Science.gov

Sample records for collagen gene col7a1

  1. Premature termination codons in the Type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) underlie severe, mutilating recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J. ); Anhalt, G. ); Gibbons, S.; Bauer, E.A. )

    1994-05-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of heritable mechano-bullous skin diseases classified into three major categories on the basis of the level of tissue separation within the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone. The most severe, dystrophic (scarring) forms of EB demonstrate blister formation below the cutaneous basement membrane at the level of the anchoring fibrils. Ultrastructural observations of altered anchoring fibrils and genetic linkage to the gene encoding type VII collagen (COL7A1), the major component of anchoring fibrils, have implicated COL7A1 as the candidate gene in the dystrophic forms of EB. The authors have recently cloned the entire cDNA and gene for human COL7A1, which has been mapped to 3p21. In this study, they describe mutations in four COL7A1 alleles in three patients with severe, mutilating recessive dystrophic EB (Hallopeau-Siemens type, HS-RDEB). Each of these mutations resulted in a premature termination codon (PTC) in the amino-terminal portion of COL7A1. One of the patients was a compound heterozygote for two different mutations. The heterozygous carriers showed an [approximately] 50% reduction in anchoring fibrils, yet were clinically unaffected. Premature termination codons in both alleles of COL7A1 may thus be a major underlying cause of the severe, recessive dystrophic forms of EB. 40 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Structural organization of the human type VII collagen gene (COL7A1), composed of more exons than any previously characterized gene

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, A.M.; Chung-Honet, L.C.; Greenspan, D.S.; Hoffman, G.G.; Lee, S.; Cheng, W. ); Uitto, J. )

    1994-05-01

    The human type VII collagen (COL7A1) gene is the locus for mutations in at least some cases of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Here the authors describe the entire intron/exon organization of COL7A1, which is shown to have 118 exons, more than any previously described gene. Despite this complexity, COL7A1 is compact. Consisting of 31,132 bp from transcription start site to polyadenylation site, it is only about three times the size of type VII collagen mRNA. Thus, COL7A1 introns are small. A 71-nucleotide COL7A1 intron is the smallest intron yet reported in a collagen gene, and only one COL7A1 intron is greater than 1 kb in length. All exons in the COL7A1 triple helix coding region that do not begin with sequences corresponding to imperfections of the triple helix begin with intact codons for Gly residues of Gly-X-Y repeats. This is reminiscent of the structure of fibrillar rather than other nonfibrillar collagen genes. In addition, the COL7A1 triple helix coding region contains many exons of recurring sizes (e.g., 25 exons are 36 bp, 12 exons are 45 bp, 8 exons are 63 bp), suggesting an evolutionary origin distinct from those of other nonfibrillar collagen genes. Sequences from the 5[prime] portion of COL7A1 are presented along with the 3766-bp intergenic sequence, which separated COL7A1 from the upstream gene encoding the core I protein of the cytochrome bc[sub 1] complex. The COL7A1 promoter region is found to lack extensive homologies with promoter regions of other genes expressed primarily in skin. 60 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of the mouse type VII collagen gene (Col7a1): Evidence for rapid evolutionary divergence of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kehua; Christiano, A.M.; Chu, Mon Li; Uitto, J. Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA ); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J. )

    1993-06-01

    Type VII collagen is the major component of anchoring fibrils, critical attachment structures at the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone. Genetic linkage analyses with recently cloned human type VII collagen cDNAs have indicated that the corresponding gene, COL7A1, is the candidate gene in the dystrophic forms of epidermolysis bullosa. To gain insight into the evolutionary conservation of COL7A1, in this study the authors have isolated mouse type VII collagen cDNAs by screening a mouse epidermal keratinocyte cDNA library with a human COL7A1 cDNA. Two overlapping mouse cDNAs were isolated, and Northern hybridization of mouse epidermal keratinocyte RNA with one of them revealed the presence of a mRNA transcript of [approximately]9.5 kb, the approximate size of the human COL7A1 mRNA. Nucleotide sequencing of the mouse cDNAs revealed a 2760-bp open reading frame that encodes the 5[prime] half of the collagenous domain and a segment of the NC-1, the noncollagenous amino-terminal domain of type VII collagen. Comparison of the mouse amino acid sequences with the corresponding human sequences deduced from cDNAs revealed 82.5% identity. The evolutionary divergence of the gene was relatively rapid in comparison to other collagen genes. Despite the high degree of sequence variation, several sequences, including the size and the position of noncollagenous imperfections and interruptions within the Gly-X-Y repeat sequence, were precisely conserved. Finally, the mouse Col7a1 gene was located by interspecific backcross mapping to mouse Chromosome 9, a region that corresponds to human chromosome 3p21, the position of human COL7Al. This assignment confirms and extends the relationship between the mouse and the human chromosomes in this region of the genome. 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Characterization of mutations of the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa mitis (M-RDEB) from three Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, Y W; Kim, B C; Lee, K S

    2001-06-01

    In recent years, the molecular basis for the main subtypes of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) has been elucidated with pathogenetic mutations delineated in ten different genes encoding structural components of the dermal-epidermal junction. Both the autosomal dominant and recessive forms of dystrophic EB (DEB) is caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene. Type VII collagen is a major component of anchoring fibrils, structural elements that stabilize the attachment of the basement membrane to underlying dermis. Recent delineation of the exon-intron organization of the COL7A1 gene provided the basis for the comprehensive design of PCR primer pairs that amplified exons in genomic DNA by placing the primers on the flanking introns. A number of COL7A1 mutations have been reported and some genotype-phenotype correlations are starting to emerge. In this study, we examined mutational analyses from three Korean patients with recessive dystrophic EB (RDEB) mitis. We designed and optimized primers according to the previously reported sequences. Such PCR amplification products can be examined by electrophoretic scanning technique, CSGE heteroduplex analyses. Utilizing heteroduplex analyses, we have identified a number of sequence variants in COL7A1 both in unaffected individuals and in patients with M-RDEB. Mutation detection of the COL7A1 gene revealed six allelic mutations (V6677E, P6685S, Y3749S, P6084S, P6695R and G6697C). We suggest that the full length of type VII collagen polypeptide are synthesized, but those missense mutations, that may affect a critical amino acid, can alter the conformation of the protein and interferes with the assembly and packing of type VII collagen molecules into anchoring fibrils. Immunohistochemical study of skin biopsies by use of anti-type VII collagen antibody showed markedly reduced staining and presence of a dermo/epidermal cleavage. This is the first report of a COL7A1 mutation study in DEB from Korean patients. We hope that these data

  5. PCR-SSCP analysis of the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1): Detection of a point mutation in five patients

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnil, M.G.S.; Richards, A.J.; Pope, F.M.

    1994-09-01

    Type VII collagen is the major component of anchoring fibrils, structures which extend below the lamina densa of the epidermal basement membrane in stratified squamous epithelia. Genetic linkage studies and two mutation reports have implicated the type VII collagen gene, COL7A1, in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB), an inherited disorder characterized by blistering and scarring of the skin and mucous membranes after minor trauma. We have used PCR-SSCP of genomic DNA to screen exons of COL7A1 for mutations in recessive DEB patients. Band mobility shifts were detected in exon FN4-B in five patients. Sequencing revealed a C to T transition changing a codon for arginine into a stop codon, homozygous in two related patients and heterozygous in the others. We are currently searching for a second mutation in these three heterozygous patients who are presumably genetic compounds. Screening for an informative Xho I restriction site altered by the mutation showed parental heterozygosity but no evidence for the mutation in 50 normal chromosomes. Segregation of COL7A1 markers in these patients suggests that the mutation has arisen independently in at least two of our families. The premature stop mutation in the 5{prime} end of the gene predicts a severely shortened collagen VII molecule. The homozygote formation of anchoring fibrils would be impaired providing an explanation at the molecular level for the ultrastructural findings of reduced numbers or absence of anchoring fibrils in this disease. In conclusion, these data strongly suggest that this novel premature stop mutation is the cause of DEB in the homozygotes and contributes to the disease in the other patients. The important role of anchoring fibrils in dermal-epidermal adhesion is also underlined.

  6. A Gene Gun-mediated Nonviral RNA trans-splicing Strategy for Col7a1 Repair.

    PubMed

    Peking, Patricia; Koller, Ulrich; Hainzl, Stefan; Kitzmueller, Sophie; Kocher, Thomas; Mayr, Elisabeth; Nyström, Alexander; Lener, Thomas; Reichelt, Julia; Bauer, Johann W; Murauer, Eva M

    2016-01-01

    RNA trans-splicing represents an auspicious option for the correction of genetic mutations at RNA level. Mutations within COL7A1 causing strong reduction or absence of type VII collagen are associated with the severe skin blistering disease dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. The human COL7A1 mRNA constitutes a suitable target for this RNA therapy approach, as only a portion of the almost 9 kb transcript has to be delivered into the target cells. Here, we have proven the feasibility of 5' trans-splicing into the Col7a1 mRNA in vitro and in vivo. We designed a 5' RNA trans-splicing molecule, capable of replacing Col7a1 exons 1-15 and verified it in a fluorescence-based trans-splicing model system. Specific and efficient Col7a1 trans-splicing was confirmed in murine keratinocytes. To analyze trans-splicing in vivo, we used gene gun delivery of a minicircle expressing a FLAG-tagged 5' RNA trans-splicing molecule into the skin of wild-type mice. Histological and immunofluorescence analysis of bombarded skin sections revealed vector delivery and expression within dermis and epidermis. Furthermore, we have detected trans-spliced type VII collagen protein using FLAG-tag antibodies. In conclusion, we describe a novel in vivo nonviral RNA therapy approach to restore type VII collagen expression for causative treatment of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. PMID:26928235

  7. Gene Editing for the Efficient Correction of a Recurrent COL7A1 Mutation in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Cristina; Mencía, Angeles; Almarza, David; Duarte, Blanca; Büning, Hildegard; Sallach, Jessica; Hausser, Ingrid; Del Río, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando; Murillas, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Clonal gene therapy protocols based on the precise manipulation of epidermal stem cells require highly efficient gene-editing molecular tools. We have combined adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of donor template DNA with transcription activator-like nucleases (TALE) expressed by adenoviral vectors to address the correction of the c.6527insC mutation in the COL7A1 gene, causing recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in a high percentage of Spanish patients. After transduction with these viral vectors, high frequencies of homology-directed repair were found in clones of keratinocytes derived from a recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) patient homozygous for the c.6527insC mutation. Gene-edited clones recovered the expression of the COL7A1 transcript and collagen VII protein at physiological levels. In addition, treatment of patient keratinocytes with TALE nucleases in the absence of a donor template DNA resulted in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated indel generation in the vicinity of the c.6527insC mutation site in a large proportion of keratinocyte clones. A subset of these indels restored the reading frame of COL7A1 and resulted in abundant, supraphysiological expression levels of mutant or truncated collagen VII protein. Keratinocyte clones corrected both by homology-directed repair (HDR) or NHEJ were used to regenerate skin displaying collagen VII in the dermo-epidermal junction. PMID:27045209

  8. Genetic linkage of type VII collagen (COL7A1) to dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in families with abnormal anchoring fibrils.

    PubMed Central

    Ryynänen, M; Ryynänen, J; Sollberg, S; Iozzo, R V; Knowlton, R G; Uitto, J

    1992-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) in a group of genodermatoses characterized by the fragility of skin. Previous studies on the dystrophic (scarring) forms of EB have suggested abnormalities in anchoring fibrils, morphologically recognizable attachment structures that provide stability to the association of the cutaneous basement membrane to the underlying dermis. Since type VII collagen is the major component of the anchoring fibrils, we examined the genetic linkage of dominant dystrophic EB (EBDD) and the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) locus, which we have recently mapped to chromosome 3p, in three large kindreds with abnormal anchoring fibrils. Strong genetic linkage of EBDD and COL7A1 loci was demonstrated with the maximum logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 8.77 at theta = 0. This linkage was further confirmed with two additional markers in this region of the short arm of chromosome 3, and these analyses allowed further refinement of the map locus of COL7A1. Since there were no recombinants between the COL7A1 and EBDD loci, our findings suggest that type VII collagen is the candidate gene that may harbor the mutations responsible for the EB phenotype in these three families. Images PMID:1347297

  9. SIN Retroviral Vectors Expressing COL7A1 Under Human Promoters for Ex Vivo Gene Therapy of Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Titeux, Matthias; Pendaries, Valérie; Zanta-Boussif, Maria A; Décha, Audrey; Pironon, Nathalie; Tonasso, Laure; Mejia, José E; Brice, Agnes; Danos, Olivier; Hovnanian, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL7A1 encoding type VII collagen which forms key structures (anchoring fibrils) for dermal–epidermal adherence. Patients suffer since birth from skin blistering, and develop severe local and systemic complications resulting in poor prognosis. We lack a specific treatment for RDEB, but ex vivo gene transfer to epidermal stem cells shows a therapeutic potential. To minimize the risk of oncogenic events, we have developed new minimal self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors in which the COL7A1 complementary DNA (cDNA) is under the control of the human elongation factor 1α (EF1α) or COL7A1 promoters. We show efficient ex vivo genetic correction of primary RDEB keratinocytes and fibroblasts without antibiotic selection, and use either of these genetically corrected cells to generate human skin equivalents (SEs) which were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. We achieved long-term expression of recombinant type VII collagen with restored dermal–epidermal adherence and anchoring fibril formation, demonstrating in vivo functional correction. In few cases, rearranged proviruses were detected, which were probably generated during the retrotranscription process. Despite this observation which should be taken under consideration for clinical application, this preclinical study paves the way for a therapy based on grafting the most severely affected skin areas of patients with fully autologous SEs genetically corrected using a SIN COL7A1 retroviral vector. PMID:20485266

  10. Gene-Corrected Fibroblast Therapy for Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa using a Self-Inactivating COL7A1 Retroviral Vector.

    PubMed

    Jacków, Joanna; Titeux, Matthias; Portier, Soizic; Charbonnier, Soëli; Ganier, Clarisse; Gaucher, Sonia; Hovnanian, Alain

    2016-07-01

    Patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) lack type VII collagen and therefore have severely impaired dermal-epidermal stability causing recurrent skin and mucosal blistering. There is currently no specific approved treatment for RDEB. We present preclinical data showing that intradermal injections of genetically corrected patient-derived RDEB fibroblasts using a Good Manufacturing Practices grade self-inactivating COL7A1 retroviral vector reverse the disease phenotype in a xenograft model in nude mice. We obtained 50% transduction efficiency in primary human RDEB fibroblasts with an average low copy number (range = 1-2) of integrated provirus. Transduced fibroblasts showed strong type VII collagen re-expression, improved adhesion properties, normal proliferative capabilities, and viability in vitro. We show that a single intradermal injection of 3 × 10(6) genetically corrected RDEB fibroblasts beneath RDEB skin equivalents grafted onto mice allows type VII collagen deposition, anchoring fibril formation at the dermal-epidermal junction, and improved dermal-epidermal adherence 2 months after treatment, supporting functional correction in vivo. Gene-corrected fibroblasts previously showed no tumorigenicity. These data show the efficacy and safety of gene-corrected fibroblast therapy using a self-inactivating vector that has now been good manufacturing grade-certified and pave the way for clinical translation to treat nonhealing wounds in RDEB patients. PMID:26994967

  11. A COL7A1 Mutation Causes Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa in Rotes Höhenvieh Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Menoud, Annie; Welle, Monika; Tetens, Jens; Lichtner, Peter; Drögemüller, Cord

    2012-01-01

    We identified a congenital mechanobullous skin disorder in six calves on a single farm of an endangered German cattle breed in 2010. The condition presented as a large loss of skin distal to the fetlocks and at the mucosa of the muzzle. All affected calves were euthanized on humane grounds due to the severity, extent and progression of the skin and oral lesions. Examination of skin samples under light microscopy revealed detachment of the epidermis from the dermis at the level of the dermo epidermal junction, leading to the diagnosis of a subepidermal bullous dermatosis such as epidermolysis bullosa. The pedigree was consistent with monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance. We localized the causative mutation to an 18 Mb interval on chromosome 22 by homozygosity mapping. The COL7A1 gene encoding collagen type VII alpha 1 is located within this interval and COL7A1 mutations have been shown to cause inherited dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) in humans. A SNP in the bovine COL7A1 exon 49 (c.4756C>T) was perfectly associated with the observed disease. The homozygous mutant T/T genotype was exclusively present in affected calves and their parents were heterozygous C/T confirming the assumed recessive mode of inheritance. All known cases and genotyped carriers were related to a single cow, which is supposed to be the founder animal. The mutant T allele was absent in 63 animals from 24 cattle breeds. The identified mutation causes a premature stop codon which leads to a truncated protein representing a complete loss of COL7A1 function (p.R1586*). We thus have identified a candidate causative mutation for this genetic disease using only three cases to unravel its molecular basis. Selection against this mutation can now be used to eliminate the mutant allele from the Rotes Höhenvieh breed. PMID:22715415

  12. Characterization of 18 new mutations in COL7A1 in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa provides evidence for distinct molecular mechanisms underlying defective anchoring fibril formation.

    PubMed Central

    Hovnanian, A; Rochat, A; Bodemer, C; Petit, E; Rivers, C A; Prost, C; Fraitag, S; Christiano, A M; Uitto, J; Lathrop, M; Barrandon, Y; de Prost, Y

    1997-01-01

    We have characterized 21 mutations in the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) encoding the anchoring fibrils, 18 of which were not previously reported, in patients from 15 unrelated families with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). COL7A1 mutations in both alleles were identified by screening the 118 exons of COL7A1 and flanking intron regions. Fourteen mutations created premature termination codons (PTCs) and consisted of nonsense mutations, small insertions, deletions, and splice-site mutations. A further seven mutations predicted glycine or arginine substitutions in the collagenous domain of the molecule. Two mutations were found in more than one family reported in this study, and six of the seven missense mutations showed clustering within exons 72-74 next to the hinge region of the protein. Patients who were homozygous or compound heterozygotes for mutations leading to PTCs displayed both absence or drastic reduction of COL7A1 transcripts and undetectable type VII collagen protein in skin. In contrast, missense mutations were associated with clearly detectable COL7A1 transcripts and with normal or reduced expression of type VII collagen protein at the dermo/epidermal junction. Our results provide evidence for at least two distinct molecular mechanisms underlying defective anchoring fibril formation in RDEB: one involving PTCs leading to mRNA instability and absence of protein synthesis, the other implicating missense mutations resulting in the synthesis of type VII collagen polypeptide with decreased stability and/or altered function. Genotype-phenotype correlations suggested that the nature and location of these mutations are important determinants of the disease phenotype and showed evidence for interfamilial phenotypic variability. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9326325

  13. Compound heterozygosity for COL7A1 mutations in twins with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: A recessive paternal deletion/insertion mutation and a dominant negative maternal glycine substitution result in a severe phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J.; Anton-Lamprecht, I.; Ebschner, U.; Amano, S.; Burgeson, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    We have previously demonstrated genetic linkage between the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) and the dominant (DDEB) and recessive (RDEB) forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) and have subsequently identified pathogenetic mutations in several families. Mutations in DDEB identified thus far are glycine substitutions in the collagenous domain of COL7A1, while the most severe forms of RDEB result from premature termination codon (PTC) mutations on both alleles. In this study, we performed mutation analysis in the COL7A1 gene in twins who displayed a severe DEB phenotype. Mutational analysis revealed a paternal 2-bp deletion/1-bp insertion in exon 56, designated 5103CC{yields}G, which results in a frameshift and downstream PTC. Analysis of the maternal COL7A1 allele revealed a glycine-to-arginine substitution in exon 91 (G2351R). Careful questioning of the mother revealed that she and her father had a history of shedding of toenails and occasional poorly heating erosions, consistent with a mild form of DDEB. Immunoprecipitation of type VII collagen from fibroblasts of the twins revealed a marked reduction in intracellular protein production, consistent with the drastic reduction in mRNA transcript from the paternal mutant allele, while the majority of polypeptides bearing the glycine substitution appeared to be degraded intracellularly. Thus, the severe RDEB phenotype in the probands results from compound heterozygosity for one glycine substitution and one PTC mutation in COL7A1. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Lentiviral Engineered Fibroblasts Expressing Codon-Optimized COL7A1 Restore Anchoring Fibrils in RDEB

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, Christos; Syed, Farhatullah; Petrova, Anastasia; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Lwin, Su M.; Farzaneh, Farzin; Chan, Lucas; Ghani, Sumera; Fleck, Roland A.; Glover, Leanne; McMillan, James R.; Chen, Mei; Thrasher, Adrian J.; McGrath, John A.; Di, Wei-Li; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Cells therapies, engineered to secrete replacement proteins, are being developed to ameliorate otherwise debilitating diseases. Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by defects of type VII collagen, a protein essential for anchoring fibril formation at the dermal-epidermal junction. Whereas allogeneic fibroblasts injected directly into the dermis can mediate transient disease modulation, autologous gene-modified fibroblasts should evade immunological rejection and support sustained delivery of type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal junction. We demonstrate the feasibility of such an approach using a therapeutic grade, self-inactivating-lentiviral vector, encoding codon-optimized COL7A1, to transduce RDEB fibroblasts under conditions suitable for clinical application. Expression and secretion of type VII collagen was confirmed with transduced cells exhibiting supranormal levels of protein expression, and ex vivo migration of fibroblasts was restored in functional assays. Gene-modified RDEB fibroblasts also deposited type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal junction of human RDEB skin xenografts placed on NOD-scid IL2Rgammanull recipients, with reconstruction of human epidermal structure and regeneration of anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction. Fibroblast-mediated restoration of protein and structural defects in this RDEB model strongly supports proposed therapeutic applications in man. PMID:26763448

  15. Lentiviral Engineered Fibroblasts Expressing Codon-Optimized COL7A1 Restore Anchoring Fibrils in RDEB.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, Christos; Syed, Farhatullah; Petrova, Anastasia; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Lwin, Su M; Farzaneh, Farzin; Chan, Lucas; Ghani, Sumera; Fleck, Roland A; Glover, Leanne; McMillan, James R; Chen, Mei; Thrasher, Adrian J; McGrath, John A; Di, Wei-Li; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Cells therapies, engineered to secrete replacement proteins, are being developed to ameliorate otherwise debilitating diseases. Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by defects of type VII collagen, a protein essential for anchoring fibril formation at the dermal-epidermal junction. Whereas allogeneic fibroblasts injected directly into the dermis can mediate transient disease modulation, autologous gene-modified fibroblasts should evade immunological rejection and support sustained delivery of type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal junction. We demonstrate the feasibility of such an approach using a therapeutic grade, self-inactivating-lentiviral vector, encoding codon-optimized COL7A1, to transduce RDEB fibroblasts under conditions suitable for clinical application. Expression and secretion of type VII collagen was confirmed with transduced cells exhibiting supranormal levels of protein expression, and ex vivo migration of fibroblasts was restored in functional assays. Gene-modified RDEB fibroblasts also deposited type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal junction of human RDEB skin xenografts placed on NOD-scid IL2Rgamma(null) recipients, with reconstruction of human epidermal structure and regeneration of anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction. Fibroblast-mediated restoration of protein and structural defects in this RDEB model strongly supports proposed therapeutic applications in man. PMID:26763448

  16. Case Report: Whole exome sequencing reveals a novel frameshift deletion mutation p.G2254fs in COL7A1 associated with autosomal recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Karuthedath Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen; Jayarajan, Rijith; Verma, Ankit; Nair, Sreelata; Ravi, Rowmika; Senthivel, Vigneshwar; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa simplex (DEB) is a phenotypically diverse inherited skin fragility disorder. It is majorly manifested by appearance of epidermal bullae upon friction caused either by physical or environmental trauma. The phenotypic manifestations also include appearance of milia, scarring all over the body and nail dystrophy. DEB can be inherited in a recessive or dominant form and the recessive form of DEB (RDEB) is more severe. In the present study, we identify a novel p.G2254fs mutation in COL7A1 gene causing a sporadic case of RDEB by whole exome sequencing (WES). Apart from adding a novel frameshift Collagen VII mutation to the repertoire of known mutations reported in the disease, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a genetically characterized case of DEB from India. PMID:27408687

  17. Recurrent nonsense mutations within the type VII collagen gene in patients with severe recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hovnanian, A.; Hilal, L.; Goossens, M. ); Blanchet-Bardon, C.; Prost, Y. de ); Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J. )

    1994-08-01

    The generalized mutilating form of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (i.e., the Hallopeau-Siemens type; HS-RDEB) is a life-threatening disease characterized by extreme mucocutaneous fragility associated with absent or markedly altered anchoring fibrils (AF). Recently, the authors reported linkage between HS-RDEB and the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1), which encodes the major component of AF. In this study, they investigated 52 unrelated HS-RDEB patients and 2 patients with RDEB inversa for the presence, at CpG dinucleotides, of mutations changing CGA arginine codons to premature stop codons TGA within the COL7A1 gene. Eight exons containing 10 CGA codons located in the amino-terminal domain of the COL7A1 gene were studied. Mutation analysis was performed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified genomic fragments. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products with altered electrophoretic mobility led to the characterization of three premature stop codons, each in a single COL7A1 allele, in four patients. Two patients (one affected with HS-RDEB and the other with RDEB inversa) have the same C-to-T transition at arginine codon 109. Two other HS-RDEB patients have a C-to-T transition at arginine 1213 and 1216, respectively. These nonsense mutations predict the truncation of [approximately]56%-92% of the polypeptide, including the collagenous and the noncollagenous NC-2 domains. On the basis of linkage analysis, which showed no evidence for locus heterogeneity in RDEB, it is expected that these patients are compound heterozygotes and have additional mutations on the other COL7A1 allele, leading to impaired AF formation. These results indicate that stop mutations within the COL7A1 gene can underlie both HS-RDEB and RDEB inversa, thus providing further evidence for the implication of this gene in RDEB. 46 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. An Incompletely Penetrant Novel Mutation in COL7A1 Causes Epidermolysis Bullosa Pruriginosa and Dominant Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Phenotypes in an Extended Kindred

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Catherine S; Lu, Yin; Farhi, Anita; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Kashgarian, Michael; Glusac, Earl J; Lifton, Richard P; Antaya, Richard J; Choate, Keith A

    2012-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa (EBP) is a rare subtype of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) characterized by intense pruritus, nodular or lichenoid lesions, and violaceous linear scarring, most prominently on the extensor extremities. Remarkably, identical mutations in COL7A1, which encodes an anchoring fibril protein present at the dermal–epidermal junction, can cause both DEB and EBP with either autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance. We present one family with both dystrophic and pruriginosa phenotypes of epidermolysis bullosa. The proband is a 19-year-old Caucasian woman who initially presented in childhood with lichenoid papules affecting her extensor limbs and intense pruritus consistent with EBP. Her maternal grandmother saw a dermatologist for similar skin lesions that developed without any known triggers at age 47 and mostly resolved spontaneously after approximately 10 years. The proband’s younger brother developed a small crop of pruritic papules on his elbows, dorsal hands, knees, and ankles at age 13. Her second cousin once removed, however, reported a mild blistering disease without pruritus consistent with DEB. Genetic sequencing of the kindred revealed a single dominant novel intron 47 splice site donor G>A mutation, c.4668 + 1 G>A, which we predict leads to exon skipping. Incomplete penetrance is confirmed in her clinically unaffected mother, who carries the same dominant mutation. The wide diversity of clinical phenotypes with one underlying genotype demonstrates that COL7A1 mutations are incompletely penetrant and strongly suggests that other genetic and environmental factors influence clinical presentation. PMID:22515571

  19. Human type VII collagen: cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Parente, M.G.; Chung, L.C.; Ryynaenen, J.; Monli Chu; Uitto, J. ); Woodley, D.T.; Wynn, K.C.; Bauer, E.A. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1991-08-15

    A human keratinocyte cDNA expression library in bacteriophage {lambda}gt11 was screened with the purified IgG fraction of serum from a patient with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, which had a high titer of anti-type VII collagen antibodies. Screening of {approx}3 {times} 10{sup 5} plaques identified 8 positive clones, the largest one (K-131) being {approx}1.9 kilobases in size. Dideoxynucleotide sequencing of K-131 indicated that it consisted of 1875 base pairs and contained an open reading frame coding for a putative N-terminal noncollagenous domain of 439 amino acids and a collagenous domain was characterized by repeating Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequences that were interrupted in several positions by insertions or deletions of 1-3 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence also revealed a peptide segment that had a high degree of identity with a published type VII collagen protein sequence. The results mapped the COL7A1 to the locus 3p21. The cDNA clones characterized in this study will be valuable for understanding the protein structure and gene expression of type VII collagen present in anchoring fibrils and its aberrations in the dystrophic forms of heritable epidermolysis bullosa.

  20. Glycine substitutions in the triple-helical region of type VII collagen result in a spectrum of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa phenotypes and patterns of inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, A.M.; McGrath, J.A.; Uitto, J.; Kong Chong Tan

    1996-04-01

    The dystrophic forms of epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) are characterized by fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. DEB can be inherited in either an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive pattern, and the spectrum of clinical severity is highly variable. The unifying diagnostic hallmark of DEB is abnormalities in the anchoring fibrils, which consist of type VII collagen, and recently, mutations in the corresponding gene, COL7A1, have been disclosed in a number of families. In this study, we report six families with glycine substitution mutations in the triple-helical region of type VII collagen. Among the six families, two demonstrated a mild phenotype, and the inheritance of the mutation was consistent with the dominantly inherited form of DEB. In the four other families, the mutation was silent in the heterozygous state but, when present in the homozygous state, or combined with a second mutation, resulted in a recessively inherited DEB phenotype. Type VII collagen is, therefore, unique among the collagen genes, in that different glycine substitutions can be either silent in heterozygous individuals or result in a dominantly inherited DEB. Inspection of the locations of the glycine substitutions along the COL7A1 polypeptide suggests that the consequences of these mutations, in terms of phenotype and pattern of inheritance, are position independent. 29 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Renal medullary microRNAs in Dahl salt-sensitive rats: miR-29b regulates several collagens and related genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Taylor, Norman E; Lu, Limin; Usa, Kristie; Cowley, Allen W; Ferreri, Nicholas R; Yeo, Nan Cher; Liang, Mingyu

    2010-04-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous repressors of gene expression. We examined microRNAs in the renal medulla of Dahl salt-sensitive rats and consomic SS-13(BN) rats. Salt-induced hypertension and renal injury in Dahl salt-sensitive rats, particularly medullary interstitial fibrosis, have been shown previously to be substantially attenuated in SS-13(BN) rats. Of 377 microRNAs examined, 5 were found to be differentially expressed between Dahl salt-sensitive rats and consomic SS-13(BN) rats receiving a high-salt diet. Real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that high-salt diets induced substantial upregulation of miR-29b in the renal medulla of SS-13(BN) rats but not in SS rats. miR-29b was predicted to regulate 20 collagen genes, matrix metalloproteinase 2 (Mmp2), integrin beta1 (Itgb1), and other genes related to the extracellular matrix. Expression of 9 collagen genes and Mmp2 was upregulated by a high-salt diet in the renal medulla of SS rats, but not in SS-13(BN) rats, an expression pattern opposite to miR-29b. Knockdown of miR-29b in the kidneys of SS-13(BN) rats resulted in upregulation of several collagen genes. miR-29b reduced expression levels of several collagen genes and Itgb1 in cultured rat renal medullary epithelial cells. Moreover, miR-29b suppressed the activity of luciferase when the reporter gene was linked to a 3'-untranslated segment of collagen genes Col1a1, Col3a1, Col4a1, Col5a1, Col5a2, Col5a3, Col7a1, Col8a1, Mmp2, or Itgb1 but not Col12a1. The result demonstrated broad effects of miR-29b on a large number of collagens and genes related to the extracellular matrix and suggested involvement of miR-29b in the protection from renal medullary injury in SS-13(BN) rats. PMID:20194304

  2. A knot polymer mediated non-viral gene transfection for skin cells.

    PubMed

    Cutlar, Lara; Gao, Yongsheng; Aied, Ahmed; Greiser, Udo; Murauer, Eva Maria; Zhou, Dezhong; Wang, Wenxin

    2016-01-01

    A knot polymer, poly[bis(2-acryloyl)oxyethyl disulphide-co-2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate] (DSP), was synthesized, optimized and evaluated as a non-viral vector for gene transfection for skin cells, keratinocytes. With recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa keratinocytes (RDEBK-TA4), the DSP exhibited high transfection efficacy with both Gaussia luciferase marker DNA and the full length COL7A1 transcript encoding the therapeutic type VII collagen protein (C7). The effective restoration of C7 in C7 null-RDEB skin cells indicates that DSP is promising for non-viral gene therapy of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). PMID:26369723

  3. Cloning of an annelid fibrillar-collagen gene and phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate and invertebrate collagens.

    PubMed

    Sicot, F X; Exposito, J Y; Masselot, M; Garrone, R; Deutsch, J; Gaill, F

    1997-05-15

    Arenicola marina possesses cuticular and interstitial collagens, which are mostly synthesised by its epidermis. A cDNA library was constructed from the body wall. This annelid cDNA library was screened with a sea-urchin-collagen cDNA probe, and several overlapping clones were isolated. Nucleotide sequencing of these clones revealed an open reading frame of 2052 nucleotides. The translation product exhibits a triple helical domain of 138 Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats followed by a 269-residue-long C-terminal non-collagenous domain (C-propeptide). The triple helical domain exhibits an imperfection that has been previously described in a peptide produced by cyanogen bromide digestion (CNBr peptide) of A. marina interstitial collagen. This imperfection occurs at the same place in the interstitial collagen of the vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila. This identifies the clone as coding for the C-terminal part of a fibrillar collagen chain. It was called FAm1alpha, for fibrillar collagen 1alpha chain of A. marina. The non-collagenous domain possesses a structure similar to carboxy-terminal propeptides of fibrillar pro-alpha chains. Only six conserved cysteine residues are observed in A. marina compared with seven or eight in all other known C-propeptides. This provides information on the importance of disulfide bonds in C-propeptide interactions and in the collagen-assembly process. Phylogenetic studies indicate that the fibrillar collagen 1alpha chain of A. marina is homologous to the R. pachyptila interstitial collagen and that the FAm1alpha gene evolved independently from the other alpha-chain genes. Complementary analyses indicate that the vertebrate fibrillar collagen family is composed of two monophyletic subgroups with a specific position of the collagen type-V chains. PMID:9210465

  4. Type VII Collagen Replacement Therapy in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa-How Much, How Often?

    PubMed

    South, Andrew P; Uitto, Jouni

    2016-06-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a devastating blistering disease caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene, which encodes type VII collagen, the major component of anchoring fibrils. The anchoring fibrils in patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa can be morphologically altered, reduced in number, or absent entirely. There is no specific treatment for this disease, but recent advances in gene, protein replacement, or cell-based therapies, with the purpose of delivering functional type VII collagen to the skin, have shown encouraging results in both preclinical and clinical settings. One critical issue is the stability of type VII collagen in anchoring fibrils, which will ultimately determine the dose and frequency of administration of the missing protein. Kühl et al. attempted to determine the half-life of type VII collagen in the skin, tongue, and esophagus of genetically altered mice that express type VII collagen constitutively, but with its expression abrogated by genetic manipulation. Their results revealed a half-life much shorter than previously anticipated, some 30 days. These findings have implications for strategies to be used for protein replacement therapy, and they also suggest that the basement membrane components at the dermal-epidermal junction are subject to ongoing remodeling and turnover. PMID:27212645

  5. Characterization of a fibrillar collagen gene in sponges reveals the early evolutionary appearance of two collagen gene families.

    PubMed Central

    Exposito, J Y; Garrone, R

    1990-01-01

    We have characterized cDNA and genomic clones coding for a sponge collagen. The partial cDNA has an open reading frame encoding 547 amino acid residues. The conceptual translation product contains a probably incomplete triple-helical domain (307 amino acids) with one Gly-Xaa-Yaa-Zaa imperfection in the otherwise perfect Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats and a carboxyl propeptide (240 amino acids) that includes 7 cysteine residues. Amino acid sequence comparisons indicate that this sponge collagen is homologous to vertebrate and sea urchin fibrillar collagens. Partial characterization of the corresponding gene reveals an intron-exon organization clearly related to the fibrillar collagen gene family. The exons coding for the triple-helical domain are 54 base pairs (bp) or multiples thereof, except for a 57-bp exon containing the Gly-Xaa-Yaa-Zaa coding sequence and for two unusual exons of 126 and 18 bp, respectively. This latter 18-bp exon marks the end of the triple-helical domain, contrary to the other known fibrillar collagen genes that contain exons coding for the junction between the triple-helical domain and the carboxyl propeptide. Compared to other fibrillar collagen genes, the introns are remarkably small. Hybridization to blotted RNAs established that the gene transcript is 4.9 kilobases. Together with previous results that showed the existence of a nonfibrillar collagen in the same species, these data demonstrate that at least two collagen gene families are represented in the most primitive metazoa. PMID:2395869

  6. Gene editing toward the use of autologous therapies in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Perdoni, Christopher; Osborn, Mark J; Tolar, Jakub

    2016-02-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is a disease caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene that result in absent or dysfunctional type VII collagen protein production. Clinically, RDEB manifests as early and severe chronic cutaneous blistering, damage to internal epithelium, an increased risk for squamous cell carcinoma, and an overall reduced life expectancy. Recent localized and systemic treatments have shown promise for lessening the disease severity in RDEB, but the concept of ex vivo therapy would allow a patient's own cells to be engineered to express functional type VII collagen. Here, we review gene delivery and editing platforms and their application toward the development of next-generation treatments designed to correct the causative genetic defects of RDEB. PMID:26073463

  7. [Osteochondrodysplasia determined genetically by a collagen type II gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Czarny-Ratajczak, M; Rogala, P; Wolnik-Brzozowska, D; Latos-Bieleńska, A

    2001-01-01

    Chondrodysplasias are a heterogenous group of skeletal dysplasias, affecting the growing cartilage. The main part of chondrodysplasias is caused by mutations in various types of collagen genes. The current classification within this group of disorder relies on clinical, histological and radiographic features. Type II collagenopathies comprise part of chondrodysplasias, consisting of hereditary disorders caused by defects in the type II collagen. Collagen type II is coded by a large gene--COL2A1. The chromosomal location for the human COL2A1 gene is 12q13.11-q13.12. Defects in collagen type II are caused by point mutations in the COL2A1 gene. Type II collagenopathies form a wide spectrum of clinical severity ranging from lethal achondrogenesis type II, hypochondrogenesis, through severe forms like spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia congenita, Marshall syndrome, to the mild forms--Stickler syndrome and early osteoarthritis. The pathological changes in the patients are observed in the growth plate, nucleus pulposus and vitreous body, where the abnormal collagen type II is distributed. This article presents the genetic background of collagenopathies type II and the results of current molecular studies of the patients. Both the molecular and the clinical studies may promise a better understanding of the relationship between the genotype and the phenotype. We present the patients, who were diagnosed at the Department of Medical Genetics and in the Orthopaedic Department in Poznań. PMID:11481990

  8. Regulation of collagen I gene expression by ras.

    PubMed Central

    Slack, J L; Parker, M I; Robinson, V R; Bornstein, P

    1992-01-01

    Although transformation of rodent fibroblasts can lead to dramatic changes in expression of extracellular matrix genes, the molecular basis and physiological significance of these changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism(s) by which ras affects expression of the genes encoding type I collagen. Levels of both alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) collagen mRNAs were markedly reduced in Rat 1 fibroblasts overexpressing either the N-rasLys-61 or the Ha-rasVal-12 oncogene. In fibroblasts conditionally transformed with N-rasLys-61, alpha 1(I) transcript levels began to decline within 8 h of ras induction and reached 1 to 5% of control levels after 96 h. In contrast, overexpression of normal ras p21 had no effect on alpha 1(I) or alpha 2(I) mRNA levels. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that the transcription rates of both the alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) genes were significantly reduced in ras-transformed cells compared with those in parental cells. In addition, the alpha 1(I) transcript was less stable in transformed cells. Chimeric plasmids containing up to 3.6 kb of alpha 1(I) 5'-flanking DNA and up to 2.3 kb of the 3'-flanking region were expressed at equivalent levels in both normal and ras-transformed fibroblasts. However, a cosmid clone containing the entire mouse alpha 1(I) gene, including 3.7 kb of 5'- and 4 kb of 3'-flanking DNA, was expressed at reduced levels in fibroblasts overexpressing oncogenic ras. We conclude that oncogenic ras regulates the type I collagen genes at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels and that this effect, at least for the alpha 1(I) gene, may be mediated by sequences located either within the body of the gene itself or in the distal 3'-flanking region. Images PMID:1406656

  9. Complete structural organization of the human {alpha}1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1): Divergence from the conserved organization of other characterized fibrillar collagen genes

    SciTech Connect

    Takahara, Kazuhiko; Hoffman, G.G.; Greenspan, D.S.

