are…

  14. Collaborative Research and Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christianakis, Mary

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author explores how collaborative teacher research can reposition teachers to be powerful stakeholders and policymakers rather than skilled technicians and implementers. She begins with a brief review of the historical antecedents to collaborative teacher research in order to detail how teachers and their allies have fought…

  15. Designing Electronic Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschner, Paul; Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Kreijns, Karel; Beers, Pieter Jelle

    2004-01-01

    Electronic collaborative learning environments for learning and working are in vogue. Designers design them according to their own constructivist interpretations of what collaborative learning is and what it should achieve. Educators employ them with different educational approaches and in diverse situations to achieve different ends. Students use…

  16. Educational Leadership for Teacher Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Lynne; Friend, Marilyn

    This chapter, taken from a guide to designing, implementing, and evaluating instruction and services for students with disabilities, addresses the issue of teacher collaboration. It provides information about the nature of teacher collaboration, its role in relation to special education service delivery as well as other school trends, its…

  17. Illinois: Child Care Collaboration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Care Collaboration Program promotes collaboration between child care and other early care and education providers, including Early Head Start (EHS), by creating policies to ease blending of funds to extend the day or year of existing services. While no funding is provided through the initiative, participating programs may take…

  18. A Model of Transformative Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Ann L.; Triscari, Jacqlyn S.

    2011-01-01

    Two collaborative writing partners sought to deepen their understanding of transformative learning by conducting several spirals of grounded theory research on their own collaborative relationship. Drawing from adult education, business, and social science literature and including descriptive analysis of their records of activity and interaction…

  19. Collaborative Writing: Online versus Frontal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passig, David; Schwartz, Gali

    2007-01-01

    Students in higher education, most frequently, use the frontal approach while being asked to collaborate on a writing assignment. However, the difficulty in collaborative writing using conventional technologies such as pen and paper, board or computer is the limited ability to view the work of your peers during the process (Baeker, Glass,…

  20. Community Collaboration for Inquiry Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Cherry; Kearley, Donna; Byerly, Gayla; Ramin, Lilly

    2014-01-01

    Synergy may be defined as the collaboration between two or more parties to produce a combined effect greater than the sum of their separate parts. That is exactly what happened in Denton, Texas, when all types of librarians collaborated on a community reading initiative. In 2007 Denton Reads--a One Book, One Community organization--was formed with…

  1. Accounting Experiences in Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmond, Tracie; Tiggeman, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses incorporating collaborative learning into accounting classes as a response to the Accounting Education Change Commission's call to install a more active student learner in the classroom. Collaborative learning requires the students to interact with each other and with the material within the classroom setting. It is a…

  2. Knowledge Convergence and Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Heisawn; Chi, Michelene T. H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper operationalized the notion of knowledge convergence and assessed quantitatively how much knowledge convergence occurred during collaborative learning. Knowledge convergence was defined as an increase in common knowledge where common knowledge referred to the knowledge that all collaborating partners had. Twenty pairs of college students…

  3. Online Collaborative Documents for Research and Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Karen L.; Cifuentes, Lauren; Shih, Yu-Chih Doris

    2004-01-01

    The increased use of the internet in higher education has helped researchers conduct collaborative research and enabled faculty to provide opportunities for students to work collaboratively in their courses. The authors of this article use online collaborative documents for conducting collaborative research and for learning collaboratively via the…

  4. Wikis and Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Binbin; Niiya, Melissa; Warschauer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    While collaborative learning and collaborative writing can be of great value to student learning, the implementation of a technology-supported collaborative learning environment is a challenge. With their built-in features for supporting collaborative writing and social communication, wikis are a promising platform for collaborative learning;…

  5. Collaborative space surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang; Pham, Khanh D.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents a space-based, space-surveillance study wherein the goal is to demonstrate the feasibility and scalability of the modeling and simulation of a distributed multi-agent multiple satellites tracking and prediction system. A flexible and modular system architecture that enables collaborative and efficient teaming among distributed agents is delineated. Hierarchical objective methodology is deployed to align the mission objectives with the diverse agents' capabilities and resources. A set of satellite platform and sensor configuration/models is considered. Detailed mathematical models of the satellite orbits including the mutual visibility function are simulated for combinations of GEO and LEO orbits. An Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF)/Distributed Unscented Information Filter (DUIF) for high-accuracy orbital determination and tracking is demonstrated to show that the LEO orbit estimation from the GEO satellite with only angle measurements based on UKF is an excellent approach. Simulation studies show that the rate of filter convergence depends on sample time period, initial error, process error, measurement errors as well as the relative geometry of the LEO and GEO satellite orbits.

  6. Collaborations in Underground Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Joseph S. Y.

    2011-04-01

    There are programs between underground physics labs into other studies. The Gran Sasso with large halls and dedicated tunnels in Italy and the Canfranc with newly completed space in Spain have geodynamic experiments (A. Bettini communication, 2011). The Low Noise Underground Lab (LSBB of Rustrel-pays d'Apt) converted a former French missiles launching command center to house a SQUID shielded electromagnetically above 10 Hz for global ionosphere and earthquake observations (G. Waysand et al. 2010). The China JingPing Lab has new physics room and tunnels excavated under 2.5 km overburden with rock mechanic changes evaluated (X. Feng, 2011). These are examples associated with tunnels through mountain ranges. In North America, we have Canada's SNO in an active mine with new space and the U.S. effort for reentry into the abandoned Homestake mine levels for physics and bio-geo-engineering studies. We also have underground research labs dedicated to nuclear waste research in Sweden, Switzerland, France, Germany, and candidate sites in Japan and China. All these underground labs are engaging in international collaborations to develop inter-disciplinary studies. The linkage/networking with International Physics is pursued.

  7. Frailty and Interprofessional Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Marion C E; McElhaney, Janet E

    2015-01-01

    This chapter underscores the importance of interprofessional collaboration in the care of frail older patients. Hospital-based care is emphasized because interprofessionalism is difficult in that setting since the setting is constantly changing and since multiple healthcare professionals care for many complex, very ill patients, only some of whom are frail older people. Interprofessionalism is particularly important and challenging in teaching units in the acute care setting, where many health professionals practice and learn together and team membership changes frequently. Learning is enhanced and interprofessionalism can enhance learning by viewing the patient as a key part of the teaching team. While 'best practice' interventions have been identified for frail older adults who are hospitalized, these interventions are not easily implemented in routine hospital care. Three interdependent processes in clinical practice--representation, sense-making, and improvisation--are described, which contribute to an understanding of how practices change when implemented in a way that takes the local context into account and keeps person-centered care as the central consideration. PMID:26301985

  8. Solving Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Initial-value ordinary differential equation solution via variable order Adams method (SIVA/DIVA) package is collection of subroutines for solution of nonstiff ordinary differential equations. There are versions for single-precision and double-precision arithmetic. Requires fewer evaluations of derivatives than other variable-order Adams predictor/ corrector methods. Option for direct integration of second-order equations makes integration of trajectory problems significantly more efficient. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  9. Einstein equation at singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Ovidiu-Cristinel

    2014-02-01

    Einstein's equation is rewritten in an equivalent form, which remains valid at the singularities in some major cases. These cases include the Schwarzschild singularity, the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker Big Bang singularity, isotropic singularities, and a class of warped product singularities. This equation is constructed in terms of the Ricci part of the Riemann curvature (as the Kulkarni-Nomizu product between Einstein's equation and the metric tensor).

  10. What Makes a Chemical Equation an Equation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fensham, Peter J.; Lui, Julia

    2001-01-01

    Explores how well chemistry graduates preparing for teaching can recognize the similarities and differences between the uses of the word "equation" in mathematics and in chemistry. Reports that the conservation similarities were much less frequently recognized than those involved in the creation of new entities. (Author/MM)

  11. An Emerging View of Scientific Collaboration: Scientists' Perspectives on Collaboration and Factors That Impact Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hara, Noriko; Solomon, Paul; Kim, Seung-Lye; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2003-01-01

    Describes collaboration among a group of scientists and considers how their experiences are socially shaped. Data analysis of interviews, observations of videoconferences and meetings, and a sociometric survey led to the development of a framework that identifies forms of collaboration that emerged among scientists and factors which influenced…

  12. Octonic Gravitational Field Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Süleyman; Tanişli, Murat; Tolan, Tülay

    2013-08-01

    Generalized field equations of linear gravity are formulated on the basis of octons. When compared to the other eight-component noncommutative hypercomplex number systems, it is demonstrated that associative octons with scalar, pseudoscalar, pseudovector and vector values present a convenient and capable tool to describe the Maxwell-Proca-like field equations of gravitoelectromagnetism in a compact and simple way. Introducing massive graviton and gravitomagnetic monopole terms, the generalized gravitational wave equation and Klein-Gordon equation for linear gravity are also developed.

  13. Octonic massless field equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Süleyman; Tanişli, Murat; Kansu, Mustafa Emre

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, it is proven that the associative octons including scalar, pseudoscalar, pseudovector and vector values are convenient and capable tools to generalize the Maxwell-Dirac like field equations of electromagnetism and linear gravity in a compact and simple way. Although an attempt to describe the massless field equations of electromagnetism and linear gravity needs the sixteen real component mathematical structures, it is proved that these equations can be formulated in terms of eight components of octons. Furthermore, the generalized wave equation in terms of potentials is derived in the presence of electromagnetic and gravitational charges (masses). Finally, conservation of energy concept has also been investigated for massless fields.

  14. Canadian family physicians' decision to collaborate: age, period and cohort effects.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Sisira; Devlin, Rose Anne; Thind, Amardeep; Chu, Man-Kee

    2012-11-01

    One of the core primary care reform initiatives seen across provinces in Canada is the introduction of inter-professional primary healthcare teams in which family physicians are encouraged to collaborate with other health professionals. Although a higher proportion of physicians are collaborating with various health professionals now compared to the previous decade, a substantial number of physicians still do not work in a collaborative setting. The objective of this paper is to examine the age, period and cohort effects of Canadian family physicians' decisions to collaborate with seven types of health professionals: specialists, nurse practitioners, nurses, dieticians, physiotherapists, psychologists and occupational therapists. To this end, this paper employs a multivariate probit model consisting of seven equations and a cross-classified fixed-effects strategy to explain the collaborative decisions of family physicians. Utilizing three cross-sectional physician surveys from Canada over the 2001-2007 period, cohorts are defined over five-year intervals according to their year of graduation from medical school. We find that newer cohorts of physicians are more likely to collaborate with dieticians, physiotherapists, psychologists and occupational therapists; newer female cohorts are more likely to collaborate with nurses while newer male cohorts are less likely to collaborate with nurses but more likely to collaborate with specialists. Older physicians are more likely to collaborate with specialists, physiotherapists, psychologists, and occupational therapists; the age effect for nurses is U-shaped for male physicians while it is inverse U-shaped for females. Family physicians are collaborating more with all seven health professionals in 2004 and 2007 compared to 2001. Belonging to a group practice has a largely positive influence on collaborations; and being paid by a fee-for-service remuneration scheme exerts a negative influence on collaboration, ceteris

  15. Adaptation in Collaborative Governance Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  16. Adaptation in collaborative governance regimes.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program. PMID:25073764

  17. The NMDB collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigies, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Since the International Geophysical Year (IGY) in 1957-58 cosmic rays areroutinely measured by many ground-based Neutron Monitors (NM) around theworld. The World Data Center for Cosmic Rays (WDCCR) was established as apart of this activity and is providing a database of cosmic-ray neutronobservations in unified formats. However, that standard data comprises onlyof one hour averages, whereas most NM stations have been enhanced at the endof the 20th century to provide data in one minute resolution or even better.This data was only available on the web-sites of the institutes operatingthe station, and every station invented their own data format for thehigh-resolution measurements. There were some efforts to collect data fromseveral stations, to make this data available on FTP servers, however noneof these efforts could provide real-time data for all stations.The EU FP7 project NMDB (real-time database for high-resolution NeutronMonitor measurements, http://nmdb.eu) was funded by the European Commission,and a new database was set up by several Neutron Monitor stations in Europeand Asia to store high-resolution data and to provide access to the data inreal-time (i.e. less than five minute delay). By storing the measurements ina database, a standard format for the high-resolution measurements isenforced. This database is complementary to the WDCCR, as it does not (yet)provide all historical data, but the creation of this effort has spurred anew collaboration between Neutron Monitor scientists worldwide, (new)stations have gone online (again), new projects are building on the resultsof NMDB, new users outside of the Cosmic Ray community are starting to useNM data for new applications like soil moisture measurements using cosmicrays. These applications are facilitated by the easy access to the data withthe http://nest.nmdb.eu interface that offers access to all NMDB data forall users.

  18. When is collaboration not collaboration? When it's militarized.

    PubMed

    Lane, Karen

    2012-03-01

    In adopting the medical lobby's preferred definition of collaboration where midwives are legally compelled to seek endorsement for their care plan from an obstetrician, Determination 2010 connotes a form of militarized collaboration and thus negates all that genuine collaboration stands for--equality, mutual trust and reciprocal respect. Using Critical Discourse Analysis, the first half of this paper analyses the submissions from medical, midwifery and consumer peak organisations to the Maternity Services Review and Senate reviews held between 2008 and 2010 showing that Determination 2010 privileges the medical lobby worldview in adopting a vertical definition of collaboration. The second half of the paper responds to the principal assumption of Determination 2010--that midwives do not voluntarily collaborate. It argues by reference to a qualitative inquiry conducted into select caseload maternity units in South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales during 2009-2010 that this presupposition is erroneous. The evidence shows that genuine collaboration is possible without legislative force but it requires a coalition of the willing among senior midwives and obstetricians to institute regular interdisciplinary meetings and clinical reviews and to model respectful behaviour to new entrants. PMID:21489895

  19. Octonic Massive Field Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Süleyman; Kekeç, Seray

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper we propose the octonic form of massive field equations based on the analogy with electromagnetism and linear gravity. Using the advantages of octon algebra the Maxwell-Dirac-Proca equations have been reformulated in compact and elegant way. The energy-momentum relations for massive field are discussed.

  20. On the Diophantine equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahari, N. M.; Sapar, S. H.; Mohd Atan, K. A.

    2013-04-01

    This paper discusses an integral solution (a, b, c) of the Diophantine equations x3n+y3n = 2z2n for n ≥ 2 and it is found that the integral solution of these equation are of the form a = b = t2, c = t3 for any integers t.

  1. The lens equation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molesini, Giuseppe

    2005-02-01

    Problems in the general validity of the lens equations are reported, requiring an assessment of the conditions for correct use. A discussion is given on critical behaviour of the lens equation, and a sign and meaning scheme is provided so that apparent inconsistencies are avoided.

  2. Octonic Massive Field Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Süleyman; Kekeç, Seray

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper we propose the octonic form of massive field equations based on the analogy with electromagnetism and linear gravity. Using the advantages of octon algebra the Maxwell-Dirac-Proca equations have been reformulated in compact and elegant way. The energy-momentum relations for massive field are discussed.

  3. Reduced Braginskii equations

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, M.; Horton, W. )

    1994-07-01

    A set of reduced Braginskii equations is derived without assuming flute ordering and the Boussinesq approximation. These model equations conserve the physical energy. It is crucial at finite [beta] that the perpendicular component of Ohm's law be solved to ensure [del][center dot][bold j]=0 for energy conservation.

  4. Linear Equations: Equivalence = Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    The ability to solve linear equations sets students up for success in many areas of mathematics and other disciplines requiring formula manipulations. There are many reasons why solving linear equations is a challenging skill for students to master. One major barrier for students is the inability to interpret the equals sign as anything other than…

  5. Interdisciplinary Educational Collaborations: Chemistry and Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Ronald S.; Woo, Daniel T.; Hudson, Benjamin T.; Mori, Joji C.; Ngan, Evey S. M.; Pak, Wing-Yee

    2007-01-01

    Research collaborations between chemists and other scientists resulted in significant outcomes such as development of software. Such collaboration provided a realistic learning experience for computer science students.

  6. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Update (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.

    2013-10-01

    This presentation was given at the Sandia Reliability Workshop in August 2013 and provides information on current statistics, a status update, next steps, and other reliability research and development activities related to the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative.

  7. COLLABORATIONS AND SPECIALIZED CLIENT INTERACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this task is to improve our understanding of atmospheric modeling research applications through collaborations with the international air pollution community and to demonstrate the applicability of our AQ models for their utility through technical applications by clie...

  8. [Collaboration between academia and companies].

    PubMed

    Ueda, Minoru

    2008-05-01

    Recently the collaboration between academia and company has been recommended by the government and more than 1,000 venture companies have established since 2001. Indeed this situation caused the researchers active, on the other side many undesirable troubles has been increasing among researches in the university. In this paper the cause of these troubles related to the collaboration between academia and company has been analyzed and proposed the possible solutions for the problems. PMID:18464523

  9. Maxwellians and the Remaking of Maxwell's Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Bruce

    2012-02-01

    Although James Clerk Maxwell first formulated his theory of the electromagnetic field in the early 1860s, it went through important changes before it gained general acceptance in the 1890s. Those changes were largely the work of a group of younger physicists, the Maxwellians, led by G. F. FitzGerald in Ireland, Oliver Lodge and Oliver Heaviside in England, and Heinrich Hertz in Germany. Together, they extended, refined, tested, and confirmed Maxwell's theory, and recast it into the set of four vector equations known ever since as ``Maxwell's equations.'' By tracing how the Maxwellians remade and disseminated Maxwell's theory between the late 1870s and the mid-1890s, we can gain a clearer understanding not just of how the electromagnetic field was understood at the end of the 19th century, but of the collaborative nature of work at the frontiers of physics.

  10. Are you a collaborative leader?

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Herminia; Hansen, Morten T

    2011-01-01

    Social media and technologies have put connectivity on steroids and made collaboration more integral to business than ever. But without the right leadership, collaboration can go astray. Employees who try to collaborate on everything may wind up stuck in endless meetings, struggling to reach agreement. On the other side of the coin, executives who came of age during the heyday of "command and control" management can have trouble adjusting their style to fit the new realities. In their research on top-performing CEOs, Insead professors Ibarra and Hansen have examined what it takes to be a collaborative leader. They've found that it requires connecting people and ideas outside an organization to those inside it, leveraging diverse talent, modeling collaborative behavior at the top, and showing a strong hand to keep teams from getting mired in debate. In this article, they describe tactics that executives from Akamai, GE, Reckitt Benckiser, and other firms use in those four areas and how they foster high-performance collaborative cultures in their organizations. PMID:21800471

  11. University-Industry Research Collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Charles

    2000-03-01

    University-industry research collaborations take many forms. Perhaps the simplest is unsponsored one-on-one collaborations between individuals. A more formal but less intimate arrangement is industrial sponsorship of individual or collective work on campus, e.g., via an outright gift or membership in an industrial affiliates consortium. A more intimate institutional collaboration is a mutually sanctioned joint project, sponsored by either a governmental funding agency or an industrial entity, the terms and conditions of which (funds flows, reports, intellectual property ownership, etc.) are governed by formal arrangements. Partnerships, e.g., support of an on-campus joint venture funded in part by one or more firms and in part by a third party, are the most intimate and complex form of such collaborations. During the past two decades Xerox has engaged in all four forms of collaborations. I give examples of each, and indicate the attributes which distinguish the more successful from the less successful collaborations, as well as recent trends in their nature and purposes.

  12. The Effective Equation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksin, Sergei; Maiocchi, Alberto

    In this chapter we present a general method of constructing the effective equation which describes the behavior of small-amplitude solutions for a nonlinear PDE in finite volume, provided that the linear part of the equation is a hamiltonian system with a pure imaginary discrete spectrum. The effective equation is obtained by retaining only the resonant terms of the nonlinearity (which may be hamiltonian, or may be not); the assertion that it describes the limiting behavior of small-amplitude solutions is a rigorous mathematical theorem. In particular, the method applies to the three- and four-wave systems. We demonstrate that different possible types of energy transport are covered by this method, depending on whether the set of resonances splits into finite clusters (this happens, e.g. in case of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation), or is connected (this happens, e.g. in the case of the NLS equation if the space-dimension is at least two). For equations of the first type the energy transition to high frequencies does not hold, while for equations of the second type it may take place. Our method applies to various weakly nonlinear wave systems, appearing in plasma, meteorology and oceanography.

  13. Nonlinear gyrokinetic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, D.H.E.; Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.; Lee, W.W.

    1983-03-01

    Nonlinear gyrokinetic equations are derived from a systematic Hamiltonian theory. The derivation employs Lie transforms and a noncanonical perturbation theory first used by Littlejohn for the simpler problem of asymptotically small gyroradius. For definiteness, we emphasize the limit of electrostatic fluctuations in slab geometry; however, there is a straight-forward generalization to arbitrary field geometry and electromagnetic perturbations. An energy invariant for the nonlinear system is derived, and various of its limits are considered. The weak turbulence theory of the equations is examined. In particular, the wave kinetic equation of Galeev and Sagdeev is derived from an asystematic truncation of the equations, implying that this equation fails to consider all gyrokinetic effects. The equations are simplified for the case of small but finite gyroradius and put in a form suitable for efficient computer simulation. Although it is possible to derive the Terry-Horton and Hasegawa-Mima equations as limiting cases of our theory, several new nonlinear terms absent from conventional theories appear and are discussed.

  14. Volterra difference equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Nasrin

    This dissertation consists of five papers in which discrete Volterra equations of different types and orders are studied and results regarding the behavior of their solutions are established. The first paper presents some fundamental results about subexponential sequences. It also illustrates the subexponential solutions of scalar linear Volterra sum-difference equations are asymptotically stable. The exact value of the rate of convergence of asymptotically stable solutions is found by determining the asymptotic behavior of the transient renewal equations. The study of subexponential solutions is also continued in the second and third articles. The second paper investigates the same equation using the same process as considered in the first paper. The discussion focuses on a positive lower bound of the rate of convergence of the asymptotically stable solutions. The third paper addresses the rate of convergence of the solutions of scalar linear Volterra sum-difference equations with delay. The result is proved by developing the rate of convergence of transient renewal delay difference equations. The fourth paper discusses the existence of bounded solutions on an unbounded domain of more general nonlinear Volterra sum-difference equations using the Schaefer fixed point theorem and the Lyapunov direct method. The fifth paper examines the asymptotic behavior of nonoscillatory solutions of higher-order integro-dynamic equations and establishes some new criteria based on so-called time scales, which unifies and extends both discrete and continuous mathematical analysis. Beside these five research papers that focus on discrete Volterra equations, this dissertation also contains an introduction, a section on difference calculus, a section on time scales calculus, and a conclusion.

  15. Stochastic Gauss equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierret, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    We derived the equations of Celestial Mechanics governing the variation of the orbital elements under a stochastic perturbation, thereby generalizing the classical Gauss equations. Explicit formulas are given for the semimajor axis, the eccentricity, the inclination, the longitude of the ascending node, the pericenter angle, and the mean anomaly, which are expressed in term of the angular momentum vector H per unit of mass and the energy E per unit of mass. Together, these formulas are called the stochastic Gauss equations, and they are illustrated numerically on an example from satellite dynamics.

  16. Nonlinear ordinary difference equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caughey, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Future space vehicles will be relatively large and flexible, and active control will be necessary to maintain geometrical configuration. While the stresses and strains in these space vehicles are not expected to be excessively large, their cumulative effects will cause significant geometrical nonlinearities to appear in the equations of motion, in addition to the nonlinearities caused by material properties. Since the only effective tool for the analysis of such large complex structures is the digital computer, it will be necessary to gain a better understanding of the nonlinear ordinary difference equations which result from the time discretization of the semidiscrete equations of motion for such structures.

  17. A Comparison of IRT Equating and Beta 4 Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Dong-In; Brennan, Robert; Kolen, Michael

    Four equating methods were compared using four equating criteria: first-order equity (FOE), second-order equity (SOE), conditional mean squared error (CMSE) difference, and the equipercentile equating property. The four methods were: (1) three parameter logistic (3PL) model true score equating; (2) 3PL observed score equating; (3) beta 4 true…

  18. Diophantine Equations and Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Martin

    Unless otherwise stated, we’ll work with the natural numbers: N = \\{0,1,2,3, dots\\}. Consider a Diophantine equation F(a1,a2,...,an,x1,x2,...,xm) = 0 with parameters a1,a2,...,an and unknowns x1,x2,...,xm For such a given equation, it is usual to ask: For which values of the parameters does the equation have a solution in the unknowns? In other words, find the set: \\{ mid exists x_1,ldots,x_m [F(a_1,ldots,x_1,ldots)=0] \\} Inverting this, we think of the equation F = 0 furnishing a definition of this set, and we distinguish three classes: a set is called Diophantine if it has such a definition in which F is a polynomial with integer coefficients. We write \\cal D for the class of Diophantine sets.

  19. Regularized Structural Equation Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Jacobucci, Ross; Grimm, Kevin J.; McArdle, John J.

    2016-01-01

    A new method is proposed that extends the use of regularization in both lasso and ridge regression to structural equation models. The method is termed regularized structural equation modeling (RegSEM). RegSEM penalizes specific parameters in structural equation models, with the goal of creating easier to understand and simpler models. Although regularization has gained wide adoption in regression, very little has transferred to models with latent variables. By adding penalties to specific parameters in a structural equation model, researchers have a high level of flexibility in reducing model complexity, overcoming poor fitting models, and the creation of models that are more likely to generalize to new samples. The proposed method was evaluated through a simulation study, two illustrative examples involving a measurement model, and one empirical example involving the structural part of the model to demonstrate RegSEM’s utility. PMID:27398019

  20. Nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1988-01-01

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics.

