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Sample records for collagen antibody-induced arthritis

  1. Transgenic Disruption of Glucocorticoid Signaling in Osteoblasts Attenuates Joint Inflammation in Collagen Antibody-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jinwen; Zhang, Yaqing; Kim, Sarah; Wiebe, Edgar; Spies, Cornelia M; Buttgereit, Frank; Cooper, Mark S; Seibel, Markus J; Zhou, Hong

    2016-05-01

    The role of endogenous glucocorticoids (GCs) in rheumatoid arthritis remains unclear. Herein, we examined the role of osteoblastic GC signaling in collagen antibody-induced arthritis. Intracellular GC signaling was abrogated exclusively in mature osteoblasts via transgenic (tg) expression of 11ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2. Arthritis was induced in 8-week-old male tg mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Paw swelling was scored daily from induction to end point (day 14). Inflammation, cartilage degradation, and local bone erosion were assessed at the wrist, knee, and ankle joints. Systemic skeletal changes were determined by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometrical analysis of the tibiae. Both tg and WT mice developed acute arthritis in response to the administration of collagen antibodies. However, compared with WT mice, both clinical and histological indexes of joint inflammation were significantly mitigated in animals with disrupted osteoblastic GC signaling. In WT mice, arthritis was associated with increased bone resorption, decreased bone formation, and significant bone loss. In contrast, bone turnover and bone mass remained unchanged in tg arthritic mice. Disruption of GC signaling in osteoblasts significantly reduces joint inflammation and prevents structural bone and cartilage damage in collagen antibody-induced arthritis. These data corroborate the concept that osteoblasts modulate the inflammatory response in immune-mediated arthritis via a GC-dependent pathway. PMID:26988651

  2. Puerarin attenuates inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody-induced arthritis via TLR4/NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changxing; Wang, Weidong; Jin, Xiaping; Shen, Jianguo; Hu, Weifeng; Jiang, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Puerarin is an important active ingredient in the root of kudzu vine due to its pharmacological properties. The aim of the present study is to contribute to the existing knowledge of the effect of puerarin in the attenuation of inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody-induced arthritis via toll‑like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling. Arthritis was induced using injection of anti‑type II collagen antibodies. Treatment with puerarin was observed to significantly decrease clinical scoring of the collagen antibody‑induced arthritis and suppress oxidative stress and the inflammatory response in mice. Furthermore, puerarin was demonstrated to inhibit mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase‑9 and protein expression of TLR4 following collagen antibody-induced arthritis in mice. The effect of puerarin may be associated with the suppression of NF‑κB activity in collagen antibody‑induced arthritis mice. Furthermore, upregulation of phosphorylated (p)‑Janus kinase 2 and p‑signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 protein expression was suppressed by puerarin. The results of the present study indicate, for the first time, the effect of puerarin to attenuate inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody‑induced arthritis via TLR4/NF-κB signaling. PMID:27278131

  3. Involvement of tachykinins and NK1 receptor in the joint inflammation with collagen type II-specific monoclonal antibody-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Makino, Akira; Sakai, Atsushi; Ito, Hiromoto; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic multisystem disease characterized by persistent joint inflammation associated with severe pain. Because RA is an immune-mediated joint disease and because type II collagen is considered an autoantigen, rodent models of arthritis using collagen type II-specific monoclonal antibodies are valuable for studying the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis and for evaluating therapeutic strategies. The tachykinin family peptides, substance P (SP) and hemokinin-1 (HK-1), are expressed in the nervous systems and in many peripheral organs and immunocompetent cells and activate tachykinin NK1 receptors with similar affinities. NK1 receptors are involved in the inflammation and hyperalgesia associated with a variety of inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we examined the involvement of SP and HK-1 in the joint inflammation and hyperalgesia in a collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model in mice. The messenger RNA expression levels of the TAC1 gene encoding SP and of the TAC4 gene encoding HK-1 were decreased in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord at the peak of the inflammatory symptoms in CAIA. Systemic injection of an NK1 receptor antagonist, WIN 51708, significantly inhibited the joint swelling, but not the mechanical allodynia, on day 7 in CAIA mice. The messenger RNA expression levels of TAC1 and TAC4 in the dorsal root ganglia and dorsal spinal cord were unaffected by treatment with WIN 51708. These findings suggest that tachykinins and NK1 receptors play a key role in joint inflammation, rather than in nociceptive sensitization, in CAIA. PMID:22687356

  4. Essential Role for the Lectin Pathway in Collagen Antibody-Induced Arthritis Revealed Through Use of Adenovirus Programming Complement Inhibitor MAp44 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Nirmal K.; Mehta, Gaurav; Kjaer, Troels R.; Takahashi, Minoru; Schaack, Jerome; Morrison, Thomas E.; Thiel, Steffen; Arend, William P.; Holers, V. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies using mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and complement C4 deficient mice have suggested that the lectin pathway (LP) is not required for the development of inflammatory arthritis in the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model. MBL, ficolins and collectin-11 are key LP pattern recognition molecules that associate with three serine proteases, MASP-1, MASP-2 and MASP-3, and also with two MBL-associated proteins designated sMAP and MAp44. Recent studies have shown that MAp44, an alternatively spliced product of the MASP-1/3 gene, is a competitive inhibitor of the binding of the recognition molecules to all three MASPs. In these studies we examined the effect of treatment of mice with adenovirus (Ad) programmed to express human MAp44 (AdhMAp44) on the development of CAIA. AdhMAp44 and Ad programming Green fluorescent protein (AdGFP) expression were injected intraperitoneally in C57BL/6 wild-type mice prior to the induction of CAIA. AdhMAp44 significantly reduced the clinical disease activity score (CDA) by 81% compared to mice injected with AdGFP. Similarly, histopathologic injury scores for inflammation, pannus, cartilage and bone damage, as well as C3 deposition in the cartilage and synovium, were significantly reduced by AdhMAp44 pretreatment. Mice treated with AdmMAp44, programming expression of mouse MAp44, also showed significantly decreased CDA and histopathologic injury scores. Additionally, administration of AdhMAp44 significantly diminished the severity of Ross River Virus-induced arthritis, a LP-dependent model. Our study provides conclusive evidence that an intact complement LP is essential to initiate CAIA, and that MAp44 may be an appropriate treatment for inflammatory arthritis. PMID:25070856

  5. The X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein Inhibitor Embelin Suppresses Inflammation and Bone Erosion in Collagen Antibody Induced Arthritis Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dharmapatni, Anak A. S. S. K.; Cantley, Melissa D.; Marino, Victor; Perilli, Egon; Crotti, Tania N.; Smith, Malcolm D.; Haynes, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of Embelin, an inhibitor of X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP), on inflammation and bone erosion in a collagen antibody induced arthritis (CAIA) in mice. Methods. Four groups of mice (n = 6 per group) were allocated: CAIA untreated mice, CAIA treated with Prednisolone (10 mg/kg/day), CAIA treated with low dose Embelin (30 mg/kg/day), and CAIA treated with high dose Embelin (50 mg/kg/day). Joint inflammation was evaluated using clinical paw score and histological assessments. Bone erosion was assessed using micro-CT, tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, and serum carboxy-terminal collagen crosslinks (CTX-1) ELISA. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect XIAP protein. TUNEL was performed to identify apoptotic cells. Results. Low dose, but not high dose Embelin, suppressed inflammation as reflected by lower paw scores (P < 0.05) and lower histological scores for inflammation. Low dose Embelin reduced serum CTX-1 (P < 0.05) and demonstrated lower histological score and TRAP counting, and slightly higher bone volume as compared to CAIA untreated mice. XIAP expression was not reduced but TUNEL positive cells were more abundant in Embelin treated CAIA mice. Conclusion. Low dose Embelin suppressed inflammation and serum CTX-1 in CAIA mice, indicating a potential use for Embelin to treat pathological bone loss. PMID:26347311

  6. A Novel Cryptic Binding Motif, LRSKSRSFQVSDEQY, in the C-Terminal Fragment of MMP-3/7-Cleaved Osteopontin as a Novel Ligand for α9β1 Integrin Is Involved in the Anti-Type II Collagen Antibody-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Shigeyuki; Nakayama, Yosuke; Matsumoto, Naoki; Ito, Koyu; Kanayama, Masashi; Kimura, Chiemi; Kouro, Hitomi; Ashitomi, Dai; Matsuda, Tadashi; Uede, Toshimitsu

    2014-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a multifunctional protein that has been linked to various intractable inflammatory diseases. One way by which OPN induces inflammation is the production of various functional fragments by enzyme cleavage. It has been well appreciated that OPN is cleaved by thrombin, and/or matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -7 (MMP-3/7). Although the function of thrombin-cleaved OPN is well characterized, little is known about the function of MMP-3/7-cleaved OPN. In this study, we found a novel motif, LRSKSRSFQVSDEQY, in the C-terminal fragment of MMP-3/7-cleaved mouse OPN binds to α9β1 integrin. Importantly, this novel motif is involved in the development of anti-type II collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA). This study provides the first in vitro and in vivo evidence that OPN cleavage by MMP-3/7 is an important regulatory mechanism for CAIA. PMID:25545242

  7. Chemical changes demonstrated in cartilage by synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy in an antibody-induced murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxford, Allyson M.; Selva Nandakumar, Kutty; Holmdahl, Rikard; Tobin, Mark J.; McNaughton, Don; Rowley, Merrill J.

    2011-06-01

    Collagen antibody-induced arthritis develops in mice following passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to type II collagen (CII) and is attributed to effects of proinflammatory immune complexes, but transferred mAbs may react directly and damagingly with CII. To determine whether such mAbs cause cartilage damage in vivo in the absence of inflammation, mice lacking complement factor 5 that do not develop joint inflammation were injected intravenously with two arthritogenic mAbs to CII, M2139 and CIIC1. Paws were collected at day 3, decalcified, paraffin embedded, and 5-μm sections were examined using standard histology and synchrotron Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). None of the mice injected with mAb showed visual or histological evidence of inflammation but there were histological changes in the articular cartilage including loss of proteoglycan and altered chondrocyte morphology. Findings using FTIRM at high lateral resolution revealed loss of collagen and the appearance of a new peak at 1635 cm-1 at the surface of the cartilage interpreted as cellular activation. Thus, we demonstrate the utility of synchrotron FTIRM for examining chemical changes in diseased cartilage at the microscopic level and establish that arthritogenic mAbs to CII do cause cartilage damage in vivo in the absence of inflammation.

  8. Exposure to Mimivirus Collagen Promotes Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Hülsmeier, Andreas J.; Hochhold, Nina; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in animals, also occur in some recently described nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses such as Mimiviridae, which replicate in amoebae. To clarify the impact of viral collagens on the immune response of animals exposed to Mimiviridae, we have investigated the localization of collagens in Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus particles and the response of mice to immunization with mimivirus particles. Using protein biotinylation, we have first shown that viral collagen encoded by open reading frame L71 is present at the surface of mimivirus particles. Exposure to mimivirus collagens elicited the production of anti-collagen antibodies in DBA/1 mice immunized intradermally with mimivirus protein extracts. This antibody response also targeted mouse collagen type II and was accompanied by T-cell reactivity to collagen and joint inflammation, as observed in collagen-induced arthritis following immunization of mice with bovine collagen type II. The broad distribution of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses in the environment suggests that humans are constantly exposed to such large virus particles. A survey of blood sera from healthy human subjects and from rheumatoid arthritis patients indeed demonstrated that 30% of healthy-subject and 36% of rheumatoid arthritis sera recognized the major mimivirus capsid protein L425. Moreover, whereas 6% of healthy-subject sera recognized the mimivirus collagen protein L71, 22% of rheumatoid arthritis sera were positive for mimivirus L71. Accordingly, our study shows that environmental exposure to mimivirus represents a risk factor in triggering autoimmunity to collagens. PMID:24173233

  9. Collagenase-3 (MMP-13) deficiency protects C57BL/6 mice from antibody-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important in tissue remodelling. Here we investigate the role of collagenase-3 (MMP-13) in antibody-induced arthritis. Methods For this study we employed the K/BxN serum-induced arthritis model. Arthritis was induced in C57BL/6 wild type (WT) and MMP-13-deficient (MMP-13–/–) mice by intraperitoneal injection of 200 μl of K/BxN serum. Arthritis was assessed by measuring the ankle swelling. During the course of the experiments, mice were sacrificed every second day for histological examination of the ankle joints. Ankle sections were evaluated histologically for infiltration of inflammatory cells, pannus tissue formation and bone/cartilage destruction. Semi-quantitative PCR was used to determine MMP-13 expression levels in ankle joints of untreated and K/BxN serum-injected mice. Results This study shows that MMP-13 is a regulator of inflammation. We observed increased expression of MMP-13 in ankle joints of WT mice during K/BxN serum-induced arthritis and both K/BxN serum-treated WT and MMP-13–/– mice developed progressive arthritis with a similar onset. However, MMP-13–/– mice showed significantly reduced disease over the whole arthritic period. Ankle joints of WT mice showed severe joint destruction with extensive inflammation and erosion of cartilage and bone. In contrast, MMP-13–/– mice displayed significantly decreased severity of arthritis (50% to 60%) as analyzed by clinical and histological scoring methods. Conclusions MMP-13 deficiency acts to suppress the local inflammatory responses. Therefore, MMP-13 has a role in the pathogenesis of arthritis, suggesting MMP-13 is a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24369907

  10. Immunosuppression by fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in collagen arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Belli, J.A.; Trentham, D.E.

    1982-05-01

    Treatments with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and cyclophosphamide were evaluated for rats injected with type II collagen. Preadministration of TLI and repeated injections of cyclophosphamide suppressed the severity of arthritis and lowered antibody titers to collagen significantly. TLI initiated at the onset of collagen arthritis decreased humoral and cellular responses to collagen but did not affect the severity of arthritis. These data demonstrate that both TLi and cyclophosphamide are immunosuppressive in an experimentally inducible autoimmune disease.

  11. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  12. Suppression of collagen induced arthritis by idiotype coupled lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nagler-Anderson, C.; Gurish, M.F.; Robinson, M.E.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were initiated to evaluate the regulatory influence of idiotype (Id) networks in an experimental auto-immune disease. Collagen induced arthritis is an animal model of polyarthritis induced in susceptible mice by immunization with collagen II (CII). A humoral immune response to CII appears to be critical for the development of diseases. If subpopulations of the anti-CII abs, important for the induction of arthritis, could be identified and manipulated through the presence of a major Id, it should be possible to decrease arthritis incidence by suppressing the production of these Ids. Specifically purified anti-CII abs from arthritic DBA/1 mice were coupled to syngeneic spleen cells and administered IV prior to intradermal immunization with CII. By day 34 after 1/sup 0/ immunization, 100% of control mice and 50% of treated mice had developed arthritis. Suppression of the Id population administered to the treated group was confirmed by RIA. Sera from individual mice were tested as inhibitors of binding of /sup 125/I-labelled polyclonal DBA/1 anti-CII to a rabbit anti-Id directed against polyclonal anti-CII isolated from the sera of arthritic mice. Mean percentage of inhibition of binding of /sup 125/I-Id to rabbit anti-Id by sera from non-arthritic treated mice was found to be significantly lower than that observed in the arthritic control group (p = .045), but did not correlate with total anti-CII ab titers.

  13. Arthritis in mice induced by a single immunisation with collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, F; Nomura, M; Nakamura, K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in mice can be satisfactorily induced by a single immunisation and whether this model has some advantages compared with conventional CIA, which is induced by two immunisations. METHODS: The incidence of arthritis was observed under different immunisation conditions (variation of species of Mycobacterium included in complete Freund's adjuvant and the method of emulsification) and immunological, histopathological, and pharmacological features were examined. RESULTS: Under optimum immunisation conditions, joint inflammation developed two to three weeks after the primary immunisation with an incidence of 100% at four to five weeks. The progression of the arthritis was mild and was associated with moderate increases in concentrations of serum IgG against type II collagen. This CIA model was similar to the conventional model in histopathological and pharmacological features. CONCLUSIONS: Murine CIA could be successfully induced by a single immunisation. An important feature of this model was a mild progression of joint inflammation. This feature seems to be of benefit for monitoring the development of arthritis from an early stage in the disease and for the development of novel antirheumatic drugs for such early stage patients. Images PMID:8774181

  14. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  15. Isorhamnetin attenuates collagen-induced arthritis via modulating cytokines and oxidative stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuewen; Zhong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress were involved in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Isorhamnetin has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities, but its effects on RA have not been investigated. In order to observe the possible therapeutic effects of isorhamnetin on RA, we established a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model and treated the animal with isorhamnetin for 3 weeks. Besides, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and isorhamnetin. The severity of arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, joint destruction score and inflammation score. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-10 and IL-35 in the joint tissue homogenate and cell culture medium as well as anti-type II collagen antibody in serum were measured using ELISA. Contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in joint tissue homogenate were measured using assay kits. We found collagen immunization induced significant arthritis in mice and isorhamnetin at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day could significantly attenuate the collagen-induced arthritis. Isorhamnetin also modulated the production of cytokines and suppressed the oxidative stress in the mice with collagen-induced arthritis at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day. These data suggested that isorhamnetin might be a potential agent for the management of RA. PMID:26629181

  16. Nimesulide Improves the Symptomatic and Disease Modifying Effects of Leflunomide in Collagen Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M.; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.; Nofal, Salwa M.; Khalifa, Amani E.; Williams, Richard O.; El-Eraky, Wafaa I.; Nagy, Ayman A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2014-01-01

    Nimesulide is a COX-2 inhibitor used for symptomatic relief of rheumatoid arthritis. Leflunomide is an anti-pyrimidine used to manage the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Herein we studied the influence of nimesulide and leflunomide combination in terms of disease symptoms and progression using collagen-induced arthritis model in mice, as a model for rheumatoid arthritis. Collagen induced arthritis was induced by immunization with type II collagen. Assessment of joint stiffness and articular hyperalgesia were evaluated using a locomotor activity cage and the Hargreaves method, respectively. Disease progression was assessed via arthritic index scoring, X-ray imaging, myeloperoxidase enzyme activity and histopathologic examination. Nimesulide induced only transient symptomatic alleviation on the top of decreased leucocytic infiltration compared to arthritis group. However, nimesulide alone failed to induce any significant improvement in the radiological or pathological disease progression. Leflunomide alone moderately alleviates the symptoms of arthritis and moderately retarded the radiological and pathological disease progression. Combination of nimesulide and leflunomide significantly improved symptomatic (analgesia and joint stiffness) and arthritic disease progression (radiological, pathological and Myeloperoxidase enzyme activity) in collagen induced arthritis animal model. PMID:25375820

  17. Torilin ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Endale, Mehari; Lee, Whi Min; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Na-Mi; Kim, Bok-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Hyung; Cho, Jaeyoul; Kim, Suk; Park, Seung-Chun; Yun, Bong-Sik; Ko, Dukhwan; Rhee, Manhee

    2013-06-01

    Advancements in rheumatoid-arthritis-(RA) therapies have shown considerable progresses in the comprehension of disease. However, the development of new potential agents with relative safety and efficacy continues and natural compounds have been considered as alternatives to identify new entities. Since previous in-vivo data and our in-vitro findings showed that torilin has a strong anti-inflammatory property, we further investigated its effect against collagen-induced-arthritis-(CIA) in mice. CIA-induced DBA/1J mice were treated with torilin or methotrexate (MTX) for 5-weeks. Arthritis severity was evaluated by arthritic score and joint histopathology. Draining lymph node (dLN), joint and peripheral-blood mononuclear-cell (PBMC) counts, and activation/localization of T-/B-lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and neutrophils were examined by FACS analysis. Serum anti-type-II-collagen-(CII) antibody levels and cultured-splenocyte and serum cytokines were also evaluated. Torilin markedly reduced CIA-induced arthritic score, histopathology and leukocyte counts. Besides, torilin suppressed CIA-activated T-cells including CD3+, CD3+/CD69+, CD8+, CD4+ and CD4+/CD25+ in dLNs or joints. It also modified CD19+ or CD20+/CD23+ (B-cells), MHCII+/CD11c+ (DCs) and Gr-1+/CD11b+ (neutrophil) subpopulations. It further depressed total anti-CII-IgG, anti-CII-IgG1 and anti-CII-IgG2a antibody productions. Moreover, while IFN-γ and IL-10 were not affected, torilin suppressed CIA-induced serum TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels. Interestingly, torilin also blocked IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-6 cytokines while it did not affect IL-10 but enhanced IL-4 in splenocytes. These results show that torilin attenuated arthritis severity, modified leukocyte activations in dLNs or joints, and restored serum and splenocyte cytokine imbalances. Torilin may have immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties with the capacity to ameliorate the inflammatory response in CIA-mice. PMID:23623942

  18. Effect of cadmium chloride exposure during the induction of collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Md Meraj; Neha; Khan, Haider A

    2015-08-01

    The precise cause of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis remains uncertain. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in animals is the most commonly used model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Exposure of humans and animals to toxic metals is widespread. Cadmium is one of the most prevalent nephrotoxic heavy metal, but it may cause other systemic toxicity as well. Cadmium may cause adverse health effects by impairment of the immune systems and induction of reactive oxygen species. Since rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis involve immune system disorder and chronic inflammation, the present study has been designed to find out the effect of cadmium chloride exposure on clinical manifestation of development of collagen induced rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis was induced in rats by intradermal injection of emulsion of type II collagen in Complete Freund's Adjuvant. Rats were treated with cadmium chloride dissolved in drinking water at concentrations of 5ppm and 50ppm for 21 days from day of immunization. The effects of cadmium in the rats were assessed by biochemical parameters (articular elastase, articular nitrite, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase) histopathological analysis and immunohistochemical expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in rat joint tissue. Histopathological changes further confirmed the biochemical and immunohistochemical results. Our results suggest that exposure to cadmium chloride during the induction phase of collagen induced arthritis abrogate disease development at lower dose whereas exacerbates at higher dose in Wistar rats. PMID:26070417

  19. Effects of Oral Administration of Type II Collagen on Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentham, David E.; Dynesius-Trentham, Roselynn A.; Orav, E. John; Combitchi, Daniel; Lorenzo, Carlos; Sewell, Kathryn Lea; Hafler, David A.; Weiner, Howard L.

    1993-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory synovial disease thought to involve T cells reacting to an antigen within the joint. Type II collagen is the major protein in articular cartilage and is a potential autoantigen in this disease. Oral tolerization to autoantigens suppresses animal models of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, including two models of rheumatoid arthritis. In this randomized, double-blind trial involving 60 patients with severe, active rheumatoid arthritis, a decrease in the number of swollen joints and tender joints occurred in subjects fed chicken type II collagen for 3 months but not in those that received a placebo. Four patients in the collagen group had complete remission of the disease. No side effects were evident. These data demonstrate clinical efficacy of an oral tolerization approach for rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. The Staphylococcus aureus collagen adhesin is a virulence determinant in experimental septic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Patti, J M; Bremell, T; Krajewska-Pietrasik, D; Abdelnour, A; Tarkowski, A; Rydén, C; Höök, M

    1994-01-01

    The importance of a collagen-binding adhesin in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis has been examined by comparing the virulence of two sets of Staphylococcus aureus mutants in an animal model. Collagen adhesin-negative mutant PH100 was constructed by replacing the chromosomal collagen adhesin gene (cna) in a clinical strain, Phillips, with an inactivated copy of the gene. Collagen adhesin-positive mutant S. aureus CYL574 was generated by introducing the cna gene into CYL316, a strain that normally lacks the cna gene. Biochemical, immunological, and functional analyses of the generated mutants and their respective parent strains showed that binding of 125I-labeled collagen, expression of an immunoreactive collagen adhesin, and bacterial adherence to cartilage were directly correlated with the presence of a functional cna gene. Greater than 70% of the mice injected with the Cna+ strains developed clinical signs of arthritis, whereas less than 27% of the animals injected with Cna- strains showed symptoms of disease. Furthermore, mice injected with the Cna+ strain Phillips had remarkably elevated levels of immunoglobulin G1 and interleukin-6 compared with mice injected with the Cna- mutant PH100. Taken together, these results demonstrate that collagen adhesin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis induced by S. aureus. Images PMID:8262622

  1. Increased limb involvement in murine collagen-induced arthritis following treatment with anti-interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R O; Williams, D G; Feldmann, M; Maini, R N

    1993-01-01

    We have tested the effect of administering H22, a hamster neutralizing MoAb to murine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in collagen-induced arthritis. Mice were immunized with human type II collagen in adjuvant on day 1 and boosted with soluble collagen on day 21. H22 was administered (250 micrograms, intraperitoneally) either during the induction of arthritis (on days 0, 6, 13 and 20) or around the time of disease manifestation (on days 21, 28, 35 and 42). Control mice received either an isotype-matched non-neutralizing MoAb or saline. Both treatment regimes gave similar results. Treatment with H22 did not significantly affect the incidence of arthritis, time of onset, degree of oedema, histopathological severity, or level of anti-type II collagen IgG. However, a highly significant increase (P < 0.01) in the number of limbs affected by arthritis was observed in the H22-treated group, irrespective of whether the antibody was administered during the induction of arthritis, or during the time of clinical manifestation of disease. From these results it was concluded that anti-IFN-gamma treatment caused an increase in the number of arthritic lesions, but did not affect the severity of each individual lesion. PMID:8485917

  2. Anti-arthritic effect of eugenol on collagen-induced arthritis experimental model.

    PubMed

    Grespan, Renata; Paludo, Marcia; Lemos, Henrique de Paula; Barbosa, Carmem Patrícia; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Dalalio, Marcia Machado de Oliveira; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to test the efficacy of eugenol, a compound obtained from the essential oil of cloves (Syzygium aromaticum) in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a well characterized murine model of rheumatoid arthritis. Macroscopic clinical evidence of CIA manifests first as periarticular erythema and edema in the hind paws. Treatment with eugenol starting at the onset of arthritis (day 25) ameliorated these clinical signs of CIA. Furthermore, eugenol inhibited mononuclear cell infiltration into the knee joints of arthritic mice and also lowered the levels of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor growth factor (TGF)-β) within the ankle joints. Eugenol treatment did not affect the in vitro cell viability as assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Therefore, eugenol ameliorates experimental arthritis and could be useful as a beneficial supplement in treating human arthritis. PMID:23037170

  3. Aortic VCAM-1: an early marker of vascular inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Denys, Anne; Clavel, Gaëlle; Lemeiter, Delphine; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Semerano, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There are limited experimental data on vascular involvement in arthritis models. To study the link between CVD and inflammation in RA, we developed a model of vascular dysfunction and articular inflammation by collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. We studied the expression of vascular inflammatory markers in CIA with and without concomitant hyperlipidic diet (HD). Collagen-induced arthritis was induced with intradermal injection of chicken type-II collagen followed by a boost 21 days later. Mice with and without CIA were fed a standard diet or an HD for 12 weeks starting from the day of the boost. Arthritis severity was evaluated with a validated clinical score. Aortic mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-17 were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 localization in the aortic sinus was determined by immunohistochemistry. Atherosclerotic plaque presence was assessed in aortas. Collagen-induced arthritis was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1, independent of diet. VCAM-1 overexpression was detectable as early as 4 weeks after collagen immunization and persisted after 15 weeks. The HD induced atheroma plaque formation and aortic iNOS expression regardless of CIA. Concomitant CIA and HD had no additive effect on atheroma or VCAM-1 or iNOS expression. CIA and an HD diet induced a distinct and independent expression of large-vessel inflammation markers in B6 mice. This model may be relevant for the study of CVD in RA. PMID:26859834

  4. Gene expression profile and synovial microcirculation at early stages of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gierer, Philip; Ibrahim, Saleh; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Koczan, Dirk; Moeller, Steffen; Landes, Jürgen; Gradl, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2005-01-01

    A better understanding of the initial mechanisms that lead to arthritic disease could facilitate development of improved therapeutic strategies. We characterized the synovial microcirculation of knee joints in susceptible mouse strains undergoing intradermal immunization with bovine collagen II in complete Freund's adjuvant to induce arthritis (i.e. collagen-induced arthritis [CIA]). Susceptible DBA1/J and collagen II T-cell receptor transgenic mice were compared with CIA-resistant FVB/NJ mice. Before onset of clinical symptoms of arthritis, in vivo fluorescence microscopy of knee joints revealed marked leucocyte activation and interaction with the endothelial lining of synovial microvessels. This initial inflammatory cell response correlated with the gene expression profile at this disease stage. The majority of the 655 differentially expressed genes belonged to classes of genes that are involved in cell movement and structure, cell cycle and signal transduction, as well as transcription, protein synthesis and metabolism. However, 24 adhesion molecules and chemokine/cytokine genes were identified, some of which are known to contribute to arthritis (e.g. CD44 and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1) and some of which are novel in this respect (e.g. CC chemokine ligand-27 and IL-13 receptor α1). Online in vivo data on synovial tissue microcirculation, together with gene expression profiling, emphasize the potential role played by early inflammatory events in the development of arthritis. PMID:15987489

  5. Sialylation converts arthritogenic IgG into inhibitors of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Ise, Wataru; Harazono, Akira; Takakura, Daisuke; Fukuyama, Hidehiro; Baba, Yoshihiro; Narazaki, Masashi; Shoda, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Nobunori; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ji, Shuting; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Fujio, Keishi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Furukawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated IgG antibodies such as anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) have diverse glycosylation variants; however, key sugar chains modulating the arthritogenic activity of IgG remain to be clarified. Here, we show that reduced sialylation is a common feature of RA-associated IgG in humans and in mouse models of arthritis. Genetically blocking sialylation in activated B cells results in exacerbation of joint inflammation in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. On the other hand, artificial sialylation of anti-type II collagen antibodies, including ACPAs, not only attenuates arthritogenic activity, but also suppresses the development of CIA in the antibody-infused mice, whereas sialylation of other IgG does not prevent CIA. Thus, our data demonstrate that sialylation levels control the arthritogenicity of RA-associated IgG, presenting a potential target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:27046227

  6. Sialylation converts arthritogenic IgG into inhibitors of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Ise, Wataru; Harazono, Akira; Takakura, Daisuke; Fukuyama, Hidehiro; Baba, Yoshihiro; Narazaki, Masashi; Shoda, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Nobunori; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ji, Shuting; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Fujio, Keishi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Furukawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated IgG antibodies such as anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) have diverse glycosylation variants; however, key sugar chains modulating the arthritogenic activity of IgG remain to be clarified. Here, we show that reduced sialylation is a common feature of RA-associated IgG in humans and in mouse models of arthritis. Genetically blocking sialylation in activated B cells results in exacerbation of joint inflammation in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. On the other hand, artificial sialylation of anti-type II collagen antibodies, including ACPAs, not only attenuates arthritogenic activity, but also suppresses the development of CIA in the antibody-infused mice, whereas sialylation of other IgG does not prevent CIA. Thus, our data demonstrate that sialylation levels control the arthritogenicity of RA-associated IgG, presenting a potential target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:27046227

  7. NLRP3 Inflammasome Plays an Important Role in the Pathogenesis of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Zheng, Yi; Li, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between NLRP3 and the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis. Methods. We used the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. The mice were divided into two groups: the model group (CIA, n = 16) and the control group (Normal, n = 8). The mice were sacrificed seven weeks after immunization. The arthritis score and imaging evaluation (X-rays, Micro-CT, and MRI) were performed. Synovial tissue NLRP3 expression and peripheral blood cytokine levels were analyzed. Results. The arthritis score (6.00 ± 2.52), imaging score (4.63 ± 0.92), and synovial tissue NLRP3 expression (4.00 ± 2.03) significantly increased in the CIA mice. The expression of synovial NLRP3 was positively correlated with arthritis clinical and radiographic scores (r = 0.792 and r = 0.669, resp.). Conclusions. The synovial NLRP3 expression increased at the early onset of RA. Synovial NLRP3 expression level was correlated with the clinical arthritis severity and extent of radiological destruction, suggesting that NLRP3 is involved in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:27034595

  8. Inhibition of GSK-3β Alleviates Collagen II-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haiyan; Liu, Jun; Zeng, Jiashun; Hu, Bailong; Fang, Xiuyi; Li, Long

    2016-01-01

    Background Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor is a serine/threonine kinase with an inhibitory role in glycogen synthesis, which is essential in inflammatory and immunological diseases. The purpose of our study was to determine if TDZD-8 can alleviate collagen II-induced rheumatoid arthritis in rats. Material/Methods Twenty collagen II-induced rheumatoid arthritis rats were treated with selective GSK-3β inhibitor. The effects of GSK-3β inhibition on collagen II-induced rheumatoid arthritis in the rats were evaluated by paw edema, histological examination of arthritic synovium, radiographic examination of knee joint, and the level of inflammation mediators such as prostaglandin E2, 5-hydroxytryptamin, and histamine. The level of cytokines such as IL-6, IL-12, IL-10, and TNF-α, was examined by Elisa. Results GSK-3β inhibitor significantly reduced the development of rheumatoid arthritis in rats. The levels of inflammation mediators such as prostaglandin E2, 5-hydroxytryptamin, and histamine were decreased in the TDZD-8 group. Serum levels of IL-6, IL-12, and TNF-α were significantly reduced in the TDZD-8 group compared with the RA group. Conclusions Treatment with GSK-3β inhibitor suppressed inflammatory response in RA rats. These findings suggest that the inhibition of GSK-3β can be an effective treatment for RA. PMID:27029564

  9. Effects of gold sodium thiomalate, cyclosporin A, cyclophosphamide, and placebo on collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Cannon, G W; McCall, S; Cole, B C; Radov, L A; Ward, J R; Griffiths, M M

    1993-03-01

    The prophylactic and therapeutic effects of gold sodium thiomalate, cyclosporin A, cyclophosphamide, and placebo on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were evaluated in DA rats. Prophylactic treatment with cyclosporin A and cyclophosphamide suppressed the arthritis incidence, clinical inflammation, destructive bone changes, and development of anti-collagen antibody in DA rats subsequently injected with porcine type-II collagen. Therapeutic treatment with cyclosporin A and cyclophosphamide had a definite suppression on established CIA when started 21 days after the initial collagen injection, but the suppression was less marked than that of prophylactic treatment. Gold had no impact on CIA in DA rats when administered either prophylactically or therapeutically. PMID:8213350

  10. Mobilization of natural killer cells inhibits development of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Leavenworth, Jianmei W; Wang, Xiaoyang; Wenander, Carola Schellack; Spee, Pieter; Cantor, Harvey

    2011-08-30

    Although natural killer (NK) cells have been implicated in regulating immune responses, their ability to modulate disease development in autoimmune arthritis has not been analyzed. Here we investigate the contribution of NK cells to regulating collagen-induced arthritis, a well-characterized preclinical model of human rheumatoid arthritis. We find that the disease is induced by the combined action of two CD4(+) T helper (T(H)) subsets: follicular T(H) cells and T(H)17 cells. Both CD4(+) T(H) subsets are highly susceptible to lysis by NK cells after activation. Administration of antibody that activates NK cells through blockade of its inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor allows enhanced elimination of pathogenic follicular T(H) and T(H)17 cells and arrest of disease progression. These results suggest that antibody-dependent enhancement of NK activity may yield effective, previously undescribed therapeutic approaches to this autoimmune disorder. PMID:21873193

  11. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  12. Metabolomics analysis of collagen-induced arthritis in rats and interventional effects of oral tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xinghong; Hu, Jinbo; Li, Jinfeng; Zhang, Yan; Shui, Bingjie; Ding, Zhishan; Yao, Li; Fan, Yongsheng

    2014-08-01

    A serum metabolomics method based on rapid resolution liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (RRLC-Q-TOF-MS) was performed for a holistic evaluation of the metabolic changes of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to assess the interventional effects of type II collagen (CII) in this model. Partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was employed to study the metabolic profiling of CIA rats and control rats. Ten metabolites, namely, 12(S)-HHTrE, 12(S)-HEPE, PGE2, TXB2, 12(S)-HETE, LysoPE(16:0), PE(O-18:0/0:0), Lyso-PE(18:2), Lyso-PE(20:4), and Lyso-PC(22:5) were identified as differential metabolites associated with the pathogenesis of CIA. These results suggested that dysregulation of the arachidonic acid (AA) and phospholipid metabolic networks is involved in the pathomechanism of CIA. Differential metabolomics and histopathological analyses demonstrated that CII inhibits the progress of arthritis. Furthermore, the therapeutic effects of CII on CIA may involve regulation of the disordered AA and phospholipid metabolic networks. This metabolomics study provides new insights into the pathogenesis of arthritis and, furthermore, indicates the potential mechanism underlying the significantly increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome, defined as a clustering of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in arthritis patients. PMID:24814225

  13. Boswellia serrata extract attenuates inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Umar, Sadiq; Umar, Khalid; Sarwar, Abu Hasnath Md Golam; Khan, Altaf; Ahmad, Niyaz; Ahmad, Sayeed; Katiyar, Chandra Kant; Husain, Syed Akhtar; Khan, Haider A

    2014-05-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease which leads to destruction of joints. Current treatment modalities for RA either produce symptomatic relief (NSAIDs) or modify the disease process (DMARDs). Though effective, their use is also limited by their side effects. As a result, the interest in alternative, well tolerated anti-inflammatory remedies has re-emerged. Our aim was to evaluate the antioxidant and antiarthritic activity of Boswellia serrata gum resin extract (BSE) in collagen induced arthritis. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by collagen induced arthritis (CIA) method. BSE was administered at doses of 100 and 200mg/kg body weight once daily for 21 days. The effects of treatment in the rats were assessed by biochemical (articular elastase, MPO, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD and NO), inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, IFN-γ and PGE2), and histological studies in joints. BSE was effective in bringing significant changes on all the parameters (articular elastase, MPO, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD and NO) studied. Oral administration of BSE resulted in significantly reduced levels of inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and PGE2), and increased level of IL-10. The protective effects of BSE against RA were also evident from the decrease in arthritis scoring and bone histology. The abilities to inhibit proinflammatory cytokines and modulation of antioxidant status suggest that the protective effect of Boswellia serrata extract on arthritis in rats might be mediated via the modulation of immune system. PMID:24667331

  14. Porphyromonas gingivalis oral infection exacerbates the development and severity of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Clinical studies suggest a direct influence of periodontal disease (PD) on serum inflammatory markers and disease assessment of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the influence of PD on arthritis development remains unclear. This investigation was undertaken to determine the contribution of chronic PD to immune activation and development of joint inflammation using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Methods DBA1/J mice orally infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis were administered with collagen II (CII) emulsified in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) or incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) to induce arthritis. Arthritis development was assessed by visual scoring of paw swelling, caliper measurement of the paws, mRNA expression, paw micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis, histology, and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase for osteoclast detection (TRAP)-positive immunohistochemistry. Serum and reactivated splenocytes were evaluated for cytokine expression. Results Mice induced for PD and/or arthritis developed periodontal disease, shown by decreased alveolar bone and alteration of mRNA expression in gingival tissues and submandibular lymph nodes compared to vehicle. P. gingivalis oral infection increased paw swelling and osteoclast numbers in mice immunized with CFA/CII. Arthritis incidence and severity were increased by P. gingivalis in mice that received IFA/CII immunizations. Increased synovitis, bone erosions, and osteoclast numbers in the paws were observed following IFA/CII immunizations in mice infected with P gingivalis. Furthermore, cytokine analysis showed a trend toward increased serum Th17/Th1 ratios when P. gingivalis infection was present in mice receiving either CFA/CII or IFA/CII immunizations. Significant cytokine increases induced by P. gingivalis oral infection were mostly associated to Th17-related cytokines of reactivated splenic cells, including IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-22 in the CFA

  15. Phenotypic characterization of type II collagen-induced arthritis in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    SONG, HOU-PAN; LI, XIN; YU, RONG; ZENG, GUANG; YUAN, ZHEN-YI; WANG, WEI; HUANG, HUI-YONG; CAI, XIONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine a more specific, efficient and simple method for the induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Different strains of rats were injected at the base of the tail with bovine type II collagen (CII) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The onset and severity of arthritis were evaluated by clinical assessment. The established CIA model was analyzed using a comprehensive examination of clinical, hematological, histological and radiological parameters. The results demonstrated that Wistar rats were the most susceptible strain to CIA followed by Wistar Furth rats, with Sprague Dawley rats being the least susceptible. Following primary and booster immunization, female Wistar rats developed severe arthritis, with an incidence of >83% and low variability in clinical signs. The development of arthritis was accompanied by a significantly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate compared with that in the control rats. The radiographic examination revealed bone matrix resorption, considerable soft tissue swelling, periosteal new bone formation and bone erosion in the arthritic joints of the CIA rats. Histopathologically, the synovial joints of CIA rats were characterized by synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation, marked cellular infiltration, bone and cartilage erosion and narrowing of the joint space. The administration of an intradermal injection of only 200 µg bovine CII emulsified in IFA at the base of the tail therefore leads to the successful development of a CIA rat model. This well-characterized CIA rat model could be specifically used to study the pathophysiology of human rheumatoid arthritis as well as to test and develop anti-arthritic agents for humans. PMID:26622511

  16. The role of lipopolysaccharide injected systemically in the reactivation of collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Shin; Ohsawa, Motoyasu

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the role of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the reactivation of autoimmune disease by using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice in which autoimmunity to the joint cartilage component type II collagen (CII) was involved.CIA was induced by immunization with CII emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant at the base of the tail (day 0) followed by a booster injection on day 21. Varying doses of LPS from E. coli were i.p. injected on day 50.Arthritis began to develop on day 25 after immunization with CII and reached a peak on day 35. Thereafter, arthritis subsided gradually but moderate joint inflammation was still observed on day 50. An i.p. injection of LPS on day 50 markedly reactivated arthritis on a dose-related fashion. Histologically, on day 55, there were marked oedema of synovium which had proliferated by the day of LPS injection, new formation of fibrin, and intense infiltration of neutrophils accompanied with a large number of mononuclear cells. The reactivation of CIA by LPS was associated with increases in anti-CII IgG and IgG2a antibodies as well as various cytokines including IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α. LPS from S. enteritidis, S. typhimurium, and K. neumoniae and its component, lipid A from E. coli also reactivated the disease. Polymyxin B sulphate suppressed LPS- or lipid A-induced reactivation of CIA.These results suggest that LPS may play an important role in the reactivation of autoimmune joint inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:10742285

  17. Age-Related Differences in Collagen-Induced Arthritis: Clinical and Imaging Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Gerwing, Tracy D; Pratt, Isaac V; Cooper, David M L; Silver, Tawni I; Rosenberg, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Arthritis is among the most common chronic diseases in both children and adults. Although intraarticular inflammation is the feature common among all patients with chronic arthritis there are, in addition to age at onset, clinical characteristics that further distinguish the disease in pediatric and adult populations. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the utility of microCT (µCT) and ultrasonography in characterizing pathologic age-related differences in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Juvenile (35 d old) and young adult (91 d old) male Wistar rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen and incomplete Freund adjuvant to induce polyarthritis. Naïve male Wistar rats served as controls. All paws were scored on a scale of 0 (normal paw) to 4 (disuse of paw). Rats were euthanized at 14 d after the onset of arthritis and the hindpaws imaged by µCT and ultrasonography. Young adult rats had more severe signs of arthritis than did their juvenile counterparts. Imaging demonstrated that young adult CIA rats exhibited more widespread and severe skeletal lesions of the phalanges, metatarsals, and tarsal bones, whereas juvenile CIA rats had more localized and less proliferative and osteolytic damage that was confined predominantly to the phalanges and metatarsals. This report demonstrates the utility of imaging modalities to compare juvenile and young adult rats with CIA and provides evidence that disease characteristics and progression differ between the 2 age groups. Our observations indicate that the CIA model could help discern age-related pathologic processes in inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:24326225

  18. Rosiglitazone-mediated dendritic cells ameliorate collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sei-Hee; Lee, Jun-Ho; Jung, Nam-Chul; Choi, Hyun-Ji; Song, Jie-Young; Seo, Han Geuk; Choi, Jinjung; Jung, Sang Youn; Kang, Sangjin; Choi, Yong-Soo; Chung, Ji Hyung; Lim, Dae-Seog

    2016-09-01

    Rosiglitazone is a selective ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ), which serves diverse biological functions. A number of autoimmune disease models have been used to examine the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of tolerogenic dendritic cells (tDCs). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether rosiglitazone-mediated DC (Rosi-DC) therapy suppressed arthritis in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. Rosi-DCs were generated by treating immature DCs with TNF-α, type II collagen, and rosiglitazone. CIA mice then received subcutaneously (s.c.) two injections of Rosi-DCs. The severity of arthritis was then assessed histopathologically. The phenotypes of the DC and regulatory T (Treg) cell populations in CIA mice were determined by flow cytometry and the effect of Rosi-DCs on the secretion of autoimmunity-inducing cytokines was examined by ELISA. Rosi-DCs expressed lower levels of DC-related surface markers than mature DCs. Histopathological examination revealed that the degree of inflammation in the paws of Rosi-DC-treated mice was much lower than that in the paws of PBS-treated CIA mice. Taken together, these results clearly show that rosiglitazone-mediated DCs ameliorate CIA, most likely via the induction of antigen-specific Treg cells. PMID:27208887

  19. Adiponectin exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis via enhancing Th17 response and prompting RANKL expression.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoxuan; Feng, Xiaoke; Tan, Wenfeng; Lin, Na; Hua, Minhui; Wei, Yu; Wang, Fang; Li, Ningli; Zhang, Miaojia

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported adiponectin (AD) is highly expressed in the inflamed synovial joint tissue and correlates closely with progressive bone erosion in Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Here, we investigate the role of adiponectin in regulating Th17 response and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) in mice with CIA mice by intraarticularly injection of adiponectin into knee joints on day 17, day 20 and day 23 post first collagen immunization. The increased adiponectin expression was found in inflamed joint tissue of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Adiponectin injection resulted in an earlier onset of arthritis, an aggravated arthritic progression, more severe synovial hyperplasia, bone erosion and osteoporosis in CIA mice. CD4(+)IL-17(+) Th17 cells, IL-17 mRNA and RANKL mRNA expression were markedly increased in the joint tissue of adiponectin treated CIA mice. Moreover, adiponectin treatment markedly enhanced Th17 cell generation from naive CD4(+) T cells in vitro, which accompanied by the high expression of Th17 transcription factor ROR-γt, and Th17 cytokine genes included IL-22 and IL-23. This study reveals a novel effect of adiponectin in exacerbating CIA progression by enhancing Th17 cell response and RANKL expression. PMID:26063682

  20. Attenuation of collagen-induced arthritis in mice by salmon proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Sayuri; Asano, Krisana; Nakane, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious autoimmune disease caused by chronic inflammation of connective tissues. The basic principle of RA treatment is aimed to reduce joint inflammation. Our previous studies demonstrated that salmon cartilage proteoglycan (PG) suppresses excess inflammation in different mouse inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the prophylactic effect of PG on the progression of RA using an experimental mouse model, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Clinical and histological severity of CIA was attenuated by daily oral administration of PG. In the joints of PG-administered mice, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils and also osteoclast accumulation were limited. In comparison to nonadministered mice, anti-collagen antibodies in the sera of PG-administered mice did not alter. On the other hand, local expression of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-6, IL-1 β, interferon- γ (IFN- γ), C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), C-X-C chemokine ligand 1 (CXCL1), and CXCL2 in the joints of PG-administered mice decreased. Moreover, in the response of type II collagen- (CII-) restimulation ex vivo, IL-17A and IFN- γ production by splenocytes from PG-administered mice was less than that of control mice. These data suggested that daily ingested PG attenuated CIA pathogenesis by modulating immune response of splenocytes to CII stimulation and local production inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the joints. PMID:25032213

  1. Protective effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide on bone destruction in the collagen-induced arthritis model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Juarranz, Yasmina; Abad, Catalina; Martinez, Carmen; Arranz, Alicia; Gutierrez-Cañas, Irene; Rosignoli, Florencia; Gomariz, Rosa P; Leceta, Javier

    2005-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology, characterized by the presence of inflammatory synovitis accompanied by destruction of joint cartilage and bone. Treatment with vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) prevents experimental arthritis in animal models by downregulation of both autoimmune and inflammatory components of the disease. The aim of this study was to characterize the protective effect of VIP on bone erosion in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. We have studied the expression of different mediators implicated in bone homeostasis, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (RANK), receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-11 and IL-17. Circulating cytokine levels were assessed by ELISA and the local expression of mediators were determined by RT-PCR in mRNA extracts from joints. VIP treatment resulted in decreased levels of circulating IL-6, IL-1beta and TNFalpha, and increased levels of IL-4 and IL-10. CIA-mice treated with VIP presented a decrease in mRNA expression of IL-17, IL-11 in the joints. The ratio of RANKL to OPG decreased drastically in the joint after VIP treatment, which correlated with an increase in levels of circulating OPG in CIA mice treated with VIP. In addition, VIP treatment decreased the expression of mRNA for RANK, iNOS and COX-2. To investigate the molecular mechanisms involved, we tested the activity of NFkappaB and AP-1, two transcriptional factors closely related to joint erosion, by EMSA in synovial cells from CIA mice. VIP treatment in vivo was able to affect the transcriptional activity of both factors. Our data indicate that VIP is a viable candidate for the development of treatments for RA. PMID:16207319

  2. [Sonic hedgehog (SHH) promotes the proliferation of synovial fibroblasts of rats with collagen-induced arthritis].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Qin, Suping; Sun, Dexu; Pan, Wei; Li, Xiangyang; Kong, Fanyun; Zhen, Kuiyang; Tang, Renxian

    2016-05-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of sonic hedgehog (SHH) on the proliferation of synovial fibroblasts (SFs). Methods The serum samples were collected from 30 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, 30 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, 30 ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients and 30 healthy subjects. The concentrations of serum SHH were detected by ELISA. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) were developed by type 2 collagen in Sprague-Dawley rats. The SFs were isolated from knee synovial tissues of CIA rats, and then identified by the detection of vimentin by immunofluorescence technique. Before and 72 hours after blocking SHH-glioma-associated oncogene 1 (Gli-1) signaling pathway with GANT61, the expression level of SHH in SFs was detected by Western blotting, and the proliferation of SFs was examined with CCK-8 assay. Results The level of serum SHH in the RA patients was remarkably higher than that in the SLE, AS patients and the healthy controls. In the CIA rats, the expression of SHH in SFs in vitro was higher than that in the healthy control rats. After 72-hour treatment of GANT61 to block SHH-Gli-1 signaling pathway, the expression level of SHH protein in SFs from CIA rats was reduced, and meanwhile the proliferation of the SFs was inhibited. Conclusion SHH plays an important role in the proliferation of SFs and could be used as a potential therapeutic target for RA. PMID:27126942

  3. Novel therapeutic compound tuftsin-phosphorylcholine attenuates collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bashi, T; Shovman, O; Fridkin, M; Volkov, A; Barshack, I; Blank, M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2016-04-01

    Treatment with helminthes and helminthes ova improved the clinical symptoms of several autoimmune diseases in patients and in animal models. Phosphorylcholine (PC) proved to be the immunomodulatory molecule. We aimed to decipher the tolerogenic potential of tuftsin-PC (TPC), a novel helminth-based compound in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CIA DBA/1 mice were treated with TPC subcutaneously (5 µg/0.1 ml) or orally (250 µg/0.1 ml), starting prior to disease induction. The control groups were treated with PBS. Collagen antibodies were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), cytokine protein levels by ELISA kits and regulatory T (Treg ) and regulatory B (Breg ) cell phenotypes by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). TPC-treated mice had a significantly lower arthritis score of 1.5 in comparison with control mice 11.8 (P < 0.0001) in both subcutaneous and orally treated groups at day 31. Moreover, histology analysis demonstrated highly inflamed joints in control mice, whereas TPC-treated mice maintained normal joint structure. Furthermore, TPC decreased the titres of circulating collagen II antibodies in mice sera (P < 0.0001), enhanced expression of IL-10 (P < 0.0001) and inhibited production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-1β (P < 0.0001). TPC significantly expanded the CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) Treg cells and CD19(+) IL-10(+) CD5(high) CD1d(high) T cell immunoglobulin mucin-1 (TIM-1(+) ) Breg cell phenotypes (P < 0.0001) in treated mice. Our data indicate that treatment with TPC attenuates CIA in mice demonstrated by low arthritic score and normal joints histology. TPC treatment reduced proinflammatory cytokines and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine expression, as well as expansion of Treg and Breg cells. Our results may lead to a new approach for a natural therapy for early rheumatoid arthritis onset. PMID:26618631

  4. Chemically Modified Interleukin-6 Aptamer Inhibits Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Ikuo; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Tomoki; Sumida, Shun-ichiro; Ibaragi, Shigeru; Kasai, Hayato; Horai, Naoto; Drolet, Daniel W.; Gupta, Shashi; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a potent mediator of inflammatory and immune responses, and a validated target for therapeutic intervention of inflammatory diseases. Previous studies have shown that SL1026, a slow off-rate modified aptamer (SOMAmer) antagonist of IL-6, neutralizes IL-6 signaling in vitro. In the present study, we show that SL1026 delays the onset and reduces the severity of rheumatoid symptoms in a collagen-induced arthritis model in cynomolgus monkeys. SL1026 (1 and 10 mg/kg), administered q.i.d., delayed the progression of arthritis and the concomitant increase in serum IL-6 levels compared to the untreated control group. Furthermore, SL1026 inhibited IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation ex vivo in T lymphocytes from human blood and IL-6-induced C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A production in human primary hepatocytes. Importantly, SOMAmer treatment did not elicit an immune response, as evidenced by the absence of anti-SOMAmer antibodies in plasma of treated monkeys. These results demonstrate that SOMAmer antagonists of IL-6 may be attractive agents for the treatment of IL-6-mediated diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26579954

  5. Anti-Arthritic Effect of Chebulanin on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yinglan; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yao; Zhou, Dan; Dai, Qing; Liu, Songqing

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic degenerative autoimmune disease characterized by persistent inflammation of synovial membranes, which leads to cartilage destruction and bone erosion. To date, there are no effective therapies to slow the progress of this degenerative condition. Here, we evaluate the anti-arthritic effect of chebulanin, an abundant anti-inflammatory agent isolated from Terminalia chebula, in collagen induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice by intragastric administration. Arthritic severity was scored by performing histopathological evaluation of the joints and measuring the expression of inflammatory cytokines and relative enzymes by immunohistochemical staining. In parallel, bone destruction and erosion were confirmed by micro-CT. Our data revealed that chebulanin significantly improved the severity of arthritis. Specifically, the histopathological characteristics of the tissues were improved and expression of TNF-α, IL-6, MMP-3 and COX-2 in the paws and joints of the treated mice decreased in a dose-dependent manner compared with control mice. Furthermore, micro-CT analysis revealed that chebulanin induced a dose-dependent reduction in cartilage destruction and bone erosion. Taken together, our findings suggest that chebulanin suppresses the expression of inflammatory mediators and prevents cartilage destruction and bone erosion in mice. Therefore, chebulanin is a strong therapeutic alternative for the treatment of RA. PMID:26402786

  6. Suppression of interleukin 17 production by Brazilian propolis in mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mayuri; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Fukui, Takashi; Masuzawa, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    Propolis is a resinous substance collected by honeybees from leaf buds and cracks in the bark of various plants. Propolis has been reported to have immunomodulatory activity. We hypothesized that propolis would be able to reduce the disease severity of rheumatoid arthritis. We evaluated the effect of Brazilian propolis ethanolic extract on the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. Mice fed propolis exhibited significant lower clinical arthritis scores than those fed the control diet. To investigate the mechanism of the effect of propolis on CIA mice, we examined interleukin-17 (IL-17) production in CIA mice fed propolis using an enzyme-linked immunospot assay and flow cytometric analysis. The numbers of IL-17-producing cells in the CIA mice fed propolis were significantly decreased. To determine direct influence of propolis on cytokine production, splenocytes were stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate in the presence of propolis extract in vitro. Concentration-dependent declines in IL-17 expression were observed by ELISA and real-time PCR methods. We further found that propolis significantly inhibited the differentiation of Th17 cells from murine splenocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, our results may provide a new light on the potential mechanism of the immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects of propolis. PMID:21861090

  7. Unmasking of a Protective TNFR1 Mediated Signal in the Collagen Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Skipp, Cheryll; Raman, Thiagarajan; Valuck, Robert J.; Watkins, Herschel; Palmer, Brent E.; Scheinman, Robert I.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: TNFR1 plays a major role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we explore the relative importance of TNFR1 signaling in the hematopoietic tissue compartment for disease progression. METHODS: DBA/1 mice were lethally irradiated and rescued with bone marrow derived from either DBA/1 or TNFR1−/− animals. The mice were then input into the collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model and disease progression characterized. RESULTS: Surprisingly, TNFR1−/− transplant mice input into the CIA model develop increased disease as compared to controls. This could not be attributed to either an increased primary response to collagen or to the contribution of a non-DBA genetic background. Histological markers of advanced disease were evident in TNFR1−/− transplant mice shortly after initiation of the immune response to collagen and long before clinical evidence of disease. Serum TNFα was undetectable while serum IL-12p40 levels were increased in TNFR1−/− transplant mice at the end point of the study. CONCLUSION: These data raise the intriguing possibility of the existence of an anti-inflammatory TNFR1 mediated circuit in the hematopoietic compartment. This circuit bears a resemblance to emerging data delineating a switch in TNFα function observed in the resolution of bacterial infections. These data suggest that TNFR1 mediated signals in the radio-resistant tissues contributes to disease progression while TNFR1 mediated signals in the radio-sensitive tissues can contribute to protection from disease. We thus put forward the hypothesis that the degree of responce to TNFα blockade in RA is dependent, in part, on the relative genetic strengths of these two pathways. PMID:19180511

  8. Antibody-mediated delivery of IL-10 inhibits the progression of established collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Trachsel, Eveline; Bootz, Frank; Silacci, Michela; Kaspar, Manuela; Kosmehl, Hartwig; Neri, Dario

    2007-01-01

    The antibody-mediated targeted delivery of cytokines to sites of disease is a promising avenue for cancer therapy, but it is largely unexplored for the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions. Using both radioactive and fluorescent techniques, the human monoclonal antibodies L19 and G11 (specific to two markers of angiogenesis that are virtually undetectable in normal adult tissues) were found to selectively localize at arthritic sites in the murine collagen-induced model of rheumatoid arthritis following intravenous (i.v.) administration. The same animal model was used to study the therapeutic action of the L19 antibody fused to the cytokines IL-2, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-10. Whereas L19–IL-2 and L19–TNF treatment led to increased arthritic scores and paw swellings, the fusion protein L19–IL-10 displayed a therapeutic activity, which was superior to the activity of IL-10 fused to an antibody of irrelevant specificity in the mouse. The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 has been investigated for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but clinical development plans have been discontinued because of a lack of efficacy. Because the antigen recognised by L19 is strongly expressed at sites of arthritis in humans and identical in both mice and humans, it suggests that the fusion protein L19–IL-10 might help overcome some of the clinical limitations of IL-10 and provide a therapeutic benefit to patients with chronic inflammatory disorders, including arthritis. PMID:17261171

  9. An essential role for mast cells as modulators of neutrophils influx in collagen-induced arthritis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Tatiana Aparecida; Sampaio, Andrxsé Luiz Franco; D’Acquisto, Fulvio; Perretti, Mauro; Oliani, Sonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are involved in immune disorders so that many of the proinflammatory and tissue destructive mediators produced by these cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This scenario prompted us to investigate the correlation between mast cell degranulation and neutrophil influx within the digits and knees joints of arthritic mice assessing what could be the functional role(s) of joint mast cells in the response to collagen immunization. DBA/1J mice were submitted to collagen-induced arthritis and disease was assessed on day 21, 32 and 42 post-immunization. Pharmacological treatment with the glucocorticoid prednisolone, commonly used in the clinic, and nedocromil, a mast cell stabilizer, was performed from day 21 to 30. Arthritis developing after immunization gradually increased up to day 42. Neutrophil infiltration peaked on day 32 and 21, in the digits and knees, respectively, showing an unequal pattern of recruitment between these tissues. This difference emerged for mast cell they peaked in the digits on day 21, but a higher degree of degranulation could be measured in the knee joints. Uneven modulation of arthritis occurred after treatment of mice with prednisolone or nedocromil. Neutrophils migration to the tissue was reduced after both therapies, but only prednisolone augmented mast cell migration to the joints. Nedocromil exerted inhibitory properties both on mast cell proliferation and migration, more effectively on the digit joints. Thus, collagen induced an inflammatory process characterized by tissue mast cells activation and degranulation, suggesting a potential driving force in propagating inflammatory circuits yielding recruitment of neutrophils. However, the different degree of affected joint involvement suggests a time-related implication of digits and knees during collagen-induced arthritis development. These results provide evidence for local alterations whereby mast cells contribute to the initiation of

  10. Hesperidin inhibits collagen-induced arthritis possibly through suppression of free radical load and reduction in neutrophil activation and infiltration.

    PubMed

    Umar, Sadiq; Kumar, Anubhav; Sajad, Mir; Zargan, Jamil; Ansari, Meraj; Ahmad, Sayeed; Katiyar, Chandra Kant; Khan, Haider A

    2013-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone in a chronic phase. Pathology of rheumatoid arthritis suggests autoimmunity linked to inflammation. In our study, rheumatoid arthritis was induced in Wistar rats by intradermal injections of 100 μl of emulsion containing bovine type II collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant at the base of the tail. Disease developed about 13 ± 1 days after immunization and treatment with hesperidin (HES) at a dose of 160 mg kg(-1) body weight was given after onset of disease daily until 20th day. The effect of treatment in the rats was monitored by clinical scoring, biochemical parameters and histological evaluations in joints. A steady increase in the articular elastase, nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation was observed in joints of arthritic rats as compared to control, whereas a significant decrease in reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase activity and catalase was observed in collagen-induced arthritis rats as compared to control group. The results from the present work indicate that the treatment with hesperidin was effective in bringing about significant changes on all the parameters studied in collagen-induced arthritis rats. These data confirm that erosive destruction of the joint cartilage in collagen-induced arthritis is due free radicals released by activated neutrophils and produced by other biochemical pathways. In the present study, an attempt has been made to amelioration of the disease process by a natural product. These results suggest that oral administration of HES could be effective for treating human RA patients. PMID:22527139

  11. Statins accelerate the onset of collagen type II-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Statins (hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) are effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with hyperlipidemia, hypertension, or type II diabetes. Next to their cholesterol-lowering activity, statins have immunomodulatory properties. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that statin use may eventually lead to dysregulation of immune responses, possibly resulting in autoimmunity. We have recently shown in an observational study that statin use was associated with an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. Our objective was to investigate whether a causal relationship could be established for this finding. Methods The mouse collagen type II (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) model was used, with immunization, challenge, and euthanasia at days 0, 21, and 42, respectively. Statins were given orally before (day -28 until day 21) or after (day 21 until day 42) CIA induction. Atorvastatin (0.2 mg/day) or pravastatin (0.8 mg/day) was administered. Arthritis was recorded three times a week. Serum anti-CII autoantibodies and cytokines in supernatants from Concanavalin-A-stimulated lymph node cells and CII-stimulated spleen cells were measured. Results Statin administration accelerated arthritis onset and resulted in 100% arthritic animals, whereas only seven out of 12 nonstatin control animals developed arthritis. Atorvastatin administration after CIA induction resulted in earlier onset than atorvastatin administration before induction, or than pravastatin administration before or after induction. The arthritic score of animals given pravastatin before CIA induction was similar to that of the nonstatin controls, whereas the other groups that received statins showed higher arthritic scores. Atorvastatin administration, especially before CIA induction, increased anti-CII autoantibody production. IL-2 and IL-17 production by lymph node and spleen cells was higher in CIA animals than in PBS

  12. Palmitoylethanolamide and luteolin ameliorate development of arthritis caused by injection of collagen type II in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) is an endogenous fatty acid amide belonging to the family of the N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). Recently, several studies demonstrated that PEA is an important analgesic, antiinflammatory, and neuroprotective mediator. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of co-ultramicronized PEA + luteolin formulation on the modulation of the inflammatory response in mice subjected to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods CIA was induced by an intradermally injection of 100 μl of the emulsion (containing 100 μg of bovine type II collagen (CII)) and complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) at the base of the tail. On day 21, a second injection of CII in CFA was administered. Mice subjected to CIA were administered PEA (10 mg/kg 10% ethanol, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) or co-ultramicronized PEA + luteolin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) every 24 hours, starting from day 25 to 35. Results Mice developed erosive hind-paw arthritis when immunized with CII in CFA. Macroscopic clinical evidence of CIA first appeared as periarticular erythema and edema in the hindpaws. The incidence of CIA was 100% by day 28 in the CII-challenged mice, and the severity of CIA progressed over a 35-day period with a resorption of bone. The histopathology of CIA included erosion of the cartilage at the joint. Treatment with PEA or PEA + luteolin ameliorated the clinical signs at days 26 to 35 and improved histologic status in the joint and paw. The degree of oxidative and nitrosative damage was significantly reduced in PEA + luteolin-treated mice, as indicated by nitrotyrosine and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Plasma levels of the proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were significantly reduced by PEA + luteolin treatment. Conclusions We demonstrated that PEA co-ultramicronized with luteolin exerts an antiinflammatory effect during chronic inflammation and ameliorates CIA. PMID:24246048

  13. Resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in SHPS-1 mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzawa, Chie; Kaneko, Yoriaki; Murata, Yoji; Miyake, Astuko; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okajo, Jun; Tomizawa, Takeshi; Kaneko, Yuka; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Matozaki, Takashi Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2008-07-04

    SHPS-1 is a transmembrane protein that binds the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 through its cytoplasmic region and is abundantly expressed on dendritic cells and macrophages. Here we show that mice expressing a mutant form of SHPS-1 fail to develop type-II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA), a model for rheumatoid arthritis in humans. Histological examinations of the arthritic paws from immunized wild-type mice revealed that cartilage was destroyed in association with marked mononuclear cell infiltration, while only mild cell infiltration was observed in immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice. Consistently, the serum levels of both IgG and IgG2a specific to CII and of IL-1{beta} in immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice were markedly reduced compared with those apparent for wild-type mice. The CII-induced proliferation of, and production of cytokines by, T cells from immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice were reduced compared to wild-type cells. These results suggest that SHPS-1 is essential for development of CIA.

