Science.gov

Sample records for collagen chaperone protein

  1. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S; Martin, Raoul; Quan, Shu; Afonine, Pavel V; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Lili; Xu, Qingping; Trievel, Raymond C; Brooks, Charles L; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-07-01

    Challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding. Obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone-substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a new structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed residual electron and anomalous density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the Escherichia coli chaperone Spy, and to capture a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded to native-like states and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while being bound to a chaperone. PMID:27239796

  2. Structural mechanisms of chaperone mediated protein disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The ClpB/Hsp104 and Hsp70 classes of molecular chaperones use ATP hydrolysis to dissociate protein aggregates and complexes, and to move proteins through membranes. ClpB/Hsp104 are members of the AAA+ family of proteins which form ring-shaped hexamers. Loops lining the pore in the ring engage substrate proteins as extended polypeptides. Interdomain rotations and conformational changes in these loops coupled to ATP hydrolysis unfold and pull proteins through the pore. This provides a mechanism that progressively disrupts local secondary and tertiary structure in substrates, allowing these chaperones to dissociate stable aggregates such as β-sheet rich prions or coiled coil SNARE complexes. While the ClpB/Hsp104 mechanism appears to embody a true power-stroke in which an ATP powered conformational change in one protein is directly coupled to movement or structural change in another, the mechanism of force generation by Hsp70s is distinct and less well understood. Both active power-stroke and purely passive mechanisms in which Hsp70 captures spontaneous fluctuations in a substrate have been proposed, while a third proposed mechanism—entropic pulling—may be able to generate forces larger than seen in ATP-driven molecular motors without the conformational coupling required for a power-stroke. The disaggregase activity of these chaperones is required for thermotolerance, but unrestrained protein complex/aggregate dissociation is potentially detrimental. Disaggregating chaperones are strongly auto-repressed, and are regulated by co-chaperones which recruit them to protein substrates and activate the disaggregases via mechanisms involving either sequential transfer of substrate from one chaperone to another and/or simultaneous interaction of substrate with multiple chaperones. By effectively subjecting substrates to multiple levels of selection by multiple chaperones, this may insure that these potent disaggregases are only activated in the appropriate context. PMID

  3. Chaperones in control of protein disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Liberek, Krzysztof; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Ziętkiewicz, Szymon

    2008-01-01

    The chaperone protein network controls both initial protein folding and subsequent maintenance of proteins in the cell. Although the native structure of a protein is principally encoded in its amino-acid sequence, the process of folding in vivo very often requires the assistance of molecular chaperones. Chaperones also play a role in a post-translational quality control system and thus are required to maintain the proper conformation of proteins under changing environmental conditions. Many factors leading to unfolding and misfolding of proteins eventually result in protein aggregation. Stress imposed by high temperature was one of the first aggregation-inducing factors studied and remains one of the main models in this field. With massive protein aggregation occurring in response to heat exposure, the cell needs chaperones to control and counteract the aggregation process. Elimination of aggregates can be achieved by solubilization of aggregates and either refolding of the liberated polypeptides or their proteolysis. Here, we focus on the molecular mechanisms by which heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70), Hsp100 and small Hsp chaperones liberate and refold polypeptides trapped in protein aggregates. PMID:18216875

  4. Allostery in the Hsp70 chaperone proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zuiderweg, Erik R.P.; Bertelsen, Eric B.; Rousaki, Aikaterini; Mayer, Matthias P.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Ahmad, Atta

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock 70 kDa (Hsp70) chaperones are essential to in-vivo protein folding, protein transport and protein re-folding. They carry out these activities using repeated cycles of binding and release of client proteins. This process is under allosteric control of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis. X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques have contributed much to the understanding of the allosteric mechanism linking these activities and the effect of co-chaperones on this mechanism. In this chapter, these findings are critically reviewed. Studies on the allosteric mechanisms of Hsp70 have gained enhanced urgency, as recent studies have implicated this chaperone as a potential drug target in diseases such as Alzheimer's and cancer. Recent approaches to combat these diseases through interference with the Hsp70 allosteric mechanism are discussed. PMID:22576356

  5. Emerging novel concept of chaperone therapies for protein misfolding diseases

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Chaperone therapy is a newly developed molecular therapeutic approach to protein misfolding diseases. Among them we found unstable mutant enzyme proteins in a few lysosomal diseases, resulting in rapid intracellular degradation and loss of function. Active-site binding low molecular competitive inhibitors (chemical chaperones) paradoxically stabilized and enhanced the enzyme activity in somatic cells by correction of the misfolding of enzyme protein. They reached the brain through the blood-brain barrier after oral administration, and corrected pathophysiology of the disease. In addition to these inhibitory chaperones, non-competitive chaperones without inhibitory bioactivity are being developed. Furthermore molecular chaperone therapy utilizing the heat shock protein and other chaperone proteins induced by small molecules has been experimentally tried to handle abnormally accumulated proteins as a new approach particularly to neurodegenerative diseases. These three types of chaperones are promising candidates for various types of diseases, genetic or non-genetic, and neurological or non-neurological, in addition to lysosomal diseases. PMID:24814990

  6. CSPα—chaperoning presynaptic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Donnelier, Julien; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic transmission relies on precisely regulated and exceedingly fast protein-protein interactions that involve voltage-gated channels, the exocytosis/endocytosis machinery as well as signaling pathways. Although we have gained an ever more detailed picture of synaptic architecture much remains to be learned about how synapses are maintained. Synaptic chaperones are “folding catalysts” that preserve proteostasis by regulating protein conformation (and therefore protein function) and prevent unwanted protein-protein interactions. Failure to maintain synapses is an early hallmark of several degenerative diseases. Cysteine string protein (CSPα) is a presynaptic vesicle protein and molecular chaperone that has a central role in preventing synaptic loss and neurodegeneration. Over the past few years, a number of different “client proteins” have been implicated as CSPα substrates including voltage-dependent ion channels, signaling proteins and proteins critical to the synaptic vesicle cycle. Here we review the ion channels and synaptic protein complexes under the influence of CSPα and discuss gaps in our current knowledge. PMID:24808827

  7. Heat shock proteins: molecular chaperones of protein biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, E A; Gambill, B D; Nelson, R J

    1993-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) were first identified as proteins whose synthesis was enhanced by stresses such as an increase in temperature. Recently, several of the major Hsps have been shown to be intimately involved in protein biogenesis through a direct interaction with a wide variety of proteins. As a reflection of this role, these Hsps have been referred to as molecular chaperones. Hsp70s interact with incompletely folded proteins, such as nascent chains on ribosomes and proteins in the process of translocation from the cytosol into mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum. Hsp60 also binds to unfolded proteins, preventing aggregation and facilitating protein folding. Although less well defined, other Hsps such as Hsp90 also play important roles in modulating the activity of a number of proteins. The function of the proteolytic system is intertwined with that of molecular chaperones. Several components of this system, encoded by heat-inducible genes, are responsible for the degradation of abnormal or misfolded proteins. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven very useful in the analysis of the role of molecular chaperones in protein maturation, translocation, and degradation. In this review, results of experiments are discussed within the context of experiments with other organisms in an attempt to describe the current state of understanding of these ubiquitous and important proteins. PMID:8336673

  8. Inhibition of HSP70 and a Collagen-Specific Molecular Chaperone (HSP47) Expression in Rat Osteoblasts by Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumei, Yasuhiro; Morita, Sadao; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Ohya, Kei'ichi; Akiyama, Hideo; Hirano, Masahiko; Sams, Clarence F.; Whitson, Peggy A.

    2003-01-01

    Rat osteoblasts were cultured aboard a space shuttle for 4 or 5 days. Cells were exposed to 1alpha, 25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3) during the last 20 h and then solubilized by guanidine solution. The mRNA levels for molecular chaperones were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. ELISA was used to quantify TGF-beta1 in the conditioned medium. The HSP70 mRNA levels in the flight cultures were almost completely suppressed, as compared to the ground (1 x g) controls. The inducible HSP70 is known as the major heat shock protein that prevents stress-induced apoptosis. The mean mRNA levels for the constitutive HSC73 in the flight cultures were reduced to 69%, approximately 60% of the ground controls. HSC73 is reported to prevent the pathological state that is induced by disruption of microtubule network. The mean HSP47 mRNA levels in the flight cultures were decreased to 50% and 19% of the ground controls on the 4th and 5th days. Concomitantly, the concentration of TGF-beta1 in the conditioned medium of the flight cultures was reduced to 37% and 19% of the ground controls on the 4th and 5th days. HSP47 is the collagen-specific molecular chaperone that controls collagen processing and quality and is regulated by TGF-beta1. Microgravity differentially modulated the expression of molecular chaperones in osteoblasts, which might be involved in induction and/or prevention of osteopenia in space.

  9. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus. PMID:24694369

  10. Cross-system excision of chaperone-mediated proteolysis in chaperone-assisted recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Villaverde, Antonio; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2010-01-01

    Main Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones such as DnaK are key components of the control quality network designed to minimize the prevalence of polypeptides with aberrant conformations. This is achieved by both favoring refolding activities but also stimulating proteolytic degradation of folding reluctant species. This last activity is responsible for the decrease of the proteolytic stability of recombinant proteins when co-produced along with DnaK, where an increase in solubility might be associated to a decrease in protein yield. However, when DnaK and its co-chaperone DnaJ are co-produced in cultured insect cells or whole insect larvae (and expectedly, in other heterologous hosts), only positive, folding-related effects of these chaperones are observed, in absence of proteolysis-mediated reduction of recombinant protein yield. PMID:21326941

  11. A Novel Method for Assessing the Chaperone Activity of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hristozova, Nevena; Tompa, Peter; Kovacs, Denes

    2016-01-01

    Protein chaperones are molecular machines which function both during homeostasis and stress conditions in all living organisms. Depending on their specific function, molecular chaperones are involved in a plethora of cellular processes by playing key roles in nascent protein chain folding, transport and quality control. Among stress protein families-molecules expressed during adverse conditions, infection, and diseases-chaperones are highly abundant. Their molecular functions range from stabilizing stress-susceptible molecules and membranes to assisting the refolding of stress-damaged proteins, thereby acting as protective barriers against cellular damage. Here we propose a novel technique to test and measure the capability for protective activity of known and putative chaperones in a semi-high throughput manner on a plate reader. The current state of the art does not allow the in vitro measurements of chaperone activity in a highly parallel manner with high accuracy or high reproducibility, thus we believe that the method we report will be of significant benefit in this direction. The use of this method may lead to a considerable increase in the number of experimentally verified proteins with such functions, and may also allow the dissection of their molecular mechanism for a better understanding of their function. PMID:27564234

  12. A Novel Method for Assessing the Chaperone Activity of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hristozova, Nevena; Tompa, Peter; Kovacs, Denes

    2016-01-01

    Protein chaperones are molecular machines which function both during homeostasis and stress conditions in all living organisms. Depending on their specific function, molecular chaperones are involved in a plethora of cellular processes by playing key roles in nascent protein chain folding, transport and quality control. Among stress protein families–molecules expressed during adverse conditions, infection, and diseases–chaperones are highly abundant. Their molecular functions range from stabilizing stress-susceptible molecules and membranes to assisting the refolding of stress-damaged proteins, thereby acting as protective barriers against cellular damage. Here we propose a novel technique to test and measure the capability for protective activity of known and putative chaperones in a semi-high throughput manner on a plate reader. The current state of the art does not allow the in vitro measurements of chaperone activity in a highly parallel manner with high accuracy or high reproducibility, thus we believe that the method we report will be of significant benefit in this direction. The use of this method may lead to a considerable increase in the number of experimentally verified proteins with such functions, and may also allow the dissection of their molecular mechanism for a better understanding of their function. PMID:27564234

  13. The pH-dependent Client Release from the Collagen-specific Chaperone HSP47 Is Triggered by a Tandem Histidine Pair.

    PubMed

    Oecal, Sinan; Socher, Eileen; Uthoff, Matthias; Ernst, Corvin; Zaucke, Frank; Sticht, Heinrich; Baumann, Ulrich; Gebauer, Jan M

    2016-06-10

    Heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident collagen-specific chaperone and essential for proper formation of the characteristic collagen triple helix. It preferentially binds to the folded conformation of its clients and accompanies them from the ER to the Golgi compartment, where it releases them and is recycled back to the ER. Unlike other chaperones, the binding and release cycles are not governed by nucleotide exchange and hydrolysis, but presumably the dissociation of the HSP47-procollagen complex is triggered by the lower pH in the Golgi (pH 6.3) compared with the ER (pH 7.4). Histidine residues have been suggested as triggers due to their approximate textbook pKa value of 6.1 for their side chains. We present here an extensive theoretical and experimental study of the 14 histidine residues present in canine HSP47, where we have mutated all histidine residues in the collagen binding interface and additionally all of those that were predicted to undergo a significant change in protonation state between pH 7 and 6. These mutants were characterized by biolayer interferometry for their pH-dependent binding to a collagen model. One mutant (H238N) loses binding, which can be explained by a rearrangement of the Arg(222) and Asp(385) residues, which are crucial for specific collagen recognition. Most of the other mutants were remarkably silent, but a double mutant with His(273) and His(274) exchanged for asparagines exhibits a much less pronounced pH dependence of collagen binding. This effect is mainly caused by a lower koff at the low pH values. PMID:27129216

  14. Nucleolar protein B23 has molecular chaperone activities.

    PubMed Central

    Szebeni, A.; Olson, M. O.

    1999-01-01

    Protein B23 is an abundant, multifunctional nucleolar phosphoprotein whose activities are proposed to play a role in ribosome assembly. Szebeni et al. (1997) showed stimulation of nuclear import in vitro by protein B23 and suggested that this effect was due to a molecular chaperone-like activity. Protein B23 was tested for chaperone activities using several protein substrates. The temperature-dependent and -independent aggregation of the HIV-1 Rev protein was measured using a zero angle light scattering (turbidity) assay. Protein B23 inhibited the aggregation of the Rev protein, with the amount of inhibition proportional to the concentration of B23 added. This activity was saturable with nearly complete inhibition when the molar ratio of B23:Rev was slightly above one. Protein B23 also protected liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH), carboxypeptidase A, citrate synthase, and rhodanese from aggregation during thermal denaturation and preserved the enzyme activity of LADH under these conditions. In addition, protein B23 was able to promote the restoration of activity of LADH previously denatured with guanidine-HCl. Protein B23 preferentially bound denatured substrates and exposed hydrophobic regions when complexed with denatured proteins. Thus, by several criteria, protein B23 behaves like a molecular chaperone; these activities may be related to its role in ribosome biogenesis. PMID:10211837

  15. Substrate protein folds while it is bound to the ATP-independent chaperone Spy.

    PubMed

    Stull, Frederick; Koldewey, Philipp; Humes, Julia R; Radford, Sheena E; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones assist in the folding of many proteins in the cell. Although the most well-studied chaperones use cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to assist in protein folding, a number of chaperones have been identified that promote folding in the absence of high-energy cofactors. Precisely how ATP-independent chaperones accomplish this feat is unclear. Here we characterized the kinetic mechanism of substrate folding by the small ATP-independent chaperone Spy from Escherichia coli. Spy rapidly associates with its substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), thereby eliminating Im7's potential for aggregation. Remarkably, Spy then allows Im7 to fully fold into its native state while it remains bound to the surface of the chaperone. These results establish a potentially widespread mechanism whereby ATP-independent chaperones assist in protein refolding. They also provide compelling evidence that substrate proteins can fold while being continuously bound to a chaperone. PMID:26619265

  16. The chaperone like function of the nonhistone protein HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Osmanov, Taner; Ugrinova, Iva; Pasheva, Evdokia

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► The HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of nucleosome particles. ► The target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA not the histone octamer. ► The acetylation of HMGB1 decreases the stimulating effect of the protein. -- Abstract: Almost all essential nuclear processes as replication, repair, transcription and recombination require the chromatin template to be correctly unwound and than repackaged. The major strategy that the cell uses to overcome the nucleosome barrier is the proper removal of the histone octamer and subsequent deposition onto DNA. Important factors in this multi step phenomenon are the histone chaperones that can assemble nucleosome arrays in vitro in the absence of ATP. The nonhistone protein HMGB1 is a good candidate for a chaperone as its molecule consists of two DNA binding motives, Box’s A and B, and a long nonstructured C tail highly negatively charged. HMGB1 protein is known as a nuclear “architectural” factor for its property to bind preferentially to distorted DNA structures and was reported to kink the double helix. Our experiments show that in the classical stepwise dialysis method for nucleosome assembly the addition of HMGB1 protein stimulates more than two times the formation of middle-positioned nucleosomes. The stimulation effect persists in dialysis free experiment when the reconstitution is possible only in the presence of a chaperone. The addition of HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of a nucleosome in a dose dependant manner. Our results show that the target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA fragment not the histone octamer. One possible explanation for the stimulating effect of HMGB1 is the “architectural” property of the protein to associate with the middle of the DNA fragment and to kink it. The acquired V shaped DNA structure is probably conformationals more favorable to wrap around the prefolded histone octamer. We tested also the role of the post

  17. A chemical chaperone induces inhomogeneous conformational changes in flexible proteins.

    PubMed

    Hamdane, Djemel; Velours, Christophe; Cornu, David; Nicaise, Magali; Lombard, Murielle; Fontecave, Marc

    2016-07-27

    Organic osmolytes also known as chemical chaperones are major cellular compounds that favor, by an unclear mechanism, protein's compaction and stabilization of the native state. Here, we have examined the chaperone effect of the naturally occurring trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) osmolyte on a loosely packed protein (LPP), known to be a highly flexible form, using an apoprotein mutant of the flavin-dependent RNA methyltransferase as a model. Thermal and chemical denaturation experiments showed that TMAO stabilizes the structural integrity of the apoprotein dramatically. The denaturation reaction is irreversible indicating that the stability of the apoprotein is under kinetic control. This result implies that the stabilization is due to a TMAO-induced reconfiguration of the flexible LPP state, which leads to conformational limitations of the apoprotein likely driven by favorable entropic contribution. Evidence for the conformational perturbation of the apoprotein had been obtained through several biophysical approaches notably analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, labelling experiments and proteolysis coupled to mass spectrometry. Unexpectedly, TMAO promotes an overall elongation or asymmetrical changes of the hydrodynamic shape of the apoprotein without alteration of the secondary structure. The modulation of the hydrodynamic properties of the protein is associated with diverse inhomogenous conformational changes: loss of the solvent accessible cavities resulting in a dried protein matrix; some side-chain residues initially buried become solvent exposed while some others become hidden. Consequently, the TMAO-induced protein state exhibits impaired capability in the flavin binding process. Our study suggests that the nature of protein conformational changes induced by the chemical chaperones may be specific to protein packing and plasticity. This could be an efficient mechanism by which the cell controls and finely tunes the

  18. The small heat shock proteins family: the long forgotten chaperones.

    PubMed

    Garrido, C; Paul, C; Seigneuric, R; Kampinga, H H

    2012-10-01

    Small heat shock proteins are a rather heterogeneous family of ATP-independent chaperones, some of which have been proven to block protein aggregation and help the cells to survive stressful conditions. Although much less studied than high molecular weight HSPs like HSP70/HSPA or HSP90/HSPC, their implication in physio-pathological processes and human diseases is now well evidenced, as it will be discussed in the different reviews of this special issue. In this mini-review we will just present a general introduction about the small heat shock proteins family. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Small HSPs in physiology and pathology. PMID:22449631

  19. Dynamic periplasmic chaperone reservoir facilitates biogenesis of outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Costello, Shawn M; Plummer, Ashlee M; Fleming, Patrick J; Fleming, Karen G

    2016-08-16

    Outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis is critical to bacterial physiology because the cellular envelope is vital to bacterial pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance. The process of OMP biogenesis has been studied in vivo, and each of its components has been studied in isolation in vitro. This work integrates parameters and observations from both in vivo and in vitro experiments into a holistic computational model termed "Outer Membrane Protein Biogenesis Model" (OMPBioM). We use OMPBioM to assess OMP biogenesis mathematically in a global manner. Using deterministic and stochastic methods, we are able to simulate OMP biogenesis under varying genetic conditions, each of which successfully replicates experimental observations. We observe that OMPs have a prolonged lifetime in the periplasm where an unfolded OMP makes, on average, hundreds of short-lived interactions with chaperones before folding into its native state. We find that some periplasmic chaperones function primarily as quality-control factors; this function complements the folding catalysis function of other chaperones. Additionally, the effective rate for the β-barrel assembly machinery complex necessary for physiological folding was found to be higher than has currently been observed in vitro. Overall, we find a finely tuned balance between thermodynamic and kinetic parameters maximizes OMP folding flux and minimizes aggregation and unnecessary degradation. In sum, OMPBioM provides a global view of OMP biogenesis that yields unique insights into this essential pathway. PMID:27482090

  20. [Unfolding chaperone as a prion protein relating molecule].

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Naomi S; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Kaneko, Kiyotoshi

    2003-11-01

    Prion protein exists in two different isoforms, a normal cellular isoform (PrPc) and an abnormal infectious isoform (PrPSc), the latter is a causative agent of prion disease such as mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Amino acid sequences of PrPc and PrPSc are identical, but their conformations are rather different; PrPc rich in non beta-sheet vs. PrPSc rich in beta-sheet isoform. Since the two isoforms have quite different conformation, this host factor might be a molecular chaperone, which enables to override an energy barrier between PrPc and PrPSc. To examine the protein unfolding activities against collectively folded structure exist or not, we constructed an assay system and purified a novel molecular chaperone. Unfolding, from S. cerevisiae. Unfolding consists of oligomeric ring-like structure with the central cavity and has an ATP-dependent protein Unfoldingg activity with broad specificity in vitro, of which targets included PrP in beta-sheet form, alpha-synuclein, and A beta protein. We have also found that mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells contained the activity. Treatment of this factor with an ATP-hydrolyzing enzyme, apyrase, caused the decrease in its protein Unfoldingg activity. It was suggested that the purified protein probably formed homo-oligomer consisting of 4-5 subunits and its activity was ATP-dependent. PMID:15152473

  1. Mussel adhesive protein provides cohesive matrix for collagen type-1α

    PubMed Central

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Wei, Wei; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the interactions between collagen and adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps) can lead to improved medical and dental adhesives, particularly for collagen-rich tissues. Here we investigated interactions between collagen type-1, the most abundant loadbearing animal protein, and mussel foot protein-3 (mfp-3) using a quartz crystal microbalance and surface forces apparatus (SFA). Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic variants of mfp-3 were exploited to probe the nature of the interaction between the protein and collagen. Our chief findings are: 1) mfp-3 is an effective chaperone for tropocollagen adsorption to TiO2 and mica surfaces; 2) at pH 3, collagen addition between two mfp-3 films (Wc = 5.4 ± 0.2 mJ/m2) increased their cohesion by nearly 35%; 3) oxidation of Dopa in mfp-3 by periodate did not abolish the adhesion between collagen and mfp-3 films, and 4) collagen bridging between both hydrophilic and hydrophobic mfp-3 variant films is equally robust, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a minor role. Extensive H-bonding, π-cation and electrostatic interactions are more plausible to explain the reversible bridging of mfp-3 films by collagen. PMID:25770997

  2. Mussel adhesive protein provides cohesive matrix for collagen type-1α.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Wei, Wei; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the interactions between collagen and adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps) can lead to improved medical and dental adhesives, particularly for collagen-rich tissues. Here we investigated interactions between collagen type-1, the most abundant load-bearing animal protein, and mussel foot protein-3 (mfp-3) using a quartz crystal microbalance and surface forces apparatus (SFA). Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic variants of mfp-3 were exploited to probe the nature of the interaction between the protein and collagen. Our chief findings are: 1) mfp-3 is an effective chaperone for tropocollagen adsorption to TiO2 and mica surfaces; 2) at pH 3, collagen addition between two mfp-3 films (Wc = 5.4 ± 0.2 mJ/m(2)) increased their cohesion by nearly 35%; 3) oxidation of Dopa in mfp-3 by periodate did not abolish the adhesion between collagen and mfp-3 films, and 4) collagen bridging between both hydrophilic and hydrophobic mfp-3 variant films is equally robust, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a minor role. Extensive H-bonding, π-cation and electrostatic interactions are more plausible to explain the reversible bridging of mfp-3 films by collagen. PMID:25770997

  3. Yeast prions are useful for studying protein chaperones and protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Masison, Daniel C; Reidy, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Protein chaperones help proteins adopt and maintain native conformations and play vital roles in cellular processes where proteins are partially folded. They comprise a major part of the cellular protein quality control system that protects the integrity of the proteome. Many disorders are caused when proteins misfold despite this protection. Yeast prions are fibrous amyloid aggregates of misfolded proteins. The normal action of chaperones on yeast prions breaks the fibers into pieces, which results in prion replication. Because this process is necessary for propagation of yeast prions, even small differences in activity of many chaperones noticeably affect prion phenotypes. Several other factors involved in protein processing also influence formation, propagation or elimination of prions in yeast. Thus, in much the same way that the dependency of viruses on cellular functions has allowed us to learn much about cell biology, the dependency of yeast prions on chaperones presents a unique and sensitive way to monitor the functions and interactions of many components of the cell's protein quality control system. Our recent work illustrates the utility of this system for identifying and defining chaperone machinery interactions. PMID:26110609

  4. Ubiquilins Chaperone and Triage Mitochondrial Membrane Proteins for Degradation.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Eisuke; Zavodszky, Eszter; Shao, Sichen; Wohlever, Matthew L; Keenan, Robert J; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-07-01

    We investigated how mitochondrial membrane proteins remain soluble in the cytosol until their delivery to mitochondria or degradation at the proteasome. We show that Ubiquilin family proteins bind transmembrane domains in the cytosol to prevent aggregation and temporarily allow opportunities for membrane targeting. Over time, Ubiquilins recruit an E3 ligase to ubiquitinate bound clients. The attached ubiquitin engages Ubiquilin's UBA domain, normally bound to an intramolecular UBL domain, and stabilizes the Ubiquilin-client complex. This conformational change precludes additional chances at membrane targeting for the client, while simultaneously freeing Ubiquilin's UBL domain for targeting to the proteasome. Loss of Ubiquilins by genetic ablation or sequestration in polyglutamine aggregates leads to accumulation of non-inserted mitochondrial membrane protein precursors. These findings define Ubiquilins as a family of chaperones for cytosolically exposed transmembrane domains and explain how they use ubiquitin to triage clients for degradation via coordinated intra- and intermolecular interactions. PMID:27345149

  5. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lawless, Nathan; Blacklock, Kristin; Berrigan, Elizabeth; Verkhivker, Gennady

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock) kinase from the system during client loading (release) stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery. PMID:24287464

  6. The role of HSP70 and its co-chaperones in protein misfolding, aggregation and disease.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Emma J; Cheetham, Michael E; Chapple, J Paul; van der Spuy, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones and their associated co-chaperones are essential in health and disease as they are key facilitators of protein folding, quality control and function. In particular, the HSP70 molecular chaperone networks have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases caused by aberrant protein folding. The pathogenesis of these disorders usually includes the formation of deposits of misfolded, aggregated protein. HSP70 and its co-chaperones have been recognised as potent modulators of inclusion formation and cell survival in cellular and animal models of neurodegenerative disease. In has become evident that the HSP70 chaperone machine functions not only in folding, but also in proteasome mediated degradation of neurodegenerative disease proteins. Thus, there has been a great deal of interest in the potential manipulation of molecular chaperones as a therapeutic approach for many neurodegenerations. Furthermore, mutations in several HSP70 co-chaperones and putative co-chaperones have been identified as causing inherited neurodegenerative and cardiac disorders, directly linking the HSP70 chaperone system to human disease. PMID:25487025

  7. Multiple functions of the histone chaperone Jun dimerization protein 2.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Ho; Wuputra, Kenly; Lin, Yin-Chu; Lin, Chang-Shen; Yokoyama, Kazunari K

    2016-09-30

    The Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) is part of the family of stress-responsible transcription factors such as the activation protein-1, and binds the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetateresponse element and the cAMP response element. It also plays a role as a histone chaperone and participates in diverse processes, such as cell-cycle arrest, cell differentiation, apoptosis, senescence, and metastatic spread, and functions as an oncogene and anti-oncogene, and as a cellular reprogramming factor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these multiple functions of JDP2 have not been clarified. This review summarizes the structure and function of JDP2, highlighting the specific role of JDP2 in cellular-stress regulation and prevention. PMID:27041241

  8. Chaperone proteins and brain tumors: Potential targets and possible therapeutics1

    PubMed Central

    Graner, Michael W.; Bigner, Darell D.

    2005-01-01

    Chaperone proteins are most notable for the proteo- and cyotoprotective capacities they afford during cellular stress. Under conditions of cellular normalcy, chaperones still play integral roles in the folding of nascent polypeptides into functional entities, in assisting in intracellular/intraorganellar transport, in assembly and maintenance of multi-subunit protein complexes, and in aiding and abetting the degradation of senescent proteins. Tumors frequently have relatively enhanced needs for chaperone number and activity because of the stresses of rapid proliferation, increased metabolism, and overall genetic instability. Thus, it may be possible to take advantage of this reliance that tumor cells have on chaperones by pharmacologic and biologic means. Certain chaperones are abundant in the brain, which implies important roles for them. While it is presumed that the requirements of brain tumors for chaperone proteins are similar to those of any other cell type, tumor or otherwise, very little inquiry has been directed at the possibility of using chaperone proteins as therapeutic targets or even as therapeutic agents against central nervous system malignancies. This review highlights some of the research on the functions of chaperone proteins, on what can be done to modify those functions, and on the physiological responses that tumors and organisms can have to chaperone-targeted or chaperone-based therapies. In particular, this review will also underscore areas of research where brain tumors have been part of the field, although in general those instances are few and far between. This relative dearth of research devoted to chaperone protein targets and therapeutics in brain tumors reveals much untrodden turf to explore for potential treatments of these dreadfully refractive diseases. PMID:16053701

  9. Proteins with RNA Chaperone Activity: A World of Diverse Proteins with a Common Task—Impediment of RNA Misfolding

    PubMed Central

    Semrad, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    Proteins with RNA chaperone activity are ubiquitous proteins that play important roles in cellular mechanisms. They prevent RNA from misfolding by loosening misfolded structures without ATP consumption. RNA chaperone activity is studied in vitro and in vivo using oligonucleotide- or ribozyme-based assays. Due to their functional as well as structural diversity, a common chaperoning mechanism or universal motif has not yet been identified. A growing database of proteins with RNA chaperone activity has been established based on evaluation of chaperone activity via the described assays. Although the exact mechanism is not yet understood, it is more and more believed that disordered regions within proteins play an important role. This possible mechanism and which proteins were found to possess RNA chaperone activity are discussed here. PMID:21234377

  10. Interplay between chaperones and protein disorder promotes the evolution of protein networks.

    PubMed

    Pechmann, Sebastian; Frydman, Judith

    2014-06-01

    Evolution is driven by mutations, which lead to new protein functions but come at a cost to protein stability. Non-conservative substitutions are of interest in this regard because they may most profoundly affect both function and stability. Accordingly, organisms must balance the benefit of accepting advantageous substitutions with the possible cost of deleterious effects on protein folding and stability. We here examine factors that systematically promote non-conservative mutations at the proteome level. Intrinsically disordered regions in proteins play pivotal roles in protein interactions, but many questions regarding their evolution remain unanswered. Similarly, whether and how molecular chaperones, which have been shown to buffer destabilizing mutations in individual proteins, generally provide robustness during proteome evolution remains unclear. To this end, we introduce an evolutionary parameter λ that directly estimates the rate of non-conservative substitutions. Our analysis of λ in Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Homo sapiens sequences reveals how co- and post-translationally acting chaperones differentially promote non-conservative substitutions in their substrates, likely through buffering of their destabilizing effects. We further find that λ serves well to quantify the evolution of intrinsically disordered proteins even though the unstructured, thus generally variable regions in proteins are often flanked by very conserved sequences. Crucially, we show that both intrinsically disordered proteins and highly re-wired proteins in protein interaction networks, which have evolved new interactions and functions, exhibit a higher λ at the expense of enhanced chaperone assistance. Our findings thus highlight an intricate interplay of molecular chaperones and protein disorder in the evolvability of protein networks. Our results illuminate the role of chaperones in enabling protein evolution, and underline the importance of the cellular

  11. Interplay between Chaperones and Protein Disorder Promotes the Evolution of Protein Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pechmann, Sebastian; Frydman, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Evolution is driven by mutations, which lead to new protein functions but come at a cost to protein stability. Non-conservative substitutions are of interest in this regard because they may most profoundly affect both function and stability. Accordingly, organisms must balance the benefit of accepting advantageous substitutions with the possible cost of deleterious effects on protein folding and stability. We here examine factors that systematically promote non-conservative mutations at the proteome level. Intrinsically disordered regions in proteins play pivotal roles in protein interactions, but many questions regarding their evolution remain unanswered. Similarly, whether and how molecular chaperones, which have been shown to buffer destabilizing mutations in individual proteins, generally provide robustness during proteome evolution remains unclear. To this end, we introduce an evolutionary parameter λ that directly estimates the rate of non-conservative substitutions. Our analysis of λ in Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Homo sapiens sequences reveals how co- and post-translationally acting chaperones differentially promote non-conservative substitutions in their substrates, likely through buffering of their destabilizing effects. We further find that λ serves well to quantify the evolution of intrinsically disordered proteins even though the unstructured, thus generally variable regions in proteins are often flanked by very conserved sequences. Crucially, we show that both intrinsically disordered proteins and highly re-wired proteins in protein interaction networks, which have evolved new interactions and functions, exhibit a higher λ at the expense of enhanced chaperone assistance. Our findings thus highlight an intricate interplay of molecular chaperones and protein disorder in the evolvability of protein networks. Our results illuminate the role of chaperones in enabling protein evolution, and underline the importance of the cellular

  12. Genetic selection designed to stabilize proteins uncovers a chaperone called Spy

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Shu; Koldewey, Philipp; Tapley, Tim; Kirsch, Nadine; Ruane, Karen M.; Pfizenmaier, Jennifer; Shi, Rong; Hofmann, Stephan; Foit, Linda; Ren, Guoping; Jakob, Ursula; Xu, Zhaohui; Cygler, Miroslaw; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2011-01-01

    To optimize the in vivo folding of proteins, we linked protein stability to antibiotic resistance, thereby forcing bacteria to effectively fold and stabilize proteins. When we challenged Escherichia coli to stabilize a very unstable periplasmic protein, it massively overproduced a periplasmic protein called Spy, which increases the steady-state levels of a set of unstable protein mutants up to 700-fold. In vitro studies demonstrate that the Spy protein is an effective ATP-independent chaperone that suppresses protein aggregation and aids protein refolding. Our strategy opens up new routes for chaperone discovery and the custom tailoring of the in vivo folding environment. Spy forms thin, apparently flexible cradle-shaped dimers. Spy is unlike the structure of any previously solved chaperone, making it the prototypical member of a new class of small chaperones that facilitate protein refolding in the absence of energy cofactors. PMID:21317898

  13. Calcyclin Binding Protein/Siah-1 Interacting Protein Is a Hsp90 Binding Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Góral, Agnieszka; Bieganowski, Paweł; Prus, Wiktor; Krzemień-Ojak, Łucja; Kądziołka, Beata; Fabczak, Hanna; Filipek, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp90 chaperone activity is tightly regulated by interaction with many co-chaperones. Since CacyBP/SIP shares some sequence homology with a known Hsp90 co-chaperone, Sgt1, in this work we performed a set of experiments in order to verify whether CacyBP/SIP can interact with Hsp90. By applying the immunoprecipitation assay we have found that CacyBP/SIP binds to Hsp90 and that the middle (M) domain of Hsp90 is responsible for this binding. Furthermore, the proximity ligation assay (PLA) performed on HEp-2 cells has shown that the CacyBP/SIP-Hsp90 complexes are mainly localized in the cytoplasm of these cells. Using purified proteins and applying an ELISA we have shown that Hsp90 interacts directly with CacyBP/SIP and that the latter protein does not compete with Sgt1 for the binding to Hsp90. Moreover, inhibitors of Hsp90 do not perturb CacyBP/SIP-Hsp90 binding. Luciferase renaturation assay and citrate synthase aggregation assay with the use of recombinant proteins have revealed that CacyBP/SIP exhibits chaperone properties. Also, CacyBP/SIP-3xFLAG expression in HEp-2 cells results in the appearance of more basic Hsp90 forms in 2D electrophoresis, which may indicate that CacyBP/SIP dephosphorylates Hsp90. Altogether, the obtained results suggest that CacyBP/SIP is involved in regulation of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery. PMID:27249023

  14. Catalysis of protein folding by chaperones accelerates evolutionary dynamics in adapting cell populations.

    PubMed

    Cetinbaş, Murat; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly from their genome sequences. A genotype-phenotype relationship that is based on a simple yet non-trivially postulated protein-protein interaction (PPI) network determines the cell division rate. Model proteins can exist in native and molten globule states and participate in functional and all possible promiscuous non-functional PPIs. We find that an active chaperone mechanism, whereby chaperones directly catalyze protein folding, has a significant impact on the cellular fitness and the rate of evolutionary dynamics, while passive chaperones, which just maintain misfolded proteins in soluble complexes have a negligible effect on the fitness. We find that by partially releasing the constraint on protein stability, active chaperones promote a deeper exploration of sequence space to strengthen functional PPIs, and diminish the non-functional PPIs. A key experimentally testable prediction emerging from our analysis is that down-regulation of chaperones that catalyze protein folding significantly slows down the adaptation dynamics. PMID:24244114

  15. Classification of chemical chaperones based on their effect on protein folding landscapes.

    PubMed

    Dandage, Rohan; Bandyopadhyay, Anannya; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Saxena, Kanika; Dalal, Vijit; Das, Aritri; Chakraborty, Kausik

    2015-03-20

    Various small molecules present in biological systems can assist protein folding in vitro and are known as chemical chaperones. De novo design of chemical chaperones with higher activity than currently known examples is desirable to ameliorate protein misfolding and aggregation in multiple contexts. However, this development has been hindered by limited knowledge of their activities. It is thought that chemical chaperones are typically poor solvents for a protein backbone and hence facilitate native structure formation. However, it is unknown if different chemical chaperones can act differently to modulate folding energy landscapes. Using a model slow folding protein, double-mutant Maltose-binding protein (DM-MBP), we show that a canonical chemical chaperone, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), accelerates refolding by decreasing the flexibility of the refolding intermediate (RI). Among a number of small molecules that chaperone DM-MBP folding, proline and serine stabilize the transition state (TS) enthalpically, while trehalose behaves like TMAO and increases the rate of barrier crossing through nonenthalpic processes. We propose a two-group classification of chemical chaperones based upon their thermodynamic effect on RI and TS, which is also supported by single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) studies. Interestingly, for a different test protein, the molecular mechanisms of the two groups of chaperones are not conserved. This provides a glimpse into the complexity of chemical chaperoning activity of osmolytes. Future work would allow us to engineer synergism between the two classes to design more efficient chemical chaperones to ameliorate protein misfolding and aggregation problems. PMID:25493352

  16. Molecular chaperones and heat shock proteins in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingbo; Metzler, Bernhard; Jahangiri, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    In response to stress stimuli, mammalian cells activate an ancient signaling pathway leading to the transient expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs are a family of proteins serving as molecular chaperones that prevent the formation of nonspecific protein aggregates and assist proteins in the acquisition of their native structures. Physiologically, HSPs play a protective role in the homeostasis of the vessel wall but have an impact on immunoinflammatory processes in pathological conditions involved in the development of atherosclerosis. For instance, some members of HSPs have been shown to have immunoregulatory properties and modification of innate and adaptive response to HSPs, and can protect the vessel wall from the disease. On the other hand, a high degree of sequence homology between microbial and mammalian HSPs, due to evolutionary conservation, carries a risk of misdirected autoimmunity against HSPs expressed on the stressed cells of vascular endothelium. Furthermore, HSPs and anti-HSP antibodies have been shown to elicit production of proinflammatory cytokines. Potential therapeutic use of HSP in prevention of atherosclerosis involves achieving optimal balance between protective and immunogenic effects of HSPs and in the progress of research on vaccination. In this review, we update the progress of studies on HSPs and the integrity of the vessel wall, discuss the mechanism by which HSPs exert their role in the disease development, and highlight the potential clinic translation in the research field. PMID:22058161