  1. Equations For Rotary Transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, Phil M.; Wiktor, Peter J.; Marchetto, Carl A.

    1988-01-01

    Equations derived for input impedance, input power, and ratio of secondary current to primary current of rotary transformer. Used for quick analysis of transformer designs. Circuit model commonly used in textbooks on theory of ac circuits.

  2. Equating Training to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lansing J.

    1993-01-01

    Distinguishes between education and employer-sponsored training in terms of process, purpose, and providers. Concludes that work-related training and postsecondary education are cognates within the classification education, and equating their learning outcomes is appropriate. (SK)

  3. Multilateral Collaborations in Analog Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, R. l.

    2016-01-01

    International collaborations in studies utilizing ground-based space flight analogs are an effective means for answering research questions common to participating agencies. These collaborations bring together worldwide experts to solve important space research questions. By collaborating unnecessary duplication of science is reduced, and the efficiency of analog use is improved. These studies also share resources among agencies for cost effective solutions to study implementation. Recently, NASA has engaged in collaborations with international partners at a variety of analog sites. The NASA Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) is currently hosting investigator studies from NASA and from the German Space Agency (DLR). These isolation studies will answer questions in the areas of team cohesion, sleep and circadian rhythms, and neurobehavioral correlates to function. Planning for the next HERA campaign is underway as proposal selections are being made from the International Life Sciences Research Announcement (ILSRA). Studies selected from the ILSRA will be conducted across 4 HERA missions in 2017. NASA is planning collaborative studies with DLR at the :envihab facility in Cologne, Germany. Investigations were recently selected to study the effects of 0.5% CO2 exposure over 30 days of bed rest. These studies will help to determine the fidelity of this ground-based analog for studying the visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. NASA is also planning a multilateral collaboration at :envihab with DLR and the European Space Agency (ESA) to examine artificial gravity as a countermeasure to mitigate the effects of 60 days of bed rest. NASA is also considering collaborations with the Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems (IBMP) in studies that will utilize their Ground-based Experimental Facility (NEK). The NEK is comprised of 4 interconnected modules and a Martian surface simulator. This isolation analog can support 3 -10 crew members for long duration

  4. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  5. SIMULTANEOUS DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION COMPUTER

    DOEpatents

    Collier, D.M.; Meeks, L.A.; Palmer, J.P.

    1960-05-10

    A description is given for an electronic simulator for a system of simultaneous differential equations, including nonlinear equations. As a specific example, a homogeneous nuclear reactor system including a reactor fluid, heat exchanger, and a steam boiler may be simulated, with the nonlinearity resulting from a consideration of temperature effects taken into account. The simulator includes three operational amplifiers, a multiplier, appropriate potential sources, and interconnecting R-C networks.

  6. Set Equation Transformation System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-03-22

    Version 00 SETS is used for symbolic manipulation of Boolean equations, particularly the reduction of equations by the application of Boolean identities. It is a flexible and efficient tool for performing probabilistic risk analysis (PRA), vital area analysis, and common cause analysis. The equation manipulation capabilities of SETS can also be used to analyze noncoherent fault trees and determine prime implicants of Boolean functions, to verify circuit design implementation, to determine minimum cost fire protectionmore » requirements for nuclear reactor plants, to obtain solutions to combinatorial optimization problems with Boolean constraints, and to determine the susceptibility of a facility to unauthorized access through nullification of sensors in its protection system. Two auxiliary programs, SEP and FTD, are included. SEP performs the quantitative analysis of reduced Boolean equations (minimal cut sets) produced by SETS. The user can manipulate and evaluate the equations to find the probability of occurrence of any desired event and to produce an importance ranking of the terms and events in an equation. FTD is a fault tree drawing program which uses the proprietary ISSCO DISSPLA graphics software to produce an annotated drawing of a fault tree processed by SETS. The DISSPLA routines are not included.« less

  7. Online Collaborative Documents for Research and Coursework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Karen L.; Cifuentes, Lauren; Shih, Yu-Chih Doris

    Online collaborative documents can be used effectively for conducting collaborative research and for learning collaboratively via the Internet. Collaborative documents are dedicated online workspaces that allow individuals or groups to use the Internet to share their work with others, edit it, and finalize it. This paper identifies Basic Support…

  8. Teachers' Perceptions of Collaboration and Clinical Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riordan, G. P.

    This paper reports on a study of teachers involved in a collaborative model of clinical supervision. Study participants were interviewed in order to ascertain their perceptions of their collaborative relationship and the focus and effect of their collaboration. The study found that the most effective collaborations were characterized by…

  9. Recommending Research Profiles for Multidisciplinary Academic Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunawardena, Sidath Deepal

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates how data on multidisciplinary collaborative experiences can be used to solve a novel problem: recommending research profiles of potential collaborators to academic researchers seeking to engage in multidisciplinary research collaboration. As the current domain theories of multidisciplinary collaboration are insufficient…

  10. Evaluating Collaboration for Effectiveness: Conceptualization and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marek, Lydia I.; Brock, Donna-Jean P.; Savla, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Although collaboration is recognized as an effective means to address multifaceted community issues, successful collaboration is difficult to achieve and failure is prevalent. To effectively collaborate, collaborators must recognize the strengths and weaknesses within their own efforts. Using Mattessich and colleagues' work as a springboard,…

  11. Assessment of (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strijbos, J. -W.

    2011-01-01

    Within the (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning (CS)CL research community, there has been an extensive dialogue on theories and perspectives on learning from collaboration, approaches to scaffold (script) the collaborative process, and most recently research methodology. In contrast, the issue of assessment of collaborative learning has…

  12. Framing the Progress of Collaborative Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Cynthia C.; Pugach, Marlene C.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors advance 10 postulates describing what they believe to be true about collaboration in special education: (1) Collaboration in teacher education is possible; (2) Collaborative programs can be initiated from many departure points; (3) Collaboration requires real time for communication; (4) Supportive leadership is…

  13. Small School Districts: Networks of Collaborators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furtwengler, Bill; Furtwengler, Carol; Turk, Randy; Hurst, David

    1997-01-01

    A study examining collaboration between two small rural school districts in Kansas found that school boards and superintendents from both districts encouraged and supported continuous collaboration, that collaboration supported more comprehensive curricular and extracurricular programs, and that collaboration allowed districts to maintain their…

  14. Collaboration in Distance Education. International Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Louise, Ed.; Mugridge, Ian, Ed.

    This book contains nine case studies of collaboration in distance education. The case studies focus on such aspects of collaboration in distance education as the following: roles of individual institutional partners; importance of personal relationships; benefits of collaboration to individual partners; conflicts between collaboration and…

  15. Collaboration for Diverse Learners: Viewpoints and Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risko, Victoria J., Ed.; Bromley, Karen, Ed.

    This book suggests that a solution to schools' lack of comprehensive literacy programs may be found through innovations in collaborative decision making about curriculum and instruction. It provides analyses of collaborative efforts, multiple ways to think about collaboration and its implementation, and examples of collaborative projects. After an…

  16. Specifying Computer-Supported Collaboration Scripts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobbe, Lars; Weinberger, Armin; Dillenbourg, Pierre; Harrer, Andreas; Hamalainen, Raija; Hakkinen, Paivi; Fischer, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Collaboration scripts facilitate social and cognitive processes of collaborative learning by shaping the way learners interact with each other. Computer-supported collaboration scripts generally suffer from the problem of being restrained to a specific learning platform. A standardization of collaboration scripts first requires a specification of…

  17. Implicit collaboration of sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Kenneth J.

    2004-08-01

    The concept of goal lattices for the evaluation of potential sensor actions can be used to cause a multiplicity of heterogeneous sensor systems to collaborate. Previously goal lattices have been used to compute the value to a sensor system of taking a particular action in terms of how well that action contributes to the accomplishment of the topmost goals. This assumes that each sensor system is autonomous and only responsible to itself. If the topmost goals of each sensor system's goal lattice has adjoined to it two additional goals, namely "collaboration" and "altruism", then the value system is extended to include servicing requests from other systems. Two aircraft on a common mission can each benefit from measurements taken by the other aircraft either to confirm their own measurements, to create a pseudo-sensor, or to extend the area of coverage. The altruism goal indicates how much weight a sensor management system (SMS) will give in responding to a measurement request from any other system. The collaboration goal indicates how much weight will be given to responding to a measurement request from specific systems which are defined as being part of a collaborating group. By varying the values of the altruism and collaboration goals of each system, either locally or globally, various levels of implicit cooperation among sensor systems can be caused to emerge.

  18. Gender differences in collaboration patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaohan; Duch, Jordi; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Radicchi, Filippo; Ribeiro, Haroldo V.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Amaral, Luis A. N.

    2014-03-01

    Collaboration plays an increasingly important role in research productivity and impact. However, it remains unclear whether female and male researchers in science, technology, engineering and mathematical (STEM) disciplines differ significantly from each other in their collaboration propensity. Here, we report on an empirical analysis of the complete publication records of 3,920 faculty members in six STEM disciplines at selected top U.S. research universities. We find that while female faculty have significantly fewer co-authors over their careers, this can be fully explained by their lower number of publications. Indeed, we also find that females tend to distribute their co-authoring opportunities among their co-authors more evenly than males do. Our results suggest that females have had a greater propensity to collaborate, in order to succeed in a historically men-dominated academic world. Surprisingly, we find evidence that in molecular biology there has been a gender segregation within sub-disciplines. Female faculty in molecular biology departments tend to collaborate with smaller teams and publish in journals and fields where typical team size is smaller. Our results identify gender-specific collaborative behaviors as well as disciplines with distinct patterns. The authors thank the support from the following grants: NSF SBE 0624318, NSF IIS 0830388, and Spanish DGICYT under project FIS2010-18639.

  19. Hypoallometric scaling in international collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiehchen, David; Espinoza, Magdalena; Hsieh, Antony

    2016-02-01

    Collaboration is a vital process and dominant theme in knowledge production, although the effectiveness of policies directed at promoting multinational research remains ambiguous. We examined approximately 24 million research articles published over four decades and demonstrated that the scaling of international publications to research productivity for each country obeys a universal and conserved sublinear power law. Inefficient mechanisms in transborder team dynamics or organization as well as increasing opportunity costs may contribute to the disproportionate growth of international collaboration rates with increasing productivity among nations. Given the constrained growth of international relationships, our findings advocate a greater emphasis on the qualitative aspects of collaborations, such as with whom partnerships are forged, particularly when assessing research and policy outcomes.

  20. Team Collaboration: Lessons Learned Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arterberrie, Rhonda Y.; Eubanks, Steven W.; Kay, Dennis R.; Prahst, Stephen E.; Wenner, David P.

    2005-01-01

    An Agency team collaboration pilot was conducted from July 2002 until June 2003 and then extended for an additional year. The objective of the pilot was to assess the value of collaboration tools and adoption processes as applied to NASA teams. In an effort to share knowledge and experiences, the lessons that have been learned thus far are documented in this report. Overall, the pilot has been successful. An entire system has been piloted - tools, adoption, and support. The pilot consisted of two collaboration tools, a team space and a virtual team meeting capability. Of the two tools that were evaluated, the team meeting tool has been more widely accepted. Though the team space tool has been met with a lesser degree of acceptance, the need for such a tool in the NASA environment has been evidenced. Both adoption techniques and support were carefully developed and implemented in a way that has been well received by the pilot participant community.

  1. Why Does Collaboration Work? Linking Positive Psychology and Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conoley, Jane Close; Conoley, Collie Wyatt

    2010-01-01

    Authors in this special issue edited by Cook and Friend provide analyses of many important relationships within a school: teacher to teacher; teacher to paraprofessional, educators, and home caregivers; and whole-building systems. Their focus on collaboration prompted these authors to reflect on a possible theoretical mechanism behind the success…

  2. Improving Virtual Team Collaboration Outcomes through Collaboration Process Structuring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittman, Dawn R.; Hawkes, Mark; Deokar, Amit V.; Sarnikar, Surendra

    2010-01-01

    The ability to collaborate in a virtual team is a necessary skill set for today's knowledge workers and students to be effective in their work. Past research indicates that knowledge workers and students need to establish a formal process to perform work, develop clear goals and objectives, and facilitate better communication among team members.…

  3. School-Based Collaboration: An Introduction to the Collaboration Column

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, Kimberly J.

    2008-01-01

    The need for school-based collaboration has increased over the past decade, and with mandates from the 2004 Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) and the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001, this need will continue. The IDEIA requires that students with disabilities have access to the general education curriculum and…

  4. Texas Solar Collaboration Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Winland, Chris

    2013-02-14

    Texas Solar Collaboration Permitting and Interconenction Process Improvement Action Plan. San Antonio-specific; Investigate feasibility of using electronic signatures; Investigate feasibility of enabling other online permitting processes (e.g., commercial); Assess need for future document management and workflow/notification IT improvements; Update Information Bulletin 153 regarding City requirements and processes for PV; Educate contractors and public on CPS Energy’s new 2013 solar program processes; Continue to discuss “downtown grid” interconnection issues and identify potential solutions; Consider renaming Distributed Energy Resources (DER); and Continue to participate in collaborative actions.

  5. HOUCOM framework for collaborative environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffner, Norbert; Ruehl, Christian

    1999-11-01

    The steadily increasing quality of hard- and software enables the development of more and more sophisticated groupware. However, modern distributed systems and distributed multimedia systems in particular challenge the abilities of groupware manufacturers, due to the complexity involved in the development of those systems. Frameworks for collaborative environments might provide a solution to these problems, helping to reduce complexity in groupware development by provision of suitable software components. This article will identify the demands and requirements of distributed (multimedia) systems and their human users that frameworks have to take into account. The article then introduces the HOUCOM framework for collaborative environments and sketches the employment of this framework in a sample scenario.

  6. The Bernoulli-Poiseuille Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badeer, Henry S.; Synolakis, Costas E.

    1989-01-01

    Describes Bernoulli's equation and Poiseuille's equation for fluid dynamics. Discusses the application of the combined Bernoulli-Poiseuille equation in real flows, such as viscous flows under gravity and acceleration. (YP)

  7. Introducing Chemical Formulae and Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Chris; Rowell, Jack

    1979-01-01

    Discusses when the writing of chemical formula and equations can be introduced in the school science curriculum. Also presents ways in which formulae and equations learning can be aided and some examples for balancing and interpreting equations. (HM)

  8. Collaborative double robust targeted maximum likelihood estimation.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Mark J; Gruber, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative double robust targeted maximum likelihood estimators represent a fundamental further advance over standard targeted maximum likelihood estimators of a pathwise differentiable parameter of a data generating distribution in a semiparametric model, introduced in van der Laan, Rubin (2006). The targeted maximum likelihood approach involves fluctuating an initial estimate of a relevant factor (Q) of the density of the observed data, in order to make a bias/variance tradeoff targeted towards the parameter of interest. The fluctuation involves estimation of a nuisance parameter portion of the likelihood, g. TMLE has been shown to be consistent and asymptotically normally distributed (CAN) under regularity conditions, when either one of these two factors of the likelihood of the data is correctly specified, and it is semiparametric efficient if both are correctly specified. In this article we provide a template for applying collaborative targeted maximum likelihood estimation (C-TMLE) to the estimation of pathwise differentiable parameters in semi-parametric models. The procedure creates a sequence of candidate targeted maximum likelihood estimators based on an initial estimate for Q coupled with a succession of increasingly non-parametric estimates for g. In a departure from current state of the art nuisance parameter estimation, C-TMLE estimates of g are constructed based on a loss function for the targeted maximum likelihood estimator of the relevant factor Q that uses the nuisance parameter to carry out the fluctuation, instead of a loss function for the nuisance parameter itself. Likelihood-based cross-validation is used to select the best estimator among all candidate TMLE estimators of Q(0) in this sequence. A penalized-likelihood loss function for Q is suggested when the parameter of interest is borderline-identifiable. We present theoretical results for "collaborative double robustness," demonstrating that the collaborative targeted maximum

  9. Collaborative Double Robust Targeted Maximum Likelihood Estimation*

    PubMed Central

    van der Laan, Mark J.; Gruber, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative double robust targeted maximum likelihood estimators represent a fundamental further advance over standard targeted maximum likelihood estimators of a pathwise differentiable parameter of a data generating distribution in a semiparametric model, introduced in van der Laan, Rubin (2006). The targeted maximum likelihood approach involves fluctuating an initial estimate of a relevant factor (Q) of the density of the observed data, in order to make a bias/variance tradeoff targeted towards the parameter of interest. The fluctuation involves estimation of a nuisance parameter portion of the likelihood, g. TMLE has been shown to be consistent and asymptotically normally distributed (CAN) under regularity conditions, when either one of these two factors of the likelihood of the data is correctly specified, and it is semiparametric efficient if both are correctly specified. In this article we provide a template for applying collaborative targeted maximum likelihood estimation (C-TMLE) to the estimation of pathwise differentiable parameters in semi-parametric models. The procedure creates a sequence of candidate targeted maximum likelihood estimators based on an initial estimate for Q coupled with a succession of increasingly non-parametric estimates for g. In a departure from current state of the art nuisance parameter estimation, C-TMLE estimates of g are constructed based on a loss function for the targeted maximum likelihood estimator of the relevant factor Q that uses the nuisance parameter to carry out the fluctuation, instead of a loss function for the nuisance parameter itself. Likelihood-based cross-validation is used to select the best estimator among all candidate TMLE estimators of Q0 in this sequence. A penalized-likelihood loss function for Q is suggested when the parameter of interest is borderline-identifiable. We present theoretical results for “collaborative double robustness,” demonstrating that the collaborative targeted maximum

  10. Nonlocal electrical diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.; Olivares-Peregrino, V. H.; Benavides-Cruz, M.; Calderón-Ramón, C.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis and modeling of the electrical diffusion equation using the fractional calculus approach. This alternative representation for the current density is expressed in terms of the Caputo derivatives, the order for the space domain is 0<β≤1 and for the time domain is 0<γ≤2. We present solutions for the full fractional equation involving space and time fractional derivatives using numerical methods based on Fourier variable separation. The case with spatial fractional derivatives leads to Levy flight type phenomena, while the time fractional equation is related to sub- or super diffusion. We show that the mathematical concept of fractional derivatives can be useful to understand the behavior of semiconductors, the design of solar panels, electrochemical phenomena and the description of anomalous complex processes.

  11. Parallel tridiagonal equation solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Three parallel algorithms were compared for the direct solution of tridiagonal linear systems of equations. The algorithms are suitable for computers such as ILLIAC 4 and CDC STAR. For array computers similar to ILLIAC 4, cyclic odd-even reduction has the least operation count for highly structured sets of equations, and recursive doubling has the least count for relatively unstructured sets of equations. Since the difference in operation counts for these two algorithms is not substantial, their relative running times may be more related to overhead operations, which are not measured in this paper. The third algorithm, based on Buneman's Poisson solver, has more arithmetic operations than the others, and appears to be the least favorable. For pipeline computers similar to CDC STAR, cyclic odd-even reduction appears to be the most preferable algorithm for all cases.

  12. Kepler Equation solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    1995-01-01

    Kepler's Equation is solved over the entire range of elliptic motion by a fifth-order refinement of the solution of a cubic equation. This method is not iterative, and requires only four transcendental function evaluations: a square root, a cube root, and two trigonometric functions. The maximum relative error of the algorithm is less than one part in 10(exp 18), exceeding the capability of double-precision computer arithmetic. Roundoff errors in double-precision implementation of the algorithm are addressed, and procedures to avoid them are developed.

  13. Difference equation for superradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The evolution of a completely excited system of N two-level atoms, distributed over a large region and interacting with all modes of radiation field, is studied. The distinction between r-conserving (RC) and r-nonconserving (RNC) processes is emphasized. Considering the number of photons emitted as the discrete independent variable, the evolution is described by a partial difference equation. Numerical solution of this equation shows the transition from RNC dominance at the beginning to RC dominance later. This is also a transition from incoherent to coherent emission of radiation.

  14. Obtaining Maxwell's equations heuristically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Gerhard; Weissbarth, Jürgen; Grossmann, Frank; Schmidt, Rüdiger

    2013-02-01

    Starting from the experimental fact that a moving charge experiences the Lorentz force and applying the fundamental principles of simplicity (first order derivatives only) and linearity (superposition principle), we show that the structure of the microscopic Maxwell equations for the electromagnetic fields can be deduced heuristically by using the transformation properties of the fields under space inversion and time reversal. Using the experimental facts of charge conservation and that electromagnetic waves propagate with the speed of light, together with Galilean invariance of the Lorentz force, allows us to finalize Maxwell's equations and to introduce arbitrary electrodynamics units naturally.

  15. The halo Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagetti, Matteo; Desjacques, Vincent; Kehagias, Alex; Racco, Davide; Riotto, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Dark matter halos are the building blocks of the universe as they host galaxies and clusters. The knowledge of the clustering properties of halos is therefore essential for the understanding of the galaxy statistical properties. We derive an effective halo Boltzmann equation which can be used to describe the halo clustering statistics. In particular, we show how the halo Boltzmann equation encodes a statistically biased gravitational force which generates a bias in the peculiar velocities of virialized halos with respect to the underlying dark matter, as recently observed in N-body simulations.

  16. Evaluating Collaborative Learning and Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Jessica J.; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Svinicki, Marilla D.; Gorin, Joanna S.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to validate measures and assess the effects of collaborative group-learning methods in real classrooms on 3 specific dependent variables: feelings of campus connectedness, academic classroom community, and effective group processing (2 factors). Confirmatory factor analysis were conducted to evaluate a 4-factor model.…

  17. Global Collaboration Enhances Technology Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Linda A.; Bell, Meredith L.; Nugent, Jill; Smith, Walter S.

    2016-01-01

    Today's learners routinely use technology outside of school to communicate, collaborate, and gather information about the world around them. Classroom learning experiences are relevant when they include communication technologies such as social networking, blogging, and video conferencing, and information technologies such as databases, browsers,…

  18. Collaborating with Forms in Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Aileen Pugliese

    2011-01-01

    Taking students outside is a great opportunity to make art. In this article, the author describes how her students collaborated with forms in nature to create their own visual structures to communicate ideas. This lesson can be done on the beach, in a sand box on the school playground, in grassy areas, or nature can even be brought into the…

  19. The Art of Collaborative Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Marian Wynne

    The Communication Department at the University of Texas at Arlington offered an innovative news editing course taught collaboratively by a journalism professor and an editor of the "Fort Worth Star-Telegram." A syllabus was designed so that the lecture would coordinate with the laboratory as closely as possible. Students had the opportunity to…

  20. Drama: An Interdisciplinary, Collaborative Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomas, Linda

    Teaching drama gave one instructor a chance to renew herself, and drama became an important part of a personal teaching renaissance. An elective class for grade 12 entitled "Humanities and the Arts" offered opportunity for collaborative teaching with colleagues in their areas of expertise. In a class on "Modern Drama" designed for honors students,…

  1. Indigenous Continuance: Collaboration and Syncretism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Simon J.

    2011-01-01

    In this keynote address, the author talks about Indigenous peoples who are presently in a dynamic circumstance of constant change that they are facing courageously with creative collaboration and syncretism. In the address, the author speaks "of" an Indigenous consciousness and he speaks "with" an Indigenous consciousness so that Indigenous…

  2. International Collaboration in Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bertram S., Ed.; Torrey, E. Fuller, Ed.

    Presented in five parts on research, services, training, drug abuse, and alcohol abuse are 31 reports of mental health studies and programs supported by the U.S. and other countries. Explained in the introduction are reasons the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has supported international collaboration. The following are among subjects…

  3. The Community Collaboration Stakeholder Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Renee Guarriello

    2010-01-01

    Today's increasingly complex and diverse world demands 21st century communication skills to solve community and social justice problems. Interorganizational collaboration is at the heart of much community activism, such as that focused on solving environmental disputes, eradicating racially discriminating real estate practices, and bringing early…

  4. The Contemporary Art of Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Sheridan

    2008-01-01

    Predetermined assessment criteria and target levels threaten to constrain and limit teachers' desire to provide a balanced and innovative curriculum for their pupils. Through the collaborative production of annual installations, the fine art department at Trinity Catholic School has attempted to confound the effects of a comprehensive school's…

  5. Collaboration across the Power Line.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romer, Karen T.; Whipple, William R.

    1991-01-01

    The college student who participates in genuine collaboration with a faculty member in an intellectual endeavor transcends the barrier of power. Once it has been breached, other power lines will be less constraining. The experience transforms the nature of learning and constructs a lasting authority in the student. (MSE)

  6. Alliance for Computational Science Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Scheick, S. H.

    2003-04-26

    The mission of this alliance is to promote, encourage, and facilitate computational science activities at the member HBCUs and to use collaborative technologies among the alliance partners to create an environment in which students and researchers from a wide variety of applications areas can exchange ideas and share resources.

