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Sample records for collagen induced ear

  1. Prostaglandins in the perilymph of guinea pig with type II collagen induced ear diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, T.; Chiang, T.; Kitano, H.; Sudo, N.; Kim, S.Y.; Ha, S.; Woo, V.; Wolf, B.; Floyd, R.; Yoo, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have studied the prostaglandins (PGs) in the perilymph from guinea pig with type II collagen induced autoimmune ear disease. Hartly guinea pigs were immunized with type II collagen in CFA and auditory brain stem responses (ABR) were measured at 2, 3, 4, and 6 months after initial immunization perilymph was obtained and the levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha.. were measured by radioimmunoassays. Temporal bones were examined for the histopathologic changes. Immunized guinea pigs showed the evidence of hearing loss by ABR. The temporal bones showed the following changes: spiral ganglia degeneration, mild to moderate degree of degeneration in organ of Corti, infrequent very mild endolymphatic hydrops and labrynthitis. The perilymph from immunized animals contained about 5 times more PGE2 and about 3 times more 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha.. than control animals. However, between these two groups, there was no difference in the CSF and sera levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha... Thus, this study suggests that these inflammatory mediators might be involved in the pathogenesis of collagen induced autoimmune inner ear disease.

  2. Profile of capsaicin-induced mouse ear oedema as neurogenic inflammatory model: comparison with arachidonic acid-induced ear oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, H.; Nagata, N.; Koshihara, Y.

    1993-01-01

    1. We have investigated the mechanism of capsaicin-induced mouse ear oedema compared with that of arachidonic acid (AA)-induced ear oedema, and evaluated the possible involvement of neuropeptides in the development of capsaicin-induced oedema. 2. Topical application of capsaicin (0.1-1.0 mg per ear) to the ear of mice produced immediate vasodilatation and erythema followed by the development of oedema which was maximal at 30 min after the treatment. This oedema was of shorter duration with less swelling than AA-induced oedema (2.0 mg per ear). 3. Capsaicin-induced ear oedema was unaffected when inhibitors of arachidonate metabolites including platelet activating factor (PAF) were administered before capsaicin (250 micrograms per ear) application, while these agents significantly prevented AA-induced oedema. Dexamethasone, histamine H1 and/or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) antagonists, and substance P (SP) antagonists were effective in inhibiting both models. Furthermore, a Ca(2+)-channel blocker and the capsaicin inhibitor, ruthenium red, were effective inhibitors of capsaicin oedema but had no effect on AA-induced oedema. 4. Phosphoramidon (50 micrograms kg-1, i.v.), an endopeptidase inhibitor, markedly (P < 0.001) enhanced only capsaicin-induced ear oedema, but bestatin (0.5 mg kg-1, i.v.), an aminopeptidase, failed to enhance oedema formation. 5. Neuropeptides (1-100 pmol per site) such as rat calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), SP, neurokinin A (NKA), and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), which are released from capsaicin-sensitive neurones, caused ear oedema by intradermal injection. Furthermore, a synergistic effect of CGRP (10 fmol per site) and SP (10pmol per site) on oedema formation was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7508328

  3. Protective effect of small molecule analogues of the Acanthocheilonema viteae secreted product ES-62 on oxazolone-induced ear inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Lamyaa; Rodgers, David T.; Rzepecka, Justyna; Pineda, Miguel A.; Suckling, Colin J.; Harnett, Margaret M.; Harnett, William

    2015-01-01

    ES-62 is the major secreted protein of the rodent filarial nematode Acanthocheilonema viteae. The molecule contains covalently attached phosphorylcholine (PC) residues, which confer anti-inflammatory properties on ES-62, underpinning the idea that drugs based on this active moiety may have therapeutic potential in human diseases associated with aberrant inflammation. Here we demonstrate that two synthetic small molecule analogues (SMAs) of ES-62 termed SMA 11a and SMA 12b are protective in the oxazolone-induced acute allergic contact dermatitis mouse model of skin inflammation, as measured by a significant reduction in ear inflammation following their administration before oxazolone sensitisation and before oxazolone challenge. Furthermore, it was found that when tested, 12b was effective at reducing ear swelling even when first administered before challenge. Histological analysis of the ears showed elevated cellular infiltration and collagen deposition in oxazolone-treated mice both of which were reduced by treatment with the two SMAs. Likewise, the oxazolone-induced increase in IFNγ mRNA in the ears was reduced but no effect on other cytokines investigated was observed. Finally, no influence on the mast cell populations in the ear was observed. PMID:25836375

  4. Lack of Collagen VI Promotes Wound-Induced Hair Growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peiwen; Cescon, Matilde; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix molecule that is abundantly expressed in the skin. However, the role of collagen VI in hair follicle growth is unknown. Here, we show that collagen VI is strongly deposited in hair follicles, and is markedly upregulated by skin wounding. Lack of collagen VI in Col6a1(-/-) mice delays hair cycling and growth under physiological conditions, but promotes wound-induced hair regrowth without affecting skin regeneration. Conversely, addition of purified collagen VI rescues the abnormal wound-induced hair regrowth in Col6a1(-/-) mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that the increased wound-induced hair regrowth of Col6a1(-/-) mice is triggered by activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and is abolished by inhibition of this pathway. These findings highlight the essential relationships between extracellular matrix (ECM) and hair follicle regeneration, and suggest that collagen VI could be a potential therapeutic target for hair loss and other skin-related diseases. PMID:25989472

  5. Aza-Glycine Induces Collagen Hyperstability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yitao; Malamakal, Roy M; Chenoweth, David M

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding is fundamental to life on our planet, and nature utilizes H-bonding in nearly all biomolecular interactions. Often, H-bonding is already maximized in natural biopolymer systems such as nucleic acids, where Watson-Crick H-bonds are fully paired in double-helical structures. Synthetic chemistry allows molecular editing of biopolymers beyond nature's capability. Here we demonstrate that substitution of glycine (Gly) with aza-glycine in collagen may increase the number of interfacial cross-strand H-bonds, leading to hyperstability in the triple-helical form. Gly is the only amino acid that has remained intolerant to substitution in collagen. Our results highlight the vital importance of maximizing H-bonding in higher order biopolymer systems using minimally perturbing alternatives to nature's building blocks. PMID:26368649

  6. Collagen-induced thrombosis in murine arteries and veins.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Brian C

    2013-01-01

    Collagen is a powerful thrombotic stimulus that functions by direct and indirect binding to various platelet receptors. A variety of collagen types are known and several (e.g., collagen Types I, III, IV) are found in vascular tissues and are exposed upon disruption of the endothelium or more extensive vessel wall rupture. Some murine models of thrombosis purport to expose collagen to initiate thrombosis, however, the nature and extent of this exposure is not clear. This study was undertaken to place a known collagen-dominated surface into the in vivo arterial or venous circulation as a method for direct study of collagen-induced thrombosis in mice. The epigastric artery was removed from donor mice and a microsuture with attached needle was knotted into one cut end. Anesthetized mice had this needle/suture/small-artery inserted into and out of a 0.5-mm length of the larger carotid artery or femoral vein, leaving the collagen-rich adventitial surface of the epigastric artery intralumenally in the larger vessel. Extensive platelet and fibrin deposition on this surface were in evidence and were quantitated with fluorescence imaging; administration of clopidogrel reduced thrombus development in both arteries and veins. A method was developed to evert the epigastric artery and disrupt the exteriorized endothelium; with the same needle/suture vessel-insertion technique, this surface stimulated significantly less thrombotic response in both arteries and veins, suggesting differential thrombogenesis based on the molecular composition of the induction factor. This new model of thrombosis offers a method for directly assessing the role of collagen-mediated thrombosis in murine arteries and veins. PMID:23063056

  7. Skin pathology induced by snake venom metalloproteinase: acute damage, revascularization, and re-epithelization in a mouse ear model.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Natalia; Escalante, Teresa; Gutiérrez, José María; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2008-10-01

    Viperid snakebite envenomation induces blistering and dermonecrosis. The pathological alterations induced by a snake venom metalloproteinase in the skin were investigated in a mouse ear model. Metalloproteinase BaP1, from Bothrops asper, induced rapid edema, hemorrhage, and blistering; the latter two effects were abrogated by preincubation with the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat. Neutrophils did not play a role in the pathology, as depletion of these cells resulted in a similar histological picture. Blisters are likely to result from the direct proteolytic activity of BaP1 of proteins at the dermal-epidermal junction, probably at the lamina lucida, as revealed by immunostaining for type IV collagen and laminin. Widespread apoptosis of keratinocytes was detected by the TUNEL assay, whereas no apoptosis of capillary endothelial cells was observed. BaP1 induced a drastic reduction in the microvessel density, revealed by immunostaining for the endothelial marker vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2. This was followed by a rapid angiogenic response, leading to a partial revascularization. Skin damage was followed by inflammation and granulation tissue formation. Then, a successful re-epithelization process occurred, and the skin of the ear regained its normal structure by 2 weeks. Venom metalloproteinase-induced skin damage reproduces the pathological changes described in snakebitten patients. PMID:18449209

  8. Modulation by glycyrrhetinic acid derivatives of TPA-induced mouse ear oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, H.; Mori, T.; Shibata, S.; Koshihara, Y.

    1989-01-01

    1. The anti-inflammatory effects of glycyrrhetinic acid and its derivatives on TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate)-induced mouse ear oedema were studied. The mechanisms of TPA-induced ear oedema were first investigated with respect to the chemical mediators. 2. The formation of ear oedema reached a maximum 5 h after TPA application (2 micrograms per ear) and the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production of mouse ear increased with the oedema formation. 3. TPA-induced ear oedema was prevented by actinomycin D and cycloheximide (0.1 mg per ear, respectively) when applied during 60 min after TPA treatment. 4. Of glycyrrhetinic acid derivatives examined, dihemiphthalate derivatives (IIe, IIe', IIIa, IIIa', IVa, IVa') most strongly inhibited ear oedema on both topical (ID50, 1.6 mg per ear for IIe, 2.0 mg per ear for IIIa and 1.6 mg per ear for IVa) and oral (ID50, 88 mg kg-1 for IIe', 130 mg kg-1 for IIIa' and 92 mg kg-1 for IVa') administration. 5. Glycyrrhetinic acid (Ia) and its derivatives applied 30 min before TPA treatment were much more effective in inhibiting oedema than when applied 30 min after TPA. A dihemiphthalate of triterpenoid compound IVa completely inhibited oedema, even when applied 3 h before TPA treatment. 6. Glycyrrhetinic acid (Ia) and deoxoglycyrrhetol (IIa), the parent compounds, produced little inhibition by oral administration at less than 200 mg kg-1. 7. These results suggest that the dihemiphthalate derivatives of triterpenes derived from glycyrrhetinic acid by chemical modification are useful for the treatment of skin inflammation by both topical and oral application. PMID:2924072

  9. Characteristics of laser-induced shock wave injury to the inner ear of rats.

    PubMed

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Niwa, Katsuki; Tamura, Atsushi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Satoh, Yasushi; Sato, Shunichi; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the number of blast injuries of the inner ear has increased in the general population. In blast-induced inner ear injury, a shock wave (SW) component in the blast wave is considered to play an important role in sensorineural hearing loss. However, the mechanisms by which an SW affects inner ear tissue remain largely unknown. We aimed to establish a new animal model for SW-induced inner ear injury by using laser-induced SWs (LISWs) on rats. The LISWs were generated by irradiating an elastic laser target with 694-nm nanosecond pulses of a ruby laser. After LISW application to the cochlea through bone conduction, auditory measurements revealed the presence of inner ear dysfunction, the extent of which depended on LISW overpressure. A significantly lower survival rate of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons, as well as severe oxidative damage, were observed in the inner ear exposed to an LISW. Although considerable differences in the pressure characteristics exist between LISWs and SWs in real blast waves, the functional and morphological changes shown by the present LISW-based model were similar to those observed in real blast-induced injury. Thus, our animal model is expected to be useful for laboratory-based research of blast-induced inner ear injury. PMID:25467523

  10. Characteristics of laser-induced shock wave injury to the inner ear of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Niwa, Katsuki; Tamura, Atsushi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Satoh, Yasushi; Sato, Shunichi; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the number of blast injuries of the inner ear has increased in the general population. In blast-induced inner ear injury, a shock wave (SW) component in the blast wave is considered to play an important role in sensorineural hearing loss. However, the mechanisms by which an SW affects inner ear tissue remain largely unknown. We aimed to establish a new animal model for SW-induced inner ear injury by using laser-induced SWs (LISWs) on rats. The LISWs were generated by irradiating an elastic laser target with 694-nm nanosecond pulses of a ruby laser. After LISW application to the cochlea through bone conduction, auditory measurements revealed the presence of inner ear dysfunction, the extent of which depended on LISW overpressure. A significantly lower survival rate of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons, as well as severe oxidative damage, were observed in the inner ear exposed to an LISW. Although considerable differences in the pressure characteristics exist between LISWs and SWs in real blast waves, the functional and morphological changes shown by the present LISW-based model were similar to those observed in real blast-induced injury. Thus, our animal model is expected to be useful for laboratory-based research of blast-induced inner ear injury.

  11. Inorganic pyrophosphatase induces type I collagen in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Polewski, Monika D.; Johnson, Kristen A.; Foster, Melissa; Millán, José Luis; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The physiologic selectivity of calcification in bone tissue reflects selective co-expression by osteoblasts of fibrillar collagen I and of tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), which hydrolyzes the calcification inhibitor pyrophosphate (PPi) and generates phosphate (Pi). Humans and mice deficient in the PPi-generating ecto-enzyme NPP1 demonstrate soft tissue calcification, occurring at sites of extracellular matrix expansion. Significantly, the function in osteoblasts of cytosolic inorganic pyrophosphatase (abbreviated iPPiase), which generates Pi via PPi hydrolysis with neutral pH optimum, remains unknown. We assessed iPPiase in Enpp1−/− and wild type (WT) mouse osteoblasts and we tested the hypothesis that iPPiase regulates collagen I expression. Methods We treated mouse calvarial osteoblasts with ascorbate and β-glycerol phosphate to promote calcification, and we assessed cytosolic Pi and PPi levels, sodium-dependent Pi uptake, Pit-1 Pi co-transporter expression, and iPPiase and TNAP activity and expression. We also assessed the function of transfected Ppa1 in osteoblasts. Results Inorganic pyrophosphatase but not TNAP was elevated in Enpp1−/− calvariae in situ. Cultured primary Enpp1−/− calvarial osteoblasts demonstrated increased calcification despite flat TNAP activity rather than physiologic TNAP up-regulation seen in WT osteoblasts. Despite decreased cytosolic PPi in early culture, Enpp1−/− osteoblasts maintained cytosolic Pi levels comparable to WT osteoblasts, in association with increased iPPiase, enhanced sodium-dependent Pi uptake and expression of Pit-1, and markedly increased collagen I synthesis. Suppression of collagen synthesis in Enpp1−/− osteoblasts using 3,4-dehydroproline markedly suppressed calcification. Last, transfection of Ppa1 in WT osteoblasts increased cytosolic Pi and decreased cytosolic but not extracellular PPi, and induced both collagen I synthesis and calcification. Conclusions Increased

  12. Photo-induced processes in collagen-hypericin system revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy and multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hovhannisyan, V; Guo, H W; Hovhannisyan, A; Ghukasyan, V; Buryakina, T; Chen, Y F; Dong, C Y

    2014-05-01

    Collagen is the main structural protein and the key determinant of mechanical and functional properties of tissues and organs. Proper balance between synthesis and degradation of collagen molecules is critical for maintaining normal physiological functions. In addition, collagen influences tumor development and drug delivery, which makes it a potential cancer therapy target. Using second harmonic generation, two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy, and spectrofluorimetry, we show that the natural pigment hypericin induces photosensitized destruction of collagen-based tissues. We demonstrate that hypericin-mediated processes in collagen fibers are irreversible and may be used for the treatment of cancer and collagen-related disorders. PMID:24877000

  13. Arthritis in mice induced by a single immunisation with collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, F; Nomura, M; Nakamura, K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in mice can be satisfactorily induced by a single immunisation and whether this model has some advantages compared with conventional CIA, which is induced by two immunisations. METHODS: The incidence of arthritis was observed under different immunisation conditions (variation of species of Mycobacterium included in complete Freund's adjuvant and the method of emulsification) and immunological, histopathological, and pharmacological features were examined. RESULTS: Under optimum immunisation conditions, joint inflammation developed two to three weeks after the primary immunisation with an incidence of 100% at four to five weeks. The progression of the arthritis was mild and was associated with moderate increases in concentrations of serum IgG against type II collagen. This CIA model was similar to the conventional model in histopathological and pharmacological features. CONCLUSIONS: Murine CIA could be successfully induced by a single immunisation. An important feature of this model was a mild progression of joint inflammation. This feature seems to be of benefit for monitoring the development of arthritis from an early stage in the disease and for the development of novel antirheumatic drugs for such early stage patients. Images PMID:8774181

  14. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  15. Assessment of thermal treatment via irrigation of external ear to reduce cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Spankovich, Christopher; Lobarinas, Edward; Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard; Le Prell, Colleen G

    2016-02-01

    Systemic and local changes in body temperature can have a profound effect on traumatic injuries including those to the inner ear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of acutely increasing or decreasing the temperature of the external ear canal on cisplatin-induced hearing loss. The external auditory canals of male guinea pigs were acutely irrigated with warm (44 °C), euthermic (37 °C), or cool (30 °C) water and subsequently injected with cisplatin (12 mg/kg, i.p.). Hearing was assessed by the auditory brainstem response and cochleograms were prepared to determine loss of hair cells. Ear canal irrigation with warm water potentiated cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss whereas cool ear canal irrigation showed significant protection from cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss. These results suggest that non-invasive cool water ear canal irrigation may be highly effective clinical procedure for protecting against cisplatin-induced hearing loss. PMID:26639015

  16. Suppression of collagen induced arthritis by idiotype coupled lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nagler-Anderson, C.; Gurish, M.F.; Robinson, M.E.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were initiated to evaluate the regulatory influence of idiotype (Id) networks in an experimental auto-immune disease. Collagen induced arthritis is an animal model of polyarthritis induced in susceptible mice by immunization with collagen II (CII). A humoral immune response to CII appears to be critical for the development of diseases. If subpopulations of the anti-CII abs, important for the induction of arthritis, could be identified and manipulated through the presence of a major Id, it should be possible to decrease arthritis incidence by suppressing the production of these Ids. Specifically purified anti-CII abs from arthritic DBA/1 mice were coupled to syngeneic spleen cells and administered IV prior to intradermal immunization with CII. By day 34 after 1/sup 0/ immunization, 100% of control mice and 50% of treated mice had developed arthritis. Suppression of the Id population administered to the treated group was confirmed by RIA. Sera from individual mice were tested as inhibitors of binding of /sup 125/I-labelled polyclonal DBA/1 anti-CII to a rabbit anti-Id directed against polyclonal anti-CII isolated from the sera of arthritic mice. Mean percentage of inhibition of binding of /sup 125/I-Id to rabbit anti-Id by sera from non-arthritic treated mice was found to be significantly lower than that observed in the arthritic control group (p = .045), but did not correlate with total anti-CII ab titers.

  17. Development of biomimetic tilapia collagen nanofibers for skin regeneration through inducing keratinocytes differentiation and collagen synthesis of dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Nanping; Xue, Yang; Ding, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Mo, Xiumei; Sun, Jiao

    2015-02-11

    In this study, tilapia skin collagen sponge and electrospun nanofibers were developed for wound dressing. The collagen sponge was composed of at least two α-peptides, and its denaturation temperature was 44.99 °C. It did not change the number of spleen-derived lymphocytes in BALB/c mice, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytes, and the level of IgG or IgM in Sprague-Dawley rat. The contact angle, tensile strength, and weight loss temperature of collagen nanofibers were 21.2°, 6.72±0.44 MPa, and 300 °C, respectively. The nanofibers could promote the viabilities of human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), inducing epidermal differentiation through the gene expression of involucrin, filaggrin, and type I transglutaminase of HaCaTs, and they could also accelerate migration of HaCaTs with the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Besides, the nanofibers could upregulate the protien level of Col-I in HDFs both via a direct effect and TGF-β1 secreted from HaCaTs, thus facilitating the formation of collagen fibers. Furthermore, the collagen nanofibers stimulated the skin regeneration rapidly and effectively in vivo. These biological effects could be explained as the contributions from the biomimic extracellular cell matrix structure, hydrophilicity, and the multiple amino acids of the collagen nanofibers. PMID:25598076

  18. Immune regulation and anti-inflammatory effects of isogarcinol extracted from Garcinia mangostana L. against collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanxia; Zhou, Hailing; Wang, Mengqi; Cen, Juren; Wei, Qun

    2014-05-01

    Isogarcinol is a natural compound that we extracted from Garcinia mangostana L., and we were the first to report that it is a new immunosuppressant. In the present study, we investigated the immune regulation and anti-inflammatory effects of isogarcinol on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and explored its potential mechanism in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The oral administration of isogarcinol significantly reduced clinical scores, alleviated cartilage and bone erosion, and reduced the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines in CIA mice. Isogarcinol inhibited xylene-induced mouse ear edema in vivo. In vitro, isogarcinol decreased iNOS and COX-2 mRNA expression and NO content by inhibiting NF-κB expression. Furthermore, isogarcinol decreased the activity of NFAT and inhibited IL-2 expression. The mechanism of action of isogarcinol is associated with down-regulation of both autoimmune and inflammatory reactions. PMID:24738849

  19. Cantharidin-induced inflammation in mouse ear model for translational research of novel anti-inflammatories.

    PubMed

    Ivetic Tkalcevic, Vanesa; Hrvacic, Boska; Bosnar, Martina; Cuzic, Snjezana; Bosnjak, Berislav; Erakovic Haber, Vesna; Glojnaric, Ines

    2012-08-01

    The murine model of cantharidin-induced ear inflammation was profiled in detail for its alignment with the human model and to explore the mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity of the macrolide antibiotics, clarithromycin and azithromycin. Ear swelling in CD1 mice persisted for 7 days, with peak intensity at 16 h after inflammation induction. As in humans, cantharidin (12.5 μg/ear) generated macrophage-inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) production, as well as neutrophil accumulation in mouse ear tissue. The tested macrolides, clarithromycin and azithromycin, administered orally (2 × 150 mg/kg) 0.5 h before and 5 h after cantharidin challenge, reduced MIP-2, MCP-1, KC, and MPO concentrations and thereby decreased ear swelling. Our results suggest that cantharidin-induced acute inflammation represents an excellent model for translational research of novel anti-inflammatories. PMID:22677362

  20. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  1. Protective effects of papaverine salicylate in mouse ear dermatitis and PAF-induced rat paw oedema.

    PubMed

    de Bernardis, E; Leonardi, G; Caruso, A; Cutuli, V M; Amico-Roxas, M

    1994-08-01

    Papaverine salicylate (MR-800) has been tested as a topical antiinflammatory agent in several models of skin inflammation in rodents, such as mouse ear dermatitis induced by croton oil, cantharidin or zymosan, and rat paw oedema induced by PAF. MR-800 exerted a dose-dependent inhibitory activity in all assays, when equimolar doses of sodium salicylate or papaverine were less effective, suggesting the existence of a favourable synergism between salicylate and papaverine. PMID:7847181

  2. Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Miki; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Real time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.

  3. Pathophysiology of the inner ear after blast injury caused by laser-induced shock wave

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Katsuki; Mizutari, Kunio; Matsui, Toshiyasu; Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Satoh, Yasushi; Sato, Shunichi; Shiotani, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The ear is the organ that is most sensitive to blast overpressure, and ear damage is most frequently seen after blast exposure. Blast overpressure to the ear results in sensorineural hearing loss, which is untreatable and is often associated with a decline in the quality of life. In this study, we used a rat model to demonstrate the pathophysiological and structural changes in the inner ear that replicate pure sensorineural hearing loss associated with blast injury using laser-induced shock wave (LISW) without any conductive hearing loss. Our results indicate that threshold elevation of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) after blast exposure was primarily caused by outer hair cell dysfunction induced by stereociliary bundle disruption. The bundle disruption pattern was unique; disturbed stereocilia were mostly observed in the outermost row, whereas those in the inner and middle rows stereocilia remained intact. In addition, the ABR examination showed a reduction in wave I amplitude without elevation of the threshold in the lower energy exposure group. This phenomenon was caused by loss of the synaptic ribbon. This type of hearing dysfunction has recently been described as hidden hearing loss caused by cochlear neuropathy, which is associated with tinnitus or hyperacusis. PMID:27531021

  4. Pathophysiology of the inner ear after blast injury caused by laser-induced shock wave.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Katsuki; Mizutari, Kunio; Matsui, Toshiyasu; Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Satoh, Yasushi; Sato, Shunichi; Shiotani, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The ear is the organ that is most sensitive to blast overpressure, and ear damage is most frequently seen after blast exposure. Blast overpressure to the ear results in sensorineural hearing loss, which is untreatable and is often associated with a decline in the quality of life. In this study, we used a rat model to demonstrate the pathophysiological and structural changes in the inner ear that replicate pure sensorineural hearing loss associated with blast injury using laser-induced shock wave (LISW) without any conductive hearing loss. Our results indicate that threshold elevation of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) after blast exposure was primarily caused by outer hair cell dysfunction induced by stereociliary bundle disruption. The bundle disruption pattern was unique; disturbed stereocilia were mostly observed in the outermost row, whereas those in the inner and middle rows stereocilia remained intact. In addition, the ABR examination showed a reduction in wave I amplitude without elevation of the threshold in the lower energy exposure group. This phenomenon was caused by loss of the synaptic ribbon. This type of hearing dysfunction has recently been described as hidden hearing loss caused by cochlear neuropathy, which is associated with tinnitus or hyperacusis. PMID:27531021

  5. Cell Alignment Driven by Mechanically Induced Collagen Fiber Alignment in Collagen/Alginate Coatings.

    PubMed

    Chaubaroux, Christophe; Perrin-Schmitt, Fabienne; Senger, Bernard; Vidal, Loïc; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Schaaf, Pierre; Haikel, Youssef; Boulmedais, Fouzia; Lavalle, Philippe; Hemmerlé, Joseph

    2015-09-01

    For many years it has been a major challenge to regenerate damaged tissues using synthetic or natural materials. To favor the healing processes after tendon, cornea, muscle, or brain injuries, aligned collagen-based architectures are of utmost interest. In this study, we define a novel aligned coating based on a collagen/alginate (COL/ALG) multilayer film. The coating exhibiting a nanofibrillar structure is cross-linked with genipin for stability in physiological conditions. By stretching COL/ALG-coated polydimethylsiloxane substrates, we developed a versatile method to align the collagen fibrils of the polymeric coating. Assays on cell morphology and alignment were performed to investigate the properties of these films. Microscopic assessments revealed that cells align with the stretched collagen fibrils of the coating. The degree of alignment is tuned by the stretching rate (i.e., the strain) of the COL/ALG-coated elastic substrate. Such coatings are of great interest for strategies that require aligned nanofibrillar biological material as a substrate for tissue engineering. PMID:25658028

  6. A Mouse Ear Model for Bystander Studies Induced by Microbeam Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Buonanno, M.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Smilenov, L. B.; Kleiman, N. J.; Young, E.; Ponnayia, B.; Brenner, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been observed in vitro and in cell and tissue culture models, however, there are few reported studies showing these effects in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study on bystander effects induced by microbeam irradiation in an intact living mammal. The mouse ear was used to investigate radiation-induced bystander effects in keratinocytes, utilizing a 3 MeV proton microbeam (LET 13.1 keV/µm) with a range in skin of about 135 µm. Using a custom-designed holder, the ear of an anesthetized C57BL/6J mouse was flattened by gentle suction and placed over the microbeam port to irradiate cells along a 35 µm wide, 6 mm long path. Immunohistochemical analysis of γ-H2AX foci formation in tissue sections revealed, compared to control tissue, proton-induced γ-H2AX foci formation in one of the two epidermal layers of the mouse ear. Strikingly, a higher number of cells than expected showed foci from direct irradiation effects. Although the proton-irradiated line was ~35 µm wide, the average width spanned by γ-H2AX-positive cells exceeded 150 µm. Cells adjacent to or in the epidermal layer opposite the γ-H2AX-positive region did not exhibit foci. These findings validate this mammalian model as a viable system for investigating radiation-induced bystander effects in an intact living organism. PMID:26207682

  7. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  8. Heparin fragments modulate the collagen phenotype of fibroblasts from radiation-induced subcutaneous fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    el Nabout, R.; Martin, M.; Remy, J.; Robert, L.; Lafuma, C. )

    1989-10-01

    Acute local gamma irradiation of porcine skin induces, as in human skin, an extensive and mutilating sclerosis characterized by continuous expansion of the fibrosis invading the adjacent muscle and by accumulation of the macromolecular components of the extracellular matrix. Collagen synthesis, content, and types were studied in the presence of heparin fragments (100 micrograms/10(6) cells) in the culture medium, by measuring the incorporation of the radiolabeled precursor (3H)proline into confluent primary cultures of porcine fibroblasts obtained from normal and irradiated fibrotic dermis. Enhancement in collagen biosynthesis and deposition and preferential increase in collagen type III synthesis were observed in fibrotic fibroblast cultures when compared to those in normal dermis fibroblasts. The total collagen synthesis and the rate of collagen hydroxylation appear unmodified by heparin fragments both in normal and in fibrotic fibroblast cultures. But heparin fragments induce a 10- and 2-fold decrease, respectively, in collagen type III and type V syntheses by fibrosis fibroblasts. As only minor effects upon collagen type III and V are observed in cultures of normal dermis fibroblasts, these results highly suggest that heparin fragments are capable of specifically modulating the collagen phenotype of fibroblasts derived from radiation-induced dermis fibrosis and thus are able to regulate the fibrotic process.

  9. Infection of corn ears by Fusarium spp. induces the emission of volatile sesquiterpenes.

    PubMed

    Becker, Eva-Maria; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Irmisch, Sandra; Köllner, Tobias G; Feussner, Ivo; Karlovsky, Petr; Splivallo, Richard

    2014-06-01

    Infection of corn (Zea mays L.) ears with fungal pathogens of the Fusarium genus might result in yield losses and in the accumulation of mycotoxins. The aim of this study was to investigate whether volatile profiles could be used to identify Fusarium-infected corn ears. The volatiles released by corn ears infected by Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium verticillioides, and Fusarium subglutinans were studied. Volatile emission was recorded at 24 days postinoculation (dpi) and in a time series (from 4 to 24 dpi). Twenty-two volatiles were differentially emitted from Fusarium-infected versus healthy corn ears. These included C6-C8 compounds and sesquiterpenoids. All volatiles indicative of Fusarium infection were detectable as early as 4-8 dpi and continued to be produced to the final sampling time (early milk maturity stage). The induced emission of β-macrocarpene and β-bisabolene correlated with an increased transcript accumulation of corn terpene synthase 6/11 (tps6/11). Additionally, the modification of volatile profiles after Fusarium infection was accompanied by the induction of plant defense compounds such as zealexins and oxylipins. Together, these results reveal a broad metabolic response of the plant to pathogen attack. Volatile biomarkers of Fusarium infection are promising indicators for the early detection of fungal infection before disease symptoms become visible. PMID:24816267

  10. Riboflavin-induced photo-crosslinking of collagen hydrogel and its application in meniscus tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jiseung; Koh, Rachel H; Shim, Whuisu; Kim, Hwan D; Yim, Hyun-Gu; Hwang, Nathaniel S

    2016-04-01

    A meniscus tear is a common knee injury, but its regeneration remains a clinical challenge. Recently, collagen-based scaffolds have been applied in meniscus tissue engineering. Despite its prevalence, application of natural collagen scaffold in clinical setting is limited due to its extremely low stiffness and rapid degradation. The purpose of the present study was to increase the mechanical properties and delay degradation rate of a collagen-based scaffold by photo-crosslinking using riboflavin (RF) and UV exposure. RF is a biocompatible vitamin B2 that showed minimal cytotoxicity compared to conventionally utilized photo-initiator. Furthermore, collagen photo-crosslinking with RF improved mechanical properties and delayed enzyme-triggered degradation of collagen scaffolds. RF-induced photo-crosslinked collagen scaffolds encapsulated with fibrochondrocytes resulted in reduced scaffold contraction and enhanced gene expression levels for the collagen II and aggrecan. Additionally, hyaluronic acid (HA) incorporation into photo-crosslinked collagen scaffold showed an increase in its retention. Based on these results, we demonstrate that photo-crosslinked collagen-HA hydrogels can be potentially applied in the scaffold-based meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:25809935

  11. Pierced Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Pierced Ears KidsHealth > For Kids > Pierced Ears Print A A ... cool, but infected ears do not! Getting Your Ears Pierced It's important to get your ears pierced ...

  12. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J.; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone. PMID:25608644

  13. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J.; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone.

  14. Nutrient-Enhanced Diet Reduces Noise-Induced Damage to the Inner Ear and Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, C. G.; Gagnon, P. M; Bennett, D. C.; Ohlemiller, K. K.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been broadly implicated as a cause of cell death and neural degeneration in multiple disease conditions; however, the evidence for successful intervention with dietary antioxidant manipulations has been mixed. In this study, we investigated the potential for protection of cells in the inner ear using a dietary supplement with multiple antioxidant components, selected for their potential interactive effectiveness. Protection against permanent threshold shift (PTS) was observed in CBA/J mice maintained on a diet supplemented with a combination of β-carotene, vitamins C and E, and magnesium when compared to PTS in control mice maintained on a nutritionally complete control diet. Although hair cell survival was not enhanced, noise-induced loss of Type II fibrocytes in the lateral wall was significantly reduced (p<0.05), and there was a trend towards less noise-induced loss in strial cell density in animals maintained on the supplemented diet. Taken together, our data suggest that pre-noise oral treatment with the high-nutrient diet can protect cells in the inner ear and reduce PTS in mice. Demonstration of functional and morphological preservation of cells in the inner ear with oral administration of this antioxidant supplemented diet supports the possibility of translation to human patients, and suggests an opportunity to evaluate antioxidant protection in mouse models of oxidative stress-related disease and pathology. PMID:21708355

  15. Nutrient-enhanced diet reduces noise-induced damage to the inner ear and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Le Prell, Colleen G; Gagnon, Patricia M; Bennett, David C; Ohlemiller, Kevin K

    2011-07-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated broadly as a cause of cell death and neural degeneration in multiple disease conditions; however, the evidence for successful intervention with dietary antioxidant manipulations has been mixed. In this study, we investigated the potential for protection of cells in the inner ear using a dietary supplement with multiple antioxidant components, which were selected for their potential interactive effectiveness. Protection against permanent threshold shift (PTS) was observed in CBA/J mice maintained on a diet supplemented with a combination of β-carotene, vitamins C and E, and magnesium when compared with PTS in control mice maintained on a nutritionally complete control diet. Although hair cell survival was not enhanced, noise-induced loss of type II fibrocytes in the lateral wall was significantly reduced (P < 0.05), and there was a trend toward less noise-induced loss in strial cell density in animals maintained on the supplemented diet. Taken together, our data suggest that prenoise oral treatment with the high-nutrient diet can protect cells in the inner ear and reduce PTS in mice. The demonstration of functional and morphologic preservation of cells in the inner ear with oral administration of this antioxidant supplemented diet supports the possibility of translation to human patients and suggests an opportunity to evaluate antioxidant protection in mouse models of oxidative stress-related disease and pathology. PMID:21708355

  16. A histological evaluation for guided bone regeneration induced by a collagenous membrane.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yuya; Amizuka, Norio; Nakadate, Masayoshi; Ohnishi, Hideo; Fujii, Noritaka; Oda, Kimimitsu; Nomura, Shuichi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2005-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the histological changes during ossification and cellular events including osteogenic differentiation responding to collagenous bioresorbable membranes utilized for GBR. Standardized artificial bony defects were prepared at rat maxillae, and covered with a collagenous bioresorbable membrane. These animals were sacrificed at 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after the GBR-operation. The paraffin sections were subject to tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) enzyme histochemistry and immunohistochemistry for alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OP) and osteocalcin (OC). In the first week of the experimental group, woven bone with ALP-positive osteoblasts occupied the lower half of the cavity. The collagenous membrane included numerous ALP-negative cells and OP-immunoreactive extracellular matrices. At 2 weeks, the ALP-, OP- and OC-immunoreactivity came to be recognizable in the region of collagenous membrane. Since ALP-negative soft tissue separated the collagenous membrane and the new bone originating from the cavity bottom, the collagenous membrane appeared to induce osteogenesis in situ. At 3 weeks, numerous collagen fibers of the membrane were embedded in the adjacent bone matrix. At 4 weeks, the membrane-associated and the cavity-derived bones had completely integrated, showing the same height of the periosteal ridge as the surrounding alveolar bones. The collagen fibers of a GBR-membrane appear to participate in osteogenic differentiation. PMID:15885767

  17. Magnetically induced behaviour of ferritin corpuscles in avian ears: can cuticulosomes function as magnetosomes?

    PubMed Central

    Jandacka, Petr; Burda, Hynek; Pistora, Jaromir

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoreception is an enigmatic, poorly understood sensory ability, described mainly on the basis of behavioural studies in animals of diverse taxa. Recently, corpuscles containing superparamagnetic iron-storage protein ferritin were found in the inner ear hair cells of birds, a predominantly single ferritin corpuscle per cell. It was suggested that these corpuscles might represent magnetosomes and function as magnetosensors. Here we determine ferritin low-field paramagnetic susceptibility to estimate its magnetically induced intracellular behaviour. Physical simulations show that ferritin corpuscles cannot be deformed or rotate in weak geomagnetic fields, and thus cannot provide magnetoreception via deformation of the cuticular plate. Furthermore, we reached an alternative hypothesis that ferritin corpuscle in avian ears may function as an intracellular electromagnetic oscillator. Such an oscillator would generate additional cellular electric potential related to normal cell conditions. Though the phenomenon seems to be weak, this effect deserves further analyses. PMID:25551148

  18. Objective assessment of endogenous collagen in vivo during tissue repair by laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Satish B S; Fernandes, Edward Mark; Rao, Anuradha C K; Prasad, Keerthana; Mahato, Krishna K

    2014-01-01

    Collagen, a triple helical protein with the primary role of mechanical function, provides tensile strength to the skin, and plays a pivotal task in tissue repair. During tissue regeneration, collagen level increases gradually and therefore, monitoring of such changes in vivo by laser induced fluorescence was the main objective behind the present study. In order to accomplish this, 15 mm diameter excisional wounds were created on six to eight week old Swiss albino mice. The collagen deposition accelerated upon irradiation of single exposure of 2 J/cm2 He-Ne laser dose immediately after wounding was recorded by laser induced autofluorescence in vivo along with un-illuminated and un-wounded controls. Autofluorescence spectra were recorded for each animal of the experimental groups on 0, 5, 10, 30, 45 and 60 days post-wounding, by exciting the granulation tissue/skin with 325 nm He-Cd laser. The variations in the average collagen intensities from the granulation tissue/skin of mice were inspected as a function of age and gender. Further, the spectral findings of the collagen synthesis in wound granulation tissue/un-wounded skin tissues were validated by Picro-Sirius red- polarized light microscopy in a blinded manner through image analysis of the respective collagen birefringence. The in vivo autofluorescence studies have shown a significant increase in collagen synthesis in laser treated animals as compared to the un-illuminated controls. Image analysis of the collagen birefringence further authenticated the ability of autofluorescence in the objective monitoring of collagen in vivo. Our results clearly demonstrate the potential of laser induced autofluorescence in the monitoring of collegen synthesis during tissue regeneration, which may have clinical implications. PMID:24874229

  19. Laser-induced collagen remodeling and deposition within the basilar membrane of the mouse cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Gentiana I.; Anvari, Bahman; Mazhar, Amaan; Pikkula, Brian; Oghalai, John S.

    2013-01-01

    The cochlea is the mammalian organ of hearing. Its predominant vibratory element, the basilar membrane, is tonotopically tuned, based on the spatial variation of its mass and stiffness. The constituent collagen fibers of the basilar membrane affect its stiffness. Laser irradiation can induce collagen remodeling and deposition in various tissues. We tested whether similar effects could be induced within the basilar membrane. Trypan blue was perfused into the scala tympani of anesthetized mice to stain the basilar membrane. We then irradiated the cochleas with a 694-nm pulsed ruby laser at 15 or 180 J /cm2. The mice were sacrificed 14 to 16 days later and collagen organization was studied. Polarization microscopy revealed that laser irradiation increased the birefringence within the basilar membrane in a dose-dependent manner. Electron microscopy demonstrated an increase in the density of collagen fibers and the deposition of new fibrils between collagen fibers after laser irradiation. As an assessment of hearing, auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds were found to increase moderately after 15 J/cm2 and substantially after 180 J /cm2. Our results demonstrate that collagen remodeling and new collagen deposition occurs within the basilar membrane after laser irradiation in a similar fashion to that found in other tissues. PMID:17477714

  20. A Mouse Ear Model for Bystander Studies Induced by Microbeam Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, M; Randers-Pehrson, G; Smilenov, L B; Kleiman, N J; Young, E; Ponnayia, B; Brenner, D J

    2015-08-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been observed in vitro and in cell and tissue culture models, however, there are few reported studies showing these effects in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study on bystander effects induced by microbeam irradiation in an intact living mammal. The mouse ear was used to investigate radiation-induced bystander effects in keratinocytes, utilizing a 3 MeV proton microbeam (LET 13.1 keV/μm) with a range in skin of about 135 μm. Using a custom-designed holder, the ear of an anesthetized C57BL/6J mouse was flattened by gentle suction and placed over the microbeam port to irradiate cells along a 35 μm wide, 6 mm long path. Immunohistochemical analysis of γ-H2AX foci formation in tissue sections revealed, compared to control tissue, proton-induced γ-H2AX foci formation in one of the two epidermal layers of the mouse ear. Strikingly, a higher number of cells than expected showed foci from direct irradiation effects. Although the proton-irradiated line was ~35 μm wide, the average width spanned by γ-H2AX-positive cells exceeded 150 μm. Cells adjacent to or in the epidermal layer opposite the γ-H2AX-positive region did not exhibit foci. These findings validate this mammalian model as a viable system for investigating radiation-induced bystander effects in an intact living organism. PMID:26207682

  1. Distinct roles of GPVI and integrin α2β1 in platelet shape change and aggregation induced by different collagens

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Gavin E; Atkinson, Ben T; Snell, Daniel C; Watson, Steve P

    2002-01-01

    Various platelet membrane glycoproteins have been proposed as receptors for collagen, in some cases as receptors for specific collagen types. In this study we have compared the ability of a range of collagen types to activate platelets. Bovine collagen types I–V, native equine tendon collagen fibrils and collagen-related peptide (CRP) all induced platelet aggregation and shape change. Responses were abolished in FcRγ chain-deficient platelets, which also lack GPVI, indicating a critical dependence on the GPVI/FcRγ chain complex. Responses to all collagens were unaffected in CD36-deficient platelets. A monoclonal antibody (6F1) which binds to the α2 integrin subunit of human platelets had a minimal effect on the rate and extent of aggregation induced by the collagens; however, it delayed the onset of aggregation following addition of all collagens. For shape change, 6F1 abolished the response induced by collagen types I and IV, substantially attenuated that to collagen types II, III and V, but only partially inhibited Horm collagen. Simultaneous blockade of the P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors, and inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase demonstrated that CRP can activate platelets independently of ADP and TxA2; however, responses to the collagens were dependent on these mediators. This study confirms the importance of the GPVI/FcRγ chain complex in platelet responses induced by a range of collagen agonists, while providing no evidence for collagen type-specific receptors. It also provides evidence for a modulatory role of α2β1, the significance of which depends on the collagen preparation. PMID:12183336

  2. Non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush induces HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingsheng; Zhang, Ying; Dusevich, Vladimir; Liu, Yi; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) brush has been regarded as a promising technique to enhance dental interfacial bonding. However, the principal enhancement mechanisms have not been well identified. In this study, the effect of non-thermal plasmas on grafting of HEMA, a typical dental monomer, onto dentin collagen thin films was investigated. Methods Human dentin was sectioned into 10-um-thick films. After total demineralization in 0.5 M EDTA solution for 30 min, the dentin collagen films were water-rinsed, air-dried, treated with 35 wt% HEMA aqueous solution. The films were then subject to plasma-exposure under a NTAP brush with different time (1–8 min) / input power (5–15 w). For comparison, the dentin collagen films were also treated with the above HEMA solution containing photo-initiators, then subject to light-curing. After plasma-exposure or light-curing, the HEMA-collagen films were rinsed in deionized water, and then examined by FTIR spectroscopy and TEM. Results The FITR results indicated that plasma-exposure could induce significant HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen thin films. In contrast, light-curing led to no detectable interaction of HEMA with dentin collagen. Quantitative IR spectral analysis (i.e., 1720/3075 or 749/3075, HEMA/collagen ratios) further suggested that the grafting efficacy of HEMA onto the plasma-exposed collagen thin films strongly depended on the treatment time and input power of plasmas. TEM results indicated that plasma treatment did not alter collagen’s banding structure. Significance The current study provides deeper insight into the mechanism of dental adhesion enhancement induced by non-thermal plasmas treatment. The NTAP brush could be a promising method to create chemical bond between resin monomers and dentin collagen. PMID:25458523

  3. Swimmer's Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Swimmer's Ear KidsHealth > For Kids > Swimmer's Ear Print A A ... How Do I Know if I Have Swimmer's Ear? Swimmer's ear may start with some itching, but ...

  4. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Tubes Ear Tubes Patient Health Information News media ... and throat specialist) may be considered. What are ear tubes? Ear tubes are tiny cylinders placed through ...

  5. Electrospun tilapia collagen nanofibers accelerating wound healing via inducing keratinocytes proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Nanping; Xue, Yang; Ding, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Mo, Xiumei; Sun, Jiao

    2016-07-01

    The development of biomaterials with the ability to induce skin wound healing is a great challenge in biomedicine. In this study, tilapia skin collagen sponge and electrospun nanofibers were developed for wound dressing. The collagen sponge was composed of at least two α-peptides. It did not change the number of spleen-derived lymphocytes in BALB/c mice, the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+) lymphocytes, and the level of IgG or IgM in Sprague-Dawley rats. The tensile strength and contact angle of collagen nanofibers were 6.72±0.44MPa and 26.71±4.88°, respectively. They also had good thermal stability and swelling property. Furthermore, the nanofibers could significantly promote the proliferation of human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and stimulate epidermal differentiation through the up-regulated gene expression of involucrin, filaggrin, and type I transglutaminase in HaCaTs. The collagen nanofibers could also facilitate rat skin regeneration. In the present study, electrospun biomimetic tilapia skin collagen nanofibers were succesfully prepared, were proved to have good bioactivity and could accelerate rat wound healing rapidly and effectively. These biological effects might be attributed to the biomimic extracellular matrix structure and the multiple amino acids of the collagen nanofibers. Therefore, the cost-efficient tilapia collagen nanofibers could be used as novel wound dressing, meanwhile effectively avoiding the risk of transmitting animal disease in the future clinical apllication. PMID:27037778

  6. Proneurotrophin-3 may induce Sortilin dependent death in inner ear neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tauris, Jacob; Gustafsen, Camilla; Christensen, Erik Ilsø; Jansen, Pernille; Nykjaer, Anders; Nyengaard, Jens R.; Teng, Kenneth K.; Schwarz, Elisabeth; Ovesen, Therese; Madsen, Peder; Petersen, Claus Munck

    2010-01-01

    The precursor of the neurotrophin NGF (proNGF) serves physiological functions distinct from its mature counterpart as it induces neuronal apoptosis through activation of a p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) and Sortilin death-signalling complex. The neurotrophins BDNF and NT3 provide essential trophic support to auditory neurons. Injury to the neurotrophin secreting cells in the inner ear is followed by irreversible degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons with consequences such as impaired hearing or deafness. Lack of mature neurotrophins may explain the degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons, but another mechanism is possible since unprocessed proNTs released from the injured cells may contribute to the degeneration by induction of apoptosis. Recent studies demonstrate that proBDNF, like proNGF, is a potent inducer of Sortilin:p75NTR mediated apoptosis. In addition, a coincident upregulation of proBDNF and p75NTR has been observed in degenerating spiral ganglion neurons, but the Sortilin expression in the inner ear is unresolved. Here we demonstrate that Sortilin and p75NTR are coexpressed in neurons of the neonatal inner ear. Furthermore, we establish that proNT3 exhibits high affinity binding to Sortilin and has the capacity to enhance cell surface Sortilin:p75NTR complex formation as well as to mediate apoptosis in neurons coexpressing p75NTR and Sortilin. Based on examination of wt and Sortilin deficient mouse embryos, Sortilin does not significantly influence the developmental selection of spiral ganglion neurons. However, our results suggest that proNT3 and proBDNF may play important roles in the response to noise-induced injuries or ototoxic damage via the Sortilin:p75NTR death-signalling complex. PMID:21261755

  7. Polymerized-Type I Collagen Induces Upregulation of Foxp3-Expressing CD4 Regulatory T Cells and Downregulation of IL-17-Producing CD4+ T Cells (Th17) Cells in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Macip-Rodríguez, Perla; Galindo-Feria, Angeles S.; Cruz-Robles, David; Soto-Abraham, Virgina; Escobar-Hernández, Sergio; Aguilar, Diana; Alpizar-Rodríguez, Deshiré; Férez-Blando, Karen; Llorente, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that polymerized-type I collagen (polymerized collagen) exhibits potent immunoregulatory properties. This work evaluated the effect of intramuscular administration of polymerized collagen in early and established collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and analyzed changes in Th subsets following therapy. Incidence of CIA was of 100% in mice challenged with type II collagen. Clinimorphometric analysis showed a downregulation of inflammation after administration of all treatments (P < 0.05). Histological analysis showed that the CIA-mice group had extensive bone erosion, pannus and severe focal inflammatory infiltrates. In contrast, there was a remarkable reduction in the severity of arthritis in mice under polymerized collagen, methotrexate or methotrexate/polymerized collagen treatment. Polymerized Collagen but not methotrexate induced tissue joint regeneration. Polymerized Collagen and methotrexate/polymerized collagen but not methotrexate alone induces downregulation of CD4+/IL17A+ T cells and upregulation of Tregs and CD4+/IFN-γ+ T cells. Thus, Polymerized Collagen could be an effective therapeutic agent in early and established rheumatoid arthritis by exerting downregulation of autoimmune inflammation. PMID:22028728

  8. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo; Kim, So Young; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Taehoon G.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify a function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in Hs27. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YIGSR peptide enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis both of gene and protein levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There were no changes in cell proliferation and MMP-1 level in YIGSR treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR effect on collagen synthesis mediated activation of FAK, pyk2 and ERK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR-induced FAK and ERK activation was modulated by FAK and MEK inhibitors. -- Abstract: The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the {beta}1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67 kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate

  9. Apigenin Induces Dermal Collagen Synthesis Via smad2/3 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, J.; Cheng, X.; Yi, B.; Zhang, X.; Li, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Decrease in fibroblast-produced collagen has been proven to be the pivotal cause of skin aging, but there is no satisfactory drug which directly increases dermal thickness and collage density. Here we found that a flavonoid natural product, apigenin, could significantly increase collagen synthesis. NIH/3T3 and primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) were incubated with various concentrations of apigenin, with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) serving as the negative control. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western Blot, and Toluidine blue staining demonstrated that apigenin stimulated type-I and type-III collagen synthesis of fibroblasts on the mRNA and protein levels. Meanwhile, apigenin did not induce expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in vitro and in vivo, a fibrotic marker in living tissues. Then the production of collagen was confirmed by Masson’s trichrome stain, Picrosirius red stain and immunohistochemistry in mouse models. We also clarified that this compound induced collagen synthesis by activating smad2/3 signaling pathway. Taken together, without obvious influence on fibroblasts’ apoptosis and viability, apigenin could promote the type-I and type-III collagen synthesis of dermal fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo, thus suggesting that apigenin may serve as a potential agent for esthetic and reconstructive skin rejuvenation. PMID:26150153

  10. In vitro deposition of hydroxyapatite on cortical bone collagen stimulated by deformation-induced piezoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Noris-Suárez, Karem; Lira-Olivares, Joaquin; Ferreira, Ana Marina; Feijoo, José Luis; Suárez, Nery; Hernández, Maria C; Barrios, Esteban

    2007-03-01

    In the present work, we have studied the effect of the piezoelectricity of elastically deformed cortical bone collagen on surface using a biomimetic approach. The mineralization process induced as a consequence of the piezoelectricity effect was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SEM micrographs showed that mineralization occurred predominantly over the compressed side of bone collagen, due to the effect of piezoelectricity, when the sample was immersed in the simulated body fluid (SBF) in a cell-free system. The TSDC method was used to examine the complex collagen dielectric response. The dielectric spectra of deformed and undeformed collagen samples with different hydration levels were compared and correlated with the mineralization process followed by SEM. The dielectric measurements showed that the mineralization induced significant changes in the dielectric spectra of the deformed sample. DSC and TSDC results demonstrated a reduction of the collagen glass transition as the mineralization process advanced. The combined use of SEM, TSDC, and DSC showed that, even without osteoblasts present, the piezoelectric dipoles produced by deformed collagen can produce the precipitation of hydroxyapatite by electrochemical means, without a catalytic converter as occurs in classical biomimetic deposition. PMID:17261065

  11. Short Stimulation of Electro-Responsive PAA/Fibrin Hydrogel Induces Collagen Production

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Nastaran; Swennen, Geertje; Verbruggen, Sanne; Scibiorek, Martyna; Molin, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Acrylic acid/fibrin hydrogel can mechanically stimulate cells when an external electrical field is applied, enabling them to migrate and align throughout the depth of the gel. The ability of electro-responsive polyacrylic acid (PAA)/fibrin hydrogel to promote collagen production and remodeling has been investigated by three-dimensional (3D) culturing and conditioning of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs-seeded hydrogels were subjected to an alternating electrical field (0.06 V/mm) for 2 h for one, two, or three times per week during 4 weeks of culturing. Fluorescent images of collagen structure and accumulation, assessed by CNA-35 probe, showed increased collagen content (>100-fold at 1× stimulation/week) in the center of the hydrogels after 4 weeks of culture. The increase in collagen production correlated with increasing extracellular matrix gene expression and resulted in significantly improved mechanical properties of the stimulated hydrogels. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity was also significantly enhanced by stimulation, which probably has a role in the reorganization of the collagen. Short stimulation (2 h) induced a favorable response in the cells and enhanced tissue formation and integrity of the scaffold by inducing collagen production. The presented set up could be used for conditioning and improving the functionality of current tissue-engineered vascular grafts. PMID:24341313

  12. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  13. Isorhamnetin attenuates collagen-induced arthritis via modulating cytokines and oxidative stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuewen; Zhong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress were involved in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Isorhamnetin has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities, but its effects on RA have not been investigated. In order to observe the possible therapeutic effects of isorhamnetin on RA, we established a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model and treated the animal with isorhamnetin for 3 weeks. Besides, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and isorhamnetin. The severity of arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, joint destruction score and inflammation score. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-10 and IL-35 in the joint tissue homogenate and cell culture medium as well as anti-type II collagen antibody in serum were measured using ELISA. Contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in joint tissue homogenate were measured using assay kits. We found collagen immunization induced significant arthritis in mice and isorhamnetin at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day could significantly attenuate the collagen-induced arthritis. Isorhamnetin also modulated the production of cytokines and suppressed the oxidative stress in the mice with collagen-induced arthritis at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day. These data suggested that isorhamnetin might be a potential agent for the management of RA. PMID:26629181

  14. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Svoboda, Kathy K.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Gordon, Marion K.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2013-04-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin γ2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing from 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin γ2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin γ2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. - Highlights: ► We demonstrated ER stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model. ► We described the asymmetrical nature of wound repair in the MEVM. ► We identified the distribution of various ER stress markers in the MEVM.

  15. Collagen V-induced nasal tolerance downregulates pulmonary collagen mRNA gene and TGF-beta expression in experimental systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate collagen deposition, mRNA collagen synthesis and TGF-beta expression in the lung tissue in an experimental model of scleroderma after collagen V-induced nasal tolerance. Methods Female New Zealand rabbits (N = 12) were immunized with 1 mg/ml of collagen V in Freund's adjuvant (IM). After 150 days, six immunized animals were tolerated by nasal administration of collagen V (25 μg/day) (IM-TOL) daily for 60 days. The collagen content was determined by morphometry, and mRNA expressions of types I, III and V collagen were determined by Real-time PCR. The TGF-beta expression was evaluated by immunostaining and quantified by point counting methods. To statistic analysis ANOVA with Bonferroni test were employed for multiple comparison when appropriate and the level of significance was determined to be p < 0.05. Results IM-TOL, when compared to IM, showed significant reduction in total collagen content around the vessels (0.371 ± 0.118 vs. 0.874 ± 0.282, p < 0.001), bronchioles (0.294 ± 0.139 vs. 0.646 ± 0.172, p < 0.001) and in the septal interstitium (0.027 ± 0.014 vs. 0.067 ± 0.039, p = 0.026). The lung tissue of IM-TOL, when compared to IM, showed decreased immunostaining of types I, III and V collagen, reduced mRNA expression of types I (0.10 ± 0.07 vs. 1.0 ± 0.528, p = 0.002) and V (1.12 ± 0.42 vs. 4.74 ± 2.25, p = 0.009) collagen, in addition to decreased TGF-beta expression (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Collagen V-induced nasal tolerance in the experimental model of SSc regulated the pulmonary remodeling process, inhibiting collagen deposition and collagen I and V mRNA synthesis. Additionally, it decreased TGF-beta expression, suggesting a promising therapeutic option for scleroderma treatment. PMID:20047687

  16. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Svoboda, Kathy K.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Gordon, Marion K.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin γ2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing from 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin γ2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin γ2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. PMID:23357548

  17. The effects of an inhibitor of diglyceride lipase on collagen-induced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Elke C G; Ortar, Giorgio; McNicol, Archie

    2013-12-01

    Human platelet activation by collagen occurs in a dose-dependent manner. High concentrations of collagen bind to a pair of receptors, the α2β1 integrin and glycoprotein (GP)VI/Fc-receptor γ-chain (FcRγ), which stimulate a cascade of events including Syk, LAT, Btk, Gads, and phospholipase Cγ2, leading to calcium release and protein kinase C (PKC) activation. Calcium and PKC are responsible for a range of platelet responses including exocytosis and aggregation, as well as the cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2)-mediated release of arachidonic acid, which is converted to thromboxane (Tx)A2. In contrast, low concentrations of collagen are acutely aspirin-sensitive, and calcium release and aggregation are TxA2-dependent. Under these conditions, cPLA2 is not involved and it has been suggested that phospholipase C generates 1,2-diacylglycerol (DG) from which arachidonic acid is liberated by diglyceride lipase (DGL). Here a novel DGL blocker (OMDM-188) inhibited collagen-, but not arachidonic acid-induced aggregation and TxA2 synthesis. Furthermore, OMDM-188 inhibited collagen-induced arachidonic acid release. Finally OMDM-188 inhibited collagen-induced p38(MAPK) phosphorylation, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, with no effect on the phosphorylation of either enzyme in response to arachidonic acid. Taken together, these data suggest a role for a pathway involving phospholipase C liberating DG from membrane phospholipids in response to minimally activating concentrations of collagen. The DG serves as a substrate for DGL, potentially under the regulations of p38(MAPK), to release arachidonic acid, which is subsequently converted to TxA2, which mediates the final platelet response. PMID:24042163

  18. In vivo left ventricular function and collagen expression in aldosterone/salt-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Gil, J F; Delcayre, C; Robert, V; Wassef, M; Trouve, P; Mougenot, N; Charlemagne, D; Lechat, P

    1998-12-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is linked to aldosterone-induced hypertension, but the effects on in vivo left ventricular (LV) function are not established. We studied the relations between in vivo LV function and aldosterone/salt cardiac fibrosis. Adult guinea pigs (GPs) were treated for 3 months with an aldosterone infusion and high-salt diet. This treatment induced arterial hypertension (+35%) and moderate LV hypertrophy (LVH; +60%) without right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy. Echo-Doppler LV assessment demonstrated unaltered cardiac output, stroke volume, or LV relaxation. Type I collagen messenger RNA (mRNA) was significantly increased in both ventricles (LV, +48%; RV, +77%) and accompanied by a significant increase in total collagen deposition (LV, from 0.52% in controls to 4.4% in treated GPs; RV, from 0.82 to 5.5% in treated GPs). Plasma norepinephrine levels increased 2.6-fold (p < 0.01) and correlated with the increase in collagen deposition in both ventricles. Collagen content was not correlated with hypertension or LVH. We conclude that aldosterone administration induces cardiac collagen accumulation and a sympathetic stimulation, which might preserve systolic and diastolic function. PMID:9869498

  19. Nimesulide Improves the Symptomatic and Disease Modifying Effects of Leflunomide in Collagen Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M.; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.; Nofal, Salwa M.; Khalifa, Amani E.; Williams, Richard O.; El-Eraky, Wafaa I.; Nagy, Ayman A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2014-01-01

    Nimesulide is a COX-2 inhibitor used for symptomatic relief of rheumatoid arthritis. Leflunomide is an anti-pyrimidine used to manage the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Herein we studied the influence of nimesulide and leflunomide combination in terms of disease symptoms and progression using collagen-induced arthritis model in mice, as a model for rheumatoid arthritis. Collagen induced arthritis was induced by immunization with type II collagen. Assessment of joint stiffness and articular hyperalgesia were evaluated using a locomotor activity cage and the Hargreaves method, respectively. Disease progression was assessed via arthritic index scoring, X-ray imaging, myeloperoxidase enzyme activity and histopathologic examination. Nimesulide induced only transient symptomatic alleviation on the top of decreased leucocytic infiltration compared to arthritis group. However, nimesulide alone failed to induce any significant improvement in the radiological or pathological disease progression. Leflunomide alone moderately alleviates the symptoms of arthritis and moderately retarded the radiological and pathological disease progression. Combination of nimesulide and leflunomide significantly improved symptomatic (analgesia and joint stiffness) and arthritic disease progression (radiological, pathological and Myeloperoxidase enzyme activity) in collagen induced arthritis animal model. PMID:25375820

  20. Changes in corneal collagen induced by holmium:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timberlake, George T.; Reinke, Martin H.; Miller, Alvin

    1996-05-01

    Holmium:YAG laser thermokeratoplasty corrects hyperopia (farsightedness) by producing small areas of corneal collagen shrinkage that cause the central cornea to bulge outward, increasing optical power. Collagen shrinkage is probably caused by laser-heated corneal water, but details of the shrinkage mechanism are not known. We investigated the shrinkage mechanism by measuring changes in corneal ultrastructure, surface shrinkage, water content, and strength following Ho:YAG laser exposures. Morphological changes in collagen were documented by measurements from electron micrographs. Corneal adhesive strength was determined by measuring tearing force in a plane parallel to the corneal surface. Laser-induced water loss was measured by weighing corneal samples before and after exposure. Corneal surface shrinkage was assessed by photographing the movement of particles on the cornea. Lasered collagen fibrils increased in diameter, lost their orderly arrangement, and appeared `frayed.' The corneal surface contracted toward lasered areas with a maximal shift of approximately 190 micrometers , more than could be explained by a model based on collagen fibril changes. Water loss plays a minor role in corneal shrinkage since corneal samples lost about only about 1.4% of their weight after massive laser exposure. Despite marked changes in collagen structure, corneal adhesive force was unchanged.

  1. Blister-inducing antibodies target multiple epitopes on collagen VII in mice

    PubMed Central

    Csorba, Kinga; Chiriac, Mircea Teodor; Florea, Florina; Ghinia, Miruna Georgiana; Licarete, Emilia; Rados, Andreea; Sas, Alexandra; Vuta, Vlad; Sitaru, Cassian

    2014-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease of mucous membranes and the skin caused by autoantibodies against collagen VII. In silico and wet laboratory epitope mapping studies revealed numerous distinct epitopes recognized by EBA patients' autoantibodies within the non-collagenous (NC)1 and NC2 domains of collagen VII. However, the distribution of pathogenic epitopes on collagen VII has not yet been described. In this study, we therefore performed an in vivo functional epitope mapping of pathogenic autoantibodies in experimental EBA. Animals (n = 10/group) immunized against fragments of the NC1 and NC2 domains of collagen VII or injected with antibodies generated against the same fragments developed to different extent experimental EBA. Our results demonstrate that antibodies targeting multiple, distinct epitopes distributed over the entire NC1, but not NC2 domain of collagen VII induce blistering skin disease in vivo. Our present findings have crucial implications for the development of antigen-specific B- and T cell-targeted therapies in EBA. PMID:25091020

  2. Blister-inducing antibodies target multiple epitopes on collagen VII in mice.

    PubMed

    Csorba, Kinga; Chiriac, Mircea Teodor; Florea, Florina; Ghinia, Miruna Georgiana; Licarete, Emilia; Rados, Andreea; Sas, Alexandra; Vuta, Vlad; Sitaru, Cassian

    2014-09-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease of mucous membranes and the skin caused by autoantibodies against collagen VII. In silico and wet laboratory epitope mapping studies revealed numerous distinct epitopes recognized by EBA patients' autoantibodies within the non-collagenous (NC)1 and NC2 domains of collagen VII. However, the distribution of pathogenic epitopes on collagen VII has not yet been described. In this study, we therefore performed an in vivo functional epitope mapping of pathogenic autoantibodies in experimental EBA. Animals (n = 10/group) immunized against fragments of the NC1 and NC2 domains of collagen VII or injected with antibodies generated against the same fragments developed to different extent experimental EBA. Our results demonstrate that antibodies targeting multiple, distinct epitopes distributed over the entire NC1, but not NC2 domain of collagen VII induce blistering skin disease in vivo. Our present findings have crucial implications for the development of antigen-specific B- and T cell-targeted therapies in EBA. PMID:25091020

  3. Hindlimb unloading induces a collagen isoform shift in the soleus muscle of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. A.; Lesniewski, L. A.; Muller-Delp, J. M.; Majors, A. K.; Scalise, D.; Delp, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether hindlimb unloading (HU) alters the extracellular matrix of skeletal muscle, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 0 (n = 11), 1 (n = 11), 14 (n = 13), or 28 (n = 11) days of unloading. Remodeling of the soleus and plantaris muscles was examined biochemically for collagen abundance via measurement of hydroxyproline, and the percentage of cross-sectional area of collagen was determined histologically with picrosirius red staining. Total hydroxyproline content in the soleus and plantaris muscles was unaltered by HU at any time point. However, the relative proportions of type I collagen in the soleus muscle decreased relative to control (Con) with 14 and 28 days HU (Con 68 +/- 5%; 14 days HU 53 +/- 4%; 28 days HU 53 +/- 7%). Correspondingly, type III collagen increased in soleus muscle with 14 and 28 days HU (Con 32 +/- 5%; 14 days HU 47 +/- 4%; 28 days HU 48 +/- 7%). The proportion of type I muscle fibers in soleus muscle was diminished with HU (Con 96 +/- 2%; 14 days HU 86 +/- 1%; 28 days HU 83 +/- 1%), and the proportion of hybrid type I/IIB fibers increased (Con 0%; 14 days HU 8 +/- 2%; 28 days HU 14 +/- 2%). HU had no effect on the proportion of type I and III collagen or muscle fiber composition in plantaris muscle. The data demonstrate that HU induces a shift in the relative proportion of collagen isoform (type I to III) in the antigravity soleus muscle, which occurs concomitantly with a slow-to-fast myofiber transformation.

  4. Effect of drill-induced noise on hearing in non-operated ear

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, Seyyed Hamidreza; Fazel, Alireza; Rogha, Mehrdad; Nilforoush, Mohamadhosein; Solooki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of drill-generated noise on hearing loss in non-operated ear and if any, was temporary or persistent. Materials and Methods: In this prospective clinical study, 23 patients who had undergone mastoidectomy and normal contralateral hearing were enrolled. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively (1 and 7 days) following surgery using low and high-frequency pure tone audiometry (PTA) and low and high-frequency transient evoked and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) testing. Results: Comparing preoperative and 1-day after surgery, PTA averages were significantly different at low frequencies, but no statistical significant differences were observed at 0.25 KHz and high-frequencies. Comparing 1-day after surgery and 7 days after surgery showed that, PTA averages at 0.5, 2 and 2 KHz were significantly different with no significant differences at the other average of thresholds in low and high frequencies; PTA average at 1 KHz was significantly different with, no significant differences at the other averages of thresholds in low and high frequencies. DPOAEs showed a significant difference preoperative and 1-day after surgery, 1-day and 7 days after, but DPOAEs were not significantly different. Transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) had a significant difference preoperative and 1-day after surgery, 1-day and 7 days after but when comparing preoperative and 7 days after surgery, TEOAEs were not significantly different. Conclusions: Drill-induced noise during ear surgery (mastoidectomy) can cause reversible changes in PTA, DPOAEs and TEOAEs in the non-operated ear. PMID:27274502

  5. Histological characteristics of collagen denaturation and injuries in bipolar radiofrequency-induced colonic anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingxi; Zhuo, Changhua; Song, Chengli; Li, Xinxiang; Zhou, Yu; Shi, Debing

    2015-03-01

    Bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermo-fusion has been explored as an advanced surgical method for intestinal anastomoses; however, the histological characteristics of collagen denaturation and injuries arising from this process remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the microcosmic changes and tissue damage of fusion regions with various parameters of injury. Ex vivo colons of pigs were fused serosa-serosa on two carrier rings, which were installed on a homemade anastomotic device. Five levels of compressive pressure from 171 to 313 kPa were applied for 5s to fuse the colons under radiofrequency power of 160 W, and then the collagen denaturation of the fused region was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Light microscopy was utilized to observe histological slices that were stained with picrosirius red in order to visualize the tissue injuries under two levels of radiofrequency power (120 vs. 140 W) and operation time (5 vs. 10s). Transmission electron micrographs showed that increased compressive pressure led to thicker denatured collagen fibrils and wider gaps between each collagen fibril. Serosa adhesion regions appeared abundant in collagen. No histological differences were observed when 120 W of power was applied for 5 and 10s. Significant muscle cracking occurred when colons were fused using 140 W for 5s. When the operation time was extended to 10s, 140 W led to tight fusion and less splitting on muscles. These results suggest that higher compressive pressure results in more severe collagen unfolding and also reduces collagen crosslinking in fused colons. Improved radiofrequency power along with operation time could avoid tissue injury upon radiofrequency-induced colonic anastomoses. PMID:25434604

  6. Aortic VCAM-1: an early marker of vascular inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Denys, Anne; Clavel, Gaëlle; Lemeiter, Delphine; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Semerano, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There are limited experimental data on vascular involvement in arthritis models. To study the link between CVD and inflammation in RA, we developed a model of vascular dysfunction and articular inflammation by collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. We studied the expression of vascular inflammatory markers in CIA with and without concomitant hyperlipidic diet (HD). Collagen-induced arthritis was induced with intradermal injection of chicken type-II collagen followed by a boost 21 days later. Mice with and without CIA were fed a standard diet or an HD for 12 weeks starting from the day of the boost. Arthritis severity was evaluated with a validated clinical score. Aortic mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-17 were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 localization in the aortic sinus was determined by immunohistochemistry. Atherosclerotic plaque presence was assessed in aortas. Collagen-induced arthritis was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1, independent of diet. VCAM-1 overexpression was detectable as early as 4 weeks after collagen immunization and persisted after 15 weeks. The HD induced atheroma plaque formation and aortic iNOS expression regardless of CIA. Concomitant CIA and HD had no additive effect on atheroma or VCAM-1 or iNOS expression. CIA and an HD diet induced a distinct and independent expression of large-vessel inflammation markers in B6 mice. This model may be relevant for the study of CVD in RA. PMID:26859834

  7. Regulation of collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts by ascorbic-induced lipid peroxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Geesin, J.C. Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products, Inc., Skillman, NJ ); Gordon, J.S. ); Gordon, J.S. ); Berg, R.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Ascorbic acid has been shown to stimulate collagen synthesis through the induction of lipid peroxidation which leads to increased transcription of the collagen genes. To test the ability of aldehyde products of lipid peroxidation to mediate this effect, the authors treated cultured fibroblasts with 1-200{mu}M of malondialdehyde, acetaldehyde, glyoxal or hexenal in the presence of lipid peroxidation inducing or noninducing concentrations of ascorbic acid. The treatment process involved either pretreatment of cells for 66hrs with either concentration of ascorbate before a 6hr treatment in the presence of ascorbate and the aldehydes, or 6 or 72hr treatment of the cells in the presence of either concentration of ascorbate plus the aldehydes. No effect of any of these aldehydes was seen on ascorbate-stimulated collagen synthesis. Also, pretreatment of fibroblasts for 24hrs with 100nM phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which produces down regulation of protein kinase C(PKC), failed to alter the ascorbate-stimulation of collagen synthesis. Additionally, the authors tested the ability of benzamide, a poly ACP ribosylation inhibitor, to inhibit the ascorbate response with no specific effect noted. These results do not support the proposed roles for aldehydes, PKC, or poly ADP ribosylation in the mediation of the lipid peroxidation induced stimulation of collagen synthesis.