  17. Model systems of protein-misfolding diseases reveal chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chaperones and co-chaperones enable protein folding and degradation, safeguarding the proteome against proteotoxic stress. Chaperones display dynamic responses to exogenous and endogenous stressors and thus constitute a key component of the proteostasis network (PN), an intricately regulated network of quality control and repair pathways that cooperate to maintain cellular proteostasis. It has been hypothesized that aging leads to chronic stress on the proteome and that this could underlie many age-associated diseases such as neurodegeneration. Understanding the dynamics of chaperone function during aging and disease-related proteotoxic stress could reveal specific chaperone systems that fail to respond to protein misfolding. Through the use of suppressor and enhancer screens, key chaperones crucial for proteostasis maintenance have been identified in model organisms that express misfolded disease-related proteins. This review provides a literature-based analysis of these genetic studies and highlights prominent chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity, which include the HSP70-HSP40 machine and small HSPs. Taken together, these studies in model systems can inform strategies for therapeutic regulation of chaperone functionality, to manage aging-related proteotoxic stress and to delay the onset of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27491084

  18. Zinc-L-carnosine binds to molecular chaperone HSP70 and inhibits the chaperone activity of the protein.

    PubMed

    Haga, Asami; Okamoto, Tomoya; Yamada, Shintaroh; Kubota, Toshihiko; Sanpei, Ann; Takahashi, Shota; Nakayama, Masahiro; Nagai, Miki; Otaka, Michiro; Miyazaki, Toshio; Nunomura, Wataru; Grave, Ewa; Itoh, Hideaki

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the specific binding proteins of Zinc-L-carnosine (Polaprezinc) using Polaprezinc-affinity column chromatography in vitro. A protein having a 70-kDa molecular mass was eluted by the linear gradient of 0-1.0 mM Polaprezinc from the affinity column and the protein was identified as the molecular chaperone HSP70 by immunoblotting. The chaperone activity of HSP70 was completely suppressed by Polaprezinc. The ATPase activity of HSP70 was affected to some extent by the reagent. In the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum, the secondary structure of HSP70 was changed in the presence of Polaprezinc, i.e. it decreased in the α-helix. We have determined the Polaprezinc-binding domain of HSP70 by using recombinant HSP70N- and C-domains. Although Polaprezinc could bind to both the N-terminal and the C-terminal of HSP70, the HSP70N-domain has a high affinity to the drug. Regarding the peptide cleavage of the HSP70N- and C-domains with proteinase K, the intact HSP70N still remained in the presence of Polaprezinc. On the other hand, the quantity of the intact C-domain slightly decreased under the same conditions along with the newly digested small peptides appeared. It has been suggested that Polaprezinc binds to HSP70 especially in the N-domains, suppresses the chaperone activity and delays an ATPase activities of HSP70. PMID:23687308

  19. Protein chaperones: a composition of matter review (2008 – 2013)

    PubMed Central

    Taldone, Tony; Patel, Hardik J; Bolaender, Alexander; Patel, Maulik R; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are proteins with important functions in regulating disease phenotypes. Historically, Hsp90 has first received recognition as a target in cancer, with consequent efforts extending its potential role to other diseases. Hsp70 has also attracted interest as a therapeutic target for its role as a co-chaperone to Hsp90 as well as its own anti-apoptotic roles. Areas covered Herein, patents from 2008 to 2013 are reviewed to identify those that disclose composition of matter claimed to inhibit Hsp90 or Hsp70. Expert opinion For Hsp90, there has been considerable creativity in the discovery of novel pharmacophores that fall outside the three initially discovered scaffolds (i.e., ansamycins, resorcinols and purines). Nonetheless, much of the patent literature appears to build on previously reported structure activity relationship through slight modifications of Hsp90 inhibitor space by finding weaknesses in existing patents. The major goal of future development of Hsp90 inhibitors is not necessarily identifying better molecules but rather understanding how to rationally use these agents in the clinic. The development of Hsp70 inhibitors has lagged behind. It will require a more concerted effort from the drug discovery community in order to begin to realize the potential of this target. PMID:24742089

  20. A quantitative chaperone interaction network reveals the architecture of cellular protein homeostasis pathways.

    PubMed

    Taipale, Mikko; Tucker, George; Peng, Jian; Krykbaeva, Irina; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Larsen, Brett; Choi, Hyungwon; Berger, Bonnie; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-07-17

    Chaperones are abundant cellular proteins that promote the folding and function of their substrate proteins (clients). In vivo, chaperones also associate with a large and diverse set of cofactors (cochaperones) that regulate their specificity and function. However, how these cochaperones regulate protein folding and whether they have chaperone-independent biological functions is largely unknown. We combined mass spectrometry and quantitative high-throughput LUMIER assays to systematically characterize the chaperone-cochaperone-client interaction network in human cells. We uncover hundreds of chaperone clients, delineate their participation in specific cochaperone complexes, and establish a surprisingly distinct network of protein-protein interactions for cochaperones. As a salient example of the power of such analysis, we establish that NUDC family cochaperones specifically associate with structurally related but evolutionarily distinct β-propeller folds. We provide a framework for deciphering the proteostasis network and its regulation in development and disease and expand the use of chaperones as sensors for drug-target engagement. PMID:25036637

  1. Engineering and Evolution of Molecular Chaperones and Protein Disaggregases with Enhanced Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Korrie L.; Shorter, James

    2016-01-01

    Cells have evolved a sophisticated proteostasis network to ensure that proteins acquire and retain their native structure and function. Critical components of this network include molecular chaperones and protein disaggregases, which function to prevent and reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, proteostasis networks have limits, which when exceeded can have fatal consequences as in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A promising strategy is to engineer proteostasis networks to counter challenges presented by specific diseases or specific proteins. Here, we review efforts to enhance the activity of individual molecular chaperones or protein disaggregases via engineering and directed evolution. Remarkably, enhanced global activity or altered substrate specificity of various molecular chaperones, including GroEL, Hsp70, ClpX, and Spy, can be achieved by minor changes in primary sequence and often a single missense mutation. Likewise, small changes in the primary sequence of Hsp104 yield potentiated protein disaggregases that reverse the aggregation and buffer toxicity of various neurodegenerative disease proteins, including α-synuclein, TDP-43, and FUS. Collectively, these advances have revealed key mechanistic and functional insights into chaperone and disaggregase biology. They also suggest that enhanced chaperones and disaggregases could have important applications in treating human disease as well as in the purification of valuable proteins in the pharmaceutical sector. PMID:27014702

  2. Engineering and Evolution of Molecular Chaperones and Protein Disaggregases with Enhanced Activity.

    PubMed

    Mack, Korrie L; Shorter, James

    2016-01-01

    Cells have evolved a sophisticated proteostasis network to ensure that proteins acquire and retain their native structure and function. Critical components of this network include molecular chaperones and protein disaggregases, which function to prevent and reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, proteostasis networks have limits, which when exceeded can have fatal consequences as in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A promising strategy is to engineer proteostasis networks to counter challenges presented by specific diseases or specific proteins. Here, we review efforts to enhance the activity of individual molecular chaperones or protein disaggregases via engineering and directed evolution. Remarkably, enhanced global activity or altered substrate specificity of various molecular chaperones, including GroEL, Hsp70, ClpX, and Spy, can be achieved by minor changes in primary sequence and often a single missense mutation. Likewise, small changes in the primary sequence of Hsp104 yield potentiated protein disaggregases that reverse the aggregation and buffer toxicity of various neurodegenerative disease proteins, including α-synuclein, TDP-43, and FUS. Collectively, these advances have revealed key mechanistic and functional insights into chaperone and disaggregase biology. They also suggest that enhanced chaperones and disaggregases could have important applications in treating human disease as well as in the purification of valuable proteins in the pharmaceutical sector. PMID:27014702

  3. Exploring the mechanisms used by promiscuous chaperones to assist protein folding in the cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, Andrew I.

    There are two popular theories to explain how molecular chaperones boost the yield of folded protein in the cell: According to the Anfinsen cage model, (ACM) chaperonins protect denatured proteins from aggregation. A competing theory, the iterative annealing model (IAM) claims that ATP regulated chaperone binding and release accelerates folding by freeing proteins from long-lived kinetic traps. We present experimental and kinetic evidence to argue that the IAM is not a complete picture of how the GroEL/ES chaperonin works. Surprisingly some substrate proteins experience folding rate enhancements without undergoing multiple rounds of ATP-induced binding and release from the chaperonin. An explanation of this data requires going beyond the ACM and IAM models. Our work uses molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the folding of a highly frustrated protein within a chaperonin cavity. The chaperonin interior is modeled by a sphere with variable degree of attraction to the protein inside. We demonstrate that this cavity, similar to the weakly hydrophobic interior of the GroEL cavity upon complexion with ATP and GroES, is sufficient to accelerate the folding of a frustrated protein by more than an order of magnitude. Our simulations uncover a novel form of the IAM in which the substrate exhibits spontaneous binding and release from the wall of the chaperonin cage. This mimics the behavior observed in the standard IAM, with the difference that thermal fluctuations, rather than ATP, allow the substrate to unbind from the chaperone. An growing number of smaller cageless chaperones have been discovered that can assist protein folding without the consumption of ATP, including artificial "minichaperones" (fragments of larger chaperones). It is tempting to speculate that the same thermally-driven IAM mechanism could play a role with these chaperones as well. We performed additional simulations of protein folding outside the sphere. We find that in order to accelerate

  4. Survey of molecular chaperone requirement for the biosynthesis of hamster polyomavirus VP1 protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Valaviciute, Monika; Norkiene, Milda; Goda, Karolis; Slibinskas, Rimantas; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2016-07-01

    A number of viruses utilize molecular chaperones during various stages of their life cycle. It has been shown that members of the heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) chaperone family assist polyomavirus capsids during infection. However, the molecular chaperones that assist the formation of recombinant capsid viral protein 1 (VP1)-derived virus-like particles (VLPs) in yeast remain unclear. A panel of yeast strains with single chaperone gene deletions were used to evaluate the chaperones required for biosynthesis of recombinant hamster polyomavirus capsid protein VP1. The impact of deletion or mild overexpression of chaperone genes was determined in live cells by flow cytometry using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fused with VP1. Targeted genetic analysis demonstrated that VP1-EGFP fusion protein levels were significantly higher in yeast strains in which the SSZ1 or ZUO1 genes encoding ribosome-associated complex components were deleted. The results confirmed the participation of cytosolic Hsp70 chaperones and suggested the potential involvement of the Ydj1 and Caj1 co-chaperones and the endoplasmic reticulum chaperones in the biosynthesis of VP1 VLPs in yeast. Likewise, the markedly reduced levels of VP1-EGFP in Δhsc82 and Δhsp82 yeast strains indicated that both Hsp70 and Hsp90 chaperones might assist VP1 VLPs during protein biosynthesis. PMID:27038828

  5. Affinity chromatography of chaperones based on denatured proteins: Analysis of cell lysates of different origin.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, N Yu; Sikorskaya, E V; Marchenkov, V V; Kashparov, I A; Semisotnov, G V

    2016-03-01

    Molecular chaperones are involved in folding, oligomerization, transport, and degradation of numerous cellular proteins. Most of chaperones are heat-shock proteins (HSPs). A number of diseases of various organisms are accompanied by changes in the structure and functional activity of chaperones, thereby revealing their vital importance. One of the fundamental properties of chaperones is their ability to bind polypeptides lacking a rigid spatial structure. Here, we demonstrate that affinity chromatography using sorbents with covalently attached denatured proteins allows effective purification and quantitative assessment of their bound protein partners. Using pure Escherichia coli chaperone GroEL (Hsp60), the capacity of denatured pepsin or lysozyme-based affinity sorbents was evaluated as 1 mg and 1.4 mg of GroEL per 1 ml of sorbent, respectively. Cell lysates of bacteria (E. coli, Thermus thermophilus, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis), archaea (Halorubrum lacusprofundi) as well as the lysate of rat liver mitochondria were analyzed using affinity carrier with denatured lysozyme. It was found that, apart from Hsp60, other proteins with a molecular weight of about 100, 50, 40, and 20 kDa are able to interact with denatured lysozyme. PMID:26644295

  6. Structural Basis for Protein anti-Aggregation Activity of the Trigger Factor Chaperone*

    PubMed Central

    Saio, Tomohide; Guan, Xiao; Rossi, Paolo; Economou, Anastassios; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular chaperones prevent aggregation and misfolding of proteins but scarcity of structural data has impeded an understanding of the recognition and anti-aggregation mechanisms. Here we report the solution structure, dynamics and energetics of three Trigger Factor (TF) chaperone molecules in complex with alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) captured in the unfolded state. Our data show that TF uses multiple sites to bind to several regions of the PhoA substrate protein primarily through hydrophobic contacts. NMR relaxation experiments show that TF interacts with PhoA in a highly dynamic fashion but as the number and length of the PhoA regions engaged by TF increases, a more stable complex gradually emerges. Multivalent binding keeps the substrate protein in an extended, unfolded conformation. The results show how molecular chaperones recognize unfolded polypeptides and how by acting as unfoldases and holdases prevent the aggregation and premature (mis)folding of unfolded proteins. PMID:24812405

  7. Mitochondrial heat shock protein 70, a molecular chaperone for proteins encoded by mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (mt-Hsp70) has been shown to play an important role in facilitating import into, as well as folding and assembly of nuclear-encoded proteins in the mitochondrial matrix. Here, we describe a role for mt-Hsp70 in chaperoning proteins encoded by mitochondrial DNA and synthesized within mitochondria. The availability of mt-Hsp70 function influences the pattern of proteins synthesized in mitochondria of yeast both in vivo and in vitro. In particular, we show that mt-Hsp70 acts in maintaining the var1 protein, the only mitochondrially encoded subunit of mitochondrial ribosomes, in an assembly competent state, especially under heat stress conditions. Furthermore, mt-Hsp70 helps to facilitate assembly of mitochondrially encoded subunits of the ATP synthase complex. By interacting with the ATP-ase 9 oligomer, mt-Hsp70 promotes assembly of ATP-ase 6, and thereby protects the latter protein from proteolytic degradation. Thus mt-Hsp70 by acting as a chaperone for proteins encoded by the mitochondrial DNA, has a critical role in the assembly of supra- molecular complexes. PMID:7962074

  8. Investigating the Chaperone Properties of a Novel Heat Shock Protein, Hsp70.c, from Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Burger, Adélle; Ludewig, Michael H; Boshoff, Aileen

    2014-01-01

    The neglected tropical disease, African Trypanosomiasis, is fatal and has a crippling impact on economic development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is an important molecular chaperone that is expressed in response to stress and Hsp40 acts as its co-chaperone. These proteins play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist the parasite as it moves from a cold blooded insect vector to a warm blooded mammalian host. A novel cytosolic Hsp70, from Trypanosoma brucei, TbHsp70.c, contains an acidic substrate binding domain and lacks the C-terminal EEVD motif. The ability of a cytosolic Hsp40 from Trypanosoma brucei J protein 2, Tbj2, to function as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c was investigated. The main objective was to functionally characterize TbHsp70.c to further expand our knowledge of parasite biology. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 were heterologously expressed and purified and both proteins displayed the ability to suppress aggregation of thermolabile MDH and chemically denatured rhodanese. ATPase assays revealed a 2.8-fold stimulation of the ATPase activity of TbHsp70.c by Tbj2. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 both demonstrated chaperone activity and Tbj2 functions as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c. In vivo heat stress experiments indicated upregulation of the expression levels of TbHsp70.c. PMID:24707395

  9. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by their dedicated chaperones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausch, Patrick; Singh, Ujjwala; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Pillet, Benjamin; Murat, Guillaume; Altegoer, Florian; Stier, Gunter; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard; Bange, Gert; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cells produce every minute >160,000 ribosomal proteins. Owing to their difficult physicochemical properties, the synthesis of assembly-competent ribosomal proteins represents a major challenge. Recent evidence highlights that dedicated chaperone proteins recognize the N-terminal regions of ribosomal proteins and promote their soluble expression and delivery to the assembly site. Here we explore the intuitive possibility that ribosomal proteins are captured by dedicated chaperones in a co-translational manner. Affinity purification of four chaperones (Rrb1, Syo1, Sqt1 and Yar1) selectively enriched the mRNAs encoding their specific ribosomal protein clients (Rpl3, Rpl5, Rpl10 and Rps3). X-ray crystallography reveals how the N-terminal, rRNA-binding residues of Rpl10 are shielded by Sqt1's WD-repeat β-propeller, providing mechanistic insight into the incorporation of Rpl10 into pre-60S subunits. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by dedicated chaperones constitutes an elegant mechanism to prevent unspecific interactions and aggregation of ribosomal proteins on their road to incorporation.

  10. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by their dedicated chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Pausch, Patrick; Singh, Ujjwala; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Pillet, Benjamin; Murat, Guillaume; Altegoer, Florian; Stier, Gunter; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard; Bange, Gert; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cells produce every minute >160,000 ribosomal proteins. Owing to their difficult physicochemical properties, the synthesis of assembly-competent ribosomal proteins represents a major challenge. Recent evidence highlights that dedicated chaperone proteins recognize the N-terminal regions of ribosomal proteins and promote their soluble expression and delivery to the assembly site. Here we explore the intuitive possibility that ribosomal proteins are captured by dedicated chaperones in a co-translational manner. Affinity purification of four chaperones (Rrb1, Syo1, Sqt1 and Yar1) selectively enriched the mRNAs encoding their specific ribosomal protein clients (Rpl3, Rpl5, Rpl10 and Rps3). X-ray crystallography reveals how the N-terminal, rRNA-binding residues of Rpl10 are shielded by Sqt1's WD-repeat β-propeller, providing mechanistic insight into the incorporation of Rpl10 into pre-60S subunits. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by dedicated chaperones constitutes an elegant mechanism to prevent unspecific interactions and aggregation of ribosomal proteins on their road to incorporation. PMID:26112308

  11. Fluorescently labeled collagen binding proteins allow specific visualization of collagen in tissues and live cell culture.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Katy Nash; Bouten, Carlijn V C; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; van Zandvoort, Marc A M J; Merkx, Maarten

    2006-03-15

    Visualization of the formation and orientation of collagen fibers in tissue engineering experiments is crucial for understanding the factors that determine the mechanical properties of tissues. In this study, collagen-specific fluorescent probes were developed using a new approach that takes advantage of the inherent specificity of collagen binding protein domains present in bacterial adhesion proteins (CNA35) and integrins (GST-alpha1I). Both collagen binding domains were obtained as fusion proteins from an Escherichia coli expression system and fluorescently labeled using either amine-reactive succinimide (CNA35) or cysteine-reactive maleimide (GST-alpha1I) dyes. Solid-phase binding assays showed that both protein-based probes are much more specific than dichlorotriazinyl aminofluorescein (DTAF), a fluorescent dye that is currently used to track collagen formation in tissue engineering experiments. The CNA35 probe showed a higher affinity for human collagen type I than did the GST-alpha1I probe (apparent K(d) values of 0.5 and 50 microM, respectively) and showed very little cross-reactivity with noncollagenous extracellular matrix proteins. The CNA35 probe was also superior to both GST-alpha1I and DTAF in visualizing the formation of collagen fibers around live human venous saphena cells. Immunohistological experiments on rat tissue showed colocalization of the CNA35 probe with collagen type I and type III antibodies. The fluorescent probes described here have important advantages over existing methods for visualization of collagen, in particular for monitoring the formation of collagen in live tissue cultures over prolonged time periods. PMID:16476406

  12. 14-3-3 protein targets misfolded chaperone-associated proteins to aggresomes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhe; Graham, Kourtney; Foote, Molly; Liang, Fengshan; Rizkallah, Raed; Hurt, Myra; Wang, Yanchang; Wu, Yuying; Zhou, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Summary The aggresome is a key cytoplasmic organelle for sequestration and clearance of toxic protein aggregates. Although loading misfolded proteins cargos to dynein motors has been recognized as an important step in the aggresome formation process, the molecular machinery that mediates the association of cargos with the dynein motor is poorly understood. Here, we report a new aggresome-targeting pathway that involves isoforms of 14-3-3, a family of conserved regulatory proteins. 14-3-3 interacts with both the dynein-intermediate chain (DIC) and an Hsp70 co-chaperone Bcl-2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3), thereby recruiting chaperone-associated protein cargos to dynein motors for their transport to aggresomes. This molecular cascade entails functional dimerization of 14-3-3, which we show to be crucial for the formation of aggresomes in both yeast and mammalian cells. These results suggest that 14-3-3 functions as a molecular adaptor to promote aggresomal targeting of misfolded protein aggregates and may link such complexes to inclusion bodies observed in various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23843611

  13. Novel RNA chaperone domain of RNA-binding protein La is regulated by AKT phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kuehnert, Julia; Sommer, Gunhild; Zierk, Avery W.; Fedarovich, Alena; Brock, Alexander; Fedarovich, Dzmitry; Heise, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    The cellular function of the cancer-associated RNA-binding protein La has been linked to translation of viral and cellular mRNAs. Recently, we have shown that the human La protein stimulates IRES-mediated translation of the cooperative oncogene CCND1 in cervical cancer cells. However, there is little known about the underlying molecular mechanism by which La stimulates CCND1 IRES-mediated translation, and we propose that its RNA chaperone activity is required. Herein, we show that La binds close to the CCND1 start codon and demonstrate that La's RNA chaperone activity can change the folding of its binding site. We map the RNA chaperone domain (RCD) within the C-terminal region of La in close proximity to a novel AKT phosphorylation site (T389). Phosphorylation at T389 by AKT-1 strongly impairs its RNA chaperone activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the RCD as well as T389 is required to stimulate CCND1 IRES-mediated translation in cells. In summary, we provide a model whereby a novel interplay between RNA-binding, RNA chaperoning and AKT phosphorylation of La protein regulates CCND1 IRES-mediated translation. PMID:25520193

  14. The Trigger Factor Chaperone Encapsulates and Stabilizes Partial Folds of Substrate Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Kushagra; Vreede, Jocelyne; Mashaghi, Alireza; Tans, Sander J.; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    How chaperones interact with protein chains to assist in their folding is a central open question in biology. Obtaining atomistic insight is challenging in particular, given the transient nature of the chaperone-substrate complexes and the large system sizes. Recent single-molecule experiments have shown that the chaperone Trigger Factor (TF) not only binds unfolded protein chains, but can also guide protein chains to their native state by interacting with partially folded structures. Here, we used all-atom MD simulations to provide atomistic insights into how Trigger Factor achieves this chaperone function. Our results indicate a crucial role for the tips of the finger-like appendages of TF in the early interactions with both unfolded chains and partially folded structures. Unfolded chains are kinetically trapped when bound to TF, which suppresses the formation of transient, non-native end-to-end contacts. Mechanical flexibility allows TF to hold partially folded structures with two tips (in a pinching configuration), and to stabilize them by wrapping around its appendages. This encapsulation mechanism is distinct from that of chaperones such as GroEL, and allows folded structures of diverse size and composition to be protected from aggregation and misfolding interactions. The results suggest that an ATP cycle is not required to enable both encapsulation and liberation. PMID:26512985

  15. DnaJ/Hsc70 chaperone complexes control the extracellular release of neurodegenerative-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Sarah N; Zheng, Dali; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Martin, Mackenzie D; Chaput, Dale; Darling, April; Trotter, Justin H; Stothert, Andrew R; Nordhues, Bryce A; Lussier, April; Baker, Jeremy; Shelton, Lindsey; Kahn, Mahnoor; Blair, Laura J; Stevens, Stanley M; Dickey, Chad A

    2016-07-15

    It is now known that proteins associated with neurodegenerative disease can spread throughout the brain in a prionlike manner. However, the mechanisms regulating the trans-synaptic spread propagation, including the neuronal release of these proteins, remain unknown. The interaction of neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins with the molecular chaperone Hsc70 is well known, and we hypothesized that much like disaggregation, refolding, degradation, and even normal function, Hsc70 may dictate the extracellular fate of these proteins. Here, we show that several proteins, including TDP-43, α-synuclein, and the microtubule-associated protein tau, can be driven out of the cell by an Hsc70 co-chaperone, DnaJC5. In fact, DnaJC5 overexpression induced tau release in cells, neurons, and brain tissue, but only when activity of the chaperone Hsc70 was intact and when tau was able to associate with this chaperone. Moreover, release of tau from neurons was reduced in mice lacking the DnaJC5 gene and when the complement of DnaJs in the cell was altered. These results demonstrate that the dynamics of DnaJ/Hsc70 complexes are critically involved in the release of neurodegenerative disease proteins. PMID:27261198

  16. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  17. Ribonuclease A suggests how proteins self-chaperone against amyloid fiber formation

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Poh K.; Anderson, Natalie J.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Sawaya, Michael R.; Sambashivan, Shilpa; Eisenberg, David

    2012-05-29

    Genomic analyses have identified segments with high fiber-forming propensity in many proteins not known to form amyloid. Proteins are often protected from entering the amyloid state by molecular chaperones that permit them to fold in isolation from identical molecules; but, how do proteins self-chaperone their folding in the absence of chaperones? Here, we explore this question with the stable protein ribonuclease A (RNase A). We previously identified fiber-forming segments of amyloid-related proteins and demonstrated that insertion of these segments into the C-terminal hinge loop of nonfiber-forming RNase A can convert RNase A into the amyloid state through three-dimensional domain-swapping, where the inserted fiber-forming segments interact to create a steric zipper spine. In this study, we convert RNase A into amyloid-like fibers by increasing the loop length and hence conformational freedom of an endogenous fiber-forming segment, SSTSAASS, in the N-terminal hinge loop. This is accomplished by sandwiching SSTSAASS between inserted Gly residues. With these inserts, SSTSAASS is now able to form the steric zipper spine, allowing RNase A to form amyloid-like fibers. We show that these fibers contain RNase A molecules retaining their enzymatic activity and therefore native-like structure. Thus, RNase A appears to prevent fiber formation by limiting the conformational freedom of this fiber-forming segment from entering a steric zipper. Our observations suggest that proteins have evolved to self-chaperone by using similar protective mechanisms.

  18. The critical roles of endoplasmic reticulum chaperones and unfolded protein response in tumorigenesis and anticancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Luo, B; Lee, A S

    2013-02-14

    Cancer progression is characterized by rapidly proliferating cancer cells that are in need of increased protein synthesis. Therefore, enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activity is required to facilitate the folding, assembly and transportation of membrane and secretory proteins. These functions are carried out by ER chaperones. It is now becoming clear that the ER chaperones have critical functions outside of simply facilitating protein folding. For example, cancer progression requires glucose regulated protein (GRP) 78 for cancer cell survival and proliferation, as well as angiogenesis in the microenvironment. GRP78 can translocate to the cell surface acting as a receptor regulating oncogenic signaling and cell viability. Calreticulin, another ER chaperone, can translocate to the cell surface of apoptotic cancer cells and induce immunogenic cancer cell death and antitumor responses in vivo. Tumor-secreted GRP94 has been shown to elicit antitumor immune responses when used as antitumor vaccines. Protein disulfide isomerase is another ER chaperone that demonstrates pro-oncogenic and pro-survival functions. Because of intrinsic alterations of cellular metabolism and extrinsic factors in the tumor microenvironment, cancer cells are under ER stress, and they respond to this stress by activating the unfolded protein response (UPR). Depending on the severity and duration of ER stress, the signaling branches of the UPR can activate adaptive and pro-survival signals, or induce apoptotic cell death. The protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase signaling branch of the UPR has a dual role in cancer proliferation and survival, and is also required for ER stress-induced autophagy. The activation of the inositol-requiring kinase 1α branch promotes tumorigenesis, cancer cell survival and regulates tumor invasion. In summary, perturbance of ER homeostasis has critical roles in tumorigenesis, and therapeutic modulation of ER chaperones and/or UPR components presents potential antitumor

  19. Screening Molecular Chaperones Similar to Small Heat Shock Proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiyoung; Kim, Kanghwa

    2015-01-01

    To screen molecular chaperones similar to small heat shock proteins (sHsps), but without α-crystalline domain, heat-stable proteins from Schizosaccharomyces pombe were analyzed by 2-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Sixteen proteins were identified, and four recombinant proteins, including cofilin, NTF2, pyridoxin biosynthesis protein (Snz1) and Wos2 that has an α-crystalline domain, were purified. Among these proteins, only Snz1 showed the anti-aggregation activity against thermal denaturation of citrate synthase. However, pre-heating of NTF2 and Wos2 at 70℃ for 30 min, efficiently prevented thermal aggregation of citrate synthase. These results indicate that Snz1 and NTF2 possess molecular chaperone activity similar to sHsps, even though there is no α-crystalline domain in their sequences. PMID:26539043

  20. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central “hubs”. Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates. PMID:26394388

  1. A Novel Mechanism for Small Heat Shock Proteins to Function as Molecular Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kaiming; Ezemaduka, Anastasia N.; Wang, Zhao; Hu, Hongli; Shi, Xiaodong; Liu, Chuang; Lu, Xinping; Fu, Xinmiao; Chang, Zengyi; Yin, Chang-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are molecular chaperones ubiquitously present in all forms of life, but their function mechanisms remain controversial. Here we show by cryo-electron microscopy and single particle 3D reconstruction that, at the low temperatures (4–25°C), CeHSP17 (a sHSP from Caenorhabditis elegans) exists as a 24-subunit spherical oligomer with tetrahedral symmetry. Our studies demonstrate that CeHSP17 forms large sheet-like super-molecular assemblies (SMAs) at the high temperatures (45–60°C), and such SMAs are apparently the form that exhibits chaperone-like activity. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for sHSPs to function as molecular chaperones. PMID:25744691

  2. Suppression of protein aggregation by chaperone modification of high molecular weight complexes.

    PubMed

    Labbadia, John; Novoselov, Sergey S; Bett, John S; Weiss, Andreas; Paganetti, Paolo; Bates, Gillian P; Cheetham, Michael E

    2012-04-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation are associated with many neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease. The cellular machinery for maintaining proteostasis includes molecular chaperones that facilitate protein folding and reduce proteotoxicity. Increasing the protein folding capacity of cells through manipulation of DNAJ chaperones has been shown to suppress aggregation and ameliorate polyglutamine toxicity in cells and flies. However, to date these promising findings have not been translated to mammalian models of disease. To address this issue, we developed transgenic mice that over-express the neuronal chaperone HSJ1a (DNAJB2a) and crossed them with the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease. Over-expression of HSJ1a significantly reduced mutant huntingtin aggregation and enhanced solubility. Surprisingly, this was mediated through specific association with K63 ubiquitylated, detergent insoluble, higher order mutant huntingtin assemblies that decreased their ability to nucleate further aggregation. This was dependent on HSJ1a client binding ability, ubiquitin interaction and functional co-operation with HSP70. Importantly, these changes in mutant huntingtin solubility and aggregation led to improved neurological performance in R6/2 mice. These data reveal that prevention of further aggregation of detergent insoluble mutant huntingtin is an additional level of quality control for late stage chaperone-mediated neuroprotection. Furthermore, our findings represent an important proof of principle that DNAJ manipulation is a valid therapeutic approach for intervention in Huntington's disease. PMID:22396390

  3. Suppression of protein aggregation by chaperone modification of high molecular weight complexes

    PubMed Central

    Labbadia, John; Novoselov, Sergey S.; Bett, John S.; Weiss, Andreas; Paganetti, Paolo; Bates, Gillian P.

    2012-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation are associated with many neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington’s disease. The cellular machinery for maintaining proteostasis includes molecular chaperones that facilitate protein folding and reduce proteotoxicity. Increasing the protein folding capacity of cells through manipulation of DNAJ chaperones has been shown to suppress aggregation and ameliorate polyglutamine toxicity in cells and flies. However, to date these promising findings have not been translated to mammalian models of disease. To address this issue, we developed transgenic mice that over-express the neuronal chaperone HSJ1a (DNAJB2a) and crossed them with the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington’s disease. Over-expression of HSJ1a significantly reduced mutant huntingtin aggregation and enhanced solubility. Surprisingly, this was mediated through specific association with K63 ubiquitylated, detergent insoluble, higher order mutant huntingtin assemblies that decreased their ability to nucleate further aggregation. This was dependent on HSJ1a client binding ability, ubiquitin interaction and functional co-operation with HSP70. Importantly, these changes in mutant huntingtin solubility and aggregation led to improved neurological performance in R6/2 mice. These data reveal that prevention of further aggregation of detergent insoluble mutant huntingtin is an additional level of quality control for late stage chaperone-mediated neuroprotection. Furthermore, our findings represent an important proof of principle that DNAJ manipulation is a valid therapeutic approach for intervention in Huntington’s disease. PMID:22396390

  4. Hsp70 targets Hsp100 chaperones to substrates for protein disaggregation and prion fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Juliane; Tyedmers, Jens; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel

    2012-08-01

    Hsp100 and Hsp70 chaperones in bacteria, yeast, and plants cooperate to reactivate aggregated proteins. Disaggregation relies on Hsp70 function and on ATP-dependent threading of aggregated polypeptides through the pore of the Hsp100 AAA(+) hexamer. In yeast, both chaperones also promote propagation of prions by fibril fragmentation, but their functional interplay is controversial. Here, we demonstrate that Hsp70 chaperones were essential for species-specific targeting of their Hsp100 partner chaperones ClpB and Hsp104, respectively, to heat-induced protein aggregates in vivo. Hsp70 inactivation in yeast also abrogated Hsp104 targeting to almost all prions tested and reduced fibril mobility, which indicates that fibril fragmentation by Hsp104 requires Hsp70. The Sup35 prion was unique in allowing Hsp70-independent association of Hsp104 via its N-terminal domain, which, however, was nonproductive. Hsp104 overproduction even outcompeted Hsp70 for Sup35 prion binding, which explains why this condition prevented Sup35 fragmentation and caused prion curing. Our findings indicate a conserved mechanism of Hsp70-Hsp100 cooperation at the surface of protein aggregates and prion fibrils. PMID:22869599

  5. Hsp70 chaperones accelerate protein translocation and the unfolding of stable protein aggregates by entropic pulling.

    PubMed

    De Los Rios, Paolo; Ben-Zvi, Anat; Slutsky, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2006-04-18

    Hsp70s are highly conserved ATPase molecular chaperones mediating the correct folding of de novo synthesized proteins, the translocation of proteins across membranes, the disassembly of some native protein oligomers, and the active unfolding and disassembly of stress-induced protein aggregates. Here, we bring thermodynamic arguments and biochemical evidences for a unifying mechanism named entropic pulling, based on entropy loss due to excluded-volume effects, by which Hsp70 molecules can convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into a force capable of accelerating the local unfolding of various protein substrates and, thus, perform disparate cellular functions. By means of entropic pulling, individual Hsp70 molecules can accelerate unfolding and pulling of translocating polypeptides into mitochondria in the absence of a molecular fulcrum, thus settling former contradictions between the power-stroke and the Brownian ratchet models for Hsp70-mediated protein translocation across membranes. Moreover, in a very different context devoid of membrane and components of the import pore, the same physical principles apply to the forceful unfolding, solubilization, and assisted native refolding of stable protein aggregates by individual Hsp70 molecules, thus providing a mechanism for Hsp70-mediated protein disaggregation. PMID:16606842

  6. Hsp70 chaperones accelerate protein translocation and the unfolding of stable protein aggregates by entropic pulling

    PubMed Central

    De Los Rios, Paolo; Ben-Zvi, Anat; Slutsky, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Hsp70s are highly conserved ATPase molecular chaperones mediating the correct folding of de novo synthesized proteins, the translocation of proteins across membranes, the disassembly of some native protein oligomers, and the active unfolding and disassembly of stress-induced protein aggregates. Here, we bring thermodynamic arguments and biochemical evidences for a unifying mechanism named entropic pulling, based on entropy loss due to excluded-volume effects, by which Hsp70 molecules can convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into a force capable of accelerating the local unfolding of various protein substrates and, thus, perform disparate cellular functions. By means of entropic pulling, individual Hsp70 molecules can accelerate unfolding and pulling of translocating polypeptides into mitochondria in the absence of a molecular fulcrum, thus settling former contradictions between the power-stroke and the Brownian ratchet models for Hsp70-mediated protein translocation across membranes. Moreover, in a very different context devoid of membrane and components of the import pore, the same physical principles apply to the forceful unfolding, solubilization, and assisted native refolding of stable protein aggregates by individual Hsp70 molecules, thus providing a mechanism for Hsp70-mediated protein disaggregation. PMID:16606842

  7. Collagen-like proteins in pathogenic E. coli strains.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Neelanjana; McKillop, Thomas J; Jowitt, Thomas A; Howard, Marjorie; Davies, Heather; Holmes, David F; Roberts, Ian S; Bella, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequences of enterohaemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 strains show multiple open-reading frames with collagen-like sequences that are absent from the common laboratory strain K-12. These putative collagens are included in prophages embedded in O157:H7 genomes. These prophages carry numerous genes related to strain virulence and have been shown to be inducible and capable of disseminating virulence factors by horizontal gene transfer. We have cloned two collagen-like proteins from E. coli O157:H7 into a laboratory strain and analysed the structure and conformation of the recombinant proteins and several of their constituting domains by a variety of spectroscopic, biophysical, and electron microscopy techniques. We show that these molecules exhibit many of the characteristics of vertebrate collagens, including trimer formation and the presence of a collagen triple helical domain. They also contain a C-terminal trimerization domain, and a trimeric α-helical coiled-coil domain with an unusual amino acid sequence almost completely lacking leucine, valine or isoleucine residues. Intriguingly, these molecules show high thermal stability, with the collagen domain being more stable than those of vertebrate fibrillar collagens, which are much longer and post-translationally modified. Under the electron microscope, collagen-like proteins from E. coli O157:H7 show a dumbbell shape, with two globular domains joined by a hinged stalk. This morphology is consistent with their likely role as trimeric phage side-tail proteins that participate in the attachment of phage particles to E. coli target cells, either directly or through assembly with other phage tail proteins. Thus, collagen-like proteins in enterohaemorrhagic E. coli genomes may have a direct role in the dissemination of virulence-related genes through infection of harmless strains by induced bacteriophages. PMID:22701585

  8. Heat Shock Proteins: A Review of the Molecular Chaperones for Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang-Jin; Seo, Young-Su

    2015-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to persistently changing stresses and have to be able to interpret and respond to them. The stresses, drought, salinity, chemicals, cold and hot temperatures, and various pathogen attacks have interconnected effects on plants, resulting in the disruption of protein homeostasis. Maintenance of proteins in their functional native conformations and preventing aggregation of non-native proteins are important for cell survival under stress. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) functioning as molecular chaperones are the key components responsible for protein folding, assembly, translocation, and degradation under stress conditions and in many normal cellular processes. Plants respond to pathogen invasion using two different innate immune responses mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) or resistance (R) proteins. HSPs play an indispensable role as molecular chaperones in the quality control of plasma membrane-resident PRRs and intracellular R proteins against potential invaders. Here, we specifically discuss the functional involvement of cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) HSPs/chaperones in plant immunity to obtain an integrated understanding of the immune responses in plant cells. PMID:26676169

  9. Discovery of Benzisoxazoles as Potent Inhibitors of Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Shi, Mengxiao; Golas, Jennifer; Vogan, Erik; Jacob, Jaison; Johnson, Mark; Lee, Frederick; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Petersen, Roseann; Svenson, Kristin; Chopra, Rajiv; Tam, May S.; Wen, Yingxia; Ellingboe, John; Arndt, Kim; Boschelli, Frank

    2008-08-11

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that is responsible for activating many signaling proteins and is a promising target in tumor biology. We have identified small-molecule benzisoxazole derivatives as Hsp90 inhibitors. Crystallographic studies show that these compounds bind in the ATP binding pocket interacting with the Asp93. Structure based optimization led to the identification of potent analogues, such as 13, with good biochemical profiles.