  7. Dear Doc: advice for collaborators.

    PubMed

    Gadlin, Howard; Bennett, Michelle

    2012-12-01

    Years ago, when Doc was a junior faculty member she became aware of a situation that changed her life. An extremely well-known senior scientist in her department took the data of a graduate student and published it in a very significant, oft-cited paper without crediting the student in any way. That this action had the tacit approval of the department chair was confusing. Dismayed by this violation of trust and feeling powerless to intervene, she decided to become the Dear Abby of Science. Working in the lab during the day she was becoming a world-renowned researcher as well as a highly revered mentor to younger scientists. At night, disguised as Dr. Doc she began advising other researchers who were looking for help with their sticky situations. As word of mouth spread about Doc more and more researchers sought out her advice about a wide range of problems in their labs and in their collaborations. She is currently entertaining a proposal from a collaborative group of editors from high-impact journals to develop a web presence that would offer insightful advice to struggling scientific collaborators around the world. The following is a selection of letters from Doc's files focused on collaboration. The names and details in the letters have been changed to protect confidentiality. PMID:24073149

  8. The Funding of Academic Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelau, Demaree K.; Poulin, Russell

    2008-01-01

    To leverage expertise and efficiencies in implementing educational technologies, higher education leaders often create centralized service organizations or inter-institutional partnerships. Defined as "academic collaborations," these organizations foster inter-institutional partnerships that share resources to increase institutional capacity for,…

  9. Assessments That Promote Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watanabe, Maika; Evans, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses assessments that can be used to help encourage a collaborative classroom community, in which students help one another learn mathematics. The authors describe participation quizzes and explanation quizzes as assessment tools that encourage students to work together, share specific questions on challenging mathematics…

  10. Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, June G.

    2002-01-01

    The feature story in this issue, "Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment," focuses on the growing emphasis on teamwork in the workplace. It discusses how the concept of empowering employees in the workplace is evolving and the benefits--faster decision making, lower costs and absenteeism, higher productivity and quality, and increased…

  11. Mapping the Collaborative Research Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochanek, Julie Reed; Scholz, Carrie; Garcia, Alicia N.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant federal investments in the production of high-quality education research, the direct use of that research in policy and practice is not evident. Some education researchers are increasingly employing collaborative research models that use structures and processes to integrate practitioners into the research process in an effort…

  12. Collaborative Yearlong Teaching Experience (CYTE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deich, Randee

    This report describes the Collaborative Yearlong Teaching Experience (CYTE), an extensive 1-year internship program that promotes a coaching/mentoring model of preservice education and professional job-embedded staff development in Broward County, Florida. This student teacher program is intended to help preservice teachers meet the demands of the…

  13. Emergent Agendas in Collaborative Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemke, J. L.

    This paper discusses a cognitive model of how action agendas and goals emerge through the dynamics of self-organization in collaborative activities. While machines are designed to perform a function, or goal, humans are self-organizing systems that set their own goals and produce order without having external order imposed on them, or, more…

  14. Nonreaders Anonymous: Reading History Collaboratively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the issue of teaching students in the U.S. history survey course to read historical works by shifting the focus from the lecture method to collaborative learning techniques. Describes various techniques that can be used in the classroom such as expert groups, Particulars into Generalizations (PIG), and making lists and evaluative…

  15. Therapists Value of Interprofessional Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vries, Dawn R.

    2012-01-01

    The work of occupational (OT), physical (PT), and recreational therapists (RT), as well as speech- language pathologists (SLP), is interrelated and requires effective teamwork and collaboration to optimize patient outcomes and satisfaction. Literature shows that health care professionals are ill prepared to work in an interprofessional manner due…

  16. Collaborative Stakeholder Engagement. Special Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Matt; Chrislip, David; Workman, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Stakeholder engagement and collaboration are essential to the development of an effective state plan. Engaging a diverse group of stakeholders tasked with working together to create education policies that will have a positive, lasting impact on students is not as easy as it sounds. Experts in the field argue that the traditional stakeholder…

  17. A Collaborative Staff Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainey, Larry

    1987-01-01

    The Hale County (Alabama) school system and the University of Alabama formed a long-range collaborative relationship targeted at meeting staffing shortages and improving science instruction in the rural county. Statistically significant gains were achieved in the science teachers' mastery of content, teaching methodology, and attitudes toward…

  18. Multiage Grouping and Student Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this action research project was to investigate students' social preferences and pro-social interactions in a multiage, high school classroom in order to better understand how to group students to maximize learning and collaboration. According to many educational experts and previous inquiries, mixed-age learning groups introduce…

  19. Collaborative Test Reviews: Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Anuradha; Makela, Carole J.

    2010-01-01

    A group study method proved helpful in improving senior-level students' performance on unit tests through collaborative learning. Students of a History of Textiles course voluntarily attended study sessions to review course content and prepare for unit tests. The students who attended the group reviews scored better on tests than those who did…

  20. Collaborative Learning in Engineering Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, Sigrin

    1990-01-01

    Described is a capstone experience for undergraduate biomedical engineering students in which student teams work with children and adults with cerebral palsy to produce devices that make their lives easier or more enjoyable. The collaborative approach, benefits to the clients, and evaluation of the projects are discussed. (CW)

  1. Communication in Collaborative Discovery Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saab, Nadira; van Joolingen, Wouter R.; van Hout-Wolters, Bernadette H. A. M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Constructivist approaches to learning focus on learning environments in which students have the opportunity to construct knowledge themselves, and negotiate this knowledge with others. "Discovery learning" and "collaborative learning" are examples of learning contexts that cater for knowledge construction processes. We introduce a…

  2. Collaborating in Electronic Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ava S.

    2009-01-01

    There are obvious differences between face-to-face instruction and learning and online instruction and learning. Although collaboration and community building do occur in the campus classroom, as does active learning, it is imperative in an online class. Students today will reluctantly attend classes that consist entirely of faculty lectures and…

  3. Actor Interdependence in Collaborative Telelearning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasson, Barbara; Bourdeau, Jacqueline

    This paper presents a model of collaborative telelearning and describes how coordination theory has provided a framework for the analysis of actor (inter)dependencies in this scenario. The model is intended to inform the instructional design of learning scenarios, the technological design of the telelearning environment, and the design of…

  4. Collaboration with the Local Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Michael L.; Cherrey, Cynthia

    2002-01-01

    Colleges and universities continually search for ways to enhance the safety and security of their educational programs and physical plant. This article examines how the University of Southern California and other institutions are using collaborative efforts with the local community to enhance their mutual safety and security through dynamic…

  5. The Statistical Drake Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We provide the statistical generalization of the Drake equation. From a simple product of seven positive numbers, the Drake equation is now turned into the product of seven positive random variables. We call this "the Statistical Drake Equation". The mathematical consequences of this transformation are then derived. The proof of our results is based on the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) of Statistics. In loose terms, the CLT states that the sum of any number of independent random variables, each of which may be ARBITRARILY distributed, approaches a Gaussian (i.e. normal) random variable. This is called the Lyapunov Form of the CLT, or the Lindeberg Form of the CLT, depending on the mathematical constraints assumed on the third moments of the various probability distributions. In conclusion, we show that: The new random variable N, yielding the number of communicating civilizations in the Galaxy, follows the LOGNORMAL distribution. Then, as a consequence, the mean value of this lognormal distribution is the ordinary N in the Drake equation. The standard deviation, mode, and all the moments of this lognormal N are also found. The seven factors in the ordinary Drake equation now become seven positive random variables. The probability distribution of each random variable may be ARBITRARY. The CLT in the so-called Lyapunov or Lindeberg forms (that both do not assume the factors to be identically distributed) allows for that. In other words, the CLT "translates" into our statistical Drake equation by allowing an arbitrary probability distribution for each factor. This is both physically realistic and practically very useful, of course. An application of our statistical Drake equation then follows. The (average) DISTANCE between any two neighboring and communicating civilizations in the Galaxy may be shown to be inversely proportional to the cubic root of N. Then, in our approach, this distance becomes a new random variable. We derive the relevant probability density

  6. Comparison of Kernel Equating and Item Response Theory Equating Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The kernel method of test equating is a unified approach to test equating with some advantages over traditional equating methods. Therefore, it is important to evaluate in a comprehensive way the usefulness and appropriateness of the Kernel equating (KE) method, as well as its advantages and disadvantages compared with several popular item…

  7. Incorporating Brokers within Collaboration Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekar, A.; Moore, R.; de Torcy, A.

    2013-12-01

    A collaboration environment, such as the integrated Rule Oriented Data System (iRODS - http://irods.diceresearch.org), provides interoperability mechanisms for accessing storage systems, authentication systems, messaging systems, information catalogs, networks, and policy engines from a wide variety of clients. The interoperability mechanisms function as brokers, translating actions requested by clients to the protocol required by a specific technology. The iRODS data grid is used to enable collaborative research within hydrology, seismology, earth science, climate, oceanography, plant biology, astronomy, physics, and genomics disciplines. Although each domain has unique resources, data formats, semantics, and protocols, the iRODS system provides a generic framework that is capable of managing collaborative research initiatives that span multiple disciplines. Each interoperability mechanism (broker) is linked to a name space that enables unified access across the heterogeneous systems. The collaboration environment provides not only support for brokers, but also support for virtualization of name spaces for users, files, collections, storage systems, metadata, and policies. The broker enables access to data or information in a remote system using the appropriate protocol, while the collaboration environment provides a uniform naming convention for accessing and manipulating each object. Within the NSF DataNet Federation Consortium project (http://www.datafed.org), three basic types of interoperability mechanisms have been identified and applied: 1) drivers for managing manipulation at the remote resource (such as data subsetting), 2) micro-services that execute the protocol required by the remote resource, and 3) policies for controlling the execution. For example, drivers have been written for manipulating NetCDF and HDF formatted files within THREDDS servers. Micro-services have been written that manage interactions with the CUAHSI data repository, the Data

  8. Balancing Chemical Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savoy, L. G.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a study of students' ability to balance equations. Answers to a test on this topic were analyzed to determine the level of understanding and processes used by the students. Presented is a method to teach this skill to high school chemistry students. (CW)

  9. Structural Equation Model Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree…

  10. Parallel Multigrid Equation Solver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-09-07

    Prometheus is a fully parallel multigrid equation solver for matrices that arise in unstructured grid finite element applications. It includes a geometric and an algebraic multigrid method and has solved problems of up to 76 mullion degrees of feedom, problems in linear elasticity on the ASCI blue pacific and ASCI red machines.

  11. A Quadratic Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2010-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]…

  12. Generalized reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, S.E.

    1999-02-01

    A new derivation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is presented. A multiple-time-scale expansion is employed. It has the advantage of clearly separating the three time scales of the problem associated with (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) fluctuations whose wave vector is aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, and (3) those aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The derivation is carried out without relying on a large aspect ratio assumption; therefore this model can be applied to any general configuration. By accounting for the MHD equilibrium and constraints to eliminate the fast perpendicular waves, equations are derived to evolve scalar potential quantities on a time scale associated with the parallel wave vector (shear-Alfven wave time scale), which is the time scale of interest for MHD instability studies. Careful attention is given in the derivation to satisfy energy conservation and to have manifestly divergence-free magnetic fields to all orders in the expansion parameter. Additionally, neoclassical closures and equilibrium shear flow effects are easily accounted for in this model. Equations for the inner resistive layer are derived which reproduce the linear ideal and resistive stability criterion of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson. The equations have been programmed into a spectral initial value code and run with shear flow that is consistent with the equilibrium input into the code. Linear results of tearing modes with shear flow are presented which differentiate the effects of shear flow gradients in the layer with the effects of the shear flow decoupling multiple harmonics.

  13. Modelling by Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaachoua, Hamid; Saglam, Ayse

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to show the close relation between physics and mathematics taking into account especially the theory of differential equations. By analysing the problems posed by scientists in the seventeenth century, we note that physics is very important for the emergence of this theory. Taking into account this analysis, we show the…

  14. Do Differential Equations Swing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    One of the units of in a standard differential equations course is a discussion of the oscillatory motion of a spring and the associated material on forcing functions and resonance. During the presentation on practical resonance, the instructor may tell students that it is similar to when they take their siblings to the playground and help them on…

  15. Learning to Collaborate by Collaborating: A Face-to-Face Collaborative Activity for Measuring and Learning Basics about Teamwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortez, C.; Nussbaum, M.; Woywood, G.; Aravena, R.

    2009-01-01

    In today's fast-changing business environment, teams have emerged as a requirement for business success. However, in schools and universities, students are usually not taught teamwork skills. In this paper, we introduce learning to collaborate by collaborating, a process that enables collaboration and teamwork skills to be taught and measured…

  16. Supersymmetric fifth order evolution equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, K.; Liu, Q. P.

    2010-03-08

    This paper considers supersymmetric fifth order evolution equations. Within the framework of symmetry approach, we give a list containing six equations, which are (potentially) integrable systems. Among these equations, the most interesting ones include a supersymmetric Sawada-Kotera equation and a novel supersymmetric fifth order KdV equation. For the latter, we supply some properties such as a Hamiltonian structures and a possible recursion operator.

  17. Brownian motion from Boltzmann's equation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1971-01-01

    Two apparently disparate lines of inquiry in kinetic theory are shown to be equivalent: (1) Brownian motion as treated by the (stochastic) Langevin equation and Fokker-Planck equation; and (2) Boltzmann's equation. The method is to derive the kinetic equation for Brownian motion from the Boltzmann equation for a two-component neutral gas by a simultaneous expansion in the density and mass ratios.

  18. Factors Affecting Teachers' Perceived Readiness for Online Collaborative Learning: A Case Study in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koo, Ah-Choo

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates factors affecting the perceived readiness for online collaborative learning (OCL) of a sample of 86 mathematics teachers from 12 secondary schools. Descriptive analysis, factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and structure equation modeling were used to analyze the data. A moderately fit model was generated and able…

  19. Self-organization of collaboration networks.

    PubMed

    Ramasco, José J; Dorogovtsev, S N; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2004-09-01

    We study collaboration networks in terms of evolving, self-organizing bipartite graph models. We propose a model of a growing network, which combines preferential edge attachment with the bipartite structure, generic for collaboration networks. The model depends exclusively on basic properties of the network, such as the total number of collaborators and acts of collaboration, the mean size of collaborations, etc. The simplest model defined within this framework already allows us to describe many of the main topological characteristics (degree distribution, clustering coefficient, etc.) of one-mode projections of several real collaboration networks, without parameter fitting. We explain the observed dependence of the local clustering on degree and the degree-degree correlations in terms of the "aging" of collaborators and their physical impossibility to participate in an unlimited number of collaborations. PMID:15524586

  20. TREATMENT OF DEPRESSION COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM (TDCRP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NIMH Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program (TDCRP) was a collaborative agreement between NIMH (Mood, Anxiety and Personality Disorder Research Branch) and three research sites, George Washington University, University of Oklahoma and the University of Pittsbu...

  1. Causal electromagnetic interaction equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zinoviev, Yury M.

    2011-02-15

    For the electromagnetic interaction of two particles the relativistic causal quantum mechanics equations are proposed. These equations are solved for the case when the second particle moves freely. The initial wave functions are supposed to be smooth and rapidly decreasing at the infinity. This condition is important for the convergence of the integrals similar to the integrals of quantum electrodynamics. We also consider the singular initial wave functions in the particular case when the second particle mass is equal to zero. The discrete energy spectrum of the first particle wave function is defined by the initial wave function of the free-moving second particle. Choosing the initial wave functions of the free-moving second particle it is possible to obtain a practically arbitrary discrete energy spectrum.

  2. Biaxial constitutive equation development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Walker, K. P.

    1984-01-01

    In developing the constitutive equations an interdisciplinary approach is being pursued. Specifically, both metallurgical and continuum mechanics considerations are recognized in the formulation. Experiments will be utilized to both explore general qualitative features of the material behavior that needs to be modeled and to provide a means of assessing the validity of the equations being developed. The model under development explicitly recognizes crystallographic slip on the individual slip systems. This makes possible direct representation of specific slip system phenomena. The present constitutive formulation takes the anisotropic creep theory and incorporates two state variables into the model to account for the effect of prior inelastic deformation history on the current rate-dependent response of the material.

  3. Nikolaevskiy equation with dispersion.

    PubMed

    Simbawa, Eman; Matthews, Paul C; Cox, Stephen M

    2010-03-01

    The Nikolaevskiy equation was originally proposed as a model for seismic waves and is also a model for a wide variety of systems incorporating a neutral "Goldstone" mode, including electroconvection and reaction-diffusion systems. It is known to exhibit chaotic dynamics at the onset of pattern formation, at least when the dispersive terms in the equation are suppressed, as is commonly the practice in previous analyses. In this paper, the effects of reinstating the dispersive terms are examined. It is shown that such terms can stabilize some of the spatially periodic traveling waves; this allows us to study the loss of stability and transition to chaos of the waves. The secondary stability diagram ("Busse balloon") for the traveling waves can be remarkably complicated. PMID:20365845

  4. Comparative analysis of collaboration networks

    SciTech Connect

    Progulova, Tatiana; Gadjiev, Bahruz

    2011-03-14

    In this paper we carry out a comparative analysis of the word network as the collaboration network based on the novel by M. Bulgakov 'Master and Margarita', the synonym network of the Russian language as well as the Russian movie actor network. We have constructed one-mode projections of these networks, defined degree distributions for them and have calculated main characteristics. In the paper a generation algorithm of collaboration networks has been offered which allows one to generate networks statistically equivalent to the studied ones. It lets us reveal a structural correlation between word network, synonym network and movie actor network. We show that the degree distributions of all analyzable networks are described by the distribution of q-type.

  5. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Bearing Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, J.

    2011-10-01

    NREL has initiated the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) to investigate the root cause of the low wind turbine gearbox reliability. The GRC follows a multi-pronged approach based on a collaborative of manufacturers, owners, researchers and consultants. The project combines analysis, field testing, dynamometer testing, condition monitoring, and the development and population of a gearbox failure database. At the core of the project are two 750kW gearboxes that have been redesigned and rebuilt so that they are representative of the multi-megawatt gearbox topology currently used in the industry. These gearboxes are heavily instrumented and are tested in the field and on the dynamometer. This report discusses the bearing calibrations of the gearboxes.

  6. Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging.

    PubMed

    Cattuto, Ciro; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2007-01-30

    Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag cooccurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory, or aging of resources, in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users who, despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity, appear to follow simple activity patterns. PMID:17244704

  7. Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging

    PubMed Central

    Cattuto, Ciro; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag cooccurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory, or aging of resources, in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users who, despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity, appear to follow simple activity patterns. PMID:17244704

  8. International Collaboration: Promises and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, R. Jay; Widmer, Jocelyn M.; Lerman, Amir

    2015-01-01

    We currently face a myriad of grand global challenges in fields such as poverty, the environment, education, science, and medicine. However, our current means of dealing with such challenges has fallen short, and ingenious solutions are required to overcome the inherent resistance to progress toward ameliorating such difficulties. Here, we highlight the promises and challenges of international collaboration in achieving success toward these trials. We note prior successes in fields such as education, medicine, science, and environmental issues made to date, yet at the same time we do note deficiencies and shortcomings in these efforts. Hence, the notion of international collaboration should be strengthened and encouraged by governments, non-profit organizations, and others moving forward using creative means to bring talented teams together to tackle these challenges across the globe. PMID:25973264

  9. Collaboration technology and space science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiner, Barry M.; Brown, R. L.; Haines, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    A summary of available collaboration technologies and their applications to space science is presented as well as investigations into remote coaching paradigms and the role of a specific collaboration tool for distributed task coordination in supporting such teleoperations. The applicability and effectiveness of different communication media and tools in supporting remote coaching are investigated. One investigation concerns a distributed check-list, a computer-based tool that allows a group of people, e.g., onboard crew, ground based investigator, and mission control, to synchronize their actions while providing full flexibility for the flight crew to set the pace and remain on their operational schedule. This autonomy is shown to contribute to morale and productivity.

  10. Therapists and researchers: advancing collaboration.

    PubMed

    Garland, Ann F; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative partnerships between community-based clinicians and academic researchers have the potential to improve the relevance, utility, and feasibility of research, as well as the effectiveness of practice. Collaborative partnership research from a variety of fields can inform the development and maintenance of effective partnerships. In this paper we present a conceptual model of research-community practice partnership derived from literature across disciplines and then illustrate application of this model to one case example. The case example is a multi-year partnership between an interdisciplinary group of community-based psychotherapists and a team of mental health researchers. This partnership was initiated to support federally funded research on community-based outpatient mental health care for children with disruptive behavior problems, but it has evolved to drive and support new intervention studies with different clinical foci. Lessons learned from this partnership process will be shared and interpreted in the context of the presented research-practice partnership model. PMID:24224554

  11. Singularities for PRANDTL'S Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Bosco, G.; Sammartino, M.; Sciacca, V.

    2006-03-01

    We use a mixed spectral/finite-difference numerical method to investigate the possibility of a finite time blow-up of the solutions of Prandtl's equations for the case of the impulsively started cylinder. Our tool is the complex singularity tracking method. We show that a cubic root singularity seems to develop, in a time that can be made arbitrarily short, from a class of data uniformly bounded in H1.

  12. Multinomial diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balter, Ariel; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-06-01

    We describe a new, microscopic model for diffusion that captures diffusion induced fluctuations at scales where the concept of concentration gives way to discrete particles. We show that in the limit as the number of particles N→∞, our model is equivalent to the classical stochastic diffusion equation (SDE). We test our new model and the SDE against Langevin dynamics in numerical simulations, and show that our model successfully reproduces the correct ensemble statistics, while the classical model fails.

  13. Multinomial diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, Ariel I.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-06-24

    We describe a new, microscopic model for diffusion that captures diffusion induced uctuations at scales where the concept of concentration gives way to discrete par- ticles. We show that in the limit as the number of particles N ! 1, our model is equivalent to the classical stochastic diffusion equation (SDE). We test our new model and the SDE against Langevin dynamics in numerical simulations, and show that our model successfully reproduces the correct ensemble statistics, while the classical model fails.

  14. Student-Generated Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasile, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    We are frequently told that Hong Kong has a model system for learning mathematics. In this article Daniela Vasile notes one short-coming in that the pupils are not taught to problem-solve. She begins with a new class by asking them to write down the craziest equation they can come up with and bases her whole lesson, and the following homework,…

  15. Evaluation of Collaborative GIS Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. D.; McGuire, M.

    2008-12-01

    Remote real-time shared displays of information in a GIS user interface or geobrowser can provide valuable support to multidisciplinary research teams spread across different locations, emergency management personnel, and teams in the field. In terms of the classic computer supported cooperative work (CSCW) application matrix, this falls in the "same time, different place" quadrant. This shared remote interaction with multiple active participants is distinct from typical "collaborative GIS" research, which has emphasized publishing GIS data for researchers to use, making data available to the public, and large screen support for multiple people to interact with the GIS. This is a research study of small groups of people using standard computer applications - off the shelf GIS and remote control software - to collaboratively perform spatial search and analytical tasks. This system architecture implements a floor control policy specifying only one user at a time controlling the input but with all users immediately seeing the results. A simple request and approval process allows the users to change between controlling and viewing roles. The objective of this research is to improve the design of remote real-time shared GIS software based on empirical data focused on user-software interaction in a realistic scenario. The focus is on the interaction of the people with the software. The participants in the study evaluate the system in terms of ease of use and related factors. The evaluation includes the core of the Computer Usability Satisfaction Questionnaire (Lewis, 1995) enhanced with questions specific to remote collaboration. The results from the study serve to identify requirements for a more robust and usable approach to remote collaboration using spatial data. In addition to the basic requirements for sharing, the factors for designing a highly usable and effective system are described. CSCW issues of awareness, concurrency, and remote deictic references are

  16. The collaborative roots of corruption.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Ori; Shalvi, Shaul

    2015-08-25

    Cooperation is essential for completing tasks that individuals cannot accomplish alone. Whereas the benefits of cooperation are clear, little is known about its possible negative aspects. Introducing a novel sequential dyadic die-rolling paradigm, we show that collaborative settings provide fertile ground for the emergence of corruption. In the main experimental treatment the outcomes of the two players are perfectly aligned. Player A privately rolls a die, reports the result to player B, who then privately rolls and reports the result as well. Both players are paid the value of the reports if, and only if, they are identical (e.g., if both report 6, each earns €6). Because rolls are truly private, players can inflate their profit by misreporting the actual outcomes. Indeed, the proportion of reported doubles was 489% higher than the expected proportion assuming honesty, 48% higher than when individuals rolled and reported alone, and 96% higher than when lies only benefited the other player. Breaking the alignment in payoffs between player A and player B reduced the extent of brazen lying. Despite player B's central role in determining whether a double was reported, modifying the incentive structure of either player A or player B had nearly identical effects on the frequency of reported doubles. Our results highlight the role of collaboration-particularly on equal terms-in shaping corruption. These findings fit a functional perspective on morality. When facing opposing moral sentiments-to be honest vs. to join forces in collaboration-people often opt for engaging in corrupt collaboration. PMID:26261341

  17. Generalized reduced MHD equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, S.E.; Hegna, C.C.; Callen, J.D.

    1998-07-01

    A new derivation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is presented. A multiple-time-scale expansion is employed. It has the advantage of clearly separating the three time scales of the problem associated with (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) fluctuations whose wave vector is aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, and (3) those aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The derivation is carried out without relying on a large aspect ratio assumption; therefore this model can be applied to any general toroidal configuration. By accounting for the MHD equilibrium and constraints to eliminate the fast perpendicular waves, equations are derived to evolve scalar potential quantities on a time scale associated with the parallel wave vector (shear-alfven wave time scale), which is the time scale of interest for MHD instability studies. Careful attention is given in the derivation to satisfy energy conservation and to have manifestly divergence-free magnetic fields to all orders in the expansion parameter. Additionally, neoclassical closures and equilibrium shear flow effects are easily accounted for in this model. Equations for the inner resistive layer are derived which reproduce the linear ideal and resistive stability criterion of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson.