  8. Regional alterations of type I collagen in rat tibia induced by skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, Masashi; Arnaud, Sara B.; Tanzawa, Hideki; Kitamura, Eiji; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of mineral density in weight-bearing bones that leads to inferior bone mechanical strength. This appears to be caused by a failure of bone formation; however, its mechanisms still are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize collagen, the predominant matrix protein in bone, in various regions of tibia of rats that were subjected to skeletal unloading by 4 weeks tail suspension. Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (4 months old) were divided into tail suspension and ambulatory controls (eight rats each). After the tail suspension, tibias from each animal were collected and divided into five regions and collagen was analyzed. The collagen cross-linking and the extent of lysine (Lys) hydroxylation in unloaded bones were significantly altered in proximal epiphysis, diaphysis, and, in particular, proximal metaphysis but not in distal regions. The pool of immature/nonmineralized collagen measured by its extractability with a chaotropic solvent was significantly increased in proximal metaphysis. These results suggest that skeletal unloading induced an accumulation of post-translationally altered nonmineralized collagen and that these changes are bone region specific. These alterations might be caused by impaired osteoblastic function/differentiation resulting in a mineralization defect.

  9. Glutaraldehyde-induced remineralization improves the mechanical properties and biostability of dentin collagen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoqun; Mao, Caiyun; Sun, Jian; Chen, Yi; Wang, Wei; Pan, Haihua; Tang, Ruikang; Gu, Xinhua

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to induce a biomimetic remineralization process by using glutaraldehyde (GA) to reconstruct the mechanical properties and biostability of demineralized collagen. Demineralized dentin disks (35% phosphoric acid, 10s) were pretreated with a 5% GA solution for 3min and then cultivated in a calcium phosphate remineralization solution. The remineralization kinetics and superstructure of the remineralization layer were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and nanoindentation tests. The biostability was examined by enzymatic degradation experiments. A significant difference was found in dentin remineralization process between dentin with and without GA pretreating. GA showed a specific affinity to dentin collagen resulting in the formation of a cross-linking superstructure. GA pretreating could remarkably shorten remineralization time from 7days to 2days. The GA-induced remineralized collagen fibrils were well encapsulated by newly formed hydroxyapatite mineral nanocrystals. With the nano-hydroxyapatite coating, both the mechanical properties (elastic modulus and hardness) and the biostability against enzymatic degradation of the collagen were significantly enhanced, matching those of natural dentin. The results indicated that GA cross-linking of dentin collagen could promote dentin biomimetic remineralization, resulting in an improved mechanical properties and biostability. It may provide a promising tissue-engineering technology for dentin repair. PMID:27287165

  10. Piperlongumine Blocks JAK2-STAT3 to Inhibit Collagen-Induced Platelet Reactivity Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species†

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hengjie; Houck, Katie L.; Tian, Ye; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Hull, Ken; Zhou, Zhou; Zhou, Mingzhao; Wu, Xiaoping; Tweardy, David J.; Romo, Daniel; Fu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhang, Jianning; Dong, Jing-fei

    2015-01-01

    Background Piperlongumine (PL) is a compound isolated from the piper longum plant. It possesses anti-cancer activities through blocking the transcription factor STAT3 and by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer, but not normal cells. It also inhibits platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but the underlying mechanism is not known. Objective We conducted in vitro experiments to test the hypothesis that PL regulates a non-transcriptional activity of STAT3 to specifically reduce the reactivity of human platelets to collagen. Results PL dose-dependently blocked collagen-induced platelet aggregation, calcium influx, CD62p expression and thrombus formation on collagen with a maximal inhibition at 100 μM. It reduced platelet microvesiculation induced by collagen. PL blocked the activation of JAK2 and STAT3 in collagen-stimulated platelets. This inhibitory effect was significantly reduced in platelets pretreated with a STAT3 inhibitor. Although PL induced ROS production in platelets; quenching ROS using excessive reducing agents: 20 μM GSH and 0.5 mM L-Cysteine, did not block the inhibitory effects. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor Apocynin also had no effect. Conclusions PL inhibited collagen-induced platelet reactivity by targeting the JAK2-STAT3 pathway. We also provide experimental evidence that PL and collagen induce different oxidants that have differential effects on platelets. Studying these differential effects may uncover new mechanisms of regulating platelet functions by oxidants in redox signals. PMID:26645674

  11. Type V Collagen Induced Tolerance Suppresses Collagen Deposition, TGF-β and Associated Transcripts in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Vittal, Ragini; Mickler, Elizabeth A.; Fisher, Amanda J.; Zhang, Chen; Rothhaar, Katia; Gu, Hongmei; Brown, Krista M.; Emtiazdjoo, Amir; Lott, Jeremy M.; Frye, Sarah B.; Smith, Gerald N.; Sandusky, George E.; Cummings, Oscar W.; Wilkes, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal interstitial lung disease characterized by progressive scarring and matrix deposition. Recent reports highlight an autoimmune component in IPF pathogenesis. We have reported anti-col(V) immunity in IPF patients. The objective of our study was to determine the specificity of col(V) expression profile and anti-col(V) immunity relative to col(I) in clinical IPF and the efficacy of nebulized col(V) in pre-clinical IPF models. Methods Col(V) and col(I) expression profile was analyzed in normal human and IPF tissues. C57-BL6 mice were intratracheally instilled with bleomycin (0.025 U) followed by col(V) nebulization at pre-/post-fibrotic stage and analyzed for systemic and local responses. Results Compared to normal lungs, IPF lungs had higher protein and transcript expression of the alpha 1 chain of col(V) and col(I). Systemic anti-col(V) antibody concentrations, but not of anti-col(I), were higher in IPF patients. Nebulized col(V), but not col(I), prevented bleomycin-induced fibrosis, collagen deposition, and myofibroblast differentiation. Col(V) treatment suppressed systemic levels of anti-col(V) antibodies, IL-6 and TNF-α; and local Il-17a transcripts. Compared to controls, nebulized col(V)-induced tolerance abrogated antigen-specific proliferation in mediastinal lymphocytes and production of IL-17A, IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ. In a clinically relevant established fibrosis model, nebulized col(V) decreased collagen deposition. mRNA array revealed downregulation of genes specific to fibrosis (Tgf-β, Il-1β, Pdgfb), matrix (Acta2, Col1a2, Col3a1, Lox, Itgb1/6, Itga2/3) and members of the TGF-β superfamily (Tgfbr1/2, Smad2/3, Ltbp1, Serpine1, Nfkb/Sp1/Cebpb). Conclusions Anti-col(V) immunity is pathogenic in IPF, and col(V)-induced tolerance abrogates bleomycin-induced fibrogenesis and down regulates TGF- β-related signaling pathways. PMID:24204629

  12. Effect of cadmium chloride exposure during the induction of collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Md Meraj; Neha; Khan, Haider A

    2015-08-01

    The precise cause of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis remains uncertain. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in animals is the most commonly used model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Exposure of humans and animals to toxic metals is widespread. Cadmium is one of the most prevalent nephrotoxic heavy metal, but it may cause other systemic toxicity as well. Cadmium may cause adverse health effects by impairment of the immune systems and induction of reactive oxygen species. Since rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis involve immune system disorder and chronic inflammation, the present study has been designed to find out the effect of cadmium chloride exposure on clinical manifestation of development of collagen induced rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis was induced in rats by intradermal injection of emulsion of type II collagen in Complete Freund's Adjuvant. Rats were treated with cadmium chloride dissolved in drinking water at concentrations of 5ppm and 50ppm for 21 days from day of immunization. The effects of cadmium in the rats were assessed by biochemical parameters (articular elastase, articular nitrite, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase) histopathological analysis and immunohistochemical expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in rat joint tissue. Histopathological changes further confirmed the biochemical and immunohistochemical results. Our results suggest that exposure to cadmium chloride during the induction phase of collagen induced arthritis abrogate disease development at lower dose whereas exacerbates at higher dose in Wistar rats. PMID:26070417

  13. Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Ear Infections Overview How does the ear work? A tube called the eustachian (say: "you-stay-shee-an") tube connects the middle ear with the back of the nose. Normally this ...

  14. Cauliflower Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What's Cauliflower Ear? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Cauliflower Ear? Print A A A Text Size Have you ever seen someone whose ear looks bumpy and lumpy? The person might have ...

  15. Ear Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... ear, where they make your eardrum vibrate. The vibrations are transmitted through three tiny bones, called ossicles, in your middle ear. The vibrations travel to your inner ear, a snail-shaped ...

  16. Swimmer's ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) Vinegar (acetic acid) ear drops People with chronic swimmer's ear may ... drop of alcohol with 1 drop of white vinegar and placing the mixture into the ears after ...

  17. In vivo collagen turnover during development of thyroxine-induced left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Karim, M A; Ferguson, A G; Wakim, B T; Samarel, A M

    1991-02-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts synthesize large amounts of procollagens, yet only a small fraction of mature collagens accumulate in the extracellular matrix. To determine the roles of intracellular degradation of newly synthesized procollagens and extracellular degradation of mature collagens during normal growth and during thyroxine-induced left ventricular hypertrophy, in vivo left ventricular procollagen synthetic rates were assessed in control rats and rats treated with L-thyroxine for 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk (1 mg.kg-1.day-1). A modification of the flooding infusion method was developed using measurements of cardiac prolyl-tRNA, and tissue-free and protein-bound hydroxyproline specific radioactivities 60 min after intravenous administration of a massive dose of [3H]proline. Degradative rates of newly synthesized procollagens and mature collagens were then derived as the difference between rates of procollagen synthesis and collagen accumulation. Left ventricular procollagen synthetic rates were markedly increased after 1 wk of hormone administration (256 +/- 16 and 166 +/- 13 micrograms/day per left ventricle for thyroxine-treated and control animals, respectively; P less than 0.01). An even greater increase in procollagen synthetic rates was observed after 8 wk (438 +/- 46 and 202 +/- 18 micrograms/day for thyroxine-treated and control animals, respectively; P less than 0.01). Despite increased procollagen synthesis, disproportionate accumulation of fibrillar collagens (assessed as the relative concentration of protein-bound hydroxyproline in left ventricular tissue) did not occur. Derived left ventricular degradative rates for newly synthesized procollagens as well as for mature collagens were increased in thyroxine-treated animals. Increased procollagen synthesis, enhanced flux of newly synthesized procollagens through intracellular degradative pathways, and extensive extracellular matrix remodeling without disproportionate collagen accumulation are characteristics of this

  18. Lack of collagen VI promotes neurodegeneration by impairing autophagy and inducing apoptosis during aging

    PubMed Central

    Castagnaro, Silvia; Gregorio, Ilaria; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein with a broad distribution in different tissues and mostly deposited at the close periphery of the cell surface. Previous studies revealed that collagen VI protects neurons from the toxicity of amyloid-βpeptides and from UV-induced damage. However, the physiological role of this protein in the central nervous system (CNS) remains unknown. Here, we established primary neural cultures from murine cortex and hippocampus, and carried out in vitro and in vivo studies in wild-type and collagen VI null (Col6a1−/−) mice. Col6a1−/− neural cultures displayed an increased incidence of spontaneous apoptosis and higher vulnerability to oxidative stress, accompanied by altered regulation of autophagy with increased p62 protein levels and decreased LC3 lipidation. Analysis of brain sections confirmed increased apoptosis and abnormal regulation of autophagy in the CNS of collagen VI-deficient animals. To investigate the in vivo physiological consequences of these CNS defects, we carried out functional studies and found that motor and memory task performances were impaired in aged Col6a1−/− mice. These findings indicate that lack of collagen VI leads to spontaneous apoptosis and defective autophagy in neural cells, and point at a protective role for this ECM protein in the CNS during physiological aging. PMID:27060109

  19. Lack of collagen VI promotes neurodegeneration by impairing autophagy and inducing apoptosis during aging.

    PubMed

    Cescon, Matilde; Chen, Peiwen; Castagnaro, Silvia; Gregorio, Ilaria; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein with a broad distribution in different tissues and mostly deposited at the close periphery of the cell surface. Previous studies revealed that collagen VI protects neurons from the toxicity of amyloid-βpeptides and from UV-induced damage. However, the physiological role of this protein in the central nervous system (CNS) remains unknown. Here, we established primary neural cultures from murine cortex and hippocampus, and carried out in vitro and in vivo studies in wild-type and collagen VI null (Col6a1-/-) mice. Col6a1-/- neural cultures displayed an increased incidence of spontaneous apoptosis and higher vulnerability to oxidative stress, accompanied by altered regulation of autophagy with increased p62 protein levels and decreased LC3 lipidation. Analysis of brain sections confirmed increased apoptosis and abnormal regulation of autophagy in the CNS of collagen VI-deficient animals. To investigate the in vivo physiological consequences of these CNS defects, we carried out functional studies and found that motor and memory task performances were impaired in aged Col6a1-/-mice. These findings indicate that lack of collagen VI leads to spontaneous apoptosis and defective autophagy in neural cells, and point at a protective role for this ECM protein in the CNS during physiological aging. PMID:27060109

  20. Panax ginseng induces human Type I collagen synthesis through activation of Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongsung; Jung, Eunsun; Lee, Jiyoung; Huh, Sungran; Kim, Jieun; Park, Mijung; So, Jungwoon; Ham, Younggeun; Jung, Kwangseon; Hyun, Chang-Gu; Kim, Yeong Shik; Park, Deokhoon

    2007-01-01

    Skin aging appears to be principally related to a decrease in levels of Type I collagen, the primary component of the dermal layer of skin. It is important to introduce an efficient agent for effective management of skin aging; this agent should have the fewest possible side effects and the greatest wrinkle-reducing effect. In the course of screening collagen production-promoting agents, we obtained Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer. This study was designed to investigate the possible collagen production-promoting activities of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer root extract (PGRE) in human dermal fibroblast cells. As a first step to this end, human COL1A2 promoter luciferase assay was performed in human dermal fibroblast cells. In this assay, PGRE activated human COL1A2 promoter activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Human Type I procollagen synthesis was also induced by PGRE. These results suggest that PGRE promotes collagen production in human dermal fibroblast cells. Additionally, we have attempted to characterize the mechanism of action of PGRE in Type I procollagen synthesis. PGRE was found to induce the phosphorylation of Smad2, an important transcription factor in the production of Type I procollagen. When applied topically in a human skin primary irritation test, PGRE did not induce any adverse reactions. Therefore, based on these results, we suggest the possibility that PGRE may be considered as an attractive, wrinkle-reducing candidate for topical application. PMID:16890388

  1. 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 rapidly inhibits fibroblast-induced collagen gel contraction.

    PubMed

    Greiling, D; Thieroff-Ekerdt, R

    1996-06-01

    1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-D3) inhibits the proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro in monolayer culture. We investigated the effect of 1,25-D3 on normal murine and human fibroblasts cultured in collagen type I gels, which more closely resembles the in vivo situation in the dermis. In this culture system 1,25-D3 had no effect on fibroblast proliferation; however, the fibroblast-induced collagen gel contraction was inhibited in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in the nanomolar concentration range. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 were inactive. 1,25-D3 had no effect in fibroblasts lacking a functional vitamin D receptor. Pretreatment of fibroblasts in monolayer culture for 5 min was sufficient to trigger the inhibition of collagen gel contraction. Nifedipine increased collagen gel contraction and counteracted the effect of 1,25-D3. The inhibition of collagen gel contraction by 1,25-D3 is supposed to be mediated by the vitamin D receptor because a functional vitamin D receptor is required, and vitamin D metabolites with low affinity to the vitamin D receptor were inactive. Brief pretreatment of fibroblasts was sufficient to trigger the inhibitory effect of 1,25-D3, suggesting a nongenomic effect. A genomic mode of action could not be ruled out, however, because the inhibition was first measured after 24 h. The antagonism of the calcium channel antagonist nifedipine probably represents the sum of two opposite effects rather than supporting evidence for a nongenomic mode of action of 1,25-D3. In conclusion, 1,25-D3 has a specific and rapidly triggered inhibitory effect on fibroblast-induced collagen gel contraction. PMID:8752663

  2. Impact of Cyclic Stretch on Induced Elastogenesis Within Collagenous Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Lavanya; Bashur, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro tissue engineering of vascular conduits requires a synergy between several external factors, including biochemical supplementation and mechanotranductive stimulation. The goal of this study was to improve adult human vascular smooth muscle cell orientation and elastic matrix synthesis within 3D tubular collagen gel constructs. We used a combination of elastogenic factors (EFs) previously tested in our lab, along with cyclic circumferential strains at low amplitude (2.5%) delivered at a range of frequencies (0.5, 1.5, and 3 Hz). After 21 days of culture, the constructs were analyzed for elastic matrix outcomes, activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and −9, cell densities and phenotype, and mechanical properties of constructs. While cell densities remained unaffected by the addition of stretch, contractile phenotypic markers were elevated in all stretched constructs relative to control. Constructs cultured with EFs stretched at 1.5 Hz exhibited the maximum elastin mRNA expression and total matrix elastin (over sixfold vs. the static EFs control). MMP-2 content was comparable in all treatment conditions, but MMP-9 levels were elevated at the higher frequencies (1.5 and 3 Hz). Minimal circumferential orientation was achieved and the mechanical properties remained comparable among the treatment conditions. Overall, constructs treated with EFs and stretched at 1.5 Hz exhibited the most elastogenic outcomes. PMID:24313750

  3. Lipopolysaccharide induces expression of collagen VI in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Okawa, Sayuri; Unuma, Kana; Yamada, Atsushi; Aki, Toshihiko; Uemura, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of the lung during the septic systemic inflammatory response elicited by administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was investigated. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected i.p. with 15 mg/kg LPS. After 24 h, the lungs were excised to evaluate the cellular responses to LPS. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis revealed that type VI collagen (ColVI) was extremely upregulated during sepsis in the rat lung within the first 24 h of LPS administration. Upregulation of ColVI protein and its mRNA was demonstrated by Western blot analysis, real time PCR, and immunohistochemistry. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the activation of ColVI in the rat lung at the early stage of systemic inflammation. Activation of ColVI might be involved in sepsis-mediated lung fibrosis at an early stage. PMID:26023260

  4. Effects of gold sodium thiomalate, cyclosporin A, cyclophosphamide, and placebo on collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Cannon, G W; McCall, S; Cole, B C; Radov, L A; Ward, J R; Griffiths, M M

    1993-03-01

    The prophylactic and therapeutic effects of gold sodium thiomalate, cyclosporin A, cyclophosphamide, and placebo on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were evaluated in DA rats. Prophylactic treatment with cyclosporin A and cyclophosphamide suppressed the arthritis incidence, clinical inflammation, destructive bone changes, and development of anti-collagen antibody in DA rats subsequently injected with porcine type-II collagen. Therapeutic treatment with cyclosporin A and cyclophosphamide had a definite suppression on established CIA when started 21 days after the initial collagen injection, but the suppression was less marked than that of prophylactic treatment. Gold had no impact on CIA in DA rats when administered either prophylactically or therapeutically. PMID:8213350

  5. Exercise prevents β-aminopropionitrile-induced morphological changes to type I collagen in murine bone

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Max A; Wallace, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of reduced enzymatic crosslinking, exercise and the ability of exercise to prevent the deleterious impact of reduced crosslinking on collagen D-spacing. Eight-week-old female mice were divided into four weight-matched groups receiving daily injections of either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or 300 mg kg−1 β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) while undergoing normal cage activity (Sed) or 30 min per day of treadmill exercise (Ex) for 21 consecutive days. BAPN caused a downward shift in the D-spacing distribution in Sed BAPN compared with Sed PBS (P<0.001) but not in Ex BAPN (P=0.429), indicating that exercise can prevent changes in collagen morphology caused by BAPN. Exercise had no effect on D-spacing in PBS control mice (P=0.726), which suggests that exercise-induced increases in lysyl oxidase may be a possible mechanism for preventing BAPN-induced changes in D-spacing. The D-spacing changes were accompanied by an increase in mineral crystallinity/maturity due to the main effect of BAPN (P=0.016). However, no changes in nanoindentation, reference point indentation or other Raman spectroscopy parameters were observed. The ability of exercise to rescue BAPN-driven changes in collagen morphology necessitates further research into the use of mechanical stimulation as a preventative therapy for collagen-based diseases. PMID:25798234

  6. Two-photon induced collagen cross-linking in bioartificial cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuetemeyer, Kai; Kensah, George; Heidrich, Marko; Meyer, Heiko; Martin, Ulrich; Gruh, Ina; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2011-08-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a promising strategy for regenerative therapies to overcome the shortage of donor organs for transplantation. Besides contractile function, the stiffness of tissue engineered constructs is crucial to generate transplantable tissue surrogates with sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the high pressure present in the heart. Although several collagen cross-linking techniques have proven to be efficient in stabilizing biomaterials, they cannot be applied to cardiac tissue engineering, as cell death occurs in the treated area. Here, we present a novel method using femtosecond (fs) laser pulses to increase the stiffness of collagen-based tissue constructs without impairing cell viability. Raster scanning of the fs laser beam over riboflavin-treated tissue induced collagen cross-linking by two-photon photosensitized singlet oxygen production. One day post-irradiation, stress-strain measurements revealed increased tissue stiffness by around 40% being dependent on the fibroblast content in the tissue. At the same time, cells remained viable and fully functional as demonstrated by fluorescence imaging of cardiomyocyte mitochondrial activity and preservation of active contraction force. Our results indicate that two-photon induced collagen cross-linking has great potential for studying and improving artificially engineered tissue for regenerative therapies.

  7. Assessing cisplatin-induced ototoxicity and otoprotection in whole organ culture of the mouse inner ear in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Tropitzsch, Anke; Arnold, Heinz; Bassiouni, Mohamed; Müller, Andrea; Eckhard, Andreas; Müller, Marcus; Löwenheim, Hubert

    2014-06-16

    Cisplatin is a widely used anti-cancer drug. Ototoxicity is a major dose-limiting side-effect. A reproducible mammalian in-vitro model of cisplatin ototoxicity is required to screen and validate otoprotective drug candidates. We utilized a whole organ culture system of the postnatal mouse inner ear in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor under "simulated microgravity" culture conditions. As previously described this system allows whole organ culture of the inner ear and quantitative assessment of ototoxic effects of aminoglycoside induced hair cell loss. Here we demonstrate that this model is also applicable to the assessment of cisplatin induced ototoxicity. In this model cisplatin induced hair cell loss was dose and time dependent. Increasing exposure time of cisplatin led to decreasing EC50 concentrations. Outer hair cells were more susceptible than inner hair cells, and hair cells in the cochlear base were more susceptible than hair cells in the cochlear apex. Initial cisplatin dose determined the final extent of hair cell loss irrespective if the drug was withdrawn or continued. Dose dependant otoprotection was demonstrated by co-administration of the antioxidant agent N-acetyl l-cysteine. The results support the use of this inner ear organ culture system as an in vitro assay and validation platform for inner ear toxicology and the search for otoprotective compounds. PMID:24709139

  8. Developing functional musculoskeletal tissues through hypoxia and lysyl oxidase-induced collagen cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Eleftherios A.; Responte, Donald J.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2014-01-01

    The inability to recapitulate native tissue biomechanics, especially tensile properties, hinders progress in regenerative medicine. To address this problem, strategies have focused on enhancing collagen production. However, manipulating collagen cross-links, ubiquitous throughout all tissues and conferring mechanical integrity, has been underinvestigated. A series of studies examined the effects of lysyl oxidase (LOX), the enzyme responsible for the formation of collagen cross-links. Hypoxia-induced endogenous LOX was applied in multiple musculoskeletal tissues (i.e., cartilage, meniscus, tendons, ligaments). Results of these studies showed that both native and engineered tissues are enhanced by invoking a mechanism of hypoxia-induced pyridinoline (PYR) cross-links via intermediaries like LOX. Hypoxia was shown to enhance PYR cross-linking 1.4- to 6.4-fold and, concomitantly, to increase the tensile properties of collagen-rich tissues 1.3- to 2.2-fold. Direct administration of exogenous LOX was applied in native cartilage and neocartilage generated using a scaffold-free, self-assembling process of primary chondrocytes. Exogenous LOX was found to enhance native tissue tensile properties 1.9-fold. LOX concentration- and time-dependent increases in PYR content (∼16-fold compared with controls) and tensile properties (approximately fivefold compared with controls) of neocartilage were also detected, resulting in properties on par with native tissue. Finally, in vivo subcutaneous implantation of LOX-treated neocartilage in nude mice promoted further maturation of the neotissue, enhancing tensile and PYR content approximately threefold and 14-fold, respectively, compared with in vitro controls. Collectively, these results provide the first report, to our knowledge, of endogenous (hypoxia-induced) and exogenous LOX applications for promoting collagen cross-linking and improving the tensile properties of a spectrum of native and engineered tissues both in vitro and in

  9. Libby amphibole-induced mesothelial cell autoantibodies promote collagen deposition in mice.

    PubMed

    Gilmer, John; Serve, Kinta; Davis, Chad; Anthony, Marti; Hanson, Robert; Harding, Tanner; Pfau, Jean C

    2016-06-01

    Libby amphibole (LA) causes a unique progressive lamellar pleural fibrosis (LPF) that is associated with pulmonary function decline. Pleural fibrosis among the LA-exposed population of Libby, MT, has been associated with the production of anti-mesothelial cell autoantibodies (MCAA), which induce collagen production from cultured human mesothelial cells. We hypothesized that the progressive nature of LPF could be at least partially attributed to an autoimmune process and sought to demonstrate that LA-induced MCAA trigger collagen deposition in vivo. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to LA for 7 mo, and serum was tested for MCAA by cell-based ELISA on primary mouse mesothelial cells. When treated in vitro with serum from mice exposed to LA, mesothelial cells upregulated collagen matrix production. This effect was lost when the serum was cleared of IgG using protein G beads, implicating IgG autoantibodies. Using the peritoneal cavity as a surrogate for the pleural cavity, groups of naïve (non-asbestos-exposed) mice were injected intraperitoneally with 1) control serum, 2) one dose of serum from LA-exposed mice (LA serum), 3) two doses of LA serum, or 4) two doses of LA serum cleared of IgG. After 1 mo, analysis of collagen in peritoneal walls using two-photon confocal microscopy (SHG analysis) and a hydroxyproline assay demonstrated significant increases in collagen by LA serum but not control or cleared serum. These data support the hypothesis that MCAA in LA-exposed mice induce fibrotic responses in vivo, demonstrating that an autoimmune component may be contributing to the progressive pleural fibrosis seen in LA-exposed patients. PMID:27106292

  10. CALCOSPHERULITES* ISOLATED FROM THE MINERALIZATION FRONT OF BONE INDUCE THE MINERALIZATION OF TYPE I COLLAGEN

    PubMed Central

    Midura, Ronald J.; Vasanji, Amit; Su, Xiaowei; Wang, Aimin; Midura, Sharon B.; Gorski, Jeff P.

    2007-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that “calcospherulites” actively participate in the mineralization of developing and healing bone. This study sought to directly test this hypothesis by developing a method to isolate calcospherulites and analyzing their capacity to seed mineralization of fibrillar collagen. The periosteal surface of juvenile rat tibial diaphysis was enriched in spherulites of ~0.5-micron diameter exhibiting a Ca/P ratio of 1.3. Their identity as calcospherulites was confirmed by their uptake of calcein at the tibial mineralization front 24 h following in vivo injection. Periosteum was dissected and unmineralized osteoid removed by collagenase in order to expose calcospherulites. Calcein-labeled calcospherulites were then released from the mineralization front by dispase digestion and isolated via fluorescence flow sorting. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed they contained apatite crystals (c-axis length of 17.5 ± 0.2 nm), though their Ca/P ratio of 1.3 is lower than that of hydroxyapatite. Much of their non-mineral phosphorous content was removed by ice-cold ethanol, elevating their Ca/P ratio to 1.6, suggesting the presence of phospholipids. Western blot analyses showed the presence of bone matrix proteins and type I collagen in these preparations. Incubating isolated calcospherulites in collagen hydrogels demonstrated that they could seed a mineralization reaction on type I collagen fibers in vitro. Ultrastructural analyses revealed crystals on the collagen fibers that were distributed rather uniformly along the fiber lengths. Furthermore, crystals were observed at distances well away from the observed calcospherulites. Our results directly support an active role for calcospherulites in inducing the mineralization of type I collagen fibers at the mineralization front of bone. PMID:17936099

  11. Ear Pieces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students make fanciful connections between art and medicine. This project challenges students to interpret "ear idioms" (e.g. "blow it out your ear," "in one ear and out the other") by relying almost entirely on realistic ear drawings, the placement of them, marks, and values. In that…

  12. Simulating Reflex Induced Changes in the Acoustic Impedance of the Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirlin, Mindy W.; Levitt, Harry

    1991-01-01

    A simple procedure for measuring changes in the acoustic impedance of the ear is described. The technique has several applications, including simulation using a standard coupler of changes in real ear impedance produced by the acoustic reflex, and calibration of response time of an otoadmittance meter. (Author/DB)

  13. Native Australian plant extracts differentially induce Collagen I and Collagen III in vitro and could be important targets for the development of new wound healing therapies.

    PubMed

    Adams, Damian H; Shou, Qingyao; Wohlmuth, Hans; Cowin, Allison J

    2016-03-01

    Australian native plants have a long history of therapeutic use in indigenous cultures, however, they have been poorly studied scientifically. We analysed the effects of 14 plant derived compounds from the species Pilidiostigma glabrum, Myoporum montanum, Geijera parviflora, and Rhodomyrtus psidioides for their potential wound healing properties by assessing their ability to induce or suppress Collagen I and Collagen III expression in human skin fibroblasts in culture. The compound 7-geranyloxycoumarin was able to significantly increase Collagen I (23.7%, p<0.0002) expression in comparison to control. Significant suppression of Collagen III was observed for the compounds flindersine (11.1%, p<0.02), and (N-acetoxymethyl) flindersine (27%, p<0.00005). The implications of these finding is that these compounds could potentially alter the expression of different collagens in the skin allowing for the potential development of new wound healing therapies and new approaches for treating various skin diseases as well as photo (sun) damaged, and aged skin. PMID:26705840

  14. The effects of experimentally induced conductive hearing loss on spectral and temporal aspects of sound transmission through the ear

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, J. Eric; Koka, Kanthaiah; Thornton, Jennifer L.; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Conductive hearing loss (CHL) is known to produce hearing deficits, including deficits in sound localization ability. The differences in sound intensities and timing experienced between the two tympanic membranes are important cues to sound localization (ILD and ITD, respectively). Although much is known about the effect of CHL on hearing levels, little investigation has been conducted into the actual impact of CHL on sound location cues. This study investigated effects of CHL induced by earplugs on cochlear microphonic (CM) amplitude and timing and their corresponding effect on the ILD and ITD location cues. Acoustic and CM measurements were made in 5 chinchillas before and after earplug insertion, and again after earplug removal using pure tones (500 Hz to 24 kHz). ILDs in the unoccluded condition demonstrated position and frequency dependence where peak far-lateral ILDs approached 30 dB for high frequencies. Unoccluded ear ITD cues demonstrated positional and frequency dependence with increased ITD cue for both decreasing frequency (± 420 µs at 500 Hz, ± 310 µs for 1–4 kHz ) and increasingly lateral sound source locations. Occlusion of the ear canal with foam plugs resulted in a mild, frequency-dependent conductive hearing loss of 10–38 dB (mean 31 ± 3.9 dB) leading to a concomitant frequency dependent increase in ILDs at all source locations. The effective ITDs increased in a frequency dependent manner with ear occlusion as a direct result of the acoustic properties of the plugging material, the latter confirmed via acoustical measurements using a model ear canal with varying volumes of acoustic foam. Upon ear plugging with acoustic foam, a mild CHL is induced. Furthermore, the CHL induced by acoustic foam results in substantial changes in the magnitudes of both the ITD and ILD cues to sound location. PMID:21073935

  15. Increased limb involvement in murine collagen-induced arthritis following treatment with anti-interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R O; Williams, D G; Feldmann, M; Maini, R N

    1993-01-01

    We have tested the effect of administering H22, a hamster neutralizing MoAb to murine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in collagen-induced arthritis. Mice were immunized with human type II collagen in adjuvant on day 1 and boosted with soluble collagen on day 21. H22 was administered (250 micrograms, intraperitoneally) either during the induction of arthritis (on days 0, 6, 13 and 20) or around the time of disease manifestation (on days 21, 28, 35 and 42). Control mice received either an isotype-matched non-neutralizing MoAb or saline. Both treatment regimes gave similar results. Treatment with H22 did not significantly affect the incidence of arthritis, time of onset, degree of oedema, histopathological severity, or level of anti-type II collagen IgG. However, a highly significant increase (P < 0.01) in the number of limbs affected by arthritis was observed in the H22-treated group, irrespective of whether the antibody was administered during the induction of arthritis, or during the time of clinical manifestation of disease. From these results it was concluded that anti-IFN-gamma treatment caused an increase in the number of arthritic lesions, but did not affect the severity of each individual lesion. PMID:8485917

  16. Embryonic brain extract induces collagen biosynthesis in cultured muscle cells: involvement in acetylcholine receptor aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Kalcheim, C; Vogel, Z; Duksin, D

    1982-01-01

    The involvement of extracellular matrix components in induction of the aggregation of acetylcholine (AcCho) receptors by factor(s) present in embryonic brain extract was investigated. Embryonic brain extract induced a three-fold increase in the number of AcCho receptor aggregates on the surface of cultured myotubes and a 5- to 10-fold increase in the synthesis of procollagen, which was secreted into the medium and converted to collagen. Adult brain extract, embryonic serum, and embryonic liver extract were less active in stimulating both collagen synthesis and AcCho receptor aggregation. A physiological connection between the two processes is suggested, since the number of AcCho receptor aggregates could be reduced to control levels by treating brain extract-stimulated myotubes with purified bacterial collagenase. In addition, stimulation of collagen secretion by ascorbic acid (50 micrograms/ml) promoted a 1.6-fold increase in AcCho receptor aggregation. When ascorbic acid was added together with the brain extract, further increases in both collagen synthesis and AcCho receptor aggregation were observed. Images PMID:6285338

  17. Osteoblasts extracellular matrix induces vessel like structures through glycosylated collagen I

    SciTech Connect

    Palmieri, D.; Valli, M.; Viglio, S.; Ferrari, N.; Ledda, B.; Volta, C.; Manduca, P.

    2010-03-10

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a fundamental role in angiogenesis affecting endothelial cells proliferation, migration and differentiation. Vessels-like network formation in vitro is a reliable test to study the inductive effects of ECM on angiogenesis. Here we utilized matrix deposed by osteoblasts as substrate where the molecular and structural complexity of the endogenous ECM is preserved, to test if it induces vessel-like network formation by endothelial cells in vitro. ECM is more similar to the physiological substrate in vivo than other substrates previously utilized for these studies in vitro. Osteogenic ECM, prepared in vitro from mature osteoblasts at the phase of maximal deposition and glycosylation of collagen I, induces EAhy926, HUVEC, and HDMEC endothelial cells to form vessels-like structures and promotes the activation of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2); the functionality of the p-38/MAPK signaling pathway is required. Osteogenic ECM also induces a transient increase of CXCL12 and a decrease of the receptor CXCR4. The induction of vessel-like networks is dependent from proper glycosylation of collagens and does not occur on osteogenic ECMs if deglycosylated by -galactosidase or on less glycosylated ECMs derived from preosteoblasts and normal fibroblasts, while is sustained on ECM from osteogenesis imperfecta fibroblasts only when their mutation is associated with over-glycosylation of collagen type I. These data support that post-translational glycosylation has a role in the induction in endothelial cells in vitro of molecules conductive to self-organization in vessels-like structures.

  18. Inhibition of GSK-3β Alleviates Collagen II-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haiyan; Liu, Jun; Zeng, Jiashun; Hu, Bailong; Fang, Xiuyi; Li, Long

    2016-01-01

    Background Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor is a serine/threonine kinase with an inhibitory role in glycogen synthesis, which is essential in inflammatory and immunological diseases. The purpose of our study was to determine if TDZD-8 can alleviate collagen II-induced rheumatoid arthritis in rats. Material/Methods Twenty collagen II-induced rheumatoid arthritis rats were treated with selective GSK-3β inhibitor. The effects of GSK-3β inhibition on collagen II-induced rheumatoid arthritis in the rats were evaluated by paw edema, histological examination of arthritic synovium, radiographic examination of knee joint, and the level of inflammation mediators such as prostaglandin E2, 5-hydroxytryptamin, and histamine. The level of cytokines such as IL-6, IL-12, IL-10, and TNF-α, was examined by Elisa. Results GSK-3β inhibitor significantly reduced the development of rheumatoid arthritis in rats. The levels of inflammation mediators such as prostaglandin E2, 5-hydroxytryptamin, and histamine were decreased in the TDZD-8 group. Serum levels of IL-6, IL-12, and TNF-α were significantly reduced in the TDZD-8 group compared with the RA group. Conclusions Treatment with GSK-3β inhibitor suppressed inflammatory response in RA rats. These findings suggest that the inhibition of GSK-3β can be an effective treatment for RA. PMID:27029564

  19. Transgenic Disruption of Glucocorticoid Signaling in Osteoblasts Attenuates Joint Inflammation in Collagen Antibody-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jinwen; Zhang, Yaqing; Kim, Sarah; Wiebe, Edgar; Spies, Cornelia M; Buttgereit, Frank; Cooper, Mark S; Seibel, Markus J; Zhou, Hong

    2016-05-01

    The role of endogenous glucocorticoids (GCs) in rheumatoid arthritis remains unclear. Herein, we examined the role of osteoblastic GC signaling in collagen antibody-induced arthritis. Intracellular GC signaling was abrogated exclusively in mature osteoblasts via transgenic (tg) expression of 11ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2. Arthritis was induced in 8-week-old male tg mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Paw swelling was scored daily from induction to end point (day 14). Inflammation, cartilage degradation, and local bone erosion were assessed at the wrist, knee, and ankle joints. Systemic skeletal changes were determined by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometrical analysis of the tibiae. Both tg and WT mice developed acute arthritis in response to the administration of collagen antibodies. However, compared with WT mice, both clinical and histological indexes of joint inflammation were significantly mitigated in animals with disrupted osteoblastic GC signaling. In WT mice, arthritis was associated with increased bone resorption, decreased bone formation, and significant bone loss. In contrast, bone turnover and bone mass remained unchanged in tg arthritic mice. Disruption of GC signaling in osteoblasts significantly reduces joint inflammation and prevents structural bone and cartilage damage in collagen antibody-induced arthritis. These data corroborate the concept that osteoblasts modulate the inflammatory response in immune-mediated arthritis via a GC-dependent pathway. PMID:26988651

  20. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic study on the thermally induced structural changes of glutaraldehyde-crosslinked collagen.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhenhua; Wu, Kun; Liu, Wentao; Shen, Lirui; Li, Guoying

    2015-04-01

    The thermal stability of collagen solution (5 mg/mL) crosslinked by glutaraldehyde (GTA) [GTA/collagen (w/w)=0.5] was measured by differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the thermally induced structural changes were analyzed using two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectra. The denaturation temperature (Td) and enthalpy change (ΔH) of crosslinked collagen were respectively about 27°C and 88 J/g higher than those of native collagen, illuminating the thermal stability increased. With the increase of temperature, the red-shift of absorption bands and the decreased AIII/A1455 value obtained from FTIR spectra indicated that hydrogen bonds were weakened and the unwinding of triple helix occurred for both native and crosslinked collagens; whereas the less changes in red-shifting and AIII/A1455 values for crosslinked collagen also confirmed the increase in thermal stability. Additionally, the 2D correlation analysis provided information about the thermally induced structural changes. In the 2D synchronous spectra, the intensities of auto-peaks at 1655 and 1555 cm(-1), respectively assigned to amide I band (CO stretching vibration) and amide II band (combination of NH bending and CN stretching vibrations) in helical conformation were weaker for crosslinked collagen than those for native collagen, indicating that the helical structure of crosslinked collagen was less sensitive to temperature. Moreover, the sequence of the band intensity variations showed that the band at 1555 cm(-1) moved backwards owing to the addition of GTA, demonstrating that the response of helical structure of crosslinked collagen to the increased temperature lagged. It was speculated that the stabilization of collagen by GTA was due to the reinforcement of triple helical structure. PMID:25617846

  1. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic study on the thermally induced structural changes of glutaraldehyde-crosslinked collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Wu, Kun; Liu, Wentao; Shen, Lirui; Li, Guoying

    2015-04-01

    The thermal stability of collagen solution (5 mg/mL) crosslinked by glutaraldehyde (GTA) [GTA/collagen (w/w) = 0.5] was measured by differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the thermally induced structural changes were analyzed using two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectra. The denaturation temperature (Td) and enthalpy change (ΔH) of crosslinked collagen were respectively about 27 °C and 88 J/g higher than those of native collagen, illuminating the thermal stability increased. With the increase of temperature, the red-shift of absorption bands and the decreased AIII/A1455 value obtained from FTIR spectra indicated that hydrogen bonds were weakened and the unwinding of triple helix occurred for both native and crosslinked collagens; whereas the less changes in red-shifting and AIII/A1455 values for crosslinked collagen also confirmed the increase in thermal stability. Additionally, the 2D correlation analysis provided information about the thermally induced structural changes. In the 2D synchronous spectra, the intensities of auto-peaks at 1655 and 1555 cm-1, respectively assigned to amide I band (Cdbnd O stretching vibration) and amide II band (combination of Nsbnd H bending and Csbnd N stretching vibrations) in helical conformation were weaker for crosslinked collagen than those for native collagen, indicating that the helical structure of crosslinked collagen was less sensitive to temperature. Moreover, the sequence of the band intensity variations showed that the band at 1555 cm-1 moved backwards owing to the addition of GTA, demonstrating that the response of helical structure of crosslinked collagen to the increased temperature lagged. It was speculated that the stabilization of collagen by GTA was due to the reinforcement of triple helical structure.

  2. Anti-PD1-induced collagenous colitis in a melanoma patient.

    PubMed

    Baroudjian, Barouyr; Lourenco, Nelson; Pagès, Cécile; Chami, Ichrak; Maillet, Marianne; Bertheau, Philippe; Bagot, Martine; Gornet, Jean-Marc; Lebbé, Céleste; Allez, Matthieu

    2016-06-01

    Targeted immunotherapy has markedly improved the survival of melanoma patients. We report the case of a melanoma patient who developed a collagenous colitis under an anti-PD1 regimen. A 68-year-old woman was treated for a stage IV melanoma. An anti-PD1, pembrolizumab, was introduced after the failure of a first-line therapy with an anti-CTLA4. At cycle 14, pembrolizumab was interrupted because of grade 3 diarrhea. Histologic analysis of colon mucosa showed a thickened apical subepithelial collagen layer with irregular collagen deposition of more than 25 µm thickness. Budesonide 9 mg/day and cholestyramin 8 g/day were then introduced, leading to a decrease in the number of stools to grade 2. Because of the prognosis of the disease, the efficacy of pembrolizumab in this patient and the lack of other efficient treatments, pembrolizumab was restarted, with no worsening of the diarrhea after a follow-up of 8 weeks. In the era of immunotherapy, a new type of drug-induced colitis has emerged because of monoclonal antibodies targeting immune checkpoints such as CTLA-4 and PD1. Gastrointestinal tract immune-mediated adverse effects are now well described with ipilimumab. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a collagenous colitis in a patient treated with pembrolizumab, thus suggesting a new mechanism of toxicity. Classically, collagenous colitis first-line treatment is based on discontinuation of the suspected treatment. However, there may be a strong benefit to maintaining an anti-PD1 regimen in our patients. In this case, symptomatic management associated with budesonide and cholestyramin enabled continuation of pembrolizumab. PMID:26990271

  3. Probing collagen/enzyme mechanochemistry in native tissue with dynamic, enzyme-induced creep.

    PubMed

    Zareian, Ramin; Church, Kelli P; Saeidi, Nima; Flynn, Brendan P; Beale, John W; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2010-06-15

    Mechanical strain or stretch of collagen has been shown to be protective of fibrils against both thermal and enzymatic degradation. The details of this mechanochemical relationship could change our understanding of load-bearing tissue formation, growth, maintenance, and disease in vertebrate animals. However, extracting a quantitative relationship between strain and the rate of enzymatic degradation is extremely difficult in bulk tissue due to confounding diffusion effects. In this investigation, we develop a dynamic, enzyme-induced creep assay and diffusion/reaction rate scaling arguments to extract a lower bound on the relationship between strain and the cutting rate of bacterial collagenase (BC) at low strains. The assay method permits continuous, forced probing of enzyme-induced strain which is very sensitive to degradation rate differences between specimens at low initial strain. The results, obtained on uniaxially loaded strips of bovine corneal tissue (0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 N), demonstrate that small differences in strain alter the enzymatic cutting rate of the BC substantially. It was estimated that a change in tissue elongation of only 1.5% (at approximately 5% strain) reduces the maximum cutting rate of the enzyme by more than half. Estimation of the average load per monomer in the tissue strips indicates that this protective "cutoff" occurs when the collagen monomers are transitioning from an entropic to an energetic mechanical regime. The continuous tracking of the enzymatic cleavage rate as a function of strain during the initial creep response indicates that the decrease in the cleavage rate of the BC is nonlinear (initially steep between 4.5 and 6.5% and then flattens out from 6.5 to 9.5%). The high sensitivity to strain at low strain implies that even lightly loaded collagenous tissue may exhibit significant strain protection. The dynamic, enzyme-induced creep assay described herein has the potential to permit the rapid characterization of collagen

  4. Molecular basis for T cell response induced by altered peptide ligand of type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeoung-Eun; Cullins, David; Zalduondo, Lillian; Barnett, Stacey L; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Kleinau, Sandra; Stuart, John M; Kang, Andrew H; Myers, Linda K

    2012-06-01

    Mounting evidence from animal models has demonstrated that alterations in peptide-MHC interactions with the T cell receptor (TCR) can lead to dramatically different T cell outcomes. We have developed an altered peptide ligand of type II collagen, referred to as A9, which differentially regulates TCR signaling in murine T cells leading to suppression of arthritis in the experimental model of collagen-induced arthritis. This study delineates the T cell signaling pathway used by T cells stimulated by the A9·I-A(q) complex. We have found that T cells activated by A9 bypass the requirement for Zap-70 and CD3-ζ and signal via FcRγ and Syk. Using collagen-specific T cell hybridomas engineered to overexpress either Syk, Zap-70, TCR-FcRγ, or CD3-ζ, we demonstrate that A9·I-A(q) preferentially activates FcRγ/Syk but not CD3-ζ/Zap-70. Moreover, a genetic absence of Syk or FcRγ significantly reduces the altered peptide ligand induction of the nuclear factor GATA3. By dissecting the molecular mechanism of A9-induced T cell signaling we have defined a new alternate pathway that is dependent upon FcRγ and Syk to secrete immunoregulatory cytokines. Given the interest in using Syk inhibitors to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis, understanding this pathway may be critical for the proper application of this therapy. PMID:22511761

  5. Dense fibrillar collagen is a potent inducer of invadopodia via a specific signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Swatkoski, Stephen; Matsumoto, Kazue; Campbell, Catherine B.; Petrie, Ryan J.; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Li, Xin; Mueller, Susette C.; Bugge, Thomas H.; Gucek, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) can regulate multiple cellular activities and the matrix itself in dynamic, bidirectional processes. One such process is local proteolytic modification of the ECM. Invadopodia of tumor cells are actin-rich proteolytic protrusions that locally degrade matrix molecules and mediate invasion. We report that a novel high-density fibrillar collagen (HDFC) matrix is a potent inducer of invadopodia, both in carcinoma cell lines and in primary human fibroblasts. In carcinoma cells, HDFC matrix induced formation of invadopodia via a specific integrin signaling pathway that did not require growth factors or even altered gene and protein expression. In contrast, phosphoproteomics identified major changes in a complex phosphosignaling network with kindlin2 serine phosphorylation as a key regulatory element. This kindlin2-dependent signal transduction network was required for efficient induction of invadopodia on dense fibrillar collagen and for local degradation of collagen. This novel phosphosignaling mechanism regulates cell surface invadopodia via kindlin2 for local proteolytic remodeling of the ECM. PMID:25646088

  6. Gene expression profile and synovial microcirculation at early stages of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gierer, Philip; Ibrahim, Saleh; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Koczan, Dirk; Moeller, Steffen; Landes, Jürgen; Gradl, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2005-01-01

    A better understanding of the initial mechanisms that lead to arthritic disease could facilitate development of improved therapeutic strategies. We characterized the synovial microcirculation of knee joints in susceptible mouse strains undergoing intradermal immunization with bovine collagen II in complete Freund's adjuvant to induce arthritis (i.e. collagen-induced arthritis [CIA]). Susceptible DBA1/J and collagen II T-cell receptor transgenic mice were compared with CIA-resistant FVB/NJ mice. Before onset of clinical symptoms of arthritis, in vivo fluorescence microscopy of knee joints revealed marked leucocyte activation and interaction with the endothelial lining of synovial microvessels. This initial inflammatory cell response correlated with the gene expression profile at this disease stage. The majority of the 655 differentially expressed genes belonged to classes of genes that are involved in cell movement and structure, cell cycle and signal transduction, as well as transcription, protein synthesis and metabolism. However, 24 adhesion molecules and chemokine/cytokine genes were identified, some of which are known to contribute to arthritis (e.g. CD44 and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1) and some of which are novel in this respect (e.g. CC chemokine ligand-27 and IL-13 receptor α1). Online in vivo data on synovial tissue microcirculation, together with gene expression profiling, emphasize the potential role played by early inflammatory events in the development of arthritis. PMID:15987489

  7. Identification and characterization of a collagen-induced platelet aggregation inhibitor, triplatin, from salivary glands of the assassin bug, Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Morita, Akihiro; Isawa, Haruhiko; Orito, Yuki; Iwanaga, Shiroh; Chinzei, Yasuo; Yuda, Masao

    2006-07-01

    To facilitate feeding, certain hematophagous invertebrates possess inhibitors of collagen-induced platelet aggregation in their saliva. However, their mechanisms of action have not been fully elucidated. Here, we describe two major salivary proteins, triplatin-1 and -2, from the assassin bug, Triatoma infestans, which inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen but not by other agents including ADP, arachidonic acid, U46619 and thrombin. Furthermore, these triplatins also inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen-related peptide, a specific agonist of the major collagen-signaling receptor glycoprotein (GP)VI. Moreover, triplatin-1 inhibited Fc receptor gamma-chain phosphorylation induced by collagen, which is the first step of GPVI-mediated signaling. These results strongly suggest that triplatins target GPVI and inhibit signal transduction necessary for platelet activation by collagen. This is the first report on the mechanism of action of collagen-induced platelet aggregation inhibitors from hematophagus invertebrates. PMID:16759235

  8. Ionizing radiations and collagen metabolism: from oxygen free radicals to radio-induced late fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tan Dat; Maquart, François-Xavier; Monboisse, Jean-Claude

    2005-02-01

    Skin fibrosis is one of the most common late adverse effects observed after radiation therapy for cancer. As a dose-limiting factor and hence a major hindrance to increase the amount of radiation delivered to the tumor, this problem can be addressed according to the very early steps of the fibrotic process: the oxygen free radical production. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during radiotherapy result from both inflammatory response and water radiolysis. Many studies have demonstrated that the extracellular matrix molecules are potential targets for ROS, and that collagen metabolism and properties are deeply and permanently modified after irradiation, both in vitro and in vivo. It is therefore possible to design different therapeutic approaches such as the clinical use of liposomal superoxide dismutase able to reverse the imbalance between collagen matrix synthesis and degradation. Finally, the so-called oxidative stress induced by radiation represents a significant parameter leading to fibrosis and will undoubtedly serve to design further experimental and clinical studies.

  9. Sialylation converts arthritogenic IgG into inhibitors of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Ise, Wataru; Harazono, Akira; Takakura, Daisuke; Fukuyama, Hidehiro; Baba, Yoshihiro; Narazaki, Masashi; Shoda, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Nobunori; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ji, Shuting; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Fujio, Keishi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Furukawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated IgG antibodies such as anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) have diverse glycosylation variants; however, key sugar chains modulating the arthritogenic activity of IgG remain to be clarified. Here, we show that reduced sialylation is a common feature of RA-associated IgG in humans and in mouse models of arthritis. Genetically blocking sialylation in activated B cells results in exacerbation of joint inflammation in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. On the other hand, artificial sialylation of anti-type II collagen antibodies, including ACPAs, not only attenuates arthritogenic activity, but also suppresses the development of CIA in the antibody-infused mice, whereas sialylation of other IgG does not prevent CIA. Thus, our data demonstrate that sialylation levels control the arthritogenicity of RA-associated IgG, presenting a potential target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:27046227

  10. Sialylation converts arthritogenic IgG into inhibitors of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Ise, Wataru; Harazono, Akira; Takakura, Daisuke; Fukuyama, Hidehiro; Baba, Yoshihiro; Narazaki, Masashi; Shoda, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Nobunori; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ji, Shuting; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Fujio, Keishi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Furukawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated IgG antibodies such as anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) have diverse glycosylation variants; however, key sugar chains modulating the arthritogenic activity of IgG remain to be clarified. Here, we show that reduced sialylation is a common feature of RA-associated IgG in humans and in mouse models of arthritis. Genetically blocking sialylation in activated B cells results in exacerbation of joint inflammation in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. On the other hand, artificial sialylation of anti-type II collagen antibodies, including ACPAs, not only attenuates arthritogenic activity, but also suppresses the development of CIA in the antibody-infused mice, whereas sialylation of other IgG does not prevent CIA. Thus, our data demonstrate that sialylation levels control the arthritogenicity of RA-associated IgG, presenting a potential target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:27046227

  11. Ear wax

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the ear: Baby oil Commercial drops Glycerin Mineral oil Water Another method is to wash out the ... cloth or paper tissue wrapped around your finger. Mineral oil can be used to moisturize the ear and ...

  12. Ear examination

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003340.htm Ear examination To use the sharing features on this page, ... ear References King EF, Couch ME. History, physical examination, and the preoperative evaluation. In: Flint PW, Haughey ...

  13. Ear emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... the ear. CUTS ON THE OUTER EAR Apply direct pressure until the bleeding stops. Cover the injury ... Mosby; 2013:chap 143. Thomas SH, Goodloe JM. Foreign bodies. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, ...

  14. Your Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Protect your hearing by wearing earplugs at loud music concerts and around noisy machinery, like in wood ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? What Is an Ear Infection? ...

  15. Ear wax

    MedlinePlus

    ... water to drain. You may need to repeat irrigation several times. To avoid damaging your ear or ... who may remove the wax by: Repeating the irrigation attempts Suctioning the ear canal Using a small ...

  16. Loudness changes resulting from an electrically induced middle-ear reflex.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in order to determine the changes in loudness brought about by electro-cutaneous elicitation of the middle-ear reflex. Subjects were required to judge the relative loudness of the second of three consecutive 30-msec bursts of tone, the second tone being accompanied by an electrical shock to the external auditory meatus, capable of eliciting a contraction of the middle-ear muscles. The difference between these judgments and those of the control condition (shock on the arm) was taken to represent a measure of the attenuation provided by contraction of the middle-ear muscles. Test tones were 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 Hz at levels of 65, 75, 85, 95, and 105 dB. The results indicate that the middle-ear reflex decreases the middle-ear's transmission mainly for low-frequency sounds. The results fail to lend support to the Loeb-Riopelle hypothesis that the middle-ear reflex acts as a limiter, rather than a linear attenuator.

  17. Ear barotrauma

    MedlinePlus

    Barotitis media; Barotrauma; Ear popping; Pressure-related ear pain; Eustachian tube dysfunction ... The air pressure in the middle ear is most often the same as the air pressure outside of the body. The Eustachian tube is a connection between the middle ...

  18. Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... affects the middle ear and is called otitis media. The tubes inside the ears become clogged with fluid and mucus. This can affect hearing, because sound cannot get through all that fluid. If your child isn't old enough to say "My ear ...

  19. Super Ears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Stan

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students design, construct, and test "super ears" to investigate sound and hearing. Students work in groups of three and explore how the outer ear funnels sound waves to the inner ear and how human hearing compares to that of other animals. (NB)

  20. Attenuation of collagen-induced arthritis in mice by salmon proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Sayuri; Asano, Krisana; Nakane, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious autoimmune disease caused by chronic inflammation of connective tissues. The basic principle of RA treatment is aimed to reduce joint inflammation. Our previous studies demonstrated that salmon cartilage proteoglycan (PG) suppresses excess inflammation in different mouse inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the prophylactic effect of PG on the progression of RA using an experimental mouse model, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Clinical and histological severity of CIA was attenuated by daily oral administration of PG. In the joints of PG-administered mice, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils and also osteoclast accumulation were limited. In comparison to nonadministered mice, anti-collagen antibodies in the sera of PG-administered mice did not alter. On the other hand, local expression of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-6, IL-1 β, interferon- γ (IFN- γ), C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), C-X-C chemokine ligand 1 (CXCL1), and CXCL2 in the joints of PG-administered mice decreased. Moreover, in the response of type II collagen- (CII-) restimulation ex vivo, IL-17A and IFN- γ production by splenocytes from PG-administered mice was less than that of control mice. These data suggested that daily ingested PG attenuated CIA pathogenesis by modulating immune response of splenocytes to CII stimulation and local production inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the joints. PMID:25032213

  1. Libby amphibole-induced mesothelial cell autoantibodies bind to surface plasminogen and alter collagen matrix remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Robert; Evilia, Caryn; Gilmer, John; Woods, Linda; Black, Brad; Flores, Raja; Pfau, Jean C

    2016-08-01

    Lamellar pleural thickening (LPT) is a fibrotic disease induced by exposure to Libby amphibole (LA) asbestos that causes widespread scarring around the lung, resulting in deterioration of pulmonary function. Investigating the effects of autoantibodies to mesothelial cells (MCAA) present in the study populations has been a major part of the effort to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis. It has been shown in vitro that human mesothelial cells (Met5a) exposed to MCAA increase collagen deposition into the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we sought to further elucidate how MCAA drive increased collagen deposition by identifying the protein targets bound by MCAA on the cellular surface using biotinylation to label and isolate surface proteins. Isolated surface protein fractions were identified as containing MCAA targets using ELISA The fractions that demonstrated binding by MCAA were then analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and MASCOT analysis. The most promising result from the MASCOT analysis, plasminogen (PLG), was tested for MCAA binding using purified human PLG in an ELISA We report that serum containing MCAA bound at an optical density (OD) 3 times greater than that of controls, and LA-exposed subjects had a high frequency of positive tests for anti-PLG autoantibodies. This work implicates the involvement of the plasminogen/plasmin system in the mechanism of excess collagen deposition in Met5a cells exposed to MCAA Elucidating this mechanism could contribute to the understanding of LPT. PMID:27519611

  2. Thermally induced irreversible conformational changes in collagen probed by optical second harmonic generation and laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Theodossiou, T; Rapti, G S; Hovhannisyan, V; Georgiou, E; Politopoulos, K; Yova, D

    2002-01-01

    Irreversible thermal conformational changes induced to collagen have been studied by optical methods. More specifically, second harmonic generation (SHG) from incident nanosecond Ng:YAG 1064 nm radiation and laser-induced fluorescence by 337 nm, pulsed nanosecond nitrogen laser excitation, at 405, 410 and 415 nm emission wavelengths were registered at eight temperatures (40 degrees, 50 degrees, 55 degrees, 60 degrees, 65 degrees, 70 degrees, 75 degrees and 80 degrees C) and normalised with respect to the corresponding values at the ambient temperature of 30 degrees C. The heating protocol used in this work, was selected to monitor only permanent changes reflecting in the optical properties of the samples under investigation. In this context, the SHG, directly related to the collagen fibril population in triple helix conformation, indicated on irreversible phase transition around 64 degrees C. On the other hand fluorescence related to the destruction of cross-linked chromophores in collagen, some of which are related to the triple helix tertiary structure, also indicated a permanent phase transition around 63 degrees C. These results are in agreement with previous results from studies with differential scanning calorimetry. However SHG and fluorescence, being non-invasive optical methods are expected to have a significant impact in the fields of laser ablative surgery and laser tissue welding. PMID:11845366

  3. STAT6-Dependent Collagen Synthesis in Human Fibroblasts Is Induced by Bovine Milk

    PubMed Central

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Zöller, Nadja; Kleemann, Johannes; Müller, Jutta; Kaufmann, Roland; Hofmann, Matthias; Bernd, August; Meissner, Markus; Valesky, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Since the domestication of the urus, 10.000 years ago, mankind utilizes bovine milk for different purposes. Besides usage as a nutrient also the external application of milk on skin has a long tradition going back to at least the ancient Aegypt with Cleopatra VII as a great exponent. In order to test whether milk has impact on skin physiology, cultures of human skin fibroblasts were exposed to commercial bovine milk. Our data show significant induction of proliferation by milk (max. 2,3-fold, EC50: 2,5% milk) without toxic effects. Surprisingly, bovine milk was identified as strong inducer of collagen 1A1 synthesis at both, the protein (4-fold, EC50: 0,09% milk) and promoter level. Regarding the underlying molecular pathways, we show functional activation of STAT6 in a p44/42 and p38-dependent manner. More upstream, we identified IGF-1 and insulin as key factors responsible for milk-induced collagen synthesis. These findings show that bovine milk contains bioactive molecules that act on human skin cells. Therefore, it is tempting to test the herein introduced concept in treatment of atrophic skin conditions induced e.g. by UV light or corticosteroids. PMID:26134630

  4. The Aminopeptidase CD13 Induces Homotypic Aggregation in Neutrophils and Impairs Collagen Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Fiddler, Christine A.; Parfrey, Helen; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Luo, Ding; Nash, Gerard B.; Murphy, Gillian; Chilvers, Edwin R.

    2016-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (CD13) is a widely expressed cell surface metallopeptidase involved in the migration of cancer and endothelial cells. Apart from our demonstration that CD13 modulates the efficacy of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis in neutrophils, no other function for CD13 has been ascribed in this cell. We hypothesized that CD13 may be involved in neutrophil migration and/or homotypic aggregation. Using purified human blood neutrophils we confirmed the expression of CD13 on neutrophils and its up-regulation by pro-inflammatory agonists. However, using the anti-CD13 monoclonal antibody WM-15 and the aminopeptidase enzymatic inhibitor bestatin we were unable to demonstrate any direct involvement of CD13 in neutrophil polarisation or chemotaxis. In contrast, IL-8-mediated neutrophil migration in type I collagen gels was significantly impaired by the anti-CD13 monoclonal antibodies WM-15 and MY7. Notably, these antibodies also induced significant homotypic aggregation of neutrophils, which was dependent on CD13 cross-linking and was attenuated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 inhibition. Live imaging demonstrated that in WM-15-treated neutrophils, where homotypic aggregation was evident, the number of cells entering IL-8 impregnated collagen I gels was significantly reduced. These data reveal a novel role for CD13 in inducing homotypic aggregation in neutrophils, which results in a transmigration deficiency; this mechanism may be relevant to neutrophil micro-aggregation in vivo. PMID:27467268

  5. STAT6-Dependent Collagen Synthesis in Human Fibroblasts Is Induced by Bovine Milk.

    PubMed

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Zöller, Nadja; Kleemann, Johannes; Müller, Jutta; Kaufmann, Roland; Hofmann, Matthias; Bernd, August; Meissner, Markus; Valesky, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Since the domestication of the urus, 10.000 years ago, mankind utilizes bovine milk for different purposes. Besides usage as a nutrient also the external application of milk on skin has a long tradition going back to at least the ancient Aegypt with Cleopatra VII as a great exponent. In order to test whether milk has impact on skin physiology, cultures of human skin fibroblasts were exposed to commercial bovine milk. Our data show significant induction of proliferation by milk (max. 2,3-fold, EC50: 2,5% milk) without toxic effects. Surprisingly, bovine milk was identified as strong inducer of collagen 1A1 synthesis at both, the protein (4-fold, EC50: 0,09% milk) and promoter level. Regarding the underlying molecular pathways, we show functional activation of STAT6 in a p44/42 and p38-dependent manner. More upstream, we identified IGF-1 and insulin as key factors responsible for milk-induced collagen synthesis. These findings show that bovine milk contains bioactive molecules that act on human skin cells. Therefore, it is tempting to test the herein introduced concept in treatment of atrophic skin conditions induced e.g. by UV light or corticosteroids. PMID:26134630

  6. Adenovector-mediated gene delivery to human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells induces inner ear cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Keerthana; Forrest, M Laird; Detamore, Michael S; Staecker, Hinrich

    2013-02-01

    Hearing is one of our main sensory systems and having a hearing disorder can have a significant impact in an individual's quality of life. Sensory neural hearing loss (SNHL) is the most common form of hearing loss; it results from the degeneration of inner ear sensory hair cells and auditory neurons in the cochlea, cells that are terminally differentiated. Stem cell-and gene delivery-based strategies provide an opportunity for the replacement of these cells. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in gene delivery to mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we evaluated the potential of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (hUCMSCs) as a possible source for regenerating inner ear hair cells. The expression of Atoh1 induced the differentiation of hUCMSCs into cells that resembled inner ear hair cells morphologically and immunocytochemically, evidenced by the expression of hair cell-specific markers. The results demonstrated for the first time that hUCMSCs can differentiate into hair cell-like cells, thus introducing a new potential tissue engineering and cell transplantation approach for the treatment of hearing loss. PMID:23379581

  7. Human-induced contaminant impacts on migratory birds: lessons from the North American eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sladky, Kurt K.; Quist, Charlotte; Ramirez, Pedro; Hill, David; Dein, F. Joshua

    2003-01-01

    The effects of aquatic contaminants generated by soda ash mining processes on the North American eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis) population illustrates important issues associated with human-induced habitat degradation on the health of migratory species. Eared grebes have been extensively studied in their staging and breeding habitats, but little is known about their 2- to 3-day migratory periods. During migration, few bodies of water are available to the birds for refuge between freshwater breeding areas in Canada and hypersaline lakes (e.g., Great Salt Lake in Utah or Mono Lake in California) to which they migrate. One geographic refuge area includes a series of "tailings" ponds associated with soda ash mining operations in southwestern Wyoming. The ponds range from 100-1200 acres, with water containing high concentrations of sodium decahydrate (Na2CO3•10H2O). At cool temperatures (generally < 40°F) sodium decahydrate precipitates out of the water and crystallizes on solid objects in the ponds or on the water surface. Bird mortality on these ponds has been recognized since the early 1970's, and the mining companies have developed hazing strategies and rehabilitation programs in order to minimize mortality. In order to determine causes of grebe mortality and devise strategies to reduce mortality, a field epidemiologic investigation was developed with the following objectives: 1) to determine whether eared grebes have quantifiable physiologic abnormalities associated with exposure to soda ash mine pond water; 2) to evaluate physical effects of sodium decahydrate crystallization on grebe survival; 3) to establish cause of death based on necropsy of deceased grebes; 4) to determine long-term survivability of eared grebes after exposure to the pond water; and 5) to evaluate water quality and determine whether aquatic invertebrates are present in the ponds as a possible food source.