  14. Polymorphism of the MHC class II Eb gene determines the protection against collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Zanelli, E.; Krco, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an animal model of auto immune polyarthritis, sharing similarities with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Paradoxally, susceptibility to mouse CIA is controlled by the H2A loci (DQ homologous) while RA is linked to HLA.DR genes (H2E homologous). We recently showed that the E{beta}{sup d} molecule prevents CIA development in susceptible H2{sup q} mice. We addressed the question of whether H2Eb polymorphism will influence CIA incidence as HLA.DRB1 polymorphism does in RA. In F{sub 1} mice, only H2Eb{sup d} and H2Eb{sup s} molecules showed protection. Using recombinant B10.RDD (Eb{sup d/b}) mice, we found that CIA protection was mediated by the first domain of the E{beta}{sup d} molecule. Using peptides covering the third hypervariable region of the E{beta} chain, we found a perfect correlation between presentation of E{beta} peptides by the H2A{sup q} molecule and protection on CIA. Therefore, the mechanism by which H2Eb protects against CIA seems to rely on the affinity of E{beta} peptides for the H2A{sup q} molecule. 35 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Sympathetic Neurotransmitters Modulate Osteoclastogenesis and Osteoclast Activity in the Context of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Muschter, Dominique; Schäfer, Nicole; Stangl, Hubert; Straub, Rainer H.; Grässel, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Excessive synovial osteoclastogenesis is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Concomitantly, local synovial changes comprise neuronal components of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. Here, we wanted to analyze if collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) alters bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMM) osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity, and how sympathetic neurotransmitters participate in this process. Therefore, BMMs from Dark Agouti rats at different CIA stages were differentiated into osteoclasts in vitro and osteoclast number, cathepsin K activity, matrix resorption and apoptosis were analyzed in the presence of acetylcholine (ACh), noradrenaline (NA) vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and assay-dependent, adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477. We observed modulation of neurotransmitter receptor mRNA expression in CIA osteoclasts without affecting protein level. CIA stage-dependently altered marker gene expression associated with osteoclast differentiation and activity without affecting osteoclast number or activity. Neurotransmitter stimulation modulated osteoclast differentiation, apoptosis and activity. VIP, NA and adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477 inhibited cathepsin K activity and osteoclastogenesis (NKH477, 10-6M NA) whereas ACh mostly acted pro-osteoclastogenic. We conclude that CIA alone does not affect metabolism of in vitro generated osteoclasts whereas stimulation with NA, VIP plus specific activation of adenylyl cyclase induced anti-resorptive effects probably mediated via cAMP signaling. Contrary, we suggest pro-osteoclastogenic and pro-resorptive properties of ACh mediated via muscarinic receptors. PMID:26431344

  16. Acarbose Decreases the Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk of Diabetic Patients and Attenuates the Incidence and Severity of Collagen-induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Hua; Chen, Der-Yuan; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Ming; Wu, Chao-Liang; Lai, Kuo-Lung; Lin, Ching-Heng; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Acarbose has been found to decrease some inflammatory parameters in diabetic patients. This study aimed to examine the influence of acarbose on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) risk in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and on the incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. In a nationwide, matched case–control study, we identified 723 incident RA cases and selected 7,230 age-, sex- and RA diagnosis date–matched controls from all newly treated DM patients. We found that use of acarbose at > 16,950 mg per year was associated with a lower RA risk (odds ratio 0.60; 95% CI, 0.41–0.89). In the CIA mouse study, acarbose was orally administered from days -7 to 38 relative to type II collagen (CII) immunization. The results revealed that acarbose at the dose of 500 mg/kg/day attenuated the incidence and severity of arthritis and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17 in the paw tissues. Acarbose further decreased the productions of anti-CII-IgG, IL-17 and IFN-γ by collagen-reactive lymph node cells. This work suggests that the use of acarbose decreased RA risk in DM patients and the incidence of CIA in mice. Acarbose also attenuated the severity of CIA via anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. PMID:26678745

  17. Treatment with SI000413, a new herbal formula, ameliorates murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee-Hun; Lee, Jeong-Min; Kim, Se-Na; Lee, Seung-Ha; Jun, Sung-Hoon; You, Jae-Hoon; Ahn, Kyoo-Seok; Kang, Hee

    2008-07-01

    We tested the effects of SI000413, a new formula, consisting of Pyrolae herba and Trachelospermi caulis, on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in DBA/1J mice by immunization with bovine type II collagen (CII) on days 1 and 21. SI000413 was orally administered 3 times per week throughout the experiment and indomethacin was served as a positive control. Clinical scores, the count of arthritic legs, levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and anti-CII antibody, and lymphocyte subsets in blood were examined. SI000413 suppressed CIA development in a dose dependent manner and reduced the incidence of arthritic legs in mice. Histological analysis showed administration of SI000413 reduced inflammatory signs and cartilage destruction. Serum levels of IL-6 and anti-CII antibody were significantly decreased in SI000413-treated mice and the percentages of CD4 T cell, CD8 T cell and B cell in blood were restored to normal levels. In conclusion, we demonstrate that SI000413 ameliorates CIA both clinically and histologically and inhibits the production of anti-CII antibody and pro-inflammatory cytokine in the CIA mouse. These findings suggest that SI000413 is a potential new therapeutic herbal formula for the treatment of RA. PMID:18591771

  18. Increased type I collagen degradation correlates with disease severity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hakala, M; Risteli, L; Manelius, J; Nieminen, P; Risteli, J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the extent and clinical significance of type I collagen degradation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS--Serum samples from 90 consecutive patients with RA from a cross-sectional population based study and 90 age- and sex-matched controls were analysed with the new assay of cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP). RESULTS--Patients with RA had significantly higher concentrations of ICTP than the controls. ICTP correlated strongly with measures of impairment in RA, such as the erosive state of joint disease (ES) (r = 0.57, p < 0.001) and Keitel function test (KFT) (r = 0.49, p < 0.001), and more weakly with various disease activity markers. When erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), ES or KFT were used as indicators of disease severity among the patients with disease duration over five years, ICTP distinguished the more serious RA from milder cases. CONCLUSIONS--Elevated serum concentrations of ICTP are common in RA and are associated with signs of aggressive disease. PMID:8311537

  19. Photodynamic therapy using talaporfin sodium for synovial membrane from rheumatoid arthritis patients and collagen-induced arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Torikai, Eiji; Kageyama, Yasunori; Kohno, Eiji; Hirano, Toru; Koide, Yukio; Terakawa, Susumu; Nagano, Akira

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using talaporfin sodium as a new method of synovectomy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We first used RA synovial membrane (RASM) for in vitro and in vivo study. The RASM was obtained from patients with RA during total knee replacement. In the in vitro study, RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (RASCs) obtained from the RASM were examined by fluorescent microscopy to measure the intracellular localization of talaporfin sodium. The cells were then subjected to PDT, and their viability was examined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium inner salt assay. In the in vivo assay, RASM was obtained as described above, grafted onto severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice and subjected to PDT. The damaged area of RASM was evaluated histologically at 1 day after PDT. Next, we performed a separate experiment using rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). After intra-articular injection of talaporfin sodium, the concentration of talaporfin sodium accumulated in the CIA synovial membrane (CIASM) was compared with that in cartilage, periarticular muscle, and skin. We then performed PDT with intra-articular injection of talaporfin sodium and intra-articular irradiation. The damaged area of the CIASM was measured at 1 day after the PDT, and the articular histological and radiological changes of the ankle were observed at 56 days after the PDT. In RASM, talaporfin sodium accumulated in lysosomes in vitro, and the phototoxicity to RASCs in vitro and to RASM grafted onto SCID mice in vivo depended on the concentration of talaporfin sodium and the laser energy. In CIA rats, there was a greater accumulation of talaporfin sodium in the CIASM than in normal tissue. The CIASM was selectively damaged at 1 day after the PDT, and the bone and cartilage destruction were ameliorated at 56 days after the PDT. In conclusion, PDT using talaporfin sodium might be a new method for

  20. Effects of low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, So Yean; Sim, Joon-Soo; Jeong, Choon Sik; Chang, Seung Yeup; Choi, Don Woong; Toida, Toshihiko; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2004-01-01

    In order to evaluate the improvement in the treatment of chronic arthritis, we investigated chondroitin sulfate depolymerization product (low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate, LMWCS) and intact chondroitin sulfate (CS) in vitro and in vivo. LMWCS was prepared by a chemical depolymerization process induced by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of copper salts. LMWCS (300 mg/kg) and CS (1200 mg/kg) were orally administered to DBA/1J mice once daily for 14 d prior to initial immunization with type II collagen. Their elastase activities and the production of cytokines in sera were examined on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice. We also compared the paracellular transport of LMWCS and CS across Caco-2 cell monolayers and examined the inhibitory effects on elastase activities. LMWCS inhibited elastase activity slightly, but CS did not show inhibition. Hind paw edema was significantly decreased by LMWCS treatment. Levels of anti-type II collagen antibody and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in sera were also reduced by LMWCS treatment but not in case of CS, although no significant difference was observed between LMWCS and CS on interleukin-6 (IL-6) induction. The LMWCS preparation showed preventive effects on the type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and better permeability through Caco-2 cells. PMID:14709897

  1. Polymerized-Type I Collagen Induces Upregulation of Foxp3-Expressing CD4 Regulatory T Cells and Downregulation of IL-17-Producing CD4+ T Cells (Th17) Cells in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Macip-Rodríguez, Perla; Galindo-Feria, Angeles S.; Cruz-Robles, David; Soto-Abraham, Virgina; Escobar-Hernández, Sergio; Aguilar, Diana; Alpizar-Rodríguez, Deshiré; Férez-Blando, Karen; Llorente, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that polymerized-type I collagen (polymerized collagen) exhibits potent immunoregulatory properties. This work evaluated the effect of intramuscular administration of polymerized collagen in early and established collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and analyzed changes in Th subsets following therapy. Incidence of CIA was of 100% in mice challenged with type II collagen. Clinimorphometric analysis showed a downregulation of inflammation after administration of all treatments (P < 0.05). Histological analysis showed that the CIA-mice group had extensive bone erosion, pannus and severe focal inflammatory infiltrates. In contrast, there was a remarkable reduction in the severity of arthritis in mice under polymerized collagen, methotrexate or methotrexate/polymerized collagen treatment. Polymerized Collagen but not methotrexate induced tissue joint regeneration. Polymerized Collagen and methotrexate/polymerized collagen but not methotrexate alone induces downregulation of CD4+/IL17A+ T cells and upregulation of Tregs and CD4+/IFN-γ+ T cells. Thus, Polymerized Collagen could be an effective therapeutic agent in early and established rheumatoid arthritis by exerting downregulation of autoimmune inflammation. PMID:22028728

  2. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-mediated tryptophan catabolism accelerates collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Szántó, Sándor; Koreny, Tamás; Mikecz, Katalin; Glant, Tibor T; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Varga, John

    2007-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is one of the initial and rate-limiting enzymes involved in the catabolism of the essential amino acid tryptophan. In cultured cells, the induction of IDO leads to depletion of tryptophan and tryptophan starvation. Recent studies suggest that modulation of tryptophan concentration via IDO plays a fundamental role in innate immune responses. Induction of IDO by interferon-gamma in macrophages and dendritic cells results in tryptophan depletion and suppresses the immune-mediated activation of fibroblasts and T, B, and natural killer cells. To assess the role of IDO in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a model of rheumatoid arthritis characterized by a primarily Th1-like immune response, activity of IDO was inhibited by 1-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT) in vivo. The results showed significantly increased incidence and severity of CIA in mice treated with 1-MT. Activity of IDO, as determined by measuring the levels of kynurenine/tryptophan ratio in the sera, was increased in the acute phase of arthritis and was higher in collagen-immunized mice that did not develop arthritis. Treatment with 1-MT resulted in an enhanced cellular and humoral immune response and a more dominant polarization to Th1 in mice with arthritis compared with vehicle-treated arthritic mice. The results demonstrated that development of CIA was associated with increased IDO activity and enhanced tryptophan catabolism in mice. Blocking IDO with 1-MT aggravated the severity of arthritis and enhanced the immune responses. These findings suggest that IDO may play an important and novel role in the negative feedback of CIA and possibly in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:17511858

  3. IL-10-producing regulatory B10 cells ameliorate collagen-induced arthritis via suppressing Th17 cell generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Deng, Jun; Liu, Yang; Ko, King-Hung; Wang, Xiaohui; Jiao, Zhijun; Wang, Shengjun; Hua, Zichun; Sun, Lingyun; Srivastava, Gopesh; Lau, Chak-Sing; Cao, Xuetao; Lu, Liwei

    2012-06-01

    IL-10-producing CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, have been shown to possess a regulatory function in the inhibition of immune responses, but whether and how B10 cells suppress the development of autoimmune arthritis remain largely unclear. In this study, we detected significantly decreased numbers of IL-10-producing B cells, but increased IL-17-producing CD4(+) T (Th17) cells in both spleen and draining lymph nodes of mice during the acute stage of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) when compared with adjuvant-treated control mice. On adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded B10 cells, collagen-immunized mice showed a marked delay of arthritis onset with reduced severity of both clinical symptoms and joint damage, accompanied by a substantial reduction in the number of Th17 cells. To determine whether B10 cells directly inhibit the generation of Th17 cells in culture, naive CD4(+) T cells labeled with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) were co-cultured with B10 cells. These B10 cells suppressed Th17 cell differentiation via the reduction of STAT3 phosphorylation and retinoid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) expression. Moreover, Th17 cells showed significantly decreased proliferation when co-cultured with B10 cells. Although adoptive transfer of Th17 cells triggered the development of collagen-induced arthritis in IL-17(-/-)DBA/1J mice, co-transfer of B10 cells with Th17 cells profoundly delayed the onset of arthritis. Thus, our findings suggest a novel regulatory role of B10 cells in arthritic progression via the suppression of Th17 cell generation. PMID:22538089

  4. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Systemic Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Manasa G; Kour, Supinder; Piprode, Vikrant; Mittal, Monika; Kumar, Anil; Rani, Lekha; Pote, Satish T; Mishra, Gyan C; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammatory synovitis leading to joint destruction and systemic bone loss. The inflammation-induced bone loss is mediated by increased osteoclast formation and function. Current antirheumatic therapies primarily target suppression of inflammatory cascade with limited or no success in controlling progression of bone destruction. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by virtue of their tissue repair and immunomodulatory properties have shown promising results in various autoimmune and degenerative diseases. However, the role of MSCs in prevention of bone destruction in RA is not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) on in vitro formation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and pathological bone loss in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA. We observed that ASCs significantly inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis in both a contact-dependent and -independent manner. Additionally, ASCs inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-17, and IL-1β. Furthermore, treatment with ASCs at the onset of CIA significantly reduced clinical symptoms and joint pathology. Interestingly, ASCs protected periarticular and systemic bone loss in CIA mice by maintaining trabecular bone structure. We further observed that treatment with ASCs reduced osteoclast precursors in bone marrow, resulting in decreased osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, ASCs suppressed autoimmune T cell responses and increased the percentages of peripheral regulatory T and B cells. Thus, we provide strong evidence that ASCs ameliorate inflammation-induced systemic bone loss in CIA mice by reducing osteoclast precursors and promoting immune tolerance. PMID:26538398

  5. Treatment of Collagen-Induced Arthritis Using Immune Modulatory Properties of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyu-Hyung; Mun, Chin Hee; Kang, Mi-Il; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Soo-Kon; Park, Yong-Beom

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immune modulatory properties. We investigated the potential therapeutic effects of human bone marrow (BM)-, adipose tissue (AD)-, and cord blood (CB)-derived MSCs in an experimental animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and explored the mechanism underlying immune modulation by MSCs. We evaluated the therapeutic effect of clinically available human BM-, AD-, and CB-derived MSCs in DBA/1 mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA mice were injected intraperitoneally with three types of MSCs. Treatment control animals were injected with 35 mg/kg methotrexate (MTX) twice weekly. Clinical activity in CIA mice, degree of inflammation, cytokine expression in the joint, serum cytokine levels, and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were evaluated. Mice treated with human BM-, AD-, and CB-MSCs showed significant improvement in clinical joint score, comparable to MTX-treated mice. Histologic examination showed greatly reduced joint inflammation and damage in MSC-treated mice compared with untreated mice. Microcomputed tomography also showed little joint damage in the MSC-treated group. MSCs significantly decreased serum interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, and interferon-γ and increased IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β levels. Tregs were increased in mice treated with MSCs compared to untreated or MTX-treated mice. Human BM-, AD-, and CB-MSCs significantly suppressed joint inflammation in CIA mice. The cells decreased proinflammatory cytokines and upregulated anti-inflammatory cytokines and induced Tregs. Therefore, our study suggests that the use of human BM-, AD-, and CB-MSCs could be an effective therapeutic approach for RA. PMID:25853338

  6. Autoantibodies to type II collagen: occurrence in rheumatoid arthritis, other arthritides, autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and chronic inflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, E K; Gatenby, P A; McGill, N W; Bateman, J F; Cole, W G; York, J R

    1988-01-01

    Serum IgG antibodies to native and denatured human type II collagen (Col II) were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). One hundred and thirty one patients with various forms of arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis (PSA). Reiter's Syndrome (RS), osteoarthritis (OA), and gout, 60 with autoimmune connective tissue disease, and 37 with the chronic inflammatory conditions--graft versus host disease and leprosy--were studied. With the exception of RS, PSA, OA, and gout, significant levels of Col II antibodies were detected in each disease group. Blocking studies with types I and II collagen on selected serum samples confirmed the specificity to native Col II, though some cross reactivity was apparent with denatured collagen. The patients with RA who were Col II antibody positive tended to fall into stage III of disease progression. There was, however, no correlation with rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, or disease duration and this, together with the finding that Col II antibodies are present in a wide array of diseases, makes their role in the pathogenesis of RA questionable. They may arise as a secondary disease perpetuating mechanism in some patients, or in turn may be an epiphenomenon secondary to generalised disturbed immunoregulation or B cell hyperreactivity, or both, that characterises these clinical conditions. PMID:3365030

  7. Effects of Wutou Decoction on DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications in Rats with Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying; Hu, Yong-Hong; Tu, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wutou decoction (WTD) has been wildly applied in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and experimental arthritis in rats for many years. Epigenetic deregulation is associated with the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the effects of WTD on epigenetic changes are unclear. This study is set to explore the effects of WTD on DNA methylation and histone modifications in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The CIA model was established by the stimulation of collagen and adjuvant. The knee synovium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methylated CpG binding domain 2 (MBD2) expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by Real-Time PCR. The global DNA histone H3-K4/H3-K27 methylation and total histones H3 and H4 acetylation of PBMCs were detected. Results. Our data demonstrated that the DNMT1 mRNA expression was significantly lowered in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). The DNA methylation level was significantly reduced in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). Moreover, H3 acetylation of PBMCs was overexpressed in WTD compared with CIA (P < 0.05). Conclusions. WTD may modulate DNA methylation and histone modifications, functioning as anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:27042192

  8. Effects of Wutou Decoction on DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications in Rats with Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Fei; Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying; Hu, Yong-Hong; Tu, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wutou decoction (WTD) has been wildly applied in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and experimental arthritis in rats for many years. Epigenetic deregulation is associated with the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the effects of WTD on epigenetic changes are unclear. This study is set to explore the effects of WTD on DNA methylation and histone modifications in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The CIA model was established by the stimulation of collagen and adjuvant. The knee synovium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methylated CpG binding domain 2 (MBD2) expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by Real-Time PCR. The global DNA histone H3-K4/H3-K27 methylation and total histones H3 and H4 acetylation of PBMCs were detected. Results. Our data demonstrated that the DNMT1 mRNA expression was significantly lowered in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). The DNA methylation level was significantly reduced in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). Moreover, H3 acetylation of PBMCs was overexpressed in WTD compared with CIA (P < 0.05). Conclusions. WTD may modulate DNA methylation and histone modifications, functioning as anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:27042192

  9. Type 1 regulatory T cells specific for collagen type II as an efficient cell-based therapy in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Regulatory T (Treg) cells play a crucial role in preventing autoimmune diseases and are an ideal target for the development of therapies designed to suppress inflammation in an antigen-specific manner. Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are defined by their capacity to produce high levels of interleukin 10 (IL-10), which contributes to their ability to suppress pathological immune responses in several settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of collagen type II–specific Tr1 (Col-Treg) cells in two models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in mice. Methods Col-Treg clones were isolated and expanded from collagen-specific TCR transgenic mice. Their cytokine secretion profile and phenotype characterization were studied. The therapeutic potential of Col-Treg cells was evaluated after adoptive transfer in collagen-antibody– and collagen-induced arthritis models. The in vivo suppressive mechanism of Col-Treg clones on effector T-cell proliferation was also investigated. Results Col-Treg clones are characterized by their specific cytokine profile (IL-10highIL-4negIFN-γint) and mediate contact-independent immune suppression. They also share with natural Tregs high expression of GITR, CD39 and granzyme B. A single infusion of Col-Treg cells reduced the incidence and clinical symptoms of arthritis in both preventive and curative settings, with a significant impact on collagen type II antibodies. Importantly, injection of antigen-specific Tr1 cells decreased the proliferation of antigen-specific effector T cells in vivo significantly. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of Col-Treg cells in two models of RA, providing evidence that Col-Treg could be an efficient cell-based therapy for RA patients whose disease is refractory to current treatments. PMID:24886976

  10. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or have trouble moving around, you might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints ... joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such ...

  11. Repeated Electroacupuncture Persistently Elevates Adenosine and Ameliorates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tian-shen; Du, Zhong-heng; Li, Zhi-hui; Xie, Wen-xia; Huang, Ka-te; Chen, Yong; Chen, Zhou-yang; Hu, Huan; Wang, Jun-lu; Fang, Jian-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the effect of repeated electroacupuncture (EA) over 21 days on the adenosine concentration in peripheral blood of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Wistar rats were divided into three groups of 6 animals each: sham-control, CIA-control, and CIA-EA. We determined the adenosine concentration in peripheral blood and assessed pathological changes of ankle joints. Quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine mRNA levels of ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73), adenosine deaminase (ADA), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect expression of ADA and CD73 in synovial tissue. Repeated EA treatment on CIA resulted in the persistence of high concentrations of adenosine in peripheral blood, significantly reduced pathological scores, TNF-α mRNA concentrations, and synovial hyperplasia. Importantly, EA treatment led to a significant increase in CD73 mRNA levels in peripheral blood but was associated with a decrease of CD73 immunostaining in synovial tissue. In addition, EA treatment resulted in a significant decrease of both ADA mRNA levels in peripheral blood and ADA immunostaining in synovial tissue. Thus, repeated EA treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effect on CIA by increasing the concentration of adenosine. The mechanism of EA action may involve the modulation of CD73 and ADA expression levels. PMID:26941824

  12. Overexpression of ADAMTS-7 leads to accelerated initiation and progression of collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuying; Wei, Fanhua; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine whether ADAMTS-7 contributes to the onset and severity of joint inflammation in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis. ADAMTS-7 was found to be elevated in the course of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA).. ADAMTS-7 transgenic (TG) mice were more susceptible to the induction of CIA. The onset of CIA was accelerated and the arthritic severity was increased in TG mice compared to wild type mice. The overall incidence was also significantly higher in TG mice. In addition, arthritic TG mice displayed significantly higher clinical and histological arthritis scores. The COMP degradative fragments were significantly elevated in articular cartilage and sera in CIA models of TG mice. Furthermore, the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) were also increased in serum and draining lymph nodes of arthritic TG mice. Therefore, these data provided the in vivo evidence, suggesting that ADAMTS-7 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis, and that inhibition of ADAMTS-7 may be a potential target to ameliorate the severity of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:25742929

  13. Regulation of pathogenic IL-17 responses in collagen-induced arthritis: roles of endogenous interferon-gamma and IL-4

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Interleukin (IL)-17 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and the mouse model collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Interferon(IFN)-γ and IL-4 have been shown to suppress Th17 development in vitro, but their potential immunoregulatory roles in vivo are uncertain. The goals of this study were to determine the relationship between Th17 responses and disease severity in CIA and to assess regulation of IL-17 by endogenous IFN-γ and IL-4. Methods DBA1/LacJ mice were immunized with type II collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) to induce arthritis, and treated with neutralizing antibody to IFN-γ and/or IL-4. Systemic IL-17, IFN-γ, and IL-4 were measured in serum. At the peak of disease, cytokine production was measured by ELISA of supernatants from spleen, lymph node and paw cultures. Paws were also scored for histologic severity of arthritis. Results Joint inflammation was associated with a higher ratio of systemic IL-17/IFN-γ. Neutralization of IFN-γ accelerated the course of CIA and was associated with increased IL-17 levels in the serum and joints. The IFN-γ/IL-4/IL-17 responses in the lymphoid organ were distinct from such responses in the joints. Neutralization of IL-4 led to increased arthritis only in the absence of IFN-γ and was associated with increased bone and cartilage damage without an increase in the levels of IL-17. Conclusions IL-4 and IFN-γ both play protective roles in CIA, but through different mechanisms. Our data suggests that the absolute level of IL-17 is not the only determinant of joint inflammation. Instead, the balance of Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokines control the immune events leading to joint inflammation. PMID:19852819

  14. Dynamic activation of bone morphogenetic protein signaling in collagen-induced arthritis supports their role in joint homeostasis and disease

    PubMed Central

    Daans, Melina; Lories, Rik JU; Luyten, Frank P

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease affecting peripheral joints and leading to loss of joint function. The severity and outcome of disease are dependent on the balance between inflammatory/destructive and homeostatic or repair pathways. Increasing evidence suggests a role for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in joint homeostasis and disease. Methods Activation of BMP signaling in collagen-induced arthritis as a model of rheumatoid arthritis was studied by immunohistochemistry and Western blot for phosphorylated SMAD1/5 at different time points. Expression of different BMP ligands and noggin, a BMP antagonist, was determined on synovium and cartilage extracts of arthritic knees, at different time points, with quantitative polymerase chain reaction. At the protein level, BMP2 and BMP7 were studied with immunohistochemistry. Finally, the effect of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) treatment on the expression of BMP2, BMP7, and growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF5) in synovium and cartilage of arthritic knees was investigated. Results A time-dependent activation of the BMP signaling pathway in collagen-induced arthritis was demonstrated with a dynamic and characteristic expression pattern of different BMP subfamily members in synovium and cartilage of arthritic knees. As severity increases, the activation of BMP signaling becomes more prominent in the invasive pannus tissue. BMP2 is present in cartilage and the hyperplastic lining layer. BMP7 is found in the sublining zone and inflammatory infiltrate. Treatment with etanercept slowed down progression of disease, but no change in expression of GDF5, BMP2, and BMP7 in synovium was found; in the cartilage, however, blocking of TNFα increased the expression of BMP7. Conclusions BMP signaling is dynamically activated in collagen-induced arthritis and is partly TNFα-independent. TNFα blocking increased the expression of BMP7 in the articular cartilage, possibly

  15. Cartilage specific collagen activates macrophages and the alternative pathway of complement: evidence for an immunopathogenic concept of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hanauske-Abel, H M; Pontz, B F; Schorlemmer, H U

    1982-01-01

    We studied the effect of human interstitial collagen types I, II, and III on serum-free cultured mouse macrophages and on the complement classical and alternative pathways in human and guinea-pig serum. Type II collagen produced a dose-dependent consumption and conversion of C3 and factor B both in the homologous and in the heterologous system. This effect on the alternative pathway was reproduced in genetically C4-deficient guinea-pig serum and could be triggered by native, triple helical type II molecules, by their component alpha chains, and the CNBr peptide mixture. Addition of type II collagen to the mouse macrophage cultures induced not only a dose- and time-dependent secretion of lysosomal enzymes, but also the generation of a supernatant factor cytotoxic for mouse mastocytoma P 815 cells. Collagen of types I and III were conspicuously less active or inactive in all assays. The studies demonstrate properties of the collagen specific for cartilage which, on a molecular level, suggest its direct, local participation in the production and perpetuation of rheumatoid arthritis. Images PMID:7073345

  16. Lupeol acetate ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis and osteoclastogenesis of mice through improvement of microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Hsun; Chuang, Hui-Yen; Chen, Chien-Hui; Chen, Wun-Ke; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2016-04-01

    Lupeol has been shown with anti-inflammation and antitumor capability, however, the poor bioavailability limiting its applications in living subjects. Lupeol acetate (LA), a derivative of lupeol, shows similar biological activities as lupeol but with better bioavailability. Here RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were treated with 0-80μM of LA, and assayed for TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, MCP-1 using Western blotting. Moreover, osteoclatogenesis was examined with reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. For in vivo study, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA)-bearing DBA/1J mice were randomly separated into three groups: vehicle, LA-treated (50mg/kg) and curcumin-treated (100mg/kg). Therapeutic efficacies were assayed by the clinical score, expression levels of serum cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) microPET/CT and histopathology. The results showed that LA could inhibit the activation, migration, and formation of osteoclastogenesis of macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. In RA-bearing mice, the expressions of inflammation-related cytokines were suppressed, and clinical symptoms and bone erosion were ameliorated by LA. The accumulation of (18)F-FDG in the joints of RA-bearing mice was also significantly decreased by LA. The results indicate that LA significantly improves the symptoms of RA by down-regulating expressions of inflammatory cytokines and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:27044833

  17. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells contribute to bone erosion in collagen-induced arthritis by differentiating to osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Huang, Yuefang; Wang, Shuang; Fu, Rong; Guo, Chaohuan; Wang, Hongyue; Zhao, Jijun; Gaskin, Felicia; Chen, Jingxian; Yang, Niansheng; Fu, Shu Man

    2015-12-01

    Bone erosion is a sign of severe rheumatoid arthritis and osteoclasts play a major role in the bone resorption. Recently, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) has been reported to be increased in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The number of circulating MDSCs is shown to correlate with rheumatoid arthritis. These findings suggest that MDSCs are precursor cells involved in bone erosion. In this study, MDSCs isolated from mice with CIA stimulated with M-CSF and RANKL in vitro expressed osteoclast markers and acquired osteoclast bone resorption function. MDSCs sorted from CIA mice were transferred into the tibia of normal DBA/1J mice and bones were subjected to histological and Micro CT analyses. The transferred CIA-MDSCs were shown to differentiate into TRAP(+) osteoclasts that were capable of bone resorption in vivo. MDSCs isolated from normal mice had more potent suppressor activity and much less capability to differentiate to osteoclast. Additional experiments showed that NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 or IκB inhibitor peptide blocked the differentiation of MDSCs to osteoclast and bone resorption. IL-1Ra also blocked this differentiation. In contrast, the addition of IL-1α further enhanced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. These results suggest that MDSCs are a source of osteoclast precursors and inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, contributing significantly to erosive changes seen in rheumatoid arthritis and related disorders. PMID:26318644

  18. Evaluation of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody therapy using murine type II collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bailin; Song, Zheng; Wu, Bin; Gardner, Debra; Shealy, David; Song, Xiao-Yu; Wooley, Paul H

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that is critical for T/B-cell differentiation and maturation, immunoglobulin secretion, acute-phase protein production, and macrophage/monocyte functions. Extensive research into the biology of IL-6 has implicated IL-6 in the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of RA. An anti-murine IL-6 mAb that neutralizes mouse IL-6 activities was tested in animal model of collagen-induced arthritis. Prophylactic treatment with anti-IL-6 mAb significantly reduced the incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control mAb treated mice. The mitogenic response of B and T cells isolated from the lymph nodes of anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced compared to cells isolated from control mAb treated mice. The overall histopathology score for paws from the anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced when compared to paws from mice treated with control mAb, including both inflammatory (synovitis and pannus) and erosive (erosions and architecture) parameters. Reduced loss of cartilage matrix components was also observed in the anti-IL-6 treated mice. Collectively, these data suggest that IL-6 plays a major role in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus support the potential benefit of anti-IL-6 mAb treatment in rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:19368720

  19. Immunosuppressive activity of deer antler extracts of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, on type II collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Koo; Kim, Kap-Sung; Kim, Sung-Il; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Lee, In-Seon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2006-01-01

    Unossified horn or pilose antler cut from deer, which belong to the Cervidae generally is termed Nokyong. Nokyong is one of the most famous Korean traditional medicines and has been considered to possess sexual-reinforcing and antiaging actions. In this study, water extract of deer antler extract (DAA) prepared from the growing antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe was used to investigate the efficacy of the DAA on the development of type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Male rats were immunized with an emulsion of 200 microg of CII and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The rats then were administered by injection a suspension of DAA or phosphate-buffered saline. The effect of DAA on cellular responses to CII was examined. The injection of DAA suppressed the CII-specific secretion of interferon (IFN)-gamma from splenocytes ex vivo. The influence of DAA also was evaluated on the incidence and development of arthritis in rat CIA. Rats were immunized twice at a 3-wk interval with bovine CII, with DAA being given by injection once a d for 14 d with four different regimens. A 14-d course of DAA treatment at a daily dose of 100 microg/kg, which began on the d of the first CII immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis, as well as antibody formation and delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII. Treatment with DAA resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and immune responses to CII. PMID:16759146

  20. Immune regulation and anti-inflammatory effects of isogarcinol extracted from Garcinia mangostana L. against collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanxia; Zhou, Hailing; Wang, Mengqi; Cen, Juren; Wei, Qun

    2014-05-01

    Isogarcinol is a natural compound that we extracted from Garcinia mangostana L., and we were the first to report that it is a new immunosuppressant. In the present study, we investigated the immune regulation and anti-inflammatory effects of isogarcinol on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and explored its potential mechanism in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The oral administration of isogarcinol significantly reduced clinical scores, alleviated cartilage and bone erosion, and reduced the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines in CIA mice. Isogarcinol inhibited xylene-induced mouse ear edema in vivo. In vitro, isogarcinol decreased iNOS and COX-2 mRNA expression and NO content by inhibiting NF-κB expression. Furthermore, isogarcinol decreased the activity of NFAT and inhibited IL-2 expression. The mechanism of action of isogarcinol is associated with down-regulation of both autoimmune and inflammatory reactions. PMID:24738849

  1. Collagen-induced arthritis in the BB rat. Prevention of disease by treatment with CTLA-4-Ig.

    PubMed Central

    Knoerzer, D B; Karr, R W; Schwartz, B D; Mengle-Gaw, L J

    1995-01-01

    Antigen-specific T cell activation requires two independent signalling events, one mediated through T cell receptor engagement by the antigen-presenting cell-expressed peptide/class II major histocompatibility complex, and the second through the cognate interactions of costimulatory molecules expressed on the T cell and antigen-presenting cell. There is evidence from in vitro and in vivo experimental systems suggesting that the CD28/B7 costimulatory pathway is crucial for induction of maximal T cell proliferation and T helper-B cell collaboration for IgG production. This pathway can be blocked by CTLA-4-Ig, a soluble form of CTLA-4 which binds with high avidity to the CD28 ligands, B7-1 and B7-2. Here, we show that CTLA-4-Ig treatment prevents clinical and histological manifestations of disease in a collagen-induced arthritis model of rheumatoid arthritis in the diabetes resistant BB/Wor rat, when therapy is initiated before immunization with bovine type II collagen (BIIC). Anti-BIIC antibody titers are reduced in CTLA-4-Ig-treated rats compared to diseased control animals. Histologically, joints from CTLA-4-Ig-treated animals show no histological abnormalities, in contrast to control antibody-treated animals, which show complete erosion of the articular cartilage and bone. Despite the efficacy of CTLA-4-Ig in preventing clinical and histological signs of arthritis and reducing antibody responses to BIIC, delayed type hypersensitivity responses to collagen 18 d or more after CTLA-4-Ig treatment ends are similar in CTLA-4-Ig-treated and untreated rats, suggesting that the prolonged disease suppression observed does not result from induction of T cell anergy. Images PMID:7543497

  2. Induction of PNAd and N-acetylglucosamine 6-O-sulfotransferases 1 and 2 in mouse collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiwei; Rosen, Steven D; Bendele, Philip; Hemmerich, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Background Leukocyte recruitment across blood vessels is fundamental to immune surveillance and inflammation. Lymphocyte homing to peripheral lymph nodes is mediated by the adhesion molecule, L-selectin, which binds to sulfated carbohydrate ligands on high endothelial venules (HEV). These glycoprotein ligands are collectively known as peripheral node addressin (PNAd), as defined by the function-blocking monoclonal antibody known as MECA-79. The sulfation of these ligands depends on the action of two HEV-expressed N-acetylglucosamine 6-O-sulfotransferases: GlcNAc6ST-2 and to a lesser degree GlcNAc6ST-1. Induction of PNAd has also been shown to occur in a number of human inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Results In order to identify an animal model suitable for investigating the role of PNAd in chronic inflammation, we examined the expression of PNAd as well as GlcNAc6ST-1 and -2 in collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Here we show that PNAd is expressed in the vasculature of arthritic synovium in mice immunized with collagen but not in the normal synovium of control animals. This de novo expression of PNAd correlates strongly with induction of transcripts for both GlcNAc6ST-1 and GlcNAc6ST-2, as well as the expression of GlcNAc6ST-2 protein. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that PNAd and the sulfotransferases GlcNAc6ST-1 and 2 are induced in mouse collagen-induced arthritis and suggest that PNAd antagonists or inhibitors of the enzymes may have therapeutic benefit in this widely-used mouse model of RA. PMID:16772045

  3. Dopamine D2 Receptor Is Involved in Alleviation of Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Yi-Qian; Deng, Qiao-Wen; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Human and murine lymphocytes express dopamine (DA) D2-like receptors including DRD2, DRD3, and DRD4. However, their roles in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are less clear. Here we showed that lymphocyte DRD2 activation alleviates both imbalance of T-helper (Th)17/T-regulatory (Treg) cells and inflamed symptoms in a mouse arthritis model of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was prepared by intradermal injection of chicken collagen type II (CII) in tail base of DBA/1 mice or Drd2−/− C57BL/6 mice. D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole downregulated expression of proinflammatory Th17-related cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 17 and IL-22 but further upregulated expression of anti-inflammatory Treg-related cytokines transforming growth factor- (TGF-) β and IL-10 in lymphocytes in vitro and in ankle joints in vivo in CIA mice. Quinpirole intraperitoneal administration reduced both clinical arthritis score and serum anti-CII IgG level in CIA mice. However, Drd2−/− CIA mice manifested more severe limb inflammation and higher serum anti-CII IgG level and further upregulated IL-17 and IL-22 expression and downregulated TGF-β and IL-10 expression than wild-type CIA mice. In contrast, Drd1−/− CIA mice did not alter limb inflammation or anti-CII IgG level compared with wild-type CIA mice. These results suggest that DRD2 activation is involved in alleviation of CIA symptoms by amelioration of Th17/Treg imbalance. PMID:26693483

  4. Dopamine D2 Receptor Is Involved in Alleviation of Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Yi-Qian; Deng, Qiao-Wen; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Human and murine lymphocytes express dopamine (DA) D2-like receptors including DRD2, DRD3, and DRD4. However, their roles in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are less clear. Here we showed that lymphocyte DRD2 activation alleviates both imbalance of T-helper (Th)17/T-regulatory (Treg) cells and inflamed symptoms in a mouse arthritis model of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was prepared by intradermal injection of chicken collagen type II (CII) in tail base of DBA/1 mice or Drd2 (-/-) C57BL/6 mice. D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole downregulated expression of proinflammatory Th17-related cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 17 and IL-22 but further upregulated expression of anti-inflammatory Treg-related cytokines transforming growth factor- (TGF-) β and IL-10 in lymphocytes in vitro and in ankle joints in vivo in CIA mice. Quinpirole intraperitoneal administration reduced both clinical arthritis score and serum anti-CII IgG level in CIA mice. However, Drd2 (-/-) CIA mice manifested more severe limb inflammation and higher serum anti-CII IgG level and further upregulated IL-17 and IL-22 expression and downregulated TGF-β and IL-10 expression than wild-type CIA mice. In contrast, Drd1 (-/-) CIA mice did not alter limb inflammation or anti-CII IgG level compared with wild-type CIA mice. These results suggest that DRD2 activation is involved in alleviation of CIA symptoms by amelioration of Th17/Treg imbalance. PMID:26693483

  5. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when taking arthritis medicines . Over-the-counter medicines: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is often the first medicine tried. Take up to 4000 mg a day (two arthritis-strength Tylenol every 8 hours). To prevent damage to your ...

  6. Non-Enzymatic Decomposition of Collagen Fibers by a Biglycan Antibody and a Plausible Mechanism for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2013-04-08

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune inflammatory and destructive joint disorder that affects tens of millions of people worldwide. Normal healthy joints maintain a balance between the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and the proteolytic degradation of damaged ones. In the case of RA, this balance is shifted toward matrix destruction due to increased production of cleavage enzymes and the presence of (autoimmune) immunoglobulins resulting from an inflammation induced immune response. Herein we demonstrate that a polyclonal antibody against the proteoglycan biglycan (BG) causes tissue destruction that may be analogous to that of RA affected tissues. The effect of the antibody is more potent than harsh chemical and/or enzymatic treatments designed to mimic arthritis-like fibril de-polymerization. In RA cases, the immune response to inflammation causes synovial fibroblasts, monocytes and macrophages to produce cytokines and secrete matrix remodeling enzymes, whereas B cells are stimulated to produce immunoglobulins. The specific antigen that causes the RA immune response has not yet been identified, although possible candidates have been proposed, including collagen types I and II, and proteoglycans (PG's) such as biglycan. We speculate that the initiation of RA associated tissue destruction in vivo may involve a similar non-enzymatic decomposition of collagen fibrils via the immunoglobulins themselves that we observe here ex vivo.

  7. Enhanced immunoregulation of mesenchymal stem cells by IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T cells in collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jung-Yeon; Im, Keon-Il; Lee, Eun-Sol; Kim, Nayoun; Nam, Young-Sun; Jeon, Young-Woo; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties and have potential, however, there have been conflicting reports regarding their effects in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which causes inflammation and destruction of the joints. Through a comparative analysis of regulatory T (Treg) and IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells, we hypothesized that Tr1 cells enhance the immunoregulatory functions of MSCs, and that a combinatorial approach to cell therapy may exert synergistic immunomodulatory effects in an experimental animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A combination of MSCs and Tr1 cells prevented the development of destructive arthritis compared to single cell therapy. These therapeutic effects were associated with an increase in type II collagen (CII)-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells and inhibition of CII-specific CD4+IL-17+ T cells. We observed that Tr1 cells produce high levels of IL-10-dependent interferon (IFN)-β, which induces toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 expression in MSCs. Moreover, induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by TLR3 involved an autocrine IFN-β that was dependent on STAT1 signaling. Furthermore, we observed that production of IFN-β and IL-10 in Tr1 cells synergistically induces IDO in MSCs through the STAT1 pathway. These findings suggest co-administration of MSCs and Tr1 cells to be a novel therapeutic modality for clinical autoimmune diseases. PMID:27246365

  8. Enhanced immunoregulation of mesenchymal stem cells by IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T cells in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Yeon; Im, Keon-Il; Lee, Eun-Sol; Kim, Nayoun; Nam, Young-Sun; Jeon, Young-Woo; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties and have potential, however, there have been conflicting reports regarding their effects in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which causes inflammation and destruction of the joints. Through a comparative analysis of regulatory T (Treg) and IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells, we hypothesized that Tr1 cells enhance the immunoregulatory functions of MSCs, and that a combinatorial approach to cell therapy may exert synergistic immunomodulatory effects in an experimental animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A combination of MSCs and Tr1 cells prevented the development of destructive arthritis compared to single cell therapy. These therapeutic effects were associated with an increase in type II collagen (CII)-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells and inhibition of CII-specific CD4+IL-17+ T cells. We observed that Tr1 cells produce high levels of IL-10-dependent interferon (IFN)-β, which induces toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 expression in MSCs. Moreover, induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by TLR3 involved an autocrine IFN-β that was dependent on STAT1 signaling. Furthermore, we observed that production of IFN-β and IL-10 in Tr1 cells synergistically induces IDO in MSCs through the STAT1 pathway. These findings suggest co-administration of MSCs and Tr1 cells to be a novel therapeutic modality for clinical autoimmune diseases. PMID:27246365

  9. A new phenylpyrazoleanilide, y-320, inhibits interleukin 17 production and ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Hiroyuki; Ishibuchi, Seigo; Oshita, Koichi; Seki, Noriyasu; Kataoka, Hirotoshi; Sugahara, Kunio; Adachi, Kunitomo; Chiba, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-17 are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) because both pro-inflammatory cytokines are found in synovial fluid of RA patients. In this study, we examined the pharmacological profiles of Y-320, a new phenylpyrazoleanilide immunomodulator. Y-320 inhibited IL-17 production by CD4 T cells stimulated with IL-15 with IC50 values of 20 to 60 nM. Oral administration of Y-320 (0.3 to 3 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the development and progression of arthritis and joint destruction with reduction of IL-17 mRNA expression in arthritic joints of type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1J mice. Y-320 in combination with anti-murine tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibody showed a synergistic effect on mouse CIA. Moreover, therapeutic treatment with Y-320 (0.3 and 1 mg/kg orally) ameliorated CIA in cynomolgus monkeys. Our results suggest that Y-320, an orally active inhibitor for IL-17 production, provides a useful therapy for RA. PMID:24366113

  10. Anti-inflammatory activities of light emitting diode irradiation on collagen-induced arthritis in mice (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Yusuke; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an auto-immune disease afflicting multiple joints of the body, where as a result of the increase in inflammatory cytokines and tissue destructive factors such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, deterioration of the bones and cartilages of the joints occurs. The present investigation was carried out to study the anti-inflammatory activities of light emitting diode (LED) irradiation on hind paw inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice models. Materials and method: RA in the CIA mouse model was induced by immunization of DBA/1J mice with intradermal injections of an emulsion of bovine type II collagen and complete Freund's adjuvant. A total of 20 CIA mice were subdivided into the following groups: control group, CIA group and 2 groups of LED irradiated CIA mice (LED groups) (n=5 per group). The mouse knee joint area in the LED groups (the 570 nm and 940 nm groups) was irradiated with LED energy, three times a week for 500 s per session over 8 weeks at a dose of 5 J/cm2. The hind paw swelling was assessed by the increase in hind paw thickness. The serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines and arthritic factor MMP-3 were determined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In the LED-570 and LED-940 groups at 4 weeks after arthritis induction, the swelling inhibition index was 18.1±4.9 and 29.3±4.0 respectively. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and MMP-3 serum levels were significantly lower in the LED-940 group. Conclusions: LED irradiation, particularly in the near-infrared was effective for inhibition of the inflammatory reactions caused by RA. PMID:25368445

  11. Anti-inflammatory activity of lycopene isolated from Chlorella marina on type II collagen induced arthritis in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Renju, G L; Muraleedhara Kurup, G; Saritha Kumari, C H

    2013-04-01

    The role of commercially available lycopene (all-trans) from tomato in controlling arthritis has been reported. Even though many reports are available that the cis form of lycopene is more biologically active, no report seems to be available on lycopene (cis and trans) isolated from an easily available and culturable sources. In the present study, the anti-arthritic effect of lycopene (cis and trans) from the algae Chlorella marina (AL) has been compared with lycopene (all-trans) from tomato (TL) and indomethacin (Indo). Arthritis (CIA) was developed in male Sprague dawley rats by collagen and the following parameters were studied. The activities of inflammatory marker enzymes like cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were found to be decreased on treatment with AL when compared to TL and Indo. Changes in Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cells (RBC) count, hemoglobin (Hb), C-reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF), and ceruloplasmin levels observed in the blood of arthritic animals were brought back to normal by AL when compared to TL and Indo. Histopathology of paw and joint tissues showed marked reduction in edema on supplementation of AL. Thus these results indicate the potential beneficiary effect of algal lycopene on collagen induced arthritis in rats when compared to TL and even to the commonly used anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. Therefore lycopene from C. marina would be recommended as a better natural source with increased activity and without side effects in the treatment of anti-inflammatory diseases. PMID:23237458

  12. Incidence and specificity of antibodies to types I, II, III, IV, and V collagen in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases as measured by 125I-radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.M.; Huffstutter, E.H.; Townes, A.S.; Kang, A.H.

    1983-07-01

    Antibodies to human native and denatured types I, II, III, IV, and V collagens were measured using 125I-radioimmunoassay. Mean levels of binding by sera from 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients were significantly higher than those from 20 normal subjects against all of the collagens tested. The relative antibody concentration was higher in synovial fluid than in simultaneously obtained serum. Many patients with gout or various other rheumatic diseases also had detectable anticollagen antibodies. With a few notable exceptions, the majority of the reactivity detected in all patient groups was directed against covalent structural determinants present on all of the denatured collagens, suggesting a secondary reaction to tissue injury.

  13. Myeloid deletion of SIRT1 suppresses collagen-induced arthritis in mice by modulating dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seong Ji; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Lim, Hye Song; Hah, Young-Sool; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Kim, Hyun-Ok; Cheon, Yun-Hong; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Jang, Kyu Yun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Park, Byung-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Il

    2016-01-01

    The type III histone deacetylase silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) is an enzyme that is critical for the modulation of immune and inflammatory responses. However, the data on its role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are limited and controversial. To better understand how SIRT1 regulates adaptive immune responses in RA, we evaluated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in myeloid cell-specific SIRT1 knockout (mSIRT1 KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Arthritis severity was gauged on the basis of clinical, radiographic and pathologic scores. Compared with their WT counterparts, the mSIRT1 KO mice exhibited less severe arthritis, which was less destructive to the joints. The expression levels of inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases and ROR-γT were also reduced in the mSIRT1 KO mice compared with the WT mice and were paralleled by reductions in the numbers of Th1 and Th17 cells and CD80- or CD86-positive dendritic cells (DCs). In addition, impaired DC maturation and decreases in the Th1/Th17 immune response were observed in the mSIRT1 KO mice. T-cell proliferation was also investigated in co-cultures with antigen-pulsed DCs. In the co-cultures, the DCs from the mSIRT1 KO mice showed decreases in T-cell proliferation and the Th1/Th17 immune response. In this study, myeloid cell-specific deletion of SIRT1 appeared to suppress CIA by modulating DC maturation. Thus, a careful investigation of DC-specific SIRT1 downregulation is needed to gauge the therapeutic utility of agents targeting SIRT1 in RA. PMID:26987484

  14. CX3CR1 deficient mice have decreased Th17 and antigen-specific humoral responses in the collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, Teresa K.; Liu, Peng; Rampersad, Rishi R.; Esserman, Denise; Rothlein, Lisa R.; Timoshchenko, Roman G; McGinnis, Marcus W.; Fitzhugh, David J; Patel, Dhavalkumar D.; Fong, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective CX3CR1 is a chemokine receptor that uniquely binds to its ligand fractalkine (FKN or CX3CL1) and has been shown to be important in inflammatory arthritis responses largely due to effects on cellular migration. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that genetic deficiency of CX3CR1 would be protective in the chronic inflammatory arthritis model, collagen induced arthritis (CIA). Because CX3CR1 is expressed on T cells and antigen-presenting cells, we additionally examined adaptive immune functions in this model. Methods Autoantibody formation, clinical, histologic, T cell proliferative, and cytokine responses were evaluated in DBA-1J mice deficient in (-/-) or wildtype (+/+) for CX3CR1 after immunization with heterologous type II collagen. Results CX3CR1-/- mice had an approximate 30% reduction in arthritis by two independent measures of paw swelling (p<0.01) and clinical disease score (p<0.0001). Additionally, CX3CR1-/- mice had an approximate 50% decrease in anti-type II collagen autoantibody formation (p<0.05), decreased Th17 intra-articular cytokine expression (IL-17 p<0.01 and IL-23 p<0.001), and decreased total numbers of Th17 cells in inflamed joints (p<0.05). Conclusions Deficiency of CX3CR1 is protective in inflammatory arthritis and may have effects that extend beyond migration that involve adaptive immune responses in autoimmune disease. PMID:22144035

  15. Evolution of collagen arthritis in mice is arrested by treatment with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) antibody or a recombinant soluble TNF receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Piguet, P F; Grau, G E; Vesin, C; Loetscher, H; Gentz, R; Lesslauer, W

    1992-01-01

    Immunization of DBA/1 mice with type II collagen within complete Freund's adjuvant leads to arthritis, lasting more than 3 months. Injection of anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) IgG, 2 and 3 weeks after immunization prevented the development of arthritis in the following months. This treatment had no effect when started 2 months after induction of the disease. A soluble form of the human recombinant TNF receptor type-beta (rsTNFR-beta), continuously infused at a rate of 20 micrograms/day during the second and third week after immunization, also had a long-term protective effect. Anti-TNF antibody had no effect upon the production of anti-type II collagen antibodies. These results indicate that TNF is critically involved in an early phase of this arthritis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1337334

  16. Persistence of collagen type II-specific T-cell clones in the synovial membrane of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Londei, M.; Savill, C.M.; Verhoef, A.; Brennan, F.; Leech, Z.A.; Feldmann, M. ); Duance, V. ); Maini, R.N. )

    1989-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell infiltration of the synovium of joints. Analysis of the phenotype and antigen specificity of the infiltrating cells may thus provide insight into the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. T cells were cloned with interleukin 2, a procedure that selects for in vivo-activated cells. All clones had the CD4 CDW29 phenotype. Their antigen specificity was tested by using a panel of candidate joint autoantigens. Four of 17 reacted against autologous blood mononuclear cells. Two clones proliferated in response to collagen type II. After 21 months, another set of clones was derived from synovial tissue of the same joint. One of eight clones tested showed a strong proliferative response against collagen type II. The uncloned synovial T cells of a third operation from another joint also responded to collagen type II. The persistence of collagen type II-specific T cells in active rheumatoid joints over a period of 3 years suggests that collagen type II could be one of the autoantigens involved in perpetuating the inflammatory process in rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Alleviation of collagen-induced arthritis by the benzoxathiole derivative BOT-4-one in mice: Implication of the Th1- and Th17-cell-mediated immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Hak; Yoon, Bo Ruem; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Noh, Kum Hee; Kwon, Sun-Ho; Yi, Eun Hee; Lee, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Jung Sook; Kang, Seong Wook; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Won-Woo; Ye, Sang-Kyu

    2016-06-15

    Autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by chronic inflammation and hyperplasia in the synovial joints. Although the cause of rheumatoid arthritis is largely unknown, substantial evidence has supported the importance of immune cells and inflammatory cytokines in the initiation and progression of this disease. Herein, we demonstrated that the benzoxathiole derivative 2-cyclohexylimino-6-methyl-6,7-dihydro-5H-benzo[1,3]oxathiol-4-one (BOT-4-one) alleviated type II collagen-induced arthritis in a mouse model. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in both human patients with rheumatoid arthritis and mice with collagen-induced arthritis. BOT-4-one treatment reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice and endotoxin-stimulated macrophages. BOT-4-one treatment suppressed the polarization of Th1- and Th17-cell subsets by inhibiting the expression and production of their lineage-specific master transcription factors and cytokines, as well as activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins. In addition, BOT-4-one inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-kappaB signaling as well as the transcriptional activities and DNA-binding of transcription factors, including activator protein-1, cAMP response element-binding protein and NF-kappaB. Our results suggest that BOT-4-one may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of chronic inflammation associated with autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27005941

  18. Evaluation of anti-citrullinated type II collagen and anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence and significance of anti-citrullinated vimentin and anti-citrullinated type II collagen antibodies and elucidate their role in the disease process of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods Sera were obtained from 95 patients with various subtypes of JIA, 19 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, and 10 healthy children. Antibodies were measured in the sera against citrullinated and native type II collagen and vimentin (vim1-16 and vim 59-74) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Samples were compared to anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody and rheumatoid factor (RF) isotypes, and our previously measured anti-citrullinated fibrinogen and α-enolase antibodies on the same patient population, in addition to erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. The relationship between the anti-citrullinated antibody profile and disease activity and joint damage were also investigated. Results Twenty-three JIA patients (24%) demonstrated reactivity to anti-citrullinated type II collagen. Ten JIA patients (10.5%) demonstrated reactivity to anti-citrullinated vimentin 1–16 antibodies and 7 (7.4%) to anti-citrullinated vimentin 59–74 antibodies. One IgM RF-positive polyarticular patient was positive for all 5 of the citrullinated autoantibodies tested. Thirty-seven different subsets of patients were identified based on their anti-citrullinated autoantibody and RF isotype profile. No significant associations were noted with anti-citrullinated type II collagen and anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies with joint damage or disease activity. Anti-citrullinated vimentin 59–74 antibodies demonstrated the highest overall specificity at 89.7%, with anti-citrullinated vimentin 1–16 and anti-citrullinated type II collagen antibodies at 86.2%. Conclusion This study demonstrates that antibodies to multiple citrullinated epitopes are present in the sera of patients with various subtypes of JIA. It also

  19. T-cell immune adaptor SKAP1 regulates the induction of collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Xin; Taylor, Alison; Rudd, Christopher E

    2016-08-01

    SKAP1 is an immune cell adaptor that couples the T-cell receptor with the 'inside-out' signalling pathway for LFA-1 mediated adhesion in T-cells. A connection of SKAP1 to the regulation of an autoimmune disorder has not previously been reported. In this study, we show that Skap1-deficient (skap1-/-) mice are highly resistant to the induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), both in terms of incidence or severity. Skap1-/- T-cells were characterised by a selective reduction in the presence IL-17+ (Th17) in response to CII peptide and a marked reduction of joint infiltrating T-cells in Skap1-/- mice. SKAP1 therefore represents a novel connection to Th17 producing T-cells and is new potential target in the therapeutic intervention in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27181093

  20. Extracts of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. attenuate the inflammatory response in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    XU, WEI; HUANG, MINGQING; ZHANG, YUQIN; LI, HUANG; ZHENG, HAIYIN; YU, LISHUANG; CHU, KEDAN; LIN, YU; CHEN, LIDIAN

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is considered a serious public health problem, which is commonly treated with traditional Chinese or herbal medicine. The present study evaluated the effects of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. extraction (BCBE) on a type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Wistar rats with CIA received either 125 or 500 mg/kg BCBE, after which, paw swelling was markedly suppressed compared with in the model group. In addition, BCBE significantly ameliorated pathological joint alterations, including synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone destruction. The protein and mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α and nuclear factor-κB in synovial tissue were determined by immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that the expression levels of these factors were significantly downregulated in the BCBE-treated group compared with in the model group. These results indicated that BCBE may exert an inhibitory effect on the CIA rat model, and its therapeutic potential is associated with its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27035125

  1. SARS Coronavirus Fusion Peptide-Derived Sequence Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zu T; Sigalov, Alexander B

    2016-01-01

    During the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, the viruses have evolved numerous strategies to counter and evade host antiviral immune responses in order to establish a successful infection, replicate and persist in the host. Recently, based on our model of immune signaling, the Signaling Chain HOmoOLigomerization (SCHOOL) model, we suggested specific molecular mechanisms used by different viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) to modulate the host immune response mediated by members of the family of multichain immune recognition receptors (MIRRs). This family includes T cell receptor (TCR) that is critically involved in immune diseases such as autoimmune arthritis. In the present study, we provide compelling experimental in vivo evidence in support of our hypothesis. Using the SCHOOL approach and the SARS-CoV fusion peptide sequence, we rationally designed a novel immunomodulatory peptide that targets TCR. We showed that this peptide ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and protects against bone and cartilage damage. Incorporation of the peptide into self-assembling lipopeptide nanoparticles that mimic native human high density lipoproteins significantly increases peptide dosage efficacy. Together, our data further confirm that viral immune evasion strategies that target MIRRs can be transferred to therapeutic strategies that require similar functionalities. PMID:27349522

  2. The immunosuppressive effect of domain-deleted dimer of HLA-G2 isoform in collagen-induced arthritis mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ami; Kuroki, Kimiko; Okabe, Yuki; Kasai, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Naoki; Yamada, Chisato; Takai, Toshiyuki; Ose, Toyoyuki; Kon, Shigeyuki; Matsuda, Tadashi; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2016-09-01

    HLA-G is involved in maternal-fetal immune tolerance and is reported to be a natural tolerogenic molecule. Seven-spliced isoforms including dimeric and β2m-free forms have been identified. The major isoform, HLA-G1 (and its soluble type HLA-G5), binds to the inhibitory immune receptors, leukocyte immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptor (LILR) B1 and LILRB2. We previously reported that HLA-G1 also binds to paired Ig-like receptor (PIR)-B, a mouse homolog of LILRBs, and had a significant immunosuppressive effect in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Although HLA-G2 and its soluble form HLA-G6 bind specifically to LILRB2, its functional characteristics are largely unknown. In this study, we report the significant immunosuppressive effect of HLA-G2 dimer in CIA mice. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed a specific interaction of HLA-G2 with PIR-B. CIA mice were administered HLA-G2 protein subcutaneously once in the left footpad and clinical severity was evaluated in a double-blind study. A single administration of HLA-G2 maintained a suppressive effect for over 1month. These results suggested that the HLA-G2 protein might be a useful biopharmaceutical for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis by binding to inhibitory PIR-B. PMID:26805457

  3. Decreased severity of collagen antibody and lipopolysaccharide-induced arthritis in human IL-32β overexpressed transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Jung Ok; Kim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Dong Hun; Song, Sukgil; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Hee Pom; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-32, mainly produced by T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells, epithelial cells, and blood monocytes, is dominantly known as a pro-inflammatory cytokine. However, the role of IL-32 on inflammatory disease has been doubtful according to diverse conflicting results. This study was designed to examine the role of IL-32β on the development of collagen antibody (CAIA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory arthritis. Our data showed that the paw swelling volume and clinical score were significantly reduced in the CAIA and LPS-treated IL-32β transgenic mice compared with non-transgenic mice. The populations of cytotoxic T, NK and dendritic cells was inhibited and NF-κB and STAT3 activities were significantly lowered in the CAIA and LPS-treated IL-32β transgenic mice. The expression of pro-inflammatory proteins was prevented in the paw tissues of CAIA and LPS-treated IL-32β transgenic mice. In addition, IL-32β altered several cytokine levels in the blood, spleen and paw joint. Our data indicates that IL-32β comprehensively inhibits the inflammation responses in the CAIA and LPS-induced inflammatory arthritis model. PMID:26497686

  4. SARS Coronavirus Fusion Peptide-Derived Sequence Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zu T.; Sigalov, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    During the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, the viruses have evolved numerous strategies to counter and evade host antiviral immune responses in order to establish a successful infection, replicate and persist in the host. Recently, based on our model of immune signaling, the Signaling Chain HOmoOLigomerization (SCHOOL) model, we suggested specific molecular mechanisms used by different viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) to modulate the host immune response mediated by members of the family of multichain immune recognition receptors (MIRRs). This family includes T cell receptor (TCR) that is critically involved in immune diseases such as autoimmune arthritis. In the present study, we provide compelling experimental in vivo evidence in support of our hypothesis. Using the SCHOOL approach and the SARS-CoV fusion peptide sequence, we rationally designed a novel immunomodulatory peptide that targets TCR. We showed that this peptide ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and protects against bone and cartilage damage. Incorporation of the peptide into self-assembling lipopeptide nanoparticles that mimic native human high density lipoproteins significantly increases peptide dosage efficacy. Together, our data further confirm that viral immune evasion strategies that target MIRRs can be transferred to therapeutic strategies that require similar functionalities. PMID:27349522

  5. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Difficulty moving a joint (called "limited range of motion") Some types of arthritis may cause joint deformity. ... exercise). Walking is a good example. Range of motion exercises for flexibility. Strength training for muscle tone. ...