  18. The Drake Equation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konesky, Gregory

    2009-08-01

    In the almost half century since the Drake Equation was first conceived, a number of profound discoveries have been made that require each of the seven variables of this equation to be reconsidered. The discovery of hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor, for example, as well as the ever-increasing extreme conditions in which life is found on Earth, suggest a much wider range of possible extraterrestrial habitats. The growing consensus that life originated very early in Earth's history also supports this suggestion. The discovery of exoplanets with a wide range of host star types, and attendant habitable zones, suggests that life may be possible in planetary systems with stars quite unlike our Sun. Stellar evolution also plays an important part in that habitable zones are mobile. The increasing brightness of our Sun over the next few billion years, will place the Earth well outside the present habitable zone, but will then encompass Mars, giving rise to the notion that some Drake Equation variables, such as the fraction of planets on which life emerges, may have multiple values.

  19. Utilizing Collaboration Theory to Evaluate Strategic Alliances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gajda, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly, "collaboration" between business, non-profit, health and educational agencies is being championed as a powerful strategy to achieve a vision otherwise not possible when independent entities work alone. But the definition of collaboration is elusive and it is often difficult for organizations to put collaboration into practice and…

  20. Aligning Collaborative and Culturally Responsive Evaluation Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askew, Karyl; Beverly, Monifa Green; Jay, Michelle L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors, three African-American women trained as collaborative evaluators, offer a comparative analysis of collaborative evaluation (O'Sullivan, 2004) and culturally responsive evaluation approaches (Frierson, Hood, & Hughes, 2002; Kirkhart & Hopson, 2010). Collaborative evaluation techniques immerse evaluators in the cultural milieu of the…

  1. 5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Continuing collaboration. 9701.105... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a) In... determine the number of employee representatives to be engaged in the continuing collaboration process....

  2. 5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Continuing collaboration. 9701.105... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a) In... determine the number of employee representatives to be engaged in the continuing collaboration process....

  3. 5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Continuing collaboration. 9701.105... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a) In... determine the number of employee representatives to be engaged in the continuing collaboration process....

  4. 5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Continuing collaboration. 9701.105... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a) In... determine the number of employee representatives to be engaged in the continuing collaboration process....

  5. Improving Teaching through Collaborative Reflective Teaching Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Reflection and collaboration are two activities teachers can use to change and improve their practice. However, finding the time and space to do so can be challenging. The collaborative reflective teaching cycle is a structured activity teachers can use to engage in reflection and collaboration. This article describes how a seventh grade teaching…

  6. Conditions for Successful Online Document Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallance, Michael; Towndrow, Phillip A.; Wiz, Charles

    2010-01-01

    With the development of Web 2.0 technologies, online document collaboration tools are becoming increasingly available, often free of charge. Although the technology is considered interactive and collaborative, it does not necessarily mean learners themselves will interact and collaborate. This paper discusses the conditions required for successful…

  7. Online Collaborative Learning: Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Tim, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Online Collaborative Learning: Theory and Practice" provides a resource for researchers and practitioners in the area of online collaborative learning (also known as CSCL, computer-supported collaborative learning), particularly those working within a tertiary education environment. It includes articles of relevance to those interested in both…

  8. Inside and outside: Teacher-Researcher Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrenkohl, Leslie Rupert; Kawasaki, Keiko; DeWater, Lezlie Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss our approach to teacher-researcher collaboration and how it is similar and different from other models of teacher collaboration. Our approach to collaboration employed design experimentation (Brown, 1992; Design Based Research Collective, 2003) as a central method since it yields important findings for teachers'…

  9. Methodological Challenges for Collaborative Learning Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Fischer, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Research on collaborative learning, both face-to-face and computer-supported, has thrived in the past 10 years. The studies range from outcome-oriented (individual and group learning) to process-oriented (impact of interaction on learning processes, motivation and organisation of collaboration) to mixed studies. Collaborative learning research is…

  10. Evaluation Framework for Collaborative Educational Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsiatsos, Thrasyvoulos; Andreas, Konstantinidis; Pomportsis, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we will focus on a specific category of Collaborative Virtual Environments that aims to support Collaborative Learning. We call these environments Collaborative Educational Virtual Environments. Our aim is to analyze the evaluation process through the study of relevant bibliography and by doing so reveal the existing research gap…

  11. Delicate Balances: Collaborative Research in Language Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudelson, Sarah J., Ed.; Lindfors, Judith Wells, Ed.

    This book addresses the special demands, problems, challenges, and tensions of collaborative research. Following an introduction by the editors, the articles and their authors are: "Collaborative Research: More Questions Than Answers" (Carole Edelsky and Chris Boyd); "Interactive Writing on a Computer Network: A Teacher/Researcher Collaboration"…

  12. Educators' Views of Collaboration with Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Chankook; Fortner, Rosanne

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated educators' views of collaboration with scientists, a baseline for COSEE Great Lakes efforts in facilitating dynamic collaborative relationships between Great Lakes researchers and educators. Three research questions guided the study: (1) how are educators in the Great Lakes region involved in collaboration with scientists,…

  13. Advanced engineering environment collaboration project.

    SciTech Connect

    Lamph, Jane Ann; Pomplun, Alan R.; Kiba, Grant W.; Dutra, Edward G.; Dankiewicz, Robert J.; Marburger, Scot J.

    2008-12-01

    The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a model for an engineering design and communications system that will enhance project collaboration throughout the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) worked together on a prototype project to evaluate the suitability of a portion of PTC's Windchill 9.0 suite of data management, design and collaboration tools as the basis for an AEE. The AEE project team implemented Windchill 9.0 development servers in both classified and unclassified domains and used them to test and evaluate the Windchill tool suite relative to the needs of the NWC using weapons project use cases. A primary deliverable was the development of a new real time collaborative desktop design and engineering process using PDMLink (data management tool), Pro/Engineer (mechanical computer aided design tool) and ProductView Lite (visualization tool). Additional project activities included evaluations of PTC's electrical computer aided design, visualization, and engineering calculations applications. This report documents the AEE project work to share information and lessons learned with other NWC sites. It also provides PTC with recommendations for improving their products for NWC applications.

  14. Rocinante, a virtual collaborative visualizer

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.J.; Ice, L.G.

    1996-12-31

    With the goal of improving the ability of people around the world to share the development and use of intelligent systems, Sandia National Laboratories` Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center is developing new Virtual Collaborative Engineering (VCE) and Virtual Collaborative Control (VCC) technologies. A key area of VCE and VCC research is in shared visualization of virtual environments. This paper describes a Virtual Collaborative Visualizer (VCV), named Rocinante, that Sandia developed for VCE and VCC applications. Rocinante allows multiple participants to simultaneously view dynamic geometrically-defined environments. Each viewer can exclude extraneous detail or include additional information in the scene as desired. Shared information can be saved and later replayed in a stand-alone mode. Rocinante automatically scales visualization requirements with computer system capabilities. Models with 30,000 polygons and 4 Megabytes of texture display at 12 to 15 frames per second (fps) on an SGI Onyx and at 3 to 8 fps (without texture) on Indigo 2 Extreme computers. In its networked mode, Rocinante synchronizes its local geometric model with remote simulators and sensory systems by monitoring data transmitted through UDP packets. Rocinante`s scalability and performance make it an ideal VCC tool. Users throughout the country can monitor robot motions and the thinking behind their motion planners and simulators.

  15. Distributed and Collaborative Software Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzi, Giacomo; Gall, Harald C.

    Throughout the years software engineers have come up with a myriad of specialized tools and techniques that focus on a certain type of software analysissoftware analysis such as source code analysis, co-change analysis or bug prediction. However, easy and straight forward synergies between these analyses and tools rarely exist because of their stand-alone nature, their platform dependence, their different input and output formats and the variety of data to analyze. As a consequence, distributed and collaborative software analysiscollaborative software analysis scenarios and in particular interoperability are severely limited. We describe a distributed and collaborative software analysis platform that allows for a seamless interoperability of software analysis tools across platform, geographical and organizational boundaries. We realize software analysis tools as services that can be accessed and composed over the Internet. These distributed analysis services shall be widely accessible in our incrementally augmented Software Analysis Broker software analysis broker where organizations and tool providers can register and share their tools. To allow (semi-) automatic use and composition of these tools, they are classified and mapped into a software analysis taxonomy and adhere to specific meta-models and ontologiesontologies for their category of analysis.

  16. Collaborative Clustering for Sensor Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff. Loro :/; Green Jillian; Lane, Terran

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, nodes in a sensor network simply collect data and then pass it on to a centralized node that archives, distributes, and possibly analyzes the data. However, analysis at the individual nodes could enable faster detection of anomalies or other interesting events, as well as faster responses such as sending out alerts or increasing the data collection rate. There is an additional opportunity for increased performance if individual nodes can communicate directly with their neighbors. Previously, a method was developed by which machine learning classification algorithms could collaborate to achieve high performance autonomously (without requiring human intervention). This method worked for supervised learning algorithms, in which labeled data is used to train models. The learners collaborated by exchanging labels describing the data. The new advance enables clustering algorithms, which do not use labeled data, to also collaborate. This is achieved by defining a new language for collaboration that uses pair-wise constraints to encode useful information for other learners. These constraints specify that two items must, or cannot, be placed into the same cluster. Previous work has shown that clustering with these constraints (in isolation) already improves performance. In the problem formulation, each learner resides at a different node in the sensor network and makes observations (collects data) independently of the other learners. Each learner clusters its data and then selects a pair of items about which it is uncertain and uses them to query its neighbors. The resulting feedback (a must and cannot constraint from each neighbor) is combined by the learner into a consensus constraint, and it then reclusters its data while incorporating the new constraint. A strategy was also proposed for cleaning the resulting constraint sets, which may contain conflicting constraints; this improves performance significantly. This approach has been applied to collaborative

  17. Designing Facilities for Collaborative Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Powell, Mark; Backes, Paul; Steinke, Robert; Tso, Kam; Wales, Roxana

    2003-01-01

    A methodology for designing operational facilities for collaboration by multiple experts has begun to take shape as an outgrowth of a project to design such facilities for scientific operations of the planned 2003 Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission. The methodology could also be applicable to the design of military "situation rooms" and other facilities for terrestrial missions. It was recognized in this project that modern mission operations depend heavily upon the collaborative use of computers. It was further recognized that tests have shown that layout of a facility exerts a dramatic effect on the efficiency and endurance of the operations staff. The facility designs (for example, see figure) and the methodology developed during the project reflect this recognition. One element of the methodology is a metric, called effective capacity, that was created for use in evaluating proposed MER operational facilities and may also be useful for evaluating other collaboration spaces, including meeting rooms and military situation rooms. The effective capacity of a facility is defined as the number of people in the facility who can be meaningfully engaged in its operations. A person is considered to be meaningfully engaged if the person can (1) see, hear, and communicate with everyone else present; (2) see the material under discussion (typically data on a piece of paper, computer monitor, or projection screen); and (3) provide input to the product under development by the group. The effective capacity of a facility is less than the number of people that can physically fit in the facility. For example, a typical office that contains a desktop computer has an effective capacity of .4, while a small conference room that contains a projection screen has an effective capacity of around 10. Little or no benefit would be derived from allowing the number of persons in an operational facility to exceed its effective capacity: At best, the operations staff would be underutilized

  18. International Collaboration for Venus Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutts, James; Limaye, Sanjay; Zasova, Ludmila; Wilson, Colin; Ocampo, Adriana; Glaze, Lori; Svedhem, H.; Nakamura, Masato; Widemann, Thomas

    The Venus Exploration Analysis Group (VEXAG) was established by NASA in July 2005 to identify scientific priorities and strategy for exploration of Venus. From the outset, VEXAG has been open to the international community participation and has followed the progress of the ESA Venus Express Mission and the JAXA Akasuki mission as well exploring potential broad international partnerships for Venus exploration through coordinated science and missions. This paper discussed three mechanisms through which these collaborations are being explored in which VEXAG members participate One pathway for international collaboration has been through COSPAR. The International Venus Exploration Working Group (IVEWG) was formed during the 2012 COSPAR general assembly in Mysore, India. Another potentially significant outcome has been the IVEWG’s efforts to foster a formal dialog between IKI and NASA/PSD on the proposed Venera D mission resulting in a meeting in June 2013 to be followed by a discussion at the 4MS3 conference in October 2013. This has now resulted in an agreement between NASA/PSD and IKI to form a joint Science Definition Team for Venera D. A second pathway has been through an international focus on comparative climatology. Scientists from the established space faring nations participated in a first international conference on Comparative Climatology for Terrestrial Planet (CCTP) in Boulder Colorado in June 2012 sponsored by several international scientific organizations. A second conference is planned for 2015. The Planetary Robotics Exploration Coordinating Group (PRECG) of International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) the IAA has been focusing on exploring affordable contributions to the robotic exploration by non-space-faring nations wishing to get involved in planetary exploration. PRECG has sponsored a two year study of Comparative Climatology for which Venus is the focal point and focused on engaging nations without deep space exploration capabilities. A third

  19. Developing Adaptive Collaboration Support: The Example of an Effective Training for Collaborative Inferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deiglmayr, Anne; Spada, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive support for computer-mediated collaboration aims at supporting learners' collaboration in a way that is tailored to their actual needs and by fostering their self-regulation, leading to the acquisition of new collaboration skills. This review gives an example of developing support for a specific collaboration skill: the co-construction of…

  20. When Collaborative Is Not Collaborative: Supporting Student Learning through Self-Surveillance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotsopoulos, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative learning has been widely endorsed in education. This qualitative research examines instances of collaborative learning during mathematics that were seen to be predominantly non-collaborative despite the pedagogical efforts and intentions of the teacher and the task. In an effort to disrupt the non-collaborative learning, small groups…

  1. Catalyzing Collaborative Learning: How Automated Task Distribution May Prompt Students to Collaborate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Chandler

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative learning must prompt collaborative behavior among students. Once initiated, collaboration then must facilitate awareness between students of each other's activities and knowledge. Collaborative scripts provide explicit framework and guidance for roles and activities within student interactions, and are one method of fulfilling the…

  2. Equation of State of Nucleonic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassing, W.

    2000-02-01

    The nuclear equation of state (EoS) is investigated by flow phenomena in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, both in transverse and radial direction, in comparison to experimental data from 150 A MeV to 11 A GeV. To this aim the collective dynamics of the nucleus--nucleus collision is described within a transport model of the coupled channel RBUU type. There are two factors which dominantly determine the baryon flow at these energies: the momentum dependence of the scalar (US) and vector potentials (Uμ ) for baryons and the resonance/string degrees of freedom for energetic hadron excitations. We fix the explicit momentum dependence of the nucleon--meson couplings by the nucleon optical potential up to 1 GeV and extrapolate to higher energy. When assuming the optical potential to vanish identically for Ekin ≥ 3.5 GeV we simultaneously describe the sideward flow data of the PLASTIC BALL, FOPI, EoS and E877 collaborations, the elliptic flow data of the E895 and E877 collaborations and approximately the rapidity and transverse mass distribution of protons at AGS energies without employing any explicit assumption on a phase transition in the EoS. However, the gradual change from hadronic to string degrees of freedom with increasing bombarding energy can be viewed as a transition from hadronic to string matter, i.e. a dissolution of hadrons at high energy density.

  3. Differential Equations Compatible with Boundary Rational qKZ Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, Yoshihiro

    2011-10-01

    We give diffierential equations compatible with the rational qKZ equation with boundary reflection. The total system contains the trigonometric degeneration of the bispectral qKZ equation of type (Cěen, Cn) which in the case of type GLn was studied by van Meer and Stokman. We construct an integral formula for solutions to our compatible system in a special case.

  4. The compressible adjoint equations in geodynamics: equations and numerical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghelichkhan, Siavash; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2016-04-01

    The adjoint method is a powerful means to obtain gradient information in a mantle convection model relative to past flow structure. While the adjoint equations in geodynamics have been derived for the conservation equations of mantle flow in their incompressible form, the applicability of this approximation to Earth is limited, because density increases by almost a factor of two from the surface to the Core Mantle Boundary. Here we introduce the compressible adjoint equations for the conservation equations in the anelastic-liquid approximation. Our derivation applies an operator formulation in Hilbert spaces, to connect to recent work in seismology (Fichtner et al (2006)) and geodynamics (Horbach et al (2014)), where the approach was used to derive the adjoint equations for the wave equation and incompressible mantle flow. We present numerical tests of the newly derived equations based on twin experiments, focusing on three simulations. A first, termed Compressible, assumes the compressible forward and adjoint equations, and represents the consistent means of including compressibility effects. A second, termed Mixed, applies the compressible forward equation, but ignores compressibility effects in the adjoint equations, where the incompressible equations are used instead. A third simulation, termed Incompressible, neglects compressibility effects entirely in the forward and adjoint equations relative to the reference twin. The compressible and mixed formulations successfully restore earlier mantle flow structure, while the incompressible formulation yields noticeable artifacts. Our results suggest the use of a compressible formulation, when applying the adjoint method to seismically derived mantle heterogeneity structure.

  5. Estimating Equating Error in Observed-Score Equating. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    Traditionally, error in equating observed scores on two versions of a test is defined as the difference between the transformations that equate the quantiles of their distributions in the sample and in the population of examinees. This definition underlies, for example, the well-known approximation to the standard error of equating by Lord (1982).…

  6. Supporting Dynamic Ad hoc Collaboration Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Deborah A.; Berket, Karlo

    2003-07-14

    Modern HENP experiments such as CMS and Atlas involve as many as 2000 collaborators around the world. Collaborations this large will be unable to meet often enough to support working closely together. Many of the tools currently available for collaboration focus on heavy-weight applications such as videoconferencing tools. While these are important, there is a more basic need for tools that support connecting physicists to work together on an ad hoc or continuous basis. Tools that support the day-to-day connectivity and underlying needs of a group of collaborators are important for providing light-weight, non-intrusive, and flexible ways to work collaboratively. Some example tools include messaging, file-sharing, and shared plot viewers. An important component of the environment is a scalable underlying communication framework. In this paper we will describe our current progress on building a dynamic and ad hoc collaboration environment and our vision for its evolution into a HENP collaboration environment.

  7. Young's equation revisited.

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Lasse

    2016-04-01

    Young's construction for a contact angle at a three-phase intersection forms the basis of all fields of science that involve wetting and capillary action. We find compelling evidence from recent experimental results on the deformation of a soft solid at the contact line, and displacement of an elastic wire immersed in a liquid, that Young's equation can only be interpreted by surface energies, and not as a balance of surface tensions. It follows that the a priori variable in finding equilibrium is not the position of the contact line, but the contact angle. This finding provides the explanation for the pinning of a contact line. PMID:26940644

  8. Noncommutativity and the Friedmann Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabido, M.; Guzmán, W.; Socorro, J.

    2010-07-01

    In this paper we study noncommutative scalar field cosmology, we find the noncommutative Friedmann equations as well as the noncommutative Klein-Gordon equation, interestingly the noncommutative contributions are only present up to second order in the noncommutitive parameter.

  9. Solitons and nonlinear wave equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, Roger K.; Eilbeck, J. Chris; Gibbon, John D.; Morris, Hedley C.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of the theory and applications of classical solitons is presented with a brief treatment of quantum mechanical effects which occur in particle physics and quantum field theory. The subjects addressed include: solitary waves and solitons, scattering transforms, the Schroedinger equation and the Korteweg-de Vries equation, and the inverse method for the isospectral Schroedinger equation and the general solution of the solvable nonlinear equations. Also considered are: isolation of the Korteweg-de Vries equation in some physical examples, the Zakharov-Shabat/AKNS inverse method, kinks and the sine-Gordon equation, the nonlinear Schroedinger equation and wave resonance interactions, amplitude equations in unstable systems, and numerical studies of solitons. 45 references.

  10. Conservational PDF Equations of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have revisited the traditional probability density function (PDF) equations for the velocity and species in turbulent incompressible flows. They are all unclosed due to the appearance of various conditional means which are modeled empirically. However, we have observed that it is possible to establish a closed velocity PDF equation and a closed joint velocity and species PDF equation through conditions derived from the integral form of the Navier-Stokes equations. Although, in theory, the resulted PDF equations are neither general nor unique, they nevertheless lead to the exact transport equations for the first moment as well as all higher order moments. We refer these PDF equations as the conservational PDF equations. This observation is worth further exploration for its validity and CFD application

  11. Foundations for a multiscale collaborative Earth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Michael; Peter, Daniel; Sager, Korbinian; Simutė, Saulė; Ermert, Laura; Krischer, Lion; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational framework for the assimilation of local to global seismic data into a consistent model describing Earth structure on all seismically accessible scales. This Collaborative Seismic Earth Model (CSEM) is designed to meet the following requirements: (i) Flexible geometric parametrization, capable of capturing topography and bathymetry, as well as all aspects of potentially resolvable structure, including small-scale heterogeneities and deformations of internal discontinuities. (ii) Independence of any particular wave equation solver, in order to enable the combination of inversion techniques suitable for different types of seismic data. (iii) Physical parametrization that allows for full anisotropy and for variations in attenuation and density. While not all of these parameters are always resolvable, the assimilation of data that constrain any parameter subset should be possible. (iv) Ability to accommodate successive refinements through the incorporation of updates on any scale as new data or inversion techniques become available. (v) Enable collaborative Earth model construction. The structure of the initial CSEM is represented on a variable-resolution tetrahedral mesh. It is assembled from a long-wavelength 3-D global model into which several regional-scale tomographies are embedded. We illustrate the CSEM workflow of successive updating with two examples from Japan and the Western Mediterranean, where we constrain smaller scale structure using full-waveform inversion. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of the CSEM to act as a vehicle for the combination of different tomographic techniques with a joint full-waveform and traveltime ray tomography of Europe. This combination broadens the exploitable frequency range of the individual techniques, thereby improving resolution. We perform two iterations of a whole-Earth full-waveform inversion using a long-period reference data set from 225 globally recorded earthquakes. At this early stage

  12. The Dirac equation

    SciTech Connect

    Thaller, B.

    1992-01-01

    This monograph treats most of the usual material to be found in texts on the Dirac equation such as the basic formalism of quantum mechanics, representations of Dirac matrices, covariant realization of the Dirac equation, interpretation of negative energies, Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation, Klein's paradox, spherically symmetric interactions and a treatment of the relativistic hydrogen atom, etc., and also provides excellent additional treatments of a variety of other relevant topics. The monograph contains an extensive treatment of the Lorentz and Poincare groups and their representations. The author discusses in depth Lie algebaic and projective representations, covering groups, and Mackey's theory and Wigner's realization of induced representations. A careful classification of external fields with respect to their behavior under Poincare transformations is supplemented by a basic account of self-adjointness and spectral properties of Dirac operators. A state-of-the-art treatment of relativistic scattering theory based on a time-dependent approach originally due to Enss is presented. An excellent introduction to quantum electrodynamics in external fields is provided. Various appendices containing further details, notes on each chapter commenting on the history involved and referring to original research papers and further developments in the literature, and a bibliography covering all relevant monographs and over 500 articles on the subject, complete this text. This book should satisfy the needs of a wide audience, ranging from graduate students in theoretical physics and mathematics to researchers interested in mathematical physics.

  13. A macroscopic analytical model of collaboration in distributed robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Lerman, K; Galstyan, A; Martinoli, A; Ijspeert, A

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we present a macroscopic analytical model of collaboration in a group of reactive robots. The model consists of a series of coupled differential equations that describe the dynamics of group behavior. After presenting the general model, we analyze in detail a case study of collaboration, the stick-pulling experiment, studied experimentally and in simulation by Ijspeert et al. [Autonomous Robots, 11, 149-171]. The robots' task is to pull sticks out of their holes, and it can be successfully achieved only through the collaboration of two robots. There is no explicit communication or coordination between the robots. Unlike microscopic simulations (sensor-based or using a probabilistic numerical model), in which computational time scales with the robot group size, the macroscopic model is computationally efficient, because its solutions are independent of robot group size. Analysis reproduces several qualitative conclusions of Ijspeert et al.: namely, the different dynamical regimes for different values of the ratio of robots to sticks, the existence of optimal control parameters that maximize system performance as a function of group size, and the transition from superlinear to sublinear performance as the number of robots is increased. PMID:11911788

  14. Social collaboration, inhibition and context.

    PubMed

    Dagnall, Neil; Parker, Andrew; Munley, Gary

    2007-06-01

    This experiment investigated whether the exchange of information in social recall situations produced an inhibitory effect comparable to that observed in part-set cuing studies. 112 participants solved anagrams either individually or with a partner, then after a brief interference task recalled the words alone. Following delay participants attempted to recall the words a second time either alone or with a partner. Pairs recalled more words on second recall than those alone. This difference was due to pooling; there was no evidence of collaborative facilitation. Individuals who encoded individually and recalled as a pair forgot more items than those who encoded and recalled individually. PMID:17688081

  15. Innovative collaboration improves student recruitment.

    PubMed

    Cauble, K C

    1990-01-01

    This article reports on the problem of and partial solution to declining enrollments in an associate degree medical radiography program at Bunker Hill Community College in Boston. After it was determined that many interested and capable applicants could not attend on a full-time day basis, the full-time day program was adapted to a part-time late afternoon/evening format. Major institutions consequently supported their full-time employees in this part-time option. The collaboration between college and community provided visibility, funding, access and quality. PMID:2374810

  16. Collaborative computing environments for HEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunn, Julian J.

    1998-05-01

    This paper describes the diverse software tools that facilitate the work of groups of people. The focus is on tools that exploit the Internet or intranets, and on those which appear to be useful to the HEP community. A brief history of Computer Supported Collaborative Work (CSCW) is presented, followed by a description of some CSCW tools that are currently available, and some which are used in HEP. Finally, predictions are made on what HEP might expect to be using in this domain in future years.

  17. Inequivalence between the Schroedinger equation and the Madelung hydrodynamic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Wallstrom, T.C.