  8. Bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the external ear canal: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Froelich, K; Radeloff, A; Köhler, C; Mlynski, R; Müller, J; Hagen, R; Kleinsasser, N H

    2011-08-01

    In 2003, osteonecrosis of the jaw was described as an intraoral complication of bisphosphonate therapy. More recently, cases of avascular necrosis of the hip were reported in patients with long-lasting bisphosphonate therapy. Thus, it was the aim of the present study to analyze cases of benign osteonecrosis of the external ear canal and to retrospectively identify a possible relationship to long-lasting bisphosphonate therapy. 13 patients with osteonecrosis of the external ear canal operated on between 2005 and 2009 were included. Patient histories were reviewed for possible previous or current bisphosphonate therapy. Three patients with osteonecrosis of the external ear canal and long-term bisphosphonate therapy could be identified. They had been treated either for breast cancer or multiple myeloma. Certainly, the jaw is an area of increased risk for developing osteonecrosis with its high mechanical stress and intraoral bacterial flora. However, osteonecrosis of the hips and the external ear canal in patients receiving long-term bisphosphonate therapy necessitate further investigation of a possible systemic, bisphosphonate-related phenomenon. PMID:21327733

  9. A heterocyclic molecule kartogenin induces collagen synthesis of human dermal fibroblasts by activating the smad4/smad5 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Xiaoling; Li, Qingfeng

    2014-07-18

    Declined production of collagen by fibroblasts is one of the major causes of aging appearance. However, only few of compounds found in cosmetic products are able to directly increase collagen synthesis. A novel small heterocyclic compound called kartogenin (KGN) was found to stimulate collagen synthesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). So, we hypothesized and tested that if KGN could be applied to stimulate the collagen synthesis of fibroblasts. Human dermal fibroblasts in vitro were treated with various concentrations of KGN, with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) serving as the negative control. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunofluorescence analyses were performed to examine the expression of collagen and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway. The production of collagen was also tested in vivo by Masson's trichrome stain and immunohistochemistry in the dermis of mice administrated with KGN. Results showed that without obvious influence on fibroblasts' apoptosis and viability, KGN stimulated type-I collagen synthesis of fibroblasts at the mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, but KGN did not induce expression of α-skeletal muscle actin (α-sma) or matrix metallopeptidase1 (MMP1), MMP9 in vitro. Smad4/smad5 of the TGF-β signaling pathway was activated by KGN while MAPK signaling pathway remained unchanged. KGN also increased type-I collagen synthesis in the dermis of BALB/C mice. Our results indicated that KGN promoted the type-I collagen synthesis of dermal fibroblasts in vitro and in the dermis of mice through activation of the smad4/smad5 pathway. This molecule could be used in wound healing, tissue engineering of fibroblasts, or aesthetic and reconstructive procedures. PMID:24928394

  10. Rosiglitazone-mediated dendritic cells ameliorate collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sei-Hee; Lee, Jun-Ho; Jung, Nam-Chul; Choi, Hyun-Ji; Song, Jie-Young; Seo, Han Geuk; Choi, Jinjung; Jung, Sang Youn; Kang, Sangjin; Choi, Yong-Soo; Chung, Ji Hyung; Lim, Dae-Seog

    2016-09-01

    Rosiglitazone is a selective ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ), which serves diverse biological functions. A number of autoimmune disease models have been used to examine the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of tolerogenic dendritic cells (tDCs). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether rosiglitazone-mediated DC (Rosi-DC) therapy suppressed arthritis in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. Rosi-DCs were generated by treating immature DCs with TNF-α, type II collagen, and rosiglitazone. CIA mice then received subcutaneously (s.c.) two injections of Rosi-DCs. The severity of arthritis was then assessed histopathologically. The phenotypes of the DC and regulatory T (Treg) cell populations in CIA mice were determined by flow cytometry and the effect of Rosi-DCs on the secretion of autoimmunity-inducing cytokines was examined by ELISA. Rosi-DCs expressed lower levels of DC-related surface markers than mature DCs. Histopathological examination revealed that the degree of inflammation in the paws of Rosi-DC-treated mice was much lower than that in the paws of PBS-treated CIA mice. Taken together, these results clearly show that rosiglitazone-mediated DCs ameliorate CIA, most likely via the induction of antigen-specific Treg cells. PMID:27208887

  11. Collagen-Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds Induce Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells Osteogenic Differentiation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Giovanna; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Fabbi, Claudia; Figallo, Elisa; Lo Furno, Debora; Gulino, Rosario; Colarossi, Cristina; Fullone, Francesco; Giuffrida, Rosario; Parenti, Rosalba; Memeo, Lorenzo; Forte, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play a crucial role in regulating normal skeletal homeostasis and, in case of injury, in bone healing and reestablishment of skeletal integrity. Recent scientific literature is focused on the development of bone regeneration models where MSCs are combined with biomimetic three-dimensional scaffolds able to direct MSC osteogenesis. In this work the osteogenic potential of human MSCs isolated from adipose tissue (hADSCs) has been evaluated in vitro in combination with collagen/Mg doped hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Results demonstrate the high osteogenic potential of hADSCs when cultured in specific differentiation induction medium, as revealed by the Alizarin Red S staining and gene expression profile analysis. In combination with collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffold, hADSCs differentiate into mature osteoblasts even in the absence of specific inducing factors; nevertheless, the supplement of the factors markedly accelerates the osteogenic process, as confirmed by the expression of specific markers of pre-osteoblast and mature osteoblast stages, such as osterix, osteopontin (also known as bone sialoprotein I), osteocalcin and specific markers of extracellular matrix maturation and mineralization stages, such as ALPL and osteonectin. Hence, the present work demonstrates that the scaffold per se is able to induce hADSCs differentiation, while the addition of osteo-inductive factors produces a significant acceleration of the osteogenic process. This observation makes the use of our model potentially interesting in the field of regenerative medicine for the treatment of bone defects. PMID:26982592

  12. Treatment with SI000413, a new herbal formula, ameliorates murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee-Hun; Lee, Jeong-Min; Kim, Se-Na; Lee, Seung-Ha; Jun, Sung-Hoon; You, Jae-Hoon; Ahn, Kyoo-Seok; Kang, Hee

    2008-07-01

    We tested the effects of SI000413, a new formula, consisting of Pyrolae herba and Trachelospermi caulis, on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in DBA/1J mice by immunization with bovine type II collagen (CII) on days 1 and 21. SI000413 was orally administered 3 times per week throughout the experiment and indomethacin was served as a positive control. Clinical scores, the count of arthritic legs, levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and anti-CII antibody, and lymphocyte subsets in blood were examined. SI000413 suppressed CIA development in a dose dependent manner and reduced the incidence of arthritic legs in mice. Histological analysis showed administration of SI000413 reduced inflammatory signs and cartilage destruction. Serum levels of IL-6 and anti-CII antibody were significantly decreased in SI000413-treated mice and the percentages of CD4 T cell, CD8 T cell and B cell in blood were restored to normal levels. In conclusion, we demonstrate that SI000413 ameliorates CIA both clinically and histologically and inhibits the production of anti-CII antibody and pro-inflammatory cytokine in the CIA mouse. These findings suggest that SI000413 is a potential new therapeutic herbal formula for the treatment of RA. PMID:18591771

  13. NLRP3 Inflammasome Plays an Important Role in the Pathogenesis of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Zheng, Yi; Li, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between NLRP3 and the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis. Methods. We used the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. The mice were divided into two groups: the model group (CIA, n = 16) and the control group (Normal, n = 8). The mice were sacrificed seven weeks after immunization. The arthritis score and imaging evaluation (X-rays, Micro-CT, and MRI) were performed. Synovial tissue NLRP3 expression and peripheral blood cytokine levels were analyzed. Results. The arthritis score (6.00 ± 2.52), imaging score (4.63 ± 0.92), and synovial tissue NLRP3 expression (4.00 ± 2.03) significantly increased in the CIA mice. The expression of synovial NLRP3 was positively correlated with arthritis clinical and radiographic scores (r = 0.792 and r = 0.669, resp.). Conclusions. The synovial NLRP3 expression increased at the early onset of RA. Synovial NLRP3 expression level was correlated with the clinical arthritis severity and extent of radiological destruction, suggesting that NLRP3 is involved in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:27034595

  14. Collagen-Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds Induce Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells Osteogenic Differentiation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fabbi, Claudia; Figallo, Elisa; Lo Furno, Debora; Gulino, Rosario; Colarossi, Cristina; Fullone, Francesco; Giuffrida, Rosario; Parenti, Rosalba; Memeo, Lorenzo; Forte, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play a crucial role in regulating normal skeletal homeostasis and, in case of injury, in bone healing and reestablishment of skeletal integrity. Recent scientific literature is focused on the development of bone regeneration models where MSCs are combined with biomimetic three-dimensional scaffolds able to direct MSC osteogenesis. In this work the osteogenic potential of human MSCs isolated from adipose tissue (hADSCs) has been evaluated in vitro in combination with collagen/Mg doped hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Results demonstrate the high osteogenic potential of hADSCs when cultured in specific differentiation induction medium, as revealed by the Alizarin Red S staining and gene expression profile analysis. In combination with collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffold, hADSCs differentiate into mature osteoblasts even in the absence of specific inducing factors; nevertheless, the supplement of the factors markedly accelerates the osteogenic process, as confirmed by the expression of specific markers of pre-osteoblast and mature osteoblast stages, such as osterix, osteopontin (also known as bone sialoprotein I), osteocalcin and specific markers of extracellular matrix maturation and mineralization stages, such as ALPL and osteonectin. Hence, the present work demonstrates that the scaffold per se is able to induce hADSCs differentiation, while the addition of osteo-inductive factors produces a significant acceleration of the osteogenic process. This observation makes the use of our model potentially interesting in the field of regenerative medicine for the treatment of bone defects. PMID:26982592

  15. Beta-amyrin from Ardisia elliptica Thunb. is more potent than aspirin in inhibiting collagen-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ching, Jianhong; Chua, Tung-Kian; Chin, Lee-Cheng; Lau, Aik-Jiang; Pang, Yun-Keng; Jaya, Johannes Murti; Tan, Chay-Hoon; Koh, Hwee-Ling

    2010-03-01

    Ardisia elliptica Thunberg (Myrsinaceae) is a medicinal plant traditionally used for alleviating chest pains, treatment of fever, diarrhoea, liver poisoning and parturition complications. The objectives of the study were to investigate the effect of A. elliptica on collagen induced platelet aggregation and to isolate and purify potential antiplatelet components. Fresh A. elliptica leaves were extracted using methanol (70% v/v) by Soxhlet extraction and the extract was analysed for its inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Inhibition of platelet aggregation was assessed by incubating the extracts with rabbit blood and collagen in a whole blood aggregometer and measuring the impedance. The leaf extract was found to inhibit platelet aggregation with an IC50 value of 167 microg/ml. Using bioassay guided fractionation, beta-amyrin was isolated and purified. The IC50 value of beta-amyrin was found to be 4.5 microg/ml (10.5 microM) while that of aspirin was found to be 11 microg/ml (62.7 microM), indicating that beta-amyrin was six times as active as aspirin in inhibiting platelet aggregation. This paper is the first report that beta-amyrin isolated from A. elliptica is more potent than aspirin in inhibiting collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In conclusion, A. elliptica leaves were found to inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation and one of the bioactive components responsible for the observed effect was determined to be beta-amyrin. PMID:21046981

  16. Mobilization of natural killer cells inhibits development of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Leavenworth, Jianmei W; Wang, Xiaoyang; Wenander, Carola Schellack; Spee, Pieter; Cantor, Harvey

    2011-08-30

    Although natural killer (NK) cells have been implicated in regulating immune responses, their ability to modulate disease development in autoimmune arthritis has not been analyzed. Here we investigate the contribution of NK cells to regulating collagen-induced arthritis, a well-characterized preclinical model of human rheumatoid arthritis. We find that the disease is induced by the combined action of two CD4(+) T helper (T(H)) subsets: follicular T(H) cells and T(H)17 cells. Both CD4(+) T(H) subsets are highly susceptible to lysis by NK cells after activation. Administration of antibody that activates NK cells through blockade of its inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor allows enhanced elimination of pathogenic follicular T(H) and T(H)17 cells and arrest of disease progression. These results suggest that antibody-dependent enhancement of NK activity may yield effective, previously undescribed therapeutic approaches to this autoimmune disorder. PMID:21873193

  17. Changes in collagen fibril pattern and adhesion force with collagenase-induced injury in rat Achilles tendon observed via AFM.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Choi, Samjin; Chon, Jinmann; Yoo, Seungdon; Cho, Ilsung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2011-01-01

    The Achilles tendon consists mainly of type I collagen fibers that contain collagen fibrils. When the Achilles tendon is injured, it is inflamed. The collagenase-induced model has been widely used to study tendinitis. The major advantages of atomic force microscopy (AFM) over conventional optical and electron microscopy for bio-imaging include its non-requirement of a special coating and vacuum, and its capability to perform imaging in all environments. AFM force-distance measurements have become a fundamental tool in the fields of surface chemistry, biochemistry and materials science. Therefore, the changes in the ultrastructure and adhesion force of the collagen fibrils on the Achilles tendons of rats with Achilles tendinitis were observed using AFM. The changes in the structure of the Achilles tendons were evaluated based on the diameter and D-banding of the collagen fibrils. Collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis was induced with the injection of 30 microl crude collagenase into 7-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were each sacrificed on the first, second, third, fifth and seventh day after the collagenase injection. The normal and injured Achilles tendons were fixed in 4% buffered formalin and dehydrated with increasing concentrations of ethanol. AFM was performed using the non-contact mode at the resolution of 512 x 512 pixels, with a scan speed of 0.8 line/sec. The adhesion force was measured via the force-distance curve that resulted from the interactions between the AFM tip and the collagen fibril sample using the contact mode. The diameter of the collagen fibrils in the Achilles tendons significantly decreased (p < 0.05) after the collagenase injection, and the pattern of the D-banding of the collagen fibrils was similar to that of the diameter changes. The adhesion force decreased until the fifth day after the collagenase injection, but increased on the seventh day after the collagenase injection (p < 0.0001). PMID:21446543

  18. Elephant ear

    MedlinePlus

    Elephant ear plants are indoor or outdoor plants with very large, arrow-shaped leaves. Poisoning may occur if you ... The harmful substances in elephant ear plants are: Oxalic acid ... plant Note: Leaves and stems are the most dangerous when eaten ...

  19. Ear Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... this condition. Try an over-the-counter decongestant medicine for a few days. Putting a warm heating pad on your ear may help relieve the pain. If the pain is intense or doesn't go away in 1 or 2 days, see your doctor. No 9. Do you have tooth pain on the same side as the ear ...

  20. [Sonic hedgehog (SHH) promotes the proliferation of synovial fibroblasts of rats with collagen-induced arthritis].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Qin, Suping; Sun, Dexu; Pan, Wei; Li, Xiangyang; Kong, Fanyun; Zhen, Kuiyang; Tang, Renxian

    2016-05-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of sonic hedgehog (SHH) on the proliferation of synovial fibroblasts (SFs). Methods The serum samples were collected from 30 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, 30 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, 30 ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients and 30 healthy subjects. The concentrations of serum SHH were detected by ELISA. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) were developed by type 2 collagen in Sprague-Dawley rats. The SFs were isolated from knee synovial tissues of CIA rats, and then identified by the detection of vimentin by immunofluorescence technique. Before and 72 hours after blocking SHH-glioma-associated oncogene 1 (Gli-1) signaling pathway with GANT61, the expression level of SHH in SFs was detected by Western blotting, and the proliferation of SFs was examined with CCK-8 assay. Results The level of serum SHH in the RA patients was remarkably higher than that in the SLE, AS patients and the healthy controls. In the CIA rats, the expression of SHH in SFs in vitro was higher than that in the healthy control rats. After 72-hour treatment of GANT61 to block SHH-Gli-1 signaling pathway, the expression level of SHH protein in SFs from CIA rats was reduced, and meanwhile the proliferation of the SFs was inhibited. Conclusion SHH plays an important role in the proliferation of SFs and could be used as a potential therapeutic target for RA. PMID:27126942

  1. Metabolomics analysis of collagen-induced arthritis in rats and interventional effects of oral tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xinghong; Hu, Jinbo; Li, Jinfeng; Zhang, Yan; Shui, Bingjie; Ding, Zhishan; Yao, Li; Fan, Yongsheng

    2014-08-01

    A serum metabolomics method based on rapid resolution liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (RRLC-Q-TOF-MS) was performed for a holistic evaluation of the metabolic changes of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to assess the interventional effects of type II collagen (CII) in this model. Partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was employed to study the metabolic profiling of CIA rats and control rats. Ten metabolites, namely, 12(S)-HHTrE, 12(S)-HEPE, PGE2, TXB2, 12(S)-HETE, LysoPE(16:0), PE(O-18:0/0:0), Lyso-PE(18:2), Lyso-PE(20:4), and Lyso-PC(22:5) were identified as differential metabolites associated with the pathogenesis of CIA. These results suggested that dysregulation of the arachidonic acid (AA) and phospholipid metabolic networks is involved in the pathomechanism of CIA. Differential metabolomics and histopathological analyses demonstrated that CII inhibits the progress of arthritis. Furthermore, the therapeutic effects of CII on CIA may involve regulation of the disordered AA and phospholipid metabolic networks. This metabolomics study provides new insights into the pathogenesis of arthritis and, furthermore, indicates the potential mechanism underlying the significantly increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome, defined as a clustering of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in arthritis patients. PMID:24814225

  2. Adiponectin exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis via enhancing Th17 response and prompting RANKL expression.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoxuan; Feng, Xiaoke; Tan, Wenfeng; Lin, Na; Hua, Minhui; Wei, Yu; Wang, Fang; Li, Ningli; Zhang, Miaojia

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported adiponectin (AD) is highly expressed in the inflamed synovial joint tissue and correlates closely with progressive bone erosion in Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Here, we investigate the role of adiponectin in regulating Th17 response and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) in mice with CIA mice by intraarticularly injection of adiponectin into knee joints on day 17, day 20 and day 23 post first collagen immunization. The increased adiponectin expression was found in inflamed joint tissue of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Adiponectin injection resulted in an earlier onset of arthritis, an aggravated arthritic progression, more severe synovial hyperplasia, bone erosion and osteoporosis in CIA mice. CD4(+)IL-17(+) Th17 cells, IL-17 mRNA and RANKL mRNA expression were markedly increased in the joint tissue of adiponectin treated CIA mice. Moreover, adiponectin treatment markedly enhanced Th17 cell generation from naive CD4(+) T cells in vitro, which accompanied by the high expression of Th17 transcription factor ROR-γt, and Th17 cytokine genes included IL-22 and IL-23. This study reveals a novel effect of adiponectin in exacerbating CIA progression by enhancing Th17 cell response and RANKL expression. PMID:26063682

  3. The role of lipopolysaccharide injected systemically in the reactivation of collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Shin; Ohsawa, Motoyasu

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the role of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the reactivation of autoimmune disease by using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice in which autoimmunity to the joint cartilage component type II collagen (CII) was involved.CIA was induced by immunization with CII emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant at the base of the tail (day 0) followed by a booster injection on day 21. Varying doses of LPS from E. coli were i.p. injected on day 50.Arthritis began to develop on day 25 after immunization with CII and reached a peak on day 35. Thereafter, arthritis subsided gradually but moderate joint inflammation was still observed on day 50. An i.p. injection of LPS on day 50 markedly reactivated arthritis on a dose-related fashion. Histologically, on day 55, there were marked oedema of synovium which had proliferated by the day of LPS injection, new formation of fibrin, and intense infiltration of neutrophils accompanied with a large number of mononuclear cells. The reactivation of CIA by LPS was associated with increases in anti-CII IgG and IgG2a antibodies as well as various cytokines including IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α. LPS from S. enteritidis, S. typhimurium, and K. neumoniae and its component, lipid A from E. coli also reactivated the disease. Polymyxin B sulphate suppressed LPS- or lipid A-induced reactivation of CIA.These results suggest that LPS may play an important role in the reactivation of autoimmune joint inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:10742285

  4. Boswellia serrata extract attenuates inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Umar, Sadiq; Umar, Khalid; Sarwar, Abu Hasnath Md Golam; Khan, Altaf; Ahmad, Niyaz; Ahmad, Sayeed; Katiyar, Chandra Kant; Husain, Syed Akhtar; Khan, Haider A

    2014-05-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease which leads to destruction of joints. Current treatment modalities for RA either produce symptomatic relief (NSAIDs) or modify the disease process (DMARDs). Though effective, their use is also limited by their side effects. As a result, the interest in alternative, well tolerated anti-inflammatory remedies has re-emerged. Our aim was to evaluate the antioxidant and antiarthritic activity of Boswellia serrata gum resin extract (BSE) in collagen induced arthritis. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by collagen induced arthritis (CIA) method. BSE was administered at doses of 100 and 200mg/kg body weight once daily for 21 days. The effects of treatment in the rats were assessed by biochemical (articular elastase, MPO, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD and NO), inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, IFN-γ and PGE2), and histological studies in joints. BSE was effective in bringing significant changes on all the parameters (articular elastase, MPO, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD and NO) studied. Oral administration of BSE resulted in significantly reduced levels of inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and PGE2), and increased level of IL-10. The protective effects of BSE against RA were also evident from the decrease in arthritis scoring and bone histology. The abilities to inhibit proinflammatory cytokines and modulation of antioxidant status suggest that the protective effect of Boswellia serrata extract on arthritis in rats might be mediated via the modulation of immune system. PMID:24667331

  5. Keratocytes are induced to produce collagen type II: A new strategy for in vivo corneal matrix regeneration.

    PubMed

    Greene, Carol Ann; Green, Colin R; Dickinson, Michelle E; Johnson, Virginia; Sherwin, Trevor

    2016-09-10

    The stroma, the middle layer of the cornea, is a connective tissue making up most of the corneal thickness. The stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of highly organised lamellae which are made up of tightly packed fibrils primarily composed of collagens type I and V. This layer is interspersed with keratocytes, mesenchymal cells of neural crest origin. We have previously shown that adult corneal keratocytes exhibit phenotypic plasticity and can be induced into a neuronal phenotype. In the current study we evaluated the potential of keratocytes to produce collagen type II via phenotypic reprogramming with exogenous chondrogenic factors. The cornea presents a challenge to tissue engineers owing to its high level of organisation and the phenotypic instability of keratocytes. Traditional approaches based on a scar model do not support the engineering of functional stromal tissue. Type II collagen is not found in the adult cornea but is reported to be expressed during corneal development, raising the possibility of using such an approach to regenerate the corneal ECM. Keratocytes in culture and within intact normal and diseased tissue were induced to produce collagen type II upon treatment with transforming growth factor Beta3 (TGFβ3) and dexamethasone. In vivo treatment of rat corneas also resulted in collagen type II deposition and a threefold increase in corneal hardness and elasticity. Furthermore, the treatment of corneas and subsequent deposition of collagen type II did not cause opacity, fibrosis or scarring. The induction of keratocytes with specific exogenous factors and resulting deposition of type II collagen in the stroma can potentially be controlled by withdrawal of the factors. This might be a promising new approach for in vivo corneal regeneration strategies aimed at increasing corneal integrity in diseases associated with weakened ectatic corneal tissue such as keratoconus. PMID:27539660

  6. Identification of a major quantitative trait locus for ear size induced by space flight in sweet corn.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y T; Li, G K; Yang, Z L; Hu, J G; Zheng, J R; Qi, X T

    2014-01-01

    The development of molecular markers has contributed to progress in identifying the gene(s) responsible for favorable variations in maize studies. In this study, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was conducted using simple sequence repeat markers in an F2 sweet corn population from a cross between parental line 1132 and space flight-induced mutant line 751 to identify the loci contributing to an increase in some yield traits. A primary mutated genomic region was located on chromosome 9. In total, 26 QTL were detected for eight yield-related traits and assembled into three clusters on chromosome 9. The largest QTL cluster at bin 9.02/03, primarily contributing to >10% of the phenotypic variation in ear and cob diameters, was likely due to a major QTL. Desired alleles of these QTL were provided by the mutant line 751. The primary action of the major mutant allele was an additive effect. Another mutant locus, which was induced in bin 9.01, increased cob and ear diameters by dominant genetic action. PMID:24782164

  7. Recombinant Human Decorin Inhibits TGF-b1 Induced Contraction of Collagen Lattice by Keloid Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Garron, Tania; Li, Xiao-Jian; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Xiong; Li, Ye-Yang; Xu, Wei-Shi

    2009-02-01

    While wound contraction plays an important role in healing, it may lead to excessive scar formation and pathological wound contracture in extreme conditions. To date, the key regulator of wound contraction and keloid formation is transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-b1). Decorin has been reported to bind TGF-b1 and neutralize some of its activities. The present study investigated whether decorin affected TGF-b1-induced fibroblast contractile activity by using fibroblast-populated collagen lattice (FPCL), which has been generally used as an in-vitro model thought to mimic wound contraction in vivo, modified by the incorporation of recombinant human decorin into collagen gel. As expected, TGF-b1 significantly enhanced the contraction of collagen gel at hour 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 (P < 0.05). Recombinant human decorin inhibited both the basal and TGF-b1-enhanced contraction of collagen gel by keloid fibroblasts (P < 0.05). These inhibitory effects of recombinant human decorin were associated with suppression of TGF-b1-induced filamentous actin (F-actin) expression in keloid fibroblasts. Furthermore, recombinant human decorin inhibited TGF-b1 induced a-smooth muscle actin (a-SMA), PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) protein, and mRNA expressions in keloid fibroblasts (P < 0.05). These data indicate that recombinant human decorin can suppress TGF-b1-induced contraction of collagen gel by keloid fibroblasts. Moreover, decorin can inhibit basal contraction of collagen gel by keloid fibroblasts. These results suggest that decorin may have therapeutic potential for excessive skin contraction as observed in a keloid. . PMID:25903025

  8. Triplex Forming Oligonucleotides against Type α 1(I) Collagen attenuates Liver Fibrosis induced by Bile Duct ligation

    PubMed Central

    Panakanti, Ravikiran; Pratap, Akshay; Yang, Ningning; Jackson, John S.; Mahato, Ram I.

    2010-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a consequence of chronic liver disorders which lead to the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM). Particularly, there is an increased accumulation of collagen in the fibrotic liver. We have therefore used a triplex forming oligonucleotide (TFO) against the type α 1 (I) collagen and evaluated, whether it can attenuate liver fibrosis induced by common bile duct ligation (CBDL) in rats. There was a significant decrease in hydroxyproline levels and Masson’s trichrome staining for collagen in TFO-treated CBDL groups compared to non-treated CBDL group. There was over expression of type α1(I) collagen, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and TGF-β1 expression in the CBDL group compared to TFO-treated CBDL group. Also, the serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) concentrations were less in the TFO treated group compared to non-treated CBDL group. There was also less neutrophils accumulation in TFO treated CBDL group assayed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay. These results suggests that TFO can be used to downregulate type 1 collagen gene expression and can alleviate liver fibrosis induced by common bile duct ligation. PMID:20816672

  9. Collagen Induces Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells by Signaling through Osteoclast-Associated Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Heidi S.; Nitze, Louise M.; Zeuthen, Louise H.; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J.; Hamilton, John A.; Berchtold, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB–dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR–collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs. PMID:25725106

  10. Alignment and assembly of adsorbed collagen molecules induced by anisotropic chemical nanopatterns.

    PubMed

    Denis, Frédéric A; Pallandre, Antoine; Nysten, Bernard; Jonas, Alain M; Dupont-Gillain, Christine C

    2005-10-01

    Collagen, a protein widely used to control cell-material interactions, is known to self-assemble in solution. Supramolecular structures also form on material surfaces following collagen adsorption. Herein, we report the use of anisotropic, flat, surface chemical nanopatterns, which consist of alkyl-terminated tracks drawn in an oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated matrix, to direct collagen adsorption. As revealed by atomic force microscopy, the spontaneous collagen adsorption performed on such patterned substrates results in the accumulation of collagen on the hydrophobic tracks. Moreover, the width of the tracks (30-90 nm), which is much smaller than the length of the collagen molecule (approximately 300 nm), is the origin of preferential alignment of the molecules and of their assembly into continuous bundles of adsorbed collagen. This chemical guidance effect due to self-confinement of proteins upon adsorption may bring novel and valuable applications, specifically in biomaterials science and cell growth control. PMID:17193383

  11. Epithelial derived CTGF promotes breast tumor progression via inducing EMT and collagen I fibers deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Sheng, Jianting; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Jiyong; Cui, Kemi; Chang, Jenny; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Interactions among tumor cells, stromal cells, and extracellular matrix compositions are mediated through cytokines during tumor progression. Our analysis of 132 known cytokines and growth factors in published clinical breast cohorts and our 84 patient-derived xenograft models revealed that the elevated connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in tumor epithelial cells significantly correlated with poor clinical prognosis and outcomes. CTGF was able to induce tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and promote stroma deposition of collagen I fibers to stimulate tumor growth and metastasis. This process was mediated through CTGF-tumor necrosis factor receptor I (TNFR1)-IκB autocrine signaling. Drug treatments targeting CTGF, TNFR1, and IκB signaling each prohibited the EMT and tumor progression. PMID:26318291

  12. Anti-arthritic effect of eugenol on collagen-induced arthritis experimental model.

    PubMed

    Grespan, Renata; Paludo, Marcia; Lemos, Henrique de Paula; Barbosa, Carmem Patrícia; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Dalalio, Marcia Machado de Oliveira; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to test the efficacy of eugenol, a compound obtained from the essential oil of cloves (Syzygium aromaticum) in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a well characterized murine model of rheumatoid arthritis. Macroscopic clinical evidence of CIA manifests first as periarticular erythema and edema in the hind paws. Treatment with eugenol starting at the onset of arthritis (day 25) ameliorated these clinical signs of CIA. Furthermore, eugenol inhibited mononuclear cell infiltration into the knee joints of arthritic mice and also lowered the levels of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor growth factor (TGF)-β) within the ankle joints. Eugenol treatment did not affect the in vitro cell viability as assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Therefore, eugenol ameliorates experimental arthritis and could be useful as a beneficial supplement in treating human arthritis. PMID:23037170

  13. Collagen-induced binding to human platelets of platelet-derived growth factor leading to inhibition of P43 and P20 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Bryckaert, M.C.; Rendu, F.; Tobelem, G.; Wasteson, A.

    1989-03-15

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is known to inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Collagen-induced binding of /sup 125/I-PDGF to human washed platelets was therefore investigated. It was found to be time-dependent, reaching a plateau at 20 degrees C after 30 min, collagen concentration-dependent, specifically inhibited by unlabeled PDGF, and saturable. Scatchard plot analysis showed a single class of sites with 3000 +/- 450 molecules bound/cell and an apparent KD of 1.2 +/- 0.2 10(-8) M. The effects of PDGF on collagen-induced phosphoinositide breakdown and protein phosphorylation were also investigated. At 50 ng/ml PDGF, a concentration which completely inhibited collagen-induced aggregation, the breakdown of (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) and (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) was observed, but the subsequent replenishment of (/sup 32/P)PIP2 was inhibited. The same PDGF concentration totally inhibited collagen-induced phosphatidic acid formation. PDGF also completely prevented phosphorylation of P43 and P20, as a result of protein kinase C activation consecutive to phosphoinositide metabolism. These results suggest that a specific PDGF receptor can be induced by collagen, and PDGF can effect the early events of collagen-induced platelet activation by inhibiting PIP2 resynthesis and P43 and P20 phosphorylation. It is concluded that PDGF might be involved in a negative feed-back control of platelet activation.

  14. Vascular pentraxin 3 controls arterial thrombosis by targeting collagen and fibrinogen induced platelets aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Bonacina, F.; Barbieri, S.S.; Cutuli, L.; Amadio, P.; Doni, A.; Sironi, M.; Tartari, S.; Mantovani, A.; Bottazzi, B.; Garlanda, C.; Tremoli, E.; Catapano, A.L.; Norata, G.D.

    2016-01-01

    Aim The long pentraxin PTX3 plays a non-redundant role during acute myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis and in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling during vascular injury, clotting and fibrin deposition. The aim of this work is to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective role of PTX3 during arterial thrombosis. Methods and results PTX3 KO mice transplanted with bone marrow from WT or PTX3 KO mice presented a significant reduction in carotid artery blood flow following FeCl3 induced arterial thrombosis (− 80.36 ± 11.5% and − 95.53 ± 4.46%), while in WT mice transplanted with bone marrow from either WT or PTX3 KO mice, the reduction was less dramatic (− 45.55 ± 1.37% and − 53.39 ± 9.8%), thus pointing to a protective effect independent of a hematopoietic cell's derived PTX3. By using P-selectin/PTX3 double KO mice, we further excluded a role for P-selectin, a target of PTX3 released by neutrophils, in vascular protection played by PTX3. In agreement with a minor role for hematopoietic cell-derived PTX3, platelet activation (assessed by flow cytometric expression of markers of platelet activation) was similar in PTX3 KO and WT mice as were haemostatic properties. Histological analysis indicated that PTX3 localizes within the thrombus and the vessel wall, and specific experiments with the N-terminal and the C-terminal PTX3 domain showed the ability of PTX3 to selectively dampen either fibrinogen or collagen induced platelet adhesion and aggregation. Conclusion PTX3 interacts with fibrinogen and collagen and, by dampening their pro-thrombotic effects, plays a protective role during arterial thrombosis. PMID:26976330

  15. Age-Related Differences in Collagen-Induced Arthritis: Clinical and Imaging Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Gerwing, Tracy D; Pratt, Isaac V; Cooper, David M L; Silver, Tawni I; Rosenberg, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Arthritis is among the most common chronic diseases in both children and adults. Although intraarticular inflammation is the feature common among all patients with chronic arthritis there are, in addition to age at onset, clinical characteristics that further distinguish the disease in pediatric and adult populations. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the utility of microCT (µCT) and ultrasonography in characterizing pathologic age-related differences in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Juvenile (35 d old) and young adult (91 d old) male Wistar rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen and incomplete Freund adjuvant to induce polyarthritis. Naïve male Wistar rats served as controls. All paws were scored on a scale of 0 (normal paw) to 4 (disuse of paw). Rats were euthanized at 14 d after the onset of arthritis and the hindpaws imaged by µCT and ultrasonography. Young adult rats had more severe signs of arthritis than did their juvenile counterparts. Imaging demonstrated that young adult CIA rats exhibited more widespread and severe skeletal lesions of the phalanges, metatarsals, and tarsal bones, whereas juvenile CIA rats had more localized and less proliferative and osteolytic damage that was confined predominantly to the phalanges and metatarsals. This report demonstrates the utility of imaging modalities to compare juvenile and young adult rats with CIA and provides evidence that disease characteristics and progression differ between the 2 age groups. Our observations indicate that the CIA model could help discern age-related pathologic processes in inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:24326225

  16. Elephant ear

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in elephant ear plants are: Oxalic acid Asparagine, a protein found in this plant Note: ... days to a week if treated correctly. Rarely, oxalic acid may cause swelling severe enough to block the ...

  17. Swimmer's ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... or a respiratory infection such as a cold. Swimming in unclean water can lead to swimmer's ear. ... very well after it has gotten wet. Avoid swimming in polluted water. Use earplugs when swimming. Try ...

  18. Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Effects of Repeated Exposure to Cruciferous Allyl Nitrile in Sensitizer-Induced Ear Edema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tanii, Hideji; Sugitani, Kayo; Saijoh, Kiyofumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Skin sensitizers induce allergic reactions through the induction of reactive oxygen species. Allyl nitrile from cruciferous vegetables has been reported to induce antioxidants and phase II detoxification enzymes in various tissues. We assessed the effects of repeated exposure to allyl nitrile on sensitizer-induced allergic reactions. Material/Methods Mice were dosed with allyl nitrile (0–200 μmol/kg), and then received a dermal application of 1 of 3 sensitizers on the left ear or 1 of 2 vehicles on the right ear. Quantitative assessment of edema was carried out by measuring the difference in weight between the portions taken from the right and left ears. We tested enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in ears. Results Repeated exposure to allyl nitrile reduced edemas induced by glutaraldehyde and by 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), but not by formaldehyde. The repeated exposure decreased levels of TBARS, a marker of oxidative stress, induced by glutaraldehyde and by DNCB, but not by formaldehyde. Allyl nitrile elevated SOD levels for the 3 sensitizers, and CAT levels for formaldehyde and DNCB. Allyl nitrile also increased GPx levels for formaldehyde and DNCB, but not for glutaraldehyde. The reduced edemas were associated with changes in oxidative stress levels and antioxidant enzymes. Conclusions Repeated exposure to allyl nitrile reduced allergic reactions induced by glutaraldehyde and by DNCB, but not by formaldehyde. This reduction was associated with changes in ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:26932717

  19. Simultaneous 3D imaging of sound-induced motions of the tympanic membrane and middle ear ossicles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ernest W; Cheng, Jeffrey T; Röösli, Christof; Kobler, James B; Rosowski, John J; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2013-10-01

    Efficient transfer of sound by the middle ear ossicles is essential for hearing. Various pathologies can impede the transmission of sound and thereby cause conductive hearing loss. Differential diagnosis of ossicular disorders can be challenging since the ossicles are normally hidden behind the tympanic membrane (TM). Here we describe the use of a technique termed optical coherence tomography (OCT) vibrography to view the sound-induced motion of the TM and ossicles simultaneously. With this method, we were able to capture three-dimensional motion of the intact TM and ossicles of the chinchilla ear with nanometer-scale sensitivity at sound frequencies from 0.5 to 5 kHz. The vibration patterns of the TM were complex and highly frequency dependent with mean amplitudes of 70-120 nm at 100 dB sound pressure level. The TM motion was only marginally sensitive to stapes fixation and incus-stapes joint interruption; however, when additional information derived from the simultaneous measurement of ossicular motion was added, it was possible to clearly distinguish these different simulated pathologies. The technique may be applicable to clinical diagnosis in Otology and to basic research in audition and acoustics. PMID:23811181

  20. Chemically Modified Interleukin-6 Aptamer Inhibits Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Ikuo; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Tomoki; Sumida, Shun-ichiro; Ibaragi, Shigeru; Kasai, Hayato; Horai, Naoto; Drolet, Daniel W.; Gupta, Shashi; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a potent mediator of inflammatory and immune responses, and a validated target for therapeutic intervention of inflammatory diseases. Previous studies have shown that SL1026, a slow off-rate modified aptamer (SOMAmer) antagonist of IL-6, neutralizes IL-6 signaling in vitro. In the present study, we show that SL1026 delays the onset and reduces the severity of rheumatoid symptoms in a collagen-induced arthritis model in cynomolgus monkeys. SL1026 (1 and 10 mg/kg), administered q.i.d., delayed the progression of arthritis and the concomitant increase in serum IL-6 levels compared to the untreated control group. Furthermore, SL1026 inhibited IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation ex vivo in T lymphocytes from human blood and IL-6-induced C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A production in human primary hepatocytes. Importantly, SOMAmer treatment did not elicit an immune response, as evidenced by the absence of anti-SOMAmer antibodies in plasma of treated monkeys. These results demonstrate that SOMAmer antagonists of IL-6 may be attractive agents for the treatment of IL-6-mediated diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26579954

  1. Lactobacillus acidophilus maintained oxidative stress from reproductive organs in collagen-induced arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Amdekar, Sarika; Singh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXTS: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induced organ damage is a well-known fact. Previous studies suggest that Lactobacillus scavenge the free radicals from liver and kidney and also protect animals from arthritis. AIMS: Comparing protective properties of Lactobacillus acidophilus in reducing oxidative stress from reproductive organs developed during collagen-induced arthritis in animal model. METHODS: Arthritis was induced in Wistar rats. Oral administration of L. acidophilus, indomethacin, and distilled water were all started on the same day. Arthritis scores were calculated for each group. Oxidative stress parameters were estimated in testis and ovary homogenates. Histopathology of ovary and testis was also performed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: L. acidophilus decreased arthritis score (P < 0.001) as well as maintained normal histology of reproductive organs. L. acidophilus maintained oxidative stress parameters from ovaries and testis (P < 0.001). These results provide strong evidence that NSAIDs increase oxidative stress in reproductive organs while L. acidophilus not only scavenges free radicals from reproductive organs but also protects rats from arthritis symptoms. PMID:27110077

  2. Fenugreek seed (Trigonella foenum graecum) polyphenols inhibit ethanol-induced collagen and lipid accumulation in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Kaviarasan, S; Viswanathan, P; Anuradha, C V

    2007-11-01

    Chronic alcoholism is associated with fatty liver and fibrosis characterized by collagen accumulation. Seeds of fenugreek, an annual herb, are reported to possess hepatoprotective activity. The study aims to investigate the effects of fenugreek seed polyphenol extract (FPEt) on liver lipids and collagen in experimental hepatotoxic rats. Hepatotoxicity was induced in male albino Wistar rats by administrating ethanol (6 g/kg per day) for 30 days. Control rats were given isocaloric glucose solution. FPEt was co-administered with ethanol at a dose of 200 mg/kg per day for the next 30 days. Silymarin was used as a positive control. Ethanol treatment caused increase in plasma and liver lipids, together with alterations in collagen content and properties. Administration of FPEt to alcohol-fed rats significantly improved lipid profile and reduced collagen content, crosslinking, aldehyde content and peroxidation. The effects were comparable with that of silymarin. FPEt administration had a positive influence on both lipid profile and on the quantitative and qualitative properties of collagen in alcoholic liver disease. The protective effect is presumably due to the bioactive phytochemicals in fenugreek seeds. PMID:17453353

  3. Identification of the epitope for a monoclonal antibody that blocks platelet aggregation induced by type III collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Glattauer, V; Werkmeister, J A; Kirkpatrick, A; Ramshaw, J A

    1997-01-01

    A library of eight conformation-dependent monoclonal antibodies that react with distinct epitopes on native human type III collagen has been examined for the ability of these antibodies to inhibit platelet aggregation induced by this collagen. Six of these antibodies had no effects; one, 1E7-D7/Col3, delayed the onset and slowed the rate of platelet aggregation, while another, 2G8-B1/Col3, completely inhibited aggregation. In order to identify the epitope recognized by this inhibitory antibody, a series of peptides that could fold to form triple-helical fragments was examined. Each peptide included six Gly-Xaa-Yaa triplets from the human type III collagen sequence, where Xaa and Yaa represent the particular amino acids in the sequence, and a C-terminal (Gly-Pro-Hyp)4 sequence to enhance triple-helical stability. Using these peptides we have identified the epitope as a nine-amino-acid sequence, GLAGAOGLR (where O is the one-letter code for 4-hydroxyproline), starting at position 520 in the human type III collagen helical domain. This sequence is proximal to the site proposed for the interaction of type III collagen with alpha2beta1-integrin of platelets. PMID:9173900

  4. Torilin ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Endale, Mehari; Lee, Whi Min; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Na-Mi; Kim, Bok-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Hyung; Cho, Jaeyoul; Kim, Suk; Park, Seung-Chun; Yun, Bong-Sik; Ko, Dukhwan; Rhee, Manhee

    2013-06-01

    Advancements in rheumatoid-arthritis-(RA) therapies have shown considerable progresses in the comprehension of disease. However, the development of new potential agents with relative safety and efficacy continues and natural compounds have been considered as alternatives to identify new entities. Since previous in-vivo data and our in-vitro findings showed that torilin has a strong anti-inflammatory property, we further investigated its effect against collagen-induced-arthritis-(CIA) in mice. CIA-induced DBA/1J mice were treated with torilin or methotrexate (MTX) for 5-weeks. Arthritis severity was evaluated by arthritic score and joint histopathology. Draining lymph node (dLN), joint and peripheral-blood mononuclear-cell (PBMC) counts, and activation/localization of T-/B-lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and neutrophils were examined by FACS analysis. Serum anti-type-II-collagen-(CII) antibody levels and cultured-splenocyte and serum cytokines were also evaluated. Torilin markedly reduced CIA-induced arthritic score, histopathology and leukocyte counts. Besides, torilin suppressed CIA-activated T-cells including CD3+, CD3+/CD69+, CD8+, CD4+ and CD4+/CD25+ in dLNs or joints. It also modified CD19+ or CD20+/CD23+ (B-cells), MHCII+/CD11c+ (DCs) and Gr-1+/CD11b+ (neutrophil) subpopulations. It further depressed total anti-CII-IgG, anti-CII-IgG1 and anti-CII-IgG2a antibody productions. Moreover, while IFN-γ and IL-10 were not affected, torilin suppressed CIA-induced serum TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels. Interestingly, torilin also blocked IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-6 cytokines while it did not affect IL-10 but enhanced IL-4 in splenocytes. These results show that torilin attenuated arthritis severity, modified leukocyte activations in dLNs or joints, and restored serum and splenocyte cytokine imbalances. Torilin may have immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties with the capacity to ameliorate the inflammatory response in CIA-mice. PMID:23623942

  5. Porphyromonas gingivalis oral infection exacerbates the development and severity of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Clinical studies suggest a direct influence of periodontal disease (PD) on serum inflammatory markers and disease assessment of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the influence of PD on arthritis development remains unclear. This investigation was undertaken to determine the contribution of chronic PD to immune activation and development of joint inflammation using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Methods DBA1/J mice orally infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis were administered with collagen II (CII) emulsified in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) or incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) to induce arthritis. Arthritis development was assessed by visual scoring of paw swelling, caliper measurement of the paws, mRNA expression, paw micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis, histology, and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase for osteoclast detection (TRAP)-positive immunohistochemistry. Serum and reactivated splenocytes were evaluated for cytokine expression. Results Mice induced for PD and/or arthritis developed periodontal disease, shown by decreased alveolar bone and alteration of mRNA expression in gingival tissues and submandibular lymph nodes compared to vehicle. P. gingivalis oral infection increased paw swelling and osteoclast numbers in mice immunized with CFA/CII. Arthritis incidence and severity were increased by P. gingivalis in mice that received IFA/CII immunizations. Increased synovitis, bone erosions, and osteoclast numbers in the paws were observed following IFA/CII immunizations in mice infected with P gingivalis. Furthermore, cytokine analysis showed a trend toward increased serum Th17/Th1 ratios when P. gingivalis infection was present in mice receiving either CFA/CII or IFA/CII immunizations. Significant cytokine increases induced by P. gingivalis oral infection were mostly associated to Th17-related cytokines of reactivated splenic cells, including IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-22 in the CFA

  6. Effects of low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, So Yean; Sim, Joon-Soo; Jeong, Choon Sik; Chang, Seung Yeup; Choi, Don Woong; Toida, Toshihiko; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2004-01-01

    In order to evaluate the improvement in the treatment of chronic arthritis, we investigated chondroitin sulfate depolymerization product (low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate, LMWCS) and intact chondroitin sulfate (CS) in vitro and in vivo. LMWCS was prepared by a chemical depolymerization process induced by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of copper salts. LMWCS (300 mg/kg) and CS (1200 mg/kg) were orally administered to DBA/1J mice once daily for 14 d prior to initial immunization with type II collagen. Their elastase activities and the production of cytokines in sera were examined on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice. We also compared the paracellular transport of LMWCS and CS across Caco-2 cell monolayers and examined the inhibitory effects on elastase activities. LMWCS inhibited elastase activity slightly, but CS did not show inhibition. Hind paw edema was significantly decreased by LMWCS treatment. Levels of anti-type II collagen antibody and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in sera were also reduced by LMWCS treatment but not in case of CS, although no significant difference was observed between LMWCS and CS on interleukin-6 (IL-6) induction. The LMWCS preparation showed preventive effects on the type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and better permeability through Caco-2 cells. PMID:14709897

  7. Regenerative effects of moxibustion on skeletal muscle in collagen-induced arthritic mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jung; Namgung, Uk; Hong, Kwon-Eui

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that the direct application of moxibustion significantly enhances muscle regeneration in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Twelve Dilute Brown Non-Agouti (DBA)/1 J male mice were randomly divided into the following groups: intact control (n=4), CIA (n=4), and CIA with moxibustion treatment (CIA+moxi, n=4). Mice in the CIA and CIA+moxi groups were immunized twice via intradermal injections of bovine type II collagen (C II) at 3-week intervals. After the second injection, moxibustion was applied to the mouse equivalent of the BL24 and ST36 acupoints with a moxa cone five times/day, every other day (except Sundays), for 3 weeks (a total of 9 treatments were administered). Phospho-Erk1/2, myostatin, TFG-B1, and IGF-1 were analyzed using ELISA. Protein levels in skeletal muscle tissues of the hind limb were analyzed by Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining. Treatment with direct moxibustion led to a marked improvement in CIA and atrophy of individual muscle fibers. Collagen protein signaling in the muscle of the CIA group was stronger than the control and CIA+moxi groups. Myostatin protein expression, as determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining, were stronger in the CIA group compared with the control and CIA+moxi groups. Immunofluorescent staining confirmed that the CIA group had the strongest TGF-B1 protein signals among the three groups. However, in serum analysis the intact control group showed the strongest TGF-B1 protein signaling. RT-PCR analysis of the muscle tissues of the CIA+moxi group showed significant IGF-1 mRNA expression, and the most intense phospho-Erk1/2 protein signaling was detected in the muscle tissues of the CIA group via Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining. These results confirm that the direct administration of moxibustion at Shenshu (BL 23) and Zusanli (ST 36) influences muscle regeneration in the CIA mouse model. Our results suggest that the establishment of

  8. Novel therapeutic compound tuftsin-phosphorylcholine attenuates collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bashi, T; Shovman, O; Fridkin, M; Volkov, A; Barshack, I; Blank, M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2016-04-01

    Treatment with helminthes and helminthes ova improved the clinical symptoms of several autoimmune diseases in patients and in animal models. Phosphorylcholine (PC) proved to be the immunomodulatory molecule. We aimed to decipher the tolerogenic potential of tuftsin-PC (TPC), a novel helminth-based compound in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CIA DBA/1 mice were treated with TPC subcutaneously (5 µg/0.1 ml) or orally (250 µg/0.1 ml), starting prior to disease induction. The control groups were treated with PBS. Collagen antibodies were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), cytokine protein levels by ELISA kits and regulatory T (Treg ) and regulatory B (Breg ) cell phenotypes by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). TPC-treated mice had a significantly lower arthritis score of 1.5 in comparison with control mice 11.8 (P < 0.0001) in both subcutaneous and orally treated groups at day 31. Moreover, histology analysis demonstrated highly inflamed joints in control mice, whereas TPC-treated mice maintained normal joint structure. Furthermore, TPC decreased the titres of circulating collagen II antibodies in mice sera (P < 0.0001), enhanced expression of IL-10 (P < 0.0001) and inhibited production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-1β (P < 0.0001). TPC significantly expanded the CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) Treg cells and CD19(+) IL-10(+) CD5(high) CD1d(high) T cell immunoglobulin mucin-1 (TIM-1(+) ) Breg cell phenotypes (P < 0.0001) in treated mice. Our data indicate that treatment with TPC attenuates CIA in mice demonstrated by low arthritic score and normal joints histology. TPC treatment reduced proinflammatory cytokines and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine expression, as well as expansion of Treg and Breg cells. Our results may lead to a new approach for a natural therapy for early rheumatoid arthritis onset. PMID:26618631

  9. Parathyroid hormone attenuates radiation-induced increases in collagen crosslink ratio at periosteal surfaces of mouse tibia.

    PubMed

    Oest, Megan E; Gong, Bo; Esmonde-White, Karen; Mann, Kenneth A; Zimmerman, Nicholas D; Damron, Timothy A; Morris, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    As part of our ongoing efforts to understand underlying mechanisms contributing to radiation-associated bone fragility and to identify possible treatments, we evaluated the longitudinal effects of parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment on bone quality in a murine model of limited field irradiation. We hypothesized PTH would mitigate radiation-induced changes in the chemical composition and structure of bone, as measured by microscope-based Raman spectroscopy. We further hypothesized that collagen crosslinking would be especially responsive to PTH treatment. Raman spectroscopy was performed on retrieved tibiae (6-7/group/time point) to quantify metrics associated with bone quality, including: mineral-to-matrix ratio, carbonate-to-phosphate ratio, mineral crystallinity, collagen crosslink (trivalent:divalent) ratio, and the mineral and matrix depolarization ratios. Irradiation disrupted the molecular structure and orientation of bone collagen, as evidenced by a higher collagen crosslink ratio and lower matrix depolarization ratio (vs. non-irradiated control bones), persisting until 12weeks post-irradiation. Radiation transiently affected the mineral phase, as evidenced by increased mineral crystallinity and mineral-to-matrix ratio at 4weeks compared to controls. Radiation decreased bone mineral depolarization ratios through 12weeks, indicating increased mineral alignment. PTH treatment partially attenuated radiation-induced increases in collagen crosslink ratio, but did not restore collagen or mineral alignment. These post-radiation matrix changes are consistent with our previous studies of radiation damage to bone, and suggest that the initial radiation damage to bone matrix has extensive effects on the quality of tissue deposited thereafter. In addition to maintaining bone quality, preventing initial radiation damage to the bone matrix (i.e. crosslink ratio, matrix orientation) may be critical to preventing late-onset fragility fractures. PMID:26960578

  10. Nanoparticulate Delivery of Agents for Induced Elastogenesis in 3-Dimensional Collagenous Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Lavanya; Sivaraman, Balakrishnan; Vaidya, Pratik; Ramamurthi, Anand

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of elastic matrix in the infrarenal aortic wall is a critical parameter underlying the formation and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). It is mediated by the chronic overexpression of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) -2 and -9, leading to a progressive loss of elasticity and weakening of the aortic wall. Delivery of therapeutic agents to inhibit MMPs, while concurrently coaxing cell-based regenerative repair of the elastic matrix represents a potential strategy for slowing or arresting AAA growth. Our prior studies have demonstrated elastogenic induction of healthy and aneurysmal aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and inhibition of MMPs, following exogenous delivery of elastogenic factors such as TGF-β1, as well as MMP-inhibitors such as doxycycline (DOX) in two-dimensional (2-D) culture. Based on these findings, and others that demonstrated elastogenic benefits of nanoparticulate delivery of these agents in 2-D culture, we have developed poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for localized, controlled and sustained delivery of DOX and TGF-β1 to human aortic SMCs (HASMCs) within a three-dimensional (3-D) gels of type-I collagen gel, which closely evoke the arterial tissue microenvironment. DOX and TGF-β1 released from these NPs influenced elastogenic outcomes positively within the collagen constructs over 21 days of culture, which were comparable to that induced by exogenous supplementation of DOX and TGF-β1 within the culture medium. However, this was accomplished at doses ∼20-fold lower than the exogenous dosages of the agents, illustrating that their localized, controlled, and sustained delivery from NPs embedded within a 3-D scaffold is an efficient strategy for directed elastogenesis. PMID:24737693

  11. Phenotypic characterization of type II collagen-induced arthritis in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    SONG, HOU-PAN; LI, XIN; YU, RONG; ZENG, GUANG; YUAN, ZHEN-YI; WANG, WEI; HUANG, HUI-YONG; CAI, XIONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine a more specific, efficient and simple method for the induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Different strains of rats were injected at the base of the tail with bovine type II collagen (CII) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The onset and severity of arthritis were evaluated by clinical assessment. The established CIA model was analyzed using a comprehensive examination of clinical, hematological, histological and radiological parameters. The results demonstrated that Wistar rats were the most susceptible strain to CIA followed by Wistar Furth rats, with Sprague Dawley rats being the least susceptible. Following primary and booster immunization, female Wistar rats developed severe arthritis, with an incidence of >83% and low variability in clinical signs. The development of arthritis was accompanied by a significantly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate compared with that in the control rats. The radiographic examination revealed bone matrix resorption, considerable soft tissue swelling, periosteal new bone formation and bone erosion in the arthritic joints of the CIA rats. Histopathologically, the synovial joints of CIA rats were characterized by synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation, marked cellular infiltration, bone and cartilage erosion and narrowing of the joint space. The administration of an intradermal injection of only 200 µg bovine CII emulsified in IFA at the base of the tail therefore leads to the successful development of a CIA rat model. This well-characterized CIA rat model could be specifically used to study the pathophysiology of human rheumatoid arthritis as well as to test and develop anti-arthritic agents for humans. PMID:26622511

  12. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Systemic Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Manasa G; Kour, Supinder; Piprode, Vikrant; Mittal, Monika; Kumar, Anil; Rani, Lekha; Pote, Satish T; Mishra, Gyan C; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammatory synovitis leading to joint destruction and systemic bone loss. The inflammation-induced bone loss is mediated by increased osteoclast formation and function. Current antirheumatic therapies primarily target suppression of inflammatory cascade with limited or no success in controlling progression of bone destruction. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by virtue of their tissue repair and immunomodulatory properties have shown promising results in various autoimmune and degenerative diseases. However, the role of MSCs in prevention of bone destruction in RA is not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) on in vitro formation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and pathological bone loss in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA. We observed that ASCs significantly inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis in both a contact-dependent and -independent manner. Additionally, ASCs inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-17, and IL-1β. Furthermore, treatment with ASCs at the onset of CIA significantly reduced clinical symptoms and joint pathology. Interestingly, ASCs protected periarticular and systemic bone loss in CIA mice by maintaining trabecular bone structure. We further observed that treatment with ASCs reduced osteoclast precursors in bone marrow, resulting in decreased osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, ASCs suppressed autoimmune T cell responses and increased the percentages of peripheral regulatory T and B cells. Thus, we provide strong evidence that ASCs ameliorate inflammation-induced systemic bone loss in CIA mice by reducing osteoclast precursors and promoting immune tolerance. PMID:26538398

  13. Full-Length Fibronectin Drives Fibroblast Accumulation at the Surface of Collagen Microtissues during Cell-Induced Tissue Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Foolen, Jasper; Shiu, Jau-Ye; Mitsi, Maria; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Christopher S; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Generating and maintaining gradients of cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a prerequisite for the development of functionality of healthy tissue. Therefore, gaining insights into the drivers of spatial organization of cells and the role of ECM during tissue morphogenesis is vital. In a 3D model system of tissue morphogenesis, a fibronectin-FRET sensor recently revealed the existence of two separate fibronectin populations with different conformations in microtissues, i.e. 'compact and adsorbed to collagen' versus 'extended and fibrillar' fibronectin that does not colocalize with the collagen scaffold. Here we asked how the presence of fibronectin might drive this cell-induced tissue morphogenesis, more specifically the formation of gradients in cell density and ECM composition. Microtissues were engineered in a high-throughput model system containing rectangular microarrays of 12 posts, which constrained fibroblast-populated collagen gels, remodeled by the contractile cells into trampoline-shaped microtissues. Fibronectin's contribution during the tissue maturation process was assessed using fibronectin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (Fn-/- MEFs) and floxed equivalents (Fnf/f MEFs), in fibronectin-depleted growth medium with and without exogenously added plasma fibronectin (full-length, or various fragments). In the absence of full-length fibronectin, Fn-/- MEFs remained homogenously distributed throughout the cell-contracted collagen gels. In contrast, in the presence of full-length fibronectin, both cell types produced shell-like tissues with a predominantly cell-free compacted collagen core and a peripheral surface layer rich in cells. Single cell assays then revealed that Fn-/- MEFs applied lower total strain energy on nanopillar arrays coated with either fibronectin or vitronectin when compared to Fnf/f MEFs, but that the presence of exogenously added plasma fibronectin rescued their contractility. While collagen decoration of

  14. Resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in SHPS-1 mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzawa, Chie; Kaneko, Yoriaki; Murata, Yoji; Miyake, Astuko; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okajo, Jun; Tomizawa, Takeshi; Kaneko, Yuka; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Matozaki, Takashi Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2008-07-04

    SHPS-1 is a transmembrane protein that binds the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 through its cytoplasmic region and is abundantly expressed on dendritic cells and macrophages. Here we show that mice expressing a mutant form of SHPS-1 fail to develop type-II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA), a model for rheumatoid arthritis in humans. Histological examinations of the arthritic paws from immunized wild-type mice revealed that cartilage was destroyed in association with marked mononuclear cell infiltration, while only mild cell infiltration was observed in immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice. Consistently, the serum levels of both IgG and IgG2a specific to CII and of IL-1{beta} in immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice were markedly reduced compared with those apparent for wild-type mice. The CII-induced proliferation of, and production of cytokines by, T cells from immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice were reduced compared to wild-type cells. These results suggest that SHPS-1 is essential for development of CIA.

  15. The involvement of platelets and the coronary vasculature in collagen-induced sudden death in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mallarkey, G; Smith, G M

    1985-02-18

    The mechanism of collagen-induced sudden death in rabbits was studied by measuring blood pressure (BP), heart rate, ECG, the continuous platelet count and the plasma levels of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and 6-keto prostaglandin F1a (6-keto PGF1a). Death was preceded by myocardial ischaemia and a sharp fall in BP which occurred before any fall in platelet count was observed. The calcium entry blockers (CEBS), verapamil, nifedipine and PY 108-068 protected the rabbits from sudden death without any significant effect on the decrease in the platelet count or increase in plasma TXB2 levels. 6-keto PGF1a could not be detected in any plasma samples. Indomethacin and tri-sodium citrate also protected the rabbits but significantly reduced the fall in platelet count and plasma TXB2. In vitro studies on isolated aortae indicated that verapamil non-specifically inhibited vasoconstriction induced by KCl, adrenaline and U46619 (a thromboxane agonist). It is concluded that CEBS physiologically antagonize the vasoconstricting actions of platelet-derived substances and that it is coronary vasoconstriction that is primarily the cause of death. PMID:3992523

  16. Anti-Arthritic Effect of Chebulanin on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yinglan; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yao; Zhou, Dan; Dai, Qing; Liu, Songqing

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic degenerative autoimmune disease characterized by persistent inflammation of synovial membranes, which leads to cartilage destruction and bone erosion. To date, there are no effective therapies to slow the progress of this degenerative condition. Here, we evaluate the anti-arthritic effect of chebulanin, an abundant anti-inflammatory agent isolated from Terminalia chebula, in collagen induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice by intragastric administration. Arthritic severity was scored by performing histopathological evaluation of the joints and measuring the expression of inflammatory cytokines and relative enzymes by immunohistochemical staining. In parallel, bone destruction and erosion were confirmed by micro-CT. Our data revealed that chebulanin significantly improved the severity of arthritis. Specifically, the histopathological characteristics of the tissues were improved and expression of TNF-α, IL-6, MMP-3 and COX-2 in the paws and joints of the treated mice decreased in a dose-dependent manner compared with control mice. Furthermore, micro-CT analysis revealed that chebulanin induced a dose-dependent reduction in cartilage destruction and bone erosion. Taken together, our findings suggest that chebulanin suppresses the expression of inflammatory mediators and prevents cartilage destruction and bone erosion in mice. Therefore, chebulanin is a strong therapeutic alternative for the treatment of RA. PMID:26402786

  17. Compression loading-induced stress responses in intervertebral disc cells encapsulated in 3D collagen constructs

    PubMed Central

    Chooi, Wai Hon; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Cells protect themselves from stresses through a cellular stress response. In the interverebral disc, such response was also demonstrated to be induced by various environmental stresses. However, whether compression loading will cause cellular stress response in the nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) is not well studied. By using an in vitro collagen microencapsulation model, we investigated the effect of compression loading on the stress response of NPCs. Cell viability tests, and gene and protein expression experiments were conducted, with primers for the heat shock response (HSR: HSP70, HSF1, HSP27 and HSP90), and unfolded protein response (UPR: GRP78, GRP94, ATF4 and CHOP) genes and an antibody to HSP72. Different gene expression patterns occurred due to loading type throughout experiments. Increasing the loading strain for a short duration did not increase the stress response genes significantly, but over longer durations, HSP70 and HSP27 were upregulated. Longer loading durations also resulted in a continuous upregulation of HSR genes and downregulation of UPR genes, even after load removal. The rate of apoptosis did not increase significantly after loading, suggesting that stress response genes might play a role in cell survival following mechanical stress. These results demonstrate how mechanical stress might induce and control the expression of HSR and UPR genes in NPCs. PMID:27197886

  18. Mucosal Administration of Collagen V Ameliorates the Atherosclerotic Plaque Burden by Inducing Interleukin 35-dependent Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Park, Arick C; Huang, Guorui; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Massoudi, Dawiyat; Kernien, John F; Vignali, Dario A; Sullivan, Jeremy A; Wilkes, David S; Burlingham, William J; Greenspan, Daniel S

    2016-02-12

    We have shown previously that collagen V (col(V)) autoimmunity is a consistent feature of atherosclerosis in human coronary artery disease and in the Apoe(-/-) mouse model. We have also shown sensitization of Apoe(-/-) mice with col(V) to markedly increase the atherosclerotic burden, providing evidence of a causative role for col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerotic pathogenesis. Here we sought to determine whether induction of immune tolerance to col(V) might ameliorate atherosclerosis, providing further evidence for a causal role for col(V) autoimmunity in atherogenesis and providing insights into the potential for immunomodulatory therapeutic interventions. Mucosal inoculation successfully induced immune tolerance to col(V) with an accompanying reduction in plaque burden in Ldlr(-/-) mice on a high-cholesterol diet. The results therefore demonstrate that inoculation with col(V) can successfully ameliorate the atherosclerotic burden, suggesting novel approaches for therapeutic interventions. Surprisingly, tolerance and reduced atherosclerotic burden were both dependent on the recently described IL-35 and not on IL-10, the immunosuppressive cytokine usually studied in the context of induced tolerance and amelioration of atherosclerotic symptoms. In addition to the above, using recombinant protein fragments, we were able to localize two epitopes of the α1(V) chain involved in col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerotic Ldlr(-/-) mice, suggesting future courses of experimentation for the characterization of such epitopes. PMID:26721885

  19. Sympathetic Neurotransmitters Modulate Osteoclastogenesis and Osteoclast Activity in the Context of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Muschter, Dominique; Schäfer, Nicole; Stangl, Hubert; Straub, Rainer H.; Grässel, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Excessive synovial osteoclastogenesis is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Concomitantly, local synovial changes comprise neuronal components of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. Here, we wanted to analyze if collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) alters bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMM) osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity, and how sympathetic neurotransmitters participate in this process. Therefore, BMMs from Dark Agouti rats at different CIA stages were differentiated into osteoclasts in vitro and osteoclast number, cathepsin K activity, matrix resorption and apoptosis were analyzed in the presence of acetylcholine (ACh), noradrenaline (NA) vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and assay-dependent, adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477. We observed modulation of neurotransmitter receptor mRNA expression in CIA osteoclasts without affecting protein level. CIA stage-dependently altered marker gene expression associated with osteoclast differentiation and activity without affecting osteoclast number or activity. Neurotransmitter stimulation modulated osteoclast differentiation, apoptosis and activity. VIP, NA and adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477 inhibited cathepsin K activity and osteoclastogenesis (NKH477, 10-6M NA) whereas ACh mostly acted pro-osteoclastogenic. We conclude that CIA alone does not affect metabolism of in vitro generated osteoclasts whereas stimulation with NA, VIP plus specific activation of adenylyl cyclase induced anti-resorptive effects probably mediated via cAMP signaling. Contrary, we suggest pro-osteoclastogenic and pro-resorptive properties of ACh mediated via muscarinic receptors. PMID:26431344

  20. Compression loading-induced stress responses in intervertebral disc cells encapsulated in 3D collagen constructs.

    PubMed

    Chooi, Wai Hon; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Cells protect themselves from stresses through a cellular stress response. In the interverebral disc, such response was also demonstrated to be induced by various environmental stresses. However, whether compression loading will cause cellular stress response in the nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) is not well studied. By using an in vitro collagen microencapsulation model, we investigated the effect of compression loading on the stress response of NPCs. Cell viability tests, and gene and protein expression experiments were conducted, with primers for the heat shock response (HSR: HSP70, HSF1, HSP27 and HSP90), and unfolded protein response (UPR: GRP78, GRP94, ATF4 and CHOP) genes and an antibody to HSP72. Different gene expression patterns occurred due to loading type throughout experiments. Increasing the loading strain for a short duration did not increase the stress response genes significantly, but over longer durations, HSP70 and HSP27 were upregulated. Longer loading durations also resulted in a continuous upregulation of HSR genes and downregulation of UPR genes, even after load removal. The rate of apoptosis did not increase significantly after loading, suggesting that stress response genes might play a role in cell survival following mechanical stress. These results demonstrate how mechanical stress might induce and control the expression of HSR and UPR genes in NPCs. PMID:27197886

  1. Tolerogenic splenic IDO (+) dendritic cells from the mice treated with induced-Treg cells suppress collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Yang, Yiming; Fan, Huahua; Zou, Hejian

    2014-01-01

    TGF-β-induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) retain Foxp3 expression and immune-suppressive activity in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). However, the mechanisms whereby transferred iTregs suppress immune responses, particularly the interplay between iTregs and dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo, remain incompletely understood. In this study, we found that after treatment with iTregs, splenic CD11c(+)DCs, termed "DCiTreg," expressed tolerogenic phenotypes, secreted high levels of IL-10, TGF-β, and IDO, and showed potent immunosuppressive activity in vitro. After reinfusion with DCiTreg, marked antiarthritic activity improved clinical scores and histological end-points were observed. The serological levels of inflammatory cytokines and anti-CII antibodies were low and TGF-β production was high in the DCiTreg-treated group. DCiTreg also induced new iTregs in vivo. Moreover, the inhibitory activity of DCiTreg on CIA was lost following pretreatment with the inhibitor of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Collectively, these findings suggest that transferred iTregs could induce tolerogenic characteristics in splenic DCs and these cells could effectively dampen CIA in an IDO-dependent manner. Thus, the potential therapeutic effects of iTregs in CIA are likely maintained through the generation of tolerogenic DCs in vivo. PMID:25405209

  2. Multiphoton microscopy of engineered dermal substitutes: assessment of 3-D collagen matrix remodeling induced by fibroblast contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Fagot, Dominique; Olive, Christian; Michelet, Jean-François; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Leroy, Frédéric; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Martin, Jean-Louis; Colonna, Anne; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2010-09-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are responsible for the generation of mechanical forces within their surrounding extracellular matrix and can be potentially targeted by anti-aging ingredients. Investigation of the modulation of fibroblast contraction by these ingredients requires the implementation of three-dimensional in situ imaging methodologies. We use multiphoton microscopy to visualize unstained engineered dermal tissue by combining second-harmonic generation that reveals specifically fibrillar collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence from endogenous cellular chromophores. We study the fibroblast-induced reorganization of the collagen matrix and quantitatively evaluate the effect of Y-27632, a RhoA-kinase inhibitor, on dermal substitute contraction. We observe that collagen fibrils rearrange around fibroblasts with increasing density in control samples, whereas collagen fibrils show no remodeling in the samples containing the RhoA-kinase inhibitor. Moreover, we show that the inhibitory effects are reversible. Our study demonstrates the relevance of multiphoton microscopy to visualize three-dimensional remodeling of the extracellular matrix induced by fibroblast contraction or other processes.

  3. Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.; Bourguignon, L.Y. )

    1990-08-01

    Initially we established that the binding of collagen to human blood platelets stimulates both the rapid loss of PIP2 and the generation of inositol-4,5-bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). These results indicate that the binding of collagen stimulates inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C during platelet activation. The fact that GTP or GTP-gamma-S augments, and pertussis toxin inhibits, collagen-induced IP3 formation suggests that a GTP-binding protein or (or proteins) may be directly involved in the regulation of phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets. We have used several complementary techniques to isolate and characterize a platelet 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) that has a number of structural and functional similarities to the regulatory alpha i subunit of the GTP-binding proteins isolated from bovine brain. This 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) is found to be closely associated with at least four membrane glycoproteins (e.g., gp180, gp110, gp95, and gp75) in a 330-kDa complex that can be dissociated by treatment with high salt plus urea. Most important, we have demonstrated that antilymphoma 41-kDa (alpha i subunit of GTP-binding proteins) antibody cross-reacts with the platelet 41-kDa protein (or proteins) and the alpha i subunit of bovine brain Gi alpha proteins, and blocks GTP/collagen-induced IP3 formation. These data provide strong evidence that the 41-kDa platelet GTP-binding protein (or proteins) is directly involved in collagen-induced signal transduction during platelet activation.