    1995-10-10

    Genes that encode the vertebrate fibrillar collagen types I-III have previously been shown to share a highly conserved intron/exon organization, thought to reflect common ancestry and evolutionary pressures at the protein level. We report here the complete intron/exon organization of COL5A1, the human gene that encodes the {alpha}1 chain of fibrillar collagen type V. The structure of COL5A1 is shown to be considerably diverged from the conserved structure of the genes for fibrillar collagen types I-III. COL5A1 has 66 exons, which is greater than the number of exons found in the genes for collagen types I-III. The increased number of exons is partly due to the increased size of the pro-{alpha}1(V) N-propeptide, relative to the sizes of the N-propeptides of the types I-III procollagen molecules. In addition, however, the increased number of exons is due to differences in the intron/exon organization of the triple-helix coding region of COL5A1 compared to the organization of the triple-helix coding regions of the genes for collagen types I-III. Of particular interest is the increase of 54 bp exons in this region of COL5A1, strongly supporting the proposal that the triple-helix coding regions of fibrillar collagen genes evolved from duplication of a 54 bp primordial genetic element. Moreover, comparison of the structure of COL5A1 to the highly conserved structure of the genes of collagen types I-III provides insights into the probable structure of the ancestral gene that gave rise to what appears to be two classes of vertebrate fibrillar collagen genes. 50 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Deep RNA profiling identified CLOCK and molecular clock genes as pathophysiological signatures in collagen VI myopathy.

    PubMed

    Scotton, Chiara; Bovolenta, Matteo; Schwartz, Elena; Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Martoni, Elena; Passarelli, Chiara; Armaroli, Annarita; Osman, Hana; Rodolico, Carmelo; Messina, Sonia; Pegoraro, Elena; D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Gualandi, Francesca; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Boffi, Patrizia; Maioli, Maria Antonietta; Lochmüller, Hanns; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Katherine; Castrignanò, Tiziana; Pesole, Graziano; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Merlini, Luciano; Braghetta, Paola; Bonaldo, Paolo; Bernardi, Paolo; Foley, Reghan; Cirak, Sebahattin; Zaharieva, Irina; Muntoni, Francesco; Capitanio, Daniele; Gelfi, Cecilia; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Yuryev, Anton; Lebowitz, Michael; Zhang, Xiping; Hodge, Brian A; Esser, Karyn A; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2016-04-15

    Collagen VI myopathies are genetic disorders caused by mutations in collagen 6 A1, A2 and A3 genes, ranging from the severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy to the milder Bethlem myopathy, which is recapitulated by collagen-VI-null (Col6a1(-/-)) mice. Abnormalities in mitochondria and autophagic pathway have been proposed as pathogenic causes of collagen VI myopathies, but the link between collagen VI defects and these metabolic circuits remains unknown. To unravel the expression profiling perturbation in muscles with collagen VI myopathies, we performed a deep RNA profiling in both Col6a1(-/-)mice and patients with collagen VI pathology. The interactome map identified common pathways suggesting a previously undetected connection between circadian genes and collagen VI pathology. Intriguingly, Bmal1(-/-)(also known as Arntl) mice, a well-characterized model displaying arrhythmic circadian rhythms, showed profound deregulation of the collagen VI pathway and of autophagy-related genes. The involvement of circadian rhythms in collagen VI myopathies is new and links autophagy and mitochondrial abnormalities. It also opens new avenues for therapies of hereditary myopathies to modulate the molecular clock or potential gene-environment interactions that might modify muscle damage pathogenesis. PMID:26945058

  11. The Effects of Laser Irradiation of Cartilage on Chondrocyte Gene Expression and the Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Paul K.; Li, Chao; Da Costa, Victor; Sun, Chung-Ho; Bryant, Susan V.; Gardiner, David M.; Wong, Brian J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Laser reshaping of cartilage is an emerging technology aimed at replacing conventional techniques for aesthetic and reconstructive surgery. Little is known about the mechanisms of wound healing following the photothermal heating during laser reshaping and, ultimately, how collagen remodels in the irradiated tissue. Healthy hyaline and elastic cartilage as found in the ear, nose, larynx, and trachea does not express collagen type I which is characteristic of fibro-cartilage and scar tissue. The aim of the study was to determine if collagen I and II gene expression occurs within laser irradiated rabbit septal cartilage. Methods Nasal septum harvested from freshly euthanized New Zealand White rabbits were irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser. After 2 weeks in culture, the laser spot and surrounding non-irradiated regions were imaged using immunofluorescence staining and evaluated using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine the presence of collagen I and II, and ascertain collagen I and II gene expression, respectively. Results All laser irradiated specimens showed a cessation in collagen II gene expression within the center of the laser spot. Collagen II was expressed in the surrounding region encircling the laser spot and within the non-irradiated periphery in all specimens. Immunohistochemistry identified only type II collagen. Neither collagen I gene expression nor immunoreactivity were identified in any specimens regardless or irradiation parameters. Conclusions Laser irradiation of rabbit septal cartilage using dosimetry parameters similar to those used in laser reshaping does not result in the detection of either collagen I gene expression or immunoreactivity. Only collagen type II was noted after laser exposure in vitro following cell culture, which suggests that the cellular response to laser irradiation is distinct from that observed in conventional wound healing. Laser irradiation of cartilage can leave an intact

  12. Rescue of type I collagen-deficient phenotype by retroviral-vector-mediated transfer of human pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene into Mov-13 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, A; Mulligan, R; Jaenisch, R

    1987-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone corresponding to the human pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene was isolated and inserted into a retrovirus vector. Cell lines were obtained which produced recombinant viruses transducing the collagen cDNA (HUC virus). To test whether the transduced cDNA was functional, Mov-13 mouse cells were infected with the virus. These cells do not produce any type I collagen due to an insertional mutation of the pro alpha 1(I) gene which blocks transcription. While normal amounts of pro alpha 2(I) RNA were synthesized, no alpha 2(I) collagen chains were detectable in the mutant Mov-13 cells. Infection with HUC virus, however, resulted in the production of stable type I collagen, which was secreted into the medium. Analysis of pepsin-resistant proteins indicated that interspecies heterotrimers consisting of human alpha 1(I) and mouse alpha 2(I) collagen chains were secreted by the infected Mov-13 cells. Our results show that pro alpha (I) collagen chains from species as distant as human and mouse can associate to form stable type I collagen. The availability of a retrovirus vector transducing a functional pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene combined with the Mov-13 mutant system should enable us to study the effect of specific mutations on the synthesis, assembly, and function of type I collagen, not only in tissue culture but also in the animal. Images PMID:3599181

  13. The role of polymorphisms of genes encoding collagen IX and XI in lumbar disc disease.

    PubMed

    Janeczko, Łukasz; Janeczko, Magdalena; Chrzanowski, Robert; Zieliński, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    The intervertebral disc disease (IDD) is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders. A number of environment and anthropometric risk factors may contribute to it. The recent reports have suggested the importance of genetic factors, especially these which encode collagen types IX and XI. The allelic variants in the collagen IX genes - COL9A2 (Trp2) and COL9A3 (Trp3) have been identified as genetic risk factors for IDD, because they interfere the cross-linking between collagen types II, IX and XI and result in decreased stability of intervertebral discs. Type XI collagen is a minor component of cartilage collagen fibrils, but it is present in the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs. Some studies have shown the association between gene COL11A1 polymorphism c.4603C>T and IDD. The frequency of 4603T allele was significantly higher in the patients with IDD than in the healthy controls. PMID:24636772

  14. Tissue-specific expression of the human type II collagen gene in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lovell-Badge, R H; Bygrave, A; Bradley, A; Robertson, E; Tilly, R; Cheah, K S

    1987-01-01

    Type II collagen is crucial to the development of form in vertebrates as it is the major protein of cartilage. To study the factors regulating its expression we introduced a cosmid containing the human type II collagen gene, including 4.5 kilobases of 5' and 2.2 kilobases of 3' flanking DNA, into embryonic stem cells in vitro. The transformed cells contribute to all tissues in chimeric mice allowing the expression of the exogenous gene to be studied in vivo. Human type II collagen mRNA is restricted to tissues showing transcription from the endogenous gene and human type II collagen is found in extracellular matrix surrounding chondrocytes in cartilage. The results indicate that the cis-acting requirements for correct temporal and spatial regulation of the gene are contained within the introduced DNA. Images PMID:3033664

  15. Multiple cis elements and GATA factors regulate a cuticle collagen gene in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianghua; Madaan, Uday; Park, Amy; Aftab, Neelum; Savage-Dunn, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    The cuticle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a specialized extracellular matrix whose major component is collagen. Cuticle collagens are encoded by a large multi-gene family consisting of more than 150 members. Cuticle collagen genes are expressed in epidermis (hypodermis) and may be stage-specific or cyclically expressed. We identified cuticle collagen genes as transcriptional targets of the DBL-1 TGF-β-related signaling pathway. These studies prompted us to investigate the cis-regulatory sequences required for transcription of one of the target genes, col-41. We generated reporter constructs that reproduce stage- and tissue-specific expression of fluorescent markers. We identify four conserved sequence elements that are required for transcription of reporters. Finally, we provide evidence that col-41 expression is controlled by a sequence element containing two GATA sites and by the epidermal GATA transcription factors ELT-1 and ELT-3. PMID:25711168

  16. Effect of orally administered collagen hydrolysate on gene expression profiles in mouse skin: a DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Oba, Chisato; Ito, Kyoko; Ichikawa, Satomi; Morifuji, Masashi; Nakai, Yuji; Ishijima, Tomoko; Abe, Keiko; Kawahata, Keiko

    2015-08-01

    Dietary collagen hydrolysate has been hypothesized to improve skin barrier function. To investigate the effect of long-term collagen hydrolysate administration on the skin, we evaluated stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity in intrinsically aged mice. Female hairless mice were fed a control diet or a collagen hydrolysate-containing diet for 12 wk. Stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity were gradually decreased in chronologically aged control mice. Intake of collagen hydrolysate significantly suppressed such changes. Moreover, we used DNA microarrays to analyze gene expression in the skin of mice that had been administered collagen hydrolysate. Twelve weeks after the start of collagen intake, no significant differences appeared in the gene expression profile compared with the control group. However, 1 wk after administration, 135 genes were upregulated and 448 genes were downregulated in the collagen group. This suggests that gene changes preceded changes of barrier function and elasticity. We focused on several genes correlated with functional changes in the skin. Gene Ontology terms related to epidermal cell development were significantly enriched in upregulated genes. These skin function-related genes had properties that facilitate epidermal production and differentiation while suppressing dermal degradation. In conclusion, our results suggest that altered gene expression at the early stages after collagen administration affects skin barrier function and mechanical properties. Long-term oral intake of collagen hydrolysate improves skin dysfunction by regulating genes related to production and maintenance of skin tissue. PMID:26058835

  17. Gene expression analysis in patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability suggests deregulation of collagen genes.

    PubMed

    Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Cohen, Carina; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Smith, Marília Cardoso; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2014-10-01

    Shoulder dislocation occurs in 1-2% of the population. Capsular deformation is a key factor in shoulder dislocation; however, little is known about capsule biology. We evaluated, for the first time in literature, the expression of COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1 and COL5A1 in the antero-inferior, antero-superior and posterior regions of the glenohumeral capsule of 31 patients with anterior shoulder instability and eight controls. The expression of collagen genes was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. The expression of COL1A1, COL3A1 and the ratio of COL1A1/COL1A2 were increased in all three portions of the capsule in patients compared to controls (p < 0.05). COL1A2 expression was upregulated in the antero-superior and posterior sites of the capsule of patients (p < 0.05). The ratio of COL1A2/COL3A1 expression was reduced in capsule antero-inferior and posterior sites of patients compared to controls (p < 0.05). In the capsule antero-inferior site of patients, the ratios of COL1A1/COL5A1, CO1A2/COL5A1 and COL3A1/COL5A1 expression were increased (p < 0.05). In patients, COL1A1/COL5A1 was also increased in the posterior site (p < 0.05). We found deregulated expression of collagen genes across the capsule of shoulder instability patients. These molecular alterations may lead to modifications of collagen fibril structure and impairment of the healing process, possibly with a role in capsular deformation. PMID:25042113

  18. Collagen gene expression by cultured human skin fibroblasts. Abundant steady-state levels of type VI procollagen messenger RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, D R; Peltonen, J; Jaakkola, S; Chu, M L; Uitto, J

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that procollagen types I and III are the major collagenous gene products of cultured human skin fibroblasts. In this study the expression of 10 different genes, encoding the subunit polypeptides for collagen types I-VI, by human skin fibroblasts in culture was analyzed by molecular hybridizations. Northern transfer analysis demonstrated the presence of specific mRNA transcripts for collagen types I, III, IV, V, and VI, but not for type II collagen. Quantitation of the abundance of these mRNAs by slot blot hybridizations revealed that type I, III, and VI procollagens were the major collagenous gene products of skin fibroblasts in culture. The mRNAs for type IV and V collagens represented only a small percentage of the total collagenous mRNA transcripts. Further analysis by in situ hybridization demonstrated that the majority of the cultured cells coexpressed the genes for type I, III, and VI procollagen pro-alpha chains. Further in situ hybridization analyses revealed the expression of type VI collagen genes in normal human skin. These data demonstrate that human skin fibroblast cultures can be used to study the transcriptional regulation of at least nine genetically distinct procollagen genes. The data further suggest that type VI collagen, in addition to types I and III, may be a major collagenous component of human skin. Images PMID:2921321

  19. Mutations in the collagen XII gene define a new form of extracellular matrix-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Debbie; Farsani, Golara Torabi; Laval, Steven; Collins, James; Sarkozy, Anna; Martoni, Elena; Shah, Ashoke; Zou, Yaqun; Koch, Manuel; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Roberts, Mark; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Bethlem myopathy (BM) [MIM 158810] is a slowly progressive muscle disease characterized by contractures and proximal weakness, which can be caused by mutations in one of the collagen VI genes (COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3). However, there may be additional causal genes to identify as in ∼50% of BM cases no mutations in the COL6 genes are identified. In a cohort of -24 patients with a BM-like phenotype, we first sequenced 12 candidate genes based on their function, including genes for known binding partners of collagen VI, and those enzymes involved in its correct post-translational modification, assembly and secretion. Proceeding to whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified mutations in the COL12A1 gene, a member of the FACIT collagens (fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices) in five individuals from two families. Both families showed dominant inheritance with a clinical phenotype resembling classical BM. Family 1 had a single-base substitution that led to the replacement of one glycine residue in the triple-helical domain, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern, and Family 2 had a missense mutation, which created a mutant protein with an unpaired cysteine residue. Abnormality at the protein level was confirmed in both families by the intracellular retention of collagen XII in patient dermal fibroblasts. The mutation in Family 2 leads to the up-regulation of genes associated with the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and swollen, dysmorphic rough-ER. We conclude that the spectrum of causative genes in extracellular matrix (ECM)-related myopathies be extended to include COL12A1. PMID:24334769

  20. Gene Expression Profiling Identifies Molecular Pathways Associated with Collagen VI Deficiency and Provides Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Paco, Sonia; Kalko, Susana G.; Jou, Cristina; Rodríguez, María A.; Corbera, Joan; Muntoni, Francesco; Feng, Lucy; Rivas, Eloy; Torner, Ferran; Gualandi, Francesca; Gomez-Foix, Anna M.; Ferrer, Anna; Ortez, Carlos; Nascimento, Andrés; Colomer, Jaume; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), caused by collagen VI deficiency, is a common congenital muscular dystrophy. At present, the role of collagen VI in muscle and the mechanism of disease are not fully understood. To address this we have applied microarrays to analyse the transcriptome of UCMD muscle and compare it to healthy muscle and other muscular dystrophies. We identified 389 genes which are differentially regulated in UCMD relative to controls. In addition, there were 718 genes differentially expressed between UCMD and dystrophin deficient muscle. In contrast, only 29 genes were altered relative to other congenital muscular dystrophies. Changes in gene expression were confirmed by real-time PCR. The set of regulated genes was analysed by Gene Ontology, KEGG pathways and Ingenuity Pathway analysis to reveal the molecular functions and gene networks associated with collagen VI defects. The most significantly regulated pathways were those involved in muscle regeneration, extracellular matrix remodelling and inflammation. We characterised the immune response in UCMD biopsies as being mainly mediated via M2 macrophages and the complement pathway indicating that anti-inflammatory treatment may be beneficial to UCMD as for other dystrophies. We studied the immunolocalisation of ECM components and found that biglycan, a collagen VI interacting proteoglycan, was reduced in the basal lamina of UCMD patients. We propose that biglycan reduction is secondary to collagen VI loss and that it may be contributing towards UCMD pathophysiology. Consequently, strategies aimed at over-expressing biglycan and restore the link between the muscle cell surface and the extracellular matrix should be considered. PMID:24223098

  1. The human alpha 2(IV) collagen gene, COL4A2, is syntenic with the alpha 1(IV) gene, COL4A1, on chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E; Hall, V; Kurkinen, M

    1987-05-01

    We have previously assigned the gene for the alpha 1 chain of type IV collagen to chromosome 13. In this report we show that the gene coding for the second chain of this heterotrimer is on the same chromosome. This is the first example of the genes for both chains of one collagen molecule being syntenic. PMID:3674752

  2. Increased Expression of Several Collagen Genes is Associated with Drug Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Januchowski, Radosław; Świerczewska, Monika; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer. The main reason for the high mortality among ovarian cancer patients is the development of drug resistance. The expression of collagen genes by cancer cells can increase drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into the cancer tissue as well as increase apoptosis resistance. In this study, we present data that shows differential expression levels of collagen genes and proteins in cisplatin- (CIS), paclitaxel- (PAC), doxorubicin- (DOX), topotecan- (TOP), vincristine- (VIN) and methotrexate- (MTX) resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to determine the mRNA levels. Protein expression was detected using Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays. In the drug resistant cell lines, we observed the upregulation of eight collagen genes at the mRNA level and based on these expression levels, we divided the collagen genes into the following three groups: 1. Genes with less than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A1, COL5A2, COL12A1 and COL17A1. 2. Genes with greater than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A2, COL15A1 and COL21A1. 3. Gene with a very high level of expression: COL3A1. Expression of collagen (COL) proteins from groups 2 and 3 were also confirmed using immunocytochemistry. Western blot analysis showed very high expression levels of COL3A1 protein, and immunocytochemistry analysis showed the presence of extracellular COL3A1 in the W1TR cell line. The cells mainly responsible for the extracellular COL3A1 production are aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) positive cells. All correlations between the types of cytostatic drugs and the expression levels of different COL genes were studied, and our results suggest that the expression of fibrillar collagens may be involved in the TOP and PAC resistance of the ovarian cancer cells. The expression pattern of COL genes provide a preliminary view into the role of these proteins in

  3. Increased Expression of Several Collagen Genes is Associated with Drug Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Januchowski, Radosław; Świerczewska, Monika; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer. The main reason for the high mortality among ovarian cancer patients is the development of drug resistance. The expression of collagen genes by cancer cells can increase drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into the cancer tissue as well as increase apoptosis resistance. In this study, we present data that shows differential expression levels of collagen genes and proteins in cisplatin- (CIS), paclitaxel- (PAC), doxorubicin- (DOX), topotecan- (TOP), vincristine- (VIN) and methotrexate- (MTX) resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to determine the mRNA levels. Protein expression was detected using Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays. In the drug resistant cell lines, we observed the upregulation of eight collagen genes at the mRNA level and based on these expression levels, we divided the collagen genes into the following three groups: 1. Genes with less than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A1, COL5A2, COL12A1 and COL17A1. 2. Genes with greater than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A2, COL15A1 and COL21A1. 3. Gene with a very high level of expression: COL3A1. Expression of collagen (COL) proteins from groups 2 and 3 were also confirmed using immunocytochemistry. Western blot analysis showed very high expression levels of COL3A1 protein, and immunocytochemistry analysis showed the presence of extracellular COL3A1 in the W1TR cell line. The cells mainly responsible for the extracellular COL3A1 production are aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) positive cells. All correlations between the types of cytostatic drugs and the expression levels of different COL genes were studied, and our results suggest that the expression of fibrillar collagens may be involved in the TOP and PAC resistance of the ovarian cancer cells. The expression pattern of COL genes provide a preliminary view into the role of these proteins in

  4. Enhanced osteoblast proliferation and collagen gene expression by estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest, M.; Schmid, Ch.; Froesch, E.R. )

    1988-04-01

    Estrogens play a crucial role in the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, the mechanism by which estrogens exert their effects on bone is unknown. To examine possible direct effects of 17{beta}-estradiol on bone-forming cells, the authors used pure rat osteoblast-like cells in vitro as a model. Osteoblast-like cells prepared from calvaria of newborn rats were cultured serum-free in methylcellulose-containing medium for 21 days. Osteoblast-like cells proliferate selectively into clonally derived cell clusters of spherical morphorlogy. 17{beta}-Estradiol at concentrations of 0.1 nM and 1 nM enhanced osteoblast-like cell proliferation by 41% and 68% above vehicle-treated controls. The biologically inactive stereoisomer 17{alpha}-estradiol (same concentrations) had no effect. Moreover, the antiestrogen tamoxifen abolished the stimulation of osteoblast-like cell proliferation by 17{beta}-estradiol. After 21 days of culture, RNA was prepared and analyzed in a dot-hybridization assay for the abundance of pro{alpha}1(I) collagen mRNA. Steady-state mRNA levels were increased in cultures treated with 17{beta}-estradiol in a dose-dependent manner with maximal stimulation at 1 nM and 10 nM. At the same concentrations, the percentage of synthesized protein (labeled by ({sup 3}H)proline pulse) that was digestible by collagenase was increased, indicating that 17{beta}-estradiol acts as pretranslational levels to enhance synthesis of bone collagen. These data show that the osteoblast is a direct target for 17{beta}-estradiol.

  5. Gene expression profile and synovial microcirculation at early stages of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gierer, Philip; Ibrahim, Saleh; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Koczan, Dirk; Moeller, Steffen; Landes, Jürgen; Gradl, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2005-01-01

    A better understanding of the initial mechanisms that lead to arthritic disease could facilitate development of improved therapeutic strategies. We characterized the synovial microcirculation of knee joints in susceptible mouse strains undergoing intradermal immunization with bovine collagen II in complete Freund's adjuvant to induce arthritis (i.e. collagen-induced arthritis [CIA]). Susceptible DBA1/J and collagen II T-cell receptor transgenic mice were compared with CIA-resistant FVB/NJ mice. Before onset of clinical symptoms of arthritis, in vivo fluorescence microscopy of knee joints revealed marked leucocyte activation and interaction with the endothelial lining of synovial microvessels. This initial inflammatory cell response correlated with the gene expression profile at this disease stage. The majority of the 655 differentially expressed genes belonged to classes of genes that are involved in cell movement and structure, cell cycle and signal transduction, as well as transcription, protein synthesis and metabolism. However, 24 adhesion molecules and chemokine/cytokine genes were identified, some of which are known to contribute to arthritis (e.g. CD44 and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1) and some of which are novel in this respect (e.g. CC chemokine ligand-27 and IL-13 receptor α1). Online in vivo data on synovial tissue microcirculation, together with gene expression profiling, emphasize the potential role played by early inflammatory events in the development of arthritis. PMID:15987489

  6. Patient-specific naturally gene-reverted induced pluripotent stem cells in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Tolar, Jakub; McGrath, John A; Xia, Lily; Riddle, Megan J; Lees, Chris J; Eide, Cindy; Keene, Douglas R; Liu, Lu; Osborn, Mark J; Lund, Troy C; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John E

    2014-05-01

    Spontaneous reversion of disease-causing mutations has been observed in some genetic disorders. In our clinical observations of severe generalized recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB), a currently incurable blistering genodermatosis caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL7A1 that results in a deficit of type VII collagen (C7), we have observed patches of healthy-appearing skin on some individuals. When biopsied, this skin revealed somatic mosaicism resulting in the self-correction of C7 deficiency. We believe this source of cells could represent an opportunity for translational 'natural' gene therapy. We show that revertant RDEB keratinocytes expressing functional C7 can be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and that self-corrected RDEB iPSCs can be induced to differentiate into either epidermal or hematopoietic cell populations. Our results give proof-of-principle that an inexhaustible supply of functional patient-specific revertant cells can be obtained--potentially relevant to local wound therapy and systemic hematopoietic cell transplantation. This technology may also avoid some of the major limitations of other cell therapy strategies, e.g., immune rejection and insertional mutagenesis, which are associated with viral- and nonviral-mediated gene therapy. We believe this approach should be the starting point for autologous cellular therapies using 'natural' gene therapy in RDEB and other diseases. PMID:24317394

  7. RFX family proteins differentially interact with HDACs to repress collagen alpha 2(I) gene (COL1A2) expression

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y.; Sengupta, P.K.; Seto, E.; Smith, B.D.

    2006-01-01

    Our studies indicate that regulatory factor for X-box (RFX) family proteins repress collagen alpha2(I) gene (COL1A2) expression (1,2). In the present investigation, we examine the mechanism(s) underlying the repression of collagen gene by RFX proteins. Two members of the RFX family, RFX1 and RFX5, associate with distinct sets of co-repressors on the collagen transcription start site in vitro. RFX5 specifically interacts with histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) and the mammalian transcriptional repressor (mSin3B) whereas RFX1 preferably interacts with HDAC1 and mSin3A. HDAC2 cooperates with RFX5 to down-regulate collagen promoter activity while HDAC1 enhances inhibition of collagen promoter activity by RFX1. IFN-γ promotes the recruitment of RFX5/HDAC2/mSin3B to the collagen transcription start site but decreases the occupancy by RFX1/mSin3A as manifested by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. RFX1 binds to methylated collagen sequence with much higher affinity than unmethylated sequence, recruiting more HDAC1 and mSin3A. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (aza-dC), that inhibits DNA methylation, reduces RFX1/HDAC1 binding to the collagen transcription start site in ChIP assays. Finally, both RFX1 and RFX5 are acetylated in vivo. TSA stimulates the acetylation of RFX proteins and activates the collagen promoter activity. Collectively, our data strongly indicate two separate pathways for RFX proteins to repress collagen gene expression: one for RFX5/HDAC2 in IFN-γ mediated repression, the other for RFX1/HDAC1 in methylation mediated collagen silencing. PMID:16464847

  8. Transcriptional promoter of the human alpha 1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1).

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S; Greenspan, D S

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized the 5' region of the human alpha 1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1). The transcriptional promoter is shown to have a number of features characteristic of the promoters of 'housekeeping' and growth-control-related genes. It lacks obvious TATA and CAAT boxes, has multiple transcription start sites, has a high GC content, lies within a well-defined CpG island and has a number of consensus sites for the potential binding of transcription factor Sp1. This type of promoter structure, while unusual for a collagen gene, is consistent with the broad distribution of expression of COL5A1 and is reminiscent of the promoter structures of the genes encoding type VI collagen, which has a similarly broad distribution of expression. Stepwise deletion of COL5A1 5' sequences, placed upstream of a heterologous reporter gene, yielded a gradual decrease in promoter activity, indicating that the COL5A1 promoter is composed of an array of cis-acting elements. A minimal promoter region contained within the 212 bp immediately upstream of the major transcription start site contained no consensus sequences for the binding of known transcription factors, but gel mobility shift assays showed this region to bind nuclear factors, including Sp1, at a number of sites. The major transcription start site is flanked by an upstream 34-bp oligopurine/oligopyrimidine stretch, or 'GAGA' box, and a downstream 56-bp GAGA box which contains a 10-bp mirror repeat and is sensitive to cleavage with S1 nuclease. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7646438

  9. Collagen, genes and the skeletal dysplasias on the edge of a new era: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Lachman, R S; Tiller, G E; Graham, J M; Rimoin, D L

    1992-01-01

    This article reviews the newly described biochemical (type I and II collagen) abnormalities and specific gene defects in the skeletal dysplasias. The model of the collagen molecule is described and how collagen is processed from procollagen, where and how abnormalities occur, and the types of abnormalities produced (quantitative and qualitative). The only known type I collagen defects producing skeletal dysplasias--osteogenesis imperfecta, as well as the 'family' of established type II collagen disorders--achondrogenesis type II, hypochondrogenesis and spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita are discussed. Finally, using case presentations, the practical approach to these disorders is shown. The importance of these investigations and the subsequent reevaluation of the clinical and radiological findings of specifically delineated skeletal dysplasias are discussed. PMID:1563395

  10. Characterization of a type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation identified in cultured chondrocytes from human hypochondrogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, W A; Machado, M A; Ellard, J; Campbell, D; Bartley, J; Ramirez, F; Vitale, E; Lee, B

    1992-01-01

    A subtle mutation in the type II collagen gene COL2A1 was detected in a case of human hypochondrogenesis by using a chondrocyte culture system and PCR-cDNA scanning analysis. Chondrocytes obtained from cartilage biopsies were dedifferentiated and expanded in monolayer culture and then redifferentiated by culture over agarose. Single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing analysis identified a G----A transition, resulting in a glycine substitution at amino acid 574 of the pro alpha 1(II) collagen triple-helical domain. Morphologic assessment of cartilage-like structures produced in culture and electrophoretic analysis of collagens synthesized by the cultured chondrocytes suggested that the glycine substitution interferes with conversion of type II procollagen to collagen, impairs intracellular transport and secretion of the molecule, and disrupts collagen fibril assembly. This experimental approach has broad implications for the investigation of human chondrodysplasias as well as human chondrocyte biology. Images PMID:1374906

  11. Variants in a Novel Epidermal Collagen Gene (COL29A1) Are Associated with Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kerscher, Tamara; Rüschendorf, Franz; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Worm, Margitta; Gruber, Christoph; Mayr, Gabriele; Albrecht, Mario; Rohde, Klaus; Schulz, Herbert; Wahn, Ulrich; Hubner, Norbert; Lee, Young-Ae

    2007-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disorder and a major manifestation of allergic disease. AD typically presents in early childhood often preceding the onset of an allergic airway disease, such as asthma or hay fever. We previously mapped a susceptibility locus for AD on Chromosome 3q21. To identify the underlying disease gene, we used a dense map of microsatellite markers and single nucleotide polymorphisms, and we detected association with AD. In concordance with the linkage results, we found a maternal transmission pattern. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the same families contribute to linkage and association. We replicated the association and the maternal effect in a large independent family cohort. A common haplotype showed strong association with AD (p = 0.000059). The associated region contained a single gene, COL29A1, which encodes a novel epidermal collagen. COL29A1 shows a specific gene expression pattern with the highest transcript levels in skin, lung, and the gastrointestinal tract, which are the major sites of allergic disease manifestation. Lack of COL29A1 expression in the outer epidermis of AD patients points to a role of collagen XXIX in epidermal integrity and function, the breakdown of which is a clinical hallmark of AD. PMID:17850181

  12. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    SciTech Connect

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek; Kostrouchova, Marta

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. {yields} The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. {yields} Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. {yields} Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. {yields} New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  13. Regulatory elements in the first intron contribute to transcriptional control of the human. cap alpha. 1(I) collagen gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bornstein, P.; McKay, J.; Morishima, J.K.; Devarayalu, S.; Gelinas, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    Several lines of evidence have suggested that the regulation of type I collagen gene transcription is complex and that important regulatory elements reside 5' to, and within, the first intron of the ..cap alpha..1(I) gene. The authors therefore sequenced a 2.3-kilobase HindIII fragment that encompasses 804 base pairs of 5' flanking sequence, the first exon, and most of the first intron of the ..cap alpha..1(I) human collagen gene. A 274-base-pair intronic sequence, flanked by Ava I sites (A274), contained a sequence identical to a high-affinity decanucleotide binding site for transcription factor Sp1 and a viral core enhancer sequence. DNase I protection experiments indicated zones of protection that corresponded to these motifs. When A274 was cloned 5' to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene, driven by an ..cap alpha..1(I) collagen promoter sequence, and expression was assessed by transfection, significant orientation-specific inhibition of CAT activity was observed. This effect was most apparent in chicken tendon fibroblasts, which modulate their level of collagen synthesis in culture. They propose that normal regulation of ..cap alpha..1(I) collagen gene transcription results from an interplay of positive and negative elements present in the promoter region and within the first intron.

  14. Microarray-based transcriptional and epigenetic profiling of matrix metalloproteinases, collagens, and related genes in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chernov, Andrei V; Baranovskaya, Svetlana; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Wakeman, Dustin R; Snyder, Evan Y; Williams, Roy; Strongin, Alex Y

    2010-06-18

    Epigenetic parameters (DNA methylation, histone modifications, and miRNAs) play a significant role in cancer. To identify the common epigenetic signatures of both the individual matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the additional genes, the function of which is also linked to proteolysis, migration, and tumorigenesis, we performed epigenetic profiling of 486 selected genes in unrelated non-migratory MCF-7 breast carcinoma and highly migratory U251 glioma cells. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and microRNA analyses were used to support the results of our epigenetic studies. Transcriptional silencing in both glioma and breast carcinoma cells predominantly involved the repressive histone H3 Lys-27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) mark. In turn, epigenetic stimulation was primarily performed through a gain in the histone H3 Lys-4 dimethylation (H3K4me2) and H3 hyperacetylation and by a global reduction of H3K27me3. Inactive pro-invasive genes in MCF-7 cells but not in U251 cells frequently exhibited a stem cell-like bivalent mark (enrichment in both H3K27me3 and H3K4me2), a characteristic of developmental genes. In contrast with other MMPs, MMP-8 was epigenetically silenced in both cell types, thus providing evidence for the strict epigenetic control of this anti-tumorigenic proteinase in cancer. Epigenetic stimulation of multiple collagen genes observed in cultured glioma cells was then directly confirmed using orthotopic xenografts and tumor specimens. We suggest that the epigenetic mechanisms allow gliomas to deposit an invasion-promoting collagen-enriched matrix and then to use this matrix to accomplish their rapid migration through the brain tissue. PMID:20404328

  15. Vasopressin inhibits type-I collagen and albumin gene expression in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chojkier, M.; Brenner, D.A.; Leffert, H.L.

    1989-06-05

    The mechanisms that regulate collagen gene expression in hepatic cells are poorly understood. Accelerated Ca2+ fluxes are associated with inhibiting collagen synthesis selectively in human fibroblasts. In suspension cultures of isolated hepatocytes, the Ca2+ agonist vasopressin increases cytosolic levels of free Ca2+. However, whether vasopressin's interactions with plasma membrane V1 receptors attenuate hepatic collagen production is unknown. We investigated this problem by studying vasopressin's effects on collagen synthesis and Ca2+ efflux in long-term primary cultures of differentiated and proliferation-competent adult rat hepatocytes. Twelve-day-old quiescent cultures were exposed to test substances and labeled with (5-3H)proline. Determinations of radioactivity in collagenase-sensitive and collagenase-resistant proteins were used to calculate the relative levels of collagen production. Synthetic (8-arg)vasopressin stimulated 45Ca2+ efflux within 1 min and inhibited hepatocyte collagen production within 3 h by 50%; overall rates of protein synthesis were not affected significantly. In cultures labeled with (35S)methionine, vasopressin also decreased the levels of newly synthesized and secreted albumin, but not fibrinogen, detected in specific immunoprecipitates analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Northern blot analyses using specific (32P)cDNA probes revealed 70% decreases in hybridizable levels of collagen alpha 1(I) mRNA in hepatocyte cultures treated with either vasopressin or Ca2+ ionophore A23187; hybridizable levels of albumin mRNA also fell approximately 50% following vasopressin treatment.

  16. Effect of targeted mutation in collagen V alpha 2 gene on development of cutaneous hyperplasia in tight skin mice.

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, R. G.; Murai, C.; Saito, S.; Hatakeyama, A.; Andrikopoulos, K.; Kasturi, K. N.; Bona, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    Collagen V plays a major regulatory role in the formation of heterotypic fibers of the dermis and cartilaginous tissues as well as in the assembly of extracellular matrix. The pN/pN mouse, which is defective in collagen V alpha 2 gene, exhibits skeletal abnormalities, skin fragility, and alterations in the collagen fiber organization, whereas the TSK/+ mouse, which is defective in fibrillin-1, the major component of microfibrils present in the extracellular matrix, develops cutaneous hyperplasia and autoimmunity. We have studied the role of collagen V in the formation of heterotypic collagen fibers in F1 mice, which are obtained by breeding pN/pN with TSK/+ mice. Our results show that F1 progeny neither develop cutaneous hyperplasia nor produce anti-topoisomerase I autoantibodies, unlike TSK/+ mice. The diameter of the collagen fibrils in the skin is also comparable to that found in control mice. Thus, the phenotypic changes observed in the TSK mouse could be reversed by genetic complementation with a collagen V-defective mouse. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:9642685

  17. Expression of COLLAGEN 1 and ELASTIN Genes in Mitral Valvular Interstitial Cells within Microfiber Reinforced Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, Maryam; Javadi, Gholamreza; Agdami, Nasser; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective The incidence of heart valve disease is increasing worldwide and the number of heart valve replacements is expected to increase in the future. By mimicking the main tissue structures and properties of heart valve, tissue engineering offers new options for the replacements. Applying an appropriate scaffold in fabricating tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) is of importance since it affects the secretion of the main extracellular matrix (ECM) components, collagen 1 and elastin, which are crucial in providing the proper mechanical properties of TEHVs. Materials and Methods Using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in this experi- mental study, the relative expression levels of COLLAGEN 1 and ELASTIN were obtained for three samples of each examined sheep mitral valvular interstitial cells (MVICs)-seeded onto electrospun poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS)-poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) microfibrous, gelatin and hyaluronic acid based hydrogel-only and composite (PGS-PCL/hydrogel) scaffolds. This composite has been shown to create a synthetic three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment with appropriate mechanical and biological properties for MVICs. Results Cell viability and metabolic activity were similar among all scaffold types. Our results showed that the level of relative expression of COLLAGEN 1 and ELASTIN genes was higher in the encapsulated composite scaffolds compared to PGS-PCL-only and hydrogel-only scaffolds with the difference being statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion The encapsulated composite scaffolds are more conducive to ECM secretion over the PGS-PCL-only and hydrogel-only scaffolds. This composite scaffold can serve as a model scaffold for heart valve tissue engineering. PMID:26464819

  18. Fibrochondrogenesis Results from Mutations in the COL11A1 Type XI Collagen Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, Stuart W.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Safina, Nicole P.; Bober, Michael B.; Proud, Virginia K.; Funari, Tara; Wangler, Michael F.; Nevarez, Lisette; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Wilcox, William R.; Eyre, David R.; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrochondrogenesis is a severe, autosomal-recessive, short-limbed skeletal dysplasia. In a single case of fibrochondrogenesis, whole-genome SNP genotyping identified unknown ancestral consanguinity by detecting three autozygous regions. Because of the predominantly skeletal nature of the phenotype, the 389 genes localized to the autozygous intervals were prioritized for mutation analysis by correlation of their expression with known cartilage-selective genes via the UCLA Gene Expression Tool, UGET. The gene encoding the α1 chain of type XI collagen (COL11A1) was the only cartilage-selective gene among the three candidate intervals. Sequence analysis of COL11A1 in two genetically independent fibrochondrogenesis cases demonstrated that each was a compound heterozygote for a loss-of-function mutation on one allele and a mutation predicting substitution for a conserved triple-helical glycine residue on the other. The parents who were carriers of missense mutations had myopia. Early-onset hearing loss was noted in both parents who carried a loss-of-function allele, suggesting COL11A1 as a locus for mild, dominantly inherited hearing loss. These findings identify COL11A1 as a locus for fibrochondrogenesis and indicate that there might be phenotypic manifestations among carriers. PMID:21035103

  19. Fibrochondrogenesis results from mutations in the COL11A1 type XI collagen gene.

    PubMed

    Tompson, Stuart W; Bacino, Carlos A; Safina, Nicole P; Bober, Michael B; Proud, Virginia K; Funari, Tara; Wangler, Michael F; Nevarez, Lisette; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Wilcox, William R; Eyre, David R; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H

    2010-11-12

    Fibrochondrogenesis is a severe, autosomal-recessive, short-limbed skeletal dysplasia. In a single case of fibrochondrogenesis, whole-genome SNP genotyping identified unknown ancestral consanguinity by detecting three autozygous regions. Because of the predominantly skeletal nature of the phenotype, the 389 genes localized to the autozygous intervals were prioritized for mutation analysis by correlation of their expression with known cartilage-selective genes via the UCLA Gene Expression Tool, UGET. The gene encoding the α1 chain of type XI collagen (COL11A1) was the only cartilage-selective gene among the three candidate intervals. Sequence analysis of COL11A1 in two genetically independent fibrochondrogenesis cases demonstrated that each was a compound heterozygote for a loss-of-function mutation on one allele and a mutation predicting substitution for a conserved triple-helical glycine residue on the other. The parents who were carriers of missense mutations had myopia. Early-onset hearing loss was noted in both parents who carried a loss-of-function allele, suggesting COL11A1 as a locus for mild, dominantly inherited hearing loss. These findings identify COL11A1 as a locus for fibrochondrogenesis and indicate that there might be phenotypic manifestations among carriers. PMID:21035103

  20. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  1. The Effects of Age and Platelet-Rich Plasma on ACL Cell Viability and Collagen Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, M.Y; Johnson, V.M.; Murray, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has shown in vivo potential to stimulate anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) healing at early time points in large animal models. However, in animal models, the healing potential of the ACL is dependent on animal age. In this study, we hypothesized that there are age-dependent differences in ACL cell metabolism, collagen gene expression and the ability of the cells to respond to growth factors in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). To test this hypothesis, ACL cells were obtained from skeletally immature, adolescent and adult pigs and cultured in a collagen type I hydrogel with or without PRP for 14 days. When cultured in collagen-only hydrogel, ACL cells from adult pigs had a 19% lower apoptotic rate as compared to immature pigs (p=0.001) and a 25% higher cellular metabolic activity as compared to adolescent pigs (p=0.006). The addition of PRP to the collagen hydrogel resulted in a significantly increased cellular metabolic activity, reduced apoptotic rate and stimulation of collagen production in the cells from the immature and adolescent animals (p<0.05 for all comparisons) but had less of an effect on adult cells. These findings suggest that skeletal maturity may influence ACL cells’ metabolic activity, apoptosis, collagen production, and response to PRP. PMID:21748791

  2. Identification of mutations in the COL4A5 collagen gene in Alport syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barker, D F; Hostikka, S L; Zhou, J; Chow, L T; Oliphant, A R; Gerken, S C; Gregory, M C; Skolnick, M H; Atkin, C L; Tryggvason, K

    1990-06-01

    X-linked Alport syndrome is a hereditary glomerulonephritis in which progressive loss of kidney function is often accompanied by progressive loss of hearing. Ultrastructural defects in glomerular basement membranes (GBM) of Alport syndrome patients implicate an altered structural protein as the cause of nephritis. The product of COL4A5, the alpha 5(IV) collagen chain, is a specific component of GBM within the kidney, and the gene maps to the same X chromosomal region as does Alport syndrome. Three structural aberrations were found in COL4A5, in intragenic deletion, a Pst I site variant, and an uncharacterized abnormality, which appear to cause nephritis and deafness, with allele-specific severity, in three Alport syndrome kindreds in Utah. PMID:2349482

  3. Hypoxic culture conditions induce increased metabolic rate and collagen gene expression in ACL-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Tomasz J; Leong, Natalie L; Dar, Ayelet; Wu, Ling; Kabir, Nima; Khan, Adam Z; Eliasberg, Claire D; Pedron, Andrew; Karayan, Ashant; Lee, Siyoung; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Jiacheng, Jin; Wu, Ben M; Evseenko, Denis; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    There has been substantial effort directed toward the application of bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissue. Recently, resident tissue-specific stem cells have been described in a variety of mesenchymal structures including ligament, tendon, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In the current study, we systematically characterize three novel anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-derived cell populations with the potential for ligament regeneration: ligament-forming fibroblasts (LFF: CD146(neg) , CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ), ligament perivascular cells (LPC: CD146(pos) CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ) and ligament interstitial cells (LIC: CD34(pos) CD146(neg) , CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) )-and describe their proliferative and differentiation potential, collagen gene expression and metabolism in both normoxic and hypoxic environments, and their trophic potential in vitro. All three groups of cells (LIC, LPC, and LFF) isolated from adult human ACL exhibited progenitor cell characteristics with regard to proliferation and differentiation potential in vitro. Culture in low oxygen tension enhanced the collagen I and III gene expression in LICs (by 2.8- and 3.3-fold, respectively) and LFFs (by 3- and 3.5-fold, respectively) and increased oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate in LICs (by 4- and 3.5-fold, respectively), LFFs (by 5.5- and 3-fold, respectively), LPCs (by 10- and 4.5-fold, respectively) as compared to normal oxygen concentration. In summary, this study demonstrates for the first time the presence of three novel progenitor cell populations in the adult ACL that demonstrate robust proliferative and matrix synthetic capacity; these cells may play a role in local ligament regeneration, and consequently represent a potential cell source for ligament engineering applications. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  4. High recombination between two physically close human basement membrane collagen genes at the distal end of chromosome 13q.