    1994-03-01

    By differentiating the Schroedinger equation and separating the real amd imaginary parts, one obtains the Madelung hydrodynamic equations, which have inspired numerous classical interpretations of quantum mechanics. Such interpretations frequently assume that these equations are equivalent to the Schroedinger equation, and thus provide an alternative basis for quantum mechanics. This paper proves that this is incorrect: to recover the Schroedinger equation, one must add by hand a quantization condition, as in the old quantum theory. The implications for various alternative interpretations of quantum mechanics are discussed.

  18. ``Riemann equations'' in bidifferential calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvartatskyi, O.; Müller-Hoissen, F.; Stoilov, N.

    2015-10-01

    We consider equations that formally resemble a matrix Riemann (or Hopf) equation in the framework of bidifferential calculus. With different choices of a first-order bidifferential calculus, we obtain a variety of equations, including a semi-discrete and a fully discrete version of the matrix Riemann equation. A corresponding universal solution-generating method then either yields a (continuous or discrete) Cole-Hopf transformation, or leaves us with the problem of solving Riemann equations (hence an application of the hodograph method). If the bidifferential calculus extends to second order, solutions of a system of "Riemann equations" are also solutions of an equation that arises, on the universal level of bidifferential calculus, as an integrability condition. Depending on the choice of bidifferential calculus, the latter can represent a number of prominent integrable equations, like self-dual Yang-Mills, as well as matrix versions of the two-dimensional Toda lattice, Hirota's bilinear difference equation, (2+1)-dimensional Nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS), Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, and Davey-Stewartson equations. For all of them, a recent (non-isospectral) binary Darboux transformation result in bidifferential calculus applies, which can be specialized to generate solutions of the associated "Riemann equations." For the latter, we clarify the relation between these specialized binary Darboux transformations and the aforementioned solution-generating method. From (arbitrary size) matrix versions of the "Riemann equations" associated with an integrable equation, possessing a bidifferential calculus formulation, multi-soliton-type solutions of the latter can be generated. This includes "breaking" multi-soliton-type solutions of the self-dual Yang-Mills and the (2+1)-dimensional NLS equation, which are parametrized by solutions of Riemann equations.

  19. Reciprocal Transformations of Two Camassa-Holm Type Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Min; Li, Yu-Qi; Chen, Yong

    2015-12-01

    The relation between the Camassa-Holm equation and the Olver-Rosenau-Qiao equation is obtained, and we connect a new Camassa-Holm type equation proposed by Qiao etc. with the first negative flow of the KdV hierarchy by a reciprocal transformation. Supported by the Global Change Research Program of China under Grant No. 2015CB953904, National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos.11275072, 11375090 and 11435005, Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120076110024), The Network Information Physics Calculation of basic research innovation research group of China under Grant No. 61321064, Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center of Trustworthy Software for Internet of Things under Grant No. ZF1213, Shanghai Minhang District talents of high level scientific research project.

  20. The Temporal Aspect of the Drake Equation and SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćirković, Milan M.

    2004-06-01

    We critically investigate some evolutionary aspects of the famous Drake equation, which is usually presented as the central guide for research on extraterrestrial intelligence. It is shown that the Drake equation tacitly relies on unverified assumptions on both the physicochemical history of our galaxy and the properties of advanced intelligent communities. In this manner, the conventional approach fails to take into account various evolutionary processes forming prerequisites for quantification of the Drake equation parameters. The importance of recent results of Lineweaver and collaborators on chemical build-up of inhabitable planets for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence is emphasized. Two important evolutionary effects are briefly discussed, and the resolution of the difficulties within the context of the phase-transition astrobiological models is sketched.

  1. The temporal aspect of the drake equation and SETI.

    PubMed

    Cirković, Milan M

    2004-01-01

    We critically investigate some evolutionary aspects of the famous Drake equation, which is usually presented as the central guide for research on extraterrestrial intelligence. It is shown that the Drake equation tacitly relies on unverified assumptions on both the physicochemical history of our galaxy and the properties of advanced intelligent communities. In this manner, the conventional approach fails to take into account various evolutionary processes forming prerequisites for quantification of the Drake equation parameters. The importance of recent results of Lineweaver and collaborators on chemical build-up of inhabitable planets for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence is emphasized. Two important evolutionary effects are briefly discussed, and the resolution of the difficulties within the context of the phase-transition astrobiological models is sketched. PMID:15253840

  2. The Forced Hard Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, various examples of the Duffing type forced spring equation with epsilon positive, are studied. Since [epsilon] is positive, all solutions to the associated homogeneous equation are periodic and the same is true with the forcing applied. The damped equation exhibits steady state trajectories with the interesting…

  3. Equating with Miditests Using IRT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Joseph; Skorupski, William P.

    2016-01-01

    The equating performance of two internal anchor test structures--miditests and minitests--is studied for four IRT equating methods using simulated data. Originally proposed by Sinharay and Holland, miditests are anchors that have the same mean difficulty as the overall test but less variance in item difficulties. Four popular IRT equating methods…

  4. Successfully Transitioning to Linear Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colton, Connie; Smith, Wendy M.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010) asks students in as early as fourth grade to solve word problems using equations with variables. Equations studied at this level generate a single solution, such as the equation x + 10 = 25. For students in fifth grade, the Common Core standard for algebraic thinking expects them to…

  5. Evaluating Cross-Lingual Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Joel; Allalouf, Avi

    This study examined the cross-lingual equating process adopted by a large scale testing system in which target language (TL) forms are equated to the source language (SL) forms using a set of translated items. The focus was on evaluating the degree of error inherent in the routine cross-lingual equating of the Verbal Reasoning subtest of the…

  6. Solving Nonlinear Coupled Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, L.; David, J.

    1986-01-01

    Harmonic balance method developed to obtain approximate steady-state solutions for nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations. Method usable with transfer matrices commonly used to analyze shaft systems. Solution to nonlinear equation, with periodic forcing function represented as sum of series similar to Fourier series but with form of terms suggested by equation itself.

  7. Polymorphic collaboration in the global grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuay, William K.

    2006-05-01

    Next generation collaborative systems must be able to represent the same information in different forms on a broad spectrum of devices and resources from low end personal digital assistants (PDA) to high performance computers (HPC). Users might be on a desktop then switch to a laptop and then to a PDA while accessing the global grid. The user preference profile for a collaboration session should be capable of moving with them as well as be automatically adjusted for the device type. Collaborative systems must be capable of representing the same information in many forms for different domains and on many devices and thus be polymorphic. Polymorphic collaboration will provide an ability for multiple heterogeneous resources (human to human, human to machine and machine to machine) to share information and activities, as well as the ability to regulate collaborative sessions based on client characteristics and needs; reuse user profiles, tool category choices, and settings in future collaboration session by same or different users; use intelligent agents to assist collaborative systems in learning user/resource preferences and behaviors, and autonomously derive optimal information to provide to users and decision makers. This paper discusses ongoing research in next generation collaborative environments with the goal of making electronic collaboration as easy to use as the telephone - collaboration at the touch of the screen.

  8. Shared Understanding for Collaborative Control

    SciTech Connect

    David Bruemmer; Douglas Few; Ronald Boring; Julie Marble; Miles Walton; Curtis Nielsen

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents results from three experiments in which human operators were teamed with a mixed-initiative robot control system to accomplish various indoor search and exploration tasks. By assessing human workload and error together with overall performance, these experiments provide an objective means to contrast different modes of robot autonomy and to evaluate both the usability of the interface and the effectiveness of autonomous robot behavior. The first experiment compares the performance achieved when the robot takes initiative to support human driving with the opposite case when the human takes initiative to support autonomous robot driving. The utility of robot autonomy is shown through achievement of better performance when the robot is in the driver’s seat. The second experiment introduces a virtual three-dimensional (3-D) map representation that supports collaborative understanding of the task and environment. When used in place of video, the 3-D map reduced operator workload and navigational error. By lowering bandwidth requirements, use of the virtual 3-D interface enables long-range, nonline-of-sight communication. Results from the third experiment extend the findings of experiment 1 by showing that collaborative control can increase performance and reduce error even when the complexity of the environment is increased and workload is distributed amongst multiple operators.

  9. Collaborative virtual environments art exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinsky, Margaret; Anstey, Josephine; Pape, Dave E.; Aguilera, Julieta C.; Kostis, Helen-Nicole; Tsoupikova, Daria

    2005-03-01

    This panel presentation will exhibit artwork developed in CAVEs and discuss how art methodologies enhance the science of VR through collaboration, interaction and aesthetics. Artists and scientists work alongside one another to expand scientific research and artistic expression and are motivated by exhibiting collaborative virtual environments. Looking towards the arts, such as painting and sculpture, computer graphics captures a visual tradition. Virtual reality expands this tradition to not only what we face, but to what surrounds us and even what responds to our body and its gestures. Art making that once was isolated to the static frame and an optimal point of view is now out and about, in fully immersive mode within CAVEs. Art knowledge is a guide to how the aesthetics of 2D and 3D worlds affect, transform, and influence the social, intellectual and physical condition of the human body through attention to psychology, spiritual thinking, education, and cognition. The psychological interacts with the physical in the virtual in such a way that each facilitates, enhances and extends the other, culminating in a "go together" world. Attention to sharing art experience across high-speed networks introduces a dimension of liveliness and aliveness when we "become virtual" in real time with others.

  10. Distributed and collaborative synthetic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L.; Bernardini, Fausto

    1995-01-01

    Fast graphics workstations and increased computing power, together with improved interface technologies, have created new and diverse possibilities for developing and interacting with synthetic environments. A synthetic environment system is generally characterized by input/output devices that constitute the interface between the human senses and the synthetic environment generated by the computer; and a computation system running a real-time simulation of the environment. A basic need of a synthetic environment system is that of giving the user a plausible reproduction of the visual aspect of the objects with which he is interacting. The goal of our Shastra research project is to provide a substrate of geometric data structures and algorithms which allow the distributed construction and modification of the environment, efficient querying of objects attributes, collaborative interaction with the environment, fast computation of collision detection and visibility information for efficient dynamic simulation and real-time scene display. In particular, we address the following issues: (1) A geometric framework for modeling and visualizing synthetic environments and interacting with them. We highlight the functions required for the geometric engine of a synthetic environment system. (2) A distribution and collaboration substrate that supports construction, modification, and interaction with synthetic environments on networked desktop machines.

  11. Generalized Klein-Kramers equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, Kwok Sau

    2012-12-01

    A generalized Klein-Kramers equation for a particle interacting with an external field is proposed. The equation generalizes the fractional Klein-Kramers equation introduced by Barkai and Silbey [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 3866 (2000), 10.1021/jp993491m]. Besides, the generalized Klein-Kramers equation can also recover the integro-differential Klein-Kramers equation for continuous-time random walk; this means that it can describe the subdiffusive and superdiffusive regimes in the long-time limit. Moreover, analytic solutions for first two moments both in velocity and displacement (for force-free case) are obtained, and their dynamic behaviors are investigated.

  12. Multinomial Diffusion Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, Ariel I.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel stochastic, space/time discrete representation of particle diffusion (e.g. Brownian motion) based on discrete probability distributions. We show that in the limit of both very small time step and large concentration, our description is equivalent to the space/time continuous stochastic diffusion equation. Being discrete in both time and space, our model can be used as an extremely accurate, efficient, and stable stochastic finite-difference diffusion algorithm when concentrations are so small that computationally expensive particle-based methods are usually needed. Through numerical simulations, we show that our method can generate realizations that capture the statistical properties of particle simulations. While our method converges converges to both the correct ensemble mean and ensemble variance very quickly with decreasing time step, but for small concentration, the stochastic diffusion PDE does not, even for very small time steps.

  13. Structural Equation Model Trees

    PubMed Central

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2015-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree structures that separate a data set recursively into subsets with significantly different parameter estimates in a SEM. SEM Trees provide means for finding covariates and covariate interactions that predict differences in structural parameters in observed as well as in latent space and facilitate theory-guided exploration of empirical data. We describe the methodology, discuss theoretical and practical implications, and demonstrate applications to a factor model and a linear growth curve model. PMID:22984789

  14. Elliptic scattering equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Carlos; Gomez, Humberto

    2016-06-01

    Recently the CHY approach has been extended to one loop level using elliptic functions and modular forms over a Jacobian variety. Due to the difficulty in manipulating these kind of functions, we propose an alternative prescription that is totally algebraic. This new proposal is based on an elliptic algebraic curve embedded in a mathbb{C}{P}^2 space. We show that for the simplest integrand, namely the n - gon, our proposal indeed reproduces the expected result. By using the recently formulated Λ-algorithm, we found a novel recurrence relation expansion in terms of tree level off-shell amplitudes. Our results connect nicely with recent results on the one-loop formulation of the scattering equations. In addition, this new proposal can be easily stretched out to hyperelliptic curves in order to compute higher genus.

  15. Λ scattering equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Humberto

    2016-06-01

    The CHY representation of scattering amplitudes is based on integrals over the moduli space of a punctured sphere. We replace the punctured sphere by a double-cover version. The resulting scattering equations depend on a parameter Λ controlling the opening of a branch cut. The new representation of scattering amplitudes possesses an enhanced redundancy which can be used to fix, modulo branches, the location of four punctures while promoting Λ to a variable. Via residue theorems we show how CHY formulas break up into sums of products of smaller (off-shell) ones times a propagator. This leads to a powerful way of evaluating CHY integrals of generic rational functions, which we call the Λ algorithm.

  16. On nonautonomous Dirac equation

    SciTech Connect

    Hovhannisyan, Gro; Liu Wen

    2009-12-15

    We construct the fundamental solution of time dependent linear ordinary Dirac system in terms of unknown phase functions. This construction gives approximate representation of solutions which is useful for the study of asymptotic behavior. Introducing analog of Rayleigh quotient for differential equations we generalize Hartman-Wintner asymptotic integration theorems with the error estimates for applications to the Dirac system. We also introduce the adiabatic invariants for the Dirac system, which are similar to the adiabatic invariant of Lorentz's pendulum. Using a small parameter method it is shown that the change in the adiabatic invariants approaches zero with the power speed as a small parameter approaches zero. As another application we calculate the transition probabilities for the Dirac system. We show that for the special choice of electromagnetic field, the only transition of an electron to the positron with the opposite spin orientation is possible.

  17. Parabolized stability equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Thorwald

    1994-04-01

    The parabolized stability equations (PSE) are a new approach to analyze the streamwise evolution of single or interacting Fourier modes in weakly nonparallel flows such as boundary layers. The concept rests on the decomposition of every mode into a slowly varying amplitude function and a wave function with slowly varying wave number. The neglect of the small second derivatives of the slowly varying functions with respect to the streamwise variable leads to an initial boundary-value problem that can be solved by numerical marching procedures. The PSE approach is valid in convectively unstable flows. The equations for a single mode are closely related to those of the traditional eigenvalue problems for linear stability analysis. However, the PSE approach does not exploit the homogeneity of the problem and, therefore, can be utilized to analyze forced modes and the nonlinear growth and interaction of an initial disturbance field. In contrast to the traditional patching of local solutions, the PSE provide the spatial evolution of modes with proper account for their history. The PSE approach allows studies of secondary instabilities without the constraints of the Floquet analysis and reproduces the established experimental, theoretical, and computational benchmark results on transition up to the breakdown stage. The method matches or exceeds the demonstrated capabilities of current spatial Navier-Stokes solvers at a small fraction of their computational cost. Recent applications include studies on localized or distributed receptivity and prediction of transition in model environments for realistic engineering problems. This report describes the basis, intricacies, and some applications of the PSE methodology.

  18. Glomerular filtration rate in patients with atrial fibrillation and 1-year outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Laroche, Cécile; Diemberger, Igor; Popescu, Mircea Ioachim; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Petrescu, Lucian; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.; Tavazzi, Luigi; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed 1-year outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation enrolled in the EurObservational Research Programme AF General Pilot Registry (EORP-AF), in relation to kidney function, as assessed by glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In a cohort of 2398 patients (median age 69 years; 61% male), eGFR (ml/min/1.73 m2) calculated using the CKD-EPI formula was ≥80 in 35.1%, 50–79 in 47.2%, 30–49 in 13.9% and <30 in 3.7% of patients. In a logistic regression analysis, eGFR category was an independent predictor of stroke/TIA or death, with elevated odds ratios associated with severe to mild renal impairment, ie. eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m2 [OR 3.641, 95% CI 1.572–8.433, p < 0.0001], 30–49 ml/min/1.73 m2 [OR 3.303, 95% CI 1.740–6.270, p = 0.0026] or 50–79 ml/min/1.73 m2 [OR 2.094, 95% CI 1.194–3.672, p = 0.0003]. The discriminant capability for the risk of death was tested among various eGFR calculation algorithms: the best was the Cockcroft-Gault equation adjusted for BSA, followed by Cockcroft-Gault equation, and CKD-EPI equation, while the worst was the MDRD equation. In conclusion in this prospective observational registry, renal function was a major determinant of adverse outcomes at 1 year, and even mild or moderate renal impairments were associated with an increased risk of stroke/TIA/death. PMID:27466080

  19. Glomerular filtration rate in patients with atrial fibrillation and 1-year outcomes.

    PubMed

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Laroche, Cécile; Diemberger, Igor; Popescu, Mircea Ioachim; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Petrescu, Lucian; Crijns, Harry J G M; Tavazzi, Luigi; Maggioni, Aldo P; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    We assessed 1-year outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation enrolled in the EurObservational Research Programme AF General Pilot Registry (EORP-AF), in relation to kidney function, as assessed by glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In a cohort of 2398 patients (median age 69 years; 61% male), eGFR (ml/min/1.73 m(2)) calculated using the CKD-EPI formula was ≥80 in 35.1%, 50-79 in 47.2%, 30-49 in 13.9% and <30 in 3.7% of patients. In a logistic regression analysis, eGFR category was an independent predictor of stroke/TIA or death, with elevated odds ratios associated with severe to mild renal impairment, ie. eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) [OR 3.641, 95% CI 1.572-8.433, p < 0.0001], 30-49 ml/min/1.73 m(2) [OR 3.303, 95% CI 1.740-6.270, p = 0.0026] or 50-79 ml/min/1.73 m2 [OR 2.094, 95% CI 1.194-3.672, p = 0.0003]. The discriminant capability for the risk of death was tested among various eGFR calculation algorithms: the best was the Cockcroft-Gault equation adjusted for BSA, followed by Cockcroft-Gault equation, and CKD-EPI equation, while the worst was the MDRD equation. In conclusion in this prospective observational registry, renal function was a major determinant of adverse outcomes at 1 year, and even mild or moderate renal impairments were associated with an increased risk of stroke/TIA/death. PMID:27466080

  20. Tie strength distribution in scientific collaboration networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Qing; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2014-09-01

    Science is increasingly dominated by teams. Understanding patterns of scientific collaboration and their impacts on the productivity and evolution of disciplines is crucial to understand scientific processes. Electronic bibliography offers a unique opportunity to map and investigate the nature of scientific collaboration. Recent studies have demonstrated a counterintuitive organizational pattern of scientific collaboration networks: densely interconnected local clusters consist of weak ties, whereas strong ties play the role of connecting different clusters. This pattern contrasts itself from many other types of networks where strong ties form communities while weak ties connect different communities. Although there are many models for collaboration networks, no model reproduces this pattern. In this paper, we present an evolution model of collaboration networks, which reproduces many properties of real-world collaboration networks, including the organization of tie strengths, skewed degree and weight distribution, high clustering, and assortative mixing.

  1. Collaborative Analytical Toolbox version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-08-21

    The purpose of the Collaborative Analytical Toolbox (CAT) is to provide a comprehensive, enabling, collaborative problem solving environment that enables users to more effectively apply and improve their analytical and problem solving capabilities. CAT is a software framework for integrating other tools and data sources. It includes a set of core services for collaboration and information exploration and analysis, and a framework that facilitates quickly integrating new ideas, techniques, and tools with existing data sources.

  2. Computational Approaches for Predicting Biomedical Research Collaborations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Yu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research is increasingly collaborative, and successful collaborations often produce high impact work. Computational approaches can be developed for automatically predicting biomedical research collaborations. Previous works of collaboration prediction mainly explored the topological structures of research collaboration networks, leaving out rich semantic information from the publications themselves. In this paper, we propose supervised machine learning approaches to predict research collaborations in the biomedical field. We explored both the semantic features extracted from author research interest profile and the author network topological features. We found that the most informative semantic features for author collaborations are related to research interest, including similarity of out-citing citations, similarity of abstracts. Of the four supervised machine learning models (naïve Bayes, naïve Bayes multinomial, SVMs, and logistic regression), the best performing model is logistic regression with an ROC ranging from 0.766 to 0.980 on different datasets. To our knowledge we are the first to study in depth how research interest and productivities can be used for collaboration prediction. Our approach is computationally efficient, scalable and yet simple to implement. The datasets of this study are available at https://github.com/qingzhanggithub/medline-collaboration-datasets. PMID:25375164

  3. Collaborative workspace for multimedia medical conferencing.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Park, E S; Lee, S G; Shin, Y G

    1998-01-01

    We propose an approach for collaborative workspace management in medical conferencing. A collaborative workspace is a virtual data space shared between medical experts for working out solutions collaboratively while conferencing. Our approach provides medical users with an integrated view of various kinds of multimedia patient data and a unified control over the workspace. For data navigation and conferencing, a tree-like navigation tool, which we named the patient record tree, is provided. And we classify patient data, which is the object of medical collaborative works, into six basic types, and provide a view template for displaying each of these types. PMID:10384472

  4. Collaborative Visualization: Definition, Challenges, and Research Agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Isenberg, Petra; Elmqvist, Niklas; Scholtz, Jean; Cernea, Daniel; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Hagen, Hans

    2011-10-01

    Collaborative visualization has emerged as a new research direction which offers the opportunity to reach new audiences and application areas for visualization tools and techniques. Technology now allows us to easily connect and collaborate with one another - in settings as diverse as over networked computers, across mobile devices, or using shared displays such as interactive walls and tabletop surfaces. Any of these collaborative settings carries a set of challenges and opportunities for visualization research. Digital information is already regularly accessed by multiple people together in order to share information, to view it together, to analyze it, or to form decisions. However, research on how to best support collaboration with and around visualizations is still in its infancy and has so far focused only on a small subset of possible application scenarios. The purpose of this article is (1) to provide a clear scope, definition, and overview of the evolving field of collaborative visualization, (2) to help pinpoint the unique focus of collaborative visualization with its specific aspects, challenges, and requirements within the intersection of general computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW) and visualization research, and (3) to draw attention to important future research questions to be addressed by the community. Thus, the goal of the paper is to discuss a research agenda for future work on collaborative visualization, including our vision for how to meet the grand challenge and to urge for a new generation of visualization tools that were designed with collaboration in mind from their very inception.

  5. Creating Change and Staying Connected through Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Lothian, Judith A.

    2005-01-01

    In this column, a childbirth educator describes feeling overwhelmed and alone in her work. Collaboration is presented as a key agent to creating change, staying connected, and “keeping going.” The Cochrane Library, the Coalition for Improving Maternity Services, the ongoing collaboration of Lamaze International with the Maternity Center Association and DONA International, and birth networks are presented as examples of valuable collaborations. Childbirth educators benefit from these collaborative efforts by being able to access and use evidence-based information and to feel connected with like-minded colleagues. PMID:17273451

  6. Mobile serious games for collaborative problem solving.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jaime; Mendoza, Claudia; Salinas, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from the implementation of a series of learning activities based on mobile serious games (MSG) for the development of problem-solving and collaborative skills in Chilean 8th grade students. Three MSGs were developed and played by teams of four students, who had to solve the problems posed by the game collaboratively. The data shows that the experimental group had a higher perception of their own skills of collaboration and of the plan execution dimension of problem solving than the control group, providing empirical evidence regarding the contribution of MSGs to the development of collaborative problem-solving skills. PMID:19592762

  7. Accountability and values in radically collaborative research.

    PubMed

    Winsberg, Eric; Huebner, Bryce; Kukla, Rebecca

    2014-06-01

    This paper discusses a crisis of accountability that arises when scientific collaborations are massively epistemically distributed. We argue that social models of epistemic collaboration, which are social analogs to what Patrick Suppes called a "model of the experiment," must play a role in creating accountability in these contexts. We also argue that these social models must accommodate the fact that the various agents in a collaborative project often have ineliminable, messy, and conflicting interests and values; any story about accountability in a massively distributed collaboration must therefore involve models of such interests and values and their methodological and epistemic effects. PMID:25051867

  8. Author Credit for Transdisciplinary Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Ding, Ying; Malic, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Transdisciplinary collaboration is the key for innovation. An evaluation mechanism is necessary to ensure that academic credit for this costly process can be allocated fairly among coauthors. This paper proposes a set of quantitative measures (e.g., t_credit and t_index) to reflect authors’ transdisciplinary contributions to publications. These measures are based on paper-topic probability distributions and author-topic probability distributions. We conduct an empirical analysis of the information retrieval domain which demonstrates that these measures effectively improve the results of harmonic_credit and h_index measures by taking into account the transdisciplinary contributions of authors. The definitions of t_credit and t_index provide a fair and effective way for research organizations to assign credit to authors of transdisciplinary publications. PMID:26375678

  9. Atrial fibrillation care improvement collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Robelia, Paul; Kopecky, Stephen; Thacher, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly common cardiac arrhythmia. Many patients with new onset or recurrent AF present to the emergency department and are subsequently admitted to the hospital and seen by cardiology specialists for follow up. In an attempt to address this high utilization of acute health care resources, reduce costs, and improve patient care, our institution instituted a collaborative project between the departments of emergency medicine, cardiology, family medicine, and primary care internal medicine. The project team oversaw development of a new emergency department AF order set, encouraged utilization of a new oral anticoagulant (dabigatran), improved the primary care follow up connection, and deployed a multimodal education plan for primary care providers. Between 2012 and 2014, these interventions resulted in a 17% reduction in total AF per member per month (PMPM) cost, a 28% reduction in AF PMPM inpatient cost, and a 24% reduction in inpatient admissions for AF. PMID:26734425

  10. Collaborative observations of HDE 332077

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ake, Thomas B., III

    1995-01-01

    IUE low dispersion observations were made of the T(sub c)-deficient peculiar red giant (PRG) star, HDE 332077, to test the hypothesis that T(sub c)-poor PRG's are formed as a result of mass transfer from a binary companion rather than from internal thermal pulsing while on the asymptotic red giant branch. Previous ground-based observations of this star indicated that it is a binary, but the secondary star was too massive for an expected white dwarf. A deep, short wavelength prime (SWP) exposure was needed to search for evidence of an A-type main-sequence companion. We obtained a 120 minute LWP exposure (LWP 23479), followed by a collaborative 1230 minute SWP exposure (SWP 45113). These observations were combined with our earlier IUE and optical data on this PRG star to model the spectral energy distribution of the system.