  4. Aldosterone Induces Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases-1 Expression and Further Contributes to Collagen Accumulation: From Clinical to Bench Studies.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chi-Sheng; Chou, Chia-Hung; Liao, Che-Wei; Lin, Yen-Tin; Wu, Xue-Ming; Chang, Yi-Yao; Chen, Ying-Hsien; Wu, Vin-Cent; Su, Ming-Jai; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Chen, Ming-Fong; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Lin, Yen-Hung

    2016-06-01

    Aldosterone induces myocardial fibrosis. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) is a key factor of myocardial fibrosis. This study tested the hypothesis that aldosterone induces TIMP-1 expression and contributes to the fibrotic process. We prospectively enrolled 54 patients with primary aldosteronism, and measured plasma TIMP-1 and echocardiographic parameters. In the cell study, we investigated the possible molecular mechanism by which aldosterone induces TIMP-1 secretion and the effects on collagen accumulation. In the animal study, we measured serum TIMP-1 levels, cardiac TIMP-1 levels, and cardiac structure in an aldosterone infusion mouse model using implantation of aldosterone pellets. In patients with primary aldosteronism, plasma TIMP-1 was correlated with 24-hour urinary aldosterone, left ventricular mass, and impairment of left ventricular diastolic function. In human cardiac fibroblasts, TIMP-1 protein and mRNA expressions were significantly increased by aldosterone through the glucocorticoid receptor/PI3K/Akt/nuclear factor-κB pathway. TIMP-1 small-interfering RNA significantly reduced aldosterone-induced collagen accumulation, and aldosterone did not alter the levels of collagen1a1 or matrix metalloproteinase-1 mRNA. The aldosterone-induced TIMP-1 expression was inversely related to matrix metalloproteinase-1 activity. Furthermore, in the animal model, the serum and cardiac levels of TIMP-1 were significantly elevated in the mice that received aldosterone infusion. This elevation was blocked by RU-486 but not by eplerenone, suggesting that the effect was through glucocorticoid receptors. In a long-term aldosterone infusion model, serum TIMP-1 was associated with serum aldosterone level, cardiac structure, and fibrosis. In conclusion, aldosterone induced TIMP-1 expression in vivo and in vitro. This increased TIMP-1 expression resulted in enhanced collagen accumulation via the suppression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 activity. PMID:27113051

  5. Cosmetic ear surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... 31. Thorne CH. Otoplasty. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap ...

  6. Cu,Zn-SOD deficiency induces the accumulation of hepatic collagen.

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Fujiwara, Noriko; Yoneoka, Yuka; Yoshihara, Daisaku; Eguchi, Hironobu; Suzuki, Keiichiro

    2016-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases, and results in the development of fibrosis. Oxidative stress is thought to be one of the underlying causes of NAFLD. Copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a primary antioxidative enzyme that scavenges superoxide anion radicals. Although SOD1 knockout (KO) mice have been reported to develop fatty livers, it is not known whether this lack of SOD1 leads to the development of fibrosis. Since the accumulation of collagen typically precedes liver fibrosis, we assessed the balance between the synthesis and degradation of collagen in liver tissue from SOD1 KO mice. We found a higher accumulation of collagen in the livers of SOD1 KO mice compared to wild type mice. The level of expression of HSP47, a chaperone of collagen, and a tissue inhibitor (TIMP1) of matrix metalloproteinases (a collagen degradating enzyme) was also increased in SOD1 KO mice livers. These results indicate that collagen synthesis is increased but that its degradation is inhibited in SOD1 KO mice livers. Moreover, SOD1 KO mice liver sections were extensively modified by advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which suggest that collagen in SOD1 KO mice liver might be also modified with AGEs and then would be more resistant to the action of collagen degrading enzymes. These findings clearly show that oxidative stress plays an important role in the progression of liver fibrosis. PMID:26981929

  7. Collagen-gel-induced resistance of overlying keratinocyte cultures to photosensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsantonis, John C.; Georgiou, Savas K.; Providaki, Mary G.; Vlahonikolis, John G.; Tosca, Andronicki D.

    1997-12-01

    In the present study it was found that human keratinocytes grown on collagen substrate, exhibited increased resistance to the hematoprophyrin-mediated photodynamic treatment, in comparison to keratinocytes grown on Petri dishes without collagen. Interestingly, no protection was afforded by the collagen gel to the cells in the corresponding control ('hematoprophyrin only' and 'light only') experiments. This observation was found to be independent of light dose and drug concentration, and the relative degree of resistance was the same for both normal and malignant cells. The degree of keratinocyte resistance was found to be closely related to the duration of cell attachment on the collagen substrate. These results are indicative of an active interference of collagen gel with the cellular evolution of the photodynamic phenomenon and they are also suggestive of variation in the photodynamic treatment efficacy according to the cellular environment.

  8. Nanofibrous clinical-grade collagen scaffolds seeded with human cardiomyocytes induces cardiac remodeling in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Joanne, Pierre; Kitsara, Maria; Boitard, Solène-Emmanuelle; Naemetalla, Hany; Vanneaux, Valérie; Pernot, Mathieu; Larghero, Jérôme; Forest, Patricia; Chen, Yong; Menasché, Philippe; Agbulut, Onnik

    2016-02-01

    Limited data are available on the effects of stem cells in non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Since the diffuse nature of the disease calls for a broad distribution of cells, this study investigated the scaffold-based delivery of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) in a mouse model of DCM. Nanofibrous scaffolds were produced using a clinical grade atelocollagen which was electrospun and cross-linked under different conditions. As assessed by scanning electron microscopy and shearwave elastography, the optimum crosslinking conditions for hiPS-CM colonization proved to be a 10% concentration of citric acid crosslinking agent and 150 min of post-electrospinning baking. Acellular collagen scaffolds were first implanted in both healthy mice and those with induced DCM by a cardiac-specific invalidation of serum response factor (SRF). Seven and fourteen days after implantation, the safety of the scaffold was demonstrated by echocardiography and histological assessments. The subsequent step of implantation of the scaffolds seeded with hiPS-CM in DCM induced mice, using cell-free scaffolds as controls, revealed that after fourteen days heart function decreased in controls while it remained stable in the treated mice. This pattern was associated with an increased number of endothelial cells, in line with the greater vascularity of the scaffold. Moreover, a lesser degree of fibrosis consistent with the upregulation of several genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling was observed. These results support the interest of the proposed hiPS-CM seeded electrospun scaffold for the stabilization of the DCM outcome with potential for its clinical use in the future. PMID:26708641

  9. Full-Length Fibronectin Drives Fibroblast Accumulation at the Surface of Collagen Microtissues during Cell-Induced Tissue Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Foolen, Jasper; Shiu, Jau-Ye; Mitsi, Maria; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Christopher S.; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Generating and maintaining gradients of cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a prerequisite for the development of functionality of healthy tissue. Therefore, gaining insights into the drivers of spatial organization of cells and the role of ECM during tissue morphogenesis is vital. In a 3D model system of tissue morphogenesis, a fibronectin-FRET sensor recently revealed the existence of two separate fibronectin populations with different conformations in microtissues, i.e. ‘compact and adsorbed to collagen’ versus ‘extended and fibrillar’ fibronectin that does not colocalize with the collagen scaffold. Here we asked how the presence of fibronectin might drive this cell-induced tissue morphogenesis, more specifically the formation of gradients in cell density and ECM composition. Microtissues were engineered in a high-throughput model system containing rectangular microarrays of 12 posts, which constrained fibroblast-populated collagen gels, remodeled by the contractile cells into trampoline-shaped microtissues. Fibronectin’s contribution during the tissue maturation process was assessed using fibronectin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (Fn-/- MEFs) and floxed equivalents (Fnf/f MEFs), in fibronectin-depleted growth medium with and without exogenously added plasma fibronectin (full-length, or various fragments). In the absence of full-length fibronectin, Fn-/- MEFs remained homogenously distributed throughout the cell-contracted collagen gels. In contrast, in the presence of full-length fibronectin, both cell types produced shell-like tissues with a predominantly cell-free compacted collagen core and a peripheral surface layer rich in cells. Single cell assays then revealed that Fn-/- MEFs applied lower total strain energy on nanopillar arrays coated with either fibronectin or vitronectin when compared to Fnf/f MEFs, but that the presence of exogenously added plasma fibronectin rescued their contractility. While collagen

  10. The IκB kinase inhibitor ACHP strongly attenuates TGFβ1-induced myofibroblast formation and collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mia, Masum M; Bank, Ruud A

    2015-12-01

    Excessive accumulation of a collagen-rich extracellular matrix (ECM) by myofibroblasts is a characteristic feature of fibrosis, a pathological state leading to serious organ dysfunction. Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFβ1) is a strong inducer of myofibroblast formation and subsequent collagen production. Currently, there are no remedies for the treatment of fibrosis. Activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway by phosphorylating IκB with the enzyme IκB kinase (IKK) plays a major role in the induction of fibrosis. ACHP {2-Amino-6-[2-(cyclopropylmethoxy)-6-hydroxyphenyl]-4-(4-piperidinyl)-3 pyridinecarbonitrile}, a selective inhibitor of IKK, prohibits the activation of the NF-κB pathway. It is not known whether ACHP has potential anti-fibrotic properties. Using adult human dermal and lung fibroblasts we have investigated whether ACHP has the ability to inhibit the TGFβ1-induced transition of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts and its excessive synthesis of ECM. The presence of ACHP strongly suppressed the induction of the myofibroblast markers alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) and SM22α, as well as the deposition of the ECM components collagen type I and fibronectin. Furthermore, post-treatment with ACHP partly reversed the expression of αSMA and collagen type I production. Finally, ACHP suppressed the expression of the three collagen-modifying enzymes lysyl hydroxylase (PLOD1, PLOD2 and PLOD3) in dermal fibroblasts, but did not do so in lung fibroblasts. We conclude that the IKK inhibitor ACHP has potent antifibrotic properties, and that the NF-κB pathway plays an important role in myofibroblast biology. PMID:26337045

  11. Aqueous and Methanolic Extracts of Caulerpa mexicana Suppress Cell Migration and Ear Edema Induced by Inflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bitencourt, Mariana Angelica Oliveira; Dantas, Gracielle Rodrigues; Lira, Daysianne Pereira; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; de Miranda, George Emmanuel Cavalcanti; de Oliveira Santos, Barbara Viviana; Souto, Janeusa Trindade

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of the inflammatory response is essential to maintaining homeostasis. Several studies have investigated new drugs that may contribute to avoiding or minimizing excessive inflammatory process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of extracts of green algae Caulerpa mexicana on models inflammation. In mice, the inflammatory peritonitis model is induced by zymosan. Previous treatment of mice with aqueous and methanolic extracts of C. mexicana was able to suppress the cell migration to the peritoneal cavity, in a time-dependent but not in a dose-dependent manner. The treatment of mice with C. mexicana extracts also decreased the xylene-induced ear edema, exerting strong inhibitory leukocyte migration elicited by zymosan into the air pouch. We concluded that administration of the extracts resulted in a reduction of cell migration to different sites as well as a decrease in edema formation induced by chemical irritants. This study demonstrates for the first time the anti-inflammatory effect of aqueous and methanolic extracts from the green marine algae Caulerpa mexicana. PMID:21892348

  12. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss].

    PubMed

    Hesse, G

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most dominant handicaps in modern societies, which additionally very often is not realized or not admitted. About one quarter of the general population suffers from inner ear hearing loss and is therefore restricted in communicational skills. Demographic factors like increasing age play an important role as well as environmental influences and an increasing sound and noise exposure especially in leisure activities. Thus borders between a "classical" presbyacusis - if it ever existed - and envirionmentally induced hearing loss disappear. Today restrictions in hearing ability develop earlier in age but at the same time they are detected and diagnosed earlier. This paper can eventually enlighten the wide field of inner ear hearing loss only fragmentarily; therefore mainly new research, findings and developments are reviewed. The first part discusses new aspects of diagnostics of inner ear hearing loss and different etiologies. PMID:27259171

  13. Lysyl hydroxylase 2 induces a collagen cross-link switch in tumor stroma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulong; Terajima, Masahiko; Yang, Yanan; Sun, Li; Ahn, Young-Ho; Pankova, Daniela; Puperi, Daniel S.; Watanabe, Takeshi; Kim, Min P.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Rodriguez, Jaime; Liu, Hui; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Minelli, Rosalba; Scott, Kenneth L.; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Guilak, Farshid; Pati, Debananda; Thilaganathan, Nishan; Burns, Alan R.; Creighton, Chad J.; Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Zal, Tomasz; Grande-Allen, K. Jane; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tumor metastasis is preceded by an accumulation of collagen cross-links that heighten stromal stiffness and stimulate the invasive properties of tumor cells. However, the biochemical nature of collagen cross-links in cancer is still unclear. Here, we postulated that epithelial tumorigenesis is accompanied by changes in the biochemical type of collagen cross-links. Utilizing resected human lung cancer tissues and a p21CIP1/WAF1-deficient, K-rasG12D-expressing murine metastatic lung cancer model, we showed that, relative to normal lung tissues, tumor stroma contains higher levels of hydroxylysine aldehyde–derived collagen cross-links (HLCCs) and lower levels of lysine aldehyde–derived cross-links (LCCs), which are the predominant types of collagen cross-links in skeletal tissues and soft tissues, respectively. Gain- and loss-of-function studies in tumor cells showed that lysyl hydroxylase 2 (LH2), which hydroxylates telopeptidyl lysine residues on collagen, shifted the tumor stroma toward a high-HLCC, low-LCC state, increased tumor stiffness, and enhanced tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Together, our data indicate that LH2 enhances the metastatic properties of tumor cells and functions as a regulatory switch that controls the relative abundance of biochemically distinct types of collagen cross-links in the tumor stroma. PMID:25664850

  14. Polymorphism of the MHC class II Eb gene determines the protection against collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Zanelli, E.; Krco, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an animal model of auto immune polyarthritis, sharing similarities with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Paradoxally, susceptibility to mouse CIA is controlled by the H2A loci (DQ homologous) while RA is linked to HLA.DR genes (H2E homologous). We recently showed that the E{beta}{sup d} molecule prevents CIA development in susceptible H2{sup q} mice. We addressed the question of whether H2Eb polymorphism will influence CIA incidence as HLA.DRB1 polymorphism does in RA. In F{sub 1} mice, only H2Eb{sup d} and H2Eb{sup s} molecules showed protection. Using recombinant B10.RDD (Eb{sup d/b}) mice, we found that CIA protection was mediated by the first domain of the E{beta}{sup d} molecule. Using peptides covering the third hypervariable region of the E{beta} chain, we found a perfect correlation between presentation of E{beta} peptides by the H2A{sup q} molecule and protection on CIA. Therefore, the mechanism by which H2Eb protects against CIA seems to rely on the affinity of E{beta} peptides for the H2A{sup q} molecule. 35 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Repeated Electroacupuncture Persistently Elevates Adenosine and Ameliorates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tian-shen; Du, Zhong-heng; Li, Zhi-hui; Xie, Wen-xia; Huang, Ka-te; Chen, Yong; Chen, Zhou-yang; Hu, Huan; Wang, Jun-lu; Fang, Jian-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the effect of repeated electroacupuncture (EA) over 21 days on the adenosine concentration in peripheral blood of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Wistar rats were divided into three groups of 6 animals each: sham-control, CIA-control, and CIA-EA. We determined the adenosine concentration in peripheral blood and assessed pathological changes of ankle joints. Quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine mRNA levels of ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73), adenosine deaminase (ADA), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect expression of ADA and CD73 in synovial tissue. Repeated EA treatment on CIA resulted in the persistence of high concentrations of adenosine in peripheral blood, significantly reduced pathological scores, TNF-α mRNA concentrations, and synovial hyperplasia. Importantly, EA treatment led to a significant increase in CD73 mRNA levels in peripheral blood but was associated with a decrease of CD73 immunostaining in synovial tissue. In addition, EA treatment resulted in a significant decrease of both ADA mRNA levels in peripheral blood and ADA immunostaining in synovial tissue. Thus, repeated EA treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effect on CIA by increasing the concentration of adenosine. The mechanism of EA action may involve the modulation of CD73 and ADA expression levels. PMID:26941824

  16. [THE INFLUENCE OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE ON COLLAGEN-INDUCED AGGREGATION OF HUMAN PLATELETS].

    PubMed

    Petrova, I V; Trubacheva, O A; Mangataeva, O S; Suslova, T E; Kovalev, I V; Gusakova, S V

    2015-10-01

    Study the impact of hydrogen sulfide on collagen-induced platelet aggregation from healthy donors and patients with type 2 diabetes. In healthy individuals, in contrast to patients with type 2 diabetes, NaHS significantly inhibited platelet aggregation. Activators of cAMP signaling (forskolin and phosphodiesterase inhibitor) significantly reduced platelet aggregation in both groups of examinees. NO-synthase inhibitors increased platelet aggregation in healthy volunteers, but not in patients with type 2 diabetes. The presence of H2S donor did not alter the extent of platelet aggregation at high concentrations of cAMP or decreased production of nitric oxide. It is assumed that the antiplatelet effect of H2S is not associated with the effect on the signal system, mediated cAMP or nitric oxide. Change H2S-dependent regulation of platelet aggregation in patients with type 2 diabetes is caused by disorders have been reported with this disease: the increase of intracellular calcium ion concentration, oxidative damage to proteins, hyperhomocysteinemia, glycosylation of key proteins involved in this process. PMID:26827498

  17. Suppression of interleukin 17 production by Brazilian propolis in mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mayuri; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Fukui, Takashi; Masuzawa, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    Propolis is a resinous substance collected by honeybees from leaf buds and cracks in the bark of various plants. Propolis has been reported to have immunomodulatory activity. We hypothesized that propolis would be able to reduce the disease severity of rheumatoid arthritis. We evaluated the effect of Brazilian propolis ethanolic extract on the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. Mice fed propolis exhibited significant lower clinical arthritis scores than those fed the control diet. To investigate the mechanism of the effect of propolis on CIA mice, we examined interleukin-17 (IL-17) production in CIA mice fed propolis using an enzyme-linked immunospot assay and flow cytometric analysis. The numbers of IL-17-producing cells in the CIA mice fed propolis were significantly decreased. To determine direct influence of propolis on cytokine production, splenocytes were stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate in the presence of propolis extract in vitro. Concentration-dependent declines in IL-17 expression were observed by ELISA and real-time PCR methods. We further found that propolis significantly inhibited the differentiation of Th17 cells from murine splenocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, our results may provide a new light on the potential mechanism of the immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects of propolis. PMID:21861090

  18. Retrovirus-induced insertional mutagenesis: mechanism of collagen mutation in Mov13 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, D D; Wu, H; Hartung, S; Breindl, M; Jaenisch, R

    1991-01-01

    The Mov13 mouse strain carries a mutation in the alpha 1(I) procollagen gene which is due to the insertion of a Moloney murine leukemia provirus into the first intron. This insertion results in the de novo methylation of the provirus and flanking DNA, the alteration of chromatin structure, and the transcriptional inactivity of the collagen promoter. To address the mechanism of mutagenesis, we reintroduced a cloned and therefore demethylated version of the Mov13 mutant allele into mouse fibroblasts. The transfected gene was not transcribed, indicating that the transcriptional defect was not due to the hypermethylation. Rather, this result strongly suggests that the mutation is due to the displacement or disruption of cis-acting regulatory DNA sequences within the first intron. We also constructed a Mov13 variant allele containing a single long terminal repeat instead of the whole provirus. This construct also failed to express mRNA, indicating that the Mov13 mutation does not revert by provirus excision as has been observed for other retrovirus-induced mutations. Images PMID:1922037

  19. Ear Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information ... they may improve appearance and self-confidence. Can Ear Deformities Be Corrected? Formation of the ear during ...

  20. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  1. Better Ear Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Better Ear Health Better Ear Health Patient Health Information News ... often helpful to those with this condition. Swimmer’s Ear An infection of the outer ear structures caused ...

  2. How the Ear Works

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You How the Ear Works How the Ear Works Patient Health Information News media interested in ... public relations staff at newsroom@entnet.org . The ear has three main parts: the outer ear (including ...

  3. Cosmetic ear surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  4. Somatic Antigens of Tropical Liver Flukes Ameliorate Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Yasir Akhtar; Umar, Sadiq; Abidi, Syed M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic helminths polarize immune response of their vertebrate hosts towards anti-inflammatory Th2 type and therefore it is hypothesized that they may suppress the inflammatory conditions in autoimmune disorders. The present study was undertaken to investigate in vivo immunomodulatory and therapeutic potential of somatic antigens (Ag) of liver infecting digenetic trematodes [Fasciola gigantica (Fg) and Gigantocotyle explanatum (Ge)] in collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) Wistar rats. The CIA rats were administered subcutaneously with different doses (50 μg, 100 μg and 150 μg) of somatic antigens of Fg and Ge, daily for 21 days, the time period required to establish infection in natural host (Bubalus bubalis). Thereafter, the control, diseased and treated rats were compared for different parameters viz. hind paw thickness; serum interleukins, IL-4 and IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ); expression level of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2, -9, -13 and nitric oxide (NO) in knee joints and patellar morphology. The CIA rats treated with different antigens, Fg-Ag and Ge-Ag, show significant amelioration of the disease by down regulation of serum TNF-α and IFN-γ (p< 0.05) and upregulation of IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines (p< 0.05); inhibition (p< 0.05) of MMPs (-2,-9,-13) and NO in knee joints and improved patellar morphology with decreased synovial hypertrophy and reduced infiltration of ploymorphonuclear cells. The activity of pro as well as active MMPs (-2 and -9) and active MMP-13 in knee joints of CIA rats was very high compared to the control and treatment groups, suggesting the extent of collagen degradation in CIA rats. Interestingly, the highest dose (150 μg) of Ge-Ag almost wiped out MMP-13 expression. The overall findings suggest that the somatic proteins of Ge-Ag appeared to be therapeutically more effective than Fg-Ag, reflecting interspecific molecular differences which could contribute to the ability of these worms to

  5. Hesperidin inhibits collagen-induced arthritis possibly through suppression of free radical load and reduction in neutrophil activation and infiltration.

    PubMed

    Umar, Sadiq; Kumar, Anubhav; Sajad, Mir; Zargan, Jamil; Ansari, Meraj; Ahmad, Sayeed; Katiyar, Chandra Kant; Khan, Haider A

    2013-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone in a chronic phase. Pathology of rheumatoid arthritis suggests autoimmunity linked to inflammation. In our study, rheumatoid arthritis was induced in Wistar rats by intradermal injections of 100 μl of emulsion containing bovine type II collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant at the base of the tail. Disease developed about 13 ± 1 days after immunization and treatment with hesperidin (HES) at a dose of 160 mg kg(-1) body weight was given after onset of disease daily until 20th day. The effect of treatment in the rats was monitored by clinical scoring, biochemical parameters and histological evaluations in joints. A steady increase in the articular elastase, nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation was observed in joints of arthritic rats as compared to control, whereas a significant decrease in reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase activity and catalase was observed in collagen-induced arthritis rats as compared to control group. The results from the present work indicate that the treatment with hesperidin was effective in bringing about significant changes on all the parameters studied in collagen-induced arthritis rats. These data confirm that erosive destruction of the joint cartilage in collagen-induced arthritis is due free radicals released by activated neutrophils and produced by other biochemical pathways. In the present study, an attempt has been made to amelioration of the disease process by a natural product. These results suggest that oral administration of HES could be effective for treating human RA patients. PMID:22527139

  6. Autoantibody profile in the experimental model of scleroderma induced by type V human collagen

    PubMed Central

    Callado, Maria R M; Viana, Vilma S T; Vendramini, Margarete B G; Leon, Elaine P; Bueno, Cleonice; Velosa, Ana P P; Teodoro, Walcy R; Yoshinari, Natalino H

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the humoral autoimmune response in the experimental model of systemic sclerosis (SSc) induced by human type V collagen (huCol V). New Zealand rabbits were immunized with huCol V in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and boosted twice with 15 days intervals with huCol V in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Control groups included animals injected only with FCA or bovine serum albumin. Bleeding was done at days 0, 30, 75 and 120. Tissue specimens were obtained for histopathological investigation. Serological analysis included detection of antibodies against huCol V and anti-topoisomerase I (Anti-Scl70) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by indirect immunofluorescence, and rheumatoid factor (RF) by a latex agglutination test. Target antigens were characterized by immunoblot. Histological analysis revealed extracellular matrix remodeling with fibrosis and vasculitis. Anti-Scl70 and ANA were detected as early as 30 days in all huCol V animals. The universal ANA staining pattern was Golgi-like. This serum reactivity was not abolished by previous absorption with huCol V. Characterization of the target antigen by immunoblot revealed two major protein fractions of 175 000 and 220 000 MW. Similarly to ANA, there was a gradual increase of reactivity throughout the immunization and also it was not abolished by preincubation of serum samples with huCol V. RF testing was negative in hyperimmune sera. Conclusion: The production of autoantibodies, including anti-Scl70, a serological marker for SSc associated with histopathological alterations, validates huCol V induced-experimental model and brings out its potential for understanding the pathophysiology of SSc. PMID:17442023

  7. Treatment of Collagen-Induced Arthritis Using Immune Modulatory Properties of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyu-Hyung; Mun, Chin Hee; Kang, Mi-Il; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Soo-Kon; Park, Yong-Beom

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immune modulatory properties. We investigated the potential therapeutic effects of human bone marrow (BM)-, adipose tissue (AD)-, and cord blood (CB)-derived MSCs in an experimental animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and explored the mechanism underlying immune modulation by MSCs. We evaluated the therapeutic effect of clinically available human BM-, AD-, and CB-derived MSCs in DBA/1 mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA mice were injected intraperitoneally with three types of MSCs. Treatment control animals were injected with 35 mg/kg methotrexate (MTX) twice weekly. Clinical activity in CIA mice, degree of inflammation, cytokine expression in the joint, serum cytokine levels, and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were evaluated. Mice treated with human BM-, AD-, and CB-MSCs showed significant improvement in clinical joint score, comparable to MTX-treated mice. Histologic examination showed greatly reduced joint inflammation and damage in MSC-treated mice compared with untreated mice. Microcomputed tomography also showed little joint damage in the MSC-treated group. MSCs significantly decreased serum interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, and interferon-γ and increased IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β levels. Tregs were increased in mice treated with MSCs compared to untreated or MTX-treated mice. Human BM-, AD-, and CB-MSCs significantly suppressed joint inflammation in CIA mice. The cells decreased proinflammatory cytokines and upregulated anti-inflammatory cytokines and induced Tregs. Therefore, our study suggests that the use of human BM-, AD-, and CB-MSCs could be an effective therapeutic approach for RA. PMID:25853338

  8. Biosynthesis of collagen crosslinks. III. In vivo labeling and stability of lung collagen in rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Reiser, K.M. )

    1989-08-01

    Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 1 mCi (each) of (3H)lysine at Day 11 of neonatal life to label their lung collagen. Five weeks later, half of the animals were given an intratracheal injection of 1.5 U of bleomycin sulfate via a tracheostomy; control animals received saline intratracheally by the same technique. Age-matched groups of control and bleomycin-treated rats were killed, and their lung collagen was analyzed at zero (control animals only), 1, 2, 4, 6, and 10 wk after bleomycin administration, a time course appropriate for development of pulmonary fibrosis in this animal model. We measured radioactivity in hydroxylysine and in the difunctional collagen crosslinks hydroxylysinonorleucine and dihydroxylysinonorleucine at each time point. No evidence of breakdown of this pool of mature, preformed collagen was observed in lungs of either the control or the bleomycin-treated rats. We also measured the total lung content of hydroxypyridinium, a trifunctional collagen crosslink, by its intrinsic fluorescence. There was no evidence of collagen degradation in lungs of either group of rats by this criterion either. We conclude that there is no biochemically detectable turnover of mature lung collagen, defined as that pool of lung collagen that is obligatorily extracellular (i.e., crosslinked and containing labeled hydroxylysine from an injection of precursor 5 to 15 wk earlier), in either normal rat lungs or lungs of rats made fibrotic with bleomycin. Statistical analysis of the data suggests that our methodology was sensitive and precise enough to have detected turnover of less than 0.5% of lung collagen per day, some 20-fold less than estimates of lung collagen turnover that have been suggested to be occurring in vivo by others using different techniques and presumably studying different pools of lung collagen.

  9. Methacrylation Induces Rapid, Temperature-Dependent, Reversible Self-Assembly of Type-I Collagen

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Type-I collagen self-assembles into a fibrillar gel at physiological temperature and pH to provide a cell-adhesive, supportive, structural network. As such, it is an attractive, popular scaffold for in vitro evaluations of cellular behavior and for tissue engineering applications. In this study, type-I collagen is modified to introduce methacrylate groups on the free amines of the lysine residues to create collagen methacrylamide (CMA). CMA retains the properties of collagen such as self-assembly, biodegradability, and natural bioactivity but is also photoactive and can be rapidly cross-linked or functionalized with acrylated molecules when irradiated with ultraviolet light in the presence of a photoinitiator. CMA also demonstrates unique temperature-dependent behavior. For natural type-I collagen, the overall structure of the fiber network remains largely static over time scales of a few hours upon heating and cooling at temperatures below its denaturation point. CMA, however, is rapidly thermoreversible and will oscillate between a liquid macromer suspension and a semisolid fibrillar hydrogel when the temperature is modulated between 10 and 37 °C. Using a series of mechanical, scattering, and spectroscopic methods, we demonstrate that structural reversibility is manifest across multiple scales from the protein topology of the triple helix up through the rheological properties of the CMA hydrogel. Electron microscopy imaging of CMA after various stages of heating and cooling shows that the canonical collagen-like D-periodic banding ultrastructure of the fibers is preserved. A rapidly thermoreversible collagen-based hydrogel is expected to have wide utility in tissue engineering and drug delivery applications as a biofunctional, biocompatible material. Thermal reversibility also makes CMA a powerful model for studying the complex process of hierarchical collagen self-assembly. PMID:25208340

  10. How can the auditory efferent system protect our ears from noise-induced hearing loss? Let us count the ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Lynne; Miller, Judi A. Lapsley

    2015-12-01

    It is a cause for some debate as to how the auditory olivocochlear (OC) efferent system could protect hearing from noise trauma. In this review, we examined physiological research to find mechanisms that could effectively attenuate the response to sound. For each purported mechanism, we indicate which part of the OC-efferent system is responsible for the function and the site of action. These mechanisms include basilar-membrane phase shifts at high stimulus levels; changes in outer-hair-cell stiffness and phase lag associated with efferent slow effects; small decreases in endocochlear potentials causing small decreases in outer- and inner-hair-cell output; low-spontaneous-rate and medium-spontaneous-rate fibers showing OC-induced decrements at high levels; auditory-nerve initial-peak reduction; OC effect increasing over minutes; cholinergic activation of anti-apoptotic pathways; and anti-excitotoxicity. There are clearly multiple opportunities for the OC-efferent system to protect the inner ear from noise trauma. From further exploration into the mechanisms outlined here, as well as to-be-discovered mechanisms, we will gain a greater understanding of the protective nature of the OC-efferent system. These findings could aid our ability to design better predictive tests for people at risk for noise-induced hearing loss.

  11. Platelet receptor recognition and cross-talk in collagen-induced activation of platelets.

    PubMed

    Farndale, R W; Slatter, D A; Siljander, P R-M; Jarvis, G E

    2007-07-01

    Comprehensive mapping of protein-binding sites within human collagen III has allowed the recognition motifs for integrin alpha(2)beta(1) and VWF A3 domain to be identified. Glycoprotein VI-binding sites are understood, although less well defined. This information, together with recent developments in understanding collagen fiber architecture, and crystal structures of the receptor collagen-binding domains, allows a coherent model for the interaction of collagen with the platelet surface to be developed. This complements our understanding of the orchestration of receptor presentation by membrane microdomains, such that the polyvalent collagen surface may stabilize signaling complexes within the heterogeneous receptor composition of the lipid raft. The ensuing interactions lead to the convergence of signals from each of the adhesive receptors, mediated by FcR gamma-chain and/or FcgammaRIIa, leading to concerted and co-operative platelet activation. Each receptor has a shear-dependent role, VWF/GpIb essential at high shear, and alpha(2)beta(1) at low and intermediate shear, whilst GpVI provides core signals that contribute to enhanced integrin affinity, tighter binding to collagen and consequent platelet activation. PMID:17635730

  12. Nanostructural and nanomechanical responses of collagen fibrils in the collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis rat model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Choi, Samjin; Chon, Jinmann; Yoo, Seung Don; Kim, Hee-Sang; Park, Hun-Kuk; Chung, Joo Ho

    2013-11-01

    Achilles tendons are vulnerable to acute or chronic injuries that lead to inflammation. We investigated nanostructural and nanomechanical changes in collagen fibrils from rat Achilles tendons over a period of 9 weeks after injury using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To evaluate the nanostructural changes in Achilles tendons, we measured the diameter and D-banding of collagen fibrils by AFM. And the adhesion forces, which were related to cross-linking of collagen, were calculated from the retraction process of a force-distance curve. We successfully observed the time course of changes in collagen fibrils during healing using AFM. The diameters and D-banding in healed tendons were similar to those of uninjured tendons at 9 weeks after injury, but the adhesion forces remained different from those of uninjured tendons. Our AFM results depicted the minute changes in Achilles tendon surface by natural healing quite well, even drawbacks to naturally healed tendon. Understanding changes in collagen cross-linking and structure while healing will lead to better understanding of healing mechanisms and subsequent improvements in treatment. And AFM can be applied as powerful tool to evaluate structural and property changes in collagen fibrils before and after injury and/or treatment in Achilles tendon. PMID:24245243

  13. An essential role for mast cells as modulators of neutrophils influx in collagen-induced arthritis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Tatiana Aparecida; Sampaio, Andrxsé Luiz Franco; D’Acquisto, Fulvio; Perretti, Mauro; Oliani, Sonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are involved in immune disorders so that many of the proinflammatory and tissue destructive mediators produced by these cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This scenario prompted us to investigate the correlation between mast cell degranulation and neutrophil influx within the digits and knees joints of arthritic mice assessing what could be the functional role(s) of joint mast cells in the response to collagen immunization. DBA/1J mice were submitted to collagen-induced arthritis and disease was assessed on day 21, 32 and 42 post-immunization. Pharmacological treatment with the glucocorticoid prednisolone, commonly used in the clinic, and nedocromil, a mast cell stabilizer, was performed from day 21 to 30. Arthritis developing after immunization gradually increased up to day 42. Neutrophil infiltration peaked on day 32 and 21, in the digits and knees, respectively, showing an unequal pattern of recruitment between these tissues. This difference emerged for mast cell they peaked in the digits on day 21, but a higher degree of degranulation could be measured in the knee joints. Uneven modulation of arthritis occurred after treatment of mice with prednisolone or nedocromil. Neutrophils migration to the tissue was reduced after both therapies, but only prednisolone augmented mast cell migration to the joints. Nedocromil exerted inhibitory properties both on mast cell proliferation and migration, more effectively on the digit joints. Thus, collagen induced an inflammatory process characterized by tissue mast cells activation and degranulation, suggesting a potential driving force in propagating inflammatory circuits yielding recruitment of neutrophils. However, the different degree of affected joint involvement suggests a time-related implication of digits and knees during collagen-induced arthritis development. These results provide evidence for local alterations whereby mast cells contribute to the initiation of

  14. Puerarin attenuates inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody-induced arthritis via TLR4/NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changxing; Wang, Weidong; Jin, Xiaping; Shen, Jianguo; Hu, Weifeng; Jiang, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Puerarin is an important active ingredient in the root of kudzu vine due to its pharmacological properties. The aim of the present study is to contribute to the existing knowledge of the effect of puerarin in the attenuation of inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody-induced arthritis via toll‑like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling. Arthritis was induced using injection of anti‑type II collagen antibodies. Treatment with puerarin was observed to significantly decrease clinical scoring of the collagen antibody‑induced arthritis and suppress oxidative stress and the inflammatory response in mice. Furthermore, puerarin was demonstrated to inhibit mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase‑9 and protein expression of TLR4 following collagen antibody-induced arthritis in mice. The effect of puerarin may be associated with the suppression of NF‑κB activity in collagen antibody‑induced arthritis mice. Furthermore, upregulation of phosphorylated (p)‑Janus kinase 2 and p‑signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 protein expression was suppressed by puerarin. The results of the present study indicate, for the first time, the effect of puerarin to attenuate inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody‑induced arthritis via TLR4/NF-κB signaling. PMID:27278131

  15. Radiation-Induced Middle Ear and Mastoid Opacification in Skull Base Tumors Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Gary V.; Ahmed, Salmaan; Allen, Pamela; Gidley, Paul W.; Woo, Shiao Y.; DeMonte, Franco; Chang, Eric L.; Mahajan, Anita

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of middle ear (ME) pathology in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) for skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 61 patients treated with RT between 2003 and 2008 for skull base tumors was conducted. Clinical outcomes and demographics were reviewed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was performed on the eustachian canal (EC), ME, mastoid air cells, vestibular apparatus, cochlea, internal auditory canal, lateral and posterior nasopharynx, and temporal lobes to relate doses to symptoms and radiographic change. Otomastoid opacification was rated 0 (none), 1 (mild), 2 (moderate), and 3 (severe) by a neuroradiologist blinded to clinical outcomes and doses. Results: The median prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 14-74 Gy). The ME mean dose was 14 Gy and 34 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3 opacification, respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean mastoid dose was 10 Gy and 26 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3, respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean EC dose was 17 Gy and 32 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3, respectively (p = 0.0001). Otomastoid opacification resolved in 17 of 40 patients (42.5%), at a mean of 17 months after RT (range, 2-45 months). Otomastoid opacification persisted in 23 of 40 patients (57.5%), with a mean follow-up of 23 months (range, 2-55 months). Multivariate analysis showed that mastoid dose >30 Gy (odds ratio = 28.0, p < 0.001) and posterior nasopharynx dose of >30 Gy (odds ratio = 4.9, p = 0.009) were associated with Grade 2-3 effusions, whereas other factors including dose to EC and ME were not significant. Conclusions: A mean RT dose >30 Gy to the mastoid air cells or posterior nasopharynx is associated with increased risk of moderate to severe otomastoid opacification, which persisted in more than half of patients at 2-year follow-up.

  16. Antibody-mediated delivery of IL-10 inhibits the progression of established collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Trachsel, Eveline; Bootz, Frank; Silacci, Michela; Kaspar, Manuela; Kosmehl, Hartwig; Neri, Dario

    2007-01-01

    The antibody-mediated targeted delivery of cytokines to sites of disease is a promising avenue for cancer therapy, but it is largely unexplored for the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions. Using both radioactive and fluorescent techniques, the human monoclonal antibodies L19 and G11 (specific to two markers of angiogenesis that are virtually undetectable in normal adult tissues) were found to selectively localize at arthritic sites in the murine collagen-induced model of rheumatoid arthritis following intravenous (i.v.) administration. The same animal model was used to study the therapeutic action of the L19 antibody fused to the cytokines IL-2, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-10. Whereas L19–IL-2 and L19–TNF treatment led to increased arthritic scores and paw swellings, the fusion protein L19–IL-10 displayed a therapeutic activity, which was superior to the activity of IL-10 fused to an antibody of irrelevant specificity in the mouse. The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 has been investigated for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but clinical development plans have been discontinued because of a lack of efficacy. Because the antigen recognised by L19 is strongly expressed at sites of arthritis in humans and identical in both mice and humans, it suggests that the fusion protein L19–IL-10 might help overcome some of the clinical limitations of IL-10 and provide a therapeutic benefit to patients with chronic inflammatory disorders, including arthritis. PMID:17261171

  17. Lupeol acetate ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis and osteoclastogenesis of mice through improvement of microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Hsun; Chuang, Hui-Yen; Chen, Chien-Hui; Chen, Wun-Ke; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2016-04-01

    Lupeol has been shown with anti-inflammation and antitumor capability, however, the poor bioavailability limiting its applications in living subjects. Lupeol acetate (LA), a derivative of lupeol, shows similar biological activities as lupeol but with better bioavailability. Here RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were treated with 0-80μM of LA, and assayed for TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, MCP-1 using Western blotting. Moreover, osteoclatogenesis was examined with reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. For in vivo study, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA)-bearing DBA/1J mice were randomly separated into three groups: vehicle, LA-treated (50mg/kg) and curcumin-treated (100mg/kg). Therapeutic efficacies were assayed by the clinical score, expression levels of serum cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) microPET/CT and histopathology. The results showed that LA could inhibit the activation, migration, and formation of osteoclastogenesis of macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. In RA-bearing mice, the expressions of inflammation-related cytokines were suppressed, and clinical symptoms and bone erosion were ameliorated by LA. The accumulation of (18)F-FDG in the joints of RA-bearing mice was also significantly decreased by LA. The results indicate that LA significantly improves the symptoms of RA by down-regulating expressions of inflammatory cytokines and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:27044833

  18. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and toxicities of methotrexate in healthy and collagen-induced arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong-Yang; Lon, Hoi-Kei; Wang, Yan-Lin; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.; Jusko, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an anchor drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but responsiveness is variable in effectiveness and toxicity. Methotrexate and its polyglutamate conjugates (MTXPGn) in red blood cells (RBC) have been associated with patient response. In the current study, 13 collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) rats and 12 healthy rats were given subcutaneous doses of either saline or 0.3 or 1.5 mg/kg per 2 days of MTX from day 21 to 43 post-induction. Blood samples were obtained at various times to measure MTX in plasma, and MTX and MTXPGn in RBC. Effects on disease progression were indicated by body weight and paw size. After multiple-doses, RBC MTX reached steady-state (82.4 nM) within 4 days. The MTXPG2 and MTXPG3 in RBC kept increasing until the end of the study attaining 12.5 and 17.7 nM. Significant weight loss was observed after dosing of 1.5 mg/kg/2 days, whereas moderate effectiveness was observed after dosing of 0.3 mg/kg/2 days. A pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic/disease (PK/PD/DIS) model with indirect mechanisms and transduction components incorporating plasma MTX, RBC MTX, and RBC MTXPGn concentrations, and paw size was developed using naïve data pooling and ADAPT 5. The PK/PD in CIA rats dosed at 0.3 mg/kg/2 days were captured well by our proposed model. MTX showed modest (Imaxd = 0.16) but sensitive (IC50d = 0.712 nM) effectiveness on paw edema. The higher dose produced toxicity. The proposed model offers improved understanding of MTX effects on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:23456770

  19. Adding Water to the Mill: Olmesartan-Induced Collagenous Sprue-A Case Report and Brief Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Desruisseaux, Claudine; Bensoussan, Michaël; Désilets, Etienne; Tran, Hanh-Khiem; Arcand, Robert; Poirier, Germain; Wisniewski, Andrew; Manière, Thibaut

    2016-01-01

    Collagenous sprue (CS) is a distinct clinicopathological disorder histologically defined by a thickened subepithelial band (Freeman, 2011). It is a rare condition which has been recently observed in a significant proportion of sprue-like enteropathy associated with olmesartan, a novel entity described by Rubio-Tapia et al. in 2012. CS is historically associated with a poor prognosis (Marthey et al., 2014). However, histological and clinical improvements have been described in most studies with concomitant usage of corticosteroids and/or gluten-free diet (Marthey et al., 2014). We report a unique case of olmesartan-induced collagenous sprue in a 79-year-old man that showed complete histological and clinical remission with the sole withdrawal of the incriminating drug. The literature on this topic is briefly reviewed. PMID:27446843

  20. Inhibition of collagen, and thrombin-induced platelet aggregation by Lansberg's hognose pit viper (Porthidium lansbergii hutmanni) venom.

    PubMed

    López-Johnston, Juan C; de Bosch, Norma; Scannone, Héctor; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis

    2007-12-01

    The Porthidium genus is represented by the P. lansbergii rozei and P. lansbergii hutmanni (Plh) subspecies in Venezuela. The venom components of these have been little studied, probably due to the low incidence of reported accidents, although acute and serious local effects such as invasive edema and disseminated ecchymosis are present during human envenonation. The aim of this work was to characterize the in vitro effects of crude P. l. hutmanni venom, and its fractions, on platelet aggregation triggered by two physiologic agonists: thrombin and collagen. The effects of thrombin and collagen were observed on a platelet-rich plasma (PRP) solution (3 x 10(5) platelets/microL) using serial dilutions of P. l. hutmanni venom (0.625-40 microg). The crude venom was fractionated by anionic exchange chromatography and two peaks obtained. Crude venom and both fractions were highly inhibitory on platelet aggregation mediated by the two agonists. The anti-aggregating dose (AD(50)) for both agonists was determined. PRP collagen-triggered aggregation was most inhibited by the crude venom (AD(50) = 0.67 microg) when compared with PRP thrombin-triggered aggregation (AD(50) = 4.92 microg). Collagen-induced aggregation was more intensely inhibited by venom than thrombin-induced aggregation. In conclusion, to specify the inhibition mechanisms involved for each of the active components in the venom from these subspecies, we must characterize and purify the inhibitors of aggregation from P. l. hutmanni venom, with the purpose of suggesting new pharmacological substances to be incorporated into the therapeutic arsenal to treat hemostatic pathologies related to high levels of platelet aggregation. PMID:17486300

  1. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Middle Ear Inflammation Disrupts the cochlear Intra-Strial Fluid–Blood Barrier through Down-Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Hou, Zhiqiang; Cai, Jing; Dong, Mingmin; Shi, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    Middle ear infection (or inflammation) is the most common pathological condition that causes fluid to accumulate in the middle ear, disrupting cochlear homeostasis. Lipopolysaccharide, a product of bacteriolysis, activates macrophages and causes release of inflammatory cytokines. Many studies have shown that lipopolysaccharides cause functional and structural changes in the inner ear similar to that of inflammation. However, it is specifically not known how lipopolysaccharides affect the blood-labyrinth barrier in the stria vascularis (intra-strial fluid–blood barrier), nor what the underlying mechanisms are. In this study, we used a cell culture-based in vitro model and animal-based in vivo model, combined with immunohistochemistry and a vascular leakage assay, to investigate lipopolysaccharide effects on the integrity of the mouse intra-strial fluid–blood barrier. Our results show lipopolysaccharide-induced local infection significantly affects intra-strial fluid–blood barrier component cells. Pericytes and perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes are particularly affected, and the morphological and functional changes in these cells are accompanied by substantial changes in barrier integrity. Significant vascular leakage is found in the lipopolysaccharide treated-animals. Consistent with the findings from the in vivo animal model, the permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer to FITC-albumin was significantly higher in the lipopolysaccharide-treated monolayer than in an untreated endothelial cell monolayer. Further study has shown the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation to have a major effect on the expression of tight junctions in the blood barrier. Lipopolysaccharide was also shown to cause high frequency hearing loss, corroborated by previous reports from other laboratories. Our findings show lipopolysaccharide-evoked middle ear infection disrupts inner ear fluid balance, and its particular effects on the intra-strial fluid

  2. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation. PMID:27598131

  3. Oxidative damage to collagen.

    PubMed

    Monboisse, J C; Borel, J P

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular matrix molecules, such as collagens, are good targets for oxygen free radicals. Collagen is the only protein susceptible to fragmentation by superoxide anion as demonstrated by the liberation of small 4-hydroxyproline-containing-peptides. It seems likely that hydroxyl radicals in the presence of oxygen cleave collagen into small peptides, and the cleavage seems to be specific to proline or 4-hydroxyproline residues. Hydroxyl radicals in the absence of oxygen or hypochlorous acid do not induce fragmentation of collagen molecules, but they trigger a polymerization of collagen through the formation of new cross-links such as dityrosine or disulfure bridges. Moreover, these cross-links can not explain the totality of high molecular weight components generated under these experimental conditions, and the nature of new cross-links induced by hydroxyl radicals or hypochlorous acid remains unclear. PMID:1333311

  4. Fabrication of Compositionally and Topographically Complex Robust Tissue Forms by 3D-Electrochemical Compaction of Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Younesi, Mousa; Islam, Anowarul; Kishore, Vipuil; Panit, Stefi; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Collagen solutions are phase-transformed to mechanically robust shell structures with curviplanar topographies using electrochemically induced pH gradients. The process enables rapid layer-by-layer deposition of collagen-rich mixtures over the entire field simultaneously to obtain compositionally diverse multilayered structures. In-plane tensile strength and modulus of the electrocompacted collagen sheet samples were 5200 -fold and 2300 -fold greater than that of uncompacted collagen samples. Out of plane compression tests showed 27 -fold and fold increase in compressive stress and 46 -fold increase in compressive modulus compared to uncompacted collagen sheets. Cells proliferated 4.9 times faster, and cellular area spread was 2.7 times greater on compacted collagen sheets. Electrocompaction also resulted in 2.9 times greater focal adhesion area than on regular collagen hydrogel. The reported improvements in the cell-matrix interactions with electrocompaction would serve to expedite the population of electrocompacted collagen scaffolds by cells. The capacity of the method to fabricate nonlinear curved topographies with compositional heterogeneous layers is demonstrated by sequential deposition of collagenhydroxyapatite layer over a collagen layer. The complex curved topography of the nasal structure is replicated by the electrochemical compaction method. The presented electrochemical compaction process is an enabling modality which holds significant promise for reconstruction of a wide spectrum of topographically complex systems such as joint surfaces, craniofacial defects, ears, nose or urogenital forms. PMID:26069162

  5. Autoantibodies to Type VII Collagen Mediate Fcγ-Dependent Neutrophil Activation and Induce Dermal-Epidermal Separation in Cryosections of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Sitaru, Cassian; Kromminga, Arno; Hashimoto, Takashi; Bröcker, Eva B.; Zillikens, Detlef

    2002-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is an autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease associated with autoantibodies to type VII collagen, the major constituent of anchoring fibrils. Previous attempts to demonstrate the blister-inducing potential of autoantibodies to this protein have failed. To address this question, we used an in vitro model involving cryosections of human skin incubated with patients’ autoantibodies and leukocytes from healthy donors. We show that sera from 14 of 16 epidermolysis bullosa acquisita patients, in contrast to sera from healthy controls, induced dermal-epidermal separation in the cryosections. Recruitment and activation of neutrophils at the dermal-epidermal junction was necessary for split induction, whereas mononuclear cells were not required. Importantly, patients’ autoantibodies affinity-purified against a recombinant form of the noncollagenous 1 domain of type VII collagen retained their blister-inducing capacity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas patients’ IgG that was depleted of reactivity to type VII collagen lost this ability. Monoclonal antibody LH7.2 to the noncollagenous 1 domain of type VII collagen also induced subepidermal splits in the cryosections; F(ab′)2 fragments of autoantibodies to type VII collagen were not pathogenic. We demonstrate the capacity of autoantibodies to type VII collagen to trigger an Fcγ-dependent inflammation leading to split formation in cryosections of human skin. PMID:12107115

  6. Arginase inhibition prevents bleomycin-induced pulmonary hypertension, vascular remodeling, and collagen deposition in neonatal rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, Hartmut; Dhaliwal, Rupinder; Ivanovska, Julijana; Kantores, Crystal; McNamara, Patrick J; Scott, Jeremy A; Belik, Jaques; Jankov, Robert P

    2015-03-15

    Arginase is an enzyme that limits substrate L-arginine bioavailability for the production of nitric oxide by the nitric oxide synthases and produces L-ornithine, which is a precursor for collagen formation and tissue remodeling. We studied the pulmonary vascular effects of arginase inhibition in an established model of repeated systemic bleomycin sulfate administration in neonatal rats that results in pulmonary hypertension and lung injury mimicking the characteristics typical of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. We report that arginase expression is increased in the lungs of bleomycin-exposed neonatal rats and that treatment with the arginase inhibitor amino-2-borono-6-hexanoic acid prevented the bleomycin-induced development of pulmonary hypertension and deposition of collagen. Arginase inhibition resulted in increased L-arginine and L-arginine bioavailability and increased pulmonary nitric oxide production. Arginase inhibition also normalized the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and reduced bleomycin-induced nitrative stress while having no effect on bleomycin-induced inflammation. Our data suggest that arginase is a promising target for therapeutic interventions in neonates aimed at preventing lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25595650

  7. Insoluble elastin reduces collagen scaffold stiffness, improves viscoelastic properties, and induces a contractile phenotype in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Alan J; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-12-01

    Biomaterials with the capacity to innately guide cell behaviour while also displaying suitable mechanical properties remain a challenge in tissue engineering. Our approach to this has been to utilise insoluble elastin in combination with collagen as the basis of a biomimetic scaffold for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Elastin was found to markedly alter the mechanical and biological response of these collagen-based scaffolds. Specifically, during extensive mechanical assessment elastin was found to reduce the specific tensile and compressive moduli of the scaffolds in a concentration dependant manner while having minimal effect on scaffold microarchitecture with both scaffold porosity and pore size still within the ideal ranges for tissue engineering applications. However, the viscoelastic properties were significantly improved with elastin addition with a 3.5-fold decrease in induced creep strain, a 6-fold increase in cyclical strain recovery, and with a four-parameter viscoelastic model confirming the ability of elastin to confer resistance to long term deformation/creep. Furthermore, elastin was found to result in the modulation of SMC phenotype towards a contractile state which was determined via reduced proliferation and significantly enhanced expression of early (α-SMA), mid (calponin), and late stage (SM-MHC) contractile proteins. This allows the ability to utilise extracellular matrix proteins alone to modulate SMC phenotype without any exogenous factors added. Taken together, the ability of elastin to alter the mechanical and biological response of collagen scaffolds has led to the development of a biomimetic biomaterial highly suitable for cardiovascular tissue engineering. PMID:26431909

  8. Nanoparticulate Mineralized Collagen Scaffolds and BMP-9 Induce a Long-Term Bone Cartilage Construct in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoyan; Weisgerber, Daniel W; Bischoff, David; Lewis, Michael S; Reid, Russell R; He, Tong-Chuan; Yamaguchi, Dean T; Miller, Timothy A; Harley, Brendan A C; Lee, Justine C

    2016-07-01

    Engineering the osteochondral junction requires fabrication of a microenvironment that supports both osteogenesis and chondrogenesis. Multiphasic scaffold strategies utilizing a combination of soluble factors and extracellular matrix components are ideally suited for such applications. In this work, the contribution of an osteogenic nanoparticulate mineralized glycosaminoglycan scaffold (MC-GAG) and a dually chondrogenic and osteogenic growth factor, BMP-9, in the differentiation of primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is evaluated. Although 2D cultures demonstrate alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization of hMSCs induced by BMP-9, MC-GAG scaffolds do not demonstrate significant differences in the collagen I expression, osteopontin expression, or mineralization. Instead, BMP-9 increases expression of collagen II, Sox9, aggrecan (ACAN), and cartilage oligomeric protein. However, the hypertrophic chondrocyte marker, collagen X, is not elevated with BMP-9 treatment. In addition, histologic analyses demonstrate that while BMP-9 does not increase mineralization, BMP-9 treatment results in an increase of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Thus, the combination of BMP-9 and MC-GAG stimulates chondrocytic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. PMID:27275929

  9. Rosiglitazone Prevents High Glucose-Induced Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Collagen IV Expression in Cultured Mesangial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Catharine; Wang, Hong; Xia, Ling; Munk, Snezana; Goldberg, Howard J.; Fantus, I. George

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ), a ligand-dependent transcription factor, negatively modulates high glucose effects. We postulated that rosiglitazone (RSG), an activator of PPARγ prevents the upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and collagen IV by mesangial cells exposed to high glucose. Primary cultured rat mesangial cells were growth-arrested in 5.6 mM (NG) or 25 mM D-glucose (HG) for up to 48 hours. In HG, PPARγ mRNA and protein were reduced within 3 h, and enhanced ROS generation, expression of p22phox, VEGF and collagen IV, and PKC-ζ membrane association were prevented by RSG. In NG, inhibition of PPARγ caused ROS generation and VEGF expression that were unchanged by RSG. Reduced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in HG was unchanged with RSG, and VEGF expression was unaffected by AMPK inhibition. Hence, PPARγ is a negative modulator of HG-induced signaling that acts through PKC-ζ but not AMPK and regulates VEGF and collagen IV expression by mesangial cells. PMID:19609456

  10. Ear defects.

    PubMed

    Shonka, David C; Park, Stephen S

    2009-08-01

    The projection and exposure of the auricle make it particularly susceptible to actinic injury and thus to cutaneous malignancies. Auricular reconstruction is challenging because of its unique surface anatomy and undulating topography. This article organizes auricular defects into different categories based on anatomic location and extent of tissue loss, including skin-only defects, small composite defects, full-thickness defects involving or sparing the upper third of the ear, and total auricular loss. The authors share an algorithm for repair of the array of auricular defects. PMID:19698921

  11. Increased Inner Ear Susceptibility to Noise Injury in Mice With Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Takeshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Katsunuma, Sayaka; Hasegawa, Shingo; Tanimoto, Hitoshi; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the pathophysiology of diabetes-associated hearing impairment in type 1 diabetes using mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes (C57BL/6J; male). Hearing function was evaluated 1, 3, and 5 months after induction of diabetes (five diabetic and five control animals per time point) using auditory-evoked brain stem responses (ABRs). Mice (four diabetic and four control) were exposed to loud noise (105 dB) 5 months after induction of diabetes. ABRs were measured before and after noise exposure. Cochlear blood flows were measured by laser-Doppler flowmeter. Spiral ganglion cells (SGCs) were counted. Vessel endothelial cells were observed by CD31 immunostaining. Chronologic changes in the ABR threshold shift were not significantly different between the diabetic and control groups. However, vessel walls in the modiolus of the cochleae were significantly thicker in the diabetic group than the control group. Additionally, recovery from noise-induced injury was significantly impaired in diabetic mice. Reduced cochlea blood flows and SGC loss were observed in diabetic mice cochleae after noise exposure. Our data suggest that diabetic cochleae are more susceptible than controls to loud noise exposure, and decreased cochlear blood flow due to sclerosis of the vessels and consequent loss of SGCs are possible mechanisms of hearing impairment in diabetic patients. PMID:22851574

  12. pH-responsive collagen fibrillogenesis in confined droplets induced by vapour diffusion.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Rodríguez, Gloria Belén; Iafisco, Michele; Tampieri, Anna; Gómez-Morales, Jaime; Delgado-López, José Manuel

    2014-10-01

    A novel methodology for the assembly of collagen fibrils in microliter drops is proposed. It consists in the gradual increase of pH by means of vapour diffusion coming from the decomposition of NH4HCO3 solutions. The pH increase rate as well as the final steady pH of solutions containing collagen can be adjusted by varying the concentration of NH4HCO3. Both parameters are of predominant importance in collagen fibrillogenesis. The effect of these parameters on the kinetic of the fibrillogenesis process and on the fibrils morphology was studied. We found that both the kinetic and the morphology are mainly driven by electrostatic interactions. A gradual increase of pH slows down the formation of collagen fibres and favours the lateral interaction between fibrils producing broader fibres. On the other hand, a rapid increase of pH reduces the lateral electrostatic interactions favouring the formation of thinner fibres. The formation of the D-band periodicity is also a pH-dependent process that occurs after fibrillogenesis when the most stable state of fibres formation has been reached. PMID:24652593

  13. Statins accelerate the onset of collagen type II-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Statins (hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) are effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with hyperlipidemia, hypertension, or type II diabetes. Next to their cholesterol-lowering activity, statins have immunomodulatory properties. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that statin use may eventually lead to dysregulation of immune responses, possibly resulting in autoimmunity. We have recently shown in an observational study that statin use was associated with an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. Our objective was to investigate whether a causal relationship could be established for this finding. Methods The mouse collagen type II (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) model was used, with immunization, challenge, and euthanasia at days 0, 21, and 42, respectively. Statins were given orally before (day -28 until day 21) or after (day 21 until day 42) CIA induction. Atorvastatin (0.2 mg/day) or pravastatin (0.8 mg/day) was administered. Arthritis was recorded three times a week. Serum anti-CII autoantibodies and cytokines in supernatants from Concanavalin-A-stimulated lymph node cells and CII-stimulated spleen cells were measured. Results Statin administration accelerated arthritis onset and resulted in 100% arthritic animals, whereas only seven out of 12 nonstatin control animals developed arthritis. Atorvastatin administration after CIA induction resulted in earlier onset than atorvastatin administration before induction, or than pravastatin administration before or after induction. The arthritic score of animals given pravastatin before CIA induction was similar to that of the nonstatin controls, whereas the other groups that received statins showed higher arthritic scores. Atorvastatin administration, especially before CIA induction, increased anti-CII autoantibody production. IL-2 and IL-17 production by lymph node and spleen cells was higher in CIA animals than in PBS

  14. Aronia melanocarpa Concentrate Ameliorates Pro-Inflammatory Responses in HaCaT Keratinocytes and 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate-Induced Ear Edema in Mice.

    PubMed

    Goh, Ah Ra; Youn, Gi Soo; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Won, Moo Ho; Han, Sang-Zin; Lim, Soon Sung; Lee, Keun Wook; Choi, Soo Young; Park, Jinseu

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal expression of pro-inflammatory mediators such as cell adhesion molecules and cytokines has been implicated in various inflammatory skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Aronia melanocarpa concentrate (AC) and its action mechanisms using in vivo and in vitro skin inflammation models. Topical application of AC on mouse ears significantly suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced ear edema formation, as judged by measuring ear thickness and weight, and histological analysis. Topical administration of AC also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in TPA-stimulated mouse ears. Pretreatment with AC suppressed TNF-α-induced ICAM-I expression and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. In addition, AC significantly decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation as well as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation in TNF-α-stimulated HaCaT cells. AC and its constituent cyanidin 3-glucoside also attenuated TNF-α-induced IKK activation, IκB degradation, p65 phosphorylation/nuclear translocation, and p65 DNA binding activity in HaCaT cells. Overall, our results indicate that AC exerts anti-inflammatory activities by inhibiting expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in vitro and in vivo possibly through suppression of ROS-MAPK-NF-κB signaling pathways. Therefore, AC may be developed as a therapeutic agent to treat various inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:27331630

  15. Induction of PNAd and N-acetylglucosamine 6-O-sulfotransferases 1 and 2 in mouse collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiwei; Rosen, Steven D; Bendele, Philip; Hemmerich, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Background Leukocyte recruitment across blood vessels is fundamental to immune surveillance and inflammation. Lymphocyte homing to peripheral lymph nodes is mediated by the adhesion molecule, L-selectin, which binds to sulfated carbohydrate ligands on high endothelial venules (HEV). These glycoprotein ligands are collectively known as peripheral node addressin (PNAd), as defined by the function-blocking monoclonal antibody known as MECA-79. The sulfation of these ligands depends on the action of two HEV-expressed N-acetylglucosamine 6-O-sulfotransferases: GlcNAc6ST-2 and to a lesser degree GlcNAc6ST-1. Induction of PNAd has also been shown to occur in a number of human inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Results In order to identify an animal model suitable for investigating the role of PNAd in chronic inflammation, we examined the expression of PNAd as well as GlcNAc6ST-1 and -2 in collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Here we show that PNAd is expressed in the vasculature of arthritic synovium in mice immunized with collagen but not in the normal synovium of control animals. This de novo expression of PNAd correlates strongly with induction of transcripts for both GlcNAc6ST-1 and GlcNAc6ST-2, as well as the expression of GlcNAc6ST-2 protein. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that PNAd and the sulfotransferases GlcNAc6ST-1 and 2 are induced in mouse collagen-induced arthritis and suggest that PNAd antagonists or inhibitors of the enzymes may have therapeutic benefit in this widely-used mouse model of RA. PMID:16772045

  16. COLLAGEN PROCESSING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Collagen dispersions, produced from fibrils recovered from milled bovine collagen, have shown promise in environmental remediation in applications as settling aids, filtration aids, fractionation media, oil drop stabilizers, and water purification aids. Macroporous structures, processed by controll...

  17. Flow-Induced Crystallization of Collagen: A Potentially Critical Mechanism in Early Tissue Formation.

    PubMed

    Paten, Jeffrey A; Siadat, Seyed Mohammad; Susilo, Monica E; Ismail, Ebraheim N; Stoner, Jayson L; Rothstein, Jonathan P; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2016-05-24

    The type I collagen monomer is one of nature's most exquisite and prevalent structural tools. Its 300 nm triple-helical motifs assemble into tough extracellular fibers that transition seamlessly across tissue boundaries and exceed cell dimensions by up to 4 orders of magnitude. In spite of extensive investigation, no existing model satisfactorily explains how such continuous structures are generated and grown precisely where they are needed (aligned in the path of force) by discrete, microscale cells using materials with nanoscale dimensions. We present a simple fiber drawing experiment, which demonstrates that slightly concentrated type I collagen monomers can be "flow-crystallized" to form highly oriented, continuous, hierarchical fibers at cell-achievable strain rates (<1 s(-1)) and physiologically relevant concentrations (∼50 μM). We also show that application of tension following the drawing process maintains the structural integrity of the fibers. While mechanical tension has been shown to be a critical factor driving collagen fibril formation during tissue morphogenesis in developing animals, the precise role of force in the process of building tissue is not well understood. Our data directly couple mechanical tension, specifically the extensional strain rate, to collagen fibril assembly. We further derive a "growth equation" which predicts that application of extensional strains, either globally by developing muscles or locally by fibroblasts, can rapidly drive the fusion of already formed short fibrils to produce long-range, continuous fibers. The results provide a pathway to scalable connective tissue manufacturing and support a mechano-biological model of collagen fibril deposition and growth in vivo. PMID:27070851

  18. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) antagonizes transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-induced collagen lattice contraction by human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, J S; Kim, J Y; Cho, J Y; Kang, J S; Yu, Y H

    2000-12-01

    Wound contraction plays an important role in healing, but in extreme conditions, it may lead to excessive scar formation and pathological wound contracture. To date, the key regulator of excessive contracture is known to be transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta1). In this study, we have evaluated epidermal growth factor (EGF) antagonism in fibroblast-populated collagen lattice (FPCL) gel contraction, which has been generally used as an in vitro model thought to mimic wound contraction in vivo. As expected, TGF-beta1 treatment enhanced normal fibroblast-induced collagen gel contraction in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, EGF did not affect normal gel formation, but significantly antagonized TGF-beta1-induced gel formation (p<0.05 at 100 ng/ml), whereas the other growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), did not altered either normal or TGF-beta1-induced gel contractions. Similarly, EGF treatment, but not PDGF, also significantly suppressed TGF-beta1 release that was autologously elicited by TGF-beta1 treatment (p<0.01 at 100 ng/ml). Therefore, the results suggest that EGF may negatively regulate the role of TGF-beta1 through attenuating autologous release of TGF-beta1. PMID:11145189

  19. Mechanical investigations of sound-induced responses in a simple ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotny, Manuela; Hummel, Jennifer; Kössl, Manfred; Udayashankar, Arun Palghat; Wolf, Konstantin

    2015-12-01

    Previous in-vivo studies have shown that the tonotopically-organized hearing organ, the crista acustica, of the bushcricket Mecopoda elongata is a promising model for investigations of basic hearing mechanics. This linearly arranged organ with a length of <1 mm consists of about 45 receptor units and processes frequencies from about 4 up to at least 80 kHz. Pure-tone stimulation of the crista acustica leads to travelling waves along the longitudinal axis of the hearing organ. We found that the amplitude maximum of the sound-induced travelling waves is shifted in the radial direction during the propagation of the travelling wave. The overall amplitude maximum was found to be located always on one side (anterior) in respect to the transduction place. This mechanical biasing presumably optimizes the signal transduction. Additionally, the amplitude response maximum of the travelling wave during one cycle of motion exhibits different degrees in the radial shift. During broad-band noise stimulation, the mechanical response of the crista acustica exhibits a low-frequency dominance. When using the conspecific chirp of M. elongata (2-90 kHz), as stimulus frequencies above 30 kHz do not lead to large responses even though the hearing organ is able to detect frequencies up to at least 80 kHz, covering the frequency range of the chirp with its amplitude maximum at about 70 kHz.

  20. Ears and Altitude

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ears and Altitude Ears and Altitude Patient Health Information ... uncomfortable feeling of fullness or pressure. Why do ears pop? Normally, swallowing causes a little click or ...

  1. Ear tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Myringotomy; Tympanostomy; Ear tube surgery; Pressure equalization tubes; Ventilating tubes; Ear infection - tubes; Otitis - tubes ... trapped fluid can flow out of the middle ear. This prevents hearing loss and reduces the risk ...

  2. Ear tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100045.htm Ear tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 4 Overview The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Update Date 8/ ...