  6. Blockade of Glucocorticoid-Induced Tumor Necrosis Factor-Receptor-Related Protein Signaling Ameliorates Murine Collagen-Induced Arthritis by Modulating Follicular Helper T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Feng, Dingqi; Wei, Yancai; Tian, Jie; Tang, Xinyi; Rui, Ke; Lu, Liwei; Xu, Huaxi; Wang, Shengjun

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor-receptor-related protein (GITR) and its ligand (GITRL) are critically involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis, but the role of GITRL/GITR signaling in modulating CD4(+) follicular helper T (Tfh) cell response during autoimmune arthritis remains largely unclear. We showed that splenic Tfh cells from mice with collagen-induced arthritis expressed higher levels of GITR compared with non-Tfh cells. In vitro, GITRL treatment markedly enhanced the percentage and number of Tfh cells. The administration of GITR fused to fragment crystallizable of IgG protein in mice with collagen-induced arthritis suppressed the Tfh cell response, resulting in ameliorated disease severity, and reduced production of autoantibody and the number of autoantibody-secreting cells in both the spleen and bone marrow. Together, these results indicate that blockade of GITR signaling can ameliorate arthritis progression mainly by modulating the Tfh cell response. PMID:27106763

  7. Sustained Release Myofascial Release as Treatment for a Patient with Complications of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Collagenous Colitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cubick, Erin E.; Quezada, Vanessa Y.; Schumer, Ariel D.; Davis, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Myofascial release (MFR) is a manual therapeutic technique used to release fascial restrictions, which may cause neuromusculoskeletal and systemic pathology. Purpose: This case report describes the use of sustained release MFR techniques in a patient with a primary diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and a secondary diagnosis of collagenous colitis. Changes in pain, cervical range of motion, fatigue, and gastrointestinal tract function, as well as the impact of RA on daily activities, were assessed. Methods: A 54-year-old white woman presented with signs and symptoms attributed to RA and collagenous colitis. Pre and post measurements were taken with each treatment and during the interim between the initial and final treatment series. The patient recorded changes in pain, fatigue, gastrointestinal tract function, and quality of life. Cervical range of motion was assessed. Six sustained release MFR treatment sessions were provided over a 2-week period. Following an 8-week interim, two more treatments were performed. Results: The patient showed improvements in pain, fatigue, gastrointestinal tract function, cervical range of motion, and quality of life following the initial treatment series of six sessions. The patient maintained positive gains for 5 weeks following the final treatment, after which her symptoms returned to near baseline measurements. Following two more treatments, positive gains were achieved once again. Conclusions: In a patient with RA and collagenous colitis, the application of sustained release MFR techniques in addition to standard medical treatment may provide short-term and long-term improvements in comorbid symptoms and overall quality of life. PMID:22016756

  8. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA). Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. Methods To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII) to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. Results A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9), insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors facilitating tumor

  9. Synergy between anti-CD4 and anti-tumor necrosis factor in the amelioration of established collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R O; Mason, L J; Feldmann, M; Maini, R N

    1994-01-01

    Anti-CD4 treatment is reported to prevent collagen-induced arthritis if administered before the onset of clinical disease but has relatively little effect on established arthritis. In contrast, we have recently shown that anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha/beta (TNF) treatment reduces the severity of established arthritis. We now study the effect of combined administration of anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (YTS 191.1.2/YTA 3.1.2) and anti-TNF monoclonal antibody (TN3-19.12) in established arthritis. Anti-CD4 treatment caused some reduction in paw-swelling but did not significantly prevent joint erosion. A suboptimal dose of anti-TNF alone had no significant effect on arthritis. In contrast, anti-CD4 plus suboptimal anti-TNF significantly reduced paw-swelling, limb involvement, and joint erosion. As previously reported, an optimal dose of anti-TNF alone inhibited paw-swelling, limb involvement, and joint erosion. However, optimal anti-TNF combined with anti-CD4 caused significantly greater reductions in paw-swelling and joint erosion than those achieved by optimal anti-TNF alone. Coadministration of anti-CD4 was also effective in preventing an antibody response to the hamster anti-TNF antibody, which may have implications for long-term therapy in human disease. Thus anti-CD4 acts synergistically with anti-TNF in ameliorating established collagen-induced arthritis and this combined therapeutic approach may provide effective long-term control of rheumatoid arthritis. Images PMID:7908442

  10. An insight into the biophysical characterization of insoluble collagen aggregates: implication for arthritis.

    PubMed

    Amani, Samreen; Shamsi, Anas; Rabbani, Gulam; Naim, Aabgeena

    2014-09-01

    Misfolding and aggregation of proteins is involved in some of the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorders. The importance of collagen stems from the fact that it is one of the dominant component used for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications and is a major component of skin, tendon, bone and other connective tissues. A systematic investigation on the conformation of collagen at various concentrations of glyoxal is studied by various biophysical techniques such as Trp fluorescence, ANS binding, Circular dichroism (CD), ATR-FTIR, Congo red (CR) assay, Rayleigh light scattering and Turbidity measurements. At 60% (v/v) glyoxal, collagen retains native-like secondary structure, altered Trp environment and high ANS fluorescence, characteristic of molten globule (MG) state. At 80% (v/v) glyoxal, insoluble collagen aggregates are detected as confirmed by decrease in Trp and ANS fluorescence, increase in non-native β sheet structure as evident from far-UV CD and FTIR spectra, increase in Thioflavin T fluorescence, Rayleigh light scattering, Turbidity measurements, as well as red shift in CR absorbance. PMID:25011697

  11. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Son, Youngsook

    2014-10-10

    Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T(reg) and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. PMID:25264193

  12. The suppressive effect of gelatin-conjugated superoxide dismutase on disease development and severity of collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kakimoto, K; Kojima, Y; Ishii, K; Onoue, K; Maeda, H

    1993-01-01

    We studied the effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) on murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Among SOD derivatives studied, only gelatin-SOD conjugate which has prolonged half life in vivo was effective to suppress the development of CIA, while native SOD or gelatin carrier alone was ineffective. Interestingly, pyran polymer-conjugated SOD which also has a long half life showed no suppressive effect on the disease. No significant effect on immune response against type II collagen (CII) was found in any of the experimental groups. In addition, induction of suppressor cells was not detected in spleen or lymph node cells of the gelatin-SOD-treated group. Therefore, these results suggest that oxygen radicals may have an important role in the effector phase of the immune response to manifest this chronic autoimmune polyarthritis. Thus, the use of appropriate antioxidants for the treatment of human RA may be rationalized. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8222313

  13. Intra-articular nuclear factor-κB blockade ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by eliciting regulatory T cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Min, S-Y; Yan, M; Du, Y; Wu, T; Khobahy, E; Kwon, S-R; Taneja, V; Bashmakov, A; Nukala, S; Ye, Y; Orme, J; Sajitharan, D; Kim, H-Y; Mohan, C

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB is a transcription factor implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we have examined the effect of intra-articular administration of the IKK inhibitor, NEMO-binding domain peptide (NBD), on the severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). NBD peptides were injected intra-articularly into the knee joints of DBA/1J mice after the onset of disease. Collagen-injected mice given a scrambled peptide served as controls. Arthritis severity was determined by visual examination of paws. Intra-articular NBD injection reduced the arthritis score and ameliorated morphological signs of bone destruction compared to the controls. Serum levels of type-II collagen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a antibodies were lower in NBD-treated mice versus the control mice, whereas the levels of type-II collagen-specific IgG1 antibodies were increased by NBD treatment. NBD treatment diminished the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-17 and interferon (IFN)-γ in serum, but increased the regulatory cytokine IL-10. NBD-treated CIA mice exhibited significantly higher percentages and numbers of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+)) CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells than controls. Immunofluorescence analysis of NBD-treated mice revealed that FoxP3 and Ym1, a marker of alternatively activated macrophages, were juxtaposed to each other within draining inguinal lymph nodes. Intra-articular administration of NBD peptide is effective as an experimental therapy in a murine model of RA. Nevertheless, the intra-articular treatment modality is still associated with systemic effects on the immune system. PMID:23574318

  14. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Son, Youngsook

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • SP can increase IL-10 levels and reduce TNF-α and IL-17 levels in RA. • SP causes the increase in T{sub reg}, M2 macrophage, and MSCs in RA. • SP-induced immune suppression leads to the blockade of RA progression. • SP can be used as the therapeutics for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. - Abstract: Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T{sub reg} and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases.

  15. Acceleration of onset of collagen-induced arthritis by intra-articular injection of tumour necrosis factor or transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, W O; Fava, R A; Gates, C A; Cremer, M A; Townes, A S

    1992-01-01

    We examined whether tumour necrosis factor (TNF) or transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) could alter the course of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Injection of 100 ng TNF or 500 ng TGF-beta 1 into ankle joints of normal rats induced a very limited inflammatory response, observable only upon histological analysis. However, when injected into ankle joints of rats 9 days after immunization with bovine type II collagen (CII), identical doses of TNF or TGF-beta 1 induced a sustained, clinically obvious inflammation and oedema that began within 8 h on average, as compared to 90 h in CII-immunized control rats given no injections or intra-articular injections of buffer. The incidence of arthritis at 2 weeks post-immunization was 100% for TNF-injected hindpaws, compared with 55% for the control groups, a statistically significant difference. In rats passively immunized with a subarthritic dose of affinity purified antibody to rat-CII, intra-articular injection of 100 ng TNF or 500 ng of TGF-beta 1 also induced intense, though transient arthritis. The rapid proinflammatory effects in CIA described in this study and the synergy demonstrated between anti-CII IgG and either cytokine, suggest that these cytokines can participate locally in the pathogenesis of arthritis. PMID:1638767

  16. The effect of synthetic retinoid, Am80, on T helper cell development and antibody production in murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Aya; Watanabe, Kaori; Kaneko, Kayoko; Murakami, Yousuke; Ishido, Miwako; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Nanki, Toshihiro

    2010-06-01

    Retinoids are known to promote T helper (Th)2 and regulatory T cell (Treg) differentiation, and suppress Th1 and Th17 in vitro. Am80, a synthetic retinoid, is reported to ameliorate collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The aims of this study are to determine the effects of Am80 on CIA in detail, and on Th development and antibody (Ab) production in vivo. Murine CIA was induced by immunization with bovine type II collagen (CII) at days 1 and 22. Treatment with Am80 from day 1 to 35 significantly lowered clinical arthritis score, suppressed cellular infiltration and bone destruction in the joint, decreased interleukin (IL)-17 and increased interferon (IFN)-gamma production by CII-stimulated splenocytes, and decreased proportion of Foxp3(+) splenic CD4 T cells and serum anti-CII Ab levels. Thus, Am80 inhibited Th17 and Treg and enhanced Th1 differentiation in vivo. In contrast, Am80 applied from day 15 to 35 did not alter arthritis score, IL-17 or IFN-gamma production by CII-stimulated splenocytes, but decreased the proportion of Foxp3(+) splenic CD4 T cells and serum anti-CII Ab levels. Am80 exhibits inhibitory effects on CIA and might regulate both Th development and Ab production in vivo. Decreased Th17 by treatment with Am80 might be responsible for the attenuation of arthritis. PMID:20039185

  17. Tetrandrine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by restoring the balance between Th17 and Treg cells via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xusheng; Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Tetrandrine is an alkaloid constituent of the root of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. The long-term clinical uses of tetrandrine for treatments of rheumatalgia and arthralgia as well as the inhibition of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis imply that tetrandrine may have therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we explored its anti-RA mechanism in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in relation to the balance between T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type II collagen and were orally administered tetrandrine for 14 consecutive days. Then, the mice were sacrificed, their joints were removed for histological analysis, and spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were removed to examine the Th17 and Treg cells. Tetrandrine markedly alleviated the severity of arthritis, reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the Th17/Treg balance, as demonstrated by the serum levels of their related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-10) and the proportion of each cell type. Tetrandrine inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and induced Treg cell differentiation in vitro . Notably, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was proven to play a crucial role in tetrandrine-mediated T cell differentiation. The correlation between AhR activation, regulation of Th17/Treg and amelioration of arthritis by tetrandrine was verified in the CIA mice. Moreover, tetrandrine might be a ligand of AhR because it facilitated the expression of the AhR target gene cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and the activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Taken together, tetrandrine exerts its anti-arthritis efficacy by restoring Th17/Treg balance via AhR. PMID:26640276

  18. Interleukin-35 (IL-35) inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes isolated from mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunxia; Wu, Suqin; Li, Yuxuan; Jiang, Shenyi; Lin, Tiantian; Xia, Liping; Shen, Hui; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disorder of the joints that affects 0.5-1 % of adults. Excessive growth of the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) promotes hyperplasia of synovial tissues and causes its invasion into the bone and cartilage, which eventually causes deformity and dysfunction of affected joints. Interleukin 35 (IL-35) was shown to suppress the inflammatory responses to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) via upregulation of T regulatory cells and suppression of T helper type 17 cells in a mouse model. To study the effects of IL-35 on the proliferation and apoptosis frequency of cultured FLS isolated from mice with CIA as well as to examine the effects of IL-35 on CIA in vivo. Thirty DBA/1 J mice, which are used as an animal model for RA, were divided randomly (ten mice per group) to a CIA group (collagen treatment), a CIA + IL-35 group (collagen and IL-35 treatments), and a control group (no treatment). Starting on the 24th day after collagen administration, IL-35 was injected intraperitoneally into mice of the CIA + IL-35 group once per day for 10 days. An arthritis index was calculated, and pathological analysis of synovial tissue was performed. FLS isolated from CIA mice were treated with various concentrations of IL-35 (12.5-100 ng/ml). The MTT assay was used to examine FLS proliferation, and apoptosis frequency of FLS was detected by flow cytometry. On day 24, the CIA mice began to exhibit arthritis symptoms, and the symptoms rapidly progressed with time. Treatment with IL-35 significantly alleviated arthritis symptoms and reduced the synovial tissue inflammation. In addition, IL-35 treatment inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis in cultured FLS from CIA mice in a dose-dependent manner. IL-35 could ameliorate the symptoms of arthritis in the CIA mouse model in vivo and inhibited FLS proliferation while promoting FLS apoptosis in vitro, thereby exhibited the potential in inhibiting the progression of RA. PMID:27379996

  19. H2-M polymorphism in mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis involves the peptide binding groove

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W.; Loos, M.; Maeurer, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    The ability to develop type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is associated with the major histocompatibility I-A gene and with as yet poorly defined regulatory molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen processing and presentation pathway. H2-M molecules are thought to be involved in the loading of antigenic peptides into the MHC class II binding cleft. We sequenced H2-Ma, H2-Mb1, and H2-Mb2 genes from CIA-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains and identified four different Ma and Mb2 alleles, and three different Mb1 alleles defined by polymorphic residues within the predicted peptide binding groove. Most CIA-resistant mouse strains share common Ma, Mb1, and Mb2 alleles. In contrast, H2-M alleles designated Ma-III, Ma-IV, Mb1-III, and Mb2-IV could be exclusively identified in the CIA-susceptible H2{sup r} and H2{sup q} haplotypes, suggesting that allelic H2-M molecules may modulate the composition of different CII peptides loaded onto MHC class II molecules, presumably presenting {open_quotes}arthritogenic{close_quotes} epitopes to T lymphocytes. 42 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Tolerogenic splenic IDO (+) dendritic cells from the mice treated with induced-Treg cells suppress collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Yang, Yiming; Fan, Huahua; Zou, Hejian

    2014-01-01

    TGF-β-induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) retain Foxp3 expression and immune-suppressive activity in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). However, the mechanisms whereby transferred iTregs suppress immune responses, particularly the interplay between iTregs and dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo, remain incompletely understood. In this study, we found that after treatment with iTregs, splenic CD11c(+)DCs, termed "DCiTreg," expressed tolerogenic phenotypes, secreted high levels of IL-10, TGF-β, and IDO, and showed potent immunosuppressive activity in vitro. After reinfusion with DCiTreg, marked antiarthritic activity improved clinical scores and histological end-points were observed. The serological levels of inflammatory cytokines and anti-CII antibodies were low and TGF-β production was high in the DCiTreg-treated group. DCiTreg also induced new iTregs in vivo. Moreover, the inhibitory activity of DCiTreg on CIA was lost following pretreatment with the inhibitor of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Collectively, these findings suggest that transferred iTregs could induce tolerogenic characteristics in splenic DCs and these cells could effectively dampen CIA in an IDO-dependent manner. Thus, the potential therapeutic effects of iTregs in CIA are likely maintained through the generation of tolerogenic DCs in vivo. PMID:25405209

  1. White button and shiitake mushrooms reduce the incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis in dilute brown non-agouti mice.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Lawrance; Alexander, Heather; Traoré, Djibril; Lucas, Edralin A; Clarke, Stephen L; Smith, Brenda J; Lightfoot, Stanley A; Kuvibidila, Solo

    2011-01-01

    Exotic mushrooms have been used in ancient Chinese medicine due to their immunomodulatory properties for the treatment and/or prevention of chronic diseases. However, only limited data exist on the health benefits of white button mushrooms (WBM), the most common in the American diet. In the current study, we investigated the effects of WBM and shiitake mushrooms (SM) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using a 2 x 3 factorial design in 8-wk-old female dilute brown non-agouti mice that were fed a control diet (n = 37) or the same diet supplemented with 5% lyophilized WBM or SM (n = 27) for 6 wk. CIA was induced by immunizing mice with 100 µg bovine collagen followed by 50 µg LPS on d 20 post-collagen injection. CIA was assessed by mononuclear cell infiltration, bone erosion, plasma IL-6, TNFα, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) concentrations. Compared with the control diet, WBM and SM tended to reduce the CIA index from 5.11 ± 0.82 to 3.15 ± 0.95 (P = 0.06) (median, 6-9 to 1-2) 31 d post-collagen injection. Whereas 58% of control mice had a CIA index ≥ 7, only 23% of WBM and 29% of SM mice did (P = 0.1). Although both types of mushrooms reduced plasma TNFα (34%, WBM; 64%, SM), only SM increased plasma IL-6 by 1.3-fold (P < 0.05). The CIA index was positively correlated with sICAM1 (r = 0.55; P < 0.05) but negatively correlated with TNFα (r = 0.34; P < 0.05). Whether mushrooms are beneficial for arthritis management remains to be investigated. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating a possible health benefit of WBM in arthritis treatment. PMID:21106932

  2. Somatic Antigens of Tropical Liver Flukes Ameliorate Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Yasir Akhtar; Umar, Sadiq; Abidi, Syed M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic helminths polarize immune response of their vertebrate hosts towards anti-inflammatory Th2 type and therefore it is hypothesized that they may suppress the inflammatory conditions in autoimmune disorders. The present study was undertaken to investigate in vivo immunomodulatory and therapeutic potential of somatic antigens (Ag) of liver infecting digenetic trematodes [Fasciola gigantica (Fg) and Gigantocotyle explanatum (Ge)] in collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) Wistar rats. The CIA rats were administered subcutaneously with different doses (50 μg, 100 μg and 150 μg) of somatic antigens of Fg and Ge, daily for 21 days, the time period required to establish infection in natural host (Bubalus bubalis). Thereafter, the control, diseased and treated rats were compared for different parameters viz. hind paw thickness; serum interleukins, IL-4 and IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ); expression level of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2, -9, -13 and nitric oxide (NO) in knee joints and patellar morphology. The CIA rats treated with different antigens, Fg-Ag and Ge-Ag, show significant amelioration of the disease by down regulation of serum TNF-α and IFN-γ (p< 0.05) and upregulation of IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines (p< 0.05); inhibition (p< 0.05) of MMPs (-2,-9,-13) and NO in knee joints and improved patellar morphology with decreased synovial hypertrophy and reduced infiltration of ploymorphonuclear cells. The activity of pro as well as active MMPs (-2 and -9) and active MMP-13 in knee joints of CIA rats was very high compared to the control and treatment groups, suggesting the extent of collagen degradation in CIA rats. Interestingly, the highest dose (150 μg) of Ge-Ag almost wiped out MMP-13 expression. The overall findings suggest that the somatic proteins of Ge-Ag appeared to be therapeutically more effective than Fg-Ag, reflecting interspecific molecular differences which could contribute to the ability of these worms to

  3. β1,4-galactosyltransferase-I in synovial tissue of collagen-induced rat model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hairong; Xu, Dawei; Tao, Ran; Ni, Xiaohui; Shen, Aiguo; Wang, Youhua

    2011-09-01

    β1,4-galactosyltransferase-I (β1,4-GalT-I), which is one of the best-studied glycosyltransferases, plays a key role in the synthesis of selectin ligands such as sialyl Lewis (sLe(x)) and sulfated sLe(x). Previous studies showed that inflammatory responses of β1,4-GalT-I-deficient mice were impaired because of the defect in selectin-ligand biosynthesis. However, the expression of β1,4-GalT-I and its biological function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain to be elucidated. The mRNA and protein expression of β1,4-GalT-I increased in synovial tissue of the RA group compared with the Normal group at 10d and 15d after collagen-induced. Double staining indicated β1,4-GalT-I overlapped with macrophage-like synoviocytes (MLSs), fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs), neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Moreover, β1,4-GalT-I mRNA in FLSs in vitro was affected in a dose- and time-dependent manner in response to TNF-α stimulation. ELISA revealed that expression of TNF-α was attenuated in FLSs in vitro treated with β1,4-GalT-I-Ab. We therefore suggest that β1,4-GalT-I may play an important role in the inflammation process of RA synovial tissue, which would provide the foundation for further researching into the concrete mechanism of β1,4-GalT-I in RA. PMID:21161318

  4. Piperlongumine attenuates collagen-induced arthritis via expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and inhibition of the activation of fibroblast-like synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Xu, Ping; Du, Xueping; Zhang, Qinggang; Zhu, Yuchang

    2015-04-01

    Piperlonguminine (PL), a key compound from the Piper longum fruit, is known to exhibit anti‑tumor and anti‑inflammatory activities. However, little is known about its effects on collagen‑induced arthritis (CIA). Fibroblast‑like synoviocytes (FLS) have a pivotal role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Myeloid‑derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are able to suppress T cell responses and have important roles in the regulation of autoimmune arthritis. The current study investigated whether PL alters the progression of RA. It was determined that PL reduces the arthritis score and histopathologic lesions in a mouse model of CIA. PL also reduces the expression levels of serum anti‑collagen II antibodies (anti‑CⅡ), tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α), interleukin (IL)‑1β, IL‑23 and IL‑17 in CIA mice. In draining lymph nodes (DLNs), MDSCs were significantly expanded, however, the number of Th17 cells was markedly decreased by PL treatment. Additionally, PL reduced secretion of IL‑1β, IL‑23 and IL‑17 by TNF‑α‑stimulated human RA FLS. PL significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of TNF‑α‑stimulated human RA FLS. These results indicate that PL may be a candidate therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA, via the expansion of MDSCs and the inhibition of the Th17 response and activation of FLS. PMID:25435301

  5. (p40)2-Fc reduces immune-inflammatory response through the activation of T cells in collagen induced arthritis mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon-Yeong; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Seong-Jeong; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Yang, Se-Hwan; Park, Sung-Hwan; Sung, Young-Chul; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La

    2016-08-01

    IL-12p40 homodimer, a natural antagonist of IL-12 and IL-23, performs an important role in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines that is essential for Th1 and Th17 immune responses. Here, we reveal the therapeutic and immunosuppressive effect of the IL-12p40 subunit ((p40)2-Fc) in an experimental autoimmune arthritis model. We hypothesized that (p40)2-Fc may reduce the inflammatory response and the activation of T cells. In this study, we intraperitoneally injected (p40)2-Fc into collagen induced arthritis (CIA) mice to identify whether (p40)2-Fc attenuates CIA severity. (p40)2-Fc reduced the development of CIA, joint inflammation and cartilage destruction. (p40)2-Fc also significantly decreased the concentration of serum immunoglobulin as well as the number of T cells and C II specific T cells. In addition, osteoclastogenesis in (p40)2-Fc treated mice was down-regulated compared to the mice treated with (p40)2-Fc control. We observed that (p40)2-Fc treatment alleviates arthritis in mice with CIA, reducing inflammation and osteoclast differentiation. These findings suggest that (p40)2-Fc can be a potential therapeutic approach for autoimmune arthritis. PMID:27229912

  6. Glucose Kinetics in the Collagen-Induced Arthritis Model: An All-in-One Model to Assess Both Efficacy and Metabolic Side Effects of Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Theo H.; Bleeker, Aycha; Grefhorst, Aldo; Schouten, Annelies E.; Bastiaanssen, Ellen A. J.; Ballak, Dov B.; Koenders, Marije I.; van Doorn, Cindy; van der Vleuten, Monique A. J.; van Lierop, Marie-Jose C.; Groen, Albert K.; Dokter, Wim H. A.

    2014-01-01

    Prednisolone and other glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent anti-inflammatory drugs, but chronic use is hampered by metabolic side effects. Therefore, there is an urgent medical need for improved GCs that are as effective as classical GCs but have a better safety profile. A well-established model to assess anti-inflammatory efficacy is the chronic collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model in mice, a model with features resembling rheumatoid arthritis. Models to quantify undesired effects of glucocorticoids on glucose kinetics are less well-established. Recently, we have described a model to quantify basal blood glucose kinetics using stably-labeled glucose. In the present study, we have integrated this blood glucose kinetic model in the CIA model to enable quantification of both efficacy and adverse effects in one animal model. Arthritis scores were decreased after treatment with prednisolone, confirming the anti-inflammatory properties of GCs. Both inflammation and prednisolone induced insulin resistance as insulin secretion was strongly increased whereas blood glucose concentrations and hepatic glucose production were only slightly decreased. This insulin resistance did not directly resulted in hyperglycemia, indicating a highly adaptive compensatory mechanism in these mice. In conclusion, this ‘all-in-one’ model allows for studying effects of (novel) GC compounds on the development of arthritis and glucose kinetics in a single animal. This integrative model provides a valuable tool for investigating (drug-induced) metabolic dysregulation in an inflammatory setting. PMID:25181348

  7. A Dynamic Real Time In Vivo and Static Ex Vivo Analysis of Granulomonocytic Cell Migration in the Collagen-Induced Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Ruth; Rath, Eva; Hladik, Anastasiya; Niederreiter, Birgit; Bonelli, Michael; Frantal, Sophie; Smolen, Josef S.; Scheinecker, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes (granulomonocytic cells; GMC) drive the inflammatory process at the earliest stages of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The migratory behavior and functional properties of GMC within the synovial tissue are, however, only incompletely characterized. Here we have analyzed GMC in the murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA using multi-photon real time in vivo microscopy together with ex vivo analysis of GMC in tissue sections. GMC were abundant as soon as clinical arthritis was apparent. GMC were motile and migrated randomly through the synovial tissue. In addition, we observed the frequent formation of cell clusters consisting of both neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes that actively contributed to the inflammatory process of arthritis. Treatment of animals with a single dose of prednisolone reduced the mean velocity of cell migration and diminished the overall immigration of GMC. In summary, our study shows that the combined application of real time in vivo microscopy together with elaborate static post-mortem analysis of GMC enables the description of dynamic migratory characteristics of GMC together with their precise location in a complex anatomical environment. Moreover, this approach is sensitive enough to detect subtle therapeutic effects within a very short period of time. PMID:22529989

  8. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins. PMID:27599513

  9. Curcumin attenuates inflammatory response in IL-1beta-induced human synovial fibroblasts and collagen-induced arthritis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong-Oh; Kim, Mun-Ok; Choi, Yung Hyun; Park, Yung-Min; Kim, Gi-Young

    2010-05-01

    Curcumin, a major component of turmeric, has been shown to exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study was performed to determine whether curcumin is efficacious against both collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and IL-1beta-induced activation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (CII) and treated with curcumin every other day for 2weeks after the initial immunization. For arthritis, we evaluated the incidence of disease and used an arthritis index based on paw thickness. In vitro proliferation of CII- or concanavalin A-induced splenic T cells was examined using IFN-gamma production. Pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta were examined in the mouse ankle joint and serum IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes were analyzed. The expression levels of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in human FLSs were also determined. The results showed that compared with untreated CIA mice, curcumin-treated mice downregulated clinical arthritis score, the proliferation of splenic T cells, expression levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in the ankle joint, and expression levels of IgG2a in serum. Additionally, by altering nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB transcription activity in FLSs, curcumin inhibited PGE(2) production, COX-2 expression, and MMP secretion. These results suggest that curcumin can effectively suppress inflammatory response by inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators and regulating humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:20188213

  10. Blockade of interleukin-6 receptor enhances the anti-arthritic effect of glucocorticoids without decreasing bone mineral density in mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Yoshida, H; Hashizume, M; Tanaka, K; Matsumoto, Y

    2015-11-01

    In a mouse arthritis model, we investigated whether interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) blockade would enhance the anti-arthritic effect of glucocorticoids (GCs). DBA/1J mice were immunized with type II collagen (CII), and were treated with prednisolone (PSL) and/or anti-mouse IL-6R antibody (MR16-1). Also, the effects of IL-6 on gene expression and the nuclear translocation of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) were examined in cultured cells treated with dexamethasone (DEX). PSL reduced the arthritis score dose-dependently in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. The arthritis score in the PSL (3 mg/kg) + MR16-1 group was lower than in the PSL (3 mg/kg) group, and at the same level as in the PSL (6 mg/kg) group. Lumbar vertebra bone mineral density (BMD) was decreased significantly in CIA mice and was higher in the PSL (3 mg/kg) + MR16-1 group than in the PSL (6 mg/kg) group. In the in-vitro synovial cells, IL-6 pretreatment attenuated the inhibitory effect of DEX on cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and inhibited the nuclear translocation of GR induced by DEX. In contrast, in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells, IL-6 pretreatment exacerbated the decrease in expression of osteocalcin and the increase in expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) by DEX. We demonstrated that IL-6 signalling blockade by an anti-IL-6R antibody can augment the anti-arthritic effect of GCs and inhibit the bone loss they cause. PMID:26201536

  11. Anti-CD5 therapy decreases severity of established disease in collagen type II-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Plater-Zyberk, C; Taylor, P C; Blaylock, M G; Maini, R N

    1994-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis has been widely used as an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis. We have used this model with a view to determining potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of human disease. To do this we have attempted to modulate the progression of established arthritis over a 10-day time period following the first appearance of disease, by i.p. injection of one of three different MoAbs. These consist of a rat IgG2a specific for the CD5 antigen expressed on all T cells and a subpopulation of B cells, a mouse IgG2b recognizing the CD72 antigen, and a rat IgM specific for the B220 molecule, CD72 and B220 both being expressed on all B cells. None of the three MoAbs had depleting activity in vivo. The progression of arthritis was monitored both clinically, and histologically. The effects of treatment with anti-CD5 and anti-CD72 antibodies were compared with control antibodies of the same species class and subclass. In the case of anti-B220 antibodies, the effects of treatment were compared with administration of PBS. Of these MoAbs, only treatment with anti-CD5 resulted in disease amelioration with significant decrease in disease severity in 60% of the animals. These changes became apparent 6 days after initiation of treatment. There were no significant differences in serum levels of IgG antibodies to native bovine collagen type II between the groups of treated and control mice. Possible mechanisms underlying the modification of disease expression following treatment with anti-CD5 MoAb are discussed. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7527741

  12. Preclinical characterization of DEKAVIL (F8-IL10), a novel clinical-stage immunocytokine which inhibits the progression of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In this article, we present a comparative immunohistochemical evaluation of four clinical-stage antibodies (L19, F16, G11 and F8) directed against splice isoforms of fibronectin and of tenascin-C for their ability to stain synovial tissue alterations in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Furthermore we have evaluated the therapeutic potential of the most promising antibody, F8, fused to the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL) 10. Methods F8-IL10 was produced and purified to homogeneity in CHO cells and shown to comprise biological active antibody and cytokine moieties by binding assays on recombinant antigen and by MC/9 cell proliferation assays. We have also characterized the ability of F8-IL10 to inhibit arthritis progression in the collagen-induced arthritis mouse model. Results The human antibody F8, specific to the extra-domain A of fibronectin, exhibited the strongest and most homogenous staining pattern in synovial biopsies and was thus selected for the development of a fully human fusion protein with IL10 (F8-IL10, also named DEKAVIL). Following radioiodination, F8-IL10 was able to selectively target arthritic lesions and tumor neo-vascular structures in mice, as evidenced by autoradiographic analysis and quantitative biodistribution studies. The subcutaneous administration route led to equivalent targeting results when compared with intravenous administration and was thus selected for the clinical development of the product. F8-IL10 potently inhibited progression of established arthritis in the collagen-induced mouse model when tested alone and in combination with methotrexate. In preparation for clinical trials in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, F8-IL10 was studied in rodents and in cynomolgus monkeys, revealing an excellent safety profile at doses tenfold higher than the planned starting dose for clinical phase I trials. Conclusions Following the encouraging preclinical results presented in this paper, clinical trials with F8-IL10

  13. Loss of SH3BP2 function suppresses bone destruction in TNF-driven and collagen-induced arthritis mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Tomoyuki; Gallant, Richard; Ishida, Shu; Kittaka, Mizuho; Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Fox, David A.; Morita, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Keiichiro; Rottapel, Robert; Ueki, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Objective SH3BP2 is a signaling adapter protein which regulates immune and skeletal systems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of SH3BP2 in arthritis in human TNF-α transgenic (hTNFtg) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) models. Methods First, SH3BP2-deficient (Sh3bp2–/–) and wild-type (Sh3bp2+/+) mice were crossed with hTNFtg mice. Inflammation and bone loss were examined by clinical inspection and histological and micro-CT analyses. Osteoclastogenesis was evaluated with primary bone marrow-derived M-CSF-dependent macrophages (BMMs). Second, CIA was induced in Sh3bp2–/– and Sh3bp2+/+ mice, and the incidence and severity of arthritis were evaluated. Anti-mouse type II collagen (CII) antibody levels were measured by ELISA. Lymph node cell responses to CII were also determined. Results SH3BP2-deficiency did not alter the severity of joint swelling but suppressed bone erosion in the hTNFtg model. Bone loss of talus and tibia was prevented in Sh3bp2–/–/hTNFtg mice compared to Sh3bp2+/+/hTNFtg mice. RANKL- and TNF-α-induced osteoclastogenesis was suppressed in Sh3bp2–/– BMM cultures. NFATc1 nuclear localization in response to TNF-α was decreased in Sh3bp2–/– BMMs compared to Sh3bp2+/+ BMMs. In the CIA model, SH3BP2-deficiency suppressed the incidence of arthritis, which was associated with decreased anti-CII antibody production, while the antigen-specific T-cell responses in lymph nodes were not significantly different between Sh3bp2+/+ and Sh3bp2–/– mice. Conclusion SH3BP2-deficiency prevents bone loss via impaired osteoclastogenesis in the hTNFtg model and suppresses the induction of arthritis via decreased autoantibody production in the CIA model. Therefore, SH3BP2 could be a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25470448

  14. Joint Degradation in a Monkey Model of Collagen-Induced Arthritis: Role of Cathepsin K Based on Biochemical Markers and Histological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Makoto; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Satoshi; Mori, Hiroshi; Ochi, Yasuo; Horai, Naoto; Li, Minqi; Amizuka, Norio

    2016-01-01

    The role of cathepsin K in joint degradation in a model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in cynomolgus monkey was examined using biochemical markers and histology. Joint swelling, urinary C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), and N- and C-telopeptides of type I collagen (NTX and CTX-I, resp.) were analyzed. Immunohistochemistry of type II collagen, cathepsin K, and CTX-II were performed using joints. Joint swelling reached peak on day 42 and continued at this level. The CTX-II level peaked on day 28 and declined thereafter, while CTX-I, NTX, and DPD reached plateau on day 43. Joint swelling was positively correlated with CTX-II increases on days 20 and 42/43, with increases in CTX-I and NTX/Cr on days 42/43 and 84, and with DPD increases throughout the study period. Intense cathepsin K staining was observed in osteoclasts and in articular cartilage and synovial tissue in arthritic joints. CTX-II was present in the superficial layer of articular cartilage in CIA monkeys. Evidence from biochemical markers suggests that matrix degradation in the CIA model starts with degradation of cartilage, rather than bone resorption. Cathepsin K expressed in osteoclasts, articular cartilage, and synovial tissue may contribute to degradation of cartilage. PMID:26949397

  15. APL-2, an altered peptide ligand derived from heat-shock protein 60, induces interleukin-10 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell derived from juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients and downregulates the inflammatory response in collagen-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Norailys; Cantera, Dolores; Barberá, Ariana; Alonso, Amaris; Chall, Elsy; Franco, Lourdes; Ancizar, Julio; Nuñez, Yanetsy; Altruda, Fiorella; Silengo, Lorenzo; Padrón, Gabriel; Del Carmen Dominguez, Maria

    2015-02-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by autoimmune arthritis of unknown cause with onset before age of 16 years. Methotrexate provides clinical benefits in JIA. For children who do not respond to methotrexate, treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is an option. However, some patients do not respond or are intolerant to anti-TNF therapy. Induction of peripheral tolerance has long been considered a promising approach to the treatment of chronic autoimmune diseases. We aimed to evaluate the potentialities of two altered peptide ligands (APLs) derived from human heat-shock protein 60, an autoantigen involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis, in JIA patients. Interferon (IFN)-γ, TNF-α and interleukin (IL)-10 levels were determined in ex vivo assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from these patients. Wild-type peptide and one of these APLs increased IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. Unlike, the other APLs (called APL2) increased the IL-10 level without affecting IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. On the other hand, APL2 induces a marked activation of T cells since it transforms cell cycle phase's distribution of CD4+ T cells from these patients. In addition, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of APL2 in collagen-induced arthritis model. Therapy with APL2 reduced arthritis scores and histological lesions in mice. This effect was associated to a decrease in TNF-α and IL-17 levels. These results indicate a therapeutic potentiality of APL2 for JIA. PMID:24474501

  16. Abrogation of collagen-induced arthritis by a peptidyl arginine deiminase inhibitor is associated with modulation of T cell-mediated immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kawalkowska, Joanna; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Ghari, Fatemeh; Davis, Simon; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul R; Williams, Richard O; Fischer, Roman; La Thangue, Nicholas B; Venables, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing citrulline, a post-translational modification of arginine, are generated by peptidyl arginine deiminases (PAD). Citrullinated proteins have pro-inflammatory effects in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we examine the therapeutic effects in collagen-induced arthritis of the second generation PAD inhibitor, BB-Cl-amidine. Treatment after disease onset resulted in the reversal of clinical and histological changes of arthritis, associated with a marked reduction in citrullinated proteins in lymph nodes. There was little overall change in antibodies to collagen or antibodies to citrullinated peptides, but a shift from pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17-type responses to pro-resolution Th2-type responses was demonstrated by serum cytokines and antibody subtypes. In lymph node cells from the arthritic mice treated with BB-Cl-amidine, there was a decrease in total cell numbers but an increase in the proportion of Th2 cells. BB-Cl-amidine had a pro-apoptotic effect on all Th subsets in vitro with Th17 cells appearing to be the most sensitive. We suggest that these immunoregulatory effects of PAD inhibition in CIA are complex, but primarily mediated by transcriptional regulation. We suggest that targeting PADs is a promising strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27210478

  17. Clinical efficacy of a new CD28-targeting antagonist of T cell co-stimulation in a non-human primate model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vierboom, M P M; Breedveld, E; Kap, Y S; Mary, C; Poirier, N; 't Hart, B A; Vanhove, B

    2016-03-01

    T cells have a central pathogenic role in the aetiopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and are therefore a favoured target of immunotherapy aiming at physical or functional elimination. Here we report an efficacy test of FR104, a new co-stimulation inhibitor directly targeting CD28 on T cells, in a translationally relevant model, the rhesus monkey model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). As a relevant comparator we used abatacept [cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen immunoglobulin (CTLA Ig)], an antagonist of CTLA-4 binding to CD80/86 clinically approved for treatment of RA. Treatment with either compound was started at the day of CIA induction. Although FR104 previously demonstrated a higher control of T cell responses in vitro than abatacept, both compounds were equally potent in the suppression of CIA symptoms and biomarkers, such as the production of C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin (IL)-6 and anti-collagen type II (CII) serum antibody (IgM/IgG). However, in contrast to abatacept, FR104 showed effective suppression of CII-induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation. The current study demonstrates a strong potential of the new selective CD28 antagonist FR104 for treatment of RA. PMID:26540618

  18. Remission of Collagen-Induced Arthritis through Combination Therapy of Microfracture and Transplantation of Thermogel-Encapsulated Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Yinan; Yang, Modi; Zhang, Yanbo; Chang, Fei; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-01-01

    The persistent inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) always leads to partial synovial hyperplasia and the destruction of articular cartilage. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) have been proven to possess immunosuppressive effects, and widely explored in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, poor inhibitory effect on local inflammatory state and limited capacity of preventing destruction of articular cartilage by systemic BMMSCs transplantation were observed. Herein, toward the classical type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats, the combination treatment of microfracture and in situ transplantation of thermogel-encapsulated BMMSCs was verified to obviously down-regulate the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In addition, it resulted in the decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and anti-collagen type II antibody, in the serum. Simultaneously, the combination therapy also could inhibit the proliferation of antigen specific lymphocytes and local joint inflammatory condition, and prevent the articular cartilage damage. The results indicated that the treatment programs could effectively stimulate the endogenous and exogenous BMMSCs to exhibit the immunosuppression and cartilage protection capability. This study provided a new therapeutic strategy for autoimmune inflammatory diseases, such as RA. PMID:25774788

  19. Abrogation of collagen-induced arthritis by a peptidyl arginine deiminase inhibitor is associated with modulation of T cell-mediated immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Kawalkowska, Joanna; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Ghari, Fatemeh; Davis, Simon; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul R.; Williams, Richard O.; Fischer, Roman; La Thangue, Nicholas B.; Venables, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing citrulline, a post-translational modification of arginine, are generated by peptidyl arginine deiminases (PAD). Citrullinated proteins have pro-inflammatory effects in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we examine the therapeutic effects in collagen-induced arthritis of the second generation PAD inhibitor, BB-Cl-amidine. Treatment after disease onset resulted in the reversal of clinical and histological changes of arthritis, associated with a marked reduction in citrullinated proteins in lymph nodes. There was little overall change in antibodies to collagen or antibodies to citrullinated peptides, but a shift from pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17-type responses to pro-resolution Th2-type responses was demonstrated by serum cytokines and antibody subtypes. In lymph node cells from the arthritic mice treated with BB-Cl-amidine, there was a decrease in total cell numbers but an increase in the proportion of Th2 cells. BB-Cl-amidine had a pro-apoptotic effect on all Th subsets in vitro with Th17 cells appearing to be the most sensitive. We suggest that these immunoregulatory effects of PAD inhibition in CIA are complex, but primarily mediated by transcriptional regulation. We suggest that targeting PADs is a promising strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27210478

  20. Anti-arthritic activity of Fu-Fang-Lu-Jiao-Shuang on collagen-induced arthritis in Balb/c mice and its underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyan; Sun, Weiguang; Chen, Laxia; Xu, Xin; Wu, Yunxia; Zhang, Jinwen; Zhang, Yonghui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, autoimmune disorder characterized by progressive multiple joint destruction, deformity, disability and premature death in most patients. Fu-Fang-Lu-Jiao-Shuang (FFLJS) is an effective traditional Chinese medicine, which has long been used clinically to treat RA patients. Objective: The objective of this study is aimed to evaluate the anti-rheumatic effects of FFLJS on collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model, as well as the underlying mechanisms, which have not previously been explored. Materials and Methods: CIA was induced by immunization with type II collagen (CII) in male Balb/c mice. The mice in the onset of arthritis were treated daily with FFLJS (125 or 500 mg/kg) or 1% carboxymethyl cellulose-Na for 28 days. Paw thickness and arthritic score were evaluated to confirm the anti-arthritic effect of FFLJS on CIA in mice. Levels of anti-CII antibody, proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1) β, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as well as prostaglandin E-2 (PGE-2) in serum and histological changes in the ankle joint were also analyzed. In addition, expressions of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3 and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases-1 (TIMP-1) in synovial tissue were also detected to further study the molecular mechanism of the anti-arthritic effects of FFLJS. Results: During therapeutic treatment, FFLJS significantly reduced paw thickness and arthritic score in CIA mice, decreased the amounts of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IL-17, PGE-2 and anti-CII antibody in serum. In addition, FFLJS treatment could prevent the bone destruction by reducing the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3, increasing the expression of TIMP-1 in synovial tissue of CIA mice. Conclusion: These findings offer the convincing evidence for the first time that the anti-rheumatic effects of FFLJS might be related to down-regulation of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IL-17 and PGE-2 levels for acute arthritis, and regulation of MMP-1, MMP-3

  1. MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands protect DBA/1LacJ mice from collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huan, Jianya; Kaler, Laurie J; Mooney, Jeffery L; Subramanian, Sandhya; Hopke, Corwyn; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Rosloniec, Edward F; Burrows, Gregory G; Offner, Halina

    2008-01-15

    We previously demonstrated the therapeutic effects of MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL), single-chain two domain complexes of the alpha1 and beta1 domains of MHC class II molecules genetically linked with an immunodominant peptide, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In the current study, we produced a monomeric murine I-Aq-derived RTL construct covalently linked with bovine collagen type II peptide (bCII257-270) suitable for use in DBA/1LacJ mice that develop collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model of human rheumatoid arthritis, after immunization with bCII protein in CFA. In this study, we demonstrate that the I-Aq-derived RTLs reduced the incidence of the disease, suppressed the clinical and histological signs of CIA and induced long-term modulation of T cells specific for arthritogenic Ags. Our results showed that the I-Aq/bCII257-270 molecule could systemically reduce proinflammatory IL-17 and IFN-gamma production and significantly increase anti-inflammatory IL-10, IL-13, and FoxP3 gene expression in splenocytes. Moreover, I-Aq/bCII257-270 molecule could also selectively inhibit IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-23 expression in local joint tissue. This is the first report demonstrating effective prevention of joint inflammation and clinical signs of CIA with an I-Aq-derived RTL, thus supporting the possible clinical use of this approach for treating rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:18178865

  2. CARD11 blockade suppresses murine collagen-induced arthritis via inhibiting CARD11/Bcl10 assembly and T helper type 17 response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Zhao, J; Zhang, H; Huang, Y; Wang, S; Tu, Q; Yang, N

    2014-01-01

    The scaffold protein caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11 (CARD11) is implicated in the regulation of inflammation and autoimmunity. The present study aimed to explore the role of CARD11 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were treated with either CARD11-targeted interfering RNA (CARD11 siRNA) or control siRNA by intraperitoneal injection every 3 days after CIA establishment. The clinical score of arthritis was recorded every other day. Synovial inflammation and cartilage erosion were evaluated by histology and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). Serum anti-type II collagen (anti-CII) antibodies and cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The CARD11/Bcl10 formation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation was assessed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting, and the percentage of T helper type 17 (Th17) cells was determined by flow cytometry. Systemic administration of CARD11 siRNA significantly reduced the clinical score of CIA severity. As indicated by the histology, joint inflammation and destruction were attenuated by CARD11 siRNA treatment. Micro-CT demonstrated less severe joint destruction in CARD11 siRNA-treated mice than in control mice. CARD11 siRNA treatment resulted in inhibition of CARD11/Bcl10 formation and the subsequent NF-κB activation. In addition, treatment with CARD11 siRNA resulted in a pronounced decrease in proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-17. Serum anti-CII antibody and the percentage of Th17 cells were also significantly reduced. CARD11 is involved in the pathogenesis of CIA by formation of the CARD11/Bcl10 complex and enhancement of the Th17 cell response. Targeting CARD11 provides a novel research direction in the development of therapeutic strategies for RA. PMID:24443940

  3. Effect of Mesenchymal Precursor Cells on the Systemic Inflammatory Response and Endothelial Dysfunction in an Ovine Model of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Laura M.; Abdalmula, Anwar; Washington, Elizabeth A.; Kaufman, Claire; Tudor, Elizabeth M.; Ghosh, Peter; Itescu, Silviu; Kimpton, Wayne G.; Bailey, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) are reported to possess immunomodulatory properties that may prove beneficial in autoimmune and other inflammatory conditions. However, their mechanism of action is poorly understood. A collagen-induced arthritis model has been previously developed which demonstrates local joint inflammation and systemic inflammatory changes. These include not only increased levels of inflammatory markers, but also vascular endothelial cell dysfunction, characterised by reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation. This study aimed to characterise the changes in systemic inflammatory markers and endothelial function following the intravenous administration of MPC, in the ovine model. Methods Arthritis was induced in sixteen adult sheep by administration of bovine type II collagen into the hock joint following initial sensitisation. After 24h, sheep were administered either 150 million allogeneic ovine MPCs intravenously, or saline only. Fibrinogen and serum amyloid-A were measured in plasma to assess systemic inflammation, along with pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Animals were necropsied two weeks following arthritis induction. Coronary and digital arterial segments were mounted in a Mulvaney-Halpern wire myograph. The relaxant response to endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilators was used to assess endothelial dysfunction. Results and Conclusion Arthritic sheep treated with MPC demonstrated a marked spike in plasma IL-10, 24h following MPC administration. They also showed significantly reduced plasma levels of the inflammatory markers, fibrinogen and serum amyloid A, and increased HDL. Coronary arteries from RA sheep treated with MPCs demonstrated a significantly greater maximal relaxation to bradykinin when compared to untreated RA sheep (253.6 ± 17.1% of pre-contracted tone vs. 182.3 ± 27.3% in controls), and digital arteries also demonstrated greater endothelium-dependent vasodilation

  4. MHC Class II Derived Recombinant T Cell Receptor Ligands Protect DBA/1LacJ Mice from Collagen-Induced Arthritis1

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Jianya; Kaler, Laurie J.; Mooney, Jeffery L.; Subramanian, Sandhya; Hopke, Corwyn; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Rosloniec, Edward F.; Burrows, Gregory G.; Offner, Halina

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the therapeutic effects of MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL), single-chain two domain complexes of the α1 and β1 domains of MHC class II molecules genetically linked with an immunodominant peptide, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In the current study, we produced a monomeric murine I-Aq-derived RTL construct covalently linked with bovine collagen type II peptide (bCII257–270) suitable for use in DBA/1LacJ mice that develop collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model of human rheumatoid arthritis, after immunization with bCII protein in CFA. In this study, we demonstrate that the I-Aq-derived RTLs reduced the incidence of the disease, suppressed the clinical and histological signs of CIA and induced long-term modulation of T cells specific for arthritogenic Ags. Our results showed that the I-Aq/bCII257–270 molecule could systemically reduce proinflammatory IL-17 and IFN-γ production and significantly increase anti-inflammatory IL-10, IL-13, and FoxP3 gene expression in splenocytes. Moreover, I-Aq/bCII257–270 molecule could also selectively inhibit IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 expression in local joint tissue. This is the first report demonstrating effective prevention of joint inflammation and clinical signs of CIA with an I-Aq-derived RTL, thus supporting the possible clinical use of this approach for treating rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:18178865

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Joint Protection in Collagen-Induced Arthritis after Treatment with IQ-1S, a Selective c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Hammaker, Deepa; Kochetkova, Irina; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Lyakhov, Sergey A.; Firestein, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) participate in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including inflammatory diseases. We recently synthesized the sodium salt of IQ-1S (11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one oxime) and demonstrated that it is a high-affinity JNK inhibitor and inhibits murine delayed-type hypersensitivity. Here we show that IQ-1S is highly specific for JNK and that its neutral form is the most abundant species at physiologic pH. Molecular docking of the IQ-1S syn isomer into the JNK1 binding site gave the best pose, which corresponded to the position of cocrystallized JNK inhibitor SP600125 (1,9-pyrazoloanthrone). Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of IQ-1S showed that it inhibited matrix metalloproteinase 1 and 3 gene expression induced by interleukin-1β in human fibroblast-like synoviocytes and significantly attenuated development of murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Treatment with IQ-1S either before or after induction of CIA resulted in decreased clinical scores, and joint sections from IQ-1S–treated CIA mice exhibited only mild signs of inflammation and minimal cartilage loss compared with those from control mice. Collagen II–specific antibody responses were also reduced by IQ-1S treatment. By contrast, the inactive ketone derivative 11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one had no effect on CIA clinical scores or collagen II–specific antibody titers. IQ-1S treatment also suppressed proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in joints and lymph node cells. Finally, treatment with IQ-1S increased the number of Foxp3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in lymph nodes. Thus, IQ-1S can reduce inflammation and cartilage loss associated with CIA and can serve as a small-molecule modulator for mechanistic studies of JNK function in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25784649

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Joint Protection in Collagen-Induced Arthritis after Treatment with IQ-1S, a Selective c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Hammaker, Deepa; Kochetkova, Irina; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Lyakhov, Sergey A; Firestein, Gary S; Quinn, Mark T

    2015-06-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) participate in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including inflammatory diseases. We recently synthesized the sodium salt of IQ-1S (11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one oxime) and demonstrated that it is a high-affinity JNK inhibitor and inhibits murine delayed-type hypersensitivity. Here we show that IQ-1S is highly specific for JNK and that its neutral form is the most abundant species at physiologic pH. Molecular docking of the IQ-1S syn isomer into the JNK1 binding site gave the best pose, which corresponded to the position of cocrystallized JNK inhibitor SP600125 (1,9-pyrazoloanthrone). Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of IQ-1S showed that it inhibited matrix metalloproteinase 1 and 3 gene expression induced by interleukin-1β in human fibroblast-like synoviocytes and significantly attenuated development of murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Treatment with IQ-1S either before or after induction of CIA resulted in decreased clinical scores, and joint sections from IQ-1S-treated CIA mice exhibited only mild signs of inflammation and minimal cartilage loss compared with those from control mice. Collagen II-specific antibody responses were also reduced by IQ-1S treatment. By contrast, the inactive ketone derivative 11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one had no effect on CIA clinical scores or collagen II-specific antibody titers. IQ-1S treatment also suppressed proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in joints and lymph node cells. Finally, treatment with IQ-1S increased the number of Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in lymph nodes. Thus, IQ-1S can reduce inflammation and cartilage loss associated with CIA and can serve as a small-molecule modulator for mechanistic studies of JNK function in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25784649

  7. Allogeneic Murine Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Migration to Inflamed Joints In Vivo and Amelioration of Collagen Induced Arthritis When Transduced to Express CTLA4Ig

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Frank; Ritter, Thomas; O'Flatharta, Cathal; Howard, Linda; Shaw, Georgina; Anegon, Ignacio; Murphy, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Despite the immunosuppressive, homing, and regenerative capabilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), their ability to migrate to arthritic joints and influence the course of arthritis in vivo remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine if allogeneic MSCs migrate to inflamed joints in vivo and to determine if MSCs expressing the costimulation blocker cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4 coupled to immunoglobulin-G (CTLA4Ig) could be used to ameliorate collagen induced arthritis (CIA). The migration of systemically delivered inbred mouse strain (FVB) MSCs to migrate to inflamed joints in CIA was studied using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, the effect of BALB/c MSCs modified with an adenoviral vector to express CTLA4Ig, on T cell function in vitro and on CIA in vivo was assessed. After systemic delivery of FVB MSCs, eGFP DNA was detectable in the joints of mice with CIA confirming that some MSCs had reached to inflamed joints. BALB/c MSCs suppressed the secretion of both TNFα and IFNγ, and reduced the ratio of Th1:Th2 cytokine expression, by DBA/1 T cells in vitro irrespective of viral modification. The expression of CTLA4Ig did not augment this effect. Despite a worsening of disease scores after infusion of BALB/c MSCs in vivo, BALB/c MSCs expressing CTLA4Ig significantly delayed the onset of inflammatory arthritis in CIA. These data demonstrate that allogeneic MSCs can migrate to the inflamed joints of CIA in vivo and that genetically modified allogeneic MSCs may be considered for development of gene therapy strategies for inflammatory arthritis PMID:23895495

  8. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis through modulating oxidative stress and suppressing nuclear factor-kappa B pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinhang; Li, Siming; Liu, Yaonan; Tian, Guiyou; Yuan, Qingyan; Bai, Fuliang; Wang, Wenfei; Zhang, Zhiyi; Ren, Guiping; Zhang, Yu; Li, Deshan

    2015-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that circulating FGF21 levels are elevated in the serum and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study is to investigate efficacy of FGF21 for treatment of RA and the molecular mechanisms of the therapeutic effect on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Mice with CIA were subcutaneously administered with FGF21 (5, 2 or 1mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), IL-1β antibody (5mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), IL-17A antibody (5mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) and dexamethasone (DEX) (1mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), respectively. The effects of treatment were determined by arthritis severity score, histological damage and cytokine production. The activation of NF-κB was analyzed by Western blotting. We also detected the levels of oxidative stress parameters. Our results showed that FGF21 had beneficial effects on clinical symptom and histological lesion of CIA mice. Similar to antibody and DEX, FGF21 treatment alleviated the severity of arthritis by reducing humoral and cellular immune responses and down-regulating the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. FGF21 treatment also reduced the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ and MMP-3 and increased level of IL-10 in the spleen tissue or the plasma of CIA mice in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, FGF21 inhibited IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and induced significant changes of oxidative stress parameters (MDA, SOD, CAT, GSH-PX and GSH) in the plasma. FGF21 exerts therapeutic efficacy for RA through antioxidant reaction and inhibiting NF-κB inflammatory pathway. This study provides evidence that FGF21 may be a promising therapeutic agent for RA patients. PMID:25601498

  9. Effect of Bizhongxiao decoction and its dismantled formulae on IL-1 and TNF levels in collagen-induced arthritis in rat synovial joints

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic autoimmune disease, affects sufferers in many different ways. Treatment of this chronic condition is particularly challenging. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) provides alternatives. Bizhongxiao decoction (BZX) is a TCM complex, which has been used clinically for many years to treat RA. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of BZX decoction and its dismantled formulae on IL-1 and TNF-1 levels in rats with RA, and to elucidate its mechanism of action. Methods Ninety healthy normal female SD rats were randomly divided into six groups: normal (control), model, BZX decoction, and the three dismantled formulae (I: heat-clearing and detoxication, II: dissipating dampness, and III: blood circulation promotion). Apart from the normal (control) group, the rats in each group were injected subcutaneously with bovine type II collagen and complete Freund adjuvant to establish a collagen-induced arthritis model, so that inhibition of foot swelling in the rats by BZX decoction and its dismantled formulae could be observed. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1 and TNF in synovial joints at various time points. Results Twenty-one days after the model was established, the levels of TNF and IL-1 were significantly higher in the model group, BZX decoction group and dismantled formula groups I, II and III than in the normal controls (P < 0.05). The levels of these cytokines were significantly higher in the model group than the BZX decoction or the three dismantled formula groups (P <0.01). At longer times, the TNF and IL-1 levels in model group rose gradually; those in the BZX decoction and dismantled formula groups were gradually reduced. The cytokine levels in the BZX decoction group were lower than in the three dismantled formula groups and continued to decline. Conclusions BZX decoction and the three dismantled formulae examined down-regulated the inflammatory

  10. SH3BP2 Gain-Of-Function Mutation Exacerbates Inflammation and Bone Loss in a Murine Collagen-Induced Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Tomoyuki; Gallant, Richard; Ishida, Shu; Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Kittaka, Mizuho; Nishida, Keiichiro; Fox, David A.; Morita, Yoshitaka; Ueki, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Objective SH3BP2 is a signaling adapter protein which regulates immune and skeletal systems. Gain-of-function mutations in SH3BP2 cause cherubism, characterized by jawbone destruction. This study was aimed to examine the role of SH3BP2 in inflammatory bone loss using a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Methods CIA was induced in wild-type (Sh3bp2+/+) and heterozygous P416R SH3BP2 cherubism mutant knock-in (Sh3bp2KI/+) mice, an SH3BP2 gain-of-function model. Severity of the arthritis was determined by assessing the paw swelling and histological analyses of the joints. Micro-CT analysis was used to determine the levels of bone loss. Inflammation and osteoclastogenesis in the joints were evaluated by quantitating the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and osteoclast markers. Furthermore, involvement of the T- and B-cell responses was determined by draining lymph node cell culture and measurement of the serum anti-mouse type II collagen antibody levels, respectively. Finally, roles of the SH3BP2 mutation in macrophage activation and osteoclastogenesis were determined by evaluating the TNF-α production levels and osteoclast formation in bone marrow-derived M-CSF-dependent macrophage (BMM) cultures. Results Sh3bp2KI/+ mice exhibited more severe inflammation and bone loss, accompanying an increased number of osteoclasts. The mRNA levels for TNF-α and osteoclast marker genes were higher in the joints of Sh3bp2KI/+ mice. Lymph node cell culture showed that lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ and IL-17 production were comparable between Sh3bp2+/+ and Sh3bp2KI/+ cells. Serum anti-type II collagen antibody levels were comparable between Sh3bp2+/+ and Sh3bp2KI/+ mice. In vitro experiments showed that TNF-α production in Sh3bp2KI/+ BMMs is elevated compared with Sh3bp2+/+ BMMs and that RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis is enhanced in Sh3bp2KI/+ BMMs associated with increased NFATc1 nuclear localization. Conclusion Gain-of-function of SH3BP2 augments inflammation

  11. Interferon gamma suppresses collagen-induced arthritis by regulation of Th17 through the induction of indoleamine-2,3-deoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeseon; Lee, Jennifer; Park, Mi-Kyung; Lim, Mi-Ae; Park, Eun-Mi; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Yang, Eun-Ji; Lee, Seon-Yeong; Jhun, Joo-Yeon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La

    2013-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice are known to be resistant to the development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). However, they show a severe arthritic phenotype when the Ifng gene is deleted. Although it has been proposed that IFN-γ suppresses inflammation in CIA via suppressing Th17 which is involved in the pathogenesis of CIA, the exact molecular mechanism of the Th17 regulation by IFN-γ is poorly understood. This study was conducted to 1) clarify that arthritogenic condition of IFN-γ knockout (KO) mice is dependent on the disinhibition of Th17 and 2) demonstrate that IFN-γ-induced indoleamine-2,3-dioxgenase (IDO) is engaged in the regulation of Th17. The results showed that the IFN-γ KO mice displayed increased levels of IL-17 producing T cells and the exacerbation of arthritis. Also, production of IL-17 by the splenocytes of the IFN-γ KO mice was increased when cultured with type II collagen. When Il17 was deleted from the IFN-γ KO mice, only mild arthritis developed without any progression of the arthritis score. The proportion of CD44(high)CD62L(low) memory-like T cells were elevated in the spleen, draining lymph node and mesenteric lymph node of IFN-γ KO CIA mice. Meanwhile, CD44(low)CD62L(high) naïve T cells were increased in IFN-γ and IL-17 double KO CIA mice. When Th17 polarized CD4+ T cells of IFN-γ KO mice were co-cultured with their own antigen presenting cells (APCs), a greater increase in IL-17 production was observed than in co-culture of the cells from wild type mice. In contrast, when APCs from IFN-γ KO mice were pretreated with IFN-γ, there was a significant reduction in IL-17 in the co-culture system. Of note, pretreatment of 1-methyl-DL- tryptophan, a specific inhibitor of IDO, abolished the inhibitory effects of IFN-γ. Given that IFN-γ is a potent inducer of IDO in APCs, these results suggest that IDO is involved in the regulation of IL-17 by IFN-γ. PMID:23613752

  12. Collagen-induced arthritis increases inducible nitric oxide synthase not only in aorta but also in the cardiac and renal microcirculation of mice.

