Science.gov

Sample records for colliding beam accelerator

  1. Colliding-beam-accelerator lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, J.; Cornacchia, M.; Courant, E.D.; Parzen, G.

    1983-01-01

    We describe the lattice of the Colliding Beam Accelerator, a 400 x 400 GeV pp facility proposed for construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The structure adopted is very versatile, in part in consequence of its desirable behavior as function of momentum deviation and as function of the betatron tunes. Each of the six insertions can be arranged to meet specific requirements at the crossing points as illustrated by a discussion of the tuneable low-beta insertions. The luminosity in these low-beta insertions (2 x 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/) would be an order of magnitude larger than the standard insertions.

  2. Beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Parzen, G.

    1982-08-01

    One model for beam growth due to the beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators is that it is due to the presence of non-linear forces generated by the fields produced by the beam plus some radomizing effect like noise, or a tune modulation. According to this model, to limit beam-beam effects, one should try to limit the size of the non-linear forces and the sources of noise or tune modulation. This model can also be used to compare the severity of beam-beam effects in two situations by comparing the size of the non-linear forces. In this paper, this approach will be used to study three problems: to compare the effects of beam-beam non-linear resonances in the ISR with those in ISABELLE; to estimate the strength of a spectrometer magnet that may be placed at one of the beam crossing points, without appreciably increasing the beam-beam effects; and to compare the beam-beam interaction for colliding beam accelerators with different crossing-angles and different ..beta../sub x/ and ..beta../sub y/ at the crossing points.

  3. A DSP based data acquisition module for colliding beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, J.A.; Shea, T.J.

    1995-10-01

    In 1999, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory will accelerate and store two beams of gold ions. The ions will then collide head on at a total energy of nearly 40 trillion electron volts. Attaining these conditions necessitates real-time monitoring of beam parameters and for this purpose a flexible data acquisition platform has been developed. By incorporating a floating point digital signal processor (DSP) and standard input/output modules, this system can acquire and process data from a variety of beam diagnostic devices. The DSP performs real time corrections, filtering, and data buffering to greatly reduce control system computation and bandwidth requirements. We will describe the existing hardware and software while emphasizing the compromises required to achieve a flexible yet cost effective system. Applications in several instrumentation systems currently construction will also be presented.

  4. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL.

  5. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant β-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  6. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group: Progress report, March 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report discusses work carried out by the High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group at the University of Maryland. Particular topics discussed are: OPAL experiment at LEP; deep inelastic muon interactions; B physics with the CLEO detector at CESR; further results from JADE; and search for ''small'' violation of the Pauli principle. (LSP)

  7. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Iqbal, M; Liu, R; Chi, Y

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper. PMID:26931839

  8. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Iqbal, M.; Liu, R.; Chi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  9. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics: OPAL experiment at LEP; D{phi} experiment at Fermilab; deep inelastic muon interactions at TEV II; CYGNUS experiment; final results from {nu}{sub e}{sup {minus}e} elastic scattering; physics with CLEO detector at CESR; results from JADE at PETRA; rare kaon-decay experiment at BNL; search for top quark; and super conducting super collider activities.

  10. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S. M.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S.; Houck, T. L.; Westenskow, G. A.

    1999-05-07

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  11. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S.M.; Anderson, D.E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D.L.; Yu, S.S.; Westenskow, G.A.

    1999-05-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1{percent} energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D E; Eylon, S; Henestroza, E; Houck, T L; Lidia, M; Vanecek, D L; Westenskow, G A; Yu, S S

    1998-10-05

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2&A, l-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-n-n. The prototype accelerator will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  13. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate ``fundamental`` limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  14. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate fundamental'' limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  15. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  16. Conceptual magnet design for an iron-free colliding beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.; Meuser, R.B.