  3. Delphinidin prevents high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by inhibition of NOX-1 and mitochondrial superoxide in mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Seung Eun; Jo, Hye Jun; Kim, Yong-Woon; Cho, Young-Je; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Park, So-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the effect of delphinidin on high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis in mesangial cells. Glucose dose-dependently (5.6-25 mM) increased cell proliferation and collagen I and IV mRNA levels, whereas pretreatment with delphinidin (50 μM) prevented cell proliferation and the increased collagen mRNA levels induced by high glucose (25 mM). High glucose increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and this was suppressed by pretreating delphinidin or the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine. NADPH oxidase (NOX) 1 was upregulated by high glucose, but pretreatment with delphinidin abrogated this upregulation. Increased mitochondrial superoxide by 25 mM glucose was also suppressed by delphinidin. The NOX inhibitor apocynin and mitochondria-targeted antioxidant Mito TEMPO inhibited ROS generation and cell proliferation induced by high glucose. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 was increased by high glucose, which was suppressed by delphinidin, apocynin or Mito TEMPO. Furthermore, PD98059 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) prevented the high glucose-induced cell proliferation and increased collagen mRNA levels. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β protein levels were elevated by high glucose, and pretreatment with delphinidin or PD98059 prevented this augmentation. These results suggest that delphinidin prevents high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by inhibition of NOX-1 and mitochondrial superoxide in mesangial cells. PMID:27103328

  4. Bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in hamsters. An alveolar macrophage product increases fibroblast prostaglandin E2 and cyclic adenosine monophosphate and suppresses fibroblast proliferation and collagen production.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, J G; Kostal, K M; Marino, B A

    1983-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in hamsters is associated with collagen accumulation that results from increased lung collagen synthesis rates. However, 1-2 wk after intratracheal instillation of bleomycin, lung collagen synthesis rates decline toward control values. To evaluate the potential role of the bronchoalveolar macrophage in regulating lung collagen production, we studied the effects of macrophages from normal and bleomycin-treated hamsters upon fibroblasts in vitro. We observed: (a) Medium from macrophage cultures decreased fibroblast [3H]thymidine incorporation and nondialyzable [3H]hydroxyproline production in a dose-dependent manner. Fibroblast cell counts were decreased in exposed cultures, and fibroblast viability was unchanged. Procollagen prolyl hydroxylation and prolyl-transfer RNA-specific activity were not altered by macrophage medium; this indicates that [3H]hydroxyproline reflects collagen production rate under the experimental conditions. (b) The suppressive effect of macrophage medium was selective for collagen since collagen production decreased more than noncollagen protein production. (c) Medium from bleomycin-treated hamster macrophages suppressed fibroblast proliferation and collagen production to a greater degree than medium from normal hamster macrophages. (d) Fibroblast suppression by macrophage medium was associated with increased fibroblast endogenous prostaglandin E2 production and intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP). (e) Incubation of fibroblasts with indomethacin before exposure completely inhibited prostaglandin E2 production and increases in cAMP, and eliminated suppression of fibroblast proliferation and collagen production. The macrophage-derived suppressive factor has an apparent molecular weight of 20,000-30,000 and is heat stable. It does not appear to be species restricted since both hamster and human lung fibroblasts are similarly suppressed. It is at least in part preformed in macrophages obtained by lavage, but its

  5. Treatment for chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice using parathyroid hormone agonists and antagonists linked to a collagen binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Suda, Hirofumi; Miyata, Shigeru; Sakon, Joshua; Matsushita, Osamu; Gensure, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) agonists and antagonists have been shown to improve hair growth after chemotherapy; however, rapid clearance and systemic side-effects complicate their usage. To facilitate delivery and retention to skin, we fused PTH agonists and antagonists to the collagen binding domain (CBD) of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase. in-vitro studies showed that the agonist fusion protein, PTH-CBD, bound collagen and activated the PTH/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor in SaOS-2 cells. The antagonist fusion proteins, PTH(7–33)-CBD and PTH([−1]–33)-CBD, also bound collagen and antagonized PTH(1–34) effect in SaOS-2 cells; however, PTH(7–33)-CBD had lower intrinsic activity. Distribution studies confirmed uptake of PTH-CBD to the skin at 1 and 12 hr after subcutaneous injection. We assessed in vivo efficacy of PTH-CBD and PTH(7–33)-CBD in C57BL/6J mice. Animals were depilated to synchronize the hair follicles; treated on Day 7 with agonist, antagonist, or vehicle; treated on Day 9 with cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg i.p.) or vehicle; and sacrificed on Day 39. Normal mice (no chemo and no treatment) showed rapid regrowth of hair and normal histology. Chemo + Vehicle mice showed reduced hair regrowth and decreased pigmentation; histology revealed reduced number and dystrophic anagen/catagen follicles. Chemo + Antagonist mice were grossly and histologically indistinguishable from Chemo + Vehicle mice. Chemo + Agonist mice showed more rapid regrowth and repigmentation of hair; histologically, there was a normal number of hair follicles, most of which were in the anagen phase. Overall, the agonist PTH-CBD had prominent effects in reducing chemotherapy-induced damage of hair follicles and may show promise as a therapy for chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:22130912

  6. Shikonin reduces TGF-β1-induced collagen production and contraction in hypertrophic scar-derived human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chen; Dong, Ying; Xie, Yan; Su, Yonghua; Zhang, Xufang; Leavesley, David; Upton, Zee

    2015-10-01

    Hypertrophic scarring/hypertrophic scars (HS) is a highly prevalent condition following burns and trauma wounds. Numerous studies have demonstrated that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF‑β1) plays an essential role in the wound healing process by regulating cell differentiation, collagen production and extracellular matrix degradation. The increased expression of TGF-β1 is believed to result in the formation of HS. Shikonin (SHI), an active component extracted from the Chinese herb, Radix Arnebiae, has previously been found to downregulate the expression of TGF-β1 in keratinocyte/fibroblast co-culture conditioned medium. In view of this, in this study, we aimed to further investigate the effects of SHI on TGF-β1-stimulated hypertrophic scar-derived human skin fibroblasts (HSFs) and examined the underlying mechanisms. Cell viability and proliferation were measured using alamarBlue and CyQUANT assays. The total amount of collagen and cell contraction were examined using Sirius red staining and the cell contraction assay kit. Gene expression and signalling pathway activation were detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Our results revealed that SHI reduced TGF-β1‑induced collagen production through the ERK/Smad signalling pathway and attenuated TGF-β1‑induced cell contraction by downregulating α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) expression in the HSFs. The data from this study provide evidence supporting the potential use of SHI as a novel treatment for HS. PMID:26239419

  7. IL-10-producing regulatory B10 cells ameliorate collagen-induced arthritis via suppressing Th17 cell generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Deng, Jun; Liu, Yang; Ko, King-Hung; Wang, Xiaohui; Jiao, Zhijun; Wang, Shengjun; Hua, Zichun; Sun, Lingyun; Srivastava, Gopesh; Lau, Chak-Sing; Cao, Xuetao; Lu, Liwei

    2012-06-01

    IL-10-producing CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, have been shown to possess a regulatory function in the inhibition of immune responses, but whether and how B10 cells suppress the development of autoimmune arthritis remain largely unclear. In this study, we detected significantly decreased numbers of IL-10-producing B cells, but increased IL-17-producing CD4(+) T (Th17) cells in both spleen and draining lymph nodes of mice during the acute stage of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) when compared with adjuvant-treated control mice. On adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded B10 cells, collagen-immunized mice showed a marked delay of arthritis onset with reduced severity of both clinical symptoms and joint damage, accompanied by a substantial reduction in the number of Th17 cells. To determine whether B10 cells directly inhibit the generation of Th17 cells in culture, naive CD4(+) T cells labeled with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) were co-cultured with B10 cells. These B10 cells suppressed Th17 cell differentiation via the reduction of STAT3 phosphorylation and retinoid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) expression. Moreover, Th17 cells showed significantly decreased proliferation when co-cultured with B10 cells. Although adoptive transfer of Th17 cells triggered the development of collagen-induced arthritis in IL-17(-/-)DBA/1J mice, co-transfer of B10 cells with Th17 cells profoundly delayed the onset of arthritis. Thus, our findings suggest a novel regulatory role of B10 cells in arthritic progression via the suppression of Th17 cell generation. PMID:22538089

  8. Anti-angiogenic therapy increases intratumoral adenovirus distribution by inducing collagen degradation

    PubMed Central

    Thaci, Bart; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Ahmed, Atique U.; Ferguson, Sherise D.; Han, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2012-01-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAd) are a promising class of gene therapy agents that can overcome already known glioblastoma (GBM) resistance mechanisms but have limited distribution upon direct intratumoral (i.t.) injection. Collagen bundles in the extracellular matrix (ECM) play an important role in inhibiting virus distribution. In fact, ECM pre-treatment with collagenases improves virus distributions to tumor cells. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are an endogenous class of collagenases secreted by tumor cells whose function can be altered by different drugs including anti-angiogenic agents, such as bevacizumab. In this study we hypothesized that up-regulation of MMP activity during antiangiogenic therapy can improve CRAd-S-pk7 distribution in GBM. We find that MMP-2 activity in human U251 GBM xenografts increases (*p=0.03) and collagen IV content decreases (*p=0.01) during vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) antibody neutralization. After proving that collagen IV inhibits CRAd-S-pk7 distribution in U251 xenografts (Spearman rho= −0.38; **p=0.003), we show that VEGF blocking antibody treatment followed by CRAd-S-pk7 i.t. injection reduces U251 tumor growth more than each individual agent alone (***p<0.0001). Our data proposes a novel approach to improve virus distribution in tumors by relying on the early effects of anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:22673390

  9. Anti-angiogenic therapy increases intratumoral adenovirus distribution by inducing collagen degradation.

    PubMed

    Thaci, B; Ulasov, I V; Ahmed, A U; Ferguson, S D; Han, Y; Lesniak, M S

    2013-03-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAd) are a promising class of gene therapy agents that can overcome already known glioblastoma (GBM) resistance mechanisms but have limited distribution upon direct intratumoral (i.t.) injection. Collagen bundles in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have an important role in inhibiting virus distribution. In fact, ECM pre-treatment with collagenases improves virus distributions to tumor cells. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are an endogenous class of collagenases secreted by tumor cells whose function can be altered by different drugs including anti-angiogenic agents, such as bevacizumab. In this study we hypothesized that upregulation of MMP activity during anti-angiogenic therapy can improve CRAd-S-pk7 distribution in GBM. We find that MMP-2 activity in human U251 GBM xenografts increases (*P=0.03) and collagen IV content decreases (*P=0.01) during vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) antibody neutralization. After proving that collagen IV inhibits CRAd-S-pk7 distribution in U251 xenografts (Spearman rho=-0.38; **P=0.003), we show that VEGF-blocking antibody treatment followed by CRAd-S-pk7 i.t. injection reduces U251 tumor growth more than each individual agent alone (***P<0.0001). Our data propose a novel approach to improve virus distribution in tumors by relying on the early effects of anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:22673390

  10. Platelet receptor interplay regulates collagen-induced thrombus formation in flowing human blood.

    PubMed

    Siljander, Pia R-M; Munnix, Imke C A; Smethurst, Peter A; Deckmyn, Hans; Lindhout, Theo; Ouwehand, Willem H; Farndale, Richard W; Heemskerk, Johan W M

    2004-02-15

    The platelet glycoproteins (GPs) Ib, integrin alpha(2)beta(1), and GPVI are considered central to thrombus formation. Recently, their relative importance has been re-evaluated based on data from murine knockout models. To examine their relationship during human thrombus formation on collagen type I fibers at high shear (1000 s(-1)), we tested a novel antibody against GPVI, an immunoglobulin single-chain variable fragment, 10B12, together with specific antagonists for GPIb alpha (12G1 Fab(2)) and alpha(2)beta(1) (6F1 mAb or GFOGER-GPP peptide). GPVI was found to be crucial for aggregate formation, Ca(2+) signaling, and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, but not for primary adhesion, even with more than 97% receptor blockade. Inhibiting alpha(2)beta(1) revealed its involvement in regulating Ca(2+) signaling, PS exposure, and aggregate size. Both GPIb alpha and alpha(2)beta(1) contributed to primary adhesion, showing overlapping function. The coinhibition of receptors revealed synergism in thrombus formation: the coinhibition of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptors with collagen receptors further decreased adhesion and aggregation, and, crucially, the complete eradication of thrombus formation required the coinhibition of GPVI with either GPIb alpha or alpha(2)beta(1). In summary, human platelet deposition on collagen depends on the concerted interplay of several receptors: GPIb in synergy with alpha(2)beta(1) mediating primary adhesion, reinforced by activation through GPVI, which further regulates the thrombus formation. PMID:14563646

  11. Pirfenidone inhibits TGF-β1-induced over-expression of collagen type I and heat shock protein 47 in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pirfenidone is a novel anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory agent that inhibits the progression of fibrosis in animal models and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We previously showed that pirfenidone inhibits the over-expression of collagen type I and of heat shock protein (HSP) 47, a collagen-specific molecular chaperone, in human lung fibroblasts stimulated with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in vitro. The increased numbers of HSP47-positive type II pneumocytes as well as fibroblasts were also diminished by pirfenidone in an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin. The present study evaluates the effects of pirfenidone on collagen type I and HSP47 expression in the human alveolar epithelial cell line, A549 cells in vitro. Methods The expression of collagen type I, HSP47 and E-cadherin mRNAs in A549 cells stimulated with TGF-β1 was evaluated by Northern blotting or real-time PCR. The expression of collagen type I, HSP47 and fibronectin proteins was assessed by immunocytochemical staining. Results TGF-β1 stimulated collagen type I and HSP47 mRNA and protein expression in A549 cells, and pirfenidone significantly inhibited this process. Pirfenidone also inhibited over-expression of the fibroblast phenotypic marker fibronectin in A549 cells induced by TGF-β1. Conclusion We concluded that the anti-fibrotic effects of pirfenidone might be mediated not only through the direct inhibition of collagen type I expression but also through the inhibition of HSP47 expression in alveolar epithelial cells, which results in reduced collagen synthesis in lung fibrosis. Furthermore, pirfenidone might partially inhibit the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:22694981

  12. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Mello, Maria Luiza S.

    2016-01-01

    Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs) with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140–820 cm-1) after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of –SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of –SO3- groups (1236–1225 cm-1) overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the –SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder) at 1027–1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue

  13. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2016-01-01

    Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs) with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1) after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1) overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder) at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue under

  14. Comparative effects of biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction, and tocopherol in enhancing collagen synthesis and inhibiting collagen degradation in stress-induced premature senescence model of human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Makpol, Suzana; Jam, Faidruz Azura; Khor, Shy Cian; Ismail, Zahariah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2013-01-01

    Biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF), and tocopherol have shown antiaging properties. However, the combined effects of these compounds on skin aging are yet to be investigated. This study aimed to elucidate the skin aging effects of biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol on stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) model of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) by determining the expression of collagen and MMPs at gene and protein levels. Primary HDFs were treated with biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol prior to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure. The expression of COL1A1, COL3A1, MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, and MMP9 genes was determined by qRT-PCR. Type I and type III procollagen proteins were measured by Western blotting while the activities of MMPs were quantified by fluorometric Sensolyte MMP Kit. Our results showed that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol upregulated collagen genes and downregulated MMP genes (P < 0.05). Type I procollagen and type III procollagen protein levels were significantly increased in response to biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol treatment (P < 0.05) with reduction in MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 activities (P < 0.05). These findings indicated that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol effectively enhanced collagen synthesis and inhibited collagen degradation and therefore may protect the skin from aging. PMID:24396567

  15. Comparative Effects of Biodynes, Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction, and Tocopherol in Enhancing Collagen Synthesis and Inhibiting Collagen Degradation in Stress-Induced Premature Senescence Model of Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Jam, Faidruz Azura; Ismail, Zahariah; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah

    2013-01-01

    Biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF), and tocopherol have shown antiaging properties. However, the combined effects of these compounds on skin aging are yet to be investigated. This study aimed to elucidate the skin aging effects of biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol on stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) model of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) by determining the expression of collagen and MMPs at gene and protein levels. Primary HDFs were treated with biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol prior to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure. The expression of COL1A1, COL3A1, MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, and MMP9 genes was determined by qRT-PCR. Type I and type III procollagen proteins were measured by Western blotting while the activities of MMPs were quantified by fluorometric Sensolyte MMP Kit. Our results showed that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol upregulated collagen genes and downregulated MMP genes (P < 0.05). Type I procollagen and type III procollagen protein levels were significantly increased in response to biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol treatment (P < 0.05) with reduction in MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 activities (P < 0.05). These findings indicated that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol effectively enhanced collagen synthesis and inhibited collagen degradation and therefore may protect the skin from aging. PMID:24396567

  16. Synergistic effect of interleukin 1 alpha on nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-induced up-regulation of human beta-defensin 2 in middle ear epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung-Kyun; Lee, Haa-Yung; Pan, Huiqi; Takeshita, Tamotsu; Park, Raekil; Cha, Kiweon; Andalibi, Ali; Lim, David J

    2006-01-01

    Background We recently showed that beta-defensins have antimicrobial activity against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and that interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) up-regulates the transcription of beta-defensin 2 (DEFB4 according to new nomenclature of the Human Genome Organization) in human middle ear epithelial cells via a Src-dependent Raf-MEK1/2-ERK signaling pathway. Based on these observations, we investigated if human middle ear epithelial cells could release IL-1 alpha upon exposure to a lysate of NTHi and if this cytokine could have a synergistic effect on beta-defensin 2 up-regulation by the bacterial components. Methods The studies described herein were carried out using epithelial cell lines as well as a murine model of acute otitis media (OM). Human cytokine macroarray analysis was performed to detect the released cytokines in response to NTHi exposure. Real time quantitative PCR was done to compare the induction of IL-1 alpha or beta-defensin 2 mRNAs and to identify the signaling pathways involved. Direct activation of the beta-defensin 2 promoter was monitored using a beta-defensin 2 promoter-Luciferase construct. An IL-1 alpha blocking antibody was used to demonstrate the direct involvement of this cytokine on DEFB4 induction. Results Middle ear epithelial cells released IL-1 alpha when stimulated by NTHi components and this cytokine acted in an autocrine/paracrine synergistic manner with NTHi to up-regulate beta-defensin 2. This synergistic effect of IL-1 alpha on NTHi-induced beta-defensin 2 up-regulation appeared to be mediated by the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Conclusion We demonstrate that IL-1 alpha is secreted by middle ear epithelial cells upon exposure to NTHi components and that it can synergistically act with certain of these molecules to up-regulate beta-defensin 2 via the p38 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:16433908

  17. Collagen-induced arthritis in the BB rat. Prevention of disease by treatment with CTLA-4-Ig.

    PubMed Central

    Knoerzer, D B; Karr, R W; Schwartz, B D; Mengle-Gaw, L J

    1995-01-01

    Antigen-specific T cell activation requires two independent signalling events, one mediated through T cell receptor engagement by the antigen-presenting cell-expressed peptide/class II major histocompatibility complex, and the second through the cognate interactions of costimulatory molecules expressed on the T cell and antigen-presenting cell. There is evidence from in vitro and in vivo experimental systems suggesting that the CD28/B7 costimulatory pathway is crucial for induction of maximal T cell proliferation and T helper-B cell collaboration for IgG production. This pathway can be blocked by CTLA-4-Ig, a soluble form of CTLA-4 which binds with high avidity to the CD28 ligands, B7-1 and B7-2. Here, we show that CTLA-4-Ig treatment prevents clinical and histological manifestations of disease in a collagen-induced arthritis model of rheumatoid arthritis in the diabetes resistant BB/Wor rat, when therapy is initiated before immunization with bovine type II collagen (BIIC). Anti-BIIC antibody titers are reduced in CTLA-4-Ig-treated rats compared to diseased control animals. Histologically, joints from CTLA-4-Ig-treated animals show no histological abnormalities, in contrast to control antibody-treated animals, which show complete erosion of the articular cartilage and bone. Despite the efficacy of CTLA-4-Ig in preventing clinical and histological signs of arthritis and reducing antibody responses to BIIC, delayed type hypersensitivity responses to collagen 18 d or more after CTLA-4-Ig treatment ends are similar in CTLA-4-Ig-treated and untreated rats, suggesting that the prolonged disease suppression observed does not result from induction of T cell anergy. Images PMID:7543497

  18. Role of CD14 and TLR4 in type I, type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced normal human skin fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongming; Li, Juncong; Wang, Yihe; Hu, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to investigate the role of CD14 and TLR4 in type I, type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced normal human skin fibroblasts. The secondary aim was to provide theoretical basis for the molecular mechanisms of scar formation induced by LPS. Methods: The normal skin fibroblasts cultured in vitro were randomly divided into four groups: 0.1 μg/mL LPS reference group, CD14 pretreatment + LPS, TLR4 pretreatment + LPS, CD14 and TLR4 pretreatment + LPS. The collagen DNA synthesis was assessed by 3H-proline incorporation method. Real-time Quantitative PCR was used to detect type I, type III collagen mRNA expression. Results: Similar results were revealed for mRNA expression levels. The immunofluorescence staining suggested that type I and type III collagen were expressed in all investigated groups and that the expression was differentially downregulated in groups B, C, D. ELISA demonstrated markedly decreased levels in secreting type I, type III collagens and hydroxyproline in groups B, C, D (P<0.05), and the lowest level was detected in group D (P<0.01). Conclusion: Pretreatment with CD14 or TLR4 alone or their combination can significantly reduce the levels of type I and type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion, with the most notable reduction detected in case of CD14 and TLR4 combined. We could thus conclude that both CD14 and TLR4 are involved in type I and type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced skin fibroblasts. PMID:25932184

  19. Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death of Inner Ear Organs Causes Functional Deficits in Adult Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Phillip M.; Sun, Huifang; Wang, Kevin; Asuncion, James D.; Wang, Qi; Chen, Chien-Wei; Steyger, Peter S.; Smith, Michael E.; Matsui, Jonathan I.

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics, like gentamicin, kill inner ear sensory hair cells in a variety of species including chickens, mice, and humans. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been used to study hair cell cytotoxicity in the lateral line organs of larval and adult animals. Little is known about whether aminoglycosides kill the hair cells within the inner ear of adult zebrafish. We report here the ototoxic effects of gentamicin on hair cells in the saccule, the putative hearing organ, and utricle of zebrafish. First, adult zebrafish received a single 30 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection of fluorescently-tagged gentamicin (GTTR) to determine the distribution of gentamicin within inner ear sensory epithelia. After 4 hours, GTTR was observed in hair cells throughout the saccular and utriclar sensory epithelia. To assess the ototoxic effects of gentamicin, adult zebrafish received a single 250 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection of gentamicin and, 24 hours later, auditory evoked potential recordings (AEPs) revealed significant shifts in auditory thresholds compared to untreated controls. Zebrafish were then euthanized, the inner ear fixed, and labeled for apoptotic cells (TUNEL reaction), and the stereociliary bundles of hair cells labeled with fluorescently-tagged phalloidin. Whole mounts of the saccule and utricle were imaged and cells counted. There were significantly more TUNEL-labeled cells found in both organs 4 hours after gentamicin injection compared to vehicle-injected controls. As expected, significantly fewer hair cell bundles were found along the rostral-caudal axis of the saccule and in the extrastriolar and striolar regions of the utricle in gentamicin-treated animals compared to untreated controls. Therefore, as in other species, gentamicin causes significant inner ear sensory hair cell death and auditory dysfunction in zebrafish. PMID:23533589

  20. Effects of Wutou Decoction on DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications in Rats with Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying; Hu, Yong-Hong; Tu, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wutou decoction (WTD) has been wildly applied in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and experimental arthritis in rats for many years. Epigenetic deregulation is associated with the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the effects of WTD on epigenetic changes are unclear. This study is set to explore the effects of WTD on DNA methylation and histone modifications in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The CIA model was established by the stimulation of collagen and adjuvant. The knee synovium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methylated CpG binding domain 2 (MBD2) expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by Real-Time PCR. The global DNA histone H3-K4/H3-K27 methylation and total histones H3 and H4 acetylation of PBMCs were detected. Results. Our data demonstrated that the DNMT1 mRNA expression was significantly lowered in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). The DNA methylation level was significantly reduced in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). Moreover, H3 acetylation of PBMCs was overexpressed in WTD compared with CIA (P < 0.05). Conclusions. WTD may modulate DNA methylation and histone modifications, functioning as anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:27042192

  1. Effects of Wutou Decoction on DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications in Rats with Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Fei; Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying; Hu, Yong-Hong; Tu, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wutou decoction (WTD) has been wildly applied in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and experimental arthritis in rats for many years. Epigenetic deregulation is associated with the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the effects of WTD on epigenetic changes are unclear. This study is set to explore the effects of WTD on DNA methylation and histone modifications in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The CIA model was established by the stimulation of collagen and adjuvant. The knee synovium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methylated CpG binding domain 2 (MBD2) expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by Real-Time PCR. The global DNA histone H3-K4/H3-K27 methylation and total histones H3 and H4 acetylation of PBMCs were detected. Results. Our data demonstrated that the DNMT1 mRNA expression was significantly lowered in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). The DNA methylation level was significantly reduced in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). Moreover, H3 acetylation of PBMCs was overexpressed in WTD compared with CIA (P < 0.05). Conclusions. WTD may modulate DNA methylation and histone modifications, functioning as anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:27042192

  2. CYTOKINE-INDUCED CHROMATIN MODIFICATIONS OF THE TYPE I COLLAGEN ALPHA 2 GENE DURING INTESTINAL ENDOTHELIAL-TO-MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Tammy; Scarpa, Melania; Rieder, Florian; West, Gail; Stylianou, Eleni

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibrosis of the intestine is currently an irreversible complication of Inflammatory Bowel Disease yet little is understood of the underlying pathogenesis and anti-fibrotic strategies remain elusive. To develop effective therapies, knowledge of the mechanism of transcription and excessive deposition of type I collagen - a hallmark of fibrosis, is needed. We have shown previously that endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) contributes to the pool of intestinal fibrotic cells and that a cytokine cocktail (IL1-β, TNF-α and TGF-β) induces Collagen I alpha 2 (COL1A2) mRNA and protein. Methods Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on pure cultures of human intestinal mucosal endothelial cells undergoing EndoMT were performed with antibodies to specific histone modifications and RNA polymerase II. RT-PCR was used to quantify the levels of Col1A2 and endothelial specific von Willebrand factor (vWF) mRNA. Results We show that cytokines induce selective chromatin modifications (histone 4 hyperacetylation and hypermethylation of histone 3) and phosphorylated RNA polymerase II at the COL1A2 promoter. Hypoacetylated and hypomethylated histone 3 was detected on the repressed vWF gene. Prolonged exposure to cytokines (16 days) retained hyperacetylation of select lysines in H4 on the COL1A2 promoter. Removal of cytokines after 16 days and continued culture for 10 days, showed persistent hyperacetylation at lysine 16 in histone H4. Conclusion This is the first study to show that COL1A2 gene expression is associated with cytokine-induced, temporally ordered and persistent chromatin modifications and suggests that these are important determinants of gene expression in EndoMT and intestinal fibrosis. PMID:23635716

  3. Dynamic activation of bone morphogenetic protein signaling in collagen-induced arthritis supports their role in joint homeostasis and disease

    PubMed Central

    Daans, Melina; Lories, Rik JU; Luyten, Frank P

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease affecting peripheral joints and leading to loss of joint function. The severity and outcome of disease are dependent on the balance between inflammatory/destructive and homeostatic or repair pathways. Increasing evidence suggests a role for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in joint homeostasis and disease. Methods Activation of BMP signaling in collagen-induced arthritis as a model of rheumatoid arthritis was studied by immunohistochemistry and Western blot for phosphorylated SMAD1/5 at different time points. Expression of different BMP ligands and noggin, a BMP antagonist, was determined on synovium and cartilage extracts of arthritic knees, at different time points, with quantitative polymerase chain reaction. At the protein level, BMP2 and BMP7 were studied with immunohistochemistry. Finally, the effect of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) treatment on the expression of BMP2, BMP7, and growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF5) in synovium and cartilage of arthritic knees was investigated. Results A time-dependent activation of the BMP signaling pathway in collagen-induced arthritis was demonstrated with a dynamic and characteristic expression pattern of different BMP subfamily members in synovium and cartilage of arthritic knees. As severity increases, the activation of BMP signaling becomes more prominent in the invasive pannus tissue. BMP2 is present in cartilage and the hyperplastic lining layer. BMP7 is found in the sublining zone and inflammatory infiltrate. Treatment with etanercept slowed down progression of disease, but no change in expression of GDF5, BMP2, and BMP7 in synovium was found; in the cartilage, however, blocking of TNFα increased the expression of BMP7. Conclusions BMP signaling is dynamically activated in collagen-induced arthritis and is partly TNFα-independent. TNFα blocking increased the expression of BMP7 in the articular cartilage, possibly

  4. Brucella abortus induces collagen deposition and MMP-9 down-modulation in hepatic stellate cells via TGF-β1 production.

    PubMed

    Arriola Benitez, Paula C; Scian, Romina; Comerci, Diego J; Serantes, Diego Rey; Vanzulli, Silvia; Fossati, Carlos A; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Delpino, M Victoria

    2013-12-01

    In patients with active brucellosis, the liver is frequently affected by histopathologic lesions, such as granulomas, inflammatory infiltrations, and parenchymal necrosis. Herein, we examine some potential mechanisms of liver damage in brucellosis. We demonstrate that Brucella abortus infection inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and induces collagen deposition and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 secretion induced by hepatic stellate cells (LX-2). These phenomena depend on transforming growth factor-β1 induction. In contrast, supernatants from B. abortus-infected hepatocytes and monocytes induce MMP-9 secretion and inhibit collagen deposition in hepatic stellate cells. Yet, if LX-2 cells are infected with B. abortus, the capacity of supernatants from B. abortus-infected hepatocytes and monocytes to induce MMP-9 secretion and inhibit collagen deposition is abrogated. These results indicate that depending on the balance between interacting cells and cytokines of the surrounding milieu, the response of LX-2 cells could be turned into an inflammatory or fibrogenic phenotype. Livers from mice infected with B. abortus displayed a fibrogenic phenotype with patches of collagen deposition and transforming growth factor-β1 induction. This study provides potential mechanisms of liver immune response induced by B. abortus-infected hepatic stellate cells. In addition, these results demonstrate that the cross talk of these cells with hepatocytes and macrophages implements a series of interactions that may contribute to explaining some of mechanisms of liver damage observed in human brucellosis. PMID:24113459

  5. Blockade of Glucocorticoid-Induced Tumor Necrosis Factor-Receptor-Related Protein Signaling Ameliorates Murine Collagen-Induced Arthritis by Modulating Follicular Helper T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Feng, Dingqi; Wei, Yancai; Tian, Jie; Tang, Xinyi; Rui, Ke; Lu, Liwei; Xu, Huaxi; Wang, Shengjun

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor-receptor-related protein (GITR) and its ligand (GITRL) are critically involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis, but the role of GITRL/GITR signaling in modulating CD4(+) follicular helper T (Tfh) cell response during autoimmune arthritis remains largely unclear. We showed that splenic Tfh cells from mice with collagen-induced arthritis expressed higher levels of GITR compared with non-Tfh cells. In vitro, GITRL treatment markedly enhanced the percentage and number of Tfh cells. The administration of GITR fused to fragment crystallizable of IgG protein in mice with collagen-induced arthritis suppressed the Tfh cell response, resulting in ameliorated disease severity, and reduced production of autoantibody and the number of autoantibody-secreting cells in both the spleen and bone marrow. Together, these results indicate that blockade of GITR signaling can ameliorate arthritis progression mainly by modulating the Tfh cell response. PMID:27106763

  6. T-cell immune adaptor SKAP1 regulates the induction of collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Xin; Taylor, Alison; Rudd, Christopher E

    2016-08-01

    SKAP1 is an immune cell adaptor that couples the T-cell receptor with the 'inside-out' signalling pathway for LFA-1 mediated adhesion in T-cells. A connection of SKAP1 to the regulation of an autoimmune disorder has not previously been reported. In this study, we show that Skap1-deficient (skap1-/-) mice are highly resistant to the induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), both in terms of incidence or severity. Skap1-/- T-cells were characterised by a selective reduction in the presence IL-17+ (Th17) in response to CII peptide and a marked reduction of joint infiltrating T-cells in Skap1-/- mice. SKAP1 therefore represents a novel connection to Th17 producing T-cells and is new potential target in the therapeutic intervention in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27181093

  7. Vasopressin induces endolymphatic hydrops in mouse inner ear, as evaluated with repeated 9.4 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Degerman, Eva; In 't Zandt, René; Pålbrink, Ann-Ki; Magnusson, Måns

    2015-12-01

    From histopathological specimens, endolymphatic hydrops has been demonstrated in association with inner ear disorders. Recent studies have observed findings suggestive of hydrops using MRI in humans. Previous studies suggest that vasopressin may play a critical role in endolymph homeostasis and may be involved in the development of Ménière's disease. In this study we evaluate the effect of vasopressin administration in vivo in longitudinal studies using two mouse strains. High resolution MRI at 9.4 T in combination with intraperitoneally delivered Gadolinium contrast, was performed before and after chronic subcutaneous administration of vasopressin via mini-osmotic pumps in the same mouse. A development of endolymphatic hydrops over time could be demonstrated in C57BL6 mice (5 mice, 2 and 4 weeks of administration) as well as in CBA/J mice (4 mice, 2 weeks of administration; 6 mice, 3 and 4 weeks of administration). In most C57BL6 mice hydrops developed first after more than 2 weeks while CBA/J mice had an earlier response. These results may suggest an in vivo model for studying endolymphatic hydrops and corroborates the future use of MRI as a tool in the diagnosis and treatment of inner ear diseases, such as Ménière's disease. MRI may also be developed as a critical tool in evaluating inner ear homeostasis in genetically modified mice, to augment the understanding of human disease. PMID:26048336

  8. Hypoxic culture conditions induce increased metabolic rate and collagen gene expression in ACL-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Tomasz J; Leong, Natalie L; Dar, Ayelet; Wu, Ling; Kabir, Nima; Khan, Adam Z; Eliasberg, Claire D; Pedron, Andrew; Karayan, Ashant; Lee, Siyoung; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Jiacheng, Jin; Wu, Ben M; Evseenko, Denis; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    There has been substantial effort directed toward the application of bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissue. Recently, resident tissue-specific stem cells have been described in a variety of mesenchymal structures including ligament, tendon, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In the current study, we systematically characterize three novel anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-derived cell populations with the potential for ligament regeneration: ligament-forming fibroblasts (LFF: CD146(neg) , CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ), ligament perivascular cells (LPC: CD146(pos) CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ) and ligament interstitial cells (LIC: CD34(pos) CD146(neg) , CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) )-and describe their proliferative and differentiation potential, collagen gene expression and metabolism in both normoxic and hypoxic environments, and their trophic potential in vitro. All three groups of cells (LIC, LPC, and LFF) isolated from adult human ACL exhibited progenitor cell characteristics with regard to proliferation and differentiation potential in vitro. Culture in low oxygen tension enhanced the collagen I and III gene expression in LICs (by 2.8- and 3.3-fold, respectively) and LFFs (by 3- and 3.5-fold, respectively) and increased oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate in LICs (by 4- and 3.5-fold, respectively), LFFs (by 5.5- and 3-fold, respectively), LPCs (by 10- and 4.5-fold, respectively) as compared to normal oxygen concentration. In summary, this study demonstrates for the first time the presence of three novel progenitor cell populations in the adult ACL that demonstrate robust proliferative and matrix synthetic capacity; these cells may play a role in local ligament regeneration, and consequently represent a potential cell source for ligament engineering applications. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  9. Anti-inflammatory activities of light emitting diode irradiation on collagen-induced arthritis in mice (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Yusuke; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an auto-immune disease afflicting multiple joints of the body, where as a result of the increase in inflammatory cytokines and tissue destructive factors such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, deterioration of the bones and cartilages of the joints occurs. The present investigation was carried out to study the anti-inflammatory activities of light emitting diode (LED) irradiation on hind paw inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice models. Materials and method: RA in the CIA mouse model was induced by immunization of DBA/1J mice with intradermal injections of an emulsion of bovine type II collagen and complete Freund's adjuvant. A total of 20 CIA mice were subdivided into the following groups: control group, CIA group and 2 groups of LED irradiated CIA mice (LED groups) (n=5 per group). The mouse knee joint area in the LED groups (the 570 nm and 940 nm groups) was irradiated with LED energy, three times a week for 500 s per session over 8 weeks at a dose of 5 J/cm2. The hind paw swelling was assessed by the increase in hind paw thickness. The serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines and arthritic factor MMP-3 were determined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In the LED-570 and LED-940 groups at 4 weeks after arthritis induction, the swelling inhibition index was 18.1±4.9 and 29.3±4.0 respectively. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and MMP-3 serum levels were significantly lower in the LED-940 group. Conclusions: LED irradiation, particularly in the near-infrared was effective for inhibition of the inflammatory reactions caused by RA. PMID:25368445

  10. Regulation of pathogenic IL-17 responses in collagen-induced arthritis: roles of endogenous interferon-gamma and IL-4

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Interleukin (IL)-17 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and the mouse model collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Interferon(IFN)-γ and IL-4 have been shown to suppress Th17 development in vitro, but their potential immunoregulatory roles in vivo are uncertain. The goals of this study were to determine the relationship between Th17 responses and disease severity in CIA and to assess regulation of IL-17 by endogenous IFN-γ and IL-4. Methods DBA1/LacJ mice were immunized with type II collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) to induce arthritis, and treated with neutralizing antibody to IFN-γ and/or IL-4. Systemic IL-17, IFN-γ, and IL-4 were measured in serum. At the peak of disease, cytokine production was measured by ELISA of supernatants from spleen, lymph node and paw cultures. Paws were also scored for histologic severity of arthritis. Results Joint inflammation was associated with a higher ratio of systemic IL-17/IFN-γ. Neutralization of IFN-γ accelerated the course of CIA and was associated with increased IL-17 levels in the serum and joints. The IFN-γ/IL-4/IL-17 responses in the lymphoid organ were distinct from such responses in the joints. Neutralization of IL-4 led to increased arthritis only in the absence of IFN-γ and was associated with increased bone and cartilage damage without an increase in the levels of IL-17. Conclusions IL-4 and IFN-γ both play protective roles in CIA, but through different mechanisms. Our data suggests that the absolute level of IL-17 is not the only determinant of joint inflammation. Instead, the balance of Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokines control the immune events leading to joint inflammation. PMID:19852819

  11. Bioengineered collagens

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  12. A membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)-discoidin domain receptor 1 axis regulates collagen-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Assent, Delphine; Bourgot, Isabelle; Hennuy, Benoît; Geurts, Pierre; Noël, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Maquoi, Erik

    2015-01-01

    During tumour dissemination, invading breast carcinoma cells become confronted with a reactive stroma, a type I collagen-rich environment endowed with anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. To develop metastatic capabilities, tumour cells must acquire the capacity to cope with this novel microenvironment. How cells interact with and respond to their microenvironment during cancer dissemination remains poorly understood. To address the impact of type I collagen on the fate of tumour cells, human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were cultured within three-dimensional type I collagen gels (3D COL1). Using this experimental model, we have previously demonstrated that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), a proteinase overexpressed in many aggressive tumours, promotes tumour progression by circumventing the collagen-induced up-regulation of BIK, a pro-apoptotic tumour suppressor, and hence apoptosis. Here we performed a transcriptomic analysis to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating 3D COL1-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Control and MT1-MMP expressing MCF-7 cells were cultured on two-dimensional plastic plates or within 3D COL1 and a global transcriptional time-course analysis was performed. Shifting the cells from plastic plates to 3D COL1 activated a complex reprogramming of genes implicated in various biological processes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a 3D COL1-mediated alteration of key cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, RNA processing and cytoskeleton remodelling. By using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors, we identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase specifically activated by collagen, as the initiator of 3D COL1-induced apoptosis. Our data support the concept that MT1-MMP contributes to the inactivation of the DDR1-BIK signalling axis through the cleavage of collagen fibres and/or the alteration of DDR1 receptor signalling unit, without triggering a

  13. Protective Effect of Cod (Gadus macrocephalus) Skin Collagen Peptides on Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huina; Wang, Zhicong; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Bafang

    2016-07-01

    This research was performed to explore the protective effect of cod skin collagen peptides (CCP) on gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid. The CCP were fractionated into low molecular CCP (LMCCP, Mw < 3 kDa) and high molecular CCP (HMCCP, Mw > 3 kDa). In HMCCP and LMCCP, glycine of accounted for about one-third of the total amino acids without cysteine and tryptophan, and hydrophobic amino acids accounted for about 50%. After 21 d CCP treatment (60 or 300 mg/kg, p.o./daily), the healing effects on acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers were evaluated by macroscopic measure, microscopic measure, and immune histochemistry. Moreover, the expression levels of the growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was detected. The results showed that both LMCCP and HMCCP could significantly decrease the ulcer areas and promote the healing of the lesions. They also could improve the levels of hexosamine, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, and reduce the content of malondialdehyde and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, the expression level of TGFβ1 gene and HSP70 mRNA was significantly improved by the treatment. It suggested that CCP could be able to improve symptoms of gastric ulcer and probably be used in the treatment of gastric ulcer. PMID:27219644

  14. Interferon-γ Induces Major Histocompatibility Class II Transactivator (CIITA) That Mediates Collagen Repression and Major Histocompatibility Class II Activation by Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Butticè, Giovanna; Miller, Janice; Wang, Lin; Smith, Barbara D.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis is responsible for plaque instability through alterations in extracellular matrix. Previously, we demonstrated that major histocompatibility class II (MHC II) transactivator (CIITA) in a complex with regulatory factor for X box 5 (RFX5) is a crucial protein mediating interferon (IFN)-γ–induced repression of collagen type I gene transcription in fibroblasts. This article demonstrates that, in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), IFN-γ dramatically increases the expression of CIITA isoforms III and IV, with no increase in expression of CIITA isoform I. Expression of CIITA III and IV correlates with decreased collagen type I and increased MHC II gene expression. Exogenous expression of CIITA I, III, and IV, in transiently transfected SMCs, represses collagen type I promoters (COL1A1 and COL1A2) and activates MHC II promoter. Levels of CIITA and RFX5 increase in the nucleus of cells treated with IFN-γ. Moreover, simvastatin lowers the IFN-γ–induced expression of RFX5 and MHC II in addition to repressing collagen expression. However, simvastatin does not block the IFN-γ–induced expression of CIITA III and IV, suggesting a CIITA-independent mechanism. This first demonstration that RFX5 and CIITA isoforms are expressed in SMCs after IFN-γ stimulation suggest that CIITA could be a key factor in plaque stability in atherosclerosis. PMID:16439692

  15. Mesothelial Cell Autoantibodies Induce Collagen Deposition in vitro & Using a Case Study to Introduce Undergraduates to Bioinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serve, Kinta M.

    Part I. Pleural fibrosis, a non-malignant, asbestos-related respiratory disease characterized by excessive collagen deposition, is progressive, debilitating, and potentially fatal. Disease severity may be influenced by the type of asbestos fiber inhaled, with Libby amphibole (LA) a seemingly more potent mediator of pleural fibrosis than chrysotile (CH) asbestos. This difference in severity may be due to the reported immunological component associated with LA but not CH related diseases. Here, we report the potential mechanisms by which asbestos-associated mesothelial cell autoantibodies (MCAAs) contribute to pleural fibrosis development. MCAAs are shown to bind cultured human pleural mesothelial cells and induce the deposition of type I collagen proteins in the absence of phenotypic changes typically associated with fibrosis development. However, additional extracellular proteins seem to differentially contribute to LA and CH MCAA-associated collagen deposition. Our data also suggest that IgG subclass distributions differ between LA and CH MCAAs, potentially altering the antibody effector functions. Differences in MCAA mechanisms of action and effector functions may help explain the disparate clinical disease phenotypes noted between LA and CH-exposed populations and may provide insights for development of novel therapeutic strategies. Part II. As scientific research becomes increasingly reliant on computational tools, it is more important than ever before to train students to use these tools. While educators agree that biology students should gain experience with bioinformatics, there exists no consensus as to how to integrate these concepts into the already demanding undergraduate curriculum. The Portal-21 project offers a solution by utilizing on-line learning case studies to allow flexibility for classroom integration. Presented here are the results from two field tests of a case study developed to introduce the common bioinformatics tools pBLAST and PubMed to

  16. Modeling effects of dexamethasone on disease progression of bone mineral density in collagen-induced arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Lon, Hoi-Kei; DuBois, Debra C; Earp, Justin C; Almon, Richard R; Jusko, William J

    2015-01-01

    A mechanism-based model was developed to characterize the crosstalk between proinflammatory cytokines, bone remodeling biomarkers, and bone mineral density (BMD) in collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) rats. Male Lewis rats were divided into five groups: healthy control, CIA control, CIA receiving single 0.225 mg kg−1 subcutaneous (SC) dexamethasone (DEX), CIA receiving single 2.25 mg kg−1 SC DEX, and CIA receiving chronic 0.225 mg kg−1 SC DEX. The CIA rats underwent collagen induction at day 0 and DEX was injected at day 21 post-induction. Disease activity was monitored throughout the study and rats were sacrificed at different time points for blood and paw collection. Protein concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP-5b) in paws were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Disease progression and DEX pharmacodynamic profiles of IL-1β, IL-6, RANKL, and OPG were fitted simultaneously and parameters were sequentially applied to fit the TRACP-5b and BMD data. The model was built according to the mechanisms reported in the literature and modeling was performed using ADAPT 5 software with naïve pooling. Time profiles of IL-1β and IL-6 protein concentrations correlated with their mRNAs. The RANKL and OPG profiles matched previous findings in CIA rats. DEX inhibited the expressions of IL-1β, IL-6, and RANKL, but did not alter OPG. TRACP-5b was also inhibited by DEX. Model predictions suggested that anti-IL-1β therapy and anti-RANKL therapy would result in similar efficacy for prevention of bone loss among the cytokine antagonists. PMID:26516581

  17. Dopamine D2 Receptor Is Involved in Alleviation of Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Yi-Qian; Deng, Qiao-Wen; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Human and murine lymphocytes express dopamine (DA) D2-like receptors including DRD2, DRD3, and DRD4. However, their roles in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are less clear. Here we showed that lymphocyte DRD2 activation alleviates both imbalance of T-helper (Th)17/T-regulatory (Treg) cells and inflamed symptoms in a mouse arthritis model of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was prepared by intradermal injection of chicken collagen type II (CII) in tail base of DBA/1 mice or Drd2−/− C57BL/6 mice. D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole downregulated expression of proinflammatory Th17-related cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 17 and IL-22 but further upregulated expression of anti-inflammatory Treg-related cytokines transforming growth factor- (TGF-) β and IL-10 in lymphocytes in vitro and in ankle joints in vivo in CIA mice. Quinpirole intraperitoneal administration reduced both clinical arthritis score and serum anti-CII IgG level in CIA mice. However, Drd2−/− CIA mice manifested more severe limb inflammation and higher serum anti-CII IgG level and further upregulated IL-17 and IL-22 expression and downregulated TGF-β and IL-10 expression than wild-type CIA mice. In contrast, Drd1−/− CIA mice did not alter limb inflammation or anti-CII IgG level compared with wild-type CIA mice. These results suggest that DRD2 activation is involved in alleviation of CIA symptoms by amelioration of Th17/Treg imbalance. PMID:26693483

  18. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-mediated tryptophan catabolism accelerates collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Szántó, Sándor; Koreny, Tamás; Mikecz, Katalin; Glant, Tibor T; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Varga, John

    2007-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is one of the initial and rate-limiting enzymes involved in the catabolism of the essential amino acid tryptophan. In cultured cells, the induction of IDO leads to depletion of tryptophan and tryptophan starvation. Recent studies suggest that modulation of tryptophan concentration via IDO plays a fundamental role in innate immune responses. Induction of IDO by interferon-gamma in macrophages and dendritic cells results in tryptophan depletion and suppresses the immune-mediated activation of fibroblasts and T, B, and natural killer cells. To assess the role of IDO in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a model of rheumatoid arthritis characterized by a primarily Th1-like immune response, activity of IDO was inhibited by 1-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT) in vivo. The results showed significantly increased incidence and severity of CIA in mice treated with 1-MT. Activity of IDO, as determined by measuring the levels of kynurenine/tryptophan ratio in the sera, was increased in the acute phase of arthritis and was higher in collagen-immunized mice that did not develop arthritis. Treatment with 1-MT resulted in an enhanced cellular and humoral immune response and a more dominant polarization to Th1 in mice with arthritis compared with vehicle-treated arthritic mice. The results demonstrated that development of CIA was associated with increased IDO activity and enhanced tryptophan catabolism in mice. Blocking IDO with 1-MT aggravated the severity of arthritis and enhanced the immune responses. These findings suggest that IDO may play an important and novel role in the negative feedback of CIA and possibly in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:17511858

  19. Delivery of rhBMP-2 Plasmid DNA Complexes via a PLLA/Collagen Electrospun Scaffold Induces Ectopic Bone Formation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xia; Komatsu, David E; Hadjiargyrou, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The development of effective strategies for gene delivery is a critical goal in DNA-based tissue engineering. Previously, our laboratory utilized the process of electrospinning to fabricate plasmid DNA-based polymeric scaffolds. Although there lease of DNA was robust, the in vitro transfection efficiency was low. In order to optimize these results, we recently modified our approach and utilized a strategy to adsorb plasmid DNA transfection complexes onto a PLLA/Collagen I electrospun scaffold for the delivery of recombinant human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (rhBMP-2). BMP-2 was selected since it is currently clinically used to stimulate osteogenesis. Initially, we tested this approach using β-gal plasmid DNA complexes adsorbed onto PLLA/Collagen I scaffolds and obtained a transfection efficiency of 41% of that of the positive control (over 90%, DNA complexes in solution). Next, we utilized the same approach using the rhBMP-2 plasmid DNA complexes with the pre-osteoblastic. cell line, MC3T3, and detected robust (13-fold) expression of rhBMP-2 mRNA following transfection. Lastly, a mouse muscle pouch model was used to evaluate in vivo gene delivery efficacy and ectopic bone inducing capability of the scaffold adsorbed rhBMP-2 transfection complexes. Results showed that both rhBMP-2mRNA and protein were expressed and stimulated some ectopic bone formation. As such, adsorption of plasmid DNA complexes can be an effective strategy for tissue engineering in vivo, but further research is required to optimize our approach and obtain a clinically meaningful tissue response. PMID:27319221

  20. Modeling Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics of Abatacept and Disease Progression in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Rats - A Population Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lon, Hoi-Kei; Liu, Dongyang; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    The PK / PD of abatacept, a selective T-cell co-stimulation modulator, was examined in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using a nonlinear mixed effect modeling approach. Male Lewis rats underwent collagen induction to produce rheumatoid arthritis. Two single-dose groups received either 10 mg/kg intravenous (IV) or 20 mg/kg subcutaneous (SC) abatacept, and one multiple-dose group received one 20 mg/kg SC abatacept dose and four additional 10 mg/kg SC doses. Effects on disease progression (DIS) were measured by paw swelling. Plasma concentrations of abatacept were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The PK / PD data were sequentially fitted using NONMEM VI. Goodness-of-fit was assessed by objective functions and visual inspection of diagnostic plots. The PK of abatacept followed a two-compartment model with linear elimination. For SC doses, short-term zero-order absorption was assumed with F = 59.2 %. The disease progression component was an indirect response model with a time-dependent change in paw edema production rate constant (kin) that was inhibited by abatacept. Variation in the PK data could be explained by inter-individual variability in clearance (CL) and central compartment volume (V1), while the large variability of the PD data may be the result of paw edema production (kin0) and loss rate constant (kout). Abatacept has modest effects on paw swelling in CIA rats. The PK / PD profiles were well described by the proposed model and allowed evaluation of inter-individual variability on drug- and DIS-related parameters. PMID:24233383

  1. Dopamine D2 Receptor Is Involved in Alleviation of Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Yi-Qian; Deng, Qiao-Wen; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Human and murine lymphocytes express dopamine (DA) D2-like receptors including DRD2, DRD3, and DRD4. However, their roles in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are less clear. Here we showed that lymphocyte DRD2 activation alleviates both imbalance of T-helper (Th)17/T-regulatory (Treg) cells and inflamed symptoms in a mouse arthritis model of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was prepared by intradermal injection of chicken collagen type II (CII) in tail base of DBA/1 mice or Drd2 (-/-) C57BL/6 mice. D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole downregulated expression of proinflammatory Th17-related cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 17 and IL-22 but further upregulated expression of anti-inflammatory Treg-related cytokines transforming growth factor- (TGF-) β and IL-10 in lymphocytes in vitro and in ankle joints in vivo in CIA mice. Quinpirole intraperitoneal administration reduced both clinical arthritis score and serum anti-CII IgG level in CIA mice. However, Drd2 (-/-) CIA mice manifested more severe limb inflammation and higher serum anti-CII IgG level and further upregulated IL-17 and IL-22 expression and downregulated TGF-β and IL-10 expression than wild-type CIA mice. In contrast, Drd1 (-/-) CIA mice did not alter limb inflammation or anti-CII IgG level compared with wild-type CIA mice. These results suggest that DRD2 activation is involved in alleviation of CIA symptoms by amelioration of Th17/Treg imbalance. PMID:26693483

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of lycopene isolated from Chlorella marina on type II collagen induced arthritis in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Renju, G L; Muraleedhara Kurup, G; Saritha Kumari, C H

    2013-04-01

    The role of commercially available lycopene (all-trans) from tomato in controlling arthritis has been reported. Even though many reports are available that the cis form of lycopene is more biologically active, no report seems to be available on lycopene (cis and trans) isolated from an easily available and culturable sources. In the present study, the anti-arthritic effect of lycopene (cis and trans) from the algae Chlorella marina (AL) has been compared with lycopene (all-trans) from tomato (TL) and indomethacin (Indo). Arthritis (CIA) was developed in male Sprague dawley rats by collagen and the following parameters were studied. The activities of inflammatory marker enzymes like cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were found to be decreased on treatment with AL when compared to TL and Indo. Changes in Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cells (RBC) count, hemoglobin (Hb), C-reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF), and ceruloplasmin levels observed in the blood of arthritic animals were brought back to normal by AL when compared to TL and Indo. Histopathology of paw and joint tissues showed marked reduction in edema on supplementation of AL. Thus these results indicate the potential beneficiary effect of algal lycopene on collagen induced arthritis in rats when compared to TL and even to the commonly used anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. Therefore lycopene from C. marina would be recommended as a better natural source with increased activity and without side effects in the treatment of anti-inflammatory diseases. PMID:23237458

  3. Ear surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100016.htm Ear surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Overview This image demonstrates normal appearance of the ears in relation to the face. Update Date 10/ ...

  4. Middle ear infection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A middle ear infection is also known as otitis media. It is one of the most common of childhood infections. With this illness, the middle ear becomes red, swollen, and inflamed because of bacteria ...

  5. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  6. Ear Infections in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... shaped organ that converts sound vibrations from the middle ear into electrical signals. The auditory nerve carries these signals from the cochlea to the brain. Other nearby parts of the ear also can be involved in ...

  7. Ear infection - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    ... or wearing away of the bones of the middle ear, which help with hearing Paralysis of the face Inflammation around the brain ( epidural abscess ) or in the brain Damage to the part of the ear that helps with balance Hearing ...

  8. Ear drainage culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... needed. Your health care provider will use a cotton swab to collect the sample from inside the ... Using a cotton swab to take a sample of drainage from the outer ear is not painful. However, ear pain may ...

  9. Ear infection - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... Chole RA. Chronic otitis media, mastoiditis, and petrositis. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  10. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Otitis media - acute; Infection - inner ear; Middle ear infection - acute ... Casselbrandt ML, Mandel EM. Acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  11. Accumulation of Regulatory T Cells and Chronic Inflammation in the Middle Ear in a Mouse Model of Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion Induced by Combined Eustachian Tube Blockage and Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Infection.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takashi; Kodama, Satoru; Kawano, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is associated with chronic otitis media (COM). In this study, we generated a murine model of COM by using eustachian tube (ET) obstruction and NTHi (10(7) CFU) inoculation into the tympanic bulla, and we investigated the relationship between regulatory T cells (Treg) and chronic inflammation in the middle ear. Middle ear effusions (MEEs) and middle ear mucosae (MEM) were collected at days 3 and 14 and at 1 and 2 months after inoculation. Untreated mice served as controls. MEEs were used for bacterial counts and to measure the concentrations of cytokines. MEM were collected for histological evaluation and flow cytometric analysis. Inflammation of the MEM was prolonged throughout this study, and the incidence of NTHi culture-positive MEE was 38% at 2 months after inoculation. The levels of interleukin-1β (IL-β), tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-10, and transforming growth factor β were increased in the middle ear for up to 2 months after inoculation. CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) Treg accumulated in the middle ear, and the percentage of Treg in the MEM increased for up to 2 months after inoculation. Treg depletion induced a 99.9% reduction of bacterial counts in MEEs and also significantly reduced the ratio of NTHi culture-positive MEE. The levels of these cytokines were also reduced in MEEs. In summary, we developed a murine model of COM, and our findings indicate that Treg confer infectious tolerance to NTHi in the middle ear. PMID:26553466

  12. Accumulation of Regulatory T Cells and Chronic Inflammation in the Middle Ear in a Mouse Model of Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion Induced by Combined Eustachian Tube Blockage and Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Satoru; Kawano, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is associated with chronic otitis media (COM). In this study, we generated a murine model of COM by using eustachian tube (ET) obstruction and NTHi (107 CFU) inoculation into the tympanic bulla, and we investigated the relationship between regulatory T cells (Treg) and chronic inflammation in the middle ear. Middle ear effusions (MEEs) and middle ear mucosae (MEM) were collected at days 3 and 14 and at 1 and 2 months after inoculation. Untreated mice served as controls. MEEs were used for bacterial counts and to measure the concentrations of cytokines. MEM were collected for histological evaluation and flow cytometric analysis. Inflammation of the MEM was prolonged throughout this study, and the incidence of NTHi culture-positive MEE was 38% at 2 months after inoculation. The levels of interleukin-1β (IL-β), tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-10, and transforming growth factor β were increased in the middle ear for up to 2 months after inoculation. CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg accumulated in the middle ear, and the percentage of Treg in the MEM increased for up to 2 months after inoculation. Treg depletion induced a 99.9% reduction of bacterial counts in MEEs and also significantly reduced the ratio of NTHi culture-positive MEE. The levels of these cytokines were also reduced in MEEs. In summary, we developed a murine model of COM, and our findings indicate that Treg confer infectious tolerance to NTHi in the middle ear. PMID:26553466

  13. Fusion of the ear bones

    MedlinePlus

    Fusion of the ear bones is the joining of the bones of the inner ear. These are the incus, malleus, and stapes bones. Related topics include: Chronic ear infection Otosclerosis Middle ear malformations

  14. Collagen-induced arthritis increases inducible nitric oxide synthase not only in aorta but also in the cardiac and renal microcirculation of mice.

    PubMed

    Palma Zochio Tozzato, G; Taipeiro, E F; Spadella, M A; Marabini Filho, P; de Assis, M R; Carlos, C P; Girol, A P; Chies, A B

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may promote endothelial dysfunction. This phenomenon requires further investigation, especially in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), as it is considered the experimental model most similar to RA. The objectives of this study were to identify CIA-induced changes in noradrenaline (NE) and acetylcholine (ACh) responses in mice aortas that may suggest endothelial dysfunction in these animals. Moreover, we characterize CIA-induced modifications in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in the aortas and cardiac and renal tissues taken from these mice that may be related to possible endothelial dysfunction. Male DBA/1J mice were immunized with 100 μg of emulsified bovine collagen type II (CII) plus complete Freund's adjuvant. Twenty-one days later, these animals received a boost of an additional 100 μg plus incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Fifteen days after the onset of the disease, aortic rings from CIA and control mice were challenged with NE and ACh in an organ bath. In these animals, iNOS was detected through immunohistochemical analysis of aorta, heart and kidneys. Plasma nitrite concentration was determined using the Griess reaction. CIA did not change NE or ACh responses in mice aorta but apparently increased the iNOS expression not only in aorta, but also in cardiac and renal microcirculation. In parallel, CIA reduced nitrite plasma concentration. In mice, CIA appears to increase the presence of iNOS in aorta, as well as in heart and in kidney microcirculation. This iNOS increase occurs apparently in parallel to a reduction of the bioavailability of NO. This phenomenon does not appear to change NE or ACh responses in aorta. PMID:26456019

  15. Alteration of Type I collagen microstructure induced by estrogen depletion can be prevented with drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cauble, Meagan A; Rothman, Edward; Welch, Kathleen; Fang, Ming; Duong, Le T; Pennypacker, Brenda L; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2015-01-01

    Two independent biological replicates of estrogen depletion were employed with differing drug treatment conditions. Data Set I consisted of 9-month-old New Zealand white female rabbits treated as follows: sham-operated (n=11), ovariectomized (OVX; n=12), OVX+200 μg kg−1 alendronate (ALN), 3 × a week for 27 weeks (n=12) and OVX+10 mg kg−1 Cathepsin-K inhibitor (CatKI) daily for 27 weeks. Data Set II consisted of 6-month-old New Zealand white female rabbits that were sham-operated (n=12), OVX (n=12) or OVX+0.05 mg kg−1 17β-estradiol (ERT) 3 × a week for 13 weeks (n=12). Samples from the cortical femur were polished and demineralized to make them suitable for atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. Type I collagen fibrils present in bundles or sheets, running parallel to each other, were combined into a class termed Parallel. Fibrils present outside of such structures, typically in images with an angular range of non-parallel fibrils, were combined into a class termed Oblique. The percentage of fibrils coded as Parallel for Sham animals in Data Sets I and II was 52% and 53%, respectively. The percentage of fibrils coded as Parallel for OVX animals in Data Sets I and II was 35% in both cases. ALN and ERT drug treatments reduced the change from 18 to 12%, whereas CatKI treatment reduced the change to 5%. PMID:26131356

  16. Enhanced immunoregulation of mesenchymal stem cells by IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T cells in collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jung-Yeon; Im, Keon-Il; Lee, Eun-Sol; Kim, Nayoun; Nam, Young-Sun; Jeon, Young-Woo; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties and have potential, however, there have been conflicting reports regarding their effects in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which causes inflammation and destruction of the joints. Through a comparative analysis of regulatory T (Treg) and IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells, we hypothesized that Tr1 cells enhance the immunoregulatory functions of MSCs, and that a combinatorial approach to cell therapy may exert synergistic immunomodulatory effects in an experimental animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A combination of MSCs and Tr1 cells prevented the development of destructive arthritis compared to single cell therapy. These therapeutic effects were associated with an increase in type II collagen (CII)-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells and inhibition of CII-specific CD4+IL-17+ T cells. We observed that Tr1 cells produce high levels of IL-10-dependent interferon (IFN)-β, which induces toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 expression in MSCs. Moreover, induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by TLR3 involved an autocrine IFN-β that was dependent on STAT1 signaling. Furthermore, we observed that production of IFN-β and IL-10 in Tr1 cells synergistically induces IDO in MSCs through the STAT1 pathway. These findings suggest co-administration of MSCs and Tr1 cells to be a novel therapeutic modality for clinical autoimmune diseases. PMID:27246365

  17. Designation of a Novel DKK1 Multiepitope DNA Vaccine and Inhibition of Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Sibo; Li, Shentao; Du, Yuxuan; Dou, Yunpeng; Li, Zhanguo; Yuan, Huihui; Zhao, Wenming

    2015-01-01

    Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), a secretory inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling, plays a critical role in certain bone loss diseases. Studies have shown that serum levels of DKK1 are significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and are correlated with the severity of the disease, which indicates the possibility that bone erosion in RA may be inhibited by neutralizing the biological activity of DKK1. In this study, we selected a panel of twelve peptides using the software DNASTAR 7.1 and screened high affinity and immunogenicity epitopes in vitro and in vivo assays. Furthermore, we optimized four B cell epitopes to design a novel DKK1 multiepitope DNA vaccine and evaluated its bone protective effects in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of RA. High level expression of the designed vaccine was measured in supernatant of COS7 cells. In addition, intramuscular immunization of BALB/c mice with this vaccine was also highly expressed and sufficient to induce the production of long-term IgG, which neutralized natural DKK1 in vivo. Importantly, this vaccine significantly attenuated bone erosion in CIA mice compared with positive control mice. These results provide evidence for the development of a DNA vaccine targeted against DKK1 to attenuate bone erosion. PMID:26075259

  18. Enhanced immunoregulation of mesenchymal stem cells by IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T cells in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Yeon; Im, Keon-Il; Lee, Eun-Sol; Kim, Nayoun; Nam, Young-Sun; Jeon, Young-Woo; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties and have potential, however, there have been conflicting reports regarding their effects in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which causes inflammation and destruction of the joints. Through a comparative analysis of regulatory T (Treg) and IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells, we hypothesized that Tr1 cells enhance the immunoregulatory functions of MSCs, and that a combinatorial approach to cell therapy may exert synergistic immunomodulatory effects in an experimental animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A combination of MSCs and Tr1 cells prevented the development of destructive arthritis compared to single cell therapy. These therapeutic effects were associated with an increase in type II collagen (CII)-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells and inhibition of CII-specific CD4+IL-17+ T cells. We observed that Tr1 cells produce high levels of IL-10-dependent interferon (IFN)-β, which induces toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 expression in MSCs. Moreover, induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by TLR3 involved an autocrine IFN-β that was dependent on STAT1 signaling. Furthermore, we observed that production of IFN-β and IL-10 in Tr1 cells synergistically induces IDO in MSCs through the STAT1 pathway. These findings suggest co-administration of MSCs and Tr1 cells to be a novel therapeutic modality for clinical autoimmune diseases. PMID:27246365

  19. IL-17 induces type V collagen overexpression and EMT via TGF-β-dependent pathways in obliterative bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Vittal, Ragini; Fan, Lin; Greenspan, Daniel S.; Mickler, Elizabeth A.; Gopalakrishnan, Bagavathi; Gu, Hongmei; Benson, Heather L.; Zhang, Chen; Burlingham, William; Cummings, Oscar W.