  11. Collaborative observations of HDE 332077

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ake, T.

    1995-01-01

    IUE low dispersion observations were made of the Tc-deficient peculiar red giant (PRG) star, HDE 332077, to test the hypothesis that Tc--poor PRG's are formed as a result of mass transfer from a binary companion rather than from internal thermal pulsing while on the asymptotic red giant branch. Previous ground-based observations of this star indicated that it is a binary, but the secondary star was too massive for an expected white dwarf. A deep, SWP exposure was needed to search for evidence of an A-type main-sequence companion. We obtained a 120 minute LWP exposure (LWP 23479), followed by a collaborative 120 minute SWP exposure (SWP 45113). These observations were combined with our earlier IUE and optical data on this PRG star to model the spectral energy distribution of the system.

  12. ATLAS Live: Collaborative Information Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Steven; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    I report on a pilot project launched in 2010 focusing on facilitating communication and information exchange within the ATLAS Collaboration, through the combination of digital signage software and webcasting. The project, called ATLAS Live, implements video streams of information, ranging from detailed detector and data status to educational and outreach material. The content, including text, images, video and audio, is collected, visualised and scheduled using digital signage software. The system is robust and flexible, utilizing scripts to input data from remote sources, such as the CERN Document Server, Indico, or any available URL, and to integrate these sources into professional-quality streams, including text scrolling, transition effects, inter and intra-screen divisibility. Information is published via the encoding and webcasting of standard video streams, viewable on all common platforms, using a web browser or other common video tool. Authorisation is enforced at the level of the streaming and at the web portals, using the CERN SSO system.

  13. The ANS Collaboration Monitoring Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Bacci, S.; Baldinelli, L.; Castellani, F.; Cetrulo, G.; Cherini, G.; Dallaporta, S.; Dallavia, G.; Englaro, A.; Frigo, A.; Graziani, M.; Luppi, V.; Maitan, A.; Marangoni, C.; Milani, A.; Moretti, S.; Moschini, F.; Ochner, P.; Siviero, A.; Righetti, G. L.; Tomaselli, S.; Tomasoni, S.; Vagnozzi, A.; Valisa, P.

    ANS Collaboration is a growing Italian network of small and medium size telescopes performing spectroscopy (low and medium resolution single dispersion, and Echelle high resolution modes) and UBVRC IC CCD photometry of symbiotic stars and novae mainly, but with interest also on other types of objects like optical transients, eclipsing binaries, X-ray source counterparts and on-call follow-up observations of selected targets from some surveys like IPHAS or RAVE. In the present form ANS started operations in 2005, and at the time of writing has logged on symbiotic stars 14602 photometric runs and a rich ensemble of low and high resolution, absolutely fluxed spectra. The paper describes the internal organization, operation modes and procedures, and presents sample data and performance statistics.

  14. Collaborating Fuzzy Reinforcement Learning Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1997-01-01

    Earlier, we introduced GARIC-Q, a new method for doing incremental Dynamic Programming using a society of intelligent agents which are controlled at the top level by Fuzzy Relearning and at the local level, each agent learns and operates based on ANTARCTIC, a technique for fuzzy reinforcement learning. In this paper, we show that it is possible for these agents to compete in order to affect the selected control policy but at the same time, they can collaborate while investigating the state space. In this model, the evaluator or the critic learns by observing all the agents behaviors but the control policy changes only based on the behavior of the winning agent also known as the super agent.

  15. Author Credit for Transdisciplinary Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Ding, Ying; Malic, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Transdisciplinary collaboration is the key for innovation. An evaluation mechanism is necessary to ensure that academic credit for this costly process can be allocated fairly among coauthors. This paper proposes a set of quantitative measures (e.g., t_credit and t_index) to reflect authors' transdisciplinary contributions to publications. These measures are based on paper-topic probability distributions and author-topic probability distributions. We conduct an empirical analysis of the information retrieval domain which demonstrates that these measures effectively improve the results of harmonic_credit and h_index measures by taking into account the transdisciplinary contributions of authors. The definitions of t_credit and t_index provide a fair and effective way for research organizations to assign credit to authors of transdisciplinary publications. PMID:26375678

  16. PCCR: Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Ketcham, Marsha A; Anderson, Michelle A; Whitcomb, David C; Lynch, Henry T; Ghiorzo, Paola; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sasson, Aaron R; Grizzle, William E; Haynatzki, Gleb; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Kinarsky, Leo; Brand, Randall E

    2011-01-01

    The Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry (PCCR) is a multi-institutional web-based system aimed to collect a variety of data on pancreatic cancer patients and high-risk subjects in a standard and efficient way. The PCCR was initiated by a group of experts in medical oncology, gastroenterology, genetics, pathology, epidemiology, nutrition, and computer science with the goal of facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies against pancreatic cancer. The PCCR is a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java/JSP technology and has Oracle 10 g database as a back-end. The PCCR uses a "confederation model" that encourages participation of any interested center, irrespective of its size or location. The PCCR utilizes a standardized approach to data collection and reporting, and uses extensive validation procedures to prevent entering erroneous data. The PCCR controlled vocabulary is harmonized with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT). The PCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in cancer research and healthcare. Currently, seven cancer centers in the USA, as well as one center in Italy are participating in the PCCR. At present, the PCCR database contains data on more than 2,700 subjects (PC patients and individuals at high risk of getting this disease). The PCCR has been certified by the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product. The PCCR provides a foundation for collaborative PC research. It has all the necessary prerequisites for subsequent evolution of the developed infrastructure from simply gathering PC-related data into a biomedical computing platform vital for successful PC studies, care and treatment. Studies utilizing data collected in the PCCR may engender new approaches

  17. The collaborative roots of corruption

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Ori; Shalvi, Shaul

    2015-01-01

    Cooperation is essential for completing tasks that individuals cannot accomplish alone. Whereas the benefits of cooperation are clear, little is known about its possible negative aspects. Introducing a novel sequential dyadic die-rolling paradigm, we show that collaborative settings provide fertile ground for the emergence of corruption. In the main experimental treatment the outcomes of the two players are perfectly aligned. Player A privately rolls a die, reports the result to player B, who then privately rolls and reports the result as well. Both players are paid the value of the reports if, and only if, they are identical (e.g., if both report 6, each earns €6). Because rolls are truly private, players can inflate their profit by misreporting the actual outcomes. Indeed, the proportion of reported doubles was 489% higher than the expected proportion assuming honesty, 48% higher than when individuals rolled and reported alone, and 96% higher than when lies only benefited the other player. Breaking the alignment in payoffs between player A and player B reduced the extent of brazen lying. Despite player B's central role in determining whether a double was reported, modifying the incentive structure of either player A or player B had nearly identical effects on the frequency of reported doubles. Our results highlight the role of collaboration—particularly on equal terms—in shaping corruption. These findings fit a functional perspective on morality. When facing opposing moral sentiments—to be honest vs. to join forces in collaboration—people often opt for engaging in corrupt collaboration. PMID:26261341

  18. Mode decomposition evolution equations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be

  19. Langevin equation approach to reactor noise analysis: stochastic transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Akcasu, A.Z. ); Stolle, A.M. )

    1993-01-01

    The application of the Langevin equation method to the study of fluctuations in the space- and velocity-dependent neutron density as well as in the detector outputs in nuclear reactors is presented. In this case, the Langevin equation is the stochastic linear neutron transport equation with a space- and velocity-dependent random neutron source, often referred to as the noise equivalent source (NES). The power spectral densities (PSDs) of the NESs in the transport equation, as well as in the accompanying detection rate equations, are obtained, and the cross- and auto-power spectral densities of the outputs of pairs of detectors are explicitly calculated. The transport-level expression for the R([omega]) ratio measured in the [sup 252]Cf source-driven noise analysis method is also derived. Finally, the implementation of the Langevin equation approach at different levels of approximation is discussed, and the stochastic one-speed transport and one-group P[sub 1] equations are derived by first integrating the stochastic transport equation over speed and then eliminating the angular dependence by a spherical harmonics expansion. By taking the large transport rate limit in the P[sub 1] description, the stochastic diffusion equation is obtained as well as the PSD of the NES in it. This procedure also leads directly to the stochastic Fick's law.

  20. A spinor representation of Maxwell equations and Dirac equation

    SciTech Connect

    Vaz, J. Jr.; Rodrigues, W.A. Jr.

    1993-02-01

    Using the Clifford bundle formalism and starting from the free Maxwell equations dF = {delta}F = 0 we show by writing F = b{psi}{gamma}{sup 1}{gamma}{sup 2}{psi}{sup *}, where {psi} is a Dirac-Hestenes spinor field, that the Dirac-Hestenes equation (which is the representative of the standard Dirac equation in the Clifford bundle over Minkowski spacetime) is equivalent under general assumptions to those free Maxwell equations. We briefly discuss the implications of our findings for the interpretation of quantum mechanics. 15 refs.

  1. JWL Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-15

    The JWL equation of state (EOS) is frequently used for the products (and sometimes reactants) of a high explosive (HE). Here we review and systematically derive important properties. The JWL EOS is of the Mie-Grueneisen form with a constant Grueneisen coefficient and a constants specific heat. It is thermodynamically consistent to specify the temperature at a reference state. However, increasing the reference state temperature restricts the EOS domain in the (V, e)-plane of phase space. The restrictions are due to the conditions that P ≥ 0, T ≥ 0, and the isothermal bulk modulus is positive. Typically, this limits the low temperature regime in expansion. The domain restrictions can result in the P-T equilibrium EOS of a partly burned HE failing to have a solution in some cases. For application to HE, the heat of detonation is discussed. Example JWL parameters for an HE, both products and reactions, are used to illustrate the restrictions on the domain of the EOS.

  2. PBL and beyond: trends in collaborative learning.

    PubMed

    Pluta, William J; Richards, Boyd F; Mutnick, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Building upon the disruption to lecture-based methods triggered by the introduction of problem-based learning, approaches to promote collaborative learning are becoming increasingly diverse, widespread and generally well accepted within medical education. Examples of relatively new, structured collaborative learning methods include team-based learning and just-in-time teaching. Examples of less structured approaches include think-pair share, case discussions, and the flipped classroom. It is now common practice in medical education to employ a range of instructional approaches to support collaborative learning. We believe that the adoption of such approaches is entering a new and challenging era. We define collaborate learning by drawing on the broader literature, including Chi's ICAP framework that emphasizes the importance of sustained, interactive explanation and elaboration by learners. We distinguish collaborate learning from constructive, active, and passive learning and provide preliminary evidence documenting the growth of methods that support collaborative learning. We argue that the rate of adoption of collaborative learning methods will accelerate due to a growing emphasis on the development of team competencies and the increasing availability of digital media. At the same time, the adoption collaborative learning strategies face persistent challenges, stemming from an overdependence on comparative-effectiveness research and a lack of useful guidelines about how best to adapt collaborative learning methods to given learning contexts. The medical education community has struggled to consistently demonstrate superior outcomes when using collaborative learning methods and strategies. Despite this, support for their use will continue to expand. To select approaches with the greatest utility, instructors must carefully align conditions of the learning context with the learning approaches under consideration. Further, it is critical that modifications are made

  3. Glomerular filtration rate estimated by creatinine, cystatin C, or both markers and the risk of clinical events in HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Gregory M.; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Wyatt, Christina M.; Post, Frank A.; Bormann, Alison M.; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.; Ross, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The accuracy and precision of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating equations based on plasma creatinine (GFRcr), cystatin C (GFRcys), and the combination of these markers (GFRcr-cys) has recently been assessed in HIV-infected individuals. Methods We compared the associations of baseline GFRcr, GFRcys, and GFRcr-cys (using the CKD-EPI equations) with mortality, cardiovascular events (CVE), and opportunistic diseases (OD) in the Strategies for the Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios per standard deviation (SD) change in GFR. Results 4,614 subjects from the SMART trial with available baseline creatinine and cystatin C data were included in this analysis. Of these, 99 died, 111 had a CVE and 121 had an OD. GFRcys was weakly to moderately correlated with HIV RNA, CD4 cell count, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and D-dimer, while GFRcr had little or no correlation with these factors. GFRcys had the strongest associations with the three clinical outcomes, followed closely by GFRcr-cys, with GFRcr having the weakest associations with clinical outcomes. In a model adjusting for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, HIV-related factors, and inflammation markers, a 1-SD lower GFRcys was associated with a 55% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27% -90%) increased risk of mortality, a 21% (95% CI, 0% -47%) increased risk of CVE, and a 22% (95% CI, 0% -48%) increased risk of OD. Conclusions Of the three CKD-EPI GFR equations, GFRcys had the strongest associations with mortality, CVE, and OD. PMID:24024499

  4. Raising the Profile of Innovative Teaching in Higher Education? Reflections on the EquATE Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Sue; Wall, Kate; Lofthouse, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology developed by members of the Research Centre for Learning and Teaching (RCfLAT) to collaborate with university teaching colleagues to produce theoretically- and pedagogically-based case studies of innovations in teaching and learning. The Equal Acclaim for Teaching Excellence (EquATE) project investigates…

  5. A note on "Kepler's equation".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutka, J.

    1997-07-01

    This note briefly points out the formal similarity between Kepler's equation and equations developed in Hindu and Islamic astronomy for describing the lunar parallax. Specifically, an iterative method for calculating the lunar parallax has been developed by the astronomer Habash al-Hasib al-Marwazi (about 850 A.D., Turkestan), which is surprisingly similar to the iterative method for solving Kepler's equation invented by Leonhard Euler (1707 - 1783).

  6. Perceptions of Collaborative Process in a Professional Learning Focused University-Community-School Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Psimas, Lynnae L.

    2012-01-01

    The current study explored the collaborative processes present in a collaboration between an urban university in the Southeast United States, a state-funded educational support agency, and several urban and suburban school districts served by the state agency. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of the collaboration and relevant practices,…

  7. Use of an Interculturally Enriched Collaboration Script in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popov, Vitaliy; Biemans, Harm J. A.; Kuznetsov, Andrei N.; Mulder, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the authors introduced an interculturally enriched collaboration script (IECS) for working in culturally diverse groups within a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environment and then assessed student online collaborative behaviour, learning performance and experiences. The question was if and how these…

  8. Collaborative Learning: Sourcebook for Collaborative Learning in the Arts and Sciences at Indiana University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Sharon J., Ed.; Hansen, Edmund J., Ed.

    This sourcebook, prepared by the Intercampus Group on Collaborative Learning of Indiana University, offers suggestions to those who are already familiar with collaborative learning, but want to know how others are responding to the same or similar challenges. Papers are presented that examine general issues of collaborative learning in the Arts…

  9. Wiki-Based Collaborative Writing Activities in EFL Classrooms: Exploring Teachers' Intervention in the Collaborative Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alghasab, Maha

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to explore EFL teachers' and students' online interaction during wiki based collaborative writing activities. It aims to explore the collaborative behaviours that students engaged in and to what extent the teachers' intervention can promote students' collaboration. The study has a multiple qualitative case study…

  10. A Data Mining Approach to Reveal Representative Collaboration Indicators in Open Collaboration Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anaya, Antonio R.; Boticario, Jesus G.

    2009-01-01

    Data mining methods are successful in educational environments to discover new knowledge or learner skills or features. Unfortunately, they have not been used in depth with collaboration. We have developed a scalable data mining method, whose objective is to infer information on the collaboration during the collaboration process in a…

  11. Teacher Educators' Collaboration in Subject Departments: Collaborative Activities and Social Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heldens, Henderijn; Bakx, Anouke; den Brok, Perry

    2015-01-01

    Teacher educators' collaboration plays an important role in the improvement of teacher education. Many studies in educational research focus on collaboration from 1 particular perspective. A focus on 2 perspectives, a qualitative (focusing on collaborative activities) as well as a quantitative (focusing on relations) perspective, and relating both…

  12. Redesigning for Collaboration in Learning Initiatives: An Examination of Four Highly Collaborative Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna J.

    2006-01-01

    Much has been written about the barriers to collaborative work, but little research has been conducted on how to foster collaboration within higher education. This article presents the results of a case study of four campuses that have organized to enable collaboration. The study builds on earlier literature from the corporate sector using a model…

  13. Study of the Impact of Collaboration among Teachers in a Collaborative Authoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafifi, Yacine; Touil, Ghassen

    2010-01-01

    Several researchers have studied the impact of collaboration between the learners on their cognitive levels, but few studies have been carried out on the impact of collaboration between the teachers. The aim of our research is to study the effects on the knowledge levels of learners of collaborative construction of learning objects created by the…

  14. Evaluation of Intelligent Grouping Based on Learners' Collaboration Competence Level in Online Collaborative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muuro, Maina Elizaphan; Oboko, Robert; Wagacha, Waiganjo Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we explore the impact of an intelligent grouping algorithm based on learners' collaborative competency when compared with (a) instructor based Grade Point Average (GPA) method level and (b) random method, on group outcomes and group collaboration problems in an online collaborative learning environment. An intelligent grouping…

  15. From Collaborative Technology to Collaborative Use of Technology: Designing Learning Oriented Infrastructures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipponen, Lasse; Lallimo, Jiri

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that even if empirical studies of collaborative technology and learning represent a diversity of research, the cases that have successfully used collaborative technology share one very crucial thing, namely, instead of focusing intensively only on the technology, a great deal of effort has been put into collaborative use of…

  16. Electronic representation of wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veigend, Petr; Kunovský, Jiří; Kocina, Filip; Nečasová, Gabriela; Šátek, Václav; Valenta, Václav

    2016-06-01

    The Taylor series method for solving differential equations represents a non-traditional way of a numerical solution. Even though this method is not much preferred in the literature, experimental calculations done at the Department of Intelligent Systems of the Faculty of Information Technology of TU Brno have verified that the accuracy and stability of the Taylor series method exceeds the currently used algorithms for numerically solving differential equations. This paper deals with solution of Telegraph equation using modelling of a series small pieces of the wire. Corresponding differential equations are solved by the Modern Taylor Series Method.

  17. Communication and Collaboration with Schools: Pediatricians' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley-Klug, Kathy L.; Sundman, Ashley N.; Nadeau, Joshua; Cunningham, Jennifer; Ogg, Julia

    2010-01-01

    The multifaceted effect of chronic illness in children has created a need for pediatricians and school personnel, specifically school psychologists, to engage in collaborative problem solving. However, the extent to which this collaboration actually occurs in practice is unknown. A survey was developed and administered to a national sample of…

  18. Collaborative Strategic Planning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanaghan, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    This book outlines a simple, five-phase collaborative approach to strategic planning that has worked effectively on many campuses. Specifically, Collaborative Strategic Planning (CSP) refers to the disciplined and thoughtful process of meaningfully engaging relevant stakeholders in creating a shared future vision and goals for their institution.…

  19. Messy Collaboration: Learning from a Learning Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Bob; Walker, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Messy collaboration refers to complexity, unpredictability and management dilemmas when educators work together. Such messiness was evident in a Hong Kong English Learning Study, a structured cyclical process in which teachers and researcher-participants from a teacher education institution work collaboratively on effective student learning. This…

  20. Teacher Learning and Collaboration in Innovative Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meirink, Jacobiene A.; Imants, Jeroen; Meijer, Paulien C.; Verloop, Nico

    2010-01-01

    In this study the relationship between teacher learning and collaboration in innovative teams was explored. A comparative case study was conducted in five temporary teams in secondary schools. Several quantitative and qualitative data collection methods were used to examine collaboration, teacher learning, and the context for learning and…

  1. Common Ground. Feminist Collaboration in the Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Elizabeth G., Ed.; Mink, JoAnna Stephens, Ed.

    The fifteen articles in this anthology examine the process of collaboration as it fits into questions of gender. Articles include: "Educate, Organize, and Agitate: A Historical Overview of Feminist Collaboration in Great Britain and America, 1640-1930" (Melodie Andrews); "Beyond Feminism: An Intercultural Challenge for Transforming the Academy"…

  2. A Case Study of Online Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ling; Ku, Heng-Yu

    2006-01-01

    This case study investigated 12 graduate students' online collaborative experiences and attitudes in an instructional design course. The instructor divided students into 4 groups based on their academic backgrounds. Content analysis of asynchronous group discussion board messages was used to measure degrees of collaboration of each group in terms…

  3. Writing Collaboratively: Priority, Practice, and Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Darolyn; Jones, James W.; Murk, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Writing collaboratively is now widely practiced in many fields. Particularly in this advancing technological age, people find that it is not only practiced but also commonplace. However, the practice of writing collaboratively has not been widely researched, presented, or taught, and practitioners are often left to learn what works purely through…

  4. Collaborative Teacher Research: Learning with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisar, Sally Hood

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative case study explores how collaborative teacher research serves as a professional development model for practicing teachers. The purpose of the study is to examine how participation in a collaborative teacher research group affected three French teachers' understandings of one state's foreign language standards, and to look at how…

  5. Developing Collaborative Partnerships. Practice Application Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Collaboration has become a pervasive strategy for systemic change in human services, education, government, and community agencies. Collaborative partnerships require a change in thinking and in operating. Such changes can be intimidating or threatening. In addition, other barriers must be overcome to make partnerships work. Examples of successful…

  6. Collaborative Virtual Gaming Worlds in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitton, Nicola; Hollins, Paul

    2008-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use of virtual gaming worlds in education, supported by the increased use of multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) and massively multi-player online role-playing games (MMORPGs) for collaborative learning. However, this paper argues that collaborative gaming worlds have been in use much longer and are much wider…

  7. Examining Peer Collaboration in Online Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castek, Jill; Coiro, Julie; Guzniczak, Lizbeth; Bradshaw, Carlton

    2012-01-01

    This study examines peer collaboration among four pairs of seventh graders who read online to determine what caused the downfall of the Mayan civilization. More and less productive collaborative interactions are presented through snippets of dialogue in which pairs negotiated complex texts. Few examples of how teachers can skillfully facilitate…

  8. Cultures of Collaboration: Leveraging Classroom Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    A primary task of teachers is to promote the culture of collaboration in classrooms. That's because we are smarter together than we are alone. But for teachers to leverage the unique social capacity of classrooms, they need to understand how to create situations requiring and rewarding collaboration (like that of inquiry), how to structure groups,…

  9. Understanding Children's Collaborative Interactions in Shared Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Stacey D.; Mandryk, R. L.; Inkpen, K. M.

    2003-01-01

    Explores how various collaborative settings affect elementary school children's interactions with each other and with technology. Describes the development of co-located groupware systems offering support for concurrent, multi-user interactions around a shared display, which offer a collaborative environment in which users share both the physical…

  10. Collaborative Translations: Designing Bilingual Instructional Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyes, Christopher S.; Puzio, Kelly; Jiménez, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the role of collaboration and multilingual literacy as 21st-century skills, the authors used design research methods to present, analyze, and refine a strategic reading approach for bilingual students. The collaborative translation strategy involves reading an academic text, translating key passages, and evaluating these translations.…

  11. Administrators as Advocates for Teacher Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketterlin-Geller, Leanne R.; Baumer, Patricia; Lichon, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    This column contends that administrators are responsible for constructing a culture of collaboration in their schools and that ultimately, the facilitation of collaboration affects students' academic achievement. Within the context of a leadership scenario, this article outlines the need for, function of, and logistical implementation of…

  12. Collaborators' Attitudes about Differences of Opinion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creamer, Elizabeth G.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how long-term collaborators interpret substantive differences of opinion and the strategies they use to negotiate them. Long-term collaborators are coauthors who have had a working relationship for ten or more years. Differences of opinion refer to differences in interpretation about substantive issues related to research…

  13. Collaborating for Change: Building Partnerships among Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs-Richardson, Rita; Rivers, Eileen S.

    Building partnerships among teachers is essential to enhance student learning. The Richardson-Rivers Collaboration Model emphasizes the importance of relationship building and describes procedures for successful classroom collaboration among teachers. The model combines theoretical constructs based on the Johari window and Jung's personality…

  14. Hubble Exoplanet Pro/Am Collaboration (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, D. M.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) A collaborative effort is being organized between a world-wide network of amateur astronomers and a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) science team. The purpose of this collaboration is to supplement an HST near-infrared spectroscopy survey of some 15 exoplanets with ground-based observations in the visible range.