    PubMed Central

    Bowcock, A M; Hebert, J M; Wijsman, E; Gadi, I; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Boyd, C D

    1988-01-01

    Two basement membrane collagen genes coding for the pro alpha 1 chain and pro alpha 2 chain of type IV collagen map to 13q34 and are linked with a maximum likelihood estimate of recombination of 0.028 at a logarithm of odds (lod) score of 19.98. The single-copy sequence that identifies the locus D13S3 is also closely linked to both collagen genes. Four enzymes reveal polymorphisms with COL4A1, and 10 haplotypes have been observed in Caucasoids. Within COL4A1 a nonrandom association of alleles exists only between alleles defined by Hae III and those defined by the other three enzymes. A random association of alleles of COL4A1 and COL4A2 is observed. Between the two collagen genes were detected three meiotic recombination events that contributed to the estimate of 2.8% recombination. This is higher than expected for two genes that lie within 650 kilobases of each other. The lack of linkage disequilibrium between COL4A1 and COL4A2 is in agreement with the relatively high recombination that is observed. Images PMID:2895928

  5. Effect of Brahman genetic influence on collagen enzymatic crosslinking gene expression and meat tenderness.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J M; Johnson, D D; Elzo, M A; White, M C; Stelzleni, A M; Johnson, S E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effect of Brahman genetics on collagen enzymatic crosslinking gene expression and meat tenderness. Steers were randomly selected to represent a high percentage Brahman genetics (n = 13), Half-Blood genetics (n = 13), Brangus genetics (n = 13), and a high percentage Angus genetics (n = 13). Muscle samples from the Longissimus lumborum muscle were collected at weaning and harvest and reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis was conducted to measure the mRNA expression of lysyl oxidase (LOX), bone morphogenetic protein 1 (BMP1), and cystatin C (CYS). Steaks from subject animals were collected at harvest, aged for 14 d and subjected to collagen analysis, Warner-Bratzler Shear Force (WBS) and trained sensory panel analysis (tenderness, juiciness, and connective tissue). Data indicated that Half-Blood and Brahman steers had greater (P<0.05) WBS values and tended to receive decreased (P < 0.06) panel tenderness scores than Angus and Brangus steers. Panelists tended to detect more connective tissue in Brahman and Half-Blood steaks when compared to Angus and Brangus steaks (P < 0.07). Crosslinking gene expression data revealed that at weaning Half-Blood steers had more (P < 0.05) mRNA expression of CYS and LOX than Angus and Brangus steers. At weaning and harvest, all genetic groups had similar mRNA expression of BMP1 (P > 0.10). At harvest, Brangus and Angus steers had greater LOX mRNA expression than Brahman cattle (P < 0.05). Pearson's correlation coefficients indicated that only weaning CYS mRNA expression was correlated to WBS, panel tenderness and connective tissue scores (P < 0.05). Expression of LOX was only correlated to these measures at harvest, and BMP1 was correlated to these traits at both time periods (P < 0.05). These results indicate that collagen crosslinking enzyme activity, as indicated by mRNA levels, early in an animal's life may account for some of the variation seen in steak tenderness due

  6. Expression of silicatein and collagen genes in the marine sponge Suberites domuncula is controlled by silicate and myotrophin.

    PubMed

    Krasko, A; Lorenz, B; Batel, R; Schröder, H C; Müller, I M; Müller, W E

    2000-08-01

    The major skeletal elements in the (Porifera) sponges, are spicules formed from inorganic material. The spicules in the Demospongiae class are composed of hydrated, amorphous silica. Recently an enzyme, silicatein, which polymerizes alkoxide substrates to silica was described from the sponge Tethya aurantia. In the present study the cDNA encoding silicatein was isolated from the sponge Suberites domuncula. The deduced polypeptide comprises 331 amino acids and has a calculated size of Mr 36 306. This cDNA was used as a probe to study the potential role of silicate on the expression of the silicatein gene. For these studies, primmorphs, a special form of aggregates composed of proliferating cells, have been used. It was found that after increasing the concentration of soluble silicate in the seawater medium from around 1 microM to approximately 60 microM, this gene is strongly upregulated. Without additional silicate only a very weak expression could be measured. Because silica as well as collagen are required for the formation of spicules, the expression of the gene encoding collagen was measured in parallel. It was also found that the level of transcripts for collagen strongly increases in the presence of 60 microM soluble silicate. In addition, it is demonstrated that the expression of collagen is also upregulated in those primmorphs which were treated with recombinant myotrophin obtained from the same sponge. Myotrophin, however, had no effect on the expression of silicatein. From these data we conclude that silicate influences the expression of the enzyme silicatein and also the expression of collagen, (via the mediator myotrophin). PMID:10903523

  7. cis regulatory requirements for hypodermal cell-specific expression of the Caenorhabditis elegans cuticle collagen gene dpy-7.

    PubMed Central

    Gilleard, J S; Barry, J D; Johnstone, I L

    1997-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans cuticle collagens are encoded by a multigene family of between 50 and 100 members and are the major component of the nematode cuticular exoskeleton. They are synthesized in the hypodermis prior to secretion and incorporation into the cuticle and exhibit complex patterns of spatial and temporal expression. We have investigated the cis regulatory requirements for tissue- and stage-specific expression of the cuticle collagen gene dpy-7 and have identified a compact regulatory element which is sufficient to specify hypodermal cell reporter gene expression. This element appears to be a true tissue-specific promoter element, since it encompasses the dpy-7 transcription initiation sites and functions in an orientation-dependent manner. We have also shown, by interspecies transformation experiments, that the dpy-7 cis regulatory elements are functionally conserved between C. elegans and C. briggsae, and comparative sequence analysis supports the importance of the regulatory sequence that we have identified by reporter gene analysis. All of our data suggest that the spatial expression of the dpy-7 cuticle collagen gene is established essentially by a small tissue-specific promoter element and does not require upstream activator or repressor elements. In addition, we have found the DPY-7 polypeptide is very highly conserved between the two species and that the C. briggsae polypeptide can function appropriately within the C. elegans cuticle. This finding suggests a remarkably high level of conservation of individual cuticle components, and their interactions, between these two nematode species. PMID:9121480

  8. Identification of novel type VII collagen gene mutations resulting in severe recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Massé, M; Cserhalmi-Friedman, P B; Falanga, V; Celebi, J T; Martinez-Mir, A; Christiano, A M

    2005-05-01

    In this work, we studied the proband in a small nuclear family of Chinese and Dutch/German descent and identified two novel mutations in the type VII collagen gene leading to recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, Hallopeau-Siemens variant (HS-RDEB). The maternal mutation is a single base pair deletion of a cytosine nucleotide in exon 26, designated 3472delC, resulting in a frameshift and a premature termination codon (PTC) within the same exon, 7 bp downstream of the site of the mutation. The paternal mutation is a G-->A transition located at the 5' donor splice site within intron 51, designated IVS51 + 1G-->A. This mutation leads to the activation of a cryptic splice site, 32 bp downstream of the mutation site and to subsequent aberrant out-of-frame splicing, resulting in two alternative mRNA transcripts and a downstream PTC. To our knowledge, these two mutations have not been previously reported. These findings extend the body of evidence for compound heterozygous mutations leading to HS-RDEB and provide the basis for prenatal diagnosis in this family. PMID:15807692

  9. Polymorphism of the MHC class II Eb gene determines the protection against collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Zanelli, E.; Krco, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an animal model of auto immune polyarthritis, sharing similarities with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Paradoxally, susceptibility to mouse CIA is controlled by the H2A loci (DQ homologous) while RA is linked to HLA.DR genes (H2E homologous). We recently showed that the E{beta}{sup d} molecule prevents CIA development in susceptible H2{sup q} mice. We addressed the question of whether H2Eb polymorphism will influence CIA incidence as HLA.DRB1 polymorphism does in RA. In F{sub 1} mice, only H2Eb{sup d} and H2Eb{sup s} molecules showed protection. Using recombinant B10.RDD (Eb{sup d/b}) mice, we found that CIA protection was mediated by the first domain of the E{beta}{sup d} molecule. Using peptides covering the third hypervariable region of the E{beta} chain, we found a perfect correlation between presentation of E{beta} peptides by the H2A{sup q} molecule and protection on CIA. Therefore, the mechanism by which H2Eb protects against CIA seems to rely on the affinity of E{beta} peptides for the H2A{sup q} molecule. 35 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Differential alleleic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A2) in osteoarthritic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C.; Sykes, B.; Athanasou, N.; Carr, A.

    1995-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two COL2A1 alleles in articular cartilage obtained from each patient. Three patients demonstrated differential allelic expression and produced <12% of the normal level of mRNA from one of their COL2A1 alleles. The same allele shows reduced expression in a well-defined OA population than in a control group, suggesting the possible existence of a rare COL2A1 allele that predisposes to OA. 31 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. The neurotoxicity of gene vectors and its amelioration by packaging with collagen hollow spheres.

    PubMed

    Newland, Ben; Moloney, Teresa C; Fontana, Gianluca; Browne, Shane; Abu-Rub, Mohammad T; Dowd, Eilís; Pandit, Abhay S

    2013-03-01

    Over the last twenty years there have been several reports on the use of nonviral vectors to facilitate gene transfer in the mammalian brain. Whilst a large emphasis has been placed on vector transfection efficiency, the study of the adverse effects upon the brain, caused by the vectors themselves, remains completely overshadowed. To this end, a study was undertaken to study the tissue response to three commercially available transfection agents in the brain of adult Sprague Dawley rats. The response to these transfection agents was compared to adeno-associated viral vector (AAV), PBS and naked DNA. Furthermore, the use of a collagen hollow sphere (CHS) sustained delivery system was analysed for its ability to reduce striatal toxicity of the most predominantly studied polymer vector, polyethyleneimine (PEI). The size of the gross tissue loss at the injection site was analysed after immunohistochemical staining and was used as an indication of acute toxicity. Polymeric vectors showed similar levels of acute brain toxicity as seen with AAV, and CHS were able to significantly reduce the toxicity of the PEI vector. In addition; the host response to the vectors was measured in terms of reactive astrocytes and microglial cell recruitment. To understand whether this gross tissue loss was caused by the direct toxicity of the vectors themselves an in vitro study on primary astrocytes was conducted. All vectors reduced the viability of the cells which is brought about by direct necrosis and apoptosis. The CHS delivery system reduced cell necrosis in the early stages of post administration. In conclusion, whilst polymeric gene vectors cause acute necrosis, administration in the brain causes adverse effects no worse than that of an AAV vector. Furthermore, packaging the PEI vector with CHS reduces surface charge and direct toxicity without elevating the host response. PMID:23245921

  12. Anopheles gambiae collagen IV genes: cloning, phylogeny and midgut expression associated with blood feeding and Plasmodium infection.

    PubMed

    Gare, D C; Piertney, S B; Billingsley, P F

    2003-07-01

    A prerequisite for understanding the role that mosquito midgut extracellular matrix molecules play in malaria parasite development is proper isolation and characterisation of the genes coding for components of the basal lamina. Here we have identified genes coding for alpha1 and alpha2 chains of collagen IV from the major malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae. Conserved sequences in the terminal NC1 domain were used to obtain partial gene sequences of this functional region, and full sequence was isolated from a pupal cDNA library. In a DNA-derived phylogeny, the alpha1 and alpha2 chains cluster with dipteran orthologs, and the alpha2 is ancestral. The expression of collagen alpha1(IV) peaked during the pupal stage of mosquito development, and was expressed continuously in the adult female following a blood meal with a further rise detected in older mosquitoes. Collagen alpha1(IV) is also upregulated when the early oocyst of Plasmodium yoelii was developing within the mosquito midgut and may contribute to a larger wound healing response. A model describing the expression of basal lamina proteins during oocyst development is presented, and we hypothesise that the development of new basal lamina between the oocyst and midgut epithelium is akin to a wound healing process. PMID:12814648

  13. Interactions between collagen gene variants and risk of anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Kevin; Knight, Hayley; Ficek, Krzysztof; Leonska-Duniec, Agata; Maciejewska-Karlowska, Agnieszka; Sawczuk, Marek; Stepien-Slodkowska, Marta; O'Cuinneagain, Dion; van der Merwe, Willem; Posthumus, Michael; Cieszczyk, Pawel; Collins, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    The COL5A1 and COL12A1 variants are independently associated with modulating the risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in females. The objective of this study was to further investigate if COL3A1 and COL6A1 variants independently, as well as, collagen gene-gene interactions, modulate ACL rupture risk. Three hundred and thirty-three South African (SA, n = 242) and Polish (PL, n = 91) participants with diagnosed ACL ruptures and 378 controls (235 SA and 143 PL) were recruited. Participants were genotyped for COL3A1 rs1800255 G/A, COL5A1 rs12722 (T/C), COL6A1 rs35796750 (T/C) and COL12A1 rs970547 (A/G). No significant associations were identified between COL6A1 rs35796750 and COL3A1 rs1800255 genotypes and risk of ACL rupture in the SA cohort. The COL3A1 AA genotype was, however, significantly (p = 0.036) over-represented in the PL ACL group (9.9%, n = 9) when compared to the PL control (CON) group (2.8%, n = 4). Although there were genotype distribution differences between the SA and PL cohorts, the T+A-inferred pseudo-haplotype constructed from COL5A1 and COL12A1 was significantly over-represented in the female ACL group when compared to the female CON group within the SA (T+A ACL 50.5%, T+A CON 38.1%, p = 0.022), PL (T+A ACL 56.3%, T+A CON 36.3%, p = 0.029) and combined (T+A ACL 51.8%, T+A CON 37.5%, p = 0.004) cohorts. In conclusion, the novel main finding of this study was a significant interaction between the COL5A1 rs12722 T/C and COL12A1 rs970547 A/G variants and risk of ACL injury. These results highlight the importance of investigating gene-gene interactions in the aetiology of ACL ruptures in multiple independent cohorts. PMID:25073002

  14. Prevention of liver fibrosis by triple helix-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides targeted to the promoter region of type I collagen gene.

    PubMed

    Koilan, Subramaniyan; Hamilton, David; Baburyan, Narina; Padala, Mythili K; Weber, Karl T; Guntaka, Ramareddy V

    2010-10-01

    Hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis remains a global health problem. The most common etiologies are alcoholism and viral infections. Liver fibrosis is associated with major changes in both quantity and composition of extracellular matix and leads to disorganization of the liver architecture and irreversible damage to the liver function. As of now there is no effective therapy to control fibrosis. The end product of fibrosis is abnormal synthesis and accumulation of type I collagen in the extracellular matrix, which is produced by activated stellate or Ito cells in the damaged liver. Therefore, inhibition of transcription of type I collagen should in principle inhibit its production and accumulation in liver. Normally, DNA exists in a duplex form. However, under some circumstances, DNA can assume triple helical (triplex) structures. Intermolecular triplexes, formed by the addition of a sequence-specific third strand to the major groove of the duplex DNA, have the potential to serve as selective gene regulators. Earlier, we demonstrated efficient triplex formation between the exogenously added triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides (TFOs) and a specific sequence in the promoter region of the COL1A1 gene. In this study we used a rat model of liver fibrosis, induced by dimethylnitrosamine, to test whether these TFOs prevent liver fibrosis. Our results indicate that both the 25-mer and 18-mer TFOs, specific for the upstream nucleotide sequence from -141 to -165 (relative to the transcription start site) in the 5' end of collagen gene promoter, effectively prevented accumulation of liver collagen and fibrosis. We also observed improvement in liver function tests. However, mutations in the TFO that eliminated formation of triplexes are ineffective in preventing fibrosis. We believe that these TFOs can be used as potential antifibrotic therapeutic molecules. PMID:20818932

  15. Prevention of Liver Fibrosis by Triple Helix-Forming Oligodeoxyribonucleotides Targeted to the Promoter Region of Type I Collagen Gene

    PubMed Central

    Koilan, Subramaniyan; Hamilton, David; Baburyan, Narina; Padala, Mythili K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis remains a global health problem. The most common etiologies are alcoholism and viral infections. Liver fibrosis is associated with major changes in both quantity and composition of extracellular matix and leads to disorganization of the liver architecture and irreversible damage to the liver function. As of now there is no effective therapy to control fibrosis. The end product of fibrosis is abnormal synthesis and accumulation of type I collagen in the extracellular matrix, which is produced by activated stellate or Ito cells in the damaged liver. Therefore, inhibition of transcription of type I collagen should in principle inhibit its production and accumulation in liver. Normally, DNA exists in a duplex form. However, under some circumstances, DNA can assume triple helical (triplex) structures. Intermolecular triplexes, formed by the addition of a sequence-specific third strand to the major groove of the duplex DNA, have the potential to serve as selective gene regulators. Earlier, we demonstrated efficient triplex formation between the exogenously added triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides (TFOs) and a specific sequence in the promoter region of the COL1A1 gene. In this study we used a rat model of liver fibrosis, induced by dimethylnitrosamine, to test whether these TFOs prevent liver fibrosis. Our results indicate that both the 25-mer and 18-mer TFOs, specific for the upstream nucleotide sequence from −141 to −165 (relative to the transcription start site) in the 5′ end of collagen gene promoter, effectively prevented accumulation of liver collagen and fibrosis. We also observed improvement in liver function tests. However, mutations in the TFO that eliminated formation of triplexes are ineffective in preventing fibrosis. We believe that these TFOs can be used as potential antifibrotic therapeutic molecules. PMID:20818932

  16. Gene encoding the collagen type I and thrombospondin receptor CD36 is located on chromosome 7q11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Ruiz, E.; Armesilla, A.L.; Sanchez-Madrid, F.; Vega, M.A. )

    1993-09-01

    The human CD36 is a member of a gene family of structurally related glycoproteins and functions as a receptor for collagen type I and thrombospondin. CD36 also binds to red blood cells infected with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. In the present study, the CD36 gene was assigned to chromosome 7 by using the polymerase chain reaction with DNA from human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. Furthermore, the use of a CD36 genomic probe has allowed the localization of the CD36 locus to the 7q11.2 band by fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled with GTG-banding. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Dominant mutations in the type II collagen gene, COL2A1, produce spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Strudwick type.

    PubMed

    Tiller, G E; Polumbo, P A; Weis, M A; Bogaert, R; Lachman, R S; Cohn, D H; Rimoin, D L; Eyre, D R

    1995-09-01

    The chondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormal growth or development of cartilage. Current classification is based on mode of inheritance as well as clinical, histologic, and/or radiographic features. A clinical spectrum of chondrodysplasia phenotypes, ranging from mild to perinatal lethal, is due to defects in the gene for type II collagen, COL2A1. This spectrum includes Stickler syndrome, Kniest dysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), achondrogenesis type II, and hypochondrogenesis. Individuals affected with these disorders exhibit abnormalities of the growth plate, nucleus pulposus, and vitreous humor, which are tissues that contain type II collagen. The Strudwick type of spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD) is characterized by disproportionate short stature, pectus carinatum, and scoliosis, as well as dappled metaphyses (which are not seen in SEDC). The phenotype was first described by Murdoch and Walker in 1969, and a series of 14 patients was later reported by Anderson et al. The observation of two affected sibs born to unaffected parents led to the classification of SEMD Strudwick as an autosomal recessive disorder. We now describe the biochemical characterization of defects in alpha 1(II) collagen in three unrelated individuals with SEMD Strudwick, each of which is due to heterozygosity for a unique mutation in COL2A1. Our data support the hypothesis that some cases, if not all cases, of this distinctive chondrodysplasia result from dominant mutations in COL2A1, thus expanding the clinical spectrum of phenotypes associated with this gene. PMID:7550321

  18. Spectrum of mutations in the COL4A5 collagen gene in X-linked Alport syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Knebelmann, B.; Breillat, C.; Forestier, L.; Arrondel, C.; Jacassier, D.; Giatras, I.; Drouot, L.; Deschênes, G.; Grünfeld, J. P.; Broyer, M.; Gubler, M. C.; Antignac, C.

    1996-01-01

    Alport syndrome is a mainly X-linked hereditary disease of basement membranes that is characterized by progressive renal failure, deafness, and ocular lesions. It is associated with mutations of the COL4A5 gene located at Xq22 and encoding the alpha5 chain of type IV collagen. We have screened 48 of the 51 exons of the COL4A5 gene by SSCP analysis and have identified 64 mutations and 10 sequence variants among 131 unrelated Alport syndrome patients. This represents a mutation-detection rate of 50%. There were no hot-spot mutations and no recurrent mutations in our population. The identified mutations were 6 nonsense mutations, 12 frameshift mutations, 17 splice-site mutations, and 29 missense mutations, 27 of the latter being glycine substitutions in the collagenous domain. Two of these occurred on the same allele in one patient and segregated with the disease in the family. We showed that some of the glycine substitutions could be associated with the lack of immunological expression of the alpha3(IV)-alpha5(IV) collagen chains in the glomerular basement membrane. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8940267

  19. Aspergillus Collagen-Like Genes (acl): Identification, Sequence Polymorphism, and Assessment for PCR-Based Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tuntevski, Kiril; Durney, Brandon C.; Snyder, Anna K.; LaSala, P. Rocco; Nayak, Ajay P.; Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.; Rio, Rita V. M.; Holland, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The genus Aspergillus is a burden to public health due to its ubiquitous presence in the environment, its production of allergens, and wide demographic susceptibility among cystic fibrosis, asthmatic, and immunosuppressed patients. Current methods of detection of Aspergillus colonization and infection rely on lengthy morphological characterization or nonstandardized serological assays that are restricted to identifying a fungal etiology. Collagen-like genes have been shown to exhibit species-specific conservation across the noncollagenous regions as well as strain-specific polymorphism in the collagen-like regions. Here we assess the conserved region of the Aspergillus collagen-like (acl) genes and explore the application of PCR amplicon size-based discrimination among the five most common etiologic species of the Aspergillus genus, including Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. nidulans, A. niger, and A. terreus. Genetic polymorphism and phylogenetic analysis of the aclF1 gene were additionally examined among the available strains. Furthermore, the applicability of the PCR-based assay to identification of these five species in cultures derived from sputum and bronchoalveolar fluid from 19 clinical samples was explored. Application of capillary electrophoresis on nanogels was additionally demonstrated to improve the discrimination between Aspergillus species. Overall, this study demonstrated that Aspergillus acl genes could be used as PCR targets to discriminate between clinically relevant Aspergillus species. Future studies aim to utilize the detection of Aspergillus acl genes in PCR and microfluidic applications to determine the sensitivity and specificity for the identification of Aspergillus colonization and invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised subjects. PMID:24123732

  20. Structural organization of a 17 KB segment of the alpha 2 collagen gene: evaluation by R loop mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, M P; Boyd, C D; Tolstoshev, P; Crystal, R G

    1980-01-01

    A recombinant phage, SpC3, containing a 17 kb genomic DNA insert representing approximately 60% of the 3' portion of the sheep collagen alpha 2 gene, was evaluated by electron microscopic R loop analysis. A minimum of 17 intervening sequences (introns) and 18 alpha 2 coding sequences (exons) were mapped. With the exception of the 850 base pair exon located at the extreme 3' end of the insert, all exons contained 250 base pairs or less. The total length of all the exons in SpC3 was 3,014 base pairs. The length distribution of the 17 introns ranged from 300 to 1600 base pairs; together, all of the introns comprised 14,070 base pairs of SpC3 DNA. Thus, the DNA region required for coding the interspersed 3 kb of alpha 2 collagen genetic information was 5.6 fold longer than the corresponding alpha 2 mRNA coding sequences. Images PMID:7433091

  1. Differential expression of human lysyl hydroxylase genes, lysine hydroxylation, and cross-linking of type I collagen during osteoblastic differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, K; Grzesik, W J; Nishiura, T; Kuznetsov, S A; Robey, P G; Brenner, D A; Yamauchi, M

    1999-08-01

    The pattern of lysyl hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of collagen is critical in determining the cross-linking pathways that are tissue specific. We hypothesized that the tissue specificity of type I collagen cross-linking is, in part, due to the differential expression of lysyl hydroxylase genes (Procollagen-lysine,2-oxyglutarate,5-dioxygenase 1, 2, and 3 [PLOD1, PLOD2, and PLOD3]). In this study, we have examined the expression patterns of these three genes during the course of in vitro differentiation of human osteoprogenitor cells (bone marrow stromal cells [BMSCs]) and normal skin fibroblasts (NSFs). In addition, using the medium and cell layer/matrix fractions in these cultures, lysine hydroxylation of type I collagen alpha chains and collagen cross-linking chemistries have been characterized. High levels of PLOD1 and PLOD3 genes were expressed in both BMSCs and NSFs, and the expression levels did not change in the course of differentiation. In contrast to the PLOD1 and PLOD3 genes, both cell types showed low PLOD2 gene expression in undifferentiated and early differentiated conditions. However, fully differentiated BMSCs, but not NSFs, exhibited a significantly elevated level (6-fold increase) of PLOD2 mRNA. This increase coincided with the onset of matrix mineralization and with the increase in lysyl hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of alpha chains of type I collagen molecule. Furthermore, the collagen cross-links that are derived from the nontriple helical hydroxylysine-aldehyde were found only in fully differentiated BMSC cultures. The data suggests that PLOD2 expression is associated with lysine hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of collagen and, thus, could be partially responsible for the tissue-specific collagen cross-linking pattern. PMID:10457259

  2. Differential expression of human lysyl hydroxylase genes, lysine hydroxylation, and cross-linking of type I collagen during osteoblastic differentiation in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzawa, K.; Grzesik, W. J.; Nishiura, T.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Robey, P. G.; Brenner, D. A.; Yamauchi, M.

    1999-01-01

    The pattern of lysyl hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of collagen is critical in determining the cross-linking pathways that are tissue specific. We hypothesized that the tissue specificity of type I collagen cross-linking is, in part, due to the differential expression of lysyl hydroxylase genes (Procollagen-lysine,2-oxyglutarate,5-dioxygenase 1, 2, and 3 [PLOD1, PLOD2, and PLOD3]). In this study, we have examined the expression patterns of these three genes during the course of in vitro differentiation of human osteoprogenitor cells (bone marrow stromal cells [BMSCs]) and normal skin fibroblasts (NSFs). In addition, using the medium and cell layer/matrix fractions in these cultures, lysine hydroxylation of type I collagen alpha chains and collagen cross-linking chemistries have been characterized. High levels of PLOD1 and PLOD3 genes were expressed in both BMSCs and NSFs, and the expression levels did not change in the course of differentiation. In contrast to the PLOD1 and PLOD3 genes, both cell types showed low PLOD2 gene expression in undifferentiated and early differentiated conditions. However, fully differentiated BMSCs, but not NSFs, exhibited a significantly elevated level (6-fold increase) of PLOD2 mRNA. This increase coincided with the onset of matrix mineralization and with the increase in lysyl hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of alpha chains of type I collagen molecule. Furthermore, the collagen cross-links that are derived from the nontriple helical hydroxylysine-aldehyde were found only in fully differentiated BMSC cultures. The data suggests that PLOD2 expression is associated with lysine hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of collagen and, thus, could be partially responsible for the tissue-specific collagen cross-linking pattern.

  3. Origin of the autoreactive anti-type II collagen response. II. Specificities, antibody isotypes and usage of V gene families of anti-type II collagen B cells.

    PubMed

    Holmdahl, R; Bailey, C; Enander, I; Mayer, R; Klareskog, L; Moran, T; Bona, C

    1989-03-15

    Autoantibodies play an important role in the pathogenesis of type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice. We have earlier reported a high frequency of cells producing anti-CII autoantibodies and a low frequency of cells producing multispecific antibodies, in regional lymph nodes 9 to 11 days after primary immunization with CII. It is shown here that anti-CII antibodies produced during primary immune response are IgG-antibodies mainly of IgG2a, IgG1 and IgG2b subclasses while IgM antibodies dominate primary responses elicited by OVA and denatured CII as analyzed with a large panel of hybridomas. Anti-CII antibodies generated during the primary response recognize at least five different epitopes on the CII molecule. The specificities of these antibodies for various epitopes result from combinational association of products encoded by genes derived from various VH and VK families and/or by the occurrence of somatic mutations. It is suggested that the primary anti-CII autoantibody response involves activation of memory B cells and is in this aspect different from the origin of "natural" autoantibodies. PMID:2493500

  4. Use of an Activated Beta-Catenin to Identify Wnt Pathway Target Genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, Including a Subset of Collagen Genes Expressed in Late Larval Development

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Belinda M.; Abete-Luzi, Patricia; Krause, Michael W.; Eisenmann, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays a fundamental role during metazoan development, where it regulates diverse processes, including cell fate specification, cell migration, and stem cell renewal. Activation of the beta-catenin−dependent/canonical Wnt pathway up-regulates expression of Wnt target genes to mediate a cellular response. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a canonical Wnt signaling pathway regulates several processes during larval development; however, few target genes of this pathway have been identified. To address this deficit, we used a novel approach of conditionally activated Wnt signaling during a defined stage of larval life by overexpressing an activated beta-catenin protein, then used microarray analysis to identify genes showing altered expression compared with control animals. We identified 166 differentially expressed genes, of which 104 were up-regulated. A subset of the up-regulated genes was shown to have altered expression in mutants with decreased or increased Wnt signaling; we consider these genes to be bona fide C. elegans Wnt pathway targets. Among these was a group of six genes, including the cuticular collagen genes, bli-1col-38, col-49, and col-71. These genes show a peak of expression in the mid L4 stage during normal development, suggesting a role in adult cuticle formation. Consistent with this finding, reduction of function for several of the genes causes phenotypes suggestive of defects in cuticle function or integrity. Therefore, this work has identified a large number of putative Wnt pathway target genes during larval life, including a small subset of Wnt-regulated collagen genes that may function in synthesis of the adult cuticle. PMID:24569038

  5. Collagen V-induced nasal tolerance downregulates pulmonary collagen mRNA gene and TGF-beta expression in experimental systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate collagen deposition, mRNA collagen synthesis and TGF-beta expression in the lung tissue in an experimental model of scleroderma after collagen V-induced nasal tolerance. Methods Female New Zealand rabbits (N = 12) were immunized with 1 mg/ml of collagen V in Freund's adjuvant (IM). After 150 days, six immunized animals were tolerated by nasal administration of collagen V (25 μg/day) (IM-TOL) daily for 60 days. The collagen content was determined by morphometry, and mRNA expressions of types I, III and V collagen were determined by Real-time PCR. The TGF-beta expression was evaluated by immunostaining and quantified by point counting methods. To statistic analysis ANOVA with Bonferroni test were employed for multiple comparison when appropriate and the level of significance was determined to be p < 0.05. Results IM-TOL, when compared to IM, showed significant reduction in total collagen content around the vessels (0.371 ± 0.118 vs. 0.874 ± 0.282, p < 0.001), bronchioles (0.294 ± 0.139 vs. 0.646 ± 0.172, p < 0.001) and in the septal interstitium (0.027 ± 0.014 vs. 0.067 ± 0.039, p = 0.026). The lung tissue of IM-TOL, when compared to IM, showed decreased immunostaining of types I, III and V collagen, reduced mRNA expression of types I (0.10 ± 0.07 vs. 1.0 ± 0.528, p = 0.002) and V (1.12 ± 0.42 vs. 4.74 ± 2.25, p = 0.009) collagen, in addition to decreased TGF-beta expression (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Collagen V-induced nasal tolerance in the experimental model of SSc regulated the pulmonary remodeling process, inhibiting collagen deposition and collagen I and V mRNA synthesis. Additionally, it decreased TGF-beta expression, suggesting a promising therapeutic option for scleroderma treatment. PMID:20047687

  6. Gene expression of markers of osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal cells on collagen I-modified microrough titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Morra, M; Cassinelli, C; Cascardo, G; Bollati, D; Baena, R Rodriguez Y

    2011-02-01

    Microrough, doubly acid etched titanium surfaces (Ti) were further modified by amination and covalent coupling of fibrillar collagen type I (ColTi). Human Mesenchymal Cells (HMC) adhesion and growth, and relevant osteogenic differentiation in nonosteogenic (basal) medium were evaluated by fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and RT-PCR for a three-week period. Results show strongly enhanced HMC adhesion and cell density at short experimental time on ColTi, together with complete spreading of the cell body over the microrough surface topography. RT-PCR analysis of several genes involved in osteogenesis indicate, since the first week of culturing, significant progression of HMC on ColTi along the osteogenic pathway. These results indicate that the adopted process of surface immobilization of collagen, mandatory to impart collagenase resistance in implant sites, does not impair biospecific interactions between HMC and collagen. Thus, it is possible to upgrade properties arising from the control of Ti surfaces topography by surface-chemistry driven enhanced recruitment of precursor osteogenic cells and pro-osteogenic stimula. PMID:21171164

  7. Interaction of mouse mammary epithelial cells with collagen substrata: regulation of casein gene expression and secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.H.P.; Lee, W.H.; Kaetzel, C.S.; Parry, G.; Bissell, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMEC) secrete certain milk proteins only when cultured on floating collagen gels. The authors demonstrate that modulation of milk proteins by substrata is manifested at several regulatory levels; (i) cells cultured on floating collagen gels have 3- to 10-fold more casein mRNA than cells cultured on plastic or attached collagen gels. (ii) Cells on the latter two flat substrata, nevertheless, synthesize a significant amount of caseins, indicating that the remaining mRNA is functional. (iii) Cells on all substrata are inducible for casein mRNA and casein proteins by prolactin, but the extent of induction is greater on collagen than that on plastic - i.e., the substratum confers an altered degree of inducibility. (iv) Cells on all substrata synthesize casein proteins at rates proportional to the amount of casein mRNA, but the newly synthesized caseins in cells on plastic are degraded intracellularly, whereas those synthesized by cells on floating gels are secreted into the medium. (v) Cells on all substrata examined lose virtually all mRNA for whey acidic protein despite the fact that this mRNA is abundant in the mammary gland itself; the authors conclude that additional, as-yet-unknown, factors are necessary for synthesis and secretion of whey acidic protein in culture.

  8. Changes in diaphragm muscle collagen gene expression after acute unilateral denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, L. E.; Sieck, G. C.; Aleff, R. A.; Martinez, D. A.; Vailas, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of acute (3 days) unilateral diaphragm denervation (DNV) on 1) levels of alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA; 2) collagen concentration [hydroxyproline (HYP)]; 3) amount of the nonreducible collagen cross-link hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP); and 4) the passive force-length relationship of the muscle. The levels of alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA, HYP concentration, and amount of HP were measured in muscle segments from the midcostal region of DNV and intact (INT) hemidiaphragms of adult male Fischer 344 rats (250-300 g). The in vitro passive force-length relationship of DNV and INT hemidiaphragm was determined by lengthening and shortening the diaphragm muscle segments from 85 to 115% of optimal length at a constant velocity (0.6 optimal length/s). Three days after DNV, the level of alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNA was increased over 15-fold in the DNV hemidiaphragm compared with INT (P < 0.05), whereas the level of alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA was increased by approximately sixfold in the DNV hemidiaphragm compared with INT (P < 0.05). Collagen (HYP) concentration did not differ between groups, averaging 8.7 and 8.9 micrograms/mg dry wt for the DNV and INT hemidiaphragms, respectively. In addition, there was no difference in the amount of the mature nonreducible collagen cross-link HP between the DNV and INT hemidiaphragms (0.66 vs. 0.76 mole HP/mole collagen, respectively). The amount of passive force developed during lengthening did not differ between DNV and INT hemidiaphragms. These data indicate that acute DNV of the hemidiaphragm is associated with an increase in the mRNA level of the two principal fibrillar collagen phenotypes in skeletal muscle. However, despite extensive muscle remodeling, the passive force-length relationship of the DNV hemidiaphragm is unaffected compared with the INT muscle.