  10. Chaperone Activity of Small Heat Shock Proteins Underlies Therapeutic Efficacy in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis*

    PubMed Central

    Kurnellas, Michael P.; Brownell, Sara E.; Su, Leon; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Dolganov, Gregory; Chopra, Sidharth; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Sobel, Raymond A.; Webster, Jonathan; Ousman, Shalina S.; Becker, Rachel A.; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the therapeutic activity of αB crystallin, small heat shock protein B5 (HspB5), was shared with other human sHsps, a set of seven human family members, a mutant of HspB5 G120 known to exhibit reduced chaperone activity, and a mycobacterial sHsp were expressed and purified from bacteria. Each of the recombinant proteins was shown to be a functional chaperone, capable of inhibiting aggregation of denatured insulin with varying efficiency. When injected into mice at the peak of disease, they were all effective in reducing the paralysis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Additional structure activity correlations between chaperone activity and therapeutic function were established when linear regions within HspB5 were examined. A single region, corresponding to residues 73–92 of HspB5, forms amyloid fibrils, exhibited chaperone activity, and was an effective therapeutic for encephalomyelitis. The linkage of the three activities was further established by demonstrating individual substitutions of critical hydrophobic amino acids in the peptide resulted in the loss of all of the functions. PMID:22955287

  11. Intercellular chaperone transmission via exosomes contributes to maintenance of protein homeostasis at the organismal level

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Toshihide; Suzuki, Mari; Fujikake, Nobuhiro; Popiel, H. Akiko; Kikuchi, Hisae; Futaki, Shiroh; Wada, Keiji; Nagai, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    The heat shock response (HSR), a transcriptional response that up-regulates molecular chaperones upon heat shock, is necessary for cell survival in a stressful environment to maintain protein homeostasis (proteostasis). However, there is accumulating evidence that the HSR does not ubiquitously occur under stress conditions, but largely depends on the cell types. Despite such imbalanced HSR among different cells and tissues, molecular mechanisms by which multicellular organisms maintain their global proteostasis have remained poorly understood. Here, we report that proteostasis can be maintained by molecular chaperones not only in a cell-autonomous manner but also in a non–cell-autonomous manner. We found that elevated expression of molecular chaperones, such as Hsp40 and Hsp70, in a group of cells improves proteostasis in other groups of cells, both in cultured cells and in Drosophila expressing aggregation-prone polyglutamine proteins. We also found that Hsp40, as well as Hsp70 and Hsp90, is physiologically secreted from cells via exosomes, and that the J domain at the N terminus is responsible for its exosome-mediated secretion. Addition of Hsp40/Hsp70-containing exosomes to the culture medium of the polyglutamine-expressing cells results in efficient suppression of inclusion body formation, indicating that molecular chaperones non-cell autonomously improve the protein-folding environment via exosome-mediated transmission. Our study reveals that intercellular chaperone transmission mediated by exosomes is a novel molecular mechanism for non–cell-autonomous maintenance of organismal proteostasis that could functionally compensate for the imbalanced state of the HSR among different cells, and also provides a novel physiological role of exosomes that contributes to maintenance of organismal proteostasis. PMID:25918398

  12. Water and molecular chaperones act as weak links of protein folding networks: energy landscape and punctuated equilibrium changes point towards a game theory of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kovács, István A; Szalay, Máté S; Csermely, Peter

    2005-04-25

    Water molecules and molecular chaperones efficiently help the protein folding process. Here we describe their action in the context of the energy and topological networks of proteins. In energy terms water and chaperones were suggested to decrease the activation energy between various local energy minima smoothing the energy landscape, rescuing misfolded proteins from conformational traps and stabilizing their native structure. In kinetic terms water and chaperones may make the punctuated equilibrium of conformational changes less punctuated and help protein relaxation. Finally, water and chaperones may help the convergence of multiple energy landscapes during protein-macromolecule interactions. We also discuss the possibility of the introduction of protein games to narrow the multitude of the energy landscapes when a protein binds to another macromolecule. Both water and chaperones provide a diffuse set of rapidly fluctuating weak links (low affinity and low probability interactions), which allow the generalization of all these statements to a multitude of networks. PMID:15848154

  13. Molecular chaperones cooperate with PIM1 protease in the degradation of misfolded proteins in mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, I; Arlt, H; van Dyck, L; Langer, T; Neupert, W

    1994-01-01

    ATP dependent proteolytic degradation of misfolded proteins in the mitochondrial matrix is mediated by the PIM1 protease and depends on the molecular chaperone proteins mt-hsp70 and Mdj1p. Chaperone function is essential to maintain misfolded proteins in a soluble state, a prerequisite for their degradation by PIM1 protease. In the absence of functional mt-hsp70 or Mdj1p misfolded proteins either remain associated with mt-hsp70 or form aggregates and thereby are no longer substrates for PIM1 protease. Mdj1p is shown to regulate the ATP dependent association of an unfolded polypeptide chain with mt-hsp70 affecting binding to as well as release from mt-hsp70. These findings establish a central role of molecular chaperone proteins in the degradation of misfolded proteins by PIM1 protease and thereby demonstrate a functional interrelation between components of the folding machinery and the proteolytic system within mitochondria. Images PMID:7957078

  14. Maturation of steroid receptors: an example of functional cooperation among molecular chaperones and their associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Kimmins, S; MacRae, T H

    2000-04-01

    The selective modulation of transcription exerted by steroids depends upon recognition of signalling molecules by properly folded cytoplasmic receptors and their subsequent translocation into the nucleus. These events require a sequential and dynamic series of protein-protein interactions in order to fashion receptors that bind stably to steroids. Central to receptor maturation, therefore, are several molecular chaperones and their accessory proteins; Hsp70, Hsp40, and hip modulate the 3-dimensional conformation of steroid receptors, permitting reaction via hop with Hsp90, arguably the central protein in the process. Binding to Hsp90 leads to dissociation of some proteins from the receptor complex while others are recruited. Notably, p23 stabilizes receptors in a steroid binding state, and the immunophilins, principally CyP40 and Hsp56, arrive late in receptor complex assembly. In this review, the functions of molecular chaperones during steroid receptor maturation are explored, leading to a general mechanistic model indicative of chaperone cooperation in protein folding. PMID:11147968

  15. Hydroimidazolone Modification of Human αA-Crystallin: Effect on the Chaperone Function and Protein Refolding Ability

    PubMed Central

    Gangadhariah, Mahesha H.; Wang, Benlian; Linetsky, Mikhail; Henning, Christian; Spanneberg, Robert; Glomb, Marcus A.; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2010-01-01

    Alpha A-crystallin is a molecular chaperone; it prevents aggregation of denaturing proteins. We have previously demonstrated that upon modification by a metabolic α-dicarbonyl compound, methylglyoxal (MGO), αA-crystallin becomes a better chaperone. Alpha A-crystallin also assists in refolding of denatured proteins. Here, we have investigated the effect of mild modification of αA-crystallin by MGO (with 20-500 μM) on the chaperone function and its ability to refold denatured proteins. Under the conditions used, mildly modified protein contained mostly hydroimidazolone modifications. The modified protein exhibited an increase in chaperone function against thermal aggregation of βL- and γ-crystallins, citrate synthase (CS), malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and chemical aggregation of insulin. The ability of the protein to assist in refolding of chemically denatured βL- and γ-crystallins, MDH and LDH, and to prevent thermal inactivation of CS were unchanged after mild modification by MGO. Prior binding of catalytically inactive, thermally denatured MDH or the hydrophobic probe, 2-p-toluidonaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) abolished the ability of αA-crystallin to assist in the refolding of denatured MDH. However, MGO-modification of chaperone-null TNS-bound αA-crystallin resulted in partial regain of the chaperone function. Taken together, these results demonstrate that: 1) hydroimidazolone modifications are sufficient to enhance the chaperone function of αA-crystallin but such modifications do not change its ability to assist in refolding of denatured proteins, 2) the sites on the αA-crystallin responsible for the chaperone function and refolding are the same in the native αA-crystallin and 3) additional hydrophobic sites exposed upon MGO modification, which are responsible for the enhanced chaperone function, do not enhance αA-crystallin's ability to refold denatured proteins. PMID:20085807

  16. Structure of the hypothetical Mycoplasma protein, MPN555, suggestsa chaperone function

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Aono, Shelly; Chen, Shengfeng; Yokota,Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2005-06-15

    The crystal structure of the hypothetical protein MPN555from Mycoplasma pneumoniae (gi pbar 1673958) has been determined to a resolution of 2.8 Angstrom using anomalous diffraction data at the Sepeak wavelength. Structure determination revealed a mostly alpha-helical protein with a three-lobed shape. The three lobes or fingers delineate a central binding groove and additional grooves between lobes 1 and 3, and between lobes 2 and 3. For one of the molecules in the asymmetric unit,the central binding pocket was filled with a peptide from the uncleaved N-terminal affinity tag. The MPN555 structure has structural homology to two bacterial chaperone proteins, SurA and trigger factor from Escherichia coli. The structural data and the homology to other chaperone for MPN555.

  17. The endoplasmic reticulum protein folding factory and its chaperones: new targets for drug discovery?

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Martin; Vandenbroeck, Koen

    2011-01-01

    Cytosolic heat shock proteins have received significant attention as emerging therapeutic targets. Much of this excitement has been triggered by the discovery that HSP90 plays a central role in the maintenance and stability of multifarious oncogenic membrane receptors and their resultant tyrosine kinase activity. Numerous studies have dealt with the effects of small molecules on chaperone- and stress-related pathways of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, unlike cytosolic chaperones, relatively little emphasis has been placed upon translational avenues towards targeting of the ER for inhibition of folding/secretion of disease-promoting proteins. Here, we summarise existing small molecule inhibitors and potential future targets of ER chaperone-mediated inhibition. Client proteins of translational relevance in disease treatment are outlined, alongside putative future disease treatment modalities based on ER-centric targeted therapies. Particular attention is paid to cancer and autoimmune disorders via the effects of the GRP94 inhibitor geldanamycin and its population of client proteins, overloading of the unfolded protein response, and inhibition of members of the IL-12 family of cytokines by celecoxib and non-coxib analogues. PMID:20942857

  18. The p23 co-chaperone protein is a novel substrate of CK2 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tosoni, Kendra; Costa, Alex; Sarno, Stefania; D'Alessandro, Stefano; Sparla, Francesca; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Zottini, Michela; Ruzzene, Maria

    2011-10-01

    The ubiquitous Ser/Thr protein kinase CK2, which phosphorylates hundreds of substrates and is essential for cell life, plays important roles also in plants; however, only few plant substrates have been identified so far. During a study aimed at identifying proteins targeted by CK2 in plant response to salicylic acid (SA), we found that the Arabidopsis co-chaperone protein p23 is a CK2 target, readily phosphorylated in vitro by human and maize CK2, being also a substrate for an endogenous casein kinase activity present in Arabidopsis extracts, which displays distinctive characteristics of protein kinase CK2. We also demonstrated that p23 and the catalytic subunit of CK2 interact in vitro and possibly in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts, where they colocalize in the cytosol and in the nucleus. Although its exact function is presently unknown, p23 is considered a co-chaperone because of its ability to associate to the chaperone protein Hsp90; therefore, an involvement of p23 in plant signal transduction pathways, such as SA signaling, is highly conceivable, and its phosphorylation may represent a fine mechanism for the regulation of cellular responses. PMID:21735091

  19. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  20. Crucial HSP70 co–chaperone complex unlocks metazoan protein disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Nillegoda, Nadinath B.; Kirstein, Janine; Szlachcic, Anna; Berynskyy, Mykhaylo; Stank, Antonia; Stengel, Florian; Arnsburg, Kristin; Gao, Xuechao; Scior, Annika; Aebersold, Ruedi; Guilbride, D. Lys; Wade, Rebecca C.; Morimoto, Richard I.; Mayer, Matthias P.; Bukau, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregates are the hallmark of stressed and ageing cells, and characterize several pathophysiological states1,2. Healthy metazoan cells effectively eliminate intracellular protein aggregates3,4, indicating that efficient disaggregation and/or degradation mechanisms exist. However, metazoans lack the key heat-shock protein disaggregase HSP100 of non-metazoan HSP70-dependent protein disaggregation systems5,6, and the human HSP70 system alone, even with the crucial HSP110 nucleotide exchange factor, has poor disaggregation activity in vitro4,7. This unresolved conundrum is central to protein quality control biology. Here we show that synergic cooperation between complexed J-protein co-chaperones of classes A and B unleashes highly efficient protein disaggregation activity in human and nematode HSP70 systems. Metazoan mixed-class J-protein complexes are transient, involve complementary charged regions conserved in the J-domains and carboxy-terminal domains of each J-protein class, and are flexible with respect to subunit composition. Complex formation allows J-proteins to initiate transient higher order chaperone structures involving HSP70 and interacting nucleotide exchange factors. A network of cooperative class A and B J-protein interactions therefore provides the metazoan HSP70 machinery with powerful, flexible, and finely regulatable disaggregase activity and a further level of regulation crucial for cellular protein quality control. PMID:26245380

  1. A novel protease activity assay using a protease-responsive chaperone protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sao, Kentaro; Murata, Masaharu; Fujisaki, Yuri; Umezaki, Kaori; Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki; Hashizume, Makoto

    2009-06-05

    Protease activity assays are important for elucidating protease function and for developing new therapeutic agents. In this study, a novel turbidimetric method for determining the protease activity using a protease-responsive chaperone protein is described. For this purpose, a recombinant small heat-shock protein (sHSP) with an introduced Factor Xa protease recognition site was synthesized in bacteria. This recombinant mutant, FXa-HSP, exhibited chaperone-like activity at high temperatures in cell lysates. However, the chaperone-like activity of FXa-HSP decreased dramatically following treatment with Factor Xa. Protein precipitation was subsequently observed in the cell lysates. The reaction was Factor Xa concentration-dependent and was quantitatively suppressed by a specific inhibitor for Factor Xa. Protein aggregation was detected by a simple method based on turbidimetry. The results clearly demonstrate that this assay is an effective, easy-to-use method for determining protease activities without the requirement of labeling procedures and the use of radioisotopes.

  2. Reactivation of protein aggregates by mortalin and Tid1--the human mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone system.

    PubMed

    Iosefson, Ohad; Sharon, Shelly; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Azem, Abdussalam

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial 70-kDa heat shock protein (mtHsp70), also known in humans as mortalin, is a central component of the mitochondrial protein import motor and plays a key role in the folding of matrix-localized mitochondrial proteins. MtHsp70 is assisted by a member of the 40-kDa heat shock protein co-chaperone family named Tid1 and a nucleotide exchange factor. Whereas, yeast mtHsp70 has been extensively studied in the context of protein import in the mitochondria, and the bacterial 70-kDa heat shock protein was recently shown to act as an ATP-fuelled unfolding enzyme capable of detoxifying stably misfolded polypeptides into harmless natively refolded proteins, little is known about the molecular functions of the human mortalin in protein homeostasis. Here, we developed novel and efficient purification protocols for mortalin and the two spliced versions of Tid1, Tid1-S, and Tid1-L and showed that mortalin can mediate the in vitro ATP-dependent reactivation of stable-preformed heat-denatured model aggregates, with the assistance of Mge1 and either Tid1-L or Tid1-S co-chaperones or yeast Mdj1. Thus, in addition of being a central component of the protein import machinery, human mortalin together with Tid1, may serve as a protein disaggregating machine which, for lack of Hsp100/ClpB disaggregating co-chaperones, may carry alone the scavenging of toxic protein aggregates in stressed, diseased, or aging human mitochondria. PMID:21811887

  3. Chaperoning G Protein-Coupled Receptors: From Cell Biology to Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Conn, P. Michael

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane proteins that traverse the plasma membrane seven times (hence, are also called 7TM receptors). The polytopic structure of GPCRs makes the folding of GPCRs difficult and complex. Indeed, many wild-type GPCRs are not folded optimally, and defects in folding are the most common cause of genetic diseases due to GPCR mutations. Both general and receptor-specific molecular chaperones aid the folding of GPCRs. Chemical chaperones have been shown to be able to correct the misfolding in mutant GPCRs, proving to be important tools for studying the structure-function relationship of GPCRs. However, their potential therapeutic value is very limited. Pharmacological chaperones (pharmacoperones) are potentially important novel therapeutics for treating genetic diseases caused by mutations in GPCR genes that resulted in misfolded mutant proteins. Pharmacoperones also increase cell surface expression of wild-type GPCRs; therefore, they could be used to treat diseases that do not harbor mutations in GPCRs. Recent studies have shown that indeed pharmacoperones work in both experimental animals and patients. High-throughput assays have been developed to identify new pharmacoperones that could be used as therapeutics for a number of endocrine and other genetic diseases. PMID:24661201

  4. Stabilization of collagen through bioconversion: An insight in protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Usharani, Nagarajan; Jayakumar, Gladstone Christopher; Kanth, Swarna Vinodh; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava

    2014-08-01

    Collagen is a natural protein, which is used as a vital biomaterial in tissue engineering. The major concern about native collagen is lack of its thermal stability and weak resistance to proteolytic degradation. In this scenario, the crosslinking compounds used for stabilization of collagen are mostly of chemical nature and exhibit toxicity. The enzyme mediated crosslinking of collagen provides a novel alternative, nontoxic method for stabilization. In this study, aldehyde forming enzyme (AFE) is used in the bioconversion of hydroxylmethyl groups of collagen to formyl groups that results in the formation of peptidyl aldehyde. The resulted peptidyl aldehyde interacts with bipolar ions of basic amino acid residues of collagen. Further interaction leads to the formation of conjugated double bonds (aldol condensation involving the aldehyde group of peptidyl aldehyde) within the collagen. The enzyme modified collagen matrices have shown an increase in the denaturation temperature, when compared with native collagen. Enzyme modified collagen membranes exhibit resistance toward collagenolytic activity. Moreover, they exhibited a nontoxic nature. The catalytic activity of AFE on collagen as a substrate establishes an efficient modification, which enhances the structural stability of collagen. This finds new avenues in the context of protein-protein stabilization and discovers paramount application in tissue engineering. PMID:25098180

  5. ATPase Activity and ATP-dependent Conformational Change in the Co-chaperone HSP70/HSP90-organizing Protein (HOP)*

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Soh; Subedi, Ganesh Prasad; Hanashima, Shinya; Satoh, Tadashi; Otaka, Michiro; Wakui, Hideki; Sawada, Ken-ichi; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Kubota, Hiroshi; Itoh, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Co-chaperones help to maintain cellular homeostasis by modulating the activities of molecular chaperones involved in protein quality control. The HSP70/HSP90-organizing protein (HOP) is a co-chaperone that cooperates with HSP70 and HSP90 in catalysis of protein folding and maturation in the cytosol. We show here that HOP has ATP-binding activity comparable to that of HSP70/HSP90, and that HOP slowly hydrolyzes ATP. Analysis of deletion mutants revealed that the ATPase domain of HOP is in the N-terminal TPR1-DP1-TPR2A segment. In addition, HOP changes its conformation in the presence of ATP. These results indicate that HOP is a unique co-chaperone that undergoes an ATP-dependent conformational change. PMID:24535459

  6. Chaperone potential of Pulicaria undulata extract in preventing aggregation of stressed proteins.

    PubMed

    Ghahghaei, Arezou; Valizadeh, Jafar; Nazari, Shahrzad; Ravandeh, Mehdi

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the effect of an aqueous extract of Pulicaria undulata on the 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced aggregation of proteins. The effects of the chaperone properties of P. undulata extract on protein aggregation were determined by measuring light scattering absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The aqueous extract of P. undulata possesses good chaperone properties but the protection effect was varied in different protein. The extract showed a higher level of protection in high molecular weight proteins than in those of low molecular weight. Using a fluorescence study, the present study provides information on the hydrophobic area of proteins interacting with the P. undulata extract. In fact, by increasing the concentration of the P. undulata extract, the hydrophic area of the protein decreased. CD spectroscopy also revealed that DTT caused changes in both the tertiary and the secondary structure of the proteins, while in the presence of P. undulata extract, there was little change. Our finding suggests the possibility of using P. undulata extract for the inhibition of aggregation and the deposition of protein in disease. PMID:24599512

  7. Visualization of a radical B12 enzyme with its G-protein chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Marco; Cracan, Valentin; Hubbard, Paul A.; Banerjee, Ruma; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    G-protein metallochaperones ensure fidelity during cofactor assembly for a variety of metalloproteins, including adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl)-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and hydrogenase, and thus have both medical and biofuel development applications. Here, we present crystal structures of IcmF, a natural fusion protein of AdoCbl-dependent isobutyryl-CoA mutase and its corresponding G-protein chaperone, which reveal the molecular architecture of a G-protein metallochaperone in complex with its target protein. These structures show that conserved G-protein elements become ordered upon target protein association, creating the molecular pathways that both sense and report on the cofactor loading state. Structures determined of both apo- and holo-forms of IcmF depict both open and closed enzyme states, in which the cofactor-binding domain is alternatively positioned for cofactor loading and for catalysis. Notably, the G protein moves as a unit with the cofactor-binding domain, providing a visualization of how a chaperone assists in the sequestering of a precious cofactor inside an enzyme active site. PMID:25675500

  8. Nanointerfacial strength between non-collagenous protein and collagen fibrils in antler bone

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Fei; Gupta, Himadri S.; Barber, Asa H.

    2014-01-01

    Antler bone displays considerable toughness through the use of a complex nanofibrous structure of mineralized collagen fibrils (MCFs) bound together by non-collagenous proteins (NCPs). While the NCP regions represent a small volume fraction relative to the MCFs, significant surface area is evolved upon failure of the nanointerfaces formed at NCP–collagen fibril boundaries. The mechanical properties of nanointerfaces between the MCFs are investigated directly in this work using an in situ atomic force microscopy technique to pull out individual fibrils from the NCP. Results show that the NCP–fibril interfaces in antler bone are weak, which highlights the propensity for interface failure at the nanoscale in antler bone and extensive fibril pullout observed at antler fracture surfaces. The adhesion between fibrils and NCP is additionally suggested as being rate dependent, with increasing interfacial strength and fracture energy observed when pullout velocity decreases. PMID:24352676

  9. Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity of HIV-1 NC Proteins Investigated by Single Molecule DNA Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark C.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Bloomfield, Victor A.

    2002-03-01

    HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein (NC) is a nucleic acid chaperone protein that is responsible for facilitating numerous nucleic acid rearrangements throughout the reverse transcription cycle of HIV-1. To understand the mechanism of NC’s chaperone function, we carried out single molecule DNA stretching studies in the presence of NC and mutant forms of NC. Using an optical tweezers instrument, we stretch single DNA molecules from the double-stranded helical state to the single-stranded (coil) state. Based on the observed cooperativity of DNA force-induced melting, we find that the fraction of melted base pairs at room temperature is increased dramatically in the presence of NC. Thus, upon NC binding, increased thermal fluctuations cause continuous melting and reannealing of base pairs so that DNA strands are able to rapidly sample configurations in order to find the lowest energy state. While NC destabilizes the double-stranded form of DNA, a mutant form of NC that lacks the zinc finger structures does not. DNA stretching experiments carried out in the presence of NC variants containing more subtle changes in the zinc finger structures were conducted to elucidate the contribution of each individual finger to NC’s chaperone activity, and these results will be reported.

  10. Gene expression in primary cultured astrocytes affected by aluminum: alteration of chaperons involved in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Aremu, David A.; Ezomo, Ojeiru F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Aluminum is notorious as a neurotoxic metal. The aim of our study was to determine whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in aluminum-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Methods Mitochondrial RNA (mRNA) was analyzed by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR following pulse exposure of aluminum glycinate to primary cultured astrocytes. Tunicamycin was used as a positive control. Results Gene expression analysis revealed that Ire1β was up-regulated in astrocytes exposed to aluminum while Ire1α was up-regulated by tunicamycin. Exposure to aluminum glycinate, in contrast to tunicamycin, seemed to down-regulate mRNA expression of many genes, including the ER resident molecular chaperone BiP/Grp78 and Ca2+-binding chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin), as well as stanniocalcin 2 and OASIS. The down-regulation or non-activation of the molecular chaperons, whose expressions are known to be protective by increasing protein folding, may spell doom for the adaptive response. Exposure to aluminum did not have any significant effects on the expression of Bax and Bcl2 in astrocytes. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that aluminum may induce apoptosis in astrocytes via ER stress by impairing the protein-folding machinery. PMID:21432213

  11. The Structure and Function of Non-Collagenous Bone Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hook, Magnus; McQuillan, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The research done under the cooperative research agreement for the project titled 'The structure and function of non-collagenous bone proteins' represented the first phase of an ongoing program to define the structural and functional relationships of the principal noncollagenous proteins in bone. An ultimate goal of this research is to enable design and execution of useful pharmacological compounds that will have a beneficial effect in treatment of osteoporosis, both land-based and induced by long-duration space travel. The goals of the now complete first phase were as follows: 1. Establish and/or develop powerful recombinant protein expression systems; 2. Develop and refine isolation and purification of recombinant proteins; 3. Express wild-type non-collagenous bone proteins; 4. Express site-specific mutant proteins and domains of wild-type proteins to enhance likelihood of crystal formation for subsequent solution of structure.

  12. Cooperation of Hsp70 and Hsp100 chaperone machines in protein disaggregation.

    PubMed

    Mogk, Axel; Kummer, Eva; Bukau, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Unicellular and sessile organisms are particularly exposed to environmental stress such as heat shock causing accumulation and aggregation of misfolded protein species. To counteract protein aggregation, bacteria, fungi, and plants encode a bi-chaperone system composed of ATP-dependent Hsp70 and hexameric Hsp100 (ClpB/Hsp104) chaperones, which rescue aggregated proteins and provide thermotolerance to cells. The partners act in a hierarchic manner with Hsp70 chaperones coating first the surface of protein aggregates and next recruiting Hsp100 through direct physical interaction. Hsp100 proteins bind to the ATPase domain of Hsp70 via their unique M-domain. This extra domain functions as a molecular toggle allosterically controlling ATPase and threading activities of Hsp100. Interactions between neighboring M-domains and the ATPase ring keep Hsp100 in a repressed state exhibiting low ATP turnover. Breakage of intermolecular M-domain interactions and dissociation of M-domains from the ATPase ring relieves repression and allows for Hsp70 interaction. Hsp70 binding in turn stabilizes Hsp100 in the activated state and primes Hsp100 ATPase domains for high activity upon substrate interaction. Hsp70 thereby couples Hsp100 substrate binding and motor activation. Hsp100 activation presumably relies on increased subunit cooperation leading to high ATP turnover and threading power. This Hsp70-mediated activity control of Hsp100 is crucial for cell viability as permanently activated Hsp100 variants are toxic. Hsp100 activation requires simultaneous binding of multiple Hsp70 partners, restricting high Hsp100 activity to the surface of protein aggregates and ensuring Hsp100 substrate specificity. PMID:26042222

  13. Cooperation of Hsp70 and Hsp100 chaperone machines in protein disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Mogk, Axel; Kummer, Eva; Bukau, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Unicellular and sessile organisms are particularly exposed to environmental stress such as heat shock causing accumulation and aggregation of misfolded protein species. To counteract protein aggregation, bacteria, fungi, and plants encode a bi-chaperone system composed of ATP-dependent Hsp70 and hexameric Hsp100 (ClpB/Hsp104) chaperones, which rescue aggregated proteins and provide thermotolerance to cells. The partners act in a hierarchic manner with Hsp70 chaperones coating first the surface of protein aggregates and next recruiting Hsp100 through direct physical interaction. Hsp100 proteins bind to the ATPase domain of Hsp70 via their unique M-domain. This extra domain functions as a molecular toggle allosterically controlling ATPase and threading activities of Hsp100. Interactions between neighboring M-domains and the ATPase ring keep Hsp100 in a repressed state exhibiting low ATP turnover. Breakage of intermolecular M-domain interactions and dissociation of M-domains from the ATPase ring relieves repression and allows for Hsp70 interaction. Hsp70 binding in turn stabilizes Hsp100 in the activated state and primes Hsp100 ATPase domains for high activity upon substrate interaction. Hsp70 thereby couples Hsp100 substrate binding and motor activation. Hsp100 activation presumably relies on increased subunit cooperation leading to high ATP turnover and threading power. This Hsp70-mediated activity control of Hsp100 is crucial for cell viability as permanently activated Hsp100 variants are toxic. Hsp100 activation requires simultaneous binding of multiple Hsp70 partners, restricting high Hsp100 activity to the surface of protein aggregates and ensuring Hsp100 substrate specificity. PMID:26042222

  14. Bag6/Bat3/Scythe: a novel chaperone activity with diverse regulatory functions in protein biogenesis and degradation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Gu; Ye, Yihong

    2013-04-01

    Upon emerging from the ribosome exiting tunnel, polypeptide folding occurs immediately with the assistance of both ribosome-associated and free chaperones. While many chaperones known to date are dedicated folding catalysts, recent studies have revealed a novel chaperoning system that functions at the interface of protein biogenesis and quality control by using a special "holdase" activity in order to sort and channel client proteins to distinct destinations. The key component, Bag6/Bat3/Scythe, can effectively shield long hydrophobic segments exposed on the surface of a polypeptide, preventing aggregation or inappropriate interactions before a triaging decision is made. The biological consequences of Bag6-mediated chaperoning are divergent for different substrates, ranging from membrane integration to proteasome targeting and destruction. Accordingly, Bag6 can act in various cellular contexts in order to execute many essential cellular functions, while dysfunctions in the Bag6 system can cause severe cellular abnormalities that may be associated with some pathological conditions. PMID:23417671

  15. Chaperone-assisted protein aggregate reactivation: Different solutions for the same problem.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Alejandra; Fernández-Higuero, José Angel; Moro, Fernando; Muga, Arturo

    2015-08-15

    The oligomeric AAA+ chaperones Hsp104 in yeast and ClpB in bacteria are responsible for the reactivation of aggregated proteins, an activity essential for cell survival during severe stress. The protein disaggregase activity of these members of the Hsp100 family is linked to the activity of chaperones from the Hsp70 and Hsp40 families. The precise mechanism by which these proteins untangle protein aggregates remains unclear. Strikingly, Hsp100 proteins are not present in metazoans. This does not mean that animal cells do not have a disaggregase activity, but that this activity is performed by the Hsp70 system and a representative of the Hsp110 family instead of a Hsp100 protein. This review describes the actual view of Hsp100-mediated aggregate reactivation, including the ATP-induced conformational changes associated with their disaggregase activity, the dynamics of the oligomeric assembly that is regulated by its ATPase cycle and the DnaK system, and the tight allosteric coupling between the ATPase domains within the hexameric ring complexes. The lack of homologs of these disaggregases in metazoans has suggested that they might be used as potential targets to develop antimicrobials. The current knowledge of the human disaggregase machinery and the role of Hsp110 are also discussed. PMID:26159839

  16. Mechanism of Nucleic Acid Chaperone Function of Retroviral Nuceleocapsid (NC) Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouzina, Ioulia; Vo, My-Nuong; Stewart, Kristen; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Cruceanu, Margareta; Williams, Mark

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted two main activities of HIV-1 NC protein contributing to its function as a universal nucleic acid chaperone. Firstly, it is the ability of NC to weakly destabilize all nucleic acid,(NA), secondary structures, thus resolving the kinetic traps for NA refolding, while leaving the annealed state stable. Secondly, it is the ability of NC to aggregate NA, facilitating the nucleation step of bi-molecular annealing by increasing the local NA concentration. In this work we use single molecule DNA stretching and gel-based annealing assays to characterize these two chaperone activities of NC by using various HIV-1 NC mutants and several other retroviral NC proteins. Our results suggest that two NC functions are associated with its zinc fingers and cationic residues, respectively. NC proteins from other retroviruses have similar activities, although expressed to a different degree. Thus, NA aggregating ability improves, and NA duplex destabilizing activity decreases in the sequence: MLV NC, HIV NC, RSV NC. In contrast, HTLV NC protein works very differently from other NC proteins, and similarly to typical single stranded NA binding proteins. These features of retroviral NCs co-evolved with the structure of their genomes.

  17. The Skp chaperone helps fold soluble proteins in vitro by inhibiting aggregation.

    PubMed

    Entzminger, Kevin C; Chang, Christine; Myhre, Ryan O; McCallum, Katie C; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2012-06-19

    The periplasmic seventeen kilodalton protein (Skp) chaperone has been characterized primarily for its role in outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis, during which the jellyfish-like trimeric protein encapsulates partially folded OMPs, protecting them from the aqueous environment until delivery to the BAM outer membrane protein insertion complex. However, Skp is increasingly recognized as a chaperone that also assists in folding soluble proteins in the bacterial periplasm. In this capacity, Skp coexpression increases the active yields of many recombinant proteins and bacterial virulence factors. Using a panel of single-chain antibodies and a single-chain T-cell receptor (collectively termed scFvs) possessing varying stabilities and biophysical characteristics, we performed in vivo expression and in vitro folding and aggregation assays in the presence or absence of Skp. For Skp-sensitive scFvs, the presence of Skp during in vitro refolding assays reduced aggregation but did not alter the observed folding rates, resulting in a higher overall yield of active protein. Of the proteins analyzed, Skp sensitivity in all assays correlated with the presence of folding intermediates, as observed with urea denaturation studies. These results are consistent with Skp acting as a holdase, sequestering partially folded intermediates and thereby preventing aggregation. Because not all soluble proteins are sensitive to Skp coexpression, we hypothesize that the presence of a long-lived protein folding intermediate renders a protein sensitive to Skp. Improved understanding of the bacterial periplasmic protein folding machinery may assist in high-level recombinant protein expression and may help identify novel approaches to block bacterial virulence. PMID:22650963

  18. Coffee enhances the expression of chaperones and antioxidant proteins in rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Salomone, Federico; Li Volti, Giovanni; Vitaglione, Paola; Morisco, Filomena; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Zappalà, Agata; Palmigiano, Angelo; Garozzo, Domenico; Caporaso, Nicola; D'Argenio, Giuseppe; Galvano, Fabio

    2014-06-01

    Coffee consumption is inversely related to the degree of liver injury in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Molecular mediators contributing to coffee's beneficial effects in NAFLD remain to be elucidated. In this study, we administrated decaffeinated espresso coffee or vehicle to rats fed an high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks and examined the effects of coffee on liver injury by using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) proteomic analysis combined with mass spectrometry. Rats fed an HFD and water developed panacinar steatosis, lobular inflammation, and mild fibrosis, whereas rats fed an HFD and coffee exhibited only mild steatosis. Coffee consumption increased liver expression of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperones glucose-related protein 78 and protein disulfide-isomerase A3; similarly, coffee drinking enhanced the expression of the mitochondrial chaperones heat stress protein 70 and DJ-1. Furthermore, in agreement with reduced hepatic levels of 8-isoprostanes and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, proteomic analysis showed that coffee consumption induces the expression of master regulators of redox status (i.e., peroxiredoxin 1, glutathione S-transferase α2, and D-dopachrome tautomerase). Last, proteomics revealed an association of coffee intake with decreased expression of electron transfer flavoprotein subunit α, a component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, involved in de novo lipogenesis. In this study, we were able to identify by proteomic analysis the stress proteins mediating the antioxidant effects of coffee; moreover, we establish for the first time the contribution of specific coffee-induced endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial chaperones ensuring correct protein folding and degradation in the liver. PMID:24365744

  19. Characterization of RNA binding and chaperoning activities of HIV-1 Vif protein

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Dona; Bernacchi, Serena; Xavier Guerrero, Santiago; Brachet, Franck; Larue, Valéry; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Tisné, Carine

    2014-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells, containing the cellular anti-HIV defense cytosine deaminases APOBEC3 (A3G and A3F). Vif neutralizes the antiviral activities of the APOBEC3G/F by diverse mechanisms including their degradation through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and their translational inhibition. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by interacting with Pr55Gag, reverse transcriptase and genomic RNA. Here, we expressed and purified full-length and truncated Vif proteins, and analyzed their RNA binding and chaperone properties. First, we showed by CD and NMR spectroscopies that the N-terminal domain of Vif is highly structured in solution, whereas the C-terminal domain remains mainly unfolded. Both domains exhibited substantial RNA binding capacities with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range, whereas the basic unfolded C-terminal domain of Vif was responsible in part for its RNA chaperone activity. Second, we showed by NMR chemical shift mapping that Vif and NCp7 share the same binding sites on tRNALys3, the primer of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Finally, our results indicate that Vif has potent RNA chaperone activity and provide direct evidence for an important role of the unstructured C-terminal domain of Vif in this capacity. PMID:25144404

  20. Ubiquilin-1 Is a Molecular Chaperone for the Amyloid Precursor Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Stieren, Emily S.; El Ayadi, Amina; Xiao, Yao; Siller, Efraín; Landsverk, Megan L.; Oberhauser, Andres F.; Barral, José M.; Boehning, Darren

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is associated with extracellular deposition of proteolytic fragments of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Although mutations in APP and proteases that mediate its processing are known to result in familial, early onset forms of AD, the mechanisms underlying the more common sporadic, yet genetically complex forms of the disease are still unclear. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the ubiquilin-1 gene have been shown to be genetically associated with AD, implicating its gene product in the pathogenesis of late onset AD. However, genetic linkage between ubiquilin-1 and AD has not been confirmed in studies examining different populations. Here we show that regardless of genotype, ubiquilin-1 protein levels are significantly decreased in late onset AD patient brains, suggesting that diminished ubiquilin function may be a common denominator in AD progression. Our interrogation of putative ubiquilin-1 activities based on sequence similarities to proteins involved in cellular quality control showed that ubiquilin-1 can be biochemically defined as a bona fide molecular chaperone and that this activity is capable of preventing the aggregation of amyloid precursor protein both in vitro and in live neurons. Furthermore, we show that reduced activity of ubiquilin-1 results in augmented production of pathogenic amyloid precursor protein fragments as well as increased neuronal death. Our results support the notion that ubiquilin-1 chaperone activity is necessary to regulate the production of APP and its fragments and that diminished ubiquilin-1 levels may contribute to AD pathogenesis. PMID:21852239

  1. Individual and collective contributions of chaperoning and degradation to protein homeostasis in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Cho, Younhee; Zhang, Xin; Pobre, Kristine Faye R; Liu, Yu; Powers, David L; Kelly, Jeffery W; Gierasch, Lila M; Powers, Evan T

    2015-04-14

    The folding fate of a protein in vivo is determined by the interplay between a protein's folding energy landscape and the actions of the proteostasis network, including molecular chaperones and degradation enzymes. The mechanisms of individual components of the E. coli proteostasis network have been studied extensively, but much less is known about how they function as a system. We used an integrated experimental and computational approach to quantitatively analyze the folding outcomes (native folding versus aggregation versus degradation) of three test proteins biosynthesized in E. coli under a variety of conditions. Overexpression of the entire proteostasis network benefited all three test proteins, but the effect of upregulating individual chaperones or the major degradation enzyme, Lon, varied for proteins with different biophysical properties. In sum, the impact of the E. coli proteostasis network is a consequence of concerted action by the Hsp70 system (DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE), the Hsp60 system (GroEL/GroES), and Lon. PMID:25843722