  15. Learning during a Collaborative Final Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlstrom, Orjan

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative testing has been suggested to serve as a good learning activity, for example, compared to individual testing. The aim of the present study was to measure learning at different levels of knowledge during a collaborative final exam in a course in basic methods and statistical procedures. Results on pre- and post-tests taken…

  16. Collaboration: From Analogue to Digital & Back.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Gerald; Jaeger, Numo

    Situated at a place where art meets collaboration and speaking to the 1999 InSEA World Congress's "Cultures and Transitions" theme, this paper tells a collaborative story that began as an "art-i-fax/art-e-post" project initiated via the Getty Center's educational Web site and has led to combined art projects and exhibitions across the globe. The…

  17. Training Synchronous Collaborative E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bliesener, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In order to promote cooperation among students who work separately on their computers at home, the University of Essen has developed training courses with experienced tutors to teach students the required sensitivity and practical skills for tele-collaboration in small groups. A core problem in synchronous collaborative e-learning with speech…

  18. Collaborative Problem Solving in Shared Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lin; Mills, Leila A.; Ifenthaler, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine collaborative problem solving in a shared virtual space. The main question asked was: How will the performance and processes differ between collaborative problem solvers and independent problem solvers over time? A total of 104 university students (63 female and 41 male) participated in an experimental…

  19. Forming a Collaborative Action Research Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platteel, Tamara; Hulshof, Hans; Ponte, Petra; van Driel, Jan; Verloop, Nico

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the complex nature of collaborative relationships, the difficulties of conducting research with others, and the complications of partnerships in educational research. To create and sustain a communicative space in which participants can collaborate to innovate education and curriculum, time and opportunity to develop trust…

  20. Modeling Collaboration for ESL Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DelliCarpini, Margo

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a semester-long project where a TESOL professor and English Education professor modeled collaborative teaching and explicitly taught collaboration skills to a coscheduled teaching methods class consisting of TESOL and Secondary English teacher candidates. Data were collected in the form of pre- and postsemester surveys. In…

  1. Consorting and Collaborating in the Education Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, David, Ed.; Husbands, Chris, Ed.

    This book describes one of the somewhat paradoxical consequences of the development of the education market place--the development of collaborative relations and infrastructures between competing institutions. Fourteen chapters written by participants in collaborative arrangements describe and analyze their responses to the market place and…

  2. Cross-System Collaboration: Tools That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoel, James L.

    This monograph reports on a collaborative initiative between Four Oaks, a private nonprofit family service agency in Iowa, and the Iowa Department of Human Services. The collaboration provided a series of community forums of local representatives to examine services available to delinquent youth and their families, to increase community awareness…

  3. Teaching Reading Comprehension through Collaborative Strategic Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Sharon; Klingner, Janette Kettman

    1999-01-01

    Provides an overview of collaborative strategic reading (CSR) as an approach to enhancing the reading-comprehension skills of students with learning disabilities. Procedures for implementing CSR with collaborative groups and techniques for teaching reading-comprehension skills are provided. The role of the teacher is described and sample teaching…

  4. Collaborative Learning: A Sourcebook for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, Anne S.; And Others

    This sourcebook contains nine papers on various aspects of collaborative learning for students with emphasis on college level instruction (though some material relevant to secondary elementary education is also included). Contributors address what collaborative learning is, how is it implemented, how to assess it, and where it is used. Each…

  5. Teacher Learning in Collaborative Curriculum Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voogt, J.; Westbroek, H.; Handelzalts, A.; Walraven, A.; McKenney, S.; Pieters, J.; de Vries, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Interconnected Model of Professional Growth (Clarke & Hollingsworth, 2002) was used to identify processes of teacher learning during the collaborative design of curriculum materials in the context of curriculum innovation. Nine published studies from six different countries about teachers' collaborative curriculum design were analyzed to…

  6. Collaborative Writing Support Tools on the Cloud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, R. A.; O'Rourke, S. T.; Jones, J.; Yacef, K.; Reimann, P.

    2011-01-01

    Academic writing, individual or collaborative, is an essential skill for today's graduates. Unfortunately, managing writing activities and providing feedback to students is very labor intensive and academics often opt out of including such learning experiences in their teaching. We describe the architecture for a new collaborative writing support…

  7. Collaboration by Design: Context, Structure, and Medium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiessen, Esther L.; Ward, Douglas R.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an instructional unit integrating three educational innovations: a problem-solving video (Adventures of Jasper Woodbury), a structure for collaborative learning, Fostering Communities of Learners (FCL), and Computer-Supported Intentional Learning Environments (CSILE). Argues that each innovation supports collaboration in a distinct way…

  8. Collaboration within Large Groups in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szewkis, Eyal; Nussbaum, Miguel; Rosen, Tal; Abalos, Jose; Denardin, Fernanda; Caballero, Daniela; Tagle, Arturo; Alcoholado, Cristian

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how a large group of students can work collaboratively in a synchronous way within the classroom using the cheapest possible technological support. Making use of the features of Single Display Groupware and of Multiple Mice we propose a computer-supported collaborative learning approach for big groups within…

  9. Peer Interaction in Three Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staarman, Judith Kleine; Krol, Karen; Meijden, Henny van der

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to gain insight into the occurrence of different types of peer interaction and particularly the types of interaction beneficial for learning in different collaborative learning environments. Based on theoretical notions related to collaborative learning and peer interaction, a coding scheme was developed to analyze the…

  10. Virtual Teaming: Faculty Collaboration in Online Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almjeld, Jen; Rybas, Natalia; Rybas, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This collaborative article chronicles the experiences of three faculty at three universities utilizing wiki technology to transform themselves and their students into a virtual team. Rooted in workplace approaches to distributed teaming, the project expands notions of classroom collaboration to include planning, administration, and assessment of a…

  11. Elearn: A Collaborative Educational Virtual Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michailidou, Anna; Economides, Anastasios A.

    Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) that support collaboration are one of the new technologies that have attracted great interest. VLEs are learning management software systems composed of computer-mediated communication software and online methods of delivering course material. This paper presents ELearn, a collaborative VLE for teaching…

  12. Using Web Tools, Collaborating, and Learning Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Karen L.; Cifuentes, Lauren

    2001-01-01

    Describes a case study of a graduate class that investigated how students learn and collaborate in a Web-based course designed according to the current social-constructivist conception of learning. Discusses independent and collaborative activities; how student learn to use technology; communication; student preferences; learner differences;…

  13. School-College Faculty Collaboratives: Academic Alliances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiani, Claire

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the Academic Alliances project and the collaboratives of faculty members who teach foreign languages and literature in universities, colleges, and schools in the United States which were a result of that project. Looks at what happens at meetings and how some groups are funded. Lists participating collaborative groups. (SED)

  14. The Call for Collaboration in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, Judith; Blanton, Linda

    2005-01-01

    As the number of students who are struggling in school grows, the need for general and special education to come together to create the vision and capacity to educate all students becomes more and more pronounced. Collaboration by teachers is called for in the schools, likewise, it is called for in teacher education. Collaboration between general…

  15. Accelerating Developmental Education: The Case for Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Hunter R.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the need for collaboration in developmental education and proposes two major ideas for consideration: (1) that educators need to re-conceptualize how they go about delivering developmental education; and (2) that they need to collaborate more fully with others in practicing it. The author notes that of almost…

  16. Using Wikis to Promote Collaborative EFL Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Zelilha; Yildiz, Senem

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the use of wikis in collaborative writing projects in foreign language learning classrooms. A total of 34 intermediate level university students learning English as a foreign language (EFL) were asked to accomplish three different wiki-based collaborative writing tasks, (argumentative, informative and decision-making) working…

  17. Collaborative Reasoning in China and Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Ting; Anderson, Richard C.; Kim, Il-Hee; Li, Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Students at two sites in China and one site in Korea engaged in Collaborative Reasoning, an approach to discussion that requires self-management, free participation, and critical thinking. The discontinuity between the usual adult-dominated discourse of Chinese and Korean homes and classrooms and the expected discourse of Collaborative Reasoning…

  18. Harnessing Collaborative Annotations on Online Formative Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jian-Wei; Lai, Yuan-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This paper harnesses collaborative annotations by students as learning feedback on online formative assessments to improve the learning achievements of students. Through the developed Web platform, students can conduct formative assessments, collaboratively annotate, and review historical records in a convenient way, while teachers can generate…

  19. What "Collaboration" Means: Ethnocultural Diversity's Impact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer-Bacon, Barbara J.; Brown, Sherlon

    This article examines the meaning of collaboration and the impact of ethnocultural diversity through a discussion of assumptions about how people work together, how knowledge is obtained, and how culture impacts assumptions and knowledge attainment. Following an introduction, section 2 on the meaning of collaboration examines various notions of…

  20. Collaborative Interaction for Improvement of Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Nancy E.

    1990-01-01

    Relationships are explored between elementary school teachers' (N=13) collaborative interactions and implementation of a complex instructional program ("Finding Out/Descubrimiento") in science and mathematics developed for bilingual classrooms. Findings revealed an association between frequency of teacher collaboration and quality of…

  1. Lessons Learned from the Collaborative Writing Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhavsar, Victoria; Ahn, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    We reflect on how to implement the instrumental aspect of collaborative writing in such a way that the developmental aspect of collaborative writing is maximally fostered, based on conditions necessary for socially constructed learning. We discuss four instrumental strategies that bolster mutual ownership of the writing and protect the social…

  2. Collaborative Instructional Strategies to Enhance Knowledge Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Darryl C.

    2015-01-01

    To promote knowledge convergence through collaborative learning activities in groups, this qualitative case study involved a layered approach for the design and delivery of a highly collaborative learning environment incorporating various instructional technologies grounded in learning theory. In a graduate-level instructional technology course,…

  3. Collaborative Elder Abuse Prevention Project Quarterly Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Garry L.

    The Texas Department of Human Services, in collaboration with 13 other public and private organizations, co-sponsored a statewide collaborative elder abuse prevention project, to prevent abuse of elderly and disabled adults. The goal of this project is to develop a comprehensive, long-range plan for the prevention of elder abuse, a method for…

  4. Collaboration using roles. [in computer network security

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Matt

    1990-01-01

    Segregation of roles into alternative accounts is a model which provides not only the ability to collaborate but also enables accurate accounting of resources consumed by collaborative projects, protects the resources and objects of such a project, and does not introduce new security vulnerabilities. The implementation presented here does not require users to remember additional passwords and provides a very simple consistent interface.

  5. Collaborative Job Training in Rural Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Gary Paul; Galetto, Valeria; Haines, Anna

    2003-01-01

    We examine collaborative efforts by employers to provide job training in rural areas and assess how this collaboration affects the willingness of employers to train workers. Data are drawn from a telephone survey conducted in 2001 of a stratified random sample of 1,590 nonmetropolitan firms in the U.S. The literature on job training suggests that…

  6. Practices and Strategies of Distributed Knowledge Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudaravalli, Srinivas

    2010-01-01

    Information Technology is enabling large-scale, distributed collaboration across many different kinds of boundaries. Researchers have used the label new organizational forms to describe such collaborations and suggested that they are better able to meet the demands of flexibility, speed and adaptability that characterize the knowledge economy.…

  7. Different Futures of Adaptive Collaborative Learning Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummel, Nikol; Walker, Erin; Aleven, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    In this position paper we contrast a Dystopian view of the future of adaptive collaborative learning support (ACLS) with a Utopian scenario that--due to better-designed technology, grounded in research--avoids the pitfalls of the Dystopian version and paints a positive picture of the practice of computer-supported collaborative learning 25 years…

  8. 5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Continuing collaboration. 9701.105 Section 9701.105 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a)...

  9. Collaborative Strategic Planning: Myth or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbugua, Flora; Rarieya, Jane F. A.

    2014-01-01

    The concept and practice of strategic planning, while entrenched in educational institutions in the West, is just catching on in Kenya. While literature emphasizes the importance of collaborative strategic planning, it does not indicate the challenges presented by collaboratively engaging in strategic planning. This article reports on findings of…

  10. Accountability for Project-Based Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamal, Abu-Hussain; Essawi, Mohammad; Tilchin, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    One perspective model for the creation of the learning environment and engendering students' thinking development is the Project-Based Collaborative Learning (PBCL) model. This model organizes learning by collaborative performance of various projects. In this paper we describe an approach to enhancing the PBCL model through the creation of…

  11. Leading Deep Conversations in Collaborative Inquiry Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Tamara Holmlund; Deuel, Angie; Slavit, David; Kennedy, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative inquiry groups, such as professional learning communities and lesson study groups, are proliferating in schools across the United States. In whatever form, the potential for impacting student learning through this collaborative work is expanded or limited by the nature of teachers' conversations. Polite, congenial conversations…

  12. Measuring Heedful Interrelating in Collaborative Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Sarah R.; Jordan, Michelle E.

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative group work plays an important part in postsecondary education, and the ability to assess the quality of such group work is useful for both students and instructors. The purpose of this study was to develop a self-report measure of students' perceptions of the quality of their interactions during collaborative educational tasks.…

  13. Teaching Primary & Secondary Sources: An Earthshaking Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Does history have to be boring and dry? Not if a person takes the familiar and adds an earthshaking twist! To begin the collaborative process, work with a willing teacher. This article talks about a teaching collaboration between the author as a library media specialist and Beth who was interested in literature circle titles for her 6th grade…

  14. School University Collaboration: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Robert; And Others

    A case study of school-university collaboration between Starkville School District (Mississippi) and Mississippi State University (MSU) explored the process of collaboration and the ingredients for successful implementation. MSU offered grant opportunities for university faculty to work with local school district personnel. Starkville School…

  15. Preparing Secondary Special Educators: Four Collaborative Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Kate D.; Carpenter, Laura Bowden; Dyal, Allen; Austin, Sheila; Shumack, Kellie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to share the results of multiphase initiatives funded by four separate grants. The projects were designed to improve and enhance collaborative teaching at the secondary level. Each project provided opportunities for increased collaboration between special education faculty, secondary education faculty, and…

  16. Using Communication to Solve Roadblocks to Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzzeo, Toni

    2004-01-01

    Despite the mandate of our national professional organizations to teach collaboratively, and the well-documented wisdom of doing so, roadblocks frequently litter the path to collaborative practice. Most teacher-librarians have encountered several; some still struggle daily. Suggestions offered in this article include: start by talking to teachers;…

  17. June 1992 Hall B collaboration meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Lawrence

    1992-06-01

    The Hall B collaboration meeting at the CEBAF 1992 Summer Workshop consisted of technical and physics working group meetings, a special beam line devices working group meeting the first meeting of the membership committee, a technical representatives meeting and a full collaboration meeting. Highlights of these meetings are presented in this report.

  18. Family Assessment and Collaboration Building: Conjoined Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beverly, Cheryl L.; Thomas, Suzanne B.

    1999-01-01

    Presents information to facilitate ideal family involvement in early intervention. Strategies for conducting family assessments while building collaborative partnerships with families are presented. Characteristics which produce effective collaborative partnerships are reviewed, and the reality of working with families is presented through two…

  19. Writing Together: An Arendtian Framework for Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Restaino, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This essay considers the long-standing challenges, in both practice and theory, to collaborative writing in the first-year classroom. I argue that Hannah Arendt's concepts of plurality and natality are useful frameworks for thinking constructively and practically about teaching argumentative writing through collaboration. I explore these…

  20. Chemistry and Writing: A Collaborative Writing Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Todd M.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a collaborative writing project at Adrian College in Michigan. Students in a general chemistry class collaborated with those from a freshman writing course; the intention was to have students combine their talents to improve their ability to express scientific ideas in a clear and accurate manner. Discusses student reactions and…

  1. The correct renal function evaluation in patients with thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Simeoni, Mariadelina; Cerantonio, Annamaria; Pastore, Ida; Liguori, Rossella; Greco, Marta; Foti, Daniela; Gulletta, Elio; Brunetti, Antonio; Fuiano, Giorgio

    2016-05-01

    Thyroid dysfunction induces several renal derangements involving all nephron portions. Furthermore, dysthyroidism is a recognized risk factor associated with the development of chronic kidney disease. Current data, in fact, demonstrate that either subclinical or overt thyroid disease is associated with significant changes in creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, measured glomerular filtration rate and Cystatin C. Herein, we systematically reviewed several relevant studies aiming at the identification of the most sensitive and specific parameter for the correct renal function evaluation in patients with thyroid dysfunction, that are usually treated as outpatients. Our systematic review indicates that estimated glomerular filtration rate, preferably with CKD-EPI equation, appears to be the most reliable and wieldy renal function parameter. Instead, Cystatin C should be better used in the grading of thyroid dysfunction severity. PMID:26511999

  2. Collaborative Graphic Rendering for Improving Visual Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoxin; Pei, Guodong

    Handheld devices such as UMPC, though convenient, bear weakness of size constraint for display. To mitigate such a problem and enhance user experience for owners of small devices, in this paper we design a collaborative rendering platform. When running game graphic applications at a handheld, the generated OpenGL graphic commands are intercepted and then delivered to a device with a larger display. The graphics are rendered and displayed at that device. The performance of the collaborative rendering platform is determined by graphic computing resources and network bandwidth. Analysis and simulation prove that other than providing a better display, the collaborative system can improve game experience also by increasing frame rates. In particular, at a low computing cost, a further collaboration between GPUs of collaborators can improve frame rate by eliminating the negative impact from network delay on applications that require GPU feedback.

  3. Interprofessional collaboration: if not now, when?

    PubMed

    Fried, Jackie

    2013-01-01

    Interprofessional collaboration (IPC) is a driving force behind state-of-the art health care delivery. Health care experts, governmental bodies, health professions organizations and academicians support the need for collaborative models. Dental hygienists possess unique qualities that can enhance a collaborative team. As preventive therapists, health educators and holistic providers, they are positioned to contribute richly and meaningfully to team models. Health care reform, overwhelming oral health needs and growing associations between oral and systemic wellness add to the dental hygienist's relevance in collaborative arrangements. Dental hygiene clinical and educational models that speak to collaboration are operational in many U.S. states and the future bodes well for their continued growth. PMID:24046341

  4. The QuarkNet Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzberger, A.

    2003-12-01

    QuarkNet is a long-term high school education project, supported by NSF and DOE and carried out by a collaboration of university and laboratory research groups. These research groups are part of major international particle physics experiments, including those at CERN in Switzerland, Fermilab in Illinois, and SLAC in California. Goals and Objectives: A major goal is to engage students and teachers in authentic scientific research; they gain a first-hand understanding of research and its application in the inquiry method of learning. Teachers enhance their content knowledge, increase their abilities to solve science-related problems, engage students in scientific inquiry, and develop responsibility for their own professional development. Students learn fundamental physics and are motivated by current research questions as they analyze real data. A second goal is to engage particle physicists with current issues in science education, including their understanding of the National Science Education Standards and local science education needs and what constitutes age-appropriate content. Project Design: Working with physicists nationwide, we have established a project framework with three program areas-teacher research experience, teacher development programs, and online resources and inquiry-based activities. Eight-week research appointments allow teachers to experience scientific research first-hand. In teacher institutes the next summer these teachers and scientists lead a group of teachers through a short research scenario lasting two to three weeks and assist them in creating similar scenarios for their students. When fully implemented QuarkNet will support centers associated with 60 particle physics research groups at universities and laboratories in the U. S. The QuarkNet website provides: - Experimental data for use in inquiry-based activities. - Opportunities for communication and collaboration among physicists, teachers and students. - A place for students to

  5. Collaborative PLM - The Next Generation AKA Cars on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderstrom, Tom; Stefanini, Mike

    2007-01-01

    In this slide presentation the importance of collaboration in developing the next systems for space exploration is stressed. The mechanism of this collaboration are reviewed, and particular emphasis is given to our planned exploration of Mars and how this will require a great deal of collaboration. A system architecture for this collaboration is shown and the diagram for the collaborative environment is conceptualized.

  6. Levels of Collaboration: Where Does Your Work Fit In?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcoux, Betty L.

    2007-01-01

    To collaborate is to share--to collaborate at different levels is to share the responsibility for learning with more and more input. In this article, the author lists the academic areas enhanced by collaboration; the characteristics of collaboration behaviors between educators; and the six elements of successful collaboration. She briefly…

  7. Collaboration, for Better or Worse--Part 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Carla M.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of three Smithsonian Institution seminars on collaboration in the arts, the sciences, and the humanities and social sciences. Topics discussed include the practice and purpose of collaboration in general, models of collaboration, motives for collaborating, and results of collaboration versus individual efforts. (four…

  8. Collaboration: Working Together To Support Families. Program Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padak, Nancy; Sapin, Connie

    This paper discusses collaboration as a process that can be used to support adult learners and families. The article distinguishes between collaboration, coordination, and cooperation; suggests ways to find collaborators; lists factors that promote or hinder collaboration; and provides guidelines for working with collaborators. A section on how to…

  9. Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  10. Multicenter breast cancer collaborative registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product.The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  11. Stereoscopic medical imaging collaboration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Fumio; Hirano, Takenori; Nakabayasi, Yuusuke; Minoura, Hirohito; Tsuruoka, Shinji

    2007-02-01

    The computerization of the clinical record and the realization of the multimedia have brought improvement of the medical service in medical facilities. It is very important for the patients to obtain comprehensible informed consent. Therefore, the doctor should plainly explain the purpose and the content of the diagnoses and treatments for the patient. We propose and design a Telemedicine Imaging Collaboration System which presents a three dimensional medical image as X-ray CT, MRI with stereoscopic image by using virtual common information space and operating the image from a remote location. This system is composed of two personal computers, two 15 inches stereoscopic parallax barrier type LCD display (LL-151D, Sharp), one 1Gbps router and 1000base LAN cables. The software is composed of a DICOM format data transfer program, an operation program of the images, the communication program between two personal computers and a real time rendering program. Two identical images of 512×768 pixcels are displayed on two stereoscopic LCD display, and both images show an expansion, reduction by mouse operation. This system can offer a comprehensible three-dimensional image of the diseased part. Therefore, the doctor and the patient can easily understand it, depending on their needs.

  12. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  13. Building a global teledermatology collaboration.

    PubMed

    Bobbs, Melanie; Bayer, Michelle; Frazer, Tifany; Humphrey, Stephen; Wilson, Barbara; Olasz, Edit; Holland, Kristen; Kuzminski, Jacquelyn

    2016-04-01

    Skin disease is common in low-resource countries and is associated with significant morbidity. The disease burden is often heightened by lack of access to adequate diagnosis and treatment. Teledermatology is a growing healthcare delivery modality that allows access to subspecialty care at a distance. This article describes how a low-cost teledermatology program was launched through collaboration between the Medical College of Wisconsin and Hillside Healthcare International. Several factors are required for a teledermatology program to be successful, beginning with a partnership between two entities that targets a locally identified need and is mutually beneficial to invested partners. The program should utilize the expertise of each partner, be based on an agreed upon process with clearly defined objectives, and protect patient privacy. After a program is implemented, adaptation to address challenges and best meet the needs of all parties involved will allow for continued success and sustainability. This process can serve as a model for other programs desiring to establish similar teledermatology partnerships in an academic setting. PMID:26873427

  14. Collaboration in Complex Medical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, Yan; Mankenzie, Colin F.

    1998-01-01

    Improving our understanding of collaborative work in complex environments has the potential for developing effective supporting technologies, personnel training paradigms, and design principles for multi-crew workplaces. USing a sophisticated audio-video-data acquisition system and a corresponding analysis system, the researchers at University of Maryland have been able to study in detail team performance during real trauma patient resuscitation. The first study reported here was on coordination mechanisms and on characteristics of coordination breakdowns. One of the key findings was that implicit communications were an important coordination mechanism (e.g. through the use of shared workspace and event space). The second study was on the sources of uncertainty during resuscitation. Although incoming trauma patients' status is inherently uncertain, the findings suggest that much of the uncertainty felt by care providers was related to communication and coordination. These two studies demonstrate the value of and need for creating a real-life laboratory for studying team performance with the use of comprehensive and integrated data acquisition and analysis tools.

  15. Collaborative Planning of Robotic Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Backes, Paul; Powell, Mark; Vona, Marsette; Steinke, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The Science Activity Planner (SAP) software system includes an uplink-planning component, which enables collaborative planning of activities to be undertaken by an exploratory robot on a remote planet or on Earth. Included in the uplink-planning component is the SAP-Uplink Browser, which enables users to load multiple spacecraft activity plans into a single window, compare them, and merge them. The uplink-planning component includes a subcomponent that implements the Rover Markup Language Activity Planning format (RML-AP), based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML) format that enables the representation, within a single document, of planned spacecraft and robotic activities together with the scientific reasons for the activities. Each such document is highly parseable and can be validated easily. Another subcomponent of the uplink-planning component is the Activity Dictionary Markup Language (ADML), which eliminates the need for two mission activity dictionaries - one in a human-readable format and one in a machine-readable format. Style sheets that have been developed along with the ADML format enable users to edit one dictionary in a user-friendly environment without compromising

  16. Collaborative Behavioral Teratology Study: results.

    PubMed

    Buelke-Sam, J; Kimmel, C A; Adams, J; Nelson, C J; Vorhees, C V; Wright, D C; St Omer, V; Korol, B A; Butcher, R E; Geyer, M A

    1985-01-01

    Behavioral measures used in the Collaborative Behavioral Teratology Study (CBTS) were negative geotaxis (PNDs 7-10), olfactory discrimination (PNDs 9-11), auditory startle habituation (PNDs 18-19 and 57-58), 1-hr activity (PNDs 21, 60, 100 and 120), 23-hr activity (PND 100), activity following a pharmacological challenge (PND 120), and an operant, discrete trial visual discrimination task. Maternal and offspring body weights and the appearance of certain physical landmarks of development were also monitored. The design of the CBTS allowed evaluation of the reproducibility and detection sensitivity of these behavioral test methods, as well as the impact of early testing experience on later behavioral assessment, offspring sex differences in response levels and variability, and the contribution of litter-to-litter and animal-to-animal variation to behavioral measures in a standardized test protocol. The results obtained in this test system are discussed in relation to each of these factors and to the degree of overt toxicity obtained using prenatal treatment with 0, 0.5 or 2.0 mg/kg d-amphetamine sulfate, SC, on gestation days 12-15 (Study 1) or methylmercuric chloride, 0, 2.0 or 6.0 mg/kg by gavage, on gestation days 6-9 (Study 2). PMID:3835454

  17. Uncertainty of empirical correlation equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistel, R.; Lovell-Smith, J. W.; Saunders, P.; Seitz, S.