  9. A Novel Role of Annexin A2 in Human Type I Collagen Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Jessica K.; Shaw, Tamlyn M.; Katz, Arieh A.; Parker, M. Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fibrillar collagen scaffold of the extracellular matrix provides a structural framework for cells in tissues and regulates intercellular communication; its disregulation has been associated with tumour development and progression. Previous work has shown that expression of type I collagen, the most abundant mammalian extracellular matrix protein, is decreased in chemically or virally transformed cells. This negative regulation could be mapped to a proximal COL1A2 promoter element spanning a CME (Collagen Modulating Element) site in SV40‐transformed human fibroblasts (SV‐WI38) that binds an unknown repressing protein. By magnetic bead pull‐down, we observed a multi‐protein complex bound to the CME with preference for single‐stranded over conventional double‐stranded DNA. MALDI‐TOF mass spectrometry of the CME‐binding protein complex revealed involvement of nuclear annexin A2 (AnxA2) which was increased in SV40‐transformed cells. Further EMSA analysis demonstrated that AnxA2 did not directly bind to the DNA but stabilised the complex and led to an increase in protein binding to the CME in SV‐WI38 but not untransformed WI38 cells. Knockdown of AnxA2 by siRNA increased type I collagen production in both WI38 and SV‐WI38 cells; however, these effects were not mediated at the transcriptional level. Rather, our data indicate a novel functional role of AnxA2 in the negative post‐transcriptional regulation of type I collagen synthesis in human fibroblasts. In SV40‐transformed cells, AnxA2 is accumulated at the proximal COL1A2 promoter region, suggesting close association with the transcriptional machinery that possibly facilitates binding to the emerging mRNA, eventually contributing to overall repression of type I collagen protein synthesis. J. Cell. Biochem. 116: 408–417, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25290763

  10. Overexpression of HMGA2-LPP fusion transcripts promotes expression of the {alpha} 2 type XI collagen gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Takahiro; Matsui, Yoshito . E-mail: ymatsui@sb4.so-net.ne.jp; Goto, Tomohiro; Yukata, Kiminori; Yasui, Natsuo

    2006-02-10

    In a subset of human lipomas, a specific t (3; 12) chromosome translocation gives rise to HMGA2-LPP fusion protein, containing the amino (N)-terminal DNA binding domains of HMGA2 fused to the carboxyl (C)-terminal LIM domains of LPP. In addition to its role in adipogenesis, several observations suggest that HMGA2-LPP is linked to chondrogenesis. Here, we analyzed whether HMGA2-LPP promotes chondrogenic differentiation, a marker of which is transactivation of the {alpha} 2 type XI collagen gene (Col11a2). Real-time PCR analysis showed that HMGA2-LPP and COL11A2 were co-expressed. Luciferase assay demonstrated that either of HMGA2-LPP, wild-type HMGA2 or the N-terminal HMGA2 transactivated the Col11a2 promoter in HeLa cells, while the C-terminal LPP did not. RT-PCR analysis revealed that HMGA2-LPP transcripts in lipomas with the fusion were 591-fold of full-length HMGA2 transcripts in lipomas without the fusion. These results indicate that in vivo overexpression of HMGA2-LPP promotes chondrogenesis by upregulating cartilage-specific collagen gene expression through the N-terminal DNA binding domains.

  11. Construction and Characterization of Mutations within the Klebsiella mrkD1P Gene That Affect Binding to Collagen Type V

    PubMed Central

    Sebghati, Tricia A.; Clegg, Steven

    1999-01-01

    The fimbria-associated MrkD1P protein mediates adherence of type 3 fimbriate strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae to collagen type V. Currently, three different MrkD adhesins have been described in Klebsiella species, and each possesses a distinctive binding pattern. Therefore, the binding abilities of mutants possessing defined mutations within the mrkD1P gene were examined in order to determine whether specific regions of the adhesin molecule were responsible for collagen binding. Both site-directed and chemically induced mutations were constructed within mrkD1P, and the ability of the gene products to be incorporated into fimbrial appendages or bind to collagen was determined. Binding to type V collagen was not associated solely with one particular region of the MrkD1P protein, and two classes of nonadhesive mutants were isolated. In one class of mutants, the MrkD adhesin was not assembled into the fimbrial shaft, whereas in the second class of mutants, the adhesin was associated with fimbriae but did not bind to collagen. Both hemagglutinating and collagen-binding activities were associated with the MrkD1P molecule, since P pili and type 3 fimbriae carrying adhesive MrkD proteins exhibited identical binding properties. PMID:10085002

  12. The chick and human collagen alpha1(XII) gene promoter--activity of highly conserved regions around the first exon and in the first intron.

    PubMed

    Chiquet, M; Mumenthaler, U; Wittwer, M; Jin, W; Koch, M

    1998-10-15

    A single gene encodes collagen XII, an extracellular matrix protein with three large fibronectin-related subunits connected via a short collagen triple helix. Since collagen XII is a component of a specific subset of collagen fibrils in tissues bearing high tensile stress, we are interested to know how its restricted expression is regulated. To this aim, we have isolated the region around the first exon of both the chick and human collagen alpha1(XII) gene. The upstream sequences of the two genes share common features but are not related. Strong similarity starts about 100 bp 5' of the first exon and ends 100 bp into the first intron. In addition, two large conserved regions (56-63% similarity) were found in the first intron. A single major and two clusters of minor transcription start sites were identified in both the chick and human gene. To test for promoter activity, conserved fragments from the chick gene were cloned into reporter plasmids for transient transfection of fibroblasts. A 70-bp stretch containing a conserved nuclear factor-1 binding sequence just upstream of the first transcription start site was found to work as a basal promoter. An adjacent, but nonoverlapping short segment including the more downstream start sites and a conserved TATTAA sequence exhibited independent promoter activity. GC-rich sequences just 5' and 3' of the minimal promoter fragments were required for full activity. In contrast, inclusion of more upstream sequences (up to 2.4 kb) had no effect. The two conserved regions in the first intron showed no promoter activity on their own but modulated activity when linked to autologous or heterologous promoters. Specifically, one of these intronic regions might contain enhancer element(s) that respond to mechanical stress acting on the fibroblasts. We conclude that the collagen XII gene is driven by a basal promoter with two halves that can act independently; conserved control regions are located around the first exon and in the first

  13. Biology, chemistry and pathology of collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmajer, R.; Olsen, B.R.; Kuhn, K.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the articles are: Structure of the Type II Collagen Gene; Structural and Functional Analysis of the Genes for ..cap alpha..2(1) and ..cap alpha..1(III) collagens; Structure and Expression of the Collagen Genes of C. Elegans; Molecular Basis of Clinical Heterogeneity in the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; and Normal and Mutant Human Collagen Genes.

  14. CYTOKINE-INDUCED CHROMATIN MODIFICATIONS OF THE TYPE I COLLAGEN ALPHA 2 GENE DURING INTESTINAL ENDOTHELIAL-TO-MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Tammy; Scarpa, Melania; Rieder, Florian; West, Gail; Stylianou, Eleni

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibrosis of the intestine is currently an irreversible complication of Inflammatory Bowel Disease yet little is understood of the underlying pathogenesis and anti-fibrotic strategies remain elusive. To develop effective therapies, knowledge of the mechanism of transcription and excessive deposition of type I collagen - a hallmark of fibrosis, is needed. We have shown previously that endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) contributes to the pool of intestinal fibrotic cells and that a cytokine cocktail (IL1-β, TNF-α and TGF-β) induces Collagen I alpha 2 (COL1A2) mRNA and protein. Methods Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on pure cultures of human intestinal mucosal endothelial cells undergoing EndoMT were performed with antibodies to specific histone modifications and RNA polymerase II. RT-PCR was used to quantify the levels of Col1A2 and endothelial specific von Willebrand factor (vWF) mRNA. Results We show that cytokines induce selective chromatin modifications (histone 4 hyperacetylation and hypermethylation of histone 3) and phosphorylated RNA polymerase II at the COL1A2 promoter. Hypoacetylated and hypomethylated histone 3 was detected on the repressed vWF gene. Prolonged exposure to cytokines (16 days) retained hyperacetylation of select lysines in H4 on the COL1A2 promoter. Removal of cytokines after 16 days and continued culture for 10 days, showed persistent hyperacetylation at lysine 16 in histone H4. Conclusion This is the first study to show that COL1A2 gene expression is associated with cytokine-induced, temporally ordered and persistent chromatin modifications and suggests that these are important determinants of gene expression in EndoMT and intestinal fibrosis. PMID:23635716

  15. Collagen synthesis promoting pullulan-PEI-ascorbic acid conjugate as an efficient anti-cancer gene delivery vector.

    PubMed

    Ambattu, Lizebona August; Rekha, M R

    2015-08-01

    Cationized pullulan (pullulan-PEI; PP) was synthesized and further modified with an anti-oxidant molecule, ascorbic acid (PPAA) at various ratios. The nanoplexes formed at an optimum ratio of 4:1 was within a size of 150nm and had a zeta potential of 9-14mV. The nanoplexes at this ratio was used for further investigations. The cell internalization and transfection efficiency of these nanoplexes were determined in presence of serum. The internalization and transfection efficiency were found to be unaffected by the presence of fetal bovine serum. Another interesting observation was that this polymer was found to have collagen synthesis promoting property. The collagen synthesis effect of these polymers was quantified and observed that PPAA3 promoted the highest. Transfection efficiency was evaluated by assessing the p53 gene expression in C6 rat glioma cells and cell death was quantified to be 96% by flow cytometry, thus establishing the high efficacy of this polymer. PMID:25933522

  16. Comparison of the Expression of Hepatic Genes by Human Wharton’s Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cultured in 2D and 3D Collagen Culture Systems

    PubMed Central

    Khodabandeh, Zahra; Vojdani, Zahra; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Jaberipour, Mansoureh; Hosseini, Ahmad; Bahmanpour, Soghra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (HWJMSCs) express liver-specific markers such as albumin, alpha-fetoprotein, cytokeratin-19, cytokeratin-18, and glucose-6-phosphatase. Therefore, they can be considered as a good source for cell replacement therapy for liver diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of various culture systems on the hepatocyte-specific gene expression pattern of naïve HWJMSCs. Methods: HWJMSCs were characterized as MSCs by detecting the surface CD markers and capability to differentiate toward osteoblast and adipocyte. HWJMSCs were cultured in 2D collagen films and 3D collagen scaffolds for 21 days and were compared to control cultures. Real time RT-PCR was used to evaluate the expression of liver-specific genes. Results: The HWJMSCs which were grown on non-coated culture plates expressed cytokeratin-18 and -19, alpha-fetoprotein, albumin, glucose-6-phosphatase, and claudin. The expression of the hepatic nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) was very low. The cells showed a significant increase in caludin expression when they cultured in 3D collagen scaffolds compared to the conventional monolayer culture and 2D collagen scaffold. Conclusion: Various culture systems did not influence on hepatocyte specific marker expression by HWJMSCs, except for claudin. The expression of claudin showed that 3D collagen scaffold provided the extracellular matrix for induction of the cells to interconnect with each other. PMID:26722142

  17. COLLAGEN PROCESSING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Collagen dispersions, produced from fibrils recovered from milled bovine collagen, have shown promise in environmental remediation in applications as settling aids, filtration aids, fractionation media, oil drop stabilizers, and water purification aids. Macroporous structures, processed by controll...

  18. Development and application of a new Silent reporter system to quantitate the activity of enhancer elements in the type II Collagen Gene.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuo; Shinomura, Tamayuki

    2016-07-01

    Type II collagen is a major component of cartilage, which provide structural stiffness to the tissue. As a sufficient amount of type II collagen is critical for maintaining the biomechanical properties of cartilage, its expression is tightly regulated in chondrocytes. Therefore, it is essential to elucidate in detail the transcriptional mechanism that controls expression of type II collagen, in particular by two enhancer elements we recently discovered. To systematically analyze and compare enhancer activities, we developed a novel reporter assay system that exploits site-specific integration of promoter and enhancer elements to activate a transcriptionally silent reporter gene. Using this system, we found that the enhancer elements have distinct characteristics, with one exhibiting additive effects and the other exhibiting synergistic effects when repeated in tandem. PMID:26992640

  19. Recessive Mutations in the α3 (VI) Collagen Gene COL6A3 Cause Early-Onset Isolated Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Zech, Michael; Lam, Daniel D.; Francescatto, Ludmila; Schormair, Barbara; Salminen, Aaro V.; Jochim, Angela; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Lochmüller, Hanns; Strom, Tim M.; Haslinger, Bernhard; Katsanis, Nicholas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    Isolated dystonia is a disorder characterized by involuntary twisting postures arising from sustained muscle contractions. Although autosomal-dominant mutations in TOR1A, THAP1, and GNAL have been found in some cases, the molecular mechanisms underlying isolated dystonia are largely unknown. In addition, although emphasis has been placed on dominant isolated dystonia, the disorder is also transmitted as a recessive trait, for which no mutations have been defined. Using whole-exome sequencing in a recessive isolated dystonia-affected kindred, we identified disease-segregating compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3, a collagen VI gene associated previously with muscular dystrophy. Genetic screening of a further 367 isolated dystonia subjects revealed two additional recessive pedigrees harboring compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3. Strikingly, all affected individuals had at least one pathogenic allele in exon 41, including an exon-skipping mutation that induced an in-frame deletion. We tested the hypothesis that disruption of this exon is pathognomonic for isolated dystonia by inducing a series of in-frame deletions in zebrafish embryos. Consistent with our human genetics data, suppression of the exon 41 ortholog caused deficits in axonal outgrowth, whereas suppression of other exons phenocopied collagen deposition mutants. All recessive mutation carriers demonstrated early-onset segmental isolated dystonia without muscular disease. Finally, we show that Col6a3 is expressed in neurons, with relevant mRNA levels detectable throughout the adult mouse brain. Taken together, our data indicate that loss-of-function mutations affecting a specific region of COL6A3 cause recessive isolated dystonia with underlying neurodevelopmental deficits and highlight the brain extracellular matrix as a contributor to dystonia pathogenesis. PMID:26004199

  20. Recessive mutations in the α3 (VI) collagen gene COL6A3 cause early-onset isolated dystonia.

    PubMed

    Zech, Michael; Lam, Daniel D; Francescatto, Ludmila; Schormair, Barbara; Salminen, Aaro V; Jochim, Angela; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Lochmüller, Hanns; Strom, Tim M; Haslinger, Bernhard; Katsanis, Nicholas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2015-06-01

    Isolated dystonia is a disorder characterized by involuntary twisting postures arising from sustained muscle contractions. Although autosomal-dominant mutations in TOR1A, THAP1, and GNAL have been found in some cases, the molecular mechanisms underlying isolated dystonia are largely unknown. In addition, although emphasis has been placed on dominant isolated dystonia, the disorder is also transmitted as a recessive trait, for which no mutations have been defined. Using whole-exome sequencing in a recessive isolated dystonia-affected kindred, we identified disease-segregating compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3, a collagen VI gene associated previously with muscular dystrophy. Genetic screening of a further 367 isolated dystonia subjects revealed two additional recessive pedigrees harboring compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3. Strikingly, all affected individuals had at least one pathogenic allele in exon 41, including an exon-skipping mutation that induced an in-frame deletion. We tested the hypothesis that disruption of this exon is pathognomonic for isolated dystonia by inducing a series of in-frame deletions in zebrafish embryos. Consistent with our human genetics data, suppression of the exon 41 ortholog caused deficits in axonal outgrowth, whereas suppression of other exons phenocopied collagen deposition mutants. All recessive mutation carriers demonstrated early-onset segmental isolated dystonia without muscular disease. Finally, we show that Col6a3 is expressed in neurons, with relevant mRNA levels detectable throughout the adult mouse brain. Taken together, our data indicate that loss-of-function mutations affecting a specific region of COL6A3 cause recessive isolated dystonia with underlying neurodevelopmental deficits and highlight the brain extracellular matrix as a contributor to dystonia pathogenesis. PMID:26004199

  1. THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SPATIOTEMPORAL COLLAGEN GENE EXPRESSION, HISTOLOGY, AND BIOMECHANICS FOLLOWING FULL-LENGTH INJURY IN THE MURINE PATELLAR TENDON

    PubMed Central

    Dyment, Nathaniel A; Kazemi, Namdar; Aschbacher-Smith, Lindsey E; Barthelery, Nicolas J.; Kenter, Keith; Gooch, Cynthia; Shearn, Jason T; Wylie, Christopher; Butler, David L

    2011-01-01

    Tendon injuries are major orthopaedic problems that worsen as the population ages. Type-I (Col1) and type-II (Col2) collagens play important roles in tendon midsubstance and tendon-to-bone insertion healing, respectively. Using double transgenic mice, this study aims to spatiotemporally monitor Col1 and Col2 gene expression, histology and biomechanics up to 8 weeks following a full-length patellar tendon injury. Gene expression and histology were analyzed weekly for up to 5 weeks while mechanical properties were measured at 1, 2, 5, and 8 weeks. At week 1, the healing region displayed loose granulation tissue with little Col1 expression. Col1 expression peaked at 2 weeks, but the ECM was highly disorganized and hypercellular. By 3 weeks, Col1 expression had reduced and by 5 weeks, the ECM was generally aligned along the tendon axis. Col2 expression was not seen in the healing midsubstance or insertion at any time point. The biomechanics of the healing tissue was inadequate at all time points, achieving ultimate loads and stiffnesses of 48% and 63% of normal values by 8 weeks. Future studies will further characterize the cells within the healing midsubstance and insertion using tenogenic markers and compare these results to those of tendon cells during normal development. PMID:21698662

  2. De novo expression of a type IV collagen gene in Drosophila embryos is restricted to mesodermal derivatives and occurs at germ band shortening.

    PubMed

    Mirre, C; Cecchini, J P; Le Parco, Y; Knibiehler, B

    1988-02-01

    We have examined directly the expression of one collagen gene (DCg1) during Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis by means of in situ hybridization. Transcripts of this gene, which were demonstrated to encode a basement membrane type IV collagen chain, began to accumulate specifically in mesodermal derivatives at stages 12-13 of embryogenesis, and not before. Cells expressing this gene overlap, or are closely intermingled with, somatic and visceral mesoderm in stages 12-14. In stages 15-17, in addition to the strongly positive fat bodies, highly labelled cell spots are found scattered around all the parts of the gut and symmetrically on each side of the ventral nerve cord. They correspond to circulating mesodermal cells which we consider to be haemocytes or mesoblasts. PMID:3138101

  3. Constitutive Smad signaling and Smad-dependent collagen gene expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Asish K Wei, Jun; Wu, Minghua; Varga, John

    2008-09-19

    Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}), a potent inducer of collagen synthesis, is implicated in pathological fibrosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}) is a nuclear hormone receptor that regulates adipogenesis and numerous other biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that collagen gene expression was markedly elevated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking PPAR-{gamma} compared to heterozygous control MEFs. Treatment with the PPAR-{gamma} ligand 15d-PGJ{sub 2} failed to down-regulate collagen gene expression in PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs, whereas reconstitution of these cells with ectopic PPAR-{gamma} resulted in their normalization. Compared to control MEFs, PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs displayed elevated levels of the Type I TGF-{beta} receptor (T{beta}RI), and secreted more TGF-{beta}1 into the media. Furthermore, PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs showed constitutive phosphorylation of cellular Smad2 and Smad3, even in the absence of exogenous TGF-{beta}, which was abrogated by the ALK5 inhibitor SB431542. Constitutive Smad2/3 phosphorylation in PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs was associated with Smad3 binding to its cognate DNA recognition sequences, and interaction with coactivator p300 previously implicated in TGF-{beta} responses. Taken together, these results indicate that loss of PPAR-{gamma} in MEFs is associated with upregulation of collagen synthesis, and activation of intracellular Smad signal transduction, due, at least in part, to autocrine TGF-{beta} stimulation.

  4. Cloning of the human type XVII collagen gene (COL17A1), and detection of novel mutations in generalized atrophic benign epidermolysis bullosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gatalica, B.; Pulkkinen, L.; Li, K.

    1997-02-01

    Generalized atrophic benign epidermolysis bullosa (GABEB) is a nonlethal variant of junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). Previous findings have suggested that type XVII collagen is the candidate gene for mutations in this disease. We now have cloned the entire human type XVII collagen gene (COL17A1) and have elucidated its intron-exon organization. The gene comprises 56 distinct exons, which span {approximately}52 kb of the genome, on the long arm of chromosome 10. It encodes a polypeptide, the {alpha}1(XVII) chain, consisting of an intracellular globular domain, a transmembrane segment, and an extracellular domain that contains 15 separate collagenous subdomains, the largest consisting of 242 amino acids. We also have developed a strategy to identify mutations in COL17A1 by use of PCR amplification of genomic DNA, using primers placed on the flanking introns. The PCR products are scanned for sequence variants by heteroduplex analysis using conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis and then are subjected to direct automated sequencing. We have identified several intragenic polymorphisms in COL17A1, as well as mutations, in both alleles, in two Finnish families with GABEB. The probands in both families showed negative immunofluorescence staining with an anti-type XVII collagen antibody. In one family, the proband was homozygous for a 5-bp deletion, 2944del5, which resulted in frameshift and a premature termination codon of translation. The proband in the other family was a compound heterozygote, with one allele containing the 2944del5 mutation and the other containing a nonsense mutation, Q1023X. These results expand the mutation database in different variants of JEB, and they attest to the functional importance of type XVII collagen as a transmembrane component of the hemidesmosomes at the dermal/epidermal junction. 48 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Sequence variations in the collagen IX and XI genes are associated with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Noponen-Hietala, N; Kyllonen, E; Mannikko, M; Ilkko, E; Karppinen, J; Ott, J; Ala-Kokko, L

    2003-01-01

    Background: Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is usually caused by disc herniation or degeneration. Several genetic factors have been implicated in disc disease. Tryptophan alleles in COL9A2 and COL9A3 have been shown to be associated with lumbar disc disease in the Finnish population, and polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR) (FokI and TaqI), the matrix metalloproteinase-3 gene (MMP-3) and an aggrecan gene (AGC1) VNTR have been reported to be associated with disc degeneration. In addition, an IVS6-4 a>t polymorphism in COL11A2 has been found in connection with stenosis caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the Japanese population. Objective: To study the role of genetic factors in LSS. Methods: 29 Finnish probands were analysed for mutations in the genes coding for intervertebral disc matrix proteins, COL1A1, COL1A2, COL2A1, COL9A1, COL9A2, COL9A3, COL11A1, COL11A2, and AGC1. VDR and MMP-3 polymorphisms were also analysed. Sequence variations were tested in 56 Finnish controls. Results: Several disease associated alleles were identified. A splice site mutation in COL9A2 leading to a premature translation termination codon and the generation of a truncated protein was identified in one proband, another had the Trp2 allele, and four others the Trp3 allele. The frequency of the COL11A2 IVS6-4 t allele was 93.1% in the probands and 72.3% in controls (p = 0.0016). The differences in genotype frequencies for this site were less significant (p = 0.0043). Conclusions: Genetic factors have an important role in the pathogenesis of LSS. PMID:14644861

  6. A novel type II collagen gene mutation in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and extensive intrafamilial phenotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sakamoto, Yuma; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia caused by a novel type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation and the family's phenotypic diversity. Clinical and radiographic examinations of skeletal dysplasia were conducted on seven affected family members across two generations. The entire coding region of COL2A1, including the flanking intron regions, was analyzed with PCR and direct sequencing. The stature of the subjects ranged from extremely short to within normal height range. Hip deformity and advanced osteoarthritis were noted in all the subjects, ranging from severe coxa plana to mild acetabular dysplasia. Atlantoaxial subluxation combined with a hypoplastic odontoid process was found in three of the subjects. Various degrees of platyspondyly were confirmed in all subjects. Genetically, a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala) was identified in all the affected family members; however, it was not present in the one unaffected family member tested. We described a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala). Phenotypes were diverse even among individuals with the same mutation and within the same family. PMID:27274858

  7. A novel type II collagen gene mutation in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and extensive intrafamilial phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sakamoto, Yuma; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia caused by a novel type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation and the family’s phenotypic diversity. Clinical and radiographic examinations of skeletal dysplasia were conducted on seven affected family members across two generations. The entire coding region of COL2A1, including the flanking intron regions, was analyzed with PCR and direct sequencing. The stature of the subjects ranged from extremely short to within normal height range. Hip deformity and advanced osteoarthritis were noted in all the subjects, ranging from severe coxa plana to mild acetabular dysplasia. Atlantoaxial subluxation combined with a hypoplastic odontoid process was found in three of the subjects. Various degrees of platyspondyly were confirmed in all subjects. Genetically, a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala) was identified in all the affected family members; however, it was not present in the one unaffected family member tested. We described a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala). Phenotypes were diverse even among individuals with the same mutation and within the same family. PMID:27274858

  8. Large introns in the 3' end of the gene for the pro. cap alpha. 1(IV) chain of human basement membrane collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Soininen, R.; Tikka, L.; Chow, L.; Pihlajaniemi, T.; Kurkinen, M.; Prockop, D.J.; Boyd, C.D.; Tryggvason, K.

    1986-03-01

    Using a recently characterized cDNA clone (HT-21) coding for the pro..cap alpha..1(IV) chain of human type IV procollagen, the authors have isolated three clones from a bacteriophage lambda Charon 4A library of human genomic DNA. The intron/exon structure of the pro..cap alpha..1(IV) genomic clones was analyzed by heteroduplex electron microscopy and nucleotide sequencing. The analysis showed that the introns separating exons 2-9 are large and have a total length of over 12,000 base pairs (bp). Six of seven exons at the 3' end of the gene coded for -Gly-Xaa-Yaa-repeats of the collagenous part of the chain. Five of the -Gly-Xaa-Yaa-coding exons (numbers 5-9) varied in size between 72 bp and 134 bp, and none of them were 54 bp or multiples thereof. A sixth exon (exon 4) was a junction exon containing 71 bp coding for-Gly-Xaa-Yaa-sequences and 142 bp coding for the carboxyl-terminal noncollagenous domain (NC-1). The seventh exon (exon 3, 178 bp) coded for sequences of the NC-1 domain. Five of the six-Gly-Xaa-Yaa- coding exons began with the second base coding for glycine, and only one exon began with a complete glycine codon at the 5' end. The results (i) suggest that the gene for the pro..cap alpha..1(IV) chain of human basement membrane collagen is significantly larger than the genes for fibrillar collagens and (ii) show that it lacks the 54-bp exon repeats characteristic of fibrillar collagen genes.

  9. Expression analysis of genes involved in collagen cross-linking and its regulation in traumatic anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Cohen, Carina; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Smith, Marília Cardoso; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2016-03-01

    The molecular alterations involved in the capsule deformation presented in shoulder instability patients are poorly understood. Increased TGFβ1 acts as a signal for production of matrix macromolecules by fibrogenic cells at joint injury sites. TGFβ1, through its receptor TGFβR1, regulates genes involved in collagen cross-linking, such as LOX, PLOD1, and PLOD2. We evaluated TGFβ1, TGFβR1, LOX, PLOD1, and PLOD2 gene expression in the antero-inferior (macroscopically injured region), antero-superior and posterior regions of the glenohumeral capsule of 29 shoulder instability patients and eight controls. We observed that PLOD2 expression was increased in the anterior-inferior capsule region of the patients compared to controls. LOX expression tended to be increased in the posterior portion of patients. Patients with recurrent shoulder dislocation presented upregulation of TGFβR1 in the antero-inferior capsule portion and of PLOD2 in the posterior region. Conversely, LOX was increased in the posterior portion of the capsule of patients with a single shoulder dislocation episode. In the antero-inferior, LOX expression was inversely correlated and TGFβR1 was directly correlated with the duration of symptoms. In the posterior region, PLOD2, TGFβ1, and TGFβR1 were directly correlated with the duration of symptoms. In conclusion, PLOD2 expression was increased in the macroscopically injured region of the capsule of patients. Upregulation of TGFβ1, TGFβR1, and PLOD2 seems to be related with the maintenance of disease symptoms, especially in the posterior region. LOX upregulation seems to occur only in the initial phase of the affection. Therefore, TGFβ1, TGFβR1, LOX, and PLOD2 may play a role in shoulder instability. PMID:26185036

  10. Bioengineered collagens

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  11. Y-box proteins interact with the S1 nuclease-sensitive site in the chicken alpha 2(I) collagen gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Bayarsaihan, D; Enkhmandakh, B; Lukens, L N

    1996-01-01

    The sequence of the chicken alpha 2(I) collagen promoter from -712 to -85, relative to exon 1, has been shown to be important for transcriptional activity. Within this region a pyrimidine/purine asymmetrical element at -200 bp forms an in vitro S1 nuclease-sensitive site. The pyrimidine-rich strand of this element interacts specifically with single-stranded DNA-binding proteins present in fibroblast nuclear extracts [Bayarsaihan and Lukens (1996) Biochem. J. 314, 293-296]. To identify these proteins we performed expression screening of a chick embryo fibroblast cDNA library using a single-stranded polypyrimidine sequence derived from this element. One of the isolated clones was found to encode a member of the cold-shock gene family, either chicken YB-1 or a highly homologous protein. This protein and a known chicken Y-box protein were both found to bind sequence-specifically to the pyrimidine-rich strand of the pyrimidine/purine asymmetrical element in the chicken alpha 2(I) collagen promoter. The binding mechanism of these proteins could be based on the formation of a non-canonical triplex DNA structure (H-DNA). Although members of this widespread and conserved protein family have been reported to modulate the expression of a number of genes, the findings reported here provide the first evidence for a possible role of cold-shock proteins in the regulation of type I collagen genes. PMID:8870670

  12. Differences between Mice and Humans in Regulation and the Molecular Network of Collagen, Type III, Alpha-1 at the Gene Expression Level: Obstacles that Translational Research Must Overcome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lishi; Liu, Hongchao; Jiao, Yan; Wang, Erjian; Clark, Stephen H.; Postlethwaite, Arnold E.; Gu, Weikuan; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Collagen, type III, alpha-1 (COL3A1) is essential for normal collagen I fibrillogenesis in many organs. There are differences in phenotypes of mutations in the COL3A1 gene in humans and mutations in mice. In order to investigate whether the regulation and gene network of COL3A1 is the same in healthy populations of mice and humans, we compared the quantitative trait loci (QTL) that regulate the expression level of COL3A1 and the gene network of COL3A1 pathways between humans and mice using whole genome expression profiles. Our results showed that, for the regulation of expression of Col3a1 in mice, an eQTL on chromosome (Chr) 12 regulates the expression of Col3a1. However, expression of genes in the syntenic region on human Chr 7 has no association with the expression level of COL3A1. For the gene network comparison, we identified 44 top genes whose expression levels are strongly associated with that of Col3a1 in mice. We next identified 41 genes strongly associated with the expression level of COL3A1 in humans. There are a few but significant differences in the COL3A1 gene network between humans and mice. Several genes showed opposite association with expression of COL3A1. These genes are known to play important roles in development and function of the extracellular matrix of the lung. Difference in the molecular pathway of key genes in the COL3A1 gene network in humans and mice suggest caution should be used in extrapolating results from models of human lung diseases in mice to clinical lung diseases in humans. These differences may influence the efficacy of drugs in humans whose development employed mouse models. PMID:26151842

  13. Differences between Mice and Humans in Regulation and the Molecular Network of Collagen, Type III, Alpha-1 at the Gene Expression Level: Obstacles that Translational Research Must Overcome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lishi; Liu, Hongchao; Jiao, Yan; Wang, Erjian; Clark, Stephen H; Postlethwaite, Arnold E; Gu, Weikuan; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Collagen, type III, alpha-1 (COL3A1) is essential for normal collagen I fibrillogenesis in many organs. There are differences in phenotypes of mutations in the COL3A1 gene in humans and mutations in mice. In order to investigate whether the regulation and gene network of COL3A1 is the same in healthy populations of mice and humans, we compared the quantitative trait loci (QTL) that regulate the expression level of COL3A1 and the gene network of COL3A1 pathways between humans and mice using whole genome expression profiles. Our results showed that, for the regulation of expression of Col3a1 in mice, an eQTL on chromosome (Chr) 12 regulates the expression of Col3a1. However, expression of genes in the syntenic region on human Chr 7 has no association with the expression level of COL3A1. For the gene network comparison, we identified 44 top genes whose expression levels are strongly associated with that of Col3a1 in mice. We next identified 41 genes strongly associated with the expression level of COL3A1 in humans. There are a few but significant differences in the COL3A1 gene network between humans and mice. Several genes showed opposite association with expression of COL3A1. These genes are known to play important roles in development and function of the extracellular matrix of the lung. Difference in the molecular pathway of key genes in the COL3A1 gene network in humans and mice suggest caution should be used in extrapolating results from models of human lung diseases in mice to clinical lung diseases in humans. These differences may influence the efficacy of drugs in humans whose development employed mouse models. PMID:26151842

  14. Efficient Production of Hydroxylated Human-Like Collagen Via the Co-Expression of Three Key Genes in Escherichia coli Origami (DE3).

    PubMed

    Tang, Yunping; Yang, Xiuliang; Hang, Baojian; Li, Jiangtao; Huang, Lei; Huang, Feng; Xu, Zhinan

    2016-04-01

    Mature collagen is abundant in human bodies and very valuable for a range of industrial and medical applications. The biosynthesis of mature collagen requires post-translational modifications to increase the stability of collagen triple helix structure. By co-expressing the human-like collagen (HLC) gene with human prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H) and D-arabinono-1, 4-lactone oxidase (ALO) in Escherichia coli, we have constructed a prokaryotic expression system to produce the hydroxylated HLC. Then, five different media, as well as the induction conditions were investigated with regard to the soluble expression of such protein. The results indicated that the highest soluble expression level of target HLC obtained in shaking flasks was 49.55 ± 0.36 mg/L, when recombinant cells were grew in MBL medium and induced by 0.1 mM IPTG at the middle stage of exponential growth phase. By adopting the glucose feeding strategy, the expression level of target HLC can be improved up to 260 mg/L in a 10 L bench-top fermentor. Further, HPLC analyses revealed that more than 10 % of proline residues in purified HLC were successfully hydroxylated. The present work has provided a solid base for the large-scale production of hydroxylated HLC in E. coli. PMID:26712247

  15. Identification of noncollagenous sites encoding specific interactions and quaternary assembly of alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV) collagen: implications for Alport gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Suk; Colon, Selene; Hellmark, Thomas; Sado, Yoshikazu; Hudson, Billy G; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2008-12-12

    Defective assembly of alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV) collagen in the glomerular basement membrane causes Alport syndrome, a hereditary glomerulonephritis progressing to end-stage kidney failure. Assembly of collagen IV chains into heterotrimeric molecules and networks is driven by their noncollagenous (NC1) domains, but the sites encoding the specificity of these interactions are not known. To identify the sites directing quaternary assembly of alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV) collagen, correctly folded NC1 chimeras were produced, and their interactions with other NC1 monomers were evaluated. All alpha1/alpha 5 chimeras containing alpha 5 NC1 residues 188-227 replicated the ability of alpha 5 NC1 to bind to alpha3NC1 and co-assemble into NC1 hexamers. Conversely, substitution of alpha 5 NC1 residues 188-227 by alpha1NC1 abolished these quaternary interactions. The amino-terminal 58 residues of alpha3NC1 encoded binding to alpha 5 NC1, but this interaction was not sufficient for hexamer co-assembly. Because alpha 5 NC1 residues 188-227 are necessary and sufficient for assembly into alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5 NC1 hexamers, whereas the immunodominant alloantigenic sites of alpha 5 NC1 do not encode specific quaternary interactions, the findings provide a basis for the rational design of less immunogenic alpha 5(IV) collagen constructs for the gene therapy of X-linked Alport patients. PMID:18930919

  16. The use of collagen-based scaffolds to simulate prostate cancer bone metastases with potential for evaluating delivery of nanoparticulate gene therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kathleen A; Guo, Jianfeng; Tierney, Erica G; Curtin, Caroline M; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Darcy, Raphael; O'Brien, Fergal J; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer bone metastases are a leading cause of cancer-related death in men with current treatments offering only marginally improved rates of survival. Advances in the understanding of the genetic basis of prostate cancer provide the opportunity to develop gene-based medicines capable of treating metastatic disease. The aim of this work was to establish a 3D cell culture model of prostate cancer bone metastasis using collagen-based scaffolds, to characterise this model, and to assess the potential of the model to evaluate delivery of gene therapeutics designed to target bone metastases. Two prostate cancer cell lines (PC3 and LNCaP) were cultured in 2D standard culture and compared to 3D cell growth on three different collagen-based scaffolds (collagen and composites of collagen containing either glycosaminoglycan or nanohydroxyapatite). The 3D model was characterised for cell proliferation, viability and for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzyme and Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) secretion. Chemosensitivity to docetaxel treatment was assessed in 2D in comparison to 3D. Nanoparticles (NPs) containing siRNA formulated using a modified cyclodextrin were delivered to the cells on the scaffolds and gene silencing was quantified. Both prostate cancer cell lines actively infiltrated and proliferated on the scaffolds. Cell culture in 3D resulted in reduced levels of MMP1 and MMP9 secretion in PC3 cells. In contrast, LNCaP cells grown in 3D secreted elevated levels of PSA, particularly on the scaffold composed of collagen and glycosaminoglycans. Both cell lines grown in 3D displayed increased resistance to docetaxel treatment. The cyclodextrin.siRNA nanoparticles achieved cellular uptake and knocked down the endogenous GAPDH gene in the 3D model. In conclusion, development of a novel 3D cell culture model of prostate cancer bone metastasis has been initiated resulting, for the first time, in the successful delivery of gene therapeutics in a 3D in vitro model

  17. Incorporating pTGF-β1/calcium phosphate nanoparticles with fibronectin into 3-dimensional collagen/chitosan scaffolds: efficient, sustained gene delivery to stem cells for chondrogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xia; Deng, Wenwen; Wei, Yuan; Yang, Yan; Su, Weiyan; Wei, Yawei; Xu, Ximing; Yu, Jiangnan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare a 3-dimensional nanoparticle gene delivery system (3D-NGDS) based on collagen/chitosan scaffolds, in which plasmid transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1)/calcium phosphate nanoparticles mixed with fibronectin (FN) were used to transfect mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterise the microstructure of 3-dimensional collagen/chitosan scaffolds. An analysis performed to quantify the TGF-b1 concentrations in MSC cultures revealed that the MSCs transfected with the 3D-NGDS showed remarkably high levels of TGF-b1 over long periods, retaining a concentration of TGF-b1 of approximately 10 ng/mL within two weeks, with the highest level (12.6 ng/mL) being observed on the 6th day. An immunohistochemistry analysis for collagen type II revealed that much higher production of collagen II from the 9th to 15th day was observed in the 3D-NGDS-transfected MSCs than that in MSCs transfected by the Lipofectamine 2000 method. The glycosaminoglycan content of the 3D-NGDS was comparable to those treated with TGF-β1 as well as TGF-β1 plus dexamethasone, and was significantly higher than those treated with free plasmid and Lipofectamine 2000. A remarkable type I collagen expression inhibition of the 3D-NGDS at day 21 was observed via ELISA. These results suggested that transfection with the 3D-NGDS could successfully induce MSC chondrogenic differentiation in vitro without dexamethasone. In summary, the 3D-NGDS could be developed into a promising alternative method to transfer exogenous nucleic acid to MSCs in clinical trials. PMID:22314694

  18. Structure of the human type IV collagen COL4A6 gene, which is mutated in Alport syndrome-associated leiomyomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu |; Zhou, Jing; Reeders, S.T.