  2. Turnover Rates of Hepatic Collagen and Circulating Collagen-Associated Proteins in Humans with Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kelvin; Gatmaitan, Michelle; Luo, Flora; Cattin, Jerome; Nakamura, Corelle; Holmes, William E.; Angel, Thomas E.; Peters, Marion G.; Turner, Scott M.; Hellerstein, Marc K.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation and degradation of scar tissue in fibrotic liver disease occur slowly, typically over many years. Direct measurement of fibrogenesis, the rate of scar tissue deposition, may provide valuable therapeutic and prognostic information. We describe here results from a pilot study utilizing in vivo metabolic labeling to measure the turnover rate of hepatic collagen and collagen-associated proteins in plasma for the first time in human subjects. Eight subjects with chronic liver disease were labeled with daily oral doses of 2H2O for up to 8 weeks prior to diagnostic liver biopsy and plasma collection. Tandem mass spectrometry was used to measure the abundance and fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of proteins in liver and blood. Relative protein abundance and FSR data in liver revealed marked differences among subjects. FSRs of hepatic type I and III collagen ranged from 0.2–0.6% per day (half-lives of 4 months to a year) and correlated significantly with worsening histologic fibrosis. Analysis of plasma protein turnover revealed two collagen-associated proteins, lumican and transforming growth factor beta-induced-protein (TGFBI), exhibiting FSRs that correlated significantly with FSRs of hepatic collagen. In summary, this is the first direct measurement of liver collagen turnover in vivo in humans and suggests a high rate of collagen remodeling in advanced fibrosis. In addition, the FSRs of collagen-associated proteins in plasma are measurable and may provide a novel strategy for monitoring hepatic fibrogenesis rates. PMID:25909381

  3. A bipartite interaction between Hsp70 and CHIP regulates ubiquitination of chaperoned client proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaqun; Amick, Joseph; Chakravarti, Ritu; Santarriaga, Stephanie; Schlanger, Simon; McGlone, Cameron; Dare, Michelle; Nix, Jay C; Scaglione, K Matthew; Stuehr, Dennis J; Misra, Saurav; Page, Richard C

    2015-03-01

    The ubiquitin ligase CHIP plays an important role in cytosolic protein quality control by ubiquitinating proteins chaperoned by Hsp70/Hsc70 and Hsp90, thereby targeting such substrate proteins for degradation. We present a 2.91 Å resolution structure of the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain of CHIP in complex with the α-helical lid subdomain and unstructured tail of Hsc70. Surprisingly, the CHIP-TPR interacts with determinants within both the Hsc70-lid subdomain and the C-terminal PTIEEVD motif of the tail, exhibiting an atypical mode of interaction between chaperones and TPR domains. We demonstrate that the interaction between CHIP and the Hsc70-lid subdomain is required for proper ubiquitination of Hsp70/Hsc70 or Hsp70/Hsc70-bound substrate proteins. Posttranslational modifications of the Hsc70 lid and tail disrupt key contacts with the CHIP-TPR and may regulate CHIP-mediated ubiquitination. Our study shows how CHIP docks onto Hsp70/Hsc70 and defines a bipartite mode of interaction between TPR domains and their binding partners. PMID:25684577

  4. Aha1 can act as an autonomous chaperone to prevent aggregation of stressed proteins.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vishwadeepak; Darnauer, Stefanie; Hartwig, Nadine R; Obermann, Wolfgang M J

    2014-12-26

    Aha1 (activator of Hsp90 ATPase) stimulates the ATPase activity of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 to accelerate the conformational cycle during which client proteins attain their final shape. Thereby, Aha1 promotes effective folding of Hsp90-dependent clients such as steroid receptors and many kinases involved in cellular signaling. In our current study, we find that Aha1 plays a novel, additional role beyond regulating the Hsp90 ATP hydrolysis rate. We propose a new concept suggesting that Aha1 acts as an autonomous chaperone and associates with stress-denatured proteins to prevent them from aggregation similar to the chaperonin GroEL. Our study reveals that an N-terminal sequence of 22 amino acids, present in human but absent from yeast Aha1, is critical for this capability. However, in lieu of fostering their refolding, Aha1 allows ubiquitination of bound clients by the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP. Accordingly, Aha1 may promote disposal of folding defective proteins by the cellular protein quality control. PMID:25378400

  5. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

    PubMed

    Roundhill, Elizabeth; Turnbull, Doug; Burchill, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) in Ewing's sarcoma (ES) predicts poor outcome. MRP-1 is also expressed in mitochondria, and we have examined the submitochondrial localization of MRP-1 and investigated the mechanism of MRP-1 transport and role of this organelle in the response to doxorubicin. The mitochondrial localization of MRP-1 was examined in ES cell lines by differential centrifugation and membrane solubilization by digitonin. Whether MRP-1 is chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) was investigated by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and HSP knockout using small hairpin RNA and inhibitors (apoptozole, 17-AAG, and NVPAUY). The effect of disrupting mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux activity on the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin was investigated by counting viable cell number. Mitochondrial MRP-1 is glycosylated and localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is coexpressed with HSP90. MRP-1 binds to both HSP90 and HSP70, although only inhibition of HSP90β decreases expression of MRP-1 in the mitochondria. Disruption of mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux significantly increases the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin (combination index, <0.9). For the first time, we have demonstrated that mitochondrial MRP-1 is expressed in the outer mitochondrial membrane and is a client protein of HSP90β, where it may play a role in the doxorubicin-induced resistance of ES.-Roundhill, E., Turnbull, D., Burchill, S. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β. PMID:26722004

  6. A bipartite interaction between Hsp70 and CHIP regulates ubiquitination of chaperoned client proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huaqun; Amick, Joseph; Chakravarti, Ritu; Santarriaga, Stephanie; Schlanger, Simon; McGlone, Cameron; Dare, Michelle; Nix, Jay C.; Scaglione, K. Matthew; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Misra, Saurav; Page, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitin ligase CHIP plays an important role in cytosolic protein quality control by ubiquitinating proteins chaperoned by Hsp70/Hsc70 and Hsp90, thereby targeting such substrate proteins for degradation. We present a 2.91 Å resolution structure of the TPR domain of CHIP in complex with the α-helical “lid” subdomain and unstructured “tail” of Hsc70. Surprisingly, the CHIP-TPR interacts with determinants within both the Hsc70-lid subdomain and the C-terminal PTIEEVD motif of the tail, exhibiting a novel mode of interaction between chaperones and TPR domains. We demonstrate that the interaction between CHIP and the Hsc70-lid subdomain is required for proper ubiquitination of Hsp70/Hsc70 or Hsp70/Hsc70-bound substrate proteins. Post-translational modifications of the Hsc70 lid and tail disrupt key contacts with the CHIP-TPR and may regulate CHIP-mediated ubiquitination. Our study shows how CHIP docks onto Hsp70/Hsc70 and defines a new bipartite mode of interaction between TPR domains and their binding partners. PMID:25684577

  7. Anatomy of RISC: how do small RNAs and chaperones activate Argonaute proteins?

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Kotaro

    2016-09-01

    RNA silencing is a eukaryote-specific phenomenon in which microRNAs and small interfering RNAs degrade messenger RNAs containing a complementary sequence. To this end, these small RNAs need to be loaded onto an Argonaute protein (AGO protein) to form the effector complex referred to as RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). RISC assembly undergoes multiple and sequential steps with the aid of Hsc70/Hsp90 chaperone machinery. The molecular mechanisms for this assembly process remain unclear, despite their significance for the development of gene silencing techniques and RNA interference-based therapeutics. This review dissects the currently available structures of AGO proteins and proposes models and hypotheses for RISC assembly, covering the conformation of unloaded AGO proteins, the chaperone-assisted duplex loading, and the slicer-dependent and slicer-independent duplex separation. The differences in the properties of RISC between prokaryotes and eukaryotes will also be clarified. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:637-660. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1356 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27184117

  8. Individual and Collective Contributions of Chaperoning and Degradation to Protein Homeostasis in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Younhee; Zhang, Xin; Pobre, Kristine Faye R.; Liu, Yu; Powers, David L.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Gierasch, Lila M.; Powers, Evan T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The folding fate of a protein in vivo is determined by the interplay between a protein’s folding energy landscape and the actions of the proteostasis network, including molecular chaperones and degradation enzymes. The mechanisms of individual components of the E. coli proteostasis network have been studied extensively, but much less is known about how they function as a system. We used an integrated experimental and computational approach to quantitatively analyze the folding outcomes (native folding vs. aggregation vs. degradation) of three test proteins biosynthesized in E. coli under a variety of conditions. Overexpression of the entire proteostasis network benefited all three test proteins, but the effect of upregulating individual chaperones or the major degradation enzyme, Lon, varied for proteins with different biophysical properties. In sum, the impact of the E. coli proteostasis network is a consequence of concerted action by the Hsp70 system (DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE), the Hsp60 system (GroEL/GroES), and Lon. PMID:25843722

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperone glucose regulated protein 170-Pokemon complexes elicit a robust antitumor immune response in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bangqing; Xian, Ronghua; Wu, Xianqu; Jing, Junjie; Chen, Kangning; Liu, Guojun; Zhou, Zhenhua

    2012-07-01

    Previous evidence suggested that the stress protein grp170 can function as a highly efficient molecular chaperone, binding to large protein substrates and acting as a potent vaccine against specific tumors when purified from the same tumor. In addition, Pokemon can be found in almost all malignant tumor cells and is regarded to be a promising candidate for the treatment of tumors. However, the potential of the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex has not been well described. In the present study, the natural chaperone complex between grp170 and the Pokemon was formed by heat shock, and its immunogenicity was detected by ELISPOT and (51)Cr-release assays in vitro and by tumor bearing models in vivo. Our results demonstrated that the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex could elicit T cell responses as determined by ELISPOT and (51)Cr-release assays. In addition, immunized C57BL/6 mice were challenged with subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of Lewis cancer cells to induce primary tumors. Treatment of mice with the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex also significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the life span of tumor-bearing mice. Our results indicated that the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex might represent a powerful approach to tumor immunotherapy and have significant potential for clinical application. PMID:22317751

  10. Chaperone-enhanced purification of unconventional myosin 15, a molecular motor specialized for stereocilia protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Bird, Jonathan E; Takagi, Yasuharu; Billington, Neil; Strub, Marie-Paule; Sellers, James R; Friedman, Thomas B

    2014-08-26

    Unconventional myosin 15 is a molecular motor expressed in inner ear hair cells that transports protein cargos within developing mechanosensory stereocilia. Mutations of myosin 15 cause profound hearing loss in humans and mice; however, the properties of this motor and its regulation within the stereocilia organelle are unknown. To address these questions, we expressed a subfragment 1-like (S1) truncation of mouse myosin 15, comprising the predicted motor domain plus three light-chain binding sites. Following unsuccessful attempts to express functional myosin 15-S1 using the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9)-baculovirus system, we discovered that coexpression of the muscle-myosin-specific chaperone UNC45B, in addition to the chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) significantly increased the yield of functional protein. Surprisingly, myosin 15-S1 did not bind calmodulin with high affinity. Instead, the IQ domains bound essential and regulatory light chains that are normally associated with class II myosins. We show that myosin 15-S1 is a barbed-end-directed motor that moves actin filaments in a gliding assay (∼ 430 nm · s(-1) at 30 °C), using a power stroke of 7.9 nm. The maximum ATPase rate (k(cat) ∼ 6 s(-1)) was similar to the actin-detachment rate (k(det) = 6.2 s(-1)) determined in single molecule optical trapping experiments, indicating that myosin 15-S1 was rate limited by transit through strongly actin-bound states, similar to other processive myosin motors. Our data further indicate that in addition to folding muscle myosin, UNC45B facilitates maturation of an unconventional myosin. We speculate that chaperone coexpression may be a simple method to optimize the purification of other myosin motors from Sf9 insect cells. PMID:25114250

  11. Cloning, expression and crystallisation of SGT1 co-chaperone protein from Glaciozyma antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Nur Athirah; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Beddoe, Travis; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Studies on psycrophiles are now in the limelight of today's post genomic era as they fascinate the research and development industries. The discovery from Glaciozyma antarctica, an extreme cold adapted yeast from Antarctica shows promising future to provide cost effective natural sustainable energy and create wider understanding of the property that permits this organisms to adapt to extreme temperature downshift. In plants and yeast, studies show the interaction between SGT1 and HSP90 are essential for disease resistance and heat stress by activating a number of resistance proteins. Here we report for the first time cloning, expression and crystallization of the recombinant SGT1 protein of G. antarctica (rGa_SGT1), a highly conserved eukaryotic protein that interacts with the molecular chaperones HSP90 (heat shock protein 90) apparently associated in a role of co-chaperone that may play important role in cold adaptation. The sequence analysis of rGa_SGT1 revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of SGT1 protein. In this study, we present the outlines and results of protein structural study of G. antarctica SGT1 protein. We validate this approach by starting with cloning the target insert into Ligation Independent Cloning system proceeded with expression using E. coli system, and crystallisation of the target rGA_SGT1 protein. The work is still on going with the target subunit of the complex proteins yielded crystals. These results, still ongoing, open a platform for better understanding of the uniqueness of this crucial molecular machine function in cold adaptation.

  12. Two for the Price of One: A Neuroprotective Chaperone Kit within NAD Synthase Protein NMNAT2.

    PubMed

    Lavado-Roldán, Angela; Fernández-Chacón, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    One of the most fascinating properties of the brain is the ability to function smoothly across decades of a lifespan. Neurons are nondividing mature cells specialized in fast electrical and chemical communication at synapses. Often, neurons and synapses operate at high levels of activity through sophisticated arborizations of long axons and dendrites that nevertheless stay healthy throughout years. On the other hand, aging and activity-dependent stress strike onto the protein machineries turning proteins unfolded and prone to form pathological aggregates associated with neurodegeneration. How do neurons protect from those insults and remain healthy for their whole life? Ali and colleagues now present a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) acts not only as a NAD synthase involved in axonal maintenance but as a molecular chaperone helping neurons to overcome protein unfolding and protein aggregation. PMID:27454736

  13. Two for the Price of One: A Neuroprotective Chaperone Kit within NAD Synthase Protein NMNAT2

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    One of the most fascinating properties of the brain is the ability to function smoothly across decades of a lifespan. Neurons are nondividing mature cells specialized in fast electrical and chemical communication at synapses. Often, neurons and synapses operate at high levels of activity through sophisticated arborizations of long axons and dendrites that nevertheless stay healthy throughout years. On the other hand, aging and activity-dependent stress strike onto the protein machineries turning proteins unfolded and prone to form pathological aggregates associated with neurodegeneration. How do neurons protect from those insults and remain healthy for their whole life? Ali and colleagues now present a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) acts not only as a NAD synthase involved in axonal maintenance but as a molecular chaperone helping neurons to overcome protein unfolding and protein aggregation. PMID:27454736

  14. Degradation of lipid droplet-associated proteins by chaperone-mediated autophagy facilitates lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Susmita; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) selectively degrades a subset of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. A potent physiological activator of CMA is nutrient deprivation, a condition in which intracellular triglyceride stores or lipid droplets (LD) also undergo hydrolysis (lipolysis) to generate free fatty acids for energetic purposes. Here we report that LD-associated proteins perilipin 2 (PLIN2) and perilipin 3 (PLIN3) are CMA substrates and their degradation via CMA precedes lipolysis. In vivo studies revealed that CMA degradation of PLIN2 and PLIN3 was enhanced during starvation, concurrent with elevated levels of cytosolic adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and macroautophagy proteins on LD. CMA blockage both in cultured cells and mouse liver or expression of CMA-resistant PLINs lead to reduced association of ATGL and macrolipophagy-related proteins with LD and the subsequent decrease in lipid oxidation and accumulation of LD. We propose a role of CMA in LD biology and in the maintenance of lipid homeostasis. PMID:25961502

  15. Dissecting the oligonucleotide binding properties of a disordered chaperone protein using surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Baltzinger, Mireille; Sharma, Kamal Kant; Mély, Yves; Altschuh, Danièle

    2013-01-01

    We have used surface plasmon resonance to investigate the nucleic acid binding properties of the core protein of hepatitis C virus, a disordered protein believed to chaperone the genomic RNA. It was previously shown that a peptide (peptide E) corresponding to the association of two basic clusters of core enhances the annealing and the dimerization of nucleic acid fragments derived from a stem loop (SL2) in the 3′ untranslated region of the hepatitis C virus genome. However, strong aggregation of nucleic acids by core or peptide E in the excess of the latter precluded the characterization of their binding parameters up to now. By careful design of surface plasmon resonance experiments, we obtained accurate binding parameters for the interaction of peptide E with SL2-derived oligonucleotides of different lengths and sequences, in form of stem-loop, duplex or strand. Peptide E was found to bind in a salt dependent manner to all oligonucleotides assayed. Affinity data identify at least two binding modes, of which one is independent of sequence/structure, and the other is specific to the SL2 stem-loop fold. Stoichiometry data support a multi-motif binding model allowing formation of higher-order complexes. We propose that the modular binding mode demonstrated for structured RNA-binding proteins also applies to this disordered chaperone and is relevant to its activity. PMID:24030713

  16. THE PROTEIN TARGETING FACTOR GET3 FUNCTIONS AS AN ATP-INDEPENDENT CHAPERONE UNDER OXIDATIVE STRESS CONDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Voth, Wilhelm; Schick, Markus; Gates, Stephanie; Li, Sheng; Vilardi, Fabio; Gostimskaya, Irina; Southworth, Daniel R.; Schwappach, Blanche; Jakob, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Summary Exposure of cells to reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes a rapid and significant drop in intracellular ATP-levels. This energy depletion negatively affects ATP-dependent chaperone systems, making ROS-mediated protein unfolding and aggregation a potentially very challenging problem. Here we show that Get3, a protein involved in ATP-dependent targeting of tail-anchored (TA) proteins under non-stress conditions, turns into an effective ATP-in dependent chaperone when oxidized. Activation of Get3’s chaperone function, which is a fully reversible process, involves disulfide bond formation, metal release and its conversion into distinct, higher oligomeric structures. Mutational studies demonstrate that the chaperone activity of Get3 is functionally distinct from and likely mutually exclusive with its targeting function, and responsible for the oxidative stress sensitive phenotype that has long been noted for yeast cells lacking functional Get3. These results provide convincing evidence that Get3 functions as a redox regulated chaperone, effectively protecting eukaryotic cells against oxidative protein damage. PMID:25242142

  17. Combined effects of the signal sequence and the major chaperone proteins on the export of human cytokines in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bergès, H; Joseph-Liauzun, E; Fayet, O

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the export of two human proteins in the course of their production in Escherichia coli. The coding sequences of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and of interleukin 13 were fused to those of two synthetic signal sequences to direct the human proteins to the bacterial periplasm. We found that the total amount of protein varies with the signal peptide-cytokine combination, as does the fraction of it that is soluble in a periplasmic extract. The possibility that the major chaperone proteins such as SecB and the GroEL-GroES and DnaK-DnaJ pairs are limiting factors for the export was tested by overexpressing one or the other of these chaperones concomitantly with the heterologous protein. The GroEL-GroES chaperone pair had no effect on protein production. Overproduction of SecB or DnaK plus DnaJ resulted in a marked increase of the quantity of human proteins in the periplasmic fraction, but this increase depends on the signal peptide-heterologous protein-chaperone association involved. PMID:8572712

  18. Pharmacological chaperone reshapes the energy landscape for folding and aggregation of the prion protein.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amar Nath; Neupane, Krishna; Rezajooei, Negar; Cortez, Leonardo M; Sim, Valerie L; Woodside, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    The development of small-molecule pharmacological chaperones as therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases has proven challenging, partly because their mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we study Fe-TMPyP, a tetrapyrrole that binds to the prion protein PrP and inhibits misfolding, examining its effects on PrP folding at the single-molecule level with force spectroscopy. Single PrP molecules are unfolded with and without Fe-TMPyP present using optical tweezers. Ligand binding to the native structure increases the unfolding force significantly and alters the transition state for unfolding, making it more brittle and raising the barrier height. Fe-TMPyP also binds the unfolded state, delaying native refolding. Furthermore, Fe-TMPyP binding blocks the formation of a stable misfolded dimer by interfering with intermolecular interactions, acting in a similar manner to some molecular chaperones. The ligand thus promotes native folding by stabilizing the native state while also suppressing interactions driving aggregation. PMID:27346148

  19. Pharmacological chaperone reshapes the energy landscape for folding and aggregation of the prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Amar Nath; Neupane, Krishna; Rezajooei, Negar; Cortez, Leonardo M.; Sim, Valerie L.; Woodside, Michael T.

    2016-06-01

    The development of small-molecule pharmacological chaperones as therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases has proven challenging, partly because their mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we study Fe-TMPyP, a tetrapyrrole that binds to the prion protein PrP and inhibits misfolding, examining its effects on PrP folding at the single-molecule level with force spectroscopy. Single PrP molecules are unfolded with and without Fe-TMPyP present using optical tweezers. Ligand binding to the native structure increases the unfolding force significantly and alters the transition state for unfolding, making it more brittle and raising the barrier height. Fe-TMPyP also binds the unfolded state, delaying native refolding. Furthermore, Fe-TMPyP binding blocks the formation of a stable misfolded dimer by interfering with intermolecular interactions, acting in a similar manner to some molecular chaperones. The ligand thus promotes native folding by stabilizing the native state while also suppressing interactions driving aggregation.

  20. Pharmacological chaperone reshapes the energy landscape for folding and aggregation of the prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amar Nath; Neupane, Krishna; Rezajooei, Negar; Cortez, Leonardo M.; Sim, Valerie L.; Woodside, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    The development of small-molecule pharmacological chaperones as therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases has proven challenging, partly because their mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we study Fe-TMPyP, a tetrapyrrole that binds to the prion protein PrP and inhibits misfolding, examining its effects on PrP folding at the single-molecule level with force spectroscopy. Single PrP molecules are unfolded with and without Fe-TMPyP present using optical tweezers. Ligand binding to the native structure increases the unfolding force significantly and alters the transition state for unfolding, making it more brittle and raising the barrier height. Fe-TMPyP also binds the unfolded state, delaying native refolding. Furthermore, Fe-TMPyP binding blocks the formation of a stable misfolded dimer by interfering with intermolecular interactions, acting in a similar manner to some molecular chaperones. The ligand thus promotes native folding by stabilizing the native state while also suppressing interactions driving aggregation. PMID:27346148

  1. Reversible thermal unfolding of a yfdX protein with chaperone-like activity

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Paramita; Manna, Camelia; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb; Ghosh, Mahua

    2016-01-01

    yfdX proteins are ubiquitously present in a large number of virulent bacteria. A member of this family of protein in E. coli is known to be up-regulated by the multidrug response regulator. Their abundance in such bacteria suggests some important yet unidentified functional role of this protein. Here, we study the thermal response and stability of yfdX protein STY3178 from Salmonella Typhi using circular dichroism, steady state fluorescence, dynamic light scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. We observe the protein to be stable up to a temperature of 45 °C. It folds back to the native conformation from unfolded state at temperature as high as 80 °C. The kinetic measurements of unfolding and refolding show Arrhenius behavior where the refolding involves less activation energy barrier than that of unfolding. We propose a homology model to understand the stability of the protein. Our molecular dynamic simulation studies on this model structure at high temperature show that the structure of this protein is quite stable. Finally, we report a possible functional role of this protein as a chaperone, capable of preventing DTT induced aggregation of insulin. Our studies will have broader implication in understanding the role of yfdX proteins in bacterial function and virulence. PMID:27404435

  2. Reversible thermal unfolding of a yfdX protein with chaperone-like activity.

    PubMed

    Saha, Paramita; Manna, Camelia; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb; Ghosh, Mahua

    2016-01-01

    yfdX proteins are ubiquitously present in a large number of virulent bacteria. A member of this family of protein in E. coli is known to be up-regulated by the multidrug response regulator. Their abundance in such bacteria suggests some important yet unidentified functional role of this protein. Here, we study the thermal response and stability of yfdX protein STY3178 from Salmonella Typhi using circular dichroism, steady state fluorescence, dynamic light scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. We observe the protein to be stable up to a temperature of 45 °C. It folds back to the native conformation from unfolded state at temperature as high as 80 °C. The kinetic measurements of unfolding and refolding show Arrhenius behavior where the refolding involves less activation energy barrier than that of unfolding. We propose a homology model to understand the stability of the protein. Our molecular dynamic simulation studies on this model structure at high temperature show that the structure of this protein is quite stable. Finally, we report a possible functional role of this protein as a chaperone, capable of preventing DTT induced aggregation of insulin. Our studies will have broader implication in understanding the role of yfdX proteins in bacterial function and virulence. PMID:27404435

  3. Chaperones in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, James; Wiseman, R. Luke; Chiti, Fabrizio; Dickey, Chad A.; McLean, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular protein homeostasis (proteostasis) maintains the integrity of the proteome and includes protein synthesis, folding, oligomerization, and turnover; chaperone proteins assist with all of these processes. Neurons appear to be especially susceptible to failures in proteostasis, and this is now increasingly recognized as a major origin of neurodegenerative disease. This review, based on a mini-symposium presented at the 2015 Society for Neuroscience meeting, describes new work in the area of neuronal proteostasis, with a specific focus on the roles and therapeutic uses of protein chaperones. We first present a brief review of protein misfolding and aggregation in neurodegenerative disease. We then discuss different aspects of chaperone control of neuronal proteostasis on topics ranging from chaperone engineering, to chaperone-mediated blockade of protein oligomerization and cytotoxicity, to the potential rescue of neurodegenerative processes using modified chaperone proteins. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Aberrant protein homeostasis within neurons results in protein misfolding and aggregation. In this review, we discuss specific roles for protein chaperones in the oligomerization, assembly, and disaggregation of proteins known to be abnormally folded in neurodegenerative disease. Collectively, our goal is to identify therapeutic mechanisms to reduce the cellular toxicity of abnormal aggregates. PMID:26468185

  4. Impact of holdase chaperones Skp and SurA on the folding of β-barrel outer-membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Johannes; Burmann, Björn M; Hiller, Sebastian; Müller, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    Chaperones increase the folding yields of soluble proteins by suppressing misfolding and aggregation, but how they modulate the folding of integral membrane proteins is not well understood. Here we use single-molecule force spectroscopy and NMR spectroscopy to observe the periplasmic holdase chaperones SurA and Skp shaping the folding trajectory of the large β-barrel outer-membrane receptor FhuA from Escherichia coli. Either chaperone prevents FhuA from misfolding by stabilizing a dynamic, unfolded state, thus allowing the substrate to search for structural intermediates. During this search, the SurA-chaperoned FhuA polypeptide inserts β-hairpins into the membrane in a stepwise manner until the β-barrel is folded. The membrane acts as a free-energy sink for β-hairpin insertion and physically separates transient folds from chaperones. This stabilization of dynamic unfolded states and the trapping of folding intermediates funnel the FhuA polypeptide toward the native conformation. PMID:26344570

  5. Forces Driving Chaperone Action.

    PubMed

    Koldewey, Philipp; Stull, Frederick; Horowitz, Scott; Martin, Raoul; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-07-14

    It is still unclear what molecular forces drive chaperone-mediated protein folding. Here, we obtain a detailed mechanistic understanding of the forces that dictate the four key steps of chaperone-client interaction: initial binding, complex stabilization, folding, and release. Contrary to the common belief that chaperones recognize unfolding intermediates by their hydrophobic nature, we discover that the model chaperone Spy uses long-range electrostatic interactions to rapidly bind to its unfolded client protein Im7. Short-range hydrophobic interactions follow, which serve to stabilize the complex. Hydrophobic collapse of the client protein then drives its folding. By burying hydrophobic residues in its core, the client's affinity to Spy decreases, which causes client release. By allowing the client to fold itself, Spy circumvents the need for client-specific folding instructions. This mechanism might help explain how chaperones can facilitate the folding of various unrelated proteins. PMID:27293188

  6. Lifespan Control by Redox-Dependent Recruitment of Chaperones to Misfolded Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hanzén, Sarah; Vielfort, Katarina; Yang, Junsheng; Roger, Friederike; Andersson, Veronica; Zamarbide-Forés, Sara; Andersson, Rebecca; Malm, Lisa; Palais, Gael; Biteau, Benoît; Liu, Beidong; Toledano, Michel B; Molin, Mikael; Nyström, Thomas

    2016-06-30

    Caloric restriction (CR) extends the lifespan of flies, worms, and yeast by counteracting age-related oxidation of H2O2-scavenging peroxiredoxins (Prxs). Here, we show that increased dosage of the major cytosolic Prx in yeast, Tsa1, extends lifespan in an Hsp70 chaperone-dependent and CR-independent manner without increasing H2O2 scavenging or genome stability. We found that Tsa1 and Hsp70 physically interact and that hyperoxidation of Tsa1 by H2O2 is required for the recruitment of the Hsp70 chaperones and the Hsp104 disaggregase to misfolded and aggregated proteins during aging, but not heat stress. Tsa1 counteracted the accumulation of ubiquitinated aggregates during aging and the reduction of hyperoxidized Tsa1 by sulfiredoxin facilitated clearance of H2O2-generated aggregates. The data reveal a conceptually new role for H2O2 signaling in proteostasis and lifespan control and shed new light on the selective benefits endowed to eukaryotic peroxiredoxins by their reversible hyperoxidation. PMID:27264606

  7. Gedunin inactivates the co-chaperone p23 protein causing cancer cell death by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Chaitanya A; Fauq, Abdul; Peterson, Laura B; Miller, Charles; Blagg, Brian S J; Chadli, Ahmed

    2013-03-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 is an exciting option for cancer therapy. The clinical efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitors is, however, less than expected. Binding of the co-chaperone p23 to Hsp90 and induced overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins Hsp70 and Hsp27 are thought to contribute to this outcome. Herein, we report that the natural product gedunin may provide a new alternative to inactivate the Hsp90 machine. We show that gedunin directly binds to p23 and inactivates it, without overexpression of Hsp27 and relatively modest induction of Hsp70. Using molecular docking and mutational analysis, we mapped the gedunin-binding site on p23. Functional analysis shows that gedunin inhibits the p23 chaperoning activity, blocks its cellular interaction with Hsp90, and interferes with p23-mediated gene regulation. Cell treatment with gedunin leads to cancer cell death by apoptosis through inactivation of p23 and activation of caspase 7, which cleaves p23 at the C terminus. These results provide important insight into the molecular mechanism of action of this promising lead compound. PMID:23355466

  8. Copper Transport Protein Antioxidant-1 Promotes Inflammatory Neovascularization via Chaperone and Transcription Factor Function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gin-Fu; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Youn, Seock-Won; Das, Archita; Cho, Jaehyung; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Urao, Norifumi; McKinney, Ronald D.; Surenkhuu, Bayasgalan; Hamakubo, Takao; Iwanari, Hiroko; Li, Senlin; Christman, John W.; Shantikumar, Saran; Angelini, Gianni D.; Emanueli, Costanza; Ushio-Fukai, Masuko; Fukai, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu), an essential micronutrient, plays a fundamental role in inflammation and angiogenesis; however, its precise mechanism remains undefined. Here we uncover a novel role of Cu transport protein Antioxidant-1 (Atox1), which is originally appreciated as a Cu chaperone and recently discovered as a Cu-dependent transcription factor, in inflammatory neovascularization. Atox1 expression is upregulated in patients and mice with critical limb ischemia. Atox1-deficient mice show impaired limb perfusion recovery with reduced arteriogenesis, angiogenesis, and recruitment of inflammatory cells. In vivo intravital microscopy, bone marrow reconstitution, and Atox1 gene transfer in Atox1−/− mice show that Atox1 in endothelial cells (ECs) is essential for neovascularization and recruitment of inflammatory cells which release VEGF and TNFα. Mechanistically, Atox1-depleted ECs demonstrate that Cu chaperone function of Atox1 mediated through Cu transporter ATP7A is required for VEGF-induced angiogenesis via activation of Cu enzyme lysyl oxidase. Moreover, Atox1 functions as a Cu-dependent transcription factor for NADPH oxidase organizer p47phox, thereby increasing ROS-NFκB-VCAM-1/ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion in ECs inflamed with TNFα in an ATP7A-independent manner. These findings demonstrate a novel linkage between Atox1 and NADPH oxidase involved in inflammatory neovascularization and suggest Atox1 as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of ischemic disease. PMID:26437801

  9. Copper Transport Protein Antioxidant-1 Promotes Inflammatory Neovascularization via Chaperone and Transcription Factor Function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gin-Fu; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Youn, Seock-Won; Das, Archita; Cho, Jaehyung; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Urao, Norifumi; McKinney, Ronald D; Surenkhuu, Bayasgalan; Hamakubo, Takao; Iwanari, Hiroko; Li, Senlin; Christman, John W; Shantikumar, Saran; Angelini, Gianni D; Emanueli, Costanza; Ushio-Fukai, Masuko; Fukai, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu), an essential micronutrient, plays a fundamental role in inflammation and angiogenesis; however, its precise mechanism remains undefined. Here we uncover a novel role of Cu transport protein Antioxidant-1 (Atox1), which is originally appreciated as a Cu chaperone and recently discovered as a Cu-dependent transcription factor, in inflammatory neovascularization. Atox1 expression is upregulated in patients and mice with critical limb ischemia. Atox1-deficient mice show impaired limb perfusion recovery with reduced arteriogenesis, angiogenesis, and recruitment of inflammatory cells. In vivo intravital microscopy, bone marrow reconstitution, and Atox1 gene transfer in Atox1(-/-) mice show that Atox1 in endothelial cells (ECs) is essential for neovascularization and recruitment of inflammatory cells which release VEGF and TNFα. Mechanistically, Atox1-depleted ECs demonstrate that Cu chaperone function of Atox1 mediated through Cu transporter ATP7A is required for VEGF-induced angiogenesis via activation of Cu enzyme lysyl oxidase. Moreover, Atox1 functions as a Cu-dependent transcription factor for NADPH oxidase organizer p47phox, thereby increasing ROS-NFκB-VCAM-1/ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion in ECs inflamed with TNFα in an ATP7A-independent manner. These findings demonstrate a novel linkage between Atox1 and NADPH oxidase involved in inflammatory neovascularization and suggest Atox1 as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of ischemic disease. PMID:26437801

  10. Nucleic acid chaperons: a theory of an RNA-assisted protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Biro, Jan C

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteins are assumed to contain all the information necessary for unambiguous folding (Anfinsen's principle). However, ab initio structure prediction is often not successful because the amino acid sequence itself is not sufficient to guide between endless folding possibilities. It seems to be a logical to try to find the "missing" information in nucleic acids, in the redundant codon base. Results mRNA energy dot plots and protein residue contact maps were found to be rather similar. The structure of mRNA is also conserved if the protein structure is conserved, even if the sequence similarity is low. These observations led me to suppose that some similarity might exist between nucleic acid and protein folding. I found that amino acid pairs, which are co-located in the protein structure, are preferentially coded by complementary codons. This codon complementarity is not perfect; it is suboptimal where the 1st and 3rd codon residues are complementary to each other in reverse orientation, while the 2nd codon letters may be, but are not necessarily, complementary. Conclusion Partial complementary coding of co-locating amino acids in protein structures suggests that mRNA assists in protein folding and functions not only as a template but even as a chaperon during translation. This function explains the role of wobble bases and answers the mystery of why we have a redundant codon base. PMID:16137324

  11. Multi-kinase inhibitors can associate with heat shock proteins through their NH2-termini by which they suppress chaperone function.

    PubMed

    Booth, Laurence; Shuch, Brian; Albers, Thomas; Roberts, Jane L; Tavallai, Mehrad; Proniuk, Stefan; Zukiwski, Alexander; Wang, Dasheng; Chen, Ching-Shih; Bottaro, Don; Ecroyd, Heath; Lebedyeva, Iryna O; Dent, Paul

    2016-03-15

    We performed proteomic studies using the GRP78 chaperone-inhibitor drug AR-12 (OSU-03012) as bait. Multiple additional chaperone and chaperone-associated proteins were shown to interact with AR-12, including: GRP75, HSP75, BAG2; HSP27; ULK-1; and thioredoxin. AR-12 down-regulated in situ immuno-fluorescence detection of ATP binding chaperones using antibodies directed against the NH2-termini of the proteins but only weakly reduced detection using antibodies directed against the central and COOH portions of the proteins. Traditional SDS-PAGE and western blotting assessment methods did not exhibit any alterations in chaperone detection. AR-12 altered the sub-cellular distribution of chaperone proteins, abolishing their punctate speckled patterning concomitant with changes in protein co-localization. AR-12 inhibited chaperone ATPase activity, which was enhanced by sildenafil; inhibited chaperone - chaperone and chaperone - client interactions; and docked in silico with the ATPase domains of HSP90 and of HSP70. AR-12 combined with sildenafil in a GRP78 plus HSP27 -dependent fashion to profoundly activate an eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP/Beclin1 pathway in parallel with inactivating mTOR and increasing ATG13 phosphorylation, collectively resulting in formation of punctate toxic autophagosomes. Over-expression of [GRP78 and HSP27] prevented: AR-12 -induced activation of ER stress signaling and maintained mTOR activity; AR-12 -mediated down-regulation of thioredoxin, MCL-1 and c-FLIP-s; and preserved tumor cell viability. Thus the inhibition of chaperone protein functions by AR-12 and by multi-kinase inhibitors very likely explains why these agents have anti-tumor effects in multiple genetically diverse tumor cell types. PMID:26887051

  12. Multi-kinase inhibitors can associate with heat shock proteins through their NH2-termini by which they suppress chaperone function

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jane L.; Tavallai, Mehrad; Proniuk, Stefan; Zukiwski, Alexander; Wang, Dasheng; Chen, Ching-Shih; Bottaro, Don; Ecroyd, Heath; Lebedyeva, Iryna O.; Dent, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We performed proteomic studies using the GRP78 chaperone-inhibitor drug AR-12 (OSU-03012) as bait. Multiple additional chaperone and chaperone-associated proteins were shown to interact with AR-12, including: GRP75, HSP75, BAG2; HSP27; ULK-1; and thioredoxin. AR-12 down-regulated in situ immuno-fluorescence detection of ATP binding chaperones using antibodies directed against the NH2-termini of the proteins but only weakly reduced detection using antibodies directed against the central and COOH portions of the proteins. Traditional SDS-PAGE and western blotting assessment methods did not exhibit any alterations in chaperone detection. AR-12 altered the sub-cellular distribution of chaperone proteins, abolishing their punctate speckled patterning concomitant with changes in protein co-localization. AR-12 inhibited chaperone ATPase activity, which was enhanced by sildenafil; inhibited chaperonechaperone and chaperone – client interactions; and docked in silico with the ATPase domains of HSP90 and of HSP70. AR-12 combined with sildenafil in a GRP78 plus HSP27 –dependent fashion to profoundly activate an eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP/Beclin1 pathway in parallel with inactivating mTOR and increasing ATG13 phosphorylation, collectively resulting in formation of punctate toxic autophagosomes. Over-expression of [GRP78 and HSP27] prevented: AR-12 –induced activation of ER stress signaling and maintained mTOR activity; AR-12 –mediated down-regulation of thioredoxin, MCL-1 and c-FLIP-s; and preserved tumor cell viability. Thus the inhibition of chaperone protein functions by AR-12 and by multi-kinase inhibitors very likely explains why these agents have anti-tumor effects in multiple genetically diverse tumor cell types. PMID:26887051

  13. Human Enterovirus Nonstructural Protein 2CATPase Functions as Both an RNA Helicase and ATP-Independent RNA Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hongjie; Wang, Peipei; Wang, Guang-Chuan; Yang, Jie; Sun, Xianlin; Wu, Wenzhe; Qiu, Yang; Shu, Ting; Zhao, Xiaolu; Yin, Lei; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2015-01-01

    RNA helicases and chaperones are the two major classes of RNA remodeling proteins, which function to remodel RNA structures and/or RNA-protein interactions, and are required for all aspects of RNA metabolism. Although some virus-encoded RNA helicases/chaperones have been predicted or identified, their RNA remodeling activities in vitro and functions in the viral life cycle remain largely elusive. Enteroviruses are a large group of positive-stranded RNA viruses in the Picornaviridae family, which includes numerous important human pathogens. Herein, we report that the nonstructural protein 2CATPase of enterovirus 71 (EV71), which is the major causative pathogen of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has been regarded as the most important neurotropic enterovirus after poliovirus eradication, functions not only as an RNA helicase that 3′-to-5′ unwinds RNA helices in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent manner, but also as an RNA chaperone that destabilizes helices bidirectionally and facilitates strand annealing and complex RNA structure formation independently of ATP. We also determined that the helicase activity is based on the EV71 2CATPase middle domain, whereas the C-terminus is indispensable for its RNA chaperoning activity. By promoting RNA template recycling, 2CATPase facilitated EV71 RNA synthesis in vitro; when 2CATPase helicase activity was impaired, EV71 RNA replication and virion production were mostly abolished in cells, indicating that 2CATPase-mediated RNA remodeling plays a critical role in the enteroviral life cycle. Furthermore, the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities of 2CATPase are also conserved in coxsackie A virus 16 (CAV16), another important enterovirus. Altogether, our findings are the first to demonstrate the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities associated with enterovirus 2CATPase, and our study provides both in vitro and cellular evidence for their potential roles during viral RNA replication. These findings increase our

  14. The Mitochondrial Chaperone Protein TRAP1 Mitigates α-Synuclein Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, A. Kathrin; Toegel, Jane P.; Gerhardt, Ellen; Karsten, Peter; Falkenburger, Björn; Reinartz, Andrea; Winklhofer, Konstanze F.; Schulz, Jörg B.