    PubMed

    Palma Zochio Tozzato, G; Taipeiro, E F; Spadella, M A; Marabini Filho, P; de Assis, M R; Carlos, C P; Girol, A P; Chies, A B

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may promote endothelial dysfunction. This phenomenon requires further investigation, especially in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), as it is considered the experimental model most similar to RA. The objectives of this study were to identify CIA-induced changes in noradrenaline (NE) and acetylcholine (ACh) responses in mice aortas that may suggest endothelial dysfunction in these animals. Moreover, we characterize CIA-induced modifications in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in the aortas and cardiac and renal tissues taken from these mice that may be related to possible endothelial dysfunction. Male DBA/1J mice were immunized with 100 μg of emulsified bovine collagen type II (CII) plus complete Freund's adjuvant. Twenty-one days later, these animals received a boost of an additional 100 μg plus incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Fifteen days after the onset of the disease, aortic rings from CIA and control mice were challenged with NE and ACh in an organ bath. In these animals, iNOS was detected through immunohistochemical analysis of aorta, heart and kidneys. Plasma nitrite concentration was determined using the Griess reaction. CIA did not change NE or ACh responses in mice aorta but apparently increased the iNOS expression not only in aorta, but also in cardiac and renal microcirculation. In parallel, CIA reduced nitrite plasma concentration. In mice, CIA appears to increase the presence of iNOS in aorta, as well as in heart and in kidney microcirculation. This iNOS increase occurs apparently in parallel to a reduction of the bioavailability of NO. This phenomenon does not appear to change NE or ACh responses in aorta. PMID:26456019

  13. A herbal formula comprising Rosae Multiflorae Fructus and Lonicerae Japonicae Flos, attenuates collagen-induced arthritis and inhibits TLR4 signalling in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Brian Chi Yan; Yu, Hua; Guo, Hui; Su, Tao; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Li, Ting; Cao, Hui-Hui; Tse, Anfernee Kai-Wing; Wu, Zheng-Zhi; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2016-01-01

    RL, a traditional remedy for Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), comprises two edible herbs, Rosae Multiflorae Fructus and Lonicerae Japonicae Flos. We have reported that RL could inhibit the production of inflammatory mediators in immune cells. Here we investigated the effects and the mechanism of action of RL in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. RL significantly increased food intake and weight gain of CIA rats without any observable adverse effect; ameliorated joint erythema and swelling; inhibited immune cell infiltration, bone erosion and osteophyte formation in joints; reduced joint protein expression levels of TLR4, phospho-TAK1, phospho-NF-κB p65, phospho-c-Jun and phospho-IRF3; lowered levels of inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-17A and MCP-1 in sera and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-17A in joints); elevated serum IL-10 level; reinvigorated activities of antioxidant SOD, CAT and GSH-Px in the liver and serum; reduced Th17 cell proportions in splenocytes; inhibited splenocyte proliferation and activation; and lowered serum IgG level. In conclusion, RL at nontoxic doses inhibited TLR4 signaling and potently improved clinical conditions of CIA rats. These findings provide further pharmacological justifications for the traditional use of RL in RA management. PMID:26860973

  14. Extracts of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. attenuate the inflammatory response in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Huang, Mingqing; Zhang, Yuqin; Li, Huang; Zheng, Haiyin; Yu, Lishuang; Chu, Kedan; Lin, Yu; Chen, Lidian

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is considered a serious public health problem, which is commonly treated with traditional Chinese or herbal medicine. The present study evaluated the effects of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. extraction (BCBE) on a type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Wistar rats with CIA received either 125 or 500 mg/kg BCBE, after which, paw swelling was markedly suppressed compared with in the model group. In addition, BCBE significantly ameliorated pathological joint alterations, including synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone destruction. The protein and mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)‑6, IL‑8, tumor necrosis factor‑α and nuclear factor‑κB in synovial tissue were determined by immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis and reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that the expression levels of these factors were significantly downregulated in the BCBE‑treated group compared with in the model group. These results indicated that BCBE may exert an inhibitory effect on the CIA rat model, and its therapeutic potential is associated with its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27035125

  15. Korean red ginseng saponin fraction rich in ginsenoside-Rb1, Rc and Rb2 attenuates the severity of mouse collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Endale, Mehari; Im, Eun Ju; Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Sung Dae; Yayeh, Taddesse; Song, Yong-Bum; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Chaekyun; Kim, Seung-Hyung; Roh, Seong-Soo; Cho, Jae Youl; Rhee, Man Hee

    2014-01-01

    Despite a multitude of reports on anti-inflammatory properties of ginseng extracts or individual ginsenosides, data on antiarthritic effect of ginseng saponin preparation with mixed ginsenosides is limited. On the other hand, a combined therapy of safe and inexpensive plant-derived natural products such as ginsenosides can be considered as an alternative to treat arthritis. Our previous in vitro data displayed a strong anti-inflammatory action of red ginseng saponin fraction-A (RGSF-A). We, herein, report a marked antiarthritic property of RGSF-A rich in ginsenoside Rb1, Rc, and Rb2. Collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) mice were treated with RGSF-A or methotrexate (MTX) for 5 weeks. Joint pathology, serum antibody production and leukocye activation, cytokine production in the circulation, lymph nodes, and joints were examined. RGSF-A markedly reduced severity of arthritis, cellular infiltration, and cartilage damage. It suppressed CD3(+)/CD69(+), CD4(+)/CD25(+), CD8(+) T-cell, CD19(+), B220/CD23(+) B-cell, MHCII(+)/CD11c(+), and Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) cell activations. It further suppressed anti-CII- or anti-RF-IgG/IgM, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-17, and IL-6 secretions but stimulated IL-10 levels in the serum, joint, or splenocyte. RGSF-A attenuated arthritis severity, modified leukocyte activations, and restored cytokine imbalances, suggesting that it can be considered as an antiarthritic agent with the capacity to ameliorate the immune and inflammatory responses in CIA mice. PMID:24833816

  16. Methyl salicylate lactoside inhibits inflammatory response of fibroblast-like synoviocytes and joint destruction in collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Wenyu; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Xue; Xin, Sheng; Zhou, Yiming; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dan; Li, Yongjie; Zhou, Sibai; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-d-lactoside (MSL), whose chemical structure is similar to that of salicylic acid, is a natural product derivative isolated from a traditional Chinese herb. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of MSL in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and explore its underlying mechanism. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The anti-arthritic effects of MSL were evaluated on human rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in vitro and CIA in mice in vivo by obtaining clinical scores, measuring hind paw thickness and inflammatory cytokine levels, radiographic evaluations and histopathological assessments. KEY RESULTS Treatment with MSL after the onset of arthritis significantly prevented the progression and development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in CIA mice without megascopic gastric mucosa damage. In addition, MSL inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, the phosphorylation and translocation of NF-κB, and cell proliferation induced by TNF-α in FLS. MSL non-selectively inhibited the activity of COX in vitro, but was a more potent inhibitor of COX-2 than COX-1. MSL also inhibited the phosphorylation of inhibitor of NF-κB kinase, IκBα and p65, thus blocking the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in TNF-α-stimulated FLS. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS MSL exerts therapeutic effects on CIA mice, suppressing the inflammatory response and joint destruction by non-selectively inhibiting the activity of COX and suppressing activation of the NF-κB signalling pathway, but without damaging the gastric mucosa. Therefore, MSL has great potential to be developed into a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA. PMID:24712652

  17. Changes in focal adhesion kinase expression in rats with collagen-induced arthritis and efficacy of intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs alone or in combination

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui-Ying; Luo, Jing; Li, Xiao-Feng; Lv, Qian; Wen, Hong-Yan; Song, Qing-Zhen; Zhao, Wen-Peng; Zhao, Xiang-Cong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Si-Yu; Zhi, Jian-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is known to promote the proliferation, migration and survival of synovial cells and plays an important role in the occurrence, development and pathological process of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to observe FAK changes in synovial cells of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and after intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or in combination in a CIA female SD rat model induced by collagen type II. The rats were randomized to 8 groups: normal control group, CIA model control group, methotrexate (MTX, 0.9 mg/kg/w) group, cyclophosphamide (CTX, 24 mg/kg/3 w) group, leflunomide (LEF, 1.2 mg/kg/d) group, MTX + CTX group, LEF + CTX group, and MTX + LEF group. They were intervened with DMARDs alone or in combination for six weeks. The experiment lasted a total of 9 weeks in vivo. Articular inflammation was measured during the process of drug intervention in terms of the degree of swelling degree in the right hind foot using a venire caliper. All animals were sacrificed by breaking the neck after 9 weeks. Then, the ankle was fixed, decalcified, embedded, and HE stained, and prepared into slices to observe pathological changes in the synovial tissue. FAK expression in synovial cells was assayed by immunohistochemistry and the mean optical density (OD) value was measured using the HPIAS-2000 image analysis system. It was found that FAK expression was negative in normal control group, positive in CIA model control group, and decreased in the three DMARD combination treatment groups significantly as compared with that in the three single-drug groups (P < 0.05). FAK expression in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group decreased more significantly than that in MTX + LEF group (P < 0.05), and there was no statistically significant difference between LEF + CTX and MTX + CTX groups. The arthritis index and pathological change in the synovial tissue in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group

  18. Characterization of inhibitory T cells induced by an analog of type II collagen in an HLA-DR1 humanized mouse model of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We used DR1 transgenic mice and covalently linked DR1 multimers to characterize analog-specific inhibitory T cells in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Because of the low numbers of antigen-specific T cells in wild-type mice, functional T-cell studies in autoimmune arthritis have been challenging. The use of T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice has provided useful information, but such T cells may not represent the heterogeneous T-cell response that occurs in natural settings. Our focus was to develop tools to identify and characterize the population of immunoregulatory T cells induced in wild-type mice by an analog peptide of CII259-273, which contains amino acid substitutions at positions 263 (N) and 266 (D) (analog peptide A12). Methods DR1 multimers, developed by loading empty class II molecules with exogenous peptide, provide a method for visualizing antigen-specific T cells with flow cytometry. However, the low binding avidity of A12 for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) made this strategy untenable. To overcome this problem, we generated DR1 multimers in which the analog peptide A12 was covalently linked, hoping that the low-avidity analog would occupy enough binding clefts to allow detection of the responsive T cells. Results Staining with the tetramer revealed that A12-specific T cells were readily detectable at 10 days after immunization. These CD4(+) T cells are a highly selective subset of the TCR repertoire and have a limited clonality. Analysis of cytokine expression showed that cells detected by tetramer (A12) expressed primarily suppressive cytokines (interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-10) in response to collagen, compared with control cells. Although they did not express Fox-p3, they were extremely effective in preventing and suppressing inflammatory arthritis. Conclusions In summary, our studies showed that the use of covalently linked multimers allows characterization of analog-specific T cells that are otherwise difficult to

  19. ETP-46321, a dual p110α/δ class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor modulates T lymphocyte activation and collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aragoneses-Fenoll, L; Montes-Casado, M; Ojeda, G; Acosta, Y Y; Herranz, J; Martínez, S; Blanco-Aparicio, C; Criado, G; Pastor, J; Dianzani, U; Portolés, P; Rojo, J M

    2016-04-15

    Class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are essential to function of normal and tumor cells, and to modulate immune responses. T lymphocytes express high levels of p110α and p110δ class IA PI3K. Whereas the functioning of PI3K p110δ in immune and autoimmune reactions is well established, the role of p110α is less well understood. Here, a novel dual p110α/δ inhibitor (ETP-46321) and highly specific p110α (A66) or p110δ (IC87114) inhibitors have been compared concerning T cell activation in vitro, as well as the effect on responses to protein antigen and collagen-induced arthritis in vivo. In vitro activation of naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 was inhibited more effectively by the p110δ inhibitor than by the p110α inhibitor as measured by cytokine secretion (IL-2, IL-10, and IFN-γ), T-bet expression and NFAT activation. In activated CD4(+) T cells re-stimulated through CD3 and ICOS, IC87114 inhibited Akt and Erk activation, and the secretion of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17A, and IFN-γ better than A66. The p110α/δ inhibitor ETP-46321, or p110α plus p110δ inhibitors also inhibited IL-21 secretion by differentiated CD4(+) T follicular (Tfh) or IL-17-producing (Th17) helper cells. In vivo, therapeutic administration of ETP-46321 significantly inhibited responses to protein antigen as well as collagen-induced arthritis, as measured by antigen-specific antibody responses, secretion of IL-10, IL-17A or IFN-γ, or clinical symptoms. Hence, p110α as well as p110δ Class IA PI3Ks are important to immune regulation; inhibition of both subunits may be an effective therapeutic approach in inflammatory autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26883061

  20. Low Dietary c9t11-Conjugated Linoleic Acid Intake from Dairy Fat or Supplements Reduces Inflammation in Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Shane M; Olson, Jake M; Campbell, James P; Bishop, Jeffrey W; Crump, Peter M; Cook, Mark E

    2016-07-01

    Dietary cis-9,trans-11 (c9t11) conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fed at 0.5 % w/w was previously shown to attenuate inflammation in the murine collagen-induced (CA) arthritis model, and growing evidence implicates c9t11-CLA as a major anti-inflammatory component of dairy fat. To understand c9t11-CLA's contribution to dairy fat's anti-inflammatory action, the minimum amount of dietary c9t11-CLA needed to reduce inflammation must be determined. This study had two objectives: (1) determine the minimum dietary anti-inflammatory c9t11-CLA intake level in the CA model, and (2) compare this to anti-inflammatory effects of dairy fat (non-enriched, naturally c9t11-CLA-enriched, or c9t11-CLA-supplemented). Mice received the following dietary fat treatments (w/w) post arthritis onset: corn oil (6 % CO), 0.125, 0.25, 0.375, and 0.5 % c9t11-CLA, control butter (6 % CB), c9t11-enriched butter (6 % EB), or c9t11-CLA-supplemented butter (6 % SB, containing 0.2 % c9t11-CLA). Paw arthritic severity and pad swelling were scored and measured, respectively, over an 84-day study period. All c9t11-CLA and butter diets decreased the arthritic score (25-51 %, P < 0.01) and paw swelling (8-11 %, P < 0.01). Throughout the study, plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) was elevated in CO-fed arthritic mice compared to non-arthritic (NA) mice but was reduced in 0.5 % c9t11-CLA- and EB-fed mice. Interleukin-1β and IL-6 were increased in arthritic CO-fed mice compared to NA mice but were reduced in 0.5 % c9t11-CLA- and EB-fed mice through day 42. In conclusion, 0.125 % c9t11-CLA reduced clinical arthritis as effectively as higher doses, and decreased arthritis in CB-fed mice suggested that the minimal anti-inflammatory levels of c9t11-CLA might be below 0.125 %. PMID:27270404

  1. Factors secreted from dental pulp stem cells show multifaceted benefits for treating experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Jun; Takahashi, Nobunori; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshioka, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Nishikawa, Masaya; Hibi, Hideharu; Ishigro, Naoki; Ueda, Minoru; Furukawa, Koichi; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by synovial hyperplasia and chronic inflammation, which lead to the progressive destruction of cartilage and bone in the joints. Numerous studies have reported that administrations of various types of MSCs improve arthritis symptoms in animal models, by paracrine mechanisms. However, the therapeutic effects of the secreted factors alone, without the cell graft, have been uncertain. Here, we show that a single intravenous administration of serum-free conditioned medium (CM) from human deciduous dental pulp stem cells (SHED-CM) into anti-collagen type II antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), markedly improved the arthritis symptoms and joint destruction. The therapeutic efficacy of SHED-CM was associated with an induction of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in the CAIA joints and the abrogation of RANKL expression. SHED-CM specifically depleted of an M2 macrophage inducer, the secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9 (ED-Siglec-9), exhibited a reduced ability to induce M2-related gene expression and attenuate CAIA. SHED-CM also inhibited the RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Collectively, our findings suggest that SHED-CM provides multifaceted therapeutic effects for treating CAIA, including the ED-Siglec-9-dependent induction of M2 macrophage polarization and inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Thus, SHED-CM may represent a novel anti-inflammatory and reparative therapy for RA. PMID:26603475

  2. Effects of type II collagen epitope carbamylation and citrullination in human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4(+) monozygotic twins discordant for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    De Santis, M; Ceribelli, A; Cavaciocchi, F; Generali, E; Massarotti, M; Isailovic, N; Crotti, C; Scherer, H U; Montecucco, C; Selmi, C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the native, citrullinated or carbamylated type II human collagen T cell- and B cell-epitopes on the adaptive immune response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Peripheral blood T and B cells obtained from a human leucocyte D4-related (antigen DR4(-) HLA-DR4)(+) woman with early RA, her healthy monozygotic twin and an unrelated HLA-DR3(+) woman with early RA were analysed for activation (CD154/CD69), apoptosis (annexin/7-aminoactinomycin), cytokine production [interferon (IFN)γ/interleukin (IL)-17/IL-4/IL-10/IL-6] and functional phenotype (CD45Ra/CCR7) after stimulation with the collagen native T cell epitope (T261-273), the K264 carbamylated T cell epitope (carT261-273), the native B cell epitope (B359-369) or the R360 citrullinated B cell epitope (citB359-369), and the combinations of these. The T cell memory compartment was activated by T cell epitopes in both discordant DR4(+) twins, but not in the DR3(+) RA. The collagen-specific activation of CD4(+) T cells was induced with both the native and carbamylated T cell epitopes only in the RA twin. Both T cell epitopes also induced IL-17 production in the RA twin, but a greater IL-4 and IL-10 response in the healthy twin. The citrullinated B cell epitope, particularly when combined with the carbamylated T cell epitope, induced B cell activation and an increased IL-6/IL-10 ratio in the RA twin compared to a greater IL-10 production in the healthy twin. Our data suggest that circulating collagen-specific T and B cells are found in HLA-DR4(+) subjects, but only RA activated cells express co-stimulatory molecules and produce proinflammatory cytokines. Carbamylation and citrullination further modulate the activation and cytokine polarization of T and B cells. PMID:27314557

  3. Selective oestrogen receptor modulators lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene inhibit joint inflammation and osteoporosis in ovariectomised mice with collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Angelina I.; Stubelius, Alexandra; Nurkkala-Karlsson, Merja; Ohlsson, Claes; Carlsten, Hans; Islander, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Objective. RA predominantly affects post-menopausal women and is strongly associated with development of generalised osteoporosis. To find treatments that target both joint manifestations and osteoporosis in RA is desirable. The third generation of selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) [lasofoxifene (LAS) and bazedoxifene (BZA)] are new treatment options for post-menopausal osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of LAS and BZA on arthritic disease and inflammation-associated bone loss using CIA in mice. Methods. Female DBA/1 mice were ovariectomised and subjected to CIA as a model of post-menopausal RA. Mice received treatment with LAS, BZA, 17β-estradiol (E2) as reference or vehicle. Arthritis development was assessed and BMD was determined by peripheral quantitative CT of the femurs. Serologic markers of inflammation and cartilage destruction were analysed. Immune cells in lymph nodes were studied by flow cytometry. Results. LAS and BZA reduced the clinical severity of arthritis as well as the grade of histologic synovitis and erosions on cartilage and bone. Moreover, SERMs protected against generalised bone loss in CIA by increasing trabecular BMD. Both SERMs decreased serum marker of cartilage destruction and LAS reduced serum IL-6 levels. SERMs did not alter Th17 cells in lymph nodes as E2 did. Conclusion. The anti-osteoporotic drugs LAS and BZA were found to be potent inhibitors of joint inflammation and bone destruction in experimental arthritis. This study provides new important knowledge regarding the treatment regimen of post-menopausal women with RA who suffer from increased risk for osteoporosis. PMID:26424839

  4. Norisoboldine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis through regulating the balance between Th17 and regulatory T cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wang, Ting; Yu, Juntao; Wu, Xin; Lu, Qian; Chou, Guixin; Wang, Zhengtao; Kong, Lingyi; Dai, Yue; Xia, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Norisoboldine (NOR), the main active ingredient of the dry root of Lindera aggregata, was previously proven to have substantial therapeutic effects on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice by oral administration. However, it exhibited a very poor bioavailability in normal rats. The pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamics disconnection attracts us to explore its anti-arthritic mechanism in more detail. In this study, NOR, administered orally, markedly attenuated the pathological changes in CIA rats, which was accompanied by the down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that the plasma concentration of NOR was moderately elevated in CIA rats compared with normal rats, but it was still far lower than the minimal effective concentration required for inhibiting the proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes in vitro. Interestingly, NOR was shown to regulate the balance between Th17 and regulatory T (Treg) cells in the intestinal lymph nodes more strikingly than in other tissues. It could increase the expression of Foxp3 mRNA in both gut and joints, and markedly up-regulate the number of integrin α4β7 (a marker of gut source)-positive Foxp3{sup +} cells in the joints of CIA rats. These results suggest that the gut might be the primary action site of NOR, and NOR exerts anti-arthritis effect through regulating the balance between Th17 and Treg cells in intestinal lymph nodes and yielding a trafficking of lymphocytes (especially Treg cells) from the gut to joint. The findings of the present study also provide a plausible explanation for the anti-arthritic effects of poorly absorbed compounds like NOR. - Highlights: • Norisoboldine, administered orally, markedly attenuates the clinical signs of CIA. • Norisoboldine regulates the balance of Th17/Treg cells in the intestinal lymph node. • Norisoboldine induces the migration of Treg cells from the gut to joint.

  5. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3(+) (LAG3(+)) forkhead box protein 3(-) (FOXP3(-)) regulatory T cells induced by B cells alleviates joint inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Ying; Hsu, Wan-Tseng; Chen, Yi-Lien; Chien, Chien-Hui; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which dysregulated immune cells primarily target synovial joints. Despite recent advances in the treatment of RA, including the introduction of biologic therapies and employment of combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drug strategies, remission rates remain suboptimal. Previous studies have demonstrated that the adoptive transfer of induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) was effective in treating a murine model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The objective of this study was to develop optimal potential iTreg-based therapy for CIA by adoptively transferring LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells. B-cell-induced Treg-of-B cells expressed LAG3 but not Foxp3 (designated LAG3(+) Treg-of-B), and secreted IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β. Furthermore, LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells suppressed the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) responder T cells through both LAG3 and IL-10 production. In the murine CIA model, adoptive transfer of LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells alleviated the joint severity as well as local and systemic inflammation. Treatment with LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells also promoted IL-10 production in lymphocytes isolated from the spleen and draining lymph nodes. Moreover, mice receiving LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cell treatment showed significantly less pronounced osteolysis in the hind footpads, which correlated with the downregulation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression. In conclusion, we identified a novel subset of Tregs for CIA treatment. This insight may facilitate exploring novel regulatory T-cell-based therapies for human autoimmune diseases. PMID:26908164

  6. Ginsenoside metabolite compound K suppresses T-cell priming via modulation of dendritic cell trafficking and costimulatory signals, resulting in alleviation of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingyu; Wu, Huaxun; Wang, Qingtong; Chang, Yan; Liu, Kangkang; Wei, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Ginsenoside metabolite compound K (CK; 20-O-d-glucopyranosyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol), a novel ginsenoside metabolite, belongs to the dammarane-type triterpene saponins, according to its structure. The anti-inflammatory activity of CK has been identified in several studies. Our study demonstrated that CK exerted an anti-inflammatory effect in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and adjuvant-induced arthritis animal models, and this effect was due to inhibition of the abnormal activation and differentiation of T cells. However, the mechanism of CK in suppressing T-cell activation remains unclear. In this study, CK had a therapeutic effect in mice with CIA, decreased the percentage of activated T cells and dendritic cells (DCs), and increased the percentage of naive T cells in lymph nodes. The inhibitory effect on T-cell activation of CK was related to suppression of accumulation of DCs in lymph nodes. CK decreased CCL21 levels in lymph nodes and CCR7 expression in DCs and suppressed CCL21/CCR7-mediated migration of DCs, thus reducing accumulation of DCs in lymph nodes. In addition, signals for T-cell activation including major histocompatibility complex class II and costimulatory molecules, such as CD80 and CD86, were suppressed by CK, and the proliferation of T cells induced by DCs was inhibited by CK. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that CK downregulated DC priming of T-cell activation in CIA, and suppression of CCL21/CCR7-mediated DC migration and signaling between T cells and DCs might be the potential mechanism. These results provide an interesting, novel insight into the potential mechanism by which CK contributes to the anti-inflammatory effect in autoimmune conditions. PMID:25630466

  7. The histamine H4 receptor mediates inflammation and Th17 responses in preclinical models of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cowden, Jeffery M; Yu, Fuqu; Banie, Homayon; Farahani, Mandana; Ling, Ping; Nguyen, Steven; Riley, Jason P; Zhang, Mai; Zhu, Jian; Dunford, Paul J; Thurmond, Robin L

    2014-01-01

    Objective The histamine H4 receptor (H4R) has been shown to drive inflammatory responses in models of asthma, colitis and dermatitis, and in these models it appears to affect both innate and adaptive immune responses. In this study, we used both H4R-deficient mice and a specific H4R antagonist, JNJ 28307474, to investigate the involvement of the H4R in mouse arthritis models. Methods H4R-deficient mice and wild-type mice administered the H4R antagonist were studied in models of collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The impact on Th17 cells was assessed by restimulation of inguinal lymphocytes in the disease or immunisation models and with in vitro stimulation of whole blood. Results Both H4R-deficient mice and mice treated with the H4R antagonist exhibited reduced arthritis disease severity in both CAIA and CIA models. This was evident from the reduction in disease score and in joint histology. In the CIA model, treatment with the H4R antagonist reduced the number of interleukin (IL)-17 positive cells in the lymph node and the total production of IL-17. Th17 cell development in vivo was reduced in H4R-deficient mice or in mice treated with an H4R antagonist. Finally, treatment of both mouse and human blood with an H4R antagonist reduced the production of IL-17 when cells were stimulated in vitro. Conclusions These results implicate the H4R in disease progression in arthritis and in the production of IL-17 from Th17 cells. This work supports future clinical exploration of H4R antagonists for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24126456

  8. Analogues of methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis. 1. Effects of 10-deazaaminopterin analogues on type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    DeGraw, J I; Colwell, W T; Crase, J; Smith, R L; Piper, J R; Waud, W R; Sirotnak, F M

    1997-01-31

    Carbonation of the dianions (LDA) of 5-methylthiophene-2-carboxylic, 2-methylpyridine-5-carboxylic, and 3-methylpyridine-6-carboxylic acids provided the respective carboxy heteroarylacetic acids. The crude diacids were directly esterified in MeOH-HCl to afford the diesters. Alkylation of the sodio anions with ethyl iodide yielded the appropriate alpha-ethyl diesters. The anions of the various diester substrates were then alkylated by 2,4-diamino-6-(bromomethyl)-pteridine followed by ester saponification at room temperature to afford the respective 2,4-diamino-4-deoxy-10-carboxy-10-deazapteroic acids. The 10-carboxyl group was readily decarboxylated by heating in DMSO at temperatures of 110-135 degrees C to give the diamino 10-deaza heteropteroic acid intermediates. Coupling with diethyl L-glutamate followed by ester hydrolysis afforded the target aminopterins. The analogues were evaluated for antiinflammatory effect in the mouse type II collagen model. The thiophene analogue of 10-ethyl-10-deazaaminopterin was found to be an effective inhibitor in terms of reduced visual evidence of inflammation and swelling as determined by caliper measurement. PMID:9022804

  9. Association of H2A{sup b} with resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in H2-recombinant mouse strains: An allele associated with reduction of several apparently unrelated responses

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, N.A.; Brunner, M.C.

    1995-02-01

    HLA class II alleles can protect against immunological diseases. Seeking an animal model for a naturally occurring protective allele, we screened a panel of H2-congenic and recombinant mouse strains for ability to protect against collagen-induced arthritis. The strains were crossed with the susceptible strain DBA/1, and the F{sub 1} hybrids immunized with cattle and chicken type II collagen. Hybrids having the H2A{sup b} allele displayed a reduced incidence and duration of the disease. They also had a reduced level of pre-disease inflammation, but not of anti-collagen antibodies. The allele is already known to be associated with reduction of other apparently unrelated immune responses, suggesting that some form of functional differentiation may operate that is not exclusively related to epitope-binding. It is suggested that this may reflect allelic variation in the class II major histocompatibility complex promoter region. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Bioactive Compound Ferulic Acid Contained in Oldenlandia diffusa on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hao; Liang, Qing-Hua; Xiong, Xin-Gui; Chen, Jiang; Wu, Dan; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to identify the active compounds in Oldenlandia diffusa (OD) decoction and the compounds absorbed into plasma, and to determine whether the absorbed compounds derived from OD exerted any anti-inflammatory effects in rats with collagen induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The UPLC-PDA (Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography Photo-Diode Array) method was applied to identify the active compounds both in the decoction and rat plasma. The absorbable compound was administered to the CIA rats, and the effects were dynamically observed. X-ray films of the joints and HE stain of synovial tissues were analyzed. The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in the rats from each group were measured by means of ELISA. The absorbed compound in the plasma of CIA rats was identified as ferulic acid (FA), following OD decoction administration. Two weeks after the administration of FA solution or OD decoction, the general conditions improved compared to the model group. The anti-inflammatory effect of FA was inferior to that of the OD decoction (P < 0.05), based on a comparison of IL-1β TNF-α levels. FA from the OD decoction was absorbed into the body of CIA rats, where it elicited anti-inflammatory responses in rats with CIA. Conclusions. These results suggest that FA is the bioactive compound in OD decoction, and FA exerts its effects through anti-inflammatory pathways. PMID:24883069

  11. Minimal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (mPBPK) model for a monoclonal antibody against interleukin-6 in mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Jiang, Xiling; Jusko, William J; Zhou, Honghui; Wang, Weirong

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAb) targeting soluble inflammatory cytokines exert their pharmacological effects in rheumatoid arthritis through binding and neutralizing free cytokines in target tissue sites. Therefore suppression of free cytokines in such sites directly relates to the magnitude of therapeutic response. Although the interrelationships between mAb and cytokines have been examined in the systemic circulation, less is known about the interaction of mAb and cytokines in inflamed joints. In the present study, the interplay between the mAb, CNTO 345, and its target IL-6 in serum as well as ankle joint synovial fluid were characterized in collagen-induced arthritic mice. A minimal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model with target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) features in serum and ankle joint synovial fluid was developed for the assessment of the TMDD dynamics of CNTO 345 and IL-6. Our model indicates that TMDD kinetics in ankle joints differ greatly from that in serum. The differences can be attributed to the limited tissue distribution of CNTO 345 in ankle joint synovial fluid, the significant rise of the IL-6 baseline in ankle joint synovial fluid in comparison with serum, and the relative time-scales of elimination rates between CNTO 345, free IL-6 and CNTO 345-IL-6 complex in serum and ankle joint synovial fluid. PMID:27119518

  12. Designing Anti-inflammatory Drugs from Parasitic Worms: A Synthetic Small Molecule Analogue of the Acanthocheilonema viteae Product ES-62 Prevents Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In spite of increasing evidence that parasitic worms may protect humans from developing allergic and autoimmune diseases and the continuing identification of defined helminth-derived immunomodulatory molecules, to date no new anti-inflammatory drugs have been developed from these organisms. We have approached this matter in a novel manner by synthesizing a library of drug-like small molecules based upon phosphorylcholine, the active moiety of the anti-inflammatory Acanthocheilonema viteae product, ES-62, which as an immunogenic protein is unsuitable for use as a drug. Following preliminary in vitro screening for inhibitory effects on relevant macrophage cytokine responses, a sulfone-containing phosphorylcholine analogue (11a) was selected for testing in an in vivo model of inflammation, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Testing revealed that 11a was as effective as ES-62 in protecting DBA/1 mice from developing CIA and mirrored its mechanism of action in downregulating the TLR/IL-1R transducer, MyD88. 11a is thus a novel prototype for anti-inflammatory drug development. PMID:24228757

  13. MICL controls inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Redelinghuys, Pierre; Whitehead, Lauren; Augello, Andrea; Drummond, Rebecca A; Levesque, Jean-Michel; Vautier, Simon; Reid, Delyth M; Kerscher, Bernhard; Taylor, Julie A; Nigrovic, Peter A; Wright, John; Murray, Graeme I; Willment, Janet A; Hocking, Lynne J; Fernandes, Maria J G; De Bari, Cosimo; Mcinnes, Iain B; Brown, Gordon D

    2016-01-01

    Background Myeloid inhibitory C-type lectin-like receptor (MICL, Clec12A) is a C-type lectin receptor (CLR) expressed predominantly by myeloid cells. Previous studies have suggested that MICL is involved in controlling inflammation. Objective To determine the role of this CLR in inflammatory pathology using Clec12A−/− mice. Methods Clec12A−/− mice were generated commercially and primarily characterised using the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model. Mechanisms and progress of disease were characterised by clinical scoring, histology, flow cytometry, irradiation bone-marrow chimera generation, administration of blocking antibodies and in vivo imaging. Characterisation of MICL in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was determined by immunohistochemistry and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. Anti-MICL antibodies were detected in patient serum by ELISA and dot-blot analysis. Results MICL-deficient animals did not present with pan-immune dysfunction, but exhibited markedly exacerbated inflammation during CAIA, owing to the inappropriate activation of myeloid cells. Polymorphisms of MICL were not associated with disease in patients with RA, but this CLR was the target of autoantibodies in a subset of patients with RA. In wild-type mice the administration of such antibodies recapitulated the Clec12A−/− phenotype. Conclusions MICL plays an essential role in regulating inflammation during arthritis and is an autoantigen in a subset of patients with RA. These data suggest an entirely new mechanism underlying RA pathogenesis, whereby the threshold of myeloid cell activation can be modulated by autoantibodies that bind to cell membrane-expressed inhibitory receptors. PMID:26275430

  14. Cartilage collagen type II seromarker patterns in axial spondyloarthritis and psoriatic arthritis: associations with disease activity, smoking and HLA-B27.

    PubMed

    Munk, Heidi Lausten; Gudmann, Natasja Staehr; Christensen, Anne Friesgaard; Ejstrup, Leif; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Loft, Anne Gitte; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Siebuhr, Anne Sofie; Junker, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the possible association between type II collagen turnover seromarkers and disease profile in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Outpatients with axial SpA (n = 110) or PsA (n = 101) underwent clinical examination including disease activity measures and HLA-B27 typing. The procollagen IIA N-terminal peptide (PIIANP) and a matrix metalloproteinase-generated type II collagen fragment (C2M) were quantified in serum by ELISA. C2M was higher in SpA than in controls, 0.41 versus 0.36 ng/ml (p = 0.004), while PIIANP did not differ between patients and healthy subjects, 2252 versus 2142 ng/ml (p = 0.13). However, DMARD-naïve SpA patients had higher PIIANP, 2461 ng/ml (p = 0.01) and C2M, 0.44 ng/ml (p = 0.0007) levels than controls, and PIIANP correlated with CRP (ρ = 0.34). C2M was lower in SpA smokers, 0.36 ng/ml versus non-smokers, 0.43 ng/ml (p = 0.02), while PIIANP was higher in HLA-B27 positive, 2312 ng/ml versus negative patients, 2021 ng/ml (p = 0.03). In PsA, PIIANP and C2M did not differ between patients and controls, but PIIANP was elevated in patients not receiving DMARDs, 2726 ng/ml. In PsA, PIIANP and C2M did not differ according to smoking and HLA-B27. Cartilage degradation assessed by C2M is increased in SpA irrespective of treatment but not in PsA. Cartilage synthesis reflected by PIIANP is increased in untreated SpA and PsA. PIIANP correlates with CRP in SpA while not in PsA. In DMARD-naïve SpA but not in PsA, HLA-B27 positivity and smoking are associated with a chondro-proliferative metabolic pattern. PMID:26620690

  15. Increased peripheral T cell reactivity to microbial antigens and collagen type II in rheumatoid arthritis after treatment with soluble TNFα receptors

    PubMed Central

    Berg, L; Lampa, J; Rogberg, S; van Vollenhoven, R; Klareskog, L

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Peripheral T cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are hyporesponsive when stimulated with antigen or mitogen in vitro, possibly owing to increased production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα). This study sought to find out if and how RA T cell reactivity is affected during treatment with etanercept (Enbrel), a soluble TNFα receptor.
METHODS—Heparinised blood was collected from patients with RA at baseline, after four and eight weeks of etanercept treatment, and from healthy controls. After density separation spontaneous production of interferon γ (IFNγ), TNFα, interleukin 6 (IL6), and IL10 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was detected by ELISPOT. For detection of T cell reactivity, PBMC were stimulated in vitro with mitogen (phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)), microbial antigens (purified protein derivative (PPD), influenza), or an autoantigen, collagen type II (CII). Supernatants were analysed for IFNγ and IL2 content by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).
RESULTS—In RA the number of cells spontaneously producing IFNγ was significantly increased after four, but not eight weeks' treatment with etanercept. T cell reactivity, as measured by IFNγ production to PPD, influenza, and CII was significantly increased after four and sustained after eight weeks' treatment, whereas IFNγ production induced by PHA remained unchanged. TNFα production was significantly higher in patients with RA than in controls and did not change during etanercept treatment.
CONCLUSION—Treatment of patients with RA with etanercept may lead to increased peripheral T cell reactivity both to microbial antigens and to self antigens such as CII. These findings indicate that TNFα blockade may not only suppress but also stimulate certain aspects of antimicrobial immune defence and autoimmunity.

 PMID:11156546

  16. Development of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist mutants with enhanced antagonistic activity in vitro and improved therapeutic efficacy in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dahlén, Eva; Barchan, Karin; Herrlander, Daniel; Höjman, Patrik; Karlsson, Marie; Ljung, Lill; Andersson, Mats; Bäckman, Eva; Hager, Ann-Christin Malmborg; Walse, Björn; Joosten, Leo; van den Berg, Wim

    2008-04-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is a naturally occurring inhibitor of the pro-inflammatory interleukin-1-mediated activation of the interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R). Although wild-type IL-1Ra is used for treatment of inflammatory diseases, its effect is moderate and/or short-lived. The objective of this study was to generate IL-1Ra mutants with enhanced antagonistic activity for potential therapeutic use. Using a directed evolution approach in which libraries of IL-1Ra gene mutants were generated and screened in functional assays, mutants with desired properties were identified. Initially, diversity was introduced into the IL-1Ra using random mutagenesis. Mutations resulting in enhanced antagonistic activity were identified by screening in a reporter cell assay. To further enhance the antagonistic activity, selected mutations were recombined using the DNA recombination technology Fragment-INduced Diversity (FIND). Following three rounds of FIND recombination, several mutants with up to nine times enhanced antagonistic activity (mean IC50 +/- SEM value: 0.78 +/- 0.050 vs. 6.8 +/- 1.1 ng/ml for mutant and wild-type, respectively) were identified. Sequence analysis identified the mutations D47N, E52R and E90Y as being most important for this effect, however, the mutations P38Y, H54R, Q129L and M136N further enhanced the antagonistic function. Analysis of identified mutations in protein models based on the crystal structure of the IL-1Ra/IL-1R complex suggested that mutations found to enhance the antagonistic activity had a stabilizing effect on the IL-1Ra mutants or increased the affinity for the IL-1R. Finally, the therapeutic effect of one mutant was compared to that of wild-type IL-1Ra in collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Indeed, the enhanced antagonistic effect of the mutants observed in vitro was also seen in vivo. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that directed evolution of IL-1Ra is an effective means of generating highly potent therapeutic

  17. ASIC3 deficiency increases inflammation but decreases pain behavior in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sluka, Kathleen A.; Rasmussen, Lynn A.; Edgar, Meghan M.; O’Donnell, James M.; Walder, RoxanneY.; Kolker, Sandra J.; Boyle, David L; Firestein, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Through its location on nociceptors, acid sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) is activated by decreases in pH and plays a significant role in musculoskeletal pain. We recently showed that decreases in pH activate ASIC3 located on fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Since FLS are key cells in the inflammatory process we tested if ASIC3-deficient mice with arthritis have altered inflammation and pain relative to controls. Methods Arthritis was induced by injection of a cocktail of anti-type II collagen antibodies induced collagen antibodyarthritis (CAIA). Inflammation and pain parameters in ASIC3−/− and ASIC3+/+ mice were assessed. Disease severity was measured with clinical arthritis scores, joint diameters, histological analysis of joints, and qPCR for synovial gene expression. Pain behaviors were measured by examining withdrawal thresholds of the joint and paw and by measuring physical activity levels in mice. Cell death was assessed with a Live/Dead assay in FLS in response to decreases in pH. Results Surprisingly, ASIC3−/− mice with CAIA demonstrated significantly increased joint inflammation, joint destruction and expression of IL-6, MMP-3 and MMP-13 in joint tissue compared to ASIC3+/+ mice. ASIC3+/+ FLS show enhanced cell death when exposed to pH 6.0 in the presence of interleukin-1β that is abolished in ASIC3−/− FLS. Despite enhanced disease severity, ASIC3−/− mice do not develop mechanical hypersensitivity of the paw and show greater levels of physical activity. Conclusion These data are consistent with the hypothesis that ASIC3 plays a protective role in inflammatory arthritis conditions by limiting inflammation through enhanced synoviocyte cell death to reduce disease severity and produce pain to reduce joint use. PMID:23335302

  18. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rheumatoid Arthritis What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? An Inflammatory, Autoimmune Disease Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease that causes ... sometimes feverish. Rheumatoid arthritis is classified as an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease occurs when the immune system ...

  20. Oral administration of curcumin suppresses production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 to ameliorate collagen-induced arthritis: inhibition of the PKCdelta/JNK/c-Jun pathway.

    PubMed

    Mun, Se Hwan; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Jie Wan; Ko, Na Young; Kim, Do Kyun; Lee, Beob Yi; Kim, Bokyung; Won, Hyung Sik; Shin, Hwa-Sup; Han, Jeung-Whan; Lee, Hoi Young; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2009-09-01

    We investigated whether oral administration of curcumin suppressed type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and its effect and mechanism on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 production in CIA mice, RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), and chondrocytes. CIA in mice was suppressed by oral administration of curcumin in a dose-dependent manner. Macroscopic observations were confirmed by histological examinations. Histological changes including infiltration of immune cells, synovial hyperplasia, cartilage destruction, and bone erosion in the hind paw sections were extensively suppressed by curcumin. The histological scores were consistent with clinical arthritis indexes. Production of MMP-1 and MMP-3 were inhibited by curcumin in CIA hind paw sections and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-stimulated FLS and chondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. As for the mechanism, curcumin inhibited activating phosphorylation of protein kinase Cdelta (PKCdelta) in CIA, FLS, and chondrocytes. Curcumin also suppressed the JNK and c-Jun activation in those cells. This study suggests that the suppression of MMP-1 and MMP-3 production by curcumin in CIA is mediated through the inhibition of PKCdelta and the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway. PMID:19763044

  1. Distinct serum proteome profiles associated with collagen-induced arthritis and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation in CD38⁻/⁻ mice: The discriminative power of protein species or proteoforms.

    PubMed

    Rosal-Vela, Antonio; García-Rodríguez, Sonia; Postigo, Jorge; Iglesias, Marcos; Longobardo, Victoria; Lario, Antonio; Merino, Jesús; Merino, Ramón; Zubiaur, Mercedes; Sancho, Jaime

    2015-10-01

    Collagen-type-II-induced arthritis (CIA) is an autoimmune disease, which involves a complex host systemic response including inflammatory and autoimmune reactions. CIA is milder in CD38(-/-) than in wild-type (WT) mice. ProteoMiner-equalized serum samples were subjected to 2D-DiGE and MS-MALDI-TOF/TOF analyses to identify proteins that changed in their relative abundances in CD38(-/-) versus WT mice either with arthritis (CIA(+) ), with no arthritis (CIA(-) ), or with inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated mice). Multivariate analyses revealed that a multiprotein signature (n = 28) was able to discriminate CIA(+) from CIA(-) mice, and WT from CD38(-/-) mice within each condition. Likewise, a distinct multiprotein signature (n = 16) was identified which differentiated CIA(+) CD38(-/-) mice from CIA(+) WT mice, and lastly, a third multiprotein signature (n = 18) indicated that CD38(-/-) and WT mice could be segregated in response to CFA treatment. Further analyses showed that the discriminative power to distinguish these groups was reached at protein species level and not at the protein level. Hence, the need to identify and quantify proteins at protein species level to better correlate proteome changes with disease processes. It is crucial for plasma proteomics at the low-abundance protein species level to apply the ProteoMiner enrichment. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD001788, PXD001799 and PXD002071 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001788, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001799 and http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002071). PMID:26175002

  2. Effects of the Sri Lankan medicinal plant, Salacia reticulata, in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Yuusuke; Mano, Hiroshi; Nakatani, Sachie; Shimizu, Jun; Wada, Masahiro

    2010-03-01

    Salacia reticulata is a native plant of Sri Lanka. In the traditional medicine of Sri Lanka and India, Salacia reticulata bark is considered orally effective in the treatment of rheumatism, gonorrhea, skin disease and diabetes. We have investigated, both in vivo and in vitro, whether the leaf of Salacia reticulata (SRL) can ameliorate collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) in mice as the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) model. The mice were fed a lard containing chow diet (AIN-93G) or the same diet containing 1% (w/w) SRL powder. All mice were bred for 23 days. On day 7 or 14 after LPS injection, mice were killed, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Histological analysis was performed, and serum levels of inflammatory mediators and the mRNA levels of inflammation-related genes and osteoclast-related genes were measured. SRL treatment ameliorated the rapid initial paw swelling, inflammatory cells infiltration, skeletal tissues damage, osteoclast activation and the mRNA levels for osteoclast-related genes compared with the CAIA mice. However, the serum and mRNA levels of inflammatory mediators did not differ between the CAIA mice and the SRL-treated mice. SRL might reduce the inflammatory cells induction and skeletal tissue degradation by CAIA by the regulating osteoclastogenesis. PMID:19727885

  3. Therapeutic effects of estradiol benzoate on development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in the Lewis rat are mediated via suppression of the humoral response against denatured collagen type II (CII)

    PubMed Central

    WAKSMAN, Y.; HOD, I.; FRIEDMAN, A.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of estradiol benzoate (EB) on the development of anti-CII antibodies and their pathogenic potential were studied during the progress of established CIA in the rat. CIA was induced in mature female Lewis rats by two subcutaneous inoculations containing bovine native CII (BCIIn), emulsified in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Clinical arthritis fully developed by day 18 and then EB (1 mg/kg body wt per day, diluted in corn oil (CO)) was administered intramuscularly every second day thereafter. Antibodies binding four different CIIs (bovine or rat, either native or heat-denatured) were detected in sera and joint tissue extracts by means of solid-phase ELISA. Pharmacological doses of EB (>0·2 mg/kg body wt per day) caused significant remission of established CIA 5-7 days after treatment, and selectively suppressed the production of antibodies specific for denatured CII. To evaluate the arthritogenic potential of circulating anti-CIId IgG, transfer experiments were performed. IgG anti-CIIn, purified from EB-treated CIA rats, was not arthritogenic, whereas IgG anti-denatured (CIId), purified from CO-treated CIA rats, caused severe passive arthritis. Furthermore, pretreatment with rat CIId protected against subsequent induction of CIA, and this protection was associated with suppressed antibody production against CIId. Collectively, our results indicate that antibodies specific for CIId are involved in the pathogenesis of CIA, and that oestrogen-related remission of clinical arthritis may be caused by a selective suppression of antibodies produced against degraded/denatured CII. PMID:8608634

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  5. Viral arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  6. Anti-inflammatory effects of Clematis chinensis Osbeck extract(AR-6) may be associated with NF-κB, TNF-α, and COX-2 in collagen-induced arthritis in rat.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Perera, Pathirage Kamal; Li, Yun-Man; Fang, Wei-Rong; Liu, Li-Fang; Li, Feng-Wen

    2012-10-01

    The root of Clematis chinensis Osbeck has been used widely in rheumatoid arthritis in Chinese traditional medicine, and AR-6 is a triterpene saponin isolated from it. In this present study, we investigated the in vivo effects of oral AR-6 in chronic rat with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and possible molecular mechanism. CIA was induced by immunizing 56 female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with chicken typeIIcollagen (CII). Following eighteen days, the immunization rats with CIA were treated with AR-6 (32, 16, 8 mg/kg), cyclophosphamide (7 mg/kg), and TGP (Total Glucosides of Paeonia) (180 mg/kg) for 7 days, and rats without CIA were given the same volume of purified water. TNF-α and IL-1β levels in peripheral blood will be measured by ELISA, and Western blot analysis will be used to detect the expression of NF-κB p65 subunits, TNF-α and COX-2, in synovial membrane. We found that therapeutic treatment with AR-6 markedly improves the paw swelling and histopathological changes. Moreover, the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β were markedly lowered, and the expression of NF-κB p65 subunits, TNF-α and COX-2, in the synovial membrane of CIA rats was significantly inhibited in the AR-6-treated groups. These results enable to prove that AR-6 has a potential anti-inflammatory effect in CIA rats, and its mechanism may relate to the inhibition of the expression of NF-κB p65 subunits, TNF-α and COX-2. PMID:21932136

  7. Hyperoside exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects in LPS-stimulated human fibroblast-like synoviocytes in vitro and in mice with collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiang-nan; Yan, En-zhi; Wang, Han-ming; Sui, Hai-juan; Liu, Zhou; Gao, Wei; Jin, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Hyperoside is a flavonol glycoside mainly found in plants of the genera Hypericum and Crataegus, which has shown anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the effects of hyperoside on human rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) in vitro and on mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in vivo. Methods: FLSs were isolated from primary synovial tissues obtained from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and exposed to LPS (1 μg/mL). Cell viability and proliferation were measured with MTT and BrdU assay. Cell migration was assessed using wound-healing assay and Transwell assay. DNA binding of NF-κB was measured using a TransAM-NFkappaB kit. The localization of p65 subunit was detected with immunocytochemistry. CIA was induced in mice by primary immunization with Bovine Type II collagen (CII) emulsified in CFA, followed by a booster injection 3 weeks later. The arthritic mice were treated with hyperoside (25, 50 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) for 3 weeks, and the joint tissues were harvested for histological analysis. Results: Hyperoside (10, 50, 100 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced proliferation and migration of human RA FLSs in vitro. Furthermore, hyperoside decreased LPS-stimulated production of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1 and MMP-9 in the cells. Moreover, hyperoside inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p65 and IκBα, and suppressed LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 and DNA biding of NF-κB in the cells. Three-week administration of hyperoside significantly decreased the clinical scores, and alleviated synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration and cartilage damage in mice with CIA. Conclusion: Hyperoside inhibits LPS-induced proliferation, migration and inflammatory responses in human RA FLSs in vitro by suppressing activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, which contributes to the therapeutic effects observed in mice with CIA. PMID:27041460

  8. Anti-type II collagen antibodies, anti-CCP, IgA RF and IgM RF are associated with joint damage, assessed eight years after onset of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Early appearance of antibodies specific for native human type II collagen (anti-CII) characterizes an early inflammatory and destructive phenotype in adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of anti-CII, IgM RF, IgA RF and anti-CCP in serum samples obtained early after diagnosis, and to relate the occurrence of autoantibodies to outcome after eight years of disease in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods The Nordic JIA database prospectively included JIA patients followed for eight years with data on remission and joint damage. From this database, serum samples collected from 192 patients, at a median of four months after disease onset, were analysed for IgG anti-CII, IgM RF, IgA RF and IgG anti-CCP. Joint damage was assessed based on Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index for Articular damage (JADI-A), a validated clinical instrument for joint damage. Results Elevated serum levels of anti-CII occurred in 3.1%, IgM RF in 3.6%, IgA RF in 3.1% and anti-CCP in 2.6% of the patients. Occurrence of RF and anti-CCP did to some extent overlap, but rarely with anti-CII. The polyarticular and oligoarticular extended categories were overrepresented in patients with two or more autoantibodies. Anti-CII occurred in younger children, usually without overlap with the other autoantibodies and was associated with high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) early in the disease course. All four autoantibodies were significantly associated with joint damage, but not with active disease at the eight-year follow up. Conclusions Anti-CII, anti-CCP, IgA RF and IgM RF detected early in the disease course predicted joint damage when assessed after eight years of disease. The role of anti-CII in JIA should be further studied. PMID:24944545

  9. The B cell repertoire of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Frequencies and specificities of peripheral blood B cells reacting with human IgG, human collagens, a mycobacterial heat shock protein and other antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Rudolphi, U; Hohlbaum, A; Lang, B; Peter, H H; Melchers, I

    1993-01-01

    Using a potent in vitro limiting dilution culture system, we have activated human peripheral blood B cells to proliferate and to differentiate into antibody-secreting cells (ASC). Under these conditions 25-100% of B cells are clonally expanded and produce IgM, IgG or IgA. Culture supernatants were tested for antibodies binding to human IgG-Fc fragments (RF), the 65-kD heat shock protein of Mycobacterium bovis (hsp60), human collagens type I, II, IV, V, transferrin, lactoferrin, albumins, and gelatine. All blood samples contained precursors of ASC (p-ASC) able to produce IgM binding to these antigens in frequencies above 0.03% of B cells. Most interestingly, a significant difference exists between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and controls, concerning the relative frequencies of p-ASC able to produce monospecific or multireactive RF. Whereas most p-ASC(RF) in RA patients are monospecific (mean ratio 3.7), most p-ASC(RF) in healthy control persons are cross-reactive with at least one of five other antigens tested (mean ratio 0.2). The data suggest a disease-specific expansion of p-ASC committed to the production of monospecific rheumatoid factors. PMID:8099856

  10. Immunosuppression by Co-stimulatory Molecules: Inhibition of CD2-CD48/CD58 Interaction by Peptides from CD2 to Suppress Progression of Collagen-induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Ameya; Kanthala, Shanthi; Latendresse, John; Taneja, Veena; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama

    2013-01-01

    Targeting co-stimulatory molecules to modulate the immune response has been shown to have useful therapeutic effects for autoimmune diseases. Among the co-stimulatory molecules, CD2 and CD58 are very important in the early stages of generation of an immune response. Our goal was to utilize CD2-derived peptides to modulate protein-protein interactions between CD2 and CD58, thereby modulating the immune response. Several peptides were designed based on the structure of the CD58 binding domain of CD2 protein. Among the CD2-derived peptides, peptide 6 from the F and C β-strand region of CD2 protein exhibited inhibition of cell-cell adhesion in the nanomolar concentration range. Peptide 6 was evaluated for its ability to bind to CD58 in Caco-2 cells and to CD48 in T cells from rodents. A molecular model was proposed for binding a peptide to CD58 and CD48 using docking studies. Furthermore, in vivo studies were carried out to evaluate the therapeutic ability of the peptide to modulate the immune response in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. In vivo studies indicated that peptide 6 was able to suppress the progression of CIA. Evaluation of the antigenicity of peptides in CIA and transgenic animal models indicated that this peptide is not immunogenic. PMID:23530775

  11. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of experimentally collagen-induced arthritis in rats using the nonspecific dye tetrasulfocyanine in comparison with gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, histology, and clinical score

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemeinhardt, Ines; Puls, Dorothee; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Susanne; Schnorr, Beatrix; Licha, Kai; Schirner, Michael; Ebert, Bernd; Petzelt, Diethard; Macdonald, Rainer; Schnorr, Jörg

    2012-10-01

    Using 15 rats with collagen-induced arthritis (30 joints) and 7 control rats (14 joints), we correlated the intensity of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) of the nonspecific dye tetrasulfocyanine (TSC) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histopathology, and clinical score. Fluorescence images were obtained in reflection geometry using a NIRF camera system. Normalized fluorescence intensity (INF) was determined after intravenous dye administration on different time points up to 120 min. Contrast-enhanced MRI using gadodiamide was performed after NIRF imaging. Analyses were performed in a blinded fashion. Histopathological and clinical scores were determined for each ankle joint. INF of moderate and high-grade arthritic joints were significantly higher (p<0.005) than the values of control and low-grade arthritic joints between 5 and 30 min after TSC-injection. This result correlated well with post-contrast MRI signal intensities at about 5 min after gadodiamide administration. Furthermore, INF and signal increase on contrast-enhanced MRI showed high correlation with clinical and histopathological scores. Sensitivities and specificities for detection of moderate and high-grade arthritic joints were slightly lower for NIRF imaging (89%/81%) than for MRI (100%/91%). NIRF imaging using TSC, which is characterized by slower plasma clearance compared to indocyanine green (ICG), has the potential to improve monitoring of inflamed joints.

  12. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  13. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  14. Safety, Biodistribution, and Efficacy of an AAV-5 Vector Encoding Human Interferon-Beta (ART-I02) Delivered via Intra-Articular Injection in Rhesus Monkeys with Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bevaart, Lisette; Aalbers, Caroline J; Vierboom, Michel P M; Broekstra, Niels; Kondova, Ivanela; Breedveld, Elia; Hauck, Bernd; Wright, J Fraser; Tak, Paul Peter; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J

    2015-06-01

    Preclinical studies to assess biodistribution, safety, and initial efficacy of ART-I02, an adeno-associated type 5 (rAAV5) vector expressing human interferon β (hIFN-β), were performed in a total of 24 rhesus monkeys with collagen-induced arthritis. All monkeys were naïve or showed limited neutralizing antibody (Nab) titers to AAV5 at the start of the study. Animals were injected with a single intra-articular dose of ART-I02 or placebo, consisting of 3.2×10(13) vg (Dose A=maximum feasible dose), 4.58×10(12) vg (Dose B), or placebo in the first affected finger joint, the ipsilateral knee, and ankle joint at the same time point. Animals were monitored for clinical parameters and well-being with a maximum of 4 weeks, with the option that the severity of arthritis could necessitate an earlier time point of sacrifice. No adverse events were noted after injection of ART-I02. No abnormalities were observed after histological evaluation of all organs. At both dose levels, immunohistochemical staining indicated expression of hIFN-β. In animals injected with Dose A, we observed stabilization or a reduction in swelling in the finger joint in which vector was administered. The highest copy numbers of vector DNA were detected in synovial tissue of the injected joint and the draining lymph node of the injected knee. High titers of Nab to rAAV5 were observed at the end of the study. Five monkeys developed an rAAV5-specific T-cell response. Two monkeys developed Nab to hIFN-β. In conclusion, intra-articular injection of ART-I02 was well-tolerated and did not induce adverse events. After administration of Dose A of ART-I02, we observed a beneficial effect on joint swelling, substantiated by decreased histological inflammation and bone erosion scores. A GMP vector for clinical application has been manufactured and is currently being tested in GLP rodent studies, with the aim to move forward to a clinical trial. PMID:26086763

  15. COLLAGEN PROCESSING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Collagen dispersions, produced from fibrils recovered from milled bovine collagen, have shown promise in environmental remediation in applications as settling aids, filtration aids, fractionation media, oil drop stabilizers, and water purification aids. Macroporous structures, processed by controll...

  16. A novel coumarin derivative, 8-methoxy chromen-2-one alleviates collagen induced arthritis by down regulating nitric oxide, NFκB and proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Debasis; Raghav, Sunil Kumar; Gautam, Hemlata; Das, Hasi R

    2015-12-01

    Ruta graveolens (Rue) is a well-known medicinal plant having anti-inflammatory and other healing properties. This contains many active phytochemicals such as coumarins which possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. The present study was carried out to evaluate the therapeutic potential of a newly isolated coumarin derivative from rue plant, 8-methoxy-chromen-2-one (MCO) in the collagen induced arthritic (CIA) rat model. MCO showed inhibition of cytokines and NF-κB in LPS stimulated J774 cells which prompted its possible use in animal. In CIA, arthritic index and arthritic score reduced markedly within 15days of MCO treatment at doses of 2mg and 20mg per kg body weight. Alleviation of joint damage in CIA animals on treatment with MCO was evident from radiographic and histological data. Behavioral studies by open field tests also showed convalescence in the MCO treated CIA rats. Further, escalated plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and also nitric oxide reduced significantly with the treatment. All these results indicate the therapeutic efficacy of MCO and its possible use as an anti-arthritic drug. PMID:26440401

  17. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  18. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  19. Arthritis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... hour massage will be donated to the Arthritis Foundation! Jingle Bell Run Join us for the nation's ... a cure! Answers When You Need Them Arthritis Foundation licensed social workers provide 24/7 assistance on ...

  20. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and irritation (inflammation) of a joint by a fungal infection. It is also called mycotic arthritis. Causes Fungal ... symptoms of fungal arthritis. Prevention Thorough treatment of fungal infections elsewhere in the body may help prevent fungal ...