    2016-08-01

    The International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS) has published a set of empirical reference equations of state, forming the basis of the 2010 Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater (TEOS-10), from which all thermodynamic properties of seawater, ice, and humid air can be derived in a thermodynamically consistent manner. For each of the equations of state, the parameters have been found by simultaneously fitting equations for a range of different derived quantities using large sets of measurements of these quantities. In some cases, uncertainties in these fitted equations have been assigned based on the uncertainties of the measurement results. However, because uncertainties in the parameter values have not been determined, it is not possible to estimate the uncertainty in many of the useful quantities that can be calculated using the parameters. In this paper we demonstrate how the method of generalised least squares (GLS), in which the covariance of the input data is propagated into the values calculated by the fitted equation, and in particular into the covariance matrix of the fitted parameters, can be applied to one of the TEOS-10 equations of state, namely IAPWS-95 for fluid pure water. Using the calculated parameter covariance matrix, we provide some preliminary estimates of the uncertainties in derived quantities, namely the second and third virial coefficients for water. We recommend further investigation of the GLS method for use as a standard method for calculating and propagating the uncertainties of values computed from empirical equations.

  18. Graphical Solution of Polynomial Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grishin, Anatole

    2009-01-01

    Graphing utilities, such as the ubiquitous graphing calculator, are often used in finding the approximate real roots of polynomial equations. In this paper the author offers a simple graphing technique that allows one to find all solutions of a polynomial equation (1) of arbitrary degree; (2) with real or complex coefficients; and (3) possessing…

  19. Drug Levels and Difference Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    American university offers a course in finite mathematics whose focus is difference equation with emphasis on real world applications. The conclusion states that students learned to look for growth and decay patterns in raw data, to recognize both arithmetic and geometric growth, and to model both scenarios with graphs and difference equations.

  20. Generalized Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Skrondal, Anders; Pickles, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A unifying framework for generalized multilevel structural equation modeling is introduced. The models in the framework, called generalized linear latent and mixed models (GLLAMM), combine features of generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) and structural equation models (SEM) and consist of a response model and a structural model for the latent…

  1. Complete solution of Boolean equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapia, M. A.; Tucker, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    A method is presented for generating a single formula involving arbitary Boolean parameters, which includes in it each and every possible solution of a system of Boolean equations. An alternate condition equivalent to a known necessary and sufficient condition for solving a system of Boolean equations is given.

  2. Students' Understanding of Quadratic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López, Jonathan; Robles, Izraim; Martínez-Planell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Action-Process-Object-Schema theory (APOS) was applied to study student understanding of quadratic equations in one variable. This required proposing a detailed conjecture (called a genetic decomposition) of mental constructions students may do to understand quadratic equations. The genetic decomposition which was proposed can contribute to help…

  3. The Equations of Oceanic Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Modeling and prediction of oceanographic phenomena and climate is based on the integration of dynamic equations. The Equations of Oceanic Motions derives and systematically classifies the most common dynamic equations used in physical oceanography, from large scale thermohaline circulations to those governing small scale motions and turbulence. After establishing the basic dynamical equations that describe all oceanic motions, M|ller then derives approximate equations, emphasizing the assumptions made and physical processes eliminated. He distinguishes between geometric, thermodynamic and dynamic approximations and between the acoustic, gravity, vortical and temperature-salinity modes of motion. Basic concepts and formulae of equilibrium thermodynamics, vector and tensor calculus, curvilinear coordinate systems, and the kinematics of fluid motion and wave propagation are covered in appendices. Providing the basic theoretical background for graduate students and researchers of physical oceanography and climate science, this book will serve as both a comprehensive text and an essential reference.

  4. The more you remember the more you decide: collaborative memory in adolescents with intellectual disability and their assistants.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Henrik; Dahlström, Orjan; Andersson, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate collaborative memory in adolescents with intellectual disabilities when collaborating with an assistant, and also the extent to which decisiveness is related to individual memory performance. Nineteen students with intellectual disabilities (mean age=18.5, SD=0.9) each collaborated with a teaching assistant (mean age 40.3, SD=12.1) familiar from everyday work in school. Pictures were presented individually. Recognition was performed in two parts, first individually and thereafter collaboratively. The design involved 2 settings, one natural (with equal encoding time) and another with equal individual memory performance (assistants had shorter encoding time than the students). Results showed collaborative inhibition in this previously uninvestigated collaboration setting with adolescents with intellectual disabilities and their assistants. The assistants both performed higher and decided more than the students with intellectual disabilities in the natural setting, but not in the equated performance setting. Inhibition was larger in the equated setting. The assistants' decisiveness was moderately correlated with individual memory performance. Implications for everyday life are discussed. PMID:21269804

  5. Collaborative Tracking of Image Features Based on Projective Invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jinwei

    -mode sensors for improving the flexibility and robustness of the system. From the experimental results during three field tests for the LASOIS system, we observed that most of the errors in the image processing algorithm are caused by the incorrect feature tracking. This dissertation addresses the feature tracking problem in image sequences acquired from cameras. Despite many alternatives to feature tracking problem, iterative least squares solution solving the optical flow equation has been the most popular approach used by many in the field. This dissertation attempts to leverage the former efforts to enhance feature tracking methods by introducing a view geometric constraint to the tracking problem, which provides collaboration among features. In contrast to alternative geometry based methods, the proposed approach provides an online solution to optical flow estimation in a collaborative fashion by exploiting Horn and Schunck flow estimation regularized by view geometric constraints. Proposed collaborative tracker estimates the motion of a feature based on the geometry of the scene and how the other features are moving. Alternative to this approach, a new closed form solution to tracking that combines the image appearance with the view geometry is also introduced. We particularly use invariants in the projective coordinates and conjecture that the traditional appearance solution can be significantly improved using view geometry. The geometric constraint is introduced by defining a new optical flow equation which exploits the scene geometry from a set drawn from tracked features. At the end of each tracking loop the quality of the tracked features is judged using both appearance similarity and geometric consistency. Our experiments demonstrate robust tracking performance even when the features are occluded or they undergo appearance changes due to projective deformation of the template. The proposed collaborative tracking method is also tested in the visual navigation

  6. ARTEMIS: a collaborative framework for health care.

    PubMed

    Reddy, R; Jagannathan, V; Srinivas, K; Karinthi, R; Reddy, S M; Gollapudy, C; Friedman, S

    1993-01-01

    Patient centered healthcare delivery is an inherently collaborative process. This involves a wide range of individuals and organizations with diverse perspectives: primary care physicians, hospital administrators, labs, clinics, and insurance. The key to cost reduction and quality improvement in health care is effective management of this collaborative process. The use of multi-media collaboration technology can facilitate timely delivery of patient care and reduce cost at the same time. During the last five years, the Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC), under the sponsorship of DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, recently renamed ARPA) developed a number of generic key subsystems of a comprehensive collaboration environment. These subsystems are intended to overcome the barriers that inhibit the collaborative process. Three subsystems developed under this program include: MONET (Meeting On the Net)--to provide consultation over a computer network, ISS (Information Sharing Server)--to provide access to multi-media information, and PCB (Project Coordination Board)--to better coordinate focussed activities. These systems have been integrated into an open environment to enable collaborative processes. This environment is being used to create a wide-area (geographically distributed) research testbed under DARPA sponsorship, ARTEMIS (Advance Research Testbed for Medical Informatics) to explore the collaborative health care processes. We believe this technology will play a key role in the current national thrust to reengineer the present health-care delivery system. PMID:8130536

  7. Benchmarking and testing the "Sea Level Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, G.; Barletta, V. R.; Klemann, V.; van der Wal, W.; James, T. S.; Simon, K.; Riva, R. E. M.; Martinec, Z.; Gasperini, P.; Lund, B.; Wolf, D.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.; King, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    The study of the process of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) and of the consequent sea level variations is gaining an increasingly important role within the geophysical community. Understanding the response of the Earth to the waxing and waning ice sheets is crucial in various contexts, ranging from the interpretation of modern satellite geodetic measurements to the projections of future sea level trends in response to climate change. All the processes accompanying GIA can be described solving the so-called Sea Level Equation (SLE), an integral equation that accounts for the interactions between the ice sheets, the solid Earth, and the oceans. Modern approaches to the SLE are based on various techniques that range from purely analytical formulations to fully numerical methods. Despite various teams independently investigating GIA, we do not have a suitably large set of agreed numerical results through which the methods may be validated. Following the example of the mantle convection community and our recent successful Benchmark for Post Glacial Rebound codes (Spada et al., 2011, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2011.04952.x), here we present the results of a benchmark study of independently developed codes designed to solve the SLE. This study has taken place within a collaboration facilitated through the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action ES0701. The tests involve predictions of past and current sea level variations, and 3D deformations of the Earth surface. In spite of the signi?cant differences in the numerical methods employed, the test computations performed so far show a satisfactory agreement between the results provided by the participants. The differences found, which can be often attributed to the different numerical algorithms employed within the community, help to constrain the intrinsic errors in model predictions. These are of fundamental importance for a correct interpretation of the geodetic variations observed today, and

  8. Chronic kidney disease and automatic reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rate: new developments and revised recommendations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David W; Jones, Graham R D; Mathew, Timothy H; Ludlow, Marie J; Doogue, Matthew P; Jose, Matthew D; Langham, Robyn G; Lawton, Paul D; McTaggart, Steven J; Peake, Michael J; Polkinghorne, Kevan; Usherwood, Tim

    2012-08-20

    The publication of the Australasian Creatinine Consensus Working Group's position statements in 2005 and 2007 resulted in automatic reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) with requests for serum creatinine concentration in adults, facilitated the unification of units of measurement for creatinine and eGFR, and promoted the standardisation of assays. New advancements and continuing debate led the Australasian Creatinine Consensus Working Group to reconvene in 2010. The working group recommends that the method of calculating eGFR should be changed to the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) formula, and that all laboratories should report eGFR values as a precise figure to at least 90 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Age-related decision points for eGFR in adults are not recommended, as although an eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) is very common in older people, it is nevertheless predictive of significantly increased risks of adverse clinical outcomes, and should not be considered a normal part of ageing.If using eGFR for drug dosing, body size should be considered, in addition to referring to the approved product information. For drugs with a narrow therapeutic index, therapeutic drug monitoring or a valid marker of drug effect should be used to individualise dosing. The CKD-EPI formula has been validated as a tool to estimate GFR in some populations of non-European ancestry living in Western countries. Pending publication of validation studies, the working group also recommends that Australasian laboratories continue to automatically report eGFR in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The working group concluded that routine calculation of eGFR is not recommended in children and youth, or in pregnant women. Serum creatinine concentration (preferably using an enzymatic assay for paediatric patients) should remain as the standard test for kidney function in these populations. PMID:22900871

  9. Renal Dysfunction during Tenofovir Use in a Regional Cohort of HIV-Infected Individuals in the Asia-Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Tanuma, Junko; Jiamsakul, Awachana; Makane, Abhimanyu; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Ng, Oon Tek; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Pham, Thuy Thanh; Lee, Man Po; Ditangco, Rossana; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Choi, Jun Yong; Wong, Wing Wai; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Yunihastuti, Evy; Sim, Benedict LH; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Kantipong, Pacharee; Zhang, Fujie; Mustafa, Mahiran; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Pujari, Sanjay; Sohn, Annette H.

    2016-01-01

    Background In resource-limited settings, routine monitoring of renal function during antiretroviral therapy (ART) has not been recommended. However, concerns for tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-related nephrotoxicity persist with increased use. Methods We investigated serum creatinine (S-Cr) monitoring rates before and during ART and the incidence and prevalence of renal dysfunction after starting TDF by using data from a regional cohort of HIV-infected individuals in the Asia-Pacific. Time to renal dysfunction was defined as time from TDF initiation to the decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to <60 ml/min/1.73m2 with >30% reduction from baseline using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation or the decision to stop TDF for reported TDF-nephrotoxicity. Predictors of S-Cr monitoring rates were assessed by Poisson regression and risk factors for developing renal dysfunction were assessed by Cox regression. Results Among 2,425 patients who received TDF, S-Cr monitoring rates increased from 1.01 to 1.84 per person per year after starting TDF (incidence rate ratio 1.68, 95%CI 1.62–1.74, p <0.001). Renal dysfunction on TDF occurred in 103 patients over 5,368 person-years of TDF use (4.2%; incidence 1.75 per 100 person-years). Risk factors for developing renal dysfunction included older age (>50 vs. ≤30, hazard ratio [HR] 5.39, 95%CI 2.52–11.50, p <0.001; and using PI-based regimen (HR 1.93, 95%CI 1.22–3.07, p = 0.005). Having an eGFR prior to TDF (pre-TDF eGFR) of ≥60 ml/min/1.73m2 showed a protective effect (HR 0.38, 95%CI, 0.17–0.85, p = 0.018). Conclusions Renal dysfunction on commencing TDF use was not common, however, older age, lower baseline eGFR and PI-based ART were associated with higher risk of renal dysfunction during TDF use in adult HIV-infected individuals in the Asia-Pacific region. PMID:27560968

  10. High prevalence of signs of renal damage despite normal renal function in a cohort of HIV-infected patients: evaluation of associated factors.

    PubMed

    Bonjoch, Anna; Juega, Javier; Puig, Jordi; Pérez-Alvarez, Nuria; Aiestarán, Aintzane; Echeverría, Patricia; Pérez, Vanessa; Clotet, Bonaventura; Romero, Ramon; Bonet, Josep; Negredo, Eugenia

    2014-10-01

    Renal disorders are an emerging problem in HIV-infected patients. We performed a cross-sectional study of the first 1000 HIV-infected patients attended at our HIV unit who agreed to participate. We determined the frequency of renal alterations and its related risk factors. Summary statistics and logistic regression were applied. The study sample comprised 970 patients with complete data. Most were white (94%) and men (76%). Median (IQR) age was 48 (42-53) years. Hypertension was diagnosed in 19%, dyslipidemia in 27%, and diabetes mellitus in 3%. According to the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD EPI) equation, 29 patients (3%) had an eGFR<60 ml/min/1.73 m(2); 18 of them (62%) presented altered albumin/creatinine and protein/creatinine (UPC or UAC) ratios. Of the patients with eGFR>60 mL/min, it was present in 293 (30%), 38 of whom (7.1%) had UPC>300 mg/g. Increased risk of renal abnormalities was correlated with hypertension (OR, 1.821 [95%CI, 1.292;2.564]; p=0.001), age (OR, 1.015 [95%CI, 1.001;1.030], per one year; p=0.040), and use of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) plus protease inhibitor (PI), (OR, 1.401 [95%CI, 1.078;1.821]; p=0.012). Current CD4 cell count was a protective factor (OR, 0.9995 [95%CI, 0.9991;0.9999], per one cell; p=0.035). A considerable proportion of patients presented altered UPC or UAC ratios, despite having an eGFR>60 mL/min. CD4 cell count was a protective factor; age, hypertension, and use of TDF plus PIs were risk factors for renal abnormalities. Based on our results, screen of renal abnormalities should be considered in all HIV-infected patients to detect these alterations early. PMID:25238104

  11. Global Collaborations - Prospects and Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Ian

    2005-04-01

    International collaboration has long been a feature of science. Collaborative investments in joint facilities and projects have grown considerably over the past 20-40 years, and many projects have been multinational from the start. This has been particularly true in Europe, where intergovernmental organizations such as CERN, ESA, and ESO have enabled European countries to carry out forefront science with state-of-art facilites which would have been beyond the capabilities of any one country. A brief survey of these organizations, their structure, and the possible reasons behind their success is given. The transition from regional to global creates new problems. Global scale projects face a range of generic issues which must be addressed and overcome if the project is to be a success. Each project has its own specific boundary conditions and each adopts an approach best fitted to its own objectives and constraints. Experience with billion dollar projects such as the SSC, LHC, and ITER shows the key problem areas and demonstrates the importance of preparatory work in the early stages to settle issues such as schedule, funding, location, legal and managerial structure, and oversight. A range of current and proposed intercontinental or global projects - so- called ``Megascience Projects" - is reviewed. Such projects, originally a feature of space and particle physics, are now becoming more common, and very large projects in astronomy, for example ALMA and 50 - 100m telescopes, and other areas of physics now fall into the `global' category. These projects are on such a large scale, from any scientific, managerial, financial or political perspective, and have such global importance, that they have necessarily been conceived as international from the outset. Increasing financial pressures on governments and funding agencies in the developed countries place additional demands on the project planning. The contrasting approaches, problems faced, and progress made in various

  12. The Influence of Learning Methods on Collaboration: Prior Repeated Retrieval Enhances Retrieval Organization, Abolishes Collaborative Inhibition, and Promotes Post-Collaborative Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congleton, Adam R.; Rajaram, Suparna

    2011-01-01

    Research on collaborative memory has unveiled the counterintuitive yet robust phenomenon that collaboration impairs group recall. A candidate explanation for this "collaborative inhibition" effect is the disruption of people's idiosyncratic retrieval strategies during collaboration, and it is hypothesized that employing methods that improve one's…

  13. NASA/DERA Collaborative Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitefield, Phillip D.; Hagen, Donald E.; Wormhoudt, Jody C.; Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Brundish, Kevin; Wilson, Christopher W.; Wey, Chowen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report is an interim report. The work reported are the results from the combustor testing, the first phase of testing in the DERA/NASA collaborative program. A program of work was developed by DERA and NASA utilizing specialist facilities within the UK, and specialist measurement techniques developed within the U.S. Under a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the UK and U.S. governments, the joint UK/U.S. funded program commenced. The objective of the program was to make combustor and engine exit plane emissions measurements, including particulate and sulphur measurements, for kerosene fuels with different sulphur levels. The combustor test program was performed in August/September 2000. Although probe issues complicated the test program, a consistent set of data, including CO, NO(x), NO, NO2, CO2, O2, smoke number, particulate number density and size distribution, SO2, SO3 and HONO were collected at the exit plane of the DERA TRACE engine combustor. A second probe was utilized to measure spatial location of CO, NO(x), NO, NO2 and CO2 concentrations. Data are therefore available for development of aerosol, particulate and aerosol precursor chemistry sub-models for inclusion into CFD. Inlet boundary conditions have been derived at the exit of the combustion system for the modelling of the DERA TRACE engine. The second phase of the program is to perform identical measurements at the engine exit, to allow a full data set to be available. This will be performed in July 2001 at the Glenn test facility, DERA Pyestock.

  14. Experiential Collaborative Learning and Preferential Thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpentesta, Antonio P.; Ammirato, Salvatore; Sofo, Francesco

    The paper presents a Project-Based Learning (shortly, PBL) approach in a collaborative educational environment aimed to develop design ability and creativity of students coming from different engineering disciplines. Three collaborative learning experiences in product design were conducted in order to study their impact on preferred thinking styles of students. Using a thinking style inventory, pre- and post-survey data was collected and successively analyzed through ANOVA techniques. Statistically significant results showed students successfully developed empathy and an openness to multiple perspectives. Furthermore, data analysis confirms that the proposed collaborative learning experience positively contributes to increase awareness in students' thinking styles.

  15. Student Collaborative Networks and Academic Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, David; Bridgeman, Ariel; Kohl, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Undergraduate physics students commonly collaborate with one another on homework assignments, especially in more challenging courses. However, there currently exists a dearth of empirical research directly comparing the structure of students' collaborative networks to their academic performances in lower and upper division physics courses. We investigate such networks and associated performances through a mandated collaboration reporting system in two sophomore level and three junior level physics courses during the Fall 2012 and Spring 2013 semesters. We employ social network analysis to quantify the structure and time evolution of networks involving approximately 140 students. Analysis includes analytical and numerical assignments in addition to homework and exam scores. Preliminary results are discussed.

  16. An evaluation of collaboration in environmental education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peticolas, Alison Brice

    This study examines the role collaboration can play in addressing current challenges and limitations in environmental education. The research literature suggests that one needed strategy in improving environmental education is the development of partnerships between formal and nonformal educators. Yet, one of the challenges to provider models of environmental education is the lack of connection between participating teachers and environmental education providers, resulting in a lack of commitment on the part of classroom teachers. This dissertation proposes that collaboration can play a major role in creating strong field based environmental education that has the commitment of classroom teachers. In 2001--2002, 21 teachers participated in LandPaths' In Our Own BackYard environmental education program. These teachers participated in a collaborative process that was designed to respond to teacher concern about a proposed change to the program. At the completion of the collaborative process teachers participated in an evaluation of the collaborative process. The aims of the evaluation were four-fold (a) to identify the features teachers felt established the process as collaboration and (b) to compare those features to a critical definition of collaboration, (c) to evaluate the success of the collaborative design, and (d) to assess the impact of the process on teacher commitment to the program. The results of the evaluation showed that the teachers identified three main elements that contributed to their feelings of collaboration, (a) they felt that they were working with the LandPaths staff in finding a solution to the problem, (b) the process was open and inclusive, and (c) they were making meaningful contributions to a credible process. The evaluation of the process showed that the collaborative process was appropriate for this situation particularly the element of meeting individually with teachers. Finally, most teachers articulated an increase in commitment to

  17. Human Centered Hardware Modeling and Collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian Damon; Lawrence, Brad; Stelges, Katrine; Henderson, Gena

    2013-01-01

    In order to collaborate engineering designs among NASA Centers and customers, to in clude hardware and human activities from multiple remote locations, live human-centered modeling and collaboration across several sites has been successfully facilitated by Kennedy Space Center. The focus of this paper includes innovative a pproaches to engineering design analyses and training, along with research being conducted to apply new technologies for tracking, immersing, and evaluating humans as well as rocket, vehic le, component, or faci lity hardware utilizing high resolution cameras, motion tracking, ergonomic analysis, biomedical monitoring, wor k instruction integration, head-mounted displays, and other innovative human-system integration modeling, simulation, and collaboration applications.

  18. Extended Trial Equation Method for Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gepreel, Khaled A.; Nofal, Taher A.

    2015-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to use the extended trial equation method to construct a series of some new solutions for some nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) in mathematical physics. We will construct the solutions in many different functions such as hyperbolic function solutions, trigonometric function solutions, Jacobi elliptic function solutions, and rational functional solutions for the nonlinear PDEs when the balance number is a real number via the Zhiber-Shabat nonlinear differential equation. The balance number of this method is not constant as we shown in other methods, but it is changed by changing the trial equation derivative definition. This method allowed us to construct many new types of solutions. It is shown by using the Maple software package that all obtained solutions satisfy the original PDEs.

  19. Higher derivative gravity: Field equation as the equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Ramit; Liberati, Stefano; Mohd, Arif

    2016-08-01

    One of the striking features of general relativity is that the Einstein equation is implied by the Clausius relation imposed on a small patch of locally constructed causal horizon. The extension of this thermodynamic derivation of the field equation to more general theories of gravity has been attempted many times in the last two decades. In particular, equations of motion for minimally coupled higher-curvature theories of gravity, but without the derivatives of curvature, have previously been derived using a thermodynamic reasoning. In that derivation the horizon slices were endowed with an entropy density whose form resembles that of the Noether charge for diffeomorphisms, and was dubbed the Noetheresque entropy. In this paper, we propose a new entropy density, closely related to the Noetheresque form, such that the field equation of any diffeomorphism-invariant metric theory of gravity can be derived by imposing the Clausius relation on a small patch of local causal horizon.

  20. When do researchers collaborate? Toward a model of collaboration propensity in science and engineering research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnholtz, Jeremy P.

    Geographically distributed and multidisciplinary collaborations have proven invaluable in answering a range of important scientific questions, such as understanding and controlling disease threats like SARS and AIDS or exploring the nature of matter in particle physics. Despite this, however, collaboration can often be problematic. There are institutional obstacles, collaboration tools may be poorly designed, and group coordination is difficult. To better design technologies to support research activities, we need an improved understanding of why scientists collaborate and how their collaborations work. To achieve this improved understanding, this study compares two theoretical approaches to collaboration propensity---that is, the extent to which collaboration is perceived as useful by individual researchers. On one hand, cultural comparisons of disciplines suggest that collaboration propensity will be higher in disciplinary cultures that have a more collectivist orientation, as indicated by low levels of competition for individual recognition and few concerns about secrecy related to commercialization and intellectual property. In contrast, an approach based on social and organizational psychology suggests that collaboration propensity will vary as a function of resource concentration, fieldwide focus on a well-defined set of problems, and the need for and availability of help when difficult problems are encountered in day-to-day work. To explore this question, a mail survey of 900 academic researchers in three fields was conducted, along with 100 interviews with practicing researchers at 17 sites in the field. Results support a social and organizational psychological interpretation of collaboration propensity. That is, cultural factors such as competition for individual recognition and concerns about intellectual property were not perceived as significant impediments to collaboration. Instead, characteristics like resource concentration and frequent help