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression or mutation of α-Synuclein is associated with protein aggregation and interferes with a number of cellular processes, including mitochondrial integrity and function. We used a whole-genome screen in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to search for novel genetic modifiers of human [A53T]α-Synuclein–induced neurotoxicity. Decreased expression of the mitochondrial chaperone protein tumor necrosis factor receptor associated protein-1 (TRAP1) was found to enhance age-dependent loss of fly head dopamine (DA) and DA neuron number resulting from [A53T]α-Synuclein expression. In addition, decreased TRAP1 expression in [A53T]α-Synuclein–expressing flies resulted in enhanced loss of climbing ability and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Overexpression of human TRAP1 was able to rescue these phenotypes. Similarly, human TRAP1 overexpression in rat primary cortical neurons rescued [A53T]α-Synuclein–induced sensitivity to rotenone treatment. In human (non)neuronal cell lines, small interfering RNA directed against TRAP1 enhanced [A53T]α-Synuclein–induced sensitivity to oxidative stress treatment. [A53T]α-Synuclein directly interfered with mitochondrial function, as its expression reduced Complex I activity in HEK293 cells. These effects were blocked by TRAP1 overexpression. Moreover, TRAP1 was able to prevent alteration in mitochondrial morphology caused by [A53T]α-Synuclein overexpression in human SH-SY5Y cells. These results indicate that [A53T]α-Synuclein toxicity is intimately connected to mitochondrial dysfunction and that toxicity reduction in fly and rat primary neurons and human cell lines can be achieved using overexpression of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1. Interestingly, TRAP1 has previously been shown to be phosphorylated by the serine/threonine kinase PINK1, thus providing a potential link of PINK1 via TRAP1 to α-Synuclein. PMID:22319455

  15. An RNA chaperone activity of non-specific RNA binding proteins in hammerhead ribozyme catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Herschlag, D; Khosla, M; Tsuchihashi, Z; Karpel, R L

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown that a protein derived from the p7 nucleocapsid (NC) protein of HIV type-1 increases kcat/Km and kcat for cleavage of a cognate substrate by a hammerhead ribozyme. Here we show directly that the increase in kcat/Km arises from catalysis of the annealing of the RNA substrate to the ribozyme and the increase in kcat arises from catalysis of dissociation of the RNA products from the ribozyme. A peptide polymer derived from the consensus sequence of the C-terminal domain of the hnRNP A1 protein (A1 CTD) provides similar enhancements. Although these effects apparently arise from non-specific interactions, not all non-specific binding interactions led to these enhancements. NC and A1 CTD exert their effects by accelerating attainment of the thermodynamically most stable species throughout the ribozyme catalytic cycle. In addition, NC protein is shown to resolve a misfolded ribozyme-RNA complex that is otherwise long lived. These in vitro results suggest that non-specific RNA binding proteins such as NC and hnRNP proteins may have a biological role as RNA chaperones that prevent misfolding of RNAs and resolve RNAs that have misfolded, thereby ensuring that RNA is accessible for its biological functions. Images PMID:8026476

  16. Pirfenidone inhibits TGF-β1-induced over-expression of collagen type I and heat shock protein 47 in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pirfenidone is a novel anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory agent that inhibits the progression of fibrosis in animal models and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We previously showed that pirfenidone inhibits the over-expression of collagen type I and of heat shock protein (HSP) 47, a collagen-specific molecular chaperone, in human lung fibroblasts stimulated with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in vitro. The increased numbers of HSP47-positive type II pneumocytes as well as fibroblasts were also diminished by pirfenidone in an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin. The present study evaluates the effects of pirfenidone on collagen type I and HSP47 expression in the human alveolar epithelial cell line, A549 cells in vitro. Methods The expression of collagen type I, HSP47 and E-cadherin mRNAs in A549 cells stimulated with TGF-β1 was evaluated by Northern blotting or real-time PCR. The expression of collagen type I, HSP47 and fibronectin proteins was assessed by immunocytochemical staining. Results TGF-β1 stimulated collagen type I and HSP47 mRNA and protein expression in A549 cells, and pirfenidone significantly inhibited this process. Pirfenidone also inhibited over-expression of the fibroblast phenotypic marker fibronectin in A549 cells induced by TGF-β1. Conclusion We concluded that the anti-fibrotic effects of pirfenidone might be mediated not only through the direct inhibition of collagen type I expression but also through the inhibition of HSP47 expression in alveolar epithelial cells, which results in reduced collagen synthesis in lung fibrosis. Furthermore, pirfenidone might partially inhibit the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:22694981

  17. Gymnastics of molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Matthias P

    2010-08-13

    Molecular chaperones assist folding processes and conformational changes in many proteins. In order to do so, they progress through complex conformational cycles themselves. In this review, I discuss the diverse conformational dynamics of the ATP-dependent chaperones of the Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90, and Hsp100 families. PMID:20705236

  18. Biology of the Heat Shock Response and Protein Chaperones: Budding Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Jacob; Abrams, Jennifer; Wang, Yanyu

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The eukaryotic heat shock response is an ancient and highly conserved transcriptional program that results in the immediate synthesis of a battery of cytoprotective genes in the presence of thermal and other environmental stresses. Many of these genes encode molecular chaperones, powerful protein remodelers with the capacity to shield, fold, or unfold substrates in a context-dependent manner. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be an invaluable model for driving the discovery of regulatory features of this fundamental stress response. In addition, budding yeast has been an outstanding model system to elucidate the cell biology of protein chaperones and their organization into functional networks. In this review, we evaluate our understanding of the multifaceted response to heat shock. In addition, the chaperone complement of the cytosol is compared to those of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, organelles with their own unique protein homeostasis milieus. Finally, we examine recent advances in the understanding of the roles of protein chaperones and the heat shock response in pathogenic fungi, which is being accelerated by the wealth of information gained for budding yeast. PMID:22688810

  19. Stability of Silk and Collagen Protein Materials in Space

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Raja, Waseem K.; An, Bo; Tokareva, Olena; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen and silk materials, in neat forms and as silica composites, were flown for 18 months on the International Space Station [Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE)-6] to assess the impact of space radiation on structure and function. As natural biomaterials, the impact of the space environment on films of these proteins was investigated to understand fundamental changes in structure and function related to the future utility in materials and medicine in space environments. About 15% of the film surfaces were etched by heavy ionizing particles such as atomic oxygen, the major component of the low-Earth orbit space environment. Unexpectedly, more than 80% of the silk and collagen materials were chemically crosslinked by space radiation. These findings are critical for designing next-generation biocompatible materials for contact with living systems in space environments, where the effects of heavy ionizing particles and other cosmic radiation need to be considered. PMID:24305951

  20. Stability of silk and collagen protein materials in space.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Raja, Waseem K; An, Bo; Tokareva, Olena; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Collagen and silk materials, in neat forms and as silica composites, were flown for 18 months on the International Space Station [Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE)-6] to assess the impact of space radiation on structure and function. As natural biomaterials, the impact of the space environment on films of these proteins was investigated to understand fundamental changes in structure and function related to the future utility in materials and medicine in space environments. About 15% of the film surfaces were etched by heavy ionizing particles such as atomic oxygen, the major component of the low-Earth orbit space environment. Unexpectedly, more than 80% of the silk and collagen materials were chemically crosslinked by space radiation. These findings are critical for designing next-generation biocompatible materials for contact with living systems in space environments, where the effects of heavy ionizing particles and other cosmic radiation need to be considered. PMID:24305951

  1. Fibroblastic synoviocytes secrete plasma proteins via α2 -macroglobulins serving as intracellular and extracellular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ke-Wei; Murray, Elsa J Brochmann; Murray, Samuel S

    2015-11-01

    Changes in plasma protein levels in synovial fluid (SF) have been implicated in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. It was previously thought that the presence of plasma proteins in SF reflected ultrafiltration or extravasation from the vasculature, possibly due to retraction of inflamed endothelial cells. Recent proteomic analyses have confirmed the abundant presence of plasma proteins in SF from control and arthritic patients. Systematic depletion of high-abundance plasma proteins from SF and conditioned media from synoviocytes cultured in serum, and protein analysis under denaturing/reducing conditions have limited our understanding of sources and the native structures of "plasma protein" complexes in SF. Using Western blotting, qPCR, and mass spectrometry, we found that Hig-82 lapine fibroblastic synovicytes cultured under serum-free conditions expressed and secreted plasma proteins, including the cytokine-binding protein secreted phosphoprotein 24 kDa (Spp24) and many of the proteases and protease inhibitors found in SF. Treating synoviocytes with TGF-β1 or BMP-2 for 24 h upregulated the expression of plasma proteins, including Spp24, α2 -HS-glycoprotein, α1 -antitrypsin, IGF-1, and C-reactive protein. Furthermore, many of the plasma proteins of mass <151 kDa were secreted as disulfide-bound complexes with members of the α2 -macroglobulin (A2M) family, which serve as intracellular and extracellular chaperones, not protease inhibitors. Using brefeldin A to block vesicular traffic and protease inhibitors to inhibit endogenous activation of naïve A2M, we demonstrated that the complexes were formed in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and that Ca(2+) cysteine protease-dependent processes are involved. PMID:25900303

  2. Three reasons protein disorder analysis makes more sense in the light of collagen.

    PubMed

    Smithers, Ben; Oates, Matt E; Tompa, Peter; Gough, Julian

    2016-05-01

    We have identified that the collagen helix has the potential to be disruptive to analyses of intrinsically disordered proteins. The collagen helix is an extended fibrous structure that is both promiscuous and repetitive. Whilst its sequence is predicted to be disordered, this type of protein structure is not typically considered as intrinsic disorder. Here, we show that collagen-encoding proteins skew the distribution of exon lengths in genes. We find that previous results, demonstrating that exons encoding disordered regions are more likely to be symmetric, are due to the abundance of the collagen helix. Other related results, showing increased levels of alternative splicing in disorder-encoding exons, still hold after considering collagen-containing proteins. Aside from analyses of exons, we find that the set of proteins that contain collagen significantly alters the amino acid composition of regions predicted as disordered. We conclude that research in this area should be conducted in the light of the collagen helix. PMID:26941008

  3. Interactome Analysis of the Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus RNA Polymerase Complex Identifies Protein Chaperones as Important Cofactors That Promote L-Protein Stability and RNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Diane C.; Wu, Weining; Smith, Nikki; Fix, Jenna; Noton, Sarah Louise; Galloux, Marie; Touzelet, Olivier; Armstrong, Stuart D.; Dawson, Jenna M.; Aljabr, Waleed; Easton, Andrew J.; Rameix-Welti, Marie-Anne; de Oliveira, Andressa Peres; Simabuco, Fernando M.; Ventura, Armando M.; Hughes, David J.; Barr, John N.; Fearns, Rachel; Digard, Paul

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) core viral RNA polymerase comprises the large polymerase protein (L) and its cofactor, the phosphoprotein (P), which associate with the viral ribonucleoprotein complex to replicate the genome and, together with the M2-1 protein, transcribe viral mRNAs. While cellular proteins have long been proposed to be involved in the synthesis of HRSV RNA by associating with the polymerase complex, their characterization has been hindered by the difficulty of purifying the viral polymerase from mammalian cell culture. In this study, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged L- and P-protein expression was coupled with high-affinity anti-GFP antibody-based immunoprecipitation and quantitative proteomics to identify cellular proteins that interacted with either the L- or the P-proteins when expressed as part of a biologically active viral RNP. Several core groups of cellular proteins were identified that interacted with each viral protein including, in both cases, protein chaperones. Ablation of chaperone activity by using small-molecule inhibitors confirmed previously reported studies which suggested that this class of proteins acted as positive viral factors. Inhibition of HSP90 chaperone function in the current study showed that HSP90 is critical for L-protein function and stability, whether in the presence or absence of the P-protein. Inhibition studies suggested that HSP70 also disrupts virus biology and might help the polymerase remodel the nucleocapsid to allow RNA synthesis to occur efficiently. This indicated a proviral role for protein chaperones in HRSV replication and demonstrates that the function of cellular proteins can be targeted as potential therapeutics to disrupt virus replication. IMPORTANCE Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) represents a major health care and economic burden, being the main cause of severe respiratory infections in infants worldwide. No vaccine or effective therapy is

  4. Get3 is a holdase chaperone and moves to deposition sites for aggregated proteins when membrane targeting is blocked

    PubMed Central

    Powis, Katie; Schrul, Bianca; Tienson, Heather; Gostimskaya, Irina; Breker, Michal; High, Stephen; Schuldiner, Maya; Jakob, Ursula; Schwappach, Blanche

    2013-01-01

    Summary The endomembrane system of yeast contains different tail-anchored proteins that are post-translationally targeted to membranes via their C-terminal transmembrane domain. This hydrophobic segment could be hazardous in the cytosol if membrane insertion fails, resulting in the need for energy-dependent chaperoning and the degradation of aggregated tail-anchored proteins. A cascade of GET proteins cooperates in a conserved pathway to accept newly synthesized tail-anchored proteins from ribosomes and guide them to a receptor at the endoplasmic reticulum, where membrane integration takes place. It is, however, unclear how the GET system reacts to conditions of energy depletion that might prevent membrane insertion and hence lead to the accumulation of hydrophobic proteins in the cytosol. Here we show that the ATPase Get3, which accommodates the hydrophobic tail anchor of clients, has a dual function: promoting tail-anchored protein insertion when glucose is abundant and serving as an ATP-independent holdase chaperone during energy depletion. Like the generic chaperones Hsp42, Ssa2, Sis1 and Hsp104, we found that Get3 moves reversibly to deposition sites for protein aggregates, hence supporting the sequestration of tail-anchored proteins under conditions that prevent tail-anchored protein insertion. Our findings support a ubiquitous role for the cytosolic GET complex as a triaging platform involved in cellular proteostasis. PMID:23203805

  5. Increasing the catalytic activity of Bilirubin oxidase from Bacillus pumilus: Importance of host strain and chaperones proteins.

    PubMed

    Gounel, Sébastien; Rouhana, Jad; Stines-Chaumeil, Claire; Cadet, Marine; Mano, Nicolas

    2016-07-20

    Aggregation of recombinant proteins into inclusion bodies (IBs) is the main problem of the expression of multicopper oxidase in Escherichia coli. It is usually attributed to inefficient folding of proteins due to the lack of copper and/or unavailability of chaperone proteins. The general strategies reported to overcome this issue have been focused on increasing the intracellular copper concentration. Here we report a complementary method to optimize the expression in E. coli of a promising Bilirubin oxidase (BOD) isolated from Bacillus pumilus. First, as this BOD has a disulfide bridge, we switched E.coli strain from BL21 (DE3) to Origami B (DE3), known to promote the formation of disulfide bridges in the bacterial cytoplasm. In a second step, we investigate the effect of co-expression of chaperone proteins on the protein production and specific activity. Our strategy allowed increasing the final amount of enzyme by 858% and its catalytic rate constant by 83%. PMID:27165502

  6. Protein Disulfide Isomerase Chaperone ERP-57 Decreases Plasma Membrane Expression of the Human GnRH Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yánez, Rodrigo Ayala; Conn, P. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Retention of misfolded proteins by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a quality control mechanism involving the participation of endogenous chaperones such as calnexin (CANX) which interact and restrict plasma membrane expression of gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), a G protein coupled receptor. CANX also interacts with ERP-57, a thiol oxidoreductase chaperone present in the ER. CANX along with ERP-57, promotes the formation of disulfide bond bridges in nascent proteins. The human GnRH receptor (hGnRHR) is stabilized by two disulfide bond bridges (Cys14-Cys200 and Cys114-Cys196), that, when broken, its expression at plasma membrane decreases. To determine if the presence of chaperones CANX and ERP-57 exert an influence over membrane routing and second messenger activation, we assessed the effect of various mutants including those with broken bridges (Cys→Ala) along with the wild type hGnRHR. The effect of chaperones on mutants was insignificant, whereas the overexpression of ERP-57 led to a wild type hGnRHR retention which was further enhanced by cotransfection with CANX cDNA disclosing receptor retention by ERP-57 augmented by CANX, suggesting a quality control mechanism. PMID:20029959

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of the Type III Secretion System Tip Chaperone Protein PcrG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Sukanya; Nordhues, Bryce A; Kaur, Kawaljit; Zhang, Na; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2015-11-01

    Lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of death among cystic fibrosis patients. To initiate infection, P. aeruginosa assembles a protein nanomachine, the type III secretion system (T3SS), to inject bacterial proteins directly into target host cells. An important regulator of the P. aeruginosa T3SS is the chaperone protein PcrG, which forms a complex with the tip protein, PcrV. In addition to its role as a chaperone to the tip protein, PcrG also regulates protein secretion. PcrG homologues are also important in the T3SS of other pathogens such as Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague. The atomic structure of PcrG or any member of the family of tip protein chaperones is currently unknown. Here, we show by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that PcrG lacks a tertiary structure. However, it is not completely disordered but contains secondary structures dominated by two long α-helices from residue 16 to 41 and from residue 55 to 76. The helices of PcrG are partially formed, have similar backbone dynamics, and are flexible. NMR titrations show that the entire length of PcrG residues from position 9 to 76 is involved in binding to PcrV. PcrG adds to the growing list of partially folded or unstructured proteins with important roles in type III secretion. PMID:26451841

  8. Pleiotropic role of the RNA chaperone protein Hfq in the human pathogen Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Boudry, P; Gracia, C; Monot, M; Caillet, J; Saujet, L; Hajnsdorf, E; Dupuy, B; Martin-Verstraete, I; Soutourina, O

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emergent human pathogen and the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Our recent data strongly suggest the importance of RNA-based mechanisms for the control of gene expression in C. difficile. In an effort to understand the function of the RNA chaperone protein Hfq, we constructed and characterized an Hfq-depleted strain in C. difficile. Hfq depletion led to a growth defect, morphological changes, an increased sensitivity to stresses, and a better ability to sporulate and to form biofilms. The transcriptome analysis revealed pleiotropic effects of Hfq depletion on gene expression in C. difficile, including genes encoding proteins involved in sporulation, stress response, metabolic pathways, cell wall-associated proteins, transporters, and transcriptional regulators and genes of unknown function. Remarkably, a great number of genes of the regulon dependent on sporulation-specific sigma factor, SigK, were upregulated in the Hfq-depleted strain. The altered accumulation of several sRNAs and interaction of Hfq with selected sRNAs suggest potential involvement of Hfq in these regulatory RNA functions. Altogether, these results suggest the pleiotropic role of Hfq protein in C. difficile physiology, including processes important for the C. difficile infection cycle, and expand our knowledge of Hfq-dependent regulation in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:24982306

  9. Prohibitins act as a membrane-bound chaperone for the stabilization of mitochondrial proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nijtmans, Leo G.J.; de Jong, Liesbeth; Artal Sanz, Marta; Coates, Philip J.; Berden, Jan A.; Willem Back, Jaap; Muijsers, Anton O.; van der Spek, Hans; Grivell, Les A.

    2000-01-01

    Prohibitins are ubiquitous, abundant and evolutionarily strongly conserved proteins that play a role in important cellular processes. Using blue native electrophoresis we have demonstrated that human prohibitin and Bap37 together form a large complex in the mitochondrial inner membrane. This complex is similar in size to the yeast complex formed by the homologues Phb1p and Phb2p. In yeast, levels of this complex are increased on co-overexpression of both Phb1p and Phb2p, suggesting that these two proteins are the only components of the complex. Pulse–chase experiments with mitochondria isolated from phb1/phb2-null and PHB1/2 overexpressing cells show that the Phb1/2 complex is able to stabilize newly synthesized mitochondrial translation products. This stabilization probably occurs through a direct interaction because association of mitochondrial translation products with the Phb1/2 complex could be demonstrated. The fact that Phb1/2 is a large multimeric complex, which provides protection of native peptides against proteolysis, suggests a functional homology with protein chaperones with respect to their ability to hold and prevent misfolding of newly synthesized proteins. PMID:10835343

  10. Pleiotropic Role of the RNA Chaperone Protein Hfq in the Human Pathogen Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Boudry, P.; Gracia, C.; Monot, M.; Caillet, J.; Saujet, L.; Hajnsdorf, E.; Dupuy, B.; Martin-Verstraete, I.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emergent human pathogen and the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Our recent data strongly suggest the importance of RNA-based mechanisms for the control of gene expression in C. difficile. In an effort to understand the function of the RNA chaperone protein Hfq, we constructed and characterized an Hfq-depleted strain in C. difficile. Hfq depletion led to a growth defect, morphological changes, an increased sensitivity to stresses, and a better ability to sporulate and to form biofilms. The transcriptome analysis revealed pleiotropic effects of Hfq depletion on gene expression in C. difficile, including genes encoding proteins involved in sporulation, stress response, metabolic pathways, cell wall-associated proteins, transporters, and transcriptional regulators and genes of unknown function. Remarkably, a great number of genes of the regulon dependent on sporulation-specific sigma factor, SigK, were upregulated in the Hfq-depleted strain. The altered accumulation of several sRNAs and interaction of Hfq with selected sRNAs suggest potential involvement of Hfq in these regulatory RNA functions. Altogether, these results suggest the pleiotropic role of Hfq protein in C. difficile physiology, including processes important for the C. difficile infection cycle, and expand our knowledge of Hfq-dependent regulation in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:24982306

  11. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Qualley, Dominic F. Sokolove, Victoria L.; Ross, James L.

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC.

  12. Chemical chaperone ameliorates pathological protein aggregation in plectin-deficient muscle

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Lilli; Staszewska, Ilona; Mihailovska, Eva; Fischer, Irmgard; Goldmann, Wolfgang H.; Schröder, Rolf; Wiche, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitously expressed multifunctional cytolinker protein plectin is essential for muscle fiber integrity and myofiber cytoarchitecture. Patients suffering from plectinopathy-associated epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD) and mice lacking plectin in skeletal muscle display pathological desmin-positive protein aggregation and misalignment of Z-disks, which are hallmarks of myofibrillar myopathies (MFMs). Here, we developed immortalized murine myoblast cell lines to examine the pathogenesis of plectinopathies at the molecular and single cell level. Plectin-deficient myotubes, derived from myoblasts, were fully functional and mirrored the pathological features of EBS-MD myofibers, including the presence of desmin-positive protein aggregates and a concurrent disarrangement of the myofibrillar apparatus. Using this cell model, we demonstrated that plectin deficiency leads to increased intermediate filament network and sarcomere dynamics, marked upregulation of HSPs, and reduced myotube resilience following mechanical stretch. Currently, no specific therapy or treatment is available to improve plectin-related or other forms of MFMs; therefore, we assessed the therapeutic potential of chemical chaperones to relieve plectinopathies. Treatment with 4-phenylbutyrate resulted in remarkable amelioration of the pathological phenotypes in plectin-deficient myotubes as well as in plectin-deficient mice. Together, these data demonstrate the biological relevance of the MFM cell model and suggest that this model has potential use for the development of therapeutic approaches for EBS-MD. PMID:24487589

  13. The HSP70 co-chaperone DNAJC14 targets misfolded pendrin for unconventional protein secretion

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jinsei; Kim, Jiyoon; Roh, Shin Hye; Jun, Ikhyun; Sampson, Robert D.; Gee, Heon Yung; Choi, Jae Young; Lee, Min Goo

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in SLC26A4, which encodes pendrin, are responsible for hearing loss with an enlarged vestibular aqueduct and Pendred syndrome. The most prevalent mutation in East Asia is p.H723R (His723Arg), which leads to defects in protein folding and cell-surface expression. Here we show that H723R-pendrin can be rescued to the cell surface by an HSP70 co-chaperone DNAJC14-dependent unconventional trafficking pathway. Blockade of ER-to-Golgi transport or activation of ER stress signals induced Golgi-independent cell-surface expression of H723R-pendrin and restored its cell-surface Cl−/HCO3− exchange activity. Proteomic and short interfering RNA screenings with subsequent molecular analyses showed that Hsc70 and DNAJC14 are required for the unconventional trafficking of H723R-pendrin. Moreover, DNAJC14 upregulation was able to induce the unconventional cell-surface expression of H723R-pendrin. These results indicate that Hsc70 and DNAJC14 play central roles in ER stress-associated unconventional protein secretion and are potential therapeutic targets for diseases such as Pendred syndrome, which arise from transport defects of misfolded proteins. PMID:27109633

  14. Endogenous substrates of sphingosine-dependent kinases (SDKs) are chaperone proteins: heat shock proteins, glucose-regulated proteins, protein disulfide isomerase, and calreticulin.

    PubMed

    Megidish, T; Takio, K; Titani, K; Iwabuchi, K; Hamaguchi, A; Igarashi, Y; Hakomori, S

    1999-03-16

    Protein kinases whose activity is detectable only in the presence of sphingosine (Sph) or N,N'-dimethyl-Sph (DMS), but not in the presence of 15 other sphingolipids, phospholipids, and glycerolipids tested (Megidish, T., et al. (1995) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 216, 739-747), have been termed "sphingosine-dependent kinases" (SDKs). We showed previously that a purified SDK (termed "SDK1") phosphorylates a specific Ser position of adapter/chaperone protein 14-3-3 isoforms beta, eta, and zeta but not tau or sigma (Megidish, T., et al. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 21834-45). In this study we found the following: (i) other SDKs with different substrate specificities are present in cytosolic and membrane extracts of mouse Balb/c 3T3 (A31) fibroblasts. (ii) The activation of these SDKs is specific to D-erythro-Sph and its N-methyl derivatives, the effect of L-threo-Sph or its N-methyl derivatives is minimal, and nonspecific cationic amphiphiles have no effect at all. An SDK separated as fractions "TN31-33" phosphorylated a 50 kDa substrate which was identified as calreticulin, as well as two endogenous substrates with molecular mass 58 and 55 kDa, both identified as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). This SDK, which specifically phosphorylates calreticulin and PDI, both molecular chaperones found at high levels in endoplasmic reticulum, is tentatively termed "SDK2". Another SDK activity was copurified with glucose-regulated protein (GRP) and heat shock proteins (HSP). One GRP substrate had the same amino acid sequence as GRP94 (synonym: endoplasmin); another HSP substrate had the same amino acid sequence as mouse HSP86 or HSP84, the analogues of human HSP90. An SDK activity separated and present in "fraction 42" from Q-Sepharose chromatography specifically phosphorylated GRP105 (or GRP94) and HSP68 but did not phosphorylate PDI or 14-3-3. This SDK is clearly different from other SDKs in its substrate specificity and is tentatively termed "SDK3". Interestingly

  15. Astrocytes alignment and reactivity on collagen hydrogels patterned with ECM proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Tony W.; Tresco, Patrick A.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    To modulate the surface properties of collagen and subsequent cell-surface interactions, a method was developed to transfer protein patterns from glass coverslips to collagen type I hydrogel surfaces. Two proteins and one proteoglycan found in central nervous system extracellular matrix as well as fibrinogen were patterned in stripes onto collagen hydrogel and astrocytes were cultured on these surfaces. The addition of the stripe protein patterns to hydrogels created astrocyte layers in which cells were aligned with underlying patterns and had reduced chondroitin sulfate expression compared to the cells grown on collagen alone. Protein patterns were covalently cross-linked to the collagen and stable over four days in culture with no visible cellular modifications. The present method can be adapted to transfer other types of protein patterns from glass coverslips to collagen hydrogels. PMID:25477179

  16. Astrocytes alignment and reactivity on collagen hydrogels patterned with ECM proteins.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Tony W; Tresco, Patrick A; Hlady, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    To modulate the surface properties of collagen and subsequent cell-surface interactions, a method was developed to transfer protein patterns from glass coverslips to collagen type I hydrogel surfaces. Two proteins and one proteoglycan found in central nervous system extracellular matrix as well as fibrinogen were patterned in stripes onto collagen hydrogel and astrocytes were cultured on these surfaces. The addition of the stripe protein patterns to hydrogels created astrocyte layers in which cells were aligned with underlying patterns and had reduced chondroitin sulfate expression compared to the cells grown on collagen alone. Protein patterns were covalently cross-linked to the collagen and stable over four days in culture with no visible cellular modifications. The present method can be adapted to transfer other types of protein patterns from glass coverslips to collagen hydrogels. PMID:25477179

  17. Molecular chaperones and neuronal proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather L.; Li, Wenwen; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is essential for maintaining the functionality of the proteome. The disruption of proteostasis, due to genetic mutations or an age-related decline, leads to aberrantly folded proteins that typically lose their function. The accumulation of misfolded and aggregated protein is also cytotoxic and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurons have developed an intrinsic protein quality control network, of which molecular chaperones are an essential component. Molecular chaperones function to promote efficient folding and target misfolded proteins for refolding or degradation. Increasing molecular chaperone expression can suppress protein aggregation and toxicity in numerous models of neurodegenerative disease; therefore, molecular chaperones are considered exciting therapeutic targets. Furthermore, mutations in several chaperones cause inherited neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on the importance of molecular chaperones in neurodegenerative diseases, and discuss the advances in understanding their protective mechanisms. PMID:25770416

  18. A Review of Acquired Thermotolerance, Heat Shock Proteins, and Molecular Chaperones in Archaea: Heat Shock in Archaea

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Trent, J. D.

    1996-02-09

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  19. Gene expression and molecular characterization of a chaperone protein HtpG from Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hui-Fen; Chen, Bo-En; Lin, Min-Guan; Chi, Meng-Chun; Wang, Tzu-Fan; Lin, Long-Liu

    2016-04-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90/HtpG) is a highly abundant and ubiquitous ATP-dependent molecular chaperone consisting of three flexibly linked regions, an N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain, middle domain, and a C-terminal domain. Here the putative htpG gene of Bacillus licheniformis was cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli M15 cells. Native-gel electrophoresis, size exclusion chromatography, and cross-linking analysis revealed that the recombinant protein probably exists as a mixture of monomer, dimer and other oligomers in solution. The optimal conditions for the ATPase activity of B. licheniformis HtpG (BlHtpG) were 45°C and pH 7.0 in the presence of 0.5mM Mg(2+) ions. The molecular architecture of this protein was stable at higher temperatures with a transition point (Tm) of 45°C at neutral pH, whereas the Tm value was reduced to 40.8°C at pH 10.5. Acrylamide quenching experiment further indicated that the dynamic quenching constant (Ksv) of BlHtpG became larger at higher pH values. BlHtpG also experienced a significant change in the protein conformation upon the addition of ATP and organic solvents. Collectively, our experiment data may provide insights into the molecular properties of BlHtpG and identify the alteration of protein structure to forfeit the ATPase activity at alkaline conditions. PMID:26743745

  20. Chaperone-like protein HYPK and its interacting partners augment autophagy.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Kamalika Roy; Bucha, Sudha; Baksi, Shounak; Mukhopadhyay, Debashis; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P

    2016-01-01

    To decipher the function(s) of HYPK, a huntingtin (HTT)-interacting protein with chaperone-like activity, we had previously identified 36 novel interacting partners of HYPK. Another 13 proteins were known earlier to be associated with HYPK. On the basis of analysis of the interacting partners of HYPK, it has been shown that HYPK may participate in diverse cellular functions relevant to Huntington's disease. In the present study, we identified additional 5 proteins by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization. As of now we have 54 primary interactors of HYPK. From the database we collected 1026 unique proteins (secondary interactors) interacting with these 54 primary HYPK interacting partners. We observed that 10 primary and 91 secondary interacting proteins of HYPK are associated with two types of autophagy processes. We next tested the hypothesis that the hub, HYPK, might itself be involved in autophagy. Using mouse striatal STHdh(Q7)/Hdh(Q7) cell lines, we observed that over expression of HYPK significantly increased background cellular autophagy, while knock down of endogenous HYPK decreased the autophagy level as detected by altered LC3I conversion, BECN1 expression, cleavage of GFP from LC3-GFP, ATG5-ATG12 conjugate formation and expression of transcription factors like Tfeb, Srebp2 and Zkscan3. This result shows that HYPK, possibly with its interacting partners, induces autophagy. We further observed that N-terminal mutant HTT reduced the cellular levels of LC3II and BECN1, which could be recovered significantly upon over expression of HYPK in these cells. This result further confirms that HYPK could also be involved in clearing mutant HTT aggregates by augmenting autophagy pathway. PMID:27067261

  1. Age-related changes in total protein and collagen metabolism in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Mays, P K; McAnulty, R; Laurent, G J

    1991-12-01

    Liver collagen levels are determined by a balance between synthesis and degradation, processes known to have rapid rates in growing animals. We report age-related changes in liver collagen synthesis and degradation rates, as well as protein synthesis rates, in rats at five ages from 1 to 24 mo. Fractional collagen synthesis rates were determined after injection of [14C]proline with a flooding dose of unlabeled proline and its incorporation as hydroxy-[14C]proline into proteins. Fractional protein synthesis rates were based on the uptake of [14C]proline into proteins. Fractional collagen degradation rates were calculated from the difference between collagen fractional synthesis and deposition rates. Fractional rates of collagen synthesis were similar between 1 mo (23.0% +/- 4.6%/day) and 24 mo (19.6% +/- 3.4%/day) of age. Collagen deposition into the extracellular matrix was extremely low at every age studied; therefore degradation pathways accounted for the bulk of the collagen synthesized. The mean fractional synthesis rate for the total protein pool was unaltered between 1 mo (105.0% +/- 7.2%/day) and 15 mo (89.9% +/- 6.0%/day) of age, after which it increased to 234.9% +/- 33.0%/day (p less than 0.05) by 24 mo of age. These results indicate that liver collagen and total protein synthesis rates were maintained at relatively high levels during development and maturity but that protein synthesis rates were highest in senescent animals. PMID:1959872

  2. Extracellular heat shock protein 90 binding to TGFβ receptor I participates in TGFβ-mediated collagen production in myocardial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    García, Raquel; Merino, David; Gómez, Jenny M; Nistal, J Francisco; Hurlé, María A; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Villar, Ana V

    2016-10-01

    The pathological remodeling heart shows an increase in left ventricular mass and an excess of extracellular matrix deposition that can over time cause heart failure. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is the main cytokine controlling this process. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has been shown to play a critical role in TGFβ signaling by stabilizing the TGFβ signaling cascade. We detected extracellular Hsp90 in complex with TGFβ receptor I (TGFβRI) in fibroblasts and determined a close proximity between both proteins suggesting a potential physical interaction between the two at the plasma membrane. This was supported by in silico studies predicting Hsp90 dimers and TGFβRI extracellular domain interaction. Both, Hsp90aa1 and Hsp90ab1 isoforms participate in TGFβRI complex. Extracellular Hsp90 inhibition lessened the yield of collagen production as well as the canonical TGFβ signaling cascade, and collagen protein synthesis was drastically reduced in Hsp90aa1 KO mice. These observations together with the significant increase in activity of Hsp90 at the plasma membrane pointed to a functional cooperative partnership between Hsp90 and TGFβRI in the fibrotic process. We propose that a surface population of Hsp90 extracellularly binds TGFβRI and this complex behaves as an active participant in collagen production in TGFβ-activated fibroblasts. We also offer an in vivo insight into the role of Hsp90 and its isoforms during cardiac remodeling in murine aortic banding model suffering from pathological cardiac remodeling and detect circulating Hsp90 overexpressed in remodeling mice. PMID:27418101

  3. DARPin-Based Crystallization Chaperones Exploit Molecular Geometry as a Screening Dimension in Protein Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Batyuk, Alexander; Wu, Yufan; Honegger, Annemarie; Heberling, Matthew M; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-04-24

    DARPin libraries, based on a Designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein consensus framework, are a rich source of binding partners for a wide variety of proteins. Their modular structure, stability, ease of in vitro selection and high production yields make DARPins an ideal starting point for further engineering. The X-ray structures of around 30 different DARPin complexes demonstrate their ability to facilitate crystallization of their target proteins by restricting flexibility and preventing undesired interactions of the target molecule. However, their small size (18 kDa), very hydrophilic surface and repetitive structure can limit the DARPins' ability to provide essential crystal contacts and their usefulness as a search model for addressing the crystallographic phase problem in molecular replacement. To optimize DARPins for their application as crystallization chaperones, rigid domain-domain fusions of the DARPins to larger proteins, proven to yield high-resolution crystal structures, were generated. These fusions were designed in such a way that they affect only one of the terminal capping repeats of the DARPin and do not interfere with residues involved in target binding, allowing to exchange at will the binding specificities of the DARPin in the fusion construct. As a proof of principle, we designed rigid fusions of a stabilized version of Escherichia coli TEM-1 β-lactamase to the C-terminal capping repeat of various DARPins in six different relative domain orientations. Five crystal structures representing four different fusion constructs, alone or in complex with the cognate target, show the predicted relative domain orientations and prove the validity of the concept. PMID:26975886

  4. At the Start of the Sarcomere: A Previously Unrecognized Role for Myosin Chaperones and Associated Proteins during Early Myofibrillogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Myhre, J. Layne; Pilgrim, David B.