  1. Local fibroblast proliferation but not influx is responsible for synovial hyperplasia in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Fumitaka; Saito, Tetsuya; Kawahata, Kimito; Ueha, Satoshi; Matsushima, Kouji; Inagaki, Yutaka; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2016-02-12

    Synovial fibroblasts play crucial roles in inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). How they accumulate in the RA joints remains unclear. This study was conducted to discern whether cellular influx from the outside of the joints and local proliferation are responsible for synovial fibroblast accumulation in an animal model of RA. We found that synovial fibroblasts were identified as GFP+ cells using collagen type I alpha 2 (Col1a2)-GFP transgenic reporter mice. Then, bone marrow transplantation and parabiosis techniques were utilized to study the cellular influx. Irradiated wild-type mice were transplanted with bone marrow from Col1a2-GFP mice. Col1a2-GFP and wild-type mice were conjoined for parabiosis. The transplanted mice and the parabionts were subjected to collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA). We found no GFP+ cells in the hyperplastic synovial tissues from the transplanted mice with CAIA and from the wild-type parabionts with CAIA. Furthermore, normal and CAIA synovial tissues from Col1a2-GFP mice and from fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) transgenic mice, in which cells in S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle express Azami-Green, were studied for Ki67, a cellular proliferation marker, and vimentin, a fibroblast marker, expression. The percentages of Ki67+/GFP+ and Azami-Green+/vimentin+ cells in the CAIA synovial tissues were higher than those in the untreated synovial tissues (34% vs. 0.40% and 19% vs. 0.26%, respectively). These findings indicate that local fibroblast proliferation but not cellular influx is responsible for the synovial hyperplasia in CAIA. Suppression of proliferation of the local synovial fibroblasts should be a promising treatment for RA. PMID:26806309

  2. Collagen fibrillogenesis: fibronectin, integrins, and minor collagens as organizers and nucleators

    PubMed Central

    Kadler, Karl E; Hill, Adele; Canty-Laird, Elizabeth G

    2008-01-01

    Collagens are triple helical proteins that occur in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and at the cell–ECM interface. There are more than 30 collagens and collagen-related proteins but the most abundant are collagens I and II that exist as D-periodic (where D = 67 nm) fibrils. The fibrils are of broad biomedical importance and have central roles in embryogenesis, arthritis, tissue repair, fibrosis, tumor invasion, and cardiovascular disease. Collagens I and II spontaneously form fibrils in vitro, which shows that collagen fibrillogenesis is a selfassembly process. However, the situation in vivo is not that simple; collagen I-containing fibrils do not form in the absence of fibronectin, fibronectin-binding and collagen-binding integrins, and collagen V. Likewise, the thin collagen II-containing fibrils in cartilage do not form in the absence of collagen XI. Thus, in vivo, cellular mechanisms are in place to control what is otherwise a protein self-assembly process. This review puts forward a working hypothesis for how fibronectin and integrins (the organizers) determine the site of fibril assembly, and collagens V and XI (the nucleators) initiate collagen fibrillogenesis. PMID:18640274

  3. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  4. Bioengineered collagens

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  5. Fatal coccidioidomycosis in collagen vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W M; Gall, E P

    1983-02-01

    Ten patients who died from coccidioidomycosis in Arizona from 1968 to 1975 had underlying collagen vascular diseases: 4 with rheumatoid arthritis, 4 with systemic lupus erythematosus, and 2 with dermatomyositis. All 10 patients had been treated with corticosteroids; 2 were taking cytotoxic drugs. Collagen vascular diseases and the use of corticosteroids and cytotoxic drugs may be associated with the depression of cell-mediated immunity. The potential for opportunistic coccidioidomycosis should be noted when corticosteroids and cytotoxic drugs are used for treating collagen vascular disease in patients residing in or coming from areas where coccidioidomycosis is endemic. PMID:6842490

  6. Imaging Denatured Collagen Strands In vivo and Ex vivo via Photo-triggered Hybridization of Caged Collagen Mimetic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.; Yu, S. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Collagen is a major structural component of the extracellular matrix that supports tissue formation and maintenance. Although collagen remodeling is an integral part of normal tissue renewal, excessive amount of remodeling activity is involved in tumors, arthritis, and many other pathological conditions. During collagen remodeling, the triple helical structure of collagen molecules is disrupted by proteases in the extracellular environment. In addition, collagens present in many histological tissue samples are partially denatured by the fixation and preservation processes. Therefore, these denatured collagen strands can serve as effective targets for biological imaging. We previously developed a caged collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) that can be photo-triggered to hybridize with denatured collagen strands by forming triple helical structure, which is unique to collagens. The overall goals of this procedure are i) to image denatured collagen strands resulting from normal remodeling activities in vivo, and ii) to visualize collagens in ex vivo tissue sections using the photo-triggered caged CMPs. To achieve effective hybridization and successful in vivo and ex vivo imaging, fluorescently labeled caged CMPs are either photo-activated immediately before intravenous injection, or are directly activated on tissue sections. Normal skeletal collagen remolding in nude mice and collagens in prefixed mouse cornea tissue sections are imaged in this procedure. The imaging method based on the CMP-collagen hybridization technology presented here could lead to deeper understanding of the tissue remodeling process, as well as allow development of new diagnostics for diseases associated with high collagen remodeling activity. PMID:24513868

  7. [Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis].

    PubMed

    Ebschner, U; Hartschuh, W; Petzoldt, D

    2000-02-01

    Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis is a rare dermatologic disorder seen in patients suffering from diseases in which circulating immune complexes occur. The typical cutaneous signs are linear cords usually located on the lateral aspect of the trunk. The characteristic, although not specific, histology reveals a dense diffuse infiltrate composed mostly of histiocytes, accompanied by neutrophils and eosinophils, and degenerated collagen surrounded by palisades of histiocytes. We discuss this disorder and its differential diagnosis. PMID:10743580

  8. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam as well as x rays or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the affected joints. Although there is no lab test to diagnose psoriatic arthritis, your doctor may order tests on blood or joint fluid to rule out other forms of arthritis with ...

  9. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Another form of reactive arthritis starts with eating food or handling something that has bacteria on it. To diagnose infectious arthritis, your health care provider may do tests of your blood, urine, and joint fluid. Treatment includes medicines and sometimes surgery.

  10. Reactive arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive arthritis is a group of conditions that may involve the joints, eyes, and urinary and genital systems. ... The exact cause of reactive arthritis is unknown. It occurs most often in men younger than age 40. It may follow an infection in the urethra ...

  11. Reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is one of the spondyloarthropathy family of clinical syndromes. The clinical features are those shared by other members of the spondyloarthritis family, though it is distinguished by a clear relationship with a precipitating infection. Susceptibility to reactive arthritis is closely linked with the class 1 HLA allele B27; it is likely that all sub-types pre-dispose to this condition. The link between HLA B27 and infection is mirrored by the development of arthritis in HLA B27-transgenic rats. In this model, arthritis does not develop in animals maintained in a germ-free environment. Infections of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory tract appear to provoke reactive arthritis and a wide range of pathogens has now been implicated. Although mechanistic parallels may exist, reactive arthritis is distinguished from Lyme disease, rheumatic fever and Whipple's disease by virtue of the distinct clinical features and the link with HLA B27. As in these conditions both antigens and DNA of several micro-organisms have been detected in joint material from patients with reactive arthritis. The role of such disseminated microbial elements in the provocation or maintenance of arthritis remains unclear. HLA B27-restricted T-cell responses to microbial antigens have been demonstrated and these may be important in disease pathogenesis. The importance of dissemination of bacteria from sites of mucosal infection and their deposition in joints has yet to be fully understood. The role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of reactive arthritis is being explored; in some circumstances, both the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of certain antibiotics appear to be valuable. The term reactive arthritis should be seen as a transitory one, reflecting a concept which may itself be on the verge of replacement, as our understanding of the condition develops. Nevertheless it appropriately describes arthritis that is associated with demonstrable

  12. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals form in the joints. But in this ... CPPD arthritis can be confused with: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Exams and Tests Most arthritic ...

  13. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like with gout, crystals form in the joints. But in calcium ... pyrophosphate arthritis can be misdiagnosed as: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis

  14. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rheumatoid arthritis drugs. However, because they are very expensive, insurance approval is generally required. Most of them ... rich in fish oils (omega-3 fatty acids). Smoking cigarettes should be stopped. Excessive alcohol should also ...

  16. Enteropathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... as well. Those who test positive for the HLA-B27 genetic marker are much more likely to have spinal involvement with enteropathic arthritis than those who test negative. Disease Course/Prognosis ...

  17. Septic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013:chap 109. Krogstad P. Septic arthritis. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach WJ, Hotez PJ. Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  18. Gonococcal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis affects women more often than men. ... Saunders; 2013:chap 109. Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonnorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, ...

  19. Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that often occurs with a skin condition called psoriasis . ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. In most cases, psoriasis ...

  20. Reactive Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with treatment and may cause joint damage. What Research Is Being Conducted on Reactive Arthritis? Researchers continue ... such as methotrexate and sulfasalazine. More information on research is available from the following websites: National Institutes ...

  1. Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that often occurs with a skin condition called psoriasis . Causes Psoriasis is a common skin problem that causes red ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. In ...

  2. Bacterial arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, G

    1991-08-01

    In this review of the 1990 septic arthritis literature, we revisit synovial fluid leukocytosis, examine the utility of synovial fluid glucose and protein measurements, and look at the levels of two cytokines, tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1, in infected joint fluids. We see the many faces of gonococcal arthritis and the ravages of septic arthritis when the host has rheumatoid arthritis. Should we recommend antibiotic prophylaxis for the rheumatoid patient with a prosthetic joint who is undergoing a procedure that leads to transient bacteremia? What are some of the salient features of septic arthritis when it involves the sternoclavicular or sacroiliac joints? We also look at some unusual microorganisms, eg, group C Streptococcus, Streptococcus viridans, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas cepacia, Pseudomonas maltophilia, and Neisseria sicca. In patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, we encounter reports of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and spinal epidural abscess caused by opportunistic microorganisms. Two unusual sites of infection include the C1-2 lateral facet joint and subacromial bursa without involvement of the glenohumeral joint. Finally, we examine how to drain a septic knee: the orthopedic point of view. PMID:1911055

  3. Viral arthritis.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  4. Interleukin-1β and Interleukin-6 in Arthritis Animal Models: Roles in the Early Phase of Transition from Acute to Chronic Inflammation and Relevance for Human Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Bracci-Laudiero, Luisa; Alivernini, Stefano; Gremese, Elisa; Tolusso, Barbara; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is the major target of the therapeutic approach in rheumatoid arthritis. A key issue in the approach to chronic arthritis is the understanding of the crucial molecules driving the transition from the acute phase to the chronic irreversible phase of the disease. In this review we analyzed five experimental arthritis animal models (antigen-induced arthritis, adjuvant-induced arthritis, streptococcal cell wall arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis and SKG) considered as possible scenarios to facilitate interpretation of the biology of human rheumatoid arthritis. The SKG model is strictly dependent on interleukin (IL)-6. In the other models, IL-1β and IL-6, more than TNF-α, appear to be relevant in driving the transition, which suggests that these should be the targets of an early intervention to stop the course toward the chronic form of the disease. PMID:20683549

  5. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  6. Inhibition of Inflammatory Arthritis Using Fullerene Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Dellinger, Anthony L.; Cunin, Pierre; Lee, David; Kung, Andrew L.; Brooks, D. Bradford; Zhou, Zhiguo; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Kepley, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA) is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC). Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA) were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis. PMID:25879437

  7. Arthritis of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by just two types: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive condition that ... other, it results in pain, stiffness, and weakness. Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that ...

  8. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  9. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bursitis and Tendinitis, Q&A Fibromyalgia, Q&A Gout, Q&A Juvenile Arthritis, Q&A Childhood Arthritis ( ... Many people also experience fatigue and sleep disturbances. Gout. A type of arthritis resulting from deposits of ...

  10. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiffness, inflammation, swelling and, sometimes, destruction of joints. Gout — a form of arthritis that occurs when uric ... the joints. Some 2.1 million Americans have gout. Lupus — a form of arthritis, like rheumatoid arthritis, ...

  11. Effects of Libby amphibole exposure on two models of arthritis in the Lewis rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological data suggest that occupational exposure to the amphibole-containing venniculite in Libby, MT was associated with increased risk for developing autoimmune diseases and had an odds ratio of 3.23 for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The collagen induced arthriti...

  12. Reactive Arthritis Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Of Spondylitis The Heart In Spondyloarthritis Inflammatory vs. Mechanical Back ... Arthritis Symptoms Because there is no specific laboratory test for reactive arthritis, doctors sometimes find it difficult ...

  13. Midfoot arthritis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amar; Rao, Smita; Nawoczenski, Deborah; Flemister, Adolf S; DiGiovanni, Benedict; Baumhauer, Judith F

    2010-07-01

    Midfoot arthritis is a common cause of significant pain and disability. Although the medial tarsometatarsal (TMT) joints provide < 7 degrees of sagittal plane motion, the more mobile lateral fourth and fifth TMT joints provide balance and accommodation on uneven ground. These small constrained TMT joints also provide stability and translate the forward propulsion motion of the hindfoot and ankle joint to the forefoot metatarsophalangeal joints from heel rise to toe-off. Posttraumatic degeneration is the primary cause of midfoot arthritis, although primary degeneration and inflammatory conditions can also affect this area. The result is a painful midfoot that can no longer effectively transmit load from the hindfoot to the forefoot. Shoe modifications and orthotic inserts are the mainstay of nonsurgical management. Successful management of midfoot arthritis with orthoses is predicated on achieving adequate joint stabilization while still allowing function. Surgical intervention typically involves arthrodesis of the medial midfoot, although the best treatment of the more mobile lateral column is a subject of debate. PMID:20595134

  14. Development and optimization of a high-throughput micro-computed tomography imaging method incorporating a novel analysis technique to evaluate bone mineral density of arthritic joints in a rodent model of collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Raquel S; Cruz, Francisco; Chiu, Chi-Sung; Xue, Dahai; Bettano, Kimberly A; Zhu, Joe; Chakravarthy, Kalyan; Faltus, Robert; Wang, Shubing; Vanko, Amy; Robinson, Gain; Zielstorff, Mark; Miao, John; Leccese, Erica; Conway, Donald; Moy, Lily Y; Dogdas, Belma; Cicmil, Milenko; Zhang, Weisheng

    2015-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease resulting in joint inflammation, pain, and eventual bone loss. Bone loss and remodeling caused by symmetric polyarthritis, the hallmark of RA, is readily detectable by bone mineral density (BMD) measurement using micro-CT. Abnormalities in these measurements over time reflect the underlying pathophysiology of the bone. To evaluate the efficacy of anti-rheumatic agents in animal models of arthritis, we developed a high throughput knee and ankle joint imaging assay to measure BMD as a translational biomarker. A bone sample holder was custom designed for micro-CT scanning, which significantly increased assay throughput. Batch processing 3-dimensional image reconstruction, followed by automated image cropping, significantly reduced image processing time. In addition, we developed a novel, automated image analysis method to measure BMD and bone volume of knee and ankle joints. These improvements significantly increased the throughput of ex vivo bone sample analysis, reducing data turnaround from 5 days to 24 hours for a study with 200 rat hind limbs. Taken together, our data demonstrate that BMD, as quantified by micro-CT, is a robust efficacy biomarker with a high degree of sensitivity. Our innovative approach toward evaluation of BMD using optimized image acquisition and novel image processing techniques in preclinical models of RA enables high throughput assessment of anti-rheumatic agents offering a powerful tool for drug discovery. PMID:25482211

  15. Severe inflammatory arthritis and lymphadenopathy in the absence of TNF

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian K.; O’Donnell, Kristy; Lawlor, Kate E.; Wicks, Ian P.

    2001-01-01

    It has been postulated that TNF has a pivotal role in a cytokine cascade that results in joint inflammation and destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To evaluate this, we examined the response of TNF-deficient (Tnf–/–) mice in two models of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced by injection of chick type II collagen (CII) in CFA. Tnf–/– mice had some reduction in the clinical parameters of CIA and, on histology, significantly more normal joints. However, severe disease was evident in 54% of arthritic Tnf–/– joints. Tnf–/– mice had impaired Ig class switching, but preserved T cell proliferative responses to CII and enhanced IFN-γ production. Interestingly, CII-immunized Tnf–/– mice developed lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with increased memory CD4+ T cells and activated lymph node B cells. Acute inflammatory arthritis was also reduced in Tnf–/– mice, although again some mice exhibited severe disease. We conclude that TNF is important but not essential for inflammatory arthritis; in each model, severe arthritis could proceed even in the complete absence of TNF. These results call into doubt the concept that TNF is obligatory for chronic autoimmune and acute inflammatory arthritis and provide a rationale for further studies into TNF-independent cytokine pathways in arthritis. PMID:11413159

  16. Severe inflammatory arthritis and lymphadenopathy in the absence of TNF.

    PubMed

    Campbell, I K; O'Donnell, K; Lawlor, K E; Wicks, I P

    2001-06-01

    It has been postulated that TNF has a pivotal role in a cytokine cascade that results in joint inflammation and destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To evaluate this, we examined the response of TNF-deficient (Tnf(-/-)) mice in two models of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced by injection of chick type II collagen (CII) in CFA. Tnf(-/-) mice had some reduction in the clinical parameters of CIA and, on histology, significantly more normal joints. However, severe disease was evident in 54% of arthritic Tnf(-/-) joints. Tnf(-/-) mice had impaired Ig class switching, but preserved T cell proliferative responses to CII and enhanced IFN-gamma production. Interestingly, CII-immunized Tnf(-/-) mice developed lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with increased memory CD4(+) T cells and activated lymph node B cells. Acute inflammatory arthritis was also reduced in Tnf(-/-) mice, although again some mice exhibited severe disease. We conclude that TNF is important but not essential for inflammatory arthritis; in each model, severe arthritis could proceed even in the complete absence of TNF. These results call into doubt the concept that TNF is obligatory for chronic autoimmune and acute inflammatory arthritis and provide a rationale for further studies into TNF-independent cytokine pathways in arthritis. PMID:11413159

  17. Colostral antibody induced interference of inactivated bluetongue serotype-8 vaccines in calves

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Since its introduction into northern Europe in 2006, bluetongue has become a major threat to animal health. While the efficacy of commercial vaccines has been clearly demonstrated in livestock, little is known regarding the effect of maternal immunity on vaccinal efficacy. Here, we have investigated the duration and amplitude of colostral antibody-induced immunity in calves born to dams vaccinated against bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) and the extent of colostral antibody-induced interference of vaccination in these calves. Twenty-two calf-cow pairs were included in this survey. The median age at which calves became seronegative for BTV was 84 and 112 days as assayed by seroneutralisation test (SNT) and VP7 BTV competitive ELISA (cELISA), respectively. At the mean age of 118 days, 13/22 calves were immunized with inactivated BTV-8 vaccine. In most calves vaccination elicited a weak immune response, with seroconversion in only 3/13 calves. The amplitude of the humoral response to vaccination was inversely proportional to the maternal antibody level prior to vaccination. Thus, the lack of response was attributed to the persistence of virus-specific colostral antibodies that interfered with the induction of the immune response. These data suggest that the recommended age for vaccination of calves born to vaccinated dams needs to be adjusted in order to optimize vaccinal efficacy. PMID:21314901

  18. The Collagen Family

    PubMed Central

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant proteins in mammals. The collagen family comprises 28 members that contain at least one triple-helical domain. Collagens are deposited in the extracellular matrix where most of them form supramolecular assemblies. Four collagens are type II membrane proteins that also exist in a soluble form released from the cell surface by shedding. Collagens play structural roles and contribute to mechanical properties, organization, and shape of tissues. They interact with cells via several receptor families and regulate their proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Some collagens have a restricted tissue distribution and hence specific biological functions. PMID:21421911

  19. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  20. MicroRNA-21 Promotes Proliferation of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes through Mediation of NF-κB Nuclear Translocation in a Rat Model of Collagen-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Pei-Feng; Yang, Lu; Wang, Sheng-Xu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is overexpressed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was designed to investigate the effect and mechanism of miR-21 on cell proliferation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) of RA. FLS were primary-cultured from a rat RA model. RA-FLS and normal FLS were infected with lentivirus (anti-miR-21 or pro-miR-21) for overexpression or downregulation of miR-21, respectively. The effects of miR-21 overexpression or inhibition on nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and FLS cell proliferation were evaluated by western blotting and MTT assays. The effects of an inhibitor of NF-κB nuclear translocation (BAY 11-7082) were also evaluated. The results showed that the levels of miR-21 and nucleoprotein NF-κB were increased in FLS of RA model rats compared to the control group. Downregulation of miR-21 in RA FLS led to a significant decrease in nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the antinegative control (NC) group. However, miR-21 overexpression in normal FLS resulted in a significant increase of nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the pro-NC group. The effects of miR-21 overexpression were reversed by BAY 11-7082. We concluded that upregulated miR-21 in FLS in RA model rats may promote cell proliferation by facilitating NF-κB nuclear translocation, thus affecting the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27429986

  1. Biomedical applications of collagens.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, John A M

    2016-05-01

    Collagen-based biomedical materials have developed into important, clinically effective materials used in a range of devices that have gained wide acceptance. These devices come with collagen in various formats, including those based on stabilized natural tissues, those that are based on extracted and purified collagens, and designed composite, biosynthetic materials. Further knowledge on the structure and function of collagens has led to on-going developments and improvements. Among these developments has been the production of recombinant collagen materials that are well defined and are disease free. Most recently, a group of bacterial, non-animal collagens has emerged that may provide an excellent, novel source of collagen for use in biomaterials and other applications. These newer collagens are discussed in detail. They can be modified to direct their function, and they can be fabricated into various formats, including films and sponges, while solutions can also be adapted for use in surface coating technologies. PMID:26448097

  2. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  3. Comparison of drug and cell-based delivery: engineered adult mesenchymal stem cells expressing soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II prevent arthritis in mouse and rat animal models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linda N; Wang, Gang; Hendricks, Kyle; Lee, Keunmyoung; Bohnlein, Ernst; Junker, Uwe; Mosca, Joseph D

    2013-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease with unknown etiology where tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) plays a critical role. Etanercept, a recombinant fusion protein of human soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II (hsTNFR) linked to the Fc portion of human IgG1, is used to treat RA based on the rationale that sTNFR binds TNFα and blocks TNFα-mediated inflammation. We compared hsTNFR protein delivery from genetically engineered human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with etanercept. Blocking TNFα-dependent intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression on transduced hMSCs and inhibition of nitric oxide production from TNFα-treated bovine chondrocytes by conditioned culture media from transduced hMSCs demonstrated the functionality of the hsTNFR construction. Implanted hsTNFR-transduced mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reduced mouse serum circulating TNFα generated from either implanted TNFα-expressing cells or lipopolysaccharide induction more effectively than etanercept (TNFα, 100%; interleukin [IL]-1α, 90%; and IL-6, 60% within 6 hours), suggesting faster clearance of the soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR)-TNFα complex from the animals. In vivo efficacy of sTNFR-transduced MSCs was illustrated in two (immune-deficient and immune-competent) arthritic rodent models. In the antibody-induced arthritis BalbC/SCID mouse model, intramuscular injection of hsTNFR-transduced hMSCs reduced joint inflammation by 90% compared with untransduced hMSCs; in the collagen-induced arthritis Fischer rat model, both sTNFR-transduced rat MSCs and etanercept inhibited joint inflammation by 30%. In vitro chondrogenesis assays showed the ability of TNFα and IL1α, but not interferon γ, to inhibit hMSC differentiation to chondrocytes, illustrating an additional negative role for inflammatory cytokines in joint repair. The data support the utility of hMSCs as therapeutic gene delivery vehicles and their potential to be used in alleviating inflammation

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  5. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  6. Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  7. Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  8. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  9. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It ... illness . This means the body attacks and destroys healthy body ...

  10. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  11. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with arthritis Preventing anemia in children with chronic inflammatory diseases such as arthritis Whether daily calcium supplements ... density in children with arthritis The impact of chronic and recurrent pain on ... role of an inflammatory chemical called interleukin-15 (IL-15). For More ...

  12. Endogenous galectin-1 exerts tonic inhibition on experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Asif J; Cooper, Dianne; Vugler, Alexander; Gittens, Beatrice R; Moore, Adrian; Perretti, Mauro

    2013-07-01

    Little is known about the role(s) of endogenous galectin-1 (Gal-1) in arthritis. In this study we queried whether antiarthritic functions for this effector of endogenous anti-inflammation could be unveiled by studying collagen-induced arthritis in Gal-1(-/-) mice. Gal-1(-/-) and C57BL/6J [wild-type (WT)] mice received an immunization of chicken type II collagen (CII) in CFA followed by a booster on day 21, which consisted of CII in IFA. Animals were monitored for signs of arthritis from day 14 onward. Clinical and histological signs of arthritis were recorded, and humoral and cellular immune responses against CII were analyzed. A distinct disease penetrance was apparent, with ~ 70% of Gal-1(-/-) mice developing arthritis compared with ~ 50% in WT animals. Gal-1(-/-) mice also exhibited an accelerated disease onset and more severe arthritis characterized by significantly elevated clinical scores. Postmortem analyses (day 42) revealed higher levels of IgG1 and IgG2b anti-CII Ig isotypes in the serum of Gal-1 null animals compared with WT. Finally, T cell responses following ex vivo stimulation with CII revealed a greater degree of proliferation in T cells of Gal-1(-/-) mice compared with WT, which was associated with increased production of IL-17 and IL-22. These data suggest the novel idea that endogenous Gal-1 is an inhibitory factor in the development of arthritis affecting disease severity. We have also highlighted the importance of endogenous Gal-1 in regulating T cell reactivity during experimental arthritis. PMID:23720814

  13. COLLAGEN STRUCTURE AND STABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Shoulders, Matthew D.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. This fibrous, structural protein comprises a right-handed bundle of three parallel, left-handed polyproline II-type helices. Much progress has been made in elucidating the structure of collagen triple helices and the physicochemical basis for their stability. New evidence demonstrates that stereoelectronic effects and preorganization play a key role in that stability. The fibrillar structure of type I collagen–the prototypical collagen fibril–has been revealed in detail. Artificial collagen fibrils that display some properties of natural collagen fibrils are now accessible using chemical synthesis and self-assembly. A rapidly emerging understanding of the mechanical and structural properties of native collagen fibrils will guide further development of artificial collagenous materials for biomedicine and nanotechnology. PMID:19344236

  14. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane-specific antibody-induced nephritis in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J; Chung, Sharon A; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T; Gregersen, Peter K; Gilkeson, Gary G; Kimberly, Robert P; Vyse, Timothy J; Kim, Il; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B; Criswell, Lindsey A; Wakeland, Edward K; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-04-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that maybe responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family,which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms,some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and lupus. PMID:19307730

  15. [Clinico-radiological and functional aspects of respiratory syndromes caused by collagen diseases].

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, G; Allegra, L; Bianco, S; Gangarossa, C; Ortolani, C; Rizzi, A M

    1976-11-01

    The clinical and radiological features in 100 patients with collagen diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, sclerodermia, dermatomyositis, and panarteritis nodosa) were compared with respiratory performance. 56 patients were drawn from the series of Pende et Al. and 44 from a personal series. The results are set out in tables and graphs. It was found that lung lesions due to collagen disease have no special clinical and radiological features. Respiratory performance is that of a restrictive syndrome that gradually progresses from A.R. to E.S., S. and P.M., accompanied by obstruction of the large airways, as shown by hyperinsufflation in sclerodermia and reduced specific conductance in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:995294

  16. Regulation of immune reactivity to collagen in human beings

    SciTech Connect

    Solinger, A.M.; Stobo, J.D.

    1981-08-01

    Denaturated beef collagen was tested for its ability to induce the production of leukocyte inhibition factor among the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal individuals. Responsiveness, defined as the production of leukocyte inhibition factor sufficient to cause greater than 20% inhibition of leukocyte migration, was significantly (P less than 0.001, X2 . 31.1) associated with HLA-DR4. All HLA-DR4 positive individuals, including subjects without any evidence of synovitis, were collagen responders. There was no significant (P . 0.3) difference in the absolute reactivity of HLA-DR4+ versus HLA-DR4- individuals to respond to another antigen, Candida albicans. Collagen reactivity required interactions between macrophages and T cells and was directed against determinants inherent in the linear polypeptide, (Gly-Pro)n. In 5 normal HLA-DR4- nonresponders tested, absence of discernable reactivity to collagen was associated with the presence of antigen-specific, radiosensitive suppressive T cells. These studies suggest that during the physiologic metabolism of collagen all individuals are exposed to Gly-Pro determinants normally buried in the interstices of the collagen triple helix. In individuals whose major histocompatibility complex contains genes linked to those coding for HLA-DR4, this results in the activation of reactive T cells. Conversely, in individuals lacking these genes, collagen-specific suppressive cells predominate.

  17. JNK1, but Not JNK2, Is Required in Two Mechanistically Distinct Models of Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Denninger, Katja; Rasmussen, Susanne; Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Ørskov, Catrine; Seier Poulsen, Steen; Sørensen, Poul; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Illges, Harald; Ødum, Niels; Labuda, Tord

    2011-01-01

    The roles of the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) in inflammatory arthritis have been investigated; however, the roles of each isotype (ie, JNK1 and JNK2) in rheumatoid arthritis and conclusions about whether inhibition of one or both is necessary for amelioration of disease are unclear. By using JNK1- or JNK2-deficient mice in the collagen-induced arthritis and the KRN T-cell receptor transgenic mouse on C57BL/6 nonobese diabetic (K/BxN) serum transfer arthritis models, we demonstrate that JNK1 deficiency results in protection from arthritis, as judged by clinical score and histological evaluation in both models of inflammatory arthritis. In contrast, abrogation of JNK2 exacerbates disease. In collagen-induced arthritis, the distinct roles of the JNK isotypes can, at least in part, be explained by altered regulation of CD86 expression in JNK1- or JNK2-deficient macrophages in response to microbial products, thereby affecting T-cell–mediated immunity. The protection from K/BxN serum–induced arthritis in Jnk1−/− mice can also be explained by inept macrophage function because adoptive transfer of wild-type macrophages to Jnk1−/− mice restored disease susceptibility. Thus, our results provide a possible explanation for the modest therapeutic effects of broad JNK inhibitors and suggest that future therapies should selectively target the JNK1 isoform. PMID:21839715

  18. Enigmatic insight into collagen.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  19. Collagen and gelatin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dasong; Nikoo, Mehdi; Boran, Gökhan; Zhou, Peng; Regenstein, Joe M

    2015-01-01

    Collagen and gelatin have been widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries due to their excellent biocompatibility, easy biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. Fish collagen and gelatin are of renewed interest, owing to the safety and religious concerns of their mammalian counterparts. The structure of collagen has been studied using various modern technologies, and interpretation of the raw data should be done with caution. The structure of collagen may vary with sources and seasons, which may affect its applications and optimal extraction conditions. Numerous studies have investigated the bioactivities and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and their hydrolysis peptides, using both in vitro and in vivo assay models. In addition to their established nutritional value as a protein source, collagen and collagen-derived products may exert various potential biological activities on cells in the extracellular matrix through the corresponding food-derived peptides after ingestion, and this might justify their applications in dietary supplements and pharmaceutical preparations. Moreover, an increasing number of novel applications have been found for collagen and gelatin. Therefore, this review covers the current understanding of the structure, bioactivities, and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and gelatin hydrolysates as well as their most recent applications. PMID:25884286

  20. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  1. IL-12p40 Homodimer Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon-Yeong; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kang, Chang-Min; Moon, Young-Mee; Heo, Yu-Jung; Oh, Hye-Jwa; Park, Seong-Jeong; Yang, Se-Hwan; Kwok, Seung Ki; Ju, Ji-Hyeon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Sung, Young Chul

    2015-01-01

    IL-23 is the key cytokine that induces the expansion of Th17 cells. It is composed of p19 and p40 subunits of IL-12. The p40 subunit binds competitively to the receptor of IL-23 and blocks its activity. Our aim was to assess the preventive and therapeutic effect of the IL-12p40 homodimer (p40)2 subunit in autoimmune arthritis animal models. In the current study, using IL-1R antagonist–knockout mice and a collagen-induced arthritis model, we investigated the suppressive effect of (p40)2 on inflammatory arthritis. We demonstrated that the recombinant adenovirus-expressing mouse (p40)2 model prevented the development of arthritis when given before the onset of arthritis. It also decreased the arthritis index and joint erosions in the mouse model if transferred after arthritis was established. (p40)2 inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines and Ag-specific T cell proliferation. It also induced CD4+CD25+Foxp3 regulatory T (Treg) cells in vitro and in vivo, whereas the generation of retinoic acid receptor–related organ receptor γt and Th17 cells was suppressed. The induction of Treg cells and the suppression of Th17 cells were mediated via activated STAT5 and suppressed STAT3. Our data suggest that (p40)2 suppressed inflammatory arthritis successfully. This could be a useful therapeutic approach in autoimmune arthritis to regulate the Th17/Treg balance and IL-23 signaling. PMID:26324771

  2. IL-12p40 Homodimer Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon-Yeong; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kang, Chang-Min; Moon, Young-Mee; Heo, Yu-Jung; Oh, Hye-Jwa; Park, Seong-Jeong; Yang, Se-Hwan; Kwok, Seung Ki; Ju, Ji-Hyeon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Sung, Young Chul; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La

    2015-10-01

    IL-23 is the key cytokine that induces the expansion of Th17 cells. It is composed of p19 and p40 subunits of IL-12. The p40 subunit binds competitively to the receptor of IL-23 and blocks its activity. Our aim was to assess the preventive and therapeutic effect of the IL-12p40 homodimer (p40)2 subunit in autoimmune arthritis animal models. In the current study, using IL-1R antagonist-knockout mice and a collagen-induced arthritis model, we investigated the suppressive effect of (p40)2 on inflammatory arthritis. We demonstrated that the recombinant adenovirus-expressing mouse (p40)2 model prevented the development of arthritis when given before the onset of arthritis. It also decreased the arthritis index and joint erosions in the mouse model if transferred after arthritis was established. (p40)2 inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines and Ag-specific T cell proliferation. It also induced CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3 regulatory T (Treg) cells in vitro and in vivo, whereas the generation of retinoic acid receptor-related organ receptor γt and Th17 cells was suppressed. The induction of Treg cells and the suppression of Th17 cells were mediated via activated STAT5 and suppressed STAT3. Our data suggest that (p40)2 suppressed inflammatory arthritis successfully. This could be a useful therapeutic approach in autoimmune arthritis to regulate the Th17/Treg balance and IL-23 signaling. PMID:26324771

  3. Methods for quantitative detection of antibody-induced complement activation on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth M; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies against red blood cells (RBCs) can lead to complement activation resulting in an accelerated clearance via complement receptors in the liver (extravascular hemolysis) or leading to intravascular lysis of RBCs. Alloantibodies (e.g. ABO) or autoantibodies to RBC antigens (as seen in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, AIHA) leading to complement activation are potentially harmful and can be - especially when leading to intravascular lysis - fatal(1). Currently, complement activation due to (auto)-antibodies on RBCs is assessed in vitro by using the Coombs test reflecting complement deposition on RBC or by a nonquantitative hemolytic assay reflecting RBC lysis(1-4). However, to assess the efficacy of complement inhibitors, it is mandatory to have quantitative techniques. Here we describe two such techniques. First, an assay to detect C3 and C4 deposition on red blood cells that is induced by antibodies in patient serum is presented. For this, FACS analysis is used with fluorescently labeled anti-C3 or anti-C4 antibodies. Next, a quantitative hemolytic assay is described. In this assay, complement-mediated hemolysis induced by patient serum is measured making use of spectrophotometric detection of the released hemoglobin. Both of these assays are very reproducible and quantitative, facilitating studies of antibody-induced complement activation. PMID:24514151

  4. Infections and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests. PMID:26096095

  5. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-07-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra-articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA-B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised "trigger" infection. The identification and management of "sexually acquired" and "enteric" forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  6. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  7. Hallux metatarsophalangeal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Weinfeld, S B; Schon, L C

    1998-04-01

    Arthritis of the hallux metatarsophalangeal joint is a common disorder that affects shoewear, ambulation, and other activities of daily living. Etiologies include degenerative arthritis (hallux rigidus), crystal induced arthropathy (gout, pseudogout), rheumatoid arthritis, the seronegative spondyloathropathies, posttraumatic degeneration, and advanced hallux valgus. Accurate diagnosis and selection of the appropriate intervention depends on recognition of pertinent clinical and radiographic features. This study presents a synopsis of the senior author's (LCS) experience with 439 surgically treated patients with hallux metatarsophalangeal arthritis, focusing on origin and treatment. PMID:9584362

  8. Suppression of arthritis-induced bone erosion by a CRAC channel antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Harry C; Soboloff, Jonathan; Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina L; Larrouture, Quitterie C; Witt, Michelle R; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Elliott, Meenal; Hirsch, Raphael; Barnett, John B

    2016-01-01

    Objective We have shown in vitro and in vivo that osteoclast maturation requires calcium-release activated calcium (CRAC) channels. In inflammatory arthritis, osteoclasts mediate severe and debilitating bone erosion. In the current study, we assess the value of CRAC channels as a therapeutic target to suppress bone erosion in acute inflammatory arthritis. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in mice. The CRAC channel inhibitor 3,4-dichloropropionaniline (DCPA) and a placebo was administered 1 day prior to collagen II booster to induce arthritis. Effects on swelling, inflammatory cell invasion in joints, serum cytokines and bone erosion were measured. Results Assays, by blinded observers, of arthritis severity showed that DCPA, 21 mg/kg/day, suppressed arthritis development over 3 weeks. Bone and cartilage damage in sections of animal feet was reduced approximately 50%; overall swelling of joints was reduced by a similar amount. Effects on bone density by µCT showed clear separation in DCPA-treated CIA animals from CIA without treatment, while differences between controls without CIA and CIA treated with DCPA differed by small amounts and in most cases were not statistically different. Response was not related to anticollagen titres. There were no adverse effects in the treated group on animal weight or activity, consistent with low toxicity. The effect was maximal 12–17 days after collagen booster, during the rapid appearance of arthritis in untreated CIA. At 20 days after treatment (day 40), differences in arthritis score were reduced and tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-1, or IL-6 in the serum of the animals were similar in treated and untreated animals. Conclusions DCPA, a novel inhibitor of CRAC channels, suppresses bone erosion associated with acute arthritis in mice and might represent a new treatment modality for acute arthrits. PMID:26819750

  9. Role of Leukotriene B4 Receptors in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Steven; Jala, Venkatakrishna R.; Haribabu, Bodduluri

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the role that murine models of arthritis are playing in the understanding of human rheumatoid arthritis and how leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is emerging as an important target in this field. Both the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model and the K/BxN serum transfer arthritis model have contributed to outline the potential mechanisms involved in inflammatory arthritis. Indeed, the CIA model has contributed to the development of effective anti-TNF and anti-IL-1β based treatments for RA that are currently in the clinic. Many recent studies in mouse models have suggested a critical role for LTB4 and its receptors in the development of inflammatory arthritis. Inhibitors of LTB4 biosynthesis as well as LTB4 receptors are protective in mouse models of RA and mice deficient in the LTB4 biosynthetic enzymes or LTB4 receptors are resistant to disease development suggesting several promising targets for RA in this pathway. PMID:17967719

  10. Salivary binding antibodies induced by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 recombinant gp120 vaccine. The NIAID AIDS Vaccine Evaluation Group.

    PubMed Central

    Gorse, G J; Yang, E Y; Belshe, R B; Berman, P W

    1996-01-01

    Salivary binding antibodies induced by candidate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines in healthy, HIV-1 uninfected volunteers were assessed in a clinical trial evaluating intramuscularly injected HIV-1MN recombinant gp120 (rgp120) vaccine alone or with HIV-1IIIB rgp120 vaccine. The two rgp120 vaccines induced envelope glycoprotein-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies in whole saliva and serum. PMID:8914773

  11. Collagen: Biochemistry, biomechanics, biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Nimni, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date reference for new ideas, information, and concepts in collagen research. The first volume emphasizes the relationship between the molecular structure and function of collagen, including descriptions of collagen types which exist in tissues as well as how these molecules organize into fibrils and the nature of the chemical crosslinks which stabilize them. In Volume II the biomechanical behavior of various specialized tissues, abnormal accumulation of collagen in the form of scars of fibrous infiltration are examined/and wound healing, tissue regulation and repair are covered in detail. Volume III explores the increasing application of collagen technology to the field of bioprosthesis, including the production of heart valve bioprosthesis, blood vessels, ligament substitutes, and bone substitutes.

  12. Oxidative damage to collagen.

    PubMed

    Monboisse, J C; Borel, J P

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular matrix molecules, such as collagens, are good targets for oxygen free radicals. Collagen is the only protein susceptible to fragmentation by superoxide anion as demonstrated by the liberation of small 4-hydroxyproline-containing-peptides. It seems likely that hydroxyl radicals in the presence of oxygen cleave collagen into small peptides, and the cleavage seems to be specific to proline or 4-hydroxyproline residues. Hydroxyl radicals in the absence of oxygen or hypochlorous acid do not induce fragmentation of collagen molecules, but they trigger a polymerization of collagen through the formation of new cross-links such as dityrosine or disulfure bridges. Moreover, these cross-links can not explain the totality of high molecular weight components generated under these experimental conditions, and the nature of new cross-links induced by hydroxyl radicals or hypochlorous acid remains unclear. PMID:1333311

  13. Protective role of antibodies induced by Brucella melitensis B115 against B. melitensis and Brucella abortus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Adone, Rosanna; Francia, Massimiliano; Pistoia, Claudia; Petrucci, Paola; Pesciaroli, Michele; Pasquali, Paolo

    2012-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that antibodies specific for O-PS antigen of Brucella smooth strains are involved in the protective immunity of brucellosis. Since the rough strain Brucella melitensis B115 was able to protect mice against wild Brucella strains brucellosis despite the lack of anti-OPS antibodies, in this study we evaluated the biological significance of antibodies induced by this strain, directed to antigens other than O-PS, passively tranferred to untreated mice prior to infection with Brucella abortus 2308 and B. melitensis 16M virulent strains. The protective ability of specific antisera collected from mice vaccinated with B. melitensis B115, B. abortus RB51 and B. abortus S19 strains was compared. The results indicated that antibodies induced by B115 were able to confer a satisfactory protection, especially against B. abortus 2308, similar to that conferred by the antiserum S19, while the RB51 antiserum was ineffective. These findings suggest that antibodies induced by B115 could act as opsonins as well as antibodies anti-O-PS, thus triggering more efficient internalization and degradation of bacteria within phagocytes. This is the first study assessing the efficacy of antibodies directed to antigens other than O-PS in the course of brucellosis infection. PMID:22521283

  14. Relationship between angiogenesis and inflammation in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Gaelle; Valvason, Chiara; Yamaoka, Kunio; Lemeiter, Delphine; Laroche, Liliane; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Bessis, Natacha

    2006-09-01

    Background. Angiogenesis is involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) leading to leucocyte recruitment and inflammation in the synovium. Furthermore, synovial inflammation itself further potentiates endothelial proliferation and angiogenesis. In this study, we aimed at evaluating the reciprocical relationship between synovial inflammation and angiogenesis in a RA model, namely collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. CIA was induced by immunization of DBA/1 mice with collagen type II in adjuvant. Endothelial cells were detected using a GSL-1 lectin-specific immunohistochemical staining on knee joint sections. Angiogenesis, clinical scores and histological signs of arthritis were evaluated from the induction of CIA until the end of the experiment. Angiogenesis was quantified by counting both the isolated endothelial cells and vessels stained on each section. To evaluate the effect of increased angiogenesis on CIA, VEGF gene transfer was performed using an adeno-associated virus encoding VEGF (AAV-VEGF), by intra-muscular or intra-articular injection in mice with CIA. Results. We showed an increase in synovial angiogenesis from day 6 to day 55 after CIA induction, and, moreover, joint vascularization and clinical scores of arthritis were correlated (p < 0.0001, r = 0.61). Vascularization and histological scores were also correlated (p = 0.0006, r = 0.51). Systemic VEGF overexpression in mice with CIA was followed by an aggravation of arthritis as compared to AAV-lacZ control group (p < 0.0001). In contrast, there was no difference in clinical scores between control mice and mice injected within the knee with AAV-VEGF, even if joint vascularization was higher in this group than in all other groups (p = 0,05 versus non-injected group). Intra-articular AAV-VEGF injections induced more severe signs of histological inflammation and bone destruction than AAV-Lac Z or no injection. Conclusion. Angiogenesis and joint inflammation evolve in parallel during collagen

  15. Adrenomedullin protects from experimental arthritis by down-regulating inflammation and Th1 response and inducing regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; Chorny, Alejo; O'Valle, Francisco; Delgado, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology characterized by chronic inflammation in the joints and subsequent destruction of the cartilage and bone. The present study proposes a new strategy for the treatment of arthritis: the administration of the immunomodulatory neuropeptide adrenomedullin. Treatment with adrenomedullin significantly reduced incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis, an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis, completely abrogating joint swelling and destruction of cartilage and bone. The therapeutic effect of adrenomedullin was associated with a striking reduction of the two deleterious components of the disease, ie, the Th1-driven autoimmune and inflammatory responses. Adrenomedullin also induced the generation and/or activation of efficient CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells in arthritis with capacity to suppress autoreactive response and restore immune tolerance, which could play a pivotal role in the therapeutic effect of adrenomedullin on experimental arthritis contributing to the restoration of immune tolerance. PMID:17200199

  16. Collagenous Colitis and Spondylarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ben Abdelghani, Kaouther; Sahli, Hana; Souabni, Leila; Chekili, Selma; Belhadj, Salwa; Kassab, Selma; Laatar, Ahmed; Zakraoui, Leith

    2012-01-01

    Collagenous colitis is a recent cause of chronic diarrhea. Cooccurrence with spondylarthropathy is rare. We describe two cases: one man and one woman of 33 and 20 years old were suffering from spondylarthropathy. They then developed collagenous colitis, 4 and 14 years after the onset of spondylarthropathy. The diagnosis was based on histological features. A sicca syndrome and vitiligo were observed with the female case. The presence of colitis leads to therapeutic problems. This association suggests a systemic kind of rheumatic disease of collagenous colitis. PMID:22701491

  17. Varicella arthritis in a child.

    PubMed Central

    Shuper, A; Mimouni, M; Mukamel, M; Varsano, I

    1980-01-01

    A 2 1/2-year-old girl developed arthritis in a metatarsophalangeal joint concomitantly with varicella. As she recovered within 2 days without antimicrobial treatment, it was considered that the arthritis was directly due to the viral infection. The importance of differentiating viral arthritis from septic arthritis, a well-known complication of varicella, is stressed. PMID:7436508

  18. Epitope specificity of anti‐HA2 antibodies induced in humans during influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Staneková, Zuzana; Mucha, Vojtech; Sládková, Tatiana; Blaškovičová, Hana; Kostolanský, František; Varečková, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Stanekováet al. (2012) Epitope specificity of anti‐HA2 antibodies induced in humans during influenza infection. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(6), 389–395. Background  The conserved, fusion‐active HA2 glycopolypeptide (HA2) subunit of influenza A hemagglutinin comprises four distinct antigenic sites. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) recognizing three of these sites are broadly cross‐reactive and protective. Objectives  This study aimed to establish whether antibodies specific to these three antigenic sites were elicited during a natural influenza infection or by vaccination of humans. Methods  Forty‐five paired acute and convalescent sera from individuals with a confirmed influenza A (subtype H3) infection were examined for the presence of HA2‐specific antibodies. The fraction of antibodies specific to three particular antigenic sites (designated IIF4, FC12, and CF2 here) was investigated using competitive enzyme immunoassay. Results  Increased levels of antibodies specific to an ectodomain of HA2 (EHA2: N‐terminal residues 23–185 of HA2) were detected in 73% of tested convalescent sera (33/45), while an increased level of antibodies specific to the HA2 fusion peptide (N‐terminal residues 1–38) was induced in just 15/45 individuals (33%). Competitive assays confirmed that antibodies specific to the IIF4 epitope (within HA2 residues 125–175) prevailed in 86% (13/15) over those specific to the other two epitopes during infection. However, only a negligible increase in HA2‐specific antibodies was detectable following vaccination with a current subunit vaccine. Conclusions  We observed that the antigenic site localized within N‐terminal HA2 residues 125–175 was more immunogenic than that within residues 1–38 (HA2 fusion protein), although both are weak natural immunogens. We suggest that new anti‐influenza vaccines should include HA2 (or specific epitopes localized within this

  19. Nanomechanics of collagen microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Vesentini, Simone; Redaelli, Alberto; Gautieri, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Summary Collagen constitutes one third of the human proteome, providing mechanical stability, elasticity and strength to organisms and is thus the prime construction material in biology. Collagen is also the dominating material in the extracellular matrix where its stiffness controls cell differentiation, growth and pathology. We use atomistic-based hierarchical multiscale modeling to describe this complex biological material from the bottom up. This includes the use and development of large-scale computational modeling tools to investigate several aspects related to collagen-based tissues, including source of visco-elasticity and deformation mechanisms at the nanoscale level. The key innovation of this research is that until now, collagen materials have primarily been described at macroscopic scales, without explicitly understanding the mechanical contributions at the molecular and fibrillar levels. The major impact of this research will be the development of fundamental models of collagenous tissues, important to the design of new scaffolding biomaterials for regenerative medicine as well as for the understanding of collagen-related diseases. PMID:23885342

  20. Type V collagen controls the initiation of collagen fibril assembly.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, Richard J; Florer, Jane B; Brunskill, Eric W; Bell, Sheila M; Chervoneva, Inna; Birk, David E

    2004-12-17

    Vertebrate collagen fibrils are heterotypically composed of a quantitatively major and minor fibril collagen. In non-cartilaginous tissues, type I collagen accounts for the majority of the collagen mass, and collagen type V, the functions of which are poorly understood, is a minor component. Type V collagen has been implicated in the regulation of fibril diameter, and we reported recently preliminary evidence that type V collagen is required for collagen fibril nucleation (Wenstrup, R. J., Florer, J. B., Cole, W. G., Willing, M. C., and Birk, D. E. (2004) J. Cell. Biochem. 92, 113-124). The purpose of this study was to define the roles of type V collagen in the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis and matrix assembly. Mouse embryos completely deficient in pro-alpha1(V) chains were created by homologous recombination. The col5a1-/- animals die in early embryogenesis, at approximately embryonic day 10. The type V collagen-deficient mice demonstrate a virtual lack of collagen fibril formation. In contrast, the col5a1+/- animals are viable. The reduced type V collagen content is associated with a 50% reduction in fibril number and dermal collagen content. In addition, relatively normal, cylindrical fibrils are assembled with a second population of large, structurally abnormal collagen fibrils. The structural properties of the abnormal matrix are decreased relative to the wild type control animals. These data indicate a central role for the evolutionary, ancient type V collagen in the regulation of fibrillogenesis. The complete dependence of fibril formation on type V collagen is indicative of the critical role of the latter in early fibril initiation. In addition, this fibril collagen is important in the determination of fibril structure and matrix organization. PMID:15383546

  1. Long-term natural history and complications of collagenous colitis

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh J

    2012-01-01

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis, a possibly heterogeneous disorder. Collagenous colitis most often appears to have an entirely benign clinical course that usually responds to limited treatment. Sometimes significant extracolonic disorders, especially arthritis, spondylitis, thyroiditis and skin disorders, such as pyoderma gangrenosum, dominate the clinical course and influence the treatment strategy. However, rare fatalities have been reported and several complications, some severe, have been attributed directly to the colitis. Toxic colitis and toxic megacolon may develop. Concomitant gastric and small intestinal inflammatory disorders have been described including celiac disease and more extensive collagenous inflammatory disease. Colonic ulceration has been associated with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease, may evolve directly from collagenous colitis. Submucosal ‘dissection’, colonic fractures, or mucosal tears and perforation, possibly from air insufflation during colonoscopy, have been reported. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressures that may occur during radiological imaging of the colon. Neoplastic disorders of the colon may also occur during the course of collagenous colitis, including colon carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumours (ie, carcinoids). Finally, lymphoproliferative disease has been reported. PMID:22993735

  2. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein that are done regularly at the hospital. Physical Therapy An appropriate physical therapy program is essential to the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities ...

  3. Arthritis of the Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... of hand and wrist arthritis. (Note: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not test dietary supplements. These compounds may cause negative interactions with other medications. Always consult your doctor before taking dietary supplements.) ...

  4. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for months, or years, then abate, sometimes permanently. Gout (gouty arthritis) : Gout is a condition caused by a buildup of ... sauces, shellfish, and brandy is popularly associated with gout, there are other protein compounds in foods such ...

  5. Living with Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects. Learn more about biologic treatments . Reducing your sensitivity to pain When the pain of psoriatic arthritis ... your doctor about medication that helps reduce your sensitivity to pain. Prescription pain medications such as Gabapentin ...

  6. Arthritis and IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Search: What are Crohn's & Colitis? What is Crohn's Disease What is Ulcerative Colitis Types of Medications What’s ... affect as many as 25% of people with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Although arthritis is typically associated ...

  7. Potential Use of Plectranthus amboinicus in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jia-Ming; Cheng, Chun-Ming; Hung, Le-Mei; Chung, Yuh-Shan; Wu, Rey-Yuh

    2010-03-01

    Plectranthus amboinicus (P. amboinicus) is a folk herb that is used to treat inflammatory diseases or swelling symptoms in Taiwan. We investigated therapeutic efficacy of P. amboinicus in treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) using collagen-induced arthritis animal model. Arthritis was induced in Lewis rats by immunization with bovine type II collagen. Serum anti-collagen IgG, IgM and C-reactive protein (CRP) were analyzed. To understand the inflammation condition of treated animals, production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β from peritoneal exudates cells (PEC) were also analyzed. P. amboinicus significantly inhibited the footpad swelling and arthritic symptoms in collagen-induced arthritic rats, while the serum anti-collagen IgM and CRP levels were consistently decreased. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were also decreased in the high dosage of P. amboinicus group. Here, we demonstrate the potential anti-arthritic effect of P. amboinicus for treating RA, which might confer its anti-rheumatic activity. This differs the pharmacological action mode of indomethacin. PMID:18955284

  8. Potential Use of Plectranthus amboinicus in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chun-Ming; Hung, Le-Mei; Chung, Yuh-Shan; Wu, Rey-Yuh

    2010-01-01

    Plectranthus amboinicus (P. amboinicus) is a folk herb that is used to treat inflammatory diseases or swelling symptoms in Taiwan. We investigated therapeutic efficacy of P. amboinicus in treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) using collagen-induced arthritis animal model. Arthritis was induced in Lewis rats by immunization with bovine type II collagen. Serum anti-collagen IgG, IgM and C-reactive protein (CRP) were analyzed. To understand the inflammation condition of treated animals, production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β from peritoneal exudates cells (PEC) were also analyzed. P. amboinicus significantly inhibited the footpad swelling and arthritic symptoms in collagen-induced arthritic rats, while the serum anti-collagen IgM and CRP levels were consistently decreased. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were also decreased in the high dosage of P. amboinicus group. Here, we demonstrate the potential anti-arthritic effect of P. amboinicus for treating RA, which might confer its anti-rheumatic activity. This differs the pharmacological action mode of indomethacin. PMID:18955284

  9. Role of the Gut Microbiome in Modulating Arthritis Progression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaofei; Zeng, Benhua; Zhang, Juan; Li, Wenxia; Mou, Fangxiang; Wang, Heng; Zou, Qinghua; Zhong, Bing; Wu, Like; Wei, Hong; Fang, Yongfei

    2016-01-01

    Genetics alone cannot explain most cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thus, investigating environmental factors such as the gut microbiota may provide new insights into the initiation and progression of RA. In this study, we performed 16S rRNA sequencing to characterise the gut microbiota of DBA1 mice that did or did not develop arthritis after induction with collagen. We found that divergence in the distribution of microbiota after induction was pronounced and significant. Mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) showed enriched operational taxonomic units (OTUs) affiliated with the genus Lactobacillus as the dominant genus prior to arthritis onset. With disease development, the abundance of OTUs affiliated with the families Bacteroidaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and S24-7 increased significantly in CIA-susceptible mice. Notably, germ-free mice conventionalized with the microbiota from CIA-susceptible mice showed a higher frequency of arthritis induction than those conventionalized with the microbiota from CIA-resistant mice. Consistently, the concentration of the cytokine interleukin-17 in serum and the proportions of CD8+T cells and Th17 lymphocytes in the spleen were significantly higher in the former group, whereas the abundances of dendritic cells, B cells, and Treg cells in the spleen were significantly lower. Our results suggest that the gut microbiome influences arthritis susceptibility. PMID:27481047

  10. Role of the Gut Microbiome in Modulating Arthritis Progression in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofei; Zeng, Benhua; Zhang, Juan; Li, Wenxia; Mou, Fangxiang; Wang, Heng; Zou, Qinghua; Zhong, Bing; Wu, Like; Wei, Hong; Fang, Yongfei

    2016-01-01

    Genetics alone cannot explain most cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thus, investigating environmental factors such as the gut microbiota may provide new insights into the initiation and progression of RA. In this study, we performed 16S rRNA sequencing to characterise the gut microbiota of DBA1 mice that did or did not develop arthritis after induction with collagen. We found that divergence in the distribution of microbiota after induction was pronounced and significant. Mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) showed enriched operational taxonomic units (OTUs) affiliated with the genus Lactobacillus as the dominant genus prior to arthritis onset. With disease development, the abundance of OTUs affiliated with the families Bacteroidaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and S24-7 increased significantly in CIA-susceptible mice. Notably, germ-free mice conventionalized with the microbiota from CIA-susceptible mice showed a higher frequency of arthritis induction than those conventionalized with the microbiota from CIA-resistant mice. Consistently, the concentration of the cytokine interleukin-17 in serum and the proportions of CD8+T cells and Th17 lymphocytes in the spleen were significantly higher in the former group, whereas the abundances of dendritic cells, B cells, and Treg cells in the spleen were significantly lower. Our results suggest that the gut microbiome influences arthritis susceptibility. PMID:27481047

  11. Analysing the effect of novel therapies on cytokine expression in experimental arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Richard O; Inglis, Julia J; Simelyte, Egle; Criado, Gabriel; Sumariwalla, Percy F

    2005-01-01

    Type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis that has been used extensively to address questions of disease pathogenesis and to validate novel therapeutic targets. Susceptibility to CIA is strongly associated with major histocompatibility complex class II genes, and the development of arthritis is accompanied by a robust T- and B-cell response to type II collagen. The main pathological features of CIA include proliferative synovitis with infiltration of inflammatory cells, pannus formation, cartilage degradation, erosion of bone and fibrosis. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumour necrosis factor α and interleukin-1β, are expressed in the arthritic joints in both murine CIA and human rheumatoid arthritis, and blockade of these molecules results in amelioration of disease. Hence, there is a great deal of interest in the development of small-molecular-weight inhibitors of pro-inflammatory cytokines. There is also interest in the development and testing of drugs with the capacity to modulate the immune pathways involved in driving the inflammatory response in arthritis. For these reasons, there is a need to monitor the effect of novel treatments on cytokine expression in vivo. In this review, we outline the various techniques used to detect cytokines in experimental arthritis and describe how these techniques have been used to quantify changes in cytokine expression following therapeutic intervention. PMID:16191099

  12. Follistatin-like protein 1 promotes arthritis by up-regulating IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Clutter, Suzanne D; Wilson, David C; Marinov, Anthony D; Hirsch, Raphael

    2009-01-01

    Follistatin-like protein-1 (FSTL-1) is a poorly characterized protein that is up-regulated in the early stage of collagen-induced arthritis and that exacerbates arthritis when delivered by gene transfer. The current study was designed to determine the mechanism by which FSTL-1 promotes arthritis. FSTL-1 was injected into mouse paws, resulting in severe paw swelling associated with up-regulation of IFN-gamma transcript and the IFN-gamma-induced chemokine, CXCL10. Mice depleted of T cells were protected. A central role for IFN-gamma was confirmed by the finding that mice deficient in IFN-gamma failed to exhibit paw swelling in response to injection of FSTL-1. Furthermore, IFN-gamma secretion from mouse spleen cells exposed to a weak TCR signal was increased 5-fold in the presence of FSTL-1. FSTL-1 could be induced by innate immune signals, including TLR4 agonists and the arthritogenic cytokine, IL-1beta, via an NFkappaB pathway. Finally, FSTL-1 was found to be overexpressed in human arthritis and its neutralization inhibited murine collagen-induced arthritis and suppressed IFN-gamma and CXCL10 production in arthritic joints. These findings demonstrate that FSTL-1 plays a critical role in arthritis by enhancing IFN-gamma signaling pathways and suggest a mechanism by which FSTL-1 bridges innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:19109154

  13. Collagen type VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    Bushby, Kate M D; Collins, James; Hicks, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in each of the three collagen VI genes COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 cause two main types of muscle disorders: Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, a severe phenotype, and a mild to moderate phenotype Bethlem myopathy. Recently, two additional phenotypes, including a limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotype and an autosomal recessive myosclerosis reported in one family with mutations in COL6A2 have been reported. Collagen VI is an important component of the extracellular matrix which forms a microfibrillar network that is found in close association with the cell and surrounding basement membrane. Collagen VI is also found in the interstitial space of many tissues including muscle, tendon, skin, cartilage, and intervertebral discs. Thus, collagen VI mutations result in disorders with combined muscle and connective tissue involvement, including weakness, joint laxity and contractures, and abnormal skin findings.In this review we highlight the four recognized clinical phenotypes of collagen VI related - myopathies; Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM), autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotype and autosomal recessive myosclerosis. We discuss the diagnostic criteria of these disorders, the molecular pathogenesis, genetics, treatment, and related disorders. PMID:24443028

  14. Anti-Citrullinated Protein Antibodies Induce Macrophage Subset Disequilibrium in RA Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Li, Xiu; Fang, Shaohong; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Tongshuai; Li, Zhaoying; Xu, Yanwen; Qu, Siying; Liu, Chuanliang; Gao, Fei; Pan, Haile; Wang, Guangyou; Li, Hulun; Sun, Bo

    2015-12-01

    We used samples from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients to examine whether Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) alter macrophage subset distribution and promote RA development. Macrophage subset distributions and interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) and IRF5 expressions were analyzed. ACPAs were purified by affinity column. After RA and osteoarthritis (OA) patients' macrophages were cocultured with ACPAs, macrophage subsets and IRF4 and IRF5 expressions were measured. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were transfected into ACPA-activated cells to suppress IRF4 or IRF5. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), Western blot, and immunohistochemistry were performed. Macrophage subset disequilibrium occurred in RA patient synovial fluids. IRF4 and IRF5 were all expressed in the synovial fluid and synovium. ACPAs (40 IU/ml) could induce macrophages to polarize to M1 subsets, and the percentage of increased M1/M2 ratio of RA patients was higher than that of the OA patients. ACPAs also induce IRF4 and IRF5 protein expressions. IRF5 siRNA transfection impaired ACPA activity significantly. We demonstrated that macrophage subset disequilibrium occurred in RA patients. ACPAs induced IRF5 activity and led to M1 macrophage polarization. PMID:26063186

  15. Collagen in organ development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    It is important to know whether microgravity will adversely affect developmental processes. Collagens are macromolecular structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which may be altered by perturbations in gravity. Interstitial collagens have been shown to be necessary for normal growth and morphogenesis in some embryonic organs, and in the mouse salivary gland, the biosynthetic pattern of these molecules changes during development. Determination of the effects of microgravity on epithelial organ development must be preceded by crucial ground-based studies. These will define control of normal synthesis, secretion, and deposition of ECM macromolecules and the relationship of these processes to morphogenesis.

  16. Interstitial Collagen Catabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Gregg B.

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial collagen mechanical and biological properties are altered by proteases that catalyze the hydrolysis of the collagen triple-helical structure. Collagenolysis is critical in development and homeostasis but also contributes to numerous pathologies. Mammalian collagenolytic enzymes include matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsin K, and neutrophil elastase, and a variety of invertebrates and pathogens possess collagenolytic enzymes. Components of the mechanism of action for the collagenolytic enzyme MMP-1 have been defined experimentally, and insights into other collagenolytic mechanisms have been provided. Ancillary biomolecules may modulate the action of collagenolytic enzymes. PMID:23430258

  17. In Situ D-periodic Molecular Structure of Type II Collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2010-05-06

    Collagens are essential components of extracellular matrices in multicellular animals. Fibrillar type II collagen is the most prominent component of articular cartilage and other cartilage-like tissues such as notochord. Its in situ macromolecular and packing structures have not been fully characterized, but an understanding of these attributes may help reveal mechanisms of tissue assembly and degradation (as in osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis). In some tissues such as lamprey notochord, the collagen fibrillar organization is naturally crystalline and may be studied by x-ray diffraction. We used diffraction data from native and derivative notochord tissue samples to solve the axial, D-periodic structure of type II collagen via multiple isomorphous replacement. The electron density maps and heavy atom data revealed the conformation of the nonhelical telopeptides and the overall D-periodic structure of collagen type II in native tissues, data that were further supported by structure prediction and transmission electron microscopy. These results help to explain the observed differences in collagen type I and type II fibrillar architecture and indicate the collagen type II cross-link organization, which is crucial for fibrillogenesis. Transmission electron microscopy data show the close relationship between lamprey and mammalian collagen fibrils, even though the respective larger scale tissue architecture differs.