    1996-05-01

    Basement membrane (type IV) collagen, a subfamily of the collagen protein family, is encoded by six distinct genes in mammals. Three of those, COL4A3, COL4A4, and COL4A5, are linked with Alport syndrome (hereditary nephritis). Patients with leimoyomatosis associated with Alport syndrome have been shown to have deletions in the 5{prime} end of the COL4A6 gene, in addition to having deletions in COL4A6. The human COL4A6 gene is reported to be 425 kb as determined by mapping of overlapping YAC clones by probes for its 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends. In the present study we describe the complete exon/intron size pattern of the human COL4A6 gene. The 12 {lambda} phage clones characterized in the study spanned a total of 110 kb, including 85 kb of the actual gene and 25 kb of flanking sequences. The overlapping clones contained all 46 exons of the gene and all introns, except for intron 2. Since the total size of the exons and all introns except for intron 2 is about 85 kb, intron 2 must be about 340 kb. All exons of the gene were assigned to EcoRI restriction fragments to facilitate analysis of the gene in patients with leiomyomatosis associated with Alport syndrome. The exon size pattern of COL4A6 is highly homologous with that of the human and mouse COL4A2 genes, with 27 of the 46 exons of COL4A6 being identical in size between the genes. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Tenascin-X, collagen, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: tenascin-X gene defects can protect against adverse cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Petersen, John W; Douglas, J Yellowlees

    2013-09-01

    Long thought to be two separate syndromes, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) appear on close examination to represent the same syndrome, with virtually identical clinical manifestations. While both EDS-HT and BJHS were long thought to lack the genetic loci of other connective tissue disorders, including all other types of EDS, researchers have discovered a genetic locus that accounts for manifestations of both EDS-HT and BJHS in a small population of patients. However, given the modest sample size of these studies and the strong correlation between serum levels of tenascin-X with clinical symptoms of both EDS-HT and BJHS, strong evidence exists for the origins of both types of hypermobility originating in haploinsufficiency or deficiency of the gene TNXB, responsible for tenascin-X. Tenascin-X regulates both the structure and stability of elastic fibers and organizes collagen fibrils in the extra-cellular matrix (ECM), impacting the rigidity or elasticity of virtually every cell in the body. While the impacts of tenascin-X insufficiency or deficiency on the skin and joints have received some attention, its potential cardiovascular impacts remain relatively unexplored. Here we set forth two novel hypotheses. First, TNXB haploinsufficiency or deficiency causes the range of clinical manifestations long identified with both EDS-HT and BJHS. And, second, that haploinsufficiency or deficiency of TNXB may provide some benefits against adverse cardiovascular events, including heart attack and stroke, by lowering levels of arterial stiffness associated with aging, as well as by enhancing accommodation of accrued atherosclerotic plaques. This two-fold hypothesis provides insights into the mechanisms underlying the syndromes previous identified with joint hypermobility, at the same time the hypothesis also sheds light on the role of the composition of the extracellular matrix and its impacts on endothelial sheer

  20. Effects of Food-Derived Collagen Peptides on the Expression of Keratin and Keratin-Associated Protein Genes in the Mouse Skin.

    PubMed

    Le Vu, Phuong; Takatori, Ryo; Iwamoto, Taku; Akagi, Yutaka; Satsu, Hideo; Totsuka, Mamoru; Chida, Kazuhiro; Sato, Kenji; Shimizu, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Oral ingestion of collagen peptides (CP) has long been suggested to exert beneficial effects on the skin, but the molecular events induced by CP on the skin remain unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of oral CP administration on gene expression in hairless mouse skin and of prolyl-hydroxyproline (Pro-Hyp), a collagen-derived dipeptide, on gene expression in a coculture of mouse skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Using microarray analysis, we found that oral administration of CP to hairless mice for 6 weeks induced increased expression of Krtap and Krt genes in the skin. Annotation analysis using DAVID revealed that a group of the up-regulated genes, Gprc5d, Sprr2a1, Krt27 and Krtap16-7, is associated with the development of the epidermis and the hair cycle. In addition, the presence of Pro-Hyp (200 μM) induced an increase in the expression of Krtap16-7, Krtap15, Krtap14 and Krtap8-2 in keratinocytes in coculture, partially resembling the in vivo result. The Pro-Hyp-induced up-regulation of these genes was not observed when keratinocytes were cultured without fibroblasts, suggesting that the presence of fibroblasts is essential for the effects of Pro-Hyp. Our study presents new insights into the effects of CP on the skin, which might link to the hair cycle. PMID:25721900

  1. An upstream regulatory region mediates high-level, tissue-specific expression of the human alpha 1(I) collagen gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Slack, J L; Liska, D J; Bornstein, P

    1991-01-01

    Studies in vitro have not adequately resolved the role of intronic and upstream elements in regulating expression of the alpha 1(I) collagen gene. To address this issue, we generated 12 separate lines of transgenic mice with alpha 1(I) collagen-human growth hormone (hGH) constructs containing different amounts of 5'-flanking sequence, with or without most of the first intron. Transgenes driven by 2.3 kb of alpha 1(I) 5'-flanking sequence, whether or not they contained the first intron, were expressed at a high level and in a tissue-specific manner in seven out of seven independent lines of transgenic mice. In most tissues, the transgene was expressed at levels approaching that of the endogenous alpha 1(I) gene and was regulated identically with the endogenous gene as animals aged. However, in lung, expression of the transgene was anomalously high, and in muscle, expression was lower than that of the endogenous gene, suggesting that in these tissues other regions of the gene may participate in directing appropriate expression. Five lines of mice were generated containing transgenes driven by 0.44 kb of alpha 1(I) 5'-flanking sequence (with or without the first intron), and expression was detected in four out of five of these lines. The level of expression of the 0.44-kb constructs in the major collagen-producing tissues was 15- to 500-fold lower than that observed with the longer 2.3-kb promoter. While transgenes containing the 0.44-kb promoter and the first intron retained a modest degree of tissue-specific expression, those without the first intron lacked tissue specificity and were poorly expressed in all tissues except lung.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2005897

  2. An upstream regulatory region mediates high-level, tissue-specific expression of the human alpha 1(I) collagen gene in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, J.L.; Liska, D.J.; Bornstein, P. )

    1991-04-01

    Studies in vitro have not adequately resolved the role of intronic and upstream elements in regulating expression of the [alpha]1(I) collagen gene. To address this issue, the authors generated 12 separate lines of transgenic mice with [alpha]1(I) collagen-human growth hormone (hGH) constructs containing different amounts of 5[prime]-flanking sequence, with or without most of the first intron. Transgenes driven by 2.3 kb of [alpha]1(I) 5[prime]-flanking sequence, whether or not they contained the first intron, were expressed at a high level and in a tissue-specific manner in seven out of seven independent lines of transgenic mice. In most tissues, the transgene was expressed at levels approaching that of the endogenous [alpha]1(I) gene and was regulated identically with the endogenous gene as animals aged. However, in lung, expression of the transgene was anomalously high, and in muscle, expression was lower than that of the endogenous gene, suggesting that in these tissues other regions of the gene may participate in directing appropriate expression. Five lines of mice were generated containing transgenes driven by 0.44 kb of [alpha]1(I) 5[prime]-flanking sequence (with or without the first intron), and expression was detected in four out of five of these lines. The level of expression of the 0.44-kb constructs in the major collagen-producing tissues was 15- to 500-fold lower than that observed with the longer 2.3-kb promoter.

  3. Association of Reduced Type IX Collagen Gene Expression in Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes With Epigenetic Silencing by DNA Hypermethylation

    PubMed Central

    Imagawa, Kei; de Andrés, María C; Hashimoto, Ko; Itoi, Eiji; Otero, Miguel; Roach, Helmtrud I; Goldring, Mary B; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the changes in collagen gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) human chondrocytes are associated with changes in the DNA methylation status in the COL2A1 enhancer and COL9A1 promoter. Methods Expression levels were determined using quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and the percentage of DNA methylation was quantified by pyrosequencing. The effect of CpG methylation on COL9A1 promoter activity was determined using a CpG-free vector; cotransfections with expression vectors encoding SOX9, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), and HIF-2α were carried out to analyze COL9A1 promoter activities in response to changes in the methylation status. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were carried out to validate SOX9 binding to the COL9A1 promoter and the influence of DNA methylation. Results Although COL2A1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in OA chondrocytes were 19-fold higher than those in the controls, all of the CpG sites in the COL2A1 enhancer were totally demethylated in both samples. The levels of COL9A1 mRNA in OA chondrocytes were 6,000-fold lower than those in controls; 6 CpG sites of the COL9A1 promoter were significantly hypermethylated in OA patients as compared with controls. Treatment with 5-azadeoxycitidine enhanced COL9A1 gene expression and prevented culture-induced hypermethylation. In vitro methylation decreased COL9A1 promoter activity. Mutations in the 5 CpG sites proximal to the transcription start site decreased COL9A1 promoter activity. Cotransfection with SOX9 enhanced COL9A1 promoter activity; CpG methylation attenuated SOX9 binding to the COL9A1 promoter. Conclusion This first demonstration that hypermethylation is associated with down-regulation of COL9A1 expression in OA cartilage highlights the pivotal role of epigenetics in OA, involving not only hypomethylation, but also hypermethylation, with important therapeutic implications for OA treatment. PMID:25048791

  4. Development of a gene-activated scaffold platform for tissue engineering applications using chitosan-pDNA nanoparticles on collagen-based scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Rosanne M; Tierney, Erica G; Curtin, Caroline M; Cryan, Sally-Ann; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-07-28

    Biomaterial scaffolds that support cell infiltration and tissue formation can also function as platforms for the delivery of therapeutics such as drugs, proteins, and genes. As burst release of supraphysiological quantities of recombinant proteins can result in adverse side effects, the objective of this study was to explore the potential of a series of collagen-based scaffolds, developed in our laboratory, as gene-activated scaffold platforms with potential in a range of tissue engineering applications. The potential of chitosan, a biocompatible material derived from the shells of crustaceans, as a gene delivery vector was assessed using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). A transfection efficiency of >45% is reported which is similar to what is achieved with polyethyleneimine (PEI), a non-viral gold standard vector, without causing cytotoxic side effects. When the optimised chitosan nanoparticles were incorporated into a series of collagen-based scaffolds, sustained transgene expression from MSCs seeded on the scaffolds was maintained for up to 28days and interestingly the composition of the scaffold had an effect on transfection efficiency. These results demonstrate that by simply varying the scaffold composition and the gene (or combinations thereof) chosen; the system has potential for a myriad of therapeutic applications. PMID:25982680

  5. Collagen type VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    Bushby, Kate M D; Collins, James; Hicks, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in each of the three collagen VI genes COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 cause two main types of muscle disorders: Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, a severe phenotype, and a mild to moderate phenotype Bethlem myopathy. Recently, two additional phenotypes, including a limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotype and an autosomal recessive myosclerosis reported in one family with mutations in COL6A2 have been reported. Collagen VI is an important component of the extracellular matrix which forms a microfibrillar network that is found in close association with the cell and surrounding basement membrane. Collagen VI is also found in the interstitial space of many tissues including muscle, tendon, skin, cartilage, and intervertebral discs. Thus, collagen VI mutations result in disorders with combined muscle and connective tissue involvement, including weakness, joint laxity and contractures, and abnormal skin findings.In this review we highlight the four recognized clinical phenotypes of collagen VI related - myopathies; Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM), autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotype and autosomal recessive myosclerosis. We discuss the diagnostic criteria of these disorders, the molecular pathogenesis, genetics, treatment, and related disorders. PMID:24443028

  6. Regulation of collagenase-3 and osteocalcin gene expression by collagen and osteopontin in differentiating MC3T3-E1 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Alonzo, Richard C.; Kowalski, Aaron J.; Denhardt, David T.; Nickols, G. Allen; Partridge, Nicola C.

    2002-01-01

    Both collagenase-3 and osteocalcin mRNAs are expressed maximally during the later stages of osteoblast differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that collagenase-3 mRNA expression in differentiating MC3T3-E1 cells is dependent upon the presence of ascorbic acid, is inhibited in the presence of the collagen synthesis inhibitor, 3,4-dehydroproline, and is stimulated by growth on collagen in the absence of ascorbic acid. Transient transfection studies show that collagenase-3 promoter activity increases during cell differentiation and requires the presence of ascorbic acid. Additionally, we show that, in differentiating MC3T3-E1 cells, collagenase-3 gene expression increases in the presence of an anti-osteopontin monoclonal antibody that binds near the RGD motif of this protein, whereas osteocalcin expression is inhibited. Furthermore, an RGD peptidomimetic compound, designed to block interaction of ligands to the alpha(v) integrin subunit, increases osteocalcin expression and inhibits collagenase-3 expression, suggesting that the RGD peptidomimetic initiates certain alpha(v) integrin signaling in osteoblastic cells. Overall, these studies demonstrate that stimulation of collagenase-3 expression during osteoblast differentiation requires synthesis of a collagenous matrix and that osteopontin and alpha(v) integrins exert divergent regulation of collagenase-3 and osteocalcin expression during osteoblast differentiation.

  7. Proline with or without hydroxyproline influences collagen concentration and regulates prolyl 4-hydroxylase α (I) gene expression in juvenile turbo ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaikai; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui; Liufu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yanjiao; Peng, Mo; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary proline (Pro), and Pro and hydroxyproline (Hyp) in combination on the growth performance, total Hyp and collagen concentrations of tissues, and prolyl 4-hydroxylase α(I) (P4H α(I)) gene expression in juvenile turbot feeding high plant protein diets. A diet containing 50% crude protein and 12% crude lipid was formulated as the basal and control, on which other two protein and lipid contents identical experimental diets were formulated by supplementing the basal with either 0.75% Pro (Pro-0.75) or 0.75% Pro and 0.75% Hyp (Pro+Hyp). Four groups of fish in indoor seawater recirculating systems, 35 individuals each, were fed twice a day to apparent satiation for 10 weeks. The results showed that dietary Pro and Hyp supplementation had no significant effect on growth performance and feed utilization of juvenile turbot (P > 0.05). Total Hyp and collagen concentrations in muscle were significantly increased when dietary Pro and Hyp increased (P <0.05), and fish fed diet Pro+Hyp showed significantly higher free Hyp content in plasma than those fed other diets (P <0.05). The expression of P4H a(I) gene in liver and muscle was significantly up regulated in fish fed diet Pro-0.75 in comparison with control (P <0.05); however the gene was significantly down regulated in fish fed diet Pro+Hyp in muscle in comparison with fish fed diet Pro-0.75 (P <0.05). It can be concluded that supplement of crystal L-Pro and L-Hyp to high plant protein diets did not show positive effects on growth performance of juvenile turbot, but enhanced total collagen concentrations in muscle.

  8. Protein kinase signalling pathways involved in the up-regulation of the rat alpha1(I) collagen gene by transforming growth factor beta1 and bone morphogenetic protein 2 in osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Palcy, S; Goltzman, D

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) family members are known for their important role in bone physiology. TGFbeta(1) and, to a smaller extent, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) have been reported to regulate the gene expression of different osteoblast markers in vitro. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in these actions. Here we report that BMP-2, like TGFbeta(1), up-regulated alpha1(I) collagen mRNA expression in ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic cells. This was mediated through an increase in the transcriptional rate of the gene rather than through the stabilization of alpha1(I) collagen mRNA, and required new protein synthesis. In addition, TGFbeta(1)- and BMP-2-induced increases in alpha1(I) collagen mRNA levels were both dependent on protein kinase C and protein tyrosine kinase activities. Furthermore, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) [MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase kinase 1/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (MEK-1/ERK)] pathway participated in the up-regulation of alpha1(I) collagen gene expression by TGFbeta(1) and BMP-2. In response to either TGFbeta(1) or BMP-2, the stimulation of alpha1(I) collagen mRNA levels was paralleled by an early increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase protein activity. Moreover, the effects of both TGFbeta(1) and BMP-2 on alpha1(I) collagen gene expression were markedly decreased in transfected ROS 17/2.8 cells expressing a dominant-negative MEK-1. Our findings therefore show that TGFbeta(1) and BMP-2, which signal through discrete cell-surface receptors, are able to trigger analogous, if not identical, protein-phosphorylation-transducing cascades leading to comparable actions on the transcription of the alpha1(I) collagen gene in osteoblastic cells. PMID:10493907

  9. Degenerated intervertebral disc prolapse and its association of collagen I alpha 1 Spl gene polymorphism: A preliminary case control study of Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Anjankar, Shailendra D; Poornima, Subhadra; Raju, Subodh; Jaleel, MA; Bhiladvala, Dilnavaz; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2015-01-01

    Background: Degenerated disc disease (DDD) is a common disorder responsible for increased morbidity in a productive age group. Its etiology is multifactorial and genetic factors have been predominantly implicated. Disc prolapse results due to tear in the annulus, which is a fibrous structure composed largely of type I collagen. Functional polymorphism at the Sp1 site of the collagen I alpha 1 (COL1A1) gene has shown a positive association with DDD in Dutch and Greek populations. The purpose of this study was to assess COL1A1 Sp1 gene polymorphism in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Fifty clinically and radiologically proven patients with disc prolapse requiring surgery were included as cases and 50 healthy, age-matched volunteers served as controls. After isolating DNA from their blood sample, genotyping for COL1A1 polymorphism (rs1800012) was performed and identified as GG, GT, and TT. Results: The mean age and body mass index in cases and controls were similar. 76% of the patients were males. The most common site of disc degeneration was L4–L5 (36%), followed by L5–S1 (34%). Homozygous–GG, heterozygous GT, and homozygous TT genotypes were seen in 38 (76%), 10 (20%) and 2 (4%) cases respectively, controls had similar percentage of genotypes as well. The alleles in cases and the control group showed no significant difference (P = 0.6744) and followed the Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium in the study population. Conclusion: The COL1A1 (rs1800012) is in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in the present subset of Indian population. But taken as a single factor, it was not found to be associated with DDD in this preliminary study. Disc degeneration is multifactorial and also anticipated to be a result of multiple genes involvement and gene-gene interaction. PMID:26806964

  10. Targeted insertions of two exogenous collagen genes into both alleles of their endogenous loci in cultured human cells: the insertions are directed by relatively short fragments containing the promoters and the 5' ends of the genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, A; Smelt, S; Mewar, R; Fertala, A; Sieron, A L; Overhauser, J; Prockop, D J

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that type II procollagen is synthesized by HT-1080 cells that are stably transfected with constructs of the human COL2A1 gene that contain the promoter and 5' end of either the COL2A1 gene or the human COL1A1 gene. Since the host HT-1080 cells were from a human tumor line that synthesizes type IV collagen but not type II or type I procollagen, the results suggested that the constructs were integrated near active enhancers or promoters. Here, however, we demonstrate that a 33-kb construct of the COL2A1 gene containing a 5' fragment from the same gene was inserted into both alleles of the endogenous COL2A1 gene on chromosome 12, apparently by homologous recombination by a nonconservative pathway. In contrast, a similar construct of the COL2A1 gene in which the 5' end was replaced with a 1.9-kb fragment from the 5' end of the COL1A1 gene was inserted into both alleles of the locus for the COL1A1 gene on chromosome 17. Therefore, targeted insertion of the gene construct was not directed by the degree of sequence homology. Instead, it was directed by the relatively short 5' fragment from the COL1A1 gene that contained the promoter and the initially transcribed sequences of the gene. After insertion, both gene constructs were expressed from previously inactive loci. Images PMID:8041796

  11. Gene structure for the. alpha. 1 chain of a human short-chain collagen (type XIII) with alternatively spliced transcripts and translation termination codon at the 5' end of the last exon

    SciTech Connect

    Tikka, L.; Pihlajaniemi, T.; Henttu, P.; Prockop, D.J.; Tryggvason, K. )

    1988-10-01

    Two overlapping human genomic clones that encode a short-chain collagen, designated {alpha}1(XIII), were isolated by using recently described cDNA clones. Characterization of the cosmid clones that span {approx} 65,000 base pairs (bp) of the 3' end of the gene established several unusual features of this collagen gene. The last exon encodes solely the 3' untranslated region and it begins with a complete stop codon. The 10 adjacent exons vary in size from 27 to 87 bp and two of them are 54 bp. Therefore, the {alpha}1-chain gene of type XIII collagen has some features found in genes for fibrillar collagens but other features that are distinctly different. Previous analysis of overlapping cDNA clones and nuclease S1 mapping of mRNAs indicated one alternative splicing site causing a deletion of 36 bp from the mature mRNA. The present study showed that the 36 bp is contained within the gene as a single exon and also that the gene has a 45-bp -Gly-Xaa-Xaa- repeat coding exon not found in the cDNA clones previously characterized. Nuclease S1 mapping experiments indicated that this 45-bp exon is found in normal human skin fibroblast mRNAs. Accordingly, the data demonstrate that there is alternative splicing of at least two exons of the type {alpha}1(XIII)-chain gene.

  12. Novel form of X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss with cochlear malformation caused by a mutation in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6

    PubMed Central

    Rost, Simone; Bach, Elisa; Neuner, Cordula; Nanda, Indrajit; Dysek, Sandra; Bittner, Reginald E; Keller, Alexander; Bartsch, Oliver; Mlynski, Robert; Haaf, Thomas; Müller, Clemens R; Kunstmann, Erdmute

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is the most common human sensorineural disorder. Genetic causes are highly heterogeneous, with mutations detected in >40 genes associated with nonsyndromic hearing loss, to date. Whereas autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant inheritance is prevalent, X-linked forms of nonsyndromic hearing impairment are extremely rare. Here, we present a Hungarian three-generation family with X-linked nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and the underlying genetic defect. Next-generation sequencing and subsequent segregation analysis detected a missense mutation (c.1771G>A, p.Gly591Ser) in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6 in all affected family members. Bioinformatic analysis and expression studies support this substitution as being causative. COL4A6 encodes the alpha-6 chain of type IV collagen of basal membranes, which forms a heterotrimer with two alpha-5 chains encoded by COL4A5. Whereas mutations in COL4A5 and contiguous X-chromosomal deletions involving COL4A5 and COL4A6 are associated with X-linked Alport syndrome, a nephropathy associated with deafness and cataract, mutations in COL4A6 alone have not been related to any hereditary disease so far. Moreover, our index patient and other affected family members show normal renal and ocular function, which is not consistent with Alport syndrome, but with a nonsyndromic type of hearing loss. In situ hybridization and immunostaining demonstrated expression of the COL4A6 homologs in the otic vesicle of the zebrafish and in the murine inner ear, supporting its role in normal ear development and function. In conclusion, our results suggest COL4A6 as being the fourth gene associated with X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss. PMID:23714752

  13. Novel form of X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss with cochlear malformation caused by a mutation in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6.

    PubMed

    Rost, Simone; Bach, Elisa; Neuner, Cordula; Nanda, Indrajit; Dysek, Sandra; Bittner, Reginald E; Keller, Alexander; Bartsch, Oliver; Mlynski, Robert; Haaf, Thomas; Müller, Clemens R; Kunstmann, Erdmute

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is the most common human sensorineural disorder. Genetic causes are highly heterogeneous, with mutations detected in >40 genes associated with nonsyndromic hearing loss, to date. Whereas autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant inheritance is prevalent, X-linked forms of nonsyndromic hearing impairment are extremely rare. Here, we present a Hungarian three-generation family with X-linked nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and the underlying genetic defect. Next-generation sequencing and subsequent segregation analysis detected a missense mutation (c.1771G>A, p.Gly591Ser) in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6 in all affected family members. Bioinformatic analysis and expression studies support this substitution as being causative. COL4A6 encodes the alpha-6 chain of type IV collagen of basal membranes, which forms a heterotrimer with two alpha-5 chains encoded by COL4A5. Whereas mutations in COL4A5 and contiguous X-chromosomal deletions involving COL4A5 and COL4A6 are associated with X-linked Alport syndrome, a nephropathy associated with deafness and cataract, mutations in COL4A6 alone have not been related to any hereditary disease so far. Moreover, our index patient and other affected family members show normal renal and ocular function, which is not consistent with Alport syndrome, but with a nonsyndromic type of hearing loss. In situ hybridization and immunostaining demonstrated expression of the COL4A6 homologs in the otic vesicle of the zebrafish and in the murine inner ear, supporting its role in normal ear development and function. In conclusion, our results suggest COL4A6 as being the fourth gene associated with X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss. PMID:23714752

  14. Retrovirus-induced interference with collagen I gene expression in Mov13 fibroblasts is maintained in the absence of DNA methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H; Hartung, S; Breindl, M

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the role of DNA methylation in repression of the murine alpha 1 type I collagen (COL1A1) gene in Mov13 fibroblasts. In Mov13 mice, a retroviral provirus has inserted into the first intron of the COL1A1 gene and blocks its expression at the level of transcriptional initiation. We found that regulatory sequences in the COL1A1 promoter region that are involved in the tissue-specific regulation of the gene are unmethylated in collagen-expressing wild-type fibroblasts and methylated in Mov13 fibroblasts, confirming and extending earlier observations. To directly assess the role of DNA methylation in the repression of COL1A1 gene transcription, we treated Mov13 fibroblasts with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine. This treatment resulted in a demethylation of the COL1A1 regulatory sequences but failed to activate transcription of the COL1A1 gene. Moreover, the 5-azacytidine treatment induced a transcription-competent chromatin structure in the retroviral sequences but not in the COL1A1 promoter. In DNA transfection and microinjection experiments, we found that the provirus interfered with transcriptional activity of the COL1A1 promoter in Mov13 fibroblasts but not in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In contrast, the wild-type COL1A1 promoter was transcriptionally active in Mov13 fibroblasts. These experiments showed that the COL1A1 promoter is potentially transcriptionally active in the presence of proviral sequences and that Mov13 fibroblasts contain the trans-acting factors required for efficient COL1A1 gene expression. Our results indicate that the provirus insertion in Mov13 can inactivate COL1A1 gene expression at several levels. It prevents the developmentally regulated establishment of a transcription-competent methylation pattern and chromatin structure of the COL1A1 domain and, in the absence of DNA methylation, appears to suppress the COL1A1 promoter in a cell-specific manner, presumably by assuming a dominant chromatin structure that may be

  15. Stimulation with type I collagen induces changes in gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    PubMed Central

    Atamas, S P; Luzina, I G; Ingels, J; Choi, J; Wong, W K; Furst, D E; Clements, P J; Postlethwaite, A E

    2010-01-01

    An autoantigenic role for collagen type I (CI) has been suggested previously in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc). Whether CI is indeed capable of affecting the immune system in dcSSc is not known. Patients with early (3 years or less) or late (>3 years) dcSSc and healthy controls donated blood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured with or without CI, and expression of genes known for their involvement in autoimmune and inflammatory processes was assessed using cDNA arrays; results were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for selected genes. Patients with early and late dcSSc were similarly different from healthy controls in basal gene expression. When cultured with CI, PBMC from patients with early dcSSc differed from healthy controls in expression of 34 genes, whereas PBMC from patients with late dcSSc differed from healthy controls in expression of only 29 genes. Direct comparisons of matched PBMC samples cultured with and without CI revealed differences in expression of eight genes in healthy controls, of five genes in patients with early dcSSc, and no differences in patients with late dcSSc. Thus, PBMC from patients with dcSSc respond differently than do PBMC from healthy controls when cultured with CI. Exposure to CI in culture of PBMC from patients in the early stage of dcSSc in contrast to PBMC from patients with late-stage dcSSc evokes a greater degree of activation of immune-related genes, suggesting that CI is more dominant as an autoantigen in early versus late dcSSc. PMID:20529088

  16. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins. PMID:27599513

  17. Molecules in Focus: Collagen XII: Protecting bone and muscle integrity by organizing collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Matthias; Birk, David E.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Koch, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Collagen XII, largest member of the fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helix (FACIT) family, assembles from three identical α-chains encoded by the COL12A1 gene. The molecule consists of three threadlike N-terminal noncollagenous NC3 domains, joined by disulfide bonds and a short interrupted collagen triple helix towards the C-terminus. Splice variants differ considerably in size and properties: "small" collagen XIIB (220 kDa subunit) is similar to collagen XIV, whereas collagen XIIA (350 kDa) has a much larger NC3 domain carrying glycosaminoglycan chains. Collagen XII binds to collagen I-containing fibrils via its collagenous domain, whereas its large noncollagenous arms interact with other matrix proteins such as tenascin-X. In dense connective tissues and bone, collagen XII is thought to regulate organization and mechanical properties of collagen fibril bundles. Accordingly, recent findings show that collagen XII mutations cause Ehlers-Danlos/myopathy overlap syndrome associated with skeletal abnormalities and muscle weakness in mice and humans. PMID:24801612

  18. Collagen XII: Protecting bone and muscle integrity by organizing collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Chiquet, Matthias; Birk, David E; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Koch, Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Collagen XII, largest member of the fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helix (FACIT) family, assembles from three identical α-chains encoded by the COL12A1 gene. The molecule consists of three threadlike N-terminal noncollagenous NC3 domains, joined by disulfide bonds and a short interrupted collagen triple helix toward the C-terminus. Splice variants differ considerably in size and properties: "small" collagen XIIB (220 kDa subunit) is similar to collagen XIV, whereas collagen XIIA (350 kDa) has a much larger NC3 domain carrying glycosaminoglycan chains. Collagen XII binds to collagen I-containing fibrils via its collagenous domain, whereas its large noncollagenous arms interact with other matrix proteins such as tenascin-X. In dense connective tissues and bone, collagen XII is thought to regulate organization and mechanical properties of collagen fibril bundles. Accordingly, recent findings show that collagen XII mutations cause Ehlers-Danlos/myopathy overlap syndrome associated with skeletal abnormalities and muscle weakness in mice and humans. PMID:24801612

  19. Compound heterozygosity for a dominant glycine substitution and a recessive internal duplication mutation in the type XVII collagen gene results in junctional epidermolysis bullosa and abnormal dentition.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J A; Gatalica, B; Li, K; Dunnill, M G; McMillan, J R; Christiano, A M; Eady, R A; Uitto, J

    1996-06-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa is a heterogeneous autosomal recessively inherited blistering skin disorder associated with fragility at the dermal-epidermal junction. Previously, mutations in this condition have been described in the three genes for the anchoring filament protein laminin 5 (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2), in the gene encoding the hemidesmosome-associated beta4 integrin (ITGB4), and in the gene for the hemidesmosomal protein type XVII collagen (COL17A1/BPAG2). In this study, we report a patient with a form of junctional epidermolysis bullosa with skin fragility and dental anomalies who is a compound heterozygote for a novel combination of mutations, ie, a glycine substitution mutation in one allele and an internal duplication in the other allele of COL17A1. The patient also has two offspring, both of whom have inherited the glycine substitution mutation, whereas the other COL17A1 allele is normal. The latter individuals show no evidence of skin fragility but have marked dental abnormalities with enamel hypoplasia and pitting. The clinical phenotype of junctional epidermolysis bullosa in the proband in this family probably arises due to a combination of the glycine substitution and the internal duplication in COL17A1, whereas the dental abnormalities of her offspring may be the result of the glycine substitution in COL17A1 alone, resulting in this dominantly inherited clinical phenotype. PMID:8669466

  20. Expression of Lactobacillus reuteri Pg4 collagen-binding protein gene in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 increases its adhesion ability to Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Hsiang-Yun; Yueh, Pei-Ying; Yu, Bi; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Je-Ruei

    2010-12-01

    The collagen-binding protein gene cnb was cloned from the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri strain Pg4. The DNA sequence of the cnb gene (792 bp) has an open reading frame encoding 263 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 28.5 kDa. The cnb gene was constructed so as to constitutively express under the control of the Lactococcus lactis lacA promoter and was transformed into Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393, a strain isolated from dairy products with poor ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopic and flow cytometric analysis of the transformed strain Lb. casei pNZ-cnb indicated that Cnb was displayed on its cell surface. Lb. casei pNZ-cnb not only showed a higher ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells but also exhibited a higher competition ability against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes adhesion to Caco-2 cells than Lb. casei ATCC 393. PMID:21070005

  1. Identification of the collagen type 1 alpha 1 gene (COL1A1) as a candidate survival-related factor associated with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of cancer-related death especially among Asian and African populations. It is urgent that we identify carcinogenesis-related genes to establish an innovative treatment strategy for this disease. Methods Triple-combination array analysis was performed using one pair each of HCC and noncancerous liver samples from a 68-year-old woman. This analysis consists of expression array, single nucleotide polymorphism array and methylation array. The gene encoding collagen type 1 alpha 1 (COL1A1) was identified and verified using HCC cell lines and 48 tissues from patients with primary HCC. Results Expression array revealed that COL1A1 gene expression was markedly decreased in tumor tissues (log2 ratio –1.1). The single nucleotide polymorphism array showed no chromosomal deletion in the locus of COL1A1. Importantly, the methylation value in the tumor tissue was higher (0.557) than that of the adjacent liver tissue (0.008). We verified that expression of this gene was suppressed by promoter methylation. Reactivation of COL1A1 expression by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine treatment was seen in HCC cell lines, and sequence analysis identified methylated CpG sites in the COL1A1 promoter region. Among 48 pairs of surgical specimens, 13 (27.1%) showed decreased COL1A1 mRNA expression in tumor sites. Among these 13 cases, 10 had promoter methylation at the tumor site. The log-rank test indicated that mRNA down-regulated tumors were significantly correlated with a poor overall survival rate (P = 0.013). Conclusions Triple-combination array analysis successfully identified COL1A1 as a candidate survival-related gene in HCCs. Epigenetic down-regulation of COL1A1 mRNA expression might have a role as a prognostic biomarker of HCC. PMID:24552139

  2. Collagen Accumulation in Osteosarcoma Cells lacking GLT25D1 Collagen Galactosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Stephan; Hennet, Thierry

    2016-08-26

    Collagen is post-translationally modified by prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation and subsequently by glycosylation of hydroxylysine. Despite the widespread occurrence of the glycan structure Glc(α1-2)Gal linked to hydroxylysine in animals, the functional significance of collagen glycosylation remains elusive. To address the role of glycosylation in collagen expression, folding, and secretion, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to inactivate the collagen galactosyltransferase GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes in osteosarcoma cells. Loss of GLT25D1 led to increased expression and intracellular accumulation of collagen type I, whereas loss of GLT25D2 had no effect on collagen secretion. Inactivation of the GLT25D1 gene resulted in a compensatory induction of GLT25D2 expression. Loss of GLT25D1 decreased collagen glycosylation by up to 60% but did not alter collagen folding and thermal stability. Whereas cells harboring individually inactivated GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes could be recovered and maintained in culture, cell clones with simultaneously inactive GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes could be not grown and studied, suggesting that a complete loss of collagen glycosylation impairs osteosarcoma cell proliferation and viability. PMID:27402836

  3. Gene transfection of human mesenchymal stem cells with a nano-hydroxyapatite-collagen scaffold containing DNA-functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tenkumo, Taichi; Vanegas Sáenz, Juan Ramón; Takada, Yukyo; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Rotan, Olga; Sokolova, Viktoriya; Epple, Matthias; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to fabricate a growth factor-releasing biodegradable scaffold for tissue regeneration. We prepared multishell calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles functionalized with DNA, polyethyleneimine (PEI), protamine and octa-arginine (R8) and compared their respective transfection activity and cell viability measures using human mesenchymal stem cells. DNA-protamine complexes improved the transfection efficiency of CaP nanoparticles with the exception of those functionalized with R8. These complexes also greatly reduced the cytotoxicity of PEI. In addition, we also fabricated DNA-protamine-functionalized CaP nanoparticle-loaded nano-hydroxyapatite-collagen scaffolds and investigated their gene transfection efficiencies. These experiments showed that the scaffolds were associated with moderate hMSC cell viability and were capable of releasing the BMP-2 protein into hMSCs following gene transfection. In particular, the scaffold loaded with protamine-containing CaP nanoparticles showed the highest cell viability and transfection efficiency in hMSCs; thus, it might be suitable to serve as an efficient growth factor-releasing scaffold. PMID:27238217

  4. Profile of collagen gene expression in the glenohumeral capsule of patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the expression of the genes COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1 and COL5A1 in the glenohumeral capsule of patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder. Methods Samples from the glenohumeral capsule of 18 patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder were evaluated. Male patients with a positive grip test and a Bankart lesion seen on magnetic resonance imaging were included. All the patients had suffered more than one episode of shoulder dislocation. Samples were collected from the injured glenohumeral capsule (anteroinferior region) and from the macroscopically unaffected region (anterosuperior region) of each patient. The expression of collagen genes was evaluated using the polymerase chain reaction after reverse transcription with quantitative analysis (qRT-PCR). Results The expression of COL1A1, COL1A2 and COL3A1 did not differ between the two regions of the shoulder capsule. However, it was observed that the expression of COL5A1 was significantly lower in the anteroinferior region than in the anterosuperior region (median ± interquartile range: 0.057 ± 0.052 vs. 0.155 ± 0.398; p = 0.028) of the glenohumeral capsule. Conclusion The affected region of the glenohumeral capsule in patients with shoulder instability presented reduced expression of COL5A1. PMID:26229875

  5. Physical and linkage mapping of the human and murine genes for the [alpha]1 chain of type IX collagen (COL9A1)

    SciTech Connect

    Warman, M.L. Children's Hospital Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A. ); Seldin, M.F.; Rochelle, J.M. ); Knoll, J.H.M.; Cheng, Sou De ); Olsen, B.R. )

    1993-09-01

    The IX collagen, a member of the FACIT family of extracellular matrix proteins, is a heterotrimer composed of three genetically distinct [alpha] chains. The cDNAs for the human and mouse [alpha]1(IX) chains have been cloned. In this paper the authors confirm the mapping of the human COL9A1 gene to chromosome 6q12-q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization utilizing two genomic clones which also contain short tandem repeat polymorphisms. They also report the characterization of these repeats and their incorporation into the chromosome 6 linkage map. The COL9A1 locus shows no recombination with the marker D6Z1 (Z = 27.61 at [theta] = 0) and identifies the most likely locus order of KRAS1P-[D6Z1-COL9A1]-D6S30. In addition, using an interspecific backcross panel, they have mapped murine Col9a1 to mouse chromosome 1. Together with other comparative mapping results, these data suggest that the pericentric region of human chromosome 6 is homologous to the most proximal segment of mouse chromosome 1. These data may facilitate linkage studies with COL9A1 (or col9a1) as a candidate gene for hereditary chondrodysplasias and osteoarthritis. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Role of Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog in the transcription activation of type I collagen gene mediated by transforming growth factor beta

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Mi-Sun; Jeong, Kwang Won

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • FLII activates TGFβ-mediated expression of COL1A2 gene. • TGFβ induces the association of FLII with SMAD3 and BRG1 in A549 cells. • FLII is required for the recruitment of SWI/SNF complex and chromatin accessibility to COL1A2 promoter. - Abstract: Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII) is a nuclear receptor coactivator that is known to interact with other transcriptional regulators such as the SWI/SNF complex, an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, at the promoter or enhancer region of estrogen receptor (ER)-α target genes. However, little is known about the role of FLII during transcription initiation in the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)/SMAD-dependent signaling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that FLII functions as a coactivator in the expression of type I collagen gene induced by TGFβ in A549 cells. FLII activates the reporter gene driven by COL1A2 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. Co-expression of GRIP1, CARM1, or p300 did not show any synergistic activation of transcription. Furthermore, the level of COL1A2 expression correlated with the endogenous level of FLII mRNA level. Depletion of FLII resulted in a reduction of TGFβ-induced expression of COL1A2 gene. In contrast, over-expression of FLII caused an increase in the endogenous expression of COL1A2. We also showed that FLII is associated with Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1) as well as SMAD in A549 cells. Notably, the recruitment of BRG1 to the COL1A2 promoter region was decreased in FLII-depleted A549 cells, suggesting that FLII is required for TGFβ-induced chromatin remodeling, which is carried out by the SWI/SNF complex. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments revealed that depletion of FLII caused a reduction in chromatin accessibility at the COL1A2 promoter. These results suggest that FLII plays a critical role in TGFβ/SMAD-mediated transcription of the COL1A2 gene

  7. Collagen VI related muscle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, A; Bushby, K

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding collagen VI (COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3) cause Bethlem myopathy (BM) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), two conditions which were previously believed to be completely separate entities. BM is a relatively mild dominantly inherited disorder characterised by proximal weakness and distal joint contractures. UCMD was originally described as an autosomal recessive condition causing severe muscle weakness with proximal joint contractures and distal hyperlaxity. Here we review the clinical phenotypes of BM and UCMD and their diagnosis and management, and provide an overview of the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of collagen VI related disorders. PMID:16141002

  8. Partial rescue of a lethal phenotype of fragile bones in transgenic mice with a chimeric antisense gene directed against a mutated collagen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Khillan, J S; Li, S W; Prockop, D J

    1994-01-01

    Previously, transgenic mice were prepared that developed a lethal phenotype of fragile bones because they expressed an internally deleted mini-gene for the pro alpha 1(I) chain of human type I procollagen. The shortened pro alpha 1(I) chains synthesized from the human transgene bound to and produced degradation of normal pro alpha 1(I) chains synthesized from the normal mouse alleles. Here we assembled an antisense gene that was similar to the internally deleted COL1A1 minigene but the 3' half of the gene was inverted so as to code for an antisense RNA. Transgenic mice expressing the antisense gene had a normal phenotype, apparently because the antisense gene contained human sequences instead of mouse sequences. Two lines of mice expressing the antisense gene were bred to two lines of transgenic mice expressing the mini-gene. In mice that inherited both genes, the incidence of the lethal fragile bone phenotype was reduced from 92% to 27%. The effects of the antisense gene were directly demonstrated by an increase in the ratio of normal mouse pro alpha 1(I) chains to human mini-pro alpha 1(I) chains in tissues from mice that inherited both genes and had a normal phenotype. The results raise the possibility that chimeric gene constructs that contain intron sequences and in which only the second half of a gene is inverted may be particularly effective as antisense genes. Images PMID:8022775

  9. The presence of both bone sialoprotein-binding protein gene and collagen adhesin gene as a typical virulence trait of the major epidemic cluster in isolates from orthopedic implant infections.