    2012-01-01

    The development of striated muscle in vertebrates requires the assembly of contractile myofibrils, consisting of highly ordered bundles of protein filaments. Myofibril formation occurs by the stepwise addition of complex proteins, a process that is mediated by a variety of molecular chaperones and quality control factors. Most notably, myosin of the thick filament requires specialized chaperone activity during late myofibrillogenesis, including that of Hsp90 and its cofactor, Unc45b. Unc45b has been proposed to act exclusively as an adaptor molecule, stabilizing interactions between Hsp90 and myosin; however, recent discoveries in zebrafish and C. elegans suggest the possibility of an earlier role for Unc45b during myofibrillogenesis. This role may involve functional control of nonmuscle myosins during the earliest stages of myogenesis, when premyofibril scaffolds are first formed from dynamic cytoskeletal actin. This paper will outline several lines of evidence that converge to build a model for Unc45b activity during early myofibrillogenesis. PMID:22400118

  5. Do nucleic acids moonlight as molecular chaperones?

    PubMed Central

    Docter, Brianne E.; Horowitz, Scott; Gray, Michael J.; Jakob, Ursula; Bardwell, James C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Organisms use molecular chaperones to combat the unfolding and aggregation of proteins. While protein chaperones have been widely studied, here we demonstrate that DNA and RNA exhibit potent chaperone activity in vitro. Nucleic acids suppress the aggregation of classic chaperone substrates up to 300-fold more effectively than the protein chaperone GroEL. Additionally, RNA cooperates with the DnaK chaperone system to refold purified luciferase. Our findings reveal a possible new role for nucleic acids within the cell: that nucleic acids directly participate in maintaining proteostasis by preventing protein aggregation. PMID:27105849

  6. Do nucleic acids moonlight as molecular chaperones?

    PubMed

    Docter, Brianne E; Horowitz, Scott; Gray, Michael J; Jakob, Ursula; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-06-01

    Organisms use molecular chaperones to combat the unfolding and aggregation of proteins. While protein chaperones have been widely studied, here we demonstrate that DNA and RNA exhibit potent chaperone activity in vitro Nucleic acids suppress the aggregation of classic chaperone substrates up to 300-fold more effectively than the protein chaperone GroEL. Additionally, RNA cooperates with the DnaK chaperone system to refold purified luciferase. Our findings reveal a possible new role for nucleic acids within the cell: that nucleic acids directly participate in maintaining proteostasis by preventing protein aggregation. PMID:27105849

  7. Structure of the Type III Secretion Effector Protein ExoU in Complex with Its Chaperone SpcU

    PubMed Central

    Halavaty, Andrei S.; Borek, Dominika; Tyson, Gregory H.; Veesenmeyer, Jeff L.; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Minasov, George; Otwinowski, Zbyszek

    2012-01-01

    Disease causing bacteria often manipulate host cells in a way that facilitates the infectious process. Many pathogenic gram-negative bacteria accomplish this by using type III secretion systems. In these complex secretion pathways, bacterial chaperones direct effector proteins to a needle-like secretion apparatus, which then delivers the effector protein into the host cell cytosol. The effector protein ExoU and its chaperone SpcU are components of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system. Secretion of ExoU has been associated with more severe infections in both humans and animal models. Here we describe the 1.92 Å X-ray structure of the ExoU–SpcU complex, a full-length type III effector in complex with its full-length cognate chaperone. Our crystallographic data allow a better understanding of the mechanism by which ExoU kills host cells and provides a foundation for future studies aimed at designing inhibitors of this potent toxin. PMID:23166655

  8. AAA+ Chaperone ClpX Regulates Dynamics of Prokaryotic Cytoskeletal Protein FtsZ*

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi; Nishikori, Shingo; Miyagi, Atsushi; Ando, Toshio; Ogura, Teru

    2010-01-01

    AAA+ chaperone ClpX has been suggested to be a modulator of prokaryotic cytoskeletal protein FtsZ, but the details of recognition and remodeling of FtsZ by ClpX are largely unknown. In this study, we have extensively investigated the nature of FtsZ polymers and mechanisms of ClpX-regulated FtsZ polymer dynamics. We found that FtsZ polymerization is inhibited by ClpX in an ATP-independent manner and that the N-terminal domain of ClpX plays a crucial role for the inhibition of FtsZ polymerization. Single molecule analysis with high speed atomic force microscopy directly revealed that FtsZ polymer is in a dynamic equilibrium between polymerization and depolymerization on a time scale of several seconds. ClpX disassembles FtsZ polymers presumably by blocking reassembly of FtsZ. Furthermore, Escherichia coli cells overproducing ClpX and N-terminal domain of ClpX show filamentous morphology with abnormal localization of FtsZ. These data together suggest that ClpX modulates FtsZ polymer dynamics in an ATP-independent fashion, which is achieved by interaction between the N-terminal domain of ClpX and FtsZ monomers or oligomers. PMID:20022957

  9. Histone Chaperone NAP1 Mediates Sister Chromatid Resolution by Counteracting Protein Phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Tsung-Wai; Chalkley, Gillian E.; Sap, Karen; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen A.; Ozgur, Zeliha; van Ijcken, Wilfred F. J.; Verrijzer, C. Peter

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome duplication and transmission into daughter cells requires the precisely orchestrated binding and release of cohesin. We found that the Drosophila histone chaperone NAP1 is required for cohesin release and sister chromatid resolution during mitosis. Genome-wide surveys revealed that NAP1 and cohesin co-localize at multiple genomic loci. Proteomic and biochemical analysis established that NAP1 associates with the full cohesin complex, but it also forms a separate complex with the cohesin subunit stromalin (SA). NAP1 binding to cohesin is cell-cycle regulated and increases during G2/M phase. This causes the dissociation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) from cohesin, increased phosphorylation of SA and cohesin removal in early mitosis. PP2A depletion led to a loss of centromeric cohesion. The distinct mitotic phenotypes caused by the loss of either PP2A or NAP1, were both rescued by their concomitant depletion. We conclude that the balanced antagonism between NAP1 and PP2A controls cohesin dissociation during mitosis. PMID:24086141

  10. Misato Controls Mitotic Microtubule Generation by Stabilizing the Tubulin Chaperone Protein-1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Valeria; Pellacani, Claudia; Heesom, Kate J.; Rogala, Kacper B.; Deane, Charlotte M.; Mottier-Pavie, Violaine; Gatti, Maurizio; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Wakefield, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mitotic spindles are primarily composed of microtubules (MTs), generated by polymerization of α- and β-Tubulin hetero-dimers [1, 2]. Tubulins undergo a series of protein folding and post-translational modifications in order to fulfill their functions [3, 4]. Defects in Tubulin polymerization dramatically affect spindle formation and disrupt chromosome segregation. We recently described a role for the product of the conserved misato (mst) gene in regulating mitotic MT generation in flies [5], but the molecular function of Mst remains unknown. Here, we use affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) to identify interacting partners of Mst in the Drosophila embryo. We demonstrate that Mst associates stoichiometrically with the hetero-octameric Tubulin Chaperone Protein-1 (TCP-1) complex, with the hetero-hexameric Tubulin Prefoldin complex, and with proteins having conserved roles in generating MT-competent Tubulin. We show that RNAi-mediated in vivo depletion of any TCP-1 subunit phenocopies the effects of mutations in mst or the Prefoldin-encoding gene merry-go-round (mgr), leading to monopolar and disorganized mitotic spindles containing few MTs. Crucially, we demonstrate that Mst, but not Mgr, is required for TCP-1 complex stability and that both the efficiency of Tubulin polymerization and Tubulin stability are drastically compromised in mst mutants. Moreover, our structural bioinformatic analyses indicate that Mst resembles the three-dimensional structure of Tubulin monomers and might therefore occupy the TCP-1 complex central cavity. Collectively, our results suggest that Mst acts as a co-factor of the TCP-1 complex, playing an essential role in the Tubulin-folding processes required for proper assembly of spindle MTs. PMID:26096973

  11. Engineering multiple biological functional motifs into a blank collagen-like protein template from Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yong Y; Stoichevska, Violet; Schacht, Kristin; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M

    2014-07-01

    Bacterially derived triple-helical, collagen-like proteins are attractive as potential biomedical materials. The collagen-like domain of the Scl2 protein from S. pyogenes lacks any specific binding sites for mammalian cells yet possesses the inherent structural integrity of the collagen triple-helix of animal collagens. It can, therefore, be considered as a structurally-stable "blank slate" into which various defined, biological sequences, derived from animal collagens, can be added by substitutions or insertions, to enable production of novel designed materials to fit specific functional requirements. In the present study, we have used site directed mutagenesis to substitute two functional sequences, one for heparin binding and the other for integrin binding, into different locations in the triple-helical structure. This provided three new constructs, two containing the single substitutions and one containing both substitutions. The stability of these constructs was marginally reduced when compared to the unmodified sequence. When compared to the unmodified bacterial collagen, both the modified collagens that contain the heparin binding site showed marked binding of fluorescently labeled heparin. Similarly, the modified collagens from both constructs containing the integrin binding site showed significant adhesion of L929 cells that are known to possess the appropriate integrin receptor. C2C12 cells that lack any appropriate integrins did not bind. These data show that bacterial collagen-like sequences can be modified to act like natural extracellular matrix collagens by inserting one or more unique biological domains with defined function. PMID:23913780

  12. The Deinococcus radiodurans DR1245 Protein, a DdrB Partner Homologous to YbjN Proteins and Reminiscent of Type III Secretion System Chaperones

    SciTech Connect

    Norais, Cédric; Servant, Pascale; Bouthier-de-la-Tour, Claire; Coureux, Pierre-Damien; Ithurbide, Solenne; Vannier, Françoise; Guerin, Philippe P.; Dulberger, Charles L.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Keck, James L.; Armengaud, Jean; Cox, Michael M.; Sommer, Suzanne

    2013-02-18

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. A small subset of Deinococcus genus-specific genes were shown to be up-regulated upon exposure to ionizing radiation and to play a role in genome reconstitution. These genes include an SSB-like protein called DdrB. Here, we identified a novel protein encoded by the dr1245gene as an interacting partner of DdrB. A strain devoid of the DR1245 protein is impaired in growth, exhibiting a generation time approximately threefold that of the wild type strain while radioresistance is not affected. We determined the three-dimensional structure of DR1245, revealing a relationship with type III secretion system chaperones and YbjN family proteins. Thus, DR1245 may display some chaperone activity towards DdrB and possibly other substrates.

  13. Fundamental differences between the nucleic acid chaperone activities of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein and Gag or Gag-derived proteins: Biological implications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tiyun; Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Mitra, Mithun; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rein, Alan; Levin, Judith G.

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 Gag polyprotein precursor has multiple domains including nucleocapsid (NC). Although mature NC and NC embedded in Gag are nucleic acid chaperones (proteins that remodel nucleic acid structure), few studies include detailed analysis of the chaperone activity of partially processed Gag proteins and comparison with NC and Gag. Here we address this issue by using a reconstituted minus-strand transfer system. NC and NC-containing Gag proteins exhibited annealing and duplex destabilizing activities required for strand transfer. Surprisingly, unlike NC, with increasing concentrations, Gag proteins drastically inhibited the DNA elongation step. This result is consistent with “nucleic acid-driven multimerization” of Gag and the reported slow dissociation of Gag from bound nucleic acid, which prevent reverse transcriptase from traversing the template (“roadblock” mechanism). Our findings illustrate one reason why NC (and not Gag) has evolved as a critical cofactor in reverse transcription, a paradigm that might also extend to other retrovirus systems. PMID:20655566

  14. Characterization of RNA binding and chaperoning activities of HIV-1 Vif protein. Importance of the C-terminal unstructured tail.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Dona; Bernacchi, Serena; Xavier Guerrero, Santiago; Brachet, Franck; Larue, Valéry; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Tisne, Carine

    2014-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells, containing the cellular anti-HIV defense cytosine deaminases APOBEC3 (A3G and A3F). Vif neutralizes the antiviral activities of the APOBEC3G/F by diverse mechanisms including their degradation through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and their translational inhibition. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by interacting with Pr55(Gag), reverse transcriptase and genomic RNA. Here, we expressed and purified full-length and truncated Vif proteins, and analyzed their RNA binding and chaperone properties. First, we showed by CD and NMR spectroscopies that the N-terminal domain of Vif is highly structured in solution, whereas the C-terminal domain remains mainly unfolded. Both domains exhibited substantial RNA binding capacities with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range, whereas the basic unfolded C-terminal domain of Vif was responsible in part for its RNA chaperone activity. Second, we showed by NMR chemical shift mapping that Vif and NCp7 share the same binding sites on tRNA(Lys) 3, the primer of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Finally, our results indicate that Vif has potent RNA chaperone activity and provide direct evidence for an important role of the unstructured C-terminal domain of Vif in this capacity. PMID:25144404

  15. Thermotolerance and molecular chaperone function of an SGT1-like protein from the psychrophilic yeast, Glaciozyma antarctica.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Nur Athirah; Hashim, Noor Haza Fazlin; Beddoe, Travis; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Illias, Rosli Md; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul

    2016-07-01

    The ability of eukaryotes to adapt to an extreme range of temperatures is critically important for survival. Although adaptation to extreme high temperatures is well understood, reflecting the action of molecular chaperones, it is unclear whether these molecules play a role in survival at extremely low temperatures. The recent genome sequencing of the yeast Glaciozyma antarctica, isolated from Antarctic sea ice near Casey Station, provides an opportunity to investigate the role of molecular chaperones in adaptation to cold temperatures. We isolated a G. antarctica homologue of small heat shock protein 20 (HSP20), GaSGT1, and observed that the GaSGT1 mRNA expression in G. antarctica was markedly increased following culture exposure at low temperatures. Additionally, we demonstrated that GaSGT1 overexpression in Escherichia coli protected these bacteria from exposure to both high and low temperatures, which are lethal for growth. The recombinant GaSGT1 retained up to 60 % of its native luciferase activity after exposure to luciferase-denaturing temperatures. These results suggest that GaSGT1 promotes cell thermotolerance and employs molecular chaperone-like activity toward temperature assaults. PMID:27154490

  16. The Dedicated Chaperone Acl4 Escorts Ribosomal Protein Rpl4 to Its Nuclear Pre-60S Assembly Site

    PubMed Central

    Pillet, Benjamin; García-Gómez, Juan J.; Pausch, Patrick; Falquet, Laurent; Bange, Gert; de la Cruz, Jesús; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are the highly complex macromolecular assemblies dedicated to the synthesis of all cellular proteins from mRNA templates. The main principles underlying the making of ribosomes are conserved across eukaryotic organisms and this process has been studied in most detail in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast ribosomes are composed of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 79 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins). Most r-proteins need to be transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where they get incorporated into the evolving pre-ribosomal particles. Due to the high abundance and difficult physicochemical properties of r-proteins, their correct folding and fail-safe targeting to the assembly site depends largely on general, as well as highly specialized, chaperone and transport systems. Many r-proteins contain universally conserved or eukaryote-specific internal loops and/or terminal extensions, which were shown to mediate their nuclear targeting and association with dedicated chaperones in a growing number of cases. The 60S r-protein Rpl4 is particularly interesting since it harbours a conserved long internal loop and a prominent C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension. Here we show that both the long internal loop and the C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension are strictly required for the functionality of Rpl4. While Rpl4 contains at least five distinct nuclear localization signals (NLS), the C-terminal part of the long internal loop associates with a specific binding partner, termed Acl4. Absence of Acl4 confers a severe slow-growth phenotype and a deficiency in the production of 60S subunits. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that Acl4 can be considered as a dedicated chaperone of Rpl4. Notably, Acl4 localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus and it has the capacity to capture nascent Rpl4 in a co-translational manner. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dedicated chaperone Acl4 accompanies Rpl4 from the cytoplasm to its pre-60S

  17. The Dedicated Chaperone Acl4 Escorts Ribosomal Protein Rpl4 to Its Nuclear Pre-60S Assembly Site.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Benjamin; García-Gómez, Juan J; Pausch, Patrick; Falquet, Laurent; Bange, Gert; de la Cruz, Jesús; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Ribosomes are the highly complex macromolecular assemblies dedicated to the synthesis of all cellular proteins from mRNA templates. The main principles underlying the making of ribosomes are conserved across eukaryotic organisms and this process has been studied in most detail in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast ribosomes are composed of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 79 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins). Most r-proteins need to be transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where they get incorporated into the evolving pre-ribosomal particles. Due to the high abundance and difficult physicochemical properties of r-proteins, their correct folding and fail-safe targeting to the assembly site depends largely on general, as well as highly specialized, chaperone and transport systems. Many r-proteins contain universally conserved or eukaryote-specific internal loops and/or terminal extensions, which were shown to mediate their nuclear targeting and association with dedicated chaperones in a growing number of cases. The 60S r-protein Rpl4 is particularly interesting since it harbours a conserved long internal loop and a prominent C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension. Here we show that both the long internal loop and the C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension are strictly required for the functionality of Rpl4. While Rpl4 contains at least five distinct nuclear localization signals (NLS), the C-terminal part of the long internal loop associates with a specific binding partner, termed Acl4. Absence of Acl4 confers a severe slow-growth phenotype and a deficiency in the production of 60S subunits. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that Acl4 can be considered as a dedicated chaperone of Rpl4. Notably, Acl4 localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus and it has the capacity to capture nascent Rpl4 in a co-translational manner. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dedicated chaperone Acl4 accompanies Rpl4 from the cytoplasm to its pre-60S

  18. Adenosine diphosphate restricts the protein remodeling activity of the Hsp104 chaperone to Hsp70 assisted disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kłosowska, Agnieszka; Chamera, Tomasz; Liberek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Hsp104 disaggregase provides thermotolerance in yeast by recovering proteins from aggregates in cooperation with the Hsp70 chaperone. Protein disaggregation involves polypeptide extraction from aggregates and its translocation through the central channel of the Hsp104 hexamer. This process relies on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. Considering that Hsp104 is characterized by low affinity towards ATP and is strongly inhibited by adenosine diphosphate (ADP), we asked how Hsp104 functions at the physiological levels of adenine nucleotides. We demonstrate that physiological levels of ADP highly limit Hsp104 activity. This inhibition, however, is moderated by the Hsp70 chaperone, which allows efficient disaggregation by supporting Hsp104 binding to aggregates but not to non-aggregated, disordered protein substrates. Our results point to an additional level of Hsp104 regulation by Hsp70, which restricts the potentially toxic protein unfolding activity of Hsp104 to the disaggregation process, providing the yeast protein-recovery system with substrate specificity and efficiency in ATP consumption. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15159.001 PMID:27223323

  19. alpha-Crystallin protein cognates in eggs of the moth, Plodia interpunctella: possible chaperones for the follicular epithelium yolk protein.

    PubMed

    Shirk, P D; Broza, R; Hemphill, M; Perera, O P

    1998-03-01

    alpha-Crystallin protein cognates were found in germ cells of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Shirk and Zimowska, 1997). A cDNA clone of 674 bp with a single open reading frame was isolated for a 25,000 molecular weight polypeptide member of this family, alpha CP25, and a single transcript of approximately 700 bp was found in the ovary of vitellogenic females. Both the DNA sequence and predicted amino acid sequence showed considerable homology with the embryonic lethal gene, l(2)efl, in Drosophila melanogaster. In addition to the sequence for l(2)efl, the predicted amino acid sequence for acp25 also showed significant sequence similarly with the alpha-crystallin A chain polypeptides from the lenses of vertebrae eyes. An N-terminal hydrophobic aggregation site and a C-terminal protective binding site common to alpha-crystallin proteins were present in the predicted acp25 and l(2)efl amino acid sequences, while only the C-terminal protective binding site was present in the small heat shock protein sequences from D. melanogaster. This evidence suggests that although the alpha-crystallin protein cognates in P. interpunctella evolved from a gene common with small heat shock protein genes, the amino acid sequence has converged on a structure similar to that of alpha-crystallin proteins. Native immunoblot analysis showed that the alpha-crystallin proteins formed high molecular weight complexes with the follicular epithelium yolk protein (FEYP) but not vitellin in yolk. An electroblot binding assay was used to show that the germ-cell alpha-crystallins of P. interpunctella bind specifically with the FEYP and that the binding was reversible in the presence of ATP or low pH. This evidence in conjunction with the evidence that the alpha-crystallins and FEYP form a stable complex that co-purifies from native egg proteins suggests that the alpha-cystallin cognates function as chaperones for the follicular epithelium yolk proteins in the embryos of P. interpunctella

  20. In Vitro Oxidation of Collagen Promotes the Formation of Advanced Oxidation Protein Products and the Activation of Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; Torbitz, Vanessa Dorneles; de Campos, Luízi Prestes; Sangoi, Manuela Borges; Fernandes, Natieli Flores; Gomes, Patrícia; Moretto, Maria Beatriz; Barbisan, Fernanda; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica; Moresco, Rafael Noal

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) has been linked to several pathological conditions. Here, we investigated collagen as a potential source for AOPP formation and determined the effects of hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-treated collagen (collagen-AOPPs) on human neutrophil activity. We also assessed whether alpha-tocopherol could counteract these effects. Exposure to HOCl increased the levels of collagen-AOPPs. Collagen-AOPPs also stimulated the production of AOPPs, nitric oxide (NO), superoxide radicals (O2 (-)), and HOCl by neutrophils. Collagen-AOPPs induced apoptosis and decreased the number of viable cells. Alpha-tocopherol prevented the formation of collagen-AOPPs, strongly inhibited the collagen-AOPP-induced production of O2 (-) and HOCl, and increased the viability of neutrophils. Our results suggest that collagen is an important protein that interacts with HOCl to form AOPPs, and consequently, collagen-AOPP formation is related to human neutrophil activation and cell death. PMID:26920846

  1. A rare cause of protein losing enteropathy: collagenous sprue.

    PubMed

    Karakuş, Esra; Ekinci, Özgür; Kırsaçlıoğlu, Ceyda Tuna; Özaydın, Eda; Atakan, Canan; Dursun, Ayşe

    2015-04-01

    Collagenous sprue is a clinicopathological entity with an unknown etiology. Its clinical features include progressive malabsorption, diarrhea, weight loss, unresponsiveness to treatment, and high mortality rates. The age interval of collagenous sprue is quite broad and ranges between 2 and 85 years. As far as to our knowledge, the presented case is the first reported case in infancy. PMID:25514205

  2. Binding of a Small Molecule at a Protein–Protein Interface Regulates the Chaperone Activity of Hsp70–Hsp40

    PubMed Central

    Wisén, Susanne; Bertelsen, Eric B.; Thompson, Andrea D.; Patury, Srikanth; Ung, Peter; Chang, Lyra; Evans, Christopher G.; Walter, Gladis M.; Wipf, Peter; Carlson, Heather A.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is a highly conserved molecular chaperone that plays multiple roles in protein homeostasis. In these various tasks, the activity of Hsp70 is shaped by interactions with co-chaperones, such as Hsp40. The Hsp40 family of co-chaperones binds to Hsp70 through a conserved J-domain, and these factors stimulate ATPase and protein-folding activity. Using chemical screens, we identified a compound, 115-7c, which acts as an artificial co-chaperone for Hsp70. Specifically, the activities of 115-7c mirrored those of a Hsp40; the compound stimulated the ATPase and protein-folding activities of a prokaryotic Hsp70 (DnaK) and partially compensated for a Hsp40 loss-of-function mutation in yeast. Consistent with these observations, NMR and mutagenesis studies indicate that the binding site for 115-7c is adjacent to a region on DnaK that is required for J-domain-mediated stimulation. Interestingly, we found that 115-7c and the Hsp40 do not compete for binding but act in concert. Using this information, we introduced additional steric bulk to 115-7c and converted it into an inhibitor. Thus, these chemical probes either promote or inhibit chaperone functions by regulating Hsp70–Hsp40 complex assembly at a native protein–protein interface. This unexpected mechanism may provide new avenues for exploring how chaperones and co-chaperones cooperate to shape protein homeostasis. PMID:20481474

  3. Group A Streptococcus Adheres to Pharyngeal Epithelial Cells with Salivary Proline-rich Proteins via GrpE Chaperone Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Jumpei; Terao, Yutaka; Morisaki, Ichijiro; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2012-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) is an important human pathogen that frequently causes pharyngitis. GAS organisms can adhere to and invade pharyngeal epithelial cells, which are overlaid by salivary components. However, the role of salivary components in GAS adhesion to pharyngeal cells has not been reported precisely. We collected human saliva and purified various salivary components, including proline-rich protein (PRP), statherin, and amylase, and performed invasion assays. The GAS-HEp-2 association ratio (invasion/adhesion ratio) and invasion ratio of GAS were increased significantly with whole human saliva and PRP, while the anti-PRP antibody inhibited the latter. GAS strain NY-5, which lacks M and F proteins on the cell surface, was promoted to cohere with HEp-2 cells by whole human saliva and PRP. The 28-kDa protein of GAS bound to PRP and was identified as GrpE, a chaperone protein, whereas the N-terminal of GrpE was found to bind to PRP. A GrpE-deficient mutant of GAS strain B514Sm, TR-45, exhibited a reduced ability to adhere to and invade HEp-2 cells. Microscopic observations showed the GrpE was mainly expressed on the surface of the cell division site of GAS. Furthermore, GrpE-deficient mutants of GAS and Streptococcus pneumoniae showed an elongated morphology as compared with the wild type. Taken together, this is the first study to show an interaction between salivary PRP and GAS GrpE, which plays an important role in GAS infection on the pharynx, whereas the expression of GrpE on the surface of GAS helps to maintain morphology. PMID:22566698

  4. Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis Chaperones: Evidence for Emergence of Mutational Robustness of a Highly Specific Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Delewski, Wojciech; Paterkiewicz, Bogumiła; Manicki, Mateusz; Schilke, Brenda; Tomiczek, Bartłomiej; Ciesielski, Szymon J; Nierzwicki, Lukasz; Czub, Jacek; Dutkiewicz, Rafal; Craig, Elizabeth A; Marszalek, Jaroslaw

    2016-03-01

    Biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters (FeS) is a highly conserved process involving Hsp70 and J-protein chaperones. However, Hsp70 specialization differs among species. In most eukaryotes, including Schizosaccharomyces pombe, FeS biogenesis involves interaction between the J-protein Jac1 and the multifunctional Hsp70 Ssc1. But, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and closely related species, Jac1 interacts with the specialized Hsp70 Ssq1, which emerged through duplication of SSC1. As little is known about how gene duplicates affect the robustness of their protein interaction partners, we analyzed the functional and evolutionary consequences of Ssq1 specialization on the ubiquitous J-protein cochaperone Jac1, by comparing S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. Although deletion of JAC1 is lethal in both species, alanine substitutions within the conserved His-Pro-Asp (HPD) motif, which is critical for Jac1:Hsp70 interaction, have species-specific effects. They are lethal in S. pombe, but not in S. cerevisiae. These in vivo differences correlated with in vitro biochemical measurements. Charged residues present in the J-domain of S. cerevisiae Jac1, but absent in S. pombe Jac1, are important for tolerance of S. cerevisiae Jac1 to HPD alterations. Moreover, Jac1 orthologs from species that encode Ssq1 have a higher sequence divergence. The simplest interpretation of our results is that Ssq1's coevolution with Jac1 resulted in expansion of their binding interface, thus increasing the efficiency of their interaction. Such an expansion could in turn compensate for negative effects of HPD substitutions. Thus, our results support the idea that the robustness of Jac1 emerged as consequence of its highly efficient and specific interaction with Ssq1. PMID:26545917

  5. The small heat-shock protein αB-crystallin uses different mechanisms of chaperone action to prevent the amorphous versus fibrillar aggregation of α-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Melissa; Ecroyd, Heath

    2012-12-15

    Stress conditions can destabilize proteins, promoting them to unfold and adopt intermediately folded states. Partially folded protein intermediates are unstable and prone to aggregation down off-folding pathways leading to the formation of either amorphous or amyloid fibril aggregates. The sHsp (small heat-shock protein) αB-crystallin acts as a molecular chaperone to prevent both amorphous and fibrillar protein aggregation; however, the precise molecular mechanisms behind its chaperone action are incompletely understood. To investigate whether the chaperone activity of αB-crystallin is dependent upon the form of aggregation (amorphous compared with fibrillar), bovine α-lactalbumin was developed as a model target protein that could be induced to aggregate down either off-folding pathway using comparable buffer conditions. Thus when α-lactalbumin was reduced it aggregated amorphously, whereas a reduced and carboxymethylated form aggregated to form amyloid fibrils. Using this model, αB-crystallin was shown to be a more efficient chaperone against amorphously aggregating α-lactalbumin than when it aggregated to form fibrils. Moreover, αB-crystallin forms high molecular mass complexes with α-lactalbumin to prevent its amorphous aggregation, but prevents fibril formation via weak transient interactions. Thus, the conformational stability of the protein intermediate, which is a precursor to aggregation, plays a critical role in modulating the chaperone mechanism of αB-crystallin. PMID:23005341

  6. Oxaliplatin Binding to Human Copper Chaperone Atox1 and Protein Dimerization.

    PubMed

    Belviso, Benny D; Galliani, Angela; Lasorsa, Alessia; Mirabelli, Valentina; Caliandro, Rocco; Arnesano, Fabio; Natile, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Copper trafficking proteins have been implicated in the cellular response to platinum anticancer drugs. We investigated the reaction of the chaperone Atox1 with an activated form of oxaliplatin, the third platinum drug to reach worldwide approval. Unlike cisplatin, which contains monodentate ammines, oxaliplatin contains chelated 1,2-diaminocyclohexane (DACH), which is more resistant to displacement by nucleophiles. In solution, one or two {Pt(DACH)(2+)} moieties bind to the conserved CXXC metal-binding motif of Atox1; in the latter case the two sulfur atoms likely bridging the two platinum units. At longer reaction times, a dimeric species is formed whose composition, Atox12·Pt(2+)2, indicates complete loss of the diamine ligands. Such a dimerization process is accompanied by partial unfolding of the protein. Crystallization experiments aiming at the characterization of the monomeric species have afforded, instead, a dimeric species resembling that already obtained by Boal and Rosenzweig in a similar reaction performed with cisplatin. However, while in the latter case there was only one Pt-binding site (0.4 occupancy) made of four sulfur atoms of the CXXC motifs of the two Atox1 chains in a tetrahedral arrangement, we found, in addition, a secondary Pt-binding site involving Cys41 of the B chain (0.25 occupancy). Moreover, both platinum atoms have lost their diamines. Thus, there appears to be little relationship between what is observed in solution and what is formed in the solid state. Since full occupancy of the tetrahedral cavity is a common feature of all Atox1 dimeric structures obtained with other metal ions (Cu(+), Cd(2+), and Hg(2+)), we propose that in the case of platinum, where the occupancy is only 0.4, the remaining cavities are occupied by Cu(+) ions. Experimental evidence is reported in support of the latter hypothesis. Our proposal represents a meeting point between the initial proposal of Boal and Rosenzweig (0.4 Pt occupancy) and the

  7. Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN2 is a RNA chaperone that is regulated by cold and developmental signals

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Kim, Myung-Hee; Imai, Ryozo

    2007-12-21

    Bacterial cold shock proteins (CSPs) are RNA chaperones that unwind RNA secondary structures. Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN2 (AtCSP2) contains a domain that is shared with bacterial CSPs. Here we showed that AtCSP2 binds to RNA and unwinds nucleic acid duplex. Heterologous expression of AtCSP2 complemented cold sensitivity of an Escherichia coli csp quadruple mutant, indicating that AtCSP2 function as a RNA chaperone in E. coli. AtCSP2 mRNA and protein levels increased during cold acclimation, but the protein accumulation was most prominent after 10 days of cold treatment. AtCSP2 promoter::GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtCSP2 is expressed only in root and shoot apical regions during vegetative growth but is expressed in reproductive organs such as pollens, ovules and embryos. These data indicated that AtCSP2 is involved in developmental processes as well as cold adaptation. Localization of AtCSP2::GFP in nucleolus and cytoplasm suggested different nuclear and cytosolic RNA targets.

  8. The streptococcal collagen-binding protein CNE specifically interferes with alphaVbeta3-mediated cellular interactions with triple helical collagen.

    PubMed

    van Wieringen, Tijs; Kalamajski, Sebastian; Lidén, Asa; Bihan, Dominique; Guss, Bengt; Heinegård, Dick; Farndale, Richard W; Rubin, Kristofer

    2010-11-12

    Collagen fibers expose distinct domains allowing for specific interactions with other extracellular matrix proteins and cells. To investigate putative collagen domains that govern integrin α(V)β(3)-mediated cellular interactions with native collagen fibers we took advantage of the streptococcal protein CNE that bound native fibrillar collagens. CNE specifically inhibited α(V)β(3)-dependent cell-mediated collagen gel contraction, PDGF BB-induced and α(V)β(3)-mediated adhesion of cells, and binding of fibronectin to native collagen. Using a Toolkit composed of overlapping, 27-residue triple helical segments of collagen type II, two CNE-binding sites present in peptides II-1 and II-44 were identified. These peptides lack the major binding site for collagen-binding β(1) integrins, defined by the peptide GFOGER. Peptide II-44 corresponds to a region of collagen known to bind collagenases, discoidin domain receptor 2, SPARC (osteonectin), and fibronectin. In addition to binding fibronectin, peptide II-44 but not II-1 inhibited α(V)β(3)-mediated collagen gel contraction and, when immobilized on plastic, supported adhesion of cells. Reduction of fibronectin expression by siRNA reduced PDGF BB-induced α(V)β(3)-mediated contraction. Reconstitution of collagen types I and II gels in the presence of CNE reduced collagen fibril diameters and fibril melting temperatures. Our data indicate that contraction proceeded through an indirect mechanism involving binding of cell-produced fibronectin to the collagen fibers. Furthermore, our data show that cell-mediated collagen gel contraction does not directly depend on the process of fibril formation. PMID:20837478

  9. Interaction of Heat Shock Protein 90 and the Co-chaperone Cpr6 with Ura2, a Bifunctional Enzyme Required for Pyrimidine Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Zuehlke, Abbey D.; Wren, Nicholas; Tenge, Victoria; Johnson, Jill L.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an essential protein required for the activity and stability of multiple proteins termed clients. Hsp90 cooperates with a set of co-chaperone proteins that modulate Hsp90 activity and/or target clients to Hsp90 for folding. Many of the Hsp90 co-chaperones, including Cpr6 and Cpr7, contain tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains that bind a common acceptor site at the carboxyl terminus of Hsp90. We found that Cpr6 and Hsp90 interacted with Ura2, a protein critical for pyrimidine biosynthesis. Mutation or inhibition of Hsp90 resulted in decreased accumulation of Ura2, indicating it is an Hsp90 client. Cpr6 interacted with Ura2 in the absence of stable Cpr6-Hsp90 interaction, suggesting a direct interaction. However, loss of Cpr6 did not alter the Ura2-Hsp90 interaction or Ura2 accumulation. The TPR domain of Cpr6 was required for Ura2 interaction, but other TPR containing co-chaperones, including Cpr7, failed to interact with Ura2 or rescue CPR6-dependent growth defects. Further analysis suggests that the carboxyl-terminal 100 amino acids of Cpr6 and Cpr7 are critical for specifying their unique functions, providing new information about this important class of Hsp90 co-chaperones. PMID:23926110

  10. Structural analysis of the interactions between hsp70 chaperones and the yeast DNA replication protein Orc4p.

    PubMed

    Moreno-del Alamo, María; Sánchez-Gorostiaga, Alicia; Serrano, Ana M; Prieto, Alicia; Cuéllar, Jorge; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Valpuesta, José M; Giraldo, Rafael

    2010-10-15

    Hsp70 chaperones, besides their role in assisting protein folding, are key modulators of protein disaggregation, being consistently found as components of most macromolecular assemblies isolated in proteome-wide affinity purifications. A wealth of structural information has been recently acquired on Hsp70s complexed with Hsp40 and NEF co-factors and with small hydrophobic target peptides. However, knowledge of how Hsp70s recognize large protein substrates is still limited. Earlier, we reported that homologue Hsp70 chaperones (DnaK in Escherichia coli and Ssa1-4p/Ssb1-2p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) bind strongly, both in vitro and in vivo, to the AAA+ domain in the Orc4p subunit of yeast origin recognition complex (ORC). ScORC is the paradigm for eukaryotic DNA replication initiators and consists of six distinct protein subunits (ScOrc1p-ScOrc 6p). Here, we report that a hydrophobic sequence (IL(4)) in the initiator specific motif (ISM) in Orc4p is the main target for DnaK/Hsp70. The three-dimensional electron microscopy reconstruction of a stable Orc4p(2)-DnaK complex suggests that the C-terminal substrate-binding domain in the chaperone clamps the AAA+ IL(4) motif in one Orc4p molecule, with the substrate-binding domain lid subdomain wedging apart the other Orc4p subunit. Pairwise co-expression in E. coli shows that Orc4p interacts with Orc1/2/5p. Mutation of IL(4) selectively disrupts Orc4p interaction with Orc2p. Allelic substitution of ORC4 by mutants in each residue of IL(4) results in lethal (I184A) or thermosensitive (L185A and L186A) initiation-defective phenotypes in vivo. The interplay between Hsp70 chaperones and the Orc4p-IL(4) motif might have an adaptor role in the sequential, stoichiometric assembly of ScORC subunits. PMID:20732327

  11. Physical Interaction between Bacterial Heat Shock Protein (Hsp) 90 and Hsp70 Chaperones Mediates Their Cooperative Action to Refold Denatured Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Hitoshi; Fujita, Kensaku; Ohtaki, Aguru; Watanabe, Satoru; Narumi, Shoichi; Maruyama, Takahiro; Suenaga, Emi; Misono, Tomoko S.; Kumar, Penmetcha K. R.; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an essential ATP-dependent molecular chaperone that associates with numerous client proteins. HtpG, a prokaryotic homolog of Hsp90, is essential for thermotolerance in cyanobacteria, and in vitro it suppresses the aggregation of denatured proteins efficiently. Understanding how the non-native client proteins bound to HtpG refold is of central importance to comprehend the essential role of HtpG under stress. Here, we demonstrate by yeast two-hybrid method, immunoprecipitation assays, and surface plasmon resonance techniques that HtpG physically interacts with DnaJ2 and DnaK2. DnaJ2, which belongs to the type II J-protein family, bound DnaK2 or HtpG with submicromolar affinity, and HtpG bound DnaK2 with micromolar affinity. Not only DnaJ2 but also HtpG enhanced the ATP hydrolysis by DnaK2. Although assisted by the DnaK2 chaperone system, HtpG enhanced native refolding of urea-denatured lactate dehydrogenase and heat-denatured glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. HtpG did not substitute for DnaJ2 or GrpE in the DnaK2-assisted refolding of the denatured substrates. The heat-denatured malate dehydrogenase that did not refold by the assistance of the DnaK2 chaperone system alone was trapped by HtpG first and then transferred to DnaK2 where it refolded. Dissociation of substrates from HtpG was either ATP-dependent or -independent depending on the substrate, indicating the presence of two mechanisms of cooperative action between the HtpG and the DnaK2 chaperone system. PMID:24415765

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Protein GRP-78 Mediates Endocytosis of Dentin Matrix Protein 1*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sriram; Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Eapen, Asha Sarah; Hao, Jianjun; Ramachandran, Amsaveni; Blond, Sylvie; George, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), a phosphorylated protein present in the mineral phase of both vertebrates and invertebrates, is a key regulatory protein during biogenic formation of mineral deposits. Previously we showed that DMP1 is localized in the nuclear compartment of preosteoblasts and preodontoblasts. In the nucleus DMP1 might play an important role in the regulation of genes that control osteoblast or odontoblast differentiation. Here, we show that cellular uptake of DMP1 occurs through endocytosis. Interestingly, this process is initiated by DMP1 binding to the glucose-regulated protein-78 (GRP-78) localized on the plasma membrane of preodontoblast cells. Binding of DMP1 to GRP-78 receptor was determined to be specific and saturable with a binding dissociation constant KD = 85 nm. We further depict a road map for the endocytosed DMP1 and demonstrate that the internalization is mediated primarily by caveolae and that the vesicles containing DMP1 are routed to the nucleus along microtubules. Immunohistochemical analysis and binding studies performed with biotin-labeled DMP1 confirm spatial co-localization of DMP1 and GRP-78 in the preodontoblasts of a developing mouse molar. Co-localization of DMP1 with GRP-78 was also observed in T4-4 preodontoblast cells, dental pulp stem cells, and primary preodontoblasts. By small interfering RNA techniques, we demonstrate that the receptor for DMP1 is GRP-78. Therefore, binding of DMP1 with GRP-78 receptor might be an important mechanism by which DMP1 is internalized and transported to the nucleus during bone and tooth development. PMID:18757373

  13. Single Amino Acid Deletion in Kindlin-1 Results in Partial Protein Degradation Which Can Be Rescued by Chaperone Treatment.