  18. Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  20. Role of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF) beta in the physiopathology of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Gil, Elena; Galindo-Izquierdo, María

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a cytokine with pleiotropic functions in hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Although its role in rheumatoid arthritis is not well defined, TGF-β activation leads to functional immunomodulatory effects according to environmental conditions. The function of TGF-β in the development of arthritis in murine models has been extensively studied with controversial results. Recent findings point to a non-relevant role for TGF-β in a mice model of collagen-induced arthritis. The study of TGF-β on T-cell responses has shown controversial results as an inhibitor or promoter of the inflammatory response. This paper presents a review of the role of TGF-β in animal models of arthritis. PMID:24685296

  1. The class I phosphoinositide 3-kinases α and β control antiphospholipid antibodies-induced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Terrisse, Anne-Dominique; Laurent, Pierre-Alexandre; Garcia, Cédric; Gratacap, Marie-Pierre; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart; Sié, Pierre; Payrastre, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterised by the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) associated with increased thrombotic risk and pregnancy morbidity. Although aPL are heterogeneous auto-antibodies, the major pathogenic target is the plasma protein β2-glycoprotein 1. The molecular mechanisms of platelet activation by aPL remain poorly understood. Here, we explored the role of the class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) α and β isoforms in platelet activation by aPL. Compared to control IgG from healthy individuals, the IgG fraction isolated from patients with APS potentiates platelet aggregation induced by low dose of thrombin in vitro and increases platelet adhesion and thrombus growth on a collagen matrix under arterial shear rate through a mechanism involving glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) and Toll Like Receptor 2 (TLR-2). Using isoforms-selective pharmacological PI3K inhibitors and mice with megakaryocyte/platelet lineage-specific inactivation of class IA PI3K isoforms, we demonstrate a critical role of the PI3Kβ and PI3Kα isoforms in platelet activation induced by aPL. Our data show that aPL potentiate platelet activation through GPIbα and TLR-2 via a mechanism involving the class IA PI3Kα and β isoforms, which represent new potential therapeutic targets in the prevention or treatment of thrombotic events in patients with APS. PMID:26818901

  2. CD32a antibodies induce thrombocytopenia and type II hypersensitivity reactions in FCGR2A mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Todd; Robles-Carrillo, Liza; Davila, Monica; Brodie, Meghan; Desai, Hina; Rivera-Amaya, Mildred; Francis, John L; Amirkhosravi, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The CD32a immunoglobulin G (IgG) receptor (Fcγ receptor IIa) is a potential therapeutic target for diseases in which IgG immune complexes (ICs) mediate inflammation, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a promising strategy for treating such diseases. However, IV.3, perhaps the best characterized CD32a-blocking mAb, was recently shown to induce anaphylaxis in immunocompromised "3KO" mice. This anaphylactic reaction required a human CD32a transgene because mice lack an equivalent of this gene. The finding that IV.3 induces anaphylaxis in CD32a-transgenic mice was surprising because IV.3 had long been thought to lack the intrinsic capacity to trigger cellular activation via CD32a. Such an anaphylactic reaction would also limit potential therapeutic applications of IV.3. In the present study, we examine the molecular mechanisms by which IV.3 induces anaphylaxis. We now report that IV.3 induces anaphylaxis in immunocompetent CD32a-transgenic "FCGR2A" mice, along with the novel finding that IV.3 and 2 other well-characterized CD32a-blocking mAbs, AT-10 and MDE-8, also induce severe thrombocytopenia in FCGR2A mice. Using recombinant variants of these same mAbs, we show that IgG "Fc" effector function is necessary for the induction of anaphylaxis and thrombocytopenia in FCGR2A mice. Variants of these mAbs lacking the capacity to activate mouse IgG receptors not only failed to induce anaphylaxis or thrombocytopenia, but also very potently protected FCGR2A mice from near lethal doses of IgG ICs. Our findings show that effector-deficient IV.3, AT-10, and MDE-8 are promising candidates for developing therapeutic mAbs to treat CD32a-mediated diseases. PMID:26396093

  3. CD32a antibodies induce thrombocytopenia and type II hypersensitivity reactions in FCGR2A mice

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Carrillo, Liza; Davila, Monica; Brodie, Meghan; Desai, Hina; Rivera-Amaya, Mildred; Francis, John L.; Amirkhosravi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The CD32a immunoglobulin G (IgG) receptor (Fcγ receptor IIa) is a potential therapeutic target for diseases in which IgG immune complexes (ICs) mediate inflammation, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a promising strategy for treating such diseases. However, IV.3, perhaps the best characterized CD32a-blocking mAb, was recently shown to induce anaphylaxis in immunocompromised “3KO” mice. This anaphylactic reaction required a human CD32a transgene because mice lack an equivalent of this gene. The finding that IV.3 induces anaphylaxis in CD32a-transgenic mice was surprising because IV.3 had long been thought to lack the intrinsic capacity to trigger cellular activation via CD32a. Such an anaphylactic reaction would also limit potential therapeutic applications of IV.3. In the present study, we examine the molecular mechanisms by which IV.3 induces anaphylaxis. We now report that IV.3 induces anaphylaxis in immunocompetent CD32a-transgenic “FCGR2A” mice, along with the novel finding that IV.3 and 2 other well-characterized CD32a-blocking mAbs, AT-10 and MDE-8, also induce severe thrombocytopenia in FCGR2A mice. Using recombinant variants of these same mAbs, we show that IgG “Fc” effector function is necessary for the induction of anaphylaxis and thrombocytopenia in FCGR2A mice. Variants of these mAbs lacking the capacity to activate mouse IgG receptors not only failed to induce anaphylaxis or thrombocytopenia, but also very potently protected FCGR2A mice from near lethal doses of IgG ICs. Our findings show that effector-deficient IV.3, AT-10, and MDE-8 are promising candidates for developing therapeutic mAbs to treat CD32a-mediated diseases. PMID:26396093

  4. Genetic disorders of collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Tsipouras, P; Ramirez, F

    1987-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Marfan syndrome form a group of genetic disorders of connective tissue. These disorders exhibit remarkable clinical heterogeneity which reflects their underlying biochemical and molecular differences. Defects in collagen types I and III have been found in all three syndromes. PMID:3543367

  5. Collagen and injectable fillers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jacqueline T; Perkins, Stephen W; Hamilton, Mark M

    2002-02-01

    Soft tissue augmentation of facial rhytids, scars, and deformities is a frequently performed office procedure. This article reviews the available biologic (collagen, Dermalogen, Autologen, Isolagen, autologous fat, Fibrel, hyaluronic acid derivatives, particulate fascia lata, micronized Alloderm) and alloplastic (silicone, Bioplastique, and Artecoll) soft tissue injectable fillers. PMID:11781208

  6. Collagen hydrolysate based collagen/hydroxyapatite composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficai, Anton; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Birsan, Mihaela; Sonmez, Maria; Ficai, Denisa; Trandafir, Viorica; Andronescu, Ecaterina

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to study the influence of collagen hydrolysate (HAS) on the formation of ternary collagen-hydrolysate/hydroxyapatite composite materials (COLL-HAS/HA). During the precipitation process of HA, a large amount of brushite is resulted at pH = 7 but, practically pure HA is obtained at pH ⩾ 8. The FTIR data reveal the duplication of the most important collagen absorption bands due to the presence of the collagen hydrolysate. The presence of collagen hydrolysate is beneficial for the management of bone and joint disorders such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis.

  7. Acute Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mader, Jon T.

    2002-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection. PMID:12364368

  8. Inhibition of CDK9 as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hellvard, Annelie; Zeitlmann, Lutz; Heiser, Ulrich; Kehlen, Astrid; Niestroj, André; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Koziel, Joanna; Delaleu, Nicolas; Jan Potempa; Mydel, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by synovial inflammation and proliferation of fibroblast-like synoviocytes. The induction of apoptosis has long been proposed as a target for proliferative autoimmune diseases, and has further been shown to act as a successful treatment of experimental models of arthritis, such as collagen-induced arthritis. Here we examined the effects of specific oral small-molecule inhibitors of the transcription regulating cyclin-dependent kinase 9 on the development and progression of collagen-induced arthritis. DBA/1 mice were immunised with bovine collagen type II and treated orally with specific CDK9 inhibitors. The effects of CDK9 inhibition on RNA levels and protein expression, apoptosis induction, caspase activation and lymphocyte phenotype were further analysed. Mice showed a significant delay in disease onset and a reduction in disease severity following treatment with CDK9 inhibitors. Inhibiting CDK9 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells resulted in the loss of Mcl-1 expression at both the protein and RNA levels, along with a subsequent increase in apoptosis. CDK9 specific inhibitors may be a potential alternative treatment not only of cancer, but also for autoimmune- and inflammatory diseases. Taken together, these results show that transient inhibition of CDK9 induces apoptosis in leukocyte subsets and modulates the immune response. PMID:27511630

  9. Inhibition of CDK9 as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hellvard, Annelie; Zeitlmann, Lutz; Heiser, Ulrich; Kehlen, Astrid; Niestroj, André; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Koziel, Joanna; Delaleu, Nicolas; Jan Potempa; Mydel, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by synovial inflammation and proliferation of fibroblast-like synoviocytes. The induction of apoptosis has long been proposed as a target for proliferative autoimmune diseases, and has further been shown to act as a successful treatment of experimental models of arthritis, such as collagen-induced arthritis. Here we examined the effects of specific oral small-molecule inhibitors of the transcription regulating cyclin-dependent kinase 9 on the development and progression of collagen-induced arthritis. DBA/1 mice were immunised with bovine collagen type II and treated orally with specific CDK9 inhibitors. The effects of CDK9 inhibition on RNA levels and protein expression, apoptosis induction, caspase activation and lymphocyte phenotype were further analysed. Mice showed a significant delay in disease onset and a reduction in disease severity following treatment with CDK9 inhibitors. Inhibiting CDK9 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells resulted in the loss of Mcl-1 expression at both the protein and RNA levels, along with a subsequent increase in apoptosis. CDK9 specific inhibitors may be a potential alternative treatment not only of cancer, but also for autoimmune- and inflammatory diseases. Taken together, these results show that transient inhibition of CDK9 induces apoptosis in leukocyte subsets and modulates the immune response. PMID:27511630

  10. Arthritis-associated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Osial, T A; Cash, J M; Eisenbeis, C H

    1993-12-01

    There are a number of diseases characterized by inflammatory arthropathy that, although not as commonly seen as rheumatoid arthritis, often present to the family physician as difficult diagnostic problems. The diagnosis is frequently most difficult during the early course of these diseases. During recent years, new and altered concepts have arisen regarding both diagnostic and therapeutic management of this challenging group of arthropathies. This article presents a review of the more common arthritis-associated syndromes with emphasis on the differential diagnosis and medicinal therapeutics. PMID:8310085

  11. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis - a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T; Mikecz, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2013-10-01

    The "Bermuda triangle" of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci - Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively - have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics. PMID:23288628

  12. Osthole prevents anti-Fas antibody-induced hepatitis in mice by affecting the caspase-3-mediated apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Toshihiro; Kawasaki, Toru; Hino, Okio

    2003-02-15

    Fas (Apo-1/CD95) ligand, which is a type II membrane protein, is a major inducer of apoptosis. Osthole is a coumarin derivative present in medicinal plants. The effect of osthole on hepatitis induced by anti-Fas antibody in mice was studied. Pretreatment of mice with osthole (10, 50, and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) prevented the elevation of plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) caused by anti-Fas antibody (175 microg/kg, i.v.). Administration of osthole to mice even at a dose of 10 mg/kg significantly inhibited of anti-Fas antibody-induced elevation of plasma ALT. Capase-3 is a cysteine protease, and treatment of mice with anti-Fas antibody caused an elevation of caspase-3 activity at 3.5 and 6 hr. Pretreatment of mice with osthole (100 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited the elevation of caspase-3 activity caused by anti-Fas antibody. However, the addition of osthole (up to 10(-4)M) to a liver cytosol fraction isolated from mice treated with anti-Fas antibody did not inhibit caspase-3 activity in vitro. Thus, treatment of mice with osthole inhibited caspase-3 activity by an effect upstream of caspase-3 activation. The livers of mice treated with anti-Fas antibody contained apoptotic and dead cells; osthole attenuated the development of this apoptosis and cell death. The present results show that osthole prevented anti-Fas antibody-induced hepatitis by inhibiting the Fas-mediated apoptotic pathway. PMID:12566097

  13. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonism and its role in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam Trung; Nakahama, Taisuke; Nguyen, Chi Hung; Tran, Trang Thu; Le, Van Son; Chu, Hoang Ha; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Although rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common autoimmune disease, affecting approximately 1% of the population worldwide, its pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Tobacco smoke, an environmental risk factor for RA, contains several ligands of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr), also known as dioxin receptor. Ahr plays critical roles in the immune system. We previously demonstrated that Ahr in helper T-cells contributes to development of collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of RA. Other studies have shown that cigarette smoke condensate and pure Ahr ligands exacerbate RA by altering bone metabolism and inducing proinflammatory responses in fibroblast-like synoviocytes. Consistent with these findings, several Ahr antagonists such as α-naphthoflavone, resveratrol, and GNF351 reverse the effect of Ahr ligands in RA pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of Ahr function in the immune system and the potential clinical benefits of Ahr antagonism in treating RA. PMID:27186143

  14. Collagen Homeostasis and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, S Peter; Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system and its collagen rich tissue is important for ensuring architecture of skeletal muscle, energy storage in tendon and ligaments, joint surface protection, and for ensuring the transfer of muscular forces into resulting limb movement. Structure of tendon is stable and the metabolic activity is low, but mechanical loading and subsequent mechanotransduction and molecular anabolic signaling can result in some adaptation of the tendon especially during youth and adolescence. Within short time, tendon will get stiffer with training and lack of mechanical tissue loading through inactivity or immobilization of the human body will conversely result in a dramatic loss in tendon stiffness and collagen synthesis. This illustrates the importance of regular mechanical load in order to preserve the stabilizing role of the connective tissue for the overall function of the musculoskeletal system in both daily activity and exercise. Adaptive responses may vary along the tendon, and differ between mid-substance and insertional areas of the tendon. PMID:27535245

  15. Leflunomide in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kaltwasser, Joachim Peter

    2007-09-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a common unique form of inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. Its exact prevalence is unknown but 5-30% of the 2-3% of subjects of the general population affected with psoriasis are developing PsA. Typically PsA presents as an oligoarticular asymmetrical arthritis with predominant distal finger joint pattern, presence of spinal involvement enthesitis and dactylitis. There is evidence that T-cells play a key role in the immunopathology of PsA as well as Psoriasis. Leflunomide, a selective pyrimidine synthesis inhibitor with the property to inhibit T-cell activation and proliferation has been shown to improve both joint and skin symptoms in patients with PsA. Significant response rates have been observed for Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC), modified ACR20 and PASI 50 after 24 weeks of treatment with 20 mg/d Leflunomide orally in a randomised, placebo controlled multicenter trial (TOPAS Study). Leflunomide treatment also improved quality of life and showed a favourable safety profile. It is therefore concluded that Leflunomide offers an efficacious, well tolerated, safe, and relatively inexpensive therapeutic option for the treatment of actively inflamed joints and psoriatic skin lesions in patients with PsA. PMID:17854740

  16. [Arthritis and palmoplantar pustulosis].

    PubMed

    Bauduceau, B; Hanny, P; Chanudet, X; Celton, H; Doury, P; Larroque, P

    1987-01-01

    Pustulosis palmaris et plantaris may be associated with a number of articular diseases. Known to be present in Fiessinger-Leroy-Reiter syndrome and psoriasis arthropatica, this skin disease has been classified by Japanese authors as a new nosological entity: pustular osteo-arthritis. Pustulosis palmaris et plantaris seems to represent a meeting point for axial rheumatisms close to ankylozing spondylitis. PMID:3563169

  17. Lactobacillus acidophilus maintained oxidative stress from reproductive organs in collagen-induced arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Amdekar, Sarika; Singh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXTS: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induced organ damage is a well-known fact. Previous studies suggest that Lactobacillus scavenge the free radicals from liver and kidney and also protect animals from arthritis. AIMS: Comparing protective properties of Lactobacillus acidophilus in reducing oxidative stress from reproductive organs developed during collagen-induced arthritis in animal model. METHODS: Arthritis was induced in Wistar rats. Oral administration of L. acidophilus, indomethacin, and distilled water were all started on the same day. Arthritis scores were calculated for each group. Oxidative stress parameters were estimated in testis and ovary homogenates. Histopathology of ovary and testis was also performed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: L. acidophilus decreased arthritis score (P < 0.001) as well as maintained normal histology of reproductive organs. L. acidophilus maintained oxidative stress parameters from ovaries and testis (P < 0.001). These results provide strong evidence that NSAIDs increase oxidative stress in reproductive organs while L. acidophilus not only scavenges free radicals from reproductive organs but also protects rats from arthritis symptoms. PMID:27110077

  18. Collagen-Gelatin Mixtures as Wound Model, and Substrates for VEGF-Mimetic Peptide Binding and Endothelial Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tania R.; Stahl, Patrick J.; Li, Yang; Yu, S. Michael

    2015-01-01

    In humans, high level of collagen remodeling is seen during normal physiological events such as bone renewal, as well as in pathological conditions, such as arthritis, tumor growth and other chronic wounds. Our lab recently discovered that collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) is able to hybridize with denatured collagens at these collagen remodeling sites with high affinity. Here, we show that the CMP's high binding affinity to denatured collagens can be utilized to deliver angiogenic signals to scaffolds composed of heat-denatured collagens (gelatins). We first demonstrate hybridization between denatured collagens and QKCMP, a CMP with pro-angiogenic QK domain. We show that high levels of QKCMP can be immobilized to a new artificial matrix containing both fibrous type I collagen and heat denatured collagen through triple helix hybridization, and that the QKCMP is able to stimulate early angiogenic response of endothelial cells (ECs). We also show that the QKCMP can bind to excised tissues from burn injuries in cutaneous mouse model, suggesting its potential for promoting neovascularization of burn wounds. PMID:25584990

  19. Arthritis due to synovial involvement by extramedullary haematopoiesis in myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Heinicke, M H; Zarrabi, M H; Gorevic, P D

    1983-01-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with polyarthralgias, a psoriasiform rash, and severe elbow pain. Peripheral blood smear and bone marrow biopsy established a diagnosis of myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia. Biopsy of the skin lesions revealed a nonspecific dermatitis. The clinical presentation was inconsistent with psoriatic arthritis, and there was no evidence for associated gout or collagen-vascular disease. Histological examination of tissue taken at the time of synovectomy indicated elbow arthritis to be due to myeloid metaplasia involving the synovial membrane. Images PMID:6847265

  20. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type VI collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.

    1988-05-01

    Normal adult rabbit corneas were digested with 5% pepsin and their collagens extracted with acetic acid. Collagen extracts were fractionated by differential salt precipitation. The 2.5 M NaCl fraction was then redissolved with tris buffer and precipitated with sodium acetate. The precipitate contained a high-molecular-weight disulfide-bonded aggregate which, upon reduction with mercaptoethanol, was converted into three distinct polypeptides having molecular weights between 45 and 66 Kd. These physical characteristics, together with the susceptibility of these polypeptides to collagenase and their amino acid composition, identified the high molecular weight aggregate as type VI collagen. Corneas from neonate rabbits and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were organ cultured in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine to incorporate radiolabel into collagen. Tissues were digested with 0.02% pepsin and their collagens extracted with formic acid. The total radioactivity of the extracts and tissue residues was determined before the collagens were separated by SDS-polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis. Radioactive collagen polypeptides bands were then stained with Coomassie blue, processed for fluorography, and analyzed by densitometry. The results show that: (1) type VI collagen is synthesized by neonate corneas and healing adult corneas; (2) it is not readily solubilized from either corneal tissue by 0.02% pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction; and (3) the proportion of type VI collagen deposited in scar tissue is markedly lower than that found in neonate corneas.

  1. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type III collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.; Covington, H.I.; Macarak, E.J.

    1988-05-01

    Whole neonate rabbit corneas and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were incubated in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine. Radiolabeled collagen extracted from the corneas and scar tissue were analyzed by sodium dodecylsulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to determine the types and relative quantity of collagen polypeptides present and synthesized by these tissues. In addition to other collagen types, type III was found in both neonate cornea and scar tissue from adult cornea, albeit in relatively small quantities. Type III collagen in normal cornea was associated with the residue after pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction of the tissue, and the same type of collagen was extracted from scar tissue after similar treatment. Type III collagen-specific monoclonal antibody bound to developing normal corneas and healing adult tissue sections, as determined by immunofluorescence. Antibody binding was localized to the endothelium and growing Descemet's membrane in fetal and neonate corneas, and restricted to the most posterior region of the corneal scar tissue. Although monoclonal antibody to keratan sulfate, used as a marker for stromal fibroblasts, bound to most of the scar tissue, the antibody failed to bind to the posterior scar tissue positive for type III collagen. We conclude that endothelial cells from fetal and neonate rabbit cornea and endothelium-derived fibroblasts from healing wounds of adult cornea synthesize and deposit type III collagen. Moreover, this collagen appears to be incorporated into the growing Descemet's membrane of normal corneas and narrow posterior portion of the scar tissue.

  2. Anti-proliferative effects of Salacia reticulata leaves hot-water extract on interleukin-1β-activated cells derived from the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis model mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Salacia reticulata (SR) is a plant native to Sri Lanka. In ayurvedic medicine, SR bark preparations, taken orally, are considered effective in the treatment of rheumatism and diabetes. We investigated the ability of SR leaves (SRL) to inhibit in vitro the interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-activated proliferation of synoviocyte-like cells derived from rheumatoid arthritis model mice. Findings Inflammatory synovial tissues were harvested from type II collagen antibody-induced arthritic mice. From these tissues, a synoviocyte-like cell line was established and named MTS-C H7. To determine whether SRL can suppress cell proliferation and gene expression in MTS-C H7 cells, fractionation of the SRL hot-water extract was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), liquid-liquid extraction, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and protease digestion. The 50% inhibitory concentration of the SRL hot-water extract against MTS-C H7 cells proliferation was ~850 μg/mL. Treatment with a low dose (25 μg dry matter per millilitre) of the extract inhibited IL-1β-induced cell proliferation and suppressed the expression of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) genes in MTS-C H7 cells. Various polyphenolic fractions obtained from HPLC and the fractions from liquid-liquid extraction did not affect cell proliferation. Only the residual water sample from liquid-liquid extraction significantly affected cell proliferation and the expression of MMP genes. The results of SDS-PAGE and protease digestion experiment showed that low molecular weight proteins present in SRL inhibited the IL-1β-activated cell proliferation. Conclusions We surmised that the residual water fraction of the SRL extract was involved in the inhibition of IL-1β-activated cell proliferation and regulation of mRNA expression in MTS-C H7 cells. In addition, we believe that the active ingredients in the extract are low molecular weight proteins. PMID:22537486

  3. Anti-Arthritic and Analgesic Effect of NDI10218, a Standardized Extract of Terminalia chebula, on Arthritis and Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jong Bae; Jeong, Jae-Yeon; Park, Jae Young; Jun, Eun Mi; Lee, Sang-Ik; Choe, Sung Sik; Park, Do-Yang; Choi, Eun-Wook; Seen, Dong-Seung; Lim, Jong-Soon; Lee, Tae Gyu

    2012-01-01

    The fruit of Terminalia chebula Retzius has been used as a panacea in India and Southeast Asia but its biological activities have not been fully elucidated. Here we report anti-arthritic and analgesic effect of NDI10218, a standardized ethanol extract of Terminalia chebula, on collagen-induced arthritis and acetic acid-induced writhing model, respectively. Arthritis was induced in DBA/1J mice by immunizing bovine type II collagen and mice were treated with NDI10218 daily for 5 weeks after the onset of the disease. NDI10218 reduced the arthritis index and blocked the synovial hyperplasia in a dose-dependent manner. The serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β were significantly reduced in mice treated with NDI10218. Production of the inflammatory IL-17, but not immunosuppressive IL-10, was also inhibited in splenocytes isolated from NDI10218-treated arthritis mice. Administration of NDI10218 markedly decreased the number of T cell subpopulations in the regional lymph nodes of the arthritis mice. Finally, NDI10218 reduced the number of abdominal contractions in acetic acid-induced writhing model, suggesting an analgesic effect of this extract. Taken together, these results suggest that NDI10218 can be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of rheuma-toid arthritis. PMID:24116282

  4. Reactive arthritis or post-infective arthritis?

    PubMed

    Keat, Andrew

    2002-09-01

    Infective mechanisms probably underlie a wide range of inflammatory arthropathies. There appears to be a spectrum of mechanisms ranging from the frankly septic, through low-grade infection with very small numbers of microorganisms in the joint to arthritides in which no hard evidence for an infective cause exists. In the midst of the spectrum lie 'post-infective' and 'reactive' arthritides, characterized clinically, genetically and by epidemiological links with infection. Identification of bacterial components within joint material from such patients suggested that the causes of the arthritis had been found. It is now clear that many bacteria are present in inflamed joints; establishing their significance will be of crucial importance, but not easy. PMID:12406424

  5. Arterial calcification: Conscripted by collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan D.

    2016-03-01

    In atherosclerotic plaques, patterns of calcification -- which have profound implications for plaque stability and vulnerability to rupture -- are determined by the collagen's content and patterning throughout the plaque.

  6. Molecular basis for T cell response induced by altered peptide ligand of type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeoung-Eun; Cullins, David; Zalduondo, Lillian; Barnett, Stacey L; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Kleinau, Sandra; Stuart, John M; Kang, Andrew H; Myers, Linda K

    2012-06-01

    Mounting evidence from animal models has demonstrated that alterations in peptide-MHC interactions with the T cell receptor (TCR) can lead to dramatically different T cell outcomes. We have developed an altered peptide ligand of type II collagen, referred to as A9, which differentially regulates TCR signaling in murine T cells leading to suppression of arthritis in the experimental model of collagen-induced arthritis. This study delineates the T cell signaling pathway used by T cells stimulated by the A9·I-A(q) complex. We have found that T cells activated by A9 bypass the requirement for Zap-70 and CD3-ζ and signal via FcRγ and Syk. Using collagen-specific T cell hybridomas engineered to overexpress either Syk, Zap-70, TCR-FcRγ, or CD3-ζ, we demonstrate that A9·I-A(q) preferentially activates FcRγ/Syk but not CD3-ζ/Zap-70. Moreover, a genetic absence of Syk or FcRγ significantly reduces the altered peptide ligand induction of the nuclear factor GATA3. By dissecting the molecular mechanism of A9-induced T cell signaling we have defined a new alternate pathway that is dependent upon FcRγ and Syk to secrete immunoregulatory cytokines. Given the interest in using Syk inhibitors to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis, understanding this pathway may be critical for the proper application of this therapy. PMID:22511761

  7. Arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, R; Sequeira, W

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To review the presentation and clinical findings of arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa. METHOD--Medical records from the rheumatology clinics of two major teaching hospitals were reviewed for arthritis and hidradenitis suppurativa. The nine patient records fulfilling these criteria were reviewed and compared with 20 previous reports. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION--The arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa is rare and most commonly affects the peripheral joints. The axial skeleton is less frequently involved and is often asymptomatic. Images PMID:8311560

  8. [Psoriatic arthritis and etanercept].

    PubMed

    Pedraz, J; Daudén, E

    2010-05-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PA) is a chronic inflammatory condition whose symptoms generally appear after the skin symptoms. Making an early diagnosis and treatment of the disease is of vital importance because of the potential development of mutilating and deforming arthritis. Classical treatments of PA include the use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) such as methotrexate, sulfasalazine, or gold, and finally, leflunomide. Research on the pathophysiology of psoriasis and of the PA has led to the incorporation of biological treatments, specifically anti-TNF drugs. The three treatments used most in PA are etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab. Of all these, we are going to make a systematic review of the principal studies available on etanercept for the treatment of PA. PMID:20492877

  9. [Pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Hertzberger-ten Cate, R; Fiselier, T

    1991-10-01

    On basis of clinical and immunogenetic factors most children with pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis can be included in one of the subtypes: type 1 and type 2 pauciarticular JCA. Type 1 occurs in young children, mainly girls, with involvement of knees, ankles or elbows. In the majority of children antinuclear antibodies can be detected. The presence of these autoantibodies is associated with chronic anterior uveitis. Type 2 or the juvenile spondylarthropathies include morbus Bechterew, the reactive arthritides and arthritis associated with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Large joints of the lower extremities are involved, back pain is unusual at onset, but enthesitis is frequently present. There is a strong association with HLA-B27. Treatment of both subsets consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, application of intra-articular steroids, physio- and hydrotherapy and splinting. In children with a polyarticular course of type 1, or a prolonged course of type 2 disease modifying drugs are often needed. PMID:1957301

  10. [Juvenile psoriatic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shan; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xin-Ying; Liu, Dong-Ming; Liu, Xiang-Yuan

    2007-08-01

    A case of juvenile psoriatic arthritis in a 12 year-old boy was reported. The patient had a history of one and half a year of bilateral heel pain, followed by pain in the right knee and ankle and right hip joint. He developed psoriatic lesions affecting his nails and skin. He had increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) contents. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B27 was detected but serum rheumatoid factor was not in the patient. A skin biopsy revealed psoriasis and ultrasonography demonstrated synovitis in right knee and ankle. Juvenile psoriatic arthritis was diagnosed based on his physical, laboratory and skin biopsy findings. A treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and sulfasalazine produced no effect. Leflunomide in conjunction with anti-TNF biologic agents (Etanercept) was administered, followed by symptomatic improvement 2 weeks later. PMID:17706035

  11. Mechanism by which HLA-DR4 Regulates Sex-bias of Arthritis in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Marshall; Trejo, Theodore; Luthra, Harvinder; Griffiths, Marie; David, Chella S; Taneja, Veena

    2010-01-01

    HLA class II allele DRB1*0401 is associated with predisposition to Rheumatoid Arthritis in humans as well as collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Predominantly females develop arthritis in humans and DR4 transgenic mice; however the mechanism of sex-bias is still unknown. We have investigated the molecular basis by which DR4 is associated with sex-bias of arthritis. Here we show that differential antigen-specific immune mechanisms in DR4 male and female mice lead to increased susceptibility in female mice. B cells are hyperactive and present DR-restricted peptides robustly in females compared to males. Antigen-specific response showed that females produced B cell modulating cytokines like IL-13 while males produced IFNγ. Male transgenic mice have higher number of T and B regulatory cells. An exogenous supply of 17β estradiol in male mice led to enhanced expression of DR4 and antigen-specific response to DR4-restricted peptides. On the other hand, castration increased the incidence of arthritis. We propose that sex-bias in arthritis involves B cells and presentation of antigen by HLA-DR4 leading to activation of autoreactive cells and autoantibodies production in females, while regulatory B cells in males protect them from pathogenesis. The transgenic mice expressing RA susceptible haplotype simulate human RA and may be valuable to study gender differences observed in patients. PMID:20061120

  12. Adalimumab in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Salvarani, Carlo; Pipitone, Nicolò; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Chiarolanza, Ilaria; Boiardi, Luigi; Caruso, Andrea; Pazzola, Giulia; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Di Lernia, Vito; Albertini, Giuseppe

    2012-07-01

    Open prospective studies and randomized controlled trials (RCT) have shown the short-term efficacy of adalimumab (ADA) in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis. ADA effectively treated all varied musculoskeletal manifestations characteristic of PsA, including peripheral arthritis, spinal disease, enthesitis, and dactylitis. ADA significantly inhibited structural changes on radiographs, lessened disability, and improved quality of life in patients with active PsA. One study showed the efficacy of 24-week ADA therapy on bone marrow edema and erosions, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging. The clinical and radiographic efficacy of ADA demonstrated during short-term treatment was sustained during longterm treatment. ADA was generally well tolerated and its safety profile was similar to that reported in studies of ADA in rheumatoid arthritis. Overall, ADA has a favorable risk-benefit profile in PsA. The combination of ADA and cyclosporine seems to be more effective than ADA monotherapy in patients with active PsA and inadequate response to methotrexate; however, this observation must be confirmed in RCT. PMID:22751600

  13. Collagen dynamics of partial small bowel obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Stromberg, B.V.; Klein, L.

    1984-08-01

    The response of intestinal collagen to obstruction and stress was studied in the rat. Partial small bowel obstructions were created. Preobstruction collagen was measured by injection of tritium labeled proline. New collagen formation after obstruction occurred was followed by injection of carbon-14 labeled proline. At 3 weeks, collagen fractions were identified. Throughout the study, preexisting preobstruction intestinal collagen was metabolically stable with no breakdown or remodeling demonstrable. New collagen formation was rapid and occurred to the largest degree close to the obstruction.

  14. Type I collagen degradation does not diminish with RA disease duration

    PubMed Central

    Hakala, M; Aho, K; Aman, S; Luukkainen, R; Kauppi, M; Risteli, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the relation between type I collagen degradation and the duration of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—The serum concentrations of cross linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) measured earlier in a community based series (90 patients) and a hospital based series (59 patients) were re-evaluated with reference to the duration of RA.
RESULTS—The serum ICTP showed a positive correlation with the duration of the disease in the hospital based series (rs=0.40, p<0.01) but not in the community based one (rs=0.18, p=0.10).
CONCLUSIONS—Type I collagen degradation predominantly reflecting pathological bone destruction does not seem to diminish in longlasting RA.

 PMID:11247878

  15. Equol suppresses inflammatory response and bone erosion due to rheumatoid arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, I-Chian; Yamashita, Shuya; Murata, Motoki; Kumazoe, Motofumi; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and systemic autoimmune inflammatory disease. Typical pathological findings of RA include persistent synovitis and bone degradation in the peripheral joints. Equol, a metabolite of the major soybean isoflavone daidzein, shows superior bioactivity than other isoflavones. We investigated the effects of equol administration on inflammatory response and bone erosion in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The severity of arthritis symptoms was significantly low in the equol-administered CIA mice. In addition, equol administration improved the CIA-induced bone mineral density decline. In the inflamed area of CIA mice, equol administration suppressed the expression of interleukin-6 and its receptor. Furthermore, equol reduced the expression of genes associated with bone formation inhibition, osteoclast and immature osteoblast specificity and cartilage destruction. These results suggest that equol suppresses RA development and RA-induced bone erosion by regulating inflammation and bone metabolism. PMID:27142742

  16. Type I Collagen and Collagen Mimetics as Angiogenesis Promoting Superpolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Twardowski, T.; Fertala, A.; Orgel, J.P.R.O.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2008-07-18

    Angiogenesis, the development of blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, is a key component of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Angiogenesis also drives pathologies such as tumor growth and metastasis, and hemangioma development in newborns. On the other hand, promotion of angiogenesis is needed in tissues with vascular insufficiencies, and in bioengineering, to endow tissue substitutes with appropriate microvasculatures. Therefore, much research has focused on defining mechanisms of angiogenesis, and identifying pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules. Type I collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, potently stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to its angiogenic activity appears to be ligation and possibly clustering of endothelial cell (EC) surface {alpha}1{beta}1/{alpha}2{beta}1 integrin receptors by the GFPGER502-507 sequence of the collagen fibril. However, additional aspects of collagen structure and function that may modulate its angiogenic properties are discussed. Moreover, type I collagen and fibrin, another angiogenic polymer, share several structural features. These observations suggest strategies for creating 'angiogenic superpolymers', including: modifying type I collagen to influence its biological half-life, immunogenicity, and integrin binding capacity; genetically engineering fibrillar collagens to include additional integrin binding sites or angiogenic determinants, and remove unnecessary or deleterious sequences without compromising fibril integrity; and exploring the suitability of poly(ortho ester), PEG-lysine copolymer, tubulin, and cholesteric cuticle as collagen mimetics, and suggesting means of modifying them to display ideal angiogenic properties. The collagenous and collagen mimetic angiogenic superpolymers described here may someday prove useful for many applications in tissue engineering and human medicine.

  17. Subchondral pseudocysts in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rennell, C; Mainzer, F; Multz, C V; Genant, H K

    1977-12-01

    Subchondral cyst formation (geode) is a not uncommon manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis which may at times impede correct radiologic interpretation. Four patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated striking subarticular cystic erosive disease are described. These cases emphasize the nature and appearance of this interesting finding. PMID:413361

  18. IL-33 exacerbates antigen-induced arthritis by activating mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Damo; Jiang, Hui-Rong; Kewin, Peter; Li, Yubin; Mu, Rong; Fraser, Alasdair R.; Pitman, Nick; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; McKenzie, Andrew N. J.; McInnes, Iain B.; Liew, Foo Y.

    2008-01-01

    IL-33, a cytokine of the IL-1 family, is closely associated with type II T cell responses. Here, we report an unexpected proinflammatory role of IL-33 in inflammatory arthritis. IL-33 was expressed in synovial fibroblasts from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Expression was markedly elevated in vitro by inflammatory cytokines. Mice lacking ST2, the IL-33 receptor α-chain, developed attenuated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and reduced ex vivo collagen-specific induction of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-17, TNFα, and IFNγ), and antibody production. Conversely, treatment of wild-type (WT) but not ST2−/− mice with IL-33 exacerbated CIA and elevated production of both proinflammatory cytokines and anti-collagen antibodies. Mast cells expressed high levels of ST2 and responded directly to IL-33 to produce a spectrum of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in vitro. In vivo, IL-33 treatment exacerbated CIA in ST2−/− mice engrafted with mast cells from WT but not from ST2−/− mice. Disease exacerbation was accompanied by elevated expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Our results demonstrate that IL-33 is a critical proinflammatory cytokine for inflammatory joint disease that integrates fibroblast activation with downstream immune activation mainly via an IL-33-driven, mast-cell-dependent pathway. Thus, this IL-1 superfamily member represents a therapeutic target for RA. PMID:18667700

  19. The Pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis is Associated with Milk or Egg Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianjie; Yan, Hao; Chen, He; Ji, Qiongmei; Huang, Shengguang; Yang, Pingchang; Liu, Zhigang; Yang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a very complicated autoimmune disease with apparent synovial hyperplasia and cartilage and bone destruction. Aims: In the present study, we aimed to determine whether the pathogenesis of RA correlates with food allergy and which allergen(s) are relevant. Materials and Methods: We used type-II collagen (CII) to induce arthritis (collagen-induced arthritis, CIA) model in Wistar rats, and the development of arthritis was evaluated accordingly by scoring system. Proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and concentrations of circulating immune complexes (CICs) were analyzed by C1q solid phase method. Furthermore, food-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels were determined in the CIA model. Results: In the CIA model, we found that levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and IL-17, as well as CICs, were elevated significantly. Moreover, concentrations of milk- or egg-specific IgG and IgE were enhanced strikingly in CIA rats. Conclusion: The results suggest that pathogenesis of RA correlates closely to increased egg- or milk-specific antibodies. PMID:27011946

  20. Hyaluronan nanoparticles bearing γ-secretase inhibitor: in vivo therapeutic effects on rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Heo, Roun; Park, Jong-Sung; Jang, Hye Jin; Kim, Seol-Hee; Shin, Jung Min; Suh, Yung Doug; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Park, Jae Hyung

    2014-10-28

    γ-Secretase inhibitors which prevent Notch activation are emerging as potent therapeutics for various inflammatory diseases, including ischemic stroke and rheumatoid arthritis. However, their indiscriminate distribution in the body causes serious side effects after systemic administration, since Notch proteins are ubiquitous receptors that play an important role in cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. In this study, hyaluronan nanoparticles (HA-NPs) bearing a γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) were prepared as potential therapeutics for rheumatoid arthritis. In vivo biodistribution of the DAPT-loaded HA-NPs (DNPs), labeled with near-infrared dye, were observed using a non-invasive optical imaging system after systemic administration to a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. The results demonstrated that DNPs were effectively accumulated at the inflamed joint of the CIA mice. From the in vivo therapeutic efficacy tests, DNPs (1mg DAPT/kg) significantly attenuated the severity of RA induction compared to DAPT alone (2mg/kg), which was judged from clinical scores, tissue damage, and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, DNPs dramatically reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and IL-6, -12, -17) and collagen-specific auto-antibodies (IgG1 and IgG2a) in the serum of the CIA mice. These results suggest that DNPs have potential as therapeutics for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25109660

  1. [Novel immunodiagnostics for inflammatory arthritis].

    PubMed

    Wahle, M; Kling, E

    2016-05-01

    Immunodiagnostics play an important role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis but the test results must be interpreted with respect to the clinical context. The detection of antibodies against citrullinated proteins has significantly improved the immunodiagnostics of arthritis, whereas the importance of testing for rheumatoid factor has decreased due to the low specificity. Antibodies against carbamylated or oxidized proteins will expand the immunodiagnostics of arthritis (especially rheumatoid arthritis) in the future. In contrast, the determination of cytokine concentrations in plasma or synovial fluid plays a subordinate role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis. Indirect immunofluorescence continues to be the gold standard in the detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and in the case of positive results further testing for antigen specificity should be carried out. The presence of ANA is not necessarily associated with autoimmune diseases. An example of a non-pathogenic ANA is anti-DFS70 antibodies. PMID:27142378

  2. Neuropeptides in experimental and degenerative arthritis.

    PubMed

    Niissalo, S; Hukkanen, M; Imai, S; Törnwall, J; Konttinen, Y T

    2002-06-01

    Classical symptoms of both inflammatory and degenerative arthritides may contribute to neurogenic responses like wheal, flare, edema, and pain. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease with an immunogenetic background. Neurogenic inflammation has been considered to play an essential role in RA, in part because of the symmetrical involvement (cross-spinal reflexes) and the predominant involvement of the most heavily innervated small joints of the hands and the feet (highly represented in the hominiculus). In contrast, osteoarthritis (OA) is considered to arise as a result of degeneration of the hyaline articular cartilage, which secondarily results in local inflammation and pain. However, it is possible that the age-related and predominant (compared to nociceptive nerves) degeneration of the proprioceptive, kinesthetic and vasoregulatory nerves can represent the primary pathogenic events. This leads to progressive damage of tissue with extremely poor capacity for self-regeneration. Inflammation, be it primary/autoimmune or secondary/degenerative, leads to peripheral sensitization and stimulation, which may further lead to central sensitization, neurogenic amplification of the inflammatory responses and activation of the neuro-endocrine axis. Neuropeptides serve as messengers, which modulate and mediate the actions in these cascades. Accordingly, many neuropeptides have been used successfully as experimental treatments, most recently VIP, which effectively controlled collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Therefore, it can safely be concluded that better treatment/control of disease activity and pain can be achieved by blocking the cascade leading to initiation and/or amplification of inflammatory process combined with effects on central nociceptive and neuroendocrine responses. PMID:12114296

  3. Suppression of Experimental Arthritis and Associated Bone Loss by a Tissue-Selective Estrogen Complex.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Annica; Bernardi, Angelina I; Nurkkala-Karlsson, Merja; Stubelius, Alexandra; Grahnemo, Louise; Ohlsson, Claes; Carlsten, Hans; Islander, Ulrika

    2016-03-01

    In addition to the systemic inflammation present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), decreased estradiol levels in postmenopausal RA patients further accelerate bone loss in these patients. The tissue-selective estrogen complex (TSEC), an estrogen combined with a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is a new hormone replacement therapy option. The first approved TSEC, containing conjugated estrogens and bazedoxifene (BZA), reduces menopausal symptoms and prevents osteoporosis with an improved safety profile compared with conventional hormone replacement therapy. Previous studies have shown that estrogens strongly inhibit experimental arthritis whereas BZA is mildly suppressive. In this study the antiarthritic potential of combined BZA and estradiol is explored for the first time. Female ovariectomized DBA/1 mice were subjected to collagen-induced arthritis, an experimental postmenopausal RA model, and treated with BZA, 17β-estradiol (E2), combined BZA and E2 (BZA/E2), or vehicle. BZA/E2 suppressed arthritis severity and frequency, synovitis, and joint destruction, equally efficient as E2 alone. Unwanted estrogenic proliferative effects on the endometrium were blocked by the addition of BZA, determined by collecting uterine weights. Bone mineral density was measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and all treatments protected collagen-induced arthritis mice from both trabecular and cortical bone loss. Moreover, BZA/E2, but not E2 alone, inhibited preosteoclast formation and reduced serum anticollagen type II antibodies. In conclusion, a TSEC, herein combined BZA/E2, suppresses experimental arthritis and prevents associated bone loss as efficiently as E2 alone but with minimal uterine effects, highlighting the need for clinical trials that evaluate the addition of a TSEC to conventional postmenopausal RA treatment. PMID:26745543

  4. Preclinical characterisation of the GM-CSF receptor as a therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Greven, D E A; Cohen, E S; Gerlag, D M; Campbell, J; Woods, J; Davis, N; van Nieuwenhuijze, A; Lewis, A; Heasmen, S; McCourt, M; Corkill, D; Dodd, A; Elvin, J; Statache, G; Wicks, I P; Anderson, I K; Nash, A; Sleeman, M A; Tak, P P

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous work has suggested that the granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)–GM-CSF receptor α axis (GM-CSFRα) may provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, we investigated the cellular expression of GM-CSFRα in RA synovial tissue and investigated the effects of anti-GM-CSFRα antibody treatment in vitro and in vivo in a preclinical model of RA. Methods We compared GM-CSFRα expression on macrophages positive for CD68 or CD163 on synovial biopsy samples from patients with RA or psoriatic arthritis (PsA) to disease controls. In addition, we studied the effects of CAM-3003, an anti-GM-CSFR antibody in a collagen induced arthritis model of RA in DBA/1 mice. The pharmacokinetic profile of CAM-3003 was studied in naïve CD1(ICR) mice (see online supplement) and used to interpret the results of the pharmacodynamic studies in BALB/c mice. Results GM-CSFRα was expressed by CD68 positive and CD163 positive macrophages in the synovium, and there was a significant increase in GM-CSFRα positive cells in patients in patients with RA as well as patients with PsA compared with patients with osteoarthritis and healthy controls. In the collagen induced arthritis model there was a dose dependent reduction of clinical arthritis scores and the number of F4/80 positive macrophages in the inflamed synovium after CAM-3003 treatment. In BALB/c mice CAM-3003 inhibited recombinant GM-CSF mediated margination of peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils. Conclusions The findings support the ongoing development of therapies aimed at interfering with GM-CSF or its receptor in various forms of arthritis, such as RA and PsA. PMID:24936585

  5. Psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cantini, Fabrizio; Niccoli, Laura; Nannini, Carlotta; Kaloudi, Olga; Bertoni, Michele; Cassarà, Emanuele

    2010-10-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory rheumatic disorder of unknown etiology occurring in patients with psoriasis. The Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis study group has recently developed a validated set of classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis with a sensitivity of 91.4% and a specificity of 98.7%. Three main clinical patterns have been identified: oligoarticular (≤ 4 involved joints) or polyarticular (≥ 5 involved joints) peripheral disease and axial disease with or without associated peripheral arthritis. In this context distal interphalangeal arthritis and arthritis mutilans may occur. According to other reports, also in our centre, asymmetric oligoarthritis is the most frequent pattern at onset. Axial disease has been estimated between 5% and 36% of patients. It is characterized by an irregular involvement of the axial skeleton with a predilection for the cervical spine. Recurrent episodes of enthesitis and dactylitis represent a hallmark of psoriatic arthritis. In around 20% of cases distal extremity swelling with pitting edema of the hands or feet is observed. Unilateral acute iridocyclitis, usually recurrent in alternate fashion, is the most frequent extra-articular manifestation, and accelerated atherosclerosis is the prominent comorbidity. The clinical course of peripheral and axial psoriatic arthritis is usually less severe than rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, respectively. Local corticosteroid injections and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are recommended in milder forms. Sulphasalazine and methotrexate are effective in peripheral psoriatic arthritis. Recent studies have provided evidence on the efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α drugs to control symptoms and to slow or arrest radiological disease progression. PMID:21199465

  6. Could Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Resolve After Periodontitis Treatment Only?

    PubMed Central

    Salemi, Simonetta; Biondo, Michela I.; Fiorentino, Chiara; Argento, Giuseppe; Paolantonio, Michele; Di Murro, Carlo; Malagnino, Vito A.; Canzoni, Marco; Diamanti, Andrea Picchianti; D’Amelio, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an immune-mediated polyarthritis; currently no pathogenic agent has been identified as a disease trigger. A patient with RA, presumably caused by periodontal infection, whose remission has been observed after periodontitis treatment in absence of specific RA therapy, is reported here for the first time, to our knowledge. A 61-year-old male patient presented migrant arthritis associated with antibodies against citrullinated protein antigens positivity. The clinical features allowed to make RA diagnosis according to the 2010 European League against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology RA classification criteria. X-ray of the second upper molar showed chronic apical periodontitis. After its treatment, arthritis remission has been observed in the absence of specific RA therapy. It has been suggested that periodontitis may have a trigger role in RA pathogenesis. This could be explained by the enzymatic action of Porphyromonas gingivalis, probably leading to break tolerance to collagen. The identification and subsequent treatment of periodontitis should therefore be considered pivotal in RA prophylaxis and management. PMID:25501069

  7. Collagen fibril formation during development

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmajer, R.; Perlish, J.S.; Timpl, R.; Olsen, B.R.

    1987-05-01

    Studies with embryonic skin and bone suggested that the aminopropeptide (AP) and carboxylpropeptide (CP) of type I pro-callagen (pro-col) play a role in fibril formation. Chick leg metatarsal tendons were studied by electron microscopy. AP and CP of type I pro-col were purified from chick leg tendons; antibodies developed in rabbits and purity tested by radioimmunoassays. Antibodies were used for immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunoblotting (IB). The peritendineum, consisting of thin 20-30 nm fibrils, revealed the AP of type I and type III procol. In the tendon area, collagen fibrils were arranged within small compartments and were of uniform diameter at 10d, 14d and 18d. However, beyond 21d, there was confluency of the compartments and a wide range of fibril diameters. IFM revealed fine streaks of collagen, staining with the AP of type I throughout the tendon. The CP was mainly intracellular with only a small amount present in the extracellular space. IB revealed procollagen, pN-collagen (AP+collagen) and pC-collagen, (CP+collagen) at all stages of development. Ratios of pN/pC collagen, determined by spectrophotometric scanning of autoradiographs, correlated well with the distribution of fibril diameter. This study suggests the hypothesis that AP initiates fibrillogenesis while CP may regulate additional fibril growth.

  8. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides. PMID:26970491

  9. [Early rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Babić-Naglić, Durdica

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is chronic joint disease which if untreated leads to permanent structural damage and disability. Early diagnosis and therapy are the main requests for good clinical practice. Early diagnosis tools include specific clinical assesment, serological, immunogenetic and radiological evaluation. Disease activity score is cornerstone in clinical assesment, rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) are very specific serological parameters. The shared epitope containing HLA-DRB1* alleles represent the most significant genetic risk for RA. Magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging are very sensitive methods in early phase of disease. PMID:19024271

  10. Laser in situ keratomileusis in patients with collagen vascular disease: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Rachel G; Moshirfar, Majid; Edmonds, Jason N; Christiansen, Steven M; Behunin, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the current United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations regarding laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery in patients with collagen vascular diseases (CVD) and assess whether these patients make appropriate candidates for laser vision correction, and offer treatment recommendations based on identified clinical data. Methods A literature search was conducted using PubMed, Medline, and Ovid to identify all existing studies of LASIK in patients with collagen vascular diseases. The search was conducted without date limitations. Keywords used for the search included MeSH terms: laser in situ keratomileusis, LASIK, refractive surgery, ocular surgery, and cataract surgery connected by “and” with the following MeSH and natural-language terms: collagen vascular disease, rheumatic disease, systemic disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren’s syndrome, seronegative spondyloarthropathy, HLA B27, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis. The abstracts for all studies meeting initial search criteria were reviewed; relevant studies were included. No prospective studies were found; however, four retrospective case studies were identified that examined LASIK surgery in patients with CVD. Several case reports were also identified in similar fashion. Results The FDA considers CVD a relative contraindication to LASIK surgery, due largely to the ocular complications associated with disease in the CVD spectrum. However, recent studies of LASIK in patients with CVD indicate LASIK may be safe for patients with very well-controlled systemic disease, minimal ocular manifestations, and no clinical signs or history of dry-eye symptoms. Conclusion LASIK surgery may be safe in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus and the seronegative spondyloarthropathies if stringent preoperative criteria are met. Evidence suggests patients with Sjögren’s syndrome are not

  11. Electrostatic effects in collagen fibrillization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2014-03-01

    Using light scattering and AFM techniques, we have measured the kinetics of fibrillization of collagen (pertinent to the vitreous of human eye) as a function of pH and ionic strength. At higher and lower pH, collagen triple-peptides remain stable in solution without fibrillization. At neutral pH, the fibrillization occurs and its growth kinetics is slowed upon either an increase in ionic strength or a decrease in temperature. We present a model, based on polymer crystallization theory, to describe the observed electrostatic nature of collagen assembly.

  12. Sulfonamide inhibitors of α2β1 integrin reveal the essential role of collagen receptors in in vivo models of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nissinen, Liisa; Ojala, Marika; Langen, Barbara; Dost, Rita; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Käpylä, Jarmo; Marjamäki, Anne; Heino, Jyrki

    2015-06-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of α2β1 integrin, a major cellular collagen receptor, have been reported to inhibit platelet function, kidney injury, and angiogenesis. Since α2β1 integrin is abundantly expressed on various inflammation-associated cells, we tested whether recently developed α2β1 blocking sulfonamides have anti-inflammatory properties. Integrin α2β1 inhibitors were shown to reduce the signs of inflammation in arachidonic acid-induced ear edema, PAF stimulated air pouch, ovalbumin-induced skin hypersensitivity, adjuvant arthritis, and collagen-induced arthritis. Thus, these sulfonamides are potential drugs for acute and allergic inflammation, hypersensitivity, and arthritis. One sulfonamide with potent anti-inflammatory activity has previously been reported to be selective for activated integrins, but not to inhibit platelet function. Thus, the experiments also revealed fundamental differences in the action of nonactivated and activated α2β1 integrins in inflammation when compared to thrombosis. PMID:26171226

  13. Sulfonamide inhibitors of α2β1 integrin reveal the essential role of collagen receptors in in vivo models of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nissinen, Liisa; Ojala, Marika; Langen, Barbara; Dost, Rita; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Käpylä, Jarmo; Marjamäki, Anne; Heino, Jyrki

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of α2β1 integrin, a major cellular collagen receptor, have been reported to inhibit platelet function, kidney injury, and angiogenesis. Since α2β1 integrin is abundantly expressed on various inflammation-associated cells, we tested whether recently developed α2β1 blocking sulfonamides have anti-inflammatory properties. Integrin α2β1 inhibitors were shown to reduce the signs of inflammation in arachidonic acid-induced ear edema, PAF stimulated air pouch, ovalbumin-induced skin hypersensitivity, adjuvant arthritis, and collagen-induced arthritis. Thus, these sulfonamides are potential drugs for acute and allergic inflammation, hypersensitivity, and arthritis. One sulfonamide with potent anti-inflammatory activity has previously been reported to be selective for activated integrins, but not to inhibit platelet function. Thus, the experiments also revealed fundamental differences in the action of nonactivated and activated α2β1 integrins in inflammation when compared to thrombosis. PMID:26171226

  14. Arthritis, a complex connective and synovial joint destructive autoimmune disease: animal models of arthritis with varied etiopathology and their significance.

    PubMed

    Naik, S R; Wala, S M

    2014-01-01

    Animal models play a vital role in simplifying the complexity of pathogenesis and understanding the indefinable processes and diverse mechanisms involved in the progression of disease, and in providing new knowledge that may facilitate the drug development program. Selection of the animal models has to be carefully done, so that there is morphologic similarity to human arthritic conditions that may predict as well as augment the effective screening of novel antiarthritic agents. The review describes exclusively animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). The development of RA has been vividly described using a wide variety of animal models with diverse insults (viz. collagen, Freund's adjuvant, proteoglycan, pristane, avridine, formaldehyde, etc.) that are able to simulate/trigger the cellular, biochemical, immunological, and histologic alterations, which perhaps mimic, to a great extent, the pathologic conditions of human RA. Similarly, numerous methods of inducing animal models with OA have also been described (such as spontaneous, surgical, chemical, and physical methods including genetically manipulated animals) which may give an insight into the events of alteration in connective tissues and their metabolism (synovial membrane/tissues along with cartilage) and bone erosion. The development of such arthritic animal models may throw light for better understanding of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of human arthritis and give new impetus for the drug development program on arthritis, a crippling disease. PMID:25121375

  15. Anti-GD(2) with an FC point mutation reduces complement fixation and decreases antibody-induced allodynia.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Linda S; Otto, Mario; Baldwin, William M; Vail, Emily; Gillies, Stephen D; Handgretinger, Rupert; Barfield, Raymond C; Ming Yu, Hui; Yu, Alice L

    2010-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against GD(2) ganglioside, such as ch14.18, the human-mouse chimeric antibody, have been shown to be effective for the treatment of neuroblastoma. However, treatment is associated with generalized, relatively opiate-resistant pain. We investigated if a point mutation in ch14.18 antibody (hu14.18K332A) to limit complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) would ameliorate the pain behavior, while preserving antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro, CDC and ADCC were measured using europium-TDA assay. In vivo, allodynia was evaluated by measuring thresholds to von Frey filaments applied to the hindpaws after injection of either ch14.18 or hu14.18K332 into wild type rats or rats with deficient complement factor 6. Other rats were pretreated with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist and tested following ch14.18 injection. The mutation reduces the antibody's ability to activate complement, while maintaining its ADCC capabilities. Injection of hu14.18K322 (1 or 3mg/kg) produced faster resolving allodynia than that engendered by ch14.18 (1mg/kg). Injection of ch14.18 (1mg/kg) into rats with C6 complement deficiency further reduced antibody-induced allodynia, while pre-treatment with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist completely abolished ch14.18-induced allodynia. These findings showed that mutant hu14.18 K322 elicited less allodynia than ch14.18 and that ch14.18-elicited allodynia is due to activation of the complement cascade: in part, to formation of membrane attack complex, but more importantly to release of complement factor C5a. Development of immunotherapeutic agents with decreased complement-dependent lysis while maintaining cellular cytotoxicity may offer treatment options with reduced adverse side effects, thereby allowing dose escalation of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:20171010

  16. Mapping of epitopes recognized by antibodies induced by immunization of mice with PspA and PspC.

    PubMed

    Vadesilho, Cintia F M; Ferreira, Daniela M; Gordon, Stephen B; Briles, David E; Moreno, Adriana T; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Ho, Paulo L; Miyaji, Eliane N

    2014-07-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) and pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) are important candidates for an alternative vaccine against pneumococcal infections. Since these antigens show variability, the use of variants that do not afford broad protection may lead to the selection of vaccine escape bacteria. Epitopes capable of inducing antibodies with broad cross-reactivities should thus be the preferred antigens. In this work, experiments using peptide arrays show that most linear epitopes recognized by antibodies induced in mice against different PspAs were located at the initial 44 amino acids of the mature protein and that antibodies against these linear epitopes did not confer protection against a lethal challenge. Conversely, linear epitopes recognized by antibodies to PspC included the consensus sequences involved in the interaction with human factor H and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). Since linear epitopes of PspA were not protective, larger overlapping fragments containing 100 amino acids of PspA of strain Rx1 were constructed (fragments 1 to 7, numbered from the N terminus) to permit the mapping of antibodies with conformational epitopes not represented in the peptide arrays. Antibodies from mice immunized with fragments 1, 2, 4, and 5 were capable of binding onto the surface of pneumococci and mediating protection against a lethal challenge. The fact that immunization of mice with 100-amino-acid fragments located at the more conserved N-terminal region of PspA (fragments 1 and 2) induced protection against a pneumococcal challenge indicates that the induction of antibodies against conformational epitopes present at this region may be important in strategies for inducing broad protection against pneumococci. PMID:24807052

  17. Nature designs tough collagen: Explaining the nanostructure of collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Buehler, Markus J.

    2006-01-01

    Collagen is a protein material with superior mechanical properties. It consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of ultra-long tropocollagen (TC) molecules. Theoretical and molecular modeling suggests that this natural design of collagen fibrils maximizes the strength and provides large energy dissipation during deformation, thus creating a tough and robust material. We find that the mechanics of collagen fibrils can be understood quantitatively in terms of two critical molecular length scales χS and χR that characterize when (i) deformation changes from homogeneous intermolecular shear to propagation of slip pulses and when (ii) covalent bonds within TC molecules begin to fracture, leading to brittle-like failure. The ratio χS/χR indicates which mechanism dominates deformation. Our modeling rigorously links the chemical properties of individual TC molecules to the macroscopic mechanical response of fibrils. The results help to explain why collagen fibers found in nature consist of TC molecules with lengths in the proximity of 300 nm and advance the understanding how collagen diseases that change intermolecular adhesion properties influence mechanical properties. PMID:16895989

  18. Nonlinear microscopy of collagen fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, M.; Pena, A.-M.; Hernest, M.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Fabre, A.; Marchal-Somme, J.; Crestani, B.; Débarre, D.; Martin, J.-L.; Beaurepaire, E.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2007-02-01

    We used intrinsic Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) by fibrillar collagen to visualize the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibrosis at the micrometer scale using laser scanning nonlinear microscopy. We showed that SHG signals are highly specific to fibrillar collagen and provide a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in tissues. Moreover, recording simultaneously other nonlinear optical signals in a multimodal setup, we visualized the tissue morphology using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) signals from endogenous chromophores such as NADH or elastin. We then compared different methods to determine accurate indexes of collagen fibrosis using nonlinear microscopy, given that most collagen fibrils are smaller than the microscope resolution and that second harmonic generation is a coherent process. In order to define a robust method to process our three-dimensional images, we either calculated the fraction of the images occupied by a significant SHG signal, or averaged SHG signal intensities. We showed that these scores provide an estimation of the extension of renal and pulmonary fibrosis in murine models, and that they clearly sort out the fibrotic mice.

  19. Human collagen produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2014-01-01

    Consequential to its essential role as a mechanical support and affinity regulator in extracellular matrices, collagen constitutes a highly sought after scaffolding material for regeneration and healing applications. However, substantiated concerns have been raised with regard to quality and safety of animal tissue-extracted collagen, particularly in relation to its immunogenicity, risk of disease transmission and overall quality and consistency. In parallel, contamination with undesirable cellular factors can significantly impair its bioactivity, vis-a-vis its impact on cell recruitment, proliferation and differentiation. High-scale production of recombinant human collagen Type I (rhCOL1) in the tobacco plant provides a source of an homogenic, heterotrimeric, thermally stable “virgin” collagen which self assembles to fine homogenous fibrils displaying intact binding sites and has been applied to form numerous functional scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In addition, rhCOL1 can form liquid crystal structures, yielding a well-organized and mechanically strong membrane, two properties indispensable to extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicry. Overall, the shortcomings of animal- and cadaver-derived collagens arising from their source diversity and recycled nature are fully overcome in the plant setting, constituting a collagen source ideal for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23941988

  20. Characterisations of collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, C. S.; Popa, C. L.; Petre, C. C.; Jiga, G.; Trusca, R.; Predoi, D.

    2016-05-01

    The XRD analysis were performed to confirm the formation of hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The molecular interaction in collagen-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites was highlighted by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The SEM showed a nanostructure of collagen-silverhydroxyapatite nanocomposites composed of nano needle-like particles in a veil with collagen texture. The presence of vibrational groups characteristics to the hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite (AgHApColl) nanocomposites was investigated by FTIR.

  1. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Paolo, Julie A; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H; Bravo, Brandon J; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R; DeForge, Laura E; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L; Giannetti, Anthony M; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E; Lee, Wyne P; Maciejewski, Patricia M; Mitchell, Scott A; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L; Whitney, J Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S

    2011-08-29

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor–dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes FcγRIII-induced TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and FcγR-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell– or myeloid cell–driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Paolo, Julie A.; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H.; Bravo, Brandon J.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R.; DeForge, Laura E.; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L.; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Wyne P.; Maciejewski, Patricia M.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L.; Whitney, J. Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B.; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S.