    2013-01-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB), a fibrotic airway lesion, is the leading cause of death after lung transplantation. Type V collagen [col(V)] overexpression and IL-17-mediated anti-col(V) immunity are key contributors to OB pathogenesis. Here, we report a previously undefined role of IL-17 in inducing col(V) overexpression, leading to epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and subsequent OB. We observed IL-17-mediated induction of col(V) α1 chains [α1 (V)] in normal airway epithelial cells in vitro and detected α1 (V)-specific antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of lung transplant patients. Overexpression of IL-17 and col(V) was detected in OB lesions in patient lung biopsies and in a murine OB model. IL-17 is shown to induce EMT, TGF-β mRNA expression, and SMAD3 activation, whereas downregulating SMAD7 expression in vitro. Pharmacological inhibition of TGF-βRI tyrosine kinase, p38 MAPK, or focal adhesion kinase prevented col(V) overexpression and EMT. In murine orthotopic lung transplants, neutralizing IL-17 significantly decreased TGF-β mRNA and protein expression and prevented epithelial repair/OB. Our findings highlight a feed-forward loop between IL-17 and TGF-β, leading to induction of col(V) and associated epithelial repair, thus providing one possible link between autoimmunity and OB after lung transplantation. PMID:23262228

  20. Decreased severity of collagen antibody and lipopolysaccharide-induced arthritis in human IL-32β overexpressed transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Jung Ok; Kim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Dong Hun; Song, Sukgil; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Hee Pom; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-32, mainly produced by T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells, epithelial cells, and blood monocytes, is dominantly known as a pro-inflammatory cytokine. However, the role of IL-32 on inflammatory disease has been doubtful according to diverse conflicting results. This study was designed to examine the role of IL-32β on the development of collagen antibody (CAIA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory arthritis. Our data showed that the paw swelling volume and clinical score were significantly reduced in the CAIA and LPS-treated IL-32β transgenic mice compared with non-transgenic mice. The populations of cytotoxic T, NK and dendritic cells was inhibited and NF-κB and STAT3 activities were significantly lowered in the CAIA and LPS-treated IL-32β transgenic mice. The expression of pro-inflammatory proteins was prevented in the paw tissues of CAIA and LPS-treated IL-32β transgenic mice. In addition, IL-32β altered several cytokine levels in the blood, spleen and paw joint. Our data indicates that IL-32β comprehensively inhibits the inflammation responses in the CAIA and LPS-induced inflammatory arthritis model. PMID:26497686

  1. Enriched Astaxanthin Extract from Haematococcus pluvialis Augments Growth Factor Secretions to Increase Cell Proliferation and Induces MMP1 Degradation to Enhance Collagen Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsin-Yu; Lee, Chelsea; Pan, Jian-Liang; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shu-Hung; Lan, Chi-Wei John; Liu, Wang-Ta; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Hseu, You-Cheng; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hui-Min David

    2016-01-01

    Among many antioxidants that are used for the repairing of oxidative stress induced skin damages, we identified the enriched astaxanthin extract (EAE) from Haematococcus pluvialis as a viable ingredient. EAE was extracted from the red microalgae through supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction. To compare the effectiveness, EAE wastreated on human dermal fibroblasts with other components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and doxycycline. With sirius red staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we found that PMA decreased the collagen concentration and production while overall the addition of doxycycline and EAE increased the collagen concentration in a trial experiments. EAE increased collagen contents through inhibited MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA expression and induced TIMP1, the antagonists of MMPs protein, gene expression. As for when tested for various proteins through western blotting, it was seen that the addition of EAE increased the expression of certain proteins that promote cell proliferation. Testing those previous solutions using growth factor assay, it was noticeable that EAE had a positive impact on cell proliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) than doxycycline, indicating that it was a better alternative treatment for collagen production. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agentsand food supplements. PMID:27322248

  2. Enriched Astaxanthin Extract from Haematococcus pluvialis Augments Growth Factor Secretions to Increase Cell Proliferation and Induces MMP1 Degradation to Enhance Collagen Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-Yu; Lee, Chelsea; Pan, Jian-Liang; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shu-Hung; Lan, Chi-Wei John; Liu, Wang-Ta; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Hseu, You-Cheng; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hui-Min David

    2016-01-01

    Among many antioxidants that are used for the repairing of oxidative stress induced skin damages, we identified the enriched astaxanthin extract (EAE) from Haematococcus pluvialis as a viable ingredient. EAE was extracted from the red microalgae through supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction. To compare the effectiveness, EAE wastreated on human dermal fibroblasts with other components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and doxycycline. With sirius red staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we found that PMA decreased the collagen concentration and production while overall the addition of doxycycline and EAE increased the collagen concentration in a trial experiments. EAE increased collagen contents through inhibited MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA expression and induced TIMP1, the antagonists of MMPs protein, gene expression. As for when tested for various proteins through western blotting, it was seen that the addition of EAE increased the expression of certain proteins that promote cell proliferation. Testing those previous solutions using growth factor assay, it was noticeable that EAE had a positive impact on cell proliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) than doxycycline, indicating that it was a better alternative treatment for collagen production. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agentsand food supplements. PMID:27322248

  3. Recombinant growth factor mixtures induce cell cycle progression and the upregulation of type I collagen in human skin fibroblasts, resulting in the acceleration of wound healing processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Hyun; Choi, Kyung-Ha; Cho, Jae-We; Kim, So Young; Kwon, Tae Rin; Choi, Sun Young; Choi, Yoo Mi; Lee, Jay; Yoon, Ho Sang; Kim, Beom Joon

    2014-05-01

    Application of growth factor mixtures has been used for wound healing and anti-wrinkles agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant growth factor mixtures (RGFM) on the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, type I collagen, and wound healing processes of acute animal wound models. The results showed that RGFM induced increased rates of cell proliferation and cell migration of human skin fibroblasts (HSF). In addition, expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)4, and Cdk2 proteins was markedly increased with a growth factor mixtures treatment in fibroblasts. Expression of type I collagen was also increased in growth factor mixtures-treated HSF. Moreover, growth factor mixtures-induced the upregulation of type I collagen was associated with the activation of Smad2/3. In the animal model, RGFM-treated mice showed accelerated wound closure, with the closure rate increasing as early as on day 7, as well as re-epithelization and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration than phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated mice. In conclusion, the results indicated that RGFM has the potential to accelerate wound healing through the upregulation of type I collagen, which is partly mediated by activation of Smad2/3-dependent signaling pathway as well as cell cycle progression in HSF. The topical application of growth factor mixtures to acute and chronic skin wound may accelerate the epithelization process through these molecular mechanisms. PMID:24626875

  4. Cigarette smoke-induced lung emphysema in mice is associated with prolyl endopeptidase, an enzyme involved in collagen breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Koelink, Pim J.; Henricks, Paul A. J.; Jackson, Patricia L.; Nijkamp, Frans P.; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D.; Blalock, J. Edwin; Folkerts, Gert

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the neutrophil chemoattractant proline-glycine-proline (PGP), derived from the breakdown of the extracellular matrix, plays an important role in neutrophil recruitment to the lung. PGP formation is a multistep process involving neutrophils, metalloproteinases (MMPs), and prolyl endopeptidase (PE). This cascade of events is now investigated in the development of lung emphysema. A/J mice were whole body exposed to cigarette smoke for 20 wk. After 20 wk or 8 wk after smoking cessation, animals were killed, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were collected to analyze the neutrophilic airway inflammation, the MMP-8 and MMP-9 levels, the PE activity, and the PGP levels. Lung tissue degradation was assessed by measuring the mean linear intercept. Additionally, we investigated the effect of the peptide l-arginine-threonine-arginine (RTR), which binds to PGP sequences, on the smoke-induced neutrophil influx in the lung after 5 days of smoke exposure. Neutrophilic airway inflammation was induced by cigarette smoke exposure. MMP-8 and MMP-9 levels, PE activity, and PGP levels were elevated in the lungs of cigarette smoke-exposed mice. PE was highly expressed in epithelial and inflammatory cells (macrophages and neutrophils) in lung tissue of cigarette smoke-exposed mice. After smoking cessation, the neutrophil influx, the MMP-8 and MMP-9 levels, the PE activity, and the PGP levels were decreased or reduced to normal levels. Moreover, RTR inhibited the smoke-induced neutrophil influx in the lung after 5 days' smoke exposure. In the present murine model of cigarette smoke-induced lung emphysema, it is demonstrated for the first time that all relevant components (neutrophils, MMP-8, MMP-9, PE) involved in PGP formation from collagen are upregulated in the airways. Together with MMPs, PE may play an important role in the formation of PGP and thus in the pathophysiology of lung emphysema. PMID:21112944

  5. Curcumin attenuates inflammatory response in IL-1beta-induced human synovial fibroblasts and collagen-induced arthritis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong-Oh; Kim, Mun-Ok; Choi, Yung Hyun; Park, Yung-Min; Kim, Gi-Young

    2010-05-01

    Curcumin, a major component of turmeric, has been shown to exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study was performed to determine whether curcumin is efficacious against both collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and IL-1beta-induced activation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (CII) and treated with curcumin every other day for 2weeks after the initial immunization. For arthritis, we evaluated the incidence of disease and used an arthritis index based on paw thickness. In vitro proliferation of CII- or concanavalin A-induced splenic T cells was examined using IFN-gamma production. Pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta were examined in the mouse ankle joint and serum IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes were analyzed. The expression levels of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in human FLSs were also determined. The results showed that compared with untreated CIA mice, curcumin-treated mice downregulated clinical arthritis score, the proliferation of splenic T cells, expression levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in the ankle joint, and expression levels of IgG2a in serum. Additionally, by altering nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB transcription activity in FLSs, curcumin inhibited PGE(2) production, COX-2 expression, and MMP secretion. These results suggest that curcumin can effectively suppress inflammatory response by inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators and regulating humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:20188213

  6. Inhibition of Src kinase blocks high glucose-induced EGFR transactivation and collagen synthesis in mesangial cells and prevents diabetic nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Kanta; Xia, Ling; Goldberg, Howard J; Lee, Ken W K; Shah, Anu; Stavar, Laura; Masson, Elodie A Y; Momen, Abdul; Shikatani, Eric A; John, Rohan; Husain, Mansoor; Fantus, I George

    2013-11-01

    Chronic exposure to high glucose leads to diabetic nephropathy characterized by increased mesangial matrix protein (e.g., collagen) accumulation. Altered cell signaling and gene expression accompanied by oxidative stress have been documented. The contribution of the tyrosine kinase, c-Src (Src), which is sensitive to oxidative stress, was examined. Cultured rat mesangial cells were exposed to high glucose (25 mmol/L) in the presence and absence of Src inhibitors (PP2, SU6656), Src small interfering RNA (siRNA), and the tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme (TACE) inhibitor, TAPI-2. Src was investigated in vivo by administration of PP2 to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic DBA2/J mice. High glucose stimulated Src, TACE, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2, p38), and collagen IV accumulation in mesangial cells. PP2 and SU6656 blocked high glucose-stimulated phosphorylation of Src Tyr-416, EGFR, and MAPKs. These inhibitors and Src knockdown by siRNA, as well as TAPI-2, also abrogated high glucose-induced phosphorylation of these targets and collagen IV accumulation. In STZ-diabetic mice, albuminuria, increased Src pTyr-416, TACE activation, ERK and EGFR phosphorylation, glomerular collagen accumulation, and podocyte loss were inhibited by PP2. These data indicate a role for Src in a high glucose-Src-TACE-heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-EGFR-MAPK-signaling pathway to collagen accumulation. Thus, Src may provide a novel therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23942551

  7. Inhibition of Src Kinase Blocks High Glucose–Induced EGFR Transactivation and Collagen Synthesis in Mesangial Cells and Prevents Diabetic Nephropathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Kanta; Xia, Ling; Goldberg, Howard J.; Lee, Ken W.K.; Shah, Anu; Stavar, Laura; Masson, Elodie A.Y.; Momen, Abdul; Shikatani, Eric A.; John, Rohan; Husain, Mansoor; Fantus, I. George

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to high glucose leads to diabetic nephropathy characterized by increased mesangial matrix protein (e.g., collagen) accumulation. Altered cell signaling and gene expression accompanied by oxidative stress have been documented. The contribution of the tyrosine kinase, c-Src (Src), which is sensitive to oxidative stress, was examined. Cultured rat mesangial cells were exposed to high glucose (25 mmol/L) in the presence and absence of Src inhibitors (PP2, SU6656), Src small interfering RNA (siRNA), and the tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme (TACE) inhibitor, TAPI-2. Src was investigated in vivo by administration of PP2 to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic DBA2/J mice. High glucose stimulated Src, TACE, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK1/2, p38), and collagen IV accumulation in mesangial cells. PP2 and SU6656 blocked high glucose–stimulated phosphorylation of Src Tyr-416, EGFR, and MAPKs. These inhibitors and Src knockdown by siRNA, as well as TAPI-2, also abrogated high glucose–induced phosphorylation of these targets and collagen IV accumulation. In STZ-diabetic mice, albuminuria, increased Src pTyr-416, TACE activation, ERK and EGFR phosphorylation, glomerular collagen accumulation, and podocyte loss were inhibited by PP2. These data indicate a role for Src in a high glucose-Src-TACE-heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-EGFR-MAPK–signaling pathway to collagen accumulation. Thus, Src may provide a novel therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23942551

  8. Extracts of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. attenuate the inflammatory response in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    XU, WEI; HUANG, MINGQING; ZHANG, YUQIN; LI, HUANG; ZHENG, HAIYIN; YU, LISHUANG; CHU, KEDAN; LIN, YU; CHEN, LIDIAN

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is considered a serious public health problem, which is commonly treated with traditional Chinese or herbal medicine. The present study evaluated the effects of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. extraction (BCBE) on a type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Wistar rats with CIA received either 125 or 500 mg/kg BCBE, after which, paw swelling was markedly suppressed compared with in the model group. In addition, BCBE significantly ameliorated pathological joint alterations, including synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone destruction. The protein and mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α and nuclear factor-κB in synovial tissue were determined by immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that the expression levels of these factors were significantly downregulated in the BCBE-treated group compared with in the model group. These results indicated that BCBE may exert an inhibitory effect on the CIA rat model, and its therapeutic potential is associated with its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27035125

  9. H2-M polymorphism in mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis involves the peptide binding groove

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W.; Loos, M.; Maeurer, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    The ability to develop type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is associated with the major histocompatibility I-A gene and with as yet poorly defined regulatory molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen processing and presentation pathway. H2-M molecules are thought to be involved in the loading of antigenic peptides into the MHC class II binding cleft. We sequenced H2-Ma, H2-Mb1, and H2-Mb2 genes from CIA-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains and identified four different Ma and Mb2 alleles, and three different Mb1 alleles defined by polymorphic residues within the predicted peptide binding groove. Most CIA-resistant mouse strains share common Ma, Mb1, and Mb2 alleles. In contrast, H2-M alleles designated Ma-III, Ma-IV, Mb1-III, and Mb2-IV could be exclusively identified in the CIA-susceptible H2{sup r} and H2{sup q} haplotypes, suggesting that allelic H2-M molecules may modulate the composition of different CII peptides loaded onto MHC class II molecules, presumably presenting {open_quotes}arthritogenic{close_quotes} epitopes to T lymphocytes. 42 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells contribute to bone erosion in collagen-induced arthritis by differentiating to osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Huang, Yuefang; Wang, Shuang; Fu, Rong; Guo, Chaohuan; Wang, Hongyue; Zhao, Jijun; Gaskin, Felicia; Chen, Jingxian; Yang, Niansheng; Fu, Shu Man

    2015-12-01

    Bone erosion is a sign of severe rheumatoid arthritis and osteoclasts play a major role in the bone resorption. Recently, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) has been reported to be increased in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The number of circulating MDSCs is shown to correlate with rheumatoid arthritis. These findings suggest that MDSCs are precursor cells involved in bone erosion. In this study, MDSCs isolated from mice with CIA stimulated with M-CSF and RANKL in vitro expressed osteoclast markers and acquired osteoclast bone resorption function. MDSCs sorted from CIA mice were transferred into the tibia of normal DBA/1J mice and bones were subjected to histological and Micro CT analyses. The transferred CIA-MDSCs were shown to differentiate into TRAP(+) osteoclasts that were capable of bone resorption in vivo. MDSCs isolated from normal mice had more potent suppressor activity and much less capability to differentiate to osteoclast. Additional experiments showed that NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 or IκB inhibitor peptide blocked the differentiation of MDSCs to osteoclast and bone resorption. IL-1Ra also blocked this differentiation. In contrast, the addition of IL-1α further enhanced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. These results suggest that MDSCs are a source of osteoclast precursors and inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, contributing significantly to erosive changes seen in rheumatoid arthritis and related disorders. PMID:26318644

  11. Evaluation of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody therapy using murine type II collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bailin; Song, Zheng; Wu, Bin; Gardner, Debra; Shealy, David; Song, Xiao-Yu; Wooley, Paul H

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that is critical for T/B-cell differentiation and maturation, immunoglobulin secretion, acute-phase protein production, and macrophage/monocyte functions. Extensive research into the biology of IL-6 has implicated IL-6 in the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of RA. An anti-murine IL-6 mAb that neutralizes mouse IL-6 activities was tested in animal model of collagen-induced arthritis. Prophylactic treatment with anti-IL-6 mAb significantly reduced the incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control mAb treated mice. The mitogenic response of B and T cells isolated from the lymph nodes of anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced compared to cells isolated from control mAb treated mice. The overall histopathology score for paws from the anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced when compared to paws from mice treated with control mAb, including both inflammatory (synovitis and pannus) and erosive (erosions and architecture) parameters. Reduced loss of cartilage matrix components was also observed in the anti-IL-6 treated mice. Collectively, these data suggest that IL-6 plays a major role in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus support the potential benefit of anti-IL-6 mAb treatment in rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:19368720

  12. SARS Coronavirus Fusion Peptide-Derived Sequence Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zu T; Sigalov, Alexander B

    2016-01-01

    During the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, the viruses have evolved numerous strategies to counter and evade host antiviral immune responses in order to establish a successful infection, replicate and persist in the host. Recently, based on our model of immune signaling, the Signaling Chain HOmoOLigomerization (SCHOOL) model, we suggested specific molecular mechanisms used by different viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) to modulate the host immune response mediated by members of the family of multichain immune recognition receptors (MIRRs). This family includes T cell receptor (TCR) that is critically involved in immune diseases such as autoimmune arthritis. In the present study, we provide compelling experimental in vivo evidence in support of our hypothesis. Using the SCHOOL approach and the SARS-CoV fusion peptide sequence, we rationally designed a novel immunomodulatory peptide that targets TCR. We showed that this peptide ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and protects against bone and cartilage damage. Incorporation of the peptide into self-assembling lipopeptide nanoparticles that mimic native human high density lipoproteins significantly increases peptide dosage efficacy. Together, our data further confirm that viral immune evasion strategies that target MIRRs can be transferred to therapeutic strategies that require similar functionalities. PMID:27349522

  13. Cystamine immobilization on TiO 2 film surfaces and the influence on inhibition of collagen-induced platelet activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yujuan; Weng, Yajun; Zhang, Liping; Jing, Fengjuan; Huang, Nan; Chen, Junying

    2011-12-01

    Poor haemocompatibility is a main issue of artificial cardiovascular materials in clinical application. Nitric oxide (NO), produced by vascular endothelial cells, is a well known inhibitor of platelet adhesion and activation. Thus, NO-releasing biomaterials are beneficial for improving haemocompatibility of blood-contacting biomedical devices. In this paper, a novel method was developed for enhancement of haemocompatibility by exploiting endogenous NO donors. TiO 2 films were firstly synthesized on Si (1 0 0) wafers via unbalanced magnetron sputtering technology, and then polydopamine was grafted on TiO 2 films and used as a linker for further immobilization of cystamine. The obtained surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. NO generation is evaluated by saville-griess reagents, and it shows that cystamine immobilized samples are able to catalytically generate NO by decomposing endogenous S-nitrosothiols (RSNO). In vitro platelet adhesion results reveal that cystamine modified surfaces can inhibit collagen-induced platelet activation. ELISA analysis reveals that cGMP in platelets obviously increases on cystamine immobilized surface, which suggests the reducing of platelet activation is through NO/cGMP signal channel. It can be concluded that cystamine immobilized surface shows better blood compatibility by catalyzing NO release from the endogenous NO donor. It may be a promising method for improvement of haemocompatibility of blood-contacting implants.

  14. The immunosuppressive effect of domain-deleted dimer of HLA-G2 isoform in collagen-induced arthritis mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ami; Kuroki, Kimiko; Okabe, Yuki; Kasai, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Naoki; Yamada, Chisato; Takai, Toshiyuki; Ose, Toyoyuki; Kon, Shigeyuki; Matsuda, Tadashi; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2016-09-01

    HLA-G is involved in maternal-fetal immune tolerance and is reported to be a natural tolerogenic molecule. Seven-spliced isoforms including dimeric and β2m-free forms have been identified. The major isoform, HLA-G1 (and its soluble type HLA-G5), binds to the inhibitory immune receptors, leukocyte immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptor (LILR) B1 and LILRB2. We previously reported that HLA-G1 also binds to paired Ig-like receptor (PIR)-B, a mouse homolog of LILRBs, and had a significant immunosuppressive effect in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Although HLA-G2 and its soluble form HLA-G6 bind specifically to LILRB2, its functional characteristics are largely unknown. In this study, we report the significant immunosuppressive effect of HLA-G2 dimer in CIA mice. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed a specific interaction of HLA-G2 with PIR-B. CIA mice were administered HLA-G2 protein subcutaneously once in the left footpad and clinical severity was evaluated in a double-blind study. A single administration of HLA-G2 maintained a suppressive effect for over 1month. These results suggested that the HLA-G2 protein might be a useful biopharmaceutical for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis by binding to inhibitory PIR-B. PMID:26805457

  15. Immunosuppressive activity of deer antler extracts of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, on type II collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Koo; Kim, Kap-Sung; Kim, Sung-Il; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Lee, In-Seon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2006-01-01

    Unossified horn or pilose antler cut from deer, which belong to the Cervidae generally is termed Nokyong. Nokyong is one of the most famous Korean traditional medicines and has been considered to possess sexual-reinforcing and antiaging actions. In this study, water extract of deer antler extract (DAA) prepared from the growing antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe was used to investigate the efficacy of the DAA on the development of type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Male rats were immunized with an emulsion of 200 microg of CII and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The rats then were administered by injection a suspension of DAA or phosphate-buffered saline. The effect of DAA on cellular responses to CII was examined. The injection of DAA suppressed the CII-specific secretion of interferon (IFN)-gamma from splenocytes ex vivo. The influence of DAA also was evaluated on the incidence and development of arthritis in rat CIA. Rats were immunized twice at a 3-wk interval with bovine CII, with DAA being given by injection once a d for 14 d with four different regimens. A 14-d course of DAA treatment at a daily dose of 100 microg/kg, which began on the d of the first CII immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis, as well as antibody formation and delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII. Treatment with DAA resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and immune responses to CII. PMID:16759146

  16. Overexpression of ADAMTS-7 leads to accelerated initiation and progression of collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuying; Wei, Fanhua; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine whether ADAMTS-7 contributes to the onset and severity of joint inflammation in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis. ADAMTS-7 was found to be elevated in the course of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA).. ADAMTS-7 transgenic (TG) mice were more susceptible to the induction of CIA. The onset of CIA was accelerated and the arthritic severity was increased in TG mice compared to wild type mice. The overall incidence was also significantly higher in TG mice. In addition, arthritic TG mice displayed significantly higher clinical and histological arthritis scores. The COMP degradative fragments were significantly elevated in articular cartilage and sera in CIA models of TG mice. Furthermore, the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) were also increased in serum and draining lymph nodes of arthritic TG mice. Therefore, these data provided the in vivo evidence, suggesting that ADAMTS-7 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis, and that inhibition of ADAMTS-7 may be a potential target to ameliorate the severity of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:25742929

  17. SARS Coronavirus Fusion Peptide-Derived Sequence Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zu T.; Sigalov, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    During the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, the viruses have evolved numerous strategies to counter and evade host antiviral immune responses in order to establish a successful infection, replicate and persist in the host. Recently, based on our model of immune signaling, the Signaling Chain HOmoOLigomerization (SCHOOL) model, we suggested specific molecular mechanisms used by different viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) to modulate the host immune response mediated by members of the family of multichain immune recognition receptors (MIRRs). This family includes T cell receptor (TCR) that is critically involved in immune diseases such as autoimmune arthritis. In the present study, we provide compelling experimental in vivo evidence in support of our hypothesis. Using the SCHOOL approach and the SARS-CoV fusion peptide sequence, we rationally designed a novel immunomodulatory peptide that targets TCR. We showed that this peptide ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and protects against bone and cartilage damage. Incorporation of the peptide into self-assembling lipopeptide nanoparticles that mimic native human high density lipoproteins significantly increases peptide dosage efficacy. Together, our data further confirm that viral immune evasion strategies that target MIRRs can be transferred to therapeutic strategies that require similar functionalities. PMID:27349522

  18. A new phenylpyrazoleanilide, y-320, inhibits interleukin 17 production and ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Hiroyuki; Ishibuchi, Seigo; Oshita, Koichi; Seki, Noriyasu; Kataoka, Hirotoshi; Sugahara, Kunio; Adachi, Kunitomo; Chiba, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-17 are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) because both pro-inflammatory cytokines are found in synovial fluid of RA patients. In this study, we examined the pharmacological profiles of Y-320, a new phenylpyrazoleanilide immunomodulator. Y-320 inhibited IL-17 production by CD4 T cells stimulated with IL-15 with IC50 values of 20 to 60 nM. Oral administration of Y-320 (0.3 to 3 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the development and progression of arthritis and joint destruction with reduction of IL-17 mRNA expression in arthritic joints of type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1J mice. Y-320 in combination with anti-murine tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibody showed a synergistic effect on mouse CIA. Moreover, therapeutic treatment with Y-320 (0.3 and 1 mg/kg orally) ameliorated CIA in cynomolgus monkeys. Our results suggest that Y-320, an orally active inhibitor for IL-17 production, provides a useful therapy for RA. PMID:24366113

  19. Alternate carbohydrate and nontraditional inducer leads to increased productivity of a collagen binding domain fusion protein via fed-batch fermentation.

    PubMed

    Fruchtl, McKinzie; Sakon, Joshua; Beitle, Robert

    2016-05-20

    The production of collagen binding domain fusion proteins is of significant importance because of their potential as therapeutic biomaterials. It was previously reported that the expression of collagen-binding domain fusion proteins in Escherichia coli was higher when expressed using lactose as an inducer and chemically defined growth media on a shake flask scale. In an effort to further investigate factors that affect expression levels on a fed-batch scale, alternative induction techniques were tested in conjunction with fed-batch fermentation. In this paper, we discuss ten fed-batch fermentation experiments utilizing either glucose or glycerol feed and using lactose or isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) as an induction source. It was found that glycerol-fed fermentations induced with lactose allowed for greater expression of target protein, though lesser cell densities were achieved. PMID:26975843

  20. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase reduces collagen production via p38 MAPK in cardiac fibroblasts induced by coxsackievirus B3.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shengyang; Jiang, Donglin; Zhao, Peng; He, Xinlong; Tian, Shunli; Wu, Xueming; Tao, Yijia

    2016-07-01

    Collagen deposition is the major cause of myocardial fibrosis, contributing to impaired cardiac contractile function in coxsackie virus B3 (CVB3)-infected hearts. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been considered as a cellular fuel gauge and super metabolic regulator, however, whether AMPK has an effect on collagen production in CVB3‑infected heart remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the association between AMPK activation and CVB3‑infected neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts (NRCFs) was investigated. Collagen production was determined by the hydroxyproline content of the supernatant and by the expression of type I/IV collagen in the cell lysate. Rat hydroxyproline ELISA was used to detect hydroxyproline content in the supernatant. The expression of type I/IV collagen, and the phosphorylation of AMPKα‑Thr172 and p38 in the cell lysate were evaluated using western blotting. As expected, it was found that the hydroxyproline content in the supernatant, and the production of collagen I/IV in the cell lysate were significantly promoted at 48 h post‑CVB3‑infection. However, this effect was inhibited in a dose‑dependent manner when pretreated with 5‑aminoimidazole‑4‑carboxamide‑1‑4‑ribofuranoside (AICAR) for 2 h prior to CVB3‑infection. However, if the cells were preincubated with compound C or SB203580 for 30 min prior the treatment with AICAR, the inhibitive effects of AICAR were reversed. The results of the western blotting indicated that the phosphorylation of AMPKα‑Thr172 and p38 were significantly increased by AICAR in the NRCFs. However, only the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) was inhibited by SB203580. In conclusion, AMPK activation reduced collagen production via the p38 MAPK‑dependent pathway in the cardiac fibroblasts induced by CVB3. The results of the present study may contribute to identifying an effective therapy for CVB3‑induced myocarditis and CVB3

  1. Joint Degradation in a Monkey Model of Collagen-Induced Arthritis: Role of Cathepsin K Based on Biochemical Markers and Histological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Makoto; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Satoshi; Mori, Hiroshi; Ochi, Yasuo; Horai, Naoto; Li, Minqi; Amizuka, Norio

    2016-01-01

    The role of cathepsin K in joint degradation in a model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in cynomolgus monkey was examined using biochemical markers and histology. Joint swelling, urinary C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), and N- and C-telopeptides of type I collagen (NTX and CTX-I, resp.) were analyzed. Immunohistochemistry of type II collagen, cathepsin K, and CTX-II were performed using joints. Joint swelling reached peak on day 42 and continued at this level. The CTX-II level peaked on day 28 and declined thereafter, while CTX-I, NTX, and DPD reached plateau on day 43. Joint swelling was positively correlated with CTX-II increases on days 20 and 42/43, with increases in CTX-I and NTX/Cr on days 42/43 and 84, and with DPD increases throughout the study period. Intense cathepsin K staining was observed in osteoclasts and in articular cartilage and synovial tissue in arthritic joints. CTX-II was present in the superficial layer of articular cartilage in CIA monkeys. Evidence from biochemical markers suggests that matrix degradation in the CIA model starts with degradation of cartilage, rather than bone resorption. Cathepsin K expressed in osteoclasts, articular cartilage, and synovial tissue may contribute to degradation of cartilage. PMID:26949397

  2. Adamts1 is highly induced in rachitic bones of FGF23 transgenic mice and participates in degradation of non-mineralized bone matrix collagen.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lijuan; Andersson, Göran; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Melhus, Håkan; Lind, Thomas

    2013-01-18

    Transgenic mice overexpressing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) in osteoblasts have a rachitic bone phenotype. These mice display hypomineralized bones, increased expression of osteoblast markers, but osteoclast numbers are unaltered or slightly reduced. Paradoxically, they show increased serum levels of the bone resorption marker CTX, a type I collagen degradation fragment. Here we analyzed a matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) like secreted protease, Adamts1, that has previously been associated with osteoblastic type I collagen breakdown in vitro. Bones from FGF23 transgenic (tg) mice displayed increased Adamts1 protein upon both immunohistological staining and Western blotting. We further found Adamts1 protein together with excessively degraded type I collagen in the non-mineralized bone fraction of FGF23 tg mice. A similar degradation pattern of type I collagen was noticed upon forced expression of Adamts1 in osteoblastic cells in vitro. Importantly, these Adamts1-expressing osteoblastic cells exhibited increased release of CTX fragments when cultured on demineralized bone discs. Together, these results demonstrate for the first time that Adamts1 can be highly induced in bone tissue and that this MMP-like protease can increase osteoblastic release of CTX fragments from non-mineralized bone. Thus, Adamts1 potentially contributes to the increased serum levels of CTX in rickets/osteomalacia. PMID:23261447

  3. Protective effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide on bone destruction in the collagen-induced arthritis model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Juarranz, Yasmina; Abad, Catalina; Martinez, Carmen; Arranz, Alicia; Gutierrez-Cañas, Irene; Rosignoli, Florencia; Gomariz, Rosa P; Leceta, Javier

    2005-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology, characterized by the presence of inflammatory synovitis accompanied by destruction of joint cartilage and bone. Treatment with vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) prevents experimental arthritis in animal models by downregulation of both autoimmune and inflammatory components of the disease. The aim of this study was to characterize the protective effect of VIP on bone erosion in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. We have studied the expression of different mediators implicated in bone homeostasis, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (RANK), receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-11 and IL-17. Circulating cytokine levels were assessed by ELISA and the local expression of mediators were determined by RT-PCR in mRNA extracts from joints. VIP treatment resulted in decreased levels of circulating IL-6, IL-1beta and TNFalpha, and increased levels of IL-4 and IL-10. CIA-mice treated with VIP presented a decrease in mRNA expression of IL-17, IL-11 in the joints. The ratio of RANKL to OPG decreased drastically in the joint after VIP treatment, which correlated with an increase in levels of circulating OPG in CIA mice treated with VIP. In addition, VIP treatment decreased the expression of mRNA for RANK, iNOS and COX-2. To investigate the molecular mechanisms involved, we tested the activity of NFkappaB and AP-1, two transcriptional factors closely related to joint erosion, by EMSA in synovial cells from CIA mice. VIP treatment in vivo was able to affect the transcriptional activity of both factors. Our data indicate that VIP is a viable candidate for the development of treatments for RA. PMID:16207319

  4. Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Zika & Pregnancy Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery KidsHealth > For Parents > Middle Ear Infections and Ear ... medio y colocación de tubos de ventilación Why Surgery? Many kids get middle ear infections (known as ...

  5. Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression Alteration in Human Middle Ear Epithelial Cells Induced by Asian Sand Dust

    PubMed Central

    Go, Yoon Young; Park, Moo Kyun; Kwon, Jee Young; Seo, Young Rok; Chae, Sung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the gene expression profile of Asian sand dust (ASD)-treated human middle ear epithelial cell (HMEEC) using microarray analysis. Methods The HMEEC was treated with ASD (400 µg/mL) and total RNA was extracted for microarray analysis. Molecular pathways among differentially expressed genes were further analyzed. For selected genes, the changes in gene expression were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results A total of 1,274 genes were differentially expressed by ASD. Among them, 1,138 genes were 2 folds up-regulated, whereas 136 genes were 2 folds down-regulated. Up-regulated genes were mainly involved in cellular processes, including apoptosis, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Down-regulated genes affected cellular processes, including apoptosis, cell cycle, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. The 10 genes including ADM, CCL5, EDN1, EGR1, FOS, GHRL, JUN, SOCS3, TNF, and TNFSF10 were identified as main modulators in up-regulated genes. A total of 11 genes including CSF3, DKK1, FOSL1, FST, TERT, MMP13, PTHLH, SPRY2, TGFBR2, THBS1, and TIMP1 acted as main components of pathway associated with 2-fold down regulated genes. Conclusion We identified the differentially expressed genes in ASD-treated HMEEC. Our work indicates that air pollutant like ASD, may play an important role in the pathogenesis of otitis media. PMID:26622952

  6. Heat-induced changes in the mechanics of a collagenous tissue: isothermal, isotonic shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Chen, S S; Wright, N T; Humphrey, J D

    1998-06-01

    We present data from isothermal, isotonic-shrinkage tests wherein bovine chordae tendineae were subjected to well-defined constant temperatures (from 65 to 90 degrees C), durations of heating (from 180 to 3600 s), and isotonic uniaxial stresses during heating (from 100 to 650 kPa). Tissue response during heating and "recovery" at 37 degrees C following heating was evaluated in terms of the axial shrinkage, a gross indicator of underlying heat-induced denaturation. There were three key findings. First, scaling the heating time via temperature and load-dependent characteristic times for the denaturation process collapsed all shrinkage data to a single curve, and thereby revealed a time-temperature-load equivalency. Second, the characteristic times exhibited an Arrhenius-type behavior with temperature wherein the slopes were nearly independent of applied load--this suggested that applied loads during heating affect the activation entropy, not energy. Third, all specimens exhibited a time-dependent, partial recovery when returned to 37 degrees C following heating, but the degree of recovery decreased with increases in the load imposed during heating. These new findings on heat-induced changes in tissue behavior will aid in the design of improved clinical heating protocols and provide guidance for the requisite constitutive formulations. PMID:10412406

  7. Inhibitory Effects of 4'-Demethylnobiletin, a Metabolite of Nobiletin, on 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-Induced Inflammation in Mouse Ears.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xian; Song, Mingyue; Rakariyatham, Kanyasiri; Zheng, Jinkai; Wang, Minqi; Xu, Fei; Gao, Zili; Xiao, Hang

    2015-12-30

    Nobiletin (NOB) is major citrus flavonoid with many health-promoting benefits. We reported previously that 4'-demethylnobiletin (4DN), a major metabolite of NOB, significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In this study, we further studied the anti-inflammatory effects of 4DN in TPA-induced skin inflammation in mice. We demonstrated that topical application of 4DN decreased TPA-induced ear edema by >88 ± 4.77% in mice. This inhibitory effect was associated with inhibition on TPA-induced up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. Immunoblotting results showed that 4DN resulted in profound effects on multiple proteins related with inflammation and carcinogenesis. 4DN significantly decreased the expression levels of iNOS, COX-2, and MMP-9, suppressed phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt and ERK, and increased the levels of HO-1 and NQO1 in TPA-treated mice. Overall, the results demonstrated that 4DN had strong anti-inflammatory effects in vivo, which provided a scientific basis for using NOB to inhibit inflammation-driven diseases. PMID:26651527

  8. The role of collagen in extralobar pulmonary artery stiffening in response to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chen Yen; Wang, Zhijie; Tabima, Diana M; Eickhoff, Jens C; Chesler, Naomi C

    2010-12-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) causes extralobar pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening, which potentially impairs right ventricular systolic function. Changes in the extracellular matrix proteins collagen and elastin have been suggested to contribute to this arterial stiffening. We hypothesized that vascular collagen accumulation is a major cause of extralobar PA stiffening in HPH and tested our hypothesis with transgenic mice that synthesize collagen type I resistant to collagenase degradation (Col1a1(R/R)). These mice and littermate controls that have normal collagen degradation (Col1a1(+/+)) were exposed to hypoxia for 10 days; some were allowed to recover for 32 days. In vivo PA pressure and isolated PA mechanical properties and collagen and elastin content were measured for all groups. Vasoactive studies were also performed with U-46619, Y-27632, or calcium- and magnesium-free medium. Pulmonary hypertension occurred in both mouse strains due to chronic hypoxia and resolved with recovery. HPH caused significant PA mechanical changes in both mouse strains: circumferential stretch decreased, and mid-to-high-strain circumferential elastic modulus increased (P < 0.05 for both). Impaired collagen type I degradation prevented a return to baseline mechanical properties with recovery and, in fact, led to an increase in the low and mid-to-high-strain moduli compared with hypoxia (P < 0.05 for both). Significant changes in collagen content were found, which tended to follow changes in mid-to-high-strain elastic modulus. No significant changes in elastin content or vasoactivity were observed. Our results demonstrate that collagen content is important to extralobar PA stiffening caused by chronic hypoxia. PMID:20852040

  9. Pathology of the Ear

    PubMed Central

    Orengo, Ida; Robbins, Kerri; Marsch, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    The external ear is exposed to weathering and trauma; it also has sparse vascularity, making it prone to infection and disease. The external location of the cutaneous ear makes it easily visible for diagnosis and accessible for treatment. In this article, the authors focus on diseases of the ear that are most commonly encountered and may be subject to surgical and medical evaluation and/or treatment. Epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical course, and treatment for each disease entity are discussed. PMID:23115534

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects of anthocyanins-rich extract from bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) on croton oil-induced ear edema and Propionibacterium acnes plus LPS-induced liver damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hui; Lv, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Guo-En; Li, Yi-Fang; Kurihara, Hiroshi; He, Rong-Rong

    2014-08-01

    Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) has been known to play a protective role in human health due to its high anthocyanin content. This study investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of bilberry extract (BE, containing 42.04% anthocyanin) on Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced liver injury and croton oil-induced ear edema in mice. Results showed that BE could effectively inhibit croton oil-induced ear edema and liver inflammation provoked by P. acnes plus LPS, as reflected by the reduced plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. These findings were confirmed by hepatic pathological examination. Moreover, BE administration markedly suppressed the increase of liver mRNA levels of iNOS, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and the protein levels of iNOS, TNF-α and NF-κB. In addition, liver malondialdehyde and NO contents were significantly reduced by BE treatment. These results indicated that BE has potent protective effects on acute and immunological inflammation, which might contribute to the study of the anti-inflammatory effects of natural products and healthy food. PMID:24548119

  11. S100a8/NF-κB signal pathway is involved in the 800-nm diode laser-induced skin collagen remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaolin; Ge, Minggai; Qin, Xiaofeng; Xu, Peng; Zhu, Pingya; Dang, Yongyan; Gu, Jun; Ye, Xiyun

    2016-05-01

    The 800-nm diode laser is widely used for hair removal and also promotes collagen synthesis, but the molecular mechanism by which dermis responses to the thermal damage induced by the 800-nm diode laser is still unclear. Ten 2-month-old mice were irradiated with the 800-nm diode laser at 20, 40, and 60 J/cm(2), respectively. Skin samples were taken for PCR, Western blot analysis, and histological study at day 3 or 30 after laser irradiation. The expression of S100a8 and its two receptors (advanced glycosylation end product-specific receptor, RAGE and toll-like receptor 4, TRL4) was upregulated at day 3 after laser treatments. P-p65 levels were also elevated, causing the increase of cytokine (tumor necrosis factor, TNF-α and interleukin 6, IL-6) and MMPs (MMP1a, MMP9). At day 30, PCR and Western blot analysis showed significant increase of type I and III procollagen in the dermis treated with laser. Importantly, skin structure was markedly improved in the laser-irradiated skin compared with the control. Thus, it seemed that S100a8 upregulation triggered NF-κB signal pathway through RAGE and TLR4, responding to laser-induced dermis wound healing. The involvement of the NF-κB pathway in MMP gene transcription promoted the turnover of collagen in the skin, accelerating new collagen synthesis. PMID:26914682

  12. Zinc l-pyrrolidone carboxylate inhibits the UVA-induced production of matrix metalloproteinase-1 by in vitro cultured skin fibroblasts, whereas it enhances their collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takino, Y; Okura, F; Kitazawa, M; Iwasaki, K; Tagami, H

    2012-02-01

    Reduced collagen matrix in the dermis constitutes one of the characteristic features of chronologically aged skin, which is further enhanced on the sun-exposed portions of the body by chronic ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, inducing the unique changes associated with skin photoageing. The zinc salt of l-pyrrolidone carboxylate (Zinc PCA) has long been used as a cosmetic ingredient, because of its astringent and anti-microbial properties. In the present study, by employing cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts, we found that Zinc PCA suppressed UVA-induced activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and reduced matrix metalloproteinase-1 production in these cells, which is thought to be involved in collagen degradation in photoaged skin. Moreover, Zinc PCA treatment of the cells increased the expression of an ascorbic acid transporter mRNA, SVCT2, but not SVCT1, resulting in the enhanced production of type I collagen. Based on these in vitro findings, we consider Zinc PCA to be a promising candidate for an anti-skin ageing agent. PMID:21834944

  13. Effect of advanced glycation end products, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer and matrix metalloproteinases on type-I collagen metabolism

    PubMed Central

    LI, WANG; LING, WANG; TENG, XIAOMEI; QUAN, CUIXIA; CAI, SHENGNAN; HU, SHUQUN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association among advanced glycation end products (AGEs), extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), and investigate whether AGEs affect type I collagen (COL-I) through EMMPRIN or MMPs. A co-culture system with the osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3E1) and mouse RAW264.7 cells was employed to examine the effects of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) (50 mg/l), EMMPRIN antibody (5 mg/l) and AGE-BSA+EMMPRIN antibody separately on COL-I expression for 24 h. Culture media were analyzed for the content of COL-I by ELISA. The effect of different concentrations of AGE-BSA (0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/l) for 24 h was assessed on COL-I levels. Finally, semiquantitative RT-PCR was used to detect the osteoblast COL-I mRNA expression and MMP-2 and MMP-9's PMAO were also measured in the culture medium. COL-I content in the culture medium decreased significantly following treatment with AGE-BSA (P<0.05). EMMPRIN antibody increased COL-I content (P<0.05). EMMPRIN antibody+AGE-BSA increased COL-I significantly (P<0.05). Different concentrations of AGE-BSA increased COL-I mRNA expression significantly compared with the control group (P<0.05), and were enhanced with increasing AGE-BSA concentration (P<0.05). Also MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion increased significantly (P<0.05), with the increasing AGE-BSA concentration. In conclusion, an increase in AGE levels in vitro stimulates the secretion of EMMPRIN/MMPs, promotes the degradation of COL-I and reduces bone strength. PMID:27284408

  14. β1,4-galactosyltransferase-I in synovial tissue of collagen-induced rat model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hairong; Xu, Dawei; Tao, Ran; Ni, Xiaohui; Shen, Aiguo; Wang, Youhua

    2011-09-01

    β1,4-galactosyltransferase-I (β1,4-GalT-I), which is one of the best-studied glycosyltransferases, plays a key role in the synthesis of selectin ligands such as sialyl Lewis (sLe(x)) and sulfated sLe(x). Previous studies showed that inflammatory responses of β1,4-GalT-I-deficient mice were impaired because of the defect in selectin-ligand biosynthesis. However, the expression of β1,4-GalT-I and its biological function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain to be elucidated. The mRNA and protein expression of β1,4-GalT-I increased in synovial tissue of the RA group compared with the Normal group at 10d and 15d after collagen-induced. Double staining indicated β1,4-GalT-I overlapped with macrophage-like synoviocytes (MLSs), fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs), neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Moreover, β1,4-GalT-I mRNA in FLSs in vitro was affected in a dose- and time-dependent manner in response to TNF-α stimulation. ELISA revealed that expression of TNF-α was attenuated in FLSs in vitro treated with β1,4-GalT-I-Ab. We therefore suggest that β1,4-GalT-I may play an important role in the inflammation process of RA synovial tissue, which would provide the foundation for further researching into the concrete mechanism of β1,4-GalT-I in RA. PMID:21161318

  15. Myeloid deletion of SIRT1 suppresses collagen-induced arthritis in mice by modulating dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seong Ji; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Lim, Hye Song; Hah, Young-Sool; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Kim, Hyun-Ok; Cheon, Yun-Hong; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Jang, Kyu Yun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Park, Byung-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Il

    2016-01-01

    The type III histone deacetylase silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) is an enzyme that is critical for the modulation of immune and inflammatory responses. However, the data on its role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are limited and controversial. To better understand how SIRT1 regulates adaptive immune responses in RA, we evaluated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in myeloid cell-specific SIRT1 knockout (mSIRT1 KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Arthritis severity was gauged on the basis of clinical, radiographic and pathologic scores. Compared with their WT counterparts, the mSIRT1 KO mice exhibited less severe arthritis, which was less destructive to the joints. The expression levels of inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases and ROR-γT were also reduced in the mSIRT1 KO mice compared with the WT mice and were paralleled by reductions in the numbers of Th1 and Th17 cells and CD80- or CD86-positive dendritic cells (DCs). In addition, impaired DC maturation and decreases in the Th1/Th17 immune response were observed in the mSIRT1 KO mice. T-cell proliferation was also investigated in co-cultures with antigen-pulsed DCs. In the co-cultures, the DCs from the mSIRT1 KO mice showed decreases in T-cell proliferation and the Th1/Th17 immune response. In this study, myeloid cell-specific deletion of SIRT1 appeared to suppress CIA by modulating DC maturation. Thus, a careful investigation of DC-specific SIRT1 downregulation is needed to gauge the therapeutic utility of agents targeting SIRT1 in RA. PMID:26987484

  16. Mineral dusts cause elastin and collagen breakdown in the rat lung: a potential mechanism of dust-induced emphysema.

    PubMed

    Li, K; Keeling, B; Churg, A

    1996-02-01

    It is now accepted that workers with exposure to mineral dusts can develop airflow obstruction. The basis of this process is uncertain, but carefully performed morphologic studies suggest that coal, silica, and perhaps other dusts may produce emphysema in humans. To investigate the mechanisms involved in this process, we administered crystalline silica (quartz) or titanium dioxide (rutile) to rats in a single intratracheal instillation. At varying times after instillation, the animals' lungs were lavaged, the lavageate from one lung was dried and hydrolyzed, and the amounts of desmosine (DES),as a measure of elastin breakdown, and hydroxyproline (HP), as a measure of collagen breakdown, were determined. The lavageate from the other lung was counted for inflammatory cells. Both silica and titanium dioxide caused a dose-dependent increase in DES and HP 24 h after instillation. When an equivalent dose (30 mg) of silica or rutile was administered and animals were sacrificed at various times up to 21 d, a sustained increase in lavage DES and HP was seen in the silica-treated animals, and this was accompanied by a sustained increase in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN); in contrast, both lavage PMN and lavage DES/HP rapidly peaked and then declined in the titanium dioxide-treated animals. Numbers of macrophages remained elevated over the 21-d period of sacrifice with both types of treatment. These data show for the first time that mineral dusts can cause connective-tissue breakdown in the lung, with the release of matrix components into the alveolar spaces. The amount of connective-tissue breakdown appears to parallel the number of PMN but not the number of macrophages in the alveolar spaces, suggesting that PMN-derived proteolytic enzymes are responsible for the breakdown. This process probably plays a role in dust-induced emphysema. PMID:8564112

  17. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Son, Youngsook

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • SP can increase IL-10 levels and reduce TNF-α and IL-17 levels in RA. • SP causes the increase in T{sub reg}, M2 macrophage, and MSCs in RA. • SP-induced immune suppression leads to the blockade of RA progression. • SP can be used as the therapeutics for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. - Abstract: Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T{sub reg} and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases.

  18. The suppressive effect of gelatin-conjugated superoxide dismutase on disease development and severity of collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kakimoto, K; Kojima, Y; Ishii, K; Onoue, K; Maeda, H

    1993-01-01

    We studied the effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) on murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Among SOD derivatives studied, only gelatin-SOD conjugate which has prolonged half life in vivo was effective to suppress the development of CIA, while native SOD or gelatin carrier alone was ineffective. Interestingly, pyran polymer-conjugated SOD which also has a long half life showed no suppressive effect on the disease. No significant effect on immune response against type II collagen (CII) was found in any of the experimental groups. In addition, induction of suppressor cells was not detected in spleen or lymph node cells of the gelatin-SOD-treated group. Therefore, these results suggest that oxygen radicals may have an important role in the effector phase of the immune response to manifest this chronic autoimmune polyarthritis. Thus, the use of appropriate antioxidants for the treatment of human RA may be rationalized. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8222313

  19. MiR-182-5p protects inner ear hair cells from cisplatin-induced apoptosis by inhibiting FOXO3a.

    PubMed

    Li, Yimeng; Li, Ao; Wu, Jingfang; He, Yingzi; Yu, Huiqian; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of a variety of malignancies. However, the clinical application of cisplatin is hampered by the resultant irreversible hearing loss due to hair cell apoptosis. To date, no practical regimen to resolve this has been developed. Meanwhile, the role of microRNA in protecting hair cells from cisplatin-induced apoptosis in the inner ear has not been extensively investigated. In this study, we monitored miR-183, -96, and -182 turnover in the cochlea during cisplatin treatment in vitro. We found that overexpression of miR-182, but not miR-183 and -96, improved hair cell survival after 3 μM cisplatin treatment in vitro. We demonstrated that overexpression of miR-182 repressed the intrinsic apoptotic pathway by inhibiting the translation of FOXO3a. Our study offers a new therapeutic target for alleviating cisplatin-induced hair cell apoptosis in a rapid and tissue-specific manner. PMID:27607577

  20. Mechanism of IFN-γ in regulating OPN/Th17 pathway during vascular collagen remodeling of hypertension induced by ANG II

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lei; He, Pengcheng; Liu, Yong; Chen, Jiyan; Wei, Xuebiao; Tan, Ning

    2015-01-01

    More and more researches show that hypertensive vascular remodeling is closely related to the imbalance of immune system in recent years. IFN-γ is natural protein with the function of immune regulation and has resistance effect on vascular remodeling. However, the mechanism of IFN-γ is to be defined. This paper is to explore the mechanism of IFN-γ in regulating OPN/Th17 pathway. In this research, animal models of vascular collagen remodeling were established by inducing hypertensive mice with ANG II. There was no statistical significance when the systolic blood pressures and the percentages of wall thickness/lumen diameter in both groups of WT + AngII + IFN-γ and WT + PBS were compared (P=0.219>0.05, P=0.118>0.05). The concentration of serum precollagen-type I and III and their ratio in WT + AngII + IFN-γ group were decreased after the IFN-γ being given (P<0.01). Expression of OPN within tissue in WT + Ang II group was relatively high, but lowered after treated by IFN-γ. Th17 cell ratio was decreased in WT + AngII + IFN-γ group (P<0.01). Expressions of RORα and RORγt mRNA within Th17 cell were decreased (P<0.01). The content of IL-23 in WT + AngII + IFN-γ group was increased, while IL-10 and TGF-β decreased. It has proved that IFN-γ can regulate the hypertensive vascular collagen remodeling induced by ANG II, lower the systolic pressure and reduce the pathological damage of vascular collagen remodeling and the collagen synthesis. The mechanism may that the differentiation of Th17 is inhibited by suppressing the OPN expression and regulating the secretion of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26823760

  1. White button and shiitake mushrooms reduce the incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis in dilute brown non-agouti mice.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Lawrance; Alexander, Heather; Traoré, Djibril; Lucas, Edralin A; Clarke, Stephen L; Smith, Brenda J; Lightfoot, Stanley A; Kuvibidila, Solo

    2011-01-01

    Exotic mushrooms have been used in ancient Chinese medicine due to their immunomodulatory properties for the treatment and/or prevention of chronic diseases. However, only limited data exist on the health benefits of white button mushrooms (WBM), the most common in the American diet. In the current study, we investigated the effects of WBM and shiitake mushrooms (SM) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using a 2 x 3 factorial design in 8-wk-old female dilute brown non-agouti mice that were fed a control diet (n = 37) or the same diet supplemented with 5% lyophilized WBM or SM (n = 27) for 6 wk. CIA was induced by immunizing mice with 100 µg bovine collagen followed by 50 µg LPS on d 20 post-collagen injection. CIA was assessed by mononuclear cell infiltration, bone erosion, plasma IL-6, TNFα, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) concentrations. Compared with the control diet, WBM and SM tended to reduce the CIA index from 5.11 ± 0.82 to 3.15 ± 0.95 (P = 0.06) (median, 6-9 to 1-2) 31 d post-collagen injection. Whereas 58% of control mice had a CIA index ≥ 7, only 23% of WBM and 29% of SM mice did (P = 0.1). Although both types of mushrooms reduced plasma TNFα (34%, WBM; 64%, SM), only SM increased plasma IL-6 by 1.3-fold (P < 0.05). The CIA index was positively correlated with sICAM1 (r = 0.55; P < 0.05) but negatively correlated with TNFα (r = 0.34; P < 0.05). Whether mushrooms are beneficial for arthritis management remains to be investigated. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating a possible health benefit of WBM in arthritis treatment. PMID:21106932

  2. Asiatic Acid Isolated From Centella Asiatica Inhibits TGF-β1-induced Collagen Expression in Human Keloid Fibroblasts via PPAR-γ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Difei; Zhang, Jizhou; Wu, Xin; Dou, Yannong; Yang, Yan; Tan, Qian; Xia, Yufeng; Gong, Zhunan; Dai, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Keloids are fibroproliferative disorders characterized by exuberant extracellular matrix deposition and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/Smad pathway plays a pivotal role in keloid pathogenesis. Centella asiatica extract has been applied in scar management for ages. As one of its major components, asiatic acid (AA) has been recently reported to inhibit liver fibrosis by blocking TGF-β/Smad pathway. However, its effect on keloid remains unknown. In order to investigate the effects of AA on cell proliferation, invasion and collagen synthesis, normal and keloid fibroblasts were exposed to TGF-β1 with or without AA. Relevant experiments including 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assay, Transwell invasion assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and RNA interference assay were conducted. As a result, keloid fibroblasts showed higher responsiveness to TGF-β1 stimulation than normal fibroblasts in terms of invasion and collagen synthesis. AA could suppress TGF-β1-induced expression of collagen type I, inhibit Smad 2/3 phosphorylation and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression, while elevate Smad 7 protein level. Noteworthy, the effects of AA on keloid fibroblasts could be abrogated by PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 and by silencing of PPAR-γ. The present study demonstrated that AA inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen and PAI-1 expression in keloid fibroblasts through PPAR-γ activation, which suggested that AA was one of the active constituents of C. asiatica responsible for keloid management, and could be included in the arsenal for combating against keloid. PMID:24250248

  3. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... the middle ear and the back of the nose and upper throat. ... down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are ...

  4. Ear canal cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Holt, J J

    1992-06-01

    Although cholesteatomas are more commonly found in the middle ear and the mastoid, the disease can occur in the external ear canal. All cases of ear canal cholesteatoma treated by the author were reviewed. There were nine ears in seven patients, who had an average age of 62 years. The lesions ranged in size from a few millimeters to extensive mastoid destruction. Smaller lesions can be managed by frequent cleaning as an office procedure. Larger lesions require surgery, either canaloplasty or mastoidectomy. The otolaryngologist should suspect this disease in the elderly. Microscopic examination of the ear with meticulous cleaning of all wax, especially in elderly patients, is most useful in detecting early disease. Frequent applications of mineral oil to the canal should be used in the management of the disease and to prevent recurrence. PMID:1376388

  5. Pathogenesis of Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto-Fukuda, Tomomi; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka; Shibata, Yasuaki; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Takahashi, Haruo; Koji, Takehiko

    2010-01-01

    Middle ear cholesteatoma is characterized by enhanced proliferation of epithelial cells with aberrant morphological characteristics. To investigate the origin of the cholesteatoma cells, we analyzed spontaneously occurring cholesteatomas associated with a new transplantation model in Mongolian gerbils (gerbils). Cholesteatomas were induced in gerbils with a transplanted tympanic membrane by using the external auditory canal (EAC) ligation method. After the pars flaccida of the tympanic membranes were completely removed from male gerbils, corresponding portions of tympanic membranes of female gerbils were transplanted to the area of defect, and then we ligated the EAC (hybrid-model group). As a control group, the EAC of normal male and female gerbils was ligated without myringoplasty. In all ears of each group, the induced cholesteatomas were seen. In situ PCR was then performed to detect the mouse X chromosome-linked phosphoglycerate kinase-1 (pgk-1) gene on the paraffin sections. One pgk-1 spot in the epithelial nuclei was detected in male cholesteatoma, and two pgk-1 spots were detected in female cholesteatoma, respectively. On the other hand, in the hybrid-model group, we detected not only one but also two pgk-1 spots in the epithelial nuclei of cholesteatoma. These results strengthened the evidence that the origin of epithelial cells in cholesteatoma is the tympanic membrane in this model, but not the residential middle ear epithelial cells or the skin of the EAC. PMID:20413684

  6. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA). Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. Methods To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII) to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. Results A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9), insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors facilitating tumor

  7. Exposure to Mimivirus Collagen Promotes Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Hülsmeier, Andreas J.; Hochhold, Nina; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in animals, also occur in some recently described nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses such as Mimiviridae, which replicate in amoebae. To clarify the impact of viral collagens on the immune response of animals exposed to Mimiviridae, we have investigated the localization of collagens in Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus particles and the response of mice to immunization with mimivirus particles. Using protein biotinylation, we have first shown that viral collagen encoded by open reading frame L71 is present at the surface of mimivirus particles. Exposure to mimivirus collagens elicited the production of anti-collagen antibodies in DBA/1 mice immunized intradermally with mimivirus protein extracts. This antibody response also targeted mouse collagen type II and was accompanied by T-cell reactivity to collagen and joint inflammation, as observed in collagen-induced arthritis following immunization of mice with bovine collagen type II. The broad distribution of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses in the environment suggests that humans are constantly exposed to such large virus particles. A survey of blood sera from healthy human subjects and from rheumatoid arthritis patients indeed demonstrated that 30% of healthy-subject and 36% of rheumatoid arthritis sera recognized the major mimivirus capsid protein L425. Moreover, whereas 6% of healthy-subject sera recognized the mimivirus collagen protein L71, 22% of rheumatoid arthritis sera were positive for mimivirus L71. Accordingly, our study shows that environmental exposure to mimivirus represents a risk factor in triggering autoimmunity to collagens. PMID:24173233

  8. Cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) as a new chiral triacid scaffold capable of inducing triple helix formation of collagen peptides containing either a native sequence or Pro-Hyp-Gly repeats.

    PubMed

    Rump, Erik T; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Hilbers, Hans W; de Groot, Philip G; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2002-10-18

    A new triacid scaffold is described based on the cone-shaped cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) molecule that facilitates the triple helical folding of peptides containing either a unique blood platelet binding collagen sequence or collagen peptides composed of Pro-Hyp-Gly repeats. The latter were synthesized by segment condensation using Fmoc-Pro-Hyp-Gly-OH. Peptides were coupled to this CTV scaffold and also coupled to the Kemp's triacid (KTA) scaffold. After assembly of peptide H-Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Glu(OAll)-Arg-Gly-Val-Glu (OAll)-Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-NH2 (13) by an orthogonal synthesis strategy to both triacid scaffolds, followed by deprotection of the allyl groups, the molecular constructs spontaneously folded into a triple helical structure. In contrast, the non-assembled peptides did not. The melting temperature (Tm) of (+/-) CTV[CH2C(O)N(H)Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Glu-Arg-Gly-Val-Glu-Gly- [Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-NH2]3 (14) is 19 degrees C, whereas KTA[Gly-Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Glu-Arg-Gly-Val-Glu-Gly- [Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-NH2]3 (15) has a Tm of 20 degrees C. Thus, it was shown for the first time that scaffolds were also effective in stabilizing the triple helix of native collagen sequences. The different stabilizing properties of the two CTV enantiomers could be measured after coupling of racemic CTV triacid to the collagen peptide, and subsequent chromatographic separation of the diastereomers. After assembly of the two chiral CTV scaffolds to the model peptide H-Gly-Gly-(Pro-Hyp-Gly)5-NH2 (24), the (+)-enantiomer of CTV 28b was found to serve as a better triple helix-inducing scaffold than the (-)-enantiomer 28a. In addition to an effect of the chirality of the CTV scaffold, a certain degree of flexibility between the CTV cone and the folded peptide was also shown to be of importance. Restricting the flexibility from two to one glycine residues resulted in a significant difference between the two collagen mimics 20a and 20b, whereas the difference was

  9. Preeclampsia serum-induced collagen I expression and intracellular calcium levels in arterial smooth muscle cells are mediated by the PLC-γ1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rongzhen; Teng, Yincheng; Huang, Yajuan; Gu, Jinghong; Ma, Li; Li, Ming; Zhou, Yuedi

    2014-01-01

    In women with preeclampsia (PE), endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction can lead to altered secretion of paracrine factors that induce peripheral vasoconstriction and proteinuria. This study examined the hypothesis that PE sera may directly or indirectly, through human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs), stimulate phospholipase C-γ1-1,4,5-trisphosphate (PLC-γ1-IP3) signaling, thereby increasing protein kinase C-α (PKC-α) activity, collagen I expression and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). HUASMCs and HUVECs were cocultured with normal or PE sera before PLC-γ1 silencing. Increased PLC-γ1 and IP3 receptor (IP3R) phosphorylation was observed in cocultured HUASMCs stimulated with PE sera (P<0.05). In addition, PE serum significantly increased HUASMC viability and reduced their apoptosis (P<0.05); these effects were abrogated with PLC-γ1 silencing. Compared with normal sera, PE sera increased [Ca2+]i in cocultured HUASMCs (P<0.05), which was inhibited by PLC-γ1 and IP3R silencing. Finally, PE sera-induced PKC-α activity and collagen I expression was inhibited by PLC-γ1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) (P<0.05). These results suggest that vasoactive substances in the PE serum may induce deposition in the extracellular matrix through the activation of PLC-γ1, which may in turn result in thickening and hardening of the placental vascular wall, placental blood supply shortage, fetal hypoxia–ischemia and intrauterine growth retardation or intrauterine fetal death. PE sera increased [Ca2+]i and induced PKC-α activation and collagen I expression in cocultured HUASMCs via the PLC-γ1 pathway. PMID:25257609

  10. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3(+) (LAG3(+)) forkhead box protein 3(-) (FOXP3(-)) regulatory T cells induced by B cells alleviates joint inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Ying; Hsu, Wan-Tseng; Chen, Yi-Lien; Chien, Chien-Hui; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which dysregulated immune cells primarily target synovial joints. Despite recent advances in the treatment of RA, including the introduction of biologic therapies and employment of combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drug strategies, remission rates remain suboptimal. Previous studies have demonstrated that the adoptive transfer of induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) was effective in treating a murine model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The objective of this study was to develop optimal potential iTreg-based therapy for CIA by adoptively transferring LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells. B-cell-induced Treg-of-B cells expressed LAG3 but not Foxp3 (designated LAG3(+) Treg-of-B), and secreted IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β. Furthermore, LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells suppressed the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) responder T cells through both LAG3 and IL-10 production. In the murine CIA model, adoptive transfer of LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells alleviated the joint severity as well as local and systemic inflammation. Treatment with LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells also promoted IL-10 production in lymphocytes isolated from the spleen and draining lymph nodes. Moreover, mice receiving LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cell treatment showed significantly less pronounced osteolysis in the hind footpads, which correlated with the downregulation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression. In conclusion, we identified a novel subset of Tregs for CIA treatment. This insight may facilitate exploring novel regulatory T-cell-based therapies for human autoimmune diseases. PMID:26908164

  11. Acceleration of onset of collagen-induced arthritis by intra-articular injection of tumour necrosis factor or transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, W O; Fava, R A; Gates, C A; Cremer, M A; Townes, A S

    1992-01-01

    We examined whether tumour necrosis factor (TNF) or transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) could alter the course of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Injection of 100 ng TNF or 500 ng TGF-beta 1 into ankle joints of normal rats induced a very limited inflammatory response, observable only upon histological analysis. However, when injected into ankle joints of rats 9 days after immunization with bovine type II collagen (CII), identical doses of TNF or TGF-beta 1 induced a sustained, clinically obvious inflammation and oedema that began within 8 h on average, as compared to 90 h in CII-immunized control rats given no injections or intra-articular injections of buffer. The incidence of arthritis at 2 weeks post-immunization was 100% for TNF-injected hindpaws, compared with 55% for the control groups, a statistically significant difference. In rats passively immunized with a subarthritic dose of affinity purified antibody to rat-CII, intra-articular injection of 100 ng TNF or 500 ng of TGF-beta 1 also induced intense, though transient arthritis. The rapid proinflammatory effects in CIA described in this study and the synergy demonstrated between anti-CII IgG and either cytokine, suggest that these cytokines can participate locally in the pathogenesis of arthritis. PMID:1638767

  12. Acarbose Decreases the Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk of Diabetic Patients and Attenuates the Incidence and Severity of Collagen-induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Hua; Chen, Der-Yuan; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Ming; Wu, Chao-Liang; Lai, Kuo-Lung; Lin, Ching-Heng; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Acarbose has been found to decrease some inflammatory parameters in diabetic patients. This study aimed to examine the influence of acarbose on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) risk in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and on the incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. In a nationwide, matched case–control study, we identified 723 incident RA cases and selected 7,230 age-, sex- and RA diagnosis date–matched controls from all newly treated DM patients. We found that use of acarbose at > 16,950 mg per year was associated with a lower RA risk (odds ratio 0.60; 95% CI, 0.41–0.89). In the CIA mouse study, acarbose was orally administered from days -7 to 38 relative to type II collagen (CII) immunization. The results revealed that acarbose at the dose of 500 mg/kg/day attenuated the incidence and severity of arthritis and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17 in the paw tissues. Acarbose further decreased the productions of anti-CII-IgG, IL-17 and IFN-γ by collagen-reactive lymph node cells. This work suggests that the use of acarbose decreased RA risk in DM patients and the incidence of CIA in mice. Acarbose also attenuated the severity of CIA via anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. PMID:26678745

  13. CX3CR1 deficient mice have decreased Th17 and antigen-specific humoral responses in the collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, Teresa K.; Liu, Peng; Rampersad, Rishi R.; Esserman, Denise; Rothlein, Lisa R.; Timoshchenko, Roman G; McGinnis, Marcus W.; Fitzhugh, David J; Patel, Dhavalkumar D.; Fong, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective CX3CR1 is a chemokine receptor that uniquely binds to its ligand fractalkine (FKN or CX3CL1) and has been shown to be important in inflammatory arthritis responses largely due to effects on cellular migration. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that genetic deficiency of CX3CR1 would be protective in the chronic inflammatory arthritis model, collagen induced arthritis (CIA). Because CX3CR1 is expressed on T cells and antigen-presenting cells, we additionally examined adaptive immune functions in this model. Methods Autoantibody formation, clinical, histologic, T cell proliferative, and cytokine responses were evaluated in DBA-1J mice deficient in (-/-) or wildtype (+/+) for CX3CR1 after immunization with heterologous type II collagen. Results CX3CR1-/- mice had an approximate 30% reduction in arthritis by two independent measures of paw swelling (p<0.01) and clinical disease score (p<0.0001). Additionally, CX3CR1-/- mice had an approximate 50% decrease in anti-type II collagen autoantibody formation (p<0.05), decreased Th17 intra-articular cytokine expression (IL-17 p<0.01 and IL-23 p<0.001), and decreased total numbers of Th17 cells in inflamed joints (p<0.05). Conclusions Deficiency of CX3CR1 is protective in inflammatory arthritis and may have effects that extend beyond migration that involve adaptive immune responses in autoimmune disease. PMID:22144035

  14. Intrinsic local destabilization of the C-terminus predisposes integrin α1 I domain to a conformational switch induced by collagen binding.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Ana Monica; Zhu, Jie; Jezioro, Jacqueline; Minetti, Conceição A S A; Remeta, David P; Farndale, Richard W; Hamaia, Samir W; Baum, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Integrin-collagen interactions play a critical role in a myriad of cellular functions that include immune response, and cell development and differentiation, yet their mechanism of binding is poorly understood. There is increasing evidence that conformational flexibility assumes a central role in the molecular mechanisms of protein-protein interactions and here we employ NMR hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments to explore the impact of slower timescale dynamic events. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying collagen-induced conformational switches, we have undertaken a comparative study between the wild type integrin α1 I and a gain-of-function E317A mutant. NMR HDX results suggest a relationship between regions exhibiting a reduced local stability in the unbound I domain and those that undergo significant conformational changes upon binding. Specifically, the αC and α7 helices within the C-terminus are at the center of such major perturbations and present reduced local stabilities in the unbound state relative to other structural elements. Complementary isothermal titration calorimetry experiments have been performed to derive complete thermodynamic binding profiles for association of the collagen-like triple-helical peptide with wild type α1 I and E317A mutant. The differential energetics observed for E317A are consistent with the HDX experiments and support a model in which intrinsically destabilized regions predispose conformational rearrangement in the integrin I domain. This study highlights the importance of exploring different timescales to delineate allosteric and binding events. PMID:27342747

  15. Altered expression of small proteoglycans, collagen, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 in developing bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Westergren-Thorsson, G; Hernnäs, J; Särnstrand, B; Oldberg, A; Heinegård, D; Malmström, A

    1993-01-01

    The development of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats was studied over a period of 21 d after an intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. The expression of three small proteoglycans (biglycan, decorin, and fibromodulin), collagen III and TGF-beta 1 was studied by RNA-transfer blot analysis. The proteoglycans were also studied by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blots. TGF-beta 1 mRNA increased threefold already on day 3 and remained elevated until day 10. After the increase of TGF-beta 1 mRNA the messages for biglycan and collagen III steadily increased to reach a maximum 10 d after bleomycin instillation. The mRNA for biglycan increased maximally fourfold and that of collagen III 2.5-fold. Decorin mRNA, in contrast to biglycan decreased and reached 20% of control on day 10. The message for fibromodulin remained constant throughout the study period. The amounts of biglycan and decorin in the tissue changed in accordance with the mRNA levels. The results corroborate and extend previous in vitro studies concerning the effect of TGF-beta 1 on the metabolism of small proteoglycans and show that these macromolecules are regulated differently also in vivo. The marked alterations of biglycan and decorin during the development of fibrosis suggests that these proteoglycans have a regulating role in this process. Images PMID:7688761

  16. Intra-articular nuclear factor-κB blockade ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by eliciting regulatory T cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Min, S-Y; Yan, M; Du, Y; Wu, T; Khobahy, E; Kwon, S-R; Taneja, V; Bashmakov, A; Nukala, S; Ye, Y; Orme, J; Sajitharan, D; Kim, H-Y; Mohan, C

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB is a transcription factor implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we have examined the effect of intra-articular administration of the IKK inhibitor, NEMO-binding domain peptide (NBD), on the severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). NBD peptides were injected intra-articularly into the knee joints of DBA/1J mice after the onset of disease. Collagen-injected mice given a scrambled peptide served as controls. Arthritis severity was determined by visual examination of paws. Intra-articular NBD injection reduced the arthritis score and ameliorated morphological signs of bone destruction compared to the controls. Serum levels of type-II collagen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a antibodies were lower in NBD-treated mice versus the control mice, whereas the levels of type-II collagen-specific IgG1 antibodies were increased by NBD treatment. NBD treatment diminished the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-17 and interferon (IFN)-γ in serum, but increased the regulatory cytokine IL-10. NBD-treated CIA mice exhibited significantly higher percentages and numbers of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+)) CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells than controls. Immunofluorescence analysis of NBD-treated mice revealed that FoxP3 and Ym1, a marker of alternatively activated macrophages, were juxtaposed to each other within draining inguinal lymph nodes. Intra-articular administration of NBD peptide is effective as an experimental therapy in a murine model of RA. Nevertheless, the intra-articular treatment modality is still associated with systemic effects on the immune system. PMID:23574318

  17. Ear problems in swimmers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao-Che; Liu, Chia-Yu; Shiao, An-Suey; Wang, Tyrone

    2005-08-01

    Acute diffuse otitis externa (swimmer's ear), otomycosis, exostoses, traumatic eardrum perforation, middle ear infection, and barotraumas of the inner ear are common problems in swimmers and people engaged in aqua activities. The most common ear problem in swimmers is acute diffuse otitis externa, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most common pathogen. The symptoms are itching, otalgia, otorrhea, and conductive hearing loss. The treatment includes frequent cleansing of the ear canal, pain control, oral or topical medications, acidification of the ear canal, and control of predisposing factors. Swimming in polluted waters and ear-canal cleaning with cotton-tip applicators should be avoided. Exostoses are usually seen in people who swim in cold water and present with symptoms of accumulated debris, otorrhea and conductive hearing loss. The treatment for exostoses is transmeatal surgical removal of the tumors. Traumatic eardrum perforations may occur during water skiing or scuba diving and present with symptoms of hearing loss, otalgia, otorrhea, tinnitus and vertigo. Tympanoplasty might be needed if the perforations do not heal spontaneously. Patients with chronic otitis media with active drainage should avoid swimming, while patients who have undergone mastoidectomy and who have no cavity problems may swim. For children with ventilation tubes, surface swimming is safe in a clean, chlorinated swimming pool. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss and some degree of vertigo may occur after diving because of rupture of the round or oval window membrane. PMID:16138712

  18. Bioassay-guided chemical study of the anti-inflammatory effect of Senna villosa (Miller) H.S. Irwin & Barneby (Leguminosae) in TPA-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Susunaga-Notario, Ana del Carmen; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Almanza-Pérez, Julio Cesar; Gutiérrez-Carrillo, Atilano; Arrieta-Báez, Daniel; López-López, Ana Laura; Román-Ramos, Rubén; Flores-Sáenz, José Luis Eduardo; Alarcón-Aguilar, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Senna villosa (Miller) is a plant that grows in México. In traditional Mexican medicine, it is used topically to treat skin infections, pustules and eruptions and to heal wounds by scar formation. However, studies of its potential anti-inflammatory effects have not been performed. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-inflammatory effect of extracts from the leaves of Senna villosa and to perform a bioassay-guided chemical study of the extract with major activity in a model of ear edema induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). The results reveal that the chloroform extract from Senna villosa leaves has anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties. Nine fractions were obtained from the bioassay-guided chemical study, including a white precipitate from fractions 2 and 3. Although none of the nine fractions presented anti-inflammatory activity, the white precipitate exhibited pharmacological activity. It was chemically characterized using mass spectrometry and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, resulting in a mixture of three aliphatic esters, which were identified as the principal constituents: hexyl tetradecanoate (C20H40O2), heptyl tetradecanoate (C21H42O2) and octyl tetradecanoate (C22H44O2). This research provides, for the first time, evidence of the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties of compounds isolated from Senna villosa. PMID:25029073

  19. Mesothelial Cell Autoantibodies Induce Collagen Deposition in vitro & Using a Case Study to Introduce Undergraduates to Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serve, Kinta M.

    2013-01-01

    Part I. Pleural fibrosis, a non-malignant, asbestos-related respiratory disease characterized by excessive collagen deposition, is progressive, debilitating, and potentially fatal. Disease severity may be influenced by the type of asbestos fiber inhaled, with Libby amphibole (LA) a seemingly more potent mediator of pleural fibrosis than chrysotile…

  20. Photodynamic therapy using talaporfin sodium for synovial membrane from rheumatoid arthritis patients and collagen-induced arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Torikai, Eiji; Kageyama, Yasunori; Kohno, Eiji; Hirano, Toru; Koide, Yukio; Terakawa, Susumu; Nagano, Akira

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using talaporfin sodium as a new method of synovectomy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We first used RA synovial membrane (RASM) for in vitro and in vivo study. The RASM was obtained from patients with RA during total knee replacement. In the in vitro study, RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (RASCs) obtained from the RASM were examined by fluorescent microscopy to measure the intracellular localization of talaporfin sodium. The cells were then subjected to PDT, and their viability was examined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium inner salt assay. In the in vivo assay, RASM was obtained as described above, grafted onto severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice and subjected to PDT. The damaged area of RASM was evaluated histologically at 1 day after PDT. Next, we performed a separate experiment using rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). After intra-articular injection of talaporfin sodium, the concentration of talaporfin sodium accumulated in the CIA synovial membrane (CIASM) was compared with that in cartilage, periarticular muscle, and skin. We then performed PDT with intra-articular injection of talaporfin sodium and intra-articular irradiation. The damaged area of the CIASM was measured at 1 day after the PDT, and the articular histological and radiological changes of the ankle were observed at 56 days after the PDT. In RASM, talaporfin sodium accumulated in lysosomes in vitro, and the phototoxicity to RASCs in vitro and to RASM grafted onto SCID mice in vivo depended on the concentration of talaporfin sodium and the laser energy. In CIA rats, there was a greater accumulation of talaporfin sodium in the CIASM than in normal tissue. The CIASM was selectively damaged at 1 day after the PDT, and the bone and cartilage destruction were ameliorated at 56 days after the PDT. In conclusion, PDT using talaporfin sodium might be a new method for

  1. Diallylsulfide attenuates excessive collagen production and apoptosis in a rat model of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis through the involvement of protease activated receptor-2

    SciTech Connect

    Kalayarasan, Srinivasan Sriram, Narayanan; Soumyakrishnan, Syamala; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) can be a devastating lung disease. It is primarily caused by inflammation leading to severe damage of the alveolar epithelial cells. The pathophysiology of PF is not yet been clearly defined, but studying lung parenchymal injury by involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the activation of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) may provide promising results. PAR-2 is a G-protein coupled receptor is known to play an important role in the development of PF. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory role of diallylsulfide (DAS) against ROS mediated activation of PAR-2 and collagen production accompanied by epithelial cell apoptosis. Bleomycin induced ROS levels may prompt to induce the expression of PAR-2 as well as extracellular matrix proteins (ECM), such as MMP 2 and 9, collagen specific proteins HSP-47, α-SMA, and cytokines IL-6, and IL-8RA. Importantly DAS treatment effectively decreased the expression of all these proteins. The inhibitory effect of DAS on profibrotic molecules is mediated by blocking the ROS level. To identify apoptotic signaling as a mediator of PF induction, we performed apoptotic protein expression, DNA fragmentation analysis and ultrastructural details of the lung tissue were performed. DAS treatment restored all these changes to near normalcy. In conclusion, treatment of PF bearing rats with DAS results in amelioration of the ROS production, PAR-2 activation, ECM production, collagen synthesis and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis during bleomycin induction. We attained the first evidence that treatment of DAS decreases the ROS levels and may provide a potential therapeutic effect attenuating bleomycin induced PF. - Highlights: • DAS inhibits PAR-2 activity; bleomycin stimulates PAR-2 activity. • Increase in PAR-2 activity is correlated with pulmonary fibrosis • DAS reduces pro-inflammatory activity linked to facilitating pulmonary fibrosis. • DAS inhibits apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells.