    PubMed

    Campoccia, Davide; Speziale, Pietro; Ravaioli, Stefano; Cangini, Ilaria; Rindi, Simonetta; Pirini, Valter; Montanaro, Lucio; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2009-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major, highly clonal, pathogen causing implant infections. This study aimed at investigating the diverse distribution of bacterial adhesins in most prevalent S. aureus strain types causing orthopaedic implant infections. 200 S. aureus isolates, categorized into ribogroups by automated ribotyping, i.e. rDNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, were screened for the presence of a panel of adhesins genes. Within the collection of isolates, automated ribotyping detected 98 distinct ribogroups. For many ribogroups, characteristic tandem genes arrangements could be identified. In the predominant S. aureus cluster, enlisting 27 isolates, the bbp gene encoding bone sialoprotein-binding protein appeared a typical virulence trait, found in 93% of the isolates. Conversely, the bbp gene was identified in just 10% of the remaining isolates of the collection. In this cluster, co-presence of bbp with the cna gene encoding collagen adhesin was a pattern consistently observed. These findings indicate a crucial role of both these adhesins, able to bind the most abundant bone proteins, in the pathogenesis of orthopaedic implant infections, there where biomaterials interface bone tissues. This study suggests that specific adhesins may synergistically act in the onset of implant infections and that anti-adhesin strategies should be targeted to adhesins conjointly present. PMID:19758694

  10. Beneficial effect of a sturgeon-based bioactive compound on gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, matrix metalloproteinases and type-10 collagen in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, R; Marotta, F; Jain, S; Rastmanesh, R; Allegri, F; Celep, G; Lorenzetti, A; Polimeni, A; Yadav, H

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of a marine bioactive compound containing high-purity caviar-derived DNA, collagen elastin and protein extracts from sturgeon (LD-1227, Caviarlieri, Laboratoires Dom, Switzerland) on IL-1beta-induced activation and production of TNFalpha and MMP-13 in human osteo-arthritis (OA) chondrocytes and intracellular signaling factors. Human chondrocytes were derived from OA cartilage and stimulated with IL-1beta. Gene expression of TNFalpha, MMP-13, MMP-1 and Col10A1 was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. TNFalpha protein in culture medium was determined using cytokine-specific ELISA. Western immunoblotting was used to analyze the MMP-13 production in the culture medium and the activation of NF-kB. DNA binding activity of NF-kB p65 was determined using a highly sensitive and specific ELISA. MMP-13 activity in the culture medium was assayed by gelatine zymography. LD-1227 significantly decreased IL-1beta-stimulated gene expression and production of TNFalpha, MMP-1, MMP-13 and Col10A1 in human chondrocytes. The inhibitory effect of LD-1227 on the IL-1beta-induced expression of these genes was mediated at least in part via suppression of NF-kB p65. These data show that LD-1227 can inhibit IL-1beta-induced proliferation and inflammatory reactions via inhibited activation of the transcription factor NF-kB pathway in human chondrocytes derived from OA patients. These novel pharmacological actions of LD-1227 on IL-1beta-stimulated human OA chondrocytes provide suggestions that this marine biology compound may inhibit cartilage degradation by suppressing IL-1beta-mediated activation and the catabolic response in human chondrocytes. PMID:23034253

  11. Linkage mapping of the gene for Type III collagen (COL3A1) to human chromosome 2q using a VNTR polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Summar, M.L. )

    1994-03-15

    The gene for the [alpha]1(III) chain of type III collagen, COL3A1, has been previously mapped to human chromosome 2q24.3-q31 by in situ hybridization. Physical mapping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has demonstrated that COL3A1 lies within 35 kb of COL5A2. The authors genotyped the CEPH families at the COL3A2 locus using a pentanucleotide repeat polymorphism within intron 25. They demonstrated significant linkage to 18 anonymous markers as well as the gene for carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPSI), which had been previously mapped to this region. No recombination was seen between COL3A1 and COL5A2 (Z = 9.93 at [theta] = 0) or D2S24 (Z = 10.55 at [theta] = 0). The locus order is (D2S32-D2S138-D2S148)-(D2S24-COL5A2-COL3A1)-(D2S118-D2S161), with odds of 1:2300 for the next most likely order. These relationships are consistent with the physical mapping of COL3A1 to the distal portion of 2q and place it proximal to CPSI by means of multipoint analysis. These linkage relationships should prove useful in further studies of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV and carbamyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency and provide an additional framework for localizing other genes in this region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Genetic mapping of a locus for multiple ephiphyseal dysplasia (EDM2) to a region of chromosome 1 containing a type IX collagen gene

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, M.D.; Choi, HiChang; Warman, M.L.; Loughlin, J.A.; Wordsworth, P.; Sykes, B.C.; Irven, C.M.M.; Smith, M.; Wynne-Davies, R.; Lipson, M.H.

    1994-10-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a dominantly inherited chondrodysplasia characterized by mild short stature and early-onset osteoarthrosis. Some forms of MED clinically resemble another chondrodysplasia phenotype, the mild form of pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH). On the basis of their clinical similarities as well as similar ultra-structural and biochemical features in cartilage from some patients, it has been proposed that MED and PSACH belong to a single bone-dysplasia family. Recently, both mild and severe PSACH as well as a form of MED have been linked to the same interval on chromosome 19, suggesting that they may be allelic disorders. Linkage studies with the chromosome 19 markers were carried out in a large family with MED and excluded the previously identified interval. Using this family, we have identified a MED locus on the short arm of chromosome 1, in a region containing the gene (COL9A2) that encodes the {alpha}2 chain of type IX collagen, a structural component of the cartilage extracellular matrix. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Effects of soybean peptide and collagen peptide on collagen synthesis in normal human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Kyosuke; Kage, Madoka; Todo, Hiroaki; Sugibayashi, Kenji; Hashimoto, Fumie

    2012-09-01

    The collagen present in the dermis of the skin is a fibrous protein that fills the gaps between cells and helps maintain tissue flexibility. Effectively increasing the collagen present in the skin is an important goal for cosmetic research. Recent research has shown that soybean peptide (SP) has anti-fatigue activity, antioxidant activity, and the ability to increase type I collagen, while collagen peptide (CP) has the ability to enhance corneal moisture content and viscoelasticity, as well as to increase levels of hyaluronic acid synthesizing enzymes in human skin. Little documented research, however, has been conducted on collagen formation in relation to these peptides. Therefore, this research applied SP and CP with molecular weights primarily around 500 and preparations containing both SP and CP to normal human dermal fibroblasts together with magnesium ascorbyl phosphate (VC-PMg), and used real-time PCR to determine the gene expression of type I collagen (COL1A1), which contributes to collagen synthesis, and Smad7, which contribute to collagen breakdown. In addition, enzyme linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure collagen content in the media. COL1A1 gene expression at 24 h after sample addition showed higher tendency in all samples and increased with time at 4, 8 and 24 h after addition. Smad7 gene expression was not substantially different at 4 h after addition. matrix metalloproteinase-1 gene expression was higher following SP addition, but was lower after the addition of CP and SP+CP. Medium collagen content was higher in all samples and increased with time at 8 h after addition. Collagen levels were higher when SP and CP were added together. PMID:22264122

  14. The Collagen Family

    PubMed Central

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant proteins in mammals. The collagen family comprises 28 members that contain at least one triple-helical domain. Collagens are deposited in the extracellular matrix where most of them form supramolecular assemblies. Four collagens are type II membrane proteins that also exist in a soluble form released from the cell surface by shedding. Collagens play structural roles and contribute to mechanical properties, organization, and shape of tissues. They interact with cells via several receptor families and regulate their proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Some collagens have a restricted tissue distribution and hence specific biological functions. PMID:21421911

  15. Harnessing the Versatility of Bacterial Collagen to Improve the Chondrogenic Potential of Porous Collagen Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Paresh A; St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Chow, Lesley W; Puetzer, Jennifer L; Stoichevska, Violet; Peng, Yong Y; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M; Stevens, Molly M

    2016-07-01

    Collagen I foams are used in the clinic as scaffolds to promote articular cartilage repair as they provide a bioactive environment for cells with chondrogenic potential. However, collagen I as a base material does not allow for precise control over bioactivity. Alternatively, recombinant bacterial collagens can be used as "blank slate" collagen molecules to offer a versatile platform for incorporation of selected bioactive sequences and fabrication into 3D scaffolds. Here, we show the potential of Streptococcal collagen-like 2 (Scl2) protein foams modified with peptides designed to specifically and noncovalently bind hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate to improve chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) compared to collagen I foams. Specific compositions of functionalized Scl2 foams lead to improved chondrogenesis compared to both nonfunctionalized Scl2 and collagen I foams, as indicated by gene expression, extracellular matrix accumulation, and compression moduli. hMSCs cultured in functionalized Scl2 foams exhibit decreased collagens I and X gene and protein expression, suggesting an advantage over collagen I foams in promoting a chondrocytic phenotype. These highly modular foams can be further modified to improve specific aspects chondrogenesis. As such, these scaffolds also have the potential to be tailored for other regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27219220

  16. Engineering the periodontal ligament in hyaluronan-gelatin-type I collagen constructs: upregulation of apoptosis and alterations in gene expression by cyclic compressive strain.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, Aarthi; Sriram, Gopu; Vinoth, Jayasaleen Kumar; Cao, Tong; Meikle, Murray C

    2015-02-01

    To engineer constructs of the periodontal ligament (PDL), human PDL cells were incorporated into a matrix of hyaluronan, gelatin, and type I collagen (COLI) in sample holders (13×1 mm) of six-well Biopress culture plates. The loading dynamics of the PDL were mimicked by applying a cyclic compressive strain of 33.4 kPa (340.6 gm/cm(2)) to the constructs for 1.0 s every 60 s, for 6, 12, and 24 h in a Flexercell FX-4000C Strain Unit. Compression significantly increased the number of nonviable cells and increased the expression of several apoptosis-related genes, including initiator and executioner caspases. Of the 15 extracellular matrix genes screened, most were upregulated at some point after 6-12 h deformation, but all were downregulated at 24 h, except for MMPs1-3 and CTGF. In culture supernatants, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) protein levels were upregulated at 24 h; receptor activator of nuclear kappa factor B (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) were unchanged; and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) not detected. The low modulus of elasticity of the constructs was a disadvantage-future mechanobiology studies and tissue engineering applications will require constructs with much higher stiffness. Since the major structural protein of the PDL is COLI, a more rational approach would be to permeabilize preformed COLI scaffolds with PDL-populated matrices. PMID:25181942

  17. A type I collagen reporter gene construct for protein engineering studies. Functional equivalence of transfected reporter COL1A1 and endogenous gene products during biosynthesis and in vitro extracellular matrix accumulation.

    PubMed

    Lamandé, S R; Bateman, J F

    1993-07-15

    A type I collagen reporter gene construct, designed to facilitate detailed analysis of the consequences of introduced structural and regulatory mutations on collagen biosynthesis and participation in the extracellular matrix, was produced by site-directed mutagenesis of the mouse COL1A1 gene. The reporter construct, pWTCI-Ile822, carried a single base change which converted the codon for amino acid 822 of the triple helix from methionine to isoleucine. This change allowed the reporter protein, [Ile822]alpha 1(I), to be distinguished from the wild-type alpha 1(I), and quantified, by its altered CNBr cleavage pattern. In mouse Mov13 cells, which synthesize no endogenous pro alpha 1(I), reporter chains associated with endogenous pro alpha 2(I), formed pepsin-stable triple helices and were secreted efficiently from the cell. The thermal stability of wild-type molecules and molecules containing the reporter [Ile822]alpha 1(I) chains was identical. The biosynthetic characteristics of wild-type and reporter chains were directly compared in stably transfected 3T6 cells. These cells did not make a distinction between reporter and endogenous alpha 1(I) chains, which were secreted from the cells at the same rate and were processed and deposited into the 3T6 cell in vitro accumulated extracellular matrix with equal efficiency. These data demonstrate that the helical sequence alteration in the reporter protein is functionally neutral and that the reporter construct, pWTCI-Ile822, is a suitable vector for the analysis of the biochemical effects of site-directed mutations in the putative COL1A1 functional domains. PMID:8343119

  18. Biomedical applications of collagens.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, John A M

    2016-05-01

    Collagen-based biomedical materials have developed into important, clinically effective materials used in a range of devices that have gained wide acceptance. These devices come with collagen in various formats, including those based on stabilized natural tissues, those that are based on extracted and purified collagens, and designed composite, biosynthetic materials. Further knowledge on the structure and function of collagens has led to on-going developments and improvements. Among these developments has been the production of recombinant collagen materials that are well defined and are disease free. Most recently, a group of bacterial, non-animal collagens has emerged that may provide an excellent, novel source of collagen for use in biomaterials and other applications. These newer collagens are discussed in detail. They can be modified to direct their function, and they can be fabricated into various formats, including films and sponges, while solutions can also be adapted for use in surface coating technologies. PMID:26448097

  19. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  20. A base substitution in the exon of a collagen gene causes alternative splicing and generates a structurally abnormal polypeptide in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VII.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, D; D'Alessio, M; Ramirez, F; de Wet, W; Cole, W G; Chan, D; Bateman, J F

    1989-01-01

    An unusual splicing mutation has been characterized in the pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene of a sporadic case of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type VII. Cloning of primer extended cDNA in conjunction with R-looping experiments established that nearly half of the pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene transcripts are abnormally spliced, for they lack exon 6 sequences. Analysis of cloned genomic fragments revealed that one of the proband's alleles displays the substitution of an A for a G in the last nucleotide of exon 6. The change converts the normal Met (ATG) codon to Ile (ATA) and, in addition, obliterates a NcoI restriction site. The latter event was exploited to demonstrate the de novo nature of the mutation since DNA from the unaffected parents was fully digested with the enzyme, after in vitro amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Further confirmation of the missplicing was obtained by transient expression into animal cells of allelic minigene constructs. Finally, Western blot analysis of cyanogen bromide cleaved collagen and nucleotide sequencing of appropriately selected cDNA clones demonstrated the production of relatively low amounts of correctly spliced molecules harboring the Ile substitution, as well. Images PMID:2767050

  1. A 5' splice site mutation affecting the pre-mRNA splicing of two upstream exons in the collagen COL1A1 gene. Exon 8 skipping and altered definition of exon 7 generates truncated pro alpha 1(I) chains with a non-collagenous insertion destabilizing the triple helix.

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, J F; Chan, D; Moeller, I; Hannagan, M; Cole, W G

    1994-01-01

    A heterozygous de novo G to A point mutation in intron 8 at the +5 position of the splice donor site of the gene for the pro alpha 1(I) chain of type I procollagen, COL1A1, was defined in a patient with type IV osteogenesis imperfecta. The splice donor site mutation resulted not only in the skipping of the upstream exon 8 but also unexpectedly had the secondary effect of activating a cryptic splice site in the next upstream intron, intron 7, leading to re-definition of the 3' limit of exon 7. These pre-mRNA splicing aberrations cause the deletion of exon 8 sequences from the mature mRNA and the inclusion of 96 bp of intron 7 sequence. Since the mis-splicing of the mutant allele product resulted in the maintenance of the correct codon reading frame, the resultant pro alpha 1(I) chain contained a short non-collagenous 32-amino-acid sequence insertion within the repetitive Gly-Xaa-Yaa collagen sequence motif. At the protein level, the mutant alpha 1(I) chain was revealed by digestion with pepsin, which cleaved the mutant procollagen within the protease-sensitive non-collagenous insertion, producing a truncated alpha 1(I). This protease sensitivity demonstrated the structural distortion to the helical structure caused by the insertion. In long-term culture with ascorbic acid, which stimulates the formation of a mature crosslinked collagen matrix, and in tissues, there was no evidence of the mutant chain, suggesting that during matrix formation the mutant chain was unable to stably incorporated into the matrix and was degraded proteolytically. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7945197

  2. COLLAGEN STRUCTURE AND STABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Shoulders, Matthew D.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. This fibrous, structural protein comprises a right-handed bundle of three parallel, left-handed polyproline II-type helices. Much progress has been made in elucidating the structure of collagen triple helices and the physicochemical basis for their stability. New evidence demonstrates that stereoelectronic effects and preorganization play a key role in that stability. The fibrillar structure of type I collagen–the prototypical collagen fibril–has been revealed in detail. Artificial collagen fibrils that display some properties of natural collagen fibrils are now accessible using chemical synthesis and self-assembly. A rapidly emerging understanding of the mechanical and structural properties of native collagen fibrils will guide further development of artificial collagenous materials for biomedicine and nanotechnology. PMID:19344236

  3. Differential effects of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and transforming growth factor-beta1 on gene expression of collagen-modifying enzymes in human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, Marlene; Helder, Marco N; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Bank, Ruud A; Wuisman, Paul I J M; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2009-08-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) in combination with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) or transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) are under evaluation for bone tissue engineering. Posttranslational modification of type I collagen is essential for functional bone tissue with adequate physical and mechanical properties. We investigated whether BMP-2 (10-100 ng/mL) and/or TGF-beta1 (1-10 ng/mL) affect gene expression of alpha2(I) procollagen and collagen-modifying enzymes, that is, lysyl oxidase and lysyl hydroxylases 1, 2, and 3 (encoded by PLOD1, 2, and 3), by human AT-MSCs. BMP-2, but not TGF-beta1, increased alkaline phosphatase activity after 28 days, indicating osteogenic differentiation of AT-MSCs. At day 4, both BMP-2 and TGF-beta1 upregulated alpha2(I) procollagen and PLOD1, which was downregulated at day 28. TGF-beta1, but not BMP-2, downregulated PLOD3 at day 28. Lysyl oxidase was upregulated by TGF-beta1 at day 4 and by BMP-2 at day 7. Neither BMP-2 nor TGF-beta1 affected PLOD2. In conclusion, these results suggest that AT-MSCs differentially respond to BMP-2 and TGF-beta1 with changes in gene expression of collagen-modifying enzymes. AT-MSCs may thus be able to appropriately modify type I collagen to form a functional bone extracellular matrix for tissue engineering, dependent on the growth factor added. PMID:19231972

  4. Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: a review

    PubMed Central

    Shinkuma, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a rare inherited blistering disorder caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen. The deficiency and/or dysfunction of type VII collagen leads to subepidermal blistering immediately below the lamina densa, resulting in mucocutaneous fragility and disease complications such as intractable ulcers, extensive scarring, malnutrition, and malignancy. The disease is usually diagnosed by immunofluorescence mapping and/or transmission electron microscopy and subsequently subclassified into one of 14 subtypes. This review provides practical knowledge on the disease, including new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26064063

  5. Innovative therapeutic strategies for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Larcher, F; Del Río, M

    2015-06-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is among the most serious rare skin diseases. It is also the rare skin disease for which most effort has been expended in developing advanced therapeutic interventions. RDEB is caused by collagen VII deficiency resulting from COL7A1 mutations. Therapeutic approaches seek to replenish collagen VII and thus restore dermal-epidermal adhesion. Therapeutic options under development include protein therapy and different cell-based and gene-based therapies. In addition to treating skin defects, some of these therapies may also target internal mucosa. In the coming years, these novel therapeutic approaches should substantially improve the quality of life of patients with RDEB. PMID:25796272

  6. Enigmatic insight into collagen.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  7. Collagen and gelatin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dasong; Nikoo, Mehdi; Boran, Gökhan; Zhou, Peng; Regenstein, Joe M

    2015-01-01

    Collagen and gelatin have been widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries due to their excellent biocompatibility, easy biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. Fish collagen and gelatin are of renewed interest, owing to the safety and religious concerns of their mammalian counterparts. The structure of collagen has been studied using various modern technologies, and interpretation of the raw data should be done with caution. The structure of collagen may vary with sources and seasons, which may affect its applications and optimal extraction conditions. Numerous studies have investigated the bioactivities and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and their hydrolysis peptides, using both in vitro and in vivo assay models. In addition to their established nutritional value as a protein source, collagen and collagen-derived products may exert various potential biological activities on cells in the extracellular matrix through the corresponding food-derived peptides after ingestion, and this might justify their applications in dietary supplements and pharmaceutical preparations. Moreover, an increasing number of novel applications have been found for collagen and gelatin. Therefore, this review covers the current understanding of the structure, bioactivities, and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and gelatin hydrolysates as well as their most recent applications. PMID:25884286

  8. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  9. Abnormal dentin structure in two novel gene mutations [COL1A1, Arg134Cys] and [ADAMTS2, Trp795-to-ter] causing rare type I collagen disorders.

    PubMed

    De Coster, P J; Cornelissen, M; De Paepe, A; Martens, L C; Vral, A

    2007-02-01

    Histological and ultrastructural observations of dentin of two patients affected with rare types of type I collagen disorders are presented. In the first case, a homozygous nonsense mutation in ADAMTS2 (substitution of a codon for tryptophan by a stopcodon) causes type VIIC Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) with multiple tooth agenesis and focal dysplastic dentin defects. In the second case, a missense mutation in COL1A1 (substitution of arginine by cysteine) results in a type I EDS phenotype with clinically normal-appearing dentition. Tooth samples are investigated by using light microscopy (LM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunostaining for types I and III collagen, and tenascin. These are compared with samples from patients with types III and IV osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) in association with dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI), showing a consistently abnormal appearance of the dentin in all specimens, with variations being primarily those of degree of change. Similarities in histological changes include the alternating presence of normal and severe pathological areas in primary and secondary dentin, the latter being characterized by large canal-like structures in atubular areas. Ultrastructural evidence of pathological dentinogenesis include abnormal distribution, size and organization of collagen fibers, which may also be found in clinically unaffected teeth. The histological and ultrastructural changes seen can be explained on the basis of odontoblast dysfunction which may be secondary to the collagen defect, interfering with different levels of odontoblast cell function and intercellular communication. These observations on (ultra)structural dentin defects associated with the two novel gene mutations are the first ever reported. PMID:17118335

  10. Abnormal type III collagen produced by an exon-17-skipping mutation of the COL3A1 gene in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is not incorporated into the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Chiodo, A A; Sillence, D O; Cole, W G; Bateman, J F

    1995-01-01

    A novel heterozygous mutation of the COL3A1 gene that encodes the alpha 1(III) chains of type III collagen was identified in a family with the acrogeric form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (EDS-IV). Cultured dermal fibroblasts produced normal and shortened alpha 1(III) chains. The triple helix of the latter chain was shortened owing to a 33 amino acid deletion of Gly-184 to Pro-216. The corresponding region of cDNA lacked 99 base pairs from nucleotides 1051 to 1149. The deletions corresponded exactly to the normal sequence encoded by exon 17 of the COL3A1 gene. The proband was heterozygous for a T to G transversion at position +2 of intron 17, which resulted in skipping of exon 17. The splicing defect was not corrected by growing the fibroblasts at 33 degrees C and no other splicing variants were identified at 33 or 37 degrees C. The affected brother had the same mutation but his unaffected mother did not. Heterotrimeric type III collagen molecules containing normal and mutant chains were retained within the cell. The mutant homotrimeric molecules were modified and secreted normally and were thermally stable. These normal characteristics of the mutant homotrimers suggested that the loss of ten Gly-Xaa-Yaa triplets (where Gly-Xaa-Yaa is a repetitive amino acid triplet structure in which Xaa and Yaa are other amino acids, proline and hydroxyproline being more common in the Yaa position) did not adversely affect the formation and stability of the triple helix or the structural requirements for secretion. However, the mutant homotrimers were not incorporated into the extracellular matrix of an in vitro model of EDS-IV dermis. The EDS-IV phenotype in this family was probably due to a deficiency in the amount of normal type III collagen available for formation of the heterotypic collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix. Intracellular and extracellular quality-control mechanisms prevented the incorporation of heterotrimeric and homotrimeric mutant type III collagen

  11. Oxidative damage to collagen.

    PubMed

    Monboisse, J C; Borel, J P

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular matrix molecules, such as collagens, are good targets for oxygen free radicals. Collagen is the only protein susceptible to fragmentation by superoxide anion as demonstrated by the liberation of small 4-hydroxyproline-containing-peptides. It seems likely that hydroxyl radicals in the presence of oxygen cleave collagen into small peptides, and the cleavage seems to be specific to proline or 4-hydroxyproline residues. Hydroxyl radicals in the absence of oxygen or hypochlorous acid do not induce fragmentation of collagen molecules, but they trigger a polymerization of collagen through the formation of new cross-links such as dityrosine or disulfure bridges. Moreover, these cross-links can not explain the totality of high molecular weight components generated under these experimental conditions, and the nature of new cross-links induced by hydroxyl radicals or hypochlorous acid remains unclear. PMID:1333311

  12. Collagen: Biochemistry, biomechanics, biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Nimni, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date reference for new ideas, information, and concepts in collagen research. The first volume emphasizes the relationship between the molecular structure and function of collagen, including descriptions of collagen types which exist in tissues as well as how these molecules organize into fibrils and the nature of the chemical crosslinks which stabilize them. In Volume II the biomechanical behavior of various specialized tissues, abnormal accumulation of collagen in the form of scars of fibrous infiltration are examined/and wound healing, tissue regulation and repair are covered in detail. Volume III explores the increasing application of collagen technology to the field of bioprosthesis, including the production of heart valve bioprosthesis, blood vessels, ligament substitutes, and bone substitutes.

  13. Defective collagen VI α6 chain expression in the skeletal muscle of patients with collagen VI-related myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tagliavini, F; Pellegrini, C; Sardone, F; Squarzoni, S; Paulsson, M; Wagener, R; Gualandi, F; Trabanelli, C; Ferlini, A; Merlini, L; Santi, S; Maraldi, N M; Faldini, C; Sabatelli, P

    2014-09-01

    Collagen VI is a non-fibrillar collagen present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) as a complex polymer; the mainly expressed form is composed of α1, α2 and α3 chains; mutations in genes encoding these chains cause myopathies known as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM) and myosclerosis myopathy (MM). The collagen VI α6 chain is a recently identified component of the ECM of the human skeletal muscle. Here we report that the α6 chain was dramatically reduced in skeletal muscle and muscle cell cultures of genetically characterized UCMD, BM and MM patients, independently of the clinical phenotype, the gene involved and the effect of the mutation on the expression of the "classical" α1α2α3 heterotrimer. By contrast, the collagen VI α6 chain was normally expressed or increased in the muscle of patients affected by other forms of muscular dystrophy, the overexpression matching with areas of increased fibrosis. In vitro treatment with TGF-β1, a potent collagen inducer, promoted the collagen VI α6 chain deposition in the ECM of normal muscle cells, whereas, in cultures derived from collagen VI-related myopathy patients, the collagen VI α6 chain failed to develop a network outside the cells and accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum. The defect of the α6 chain points to a contribution to the pathogenesis of collagen VI-related disorders. PMID:24907562

  14. Defective collagen VI α6 chain expression in the skeletal muscle of patients with collagen VI-related myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Tagliavini, F.; Pellegrini, C.; Sardone, F.; Squarzoni, S.; Paulsson, M.; Wagener, R.; Gualandi, F.; Trabanelli, C.; Ferlini, A.; Merlini, L.; Santi, S.; Maraldi, N.M.; Faldini, C.; Sabatelli, P.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen VI is a non-fibrillar collagen present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) as a complex polymer; the mainly expressed form is composed of α1, α2 and α3 chains; mutations in genes encoding these chains cause myopathies known as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM) and myosclerosis myopathy (MM). The collagen VI α6 chain is a recently identified component of the ECM of the human skeletal muscle. Here we report that the α6 chain was dramatically reduced in skeletal muscle and muscle cell cultures of genetically characterized UCMD, BM and MM patients, independently of the clinical phenotype, the gene involved and the effect of the mutation on the expression of the “classical” α1α2α3 heterotrimer. By contrast, the collagen VI α6 chain was normally expressed or increased in the muscle of patients affected by other forms of muscular dystrophy, the overexpression matching with areas of increased fibrosis. In vitro treatment with TGF-β1, a potent collagen inducer, promoted the collagen VI α6 chain deposition in the ECM of normal muscle cells, whereas, in cultures derived from collagen VI-related myopathy patients, the collagen VI α6 chain failed to develop a network outside the cells and accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum. The defect of the α6 chain points to a contribution to the pathogenesis of collagen VI-related disorders. PMID:24907562

  15. Collagenous Colitis and Spondylarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ben Abdelghani, Kaouther; Sahli, Hana; Souabni, Leila; Chekili, Selma; Belhadj, Salwa; Kassab, Selma; Laatar, Ahmed; Zakraoui, Leith

    2012-01-01

    Collagenous colitis is a recent cause of chronic diarrhea. Cooccurrence with spondylarthropathy is rare. We describe two cases: one man and one woman of 33 and 20 years old were suffering from spondylarthropathy. They then developed collagenous colitis, 4 and 14 years after the onset of spondylarthropathy. The diagnosis was based on histological features. A sicca syndrome and vitiligo were observed with the female case. The presence of colitis leads to therapeutic problems. This association suggests a systemic kind of rheumatic disease of collagenous colitis. PMID:22701491

  16. Nanomechanics of collagen microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Vesentini, Simone; Redaelli, Alberto; Gautieri, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Summary Collagen constitutes one third of the human proteome, providing mechanical stability, elasticity and strength to organisms and is thus the prime construction material in biology. Collagen is also the dominating material in the extracellular matrix where its stiffness controls cell differentiation, growth and pathology. We use atomistic-based hierarchical multiscale modeling to describe this complex biological material from the bottom up. This includes the use and development of large-scale computational modeling tools to investigate several aspects related to collagen-based tissues, including source of visco-elasticity and deformation mechanisms at the nanoscale level. The key innovation of this research is that until now, collagen materials have primarily been described at macroscopic scales, without explicitly understanding the mechanical contributions at the molecular and fibrillar levels. The major impact of this research will be the development of fundamental models of collagenous tissues, important to the design of new scaffolding biomaterials for regenerative medicine as well as for the understanding of collagen-related diseases. PMID:23885342

  17. Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2), an osteoarthritis-associated gene, enhances proliferation and type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Kazumasa; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Yamaga, Mika; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Abula, Kahaer; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. ► To examine the molecular functions of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in chondrocytic ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 enhanced proliferation and colony formation in ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 increased type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells treated with chondrogenic medium. -- Abstract: Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2/CHI3L2) is a secreted 39 kDa protein produced by articular chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Recent studies showed that hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes suggesting the involvement of hYKL-39 in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However little is known regarding the molecular function of hYKL-39 in joint homeostasis. Sequence analyses indicated that hYKL-39 has significant identity with the human chitotorisidase family molecules, although it is considered that hYKL-39 has no enzymatic activity since it lacks putative chitinase catalytic motif. In this study, to examine the molecular function of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in ATDC5 cells. Here we report that hYKL-39 enhances colony forming activity, cell proliferation, and type II collagen expression in these cells. These data suggest that hYKL-39 is a novel growth and differentiation factor involved in cartilage homeostasis.

  18. Type V collagen controls the initiation of collagen fibril assembly.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, Richard J; Florer, Jane B; Brunskill, Eric W; Bell, Sheila M; Chervoneva, Inna; Birk, David E

    2004-12-17

    Vertebrate collagen fibrils are heterotypically composed of a quantitatively major and minor fibril collagen. In non-cartilaginous tissues, type I collagen accounts for the majority of the collagen mass, and collagen type V, the functions of which are poorly understood, is a minor component. Type V collagen has been implicated in the regulation of fibril diameter, and we reported recently preliminary evidence that type V collagen is required for collagen fibril nucleation (Wenstrup, R. J., Florer, J. B., Cole, W. G., Willing, M. C., and Birk, D. E. (2004) J. Cell. Biochem. 92, 113-124). The purpose of this study was to define the roles of type V collagen in the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis and matrix assembly. Mouse embryos completely deficient in pro-alpha1(V) chains were created by homologous recombination. The col5a1-/- animals die in early embryogenesis, at approximately embryonic day 10. The type V collagen-deficient mice demonstrate a virtual lack of collagen fibril formation. In contrast, the col5a1+/- animals are viable. The reduced type V collagen content is associated with a 50% reduction in fibril number and dermal collagen content. In addition, relatively normal, cylindrical fibrils are assembled with a second population of large, structurally abnormal collagen fibrils. The structural properties of the abnormal matrix are decreased relative to the wild type control animals. These data indicate a central role for the evolutionary, ancient type V collagen in the regulation of fibrillogenesis. The complete dependence of fibril formation on type V collagen is indicative of the critical role of the latter in early fibril initiation. In addition, this fibril collagen is important in the determination of fibril structure and matrix organization. PMID:15383546

  19. An RNA-splicing mutation (G+5IVS20) in the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita.

    PubMed

    Tiller, G E; Weis, M A; Polumbo, P A; Gruber, H E; Rimoin, D L; Cohn, D H; Eyre, D R

    1995-02-01

    Defects in type II collagen have been demonstrated in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that includes achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We have determined that cartilage from a terminated fetus with an inherited form of SEDC contained both normal alpha 1(II) collagen chains and chains that lacked amino acids 256-273 of the triple-helical domain. PCR amplification of this region of COL2A1, from genomic DNA, yielded products of normal size, while amplification of cDNA yielded a normal sized species and a shorter fragment missing exon 20. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from the fetus revealed a G-->T transversion at position +5 of intron 20; the affected father was also heterozygous for the mutation. Allele-specific PCR and heteroduplex analysis of a VNTR in COL2A1 independently confirmed the unaffected status of a fetus in a subsequent pregnancy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the mutation prevents normal splicing of exon 20 by interfering with binding of U1 small-nuclear RNA to pre-mRNA, thus leading to skipping of exon 20 in transcripts from the mutant allele. Electron micrographs of diseased cartilage showed intracellular inclusion bodies, which were stained by an antibody to alpha 1(II) procollagen. Our findings support the hypothesis that alpha-chain length alterations that preserve the Gly-X-Y repeat motif of the triple helix result in partial intracellular retention of alpha 1(II) procollagen and produce mild to moderate chondrodysplasia phenotypes. PMID:7847372

  20. An RNA-splicing mutation (G{sup +51VS20}) in the Type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Weis, M.A.; Eyre, D.R.; Gruber, H.E.; Rimoin, D.L.; Cohn, D.H. |

    1995-02-01

    Defects in type II collagen have been demonstrated in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that includes achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We have determined that cartilage from a terminated fetus with an inherited form of SEDC contained both normal {alpha}1(II) collagen chains and chains that lacked amino acids 256-273 of the triple-helical domain. PCR amplification of this region of COL2A1, from genomic DNA, yielded products of normal size, while amplification of cDNA yielded a normal sized species and a shorter fragment missing exon 20. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from the fetus revealed a G{yields}T transversion at position +5 of intron 20; the affected father was also heterozygous for the mutation. Allele-specific PCR and heteroduplex analysis of a VNTR in COL2A1 independently confirmed the unaffected status of a fetus in a subsequent pregnancy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the mutation prevents normal splicing of exon 20 by interfering with binding of U{sub 1} small-nuclear RNA to pre-mRNA, thus leading to skipping of exon 20 in transcripts from the mutant allele. Electron micrographs of diseased cartilage showed intracellular inclusion bodies, which were stained by an antibody to {alpha}1(II) procollagen. Our findings support the hypothesis that {alpha}-chain length alterations that preserve the Gly-X-Y repeat motif of the triple helix result in partial intracellular retention of {alpha}1(II) procollagen and produce mild to moderate chondrodysplasia phenotypes. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Collagen in organ development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    It is important to know whether microgravity will adversely affect developmental processes. Collagens are macromolecular structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which may be altered by perturbations in gravity. Interstitial collagens have been shown to be necessary for normal growth and morphogenesis in some embryonic organs, and in the mouse salivary gland, the biosynthetic pattern of these molecules changes during development. Determination of the effects of microgravity on epithelial organ development must be preceded by crucial ground-based studies. These will define control of normal synthesis, secretion, and deposition of ECM macromolecules and the relationship of these processes to morphogenesis.

  2. Interstitial Collagen Catabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Gregg B.

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial collagen mechanical and biological properties are altered by proteases that catalyze the hydrolysis of the collagen triple-helical structure. Collagenolysis is critical in development and homeostasis but also contributes to numerous pathologies. Mammalian collagenolytic enzymes include matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsin K, and neutrophil elastase, and a variety of invertebrates and pathogens possess collagenolytic enzymes. Components of the mechanism of action for the collagenolytic enzyme MMP-1 have been defined experimentally, and insights into other collagenolytic mechanisms have been provided. Ancillary biomolecules may modulate the action of collagenolytic enzymes. PMID:23430258

  3. Human recombinant type I collagen produced in plants.

    PubMed

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2013-07-01

    As a central element of the extracellular matrix, collagen is intimately involved in tissue development, remodeling, and repair and confers high tensile strength to tissues. Numerous medical applications, particularly, wound healing, cell therapy, bone reconstruction, and cosmetic technologies, rely on its supportive and healing qualities. Its synthesis and assembly require a multitude of genes and post-translational modifications, where even minor deviations can be deleterious or even fatal. Historically, collagen was always extracted from animal and human cadaver sources, but bare risk of contamination and allergenicity and was subjected to harsh purification conditions resulting in irreversible modifications impeding its biofunctionality. In parallel, the highly complex and stringent post-translational processing of collagen, prerequisite of its viability and proper functioning, sets significant limitations on recombinant expression systems. A tobacco plant expression platform has been recruited to effectively express human collagen, along with three modifying enzymes, critical to collagen maturation. The plant extracted recombinant human collagen type I forms thermally stable helical structures, fibrillates, and demonstrates bioactivity resembling that of native collagen. Deployment of the highly versatile plant-based biofactory can be leveraged toward mass, rapid, and low-cost production of a wide variety of recombinant proteins. As in the case of collagen, proper planning can bypass plant-related limitations, to yield products structurally and functionally identical to their native counterparts. PMID:23252967

  4. Pyridinium cross-links in heritable disorders of collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquali, M.; Still, M.J.; Dembure, P.P.