    2011-09-20

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor-dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes Fc{gamma}RIII-induced TNF{alpha}, IL-1{beta} and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and Fc{gamma}R-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell- or myeloid cell-driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Salidroside ameliorates arthritis-induced brain cognition deficits by regulating Rho/ROCK/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingpeng; Chen, Tong; Chang, Xiayun; Zhou, Rui; Luo, Fen; Liu, Jingyan; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Yue; Yang, Ying; Long, Hongyan; Liu, Yu; Yan, Tianhua; Ma, Chunhua

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of cognitive impairment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients was increasingly serious nowadays. The purpose of the current study was to explore whether salidroside (Sal) could alleviate arthritis-induced cognition deficits and examine the relationship between the impairment and Rho/ROCK/NF-κB pathway. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was established by the injection of chicken type II collagen (CII), complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). Arthritic lesions of CIA rats were assessed by arthritis index score, swelling of paws and histological analysis. Cognitive deficits symptoms of CIA rats were monitored through Morris water maze test. The contents of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in hippocampus and serum were significantly reduced with salidroside (20 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg) treatment compared with those in the CIA group. In parallel, we demonstrated that the expressions of RhoA, ROCK1, ROCK2, p-NF-κBp65, p-IκBα, p-IKKα and p-IKKβ were enhanced accompanying the investigation arthritis-induced cognition deficits, which were remarkably down-regulated by salidroside and confirmed by the results obtained from western blot and immunohistochemistry. LC-MS/MS results ascertained that Sal could enter into the blood and brain tissues to exhibit the protective effect on arthritis-induced cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, it was assumed that Sal might be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat arthritis-induced brain cognition deficits through the regulation of Rho/ROCK/NF-κB signaling. PMID:26690894

  4. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your overall health and sense of well-being. Exercise keeps your muscles strong and increases your range ... Water exercises may be the best exercise for your arthritis. Swimming laps, water aerobics, or even just walking in ...

  5. MedlinePlus: Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... an Expert For You Women Patient Handouts Summary Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes itchy or ... other parts of your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and ...

  6. Follistatin-like protein 1 is a critical mediator of experimental Lyme arthritis and the humoral response to Borrelia burgdorferi infection

    PubMed Central

    Campfield, Brian T.; Nolder, Christi L.; Marinov, Anthony; Bushnell, Daniel; Davis, Amy; Spychala, Caressa; Hirsch, Raphael; Nowalk, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Follistatin-like protein 1 (FSTL-1) has recently been described as a critical mediator of CIA and a marker of disease activity. Lyme arthritis, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, shares similarities with autoimmune arthritis and the experimental murine model collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Because FSTL-1 is important in CIA and autoimmune arthritides, and Lyme arthritis shares similarities with CIA, we hypothesized that FSTL-1 may be an important mediator of Lyme arthritis. We demonstrate for the first time that FSTL-1 is induced by B. burgdorferi infection and is required for the development of Lyme arthritis in a murine model, utilizing a gene insertion to generate FSTL-1 hypomorphic mice. Using qPCR and qRT-PCR, we found that despite similar early infectious burden, FSTL-1 hypomorphic mice have improved spirochetal clearance in the face of attenuated arthritis and inflammatory cytokine production. Further, FSTL-1 mediates pathogen-specific antibody production and antigen recognition when assessed by ELISA and one- and two-dimensional immunoblotting. This study is the first to describe a role for FSTL-1 in the development of Lyme arthritis and anti-Borrelia response, and the first to demonstrate a role for FSTL-1 in response to infection, highlighting the potential for FSTL-1 as a target in the treatment of B. burgdorferi infection. PMID:24768929

  7. Leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    2000-07-01

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are given to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to prevent synovitis, slow destruction of articular cartilage and bone, preserve function and control systemic manifestations of the disease. Recognition that irreversible joint damage often occurs early in RA has led to much prompter use of DMARDs, with sulfasalazine or methotrexate commonly considered the treatment of first choice. Leflunomide (Arava-Aventis) is a new DMARD, licensed for the treatment of adults with active RA. The manufacturer claims that leflunomide has "comparable efficacy to methotrexate and sulphasalazine", with a "faster onset of action", and an "acceptable tolerability profile". Here, we consider the place of leflunomide in the management of patients with RA. PMID:11027115

  8. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kathleen; Yang, So Min; Kim, Seong Heon; Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper. PMID:25479074

  9. Physiotherapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  10. [Rheumatoid arthritis and malignancy].

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohiro; Dobashi, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with excess mortality. Especially, malignancy is a major cause of mortality. According to previous reports, the overall incidence of malignancies in RA patients has been reported to be comparable or slightly higher than that in general population. The increased incidence of malignant lymphoma and lung cancer has been reported to be consistent in most studies. The use of some csDMARD was also reported as risk factors for malignancy. Recently, MTX associated lymphoproliferative disorder(MTX-LPD) is one of the important complications in RA treatment. We revealed the mean MTX dose was demonstrated to be an independent risk factor regarding MTX-LPD onset in RA patients. This data suggest that the treatment with higher MTX dose promotes LPD onset in Japanese RA patients. PMID:27311195

  11. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  12. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Krupa H; Karjodkar, Freny R; Sansare, Kaustubh; Patil, Darshana

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential. PMID:24808703

  13. Neo-Epitopes—Fragments of Cartilage and Connective Tissue Degradation in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis and Unclassified Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karsdal, Morten Asser; Gerlag, Daniëlle M.; Tak, Paul Peter; Bay-Jensen, Anne Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objective Tissue destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is predominantly mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), thereby generating protein fragments. Previous studies have revealed that these fragments include MMP-mediated collagen type I, II, and III degradation, citrullinated and MMP-degraded vimentin and MMP degraded C-reactive protein. We evaluated if biomarkers measuring serum levels of specific sequences of the mentioned fragments would provide further information of diagnostic and/or prognostic processes in early arthritis. Methods Ninety-two early arthritis patients (arthritis duration<1 year, DMARD naïve) were enrolled. Patients either fulfilled the ACR/EULAR2010 criteria for RA (n = 60) or had unclassified arthritis (UA) (n = 32). Patients fulfilling the RA criteria after 2 years follow-up were classified into non-erosive (n = 25), or erosive disease (n = 13). Concentrations of the biomarkers: C1M, C2M, C3M, VICM and CRPM were measured in baseline serum. Results C1M, C3M and CRPM were able to discriminate between the UA and RA baseline diagnosis in 92 patients with an AUROC of 0.64 (95%CI 0.517 to 0.762), 0.73 (95%CI 0.622 to 0.838) and 0.68 (95%CI 0.570 to 0.795). C2M showed a potential for discrimination between non-erosive and erosive disease in 38 patients with an AUROC of 0.75 (95%CI 0.597 to 0.910). All of the applied biomarkers correlated with one or more of the disease activity parameters: DAS28, ESR, CRP, SJC66, TJC68 and/or HAQ. Conclusion This is the first study evaluating the applied biomarkers at this early stage of arthritis. C1M, C3M, CRPM might be the best diagnostic marker, whereas high levels of C2M indicated progression of disease at follow-up in early RA patients. PMID:27019199

  14. Heterogeneity of Collagen VI Microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Maaß, Tobias; Bayley, Christopher P.; Mörgelin, Matthias; Lettmann, Sandra; Bonaldo, Paolo; Paulsson, Mats; Baldock, Clair; Wagener, Raimund

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI, a collagen with uncharacteristically large N- and C-terminal non-collagenous regions, forms a distinct microfibrillar network in most connective tissues. It was long considered to consist of three genetically distinct α chains (α1, α2, and α3). Intracellularly, heterotrimeric molecules associate to form dimers and tetramers, which are then secreted and assembled to microfibrils. The identification of three novel long collagen VI α chains, α4, α5, and α6, led to the question if and how these may substitute for the long α3 chain in collagen VI assembly. Here, we studied structural features of the novel long chains and analyzed the assembly of these into tetramers and microfibrils. N- and C-terminal globular regions of collagen VI were recombinantly expressed and studied by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Ab initio models of the N-terminal globular regions of the α4, α5, and α6 chains showed a C-shaped structure similar to that found for the α3 chain. Single particle EM nanostructure of the N-terminal globular region of the α4 chain confirmed the C-shaped structure revealed by SAXS. Immuno-EM of collagen VI extracted from tissue revealed that like the α3 chain the novel long chains assemble to homotetramers that are incorporated into mixed microfibrils. Moreover, SAXS models of the C-terminal globular regions of the α1, α2, α4, and α6 chains were generated. Interestingly, the α1, α2, and α4 C-terminal globular regions dimerize. These self-interactions may play a role in tetramer formation. PMID:26742845

  15. Nanomechanics of Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-07-12

    Type I collagen is the predominant collagen in mature tendons and ligaments, where it gives them their load-bearing mechanical properties. Fibrils of type I collagen are formed by the packing of polypeptide triple helices. Higher-order structures like fibril bundles and fibers are assembled from fibrils in the presence of other collagenous molecules and noncollagenous molecules. Curiously, however, experiments show that fibrils/fibril bundles are less resistant to axial stress compared to their constituent triple helices-the Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles are an order-of-magnitude smaller than the Young's moduli of triple helices. Given the sensitivity of the Young's moduli of triple helices to solvation environment, a plausible explanation is that the packing of triple helices into fibrils perhaps reduces the Young's modulus of an individual triple helix, which results in fibrils having smaller Young's moduli. We find, however, from molecular dynamics and accelerated conformational sampling simulations that the Young's modulus of the buried core of the fibril is of the same order as that of a triple helix in aqueous phase. These simulations, therefore, suggest that the lower Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles cannot be attributed to the specific packing of triple helices in the fibril core. It is not the fibril core that yields initially to axial stress. Rather, it must be the portion of the fibril exposed to the solvent and/or the fibril-fibril interface that bears the initial strain. Overall, this work provides estimates of Young's moduli and persistence lengths at two levels of collagen's structural assembly, which are necessary to quantitatively investigate the response of various biological factors on collagen mechanics, including congenital mutations, posttranslational modifications and ligand binding, and also engineer new collagen-based materials. PMID:27410733

  16. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signalling is increased in rheumatoid synovium but TGF-β blockade does not modify experimental arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo-Gil, E; Criado, G; Santiago, B; Dotor, J; Pablos, J L; Galindo, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the distribution of regulatory and inhibitory mothers against decapentaplegic homologue (Smad) proteins as markers of active transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signalling in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial tissue and to investigate the effect of TGF-β blockade in the development and progression of collagen-induced arthritis. The expression of Smad proteins in synovial tissues from RA, osteoarthritic and healthy controls was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Arthritis was induced in DBA/1 mice by immunization with chicken type-II collagen (CII). TGF-β was blocked in vivo with the specific peptide p17 starting at the time of immunization or on the day of arthritis onset. T cell population frequencies and specific responses to CII were analysed. The expression of cytokines and transcription factors was quantified in spleen and joint samples. Statistical differences between groups were compared using the Mann–Whitney U-test or one-way analysis of variance (anova) using the Kruskal–Wallis test. p-Smad-2/3 and inhibitory Smad-7 expression were detected in RA and control tissues. In RA, most lymphoid infiltrating cells showed nuclear p-Smad-2/3 without Smad-7 expression. Treatment with TGF-β antagonist did not affect clinical severity, joint inflammation and cartilage damage in collagen-induced arthritis. Frequency of T cell subsets, mRNA levels of cytokines and transcription factors, specific proliferation to CII, serum interleukin (IL)-6 and anti-CII antibodies were comparable in p17 and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated groups. The pattern of Smad proteins expression demonstrates active TGF-β signalling in RA synovium. However, specific TGF-β blockade does not have a significant effect in the mice model of collagen-induced arthritis. PMID:23869798

  17. [Reactive arthritis: inflammation or true infection?].

    PubMed

    Finckh, Axel

    2016-03-01

    Reactive arthritis has been classically defined as an aseptic arthritis induced by a bacterial infection in another organ. If the classical form of reactive arthritis is in fact a spondyloarthritis triggered by a urogenital or intestinal bacterial infection, it is not necessarily sterile, and in some cases it may be worthwhile to treat a chronic infection with long-term antibiotherapy. In a broader definition, the concept of reactive arthritis is widened to other post-infectious rheumatism, such as post-streptococcal arthritis or post-viral arthritis. PMID:27089639

  18. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (p<0.04) and showed a 3-fold increase in Young's modulus (p<0.04) at higher concentration. Furfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications. PMID:24468046

  19. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  20. Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... Molecular differences between knee and hip joints with rheumatoid arthritis may inform more personal treatment strategies. Sebastian Kaulitzki/Hemera/Thinkstock Knee and hip joints with rheumatoid arthritis have differing genetic markers linked to inflammation, suggesting ...

  1. Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158076.html Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise Baricitinib helped patients who failed other ... HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis showed promise in a new six-month trial. ...

  2. New Treatments Helping Kids with Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159984.html New Treatments Helping Kids With Juvenile Arthritis Several biologics have been approved by the FDA ... 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New treatments for juvenile arthritis offer hope to children with the chronic autoimmune ...

  3. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  4. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Definition and classification].

    PubMed

    Deslandre, C

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of diseases defined by the presence of arthritis of more than 6weeks duration in patients aged less than 16years and with unknown etiology. The international classification based on clinical and biological criteria define each type of JIA: systemic, oligoarticular, polyarticular with and without rheumatoid factor, enthesitis-related arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. However, some discussions persist concerning systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whose clinical symptoms and pathogenic mechanisms are quite similar to those observed in autoinflammatory diseases, arthritis with antinuclear factors (poly- and oligoarticular) that could be considered as a homogenous group, and a family history of psoriasis that frequently led to unclassified arthritis. Better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms should improve the initial clinical classification with more homogeneous groups of patients and reduce the number of unclassified cases of arthritis. PMID:26968301

  5. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  6. Collagen VI related muscle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, A; Bushby, K

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding collagen VI (COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3) cause Bethlem myopathy (BM) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), two conditions which were previously believed to be completely separate entities. BM is a relatively mild dominantly inherited disorder characterised by proximal weakness and distal joint contractures. UCMD was originally described as an autosomal recessive condition causing severe muscle weakness with proximal joint contractures and distal hyperlaxity. Here we review the clinical phenotypes of BM and UCMD and their diagnosis and management, and provide an overview of the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of collagen VI related disorders. PMID:16141002

  7. The evolution of fibrillar collagens: a sea-pen collagen shares common features with vertebrate type V collagen.

    PubMed

    Tillet, E; Franc, J M; Franc, S; Garrone, R

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular matrix of marine primitive invertebrates (sponges, polyps and jellyfishes) contains collagen fibrils with narrow diameters. From various data, it has been hypothesized that these primitive collagens could represent ancestral forms of the vertebrate minor collagens, i.e., types V or XI. Recently we have isolated a primitive collagen from the soft tissues of the sea-pen Veretillum cynomorium. This report examines whether the sea-pen collagen shares some features with vertebrate type V collagen. Rotary shadowed images of acid-soluble collagen molecules extracted from beta-APN treated animals, positive staining of segment-long-spacing crystallites precipitated from pepsinized collagen, Western blots of the pepsinized alpha1 and alpha2 chains with antibodies to vertebrate types I, III and V collagens, and in situ gold immunolabeling of ECM collagen fibrils were examined. Our results showed that the tissue form of the sea-pen collagen is a 340-nm threadlike molecule, which is close to the vertebrate type V collagen with its voluminous terminal globular domain, the distribution of most of its polar amino-acid residues, and its antigenic properties. PMID:8653581

  8. THE IDENTIFICATION OF A FLUORESCENT REDUCING SUBSTANCE IN THE URINE OF PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Mary

    1960-01-01

    The report that 2,5-dihydroxyphenylpyruvic acid occurs in the urine of patients with collagen disease has not been confirmed, and no evidence was found for regarding collagen disease as being due to an inherent error in tyrosine metabolism as suggested by Japanese workers. A strongly reducing substance was conspicuous in the urine of patients with rheumatoid arthritis but not in that of normal persons. This substance was identified as 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA). A method is described for the measurement of 3-HAA in urine, employing ether extraction, paper chromatography in a formate solvent, and visual assessment by fluorescence in ultra-violet light and colour with Ehrlich's reagent. Normal persons excreted from less than 125 to 375 μg./day (average rather lower than 200 μg./day); those suffering from rheumatoid arthritis excreted from less than 125 to 2,250 μg./day (average 820 μg./day). The excessive excretion of 3-HAA in persons with rheumatoid arthritis was investigated in terms of other aspects of the activity of the disease. Some relationship was suggested between excretion levels, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the sensitized sheep cell test. Cases of osteoarthritis, other orthopaedic conditions, and miscellaneous diseases were examined. A few of the latter, including diseases of the haemopoietic system, were associated with increased excretion of 3-HAA. PMID:16810953

  9. [Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis without arthritis: successful therapy with hydroxychloroquine].

    PubMed

    Gerbing, Eva Kristina; Metze, Dieter; Luger, Thomas A; Ständer, Sonja

    2003-02-01

    Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis is a rare entity characterized by cutaneous linear strands (the "rope sign") and rheumatoid arthritis. In the past years, 12 other cases have been described with variable cutaneous symptoms. All showed similar histological features, resembling those of granuloma annulare or 'palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis', suggesting a wide spectrum for a single entity. A 60-year-old patient presented with erythematous patches with an indurated, violaceous border resembling the "rope sign" on both flanks. The histological investigation revealed dense diffuse interstitial inflammatory infiltrates composed of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, macrophages and multinucleated giant cells in the superficial and deep dermis. In the deep dermis, prominent eosinophilic degenerated collagen fibres with surrounding macrophages ('floating sign') occurred. In contrast to most previously described patients, our patient did not have arthralgias. The skin findings cleared following therapy with hydroxychloroquine. PMID:16285183

  10. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  11. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  12. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  13. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  14. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  15. Vaccinations for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Lisa M.; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer an increased burden of infectious disease-related morbidity and mortality and have twice the risk of acquiring a severe infection compared to the general population. This increased risk is not only a result of the autoimmune disease but is also attributed to the immunosuppressive therapies that are commonly used in this patient population. Given the increase in infection-related risks in RA, there is great interest in mitigating such risk. A number of vaccines are available to the rheumatologist, with a handful that are of importance for RA patients in the United States. The goal of this paper is to highlight the most recent literature on the key vaccines and the specific considerations for the rheumatologist and their RA patients, with a particular focus on influenza, pneumococcal, and herpes zoster vaccines. It is important for rheumatologist to understand and be aware of which vaccines are live and what potential contraindications exist for giving vaccines to RA patients. PMID:24925587

  16. [Vasculitis in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bély, M; Apáthy, A

    1996-07-21

    The frequency and histopathological characteristics of systemic vasculitis were studied in the autopsy material of 161 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Systemic vasculitis was observed in 36 case (22.4%). In percentage of all cases with systemic vasculitis, the most frequently involved organs were the heart (66.7%), skeletal muscles (54.8%), and peripheral nerves (52%). The skin was involved only in about one third of 36 cases (36%). In most cases the arterioles and the small arteries were affected by vasculitis. Three types of vasculitis (non specific, fibrinoid necrotic, granulomatous) could be observed simultaneously in different vessels or combined in the same vessel. Different stages of inflammation could be found simultaneously, reflecting the relapsing nature of vasculitis. The frequency, the severity, and the recurrence of vasculitis are different aspects of the same phenomenon running usually parallel to each other in different organs and on different vessels. Vasculitis lead to local ischaemia and regressive changes depend on the number and size of the involved vessels. Systemic vasculitis led to death in 19 of 36 cases. Vasculitis was detected clinically in 7 of 36 cases. Exitus lethalis depend on the localization of the involved vessels. Vasculitis in the heart and brain are more life threatening, than that of localized to the skin. PMID:8757068

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klipple, G L; Cecere, F A

    1989-05-01

    The activity of RA is significantly altered by pregnancy with approximately 70 per cent of patients experiencing substantial improvement in symptoms, signs and sometimes extra-articular manifestations. This lessening of disease activity occurs in association with an almost complete cessation of medications. However, whether partial or complete this remission is short-lived with more than 90 per cent of women who improved relapsing by 6 to 8 months postpartum. Further, in approximately 30 per cent of RA patients the course remains unchanged or worsens during gestation and indeed the first symptoms of RA may develop during pregnancy or shortly thereafter. Conversely active rheumatoid arthritis seems to little influence the maternal course or fetal outcome of pregnancy. The multiple and complex immunologic alterations of the pregnant state are designed to ensure survival of the fetal allograft in a foreign host. A number of these alterations particularly involving modulation of cell-mediated immunity, immunoglobulin composition, immune complex generation, or the inflammatory response have the potential to interfere with the pathophysiology of RA. In short, although the specific mechanism remains an enigma, the reason for the amelioration of RA during pregnancy is probably an incidental and fortuitous reaction to one or more of these immunomodulatory factors. PMID:2657889

  18. Biology, chemistry and pathology of collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmajer, R.; Olsen, B.R.; Kuhn, K.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the articles are: Structure of the Type II Collagen Gene; Structural and Functional Analysis of the Genes for ..cap alpha..2(1) and ..cap alpha..1(III) collagens; Structure and Expression of the Collagen Genes of C. Elegans; Molecular Basis of Clinical Heterogeneity in the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; and Normal and Mutant Human Collagen Genes.

  19. The Lymphatic Endothelial mCLCA1 Antibody Induces Proliferation and Growth of Lymph Node Lymphatic Sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Jordan-Williams, Kimberly L.; Ramanujam, Neela; Farr, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphocyte- and leukocyte-mediated lymph node (LN) lymphatic sinus growth (lymphangiogenesis) is involved in immune responses and in diseases including cancer and arthritis. We previously discovered a 10.1.1 Ab that recognizes the lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) surface protein mCLCA1, which is an interacting partner for LFA1 and Mac-1 that mediates lymphocyte adhesion to LECs. Here, we show that 10.1.1 Ab treatment specifically induces LEC proliferation, and influences migration and adhesion in vitro. Functional testing by injection of mice with 10.1.1 Ab but not control hamster Abs identified rapid induction of LN LEC proliferation and extensive lymphangiogenesis within 23 h. BrdU pulse-chase analysis demonstrated incorporation of proliferating LYVE-1-positive LEC into the growing medullary lymphatic sinuses. The 10.1.1 Ab-induced LN remodeling involved coordinate increases in LECs and also blood endothelial cells, fibroblastic reticular cells, and double negative stroma, as is observed during the LN response to inflammation. 10.1.1 Ab-induced lymphangiogenesis was restricted to LNs, as mCLCA1-expressing lymphatic vessels of the jejunum and dermis were unaffected by 23 h 10.1.1 Ab treatment. These findings demonstrate that 10.1.1 Ab rapidly and specifically induces proliferation and growth of LN lymphatic sinuses and stroma, suggesting a key role of mCLCA1 in coordinating LN remodeling during immune responses. PMID:27224029

  20. The Lymphatic Endothelial mCLCA1 Antibody Induces Proliferation and Growth of Lymph Node Lymphatic Sinuses.

    PubMed

    Jordan-Williams, Kimberly L; Ramanujam, Neela; Farr, Andrew G; Ruddell, Alanna

    2016-01-01

    Lymphocyte- and leukocyte-mediated lymph node (LN) lymphatic sinus growth (lymphangiogenesis) is involved in immune responses and in diseases including cancer and arthritis. We previously discovered a 10.1.1 Ab that recognizes the lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) surface protein mCLCA1, which is an interacting partner for LFA1 and Mac-1 that mediates lymphocyte adhesion to LECs. Here, we show that 10.1.1 Ab treatment specifically induces LEC proliferation, and influences migration and adhesion in vitro. Functional testing by injection of mice with 10.1.1 Ab but not control hamster Abs identified rapid induction of LN LEC proliferation and extensive lymphangiogenesis within 23 h. BrdU pulse-chase analysis demonstrated incorporation of proliferating LYVE-1-positive LEC into the growing medullary lymphatic sinuses. The 10.1.1 Ab-induced LN remodeling involved coordinate increases in LECs and also blood endothelial cells, fibroblastic reticular cells, and double negative stroma, as is observed during the LN response to inflammation. 10.1.1 Ab-induced lymphangiogenesis was restricted to LNs, as mCLCA1-expressing lymphatic vessels of the jejunum and dermis were unaffected by 23 h 10.1.1 Ab treatment. These findings demonstrate that 10.1.1 Ab rapidly and specifically induces proliferation and growth of LN lymphatic sinuses and stroma, suggesting a key role of mCLCA1 in coordinating LN remodeling during immune responses. PMID:27224029

  1. Biomimetic Analogs for Collagen Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Gu, L.; Kim, Y.K.; Liu, Y.; Ryou, H.; Wimmer, C.E.; Dai, L.; Arola, D.D.; Looney, S.W.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.

    2011-01-01

    Inability of chemical phosphorylation of sodium trimetaphosphate to induce intrafibrillar mineralization of type I collagen may be due to the failure to incorporate a biomimetic analog to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphates (ACP) as nanoprecursors. This study investigated adsorption/desorption characteristics of hydrolyzed and pH-adjusted sodium trimetaphosphate (HPA-Na3P3O9) to collagen. Based on those results, a 5-minute treatment time with 2.8 wt% HPA-Na3P3O9 was used in a single-layer reconstituted collagen model to confirm that both the ACP-stabilization analog and matrix phosphoprotein analog must be present for intrafibrillar mineralization. The results of that model were further validated by complete remineralization of phosphoric-acid-etched dentin treated with the matrix phosphoprotein analog and lined with a remineralizing lining composite, and with the ACP-stabilization analog supplied in simulated body fluid. An understanding of the basic processes involved in intrafibrillar mineralization of reconstituted collagen fibrils facilitates the design of novel tissue engineering materials for hard tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:20940362

  2. Piperlongumine Suppresses Dendritic Cell Maturation by Reducing Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Has Therapeutic Potential for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Youjun; Shi, Maohua; Qiu, Qian; Huang, Mingcheng; Zeng, Shan; Zou, Yaoyao; Zhan, Zhongping; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan; Xu, Hanshi

    2016-06-15

    Piperlongumine (PLM) is a natural product from the plant Piper longum that inhibits platelet aggregation, atherosclerosis plaque formation, and tumor cell growth. It has potential value in immunomodulation and the management of autoimmune diseases. In this study, we investigated the role of PLM in regulating the differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells (DCs), a critical regulator of immune tolerance, and evaluated its clinical effects in a rheumatoid arthritis mouse model. We found that PLM treatment reduced LPS-induced murine bone marrow-derived DC maturation, characterized by reduced expression of CD80/86, secretion of MCP-1, IL-12p70, IL-6, TNFα, IFN-γ, and IL-23, and reduced alloproliferation of T cells; however, PLM does not affect cell differentiation. Furthermore, PLM reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by DCs and inhibited the activation of p38, JNK, NF-κB, and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Conversely, PLM increased the expression of GSTP1 and carbonyl reductase 1, two enzymes that counteract ROS effects. ROS inhibition by exogenous N-acetyl-l-cysteine suppressed DC maturation. PLM treatment improved the severity of arthritis and reduced in vivo splenic DC maturation, collagen-specific CD4(+) T cell responses, and ROS production in mice with collagen-induced arthritis. Taken together, these results suggest that PLM inhibits DC maturation by reducing intracellular ROS production and has potential as a therapeutic agent for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27183580

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of polyphenolic-enriched red raspberry extract in an antigen-induced arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Jean-Gilles, Dinorah; Li, Liya; Ma, Hang; Yuan, Tao; Chichester, Clinton O; Seeram, Navindra P

    2012-06-13

    The red raspberry ( Rubus idaeus ) fruit contains bioactive polyphenols including anthocyanins and ellagitannins with reported anti-inflammatory properties. This study sought to investigate the cartilage-protecting and anti-inflammatory effects of a polyphenolic-enriched red raspberry extract (RRE; standardized to total polyphenol, anthocyanin, and ellagitannin contents) using (1) an in vitro bovine nasal explant cell culture model and (2) an in vivo adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model. RRE contained 20% total polyphenols (as gallic acid equivalents), 5% anthocyanins (as cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents), and 9.25% ellagitannins (as ellagic acid equivalents). In the in vitro studies, bovine nasal explants were stimulated with 10 ng/mL IL-1β to induce the release of proteoglycan and type II collagen. On treatment with RRE (50 μg/mL), there was a decrease in the rate of degradation of both proteoglycan and type II collagen. In the in vivo antigen-induced arthritis rat model, animals were gavaged daily with RRE (at doses of 30 and 120 mg/kg, respectively) for 30 days after adjuvant injection (750 μg of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suspension in squalene). At the higher dose, animals treated with RRE had a lower incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control animals. Also, histological analyses revealed significant inhibition of inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage damage, and bone resorption by RRE. This study suggests that red raspberry polyphenols may afford cartilage protection and/or modulate the onset and severity of arthritis. PMID:22111586

  4. Polyarticular psoriatic arthritis is more like oligoarticular psoriatic arthritis, than rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, P S; Porter, G; Taylor, W J

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective Since the original description of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) subgroups by Moll and Wright, there has been some discrepancy in the precise prevalence of the different subgroups and in particular the proportion of patients with polyarthritis. The higher prevalence of the polyarthritis subgroup may be due to the inclusion of patients with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis with coincidental psoriasis. The classification of psoriatic arthritis (CASPAR) study database provided an opportunity to examine this question. Methods The CASPAR study collected clinical, radiological and laboratory data on 588 patients with physician‐diagnosed PsA and 525 controls with other inflammatory arthritis, 70% of whom had rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with PsA were divided into two groups: polyarthritis and non‐polyarthritis (which included the Moll and Wright subgroups of spinal disease, distal interphalangeal predominant and arthritis mutilans) and were compared with patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Comparisons were made between all three groups and, if a significant difference occurred, between the two groups with PsA. Results The three groups differed significantly with regard to all clinical and laboratory variables except duration of disease. Significant differences were also found between the two groups of PsA in terms of age, sex, total number of involved joints, disability score and symmetry. However, no differences were found between the groups of patients with PsA in terms of seropositivity for rheumatoid factor and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide, enthesitis, and spinal pain and stiffness. Further, dactylitis was commonly seen in patients with PsA (57% in the polyarticular group and 45% in non‐polyarticular group), and uncommonly found in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (5%). With the exception of entheseal changes, syndesmophytes and osteolysis, typical radiological features of PsA could not be used to distinguish between the Ps

  5. Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Whang, Jennifer A; Chang, Betty Y

    2014-08-01

    The function and role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) in human B cell development was demonstrated by its association with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) manifested by a substantial reduction in immunoglobulins and B cells. BTK has a crucial role in pre-B cell receptor (BCR) and BCR signaling during normal B cell development and activation. Aberrant BCR signaling is associated with autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, BTK is also expressed in myeloid cell populations, including monocytes, macrophages, neutrophils and mast cells. These innate cells infiltrate the synovial cavity and produce inflammatory cytokines, aggravating arthritic symptoms. In myeloid cell populations, BTK functions downstream of the Fcγ receptors (FcγR) and Fcɛ receptors (FcɛR). In the absence of BTK, FcR-mediated functions, such as cytokine production, are impaired. In addition, Xid mice, which have a mutation in BTK, have decreased susceptibility to developing collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Given that BTK is involved in multiple signaling pathways downstream of the BCR and FcR, it is an attractive therapeutic target for RA. PMID:24721226

  6. Down-regulation of survivin alleviates experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Andersson, K M E; Svensson, M N D; Erlandsson, M C; Jonsson, I-M; Bokarewa, M I

    2015-01-01

    Survivin is a proto-oncogene that regulates cell division and apoptosis. It is a molecular marker of cancer. Recently, survivin has emerged as a feature of RA, associated with severe joint damage and poor treatment response. The present study examined if inhibition of survivin affects experimental arthritis, which was induced in mBSA-immunized mice by an injection of mBSA in the knee joint or developed spontaneously in collagen type II-immunized mice. The inhibition of survivin transcription by a lentivirus shRNA construct alleviated joint inflammation and reduced bone damage. The inhibition of survivin reduced the levels of metalloproteinases, β-catenin, and vimentin, limiting the invasive capacity of synovia, while no inhibition of osteoclastogenesis could be found. The inhibition of survivin led to a p53-independent reduction of T cell proliferation and favored the transcription and activity of Blimp-1, which limited IL-2 production and facilitated formation of regulatory Foxp3(+)CD4(+) and effector CD8(+) T cells. The study shows that the inhibition of survivin is sufficient to reduce joint inflammation and bone damage in preclinical models of arthritis. Antiarthritic effects of survivin inhibition are related to p53-independent control of lymphocyte proliferation. PMID:25381389

  7. Pyogenic infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, I. F.; Deans, A. C.; Keat, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Ten episodes of severe pyogenic infection occurring in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. There was a wide range of presenting features including pyoarthrosis in 7 episodes. Three cases presented with meningitis, bacterial endocarditis and probable multiple abscesses respectively. Infection was caused by Staphylococcus aureus in 7 episodes and by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in each of one episode. Three infective episodes were fatal. Pyogenic, especially staphylococcal, infection should be considered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with unexplained illness with or without sudden deterioration in joint symptoms. It is important to recognize and treat infection rapidly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3671222

  8. Childhood arthritis: classification and radiology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karl; Gardner-Medwin, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Childhood arthritis has now been reclassified into a single internationally recognized entity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Radiology provides an important role in the management of JIA, in helping in the differential diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and detecting complications. Traditionally, plain radiographs have been the imaging investigation of choice but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound are now providing a more effective and safer alternative. The appropriate use of sequences in MR imaging is important in the early detection of joint abnormalities in JIA. PMID:11798203

  9. Genetics of Rheumatoid Arthritis — A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T.; Mikecz, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    The “Bermuda triangle” of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11–37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci — Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively — have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics. PMID:23288628

  10. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Bordoni, M.E.; Thornton, A.K.

    1988-06-21

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium.

  11. FcγRIIB on liver sinusoidal endothelial cells is essential for antibody-induced GPVI ectodomain shedding in mice.

    PubMed

    Stegner, David; Popp, Michael; Lorenz, Viola; Wax, Jacqueline K; Gessner, J Engelbert; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2016-08-11

    The activating platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI) is a promising antithrombotic target because of its central role in arterial thrombosis and its minor relevance for normal hemostasis. The receptor can be specifically targeted by antibodies and irreversibly downregulated in circulating platelets in vivo, resulting in long-term antithrombotic protection in mice. This GPVI immunodepletion predominantly occurs through ectodomain shedding, which is accompanied by a transient drop in peripheral platelet counts. Mechanistic studies on this targeted GPVI loss have been hampered because it cannot be reproduced in isolated platelets in vitro. Here we show that both the transient thrombocytopenia and GPVI ectodomain shedding depend on the Fc portion of the anti-GPVI antibody and its interaction with the inhibitory Fcγ receptor (FcγR)IIB. In wild-type, but not Fcgr2b(-/-) mice, anti-GPVI-opsonized platelets became transiently trapped in the liver followed by the appearance of the soluble GPVI ectodomain in the plasma. Depletion of Kupffer cells neither affected anti-GPVI-induced platelet accumulation nor GPVI shedding, demonstrating that the other major FcγRIIB-expressing cell type, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, is required for both processes to occur. These results reveal a novel and unexpected function of hepatic FcγRIIB in the targeted downregulation of GPVI in vivo. PMID:27297794

  12. Feeding transgenic plants that express a tolerogenic fusion protein effectively protects against arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Charlotta; Schön, Karin; Kalbina, Irina; Strid, Åke; Andersson, Sören; Bokarewa, Maria I; Lycke, Nils Y

    2016-04-01

    Although much explored, oral tolerance for treatment of autoimmune diseases still awaits the establishment of novel and effective vectors. We investigated whether the tolerogenic CTA1(R7K)-COL-DD fusion protein can be expressed in edible plants, to induce oral tolerance and protect against arthritis. The fusion protein was recombinantly expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana plants, which were fed to H-2(q) -restricted DBA/1 mice to assess the preventive effect on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The treatment resulted in fewer mice exhibiting disease and arthritis scores were significantly reduced. Immune suppression was evident in treated mice, and serum biomarkers for inflammation as well as anticollagen IgG responses were reduced. In spleen and draining lymph nodes, CD4(+) T-cell responses were reduced. Concomitant with a reduced effector T-cell activity with lower IFNγ, IL-13 and IL-17A production, we observed an increase in IL-10 production to recall antigen stimulation in vitro, suggesting reduced Th1, Th2 and Th17 activity subsequent to up-regulated IL-10 and regulatory T-cell (Treg) functions. This study shows that edible plants expressing a tolerogen were effective at stimulating CD4 T-cell tolerance and in protecting against CIA disease. Our study conveys optimism as to the potential of using edible plants for oral treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26403330

  13. Collagen interactions: Drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Collagen is a major component in a wide range of drug delivery systems and biomaterial applications. Its basic physical and structural properties, together with its low immunogenicity and natural turnover, are keys to its biocompatibility and effectiveness. In addition to its material properties, the collagen triple-helix interacts with a large number of molecules that trigger biological events. Collagen interactions with cell surface receptors regulate many cellular processes, while interactions with other ECM components are critical for matrix structure and remodeling. Collagen also interacts with enzymes involved in its biosynthesis and degradation, including matrix metalloproteinases. Over the past decade, much information has been gained about the nature and specificity of collagen interactions with its partners. These studies have defined collagen sequences responsible for binding and the high-resolution structures of triple-helical peptides bound to its natural binding partners. Strategies to target collagen interactions are already being developed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies to interfere with collagen fibril formation and the use of triple-helical peptides to direct liposomes to melanoma cells. The molecular information about collagen interactions will further serve as a foundation for computational studies to design small molecules that can interfere with specific interactions or target tumor cells. Intelligent control of collagen biological interactions within a material context will expand the effectiveness of collagen-based drug delivery. PMID:26631222

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis as a hyper-endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation disease.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Satoshi; Yagishita, Naoko; Tsuchimochi, Kaneyuki; Nishioka, Kusuki; Nakajima, Toshihiro

    2005-01-01

    We introduce Synoviolin as a novel pathogenic factor in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Experimental studies indicate that this endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident E3 ubiquitin ligase has important functions in the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) system, an essential system for ER homeostasis. Overexpression of Synoviolin in mice causes arthropathy with synovial hyperplasia, whereas heterozygous knockdown results in increased apoptosis of synovial cells and resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in mice. On the basis of these experimental data, we propose that excess elimination of unfolded proteins (that is, 'hyper-ERAD') by overexpression of Synoviolin triggers synovial cell overgrowth and hence a worsening of RA. Further analysis of the hyper-ERAD system may permit the complex pathomechanisms of RA to be uncovered. PMID:16207344

  15. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis are variations in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes , especially the HLA-DRB1 gene. The proteins produced from HLA genes help the immune system distinguish the body's own proteins from proteins made by foreign invaders ( ...

  16. Medicines to Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and 55, but it can happen at any age. Rheumatoid arthritis affects women more than men. Visit your doctor to talk about your health and the medicines you may need. This factsheet will give you information about a type of medicine. You will learn ...

  17. Identification of candidate synovial membrane biomarkers after Achyranthes aspera treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen; Lu, Xianghong; Fu, Zhirong; Zhang, Lin; Li, Ximin; Xu, Xiaobao; Ren, Yina; Lu, Yongzhuang; Fu, Hongwei; Tian, Jingkui

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main symptom is a heightened inflammatory response in synovial tissues. To verify the anti-arthritic activities of Achyranthes aspera and its possible therapy-related factors on the pathogenesis of RA, the saponins in A. aspera root were isolated and identified to treat the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Phytochemical analysis isolated and identified methyl caffeate, 25-S-inokosterone, 25-S-inokosterone β-D-glucopyranosyl 3-(O-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-oleanolate, and β-D-glucopyranosyl 3-(O-β-D-galactopyranosyl (1→2)(O-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-oleanolate as main compounds in the root of A. aspera. Proteomics was performed to determine the differentially expressed proteins in either inflamed or drug-treated synovium of CIA rats. Treatment resulted in dramatically decreased paw swelling, proliferation of inflammatory cells, and bone degradation. Fibrinogen, procollagen, protein disulfide-isomerase A3, and apolipoprotein A-I were all increased in inflamed synovial tissues and were found to decrease when administered drug therapy. Furthermore, Alpha-1-antiproteinase and manganese superoxide dismutase were both increased in drug-treated synovial tissues. The inhibition of RA progression shows that A. aspera is a promising candidate for future treatment of human arthritis. Importantly, the total saponins found within A. aspera are the active component. Finally, autoantigens such as fibrinogen and collagen could act as inducers of RA due to their aggravation of inflammation. Given this, it is possible that the vimentin and PDIA3 could be the candidate biomarkers specific to Achyranthes saponin therapy for rheumatoid arthritis in synovial membrane. PMID:26724776

  18. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  19. Arthritis and diagnosis of leprosy: a case report and review of the literature*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tania Rita Moreno de Oliveira; Korinfskin, Juliana Pedrosa; Espíndola, Mariana Mercês Mesquita; Corrêa, Lis Moreno de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is clinically characterized by involvement of peripheral nerves and skin. The immunological profile of the individual defines the diversity of clinical manifestations, from skin disorders to systemic manifestations, especially the articulation ones, common in multibacillary forms, which may mimic collagen diseases and often posing diagnostic difficulties in endemic areas. This is a case report of asymmetric polyarthritis of small and large articulations associated with skin lesions which had been treated by a rheumatologist for 2 years with initial clinical diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, and later, with the appearance of skin lesions, of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:24770512

  20. Immunostimulation effect of jellyfish collagen.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Takuya; Ueno, Masashi; Goto, Yoko; Shiraishi, Ryusuke; Doi, Mikiharu; Akiyama, Koichi; Yamauchi, Satoshi

    2006-09-01

    Certain edible large jellyfishes belonging to the order Rhizostomeae are consumed in large quantities in China and Japan. The exumbrella part of the edible jellyfish Stomolophus nomurai was cut and soaked in dilute hydrochloric acid solution (pH 3.0) for 12 h, and heated at 121 degrees C for 20 min. The immunostimulation effects of the jellyfish extract were examined. The jellyfish extract enhanced IgM production of human hybridoma HB4C5 cells 34-fold. IgM and IgG production of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were also accelerated, 2.8- and 1.4-fold respectively. Moreover, production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by human PBL was stimulated 100- and 17-fold respectively. Collagenase treatment inactivated the immunostimulation activity of the jellyfish extract. In addition, purified collagen from bovine Achilles' tendon accelerated IgM production of hybridoma cells. These facts mean that collagen has an immunostimulation effect, and that the active substance in jellyfish extract is collagen. PMID:16960386

  1. Lyme arthritis of the pediatric ankle.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Amiethab; Walrath, Jessica; Hennrikus, William

    2014-10-01

    Lyme arthritis results from acute inflammation caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. The number of cases per year has been rising since 2006, with a majority of patients being affected in the northeastern United States. Development of Lyme arthritis is of particular importance to the orthopedic surgeon because Lyme arthritis often presents as an acute episode of joint swelling and tenderness and may be confused with bacterial septic arthritis. Considering the vast difference in treatment management between these 2 pathologies, differentiating between them is of critical importance. Septic arthritis often needs to be addressed surgically, whereas Lyme arthritis can be treated with oral antibiotics alone. Laboratory testing for Lyme disease often results in a delay in diagnosis because many laboratories batch-test Lyme specimens only a few times per week because of increased expense. The authors present a case of Lyme arthritis in the pediatric ankle in an endemic region. No clear algorithm exists to delineate between septic arthritis and Lyme arthritis of the joint. Improved clinical guidelines for the identification and diagnosis of Lyme arthritis of the ankle are important so that appropriate antibiotics can be used and surgery can be avoided. PMID:25275987

  2. Effect of Vitamin D on Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Patients with Psoriasis Vulgaris and Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cubillos, Susana; Krieg, Nadine; Norgauer, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Background Psoriasis, a chronic skin disease with or without joint inflammation, has increased circulating proinflammatory cytokine levels. Vitamin D is involved in calcium homeostasis, bone formation, osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity, as well as regulation of immune response. We aimed to study osteoclast differentiation and cytokine secretion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis, in response to 1,25(OH)2D3. Methods Serum levels of bone turnover markers were measured by ELISA in patients with psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis, and healthy controls. PBMCs were isolated and cultured with or without RANKL/M-CSF and 1,25(OH)2D3. Osteoclast differentiation and cytokine secretion were assessed. Results Psoriatic arthritis patients had lower osteocalcin, as well as higher C-telopeptide of type I collagen and cathepsin K serum levels compared with psoriasis vulgaris patients and controls. RANKL/M-CSF-stimulated PBMCs from psoriatic arthritis patients produced higher proinflammatory cytokine levels and had a differential secretion profile in response to 1,25(OH)2D3, compared with psoriasis vulgaris and control PBMCs. Conclusions Our data confirmed altered bone turnover in psoriatic arthritis patients, and demonstrated increased osteoclastogenic potential and proinflammatory cytokine secretion capacity of these PBMCs compared with psoriasis vulgaris and controls. 1,25(OH)2D3 abrogated these effects. PMID:27050092

  3. The cation channel Trpv2 is a new suppressor of arthritis severity, joint damage, and synovial fibroblast invasion.

    PubMed

    Laragione, Teresina; Cheng, Kai F; Tanner, Mark R; He, Mingzhu; Beeton, Christine; Al-Abed, Yousef; Gulko, Pércio S

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about the regulation of arthritis severity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) have a central role in joint damage and express increased levels of the cation channel Trpv2. We aimed at determining the role of Trpv2 in arthritis. Treatment with Trpv2-specific agonists decreased the in vitro invasiveness of FLS from RA patients and arthritic rats and mice. Trpv2 stimulation suppressed IL-1β-induced expression of MMP-2 and MMP-3. Trpv2 agonists, including the new and more potent LER13, significantly reduced disease severity in KRN serum- and collagen-induced arthritis, and reduced histologic joint damage, synovial inflammation, and synovial blood vessel numbers suggesting anti-angiogenic activity. In this first in vivo use of Trpv2 agonists we discovered a new central role for Trpv2 in arthritis. These new compounds have the potential to become new therapies for RA and other diseases associated with inflammation, invasion, and angiogenesis. PMID:25869297

  4. To B or not to B: Role of B cells in pathogenesis of arthritis in HLA transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Marshall; Smart, Michele; Luckey, David; Luthra, Harvinder; Taneja, Veena

    2011-01-01

    Population studies have shown that amongst all the genetic factors linked with autoimmune disease development, MHC class II genes are the most significant. Experimental autoimmune arthritis resembling human rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can be induced in susceptible strains of mice following immunization with type II collagen (CIA). We generated transgenic mice lacking endogenous class II molecules and expressing various HLA genes including RA-associated, HLA-DRB1*0401 and HLA-DQ8, and RA-resistant, DRB1*0402, genes. The HLA molecules in these mice are expressed on the cell surface and can positively select CD4+ T cells expressing various Vβ T cell receptors. Endogenous class II invariant chain is required for proper functioning of the class II transgene. Arthritis development in transgenic mice is CD4+ and B cells dependent. Studies in humanized mice showed that B cells are required as antigen presenting cells in addition to antibody producing cells for the development of CIA. The transgenic mice expressing *0401 and *0401/DQ8 genes developed sex-biased arthritis with predominantly females being affected, similar to that of human RA. Further, the transgenic mice produced autoantibodies like rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic antibodies. Antigen presentation by B cells leads to a sex specific immune response in DRB1*0401 mice suggesting a role of B cells and HLA-DR in rendering susceptibility to develop arthritis in females. PMID:21665435

  5. Fibril-forming collagens in lamprey.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J; Tanaka, S; Hardt, T; Eikenberry, E F; Brodsky, B

    1988-01-15

    Five types of collagen with triple-helical regions approximately 300 nm in length were found in lamprey tissues which show characteristic D-periodic collagen fibrils. These collagens are members of the fibril forming family of this primitive vertebrate. Lamprey collagens were characterized with respect to solubility, mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, carboxylmethyl-cellulose chromatography, peptide digestion patterns, composition, susceptibility to vertebrate collagenase, thermal stability, and segment long spacing-banding pattern. Comparison with fibril-forming collagens in higher vertebrates (types I, II, III, V, and XI) identified three lamprey collagens as types II, V, and XI. Both lamprey dermis and major body wall collagens had properties similar to type I but not the typical heterotrimer composition. Dermis molecules had only alpha 1(I)-like chains, while body wall molecules had alpha 2(I)-like chains combined with chains resembling lamprey type II. Neither collagen exhibited the interchain disulfide linkages or solubility properties of type III. The conservation of fibril organization in type II/type XI tissues in contrast to the major developments in type I and type III tissues after the divergence of lamprey and higher vertebrates is consistent with these results. The presence of type II and type I-like molecules as major collagens and types V and XI as minor collagens in the lamprey, and the differential susceptibility of these molecules to vertebrate collagenase is analogous to the findings in higher vertebrates. PMID:3335531

  6. Collagen Mimetic Peptides: Progress Towards Functional Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, S. Michael; Li, Yang; Kim, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs) have been used for elucidating the structure of the collagen triple helix and the factors responsible for its stabilization. The wealth of fundamental knowledge on collagen structure and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions accumulated over the past decades has led to a recent burst of research exploring the potential of CMPs to recreate the higher order assembly and biological function of natural collagens for biomedical applications. Although a large portion of such research is still at an early stage, the collagen triple helix has become a promising structural motif for engineering self-assembled, hierarchical constructs similar to natural tissue scaffolds which are expected to exhibit unique or enhanced biological activities. This paper reviews recent progress in the field of collagen mimetic peptides that bears both direct and indirect implications to engineering collagen-like materials for potential biomedical use. Various CMPs and collagen-like proteins that mimic either structural or functional characteristics of natural collagens are discussed with particular emphasis on providing helpful information to bioengineers and biomaterials scientists interested in collagen engineering. PMID:26316880

  7. Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You?

    MedlinePlus

    Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You? What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious condition. The body’s immune system attacks the lining of ...

  8. Genetics of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    O'Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2014-10-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) represents a group of inflammatory rheumatic diseases that cluster within families and possess overlapping clinical features. The pathogenesis of SpA encompasses a complex array of genetic, immunological and environmental factors. In this article, we will briefly review the genetics of PsA, and then focus on the genes that may be potentially linked either directly or indirectly to the immunopathology of the Th-17 pathway. The most consistent and dominant genetic effect of PsV and PsA is located on chromosome 6p21.3 within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, which accounts for approximately one-third of the genetic contribution of PsV and PsA. To date, 36 genes have reached genome-wide significance, accounting for approximately 22% of psoriasis (PsV) heritability. Prominent genes identified via GWAS include HLA-Cw6, IL12B, IL23R, IL23A, TNIP1, TNFAIP3, LCE3B-LCE3C, TRAF3IP2, NFkBIA, FBXL19, TYK2, IFIH1, REL, and ERAP1. Genes identified in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has largely echoed those in PsV and include HLA-B/C, HLA-B, IL-12B, IL-23R, TNIP1, TRAF3IP2, FBXL19, and REL. The lack of identified genetic susceptibility loci is largely attributed to the much smaller number of PsA patients and the greater clinical heterogeneity of PsA. Searching for different types of genetic variants such as small CNVs and/or insertions/deletions has also led to the identification of several genes with a function relative to PsV in particular including DEFB4, LCE3C_LCE3B, and IL-22 gene (exon 1). The candidate genes identified in PsV/PsA have highlighted pathways of critical importance to psoriatic disease including distinct signaling pathways comprised of barrier integrity, innate immune response and adaptive immune response, mediated primarily by Th-17 and Th-1 signalling. While GWAS studies have yielded great insights into the genes that contribute to the pathogenesis of PsV and PsA, replication in large cohorts, fine-mapping and resequencing

  9. Collagen Induces Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells by Signaling through Osteoclast-Associated Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Heidi S.; Nitze, Louise M.; Zeuthen, Louise H.; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J.; Hamilton, John A.; Berchtold, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB–dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR–collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs. PMID:25725106

  10. Collagen-Based Biomaterials for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Sayani; Raines, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    With its wide distribution in soft and hard connective tissues, collagen is the most abundant of animal proteins. In vitro, natural collagen can be formed into highly organized, three-dimensional scaffolds that are intrinsically biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic upon exogenous application, and endowed with high tensile strength. These attributes make collagen the material of choice for wound healing and tissue engineering applications. In this article, we review the structure and molecular interactions of collagen in vivo; the recent use of natural collagen in sponges, injectables, films and membranes, dressings, and skin grafts; and the on-going development of synthetic collagen mimetic peptides as pylons to anchor cytoactive agents in wound beds. PMID:24633807

  11. A mathematical model of collagen lattice contraction

    PubMed Central

    Dallon, J. C.; Evans, E. J.; Ehrlich, H. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Two mathematical models for fibroblast–collagen interaction are proposed which reproduce qualitative features of fibroblast-populated collagen lattice contraction. Both models are force based and model the cells as individual entities with discrete attachment sites; however, the collagen lattice is modelled differently in each model. In the collagen lattice model, the lattice is more interconnected and formed by triangulating nodes to form the fibrous structure. In the collagen fibre model, the nodes are not triangulated, are less interconnected, and the collagen fibres are modelled as a string of nodes. Both models suggest that the overall increase in stress of the lattice as it contracts is not the cause of the reduced rate of contraction, but that the reduced rate of contraction is due to inactivation of the fibroblasts. PMID:25142520

  12. Stress controls the mechanics of collagen networks

    PubMed Central

    Licup, Albert James; Münster, Stefan; Sharma, Abhinav; Sheinman, Michael; Jawerth, Louise M.; Fabry, Ben; Weitz, David A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is the main structural and load-bearing element of various connective tissues, where it forms the extracellular matrix that supports cells. It has long been known that collagenous tissues exhibit a highly nonlinear stress–strain relationship, although the origins of this nonlinearity remain unknown. Here, we show that the nonlinear stiffening of reconstituted type I collagen networks is controlled by the applied stress and that the network stiffness becomes surprisingly insensitive to network concentration. We demonstrate how a simple model for networks of elastic fibers can quantitatively account for the mechanics of reconstituted collagen networks. Our model points to the important role of normal stresses in determining the nonlinear shear elastic response, which can explain the approximate exponential relationship between stress and strain reported for collagenous tissues. This further suggests principles for the design of synthetic fiber networks with collagen-like properties, as well as a mechanism for the control of the mechanics of such networks. PMID:26195769

  13. Psoriatic arthritis: Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jung-Tai; Yeh, Horng-Ming; Liu, Shyun-Yeu; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of psoriatic arthritis has evolved as new knowledge of the disease has emerged. However, the exact prevalence of psoriatic arthritis is unknown, and its pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated. Genetic, environmental, and immunologic factors have all been implicated in disease development. Early diagnosis and treatment have become primary objectives in clinical rheumatology. Psoriatic arthritis not only causes functional impairment, but also increases mortality risk of patients. The advent of new therapeutic agents capable of arresting the progression of joint damage is expected. However, early psoriatic arthritis assessment remains limited. The objectives of this article are to outline the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of psoriatic arthritis and to suggest a paradigm for identifying early psoriatic arthritis patients. PMID:25232529

  14. Biochemical and immunological parameters as indicators of osteoarthritis subjects: role of OH-collagen in auto-antibodies generation

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Jalaluddin M.; Haque, Quazi S.; Tabrez, Shams; Choi, Inho; Ahmad, Saheem

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by inflammation of the knee joint, which is caused by accumulation of cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the extracellular matrix as an early immune response to infection. The articular cartilage destruction is discernible by elevated tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). In this study, blood samples of knee osteoarthritis patients were analyzed for biochemical and physiological parameters based on the lipid profile, uric acid, total leukocyte count (TLC), hemoglobin percentage (Hb%) and absolute lymphocyte count (ALC). Furthermore, immunological parameters including TNF-α , interleukin-6 (IL-6) and CRP were analyzed. The presence of antibodies against hydroxyl radical modified collagen-II (•OH-collagen-II) was also investigated in arthritis patients using direct binding ELISA. The uric acid and lipid profiles changed extensively. Specifically, increased uric acid levels were associated with OA in both genders, as were enhanced immunological parameters. The TNF-α level also increased in both genders suffering from OA. Finally, auto-antibodies against OH-collagen II antigen were found in the sera of arthritis patients. These results indicated that immunological parameters are better predictors or indexes for diagnosis of OA than biochemical parameters. PMID:26933405

  15. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Collagen Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Chesnick, Ingrid E.; Mason, Jeffrey T.; Giuseppetti, Anthony A.; Eidelman, Naomi; Potter, Kimberlee

    2008-01-01

    A model mineralizing system was subjected to magnetic resonance microscopy to investigate how water proton transverse (T2) relaxation times and magnetization transfer ratios can be applied to monitor collagen mineralization. In our model system, a collagen sponge was mineralized with polymer-stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate. The lower hydration and water proton T2 values of collagen sponges during the initial mineralization phase were attributed to the replacement of the water within the collagen fibrils by amorphous calcium carbonate. The significant reduction in T2 values by day 6 (p < 0.001) was attributed to the appearance of mineral crystallites, which were also detected by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. In the second phase, between days 6 and 13, magnetic resonance microscopy properties appear to plateau as amorphous calcium carbonate droplets began to coalesce within the intrafibrillar space of collagen. In the third phase, after day 15, the amorphous mineral phase crystallized, resulting in a reduction in the absolute intensity of the collagen diffraction pattern. We speculate that magnetization transfer ratio values for collagen sponges, with similar collagen contents, increased from 0.25 ± 0.02 for control strips to a maximum value of 0.31 ± 0.04 at day 15 (p = 0.03) because mineral crystals greatly reduce the mobility of the collagen fibrils. PMID:18487295

  16. Ionic solutes impact collagen scaffold bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Pawelec, K M; Husmann, A; Wardale, R J; Best, S M; Cameron, R E

    2015-02-01

    The structure of ice-templated collagen scaffolds is sensitive to many factors. By adding 0.5 wt% of sodium chloride or sucrose to collagen slurries, scaffold structure could be tuned through changes in ice growth kinetics and interactions of the solute and collagen. With ionic solutes (sodium chloride) the entanglements of the collagen molecule decreased, leading to fibrous scaffolds with increased pore size and decreased attachment of chondrocytes. With non-ionic solutes (sucrose) ice growth was slowed, leading to significantly reduced pore size and up-regulated cell attachment. This highlights the large changes in structure and biological function stimulated by solutes in ice-templating systems. PMID:25649518

  17. Immune modulation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Dimitrios A; Geraldino-Pardilla, Laura; Bathon, Joan M

    2011-12-01

    The approval - several years ago - of the first tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitor for the management of rheumatoid arthritis launched a new era in the therapeutics of rheumatology. Since then an almost cataclysmic discovery of new treatment targets and corresponding biologic agents ensued. Nowadays, the rheumatologist and the rheumatologic patient have the luxury of several immune modulators available to successfully treat the majority of patients with RA or other inflammatory arthritides and conditions. In this review we focus on a discussion of the approved immune modulators/biologic agents available for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. We also present an overview of agents under development. For the immune modulators discussed, we describe their mechanism of action and summarise initial data and recent updates on efficacy and safety. PMID:22265267

  18. Microbial Infection and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Yu, Yangsheng; Yue, Yinshi; Zhang, Zhixin; Su, Kaihong

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex autoimmune disease affecting 1–2% of general worldwide population. The etiopathogenesis of RA involves the interplay of multiple genetic risk factors and environmental triggers. Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of RA. Recent clinical studies have shown the association of microbial infections with RA. Accumulated studies using animal models have also found that microbial infections can induce and/or exaggerate the symptoms of experimental arthritis. In this review, we have identified the most common microbial infections associated with RA in the literature and summarized the current evidence supporting their pathogenic role in RA. We also discussed the potential mechanisms whereby infection may promote the development of RA, such as generation of neo-autoantigens, induction of loss of tolerance by molecular mimicry, and bystander activation of the immune system. PMID:25133066

  19. Protective Effect of an Extract from Ascaris suum in Experimental Arthritis Models▿

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Francisco Airton Castro; Leite, Ana Karine Rocha Melo; Pompeu, Margarida Maria Lima; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; Verri, Waldiceu A.; Soares, Fernanda Macedo; Castro, Rondinelle Ribeiro; Cunha, Fernando Queiroz

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of an extract from a helminth (Ascaris suum) in zymosan-induced arthritis (ZYA) or collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Rats and mice, respectively, received 1 mg and 0.1 mg zymosan intra-articularly (i.a.). Test groups received an A. suum extract either per os (p.o.) or intraperitoneally (i.p.) 30 min prior to i.a. zymosan. Controls received saline. Hypernociception was measured using the articular incapacitation test. Cell influx, nitrite, and cytokine levels were assessed in joint exudates. The synovia and distal femoral extremities were used for histopathology. Cartilage damage was assessed through determining glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. DBA/1J mice were subjected to CIA. The test group received A. suum extract i.p. 1 day after CIA became clinically detectable. Clinical severity and hypernociception were assessed daily. Neutrophil influx was determined using myeloperoxidase activity. The A. suum extract, either i.p. or p.o., significantly and dose-dependently inhibited cell influx and hypernociception in ZYA in addition to reducing GAG loss and ameliorating synovitis. The A. suum extract reduced i.a. levels of NO, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-10 but not tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in rats subjected to ZYA while reducing i.a. IL-10, but not IL-1β or TNF-α, levels in mice. Clinically, mice subjected to CIA treated with the A. suum extract had less severe arthritis. Hypernociception, myeloperoxidase activity, and synovitis severity were significantly reduced. These data show that a helminth extract given p.o. protects from arthritis severity in two classical arthritis models. This A. suum effect is species independent and functions orally and parenterally. The results show clinical and structural benefits when A. suum extract is given either prophylactically or therapeutically. PMID:18411290

  20. Emerging immunotherapies for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Gary; Cooles, Faye AH; Isaacs, John D; Hilkens, Catharien MU

    2014-01-01

    Novel treatments in development for rheumatoid arthritis target 3 broad areas: cytokines, cells, and signaling pathways. Therapies from each domain share common advantages (for example previously demonstrated efficacy, potential long-term immunomodulation, and oral administration respectively) that have stimulated research in each area but also common obstacles to their development. In this review recent progress in each area will be discussed alongside the factors that have impeded their path to clinical use. PMID:24535556

  1. Collagen XII: Protecting bone and muscle integrity by organizing collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Chiquet, Matthias; Birk, David E; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Koch, Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Collagen XII, largest member of the fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helix (FACIT) family, assembles from three identical α-chains encoded by the COL12A1 gene. The molecule consists of three threadlike N-terminal noncollagenous NC3 domains, joined by disulfide bonds and a short interrupted collagen triple helix toward the C-terminus. Splice variants differ considerably in size and properties: "small" collagen XIIB (220 kDa subunit) is similar to collagen XIV, whereas collagen XIIA (350 kDa) has a much larger NC3 domain carrying glycosaminoglycan chains. Collagen XII binds to collagen I-containing fibrils via its collagenous domain, whereas its large noncollagenous arms interact with other matrix proteins such as tenascin-X. In dense connective tissues and bone, collagen XII is thought to regulate organization and mechanical properties of collagen fibril bundles. Accordingly, recent findings show that collagen XII mutations cause Ehlers-Danlos/myopathy overlap syndrome associated with skeletal abnormalities and muscle weakness in mice and humans. PMID:24801612

  2. Molecules in Focus: Collagen XII: Protecting bone and muscle integrity by organizing collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Matthias; Birk, David E.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Koch, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Collagen XII, largest member of the fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helix (FACIT) family, assembles from three identical α-chains encoded by the COL12A1 gene. The molecule consists of three threadlike N-terminal noncollagenous NC3 domains, joined by disulfide bonds and a short interrupted collagen triple helix towards the C-terminus. Splice variants differ considerably in size and properties: "small" collagen XIIB (220 kDa subunit) is similar to collagen XIV, whereas collagen XIIA (350 kDa) has a much larger NC3 domain carrying glycosaminoglycan chains. Collagen XII binds to collagen I-containing fibrils via its collagenous domain, whereas its large noncollagenous arms interact with other matrix proteins such as tenascin-X. In dense connective tissues and bone, collagen XII is thought to regulate organization and mechanical properties of collagen fibril bundles. Accordingly, recent findings show that collagen XII mutations cause Ehlers-Danlos/myopathy overlap syndrome associated with skeletal abnormalities and muscle weakness in mice and humans. PMID:24801612

  3. Phenotypic heterogeneity influences the behavior of rat aortic smooth muscle cells in collagen lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Orlandi, Augusto . E-mail: orlandi@uniroma2.it; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Gabbiani, Giulio; Spagnoli, Luigi Giusto; Ehrlich, Paul H.