  2. Diallylsulfide attenuates excessive collagen production and apoptosis in a rat model of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis through the involvement of protease activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Kalayarasan, Srinivasan; Sriram, Narayanan; Soumyakrishnan, Syamala; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) can be a devastating lung disease. It is primarily caused by inflammation leading to severe damage of the alveolar epithelial cells. The pathophysiology of PF is not yet been clearly defined, but studying lung parenchymal injury by involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the activation of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) may provide promising results. PAR-2 is a G-protein coupled receptor is known to play an important role in the development of PF. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory role of diallylsulfide (DAS) against ROS mediated activation of PAR-2 and collagen production accompanied by epithelial cell apoptosis. Bleomycin induced ROS levels may prompt to induce the expression of PAR-2 as well as extracellular matrix proteins (ECM), such as MMP 2 and 9, collagen specific proteins HSP-47, α-SMA, and cytokines IL-6, and IL-8RA. Importantly DAS treatment effectively decreased the expression of all these proteins. The inhibitory effect of DAS on profibrotic molecules is mediated by blocking the ROS level. To identify apoptotic signaling as a mediator of PF induction, we performed apoptotic protein expression, DNA fragmentation analysis and ultrastructural details of the lung tissue were performed. DAS treatment restored all these changes to near normalcy. In conclusion, treatment of PF bearing rats with DAS results in amelioration of the ROS production, PAR-2 activation, ECM production, collagen synthesis and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis during bleomycin induction. We attained the first evidence that treatment of DAS decreases the ROS levels and may provide a potential therapeutic effect attenuating bleomycin induced PF. PMID:23656969

  3. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Pyeongwisan on LPS-Stimulated Murine Macrophages and Mouse Models of Acetic Acid-Induced Writhing Response and Xylene-Induced Ear Edema

    PubMed Central

    Oh, You-Chang; Jeong, Yun Hee; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ha, Jeong-Ho; Gu, Min Jung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Pyeongwisan (PW) is an herbal medication used in traditional East Asian medicine to treat anorexia, abdominal distension, borborygmus and diarrhea caused by gastric catarrh, atony and dilatation. However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of PW on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in macrophages and on local inflammation in vivo. We investigated the biological effects of PW on the production of inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, we evaluated the analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response and the inhibitory activity on xylene-induced ear edema in mice. PW showed anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In addition, PW strongly suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a NO synthesis enzyme, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and inhibited NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Also, PW suppressed TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β cytokine production in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, PW showed an analgesic effect on the writhing response and an inhibitory effect on mice ear edema. We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time. Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance. PMID:25569097

  4. Oxidative stress-dependent activation of collagen synthesis is induced in human pulmonary smooth muscle cells by sera from patients with scleroderma-associated pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a major complication of systemic sclerosis. Although oxidative stress, intima hyperplasia and a progressive vessel occlusion appear to be clearly involved, the fine molecular mechanisms underpinning the onset and progression of systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension remain largely unknown. Here we shows for the first time that an increase of NADPH-derived reactive oxygen species production induced by sera from systemic sclerosis patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension drives collagen type I promoter activity in primary human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, suggesting that antioxidant-based therapies should be considered in the treatment of systemic sclerosis-associated vascular diseases. PMID:25085432

  5. Repression of let-7 by transforming growth factor-β1-induced Lin28 upregulates collagen expression in glomerular mesangial cells under diabetic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Tak; Kato, Mitsuo; Lanting, Linda; Castro, Nancy; Nam, Bo Young; Wang, Mei; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of mesangial extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as collagen type 1-α2 (Col1a2) and collagen type 4-α1 (Col4a1) is a key feature of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 plays important roles in ECM accumulation in DN, and evidence shows a mediatory role for microRNAs. In the present study, we found that microRNA let-7 family members (let-7b/c/d/g/i) were downregulated in TGF-β-treated mouse mesangial cells (MMCs) along with upregulation of Col1a2 and Col4a1. Ectopic expression of let-7b in TGF-β-treated MMCs attenuated Col1a2 and Col4a1 upregulation. Conversely, let-7b inhibitors increased Col1a2 and Col4a1 levels. Cotransfection of MMCs with mouse Col1a2 or Col4a1 3′-untranslated region luciferase constructs and let-7b inhibitors increased luciferase activity. However, constructs with let-7 target site mutations were unresponsive to TGF-β. TGF-β-induced 3′-untranslated region activity was attenuated by let-7b mimics, suggesting that Col1a2 and Col4a1 are direct targets of let-7b. In addition, Lin28b, a negative regulator of let-7 biogenesis, was upregulated in TGF-β-treated MMCs. Luciferase assays showed that the Lin28b promoter containing the Smad-binding element (SBE) responded to TGF-β, which was abolished in constructs without SBE. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed TGF-β-induced enrichment of Smad2/3 at the Lin28b promoter, together suggesting that Lin28b is transcriptionally induced by TGF-β through SBE. Furthermore, let-7b levels were decreased, whereas Lin28b, Col1a2, and Col4a1 levels were increased, in glomeruli of diabetic mice compared with nondiabetic control mice, demonstrating the in vivo relevance of this Lin28/let-7/collagen axis. These results identify Lin28 as a new TGF-β target gene and suggest a novel role for the Lin28/let-7 pathway in controlling TGF-β-induced collagen accumulation in DN. PMID:25354942

  6. Ear Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eardrum, ear canal, ossicles, cochlea, or the vestibular nerve. Here's a look at the most common ... may cause permanent hearing loss or balance problems. Vestibular therapy may help kids with balance problems. And ...

  7. Middle Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  8. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk factors for acute ear infections include: Attending day care (especially centers with more than 6 children) Changes ... hands and toys often. If possible, choose a day care that has 6 or fewer children. This can ...

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Joint Protection in Collagen-Induced Arthritis after Treatment with IQ-1S, a Selective c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Hammaker, Deepa; Kochetkova, Irina; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Lyakhov, Sergey A.; Firestein, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) participate in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including inflammatory diseases. We recently synthesized the sodium salt of IQ-1S (11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one oxime) and demonstrated that it is a high-affinity JNK inhibitor and inhibits murine delayed-type hypersensitivity. Here we show that IQ-1S is highly specific for JNK and that its neutral form is the most abundant species at physiologic pH. Molecular docking of the IQ-1S syn isomer into the JNK1 binding site gave the best pose, which corresponded to the position of cocrystallized JNK inhibitor SP600125 (1,9-pyrazoloanthrone). Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of IQ-1S showed that it inhibited matrix metalloproteinase 1 and 3 gene expression induced by interleukin-1β in human fibroblast-like synoviocytes and significantly attenuated development of murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Treatment with IQ-1S either before or after induction of CIA resulted in decreased clinical scores, and joint sections from IQ-1S–treated CIA mice exhibited only mild signs of inflammation and minimal cartilage loss compared with those from control mice. Collagen II–specific antibody responses were also reduced by IQ-1S treatment. By contrast, the inactive ketone derivative 11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one had no effect on CIA clinical scores or collagen II–specific antibody titers. IQ-1S treatment also suppressed proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in joints and lymph node cells. Finally, treatment with IQ-1S increased the number of Foxp3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in lymph nodes. Thus, IQ-1S can reduce inflammation and cartilage loss associated with CIA and can serve as a small-molecule modulator for mechanistic studies of JNK function in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25784649

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Joint Protection in Collagen-Induced Arthritis after Treatment with IQ-1S, a Selective c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Hammaker, Deepa; Kochetkova, Irina; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Lyakhov, Sergey A; Firestein, Gary S; Quinn, Mark T

    2015-06-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) participate in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including inflammatory diseases. We recently synthesized the sodium salt of IQ-1S (11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one oxime) and demonstrated that it is a high-affinity JNK inhibitor and inhibits murine delayed-type hypersensitivity. Here we show that IQ-1S is highly specific for JNK and that its neutral form is the most abundant species at physiologic pH. Molecular docking of the IQ-1S syn isomer into the JNK1 binding site gave the best pose, which corresponded to the position of cocrystallized JNK inhibitor SP600125 (1,9-pyrazoloanthrone). Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of IQ-1S showed that it inhibited matrix metalloproteinase 1 and 3 gene expression induced by interleukin-1β in human fibroblast-like synoviocytes and significantly attenuated development of murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Treatment with IQ-1S either before or after induction of CIA resulted in decreased clinical scores, and joint sections from IQ-1S-treated CIA mice exhibited only mild signs of inflammation and minimal cartilage loss compared with those from control mice. Collagen II-specific antibody responses were also reduced by IQ-1S treatment. By contrast, the inactive ketone derivative 11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one had no effect on CIA clinical scores or collagen II-specific antibody titers. IQ-1S treatment also suppressed proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in joints and lymph node cells. Finally, treatment with IQ-1S increased the number of Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in lymph nodes. Thus, IQ-1S can reduce inflammation and cartilage loss associated with CIA and can serve as a small-molecule modulator for mechanistic studies of JNK function in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25784649

  11. Sulfonamide inhibitors of α2β1 integrin reveal the essential role of collagen receptors in in vivo models of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nissinen, Liisa; Ojala, Marika; Langen, Barbara; Dost, Rita; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Käpylä, Jarmo; Marjamäki, Anne; Heino, Jyrki

    2015-06-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of α2β1 integrin, a major cellular collagen receptor, have been reported to inhibit platelet function, kidney injury, and angiogenesis. Since α2β1 integrin is abundantly expressed on various inflammation-associated cells, we tested whether recently developed α2β1 blocking sulfonamides have anti-inflammatory properties. Integrin α2β1 inhibitors were shown to reduce the signs of inflammation in arachidonic acid-induced ear edema, PAF stimulated air pouch, ovalbumin-induced skin hypersensitivity, adjuvant arthritis, and collagen-induced arthritis. Thus, these sulfonamides are potential drugs for acute and allergic inflammation, hypersensitivity, and arthritis. One sulfonamide with potent anti-inflammatory activity has previously been reported to be selective for activated integrins, but not to inhibit platelet function. Thus, the experiments also revealed fundamental differences in the action of nonactivated and activated α2β1 integrins in inflammation when compared to thrombosis. PMID:26171226

  12. Sulfonamide inhibitors of α2β1 integrin reveal the essential role of collagen receptors in in vivo models of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nissinen, Liisa; Ojala, Marika; Langen, Barbara; Dost, Rita; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Käpylä, Jarmo; Marjamäki, Anne; Heino, Jyrki

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of α2β1 integrin, a major cellular collagen receptor, have been reported to inhibit platelet function, kidney injury, and angiogenesis. Since α2β1 integrin is abundantly expressed on various inflammation-associated cells, we tested whether recently developed α2β1 blocking sulfonamides have anti-inflammatory properties. Integrin α2β1 inhibitors were shown to reduce the signs of inflammation in arachidonic acid-induced ear edema, PAF stimulated air pouch, ovalbumin-induced skin hypersensitivity, adjuvant arthritis, and collagen-induced arthritis. Thus, these sulfonamides are potential drugs for acute and allergic inflammation, hypersensitivity, and arthritis. One sulfonamide with potent anti-inflammatory activity has previously been reported to be selective for activated integrins, but not to inhibit platelet function. Thus, the experiments also revealed fundamental differences in the action of nonactivated and activated α2β1 integrins in inflammation when compared to thrombosis. PMID:26171226

  13. Nondestructive fluorescence-based quantification of threose-induced collagen cross-linking in bovine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnunen, Jussi; Kokkonen, Harri T.; Kovanen, Vuokko; Hauta-Kasari, Markku; Vahimaa, Pasi; Lammi, Mikko J.; Töyräs, Juha; Jurvelin, Jukka S.

    2012-09-01

    Extensive collagen cross-linking affects the mechanical competence of articular cartilage: it can make the cartilage stiffer and more brittle. The concentrations of the best known cross-links, pyridinoline and pentosidine, can be accurately determined by destructive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We explore a nondestructive evaluation of cross-linking by using the intrinsic fluorescence of the intact cartilage. Articular cartilage samples from bovine knee joints were incubated in threose solution for 40 and 100 h to increase the collagen cross-linking. Control samples without threose were also prepared. Excitation-emission matrices at wavelengths of 220 to 950 nm were acquired from the samples, and the pentosidine and pyridinoline cross-links and the collagen concentrations were determined using HPLC. After the threose treatment, pentosidine and lysyl pyridinole (LP) concentrations increased. The intrinsic fluorescence, excited below 350 nm, decreased and was related to pentosidine [r=-0.90, 240/325 nm (excitation/emission)] or LP (r=-0.85, 235/285 nm) concentrations. Due to overlapping, the changes in emission could not be linked specifically to the recorded cross-links. However, the fluorescence signal enabled a nondestructive optical estimate of changes in the pentosidine and LP cross-linking of intact articular cartilage.

  14. High-aspect-ratio gold nanorods: their synthesis and application to image cell-induced strain fields in collagen films.

    PubMed

    Chernak, Davin J; Sisco, Patrick N; Goldsmith, Edie C; Baxter, Sarah C; Murphy, Catherine J

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are receiving considerable attention due to their novel properties and the potential variety of their uses. Long gold nanorods with dimensions of approximately 20 × 400 nm exhibit strong light scattering and can be easily observed under dark-field microscopy. Here we describe the use of this light-scattering property to track micrometer scale strains in collagen gels and thick films, which result from cell traction forces applied by neonatal heart fibroblasts. The use of such collagen constructs to model cell behavior in the extracellular matrix is common, and describing local mechanical environments on such a small scale is necessary to understand the complex factors associated with the remodeling of the collagen network. Unlike other particles used for tracking purposes, gold nanorods do not photobleach, allowing their optical signal to be tracked for longer periods of time, and they can be easily synthesized and coated with various charged or neutral shells, potentially reducing the effect of their presence on the cell system or allowing selective placement. Techniques described here are ultimately applicable for investigations with a wide variety of cells and cell environments. PMID:23749565

  15. Antioxidants reduce cellular and functional changes induced by intense noise in the inner ear and cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianzhong; Li, Wei; Du, Xiaoping; Ewert, Donald L; West, Matthew B; Stewart, Charles; Floyd, Robert A; Kopke, Richard D

    2014-06-01

    The present study marks the first evaluation of combined application of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and the free radical spin trap reagent, disodium 2,4-disulfophenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (HPN-07), as a therapeutic approach for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Pharmacokinetic studies and C-14 tracer experiments demonstrated that both compounds achieve high blood levels within 30 min after i.p injection, with sustained levels of radiolabeled cysteine (released from NAC) in the cochlea, brainstem, and auditory cortex for up to 48 h. Rats exposed to 115 dB octave-band noise (10-20 kHz) for 1 h were treated with combined NAC/HPN-07 beginning 1 h after noise exposure and for two consecutive days. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) showed that treatment substantially reduced the degree of threshold shift across all test frequencies (2-16 kHz), beginning at 24 h after noise exposure and continuing for up to 21 days. Reduced distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) level shifts were also detected at 7 and 21 days following noise exposure in treated animals. Noise-induced hair cell (HC) loss, which was localized to the basal half of the cochlea, was reduced in treated animals by 85 and 64% in the outer and inner HC regions, respectively. Treatment also significantly reduced an increase in c-fos-positive neuronal cells in the cochlear nucleus following noise exposure. However, no detectable spiral ganglion neuron loss was observed after noise exposure. The results reported herein demonstrate that the NAC/HPN-07 combination is a promising pharmacological treatment of NIHL that reduces both temporary and permanent threshold shifts after intense noise exposure and acts to protect cochlear sensory cells, and potentially afferent neurites, from the damaging effects of acoustic trauma. In addition, the drugs were shown to reduce aberrant activation of neurons in the central auditory regions of the brain following noise exposure. It is likely that the protective

  16. Alleviation of collagen-induced arthritis by the benzoxathiole derivative BOT-4-one in mice: Implication of the Th1- and Th17-cell-mediated immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Hak; Yoon, Bo Ruem; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Noh, Kum Hee; Kwon, Sun-Ho; Yi, Eun Hee; Lee, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Jung Sook; Kang, Seong Wook; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Won-Woo; Ye, Sang-Kyu

    2016-06-15

    Autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by chronic inflammation and hyperplasia in the synovial joints. Although the cause of rheumatoid arthritis is largely unknown, substantial evidence has supported the importance of immune cells and inflammatory cytokines in the initiation and progression of this disease. Herein, we demonstrated that the benzoxathiole derivative 2-cyclohexylimino-6-methyl-6,7-dihydro-5H-benzo[1,3]oxathiol-4-one (BOT-4-one) alleviated type II collagen-induced arthritis in a mouse model. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in both human patients with rheumatoid arthritis and mice with collagen-induced arthritis. BOT-4-one treatment reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice and endotoxin-stimulated macrophages. BOT-4-one treatment suppressed the polarization of Th1- and Th17-cell subsets by inhibiting the expression and production of their lineage-specific master transcription factors and cytokines, as well as activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins. In addition, BOT-4-one inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-kappaB signaling as well as the transcriptional activities and DNA-binding of transcription factors, including activator protein-1, cAMP response element-binding protein and NF-kappaB. Our results suggest that BOT-4-one may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of chronic inflammation associated with autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27005941

  17. Clinical efficacy of a new CD28-targeting antagonist of T cell co-stimulation in a non-human primate model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vierboom, M P M; Breedveld, E; Kap, Y S; Mary, C; Poirier, N; 't Hart, B A; Vanhove, B

    2016-03-01

    T cells have a central pathogenic role in the aetiopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and are therefore a favoured target of immunotherapy aiming at physical or functional elimination. Here we report an efficacy test of FR104, a new co-stimulation inhibitor directly targeting CD28 on T cells, in a translationally relevant model, the rhesus monkey model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). As a relevant comparator we used abatacept [cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen immunoglobulin (CTLA Ig)], an antagonist of CTLA-4 binding to CD80/86 clinically approved for treatment of RA. Treatment with either compound was started at the day of CIA induction. Although FR104 previously demonstrated a higher control of T cell responses in vitro than abatacept, both compounds were equally potent in the suppression of CIA symptoms and biomarkers, such as the production of C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin (IL)-6 and anti-collagen type II (CII) serum antibody (IgM/IgG). However, in contrast to abatacept, FR104 showed effective suppression of CII-induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation. The current study demonstrates a strong potential of the new selective CD28 antagonist FR104 for treatment of RA. PMID:26540618

  18. The effect of synthetic retinoid, Am80, on T helper cell development and antibody production in murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Aya; Watanabe, Kaori; Kaneko, Kayoko; Murakami, Yousuke; Ishido, Miwako; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Nanki, Toshihiro

    2010-06-01

    Retinoids are known to promote T helper (Th)2 and regulatory T cell (Treg) differentiation, and suppress Th1 and Th17 in vitro. Am80, a synthetic retinoid, is reported to ameliorate collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The aims of this study are to determine the effects of Am80 on CIA in detail, and on Th development and antibody (Ab) production in vivo. Murine CIA was induced by immunization with bovine type II collagen (CII) at days 1 and 22. Treatment with Am80 from day 1 to 35 significantly lowered clinical arthritis score, suppressed cellular infiltration and bone destruction in the joint, decreased interleukin (IL)-17 and increased interferon (IFN)-gamma production by CII-stimulated splenocytes, and decreased proportion of Foxp3(+) splenic CD4 T cells and serum anti-CII Ab levels. Thus, Am80 inhibited Th17 and Treg and enhanced Th1 differentiation in vivo. In contrast, Am80 applied from day 15 to 35 did not alter arthritis score, IL-17 or IFN-gamma production by CII-stimulated splenocytes, but decreased the proportion of Foxp3(+) splenic CD4 T cells and serum anti-CII Ab levels. Am80 exhibits inhibitory effects on CIA and might regulate both Th development and Ab production in vivo. Decreased Th17 by treatment with Am80 might be responsible for the attenuation of arthritis. PMID:20039185

  19. Involvement of tachykinins and NK1 receptor in the joint inflammation with collagen type II-specific monoclonal antibody-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Makino, Akira; Sakai, Atsushi; Ito, Hiromoto; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic multisystem disease characterized by persistent joint inflammation associated with severe pain. Because RA is an immune-mediated joint disease and because type II collagen is considered an autoantigen, rodent models of arthritis using collagen type II-specific monoclonal antibodies are valuable for studying the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis and for evaluating therapeutic strategies. The tachykinin family peptides, substance P (SP) and hemokinin-1 (HK-1), are expressed in the nervous systems and in many peripheral organs and immunocompetent cells and activate tachykinin NK1 receptors with similar affinities. NK1 receptors are involved in the inflammation and hyperalgesia associated with a variety of inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we examined the involvement of SP and HK-1 in the joint inflammation and hyperalgesia in a collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model in mice. The messenger RNA expression levels of the TAC1 gene encoding SP and of the TAC4 gene encoding HK-1 were decreased in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord at the peak of the inflammatory symptoms in CAIA. Systemic injection of an NK1 receptor antagonist, WIN 51708, significantly inhibited the joint swelling, but not the mechanical allodynia, on day 7 in CAIA mice. The messenger RNA expression levels of TAC1 and TAC4 in the dorsal root ganglia and dorsal spinal cord were unaffected by treatment with WIN 51708. These findings suggest that tachykinins and NK1 receptors play a key role in joint inflammation, rather than in nociceptive sensitization, in CAIA. PMID:22687356

  20. Targeted blockade of JAK/STAT3 signaling inhibits proliferation, migration and collagen production as well as inducing the apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuan-Jing; Sun, Wu-Yi; Zhang, Sen; Li, Xin-Ran; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases belonging to the Janus kinase (JAK) family are associated with many cytokine receptors, which, on ligand binding, regulate important cellular functions such as proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. The protective effects of JAK inhibitors on fibrotic diseases such as myelofibrosis and bone marrow fibrosis have been demonstrated in previous studies. The JAK inhibitor SHR0302 is a synthetic molecule that potently inhibits all members of the JAK family, particularly JAK1. However, its effect on hepatic fibrosis has not been investigated to date, to the best of our knowledge. In the present study, the effects of SHR0302 on the activation, proliferation, migration and apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) as well as HSC collagen production were investigated. Our data demonstrated that treatment with SHR0302 (10-9-10-5 mol/l) exerted an inhibitory effect on the activation, proliferation and migration of HSCs. In addition, the expression of collagen I and collagen III were significantly decreased following treatment with SHR0302. Furthermore, SHR0302 induced the apoptosis of HSCs, which was demonstrated by Annexin V/PI staining. SHR0302 significantly increased the activation of caspase-3 and Bax in HSCs whereas it decreased the expression of Bcl-2. SHR0302 also inhibited the activation of Akt signaling pathway. The pharmacological inhibition of the JAK1/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 pathway led to the disruption of functions essential for HSC growth. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that SHR0302 may have the potential to alleviate hepatic fibrosis by targeting HSC functions. PMID:27460897

  1. Interleukin-35 (IL-35) inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes isolated from mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunxia; Wu, Suqin; Li, Yuxuan; Jiang, Shenyi; Lin, Tiantian; Xia, Liping; Shen, Hui; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disorder of the joints that affects 0.5-1 % of adults. Excessive growth of the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) promotes hyperplasia of synovial tissues and causes its invasion into the bone and cartilage, which eventually causes deformity and dysfunction of affected joints. Interleukin 35 (IL-35) was shown to suppress the inflammatory responses to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) via upregulation of T regulatory cells and suppression of T helper type 17 cells in a mouse model. To study the effects of IL-35 on the proliferation and apoptosis frequency of cultured FLS isolated from mice with CIA as well as to examine the effects of IL-35 on CIA in vivo. Thirty DBA/1 J mice, which are used as an animal model for RA, were divided randomly (ten mice per group) to a CIA group (collagen treatment), a CIA + IL-35 group (collagen and IL-35 treatments), and a control group (no treatment). Starting on the 24th day after collagen administration, IL-35 was injected intraperitoneally into mice of the CIA + IL-35 group once per day for 10 days. An arthritis index was calculated, and pathological analysis of synovial tissue was performed. FLS isolated from CIA mice were treated with various concentrations of IL-35 (12.5-100 ng/ml). The MTT assay was used to examine FLS proliferation, and apoptosis frequency of FLS was detected by flow cytometry. On day 24, the CIA mice began to exhibit arthritis symptoms, and the symptoms rapidly progressed with time. Treatment with IL-35 significantly alleviated arthritis symptoms and reduced the synovial tissue inflammation. In addition, IL-35 treatment inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis in cultured FLS from CIA mice in a dose-dependent manner. IL-35 could ameliorate the symptoms of arthritis in the CIA mouse model in vivo and inhibited FLS proliferation while promoting FLS apoptosis in vitro, thereby exhibited the potential in inhibiting the progression of RA. PMID:27379996

  2. Abrogation of collagen-induced arthritis by a peptidyl arginine deiminase inhibitor is associated with modulation of T cell-mediated immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kawalkowska, Joanna; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Ghari, Fatemeh; Davis, Simon; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul R; Williams, Richard O; Fischer, Roman; La Thangue, Nicholas B; Venables, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing citrulline, a post-translational modification of arginine, are generated by peptidyl arginine deiminases (PAD). Citrullinated proteins have pro-inflammatory effects in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we examine the therapeutic effects in collagen-induced arthritis of the second generation PAD inhibitor, BB-Cl-amidine. Treatment after disease onset resulted in the reversal of clinical and histological changes of arthritis, associated with a marked reduction in citrullinated proteins in lymph nodes. There was little overall change in antibodies to collagen or antibodies to citrullinated peptides, but a shift from pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17-type responses to pro-resolution Th2-type responses was demonstrated by serum cytokines and antibody subtypes. In lymph node cells from the arthritic mice treated with BB-Cl-amidine, there was a decrease in total cell numbers but an increase in the proportion of Th2 cells. BB-Cl-amidine had a pro-apoptotic effect on all Th subsets in vitro with Th17 cells appearing to be the most sensitive. We suggest that these immunoregulatory effects of PAD inhibition in CIA are complex, but primarily mediated by transcriptional regulation. We suggest that targeting PADs is a promising strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27210478

  3. Remission of Collagen-Induced Arthritis through Combination Therapy of Microfracture and Transplantation of Thermogel-Encapsulated Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Yinan; Yang, Modi; Zhang, Yanbo; Chang, Fei; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-01-01

    The persistent inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) always leads to partial synovial hyperplasia and the destruction of articular cartilage. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) have been proven to possess immunosuppressive effects, and widely explored in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, poor inhibitory effect on local inflammatory state and limited capacity of preventing destruction of articular cartilage by systemic BMMSCs transplantation were observed. Herein, toward the classical type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats, the combination treatment of microfracture and in situ transplantation of thermogel-encapsulated BMMSCs was verified to obviously down-regulate the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In addition, it resulted in the decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and anti-collagen type II antibody, in the serum. Simultaneously, the combination therapy also could inhibit the proliferation of antigen specific lymphocytes and local joint inflammatory condition, and prevent the articular cartilage damage. The results indicated that the treatment programs could effectively stimulate the endogenous and exogenous BMMSCs to exhibit the immunosuppression and cartilage protection capability. This study provided a new therapeutic strategy for autoimmune inflammatory diseases, such as RA. PMID:25774788

  4. The X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein Inhibitor Embelin Suppresses Inflammation and Bone Erosion in Collagen Antibody Induced Arthritis Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dharmapatni, Anak A. S. S. K.; Cantley, Melissa D.; Marino, Victor; Perilli, Egon; Crotti, Tania N.; Smith, Malcolm D.; Haynes, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of Embelin, an inhibitor of X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP), on inflammation and bone erosion in a collagen antibody induced arthritis (CAIA) in mice. Methods. Four groups of mice (n = 6 per group) were allocated: CAIA untreated mice, CAIA treated with Prednisolone (10 mg/kg/day), CAIA treated with low dose Embelin (30 mg/kg/day), and CAIA treated with high dose Embelin (50 mg/kg/day). Joint inflammation was evaluated using clinical paw score and histological assessments. Bone erosion was assessed using micro-CT, tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, and serum carboxy-terminal collagen crosslinks (CTX-1) ELISA. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect XIAP protein. TUNEL was performed to identify apoptotic cells. Results. Low dose, but not high dose Embelin, suppressed inflammation as reflected by lower paw scores (P < 0.05) and lower histological scores for inflammation. Low dose Embelin reduced serum CTX-1 (P < 0.05) and demonstrated lower histological score and TRAP counting, and slightly higher bone volume as compared to CAIA untreated mice. XIAP expression was not reduced but TUNEL positive cells were more abundant in Embelin treated CAIA mice. Conclusion. Low dose Embelin suppressed inflammation and serum CTX-1 in CAIA mice, indicating a potential use for Embelin to treat pathological bone loss. PMID:26347311

  5. Abrogation of collagen-induced arthritis by a peptidyl arginine deiminase inhibitor is associated with modulation of T cell-mediated immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Kawalkowska, Joanna; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Ghari, Fatemeh; Davis, Simon; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul R.; Williams, Richard O.; Fischer, Roman; La Thangue, Nicholas B.; Venables, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing citrulline, a post-translational modification of arginine, are generated by peptidyl arginine deiminases (PAD). Citrullinated proteins have pro-inflammatory effects in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we examine the therapeutic effects in collagen-induced arthritis of the second generation PAD inhibitor, BB-Cl-amidine. Treatment after disease onset resulted in the reversal of clinical and histological changes of arthritis, associated with a marked reduction in citrullinated proteins in lymph nodes. There was little overall change in antibodies to collagen or antibodies to citrullinated peptides, but a shift from pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17-type responses to pro-resolution Th2-type responses was demonstrated by serum cytokines and antibody subtypes. In lymph node cells from the arthritic mice treated with BB-Cl-amidine, there was a decrease in total cell numbers but an increase in the proportion of Th2 cells. BB-Cl-amidine had a pro-apoptotic effect on all Th subsets in vitro with Th17 cells appearing to be the most sensitive. We suggest that these immunoregulatory effects of PAD inhibition in CIA are complex, but primarily mediated by transcriptional regulation. We suggest that targeting PADs is a promising strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27210478

  6. Infection-induced regulation of NK cells by macrophages and collagen at the lymph node subcapsular sinus

    PubMed Central

    Coombes, Janine L.; Han, Seong-Ji; van Rooijen, Nico; Raulet, David H.; Robey, Ellen A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Infection leads to heightened activation of natural killer (NK) cells, a process that likely involves direct cell-to-cell contact, but how this occurs in vivo is poorly understood. We have used two-photon laser-scanning microscopy in conjunction with Toxoplasma gondii-mouse infection models to address this question. We found that NK cells accumulated in the subcapsular region of the lymph node following infection where they formed low motility contacts with collagen fibers and CD169+ macrophages. We provide evidence that interactions with collagen regulate NK cell migration, whereas CD169+ macrophages increase the activation state of NK cells. Interestingly, a subset of CD169+ macrophages that co-express the inflammatory monocyte marker Ly6C had the most potent ability to activate NK cells. Our data reveal pathways through which NK cell migration and function are regulated following infection, and identify an important accessory cell population for activation of NK cell responses in lymph nodes. PMID:22840403

  7. Tetrandrine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by restoring the balance between Th17 and Treg cells via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xusheng; Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Tetrandrine is an alkaloid constituent of the root of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. The long-term clinical uses of tetrandrine for treatments of rheumatalgia and arthralgia as well as the inhibition of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis imply that tetrandrine may have therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we explored its anti-RA mechanism in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in relation to the balance between T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type II collagen and were orally administered tetrandrine for 14 consecutive days. Then, the mice were sacrificed, their joints were removed for histological analysis, and spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were removed to examine the Th17 and Treg cells. Tetrandrine markedly alleviated the severity of arthritis, reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the Th17/Treg balance, as demonstrated by the serum levels of their related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-10) and the proportion of each cell type. Tetrandrine inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and induced Treg cell differentiation in vitro . Notably, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was proven to play a crucial role in tetrandrine-mediated T cell differentiation. The correlation between AhR activation, regulation of Th17/Treg and amelioration of arthritis by tetrandrine was verified in the CIA mice. Moreover, tetrandrine might be a ligand of AhR because it facilitated the expression of the AhR target gene cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and the activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Taken together, tetrandrine exerts its anti-arthritis efficacy by restoring Th17/Treg balance via AhR. PMID:26640276

  8. SH3BP2 Gain-Of-Function Mutation Exacerbates Inflammation and Bone Loss in a Murine Collagen-Induced Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Tomoyuki; Gallant, Richard; Ishida, Shu; Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Kittaka, Mizuho; Nishida, Keiichiro; Fox, David A.; Morita, Yoshitaka; Ueki, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Objective SH3BP2 is a signaling adapter protein which regulates immune and skeletal systems. Gain-of-function mutations in SH3BP2 cause cherubism, characterized by jawbone destruction. This study was aimed to examine the role of SH3BP2 in inflammatory bone loss using a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Methods CIA was induced in wild-type (Sh3bp2+/+) and heterozygous P416R SH3BP2 cherubism mutant knock-in (Sh3bp2KI/+) mice, an SH3BP2 gain-of-function model. Severity of the arthritis was determined by assessing the paw swelling and histological analyses of the joints. Micro-CT analysis was used to determine the levels of bone loss. Inflammation and osteoclastogenesis in the joints were evaluated by quantitating the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and osteoclast markers. Furthermore, involvement of the T- and B-cell responses was determined by draining lymph node cell culture and measurement of the serum anti-mouse type II collagen antibody levels, respectively. Finally, roles of the SH3BP2 mutation in macrophage activation and osteoclastogenesis were determined by evaluating the TNF-α production levels and osteoclast formation in bone marrow-derived M-CSF-dependent macrophage (BMM) cultures. Results Sh3bp2KI/+ mice exhibited more severe inflammation and bone loss, accompanying an increased number of osteoclasts. The mRNA levels for TNF-α and osteoclast marker genes were higher in the joints of Sh3bp2KI/+ mice. Lymph node cell culture showed that lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ and IL-17 production were comparable between Sh3bp2+/+ and Sh3bp2KI/+ cells. Serum anti-type II collagen antibody levels were comparable between Sh3bp2+/+ and Sh3bp2KI/+ mice. In vitro experiments showed that TNF-α production in Sh3bp2KI/+ BMMs is elevated compared with Sh3bp2+/+ BMMs and that RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis is enhanced in Sh3bp2KI/+ BMMs associated with increased NFATc1 nuclear localization. Conclusion Gain-of-function of SH3BP2 augments inflammation

  9. Synergy between IL-6 and soluble IL-6 receptor enhances bone morphogenetic protein-2/absorbable collagen sponge-induced bone regeneration via regulation of BMPRIA distribution and degradation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ru-Lin; Chen, Gang; Wang, Wenjin; Herller, Tanja; Xie, Yun; Gu, Bin; Li, Qingfeng

    2015-10-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-2/absorbable collagen sponge (BMP-2/ACS) implants have been approved for clinical use to induce bone regeneration. We previously showed that exaggerated inflammation characterized by elevated level of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 has been shown to inhibit BMP-2/ACS-induced bone regeneration. Furthermore, unlike the negative effects of TNF-α and IL-1β, IL-6 seemed not to affect BMP-2-induced osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). We hypothesized that there may be a regulatory loop between IL-6 and BMP-2 singling to affect BMP-2/ACS-induced bone regeneration. Here, we established a BMP-2/ACS-induced ectopic bone formation model in rats and fund that IL-6 injection significantly increased BMP-2/ACS-induced bone mass. Consistent with this animal model, an in vitro study demonstrated that synergy between IL-6 and soluble IL-6 receptor (IL-6/sIL-6R) promotes BMP-2-induced osteoblastic differentiation of human BMSCs through amplification of BMP/Smad signaling. Strikingly, IL-6 injection did not activate osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in the ectopic bone formation model, and IL-6/sIL-6R treatment did not affect receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastic differentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro. Furthermore, IL-6/sIL-6R treatment did not affect expression of BMP receptors, but enhanced the cell surface translocation of BMP receptor IA (BMPRIA) and inhibited the degradation of BMPRIA. Collectively, these findings indicate that synergy between IL-6 and sIL-6R promotes the cell surface translocation of BMPRIA and maintains the stability of BMPRIA expression, leading to enhanced BMP-2/ACS-induced bone regeneration. PMID:26232880

  10. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    High altitudes and blocked ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... you are going up or coming down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are changing ...

  11. Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved You are here Home » Health Info Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Diseases and Conditions Age-Related ... Do You Need a Hearing Test? Interactive Quiz Ear Infections in Children Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood ...

  12. Effect of HMME-PDT with different parameters in rabbit ear model: a possible way for hypertrophic scarring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hong; Gu, Ying; Zeng, Jing; Li, Shao-ran; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Ying; Shi, Dong-wen; Zhang, Lu-yong

    2007-11-01

    Background and Objective: Hypertrophic scar is a pathological scar that grows aberrantly by excessive deposition of collagens in the dermis. It is known that photodynamic therapy (PDT) contributes to a variety of diseases, however, the use of inhibiting scar formation has not been fully explored. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of HMME-PDT (Photodynamic therapy induced by Hematoporphyrin Monomethyl Ether) with different parameters on hypertrophic scar in rabbit ear. Materials and Methods: After the placement of 7-mm diameter dermal wounds on each ear, the acute model of dermal hypertrophic scar in the New Zealand white rabbits was established. Scar wounds were randomly separated into 2 groups: the experimental group received HMME-PDT with different parameters, and the control group received no special treatment. Specimens were harvested from scar wounds on postoperative day 28. Scar and hypertrophic index (HI) were observed by haematoxylin-eosin staining. Results: Compared with the control group, scar formation was inhibited by HMME-PDT in the experimental group with parameters as follows: photosensitizer dose 10mg/kg, power density 20mw/cm2, fluence 5J/cm2, meanwhile, HI was decreased significantly. Conclusion: HMME-PDT may play a role in inhibiting hypertrophic scarring in rabbit ear. The biological effect is determined by the dose of photosensitizer, interval between the injection of photosensitizer and irradiation, power density and energy fluence.

  13. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... The outer ear or "pinna" forms when the baby is growing in the mother's womb. The growth of this ear part ...

  14. Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Throat Issues & Down Syndrome Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & Down Syndrome Ear, nose, and throat (ENT) problems are common ... What ENT Problems Are Common in Children With Down Syndrome? External Ear Canal Stenosis Stenotic ear canals (narrow ...

  15. From Ear to Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimura, Doreen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper Doreen Kimura gives a personal history of the "right-ear effect" in dichotic listening. The focus is on the early ground-breaking papers, describing how she did the first dichotic listening studies relating the effects to brain asymmetry. The paper also gives a description of the visual half-field technique for lateralized stimulus…

  16. Reconstructive Middle Ear Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, R.R.F.; Ballagh, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    Conductive hearing loss is a common cause of deafness and disability, particularly in children and young adults. This article presents a brief overview of the various methods currently available for reconstructing the tympanic membrane and middle ear ossicular chain, including some comments as to their indications and limitations. Schematic diagrams showing these techniques illustrate the various types of repair described. PMID:21221356

  17. External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drops, keeping water out of the ear, and pain relievers are the most common forms of treatment. External otitis may involve the entire canal, as ... does not allow fungus to grow as well. Treatment of boils depends on ... relievers, such as oxycodone with acetaminophen , can be given ...

  18. How to Use Ear Drops

    MedlinePlus

    How to Use Ear Drops(Having someone else give you the ear drops may make this procedure easier.) Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and ... facecloth and then dry your ear. Warm the drops to near body temperature by holding the container ...

  19. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins. PMID:27599513

  20. Cyclic mechanical strain induces TGFβ1-signalling in dermal fibroblasts embedded in a 3D collagen lattice.

    PubMed

    Peters, Andreas S; Brunner, Georg; Krieg, Thomas; Eckes, Beate

    2015-03-01

    Many tissues are constantly exposed to mechanical stress, e.g. shear stress in vascular endothelium, compression forces in cartilage or tensile strain in the skin. Dermal fibroblasts can differentiate into contractile myofibroblasts in a process requiring the presence of TGFβ1 in addition to mechanical load. We aimed at investigating the effect of cyclic mechanical strain on dermal fibroblasts grown in a three-dimensional environment. Therefore, murine dermal fibroblasts were cultured in collagen gels and subjected to cyclic tension at a frequency of 0.1 Hz (6 cycles/min) with a maximal increase in surface area of 10 % for 24 h. This treatment resulted in a significant increase in active TGFβ1 levels, leaving the amount of total TGFβ1 unaffected. TGFβ1 activation led to pSMAD2-mediated transcriptional elevation of downstream mediators, such as CTGF, and an auto-induction of TGFβ1, respectively. PMID:25348252

  1. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients. PMID:27621603

  2. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients. PMID:27621603

  3. Antisense targeting of TGF-{beta}1 augments BMP-induced upregulation of osteopontin, type I collagen and Cbfa1 in human Saos-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Zhong-Jian . E-mail: zshen2@wisc.edu; Kook Kim, Sang; Youn Jun, Do; Park, Wan; Ho Kim, Young; Malter, James S.; Jo Moon, Byung . E-mail: bjmoon@mail.knu.ac.kr

    2007-04-15

    Despite commonalities in signal transduction in osteoblasts from different species, the role of TGF-{beta}1 on bone formation remains elusive. In particular, the role of autocrine TGF-{beta}1 on human osteoblasts is largely unknown. Here we show the effect of TGF-{beta}1 knock-down on the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts induced by BMP2. Treatment with antisense TGF-{beta}1 moderately increased the rate of cell proliferation, which was completely reversed by the exogenous addition of TGF-{beta}1. Notably, TGF-{beta}1 blockade significantly enhanced BMP2-induced upregulation of mRNAs encoding osteopontin, type I collagen and Cbfa1, which was suppressed by exogenous TGF-{beta}1. Moreover, TGF-{beta}1 knock-down increased BMP2-induced phosphorylation of Smad1/5 as well as their nuclear import, which paralleled a reduction of inhibitory Smad6. These data suggest autocrine TGF-{beta}1 antagonizes BMP signaling through modulation of inducible Smad6 and the activity of BMP specific Smad1/5.

  4. Effect of Bizhongxiao decoction and its dismantled formulae on IL-1 and TNF levels in collagen-induced arthritis in rat synovial joints

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic autoimmune disease, affects sufferers in many different ways. Treatment of this chronic condition is particularly challenging. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) provides alternatives. Bizhongxiao decoction (BZX) is a TCM complex, which has been used clinically for many years to treat RA. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of BZX decoction and its dismantled formulae on IL-1 and TNF-1 levels in rats with RA, and to elucidate its mechanism of action. Methods Ninety healthy normal female SD rats were randomly divided into six groups: normal (control), model, BZX decoction, and the three dismantled formulae (I: heat-clearing and detoxication, II: dissipating dampness, and III: blood circulation promotion). Apart from the normal (control) group, the rats in each group were injected subcutaneously with bovine type II collagen and complete Freund adjuvant to establish a collagen-induced arthritis model, so that inhibition of foot swelling in the rats by BZX decoction and its dismantled formulae could be observed. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1 and TNF in synovial joints at various time points. Results Twenty-one days after the model was established, the levels of TNF and IL-1 were significantly higher in the model group, BZX decoction group and dismantled formula groups I, II and III than in the normal controls (P < 0.05). The levels of these cytokines were significantly higher in the model group than the BZX decoction or the three dismantled formula groups (P <0.01). At longer times, the TNF and IL-1 levels in model group rose gradually; those in the BZX decoction and dismantled formula groups were gradually reduced. The cytokine levels in the BZX decoction group were lower than in the three dismantled formula groups and continued to decline. Conclusions BZX decoction and the three dismantled formulae examined down-regulated the inflammatory

  5. Immunosuppression by fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in collagen arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Belli, J.A.; Trentham, D.E.

    1982-05-01

    Treatments with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and cyclophosphamide were evaluated for rats injected with type II collagen. Preadministration of TLI and repeated injections of cyclophosphamide suppressed the severity of arthritis and lowered antibody titers to collagen significantly. TLI initiated at the onset of collagen arthritis decreased humoral and cellular responses to collagen but did not affect the severity of arthritis. These data demonstrate that both TLi and cyclophosphamide are immunosuppressive in an experimentally inducible autoimmune disease.

  6. MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands protect DBA/1LacJ mice from collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huan, Jianya; Kaler, Laurie J; Mooney, Jeffery L; Subramanian, Sandhya; Hopke, Corwyn; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Rosloniec, Edward F; Burrows, Gregory G; Offner, Halina

    2008-01-15

    We previously demonstrated the therapeutic effects of MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL), single-chain two domain complexes of the alpha1 and beta1 domains of MHC class II molecules genetically linked with an immunodominant peptide, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In the current study, we produced a monomeric murine I-Aq-derived RTL construct covalently linked with bovine collagen type II peptide (bCII257-270) suitable for use in DBA/1LacJ mice that develop collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model of human rheumatoid arthritis, after immunization with bCII protein in CFA. In this study, we demonstrate that the I-Aq-derived RTLs reduced the incidence of the disease, suppressed the clinical and histological signs of CIA and induced long-term modulation of T cells specific for arthritogenic Ags. Our results showed that the I-Aq/bCII257-270 molecule could systemically reduce proinflammatory IL-17 and IFN-gamma production and significantly increase anti-inflammatory IL-10, IL-13, and FoxP3 gene expression in splenocytes. Moreover, I-Aq/bCII257-270 molecule could also selectively inhibit IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-23 expression in local joint tissue. This is the first report demonstrating effective prevention of joint inflammation and clinical signs of CIA with an I-Aq-derived RTL, thus supporting the possible clinical use of this approach for treating rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:18178865

  7. Effect of Mesenchymal Precursor Cells on the Systemic Inflammatory Response and Endothelial Dysfunction in an Ovine Model of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Laura M.; Abdalmula, Anwar; Washington, Elizabeth A.; Kaufman, Claire; Tudor, Elizabeth M.; Ghosh, Peter; Itescu, Silviu; Kimpton, Wayne G.; Bailey, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) are reported to possess immunomodulatory properties that may prove beneficial in autoimmune and other inflammatory conditions. However, their mechanism of action is poorly understood. A collagen-induced arthritis model has been previously developed which demonstrates local joint inflammation and systemic inflammatory changes. These include not only increased levels of inflammatory markers, but also vascular endothelial cell dysfunction, characterised by reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation. This study aimed to characterise the changes in systemic inflammatory markers and endothelial function following the intravenous administration of MPC, in the ovine model. Methods Arthritis was induced in sixteen adult sheep by administration of bovine type II collagen into the hock joint following initial sensitisation. After 24h, sheep were administered either 150 million allogeneic ovine MPCs intravenously, or saline only. Fibrinogen and serum amyloid-A were measured in plasma to assess systemic inflammation, along with pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Animals were necropsied two weeks following arthritis induction. Coronary and digital arterial segments were mounted in a Mulvaney-Halpern wire myograph. The relaxant response to endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilators was used to assess endothelial dysfunction. Results and Conclusion Arthritic sheep treated with MPC demonstrated a marked spike in plasma IL-10, 24h following MPC administration. They also showed significantly reduced plasma levels of the inflammatory markers, fibrinogen and serum amyloid A, and increased HDL. Coronary arteries from RA sheep treated with MPCs demonstrated a significantly greater maximal relaxation to bradykinin when compared to untreated RA sheep (253.6 ± 17.1% of pre-contracted tone vs. 182.3 ± 27.3% in controls), and digital arteries also demonstrated greater endothelium-dependent vasodilation

  8. Intranasal Administration of Type V Collagen Reduces Lung Carcinogenesis through Increasing Endothelial and Epithelial Apoptosis in a Urethane-Induced Lung Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Parra, Edwin Roger; Alveno, Renata Antunes; Faustino, Carolina Brito; Corrêa, Paula Yume Sato Serzedello; Vargas, Camilla Mutai; de Morais, Jymenez; Rangel, Maristela Peres; Velosa, Ana Paula Pereira; Fabro, Alexandre Todorovic; Teodoro, Walcy Rosolia; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza

    2016-08-01

    Type V collagen (Col V) is a "minor" component of normal lung extracellular matrix, which is subjected to decreased and abnormal synthesis in human lung infiltrating adenocarcinoma. We previously reported that a direct link between low amounts of Col V and decreased cell apoptosis may favor cancer cell growth in the mouse lung after chemical carcinogenesis. Moreover, this collagen species was able to trigger DNA fragmentation and impair survival of neoplastic cells. In this study, we have extended our investigation with the aim to obtain further evidence that the death induced by Col V-treatment is of the caspase-9 apoptotic type. We used (1) optical and electron microscopy, (2) quantitation of TUNEL-labeled cells and (3) analysis of the expression levels of Col V and selected genes coding for apoptosis-linked factors, by conventional RT-PCR. BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with 1.5 g/kg body weight of urethane. After urethane injection, the animals received intranasal administration of 20 µg/20 µl of Col V every day during 2 months. We report here that Col V treatment was able to determine significant increase in Col V protein and gene expression and in the percentage of TUNEL-positive cells, to up-regulate caspase-9, resulting in low growth of tumor cells. Our data validate chemical carcinogenesis as a suitable "in vivo" model for further and more detailed studies on the molecular mechanisms of the death response induced by Col V in lung infiltrating adenocarcinoma opening new strategies for treatment. PMID:27020095

  9. MHC Class II Derived Recombinant T Cell Receptor Ligands Protect DBA/1LacJ Mice from Collagen-Induced Arthritis1

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Jianya; Kaler, Laurie J.; Mooney, Jeffery L.; Subramanian, Sandhya; Hopke, Corwyn; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Rosloniec, Edward F.; Burrows, Gregory G.; Offner, Halina

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the therapeutic effects of MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL), single-chain two domain complexes of the α1 and β1 domains of MHC class II molecules genetically linked with an immunodominant peptide, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In the current study, we produced a monomeric murine I-Aq-derived RTL construct covalently linked with bovine collagen type II peptide (bCII257–270) suitable for use in DBA/1LacJ mice that develop collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model of human rheumatoid arthritis, after immunization with bCII protein in CFA. In this study, we demonstrate that the I-Aq-derived RTLs reduced the incidence of the disease, suppressed the clinical and histological signs of CIA and induced long-term modulation of T cells specific for arthritogenic Ags. Our results showed that the I-Aq/bCII257–270 molecule could systemically reduce proinflammatory IL-17 and IFN-γ production and significantly increase anti-inflammatory IL-10, IL-13, and FoxP3 gene expression in splenocytes. Moreover, I-Aq/bCII257–270 molecule could also selectively inhibit IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 expression in local joint tissue. This is the first report demonstrating effective prevention of joint inflammation and clinical signs of CIA with an I-Aq-derived RTL, thus supporting the possible clinical use of this approach for treating rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:18178865

  10. Blockade of interleukin-6 receptor enhances the anti-arthritic effect of glucocorticoids without decreasing bone mineral density in mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Yoshida, H; Hashizume, M; Tanaka, K; Matsumoto, Y

    2015-11-01

    In a mouse arthritis model, we investigated whether interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) blockade would enhance the anti-arthritic effect of glucocorticoids (GCs). DBA/1J mice were immunized with type II collagen (CII), and were treated with prednisolone (PSL) and/or anti-mouse IL-6R antibody (MR16-1). Also, the effects of IL-6 on gene expression and the nuclear translocation of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) were examined in cultured cells treated with dexamethasone (DEX). PSL reduced the arthritis score dose-dependently in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. The arthritis score in the PSL (3 mg/kg) + MR16-1 group was lower than in the PSL (3 mg/kg) group, and at the same level as in the PSL (6 mg/kg) group. Lumbar vertebra bone mineral density (BMD) was decreased significantly in CIA mice and was higher in the PSL (3 mg/kg) + MR16-1 group than in the PSL (6 mg/kg) group. In the in-vitro synovial cells, IL-6 pretreatment attenuated the inhibitory effect of DEX on cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and inhibited the nuclear translocation of GR induced by DEX. In contrast, in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells, IL-6 pretreatment exacerbated the decrease in expression of osteocalcin and the increase in expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) by DEX. We demonstrated that IL-6 signalling blockade by an anti-IL-6R antibody can augment the anti-arthritic effect of GCs and inhibit the bone loss they cause. PMID:26201536

  11. Synergy between anti-CD4 and anti-tumor necrosis factor in the amelioration of established collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R O; Mason, L J; Feldmann, M; Maini, R N

    1994-01-01

    Anti-CD4 treatment is reported to prevent collagen-induced arthritis if administered before the onset of clinical disease but has relatively little effect on established arthritis. In contrast, we have recently shown that anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha/beta (TNF) treatment reduces the severity of established arthritis. We now study the effect of combined administration of anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (YTS 191.1.2/YTA 3.1.2) and anti-TNF monoclonal antibody (TN3-19.12) in established arthritis. Anti-CD4 treatment caused some reduction in paw-swelling but did not significantly prevent joint erosion. A suboptimal dose of anti-TNF alone had no significant effect on arthritis. In contrast, anti-CD4 plus suboptimal anti-TNF significantly reduced paw-swelling, limb involvement, and joint erosion. As previously reported, an optimal dose of anti-TNF alone inhibited paw-swelling, limb involvement, and joint erosion. However, optimal anti-TNF combined with anti-CD4 caused significantly greater reductions in paw-swelling and joint erosion than those achieved by optimal anti-TNF alone. Coadministration of anti-CD4 was also effective in preventing an antibody response to the hamster anti-TNF antibody, which may have implications for long-term therapy in human disease. Thus anti-CD4 acts synergistically with anti-TNF in ameliorating established collagen-induced arthritis and this combined therapeutic approach may provide effective long-term control of rheumatoid arthritis. Images PMID:7908442

  12. Celastrol enhances Nrf2 mediated antioxidant enzymes and exhibits anti-fibrotic effect through regulation of collagen production against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Divya, Thomas; Dineshbabu, Vadivel; Soumyakrishnan, Syamala; Sureshkumar, Anandasadagopan; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2016-02-25

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix components in the alveolar region which distorts the normal lung architecture and impairs the respiratory function. The aim of this study is to evaluate the anti-fibrotic effect of celastrol, a quinine-methide tri-terpenoid mainly found in Thunder God Vine root extracts against bleomycin (BLM)-induced PF through the enhancement of antioxidant defense system. A single intratracheal instillation of BLM (3 U/kg.bw) was administered in rats to induce PF. Celastrol (5 mg/kg) was given intraperitoneally, twice a week for a period of 28 days. BLM-induced rats exhibits declined activities of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants which were restored upon treatment with celastrol. BLM-induced rats show increased total and differential cell counts as compared to control and celastrol treated rats. Histopathological analysis shows increased inflammation and alveolar damage; while assay of hydroxyproline and Masson's trichrome staining shows an increased collagen deposition in BLM-challenged rats that were decreased upon celastrol treatment. Celastrol also reduces inflammation in BLM-induced rats as evidenced by decrease in the expressions of mast cells, Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF- α) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9. Further, Western blot analysis shows that celastrol is a potent inducer of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and it restores the activities of Phase II enzymes such as hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutathione-S-transferase (GSTs) and NADP(H): quinine oxidoreductase (NQO1) which were declined upon BLM administration. The results of this study show evidence on the protective effect of celastrol against BLM-induced PF through its antioxidant and anti-fibrotic effects. PMID:26768587

  13. The Collagen Family

    PubMed Central

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant proteins in mammals. The collagen family comprises 28 members that contain at least one triple-helical domain. Collagens are deposited in the extracellular matrix where most of them form supramolecular assemblies. Four collagens are type II membrane proteins that also exist in a soluble form released from the cell surface by shedding. Collagens play structural roles and contribute to mechanical properties, organization, and shape of tissues. They interact with cells via several receptor families and regulate their proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Some collagens have a restricted tissue distribution and hence specific biological functions. PMID:21421911

  14. Alpha adrenoceptors in the rabbit ear thermoregulatory microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Koman, L A; Smith, B P; Gordon, E S; Smith, T L

    1998-03-01

    The rabbit ear microcirculation was analyzed in a chronic unanesthetized model to evaluate alpha adrenergic microvascular control in a thermoregulatory end organ. This model allowed direct measurement of microcirculatory responses without the effects of anesthetics or inflammatory responses induced by acute surgical intervention. The ipsilateral facial artery was catheterized for drug injections into the experimental ear. Microvascular diameter changes following stimulation or blockade of adrenoceptor (AR) subtypes were observed directly through a chronic microvascular chamber implanted in the rabbit ear. Vascular alpha1- and alpha2-ARs appear to be distributed differently across the arterioles and AVAs of the rabbit ear. Both alpha1- and alpha2-ARs appear to contribute to vasoconstriction of AVAs in the conscious rabbit ear. In contrast, alpha1-AR's (vs alpha2-ARs) appear to predominate in adrenergically mediated sympathetic vasoconstriction of arterioles. PMID:9521886

  15. The contralateral ear in cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Sady Selaimen; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro; Rosito, Letícia Petersen Schmidt

    2016-07-01

    Middle ear cholesteatoma has been extensively studied. Theories of cholesteatoma pathogenesis involving previous tympanic membrane retraction are the most widely accepted, but the contralateral ear in patients with cholesteatoma remains unstudied. This study aimed to investigate the contralateral ear in patients with cholesteatoma, and to determine whether the characteristics of it differ according to patient age and cholesteatoma growth patterns. This study was cross sectional. We evaluated 356 patients with middle ear cholesteatoma in at least one ear, and no history of surgery, between August 2000 and March 2013. Otoendoscopy was conducted on both the affected and the contralateral ear. They were classified as normal, tympanic membrane perforation, moderate to severe tympanic membrane retraction and cholesteatoma. The mean age of the patients was 32.77 years, and 53.1 % of the cohort were female. Only 34.8 % of the contralateral ears were normal. The most common abnormality was moderate to severe tympanic membrane retraction (41.6 %). Cholesteatoma was identified in 16 %. Children exhibited a greater frequency of tympanic membrane retractions, whereas adults exhibited a greater frequency of cholesteatoma. All of the contralateral ears in the anterior epitympanic group were normal, but otherwise there were no differences in the contralateral ear when we compared the cholesteatoma growth patterns. We conclude that patients diagnosed with acquired cholesteatoma of one ear are significantly more likely to exhibit abnormalities of the contralateral ear. PMID:26223352

  16. In Vitro Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Formation and In Vivo Middle Ear Mucosal Biofilm in a Rat Model of Acute Otitis Induced by S. pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Chae, Sung-Won

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common pathogens of otitis media (OM) that exists in biofilm, which enhances the resistance of bacteria against antibiotic killing and diagnosis, compared to the free-floating (planktonic) form. This study evaluated biofilm formation by S. pneumoniae on an abiotic surface and in the middle ear cavity in a rat model of OM. Methods In vitro biofilm formation was evaluated by inoculation of a 1:100 diluted S. pneumoniae cell suspension in a 96-well microplate. Adherent cells were quantified spectrophotometrically following staining with crystal violet by measurement of optical density at 570 nm. The ultrastructure of pneumococcal biofilm was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For in vitro biofilm study, S. pneumoniae cell suspensions containing 1×107 colony forming units were injected through transtympanic membrane into the middle ear cavity of Sprague Dawley rats. The ultrastructure of middle ear mucus was observed by SEM 1 and 2 weeks post-inoculation. Results The in vitro study revealed robust biofilm formation by S. pneumoniae after 12-18 hours of incubation in high glucose medium, independent of exogenously supplied competence stimulating peptide and medium replacement. Adherent cells formed three-dimensional structures approximately 20-30 µm thick. The in vivo study revealed that ciliated epithelium was relatively resistant to biofilm formation and that biofilm formation occurred mainly on non-ciliated epithelium of the middle ear cavity. One week after inoculation, biofilm formation was high in 50% of the treated rats and low in 25% of the rats. After 2 weeks, biofilm formation was high and low in 25% and 37.5% of rats, respectively. Conclusion The results imply that glucose level is important for the S. pneumoniae biofilm formation and S. pneumoniae biofilm formation may play important role in the pathophysiology of OM. PMID:22977710

  17. Glucose Kinetics in the Collagen-Induced Arthritis Model: An All-in-One Model to Assess Both Efficacy and Metabolic Side Effects of Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Theo H.; Bleeker, Aycha; Grefhorst, Aldo; Schouten, Annelies E.; Bastiaanssen, Ellen A. J.; Ballak, Dov B.; Koenders, Marije I.; van Doorn, Cindy; van der Vleuten, Monique A. J.; van Lierop, Marie-Jose C.; Groen, Albert K.; Dokter, Wim H. A.

    2014-01-01

    Prednisolone and other glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent anti-inflammatory drugs, but chronic use is hampered by metabolic side effects. Therefore, there is an urgent medical need for improved GCs that are as effective as classical GCs but have a better safety profile. A well-established model to assess anti-inflammatory efficacy is the chronic collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model in mice, a model with features resembling rheumatoid arthritis. Models to quantify undesired effects of glucocorticoids on glucose kinetics are less well-established. Recently, we have described a model to quantify basal blood glucose kinetics using stably-labeled glucose. In the present study, we have integrated this blood glucose kinetic model in the CIA model to enable quantification of both efficacy and adverse effects in one animal model. Arthritis scores were decreased after treatment with prednisolone, confirming the anti-inflammatory properties of GCs. Both inflammation and prednisolone induced insulin resistance as insulin secretion was strongly increased whereas blood glucose concentrations and hepatic glucose production were only slightly decreased. This insulin resistance did not directly resulted in hyperglycemia, indicating a highly adaptive compensatory mechanism in these mice. In conclusion, this ‘all-in-one’ model allows for studying effects of (novel) GC compounds on the development of arthritis and glucose kinetics in a single animal. This integrative model provides a valuable tool for investigating (drug-induced) metabolic dysregulation in an inflammatory setting. PMID:25181348

  18. The Effector Protein BPE005 from Brucella abortus Induces Collagen Deposition and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Downmodulation via Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Rey Serantes, Diego; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Vanzulli, Silvia; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Comerci, Diego José; Delpino, María Victoria

    2016-02-01

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. In the present study, we identified a virulence factor involved in the modulation of hepatic stellate cell function and consequent fibrosis during Brucella abortus infection. This study assessed the role of BPE005 protein from B. abortus in the fibrotic phenotype induced on hepatic stellate cells during B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the fibrotic phenotype induced by B. abortus on hepatic stellate (LX-2) cells was dependent on BPE005, a protein associated with the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB from B. abortus. Our results indicated that B. abortus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) secretion through the activity of the BPE005-secreted protein and induces concomitant collagen deposition by LX-2 cells. BPE005 is a small protein containing a cyclic nucleotide monophosphate binding domain (cNMP) that modulates the LX-2 cell phenotype through a mechanism that is dependent on the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that B. abortus tilts LX-2 cells to a profibrogenic phenotype employing a functional T4SS and the secreted BPE005 protein through a mechanism that involves the cAMP and PKA signaling pathway. PMID:26667834

  19. Association of H2A{sup b} with resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in H2-recombinant mouse strains: An allele associated with reduction of several apparently unrelated responses

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, N.A.; Brunner, M.C.

    1995-02-01

    HLA class II alleles can protect against immunological diseases. Seeking an animal model for a naturally occurring protective allele, we screened a panel of H2-congenic and recombinant mouse strains for ability to protect against collagen-induced arthritis. The strains were crossed with the susceptible strain DBA/1, and the F{sub 1} hybrids immunized with cattle and chicken type II collagen. Hybrids having the H2A{sup b} allele displayed a reduced incidence and duration of the disease. They also had a reduced level of pre-disease inflammation, but not of anti-collagen antibodies. The allele is already known to be associated with reduction of other apparently unrelated immune responses, suggesting that some form of functional differentiation may operate that is not exclusively related to epitope-binding. It is suggested that this may reflect allelic variation in the class II major histocompatibility complex promoter region. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Biomedical applications of collagens.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, John A M

    2016-05-01

    Collagen-based biomedical materials have developed into important, clinically effective materials used in a range of devices that have gained wide acceptance. These devices come with collagen in various formats, including those based on stabilized natural tissues, those that are based on extracted and purified collagens, and designed composite, biosynthetic materials. Further knowledge on the structure and function of collagens has led to on-going developments and improvements. Among these developments has been the production of recombinant collagen materials that are well defined and are disease free. Most recently, a group of bacterial, non-animal collagens has emerged that may provide an excellent, novel source of collagen for use in biomaterials and other applications. These newer collagens are discussed in detail. They can be modified to direct their function, and they can be fabricated into various formats, including films and sponges, while solutions can also be adapted for use in surface coating technologies. PMID:26448097

  1. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  2. CARD11 blockade suppresses murine collagen-induced arthritis via inhibiting CARD11/Bcl10 assembly and T helper type 17 response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Zhao, J; Zhang, H; Huang, Y; Wang, S; Tu, Q; Yang, N

    2014-01-01

    The scaffold protein caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11 (CARD11) is implicated in the regulation of inflammation and autoimmunity. The present study aimed to explore the role of CARD11 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were treated with either CARD11-targeted interfering RNA (CARD11 siRNA) or control siRNA by intraperitoneal injection every 3 days after CIA establishment. The clinical score of arthritis was recorded every other day. Synovial inflammation and cartilage erosion were evaluated by histology and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). Serum anti-type II collagen (anti-CII) antibodies and cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The CARD11/Bcl10 formation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation was assessed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting, and the percentage of T helper type 17 (Th17) cells was determined by flow cytometry. Systemic administration of CARD11 siRNA significantly reduced the clinical score of CIA severity. As indicated by the histology, joint inflammation and destruction were attenuated by CARD11 siRNA treatment. Micro-CT demonstrated less severe joint destruction in CARD11 siRNA-treated mice than in control mice. CARD11 siRNA treatment resulted in inhibition of CARD11/Bcl10 formation and the subsequent NF-κB activation. In addition, treatment with CARD11 siRNA resulted in a pronounced decrease in proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-17. Serum anti-CII antibody and the percentage of Th17 cells were also significantly reduced. CARD11 is involved in the pathogenesis of CIA by formation of the CARD11/Bcl10 complex and enhancement of the Th17 cell response. Targeting CARD11 provides a novel research direction in the development of therapeutic strategies for RA. PMID:24443940

  3. Anti-CD5 therapy decreases severity of established disease in collagen type II-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Plater-Zyberk, C; Taylor, P C; Blaylock, M G; Maini, R N

    1994-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis has been widely used as an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis. We have used this model with a view to determining potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of human disease. To do this we have attempted to modulate the progression of established arthritis over a 10-day time period following the first appearance of disease, by i.p. injection of one of three different MoAbs. These consist of a rat IgG2a specific for the CD5 antigen expressed on all T cells and a subpopulation of B cells, a mouse IgG2b recognizing the CD72 antigen, and a rat IgM specific for the B220 molecule, CD72 and B220 both being expressed on all B cells. None of the three MoAbs had depleting activity in vivo. The progression of arthritis was monitored both clinically, and histologically. The effects of treatment with anti-CD5 and anti-CD72 antibodies were compared with control antibodies of the same species class and subclass. In the case of anti-B220 antibodies, the effects of treatment were compared with administration of PBS. Of these MoAbs, only treatment with anti-CD5 resulted in disease amelioration with significant decrease in disease severity in 60% of the animals. These changes became apparent 6 days after initiation of treatment. There were no significant differences in serum levels of IgG antibodies to native bovine collagen type II between the groups of treated and control mice. Possible mechanisms underlying the modification of disease expression following treatment with anti-CD5 MoAb are discussed. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7527741

  4. Ear recognition: a complete system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaza, Ayman; Harrison, Mary Ann F.

    2013-05-01

    Ear Recognition has recently received significant attention in the literature. Even though current ear recognition systems have reached a certain level of maturity, their success is still limited. This paper presents an efficient complete ear-based biometric system that can process five frames/sec; Hence it can be used for surveillance applications. The ear detection is achieved using Haar features arranged in a cascaded Adaboost classifier. The feature extraction is based on dividing the ear image into several blocks from which Local Binary Pattern feature distributions are extracted. These feature distributions are then fused at the feature level to represent the original ear texture in the classification stage. The contribution of this paper is three fold: (i) Applying a new technique for ear feature extraction, and studying various optimization parameters for that technique; (ii) Presenting a practical ear recognition system and a detailed analysis about error propagation in that system; (iii) Studying the occlusion effect of several ear parts. Detailed experiments show that the proposed ear recognition system achieved better performance (94:34%) compared to other shape-based systems as Scale-invariant feature transform (67:92%). The proposed approach can also handle efficiently hair occlusion. Experimental results show that the proposed system can achieve about (78%) rank-1 identification, even in presence of 60% occlusion.