    1995-12-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of collagen that is characterized by skin fragility, skin hyperextensibility, and joint hypermobility. EDS type VI is caused by impaired collagen lysyl hydroxylase (procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase; E.C.1.14.11.4), the ascorbate-dependent enzyme that hydroxylates lysyl residues on collagen neopeptides. Different alterations in the gene for collagen lysyl hydroxylase have been reported in families with EDS type VI. In EDS type VI, impairment of collagen lysyl hydroxylase results in a low hydroxylysine content in mature collagen. Hydroxylysine is a precursor of the stable, covalent, intermolecular cross-links of collagen, pyridinoline (Pyr), and deoxypyridinoline (Dpyr). Elsewhere we reported in preliminary form that patients with EDS type VI had a distinctive alteration in the urinary excretion of Pyr and Dpyr. In the present study, we confirm that the increased Dpyr/Pyr ratio is specific for EDS type VI and is not observed in other inherited or acquired collagen disorders. In addition, we find that skin from patients with EDS type VI has reduced Pyr and increased Dpyr, which could account for the organ pathology. 19 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Collagen-hyaluronic acid scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Davidenko, N; Campbell, J J; Thian, E S; Watson, C J; Cameron, R E

    2010-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) in vitro models of the mammary gland require a scaffold matrix that supports the development of adipose stroma within a robust freely permeable matrix. 3-D porous collagen-hyaluronic acid (HA: 7.5% and 15%) scaffolds were produced by controlled freeze-drying technique and crosslinking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide hydrochloride. All scaffolds displayed uniform, interconnected pore structure (total porosity approximately 85%). Physical and chemical analysis showed no signs of collagen denaturation during the formation process. The values of thermal characteristics indicated that crosslinking occurred and that its efficiency was enhanced by the presence of HA. Although the crosslinking reduced the swelling of the strut material in water, the collagen-HA matrix as a whole tended to swell more and show higher dissolution resistance than pure collagen samples. The compressive modulus and elastic collapse stress were higher for collagen-HA composites. All the scaffolds were shown to support the proliferation and differentiation 3T3-L1 preadipocytes while collagen-HA samples maintained a significantly increased proportion of cycling cells (Ki-67+). Furthermore, collagen-HA composites displayed significantly raised Adipsin gene expression with adipogenic culture supplementation for 8 days vs. control conditions. These results indicate that collagen-HA scaffolds may offer robust, freely permeable 3-D matrices that enhance mammary stromal tissue development in vitro. PMID:20466086

  6. Collagen-like proteins in pathogenic E. coli strains.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Neelanjana; McKillop, Thomas J; Jowitt, Thomas A; Howard, Marjorie; Davies, Heather; Holmes, David F; Roberts, Ian S; Bella, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequences of enterohaemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 strains show multiple open-reading frames with collagen-like sequences that are absent from the common laboratory strain K-12. These putative collagens are included in prophages embedded in O157:H7 genomes. These prophages carry numerous genes related to strain virulence and have been shown to be inducible and capable of disseminating virulence factors by horizontal gene transfer. We have cloned two collagen-like proteins from E. coli O157:H7 into a laboratory strain and analysed the structure and conformation of the recombinant proteins and several of their constituting domains by a variety of spectroscopic, biophysical, and electron microscopy techniques. We show that these molecules exhibit many of the characteristics of vertebrate collagens, including trimer formation and the presence of a collagen triple helical domain. They also contain a C-terminal trimerization domain, and a trimeric α-helical coiled-coil domain with an unusual amino acid sequence almost completely lacking leucine, valine or isoleucine residues. Intriguingly, these molecules show high thermal stability, with the collagen domain being more stable than those of vertebrate fibrillar collagens, which are much longer and post-translationally modified. Under the electron microscope, collagen-like proteins from E. coli O157:H7 show a dumbbell shape, with two globular domains joined by a hinged stalk. This morphology is consistent with their likely role as trimeric phage side-tail proteins that participate in the attachment of phage particles to E. coli target cells, either directly or through assembly with other phage tail proteins. Thus, collagen-like proteins in enterohaemorrhagic E. coli genomes may have a direct role in the dissemination of virulence-related genes through infection of harmless strains by induced bacteriophages. PMID:22701585

  7. Collagen and injectable fillers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jacqueline T; Perkins, Stephen W; Hamilton, Mark M

    2002-02-01

    Soft tissue augmentation of facial rhytids, scars, and deformities is a frequently performed office procedure. This article reviews the available biologic (collagen, Dermalogen, Autologen, Isolagen, autologous fat, Fibrel, hyaluronic acid derivatives, particulate fascia lata, micronized Alloderm) and alloplastic (silicone, Bioplastique, and Artecoll) soft tissue injectable fillers. PMID:11781208

  8. Genetic disorders of collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Tsipouras, P; Ramirez, F

    1987-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Marfan syndrome form a group of genetic disorders of connective tissue. These disorders exhibit remarkable clinical heterogeneity which reflects their underlying biochemical and molecular differences. Defects in collagen types I and III have been found in all three syndromes. PMID:3543367

  9. Collagen hydrolysate based collagen/hydroxyapatite composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficai, Anton; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Birsan, Mihaela; Sonmez, Maria; Ficai, Denisa; Trandafir, Viorica; Andronescu, Ecaterina

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to study the influence of collagen hydrolysate (HAS) on the formation of ternary collagen-hydrolysate/hydroxyapatite composite materials (COLL-HAS/HA). During the precipitation process of HA, a large amount of brushite is resulted at pH = 7 but, practically pure HA is obtained at pH ⩾ 8. The FTIR data reveal the duplication of the most important collagen absorption bands due to the presence of the collagen hydrolysate. The presence of collagen hydrolysate is beneficial for the management of bone and joint disorders such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis.

  10. A Mouse Model for Dominant Collagen VI Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Te-Cheng; Zhang, Rui-Zhu; Arita, Machiko; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Adams, Sheila M.; Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Wagener, Raimund; Khurana, Tejvior S.; Birk, David E.; Chu, Mon-Li

    2014-01-01

    Dominant and recessive mutations in collagen VI genes, COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3, cause a continuous spectrum of disorders characterized by muscle weakness and connective tissue abnormalities ranging from the severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy to the mild Bethlem myopathy. Herein, we report the development of a mouse model for dominant collagen VI disorders by deleting exon 16 in the Col6a3 gene. The resulting heterozygous mouse, Col6a3+/d16, produced comparable amounts of normal Col6a3 mRNA and a mutant transcript with an in-frame deletion of 54 bp of triple-helical coding sequences, thus mimicking the most common molecular defect found in dominant Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy patients. Biosynthetic studies of mutant fibroblasts indicated that the mutant α3(VI) collagen protein was produced and exerted a dominant-negative effect on collagen VI microfibrillar assembly. The distribution of the α3(VI)-like chains of collagen VI was not altered in mutant mice during development. The Col6a3+/d16 mice developed histopathologic signs of myopathy and showed ultrastructural alterations of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum in muscle and abnormal collagen fibrils in tendons. The Col6a3+/d16 mice displayed compromised muscle contractile functions and thereby provide an essential preclinical platform for developing treatment strategies for dominant collagen VI disorders. PMID:24563484

  11. Regulation of immune reactivity to collagen in human beings

    SciTech Connect

    Solinger, A.M.; Stobo, J.D.

    1981-08-01

    Denaturated beef collagen was tested for its ability to induce the production of leukocyte inhibition factor among the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal individuals. Responsiveness, defined as the production of leukocyte inhibition factor sufficient to cause greater than 20% inhibition of leukocyte migration, was significantly (P less than 0.001, X2 . 31.1) associated with HLA-DR4. All HLA-DR4 positive individuals, including subjects without any evidence of synovitis, were collagen responders. There was no significant (P . 0.3) difference in the absolute reactivity of HLA-DR4+ versus HLA-DR4- individuals to respond to another antigen, Candida albicans. Collagen reactivity required interactions between macrophages and T cells and was directed against determinants inherent in the linear polypeptide, (Gly-Pro)n. In 5 normal HLA-DR4- nonresponders tested, absence of discernable reactivity to collagen was associated with the presence of antigen-specific, radiosensitive suppressive T cells. These studies suggest that during the physiologic metabolism of collagen all individuals are exposed to Gly-Pro determinants normally buried in the interstices of the collagen triple helix. In individuals whose major histocompatibility complex contains genes linked to those coding for HLA-DR4, this results in the activation of reactive T cells. Conversely, in individuals lacking these genes, collagen-specific suppressive cells predominate.

  12. Mutations within the gene encoding the alpha 1 (X) chain of type X collagen (COL10A1) cause metaphyseal chondrodysplasia type Schmid but not several other forms of metaphyseal chondrodysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, G A; Rash, B; Sykes, B; Bonaventure, J; Maroteaux, P; Zabel, B; Wynne-Davies, R; Grant, M E; Boot-Handford, R P

    1996-01-01

    Type X collagen is a homotrimer of alpha 1 (X) chains encoded by the COL10A1 gene. It is synthesised specifically and transiently by hypertrophic chondrocytes at sites of endochondral ossification. Point mutations and deletions in the region of the COL10A1 gene encoding the alpha 1 (X) carboxyl-terminal (NC1) domain have previously been identified in subjects with metaphyseal chondrodysplasia type Schmid (MCDS). To determine whether mutations in other regions of the gene caused MCDS or comparable phenotypes, we used PCR followed by SSCP to analyse the coding and promoter regions of the COL10A1 gene, as well as the intron/exon boundaries of five further subjects with MCDS, one subject with atypical MCDS, and nine subjects with other forms of metaphyseal chondrodysplasia. Using this approach, three of the subjects with MCDS were found to be heterozygous for the deletions 1864delACTT, 1956delT, and 2029delAC in the region of COL10A1 encoding the NC1 domain. These deletions would lead to alterations in the reading frame, premature stop codons, and the translation of truncated protein products. A fourth subject with MCDS was found to be heterozygous for a single base pair transition, T1894C, that would lead to the substitution of the amino acid residue serine at position 600 by proline within the NC1 domain. We did not, however, detect mutations in the coding and non-coding regions of COL10A1 in one subject with MCDS, the subject with atypical MCDS, and in the nine subjects with other forms of metaphyseal chondrodysplasia. We propose that the nature and distribution of mutations within the NC1 domain of COL10A1 causing MCDS argues against the hypothesis that the phenotype arises simply through haploinsufficiency but that an, as yet, unexplained mutation mechanism underlies this phenotype. Images PMID:8782043

  13. A COL2A1 mutation in achondrogenesis type II results in the replacement of type II collagen by type I and III collagens in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chan, D; Cole, W G; Chow, C W; Mundlos, S; Bateman, J F

    1995-01-27

    An autosomal dominant mutation in the COL2A1 gene was identified in a fetus with achondrogenesis type II. A transition of G2853 to A in exon 41 produced a substitution of Gly769 by Ser within the triple helical domain of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II collagen, interrupting the mandatory Gly-X-Y triplet sequence required for the normal formation of stable triple helical type II collagen molecules, resulting in the complete absence of type II collagen in the cartilage, which had a gelatinous composition. Type I and III collagens were the major species found in cartilage tissue and synthesized by cultured chondrocytes along with cartilage type XI collagen. However, cultured chondrocytes produced a trace amount of type II collagen, which was retained within the cells and not secreted. In situ hybridization of cartilage sections showed that the chondrocytes produced both type II and type I collagen mRNA. As a result, it is likely that the chondrocytes produced type II collagen molecules, which were then degraded. The close proximity of the Gly769 substitution by Ser to the mammalian collagenase cleavage site at Gly775-Leu776 may have produced an unstable domain that was highly susceptible to proteolysis. The type I and III collagens that replaced type II collagen were unable to maintain the normal structure of the hyaline cartilage but did support chondrocyte maturation, evidenced by the expression of type X collagen in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate cartilage. PMID:7829510

  14. Structure-mechanics relationships of collagen fibrils in the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, O G; Chang, S W; Vanleene, M; Howarth, P H; Davies, D E; Shefelbine, S J; Buehler, M J; Thurner, P J

    2015-10-01

    The collagen molecule, which is the building block of collagen fibrils, is a triple helix of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. However, in the severe mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OIM), deletion of the COL1A2 gene results in the substitution of the α2(I) chain by one α1(I) chain. As this substitution severely impairs the structure and mechanics of collagen-rich tissues at the tissue and organ level, the main aim of this study was to investigate how the structure and mechanics are altered in OIM collagen fibrils. Comparing results from atomic force microscopy imaging and cantilever-based nanoindentation on collagen fibrils from OIM and wild-type (WT) animals, we found a 33% lower indentation modulus in OIM when air-dried (bound water present) and an almost fivefold higher indentation modulus in OIM collagen fibrils when fully hydrated (bound and unbound water present) in phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) compared with WT collagen fibrils. These mechanical changes were accompanied by an impaired swelling upon hydration within PBS. Our experimental and atomistic simulation results show how the structure and mechanics are altered at the individual collagen fibril level as a result of collagen gene mutation in OIM. We envisage that the combination of experimental and modelling approaches could allow mechanical phenotyping at the collagen fibril level of virtually any alteration of collagen structure or chemistry. PMID:26468064

  15. Structure–mechanics relationships of collagen fibrils in the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Andriotis, O. G.; Chang, S. W.; Vanleene, M.; Howarth, P. H.; Davies, D. E.; Shefelbine, S. J.; Buehler, M. J.; Thurner, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The collagen molecule, which is the building block of collagen fibrils, is a triple helix of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. However, in the severe mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OIM), deletion of the COL1A2 gene results in the substitution of the α2(I) chain by one α1(I) chain. As this substitution severely impairs the structure and mechanics of collagen-rich tissues at the tissue and organ level, the main aim of this study was to investigate how the structure and mechanics are altered in OIM collagen fibrils. Comparing results from atomic force microscopy imaging and cantilever-based nanoindentation on collagen fibrils from OIM and wild-type (WT) animals, we found a 33% lower indentation modulus in OIM when air-dried (bound water present) and an almost fivefold higher indentation modulus in OIM collagen fibrils when fully hydrated (bound and unbound water present) in phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) compared with WT collagen fibrils. These mechanical changes were accompanied by an impaired swelling upon hydration within PBS. Our experimental and atomistic simulation results show how the structure and mechanics are altered at the individual collagen fibril level as a result of collagen gene mutation in OIM. We envisage that the combination of experimental and modelling approaches could allow mechanical phenotyping at the collagen fibril level of virtually any alteration of collagen structure or chemistry. PMID:26468064

  16. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3(+) (LAG3(+)) forkhead box protein 3(-) (FOXP3(-)) regulatory T cells induced by B cells alleviates joint inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Ying; Hsu, Wan-Tseng; Chen, Yi-Lien; Chien, Chien-Hui; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which dysregulated immune cells primarily target synovial joints. Despite recent advances in the treatment of RA, including the introduction of biologic therapies and employment of combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drug strategies, remission rates remain suboptimal. Previous studies have demonstrated that the adoptive transfer of induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) was effective in treating a murine model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The objective of this study was to develop optimal potential iTreg-based therapy for CIA by adoptively transferring LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells. B-cell-induced Treg-of-B cells expressed LAG3 but not Foxp3 (designated LAG3(+) Treg-of-B), and secreted IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β. Furthermore, LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells suppressed the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) responder T cells through both LAG3 and IL-10 production. In the murine CIA model, adoptive transfer of LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells alleviated the joint severity as well as local and systemic inflammation. Treatment with LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells also promoted IL-10 production in lymphocytes isolated from the spleen and draining lymph nodes. Moreover, mice receiving LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cell treatment showed significantly less pronounced osteolysis in the hind footpads, which correlated with the downregulation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression. In conclusion, we identified a novel subset of Tregs for CIA treatment. This insight may facilitate exploring novel regulatory T-cell-based therapies for human autoimmune diseases. PMID:26908164

  17. Collagen Homeostasis and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, S Peter; Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system and its collagen rich tissue is important for ensuring architecture of skeletal muscle, energy storage in tendon and ligaments, joint surface protection, and for ensuring the transfer of muscular forces into resulting limb movement. Structure of tendon is stable and the metabolic activity is low, but mechanical loading and subsequent mechanotransduction and molecular anabolic signaling can result in some adaptation of the tendon especially during youth and adolescence. Within short time, tendon will get stiffer with training and lack of mechanical tissue loading through inactivity or immobilization of the human body will conversely result in a dramatic loss in tendon stiffness and collagen synthesis. This illustrates the importance of regular mechanical load in order to preserve the stabilizing role of the connective tissue for the overall function of the musculoskeletal system in both daily activity and exercise. Adaptive responses may vary along the tendon, and differ between mid-substance and insertional areas of the tendon. PMID:27535245

  18. The TATA-containing core promoter of the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) is the target of interferon-gamma-mediated inhibition in human chondrocytes: requirement for Stat1 alpha, Jak1 and Jak2.

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Makoto; Tan, Lujian; Choy, Bob K; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Auron, Philip E; Goldring, Mary B

    2003-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) inhibits the synthesis of the cartilage-specific extracellular matrix protein type II collagen, and suppresses the expression of the type II collagen gene ( COL2A1 ) at the transcriptional level. To further examine this mechanism, the responses of COL2A1 regulatory sequences to IFN-gamma and the role of components of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway were examined in the immortalized human chondrocyte cell line, C-28/I2. IFN-gamma inhibited the mRNA levels of COL2A1 and aggrecan, but not Sox9, L-Sox5 and Sox6, all of which were expressed by these cells as markers of the differentiated phenotype. IFN-gamma suppressed the expression of luciferase reporter constructs containing sequences of the COL2A1 promoter spanning -6368 to +125 bp in the absence and presence of the intronic enhancer and stimulated activity of the gamma-interferon-activated site (GAS) luciferase reporter vector, associated with induction of Stat1 alpha-binding activity in nuclear extracts. These responses to IFN-gamma were blocked by overexpression of the JAK inhibitor, JAK-binding protein (JAB), or reversed by dominant-negative Stat1 alpha Y701F containing a mutation at Tyr-701, the JAK phosphorylation site. IFN-gamma had no effect on COL2A1 promoter expression in Jak1 (U4A)-, Jak2 (gamma 2A)- and Stat1 alpha (U3A)-deficient cell lines. In the U3A cell line, the response to IFN-gamma was rescued by overexpression of Stat1 alpha, but not by either Stat1 alpha Y701F or Stat1 beta. Functional analysis using deletion constructs showed that the IFN-gamma response was retained in the COL2A1 core promoter region spanning -45 to +11 bp, containing the TATA-box and GC-rich sequences but no Stat1-binding elements. Inhibition of COL2A1 promoter activity by IFN-gamma persisted in the presence of multiple deletions within the -45/+11 bp region. Our results indicate that repression of COL2A1 gene transcription by IFN

  19. Three reasons protein disorder analysis makes more sense in the light of collagen.

    PubMed

    Smithers, Ben; Oates, Matt E; Tompa, Peter; Gough, Julian

    2016-05-01

    We have identified that the collagen helix has the potential to be disruptive to analyses of intrinsically disordered proteins. The collagen helix is an extended fibrous structure that is both promiscuous and repetitive. Whilst its sequence is predicted to be disordered, this type of protein structure is not typically considered as intrinsic disorder. Here, we show that collagen-encoding proteins skew the distribution of exon lengths in genes. We find that previous results, demonstrating that exons encoding disordered regions are more likely to be symmetric, are due to the abundance of the collagen helix. Other related results, showing increased levels of alternative splicing in disorder-encoding exons, still hold after considering collagen-containing proteins. Aside from analyses of exons, we find that the set of proteins that contain collagen significantly alters the amino acid composition of regions predicted as disordered. We conclude that research in this area should be conducted in the light of the collagen helix. PMID:26941008

  20. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type VI collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.

    1988-05-01

    Normal adult rabbit corneas were digested with 5% pepsin and their collagens extracted with acetic acid. Collagen extracts were fractionated by differential salt precipitation. The 2.5 M NaCl fraction was then redissolved with tris buffer and precipitated with sodium acetate. The precipitate contained a high-molecular-weight disulfide-bonded aggregate which, upon reduction with mercaptoethanol, was converted into three distinct polypeptides having molecular weights between 45 and 66 Kd. These physical characteristics, together with the susceptibility of these polypeptides to collagenase and their amino acid composition, identified the high molecular weight aggregate as type VI collagen. Corneas from neonate rabbits and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were organ cultured in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine to incorporate radiolabel into collagen. Tissues were digested with 0.02% pepsin and their collagens extracted with formic acid. The total radioactivity of the extracts and tissue residues was determined before the collagens were separated by SDS-polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis. Radioactive collagen polypeptides bands were then stained with Coomassie blue, processed for fluorography, and analyzed by densitometry. The results show that: (1) type VI collagen is synthesized by neonate corneas and healing adult corneas; (2) it is not readily solubilized from either corneal tissue by 0.02% pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction; and (3) the proportion of type VI collagen deposited in scar tissue is markedly lower than that found in neonate corneas.

  1. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type III collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.; Covington, H.I.; Macarak, E.J.

    1988-05-01

    Whole neonate rabbit corneas and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were incubated in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine. Radiolabeled collagen extracted from the corneas and scar tissue were analyzed by sodium dodecylsulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to determine the types and relative quantity of collagen polypeptides present and synthesized by these tissues. In addition to other collagen types, type III was found in both neonate cornea and scar tissue from adult cornea, albeit in relatively small quantities. Type III collagen in normal cornea was associated with the residue after pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction of the tissue, and the same type of collagen was extracted from scar tissue after similar treatment. Type III collagen-specific monoclonal antibody bound to developing normal corneas and healing adult tissue sections, as determined by immunofluorescence. Antibody binding was localized to the endothelium and growing Descemet's membrane in fetal and neonate corneas, and restricted to the most posterior region of the corneal scar tissue. Although monoclonal antibody to keratan sulfate, used as a marker for stromal fibroblasts, bound to most of the scar tissue, the antibody failed to bind to the posterior scar tissue positive for type III collagen. We conclude that endothelial cells from fetal and neonate rabbit cornea and endothelium-derived fibroblasts from healing wounds of adult cornea synthesize and deposit type III collagen. Moreover, this collagen appears to be incorporated into the growing Descemet's membrane of normal corneas and narrow posterior portion of the scar tissue.

  2. Targeting the Metastasis Suppressor, N-Myc Downstream Regulated Gene-1, with Novel Di-2-Pyridylketone Thiosemicarbazones: Suppression of Tumor Cell Migration and Cell-Collagen Adhesion by Inhibiting Focal Adhesion Kinase/Paxillin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wangpu, Xiongzhi; Lu, Jiaoyang; Xi, Ruxing; Yue, Fei; Sahni, Sumit; Park, Kyung Chan; Menezes, Sharleen; Huang, Michael L H; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a complex process that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/paxillin pathway playing a major role in the formation of focal adhesions and cell motility. N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor in many solid tumor types, including prostate and colon cancer. Considering the antimetastatic effect of NDRG1 and the crucial involvement of the FAK/paxillin pathway in cellular migration and cell-matrix adhesion, we assessed the effects of NDRG1 on this important oncogenic pathway. In the present study, NDRG1 overexpression and silencing models of HT29 colon cancer and DU145 prostate cancer cells were used to examine the activation of FAK/paxillin signaling and the formation of focal adhesions. The expression of NDRG1 resulted in a marked and significant decrease in the activating phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin, whereas silencing of NDRG1 resulted in an opposite effect. The expression of NDRG1 also inhibited the formation of focal adhesions as well as cell migration and cell-collagen adhesion. Incubation of cells with novel thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, that upregulate NDRG1 also resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin. The ability of these thiosemicarbazones to inhibit cell migration and metastasis could be mediated, at least in part, through the FAK/paxillin pathway. PMID:26895766

  3. Arterial calcification: Conscripted by collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan D.

    2016-03-01

    In atherosclerotic plaques, patterns of calcification -- which have profound implications for plaque stability and vulnerability to rupture -- are determined by the collagen's content and patterning throughout the plaque.

  4. Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Miki; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Real time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibits collagen synthesis independent of collagen-modifying enzymes in different chondrocyte populations and dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Lucienne A; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Huang, Chun-Ling; Helder, Marco N; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A

    2010-06-01

    Chondrocytes respond to glucose deprivation with a decreased collagen synthesis due to disruption of a proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER): ER stress. Since the mechanisms involved in the decreased synthesis are unknown, we have investigated whether chaperones and collagen-modifying enzymes are affected by glucose deprivation. Chondrocytes obtained from nucleus pulposus, annulus fibrosus, articular cartilage, and meniscus and dermal fibroblasts were cultured under control conditions or exposed to the ER stress-inducing treatments of tunicamycin addition or glucose withdrawal. Both treatments resulted in an up-regulation of the gene expression of the ER stress markers in all cell types, but dermal fibroblasts showed a delayed response to glucose deprivation. Collagen gene expression was down-regulated, and less collagen protein was present in the cells under both ER stress-inducing conditions. The expression levels of the prolyl 4-hydroxylases were either not affected (P4ha3) or increased (P4ha1 and P4ha2), the levels of the lysyl hydroxylases decreased, and the N-propeptidase Adamts2 decreased. Both treatments induced apoptosis. Chondrocytes respond more quickly to glucose deprivation, but it appears that chondrocytes can cope better with tunicamycin-induced ER stress than fibroblasts. Although collagen synthesis was inhibited by the treatments, some collagen-modifying enzymes and chaperones were up-regulated, suggesting that there is no causal relation between them. PMID:20555395

  6. From collagen chemistry towards cell therapy - a personal journey.

    PubMed

    Grant, Michael E

    2007-08-01

    The Fell-Muir Award requires the recipient to deliver a lecture and a review manuscript which provides a personal overview of significant scientific developments in the field of matrix biology over the period of the recipient's career. In this context, this review considers the collagen family of structural proteins and the advances in biochemical, molecular biological and genetic techniques which led to the elucidation of the structure, synthesis and function of this important group of extracellular matrix constituents. Particular attention is focussed on early research on the identification and assembly of the soluble precursors of collagen types I and II, and the identification of the precursor of basement membrane collagen type IV. In subsequent studies investigating the maintenance of the chick chondrocyte phenotype in culture, the influence of the extracellular milieu was found to influence markedly both cell morphology and collagen gene expression. These studies led to the discovery of collagen type X whose expression is restricted to hypertrophic chondrocytes at sites of endochondral ossification. Such research provided a prelude to investigations of mammalian endochondral ossification which is known to be aberrant in a variety of human chondrodysplasias and is reactivated in bone fracture repair and in osteoarthritis. The cloning of bovine and then human collagen type X genes facilitated studies in relevant human diseases and contributed to the discovery of mutations in the COL10A1 gene in families with metaphyseal chondrodysplasia type Schmid. Clustering of mutations in the C-terminal domain of the type X collagen molecule has now been widely documented and investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms in animal models are beginning to suggest the prospect of novel treatment strategies. PMID:17696900

  7. Collagen dynamics of partial small bowel obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Stromberg, B.V.; Klein, L.

    1984-08-01

    The response of intestinal collagen to obstruction and stress was studied in the rat. Partial small bowel obstructions were created. Preobstruction collagen was measured by injection of tritium labeled proline. New collagen formation after obstruction occurred was followed by injection of carbon-14 labeled proline. At 3 weeks, collagen fractions were identified. Throughout the study, preexisting preobstruction intestinal collagen was metabolically stable with no breakdown or remodeling demonstrable. New collagen formation was rapid and occurred to the largest degree close to the obstruction.

  8. Type I Collagen and Collagen Mimetics as Angiogenesis Promoting Superpolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Twardowski, T.; Fertala, A.; Orgel, J.P.R.O.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2008-07-18

    Angiogenesis, the development of blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, is a key component of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Angiogenesis also drives pathologies such as tumor growth and metastasis, and hemangioma development in newborns. On the other hand, promotion of angiogenesis is needed in tissues with vascular insufficiencies, and in bioengineering, to endow tissue substitutes with appropriate microvasculatures. Therefore, much research has focused on defining mechanisms of angiogenesis, and identifying pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules. Type I collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, potently stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to its angiogenic activity appears to be ligation and possibly clustering of endothelial cell (EC) surface {alpha}1{beta}1/{alpha}2{beta}1 integrin receptors by the GFPGER502-507 sequence of the collagen fibril. However, additional aspects of collagen structure and function that may modulate its angiogenic properties are discussed. Moreover, type I collagen and fibrin, another angiogenic polymer, share several structural features. These observations suggest strategies for creating 'angiogenic superpolymers', including: modifying type I collagen to influence its biological half-life, immunogenicity, and integrin binding capacity; genetically engineering fibrillar collagens to include additional integrin binding sites or angiogenic determinants, and remove unnecessary or deleterious sequences without compromising fibril integrity; and exploring the suitability of poly(ortho ester), PEG-lysine copolymer, tubulin, and cholesteric cuticle as collagen mimetics, and suggesting means of modifying them to display ideal angiogenic properties. The collagenous and collagen mimetic angiogenic superpolymers described here may someday prove useful for many applications in tissue engineering and human medicine.

  9. Tenascin-x deficiency mimics ehlers-danlos syndrome in mice through alteration of collagen deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J.R.; Taylor, G.; Dean, W.B.; Wagner, D.R.; Afzal, V.; Lotz, J.C.; Rubin, E.M.; Bristow, J.

    2002-03-01

    Tenascin-X is a large extracellular matrix protein of unknown function1-3. Tenascin-X deficiency in humans is associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome4,5, a generalized connective tissue disorder resulting from altered metabolism of the fibrillar collagens6. Because TNXB is the first Ehlers-Danlos syndrome gene that does not encode a fibrillar collagen or collagen-modifying enzyme7-14, we suggested that tenascin-X might regulate collagen synthesis or deposition15. To test this hypothesis, we inactivated Tnxb in mice. Tnxb-/- mice showed progressive skin hyperextensibility, similar to individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Biomechanical testing confirmed increased deformability and reduced tensile strength of their skin. The skin of Tnxb-/- mice was histologically normal, but its collagen content was significantly reduced. At the ultrastructural level, collagen fibrils of Tnxb-/- mice were of normal size and shape, but the density of fibrils in their skin was reduced, commensurate with the reduction in collagen content. Studies of cultured dermal fibroblasts showed that although synthesis of collagen I by Tnxb-/- and wildtype cells was similar, Tnxb-/- fibroblasts failed to deposit collagen I into cell-associated matrix. This study confirms a causative role for TNXB in human Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and suggests that tenascin-X is an essential regulator of collagen deposition by dermal fibroblasts.

  10. Tenascin-X deficiency mimics Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in mice through alteration of collagen deposition.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jau Ren; Taylor, Glen; Dean, Willow B; Wagner, Diane R; Afzal, Veena; Lotz, Jeffrey C; Rubin, Edward M; Bristow, James

    2002-04-01

    Tenascin-X is a large extracellular matrix protein of unknown function. Tenascin-X deficiency in humans is associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a generalized connective tissue disorder resulting from altered metabolism of the fibrillar collagens. Because TNXB is the first Ehlers-Danlos syndrome gene that does not encode a fibrillar collagen or collagen-modifying enzyme, we suggested that tenascin-X might regulate collagen synthesis or deposition. To test this hypothesis, we inactivated Tnxb in mice. Tnxb-/- mice showed progressive skin hyperextensibility, similar to individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Biomechanical testing confirmed increased deformability and reduced tensile strength of their skin. The skin of Tnxb-/- mice was histologically normal, but its collagen content was significantly reduced. At the ultrastructural level, collagen fibrils of Tnxb-/- mice were of normal size and shape, but the density of fibrils in their skin was reduced, commensurate with the reduction in collagen content. Studies of cultured dermal fibroblasts showed that although synthesis of collagen I by Tnxb-/- and wildtype cells was similar, Tnxb-/- fibroblasts failed to deposit collagen I into cell-associated matrix. This study confirms a causative role for TNXB in human Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and suggests that tenascin-X is an essential regulator of collagen deposition by dermal fibroblasts. PMID:11925569

  11. Development of biomimetic tilapia collagen nanofibers for skin regeneration through inducing keratinocytes differentiation and collagen synthesis of dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Nanping; Xue, Yang; Ding, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Mo, Xiumei; Sun, Jiao

    2015-02-11

    In this study, tilapia skin collagen sponge and electrospun nanofibers were developed for wound dressing. The collagen sponge was composed of at least two α-peptides, and its denaturation temperature was 44.99 °C. It did not change the number of spleen-derived lymphocytes in BALB/c mice, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytes, and the level of IgG or IgM in Sprague-Dawley rat. The contact angle, tensile strength, and weight loss temperature of collagen nanofibers were 21.2°, 6.72±0.44 MPa, and 300 °C, respectively. The nanofibers could promote the viabilities of human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), inducing epidermal differentiation through the gene expression of involucrin, filaggrin, and type I transglutaminase of HaCaTs, and they could also accelerate migration of HaCaTs with the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Besides, the nanofibers could upregulate the protien level of Col-I in HDFs both via a direct effect and TGF-β1 secreted from HaCaTs, thus facilitating the formation of collagen fibers. Furthermore, the collagen nanofibers stimulated the skin regeneration rapidly and effectively in vivo. These biological effects could be explained as the contributions from the biomimic extracellular cell matrix structure, hydrophilicity, and the multiple amino acids of the collagen nanofibers. PMID:25598076

  12. Collagen fibril formation during development

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmajer, R.; Perlish, J.S.; Timpl, R.; Olsen, B.R.

    1987-05-01

    Studies with embryonic skin and bone suggested that the aminopropeptide (AP) and carboxylpropeptide (CP) of type I pro-callagen (pro-col) play a role in fibril formation. Chick leg metatarsal tendons were studied by electron microscopy. AP and CP of type I pro-col were purified from chick leg tendons; antibodies developed in rabbits and purity tested by radioimmunoassays. Antibodies were used for immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunoblotting (IB). The peritendineum, consisting of thin 20-30 nm fibrils, revealed the AP of type I and type III procol. In the tendon area, collagen fibrils were arranged within small compartments and were of uniform diameter at 10d, 14d and 18d. However, beyond 21d, there was confluency of the compartments and a wide range of fibril diameters. IFM revealed fine streaks of collagen, staining with the AP of type I throughout the tendon. The CP was mainly intracellular with only a small amount present in the extracellular space. IB revealed procollagen, pN-collagen (AP+collagen) and pC-collagen, (CP+collagen) at all stages of development. Ratios of pN/pC collagen, determined by spectrophotometric scanning of autoradiographs, correlated well with the distribution of fibril diameter. This study suggests the hypothesis that AP initiates fibrillogenesis while CP may regulate additional fibril growth.

  13. Electrostatic effects in collagen fibrillization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2014-03-01

    Using light scattering and AFM techniques, we have measured the kinetics of fibrillization of collagen (pertinent to the vitreous of human eye) as a function of pH and ionic strength. At higher and lower pH, collagen triple-peptides remain stable in solution without fibrillization. At neutral pH, the fibrillization occurs and its growth kinetics is slowed upon either an increase in ionic strength or a decrease in temperature. We present a model, based on polymer crystallization theory, to describe the observed electrostatic nature of collagen assembly.

  14. The Staphylococcus aureus collagen adhesin is a virulence determinant in experimental septic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Patti, J M; Bremell, T; Krajewska-Pietrasik, D; Abdelnour, A; Tarkowski, A; Rydén, C; Höök, M

    1994-01-01

    The importance of a collagen-binding adhesin in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis has been examined by comparing the virulence of two sets of Staphylococcus aureus mutants in an animal model. Collagen adhesin-negative mutant PH100 was constructed by replacing the chromosomal collagen adhesin gene (cna) in a clinical strain, Phillips, with an inactivated copy of the gene. Collagen adhesin-positive mutant S. aureus CYL574 was generated by introducing the cna gene into CYL316, a strain that normally lacks the cna gene. Biochemical, immunological, and functional analyses of the generated mutants and their respective parent strains showed that binding of 125I-labeled collagen, expression of an immunoreactive collagen adhesin, and bacterial adherence to cartilage were directly correlated with the presence of a functional cna gene. Greater than 70% of the mice injected with the Cna+ strains developed clinical signs of arthritis, whereas less than 27% of the animals injected with Cna- strains showed symptoms of disease. Furthermore, mice injected with the Cna+ strain Phillips had remarkably elevated levels of immunoglobulin G1 and interleukin-6 compared with mice injected with the Cna- mutant PH100. Taken together, these results demonstrate that collagen adhesin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis induced by S. aureus. Images PMID:8262622

  15. Bone Collagen: New Clues to its Mineralization Mechanism From Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, David R.; Ann Weis, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Until 2006 the only mutations known to cause osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) were in the two genes coding for type I collagen chains. These dominant mutations affecting the expression or primary sequence of collagen α1(I) and α2(I) chains account for over 90% of OI cases. Since then a growing list of mutant genes causing the 5–10% of recessive cases has rapidly emerged. They include CRTAP, LEPRE1 and PPIB, which encode three proteins forming the prolyl 3-hydroxylase complex; PLOD2 and FKBP10, which encode respectively lysyl hydroxylase 2 and a foldase required for its activity in forming mature cross-links in bone collagen; SERPIN H1, which encodes the collagen chaperone HSP47; SERPIN F1, which encodes pigment epithelium-derived factor required for osteoid mineralization; and BMP1, which encodes the type I procollagen C-propeptidase. All cause fragile bone in infancy, which can include over-mineralization or under-mineralization defects as well as abnormal collagen post-translational modifications. Consistently both dominant and recessive variants lead to abnormal cross-linking chemistry in bone collagen. These recent discoveries strengthen the potential for a common pathogenic mechanism of misassembled collagen fibrils. Of the new genes identified, eight encode proteins required for collagen post-translational modification, chaperoning of newly synthesized collagen chains into native molecules or transport through the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi for polymerization, cross-linking and mineralization. In reviewing these findings, we conclude that a common theme is emerging in the pathogenesis of brittle bone disease of mishandled collagen assembly with important insights on post-translational features of bone collagen that have evolved to optimize it as a biomineral template. PMID:23508630

  16. Nature designs tough collagen: Explaining the nanostructure of collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Buehler, Markus J.

    2006-01-01

    Collagen is a protein material with superior mechanical properties. It consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of ultra-long tropocollagen (TC) molecules. Theoretical and molecular modeling suggests that this natural design of collagen fibrils maximizes the strength and provides large energy dissipation during deformation, thus creating a tough and robust material. We find that the mechanics of collagen fibrils can be understood quantitatively in terms of two critical molecular length scales χS and χR that characterize when (i) deformation changes from homogeneous intermolecular shear to propagation of slip pulses and when (ii) covalent bonds within TC molecules begin to fracture, leading to brittle-like failure. The ratio χS/χR indicates which mechanism dominates deformation. Our modeling rigorously links the chemical properties of individual TC molecules to the macroscopic mechanical response of fibrils. The results help to explain why collagen fibers found in nature consist of TC molecules with lengths in the proximity of 300 nm and advance the understanding how collagen diseases that change intermolecular adhesion properties influence mechanical properties. PMID:16895989

  17. Characterisations of collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, C. S.; Popa, C. L.; Petre, C. C.; Jiga, G.; Trusca, R.; Predoi, D.

    2016-05-01

    The XRD analysis were performed to confirm the formation of hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The molecular interaction in collagen-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites was highlighted by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The SEM showed a nanostructure of collagen-silverhydroxyapatite nanocomposites composed of nano needle-like particles in a veil with collagen texture. The presence of vibrational groups characteristics to the hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite (AgHApColl) nanocomposites was investigated by FTIR.

  18. Human collagen produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2014-01-01

    Consequential to its essential role as a mechanical support and affinity regulator in extracellular matrices, collagen constitutes a highly sought after scaffolding material for regeneration and healing applications. However, substantiated concerns have been raised with regard to quality and safety of animal tissue-extracted collagen, particularly in relation to its immunogenicity, risk of disease transmission and overall quality and consistency. In parallel, contamination with undesirable cellular factors can significantly impair its bioactivity, vis-a-vis its impact on cell recruitment, proliferation and differentiation. High-scale production of recombinant human collagen Type I (rhCOL1) in the tobacco plant provides a source of an homogenic, heterotrimeric, thermally stable “virgin” collagen which self assembles to fine homogenous fibrils displaying intact binding sites and has been applied to form numerous functional scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In addition, rhCOL1 can form liquid crystal structures, yielding a well-organized and mechanically strong membrane, two properties indispensable to extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicry. Overall, the shortcomings of animal- and cadaver-derived collagens arising from their source diversity and recycled nature are fully overcome in the plant setting, constituting a collagen source ideal for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23941988

  19. Nonlinear microscopy of collagen fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, M.; Pena, A.-M.; Hernest, M.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Fabre, A.; Marchal-Somme, J.; Crestani, B.; Débarre, D.; Martin, J.-L.; Beaurepaire, E.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2007-02-01

    We used intrinsic Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) by fibrillar collagen to visualize the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibrosis at the micrometer scale using laser scanning nonlinear microscopy. We showed that SHG signals are highly specific to fibrillar collagen and provide a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in tissues. Moreover, recording simultaneously other nonlinear optical signals in a multimodal setup, we visualized the tissue morphology using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) signals from endogenous chromophores such as NADH or elastin. We then compared different methods to determine accurate indexes of collagen fibrosis using nonlinear microscopy, given that most collagen fibrils are smaller than the microscope resolution and that second harmonic generation is a coherent process. In order to define a robust method to process our three-dimensional images, we either calculated the fraction of the images occupied by a significant SHG signal, or averaged SHG signal intensities. We showed that these scores provide an estimation of the extension of renal and pulmonary fibrosis in murine models, and that they clearly sort out the fibrotic mice.