    2005-12-10

    Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in atherosclerosis and restenosis involves responses to the surrounding microenvironment. SMCs obtained by enzymatic digestion from tunica media of newborn, young adult (YA) and old rats and from the thickened intima (TI) and underlying media of young adult rat aortas 15 days after ballooning were entrapped in floating populated collagen lattice (PCL). TI-SMCs elongated but were poor at PCL contraction and remodeling and expressed less {alpha}2 integrin compared to other SMCs that appeared more dendritic. During early phases of PCL contraction, SMCs showed a marked decrease in the expression of {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and myosin. SMCs other than TI-SMCs required 7 days to re-express {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and myosin. Only TI-SMCs in PCL were able to divide in 48 h, with a greater proportion in S and G2-M cell cycle phases compared to other SMCs. Anti-{alpha}2 integrin antibody markedly inhibited contraction but not proliferation in YA-SMC-PLCs; anti-{alpha}1 and anti-{alpha}2 integrin antibodies induced a similar slight inhibition in TI-SMC-PCLs. Finally, TI-SMCs rapidly migrated from PCL on plastic reacquiring their epithelioid phenotype. Heterogeneity in proliferation and cytoskeleton as well the capacity to remodel the extracellular matrix are maintained, when SMCs are suspended in PCLs.

  4. Nanolayered Features of Collagen-like Peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valluzzi, Regina; Bini, Elisabetta; Haas, Terry; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2003-01-01

    We have been investigating collagen-like model oligopeptides as molecular bases for complex ordered biomimetic materials. The collagen-like molecules incorporate aspects of native collagen sequence and secondary structure. Designed modifications to native primary and secondary structure have been incorporated to control the nanostructure and microstructure of the collagen-like materials produced. We find that the collagen-like molecules form a number of lyotropic rod liquid crystalline phases, which because of their strong temperature dependence in the liquid state can also be viewed as solvent intercalated thermotropic liquid crystals. The liquid crystalline phases formed by the molecules can be captured in the solid state by drying off solvent, resulting in solid nanopatterned (chemically and physically) thermally stable (to greater than 100 C) materials. Designed sequences which stabilize smectic phases have allowed a variety of nanoscale multilayered biopolymeric materials to be developed. Preliminary investigations suggest that chemical patterns running perpendicular to the smectic layer plane can be functionalized and used to localize a variety of organic, inorganic, and organometallic moieties in very simple multilayered nanocomposites. The phase behavior of collagen-like oligopeptide materials is described, emphasizing the correlation between mesophase, molecular orientation, and chemical patterning at the microscale and nanoscale. In many cases, the textures observed for smectic and hexatic phase collagens are remarkably similar to the complex (and not fully understood) helicoids observed in biological collagen-based tissues. Comparisons between biological morphologies and collagen model liquid crystalline (and solidified materials) textures may help us understand the molecular features which impart order and function to the extracellular matrix and to collagen-based mineralized tissues. Initial studies have utilized synthetic collagen-like peptides while

  5. Collagen structure: new tricks from a very old dog.

    PubMed

    Bella, Jordi

    2016-04-15

    The main features of the triple helical structure of collagen were deduced in the mid-1950s from fibre X-ray diffraction of tendons. Yet, the resulting models only could offer an average description of the molecular conformation. A critical advance came about 20 years later with the chemical synthesis of sufficiently long and homogeneous peptides with collagen-like sequences. The availability of these collagen model peptides resulted in a large number of biochemical, crystallographic and NMR studies that have revolutionized our understanding of collagen structure. High-resolution crystal structures from collagen model peptides have provided a wealth of data on collagen conformational variability, interaction with water, collagen stability or the effects of interruptions. Furthermore, a large increase in the number of structures of collagen model peptides in complex with domains from receptors or collagen-binding proteins has shed light on the mechanisms of collagen recognition. In recent years, collagen biochemistry has escaped the boundaries of natural collagen sequences. Detailed knowledge of collagen structure has opened the field for protein engineers who have used chemical biology approaches to produce hyperstable collagens with unnatural residues, rationally designed collagen heterotrimers, self-assembling collagen peptides, etc. This review summarizes our current understanding of the structure of the collagen triple helical domain (COL×3) and gives an overview of some of the new developments in collagen molecular engineering aiming to produce novel collagen-based materials with superior properties. PMID:27060106

  6. Laser welding and collagen crosslinks

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, K.M.; Last, J.A.; Small, W. IV; Maitland, D.J.; Heredia, N.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.

    1997-02-20

    Strength and stability of laser-welded tissue may be influenced, in part, by effects of laser exposure on collagen crosslinking. We therefore studied effects of diode laser exposure (805 nm, 1-8 watts, 30 seconds) + indocyanine green dye (ICG) on calf tail tendon collagen crosslinks. Effect of ICG dye alone on crosslink content prior to laser exposure was investigated; unexpectedly, we found that ICG-treated tissue had significantly increased DHLNL and OHP, but not HLNL. Laser exposure after ICG application reduced elevated DHLNL and OHP crosslink content down to their native levels. The monohydroxylated crosslink HLNL was inversely correlated with laser output (p<0.01 by linear regression analysis). DHLNL content was highly correlated with content of its maturational product, OHP, suggesting that precursor-product relations are maintained. We conclude that: (1)ICG alone induces DHLNL and OHP crosslink formation; (2)subsequent laser exposure reduces the ICG-induced crosslinks down to native levels; (3)excessive diode laser exposure destroys normally occurring HLNL crosslinks.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: collagen VI-related myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions collagen VI-related myopathy collagen VI-related myopathy Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Collagen VI-related myopathy is a group of disorders ...

  8. Oleanolic acid acetate inhibits rheumatoid arthritis by modulating T cell immune responses and matrix-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Kim, Sung-Wan; Kim, Duk-Sil; Lee, Jong Yeong; Lee, Soyoung; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Ha, Yeong Su; Yoo, Jeongsoo; Park, Pil-Hoon; Shin, Tae-Yong; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Rho, Mun-Chual; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease associated with a combination of synovium joint inflammation, synovium hyperplasia, and destruction of cartilage and bone. Oleanolic acid acetate (OAA), a compound isolated from Vigna angularis, has been known to possess pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammation and anti-bone destruction. In this study, we investigated the effects of OAA on RA and the underlying mechanisms of action by using a type-II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-stimulated RA synovial fibroblasts. Oral administration of OAA decreased the clinical arthritis symptoms, paw thickness, histologic and radiologic changes, and serum total and anti-type II collagen IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a levels. OAA administration reduced Th1/Th17 phenotype CD4(+) T lymphocyte expansions and inflammatory cytokine productions in T cell activated draining lymph nodes and spleen. OAA reduced the expression and production of inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1/3, in the ankle joint tissue and RA synovial fibroblasts by down-regulating Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and nuclear factor-κB. Our results clearly support that OAA plays a therapeutic role in RA pathogenesis by modulating helper T cell immune responses and matrix-degrading enzymes. The immunosuppressive effects of OAA were comparable to dexamethasone and ketoprofen. We provide evidences that OAA could be a potential therapeutic candidate for RA. PMID:26570984

  9. Osteoarticular Expression of Musashi-1 in an Experimental Model of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    O'Valle, Francisco; Peregrina, Magdalena; Crespo-Lora, Vicente; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Roman, Maria; Aneiros-Fernandez, Jose; Aguilar, David; Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; Delgado, Mario; Hernandez-Cortes, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a murine experimental disease model induced by immunization with type II collagen (CII), is used to evaluate novel therapeutic strategies for rheumatoid arthritis. Adult stem cell marker Musashi-1 (Msi1) plays an important role in regulating the maintenance and differentiation of stem/precursor cells. The objectives of this investigation were to perform a morphological study of the experimental CIA model, evaluate the effect of TNFα-blocker (etanercept) treatment, and determine the immunohistochemical expression of Msi1 protein. Methods. CIA was induced in 50 male DBA1/J mice for analyses of tissue and serum cytokine; clinical and morphological lesions in limbs; and immunohistochemical expression of Msi1. Results. Clinically, TNFα-blocker treatment attenuated CIA on day 32 after immunization (P < 0.001). Msi1 protein expression was significantly higher in joints damaged by CIA than in those with no lesions (P < 0.0001) and was related to the severity of the lesions (Spearman's rho = 0.775, P = 0.0001). Conclusions. Treatment with etanercept attenuates osteoarticular lesions in the murine CIA model. Osteoarticular expression of Msi1 protein is increased in joints with CIA-induced lesion and absent in nonlesioned joints, suggesting that this protein is expressed when the lesion is produced in order to favor tissue repair. PMID:26064941

  10. Cartilage collagen analysis in the chondrodystrophies.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Chou, J W; Machado, M A

    1985-09-01

    A simple and reproducible method for analyzing small samples of cartilage collagens was developed. Following extraction with guanidine HCl, the cartilage specimens were digested directly with CNBr and the resultant peptides separated by gel-permeation high-performance liquid chromatography. Resting cartilage collagen CNBr peptide maps differed from normal in two inherited chondrodystrophies, achondrogenesis II and spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. PMID:4053564

  11. Pseudomembranous collagenous colitis with superimposed drug damage.

    PubMed

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Cristina, Silvia; Muscarà, Maurizio; Saettone, Silvia; Broglia, Laura; Antonelli, Elisabetta; Salemme, Marianna; Occhipinti, Pietro; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2013-11-01

    Pseudomembranous collagenous colitis is a rare pathological condition, not related to infectious agents, and characterized by thickening of the subepithelial collagen and formation of pseudomembranes. We report one such case, which responded to budesonide treatment after failures of previous approaches given, being unaware of the correct diagnosis. PMID:24080283

  12. A novel benign solution for collagen processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoult, Olivier

    Collagen is the main protein constituting the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tissues in the body (skin, cartilage, blood vessels...). It exists many types of collagen, this work studies only fibrillar collagen (e.g. collagen type I contained in the skin) that exhibits a triple helical structure composed of 3 alpha-helical collagen chains. This particular and defined hierarchical structure is essential to the biological and mechanical properties of the collagen. Processing collagen into scaffolds to mimic the ECM is crucial for successful tissue engineering. Recently collagen was processed into fibrous and porous scaffold using electrospinning process. However the solvent (HFIP) used for electrospinning is extremely toxic for the user and expensive. This work shows that HFIP can be replaced by a benign mixture composed of water, salt and alcohol. Yet only three alcohols (methanol, ethanol and iso-propanol) enable the dissolution of large quantity of collagen in the benign mixture, with a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, and conserve the collagen hierarchical structure at least as well as the HFIP. Collagen can be electrospun from the benign mixture into sub-micron fibers with concentrations as low as 6 wt-% for a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, with at least 10wt-% of salt, and any of the three alcohols. Specific conditions yield nano size fibers. After processing from HFIP or a benign mixture, collagen is water soluble and needs to be chemically crosslink for tissue engineering application. Post-crosslinking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) results in the loss of the scaffold fibrous aspect and porosity, hence it is useless for tissue engineering. Such issue could be prevented by incorporating the crosslinker into the mixture prior to electrospinning. When EDC is used alone, collagen forms a gel in the mixture within minutes, preventing electrospinning. The addition of N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in excess to EDC

  13. Photoinduced effect of hypericin on collagen and tissues with high collagen content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yova, Dido M.; Theodossiou, Theodossis; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.

    1999-01-01

    The photoinduced effects of hypericin, a polycyclic quinone, on collagen has been investigated. It was found that after laser irradiation at both 532 nm and 337 nm, the spectral form of triple helix structure collagen fluorescence, changed to a spectral profile bearing resemblance to that of its polypeptide single chain counterpart, gelatin, or heated collagen. The effect of Chlorin e6 on collagen was also investigated and proved to be dissimilar to that of hypericin and not indicative of profound structural alterations. Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) of 1064 nm- nanosecond laser radiation in collagen was studied. While it was very efficient for pure collagen, the signal intensity was found to diminish by at least an order of magnitude after hypericin photosensitization or heating. The above noted fluorescence spectra form alteration was also observed in a smaller scale in collagen rich chicken tissue (tendon). Non sensitized chicken tendon tissue exhibited very efficient SHG, unlike skin and artery samples.

  14. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di

    2015-03-15

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations.

  15. Bioengineered collagens: emerging directions for biomedical materials.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, John A M; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  16. Intraarticular corticosteroids in refractory childhood Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nimmrich, S; Becker, I; Horneff, G

    2014-07-01

    Lyme arthritis caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is a common late manifestation of Lyme borreliosis. Current treatment recommendations include at least one oral or intravenous antibiotic course, followed by antirheumatic therapy in case of refractory arthritis. We reviewed the course of 31 children with Lyme arthritis who had received antibiotic treatment and assessed outcome and requirement of antirheumatic therapy. Of a total of 31 patients, 23 (74%) showed complete resolution of arthritis after one or two courses of antibiotics, whereas in 8 patients (28%), steroid injections had been performed due to relapsing or remaining symptoms. All of these 8 patients showed immediate resolution of symptoms after intraarticular steroid injections. Four of them (50%) remained asymptomatic so far with a follow-up period between five up to 40 months. In two cases, multiple intraarticular corticosteroid injections were required; three patients received additional or consecutive treatment with systemic antirheumatic treatment. Patients with antibiotic refractory arthritis showed a higher rate of positivity of the IgG p58 and OspC immunoblot bands (p = 0.05) at presentation. Antibodies against OspA, an indicator of later stage infection, occurred more frequently in the refractory group without reaching significant level. No clinical marker as indicator for severe or prolonged course of Lyme arthritis was identifiable. A quarter of childhood Lyme arthritis patients were refractory to antibiotics and required antirheumatic treatment. Intraarticular steroid injections in childhood Lyme arthritis refractory to antibiotics can lead to marked clinical improvement. PMID:24390634

  17. Brucellar sternoclavicular arthritis, the forgotten complication.

    PubMed

    Mousa, A M; Muhtaseb, S A; Al-Mudallal, D S; Marafie, A A; Habib, F M

    1988-06-01

    Of 511 cases of brucellosis studied between December 1983 and February 1986, four (0.8%) had sternoclavicular (STCL) arthritis. Two were male and two female, and only one was younger than 50 years old. All four cases had significantly high specific IgG antibody titres (1 of 1280), measured by the indirect immunofluorescent (IIF) test, and two had Brucella melitensis isolated from their blood. In two cases, STCL arthritis was the presenting problem, and it was associated in one with ankle arthritis, hepatitis, renal impairment, orogenital ulcers and a haematological picture of myelodysplasia; in the other it was a relapsing STCL arthritis. In the remaining two cases, STCL arthritis was part of an extensive osteoarticular disease, which was associated in one with cachexia, liver cirrhosis, heart failure and prostatitis with urine retention, and in the other with severe thrombocytopenia. Excellent results were obtained from six to eight weeks' therapy with streptomycin, rifampicin and cotrimoxazole or tetracycline. PMID:3250341

  18. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  19. Olfactory ecto-mesenchymal stem cells possess immunoregulatory function and suppress autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Ke; Zhang, Zhijiang; Tian, Jie; Lin, Xiang; Wang, Xiaohui; Ma, Jie; Tang, Xinyi; Xu, Huaxi; Lu, Liwei; Wang, Shengjun

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have identified olfactory ecto-mesenchymal stem cells (OE-MSCs) as a new type of resident stem cell in the olfactory lamina propria. However, it remains unclear whether OE-MSCs possess any immunoregulatory functions. In this study, we found that mouse OE-MSCs expressed higher transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-10 levels than bone marrow-derived MSCs. In culture, OE-MSCs exerted their immunosuppressive capacity via directly suppressing effector T-cell proliferation and increasing regulatory T (Treg) cell expansion. In mice with collagen-induced arthritis, adoptive transfer of OE-MSCs markedly suppressed arthritis onset and disease severity, which was accompanied by increased Treg cells and reduced Th1/Th17 cell responses in vivo. Taken together, our findings identified a novel function of OE-MSCs in regulating T-cell responses, indicating that OE-MSCs may represent a new cell therapy for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:26388237

  20. B1a cells play a pathogenic role in the development of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Chen, Qian; Sun, Xiaoxuan; Xiao, Fan; Ko, King-Hung; Zhang, Miaojia; Lu, Liwei

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated functions of B1 cells have been implicated in the disease progression of various autoimmune disorders, but it remains largely unclear whether B1 cells are involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis. In this study, we found that peritoneal B1a cells underwent proliferation and migrated to the inflamed joint tissue with upregulated RANKL expression during collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) development in mice. Adoptive transfer of B1a cells exacerbated arthritic severity and joint damage while intraperitoneal depletion of B1 cells ameliorated both arthritic symptoms and joint pathology in CIA mice. In culture, RANKL-expressing B1a cells significantly promoted the expansion of osteoclasts derived from bone marrow cells, which were in accord with the in vivo findings of increased osteoclastogenesis in CIA mice transferred with B1a cells. Together, these results have demonstrated a pathogenic role of B1a cells in the development of autoimmune arthritis through RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis. PMID:27014914

  1. Novel suppressive function of transitional 2 B cells in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jamie G; Chavez-Rueda, Karina A; Eddaoudi, Ayad; Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut; Rawlings, David J; Ehrenstein, Michael R; Mauri, Claudia

    2007-06-15

    The immune system contains natural regulatory cells important in the maintenance of tolerance. Although this suppressive function is usually attributed to CD4 regulatory T cells, recent reports have revealed an immunoregulatory role for IL-10-producing B cells in the context of several autoimmune diseases including collagen-induced arthritis. In the present study, we attribute this suppressive function to a B cell subset expressing high levels of CD21, CD23, and IgM, previously identified as transitional 2-marginal zone precursor (T2-MZP) B cells. T2-MZP B cells are present in the spleens of naive mice and increase during the remission phase of arthritis. Following adoptive transfer to immunized DBA/1 mice, T2-MZP B cells significantly prevented new disease and ameliorated established disease. The suppressive effect on arthritis was paralleled by an inhibition of Ag-specific T cell activation and a reduction in cells exhibiting Th1-type functional responses. We also provide evidence that this regulatory subset mediates its suppression through the secretion of suppressive cytokines and not by cell-to-cell contact. The ability to regulate an established immune response by T2-MZP B cells endows this subset of B cells with a striking and previously unrecognized immunoregulatory potential. PMID:17548625

  2. Arthritis Induces Early Bone High Turnover, Structural Degradation and Mechanical Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Bruno; Cascão, Rita; Vale, Ana Catarina; Cavaleiro, Inês; Vaz, Maria Fátima; Brito, José Américo Almeida; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2015-01-01

    Background We have previously found in the chronic SKG mouse model of arthritis that long standing (5 and 8 months) inflammation directly leads to high collagen bone turnover, disorganization of the collagen network, disturbed bone microstructure and degradation of bone biomechanical properties. The main goal of the present work was to study the effects of the first days of the inflammatory process on the microarchitecture and mechanical properties of bone. Methods Twenty eight Wistar adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats were monitored during 22 days after disease induction for the inflammatory score, ankle perimeter and body weight. Healthy non-arthritic rats were used as controls for compar-ison. After 22 days of disease progression rats were sacrificed and bone samples were collected for histomorphometrical, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopical analysis and 3-point bending. Blood samples were also collected for bone turnover markers. Results AIA rats had an increased bone turnover (as inferred from increased P1NP and CTX1, p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0002, respectively) and this was paralleled by a decreased mineral content (calcium p = 0.0046 and phos-phorus p = 0.0046). Histomorphometry showed a lower trabecular thickness (p = 0.0002) and bone volume (p = 0.0003) and higher trabecular sepa-ration (p = 0.0009) in the arthritic group as compared with controls. In addition, bone mechanical tests showed evidence of fragility as depicted by diminished values of yield stress and ultimate fracture point (p = 0.0061 and p = 0.0279, re-spectively) in the arthritic group. Conclusions We have shown in an AIA rat model that arthritis induc-es early bone high turnover, structural degradation, mineral loss and mechanical weak-ness. PMID:25617902

  3. Porphyromonas gingivalis Peptidylarginine Deiminase, a Key Contributor in the Pathogenesis of Experimental Periodontal Disease and Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gully, Neville; Bright, Richard; Marino, Victor; Marchant, Ceilidh; Cantley, Melissa; Haynes, David; Butler, Catherine; Dashper, Stuart; Reynolds, Eric; Bartold, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the suggested role of Porphyromonas gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) in the relationship between the aetiology of periodontal disease and experimentally induced arthritis and the possible association between these two conditions. Methods A genetically modified PAD-deficient strain of P. gingivalis W50 was produced. The effect of this strain, compared to the wild type, in an established murine model for experimental periodontitis and experimental arthritis was assessed. Experimental periodontitis was induced following oral inoculation with the PAD-deficient and wild type strains of P. gingivalis. Experimental arthritis was induced via the collagen antibody induction process and was monitored by assessment of paw swelling and micro-CT analysis of the radio-carpal joints. Experimental periodontitis was monitored by micro CT scans of the mandible and histological assessment of the periodontal tissues around the mandibular molars. Serum levels of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) and P. gingivalis were assessed by ELISA. Results The development of experimental periodontitis was significantly reduced in the presence of the PAD-deficient P. gingivalis strain. When experimental arthritis was induced in the presence of the PAD-deficient strain there was less paw swelling, less erosive bone damage to the joints and reduced serum ACPA levels when compared to the wild type P. gingivalis inoculated group. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that a PAD-deficient strain of P. gingivalis was associated with significantly reduced periodontal inflammation. In addition the extent of experimental arthritis was significantly reduced in animals exposed to prior induction of periodontal disease through oral inoculation of the PAD-deficient strain versus the wild type. This adds further evidence to the potential role for P. gingivalis and its PAD in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and exacerbation of arthritis. Further studies are now

  4. Circadian rhythms: glucocorticoids and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Sulli, Alberto; Pizzorni, Carmen; Secchi, Maria Elena; Soldano, Stefano; Seriolo, Bruno; Straub, Rainer H; Otsa, Kati; Maestroni, Georges J

    2006-06-01

    Circadian rhythms are driven by biological clocks and are endogenous in origin. Therefore, circadian changes in the metabolism or secretion of endogenous glucocorticoids are certainly responsible in part for the time-dependent changes observed in the inflammatory response and arthritis. More recently, melatonin (MLT), another circadian hormone that is the secretory product of the pineal gland, has been found implicated in the time-dependent inflammatory reaction with effects opposite those of cortisol. Interestingly, cortisol and MLT show an opposite response to the light. The light conditions in the early morning have a strong impact on the morning cortisol peak, whereas MLT is synthesized in a strictly nocturnal pattern. Recently, a diurnal rhythmicity in healthy humans between cellular (Th1 type) or humoral (Th2 type) immune responses has been found and related to immunomodulatory actions of cortisol and MLT. The interferon (IFN)-gamma/interleukin (IL)-10 ratio peaked during the early morning and correlated negatively with plasma cortisol and positively with plasma MLT. Accordingly, the intensity of the arthritic pain varies consistently as a function of the hour of the day: pain is greater after waking up in the morning than in the afternoon or evening. The reduced cortisol and adrenal androgen secretion, observed during testing in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients not treated with glucocoticoids, should be clearly considered as a "relative adrenal insufficiency" in the presence of a sustained inflammatory process, and allows Th1 type cytokines to be produced in higher amounts during the late night. In conclusion, the right timing (early morning) for the glucocorticoid therapy in arthritis is fundamental and well justified by the circadian rhythms of the inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:16855156

  5. Food-induced (allergic) arthritis. Inflammatory arthritis exacerbated by milk.

    PubMed

    Panush, R S; Stroud, R M; Webster, E M

    1986-02-01

    Suggestive, but largely unproven, observations have associated arthritis with environmental antigens, including foods. We studied a patient with inflammatory arthritis in a prospective, "blinded," controlled fashion to determine whether her symptoms were associated with food sensitivities. This 52-year-old white woman with 11 years of class I, stage I, active disease, had symptomatic exacerbations allegedly associated with meat, milk, and beans. We observed an increase in symptoms following an unblinded food challenge and then studied her in our clinical research unit. On her normal diet for 6 days, she averaged 30 minutes of morning stiffness, 9 tender joints, 3 swollen joints, 87% subjective assessment (100% = best possible), and 89% examiner assessment. While she was fasting (3 days) or taking Vivonex (2 days), we noted no morning stiffness, tender joint score of 1, swollen joint score of 0, and assessments of 100% (P less than 0.05 versus normal diet). She was then nourished with Vivonex for 33 days without difficulty and challenged in a blinded fashion at mealtimes with lyophilized foods placed into opaque capsules. Four milk challenges (equivalent to greater than or equal to 8 ounces per meal) produced up to 30 minutes of morning stiffness, 14 tender joints, 4 swollen joints, subjective assessment of 85%, and objective assessment of 80% (P less than 0.05 versus fasting-Vivonex), peaking 24-48 hours postchallenge. Placebo and other foods (lettuce and carrots) were without effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3513771

  6. Imaging techniques in childhood arthritis.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H T; Mandell, G A; Cassell, I L

    1997-08-01

    Technological advances in imaging have given physicians caring for children with arthritis a greater opportunity to detect abnormalities early in the course of a disease and better methods for monitoring chronic changes. Indications for using radiography, bone densitometry, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, CT scanning, and MR imaging are discussed in this article. In this era of managed care, the practicing clinician is urged more than ever to consult with the radiologist in selecting the study or sequence of studies to be used in particular case. In this way, evaluation can be limited to the most effective strategy from both the clinical and cost perspectives. PMID:9287376

  7. Arthritis in the Durer family.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M

    2007-01-01

    Deciphering the secret language of painters became a discipline into which Art historians have branched ever since the Renaissance. Various aspects of paintings and sculptures were decoded in this process. This decoding system remains however incomplete without interpreting also the medical conditions that appear in the painted subjects. History of Medicine and of Arts could be both enriched by diagnosing retrospectively diseases existent in that historical period; by identifying portraits or describing genetic family diseases. One such case is the arthritis identifiable in three out of four artists in the Durer family, visible in paintings or engravings of the early 16-th century. PMID:17943408

  8. Nonlinear optical response of the collagen triple helix and second harmonic microscopy of collagen liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniset-Besseau, A.; De Sa Peixoto, P.; Duboisset, J.; Loison, C.; Hache, F.; Benichou, E.; Brevet, P.-F.; Mosser, G.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2010-02-01

    Collagen is characterized by triple helical domains and plays a central role in the formation of fibrillar and microfibrillar networks, basement membranes, as well as other structures of the connective tissue. Remarkably, fibrillar collagen exhibits efficient Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and SHG microscopy proved to be a sensitive tool to score fibrotic pathologies. However, the nonlinear optical response of fibrillar collagen is not fully characterized yet and quantitative data are required to further process SHG images. We therefore performed Hyper-Rayleigh Scattering (HRS) experiments and measured a second order hyperpolarisability of 1.25 10-27 esu for rat-tail type I collagen. This value is surprisingly large considering that collagen presents no strong harmonophore in its amino-acid sequence. In order to get insight into the physical origin of this nonlinear process, we performed HRS measurements after denaturation of the collagen triple helix and for a collagen-like short model peptide [(Pro-Pro-Gly)10]3. It showed that the collagen large nonlinear response originates in the tight alignment of a large number of weakly efficient harmonophores, presumably the peptide bonds, resulting in a coherent amplification of the nonlinear signal along the triple helix. To illustrate this mechanism, we successfully recorded SHG images in collagen liquid solutions by achieving liquid crystalline ordering of the collagen triple helices.

  9. Cloning of an annelid fibrillar-collagen gene and phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate and invertebrate collagens.

    PubMed

    Sicot, F X; Exposito, J Y; Masselot, M; Garrone, R; Deutsch, J; Gaill, F

    1997-05-15

    Arenicola marina possesses cuticular and interstitial collagens, which are mostly synthesised by its epidermis. A cDNA library was constructed from the body wall. This annelid cDNA library was screened with a sea-urchin-collagen cDNA probe, and several overlapping clones were isolated. Nucleotide sequencing of these clones revealed an open reading frame of 2052 nucleotides. The translation product exhibits a triple helical domain of 138 Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats followed by a 269-residue-long C-terminal non-collagenous domain (C-propeptide). The triple helical domain exhibits an imperfection that has been previously described in a peptide produced by cyanogen bromide digestion (CNBr peptide) of A. marina interstitial collagen. This imperfection occurs at the same place in the interstitial collagen of the vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila. This identifies the clone as coding for the C-terminal part of a fibrillar collagen chain. It was called FAm1alpha, for fibrillar collagen 1alpha chain of A. marina. The non-collagenous domain possesses a structure similar to carboxy-terminal propeptides of fibrillar pro-alpha chains. Only six conserved cysteine residues are observed in A. marina compared with seven or eight in all other known C-propeptides. This provides information on the importance of disulfide bonds in C-propeptide interactions and in the collagen-assembly process. Phylogenetic studies indicate that the fibrillar collagen 1alpha chain of A. marina is homologous to the R. pachyptila interstitial collagen and that the FAm1alpha gene evolved independently from the other alpha-chain genes. Complementary analyses indicate that the vertebrate fibrillar collagen family is composed of two monophyletic subgroups with a specific position of the collagen type-V chains. PMID:9210465

  10. The Mineral–Collagen Interface in Bone

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The interface between collagen and the mineral reinforcement phase, carbonated hydroxyapatite (cAp), is essential for bone’s remarkable functionality as a biological composite material. The very small dimensions of the cAp phase and the disparate natures of the reinforcement and matrix are essential to the material’s performance but also complicate study of this interface. This article summarizes what is known about the cAp-collagen interface in bone and begins with descriptions of the matrix and reinforcement roles in composites, of the phases bounding the interface, of growth of cAp growing within the collagen matrix, and of the effect of intra- and extrafibrilar mineral on determinations of interfacial properties. Different observed interfacial interactions with cAp (collagen, water, non-collagenous proteins) are reviewed; experimental results on interface interactions during loading are reported as are their influence on macroscopic mechanical properties; conclusions of numerical modeling of interfacial interactions are also presented. The data suggest interfacial interlocking (bending of collagen molecules around cAp nanoplatelets) and water-mediated bonding between collagen and cAp are essential to load transfer. The review concludes with descriptions of areas where new research is needed to improve understanding of how the interface functions. PMID:25824581

  11. Single-molecule studies of collagen mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Nancy; Rezaei, Naghmeh; Kirkness, Michael

    Collagen is the fundamental structural protein in vertebrates. Its triple helical structure at the molecular level is believed to be strongly related to its mechanical role in connective tissues. However, the mechanics of collagen at the single-molecule level remain contentious. Estimates of its persistence length span an order of magnitude, from 15-180 nm for this biopolymer of 300 nm contour length. How collagen responds to applied force is also controversial, with different single-molecule studies suggesting one of three different responses: extending entropically, overwinding, or unwinding, all at forces below 10 pN. Using atomic force microscopy to image collagens deposited from solution, we find that their flexibility depends strongly on ionic strength and pH. To study force-dependent structural changes, we are performing highly parallelized enzymatic cleavage assays of triple helical collagen in our new compact centrifuge force microscope. Because proteolytic cleavage requires a locally unwound triple helix, these experiments are revealing how local collagen structure changes in response to applied force. Our results can help to resolve long-standing debates about collagen mechanics and structure at the molecular level.

  12. Age-related crosslink in skin collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M.; Mechanic, G.

    1986-05-01

    A stable crosslinking amino acid was isolated from mature bovine skin collagen and its structure was identified as histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry and /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C-NMR. This newly identified crosslink has a linkage between C-2 histidine and C-6 of lysine in the latter's portion of hydroxylysinonorleucine. Quantitative studies using various aged samples of cow and human skin collagen indicated that this acid-heat stable nonreducible compound was the major age-related crosslink. In case of cow skin collagen, for example, during early embryonic development (3 and 5 month old embryos) the content of HHL stayed less than 0.01 residue/mole of collagen, however from the middle of gestation period (7 month old embryo) through the maturation stage it showed rapid increase with age and reached approximately 0.5 residues/mole of collagen in the 3 year old animal. Small increments (up to 0.65 res/mole of collagen) were observed in the 9 year old cow. The amounts of the crosslink unlike pyridinoline do not decrease with aging. Similar patterns were observed in human skin collagen.

  13. Collagen-platelet interactions: recognition and signalling.

    PubMed

    Farndale, Richard W; Siljander, Pia R; Onley, David J; Sundaresan, Pavithra; Knight, C Graham; Barnes, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    The collagen-platelet interaction is central to haemostasis and may be a critical determinant of arterial thrombosis, where subendothelium is exposed after rupture of atherosclerotic plaque. Recent research has capitalized on the cloning of an important signalling receptor for collagen, glycoprotein VI, which is expressed only on platelets, and on the use of collagen-mimetic peptides as specific tools for both glycoprotein VI and integrin alpha 2 beta 1. We have identified sequences, GPO and GFOGER (where O denotes hydroxyproline), within collagen that are recognized by the collagen receptors glycoprotein VI and integrin alpha 2 beta 1 respectively, allowing their signalling properties and specific functional roles to be examined. Triple-helical peptides containing these sequences were used to show the signalling potential of integrin alpha 2 beta 1, and to confirm its important contribution to platelet adhesion. Glycoprotein VI appears to operate functionally on the platelet surface as a dimer, which recognizes GPO motifs that are separated by four triplets of collagen sequence. These advances will allow the relationship between the structure of collagen and its haemostatic activity to be established. PMID:14587284

  14. Nanoscale Mechanics of Type I Collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, H.; Cropper, E.; Bulger, A.; Choksi, U.; Koob, T. J.; Pandit, S.; Matthews, W. G.

    2009-03-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in the body by mass. Type I collagen fibrils provide mechanical strength and cellular housing within tissues exhibiting a broad range of mechanical properties. This diversity in the mechanics of tissues with similar underlying components warrants detailed study of the process by which structure and mechanics develop. While collagen mechanics have been studied at the tissue level for decades, surprising little is known about collagen mechanics at the fibril and molecular level. Presented herein is a multi-scale experimental and computational investigation of collagen I mechanics, bridging the single molecule and fibril hierarchal forms. The mechanics of single collagen molecules are explored using AFM and force spectroscopy. Moreover, atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations are performed to provide structural information not accessible to the experimental system. Fibrils then are grown from molecular collagen, and the mechanics of these fibrils are investigated using AFM. Based upon the single molecule and fibril results, a coarse-grain computational model is being developed. The outcomes include a better understanding of how the mechanics of filamentous self-organizing systems are derived and how their hierarchical forms are established.

  15. Transfer of spleen cells expanded by T cell growth factor suppresses arthritis induced in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, H; Tsunematsu, T

    1987-01-01

    The effects of transfer of T cell growth factor (TCGF)-expanded spleen cells after concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation into syngeneic Lewis rats were studied. The recipient rats were immunized with complete Freund's adjuvant for induction of adjuvant arthritis (AA) or chick type II collagen in incomplete Freund's adjuvant for induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) on day 0. Each of 5 X 10(7) cultured cells without mitogenic stimulation, 2 X 10(7) Con A-stimulated cells, or 1 X 10(7) TCGF-expanded cells cultured for 8 days (4 days X 2 culture cycles) after Con A stimulation was given on days 0 and 7. Both transfers of the cultured cells without stimulation and TCGF-expanded cells markedly diminished the severity of AA and CIA. On the contrary, transfer of Con A-stimulated cells led to no suppressive activity. In addition, transfer to TCGF-expanded cells significantly lowered the titre of anti-type II collagen antibody compared to that of control rats. The transfer of 1 X 10(7) TCGF-expanded cells was optimal for suppressing AA, in terms of cell number. This observation suggests that these cells were much more effective than were the unstimulated cultured cells, for which more than five times the number was required for the same suppressive activity. As far as the phenotypic proportion of helper (W3/13) and suppressor (OX-8) cells is concerned, we found no significant differences between the cultured cell groups and the freshly separated spleen cell group. The precise mechanism of these suppressive effects is the subject of further study. The transfer of TCGF-expanded cells appears to have a potent immunomodulatory effect. PMID:3497743

  16. The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR): therapeutic target and predictive biological marker in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Pnina; Cohen, Shira

    2016-09-01

    The Gi protein-associated A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) is over-expressed in inflammatory cells, and this high expression is also reflected in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with autoimmune inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease. CF101, a selective agonist with high affinity to the A3AR, is known to induce robust anti-inflammatory effect in experimental animal models of adjuvant-, collagen-, and tropomyosin-induced arthritis. The effect is mediated via a definitive molecular mechanism entailing deregulation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the Wnt signal transduction pathways resulting in apoptosis of inflammatory cells. CF101 was found to be safe and well tolerated in all preclinical, phase I, and phase II human clinical studies. In two phase II clinical studies where CF101 was administered to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients as a stand-alone drug, a significant anti-rheumatic effect and a direct significant correlation were found between receptor expression at baseline and patients' response to the drug, suggesting that A3AR may be utilized as a predictive biomarker. The A3AR is a promising therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis and can be used also as a biological marker to predict patients' response to CF101. This is a unique type of a personalized medicine approach which may pave the way for a safe and efficacious treatment for this patient population. PMID:26886128

  17. Collagen plug occlusion of Molteno tube shunts.

    PubMed

    Stewart, W; Feldman, R M; Gross, R L

    1993-01-01

    We report five patients in whom collagen lacrimal plugs were used to temporarily occlude the lumen of Molteno shunts to prevent early postoperative hypotony. Only one eye, with a double plate, developed hypotony and a flat anterior chamber that required reformation. However, in three patients, the collagen plugs did not dissolve and had to be removed surgically to lower the intraocular pressure. Although the semipermeability of collagen is desirable, its unpredictable degradation renders it unsuitable for temporary occlusion of tube shunts. Other biodegradable materials may be more appropriate for this purpose. PMID:8446334

  18. Collagen stability, hydration and native state.

    PubMed

    Mogilner, Inés G; Ruderman, Graciela; Grigera, J Raúl

    2002-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a collagen-like peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)4-Pro-Hyp-Ala-(Pro-Hyp-Gly)5 have been done in order to study the contribution of the hydration structure on keeping the native structure of collagen. The simulation shows that the absence of water produces a distortion on the molecular conformation and an increase in the number of intra-molecular hydrogen bonds. This is in agreement with previous experimental results showing the stiffness of collagen under severe drying and its increase in the thermal stability. This dehydrated material does not keep, however, the native structure. PMID:12463639

  19. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raciborski, Filip; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5–1%). According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000–157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems): M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment. PMID:27407258

  20. [Imaging modalities in psoriatic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Hermann, K-G A; Ohrndorf, S; Werner, S G; Finzel, S; Backhaus, M

    2013-10-01

    This review presents an overview of the range of imaging modalities used in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Conventional radiography is used to detect structural changes of the joints and tendon attachments. These changes occur late in the course of PsA hence conventional radiography contributes little to the early detection of PsA; however, the detection of periosteal proliferations on radiographs allows a relatively specific diagnosis of PsA. Skeletal scintigraphy and computed tomography are rarely used in PsA. Arthrosonography (ultrasound of the joints) is gaining increasing importance in the early identification of inflammatory soft tissue signs of PsA in the peripheral joints. Sonography enables early detection of synovitis and tenosynovitis as well as superficial erosions and also inflammatory processes of the tendon attachments. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for identifying possible involvement of the axial skeleton. Moreover, it allows good visualization of periostitis and arthritis. High resolution microcomputed tomography is an interesting novel diagnostic tool which allows highly sensitive evaluation of the bone structure and can detect very tiny bone lesions where typical signs of PsA are omega-shaped erosions and small corona-like spikes. Another interesting new diagnostic technique is fluorescence optical imaging (FOI) with the Xiralite system which is highly sensitive for detecting inflammatory processes of the hands. PMID:24085530

  1. [Reiter disease or reactive arthritis?].

    PubMed

    Eppinger, S; Schmitt, J; Meurer, M

    2006-04-01

    There is an ongoing international discussion on whether the condition reactive arthritis should be named after a former Nazi functionary. The German dermatological community should participate in this debate. In 1916, Hans Reiter described a disease with the symptoms urethritis, conjunctivitis, and arthritis, which was later named after him. After becoming titular professor in May 1918, Reiter was appointed director of the regional public health department Mecklenburg-Schwerin in 1926. At the same time he taught social hygiene at the University of Rostock, where he was appointed full professor in 1928. In 1931, Hans Reiter became a member of the National Socialist German Workers Party (NSDAP). In July 1932 he was elected representative of the NSDAP to the seventh assembly of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. After becoming its acting director in July 1933, Reiter was appointed president of the Reich public health department in Berlin on October 1, 1933. Both his excellent professional qualifications, as well as his National Socialist attitudes, were considered key criteria for taking over this important position. As the president of the Reich public health department, Reiter was said to have known about the conduct of experiments with typhus-fever at the concentration camp Buchenwald in which 250 humans died. From the end of the Second World War until 1947, Reiter was imprisoned in the Nuremberg Prison for War Criminals, but never convicted of a crime. PMID:17419129

  2. Diet therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Panush, R S; Carter, R L; Katz, P; Kowsari, B; Longley, S; Finnie, S

    1983-04-01

    Although diet therapy for arthritis has received considerable publicity, there is little objective information about its efficacy. We undertook a 10-week, controlled, double-blind, randomized trial of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-six patients completed the study; 11 were on an experimental diet (a specific popular diet free of additives, preservatives, fruit, red meat, herbs, and dairy products) and 15 were on a "placebo" diet. Of 183 variables analyzed, there were no clinically important differences among rheumatologic, laboratory, immunologic, radiologic, or nutritional findings between patients on experimental and placebo diets. Six RA patients on the placebo and 5 on the experimental diet improved by objective criteria. Improvement averaged 29% for patients on placebo and 32% for patients on experimental diets. Two patients on the experimental diet improved notably, elected to remain on the experimental diet following the study period, have continued to improve, and noted exacerbations of disease upon consuming nonexperimental diet foods. Our study failed to provide evidence of objective overall clinical benefit of this diet as followed by a group of patients with longstanding, progressive, active RA. However, our data are not inconsistent with the possibility that individualized dietary manipulations might be beneficial for selected patients with rheumatic disease. PMID:6838671

  3. Diagnosis and management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Amy M

    2011-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the most commonly diagnosed systemic inflammatory arthritis. Women, smokers, and those with a family history of the disease are most often affected. Criteria for diagnosis include having at least one joint with definite swelling that is not explained by another disease. The likelihood of a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis increases with the number of small joints involved. In a patient with inflammatory arthritis, the presence of a rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibody, or elevated C-reactive protein level or erythrocyte sedimentation rate suggests a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Initial laboratory evaluation should also include complete blood count with differential and assessment of renal and hepatic function. Patients taking biologic agents should be tested for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and tuberculosis. Earlier diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis allows for earlier treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic agents. Combinations of medications are often used to control the disease. Methotrexate is typically the first-line drug for rheumatoid arthritis. Biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, are generally considered second-line agents or can be added for dual therapy. The goals of treatment include minimization of joint pain and swelling, prevention of radiographic damage and visible deformity, and continuation of work and personal activities. Joint replacement is indicated for patients with severe joint damage whose symptoms are poorly controlled by medical management. PMID:22150658

  4. Septic and aseptic arthritis: a continuum?

    PubMed

    Taylor-Robinson, D; Keat, A

    1999-03-01

    This chapter considers the likelihood that a wide spectrum of infection-provoked arthritis exists, ranging from overt sepsis to apparently aseptic chronic arthritis in which very small numbers of causal bacteria can be detected only by using highly sensitive techniques. It asks whether joints are, as conventionally held, normally devoid of micro-organisms and how to judge the significance of bacteria detected within apparently sterile joints. Through a consideration of known septic, probably infective and apparently aseptic forms of arthritis, a set of criteria for attributing causality to putative arthritogenic micro-organisms is proposed. PMID:10952856

  5. Chemokines and angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Szekanecz, Zoltan; Pakozdi, Angela; Szentpetery, Agnes; Besenyei, Timea; Koch, Alisa E.

    2010-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis, chemokines mediate the migration of inflammatory leukocytes into the synovium. Among the four known chemokine families, CXC, CC chemokines and fractalkine seem to be of outstanding importance in this process. Angiogenesis, the formation of new vessels, is also important during the perpetuation of inflammation underlying rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, authors discuss the role of the most important chemokines and chemokine repetors in arthritis-associated neovascularization. The process and regulation of angiogenesis are described in this context as well. Apart from discussing the pathogenic role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in arthritic vessel formation, authors also review the important relevance of chemokines and angiogenesis for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19482623

  6. Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sathish

    2016-04-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is an inflammatory condition characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, arthritis, rash and serositis. In sJIA, systemic inflammation has been associated with dysregulation of the innate immune system, suggesting that it is an autoinflammatory disorder. IL-1 and IL-6 play a major role in the pathogenesis of sJIA and treatment with IL-1 and IL-6 inhibitors has shown to be highly effective. Recent data suggests that early cytokine blockage might abrogate chronic, destructive, therapy resistant arthritis phase, reflecting a potential "window of opportunity" in the care of children with sJIA. PMID:26916892

  7. MicroRNA-155 as a proinflammatory regulator in clinical and experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Alivernini, Stefano; Ballantine, Lucy E; Asquith, Darren L; Millar, Neal L; Gilchrist, Derek S; Reilly, James; Ierna, Michelle; Fraser, Alasdair R; Stolarski, Bartosz; McSharry, Charles; Hueber, Axel J; Baxter, Derek; Hunter, John; Gay, Steffen; Liew, Foo Y; McInnes, Iain B

    2011-07-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) species (miR) regulate mRNA translation and are implicated as mediators of disease pathology via coordinated regulation of molecular effector pathways. Unraveling miR disease-related activities will facilitate future therapeutic interventions. miR-155 recently has been identified with critical immune regulatory functions. Although detected in articular tissues, the functional role of miR-155 in inflammatory arthritis has not been defined. We report here that miR-155 is up-regulated in synovial membrane and synovial fluid (SF) macrophages from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The increased expression of miR-155 in SF CD14(+) cells was associated with lower expression of the miR-155 target, Src homology 2-containing inositol phosphatase-1 (SHIP-1), an inhibitor of inflammation. Similarly, SHIP-1 expression was decreased in CD68(+) cells in the synovial lining layer in RA patients as compared with osteoarthritis patients. Overexpression of miR-155 in PB CD14(+) cells led to down-regulation of SHIP-1 and an increase in the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Conversely, inhibition of miR-155 in RA synovial CD14(+) cells reduced TNF-α production. Finally, miR-155-deficient mice are resistant to collagen-induced arthritis, with profound suppression of antigen-specific Th17 cell and autoantibody responses and markedly reduced articular inflammation. Our data therefore identify a role of miR-155 in clinical and experimental arthritis and suggest that miR-155 may be an intriguing therapeutic target. PMID:21690378

  8. Differential Anti-inflammatory Activity of HDAC Inhibitors in Human Macrophages and Rat Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Rink-Jan; Iyer, Abishek; Fairlie, Thomas J; Cotterell, Adam; Gupta, Praveer; Reid, Robert C; Vesey, David A; Sweet, Matthew J; Fairlie, David P

    2016-02-01

    Vorinostat and other inhibitors of different histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes are currently being sought to modulate a variety of human conditions, including chronic inflammatory diseases. Some HDAC inhibitors are anti-inflammatory in rodent models of arthritis and colitis, usually at cytotoxic doses that may cause side effects. Here, we investigate the dose-dependent pro- and anti-inflammatory efficacy of two known inhibitors of multiple HDACs, vorinostat and BML281, in human macrophages and in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis by monitoring effects on disease progression, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. Both HDAC inhibitors differentially modulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine release from human macrophages, suppressing release of some inflammatory mediators (IL12p40, IL6) at low concentrations (<3 µM) but amplifying production of others (TNF, IL1β) at higher concentration (>3 μΜ). This trend translated in vivo to rat arthritis, with anti-inflammatory activity inversely correlating with dose. Both compounds were efficacious only at a low dose (1 mg⋅kg(-1)⋅day(-1) s.c.), whereas a higher dose (5 mg⋅kg(-1)⋅day(-1) s.c.) showed no positive effects on reducing pathology, even showing signs of exacerbating disease. These striking effects suggest a smaller therapeutic window than previously reported for HDAC inhibition in experimental arthritis. The findings support new investigations into repurposing HDAC inhibitors for anti-inflammatory therapeutic applications. However, HDAC inhibitors should be reinvestigated at lower, rather than higher, doses for enhanced efficacy in chronic diseases that require long-term treatment, with careful management of efficacy and long-term safety. PMID:26660228

  9. Nitrosative modifications of the Ca2+ release complex and actin underlie arthritis-induced muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takashi; Fedotovskaya, Olga; Cheng, Arthur J; Cornachione, Anabelle S; Minozzo, Fabio C; Aulin, Cecilia; Fridén, Cecilia; Turesson, Carl; Andersson, Daniel C; Glenmark, Birgitta; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Rassier, Dilson E; Westerblad, Håkan; Lanner, Johanna T

    2015-01-01

    Objective Skeletal muscle weakness is a prominent clinical feature in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but the underlying mechanism(s) is unknown. Here we investigate the mechanisms behind arthritis-induced skeletal muscle weakness with special focus on the role of nitrosative stress on intracellular Ca2+ handling and specific force production. Methods Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression, degree of nitrosative stress and composition of the major intracellular Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor 1, RyR1) complex were measured in muscle. Changes in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and force production were assessed in single-muscle fibres and isolated myofibrils using atomic force cantilevers. Results The total neuronal NOS (nNOS) levels were increased in muscles both from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice and patients with RA. The nNOS associated with RyR1 was increased and accompanied by increased [Ca2+]i during contractions of muscles from CIA mice. A marker of peroxynitrite-derived nitrosative stress (3-nitrotyrosine, 3-NT) was increased on the RyR1 complex and on actin of muscles from CIA mice. Despite increased [Ca2+]i, individual CIA muscle fibres were weaker than in healthy controls, that is, force per cross-sectional area was decreased. Furthermore, force and kinetics were impaired in CIA myofibrils, hence actin and myosin showed decreased ability to interact, which could be a result of increased 3-NT content on actin. Conclusions Arthritis-induced muscle weakness is linked to nitrosative modifications of the RyR1 protein complex and actin, which are driven by increased nNOS associated with RyR1 and progressively increasing Ca2+ activation. PMID:24854355

  10. Defining Immunological Impact and Therapeutic Benefit of Mild Heating in a Murine Model of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Kokolus, Kathleen M.; Leigh, Nicholas D.; Capitano, Maegan; Hylander, Bonnie L.; Repasky, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional treatments, including a variety of thermal therapies have been known since ancient times to provide relief from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) symptoms. However, a general absence of information on how heating affects molecular or immunological targets relevant to RA has limited heat treatment (HT) to the category of treatments known as “alternative therapies”. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of mild HT in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model which has been used in many previous studies to evaluate newer pharmacological approaches for the treatment of RA, and tested whether inflammatory immune activity was altered. We also compared the effect of HT to methotrexate, a well characterized pharmacological treatment for RA. CIA mice were treated with either a single HT for several hours or daily 30 minute HT. Disease progression and macrophage infiltration were evaluated. We found that both HT regimens significantly reduced arthritis disease severity and macrophage infiltration into inflamed joints. Surprisingly, HT was as efficient as methotrexate in controlling disease progression. At the molecular level, HT suppressed TNF-α while increasing production of IL-10. We also observed an induction of HSP70 and a reduction in both NF-κB and HIF-1α in inflamed tissues. Additionally, using activated macrophages in vitro, we found that HT reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, an effect which is correlated to induction of HSF-1 and HSP70 and inhibition of NF-κB and STAT activation. Our findings demonstrate a significant therapeutic benefit of HT in controlling arthritis progression in a clinically relevant mouse model, with an efficacy similar to methotrexate. Mechanistically, HT targets highly relevant anti-inflammatory pathways which strongly support its increased study for use in clinical trials for RA. PMID:25793532

  11. RANKL, OPG and CTR mRNA expression in the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, WEI-WEI; XU, ZHI-MIN; LI, ZHENG-QIANG; ZHANG, YAN; HAN, BING

    2015-01-01

    The calcitonin receptor (CTR) and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) have been found to be involved in the differentiation of osteoclasts. The association between the RANKL:osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression ratio and the pathogenesis of bone-destructive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been described in several joints, but the available data for the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are limited. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of osteoclasts at sites of bone erosion by determining the CTR expression and the RANKL:OPG expression ratio in the TMJ in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: Control group, injected with saline solution for 6 weeks; and CIA group, injected with emulsion. The RANKL and OPG mRNA expression was significantly increased in immunized rats compared with that in non-immunized rats. The RANKL:OPG expression ratio on the trabecular bone surface was 9.0 and 6.4 in the CIA group at weeks 4 and 6, respectively, while the RANKL:OPG expression ratio in the controls was 1.0:2. CTR mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in immunized rats compared with that in non-immunized rats; the level of CTR mRNA in the CTR-positive osteoclasts on the trabecular bone surface was 10.9- and 7.8-fold higher in the CIA rats than that in the control rats at weeks 4 and 6, respectively. In conclusion, focal bone destruction in an experimental model of arthritis in the TMJ can be attributed to cells expressing CTR, a defining feature of osteoclasts. The expression of RANKL and OPG mRNA within the inflamed synovium provides an insight into the mechanism of osteoclast differentiation and function at the border of bone erosion in arthritis. PMID:26622411

  12. A Comparative Metabolomic Evaluation of Behcet's Disease with Arthritis and Seronegative Arthritis Using Synovial Fluid.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joong Kyong; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Hwang, Jiwon; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Cha, Hoon-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) with arthritis is often confused with seronegative arthritis (SNA) because of shared clinical symptoms and the lack of definitive biomarkers for BD. To investigate possible metabolic patterns and potential biomarkers of BD with arthritis, metabolomic profiling of synovial fluid (SF) from 6 patients with BD with arthritis and 18 patients with SNA was performed using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. A total of 123 metabolites were identified from samples. Orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis showed clear discrimination between BD with arthritis and SNA. A set of 11 metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers for BD using variable importance for projection values and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Compared with SNA, BD with arthritis exhibited relatively high levels of glutamate, valine, citramalate, leucine, methionine sulfoxide, glycerate, phosphate, lysine, isoleucine, urea, and citrulline. There were two markers identified, elevated methionine sulfoxide and citrulline, that were associated with increased oxidative stress, providing a potential link to BD-associated neutrophil hyperactivity. Glutamate, citramalate, and valine were selected and validated as putative biomarkers for BD with arthritis (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 61.1%). This is the first report to present potential biomarkers from SF for discriminating BD with arthritis from SNA. The metabolomics of SF may be helpful in searching for potential biomarkers and elucidating the clinicopathogenesis of BD with arthritis. PMID:26270538

  13. Ultrasound Detection of Salmonella Septic Arthritis in a Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient on Anti-TNF Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of Salmonella septic arthritis detected by ultrasound in a 40-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis while he was on anti–tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibody certolizumab. An aspirate of his left elbow joint showed Salmonella enteritidis infection that was sensitive to ceftraixone. This was preceded by a brief episode of loose stools following a visit to the Far East. He was treated with antibiotics and made a good recovery. There have only been a few case reports of Salmonella septic arthritis in a rheumatoid arthritis patient on anti–tumor necrosis factor treatment but none previously in association with certolizumab. PMID:26425605

  14. Supramolecular assembly of collagen fibrils into collagen fiber in fish scales of red seabream, Pagrus major.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hwa Shik; Shin, Tae Joo

    2009-11-01

    Supramolecular assembly of collagen fibrils into collagen fiber and its distribution in fish scales of red seabream, Pagrus major, were investigated. By virtue of Zernike phase-contrast hard X-ray microscopy, it has been firstly observed that collagen fiber consists of helical substructures of collagen fibrils wrapped with incrustation. As it close to the scalar focus (that is, with aging), loosened- and deteriorated-helical assemblies started to be observed with loosing wrapping incrustation, indicative of the distortion of the basic helical assembly. Various distributions and packing arrangements of collagen fibers were observed dependent on subdivisions of fish scale. Freshly growing edge region of fish scale, embedded into fish skin, showed rarely patched and one directionally arranged collagen fibers, in which specifically triple helical assemblies of collagen fibrils were found. On the contrary, relatively aged region of the rostral field close to the scalar focus displayed randomly directed and densely packed collagen fibers, in which loosened- and deteriorated-helical assemblies of collagen fibrils were mostly found. Our results have demonstrated that hard X-ray microscope can be a powerful tool to study in situ internal structure of biological specimens in an atmospheric pressure. PMID:19666125

  15. Harnessing the Versatility of Bacterial Collagen to Improve the Chondrogenic Potential of Porous Collagen Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Paresh A; St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Chow, Lesley W; Puetzer, Jennifer L; Stoichevska, Violet; Peng, Yong Y; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M; Stevens, Molly M

    2016-07-01

    Collagen I foams are used in the clinic as scaffolds to promote articular cartilage repair as they provide a bioactive environment for cells with chondrogenic potential. However, collagen I as a base material does not allow for precise control over bioactivity. Alternatively, recombinant bacterial collagens can be used as "blank slate" collagen molecules to offer a versatile platform for incorporation of selected bioactive sequences and fabrication into 3D scaffolds. Here, we show the potential of Streptococcal collagen-like 2 (Scl2) protein foams modified with peptides designed to specifically and noncovalently bind hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate to improve chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) compared to collagen I foams. Specific compositions of functionalized Scl2 foams lead to improved chondrogenesis compared to both nonfunctionalized Scl2 and collagen I foams, as indicated by gene expression, extracellular matrix accumulation, and compression moduli. hMSCs cultured in functionalized Scl2 foams exhibit decreased collagens I and X gene and protein expression, suggesting an advantage over collagen I foams in promoting a chondrocytic phenotype. These highly modular foams can be further modified to improve specific aspects chondrogenesis. As such, these scaffolds also have the potential to be tailored for other regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27219220

  16. Collagen Accumulation in Osteosarcoma Cells lacking GLT25D1 Collagen Galactosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Stephan; Hennet, Thierry

    2016-08-26

    Collagen is post-translationally modified by prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation and subsequently by glycosylation of hydroxylysine. Despite the widespread occurrence of the glycan structure Glc(α1-2)Gal linked to hydroxylysine in animals, the functional significance of collagen glycosylation remains elusive. To address the role of glycosylation in collagen expression, folding, and secretion, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to inactivate the collagen galactosyltransferase GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes in osteosarcoma cells. Loss of GLT25D1 led to increased expression and intracellular accumulation of collagen type I, whereas loss of GLT25D2 had no effect on collagen secretion. Inactivation of the GLT25D1 gene resulted in a compensatory induction of GLT25D2 expression. Loss of GLT25D1 decreased collagen glycosylation by up to 60% but did not alter collagen folding and thermal stability. Whereas cells harboring individually inactivated GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes could be recovered and maintained in culture, cell clones with simultaneously inactive GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes could be not grown and studied, suggesting that a complete loss of collagen glycosylation impairs osteosarcoma cell proliferation and viability. PMID:27402836

  17. Studies on fish scale collagen of Pacific saury (Cololabis saira).

    PubMed

    Mori, Hideki; Tone, Yurie; Shimizu, Kouske; Zikihara, Kazunori; Tokutomi, Satoru; Ida, Tomoaki; Ihara, Hideshi; Hara, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    We purified and characterized Type I collagen from the scales of the Pacific saury (Cololabis saira) and compared it with collagen from other organisms. Subunit composition of C. saira collagen (2α1+α2) was similar to that of red sea bream (Pagrus major) and porcine collagen. C. saira collagen did not form a firm gel after neutralization of pH in solution. The temperature of denaturation (24-25 °C) of C. saira collagen was slightly lower than that of P. major collagen (26-27 °C). The contents of proline and hydroxyproline were lower in red sea bream and Pacific saury collagen than in porcine collagen. Circular dichroism spectra and Fourier-transformed infrared spectra showed that heat denaturation caused unfolding of the triple helices in all three collagens. PMID:25428059

  18. Marine Collagen: An Emerging Player in Biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Subhan, Fazli; Ikram, Muhammad; Shehzad, Adeeb; Ghafoor, Abdul

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian collagen is a multifactorial biomaterial that is widely used for beneficial purposes in the advanced biomedical technologies. Generally, biomedical applicable collagen is extracted from the mammalian body, but it can also be derived from marine species. Recently, mammalian tissues collagen proteins are considered a great pathological risk for transmitted diseases, because purification of such protein is very challenging and needs efficient tool to avoid structure alteration. Thus, difficult extraction process and high cost decreased mammalian collagen demands for beneficial effects compared to marine collagen. In contrast, marine collagen is safe and easy to extract, however this potential source of collagen is hindered by low denaturing temperature, which is considered a main hurdle in the beneficial effects of marine collagen. Characterization and biomedical applications of marine collagen are in transition state and yet to be discovered. Therefore, an attempt was made to summarize the recent knowledge regarding different aspects of marine collagen applications in the biomedical engineering field. PMID:26243892

  19. Unusual Fragmentation Pathways in Collagen Glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdivara, Irina; Perera, Lalith; Sricholpech, Marnisa; Terajima, Masahiko; Pleshko, Nancy; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Tomer, Kenneth B.

    2013-07-01

    Collagens are the most abundant glycoproteins in the body. One characteristic of this protein family is that the amino acid sequence consists of repeats of three amino acids -(X—Y—Gly)n. Within this motif, the Y residue is often 4-hydroxyproline (HyP) or 5-hydroxylysine (HyK). Glycosylation in collagen occurs at the 5-OH group in HyK in the form of two glycosides, galactosylhydroxylysine (Gal-HyK) and glucosyl galactosylhydroxylysine (GlcGal-HyK). In collision induced dissociation (CID), collagen tryptic glycopeptides exhibit unexpected gas-phase dissociation behavior compared to typical N- and O-linked glycopeptides (i.e., in addition to glycosidic bond cleavages, extensive cleavages of the amide bonds are observed). The Gal- or GlcGal- glycan modifications are largely retained on the fragment ions. These features enable unambiguous determination of the amino acid sequence of collagen glycopeptides and the location of the glycosylation site. This dissociation pattern was consistent for all analyzed collagen glycopeptides, regardless of their length or amino acid composition, collagen type or tissue. The two fragmentation pathways—amide bond and glycosidic bond cleavage—are highly competitive in collagen tryptic glycopeptides. The number of ionizing protons relative to the number of basic sites (i.e., Arg, Lys, HyK, and N-terminus) is a major driving force of the fragmentation. We present here our experimental results and employ quantum mechanics calculations to understand the factors enhancing the labile character of the amide bonds and the stability of hydroxylysine glycosides in gas phase dissociation of collagen glycopeptides.

  20. Dermal ultrastructure in collagen VI myopathy.

    PubMed

    Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Piérard, Gérald E; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Delvenne, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    The COL VI mutations are responsible for a spectrum of myopathies. The authors report cutaneous ultrastructural alterations in a patient with COL6A2 myopathy. The changes include variations in size of collagen fibrils, flower-like sections of collagen fibrils, as well as thickening of vessel and nerve basement membranes. Electron microscopy of a skin biopsy contributes to the diagnosis of COL VI myopathies. PMID:24134684