    PubMed

    Maier, Kristin; He, Yinghong; Esser, Philipp R; Thriene, Kerstin; Sarca, Daniela; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Dengjel, Jörn; Martin, Ludovic; Has, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Kindler syndrome, a distinct type of epidermolysis bullosa, is a rare disorder caused by mutations in FERMT1, encoding kindlin-1. Most FERMT1 mutations lead to premature termination codons and absence of kindlin-1. Here we investigated the molecular and cellular consequences of a naturally occurring FERMT1 mutation, c.299_301del resulting in a single amino acid deletion, p.R100del. The mutation led to a 50% reduction of FERMT1 mRNA and 90% reduction of kindlin-1 protein in keratinocytes derived from the patient, as compared with control cells. The misfolded p.R100del kindlin-1 mutant was lysosomally degraded and launched a homeostatic unfolded protein response. Sodium-phenylbutyrate significantly increased kindlin-1 mRNA and protein levels and the area of mutant cells, acting as a chemical chaperone and probably also as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. In a recombinant system, low levels of wild-type or p.R100del mutant kindlin-1 were sufficient to improve the cellular phenotype in respect of spreading and proliferation as compared with kindlin-1 negative keratinocytes. The study of this hypomorphic mutation provides evidence that low amounts of kindlin-1 are sufficient to improve the epidermal architecture and Kindler syndrome cellular phenotype and proposes a personalized chaperone therapy for the patient. PMID:26827766

  14. Improved 1, 2, 4-butanetriol production from an engineered Escherichia coli by co-expression of different chaperone proteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinyao; He, Shuying; Zong, Hong; Song, Jian; Chen, Wen; Zhuge, Bin

    2016-09-01

    1, 2, 4-Butanetriol (BT) is a high-value non-natural chemical and has important applications in polymers, medical production and military industry. In the constructed BT biosynthesis pathway from xylose in Escherichia coli, the xylose dehydrogenase (Xdh) and the benzoylformate decarboxylase (MdlC) are heterologous enzymes and the activity of MdlC is the key limiting factor for BT production. In this study, six chaperone protein systems were introduced into the engineered E. coli harboring the recombinant BT pathway. The chaperone GroES-GroEL was beneficial to Xdh activity but had a negative effect on MdlC activity and BT titer. The plasmid pTf16 containing the tig gene (trigger factor) was beneficial to Xdh and MdlC activities and improved the BT titer from 0.42 to 0.56 g/l from 20 g/l xylose. However, co-expression of trigger factor and GroES-GroEL simultaneously reduced the activity of MdlC and had no effect on the BT production. The plasmid pKJE7 harboring dnaK-dnaJ-grpE showed significant negative effects on these enzyme activities and cell growth, leading to completely restrained the BT production. Similarly, co-expression of DnaKJ-GrpPE and GroES-GroEL simultaneously reduced Xdh and MdlC activities and decreased the BT titer by 45.2 %. The BT production of the engineered E. coli harboring pTf16 was further improved to the highest level at 1.01 g/l under pH control (pH 7). This work showed the potential application of chaperone proteins in microorganism engineering to get high production of target compounds as an effective and valuable tool. PMID:27430516

  15. Tumor matrix protein collagen XIα1 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raglow, Zoe; Thomas, Sufi M

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is increasingly recognized as an essential player in cancer development and progression. Collagens are one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix, and have themselves been implicated in many aspects of neoplastic transformation. Collagen XI is a minor collagen whose main physiologic function is to regulate the diameter of major collagen fibrils. The α1 chain of collagen XI (colXIα1), has known pathogenic roles in several musculoskeletal disorders. Recent research has highlighted the importance of colXIα1 in many types of cancer, including its roles in metastasis, angiogenesis, and drug resistance, as well as its potential utility in screening tests and as a therapeutic target. High levels of colXIα1 overexpression have been reported in multiple expression profile studies examining differences between cancerous and normal tissue, and between beginning and advanced stage cancer. Its expression has been linked to poor progression-free and overall survival. The consistency of this data across cancer types is particularly striking, including colorectal, ovarian, breast, head and neck, lung, and brain cancers. This review discusses the role of collagen XIα1 in cancer and its potential as a target for cancer therapy. PMID:25511741

  16. Purification of collagen-binding proteins of Lactobacillus reuteri NCIB 11951.

    PubMed

    Aleljung, P; Shen, W; Rozalska, B; Hellman, U; Ljungh, A; Wadström, T

    1994-04-01

    Collagen type-I-binding proteins of Lactobacillus reuteri NCIB 11951 were purified. The cell surface proteins were affinity purified on collagen Sepharose and eluted with an NaCl gradient. Two protein bands were eluted from the column (29 kDa and 31 kDa), and both bound radio-labeled collagen type I. Rabbit antisera raised against the 29 kDa and 31 kDa protein reacted with the affinity-purified proteins in a Western blot with whole-cell extract used as antigen. The N-terminal sequence of the 29-kDa and 31-kDa proteins demonstrated the closest homologies with internal sequences from an Escherichia coli trigger factor protein (TIG.ECOLI). Out of nine other lactobacilli, the antisera reacted only with the L. reuteri and not with the other species tested. PMID:7764651

  17. Tyrosine-rich acidic matrix protein (TRAMP) accelerates collagen fibril formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    MacBeath, J R; Shackleton, D R; Hulmes, D J

    1993-09-15

    Tyrosine-rich acidic matrix protein (TRAMP) is a recently discovered protein that co-purifies with porcine skin lysyl oxidase and is equivalent to the M(r) 22,000 extracellular matrix protein from bovine skin that co-purifies with dermatan sulfate proteoglycans (Cronshaw, A. D., MacBeath, J. R. E., Shackleton, D. R., Collins, J. F., Fothergill-Gilmore, L. A., and Hulmes, D. J. S. (1993) Matrix 13, 255-266; Neame, P. J., Choi, H. U., and Rosenberg, L. C. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 5474-5479). The effect of TRAMP on collagen fibril formation was studied in vitro by reconstitution of fibrils from lathyritic rat skin collagen I. Fibril formation was initiated by the warm start procedure, in which acidic collagen solutions and double strength neutral buffer, both preincubated separately at 34 degrees C, were mixed. When monitored by turbidimetry, TRAMP was found to accelerate collagen fibril formation. Acceleration occurred at sub-stoichiometric molar ratios of TRAMP collagen, and the presence of TRAMP stabilized the fibrils against low temperature dissociation. It was confirmed by centrifugation that the amount of fibrillar collagen formed in the presence of TRAMP was greater than in its absence. By SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and scanning densitometry, binding of TRAMP to collagen was detected that approached saturation with a molar ratio of TRAMP to collagen of approximately 1:2. Fibrils formed in the presence of TRAMP were normal when observed by electron microscopy, although fibril diameters were smaller than the controls. TRAMP was found to partially reverse the inhibitory effects of urea and increased ionic strength on the kinetics of fibril formation, although inhibition by glucose was unaffected. TRAMP also accelerated the assembly of pepsin-treated collagen, where the non-helical, telopeptide regions were partially removed. Acceleration of collagen fibril formation by TRAMP is discussed in the light of the known effects of other extracellular matrix

  18. Multiple 40-kDa Heat-Shock Protein Chaperones Function in Tom70-dependent Mitochondrial Import

    PubMed Central

    Bhangoo, Melanie K.; Tzankov, Stefan; Fan, Anna C.Y.; Dejgaard, Kurt; Thomas, David Y.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial preproteins that are imported via the translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane (Tom)70 receptor are complexed with cytosolic chaperones before targeting to the mitochondrial outer membrane. The adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT) follows this pathway, and its purified mature form is identical to the preprotein. Purified ANT was reconstituted with chaperones in reticulocyte lysate, and bound proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. In addition to 70-kDa heat-shock cognate protein (Hsc70) and 90-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90), a specific subset of cochaperones were found, but no mitochondria-specific targeting factors were found. Interestingly, three different Hsp40-related J-domain proteins were identified: DJA1, DJA2, and DJA4. The DJAs bound preproteins to different extents through their C-terminal regions. DJA dominant-negative mutants lacking the N-terminal J-domains impaired mitochondrial import. The mutants blocked the binding of Hsc70 to preprotein, but with varying efficiency. The DJAs also showed significant differences in activation of the Hsc70 ATPase and Hsc70-dependent protein refolding. In HeLa cells, the DJAs increased new protein folding and mitochondrial import, although to different extents. No single DJA was superior to the others in all aspects, but each had a profile of partial specialization. The Hsp90 cochaperones p23 and Aha1 also regulated Hsp90–preprotein interactions. We suggest that multiple cochaperones with similar yet partially specialized properties cooperate in optimal chaperone–preprotein complexes. PMID:17596514

  19. Link-proteins and non-collagenous proteins from normal and chondrodysplastic cartilages.

    PubMed

    Chaminade, F; Stanescu, V; Stanescu, R; Maroteaux, P

    1979-08-01

    Baboon and human articular and growth cartilage was extracted with 4M guanidinium chloride in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors. After dialysis against 8M urea pH 6.8 the proteins were separated from proteoglycans by ion-exchange chromatography. The concentrated and reduced protein fractions was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Bands corresponding to collagen and to 6 major non-collegenous proteins were found. Two of the latter were identified with the link-proteins. By using small columns and microconcentration procedures, a gel-electrophoretic analysis of link-proteins extracted from small pieces of cartilage was performed and ten cases of osteochondrodysplasias were studied. No abnormalities were detected in the following syndromes: achondroplasia, diastrophic dwarfism, thanatophoric dwarfism, Jeune disease, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita, Kozlowski syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, polyepiphyseal dysplasia with diabetes mellitus. PMID:113215

  20. Absence of the Yeast Hsp31 Chaperones of the DJ-1 Superfamily Perturbs Cytoplasmic Protein Quality Control in Late Growth Phase

    PubMed Central

    Amm, Ingo; Norell, Derrick; Wolf, Dieter H.

    2015-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae heat shock proteins Hsp31, Hsp32, Hsp33 and Hsp34 belong to the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily which includes the human protein DJ-1 (PARK7) as the most prominent member. Mutations in the DJ-1 gene are directly linked to autosomal recessive, early-onset Parkinson’s disease. DJ-1 acts as an oxidative stress-induced chaperone preventing aggregation and fibrillation of α-synuclein, a critical factor in the development of the disease. In vivo assays in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the model substrate ΔssCPY*Leu2myc (ΔssCL*myc) as an aggregation-prone misfolded cytoplasmic protein revealed an influence of the Hsp31 chaperone family on the steady state level of this substrate. In contrast to the ubiquitin ligase of the N-end rule pathway Ubr1, which is known to be prominently involved in the degradation process of misfolded cytoplasmic proteins, the absence of the Hsp31 chaperone family does not impair the degradation of newly synthesized misfolded substrate. Also degradation of substrates with strong affinity to Ubr1 like those containing the type 1 N-degron arginine is not affected by the absence of the Hsp31 chaperone family. Epistasis analysis indicates that one function of the Hsp31 chaperone family resides in a pathway overlapping with the Ubr1-dependent degradation of misfolded cytoplasmic proteins. This pathway gains relevance in late growth phase under conditions of nutrient limitation. Additionally, the Hsp31 chaperones seem to be important for maintaining the cellular Ssa Hsp70 activity which is important for Ubr1-dependent degradation. PMID:26466368

  1. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Protein Is a Novel Modulator of Megakaryocyte-Collagen Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Abbonante, Vittorio; Gruppi, Cristian; Rubel, Diana; Gross, Oliver; Moratti, Remigio; Balduini, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence demonstrates that extracellular matrices regulate many aspects of megakaryocyte (MK) development; however, among the different extracellular matrix receptors, integrin α2β1 and glycoprotein VI are the only collagen receptors studied in platelets and MKs. In this study, we demonstrate the expression of the novel collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) by human MKs at both mRNA and protein levels and provide evidence of DDR1 involvement in the regulation of MK motility on type I collagen through a mechanism based on the activity of SHP1 phosphatase and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Specifically, we demonstrated that inhibition of DDR1 binding to type I collagen, preserving the engagement of the other collagen receptors, glycoprotein VI, α2β1, and LAIR-1, determines a decrease in MK migration due to the reduction in SHP1 phosphatase activity and consequent increase in the phosphorylation level of its main substrate Syk. Consistently, inhibition of Syk activity restored MK migration on type I collagen. In conclusion, we report the expression and function of a novel collagen receptor on human MKs, and we point out that an increasing level of complexity is necessary to better understand MK-collagen interactions in the bone marrow environment. PMID:23530036

  2. Gedunin Inactivates the Co-chaperone p23 Protein Causing Cancer Cell Death by Apoptosis*♦

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Chaitanya A.; Fauq, Abdul; Peterson, Laura B.; Miller, Charles; Blagg, Brian S. J.; Chadli, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 is an exciting option for cancer therapy. The clinical efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitors is, however, less than expected. Binding of the co-chaperone p23 to Hsp90 and induced overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins Hsp70 and Hsp27 are thought to contribute to this outcome. Herein, we report that the natural product gedunin may provide a new alternative to inactivate the Hsp90 machine. We show that gedunin directly binds to p23 and inactivates it, without overexpression of Hsp27 and relatively modest induction of Hsp70. Using molecular docking and mutational analysis, we mapped the gedunin-binding site on p23. Functional analysis shows that gedunin inhibits the p23 chaperoning activity, blocks its cellular interaction with Hsp90, and interferes with p23-mediated gene regulation. Cell treatment with gedunin leads to cancer cell death by apoptosis through inactivation of p23 and activation of caspase 7, which cleaves p23 at the C terminus. These results provide important insight into the molecular mechanism of action of this promising lead compound. PMID:23355466

  3. Biosynthesis of collagen and other matrix proteins by articular cartilage in experimental osteoarthrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, D R; McDevitt, C A; Billingham, M E; Muir, H

    1980-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis was induced in one knee joint of dogs by an established surgical procedure. Changes in the articular cartilage in the biosynthesis of collagen and other proteins were sought by radiochemical labelling in vivo, with the following findings. (1) Collagen synthesis was stimulated in all cartilage surfaces of the experimental joints at 2, 8 and 24 weeks after surgery. Systemic labelling with [3H]proline showed that over 10 times more collagen was being deposited per dry weight of experimental cartilage compared with control cartilage in the unoperated knee. (2) Type-II collagen was the radiolabelled product in all samples of experimental cartilage ranging in quality from undamaged to overtly fibrillated, and was the only collagen detected chemically in the matrix of osteoarthrotic cartilage from either dog or human joints. (3) Hydroxylysine glycosylation was examined in the newly synthesized cartilage collagen by labelling dog joints in vivo with [3H]lysine. In experimental knees the new collagen was less glycosylated than in controls. However, no difference in glycosylation of the total collagen in the tissues was observed by chemical analysis. (4) Over half the protein-bound tritium was extracted by 4 M-guanidinium chloride from control cartilage labelled with [3H]proline, compared with one-quarter or less from experimental cartilage. Two-thirds of the extracted tritium separated in the upper fraction on density-gradient centrifugation in CsCl under associative conditions. Much of this ran with a single protein band on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions. The identity of this protein was unknown, although it resembled serum albumin in mobility afte disulphide-bond cleavage. Images Fig. 3. PMID:7470037

  4. Identification and characterization of a collagen-binding protein, Cbm, in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Nomura, R; Nakano, K; Naka, S; Nemoto, H; Masuda, K; Lapirattanakul, J; Alaluusua, S; Matsumoto, M; Kawabata, S; Ooshima, T

    2012-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen of dental caries, is occasionally isolated from the blood of patients with infective endocarditis. Bacterial attachment of exposed collagen tissue in the impaired endothelium is an important step in the onset of infective endocarditis. In our previous studies, some S. mutans strains were shown to possess collagen-binding activities and most of them had an approximately 120-kDa cell-surface collagen-binding protein called Cnm. However, several strains without Cnm proteins show collagen-binding properties. In the present study, another collagen-binding protein, Cbm, was characterized and its coding gene cbm was sequenced in these strains. The amino acid alignment in the putative collagen-binding domain of Cbm was shown to have approximately 80% identity and 90% similarity to the comparable region of Cnm. Cbm-deficient isogenic mutant strains constructed by insertional inactivation of the cbm gene, lacked collagen-binding properties, which were recovered in the complemented mutant. Analyses of a large number of clinical isolates from Japan, Thailand and Finland revealed that cbm-positive strains were present in all of these countries and that cnm-positive and cbm-positive strains were detected in the oral cavity of approximately 10 and 2% of systemically healthy subjects, respectively. In addition, cnm-positive strains were predominantly identified in the serotype f group, whereas cbm-positive strains were frequently detected in serotype k. These results suggest that Cbm as well as Cnm are major cell surface proteins of S. mutans associated with binding to type I collagen and predominantly identified in serotype k strains. PMID:22759315

  5. Candidate Cell and Matrix Interaction Domains on the Collagen Fibril, the Predominant Protein of Vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Shawn M.; Orgel, Joseph P.; Fertala, Andrzej; McAuliffe, Jon D.; Turner, Kevin R.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Chen, Steven; Antipova, Olga; Perumal, Shiamalee; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Forlinoi, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Marini, Joan C.; San Antonio, James D.

    2008-07-18

    Type I collagen, the predominant protein of vertebrates, polymerizes with type III and V collagens and non-collagenous molecules into large cable-like fibrils, yet how the fibril interacts with cells and other binding partners remains poorly understood. To help reveal insights into the collagen structure-function relationship, a data base was assembled including hundreds of type I collagen ligand binding sites and mutations on a two-dimensional model of the fibril. Visual examination of the distribution of functional sites, and statistical analysis of mutation distributions on the fibril suggest it is organized into two domains. The 'cell interaction domain' is proposed to regulate dynamic aspects of collagen biology, including integrin-mediated cell interactions and fibril remodeling. The 'matrix interaction domain' may assume a structural role, mediating collagen cross-linking, proteoglycan interactions, and tissue mineralization. Molecular modeling was used to superimpose the positions of functional sites and mutations from the two-dimensional fibril map onto a three-dimensional x-ray diffraction structure of the collagen microfibril in situ, indicating the existence of domains in the native fibril. Sequence searches revealed that major fibril domain elements are conserved in type I collagens through evolution and in the type II/XI collagen fibril predominant in cartilage. Moreover, the fibril domain model provides potential insights into the genotype-phenotype relationship for several classes of human connective tissue diseases, mechanisms of integrin clustering by fibrils, the polarity of fibril assembly, heterotypic fibril function, and connective tissue pathology in diabetes and aging.

  6. Decorin Core Protein (Decoron) Shape Complements Collagen Fibril Surface Structure and Mediates Its Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Eid, Aya; Antipova, Olga; Bella, Jordi; Scott, John E.

    2010-02-11

    Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM). With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein) and binding sites in the d and e1 bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e{sub 1} bands). This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  7. Proteomics displays cytoskeletal proteins and chaperones involvement in Hedyotis corymbosa-induced photokilling in skin cancer cells.

    PubMed

    You, Bang-Jau; Wu, Yang-Chang; Wu, Chi-Yu; Bao, Bo-Ying; Chen, Mei-Yu; Chang, Yu-Hao; Lee, Hong-Zin

    2011-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy was found to be an effective therapy for local malignant tumors. This study demonstrated that 80 μg/ml Hedyotis corymbosa extracts with 0.8 J/cm(2) fluence dose caused M21 skin cancer cell death. Photoactivated H. corymbosa-induced M21 cell death is a typical apoptosis that is accompanied by nuclear condensation, externalization of phosphatidylserine and the changes in protein expression of apoptosis-related proteins, such as Bcl-2 and caspase family members. This study applied 2D electrophoresis to analyse the proteins involved in the photoactivated H. corymbosa-induced M21 cell apoptosis. We found 12 proteins to be markedly changed. According to the results of protein sequence analysis of these altered protein spots, we identified that the expression of cytoskeletal proteins and chaperones were involved in the photoactivated H. corymbosa-induced M21 cell apoptosis. We further demonstrated that photoactivated H. corymbosa caused a significant effect on the cytoskeleton distribution and mitochondrial activity in M21 cells. Based on the above findings, this study characterized the effects and mechanisms of the photoactivated H. corymbosa-induced apoptosis in M21 skin cancer cells. PMID:21569101

  8. The interplay of Hrd3 and the molecular chaperone system ensures efficient degradation of malfolded secretory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mehnert, Martin; Sommermeyer, Franziska; Berger, Maren; Kumar Lakshmipathy, Sathish; Gauss, Robert; Aebi, Markus; Jarosch, Ernst; Sommer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded proteins of the secretory pathway are extracted from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), polyubiquitylated by a protein complex termed the Hmg-CoA reductase degradation ligase (HRD-ligase), and degraded by cytosolic 26S proteasomes. This process is termed ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD). We previously showed that the membrane protein Der1, which is a subunit of the HRD-ligase, is involved in the export of aberrant polypeptides from the ER. Unexpectedly, we also uncovered a close spatial proximity of Der1 and the substrate receptor Hrd3 in the ER lumen. We report here on a mutant Hrd3KR that is selectively defective for ERAD of soluble proteins. Hrd3KR displays subtle structural changes that affect its positioning toward Der1. Furthermore, increased quantities of the ER-resident Hsp70-type chaperone Kar2 and the Hsp40-type cochaperone Scj1 bind to Hrd3KR. Of note, deletion of SCJ1 impairs ERAD of model substrates and causes the accumulation of client proteins at Hrd3. Our data imply a function of Scj1 in the removal of malfolded proteins from the receptor Hrd3, which facilitates their delivery to downstream-acting components like Der1. PMID:25428985

  9. Bcl-2 Regulates HIF-1α Protein Stabilization in Hypoxic Melanoma Cells via the Molecular Chaperone HSP90

    PubMed Central

    Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Gabellini, Chiara; Desideri, Marianna; Ziparo, Elio; Zupi, Gabriella; Del Bufalo, Donatella

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor that is a critical mediator of the cellular response to hypoxia. Enhanced levels of HIF-1α, the oxygen-regulated subunit of HIF-1, is often associated with increased tumour angiogenesis, metastasis, therapeutic resistance and poor prognosis. It is in this context that we previously demonstrated that under hypoxia, bcl-2 protein promotes HIF-1/Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)-mediated tumour angiogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings By using human melanoma cell lines and their stable or transient derivative bcl-2 overexpressing cells, the current study identified HIF-1α protein stabilization as a key regulator for the induction of HIF-1 by bcl-2 under hypoxia. We also demonstrated that bcl-2-induced accumulation of HIF-1α protein during hypoxia was not due to an increased gene transcription or protein synthesis. In fact, it was related to a modulation of HIF-1α protein expression at a post-translational level, indeed its degradation rate was faster in the control lines than in bcl-2 transfectants. The bcl-2-induced HIF-1α stabilization in response to low oxygen tension conditions was achieved through the impairment of ubiquitin-dependent HIF-1α degradation involving the molecular chaperone HSP90, but it was not dependent on the prolyl hydroxylation of HIF-1α protein. We also showed that bcl-2, HIF-1α and HSP90 proteins form a tri-complex that may contribute to enhancing the stability of the HIF-1α protein in bcl-2 overexpressing clones under hypoxic conditions. Finally, by using genetic and pharmacological approaches we proved that HSP90 is involved in bcl-2-dependent stabilization of HIF-1α protein during hypoxia, and in particular the isoform HSP90β is the main player in this phenomenon. Conclusions/Significance We identified the stabilization of HIF-1α protein as a mechanism through which bcl-2 induces the activation of HIF-1 in hypoxic tumour cells involving the

  10. Identification of protein-protein interactions between the TatB and TatC subunits of the twin-arginine translocase system and respiratory enzyme specific chaperones.

    PubMed

    Kuzniatsova, Lalita; Winstone, Tara M L; Turner, Raymond J

    2016-04-01

    The Twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway serves for translocation of fully folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane in bacterial and chloroplast thylakoid membranes. The Escherichia coli Tat system consists of three core components: TatA, TatB, and TatC. The TatB and TatC subunits form the receptor complex for Tat dependent proteins. The TatB protein is composed of a single transmembrane helix and cytoplasmic domain. The structure of TatC revealed six transmembrane helices. Redox Enzyme Maturation Proteins (REMPs) are system specific chaperones, which play roles in the maturation of Tat dependent respiratory enzymes. Here we applied the in vivo bacterial two-hybrid technique to investigate interaction of REMPs with the TatBC proteins, finding that all but the formate dehydrogenase REMP dock to TatB or TatC. We focused on the NarJ subfamily, where DmsD--the REMP for dimethyl sulfoxide reductase in E. coli--was previously shown to interact with TatB and TatC. We found that these REMPs interact with TatC cytoplasmic loops 1, 2 and 4, with the exception of NarJ, that only interacts with 1 and 4. An in vitro isothermal titration calorimetry study was applied to confirm the evidence of interactions between TatC fragments and DmsD chaperone. Using a peptide overlapping array, it was shown that the different NarJ subfamily REMPs interact with different regions of the TatB cytoplasmic domains. The results demonstrate a role of REMP chaperones in targeting respiratory enzymes to the Tat system. The data suggests that the different REMPs may have different mechanisms for this task. PMID:26826271

  11. Polyphosphate is a primordial chaperone.

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael J; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Wagner, Nico O; Cremers, Claudia M; Mueller-Schickert, Antje; Hock, Nathaniel T; Krieger, Adam G; Smith, Erica M; Bender, Robert A; Bardwell, James C A; Jakob, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Composed of up to 1,000 phospho-anhydride bond-linked phosphate monomers, inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is one of the most ancient, conserved, and enigmatic molecules in biology. Here we demonstrate that polyP functions as a hitherto unrecognized chaperone. We show that polyP stabilizes proteins in vivo, diminishes the need for other chaperone systems to survive proteotoxic stress conditions, and protects a wide variety of proteins against stress-induced unfolding and aggregation. In vitro studies reveal that polyP has protein-like chaperone qualities, binds to unfolding proteins with high affinity in an ATP-independent manner, and supports their productive refolding once nonstress conditions are restored. Our results uncover a universally important function for polyP and suggest that these long chains of inorganic phosphate may have served as one of nature's first chaperones, a role that continues to the present day. PMID:24560923

  12. Roles of intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in functional regulation of the Hsp70 J-protein co-chaperone sis1

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hyun Young; Ziegelhoffer, Thomas; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Baranowski, Maciej; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2015-02-13

    Unlike other Hsp70 molecular chaperones, those of the eukaryotic cytosol have four residues, EEVD, at their C-termini. EEVD(Hsp70) binds adaptor proteins of the Hsp90 chaperone system and mitochondrial membrane preprotein receptors, thereby facilitating processing of Hsp70-bound clients through protein folding and translocation pathways. Among J-protein co-chaperones functioning in these pathways Sis1 is unique, as it also binds the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. However, little is known about the role of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction. We found that deletion of EEVD(Hsp70) abolished the ability of Sis1, but not the ubiquitous J-protein Ydj1, to partner with Hsp70 in in vitro protein refolding. Sis1 co-chaperone activity with Hsp70ΔEEVD was restored upon substitution of a glutamic acid of the J-domain. Structural analysis revealed that this key glutamic acid, which is not present in Ydj1, forms a salt bridge with an arginine of the immediately adjacent glycine-rich region. Thus, restoration of Sis1 in vitro activity suggests that intramolecular interaction(s) between the J-domain and glycine-rich region controls co-chaperone activity, which is optimal only when Sis1 interacts with the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. Yet, we found that disruption of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction enhances the ability of Sis1 to substitute for Ydj1 in vivo. Our results are consistent with the idea that interaction of Sis1 with EEVD(Hsp70) minimizes transfer of Sis1-bound clients to Hsp70s that are primed for client transfer to folding and translocation pathways by their preassociation with EEVD-binding adaptor proteins. Finally, these interactions may be one means by which cells triage Ydj1- and Sis1-bound clients to productive and quality control pathways, respectively.

  13. Roles of intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in functional regulation of the Hsp70 J-protein co-chaperone sis1

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Hyun Young; Ziegelhoffer, Thomas; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Baranowski, Maciej; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2015-02-13

    Unlike other Hsp70 molecular chaperones, those of the eukaryotic cytosol have four residues, EEVD, at their C-termini. EEVD(Hsp70) binds adaptor proteins of the Hsp90 chaperone system and mitochondrial membrane preprotein receptors, thereby facilitating processing of Hsp70-bound clients through protein folding and translocation pathways. Among J-protein co-chaperones functioning in these pathways Sis1 is unique, as it also binds the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. However, little is known about the role of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction. We found that deletion of EEVD(Hsp70) abolished the ability of Sis1, but not the ubiquitous J-protein Ydj1, to partner with Hsp70 in in vitro protein refolding. Sis1 co-chaperone activitymore » with Hsp70ΔEEVD was restored upon substitution of a glutamic acid of the J-domain. Structural analysis revealed that this key glutamic acid, which is not present in Ydj1, forms a salt bridge with an arginine of the immediately adjacent glycine-rich region. Thus, restoration of Sis1 in vitro activity suggests that intramolecular interaction(s) between the J-domain and glycine-rich region controls co-chaperone activity, which is optimal only when Sis1 interacts with the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. Yet, we found that disruption of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction enhances the ability of Sis1 to substitute for Ydj1 in vivo. Our results are consistent with the idea that interaction of Sis1 with EEVD(Hsp70) minimizes transfer of Sis1-bound clients to Hsp70s that are primed for client transfer to folding and translocation pathways by their preassociation with EEVD-binding adaptor proteins. Finally, these interactions may be one means by which cells triage Ydj1- and Sis1-bound clients to productive and quality control pathways, respectively.« less

  14. Dancing through Life: Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Network-Centric Modeling of Allosteric Mechanisms in Hsp70 and Hsp110 Chaperone Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stetz, Gabrielle; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Hsp70 and Hsp110 chaperones play an important role in regulating cellular processes that involve protein folding and stabilization, which are essential for the integrity of signaling networks. Although many aspects of allosteric regulatory mechanisms in Hsp70 and Hsp110 chaperones have been extensively studied and significantly advanced in recent experimental studies, the atomistic picture of signal propagation and energetics of dynamics-based communication still remain unresolved. In this work, we have combined molecular dynamics simulations and protein stability analysis of the chaperone structures with the network modeling of residue interaction networks to characterize molecular determinants of allosteric mechanisms. We have shown that allosteric mechanisms of Hsp70 and Hsp110 chaperones may be primarily determined by nucleotide-induced redistribution of local conformational ensembles in the inter-domain regions and the substrate binding domain. Conformational dynamics and energetics of the peptide substrate binding with the Hsp70 structures has been analyzed using free energy calculations, revealing allosteric hotspots that control negative cooperativity between regulatory sites. The results have indicated that cooperative interactions may promote a population-shift mechanism in Hsp70, in which functional residues are organized in a broad and robust allosteric network that can link the nucleotide-binding site and the substrate-binding regions. A smaller allosteric network in Hsp110 structures may elicit an entropy-driven allostery that occurs in the absence of global structural changes. We have found that global mediating residues with high network centrality may be organized in stable local communities that are indispensable for structural stability and efficient allosteric communications. The network-centric analysis of allosteric interactions has also established that centrality of functional residues could correlate with their sensitivity to mutations

  15. Chaperone heat shock protein 70 in nucleus accumbens core: a novel biological target of behavioural sensitization to morphine in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Ting; Qin, Wang-Jun; Liu, Qing; Li, Yu-Ling; Liang, Hui; Chen, Feng; Lawrence, Andrew J; Zhang, Xiang-Lin; Liang, Jian-Hui

    2014-03-01

    Drug addiction is a major public health issue, yet the underlying adaptation of neural networks by drugs of abuse is not fully understood. We have previously linked chaperone heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) to drug-induced adaptations. Focusing on the NAc core and shell, the present study aims to provide further findings for our understanding of the relation between behavioural sensitization to morphine and Hsp70 at transcriptional and functional levels in rats. Firstly, we delineated the characteristics of behavioural sensitization induced by a single morphine exposure (1-10 mg/kg, s.c.). Secondly, Hsp70 protein expression in the NAc core was time- and dose-relatedly induced during the development of behavioural sensitization to a single morphine exposure in rats, and Pearson analysis indicated a positive correlation between behavioural sensitization and Hsp70 expression in NAc core. Thirdly, at the transcriptional level, intra-NAc core injection of the specific heat shock factor-I (HSF-I) inhibitor N-Formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidine-γ-butyrolactam (KNK437) suppressed Hsp70 expression and the development of behavioural sensitization, while the HSF-I specific inducer geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) promoted both of them. Interestingly, intra-NAc shell injection of KNK437 or GGA did not affect the development of behavioural sensitization. Finally, both the functional inhibition of Hsp70 ATPase activity by methylene blue (MB), and the antagonism of Hsp70 substrate binding site (SBD) activity by pifithrin-μ (PES) impaired the development of behavioural sensitization when they were microinjected into the NAc core. Taken together, the critical involvement of chaperone Hsp70 in behavioural sensitization to morphine identifies a biological target for long-lasting adaptations with relevance to addiction. PMID:24280010

  16. Biophysical and biological characterisation of collagen/resilin-like protein composite fibres.

    PubMed

    Sanami, M; Shtein, Z; Sweeney, I; Sorushanova, A; Rivkin, A; Miraftab, M; Shoseyov, O; O'Dowd, C; Mullen, A M; Pandit, A; Zeugolis, D I

    2015-12-01

    Collagen type I, in various physical forms, is widely used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. To control the mechanical properties and biodegradability of collagen-based devices, exogenous cross-links are introduced into the 3D supramolecular structure. However, potent cross-linking methods are associated with cytotoxicity, whilst mild cross-linking methods are associated with suboptimal mechanical resilience. Herein, we assessed the influence of resilin, a super-elastic and highly stretchable protein found within structures in arthropods where energy storage and long-range elasticity are needed, on the biophysical and biological properties of mildly cross-linked extruded collagen fibres. The addition of resilin-like protein in the 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol) ether tetrasuccinimidyl glutarate cross-linked collagen fibres resulted in a significant increase of stress and strain at break values and a significant decrease of modulus values. The addition of resilin-like protein did not compromise cell metabolic activity and DNA concentration. All groups are supported parallel to the longitudinal fibre axis cell orientation. Herein we provide evidence that the addition of resilin-like protein in mildly cross-linked collagen fibres improves their biomechanical properties, without jeopardising their biological properties. PMID:26541078

  17. Collagen-binding proteins of rat mammary tumor epithelial cells: A biochemical and immunological study

    SciTech Connect

    Wirl, G.; Pfaeffle, M. )

    1988-05-01

    Collagen-binding proteins were studied in mammary epithelial cells of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced rat mammary tumors. Using affinity chromatography on type I collagen-Sepharose and polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis, three major proteins of 34,000, 36,000, and 38,000 Da were found. Pulse-chase experiments did not indicate a precursor-product relationship of these proteins. Tryptic/chymotryptic peptide maps, however, revealed that the 36,000- and 38,000-Da proteins are very similar but are quite different from the 34,000-Da molecular form. The distribution and function of these proteins were then analyzed by using polyclonal antibodies directed against the entire set of major proteins. In immunofluorescence studies the authors observed a dense, punctate distribution of fluorescence on the cell surface of isolated and unfixed epithelial organoids and a bright pericellular staining in cultures after fixation. Treatment with the antiserum did not affect attachment and spreading of cuboidal mammary cells to plastic or to a collagen substratum. However, when the antiserum was added to the medium of growing cuboidal cells, it caused the formation of duct-like structures. These studies indicate that collagen-binding proteins may play a role in mammary gland morphology.

  18. Coordinated collagen and muscle protein synthesis in human patella tendon and quadriceps muscle after exercise.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin F; Olesen, Jens L; Hansen, Mette; Døssing, Simon; Crameri, Regina M; Welling, Rasmus J; Langberg, Henning; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Kjaer, Michael; Babraj, John A; Smith, Kenneth; Rennie, Michael J

    2005-09-15

    We hypothesized that an acute bout of strenuous, non-damaging exercise would increase rates of protein synthesis of collagen in tendon and skeletal muscle but these would be less than those of muscle myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins. Two groups (n = 8 and 6) of healthy young men were studied over 72 h after 1 h of one-legged kicking exercise at 67% of maximum workload (W(max)). To label tissue proteins in muscle and tendon primed, constant infusions of [1-(13)C]leucine or [1-(13)C]valine and flooding doses of [(15)N] or [(13)C]proline were given intravenously, with estimation of labelling in target proteins by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Patellar tendon and quadriceps biopsies were taken in exercised and rested legs at 6, 24, 42 or 48 and 72 h after exercise. The fractional synthetic rates of all proteins were elevated at 6 h and rose rapidly to peak at 24 h post exercise (tendon collagen (0.077% h(-1)), muscle collagen (0.054% h(-1)), myofibrillar protein (0.121% h(-1)), and sarcoplasmic protein (0.134% h(-1))). The rates decreased toward basal values by 72 h although rates of tendon collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis remained elevated. There was no tissue damage of muscle visible on histological evaluation. Neither tissue microdialysate nor serum concentrations of IGF-I and IGF binding proteins (IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-4) or procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide changed from resting values. Thus, there is a rapid increase in collagen synthesis after strenuous exercise in human tendon and muscle. The similar time course of changes of protein synthetic rates in different cell types supports the idea of coordinated musculotendinous adaptation. PMID:16002437

  19. Identification of Surface Proteins from Lactobacillus casei BL23 Able to Bind Fibronectin and Collagen.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Provencio, Diego; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Monedero, Vicente

    2011-03-01

    Strains of lactobacilli show the capacity to attach to extracellular matrix proteins. Cell-wall fractions of Lactobacillus casei BL23 enriched in fibronectin, and collagen-binding proteins were isolated. Mass spectrometry analysis of their protein content revealed the presence of stress-related proteins (GroEL, ClpL), translational elongation factors (EF-Tu, EF-G), oligopeptide solute-binding proteins, and the glycolytic enzymes enolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The latter two enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins, and their in vitro binding activity to fibronectin and collagen was confirmed. These results reinforce the idea that lactobacilli display on their surfaces a variety of moonlighting proteins that can be important in their adaptation to survive at intestinal mucosal sites and in the interaction with host cells. PMID:26781495

  20. The p23 molecular chaperone and GCN5 acetylase jointly modulate protein-DNA dynamics and open chromatin status

    PubMed Central

    Zelin, Elena; Zhang, Yang; Toogun, Oyetunji A.; Zhong, Sheng; Freeman, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Cellular processes function through multi-step pathways that are reliant on the controlled association and disassociation of sequential protein complexes. While dynamic action is critical to propagate and terminate work, the mechanisms used to disassemble biological structures are not fully understood. Here, we show that the p23 molecular chaperone initiates disassembly of protein-DNA complexes and that the GCN5 acetyltransferase prolongs the dissociated state through lysine acetylation. By modulating the DNA bound-state, we found that the conserved and essential joint activities of p23 and GCN5 impacted transcription factor activation potential and response time to an environmental cue. Notably, p23 and GCN5 were required to maintain open chromatin regions along the genome indicating that dynamic protein behavior is a critical feature of various DNA-associated events. Our data support a model in which p23 and GCN5 regulate diverse multi-step pathways by controlling the longevity of protein-DNA complexes. PMID:23022381

  1. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling by Cockayne Syndrome Protein B and NAP1-Like Histone Chaperones Is Required for Efficient Transcription-Coupled DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Robert J.; Basheer, Asjad; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2013-01-01

    The Cockayne syndrome complementation group B (CSB) protein is essential for transcription-coupled DNA repair, and mutations in CSB are associated with Cockayne syndrome—a devastating disease with complex clinical features, including the appearance of premature aging, sun sensitivity, and numerous neurological and developmental defects. CSB belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 ATP–dependent chromatin remodeler family, but the extent to which CSB remodels chromatin and whether this activity is utilized in DNA repair is unknown. Here, we show that CSB repositions nucleosomes in an ATP–dependent manner in vitro and that this activity is greatly enhanced by the NAP1-like histone chaperones, which we identify as new CSB–binding partners. By mapping functional domains and analyzing CSB derivatives, we demonstrate that chromatin remodeling by the combined activities of CSB and the NAP1-like chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair. Moreover, we show that chromatin remodeling and repair protein recruitment mediated by CSB are separable activities. The collaboration that we observed between CSB and the NAP1-like histone chaperones adds a new dimension to our understanding of the ways in which ATP–dependent chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones can regulate chromatin structure. Taken together, the results of this study offer new insights into the functions of chromatin remodeling by CSB in transcription-coupled DNA repair as well as the underlying mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome. PMID:23637612

  2. Leucine-Enriched Essential Amino Acids Augment Mixed Protein Synthesis, But Not Collagen Protein Synthesis, in Rat Skeletal Muscle after Downhill Running.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Inoue, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2016-01-01

    Mixed and collagen protein synthesis is elevated for as many as 3 days following exercise. Immediately after exercise, enhanced amino acid availability increases synthesis of mixed muscle protein, but not muscle collagen protein. However, the potential for synergic effects of amino acid ingestion with exercise on both mixed and collagen protein synthesis remains unclear. We investigated muscle collagen protein synthesis in rats following post-exercise ingestion of leucine-enriched essential amino acids. We determined fractional protein synthesis rates (FSR) at different time points following exercise. Mixed protein and collagen protein FSRs in skeletal muscle were determined by measuring protein-bound enrichments of hydroxyproline and proline, and by measuring the intracellular enrichment of proline, using injections of flooding d₃-proline doses. A leucine-enriched mixture of essential amino acids (or distilled water as a control) was administrated 30 min or 1 day post-exercise. The collagen protein synthesis in the vastus lateralis was elevated for 2 days after exercise. Although amino acid administration did not increase muscle collagen protein synthesis, it did lead to augmented mixed muscle protein synthesis 1 day following exercise. Thus, contrary to the regulation of mixed muscle protein synthesis, muscle collagen protein synthesis is not affected by amino acid availability after damage-inducing exercise. PMID:27367725

  3. Leucine-Enriched Essential Amino Acids Augment Mixed Protein Synthesis, But Not Collagen Protein Synthesis, in Rat Skeletal Muscle after Downhill Running

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Inoue, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2016-01-01

    Mixed and collagen protein synthesis is elevated for as many as 3 days following exercise. Immediately after exercise, enhanced amino acid availability increases synthesis of mixed muscle protein, but not muscle collagen protein. However, the potential for synergic effects of amino acid ingestion with exercise on both mixed and collagen protein synthesis remains unclear. We investigated muscle collagen protein synthesis in rats following post-exercise ingestion of leucine-enriched essential amino acids. We determined fractional protein synthesis rates (FSR) at different time points following exercise. Mixed protein and collagen protein FSRs in skeletal muscle were determined by measuring protein-bound enrichments of hydroxyproline and proline, and by measuring the intracellular enrichment of proline, using injections of flooding d3-proline doses. A leucine-enriched mixture of essential amino acids (or distilled water as a control) was administrated 30 min or 1 day post-exercise. The collagen protein synthesis in the vastus lateralis was elevated for 2 days after exercise. Although amino acid administration did not increase muscle collagen protein synthesis, it did lead to augmented mixed muscle protein synthesis 1 day following exercise. Thus, contrary to the regulation of mixed muscle protein synthesis, muscle collagen protein synthesis is not affected by amino acid availability after damage-inducing exercise. PMID:27367725

  4. Chaperone-like activity of the AAA+ proteins Rvb1 and Rvb2 in the assembly of various complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nano, Nardin; Houry, Walid A.