  5. Loss of SH3BP2 function suppresses bone destruction in TNF-driven and collagen-induced arthritis mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Tomoyuki; Gallant, Richard; Ishida, Shu; Kittaka, Mizuho; Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Fox, David A.; Morita, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Keiichiro; Rottapel, Robert; Ueki, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Objective SH3BP2 is a signaling adapter protein which regulates immune and skeletal systems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of SH3BP2 in arthritis in human TNF-α transgenic (hTNFtg) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) models. Methods First, SH3BP2-deficient (Sh3bp2–/–) and wild-type (Sh3bp2+/+) mice were crossed with hTNFtg mice. Inflammation and bone loss were examined by clinical inspection and histological and micro-CT analyses. Osteoclastogenesis was evaluated with primary bone marrow-derived M-CSF-dependent macrophages (BMMs). Second, CIA was induced in Sh3bp2–/– and Sh3bp2+/+ mice, and the incidence and severity of arthritis were evaluated. Anti-mouse type II collagen (CII) antibody levels were measured by ELISA. Lymph node cell responses to CII were also determined. Results SH3BP2-deficiency did not alter the severity of joint swelling but suppressed bone erosion in the hTNFtg model. Bone loss of talus and tibia was prevented in Sh3bp2–/–/hTNFtg mice compared to Sh3bp2+/+/hTNFtg mice. RANKL- and TNF-α-induced osteoclastogenesis was suppressed in Sh3bp2–/– BMM cultures. NFATc1 nuclear localization in response to TNF-α was decreased in Sh3bp2–/– BMMs compared to Sh3bp2+/+ BMMs. In the CIA model, SH3BP2-deficiency suppressed the incidence of arthritis, which was associated with decreased anti-CII antibody production, while the antigen-specific T-cell responses in lymph nodes were not significantly different between Sh3bp2+/+ and Sh3bp2–/– mice. Conclusion SH3BP2-deficiency prevents bone loss via impaired osteoclastogenesis in the hTNFtg model and suppresses the induction of arthritis via decreased autoantibody production in the CIA model. Therefore, SH3BP2 could be a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25470448

  6. Interferon gamma suppresses collagen-induced arthritis by regulation of Th17 through the induction of indoleamine-2,3-deoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeseon; Lee, Jennifer; Park, Mi-Kyung; Lim, Mi-Ae; Park, Eun-Mi; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Yang, Eun-Ji; Lee, Seon-Yeong; Jhun, Joo-Yeon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La

    2013-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice are known to be resistant to the development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). However, they show a severe arthritic phenotype when the Ifng gene is deleted. Although it has been proposed that IFN-γ suppresses inflammation in CIA via suppressing Th17 which is involved in the pathogenesis of CIA, the exact molecular mechanism of the Th17 regulation by IFN-γ is poorly understood. This study was conducted to 1) clarify that arthritogenic condition of IFN-γ knockout (KO) mice is dependent on the disinhibition of Th17 and 2) demonstrate that IFN-γ-induced indoleamine-2,3-dioxgenase (IDO) is engaged in the regulation of Th17. The results showed that the IFN-γ KO mice displayed increased levels of IL-17 producing T cells and the exacerbation of arthritis. Also, production of IL-17 by the splenocytes of the IFN-γ KO mice was increased when cultured with type II collagen. When Il17 was deleted from the IFN-γ KO mice, only mild arthritis developed without any progression of the arthritis score. The proportion of CD44(high)CD62L(low) memory-like T cells were elevated in the spleen, draining lymph node and mesenteric lymph node of IFN-γ KO CIA mice. Meanwhile, CD44(low)CD62L(high) naïve T cells were increased in IFN-γ and IL-17 double KO CIA mice. When Th17 polarized CD4+ T cells of IFN-γ KO mice were co-cultured with their own antigen presenting cells (APCs), a greater increase in IL-17 production was observed than in co-culture of the cells from wild type mice. In contrast, when APCs from IFN-γ KO mice were pretreated with IFN-γ, there was a significant reduction in IL-17 in the co-culture system. Of note, pretreatment of 1-methyl-DL- tryptophan, a specific inhibitor of IDO, abolished the inhibitory effects of IFN-γ. Given that IFN-γ is a potent inducer of IDO in APCs, these results suggest that IDO is involved in the regulation of IL-17 by IFN-γ. PMID:23613752

  7. Protective effect of Disporum sessile D.Don extract against UVB-induced photoaging via suppressing MMP-1 expression and collagen degradation in human skin cells.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed Antar Aziz; Jung, Mira; Lee, Sang Min; Lee, Tae Hoon; Kim, Jiyoung

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, we report that Disporum sessile D.Don herbal extract (DDE) possesses anti-skin photoaging effect through inhibition of MMP-1 mRNA and protein expression levels and increase collagen production in UVB-irradiated human dermal fibroblast cells (NHDF). To delineate the molecular mechanism by which DDE inhibited MMP-1 expression, immortal human keratinocytes cells (HaCaT) have been used. We have found that DDE inhibited UVB-induced MMP-1 mRNA and protein expression levels in HaCaT cells through inhibition of UVB-induced activation of NF-κB in HaCaT cells. Inhibitors of NF-κB (Bay11-7082), and mitogen-activated protein kinases such as extracellular regulated kinase (PD98059), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SP600125), and p38 (SB203580) suppressed expression of MMP-1, and phosphorylation of these signaling molecules were attenuated by DDE. DDE also inhibited phosphorylation of IKKα and IκBα, and reduced nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Our results also demonstrated that DDE inhibited NF-κB driven expression of luciferase reporter gene and the DNA binding of NF-κB to its cognate binding site in UV-irradiated cells. Therefore, these results strongly suggest that DDE can be utilized as a potential agent for prevention and treatment of skin photoaging. PMID:24705373

  8. COLLAGEN STRUCTURE AND STABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Shoulders, Matthew D.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. This fibrous, structural protein comprises a right-handed bundle of three parallel, left-handed polyproline II-type helices. Much progress has been made in elucidating the structure of collagen triple helices and the physicochemical basis for their stability. New evidence demonstrates that stereoelectronic effects and preorganization play a key role in that stability. The fibrillar structure of type I collagen–the prototypical collagen fibril–has been revealed in detail. Artificial collagen fibrils that display some properties of natural collagen fibrils are now accessible using chemical synthesis and self-assembly. A rapidly emerging understanding of the mechanical and structural properties of native collagen fibrils will guide further development of artificial collagenous materials for biomedicine and nanotechnology. PMID:19344236

  9. Anti-arthritic activity of Fu-Fang-Lu-Jiao-Shuang on collagen-induced arthritis in Balb/c mice and its underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyan; Sun, Weiguang; Chen, Laxia; Xu, Xin; Wu, Yunxia; Zhang, Jinwen; Zhang, Yonghui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, autoimmune disorder characterized by progressive multiple joint destruction, deformity, disability and premature death in most patients. Fu-Fang-Lu-Jiao-Shuang (FFLJS) is an effective traditional Chinese medicine, which has long been used clinically to treat RA patients. Objective: The objective of this study is aimed to evaluate the anti-rheumatic effects of FFLJS on collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model, as well as the underlying mechanisms, which have not previously been explored. Materials and Methods: CIA was induced by immunization with type II collagen (CII) in male Balb/c mice. The mice in the onset of arthritis were treated daily with FFLJS (125 or 500 mg/kg) or 1% carboxymethyl cellulose-Na for 28 days. Paw thickness and arthritic score were evaluated to confirm the anti-arthritic effect of FFLJS on CIA in mice. Levels of anti-CII antibody, proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1) β, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as well as prostaglandin E-2 (PGE-2) in serum and histological changes in the ankle joint were also analyzed. In addition, expressions of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3 and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases-1 (TIMP-1) in synovial tissue were also detected to further study the molecular mechanism of the anti-arthritic effects of FFLJS. Results: During therapeutic treatment, FFLJS significantly reduced paw thickness and arthritic score in CIA mice, decreased the amounts of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IL-17, PGE-2 and anti-CII antibody in serum. In addition, FFLJS treatment could prevent the bone destruction by reducing the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3, increasing the expression of TIMP-1 in synovial tissue of CIA mice. Conclusion: These findings offer the convincing evidence for the first time that the anti-rheumatic effects of FFLJS might be related to down-regulation of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IL-17 and PGE-2 levels for acute arthritis, and regulation of MMP-1, MMP-3

  10. Preclinical characterization of DEKAVIL (F8-IL10), a novel clinical-stage immunocytokine which inhibits the progression of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In this article, we present a comparative immunohistochemical evaluation of four clinical-stage antibodies (L19, F16, G11 and F8) directed against splice isoforms of fibronectin and of tenascin-C for their ability to stain synovial tissue alterations in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Furthermore we have evaluated the therapeutic potential of the most promising antibody, F8, fused to the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL) 10. Methods F8-IL10 was produced and purified to homogeneity in CHO cells and shown to comprise biological active antibody and cytokine moieties by binding assays on recombinant antigen and by MC/9 cell proliferation assays. We have also characterized the ability of F8-IL10 to inhibit arthritis progression in the collagen-induced arthritis mouse model. Results The human antibody F8, specific to the extra-domain A of fibronectin, exhibited the strongest and most homogenous staining pattern in synovial biopsies and was thus selected for the development of a fully human fusion protein with IL10 (F8-IL10, also named DEKAVIL). Following radioiodination, F8-IL10 was able to selectively target arthritic lesions and tumor neo-vascular structures in mice, as evidenced by autoradiographic analysis and quantitative biodistribution studies. The subcutaneous administration route led to equivalent targeting results when compared with intravenous administration and was thus selected for the clinical development of the product. F8-IL10 potently inhibited progression of established arthritis in the collagen-induced mouse model when tested alone and in combination with methotrexate. In preparation for clinical trials in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, F8-IL10 was studied in rodents and in cynomolgus monkeys, revealing an excellent safety profile at doses tenfold higher than the planned starting dose for clinical phase I trials. Conclusions Following the encouraging preclinical results presented in this paper, clinical trials with F8-IL10

  11. Changes in focal adhesion kinase expression in rats with collagen-induced arthritis and efficacy of intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs alone or in combination

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui-Ying; Luo, Jing; Li, Xiao-Feng; Lv, Qian; Wen, Hong-Yan; Song, Qing-Zhen; Zhao, Wen-Peng; Zhao, Xiang-Cong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Si-Yu; Zhi, Jian-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is known to promote the proliferation, migration and survival of synovial cells and plays an important role in the occurrence, development and pathological process of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to observe FAK changes in synovial cells of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and after intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or in combination in a CIA female SD rat model induced by collagen type II. The rats were randomized to 8 groups: normal control group, CIA model control group, methotrexate (MTX, 0.9 mg/kg/w) group, cyclophosphamide (CTX, 24 mg/kg/3 w) group, leflunomide (LEF, 1.2 mg/kg/d) group, MTX + CTX group, LEF + CTX group, and MTX + LEF group. They were intervened with DMARDs alone or in combination for six weeks. The experiment lasted a total of 9 weeks in vivo. Articular inflammation was measured during the process of drug intervention in terms of the degree of swelling degree in the right hind foot using a venire caliper. All animals were sacrificed by breaking the neck after 9 weeks. Then, the ankle was fixed, decalcified, embedded, and HE stained, and prepared into slices to observe pathological changes in the synovial tissue. FAK expression in synovial cells was assayed by immunohistochemistry and the mean optical density (OD) value was measured using the HPIAS-2000 image analysis system. It was found that FAK expression was negative in normal control group, positive in CIA model control group, and decreased in the three DMARD combination treatment groups significantly as compared with that in the three single-drug groups (P < 0.05). FAK expression in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group decreased more significantly than that in MTX + LEF group (P < 0.05), and there was no statistically significant difference between LEF + CTX and MTX + CTX groups. The arthritis index and pathological change in the synovial tissue in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group

  12. Characterization of inhibitory T cells induced by an analog of type II collagen in an HLA-DR1 humanized mouse model of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We used DR1 transgenic mice and covalently linked DR1 multimers to characterize analog-specific inhibitory T cells in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Because of the low numbers of antigen-specific T cells in wild-type mice, functional T-cell studies in autoimmune arthritis have been challenging. The use of T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice has provided useful information, but such T cells may not represent the heterogeneous T-cell response that occurs in natural settings. Our focus was to develop tools to identify and characterize the population of immunoregulatory T cells induced in wild-type mice by an analog peptide of CII259-273, which contains amino acid substitutions at positions 263 (N) and 266 (D) (analog peptide A12). Methods DR1 multimers, developed by loading empty class II molecules with exogenous peptide, provide a method for visualizing antigen-specific T cells with flow cytometry. However, the low binding avidity of A12 for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) made this strategy untenable. To overcome this problem, we generated DR1 multimers in which the analog peptide A12 was covalently linked, hoping that the low-avidity analog would occupy enough binding clefts to allow detection of the responsive T cells. Results Staining with the tetramer revealed that A12-specific T cells were readily detectable at 10 days after immunization. These CD4(+) T cells are a highly selective subset of the TCR repertoire and have a limited clonality. Analysis of cytokine expression showed that cells detected by tetramer (A12) expressed primarily suppressive cytokines (interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-10) in response to collagen, compared with control cells. Although they did not express Fox-p3, they were extremely effective in preventing and suppressing inflammatory arthritis. Conclusions In summary, our studies showed that the use of covalently linked multimers allows characterization of analog-specific T cells that are otherwise difficult to

  13. ETP-46321, a dual p110α/δ class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor modulates T lymphocyte activation and collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aragoneses-Fenoll, L; Montes-Casado, M; Ojeda, G; Acosta, Y Y; Herranz, J; Martínez, S; Blanco-Aparicio, C; Criado, G; Pastor, J; Dianzani, U; Portolés, P; Rojo, J M

    2016-04-15

    Class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are essential to function of normal and tumor cells, and to modulate immune responses. T lymphocytes express high levels of p110α and p110δ class IA PI3K. Whereas the functioning of PI3K p110δ in immune and autoimmune reactions is well established, the role of p110α is less well understood. Here, a novel dual p110α/δ inhibitor (ETP-46321) and highly specific p110α (A66) or p110δ (IC87114) inhibitors have been compared concerning T cell activation in vitro, as well as the effect on responses to protein antigen and collagen-induced arthritis in vivo. In vitro activation of naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 was inhibited more effectively by the p110δ inhibitor than by the p110α inhibitor as measured by cytokine secretion (IL-2, IL-10, and IFN-γ), T-bet expression and NFAT activation. In activated CD4(+) T cells re-stimulated through CD3 and ICOS, IC87114 inhibited Akt and Erk activation, and the secretion of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17A, and IFN-γ better than A66. The p110α/δ inhibitor ETP-46321, or p110α plus p110δ inhibitors also inhibited IL-21 secretion by differentiated CD4(+) T follicular (Tfh) or IL-17-producing (Th17) helper cells. In vivo, therapeutic administration of ETP-46321 significantly inhibited responses to protein antigen as well as collagen-induced arthritis, as measured by antigen-specific antibody responses, secretion of IL-10, IL-17A or IFN-γ, or clinical symptoms. Hence, p110α as well as p110δ Class IA PI3Ks are important to immune regulation; inhibition of both subunits may be an effective therapeutic approach in inflammatory autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26883061

  14. Mice with an induced mutation in collagen 8A2 develop larger eyes and are resistant to retinal ganglion cell damage in an experimental glaucoma model

    PubMed Central

    Steinhart, Matthew R.; Cone, Frances E.; Nguyen, Cathy; Nguyen, Thao D.; Pease, Mary E.; Puk, Oliver; Graw, Jochen; Oglesby, Ericka N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To study susceptibility to glaucoma injury as it may be affected by mutations in ocular connective tissue components. Methods Mice homozygous for an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea induced G257D exchange (Gly to Asp) missense mutation (Aca23) in their collagen 8A2 gene were studied to measure intraocular pressure (IOP), axial length and width, number of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), and inflation responses. Three month old homozygous Aca23 mutant and wild type (WT) mice had 6 weeks exposure to elevated IOP induced by polystyrene microbead injection. Additional Aca23 and matched controls were studied at ages of 10 and 18 months. Results Aca23 mice had no significant difference from WT in IOP level, and in both strains IOP rose with age. In multivariable models, axial length and width were significantly larger in Aca23 than WT, became larger with age, and were larger after exposure to glaucoma (n=227 mice). From inflation test data, the estimates of scleral stress resultants in Aca23 mice were similar to age-matched and younger WT C57BL/6 (B6) mice, while the strain estimates for Aca23 were significantly less than those for either WT group in the mid-sclera and in some of the more anterior scleral measures (p<0.001; n=29, 22, 20 eyes in Aca23, older WT, younger WT, respectively). With chronic IOP elevation, Aca23 eyes increased 9% in length and 7% in width, compared to untreated fellow eyes (p<0.05, <0.01). With similar elevated IOP exposure, WT eyes enlarged proportionately twice as much as Aca23, increasing in length by 18% and in nasal—temporal width by 13% (both p<0.001, Mann–Whitney test). In 4 month old control optic nerves, mean RGC axon number was not different in Aca23 and WT (46,905±7,592, 43,628±11,162, respectively; p=0.43, Mann–Whitney test, n=37 and 29). With chronic glaucoma, Aca23 mice had a mean axon loss of only 0.57±17%, while WT mice lost 21±31% (median loss: 1% versus 10%, n=37, 29, respectively; p=0.001; multivariable model adjusting for

  15. The ear: Diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vignaud, J.; Jardin, C.; Rosen, L.

    1986-01-01

    This is an English translation of volume 17-1 of Traite de radiodiagnostic and represents a reasonably complete documentation of the diseases of the temporal bone that have imaging manifestations. The book begins with chapters on embryology, anatomy and radiography anatomy; it continues with blood supply and an overview of temporal bone pathology. Subsequent chapters cover malformations, trauma, infections, tumors, postoperative changes, glomus tumors, vertebasilar insufficiency, and facial nerve canal lesions. A final chapter demonstrates and discusses magnetic resonance images of the ear and cerebellopontine angle.

  16. Inability to induce tympanic squamous metaplasia using organochlorine compounds in vitamin A-deficient red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    PubMed

    Kroenlein, Karl R; Sleeman, Jonathan M; Holladay, Steven D; Joyner, Priscilla H; Brown, Justin D; Griffin, Mark; Saunders, Geoffrey; Smith, Stephen A

    2008-07-01

    Previously, we reported that wild eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) with aural abscesses contained higher body burdens of organochlorine (OC) compounds than those without the lesion. This lesion in captive chelonians is associated with turtles that are fed diets deficient in vitamin A. To examine the pathophysiology of this lesion and evaluate the relationship between OC burdens and vitamin A metabolism, we maintained red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans) under different conditions of OC exposure and dietary vitamin A concentrations from August 2005 to February 2006. Dietary vitamin A concentration (0 or 5 international units/g in the diet) and OC exposure (no OC compound or the mixture of 2 mg/kg chlordane, 0.25 mg/kg aroclor, and 1 mg/kg lindane) did not affect histologic score based on degree of squamous metaplasia of the tympanic epithelium or levels of plasma or liver vitamin A among the study groups. The results of this study suggest that 6 mo of exposure to the selected OC compounds, or similar duration of reduced dietary vitamin A concentrations do not influence the formation of squamous metaplasia and aural abscesses in red-eared sliders. Further studies are required to determine whether the duration of the experiment was insufficient, the OC compounds selected were inappropriate, the dosing was incorrect, and whether there are other unknown mechanisms causing the reported association between OC exposure and aural abscesses seen in eastern box turtles. PMID:18689652

  17. Biomimetic Analogs for Collagen Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Gu, L.; Kim, Y.K.; Liu, Y.; Ryou, H.; Wimmer, C.E.; Dai, L.; Arola, D.D.; Looney, S.W.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.

    2011-01-01

    Inability of chemical phosphorylation of sodium trimetaphosphate to induce intrafibrillar mineralization of type I collagen may be due to the failure to incorporate a biomimetic analog to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphates (ACP) as nanoprecursors. This study investigated adsorption/desorption characteristics of hydrolyzed and pH-adjusted sodium trimetaphosphate (HPA-Na3P3O9) to collagen. Based on those results, a 5-minute treatment time with 2.8 wt% HPA-Na3P3O9 was used in a single-layer reconstituted collagen model to confirm that both the ACP-stabilization analog and matrix phosphoprotein analog must be present for intrafibrillar mineralization. The results of that model were further validated by complete remineralization of phosphoric-acid-etched dentin treated with the matrix phosphoprotein analog and lined with a remineralizing lining composite, and with the ACP-stabilization analog supplied in simulated body fluid. An understanding of the basic processes involved in intrafibrillar mineralization of reconstituted collagen fibrils facilitates the design of novel tissue engineering materials for hard tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:20940362

  18. Parathyroid hormone linked to a collagen binding domain promotes hair growth in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Seymour, Andrew; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a major source of psychological stress in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy, and it can influence treatment decisions. Although there is currently no therapy for alopecia, a fusion protein of parathyroid hormone and collagen binding domain (PTH-CBD) has shown promise in animal models. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are dose-dependent effects of PTH-CBD on chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a mouse model. C57BL/6J mice were waxed to synchronize hair follicles; treated on day 7 with vehicle or PTH-CBD (100, 320, and 1000 mcg/kg subcutaneous injection); and treated on day 9 with vehicle or cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg intraperitoneally). Mice were photographed every 3-4 days and killed on day 63 for histological analysis. Photographs were quantified by gray scale analysis to assess hair content. Mice not receiving chemotherapy showed regrowth of hair 2 weeks after waxing and normal histology after 2 months. Mice receiving chemotherapy alone showed marked hair loss after chemotherapy, which was sustained for 10 days and was followed by rapid regrowth of a normal coat. Histological analysis revealed rapid cycling dystrophic anagen/catagen follicles. Animals receiving chemotherapy and PTH-CBD showed decreased hair loss and more rapid regrowth of hair than that seen with chemotherapy alone (increased hair growth by gray scale analysis, P<0.05), and the effects were dose dependent. Histologically, hair follicles in animals receiving the highest dose of PTH-CBD were in a quiescent phase, similar to that in mice that did not receive chemotherapy. Single-dose subcutaneous administration of PTH-CBD showed dose-dependent effects in minimizing hair loss and speeding up recovery from chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:24710191

  19. Ginsenoside metabolite compound K suppresses T-cell priming via modulation of dendritic cell trafficking and costimulatory signals, resulting in alleviation of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingyu; Wu, Huaxun; Wang, Qingtong; Chang, Yan; Liu, Kangkang; Wei, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Ginsenoside metabolite compound K (CK; 20-O-d-glucopyranosyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol), a novel ginsenoside metabolite, belongs to the dammarane-type triterpene saponins, according to its structure. The anti-inflammatory activity of CK has been identified in several studies. Our study demonstrated that CK exerted an anti-inflammatory effect in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and adjuvant-induced arthritis animal models, and this effect was due to inhibition of the abnormal activation and differentiation of T cells. However, the mechanism of CK in suppressing T-cell activation remains unclear. In this study, CK had a therapeutic effect in mice with CIA, decreased the percentage of activated T cells and dendritic cells (DCs), and increased the percentage of naive T cells in lymph nodes. The inhibitory effect on T-cell activation of CK was related to suppression of accumulation of DCs in lymph nodes. CK decreased CCL21 levels in lymph nodes and CCR7 expression in DCs and suppressed CCL21/CCR7-mediated migration of DCs, thus reducing accumulation of DCs in lymph nodes. In addition, signals for T-cell activation including major histocompatibility complex class II and costimulatory molecules, such as CD80 and CD86, were suppressed by CK, and the proliferation of T cells induced by DCs was inhibited by CK. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that CK downregulated DC priming of T-cell activation in CIA, and suppression of CCL21/CCR7-mediated DC migration and signaling between T cells and DCs might be the potential mechanism. These results provide an interesting, novel insight into the potential mechanism by which CK contributes to the anti-inflammatory effect in autoimmune conditions. PMID:25630466

  20. Collagen fiber formation and proliferation as a mechanism of cancer prevention and regression induced by extract from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: correlation between clinical observation and animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, T; Watanabe, S; Hyodoh, F; Saito, T

    1988-01-01

    Administration of polysaccharides extracted from human Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli, Aoyama B strain (SSM) produced regression of breast cancer in 2 women. Biopsies of tumor nodules from these patients revealed intense proliferation of collagen fibers from the stromal cells. SSM apparently promoted the proliferation and maturation of collagen fibers from the stromal cells and matrix destroyed by tumor infiltration. Transplantation of human tumor cell lines into athymic mice resulted in the formation of collagen fibers surrounding the cancer cells. SSM promoted the proliferation and maturation of collagen fibers encasing the tumor cells. The intensity of collagen fiber formation varied with the kind of cancer cells used. The degree of proliferation of collagen fibers correlated with the antitumor effects of SSM. There was hardly any migration of lymphocytes, monocytes, and macrophages in the affected sites. It is interpreted that SSM stimulates the proliferation and maturation of collagen fibers in the host as a major mechanism of its antitumor property. When examined by circular dichroism this proliferation was found to be dependent upon changes in the molecular structure of the substances which make up the cell membrane. Fibronectin was presumed to be important among these substances. PMID:3390842

  1. Piperlongumine attenuates collagen-induced arthritis via expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and inhibition of the activation of fibroblast-like synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Xu, Ping; Du, Xueping; Zhang, Qinggang; Zhu, Yuchang

    2015-04-01

    Piperlonguminine (PL), a key compound from the Piper longum fruit, is known to exhibit anti‑tumor and anti‑inflammatory activities. However, little is known about its effects on collagen‑induced arthritis (CIA). Fibroblast‑like synoviocytes (FLS) have a pivotal role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Myeloid‑derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are able to suppress T cell responses and have important roles in the regulation of autoimmune arthritis. The current study investigated whether PL alters the progression of RA. It was determined that PL reduces the arthritis score and histopathologic lesions in a mouse model of CIA. PL also reduces the expression levels of serum anti‑collagen II antibodies (anti‑CⅡ), tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α), interleukin (IL)‑1β, IL‑23 and IL‑17 in CIA mice. In draining lymph nodes (DLNs), MDSCs were significantly expanded, however, the number of Th17 cells was markedly decreased by PL treatment. Additionally, PL reduced secretion of IL‑1β, IL‑23 and IL‑17 by TNF‑α‑stimulated human RA FLS. PL significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of TNF‑α‑stimulated human RA FLS. These results indicate that PL may be a candidate therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA, via the expansion of MDSCs and the inhibition of the Th17 response and activation of FLS. PMID:25435301

  2. (p40)2-Fc reduces immune-inflammatory response through the activation of T cells in collagen induced arthritis mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon-Yeong; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Seong-Jeong; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Yang, Se-Hwan; Park, Sung-Hwan; Sung, Young-Chul; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La

    2016-08-01

    IL-12p40 homodimer, a natural antagonist of IL-12 and IL-23, performs an important role in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines that is essential for Th1 and Th17 immune responses. Here, we reveal the therapeutic and immunosuppressive effect of the IL-12p40 subunit ((p40)2-Fc) in an experimental autoimmune arthritis model. We hypothesized that (p40)2-Fc may reduce the inflammatory response and the activation of T cells. In this study, we intraperitoneally injected (p40)2-Fc into collagen induced arthritis (CIA) mice to identify whether (p40)2-Fc attenuates CIA severity. (p40)2-Fc reduced the development of CIA, joint inflammation and cartilage destruction. (p40)2-Fc also significantly decreased the concentration of serum immunoglobulin as well as the number of T cells and C II specific T cells. In addition, osteoclastogenesis in (p40)2-Fc treated mice was down-regulated compared to the mice treated with (p40)2-Fc control. We observed that (p40)2-Fc treatment alleviates arthritis in mice with CIA, reducing inflammation and osteoclast differentiation. These findings suggest that (p40)2-Fc can be a potential therapeutic approach for autoimmune arthritis. PMID:27229912

  3. A herbal formula comprising Rosae Multiflorae Fructus and Lonicerae Japonicae Flos, attenuates collagen-induced arthritis and inhibits TLR4 signalling in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Brian Chi Yan; Yu, Hua; Guo, Hui; Su, Tao; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Li, Ting; Cao, Hui-Hui; Tse, Anfernee Kai-Wing; Wu, Zheng-Zhi; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2016-01-01

    RL, a traditional remedy for Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), comprises two edible herbs, Rosae Multiflorae Fructus and Lonicerae Japonicae Flos. We have reported that RL could inhibit the production of inflammatory mediators in immune cells. Here we investigated the effects and the mechanism of action of RL in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. RL significantly increased food intake and weight gain of CIA rats without any observable adverse effect; ameliorated joint erythema and swelling; inhibited immune cell infiltration, bone erosion and osteophyte formation in joints; reduced joint protein expression levels of TLR4, phospho-TAK1, phospho-NF-κB p65, phospho-c-Jun and phospho-IRF3; lowered levels of inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-17A and MCP-1 in sera and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-17A in joints); elevated serum IL-10 level; reinvigorated activities of antioxidant SOD, CAT and GSH-Px in the liver and serum; reduced Th17 cell proportions in splenocytes; inhibited splenocyte proliferation and activation; and lowered serum IgG level. In conclusion, RL at nontoxic doses inhibited TLR4 signaling and potently improved clinical conditions of CIA rats. These findings provide further pharmacological justifications for the traditional use of RL in RA management. PMID:26860973

  4. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Bioactive Compound Ferulic Acid Contained in Oldenlandia diffusa on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hao; Liang, Qing-Hua; Xiong, Xin-Gui; Chen, Jiang; Wu, Dan; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to identify the active compounds in Oldenlandia diffusa (OD) decoction and the compounds absorbed into plasma, and to determine whether the absorbed compounds derived from OD exerted any anti-inflammatory effects in rats with collagen induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The UPLC-PDA (Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography Photo-Diode Array) method was applied to identify the active compounds both in the decoction and rat plasma. The absorbable compound was administered to the CIA rats, and the effects were dynamically observed. X-ray films of the joints and HE stain of synovial tissues were analyzed. The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in the rats from each group were measured by means of ELISA. The absorbed compound in the plasma of CIA rats was identified as ferulic acid (FA), following OD decoction administration. Two weeks after the administration of FA solution or OD decoction, the general conditions improved compared to the model group. The anti-inflammatory effect of FA was inferior to that of the OD decoction (P < 0.05), based on a comparison of IL-1β TNF-α levels. FA from the OD decoction was absorbed into the body of CIA rats, where it elicited anti-inflammatory responses in rats with CIA. Conclusions. These results suggest that FA is the bioactive compound in OD decoction, and FA exerts its effects through anti-inflammatory pathways. PMID:24883069

  5. Extracts of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. attenuate the inflammatory response in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Huang, Mingqing; Zhang, Yuqin; Li, Huang; Zheng, Haiyin; Yu, Lishuang; Chu, Kedan; Lin, Yu; Chen, Lidian

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is considered a serious public health problem, which is commonly treated with traditional Chinese or herbal medicine. The present study evaluated the effects of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. extraction (BCBE) on a type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Wistar rats with CIA received either 125 or 500 mg/kg BCBE, after which, paw swelling was markedly suppressed compared with in the model group. In addition, BCBE significantly ameliorated pathological joint alterations, including synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone destruction. The protein and mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)‑6, IL‑8, tumor necrosis factor‑α and nuclear factor‑κB in synovial tissue were determined by immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis and reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that the expression levels of these factors were significantly downregulated in the BCBE‑treated group compared with in the model group. These results indicated that BCBE may exert an inhibitory effect on the CIA rat model, and its therapeutic potential is associated with its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27035125

  6. Elastin peptides prepared from piscine and mammalian elastic tissues inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation and stimulate migration and proliferation of human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Shiratsuchi, Eri; Ura, Megumi; Nakaba, Misako; Maeda, Iori; Okamoto, Kouji

    2010-11-01

    We obtained pure elastin peptides from bovine ligamentum nuchae, porcine aorta, and bonito bulbus arteriosus. The inhibitory activity of these elastin peptides on platelet aggregation induced by collagen and the migratory and proliferative responsivenesses of human skin fibroblasts to these elastin peptides were examined. All of bonito, bovine, and porcine elastin peptides found to inhibit platelet aggregation, but bonito elastin peptides showed a higher inhibitory activity than bovine and porcine elastin peptides did. All elastin peptides enhanced the proliferation of fibroblasts 3.5- to 4.5-fold at a concentration of 10 µg/ml. Bovine and porcine elastin peptides stimulated the migration of fibroblasts, with the optimal response occurring at 10(-1) µg/ml, while maximal response was at 10(2) µg/ml for bonito elastin peptides. Furthermore, pretreatment of fibroblasts by lactose depressed their ability to migrate in response to all elastin peptides, suggesting the involvement of elastin receptor in cell response. These results suggest that both mammalian and piscine elastin peptides can be applied as useful biomaterials in which elasticity, antithrombotic property, and the enhancement of cell migration and proliferation are required. PMID:20853312

  7. A novel coumarin derivative, 8-methoxy chromen-2-one alleviates collagen induced arthritis by down regulating nitric oxide, NFκB and proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Debasis; Raghav, Sunil Kumar; Gautam, Hemlata; Das, Hasi R

    2015-12-01

    Ruta graveolens (Rue) is a well-known medicinal plant having anti-inflammatory and other healing properties. This contains many active phytochemicals such as coumarins which possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. The present study was carried out to evaluate the therapeutic potential of a newly isolated coumarin derivative from rue plant, 8-methoxy-chromen-2-one (MCO) in the collagen induced arthritic (CIA) rat model. MCO showed inhibition of cytokines and NF-κB in LPS stimulated J774 cells which prompted its possible use in animal. In CIA, arthritic index and arthritic score reduced markedly within 15days of MCO treatment at doses of 2mg and 20mg per kg body weight. Alleviation of joint damage in CIA animals on treatment with MCO was evident from radiographic and histological data. Behavioral studies by open field tests also showed convalescence in the MCO treated CIA rats. Further, escalated plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and also nitric oxide reduced significantly with the treatment. All these results indicate the therapeutic efficacy of MCO and its possible use as an anti-arthritic drug. PMID:26440401

  8. Minimal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (mPBPK) model for a monoclonal antibody against interleukin-6 in mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Jiang, Xiling; Jusko, William J; Zhou, Honghui; Wang, Weirong

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAb) targeting soluble inflammatory cytokines exert their pharmacological effects in rheumatoid arthritis through binding and neutralizing free cytokines in target tissue sites. Therefore suppression of free cytokines in such sites directly relates to the magnitude of therapeutic response. Although the interrelationships between mAb and cytokines have been examined in the systemic circulation, less is known about the interaction of mAb and cytokines in inflamed joints. In the present study, the interplay between the mAb, CNTO 345, and its target IL-6 in serum as well as ankle joint synovial fluid were characterized in collagen-induced arthritic mice. A minimal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model with target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) features in serum and ankle joint synovial fluid was developed for the assessment of the TMDD dynamics of CNTO 345 and IL-6. Our model indicates that TMDD kinetics in ankle joints differ greatly from that in serum. The differences can be attributed to the limited tissue distribution of CNTO 345 in ankle joint synovial fluid, the significant rise of the IL-6 baseline in ankle joint synovial fluid in comparison with serum, and the relative time-scales of elimination rates between CNTO 345, free IL-6 and CNTO 345-IL-6 complex in serum and ankle joint synovial fluid. PMID:27119518

  9. Collagen-graft mixed cellulose esters membrane maintains undifferentiated morphology and markers of potential pluripotency in feeder-free culture of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lotfalah Moradi, Sadegh; Hajishafieeha, Zahra; Nojedehi, Shahrzad; Dinarvand, Vida; Hesami Tackallou, Saeed; Roy, Ram V; Ardeshirylajimi, Abdolreza; Soleimani, Masoud

    2016-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are unique and unlimited clinical sources of stem cell therapy for the regenerative medicine. Feeder layer preparation is an important step for iPSCs production, which is expensive, time-consuming and requires conversance. In the present study, we investigated the maintenance of pluripotency, and stemness of the iPSCs through feeder-free culture on a collagen-grafted Mixed Cellulose Esters membrane (MCE-COL) after three passages during twelve days. Results have demonstrated that the iPSCs cultured on MCE-COL membrane had a fine, typical undifferentiated morphology, increased proliferation rate and significant multi-lineage differentiation potential. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and pluripotency associated gene markers expression further confirmed that iPSCs cultured on the surface of MCE-COL had more ALP positive colonies and enhanced expression of Oct-4, Nanog, Sox-2 and ALP in comparison with MCE and control groups. Since MCE-COL membrane has three dimensional structure and bioactivity, it has the potential for usage in the feeder-free culture of iPSCs, and could be a suitable candidate to use as a feeder layer in stem cells preparation. PMID:27449919

  10. Designing Anti-inflammatory Drugs from Parasitic Worms: A Synthetic Small Molecule Analogue of the Acanthocheilonema viteae Product ES-62 Prevents Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In spite of increasing evidence that parasitic worms may protect humans from developing allergic and autoimmune diseases and the continuing identification of defined helminth-derived immunomodulatory molecules, to date no new anti-inflammatory drugs have been developed from these organisms. We have approached this matter in a novel manner by synthesizing a library of drug-like small molecules based upon phosphorylcholine, the active moiety of the anti-inflammatory Acanthocheilonema viteae product, ES-62, which as an immunogenic protein is unsuitable for use as a drug. Following preliminary in vitro screening for inhibitory effects on relevant macrophage cytokine responses, a sulfone-containing phosphorylcholine analogue (11a) was selected for testing in an in vivo model of inflammation, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Testing revealed that 11a was as effective as ES-62 in protecting DBA/1 mice from developing CIA and mirrored its mechanism of action in downregulating the TLR/IL-1R transducer, MyD88. 11a is thus a novel prototype for anti-inflammatory drug development. PMID:24228757

  11. A Dynamic Real Time In Vivo and Static Ex Vivo Analysis of Granulomonocytic Cell Migration in the Collagen-Induced Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Ruth; Rath, Eva; Hladik, Anastasiya; Niederreiter, Birgit; Bonelli, Michael; Frantal, Sophie; Smolen, Josef S.; Scheinecker, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes (granulomonocytic cells; GMC) drive the inflammatory process at the earliest stages of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The migratory behavior and functional properties of GMC within the synovial tissue are, however, only incompletely characterized. Here we have analyzed GMC in the murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA using multi-photon real time in vivo microscopy together with ex vivo analysis of GMC in tissue sections. GMC were abundant as soon as clinical arthritis was apparent. GMC were motile and migrated randomly through the synovial tissue. In addition, we observed the frequent formation of cell clusters consisting of both neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes that actively contributed to the inflammatory process of arthritis. Treatment of animals with a single dose of prednisolone reduced the mean velocity of cell migration and diminished the overall immigration of GMC. In summary, our study shows that the combined application of real time in vivo microscopy together with elaborate static post-mortem analysis of GMC enables the description of dynamic migratory characteristics of GMC together with their precise location in a complex anatomical environment. Moreover, this approach is sensitive enough to detect subtle therapeutic effects within a very short period of time. PMID:22529989

  12. Modeling Analysis of Biomechanical Changes of Middle Ear and Cochlea in Otitis Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Rong Z.; Zhang, Xiangming; Guan, Xiying

    2011-11-01

    A comprehensive finite element (FE) model of the human ear including the ear canal, middle ear, and spiral cochlea was developed using histological sections of human temporal bone. The cochlea was modeled with three chambers separated by the basilar membrane and Reissner's membrane and filled with perilymphatic fluid. The viscoelastic material behavior was applied to middle ear soft tissues based on dynamic measurements of tissues in our lab. The model was validated using the experimental data obtained in human temporal bones and then used to simulate various stages of otitis media (OM) including the changes of morphology, mechanical properties, pressure, and fluid level in the middle ear. Function alterations of the middle ear and cochlea in OM were derived from the model and compared with the measurements from temporal bones. This study indicates that OM can be simulated in the FE model to predict the hearing loss induced by biomechanical changes of the middle ear and cochlea.

  13. Wax blockage in the ear (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ear canal is lined with hair follicles and glands that produce a waxy oil called cerumen. Sometimes the ... wax than can be easily excreted out the ear. This extra wax may harden within the ear ...

  14. Otoscopic exam of the ear (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... intrument which is used to look into the ear canal. The ear speculum (a cone-shaped viewing piece of the otoscope) is slowly inserted into the ear canal while looking into the otoscope. The speculum ...

  15. Middle ear infection (otitis media) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inflammation and/or infection of the middle ear. Acute otitis media (acute ear infection) occurs ... or viral infection of the fluid of the middle ear, which causes production of fluid or pus. ...

  16. Experimental murine myopia induces collagen type Iα1 (COL1A1) DNA methylation and altered COL1A1 messenger RNA expression in sclera

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangtian; Ji, Fengtao; An, Jianhong; Zhao, Fuxin; Shi, Fanjun; Huang, Furong; Li, Yuan; Jiao, Shiming; Yan, Dongsheng; Chen, Xiaoyan; Chen, JiangFan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether myopia development is associated with changes of scleral DNA methylation in cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites in the collagen 1A1 (COL1A1) promoter and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels following murine form deprivation myopia. Methods Fifty-seven C57BL/6 mice (postnatal day 23) were randomly assigned to four groups: (1) monocular form deprivation (MD) in which a diffuser lens was placed over one eye for 28 days; (2) normal controls without MD; (3) MD recovery in which the diffuser lens was removed for seven days; and (4) MD recovery normal controls. The DNA methylation pattern in COL1A1 promoter and exon 1 was determined by bisulfite DNA sequencing, and the COL1A1 mRNA level in sclera was determined by quantitative PCR. Results MD was found to induce myopia in the treated eyes. Six CpG sites in the promoter and exon 1 region of COL1A1 were methylated with significantly higher frequency in the treated eyes than normal control eyes (p<0.05), with CpG island methylation in MD-contralateral eyes being intermediate. Consistent with the CpG methylation, scleral COL1A1 mRNA was reduced by 57% in the MD-treated eyes compared to normal controls (p<0.05). After seven days of MD recovery, CpG methylation was significantly reduced (p=0.01). The methylation patterns returned to near normal level in five CpG sites, but the sixth was hypomethylated compared to normal controls. Conclusions In parallel with the development of myopia and the reduced COL1A1 mRNA, the frequency of methylation in CpG sites of the COL1A1 promoter/exon 1 increased during MD and returned to near normal during recovery. Thus, hypermethylation of CpG sites in the promoter/exon 1 of COL1A1 may underlie reduced collagen synthesis at the transcriptional level in myopic scleras. PMID:22690110

  17. Distribution of Young's Modulus in Porcine Corneas after Riboflavin/UVA-Induced Collagen Cross-Linking as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rheinlaender, Johannes; Sel, Saadettin; Scholz, Michael; Paulsen, Friedrich; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2014-01-01

    Riboflavin/UVA-induced corneal collagen cross-linking has become an effective clinical application to treat keratoconus and other ectatic disorders of the cornea. Its beneficial effects are attributed to a marked stiffening of the unphysiologically weak stroma. Previous studies located the stiffening effect predominantly within the anterior cornea. In this study, we present an atomic force microscopy-derived analysis of the depth-dependent distribution of the Young's modulus with a depth resolution of 5 µm in 8 cross-linked porcine corneas and 8 contralateral controls. Sagittal cryosections were fabricated from every specimen and subjected to force mapping. The mean stromal depth of the zone with effective cross-linking was found to be 219±67 µm. Within this cross-linked zone, the mean Young's modulus declined from 49±18 kPa at the corneal surface to 46±17 kPa, 33±11 kPa, 17±5 kPa, 10±4 kPa and 10±4 kPa at stromal depth intervals of 0–50 µm, 50–100 µm, 100–150 µm, 150–200 µm and 200–250 µm, respectively. This corresponded to a stiffening by a factor of 8.1 (corneal surface), 7.6 (0–50 µm), 5.4 (50–100 µm), 3.0 (100–150 µm), 1.6 (150–200 µm), and 1.5 (200–250 µm), when compared to the Young's modulus of the posterior 100 µm. The mean Young's modulus within the cross-linked zone was 20±8 kPa (2.9-fold stiffening), while it was 11±4 kPa (1.7-fold stiffening) for the entire stroma. Both values were significantly distinct from the mean Young's modulus obtained from the posterior 100 µm of the cross-linked corneas and from the contralateral controls. In conclusion, we were able to specify the depth-dependent distribution of the stiffening effect elicited by standard collagen cross-linking in porcine corneas. Apart from determining the depth of the zone with effective corneal cross-linking, we also developed a method that allows for atomic force microscopy-based measurements of gradients of Young's modulus in soft tissues in

  18. Retrovirus-induced interference with collagen I gene expression in Mov13 fibroblasts is maintained in the absence of DNA methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H; Hartung, S; Breindl, M

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the role of DNA methylation in repression of the murine alpha 1 type I collagen (COL1A1) gene in Mov13 fibroblasts. In Mov13 mice, a retroviral provirus has inserted into the first intron of the COL1A1 gene and blocks its expression at the level of transcriptional initiation. We found that regulatory sequences in the COL1A1 promoter region that are involved in the tissue-specific regulation of the gene are unmethylated in collagen-expressing wild-type fibroblasts and methylated in Mov13 fibroblasts, confirming and extending earlier observations. To directly assess the role of DNA methylation in the repression of COL1A1 gene transcription, we treated Mov13 fibroblasts with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine. This treatment resulted in a demethylation of the COL1A1 regulatory sequences but failed to activate transcription of the COL1A1 gene. Moreover, the 5-azacytidine treatment induced a transcription-competent chromatin structure in the retroviral sequences but not in the COL1A1 promoter. In DNA transfection and microinjection experiments, we found that the provirus interfered with transcriptional activity of the COL1A1 promoter in Mov13 fibroblasts but not in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In contrast, the wild-type COL1A1 promoter was transcriptionally active in Mov13 fibroblasts. These experiments showed that the COL1A1 promoter is potentially transcriptionally active in the presence of proviral sequences and that Mov13 fibroblasts contain the trans-acting factors required for efficient COL1A1 gene expression. Our results indicate that the provirus insertion in Mov13 can inactivate COL1A1 gene expression at several levels. It prevents the developmentally regulated establishment of a transcription-competent methylation pattern and chromatin structure of the COL1A1 domain and, in the absence of DNA methylation, appears to suppress the COL1A1 promoter in a cell-specific manner, presumably by assuming a dominant chromatin structure that may be

  19. Two Ears Are Not Always Better than One: Mandatory Vowel Fusion Across Spectrally Mismatched Ears in Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Lina A J; Eggleston, Jessica L; Walker, Emily P; Oh, Yonghee

    2016-08-01

    Hearing loss and auditory prostheses can alter auditory processing by inducing large pitch mismatches and broad pitch fusion between the two ears. Similar to integration of incongruent inputs in other sensory modalities, the mismatched, fused pitches are often averaged across ears for simple stimuli. Here, we measured parallel effects on complex stimulus integration using a new technique based on vowel classification in five bilateral hearing aid users and eight bimodal cochlear implant users. Continua between five pairs of synthetic vowels were created by varying the first formant spectral peak while keeping the second formant constant. Comparison of binaural and monaural vowel classification functions for each vowel pair continuum enabled visualization of the following frequency-dependent integration trends: (1) similar monaural and binaural functions, (2) ear dominance, (3) binaural averaging, and (4) binaural interference. Hearing aid users showed all trends, while bimodal cochlear implant users showed mostly ear dominance or interference. Interaural pitch mismatches, frequency ranges of binaural pitch fusion, and the relative weightings of pitch averaging across ears were also measured using tone and/or electrode stimulation. The presence of both large interaural pitch mismatches and broad pitch fusion was not sufficient to predict vowel integration trends such as binaural averaging or interference. The way that pitch averaging was weighted between ears also appears to be important for determining binaural vowel integration trends. Abnormally broad spectral fusion and the associated phoneme fusion across mismatched ears may underlie binaural speech perception interference observed in hearing aid and cochlear implant users. PMID:27220769

  20. Enigmatic insight into collagen.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  1. Collagen and gelatin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dasong; Nikoo, Mehdi; Boran, Gökhan; Zhou, Peng; Regenstein, Joe M

    2015-01-01

    Collagen and gelatin have been widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries due to their excellent biocompatibility, easy biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. Fish collagen and gelatin are of renewed interest, owing to the safety and religious concerns of their mammalian counterparts. The structure of collagen has been studied using various modern technologies, and interpretation of the raw data should be done with caution. The structure of collagen may vary with sources and seasons, which may affect its applications and optimal extraction conditions. Numerous studies have investigated the bioactivities and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and their hydrolysis peptides, using both in vitro and in vivo assay models. In addition to their established nutritional value as a protein source, collagen and collagen-derived products may exert various potential biological activities on cells in the extracellular matrix through the corresponding food-derived peptides after ingestion, and this might justify their applications in dietary supplements and pharmaceutical preparations. Moreover, an increasing number of novel applications have been found for collagen and gelatin. Therefore, this review covers the current understanding of the structure, bioactivities, and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and gelatin hydrolysates as well as their most recent applications. PMID:25884286

  2. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  3. Essential Role for the Lectin Pathway in Collagen Antibody-Induced Arthritis Revealed Through Use of Adenovirus Programming Complement Inhibitor MAp44 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Nirmal K.; Mehta, Gaurav; Kjaer, Troels R.; Takahashi, Minoru; Schaack, Jerome; Morrison, Thomas E.; Thiel, Steffen; Arend, William P.; Holers, V. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies using mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and complement C4 deficient mice have suggested that the lectin pathway (LP) is not required for the development of inflammatory arthritis in the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model. MBL, ficolins and collectin-11 are key LP pattern recognition molecules that associate with three serine proteases, MASP-1, MASP-2 and MASP-3, and also with two MBL-associated proteins designated sMAP and MAp44. Recent studies have shown that MAp44, an alternatively spliced product of the MASP-1/3 gene, is a competitive inhibitor of the binding of the recognition molecules to all three MASPs. In these studies we examined the effect of treatment of mice with adenovirus (Ad) programmed to express human MAp44 (AdhMAp44) on the development of CAIA. AdhMAp44 and Ad programming Green fluorescent protein (AdGFP) expression were injected intraperitoneally in C57BL/6 wild-type mice prior to the induction of CAIA. AdhMAp44 significantly reduced the clinical disease activity score (CDA) by 81% compared to mice injected with AdGFP. Similarly, histopathologic injury scores for inflammation, pannus, cartilage and bone damage, as well as C3 deposition in the cartilage and synovium, were significantly reduced by AdhMAp44 pretreatment. Mice treated with AdmMAp44, programming expression of mouse MAp44, also showed significantly decreased CDA and histopathologic injury scores. Additionally, administration of AdhMAp44 significantly diminished the severity of Ross River Virus-induced arthritis, a LP-dependent model. Our study provides conclusive evidence that an intact complement LP is essential to initiate CAIA, and that MAp44 may be an appropriate treatment for inflammatory arthritis. PMID:25070856

  4. Norisoboldine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis through regulating the balance between Th17 and regulatory T cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wang, Ting; Yu, Juntao; Wu, Xin; Lu, Qian; Chou, Guixin; Wang, Zhengtao; Kong, Lingyi; Dai, Yue; Xia, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Norisoboldine (NOR), the main active ingredient of the dry root of Lindera aggregata, was previously proven to have substantial therapeutic effects on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice by oral administration. However, it exhibited a very poor bioavailability in normal rats. The pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamics disconnection attracts us to explore its anti-arthritic mechanism in more detail. In this study, NOR, administered orally, markedly attenuated the pathological changes in CIA rats, which was accompanied by the down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that the plasma concentration of NOR was moderately elevated in CIA rats compared with normal rats, but it was still far lower than the minimal effective concentration required for inhibiting the proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes in vitro. Interestingly, NOR was shown to regulate the balance between Th17 and regulatory T (Treg) cells in the intestinal lymph nodes more strikingly than in other tissues. It could increase the expression of Foxp3 mRNA in both gut and joints, and markedly up-regulate the number of integrin α4β7 (a marker of gut source)-positive Foxp3{sup +} cells in the joints of CIA rats. These results suggest that the gut might be the primary action site of NOR, and NOR exerts anti-arthritis effect through regulating the balance between Th17 and Treg cells in intestinal lymph nodes and yielding a trafficking of lymphocytes (especially Treg cells) from the gut to joint. The findings of the present study also provide a plausible explanation for the anti-arthritic effects of poorly absorbed compounds like NOR. - Highlights: • Norisoboldine, administered orally, markedly attenuates the clinical signs of CIA. • Norisoboldine regulates the balance of Th17/Treg cells in the intestinal lymph node. • Norisoboldine induces the migration of Treg cells from the gut to joint.

  5. Prediction of antiarthritic drug efficacies by monitoring active matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) levels in collagen-induced arthritic mice using the MMP-3 probe.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aeju; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Sung-Jae; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kim, Han Sung; Choi, Kuiwon; Kwon, Ick Chan; Yoon, Soo-Young; Youn, Inchan

    2014-05-01

    Active matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) is a prognostic marker of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We recently developed an MMP-3 probe that can specifically detect the active form of MMP-3. The aim of this study was to investigate whether detection and monitoring of active MMP-3 could be useful to predict therapeutic drug responses in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. During the period of treatment with drugs such as methotrexate (MTX) or infliximab (IFX), MMP-3 mRNA and protein levels were correlated with fluorescence signals in arthritic joint tissues and in the serum of CIA mice. Also, bone volume density and erosion in the knee joints and the paws of CIA mice were measured with microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), X-ray, and histology to confirm drug responses. In joint tissues and serum of CIA mice, strong fluorescence signals induced by the action of active MMP-3 were significantly decreased when drugs were applied. The decrease in RA scores in drug-treated CIA mice led to fluorescence reductions, mainly as a result of down-regulation of MMP-3 mRNA or protein. The micro-CT, X-ray, and histology results clearly showed marked decreases in bone and cartilage destruction, which were consistent with the reduction of fluorescence by down-regulation of active MMP-3 in drug-treated CIA mice. We suggest that the MMP-3 diagnostic kit could be used to detect and monitor the active form of MMP-3 in CIA mice serum during a treatment course and thereby used to predict the drug response or resistance to RA therapies at an earlier stage. We hope that monitoring of active MMP-3 levels in arthritis patients using the MMP-3 diagnostic kit will be a promising tool for drug discovery, drug development, and monitoring of drug responses in RA therapy. PMID:24673659

  6. Treatment and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia with PTH-CBD, a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog, in a non-depilated mouse model.

    PubMed

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is a psychologically devastating complication of chemotherapy for which there is currently no effective therapy. PTH-CBD is a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog that has shown promise as a therapy for alopecia disorders. This study compared the efficacy of prophylactic versus therapeutic administration of PTH-CBD in chemotherapy-induced alopecia using a mouse model that mimics the cyclic chemotherapy dosing used clinically. C57BL/6J mice were treated with a single subcutaneous injection of PTH-CBD (320 mcg/kg) or vehicle control before or after hair loss developing from three courses of cyclophosphamide chemotherapy (50-150 mg/kg/week). Mice receiving chemotherapy alone developed hair loss and depigmentation over 6-12 months. Mice pretreated with PTH-CBD did not develop these changes and maintained a normal-appearing coat. Mice treated with PTH-CBD after development of hair loss showed a partial recovery. Observations of hair loss were confirmed quantitatively by gray scale analysis. Histological examination showed that in mice receiving chemotherapy alone, there were small, dystrophic hair follicles mostly in the catagen phase. Mice receiving PTH-CBD before chemotherapy showed a mix of normal-appearing telogen and anagen hair follicles with no evidence of dystrophy. Mice receiving PTH-CBD therapy after chemotherapy showed intermediate histological features. PTH-CBD was effective in both the prevention and the treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice, but pretreatment appears to result in a better cosmetic outcome. PTH-CBD shows promise as an agent in the prevention of this complication of chemotherapy and improving the quality of life for cancer patients. PMID:24025564

  7. Methyl salicylate lactoside inhibits inflammatory response of fibroblast-like synoviocytes and joint destruction in collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Wenyu; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Xue; Xin, Sheng; Zhou, Yiming; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dan; Li, Yongjie; Zhou, Sibai; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-d-lactoside (MSL), whose chemical structure is similar to that of salicylic acid, is a natural product derivative isolated from a traditional Chinese herb. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of MSL in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and explore its underlying mechanism. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The anti-arthritic effects of MSL were evaluated on human rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in vitro and CIA in mice in vivo by obtaining clinical scores, measuring hind paw thickness and inflammatory cytokine levels, radiographic evaluations and histopathological assessments. KEY RESULTS Treatment with MSL after the onset of arthritis significantly prevented the progression and development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in CIA mice without megascopic gastric mucosa damage. In addition, MSL inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, the phosphorylation and translocation of NF-κB, and cell proliferation induced by TNF-α in FLS. MSL non-selectively inhibited the activity of COX in vitro, but was a more potent inhibitor of COX-2 than COX-1. MSL also inhibited the phosphorylation of inhibitor of NF-κB kinase, IκBα and p65, thus blocking the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in TNF-α-stimulated FLS. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS MSL exerts therapeutic effects on CIA mice, suppressing the inflammatory response and joint destruction by non-selectively inhibiting the activity of COX and suppressing activation of the NF-κB signalling pathway, but without damaging the gastric mucosa. Therefore, MSL has great potential to be developed into a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA. PMID:24712652

  8. Treatment and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia with PTH-CBD, a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog, in a non-depilated mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is a psychologically devastating complication of chemotherapy for which there is currently no effective therapy. PTH-CBD is a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog that has shown promise as a therapy for alopecia disorders. To compare the efficacy of prophylactic versus therapeutic administration of PTH-CBD in chemotherapy-induced alopecia using a mouse model that mimics the cyclic chemotherapy dosing used clinically. C57BL/6J mice were treated with a single subcutaneous injection of PTH-CBD (320 mcg/kg) or vehicle control before or after hair loss developing from three courses of cyclophosphamide chemotherapy (50–150 mg/kg/week). Mice receiving chemotherapy alone developed hair loss and depigmentation over 6–12 months. Mice pretreated with PTH-CBD did not develop these changes and maintained a normal-appearing coat. Mice treated with PTH-CBD after development of hair loss showed a partial recovery. Observations of hair loss were confirmed quantitatively by gray scale analysis. Histological examination showed that in mice receiving chemotherapy alone, there were small, dystrophic hair follicles mostly in the catagen phase. Mice receiving PTH-CBD before chemotherapy showed a mix of normal-appearing telogen and anagen hair follicles with no evidence of dystrophy. Mice receiving PTH-CBD therapy after chemotherapy showed intermediate histological features. PTH-CBD was effective in both the prevention and the treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice, but pretreatment appears to result in a better cosmetic outcome. PTH-CBD shows promise as an agent in the prevention of this complication of chemotherapy and improving the quality of life for cancer patients. PMID:24025564

  9. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis through modulating oxidative stress and suppressing nuclear factor-kappa B pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinhang; Li, Siming; Liu, Yaonan; Tian, Guiyou; Yuan, Qingyan; Bai, Fuliang; Wang, Wenfei; Zhang, Zhiyi; Ren, Guiping; Zhang, Yu; Li, Deshan

    2015-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that circulating FGF21 levels are elevated in the serum and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study is to investigate efficacy of FGF21 for treatment of RA and the molecular mechanisms of the therapeutic effect on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Mice with CIA were subcutaneously administered with FGF21 (5, 2 or 1mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), IL-1β antibody (5mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), IL-17A antibody (5mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) and dexamethasone (DEX) (1mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), respectively. The effects of treatment were determined by arthritis severity score, histological damage and cytokine production. The activation of NF-κB was analyzed by Western blotting. We also detected the levels of oxidative stress parameters. Our results showed that FGF21 had beneficial effects on clinical symptom and histological lesion of CIA mice. Similar to antibody and DEX, FGF21 treatment alleviated the severity of arthritis by reducing humoral and cellular immune responses and down-regulating the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. FGF21 treatment also reduced the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ and MMP-3 and increased level of IL-10 in the spleen tissue or the plasma of CIA mice in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, FGF21 inhibited IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and induced significant changes of oxidative stress parameters (MDA, SOD, CAT, GSH-PX and GSH) in the plasma. FGF21 exerts therapeutic efficacy for RA through antioxidant reaction and inhibiting NF-κB inflammatory pathway. This study provides evidence that FGF21 may be a promising therapeutic agent for RA patients. PMID:25601498

  10. Photopatterning of vascular endothelial growth factor within collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds can induce a spatially confined response in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Aurora T; Pence, Jacquelyn C; Weisgerber, Daniel W; Harley, Brendan A C; Bailey, Ryan C

    2014-11-01

    Biomolecular signals within the native extracellular matrix are complex, with bioactive factors found in both soluble and sequestered states. In the design of biomaterials for tissue engineering applications it is increasingly clear that new approaches are required to locally tailor the biomolecular environment surrounding cells within the matrix. One area of particular focus is strategies to improve the speed or quality of vascular ingrowth and remodeling. While the addition of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been shown to improve vascular response, strategies to immobilize such signals within a biomaterial offer the opportunity to optimize efficiency and to explore spatially defined patterning of such signals. Here we describe the use of benzophenone (BP) photolithography to decorate three-dimensional collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds with VEGF in a spatially defined manner. In this effort we demonstrate functional patterning of a known agonist of vascular remodeling and directly observe phenotypic effects induced by this immobilized cue. VEGF was successfully patterned in both stripes and square motifs across the scaffold with high specificity (on:off pattern signal). The depth of patterning was determined to extend up to 500 μm into the scaffold microstructure. Notably, photopatterned VEGF retained native functionality as it was shown to induce morphological changes in human umbilical vein cells indicative of early vasculogenesis. Immobilized VEGF led to greater cell infiltration into the scaffold and the formation of immature vascular network structures. Ultimately, these results suggest that BP-mediated photolithography is a facile method to spatially control the presentation of instructive biological cues to cells within CG scaffolds. PMID:25016280

  11. Facilitating roles of murine platelet glycoprotein Ib and αIIbβ3 in phosphatidylserine exposure during vWF–collagen-induced thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Kuijpers, Marijke J E; Schulte, Valerie; Oury, Cécile; Lindhout, Theo; Broers, Jos; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Heemskerk, Johan W M

    2004-01-01

    Vessel wall damage exposes collagen fibres, to which platelets adhere directly via the collagen receptors glycoprotein (GP) VI and integrin α2β1 and indirectly by collagen-bound von Willebrand factor (vWF) via the GPIb-V-IX and integrin αIIbβ3 receptor complexes. Platelet–collagen interaction under shear stimulates thrombus formation in two ways, by integrin-dependent formation of platelet aggregates and by surface exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine (PS). GPVI is involved in both processes, complemented by α2β1. In mouse blood flowing over collagen, we investigated the additional role of platelet–vWF binding via GPIb and αIIbβ3. Inhibition of GPIb as well as blocking of vWF binding to collagen reduced stable platelet adhesion at high shear rate. This was accompanied by delayed platelet Ca2+ responses and reduced PS exposure, while microaggregates were still formed. Inhibition of integrin αIIbβ3 with JON/A antibody, which blocks αIIbβ3 binding to both vWF and fibrinogen, reduced PS exposure and aggregate formation. The JON/A effects were not enhanced by combined blocking of GPIb–vWF binding, suggesting a function for αIIbβ3 downstream of GPIb. Typically, with blood from FcR γ-chain +/− mutant mice, expressing 50% of normal platelet GPVI levels, GPIb blockage almost completely abolished platelet adhesion and PS exposure. Together, these data indicate that, under physiological conditions of flow, both adhesive receptors GPIb and αIIbβ3 facilitate GPVI-mediated PS exposure by stabilizing platelet binding to collagen. Hence, these glycoproteins have an assistant procoagulant role in collagen-dependent thrombus formation, which is most prominent at reduced GPVI activity and is independent of the presence of thrombin. PMID:15155790

  12. Comparison of growth-induced resorption and denervation-induced resorption on the release of (/sup 3/H)tetracycline, /sup 45/calcium, and (/sup 3/H)collagen from whole bones of growing rats

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, L.; Heiple, K.G.; Stromberg, B.V.

    1983-01-01

    The major effect of immobilization during growth is a smaller bone mass induced by either an increased bone resorption or a decreased bone formation. Using a method of analyzing radioisotopic loss of (/sup 3/H)tetracycline and (/sup 3/H)collagen from bone prelabeled in vivo, we compared the amount of bone resorption due to immobilization with bone resorption induced by growth. One hind limb was denervated in growing male rats, 6 weeks of age, that had been chronically prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)tetracycline, /sup 45/calcium, and (/sup 3/H)proline. The total radioactivity of the whole femur and tibia/fibula from the denervated limb was compared with that from bones of the control limb at 0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks after denervation. The effect of growth on bone formation was measured by net increases in bone length, volume, and mass of matrix and mineral. Experimental bones had a significantly smaller volume and mass. Bone resorption was much greater during growth modeling than during denervation. The additional bone resorption induced by denervation was a small fraction (one-fourth) of the resorption induced by growth. Denervation during growth resulted in less bone being formed due to a smaller gain in matrix and mineral mass as a result of a reduction in bone formation.

  13. Outcomes in Endoscopic Ear Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kiringoda, Ruwan; Kozin, Elliott D; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    Endoscopic ear surgery (EES) provides several advantages compared with traditional binocular microscopy, including a wide-field view, improved resolution with high magnification, and visual access to hidden corridors of the middle ear. Although binocular microscopic-assisted surgical techniques remain the gold standard for most otologists, EES is slowly emerging as a viable alternative for performing otologic surgery at several centers in the United States and abroad. In this review, we evaluate the current body of literature regarding EES outcomes, summarize our EES outcomes at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, and compare these results with data for microscopic-assisted otologic surgery. PMID:27565392

  14. Collagen: Biochemistry, biomechanics, biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Nimni, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date reference for new ideas, information, and concepts in collagen research. The first volume emphasizes the relationship between the molecular structure and function of collagen, including descriptions of collagen types which exist in tissues as well as how these molecules organize into fibrils and the nature of the chemical crosslinks which stabilize them. In Volume II the biomechanical behavior of various specialized tissues, abnormal accumulation of collagen in the form of scars of fibrous infiltration are examined/and wound healing, tissue regulation and repair are covered in detail. Volume III explores the increasing application of collagen technology to the field of bioprosthesis, including the production of heart valve bioprosthesis, blood vessels, ligament substitutes, and bone substitutes.

  15. Curative Effects of Oleanolic Acid on Formed Hypertrophic Scars in the Rabbit Ear Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Lan-Ke; Peng, Cheng; He, Kun; Rahman, Khalid; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is a common proliferative disorder of dermal fibroblasts characterized by collagen overproduction and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM). There is no consensus about the best therapeutics to produce complete and permanent improvement of scars with few side effects. To investigate the therapeutic effects of oleanolic acid (OA) on hypertrophic scars and explore the possible mechanism of action involved, a rabbit ear model with hypertrophic scars was established. OA (2.5%, 5%, and 10%) was given once daily to the scars for 28 consecutive days. As a result, OA significantly alleviated formed hypertrophic scars on rabbit ears. The levels of TGF-β1, MMP-1, TIMP-1, and collagens I and III were notably decreased, and the number of apoptosis cells and mRNA expression of MMP-2, caspase-3, and caspase-9 were markedly increased in the scar tissue. The scar elevation index (SEI) was also evidently reduced. Histological findings exhibited significant amelioration of the collagen tissue. These results suggest that OA has the favorable curative effects on formed hypertrophic scars in the rabbit ear model, and the possible mechanism of action is that OA decreases HSFs proliferation and increases HSFs apoptosis by reduction of P311 gene expression and TGF-β1 production, inhibition of TIMP-1 secretion, enhancement of MMP-2 activity, and subsequently facilitation of degradation of collagen types I and III. PMID:23326292

  16. Allogeneic Murine Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Migration to Inflamed Joints In Vivo and Amelioration of Collagen Induced Arthritis When Transduced to Express CTLA4Ig

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Frank; Ritter, Thomas; O'Flatharta, Cathal; Howard, Linda; Shaw, Georgina; Anegon, Ignacio; Murphy, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Despite the immunosuppressive, homing, and regenerative capabilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), their ability to migrate to arthritic joints and influence the course of arthritis in vivo remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine if allogeneic MSCs migrate to inflamed joints in vivo and to determine if MSCs expressing the costimulation blocker cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4 coupled to immunoglobulin-G (CTLA4Ig) could be used to ameliorate collagen induced arthritis (CIA). The migration of systemically delivered inbred mouse strain (FVB) MSCs to migrate to inflamed joints in CIA was studied using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, the effect of BALB/c MSCs modified with an adenoviral vector to express CTLA4Ig, on T cell function in vitro and on CIA in vivo was assessed. After systemic delivery of FVB MSCs, eGFP DNA was detectable in the joints of mice with CIA confirming that some MSCs had reached to inflamed joints. BALB/c MSCs suppressed the secretion of both TNFα and IFNγ, and reduced the ratio of Th1:Th2 cytokine expression, by DBA/1 T cells in vitro irrespective of viral modification. The expression of CTLA4Ig did not augment this effect. Despite a worsening of disease scores after infusion of BALB/c MSCs in vivo, BALB/c MSCs expressing CTLA4Ig significantly delayed the onset of inflammatory arthritis in CIA. These data demonstrate that allogeneic MSCs can migrate to the inflamed joints of CIA in vivo and that genetically modified allogeneic MSCs may be considered for development of gene therapy strategies for inflammatory arthritis PMID:23895495

  17. Alport alloantibodies but not Goodpasture autoantibodies induce murine glomerulonephritis: protection by quinary crosslinks locking cryptic α3(IV) collagen autoepitopes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping; Kashtan, Clifford E; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2010-09-15

    The noncollagenous (NC1) domains of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) are targets of Goodpasture autoantibodies or Alport posttransplant nephritis alloantibodies mediating rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Because the autoepitopes but not the alloepitopes become cryptic upon assembly of alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers, we investigated how the accessibility of B cell epitopes in vivo influences the development of glomerulonephritis in mice passively immunized with human anti-GBM Abs. Alport alloantibodies, which bound to native murine alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers in vitro, deposited linearly along the mouse GBM in vivo, eliciting crescentic glomerulonephritis in Fcgr2b(-/-) mice susceptible to Ab-mediated inflammation. Goodpasture autoantibodies, which bound to murine alpha3NC1 monomer and dimer subunits but not to native alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers in vitro, neither bound to the mouse GBM in vivo nor induced experimental glomerulonephritis. This was due to quinary NC1 crosslinks, recently identified as sulfilimine bonds, which comprehensively locked the cryptic Goodpasture autoepitopes in the mouse GBM. In contrast, non-crosslinked alpha3NC1 subunits were identified as a native target of Goodpasture autoantibodies in the GBM of squirrel monkeys, a species susceptible to Goodpasture autoantibody-mediated nephritis. Thus, crypticity of B cell autoepitopes in tissues uncouples potentially pathogenic autoantibodies from autoimmune disease. Crosslinking of alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers represents a novel mechanism averting autoantibody binding and subsequent tissue injury by posttranslational modifications of an autoantigen. PMID:20709951

  18. Alport alloantibodies but not Goodpasture autoantibodies induce murine glomerulonephritis: Protection by quinary crosslinks locking cryptic α3(IV) collagen autoepitopes in vivo 1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping; Kashtan, Clifford E.; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    The noncollagenous (NC1) domains of α3α4α5(IV) collagen in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) are targets of Goodpasture autoantibodies or Alport post-transplant nephritis alloantibodies mediating rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Because the autoepitopes but not the alloepitopes become cryptic upon assembly of α3α4α5NC1 hexamers, we investigated how the accessibility of B cell epitopes in vivo influences the development of glomerulonephritis in mice passively immunized with human anti-GBM antibodies. Alport alloantibodies, which bound to native murine α3α4α5NC1 hexamers in vitro, deposited linearly along the mouse GBM in vivo, eliciting crescentic glomerulonephritis in Fcgr2b−/− mice susceptible to antibody-mediated inflammation. Goodpasture autoantibodies, which bound to murine α3NC1 monomer and dimer subunits but not to native α3α4α5NC1 hexamers in vitro, neither bound to the mouse GBM in vivo nor induced experimental glomerulonephritis. This was due to quinary NC1 cross-links, recently identified as sulfilimine bonds, which comprehensively locked the cryptic Goodpasture autoepitopes in the mouse GBM. In contrast, non-crosslinked α3NC1 subunits were identified as a native target of Goodpasture autoantibodies in the GBM of squirrel monkeys—a species susceptible to Goodpasture autoantibody-mediated nephritis. Thus, crypticity of B cell autoepitopes in tissues uncouples potentially pathogenic autoantibodies from autoimmune disease. Crosslinking