  20. Lysyl Oxidase Activity Is Required for Ordered Collagen Fibrillogenesis by Tendon Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Herchenhan, Andreas; Uhlenbrock, Franziska; Eliasson, Pernilla; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David; Kadler, Karl E.; Magnusson, S. Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases (LOXs) are a family of copper-dependent oxido-deaminases that can modify the side chain of lysyl residues in collagen and elastin, thereby leading to the spontaneous formation of non-reducible aldehyde-derived interpolypeptide chain cross-links. The consequences of LOX inhibition in producing lathyrism are well documented, but the consequences on collagen fibril formation are less clear. Here we used β-aminoproprionitrile (BAPN) to inhibit LOX in tendon-like constructs (prepared from human tenocytes), which are an experimental model of cell-mediated collagen fibril formation. The improvement in structure and strength seen with time in control constructs was absent in constructs treated with BAPN. As expected, BAPN inhibited the formation of aldimine-derived cross-links in collagen, and the constructs were mechanically weak. However, an unexpected finding was that BAPN treatment led to structurally abnormal collagen fibrils with irregular profiles and widely dispersed diameters. Of special interest, the abnormal fibril profiles resembled those seen in some Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome phenotypes. Importantly, the total collagen content developed normally, and there was no difference in COL1A1 gene expression. Collagen type V, decorin, fibromodulin, and tenascin-X proteins were unaffected by the cross-link inhibition, suggesting that LOX regulates fibrillogenesis independently of these molecules. Collectively, the data show the importance of LOX for the mechanical development of early collagenous tissues and that LOX is essential for correct collagen fibril shape formation. PMID:25979340

  1. Lysyl Oxidase Activity Is Required for Ordered Collagen Fibrillogenesis by Tendon Cells.

    PubMed

    Herchenhan, Andreas; Uhlenbrock, Franziska; Eliasson, Pernilla; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David; Kadler, Karl E; Magnusson, S Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2015-06-26

    Lysyl oxidases (LOXs) are a family of copper-dependent oxido-deaminases that can modify the side chain of lysyl residues in collagen and elastin, thereby leading to the spontaneous formation of non-reducible aldehyde-derived interpolypeptide chain cross-links. The consequences of LOX inhibition in producing lathyrism are well documented, but the consequences on collagen fibril formation are less clear. Here we used β-aminoproprionitrile (BAPN) to inhibit LOX in tendon-like constructs (prepared from human tenocytes), which are an experimental model of cell-mediated collagen fibril formation. The improvement in structure and strength seen with time in control constructs was absent in constructs treated with BAPN. As expected, BAPN inhibited the formation of aldimine-derived cross-links in collagen, and the constructs were mechanically weak. However, an unexpected finding was that BAPN treatment led to structurally abnormal collagen fibrils with irregular profiles and widely dispersed diameters. Of special interest, the abnormal fibril profiles resembled those seen in some Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome phenotypes. Importantly, the total collagen content developed normally, and there was no difference in COL1A1 gene expression. Collagen type V, decorin, fibromodulin, and tenascin-X proteins were unaffected by the cross-link inhibition, suggesting that LOX regulates fibrillogenesis independently of these molecules. Collectively, the data show the importance of LOX for the mechanical development of early collagenous tissues and that LOX is essential for correct collagen fibril shape formation. PMID:25979340

  2. Riboflavin-induced photo-crosslinking of collagen hydrogel and its application in meniscus tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jiseung; Koh, Rachel H; Shim, Whuisu; Kim, Hwan D; Yim, Hyun-Gu; Hwang, Nathaniel S

    2016-04-01

    A meniscus tear is a common knee injury, but its regeneration remains a clinical challenge. Recently, collagen-based scaffolds have been applied in meniscus tissue engineering. Despite its prevalence, application of natural collagen scaffold in clinical setting is limited due to its extremely low stiffness and rapid degradation. The purpose of the present study was to increase the mechanical properties and delay degradation rate of a collagen-based scaffold by photo-crosslinking using riboflavin (RF) and UV exposure. RF is a biocompatible vitamin B2 that showed minimal cytotoxicity compared to conventionally utilized photo-initiator. Furthermore, collagen photo-crosslinking with RF improved mechanical properties and delayed enzyme-triggered degradation of collagen scaffolds. RF-induced photo-crosslinked collagen scaffolds encapsulated with fibrochondrocytes resulted in reduced scaffold contraction and enhanced gene expression levels for the collagen II and aggrecan. Additionally, hyaluronic acid (HA) incorporation into photo-crosslinked collagen scaffold showed an increase in its retention. Based on these results, we demonstrate that photo-crosslinked collagen-HA hydrogels can be potentially applied in the scaffold-based meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:25809935

  3. Collagens VI and XII form complexes mediating osteoblast interactions during osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izu, Yayoi; Ezura, Yoichi; Koch, Manuel; Birk, David E; Noda, Masaki

    2016-06-01

    Bone formation is precisely regulated by cell-cell communication in osteoblasts. We have previously demonstrated that genetic deletion of Col6a1 or Col12a1 impairs osteoblast connections and/or communication in mice, resulting in bone mass reduction and bone fragility. Mutations of the genes encoding collagen VI cause Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM), which have overlapping phenotypes involving connective tissue and muscle. Recent studies have identified COL12A1 gene mutations in patients with UCMD- and BM-like disorders harboring no COL6 mutations, indicating the shared functions of these collagens in connective tissue homeostasis. The purpose of this investigation has been to test the hypothesis that collagens VI and XII have coordinate regulatory role(s) during bone formation. We analyzed the localization of collagens VI and XII relative to primary osteoblasts during osteogenesis. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that collagens VI and XII colocalized in matrix bridges between adjacent cells during periods when osteoblasts were establishing cell-cell connections. Quantification of cells harboring collagen bridges demonstrated that matrix bridges were composed of collagens VI and XII but not collagen I. Interestingly, matrix bridge formation was impaired in osteoblasts deficient in either Col6a1 or Col12a1, suggesting that both collagens were indispensable for matrix bridge formation. These data demonstrate, for the first time, a functional relationship between collagens VI and XII during osteogenesis and indicate that a complex containing collagens VI and XII is essential for the formation of a communicating cellular network during bone formation. PMID:26753503

  4. Collagen prolyl3-hydroxylation: a major role for a minor post-translational modification?

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, David M.; Eyre, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Prolyl 3-hydroxylation is a rare but conserved post-translational modification in many collagen types and, when defective, may be linked to a number of human diseases with musculoskeletal and potentially ocular and renal pathologies. Prolyl 3-hydroxylase-1 (P3H1), the enzyme responsible for converting proline to 3-hydroxyproline (3Hyp) in type I collagen, requires the coenzyme CRTAP for activity. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that the Crtap−/− mouse was missing 3-hydroxyproline in type I collagen α-chains. This finding led to the discovery mutations in genes encoding the P3H1 complex as a cause of recessively inherited osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease). Since then, many additional 3Hyp sites have been identified in various collagen types and classified based on observed substrate and tissue specificity. P3H1 is part of a family of gene products that also includes isoenzymes P3H2 and P3H3 as well as CRTAP and Sc65. It is believed these isoenzymes and coenzymes have evolved different collagen substrate site and tissue specificities in their activities. The post-translational fingerprinting of collagens will be essential in understanding the basic role and extent of regulated variations of prolyl 3-hydroxylation in collagen. We believe that prolyl 3-hydroxylation is a functionally significant collagen post-translational modification and can be a cause of disease when absent. PMID:23772978

  5. Critical VWF A1 Domain Residues Influence Type VI Collagen Binding

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Veronica H.; Gill, Joan Cox; Christopherson, Pamela A.; Bellissimo, Daniel B.; Friedman, Kenneth D.; Haberichter, Sandra L.; Lentz, Steven R.; Montgomery, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Von Willebrand factor (VWF) binds to subendothelial collagen at sites of vascular injury. Laboratory testing for von Willebrand disease (VWD), however, does not always include collagen binding assays (VWF:CB) and standard VWF:CB assays use type I and/or type III collagen rather than type VI collagen. Objectives We report here on several mutations that exclusively alter binding to type VI collagen. Patients/methods Healthy controls and index cases from the Zimmerman Program for the Molecular and Clinical Biology of VWD were analyzed for VWF antigen (VWF:Ag), VWF ristocetin cofactor activity, and VWF:CB with types I, III, and VI collagen. VWF gene sequencing was performed for all subjects. Results Two healthy controls and one type 1 VWD subject were heterozygous for an A1 domain sequence variation, R1399H, and displayed a selective decreased binding to type VI collagen but not types I and III. Expression of recombinant 1399H VWF resulted in absent binding to type VI collagen. Two other VWF A1 domain mutations, S1387I and Q1402P, displayed diminished binding to type VI collagen. An 11 amino acid deletion in the A1 domain also abrogated binding to type VI collagen. Conclusions VWF:CB may be useful in diagnosis of VWD, as a decreased VWF:CB/VWF:Ag ratio may reflect specific loss of collagen binding ability. Mutations that exclusively affect type VI collagen binding may be associated with bleeding, yet missed by current VWF testing. PMID:22507569

  6. Heterogeneity of Collagen VI Microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Maaß, Tobias; Bayley, Christopher P.; Mörgelin, Matthias; Lettmann, Sandra; Bonaldo, Paolo; Paulsson, Mats; Baldock, Clair; Wagener, Raimund

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI, a collagen with uncharacteristically large N- and C-terminal non-collagenous regions, forms a distinct microfibrillar network in most connective tissues. It was long considered to consist of three genetically distinct α chains (α1, α2, and α3). Intracellularly, heterotrimeric molecules associate to form dimers and tetramers, which are then secreted and assembled to microfibrils. The identification of three novel long collagen VI α chains, α4, α5, and α6, led to the question if and how these may substitute for the long α3 chain in collagen VI assembly. Here, we studied structural features of the novel long chains and analyzed the assembly of these into tetramers and microfibrils. N- and C-terminal globular regions of collagen VI were recombinantly expressed and studied by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Ab initio models of the N-terminal globular regions of the α4, α5, and α6 chains showed a C-shaped structure similar to that found for the α3 chain. Single particle EM nanostructure of the N-terminal globular region of the α4 chain confirmed the C-shaped structure revealed by SAXS. Immuno-EM of collagen VI extracted from tissue revealed that like the α3 chain the novel long chains assemble to homotetramers that are incorporated into mixed microfibrils. Moreover, SAXS models of the C-terminal globular regions of the α1, α2, α4, and α6 chains were generated. Interestingly, the α1, α2, and α4 C-terminal globular regions dimerize. These self-interactions may play a role in tetramer formation. PMID:26742845

  7. Nanomechanics of Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-07-12

    Type I collagen is the predominant collagen in mature tendons and ligaments, where it gives them their load-bearing mechanical properties. Fibrils of type I collagen are formed by the packing of polypeptide triple helices. Higher-order structures like fibril bundles and fibers are assembled from fibrils in the presence of other collagenous molecules and noncollagenous molecules. Curiously, however, experiments show that fibrils/fibril bundles are less resistant to axial stress compared to their constituent triple helices-the Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles are an order-of-magnitude smaller than the Young's moduli of triple helices. Given the sensitivity of the Young's moduli of triple helices to solvation environment, a plausible explanation is that the packing of triple helices into fibrils perhaps reduces the Young's modulus of an individual triple helix, which results in fibrils having smaller Young's moduli. We find, however, from molecular dynamics and accelerated conformational sampling simulations that the Young's modulus of the buried core of the fibril is of the same order as that of a triple helix in aqueous phase. These simulations, therefore, suggest that the lower Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles cannot be attributed to the specific packing of triple helices in the fibril core. It is not the fibril core that yields initially to axial stress. Rather, it must be the portion of the fibril exposed to the solvent and/or the fibril-fibril interface that bears the initial strain. Overall, this work provides estimates of Young's moduli and persistence lengths at two levels of collagen's structural assembly, which are necessary to quantitatively investigate the response of various biological factors on collagen mechanics, including congenital mutations, posttranslational modifications and ligand binding, and also engineer new collagen-based materials. PMID:27410733

  8. Developmental changes in skin collagen biosynthesis pathway in posthatch male and female chickens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, M.; Schickler, M.; Hurwitz, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1996-01-01

    The developmental changes in skin collagen biosynthesis pathway in male and female chickens were evaluated. Concentration of collagen, levels of mRNA for collagen type I subunits and for lysyl hydroxylase, and the level of three lysyl oxidase-derived cross-links: dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine (DHLNL), dehydro-hydroxylysinonorleucine (HLNL), and dehydro-histidinohydroxymerodesmosine (HHMD) were determined during 4 wk posthatching. Skin collagen content increased with age and was higher in males than in females. In both sexes, the expression of the genes coding for alpha 1 and alpha 2 of collagen type I decreased with age: alpha 1(I) gene expression decreased from Day 3 onwards, whereas the reduction in alpha 2(I) gene expression started 1 wk later. At all ages examined, the expression of both genes was higher in male than in female skin. Males and females lysyl hydroxylase gene expression remained low until Day 16, after which an increase in the enzyme gene expression was observed. An increase in skin HLNL content was observed from Day 3 in both sexes reaching a peak in males at Day 9 and in females 1 wk later. The DHLNL content, which was higher in males than in females at all ages tested, dramatically decreased in both male and female skin from 3 d of age, reaching its lowest level at Day 16, and remained at that low level thereafter. The skin content of HHMD in males and females followed an oscillatory behavior with higher peaks in the male skin. The results suggest that the higher tensile strength of male skin than female skin may be due to the elevated skin collagen content that resulted from increased expression in collagen type I genes on the one hand, and from the higher amounts of various collagen cross-links on the other.

  9. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (p<0.04) and showed a 3-fold increase in Young's modulus (p<0.04) at higher concentration. Furfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications. PMID:24468046

  10. Clinical and molecular dilemmas in the diagnosis of familial epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa.

    PubMed

    Ee, Hock Leong; Liu, Lu; Goh, Chee Leok; McGrath, John A

    2007-05-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a rare and clinically heterogeneous mechanobullous disorder. One unusual clinical variant is epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa (EBP), in which the combination of pruritus and skin fragility can lead to hypertrophic, lichenified nodules and plaques. This form of inherited epidermolysis bullosa may not develop clinically until adult life, leading to diagnostic confusion with acquired disorders, such as nodular prurigo, lichen simplex, lichen planus, hypertrophic scarring, or dermatitis artefacta. As in all other forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, the molecular pathology involves mutations in the gene encoding the anchoring fibril protein, type VII collagen (COL7A1), but there is no clear genotype-phenotype correlation in EBP. In this report, we describe a Chinese-Singaporean family with EBP in whom an autosomal dominant glycine substitution mutation, p.G2251E, was identified in exon 86 of the COL7A1 gene. This heterozygous mutation was identified in the genomic DNA of all 4 affected adults tested, as well as 2 clinically unaffected offspring (aged 9-29 years). Based on DNA sequencing, we predict that these individuals may develop EBP later in life, although additional factors leading to disease expression may determine phenotypic expression. Nevertheless, we plan to closely monitor these potentially presymptomatic individuals for symptoms of pruritus and early signs of the genetic disorder. PMID:17434045

  11. Myofibroblast expression in skin wounds is enhanced by collagen III suppression.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammed M; Abd-Elwahed, Mervat M; Hawary, Khalid; Arafah, Maha M; Shier, Medhat K

    2015-01-01

    Generally speaking, the excessive expression of myofibroblasts is associated with excessive collagen production. One exception is seen in patients and animal models of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV in which the COL3A1 gene mutation results in reduced collagen III but with concurrent increased myofibroblast expression. This paradox has not been examined with the use of external drugs/modalities to prevent hypertrophic scars. In this paper, we injected the rabbit ear wound model of hypertrophic scarring with two doses of a protein called nAG, which is known to reduce collagen expression and to suppress hypertrophic scarring in that animal model. The higher nAG dose was associated with significantly less collagen III expression and concurrent higher degree of myofibroblast expression. We concluded that collagen III content of the extracellular matrix may have a direct or an indirect effect on myofibroblast differentiation. However, further research is required to investigate the pathogenesis of this paradoxical phenomenon. PMID:25789326

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 modulates collagen matrices and wound repair

    PubMed Central

    LeBert, Danny C.; Squirrell, Jayne M.; Rindy, Julie; Broadbridge, Elizabeth; Lui, Yuming; Zakrzewska, Anna; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Meijer, Annemarie H.; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic injuries are characterized by leukocyte infiltration into tissues. Although matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Mmp9) has been implicated in both conditions, its role in wound repair remains unclear. We previously reported a zebrafish chronic inflammation mutant caused by an insertion in the hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor gene 1 (hai1; also known as spint1) that is characterized by epithelial extrusions and neutrophil infiltration into the fin. Here, we performed a microarray analysis and found increased inflammatory gene expression in the mutant larvae, including a marked increase in mmp9 expression. Depletion of mmp9 partially rescued the chronic inflammation and epithelial phenotypes, in addition to restoring collagen fiber organization, as detected by second-harmonic generation imaging. Additionally, we found that acute wounding induces epithelial cell mmp9 expression and is associated with a thickening of collagen fibers. Interestingly, depletion of mmp9 impaired this collagen fiber reorganization. Moreover, mmp9 depletion impaired tissue regeneration after tail transection, implicating Mmp9 in acute wound repair. Thus, Mmp9 regulates both acute and chronic tissue damage and plays an essential role in collagen reorganization during wound repair. PMID:26015541

  13. Diaphragmatic dysfunction in Collagen VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    Quijano-Roy, S; Khirani, S; Colella, M; Ramirez, A; Aloui, S; Wehbi, S; de Becdelievre, A; Carlier, R Y; Allamand, V; Richard, P; Azzi, V; Estournet, B; Fauroux, B

    2014-02-01

    Collagen VI-related myopathies are hereditary disorders causing progressive restrictive respiratory insufficiency. Specific diaphragm involvement has been suggested by a drop in supine volumes. This pilot study aimed at characterizing the respiratory muscle phenotype in patients with COL6A1-3 genes mutations. Lung function, blood gases, muscle strength and respiratory mechanics were measured in 7 patients between 2002 and 2012. Patients were classified as Early-Severe (n = 3), Moderate-Progressive (n = 2) and Mild (n = 2) according to clinical disease presentation. Seven patients (aged 6-28) were evaluated. Forced vital capacity distinguished the Mild group (>60% predicted) from the two other groups (<50% predicted). This distinction was also possible using the motor function measure scale. Diaphragmatic dysfunction at rest was observed in all the Early-Severe and Moderate-Progressive patients. During a voluntary sniff maneuver diaphragmatic dysfunction was observed in all patients, as assessed by a negative gastric pressure. All patients had diaphragmatic fatigue assessed by a tension-time index over the threshold of 0.15. Diaphragmatic dysfunction during a maximal voluntary maneuver and diaphragmatic fatigue are constant features in Collagen VI myopathies. These observations can assist the diagnosis and should be taken in account for the clinical management, with the early detection of sleep-disordered breathing. PMID:24314752

  14. Ameloblasts express type I collagen during amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Assaraf-Weill, N; Gasse, B; Silvent, J; Bardet, C; Sire, J Y; Davit-Béal, T

    2014-05-01

    Enamel and enameloid, the highly mineralized tooth-covering tissues in living vertebrates, are different in their matrix composition. Enamel, a unique product of ameloblasts, principally contains enamel matrix proteins (EMPs), while enameloid possesses collagen fibrils and probably receives contributions from both odontoblasts and ameloblasts. Here we focused on type I collagen (COL1A1) and amelogenin (AMEL) gene expression during enameloid and enamel formation throughout ontogeny in the caudate amphibian, Pleurodeles waltl. In this model, pre-metamorphic teeth possess enameloid and enamel, while post-metamorphic teeth possess enamel only. In first-generation teeth, qPCR and in situ hybridization (ISH) on sections revealed that ameloblasts weakly expressed AMEL during late-stage enameloid formation, while expression strongly increased during enamel deposition. Using ISH, we identified COL1A1 transcripts in ameloblasts and odontoblasts during enameloid formation. COL1A1 expression in ameloblasts gradually decreased and was no longer detected after metamorphosis. The transition from enameloid-rich to enamel-rich teeth could be related to a switch in ameloblast activity from COL1A1 to AMEL synthesis. P. waltl therefore appears to be an appropriate animal model for the study of the processes involved during enameloid-to-enamel transition, especially because similar events probably occurred in various lineages during vertebrate evolution. PMID:24570147

  15. Differential Effects of Collagen Prolyl 3-Hydroxylation on Skeletal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Erica P.; Lietman, Caressa; Grafe, Ingo; Lennington, Jennifer; Morello, Roy; Napierala, Dobrawa; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Munivez, Elda M.; Dawson, Brian; Bertin, Terry K.; Chen, Yuqing; Lua, Rhonald; Lichtarge, Olivier; Hicks, John; Weis, Mary Ann; Eyre, David; Lee, Brendan H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding cartilage associated protein (CRTAP) and prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1 encoded by LEPRE1) were the first identified causes of recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). These proteins, together with cyclophilin B (encoded by PPIB), form a complex that 3-hydroxylates a single proline residue on the α1(I) chain (Pro986) and has cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity essential for proper collagen folding. Recent data suggest that prolyl 3-hydroxylation of Pro986 is not required for the structural stability of collagen; however, the absence of this post-translational modification may disrupt protein-protein interactions integral for proper collagen folding and lead to collagen over-modification. P3H1 and CRTAP stabilize each other and absence of one results in degradation of the other. Hence, hypomorphic or loss of function mutations of either gene cause loss of the whole complex and its associated functions. The relative contribution of losing this complex's 3-hydroxylation versus PPIase and collagen chaperone activities to the phenotype of recessive OI is unknown. To distinguish between these functions, we generated knock-in mice carrying a single amino acid substitution in the catalytic site of P3h1 (Lepre1H662A). This substitution abolished P3h1 activity but retained ability to form a complex with Crtap and thus the collagen chaperone function. Knock-in mice showed absence of prolyl 3-hydroxylation at Pro986 of the α1(I) and α1(II) collagen chains but no significant over-modification at other collagen residues. They were normal in appearance, had no growth defects and normal cartilage growth plate histology but showed decreased trabecular bone mass. This new mouse model recapitulates elements of the bone phenotype of OI but not the cartilage and growth phenotypes caused by loss of the prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex. Our observations suggest differential tissue consequences due to selective inactivation of P3H1 hydroxylase activity

  16. Differential effects of collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation on skeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    Homan, Erica P; Lietman, Caressa; Grafe, Ingo; Lennington, Jennifer; Morello, Roy; Napierala, Dobrawa; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Munivez, Elda M; Dawson, Brian; Bertin, Terry K; Chen, Yuqing; Lua, Rhonald; Lichtarge, Olivier; Hicks, John; Weis, Mary Ann; Eyre, David; Lee, Brendan H L

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding cartilage associated protein (CRTAP) and prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1 encoded by LEPRE1) were the first identified causes of recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). These proteins, together with cyclophilin B (encoded by PPIB), form a complex that 3-hydroxylates a single proline residue on the α1(I) chain (Pro986) and has cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity essential for proper collagen folding. Recent data suggest that prolyl 3-hydroxylation of Pro986 is not required for the structural stability of collagen; however, the absence of this post-translational modification may disrupt protein-protein interactions integral for proper collagen folding and lead to collagen over-modification. P3H1 and CRTAP stabilize each other and absence of one results in degradation of the other. Hence, hypomorphic or loss of function mutations of either gene cause loss of the whole complex and its associated functions. The relative contribution of losing this complex's 3-hydroxylation versus PPIase and collagen chaperone activities to the phenotype of recessive OI is unknown. To distinguish between these functions, we generated knock-in mice carrying a single amino acid substitution in the catalytic site of P3h1 (Lepre1(H662A) ). This substitution abolished P3h1 activity but retained ability to form a complex with Crtap and thus the collagen chaperone function. Knock-in mice showed absence of prolyl 3-hydroxylation at Pro986 of the α1(I) and α1(II) collagen chains but no significant over-modification at other collagen residues. They were normal in appearance, had no growth defects and normal cartilage growth plate histology but showed decreased trabecular bone mass. This new mouse model recapitulates elements of the bone phenotype of OI but not the cartilage and growth phenotypes caused by loss of the prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex. Our observations suggest differential tissue consequences due to selective inactivation of P3H1 hydroxylase activity

  17. The evolution of fibrillar collagens: a sea-pen collagen shares common features with vertebrate type V collagen.

    PubMed

    Tillet, E; Franc, J M; Franc, S; Garrone, R

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular matrix of marine primitive invertebrates (sponges, polyps and jellyfishes) contains collagen fibrils with narrow diameters. From various data, it has been hypothesized that these primitive collagens could represent ancestral forms of the vertebrate minor collagens, i.e., types V or XI. Recently we have isolated a primitive collagen from the soft tissues of the sea-pen Veretillum cynomorium. This report examines whether the sea-pen collagen shares some features with vertebrate type V collagen. Rotary shadowed images of acid-soluble collagen molecules extracted from beta-APN treated animals, positive staining of segment-long-spacing crystallites precipitated from pepsinized collagen, Western blots of the pepsinized alpha1 and alpha2 chains with antibodies to vertebrate types I, III and V collagens, and in situ gold immunolabeling of ECM collagen fibrils were examined. Our results showed that the tissue form of the sea-pen collagen is a 340-nm threadlike molecule, which is close to the vertebrate type V collagen with its voluminous terminal globular domain, the distribution of most of its polar amino-acid residues, and its antigenic properties. PMID:8653581

  18. Collagen XIX Is Expressed by Interneurons and Contributes to the Formation of Hippocampal Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jianmin; Gorse, Karen; Ramirez, Francesco; Fox, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules contribute to the formation and maintenance of synapses in the mammalian nervous system. We previously discovered a family of nonfibrillar collagens that organize synaptic differentiation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Although many NMJ-organizing cues contribute to central nervous system (CNS) synaptogenesis, whether similar roles for collagens exist at central synapses remained unclear. In the present study we discovered that col19a1, the gene encoding nonfibrillar collagen XIX, is expressed by subsets of hippocampal neurons. Colocalization with the interneuron-specific enzyme glutamate decarboxylase 67 (Gad67), but not other cell-type-specific markers, suggests that hippocampal expression of col19a1 is restricted to interneurons. However, not all hippocampal interneurons express col19a1 mRNA; subsets of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-, somatostatin (Som)-, and calbindin (Calb)-immunoreactive interneurons express col19a1, but those containing parvalbumin (Parv) or calretinin (Calr) do not. To assess whether collagen XIX is required for the normal formation of hippocampal synapses, we examined synaptic morphology and composition in targeted mouse mutants lacking collagen XIX. We show here that subsets of synaptotagmin 2 (Syt2)-containing hippocampal nerve terminals appear malformed in the absence of collagen XIX. The presence of Syt2 in inhibitory hippocampal synapses, the altered distribution of Gad67 in collagen XIX-deficient subiculum, and abnormal levels of gephyrin in collagen XIX-deficient hippocampal extracts all suggest inhibitory synapses are affected by the loss of collagen XIX. Together, these data not only reveal that collagen XIX is expressed by central neurons, but show for the first time that a nonfibrillar collagen is necessary for the formation of hippocampal synapses. PMID:19937713

  19. Type V Collagen in Health, Disease, and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mak, Ki M; Png, Chien Yi M; Lee, Danielle J

    2016-05-01

    Type V collagen (COLV) is a regulatory fibril-forming collagen. It has at least three different molecular isoforms-α1(V)2 α2(V), α1(V)3, and α1(V)α2(V)α3(V)-formed by combinations of three different polypeptide α chains-α1(V), α2(V), and α3(V). COL V is a relatively minor collagen of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Morphologically, COLV occurs as heterotypic fibrils with type I collagen (COLI), microfilaments, or 12-nm-thick fibrils. COLV is synthesized in various mesenchymal cells and its gene expression is modulated by TGF-β and growth factors. While resistant to digestion by interstitial collagenases, native and denatured COLV are degraded by metalloproteinases and gelatinases, thereby promoting ECM remodeling. COLV interacts with matrix collagens and structural proteins, conferring structural integrity to tissue scaffolds. It binds matrix macromolecules, modulating cellular behavior, and functions. COLV co-assembles with COLI into heterotypic fibrils in the cornea and skin dermis, acting as a dominant regulator of collagen fibrillogenesis. COLV deficiency is associated with loss of corneal transparency and classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, while COLV overexpression is found in cancer, granulation tissue, inflammation, atherosclerosis, and fibrosis of lungs, skin, kidneys, adipose tissue, and liver. COLV isoform containing the α3(V) chain is involved in mediating pancreatic islet cell functions. In the liver, COLV is a minor but regular component of the ECM. Increases in COLV are associated with both early and advanced hepatic fibrosis. The neoepitopes of COLV have been shown to be a useful noninvasive serum biomarker for assessing fibrotic progression and resolution in experimental hepatic fibrosis. COLV is multifunctional in health, disease, and fibrosis. PMID:26910848

  20. Exposure to Mimivirus Collagen Promotes Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Hülsmeier, Andreas J.; Hochhold, Nina; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in animals, also occur in some recently described nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses such as Mimiviridae, which replicate in amoebae. To clarify the impact of viral collagens on the immune response of animals exposed to Mimiviridae, we have investigated the localization of collagens in Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus particles and the response of mice to immunization with mimivirus particles. Using protein biotinylation, we have first shown that viral collagen encoded by open reading frame L71 is present at the surface of mimivirus particles. Exposure to mimivirus collagens elicited the production of anti-collagen antibodies in DBA/1 mice immunized intradermally with mimivirus protein extracts. This antibody response also targeted mouse collagen type II and was accompanied by T-cell reactivity to collagen and joint inflammation, as observed in collagen-induced arthritis following immunization of mice with bovine collagen type II. The broad distribution of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses in the environment suggests that humans are constantly exposed to such large virus particles. A survey of blood sera from healthy human subjects and from rheumatoid arthritis patients indeed demonstrated that 30% of healthy-subject and 36% of rheumatoid arthritis sera recognized the major mimivirus capsid protein L425. Moreover, whereas 6% of healthy-subject sera recognized the mimivirus collagen protein L71, 22% of rheumatoid arthritis sera were positive for mimivirus L71. Accordingly, our study shows that environmental exposure to mimivirus represents a risk factor in triggering autoimmunity to collagens. PMID:24173233

  1. Biomimetic Analogs for Collagen Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Gu, L.; Kim, Y.K.; Liu, Y.; Ryou, H.; Wimmer, C.E.; Dai, L.; Arola, D.D.; Looney, S.W.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.

    2011-01-01

    Inability of chemical phosphorylation of sodium trimetaphosphate to induce intrafibrillar mineralization of type I collagen may be due to the failure to incorporate a biomimetic analog to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphates (ACP) as nanoprecursors. This study investigated adsorption/desorption characteristics of hydrolyzed and pH-adjusted sodium trimetaphosphate (HPA-Na3P3O9) to collagen. Based on those results, a 5-minute treatment time with 2.8 wt% HPA-Na3P3O9 was used in a single-layer reconstituted collagen model to confirm that both the ACP-stabilization analog and matrix phosphoprotein analog must be present for intrafibrillar mineralization. The results of that model were further validated by complete remineralization of phosphoric-acid-etched dentin treated with the matrix phosphoprotein analog and lined with a remineralizing lining composite, and with the ACP-stabilization analog supplied in simulated body fluid. An understanding of the basic processes involved in intrafibrillar mineralization of reconstituted collagen fibrils facilitates the design of novel tissue engineering materials for hard tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:20940362

  2. Abnormal Compartmentalization of Cartilage Matrix Components in Mice Lacking Collagen X: Implications for Function

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Kin Ming; Pang, Michael K.M.; Zhou, Sheila; Cowan, Soot Keng; Kong, Richard Y.C.; Pfordte, Tim; Olsen, Bjorn R.; Sillence, David O.; Tam, Patrick P.L.; Cheah, Kathryn S.E.

    1997-01-01

    There are conflicting views on whether collagen X is a purely structural molecule, or regulates bone mineralization during endochondral ossification. Mutations in the human collagen α1(X) gene (COL10A1) in Schmid metaphyseal chondrodysplasia (SMCD) suggest a supportive role. But mouse collagen α1(X) gene (Col10a1) null mutants were previously reported to show no obvious phenotypic change. We have generated collagen X deficient mice, which shows that deficiency does have phenotypic consequences which partly resemble SMCD, such as abnormal trabecular bone architecture. In particular, the mutant mice develop coxa vara, a phenotypic change common in human SMCD. Other consequences of the mutation are reduction in thickness of growth plate resting zone and articular cartilage, altered bone content, and atypical distribution of matrix components within growth plate cartilage. We propose that collagen X plays a role in the normal distribution of matrix vesicles and proteoglycans within the growth plate matrix. Collagen X deficiency impacts on the supporting properties of the growth plate and the mineralization process, resulting in abnormal trabecular bone. This hypothesis would accommodate the previously conflicting views of the function of collagen X and of the molecular pathogenesis of SMCD. PMID:9015315

  3. Type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis: identification of abnormal type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, M; Hollister, D W

    1988-12-01

    We have extended the study of a mild case of type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis to include biochemical analyses of cartilage, bone, and the collagens produced by dermal fibroblasts. Type I collagen extracted from bone and types I and III collagen produced by dermal fibroblasts were normal, as was the hexosamine ratio of cartilage proteoglycans. Hyaline cartilage, however, contained approximately equal amounts of types I and II collagen and decreased amounts of type XI collagen. Unlike the normal SDS-PAGE mobility. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE revealed extensive overmodification of all type II cyanogen bromide peptides in a pattern consistent with heterozygosity for an abnormal pro alpha 1(II) chain which impaired the assembly and/or folding of type II collagen. This interpretation implies that dominant mutations of the COL2A1 gene may cause type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis. More generally, emerging data implicating defects of type II collagen in the type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis-spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita spectrum and in the Kniest-Stickler syndrome spectrum suggest that diverse mutations of this gene may be associated with widely differing phenotypic outcome. PMID:3195588

  4. Structural constraints on the evolution of the collagen fibril: convergence on a 1014-residue COL domain

    PubMed Central

    Slatter, David Anthony; Farndale, Richard William

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is the fundamental component of the extracellular matrix. Its α1 gene is the direct descendant of ancestral fibrillar collagen and contains 57 exons encoding the rod-like triple-helical COL domain. We trace the evolution of the COL domain from a primordial collagen 18 residues in length to its present 1014 residues, the limit of its possible length. In order to maintain and improve the essential structural features of collagen during evolution, exons can be added or extended only in permitted, non-random increments that preserve the position of spatially sensitive cross-linkage sites. Such sites cannot be maintained unless the twist of the triple helix is close to 30 amino acids per turn. Inspection of the gene structure of other long structural proteins, fibronectin and titin, suggests that their evolution might have been subject to similar constraints. PMID:25994354

  5. Direct Assessment of Articular Cartilage and Underlying Subchondral Bone Reveals a Progressive Gene Expression Change in Human Osteoarthritic Knees

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ching-Heng; Lee, Chian-Her; Lu, Liang-Suei; Song, I-Wen; Chuang, Hui-Ping; Kuo, San-Yuan; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Kraus, Virginia Byers; Wu, Chia-Chun; Lee, Ming Ta Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the interaction of articular cartilage (AC) and subchondral bone (SB) through analysis of osteoarthritis (OA)-related genes of site-matched tissue. Design We developed a novel method for isolating site-matched overlying AC and underlying SB from three and four regions of interest respectively from the human knee tibial plateau (n=50). For each site, the severity of cartilage changes of OA were assessed histologically, and the severity of bone abnormalities were assessed by microcomputed tomography. An RNA isolation procedure was optimized that yielded high quality RNA from site-matched AC and SB tibial regions. Q-PCR analysis was performed to evaluate gene expression of 61 OA-associated genes for correlation with cartilage integrity and bone structure parameters. Results A total of 27 (44%) genes were coordinately up or down regulated in both tissues. The expression levels of 19 genes were statistically significantly correlated with the severity of AC degeneration and changes of SB structure; these included: ADAMTS1, ASPN, BMP6, BMPER, CCL2, CCL8, COL5A1, COL6A3, COL7A1, COL16A1, FRZB, GDF10, MMP3, OGN, OMD, POSTN, PTGES, TNFSF11 and WNT1. Conclusions These results provide a strategy for identifying targets whose modification may have the potential to ameliorate pathological alterations and progression of disease in both AC and SB simultaneously. In addition, this is the first study, to our knowledge, to overcome the major difficulties related to isolation of high quality RNA from site-matched joint tissues. We expect this method to facilitate advances in our understanding of the coordinated molecular responses of the whole joint organ. PMID:23220557

  6. Collagen interactions: Drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Collagen is a major component in a wide range of drug delivery systems and biomaterial applications. Its basic physical and structural properties, together with its low immunogenicity and natural turnover, are keys to its biocompatibility and effectiveness. In addition to its material properties, the collagen triple-helix interacts with a large number of molecules that trigger biological events. Collagen interactions with cell surface receptors regulate many cellular processes, while interactions with other ECM components are critical for matrix structure and remodeling. Collagen also interacts with enzymes involved in its biosynthesis and degradation, including matrix metalloproteinases. Over the past decade, much information has been gained about the nature and specificity of collagen interactions with its partners. These studies have defined collagen sequences responsible for binding and the high-resolution structures of triple-helical peptides bound to its natural binding partners. Strategies to target collagen interactions are already being developed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies to interfere with collagen fibril formation and the use of triple-helical peptides to direct liposomes to melanoma cells. The molecular information about collagen interactions will further serve as a foundation for computational studies to design small molecules that can interfere with specific interactions or target tumor cells. Intelligent control of collagen biological interactions within a material context will expand the effectiveness of collagen-based drug delivery. PMID:26631222

  7. Biological Effects Induced by Specific Advanced Glycation End Products in the Reconstructed Skin Model of Aging.

    PubMed

    Pageon, Hervé; Zucchi, Hélène; Dai, Zhenyu; Sell, David R; Strauch, Christopher M; Monnier, Vincent M; Asselineau, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate in the aging skin. To understand the biological effects of individual AGEs, skin reconstructed with collagen selectively enriched with N(ɛ)-(carboxymethyl)-lysine (CML), N(ɛ)-(carboxyethyl)-lysine (CEL), methylglyoxal hydroimidazolone (MG-H1), or pentosidine was studied. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased expression of α6 integrin at the dermal epidermal junction by CEL and CML (p<0.01). Laminin 5 was diminished by CEL and MG-H1 (p<0.05). Both CML and CEL induced a robust increase (p<0.01) in procollagen I. In the culture medium, IL-6, VEGF, and MMP1 secretion were significantly decreased (p<0.05) by MG-H1. While both CEL and CML decreased MMP3, only CEL decreased IL-6 and TIMP1, while CML stimulated TIMP1 synthesis significantly (p<0.05). mRNA expression studies using qPCR in the epidermis layer showed that CEL increased type 7 collagen (COL7A1), β1, and α6 integrin, while CML increased only COL7A1 (p<0.05). MG-H1-modified collagen had no effect. Importantly, in the dermis layer, MMP3 mRNA expression was increased by both CML and MG-H1. CML also significantly increased the mRNAs of MMP1, TIMP1, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1) (p<0.05). Mixed effects were present in CEL-rich matrix. Minimally glycoxidized pentosidine-rich collagen suppressed most mRNAs of the genes studied (p<0.05) and decreased VEGF and increased MCP1 protein expression. Taken together, this model of the aging skin suggests that a combination of AGEs tends to counterbalance and thus minimizes the detrimental biological effects of individual AGEs. PMID:26309782

  8. Effects of glucose on collagen mRNA levels and collagen secretion in EAhy 926 endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Kössi, J; Muona, P; Tuukkanen, J; Ylä-Outinen, H; Kalliomäki, M; Risteli, J; Oikarinen, A; Laato, M; Peltonen, J

    2001-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex metabolic disease associated with increased accumulation of extracellular matrix by endothelial cells and contributing to vascular complications of long-standing diabetes. On the other hand, DM is also associated with decreased accumulation of extracellular matrix in granulation tissue, which is suggested to be a consequence of impaired angiogenesis. The role of hyperglycemia in these situations is not fully understood. We examined the effects of high glucose concentrations on the gene expression and secretion of various collagens in cultured EAhy 926 endothelial cells. EAhy 926 endothelial cells expressed alpha1(I) collagen mRNA at a low level and small amount of the corresponding peptide was secreted from the cells; mRNA was not affected but peptide secretion was increased by elevated glucose concentration. mRNAs for type III and VI collagens were not detected in the endothelial cells. Furthermore, high glucose concentration in long term had no morphological effects on cultured endothelial cells but increased the expression of type IV collagen, which could rather be beneficial for angiogenesis in a healing wound. Our results suggest that high glucose concentration per se may contribute to increased accumulation of extracellular matrix in blood vessels but probably is not responsible for decreased angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation in diabetic patients. PMID:12041927

  9. Effects of glucose on collagen mRNA levels and collagen secretion in EAhy 926 endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Kössi, J; Muona, P; Tuukkanen, J; Ylä-Outinen, H; Kalliomäki, M; Risteli, J; Oikarinen, A; Laato, M; Peltonen, J

    2001-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex metabolic disease associated with increased accumulation of extracellular matrix by endothelial cells and contributing to vascular complications of long-standing diabetes. On the other hand, DM is also associated with decreased accumulation of extracellular matrix in granulation tissue, which is suggested to be a consequence of impaired angiogenesis. The role of hyperglycemia in these situations is not fully understood. We examined the effects of high glucose concentrations on the gene expression and secretion of various collagens in cultured EAhy 926 endothelial cells. EAhy 926 endothelial cells expressed alpha 1(I) collagen mRNA at a low level and small amount of the corresponding peptide was secreted from the cells; mRNA was not affected but peptide secretion was increased by elevated glucose concentration. mRNAs for type III and VI collagens were not detected in the endothelial cells Furthermore, high glucose concentration in long term had no morphological effects on cultured endothelial cells but increased the expression of type IV collagen, which could rather be beneficial for angiogenesis in a healing wound. Our results suggest that high glucose concentration per se may contribute to increased accumulation of extracellular matrix in blood vessels but probably is not responsible for decreased angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation in diabetic patients. PMID:12016747

  10. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data