    2013-01-01

    Rvb1 and Rvb2 are highly conserved and essential eukaryotic AAA+ proteins linked to a wide range of cellular processes. AAA+ proteins are ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities and are characterized by the presence of one or more AAA+ domains. These domains have the canonical Walker A and Walker B nucleotide binding and hydrolysis motifs. Rvb1 and Rvb2 have been found to be part of critical cellular complexes: the histone acetyltransferase Tip60 complex, chromatin remodelling complexes Ino80 and SWR-C, and the telomerase complex. In addition, Rvb1 and Rvb2 are components of the R2TP complex that was identified by our group and was determined to be involved in the maturation of box C/D small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP) complexes. Furthermore, the Rvbs have been associated with mitotic spindle assembly, as well as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) signalling. This review sheds light on the potential role of the Rvbs as chaperones in the assembly and remodelling of these critical complexes. PMID:23530256

  5. Molecular chaperones: multiple functions, pathologies, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Macario, Alberto J L; Conway de Macario, Everly

    2007-01-01

    Cell stressors are ubiquitous and frequent, challenging cells often, which leads to the stress response with activation of anti-stress mechanisms. These mechanisms involve a variety of molecules, including molecular chaperones also known as heat-shock proteins (Hsp). The chaperones treated in this article are proteins that assist other proteins to fold, refold, travel to their place of residence (cytosol, organelle, membrane, extracellular space), and translocate across membranes. Molecular chaperones participate in a variety of physiological processes and are widespread in organisms, tissues, and cells. It follows that chaperone failure will have an impact, possibly serious, on one or more cellular function, which may lead to disease. Chaperones must recognize and interact with proteins in need of assistance or client polypeptides (e.g., nascent at the ribosome, or partially denatured by stressors), and have to interact with other chaperones because the chaperoning mechanism involves teams of chaperone molecules, i.e., multimolecular assemblies or chaperone machines. Consequently, chaperone molecules have structural domains with distinctive functions: bind the client polypeptide, interact with other chaperone molecules to build a machine, and interact with other complexes that integrate the chaperoning network. Also, various chaperones have ATP-binding and ATPase sites because the chaperoning process requires as, a rule, energy from ATP hydrolysis. Alterations in any one of these domains due to a mutation or an aberrant post-translational modification can disrupt the chaperoning process and cause diseases termed chaperonopathies. This article presents the pathologic concept of chaperonopathy with examples, and discusses the potential of using chaperones (genes or proteins) in treatment (chaperonotherapy). In addition, emerging topics within the field of study of chaperones (chaperonology) are highlighted, e.g., genomics (chaperonomics), systems biology

  6. Pharmacological Targeting of the Hsp70 Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Patury, Srikanth; Miyata, Yoshinari; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    The molecular chaperone, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), acts at multiple steps in a protein’s life cycle, including during the processes of folding, trafficking, remodeling and degradation. To accomplish these various tasks, the activity of Hsp70 is shaped by a host of co-chaperones, which bind to the core chaperone and influence its functions. Genetic studies have strongly linked Hsp70 and its co-chaperones to numerous diseases, including cancer, neurodegeneration and microbial pathogenesis, yet the potential of this chaperone as a therapeutic target remains largely underexplored. Here, we review the current state of Hsp70 as a drug target, with a special emphasis on the important challenges and opportunities imposed by its co-chaperones, protein-protein interactions and allostery. PMID:19860737

  7. Active Participation of Cellular Chaperone Hsp90 in Regulating the Function of Rotavirus Nonstructural Protein 3 (NSP3)*

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Dipanjan; Chattopadhyay, Shiladitya; Bagchi, Parikshit; Halder, Umesh Chandra; Nandi, Satabdi; Mukherjee, Anupam; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Taniguchi, Koki; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has been reported to positively regulate rotavirus replication by modulating virus induced PI3K/Akt and NFκB activation. Here, we report the active association of Hsp90 in the folding and stabilization of rotavirus nonstructural protein 3 (NSP3). In pCD-NSP3-transfected cells, treatment with Hsp90 inhibitor (17-N,N-dimethylethylenediamine-geldanamycin (17DMAG)) resulted in the proteasomal degradation of NSP3. Sequence analysis and deletion mutations revealed that the region spanning amino acids 225–258 within the C-terminal eIF4G-binding domain of NSP3 is a putative Hsp90 binding region. Co-immunoprecipitation and mammalian two-hybrid experiments revealed direct interaction of the C-terminal 12-kDa domain of Hsp90 (C90) with residues 225–258 of NSP3. NSP3-Hsp90 interaction is important for the formation of functionally active mature NSP3, because full-length NSP3 in the presence of the Hsp90 inhibitor or NSP3 lacking the amino acid 225–258 region did not show NSP3 dimers following in vitro coupled transcription-translation followed by chase. Disruption of residues 225–258 within NSP3 also resulted in poor RNA binding and eIF4G binding activity. In addition, inhibition of Hsp90 by 17DMAG resulted in reduced nuclear translocation of poly(A)-binding protein and translation of viral proteins. These results highlight the crucial role of Hsp90 chaperone in the regulation of assembly and functionality of a viral protein during the virus replication and propagation in host cells. PMID:21489987

  8. The cleverSuite approach for protein characterization: predictions of structural properties, solubility, chaperone requirements and RNA-binding abilities

    PubMed Central

    Klus, Petr; Bolognesi, Benedetta; Agostini, Federico; Marchese, Domenica; Zanzoni, Andreas; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The recent shift towards high-throughput screening is posing new challenges for the interpretation of experimental results. Here we propose the cleverSuite approach for large-scale characterization of protein groups. Description: The central part of the cleverSuite is the cleverMachine (CM), an algorithm that performs statistics on protein sequences by comparing their physico-chemical propensities. The second element is called cleverClassifier and builds on top of the models generated by the CM to allow classification of new datasets. Results: We applied the cleverSuite to predict secondary structure properties, solubility, chaperone requirements and RNA-binding abilities. Using cross-validation and independent datasets, the cleverSuite reproduces experimental findings with great accuracy and provides models that can be used for future investigations. Availability: The intuitive interface for dataset exploration, analysis and prediction is available at http://s.tartaglialab.com/clever_suite. Contact: gian.tartaglia@crg.es Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24493033

  9. LcBiP, a endoplasmic reticulum chaperone binding protein gene from Lycium chinense, confers cadmium tolerance in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Guan, Chunfeng; Jin, Chao; Ji, Jing; Wang, Gang; Li, Xiaozhou

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) accumulation is very toxic to plants. The presence of Cd may lead to excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and then cause inhibition of plant growth. The endoplasmic reticulum chaperone binding protein (BiP) is an important functional protein, which has been shown to function as a sensor of alterations in the ER environment. BiP overexpression in plants was shown to increase drought tolerance through inhibition of ROS accumulation. Due to the above relationships, it is likely that there may be a link between Cd stress tolerance, ROS accumulation and the BiP transcript expression in plants. In this study, a BiP gene, LcBiP, from L. chinense was isolated and characterized. Overexpression of LcBiP in tobacco conferred Cd tolerance. Under Cd stress conditions, the transgenic tobacco lines exhibited better chlorophyll retention, less accumulation of ROS, longer root length, more glutathione (GSH) content, and less antioxidant enzyme activity than the wild type. These data demonstrated that LcBiP act as a positive regulator in Cd stress tolerance. It is hypothesized that the improved Cd tolerance of the transgenic tobacco plants may be due to the enhanced ROS scavenging capacity. The enhancement of GSH content might contribute to this ROS scavenging capacity in the transgenic plants. However, the underlying mechanism for BiP-mediated increase in Cd stress tolerance need to be further clarified. PMID:25589446

  10. Protein encoded by oncogene 6b from Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a reprogramming potential and histone chaperone-like activity

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Nanako; Kitakura, Saeko; Terakura, Shinji; Machida, Chiyoko; Machida, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    Crown gall tumors are formed mainly by actions of a group of genes in the T-DNA that is transferred from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and integrated into the nuclear DNA of host plants. These genes encode enzymes for biosynthesis of auxin and cytokinin in plant cells. Gene 6b in the T-DNA affects tumor morphology and this gene alone is able to induce small tumors on certain plant species. In addition, unorganized calli are induced from leaf disks of tobacco that are incubated on phytohormone-free media; shooty teratomas, and morphologically abnormal plants, which might be due to enhanced competence of cell division and meristematic states, are regenerated from the calli. Thus, the 6b gene appears to stimulate a reprogramming process in plants. To uncover mechanisms behind this process, various approaches including the yeast-two-hybrid system have been exploited and histone H3 was identified as one of the proteins that interact with 6b. It has been also demonstrated that 6b acts as a histone H3 chaperon in vitro and affects the expression of various genes related to cell division competence and the maintenance of meristematic states. We discuss current views on a role of 6b protein in tumorigenesis and reprogramming in plants. PMID:25389429

  11. The effect of oxygen partial pressure on protein synthesis and collagen hydroxylation by mature periodontal tissues maintained in organ cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Edwin H. K.; Sodek, Jaro; Melcher, Antony H.

    1979-01-01

    Mature periodontal tissues from adult-mouse first mandibular molars were cultured in a continuous-flow organ-culture system which allowed the regulation of both ascorbic acid concentration and pO2 (oxygen partial pressure). Protein synthesis was measured by analysing the incorporation of [3H]proline into collagenous and non-collagenous proteins during the last 24h of a 2-day culture. At low pO2 [16.0kPa (approx. 120mmHg)] approx. 60% of protein-incorporated [3H]proline was found in collagenous proteins. However, it was evident that this collagen was considerably underhydroxylated. At high pO2 [56.0kPa (approx. 420mmHg)], both the amount of collagen deposited in the tissues and the degree of hydroxylation were increased considerably. In contrast, no significant effect on non-collagenous protein was observed. Tissues cultured at low pO2 for the first 48h were unable to respond to a subsequent increase in pO2 during the last 24h. Analysis of pepsin-solubilized collagen α-chains labelled with [14C]glycine demonstrated the synthesis of both type-I and type-III collagens by explants cultured for 48h at high pO2. Type-III collagen comprised 20–30% of the radioactivity in α-chains in both the periodontal ligament and the tissues of the alveolar process. The pattern of protein synthesis in the alveolar tissues at high pO2 was similar to that observed in these tissues in vivo. However, in the cultured periodontal ligament the proportions of non-collagenous proteins and type-III collagens were increased in comparison with the tissue in vivo. PMID:454369

  12. Fibroblast Activation Protein (FAP) Accelerates Collagen Degradation and Clearance from Lungs in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ming-Hui; Zhu, Qiang; Li, Hui-Hua; Ra, Hyun-Jeong; Majumdar, Sonali; Gulick, Dexter L; Jerome, Jacob A; Madsen, Daniel H; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Speicher, David W; Bachovchin, William W; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Puré, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a disease characterized by progressive, unrelenting lung scarring, with death from respiratory failure within 2-4 years unless lung transplantation is performed. New effective therapies are clearly needed. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a cell surface-associated serine protease up-regulated in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as well as in wound healing and cancer. We postulate that FAP is not only a marker of disease but influences the development of pulmonary fibrosis after lung injury. In two different models of pulmonary fibrosis, intratracheal bleomycin instillation and thoracic irradiation, we find increased mortality and increased lung fibrosis in FAP-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Lung extracellular matrix analysis reveals accumulation of intermediate-sized collagen fragments in FAP-deficient mouse lungs, consistent within vitrostudies showing that FAP mediates ordered proteolytic processing of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-derived collagen cleavage products. FAP-mediated collagen processing leads to increased collagen internalization without altering expression of the endocytic collagen receptor, Endo180. Pharmacologic FAP inhibition decreases collagen internalization as expected. Conversely, restoration of FAP expression in the lungs of FAP-deficient mice decreases lung hydroxyproline content after intratracheal bleomycin to levels comparable with that of wild-type controls. Our findings indicate that FAP participates directly, in concert with MMPs, in collagen catabolism and clearance and is an important factor in resolving scar after injury and restoring lung homeostasis. Our study identifies FAP as a novel endogenous regulator of fibrosis and is the first to show FAP's protective effects in the lung. PMID:26663085

  13. Bethlem myopathy and engineered collagen VI triple helical deletions prevent intracellular multimer assembly and protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Lamandé, S R; Shields, K A; Kornberg, A J; Shield, L K; Bateman, J F

    1999-07-30

    Mutations in the genes that code for collagen VI subunits, COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3, are the cause of the autosomal dominant disorder, Bethlem myopathy. Although three different collagen VI structural mutations have previously been reported, the effect of these mutations on collagen VI assembly, structure, and function is currently unknown. We have characterized a new Bethlem myopathy mutation that results in skipping of COL6A1 exon 14 during pre-mRNA splicing and the deletion of 18 amino acids from the triple helical domain of the alpha1(VI) chain. Sequencing of genomic DNA identified a G to A transition in the +1 position of the splice donor site of intron 14 in one allele. The mutant alpha1(VI) chains associated intracellularly with alpha2(VI) and alpha3(VI) to form disulfide-bonded monomers, but further assembly into dimers and tetramers was prevented, and molecules containing the mutant chain were not secreted. This triple helical deletion thus resulted in production of half the normal amount of collagen VI. To further explore the biosynthetic consequences of collagen VI triple helical deletions, an alpha3(VI) cDNA expression construct containing a 202-amino acid deletion within the triple helix was produced and stably expressed in SaOS-2 cells. The transfected mutant alpha3(VI) chains associated with endogenous alpha1(VI) and alpha2(VI) to form collagen VI monomers, but dimers and tetramers did not form and the mutant-containing molecules were not secreted. Thus, deletions within the triple helical region of both the alpha1(VI) and alpha3(VI) chains can prevent intracellular dimer and tetramer assembly and secretion. These results provide the first evidence of the biosynthetic consequences of structural collagen VI mutations and suggest that functional protein haploinsufficiency may be a common pathogenic mechanism in Bethlem myopathy. PMID:10419498

  14. High-resolution solution structure of the 18 kDa substrate-binding domain of the mammalian chaperone protein Hsc70.

    PubMed

    Morshauser, R C; Hu, W; Wang, H; Pang, Y; Flynn, G C; Zuiderweg, E R

    1999-06-25

    The three-dimensional structure for the substrate-binding domain of the mammalian chaperone protein Hsc70 of the 70 kDa heat shock class (HSP70) is presented. This domain includes residues 383-540 (18 kDa) and is necessary for the binding of the chaperone with substrate proteins and peptides. The high-resolution NMR solution structure is based on 4150 experimental distance constraints leading to an average root-mean-square precision of 0.38 A for the backbone atoms and 0.76 A for all atoms in the beta-sandwich sub-domain. The protein is observed to bind residue Leu539 in its hydrophobic substrate-binding groove by intramolecular interaction. The position of a helical latch differs dramatically from what is observed in the crystal and solution structures of the homologous prokaryotic chaperone DnaK. In the Hsc70 structure, the helix lies in a hydrophobic groove and is anchored by a buried salt-bridge. Residues involved in this salt-bridge appear to be important for the allosteric functioning of the protein. A mechanism for interdomain allosteric modulation of substrate-binding is proposed. It involves large-scale movements of the helical domain, redefining the location of the hinge area that enables such motions. PMID:10373374

  15. A pH Switch Regulates the Inverse Relationship between Membranolytic and Chaperone-like Activities of HSP-1/2, a Major Protein of Horse Seminal Plasma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C Sudheer; Swamy, Musti J

    2016-07-01

    HSP-1/2, a major protein of horse seminal plasma binds to choline phospholipids present on the sperm plasma membrane and perturbs its structure by intercalating into the hydrophobic core, which results in an efflux of choline phospholipids and cholesterol, an important event in sperm capacitation. HSP-1/2 also exhibits chaperone-like activity (CLA) in vitro and protects target proteins against various kinds of stress. In the present study we show that HSP-1/2 exhibits destabilizing activity toward model supported and cell membranes. The membranolytic activity of HSP-1/2 is found to be pH dependent, with lytic activity being high at mildly acidic pH (6.0-6.5) and low at mildly basic pH (8.0-8.5). Interestingly, the CLA is also found to be pH dependent, with high activity at mildly basic pH and low activity at mildly acidic pH. Taken together the present studies demonstrate that the membranolytic and chaperone-like activities of HSP-1/2 have an inverse relationship and are regulated via a pH switch, which is reversible. The higher CLA observed at mildly basic pH could be correlated to an increase in surface hydrophobicity of the protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting regulation of two different activities of a chaperone protein by a pH switch. PMID:27292547

  16. A novel component of epidermal cell-matrix and cell-cell contacts: transmembrane protein type XIII collagen.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, S; Hentula, M; Hägg, P; Ylä-Outinen, H; Tuukkanen, J; Lakkakorpi, J; Rehn, M; Pihlajaniemi, T; Peltonen, J

    1999-10-01

    Type XIII collagen is a short chain collagen which has recently been shown to be a transmembrane protein. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the presence and localization of type XIII collagen in normal human skin and cultured keratinocytes. Expression of type XIII collagen was demonstrated in normal human skin and epidermis at the RNA level using reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction and at the protein level using western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence labeling. Immunolabeling of epidermis revealed type XIII collagen both in the cell-cell contact sites and in the dermal-epidermal junction. In cultured keratinocytes type XIII collagen epitopes were detected in focal contacts and in intercellular contacts. The results of this study show very little colocalization of type XIII collagen and desmosomal components at the light microscopic level. Thus, these results suggest that type XIII collagen is unlikely to be a component of desmosomes. Instead, the punctate labeling pattern of type XIII collagen at the cell-cell contact sites and high degree of colocalization with E-cadherin suggests that type XIII collagen is very likely to be closely associated with adherens type junctions, and may, in fact, be a component of these junctions. PMID:10504453

  17. Modulation of secreted proteins of mouse mammary epithelial cells by the collagenous substrata

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.H.; Parry, G.; Bissell, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    It has been shown previously that cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells retain their characteristic morphology and their ability to produce ..gamma..-casein, a member of the casein gene family, only if they are maintained on floating collagen gels. In this paper we show: (a) Cells on floating collagen gels secrete not only ..gamma..-casein but also ..cap alpha../sub 1/-, ..cap alpha../sub 2/-, and ..beta..-caseins. These are not secreted by cells on plastic and are secreted to only a very limited extent by cells on attached collagen gels. (b) The floating collagen gel regulates at the level of synthesis and/or stabilization of the caseins rather than at the level of secretion alone. Contraction of the floating gel is important in that cells cultured on floating glutaraldehyde cross-linked gels do not secrete any of the caseins. (c) The secretion of an 80,000-mol-wt protein, most probably transferrin, and a 67,000-mol-wt protein, probably butyrophilin, a major protein of the milk fat globule membrane, are partially modulated by substrata. However, in contrast to the caseins, these are always detectable in media from cells cultured on plastic and attached gels. (d) Whey acidic protein, a major whey protein, is actively secreted by freshly isolated cells but is secreted in extremely limited quantities in cultured cells regardless of the nature of the substratum used. Lactalbumin secretion is also decreased significantly in cultured cells. (e) A previously unreported set of proteins, which may be minor milk proteins, are prominently secreted by the mammary cells on all substrata tested. We conclude that while the substratum profoundly influences the secretion of the caseins, it does not regulate the expression of every milk-specific protein in the same way. The mechanistic implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. The LcrG Tip Chaperone Protein of the Yersinia pestis Type III Secretion System Is Partially Folded.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Sukanya; de Azevedo Souza, Clarice; Plano, Gregory V; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2015-09-25

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential in the pathogenesis of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. A small protein, LcrG, functions as a chaperone to the tip protein LcrV, and the LcrG-LcrV interaction is important in regulating protein secretion through the T3SS. The atomic structure of the LcrG family is currently unknown. However, because of its predicted helical propensity, many have suggested that the LcrG family forms a coiled-coil structure. Here, we show by NMR and CD spectroscopy that LcrG lacks a tertiary structure and it consists of three partially folded α-helices spanning residues 7-38, 41-46, and 58-73. NMR titrations of LcrG with LcrV show that the entire length of a truncated LcrG (residues 7-73) is involved in binding to LcrV. However, there is regional variation in how LcrG binds to LcrV. The C-terminal region of a truncated LcrG (residues 52-73) shows tight binding interaction with LcrV while the N-terminal region (residues 7-51) shows weaker interaction with LcrV. This suggests that there are at least two binding events when LcrG binds to LcrV. Biological assays and mutagenesis indicate that the C-terminal region of LcrG (residues 52-73) is important in blocking protein secretion through the T3SS. Our results reveal structural and mechanistic insights into the atomic conformation of LcrG and how it binds to LcrV. PMID:26259880

  19. The chaperone protein clusterin may serve as a cerebrospinal fluid biomarker for chronic spinal cord disorders in the dog.

    PubMed

    Shafie, Intan N F; McLaughlin, Mark; Burchmore, Richard; Lim, Mary Ann A; Montague, Paul; Johnston, Pamela E J; Penderis, Jacques; Anderson, Thomas J

    2014-05-01

    Chronic spinal cord dysfunction occurs in dogs as a consequence of diverse aetiologies, including long-standing spinal cord compression and insidious neurodegenerative conditions. One such neurodegenerative condition is canine degenerative myelopathy (DM), which clinically is a challenge to differentiate from other chronic spinal cord conditions. Although the clinical diagnosis of DM can be strengthened by the identification of the Sod1 mutations that are observed in affected dogs, genetic analysis alone is insufficient to provide a definitive diagnosis. There is a requirement to identify biomarkers that can differentiate conditions with a similar clinical presentation, thus facilitating patient diagnostic and management strategies. A comparison of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein gel electrophoresis profile between idiopathic epilepsy (IE) and DM identified a protein band that was more prominent in DM. This band was subsequently found to contain a multifunctional protein clusterin (apolipoprotein J) that is protective against endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis, oxidative stress, and also serves as an extracellular chaperone influencing protein aggregation. Western blot analysis of CSF clusterin confirmed elevated levels in DM compared to IE (p < 0.05). Analysis of spinal cord tissue from DM and control material found that clusterin expression was evident in neurons and that the clusterin mRNA levels from tissue extracts were elevated in DM compared to the control. The plasma clusterin levels was comparable between these groups. However, a comparison of clusterin CSF levels in a number of neurological conditions found that clusterin was elevated in both DM and chronic intervertebral disc disease (cIVDD) but not in meningoencephalitis and IE. These findings indicate that clusterin may potentially serve as a marker for chronic spinal cord disease in the dog; however, additional markers are required to differentiate DM from a concurrent

  20. Chaperoned amyloid proteins for immune manipulation: α-Synuclein/Hsp70 shifts immunity toward a modulatory phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Labrador-Garrido, Adahir; Cejudo-Guillén, Marta; Klippstein, Rebecca; De Genst, Erwin J; Tomas-Gallardo, Laura; Leal, María M; Villadiego, Javier; Toledo-Aral, Juan J; Dobson, Christopher M; Pozo, David; Roodveldt, Cintia

    2014-01-01

    α-Synuclein (αSyn) is a 140-residue amyloid-forming protein whose aggregation is linked to Parkinson's disease (PD). It has also been found to play a critical role in the immune imbalance that accompanies disease progression, a characteristic that has prompted the search for an effective αSyn-based immunotherapy. In this study, we have simultaneously exploited two important features of certain heat-shock proteins (HSPs): their classical “chaperone” activities and their recently discovered and diverse “immunoactive” properties. In particular, we have explored the immune response elicited by immunization of C57BL/6 mice with an αSyn/Hsp70 protein combination in the absence of added adjuvant. Our results show differential effects for mice immunized with the αSyn/Hsp70 complex, including a restrained αSyn-specific (IgM and IgG) humoral response as well as minimized alterations in the Treg (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) and Teff (CD4+Foxp3−) cell populations, as opposed to significant changes in mice immunized with αSyn and Hsp70 alone. Furthermore, in vitro-stimulated splenocytes from immunized mice showed the lowest relative response against αSyn challenge for the “αSyn/Hsp70” experimental group as measured by IFN-γ and IL-17 secretion, and higher IL-10 levels when stimulated with LPS. Finally, serum levels of Th1-cytokine IFN-γ and immunomodulatory IL-10 indicated a unique shift toward an immunomodulatory/immunoprotective phenotype in mice immunized with the αSyn/Hsp70 complex. Overall, we propose the use of functional “HSP-chaperoned amyloid/aggregating proteins” generated with appropriate HSP-substrate protein combinations, such as the αSyn/Hsp70 complex, as a novel strategy for immune-based intervention against synucleinopathies and other amyloid or “misfolding” neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25866630

  1. The Cytoplasmic Hsp70 Chaperone Machinery Subjects Misfolded and Endoplasmic Reticulum Import-incompetent Proteins to Degradation via the Ubiquitin–Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sae-Hun; Bolender, Natalia; Eisele, Frederik; Kostova, Zlatka; Takeuchi, Junko; Coffino, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of protein quality control and elimination of misfolded proteins in the cytoplasm is poorly understood. We studied the involvement of cytoplasmic factors required for degradation of two endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-import–defective mutated derivatives of carboxypeptidase yscY (ΔssCPY* and ΔssCPY*-GFP) and also examined the requirements for degradation of the corresponding wild-type enzyme made ER-import incompetent by removal of its signal sequence (ΔssCPY). All these protein species are rapidly degraded via the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Degradation requires the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes Ubc4p and Ubc5p, the cytoplasmic Hsp70 Ssa chaperone machinery, and the Hsp70 cochaperone Ydj1p. Neither the Hsp90 chaperones nor Hsp104 or the small heat-shock proteins Hsp26 and Hsp42 are involved in the degradation process. Elimination of a GFP fusion (GFP-cODC), containing the C-terminal 37 amino acids of ornithine decarboxylase (cODC) directing this enzyme to the proteasome, is independent of Ssa1p function. Fusion of ΔssCPY* to GFP-cODC to form ΔssCPY*-GFP-cODC reimposes a dependency on the Ssa1p chaperone for degradation. Evidently, the misfolded protein domain dictates the route of protein elimination. These data and our further results give evidence that the Ssa1p-Ydj1p machinery recognizes misfolded protein domains, keeps misfolded proteins soluble, solubilizes precipitated protein material, and escorts and delivers misfolded proteins in the ubiquitinated state to the proteasome for degradation. PMID:17065559

  2. Mutagenesis Reveals the Complex Relationships between ATPase Rate and the Chaperone Activities of Escherichia coli Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70/DnaK)*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Lyra; Thompson, Andrea D.; Ung, Peter; Carlson, Heather A.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2010-01-01

    The Escherichia coli 70-kDa heat shock protein, DnaK, is a molecular chaperone that engages in a variety of cellular activities, including the folding of proteins. During this process, DnaK binds its substrates in coordination with a catalytic ATPase cycle. Both the ATPase and protein folding activities of DnaK are stimulated by its co-chaperones, DnaJ and GrpE. However, it is not yet clear how changes in the stimulated ATPase rate of DnaK impact the folding process. In this study, we performed mutagenesis throughout the nucleotide-binding domain of DnaK to generate a collection of mutants in which the stimulated ATPase rates varied from 0.7 to 13.6 pmol/μg/min−1. We found that this range was largely established by differences in the ability of the mutants to be stimulated by one or both of the co-chaperones. Next, we explored how changes in ATPase rate might impact refolding of denatured luciferase in vitro and found that the two activities were poorly correlated. Unexpectedly, we found several mutants that refold luciferase normally in the absence of significant ATP turnover, presumably by increasing the flexibility of DnaK. Finally, we tested whether DnaK mutants could complement growth of ΔdnaK E. coli cells under heat shock and found that the ability to refold luciferase was more predictive of in vivo activity than ATPase rate. This study provides insights into how flexibility and co-chaperone interactions affect DnaK-mediated ATP turnover and protein folding. PMID:20439464

  3. Coordination of chemical (trimethylamine oxide) and molecular (heat shock protein 70) chaperone responses to heat stress in elasmobranch red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Ashra; Robertson, Cayleih E; Thistle, Maria E; Gamperl, A Kurt; Currie, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Chemical and molecular chaperones are organic compounds that protect and stabilize proteins from damage and aggregation as a result of cellular stress. Using the dogfish (Squalus acanthias) red blood cell (RBC) as a model, we examined whether elasmobranch cells with naturally high concentrations of the chemical chaperone trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) would induce the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) when exposed to an acute thermal stress. Our hypothesis was that TMAO is itself capable of preventing damage and preserving cellular function during thermal stress and thus that the heat shock response would be inhibited/diminished. We incubated RBCs in vitro with and without physiologically relevant concentrations of TMAO at 13°C and then exposed cells to a 1-h acute heat shock at 24°C. HSP70 protein expression was elevated in dogfish RBCs after the acute heat stress, but this induction was inhibited by extracellular TMAO. Regardless of the presence of TMAO and/or HSP70, we did not observe any cell damage, as indicated by changes in caspase 3/7 activity, protein carbonyls, membrane viability, or levels of ubiquitin. We also saw no change in RBC cell function, as determined by hemoglobin oxygen affinity or carrying capacity, in cells lacking the heat shock response but protected by TMAO. This study demonstrates that there is cellular coordination between chemical and molecular chaperones in response to an acute thermal stress in dogfish RBCs and suggests that TMAO has a thermoprotective role in these cells, thus eliminating the need for a heat shock response. PMID:25244377

  4. Mutations of the molecular chaperone protein SecB which alter the interaction between SecB and maltose-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Gannon, P M; Kumamoto, C A

    1993-01-25

    SecB is a 16-kDa cytosolic chaperone protein that is required for efficient export of particular proteins in Escherichia coli. To identify regions of SecB that contribute to efficient protein export, we isolated secB point mutants that are defective for protein export in vivo. We obtained missense mutations at residues Leu75 (SecBL75Q), Cys76 (SecBC76Y), and Glu77 (SecBE77K) in the center of the secB gene. In vivo, mutant SecBL75Q and SecBE77K proteins are capable of binding to precursor maltose-binding protein (MBP) and preventing the formation of export-incompetent precursor MBP; however, export of MBP is still defective. In vitro, purified SecBL75Q and SecBE77K proteins bound to unfolded MBP and blocked its refolding. SecBL75Q and SecBE77K were more effective than wild-type SecB at blocking the refolding of unfolded MBP, suggesting that SecBL75Q and SecBE77K have a higher affinity for unfolded MBP. PMID:8420934

  5. Ribosomal P3 protein AtP3B of Arabidopsis acts as both protein and RNA chaperone to increase tolerance of heat and cold stresses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Ho; Lee, Young Mee; Park, Joung Hun; Nawkar, Ganesh M; Oh, Hun Taek; Kim, Min Gab; Lee, Soo In; Kim, Woe Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2016-07-01

    The P3 proteins are plant-specific ribosomal P-proteins; however, their molecular functions have not been characterized. In a screen for components of heat-stable high-molecular weight (HMW) complexes, we isolated the P3 protein AtP3B from heat-treated Arabidopsis suspension cultures. By size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), SDS-PAGE and native PAGE followed by immunoblotting with anti-AtP3B antibody, we showed that AtP3B was stably retained in HMW complexes following heat shock. The level of AtP3B mRNA increased in response to both high- and low-temperature stresses. Bacterially expressed recombinant AtP3B protein exhibited both protein and RNA chaperone activities. Knockdown of AtP3B by RNAi made plants sensitive to both high- and low-temperature stresses, whereas overexpression of AtP3B increased tolerance of both conditions. Together, our results suggest that AtP3B protects cells against both high- and low-temperature stresses. These findings provide novel insight into the molecular functions and in vivo roles of acidic ribosomal P-proteins, thereby expanding our knowledge of the protein production machinery. PMID:27004478

  6. Effect of Chemical Chaperones in Improving the Solubility of Recombinant Proteins in Escherichia coli▿†

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Shivcharan; Khadatare, Prashant B.; Roy, Ipsita

    2011-01-01

    The recovery of active proteins from inclusion bodies usually involves chaotrope-induced denaturation, followed by refolding of the unfolded protein. The efficiency of renaturation is low, leading to reduced yield of the final product. In this work, we report that recombinant proteins can be overexpressed in the soluble form in the host expression system by incorporating compatible solutes during protein expression. Green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was otherwise expressed as inclusion bodies, could be made to partition off into the soluble fraction when sorbitol and arginine, but not ethylene glycol, were present in the growth medium. Arginine and sorbitol increased the production of soluble protein, while ethylene glycol did not. Production of ATP increased in the presence of sorbitol and arginine, but not ethylene glycol. A control experiment with fructose addition indicated that protein solubilization was not due to a simple ATP increase. We have successfully reproduced these results with the N-terminal domain of HypF (HypF-N), a bacterial protein which forms inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. Instead of forming inclusion bodies, HypF-N could be expressed as a soluble protein in the presence of sorbitol, arginine, and trehalose in the expression medium. PMID:21551288

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibits collagen synthesis independent of collagen-modifying enzymes in different chondrocyte populations and dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Lucienne A; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Huang, Chun-Ling; Helder, Marco N; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A

    2010-06-01

    Chondrocytes respond to glucose deprivation with a decreased collagen synthesis due to disruption of a proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER): ER stress. Since the mechanisms involved in the decreased synthesis are unknown, we have investigated whether chaperones and collagen-modifying enzymes are affected by glucose deprivation. Chondrocytes obtained from nucleus pulposus, annulus fibrosus, articular cartilage, and meniscus and dermal fibroblasts were cultured under control conditions or exposed to the ER stress-inducing treatments of tunicamycin addition or glucose withdrawal. Both treatments resulted in an up-regulation of the gene expression of the ER stress markers in all cell types, but dermal fibroblasts showed a delayed response to glucose deprivation. Collagen gene expression was down-regulated, and less collagen protein was present in the cells under both ER stress-inducing conditions. The expression levels of the prolyl 4-hydroxylases were either not affected (P4ha3) or increased (P4ha1 and P4ha2), the levels of the lysyl hydroxylases decreased, and the N-propeptidase Adamts2 decreased. Both treatments induced apoptosis. Chondrocytes respond more quickly to glucose deprivation, but it appears that chondrocytes can cope better with tunicamycin-induced ER stress than fibroblasts. Although collagen synthesis was inhibited by the treatments, some collagen-modifying enzymes and chaperones were up-regulated, suggesting that there is no causal relation between them. PMID:20555395

  8. Unique Peptide Substrate Binding Properties of 110-kDa Heat-shock Protein (Hsp110) Determine Its Distinct Chaperone Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xinping; Sarbeng, Evans Boateng; Vorvis, Christina; Kumar, Divya Prasanna; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Qinglian

    2012-01-01

    The molecular chaperone 70-kDa heat-shock proteins (Hsp70s) play essential roles in maintaining protein homeostasis. Hsp110, an Hsp70 homolog, is highly efficient in preventing protein aggregation but lacks the hallmark folding activity seen in Hsp70s. To understand the mechanistic differences between these two chaperones, we first characterized the distinct peptide substrate binding properties of Hsp110s. In contrast to Hsp70s, Hsp110s prefer aromatic residues in their substrates, and the substrate binding and release exhibit remarkably fast kinetics. Sequence and structure comparison revealed significant differences in the two peptide-binding loops: the length and properties are switched. When we swapped these two loops in an Hsp70, the peptide binding properties of this mutant Hsp70 were converted to Hsp110-like, and more impressively, it functionally behaved like an Hsp110. Thus, the peptide substrate binding properties implemented in the peptide-binding loops may determine the chaperone activity differences between Hsp70s and Hsp110s. PMID:22157767

  9. Evolutionary silence of the acid chaperone protein HdeB in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Periplasmic chaperones HdeA and HdeB are known to be important for cell survival at low pH (pH<3) in E. coli and Shigella spp. Here we investigated the roles of these two acid chaperones in survival of various enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) following exposure to pH 2.0. Similar to K-12 strains, th...

  10. Cell Surface Relocalization of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone and Unfolded Protein Response Regulator GRP78/BiP*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Ren; Ni, Min; Gill, Parkash; Lee, Amy S.

    2010-01-01

    The recent discovery that GRP78/BiP, a typical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumenal chaperone, can be expressed on the cell surface, interacting with an increasing repertoire of surface proteins and acting as receptor in signaling pathways, represents a paradigm shift in its biological function. However, the mechanism of GRP78 trafficking from the ER to the cell surface is not well understood. Using a combination of cellular, biochemical, and mutational approaches, we tested multiple hypotheses. Here we report that ER stress actively promotes GRP78 localization on the cell surface, whereas ectopic expression of GRP78 is also able to cause cell surface relocation in the absence of ER stress. Moreover, deletion of the C-terminal ER retention motif in GRP78 alters its cell surface presentation in a dose-dependent manner; however, mutation of the putative O-linked glycosylation site Thr648 of human GRP78 is without effect. We also identified the exposure of multiple domains of GRP78 on the cell surface and determined that binding of extracellular GRP78 to the cell surface is unlikely. A new topology model for cell surface GRP78 is presented. PMID:20208072