    1983-03-01

    Superconducting accelerator magnets usually have magnetic iron yokes to obtain maximum magnetic field and to limit stray field. However, the iron is expensive and heavy. The smaller size and weight of an iron-free magnet can result in lower magnet and refrigeration costs. However in a colliding beam accelerator the stray field from one ring produces aberrations in the field in the other. A way to eliminate this mutual interference is to surround each magnet with a coil that exactly cancels the field from the other ring magnet. That is expensive in terms of superconductor requirements. However, the cancellation of the external dipole field component is unnecessary. Only a small amount of superconductor is required for cancellation of the higher-order field-aberration components. Parameters for the iron-free magnet concept are investigated, and a preliminary conceptual design for an accelerator is presented.

  17. GEANT4 simulations for beam emittance in a linear collider based on plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Mete, O. Xia, G.; Hanahoe, K.; Labiche, M.

    2015-08-15

    Alternative acceleration technologies are currently under development for cost-effective, robust, compact, and efficient solutions. One such technology is plasma wakefield acceleration, driven by either a charged particle or laser beam. However, the potential issues must be studied in detail. In this paper, the emittance evolution of a witness beam through elastic scattering from gaseous media and under transverse focusing wakefields is studied.

  18. Design study of beam dynamics issues for 1 TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.; Sessler, A.; Yu, S.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.

    1994-11-01

    A design study has recently been conducted for exploring the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a rf power source for a 1 TeV linear collider. The author present, in this paper, the beam dynamics part of this study. They have achieved in their design study acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties for the resulting high efficiency and low cost RK-TBA.

  19. Simulations of an acceleration scheme for producing high intensity and low emittance antiproton beam for Fermilab collider operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent; Bhat, C.M.; MacLachlan, J.A.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During Fermilab collider operation, the Main Injector (MI) provides high intensity and low emittance proton and antiproton beams for the Tevatron. The present coalescing scheme for antiprotons in the Main Injector yields about a factor of two increase in the longitudinal emittance and a factor of 5% to 20% decrease in intensity before injection to the Tevatron. In order to maximize the integrated luminosity delivered to the collider experiments, it is important to minimize the emittance growth and maximize the intensity of the MI beam. To this end, a new scheme using a combination of 2.5 MHz and 53 MHz accelerations has been developed and tested. This paper describes the full simulation of the new acceleration scheme, taking account of space charge, 2.5 MHz and 53 MHz beam loading, and the effect of residual 53 MHz rf voltage during 2.5 MHz acceleration and rf manipulations. The simulations show the longitudinal emittance growth at the 10% level with no beam loss. The experimental test of the new scheme is reported in another PAC05 paper.

  20. Beam Collimation at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, N. V.

    2003-12-01

    Operational and accidental beam losses in hadron colliders can have a serious impact on machine and detector performance, resulting in effects ranging from minor to catastrophic. Principles and realization are described for a reliable beam collimation system required to sustain favorable background conditions in the collider detectors, provide quench stability of superconducting magnets, minimize irradiation of accelerator equipment, maintain operational reliability over the life of the machine, and reduce the impact of radiation on personnel and the environment. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, such a system has been designed and incorporated in the Tevatron collider. Its performance, comparison to measurements and possible ways to further improve the collimation efficiency are described in detail. Specifics of the collimation systems designed for the SSC, LHC, VLHC, and HERA colliders are discussed.

  1. Beam-based measurements of long-range transverse wakefields in the Compact Linear Collider main-linac accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Hao; Latina, Andrea; Grudiev, Alexej; De Michele, Giovanni; Solodko, Anastasiya; Wuensch, Walter; Schulte, Daniel; Adli, Erik; Lipkowitz, Nate; Yocky, Gerald S.

    2016-01-01

    The baseline design of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) uses X-band accelerating structures for its main linacs. In order to maintain beam stability in multibunch operation, long-range transverse wakefields must be suppressed by 2 orders of magnitude between successive bunches, which are separated in time by 0.5 ns. Such strong wakefield suppression is achieved by equipping every accelerating structure cell with four damping waveguides terminated with individual rf loads. A beam-based experiment to directly measure the effectiveness of this long-range transverse wakefield and benchmark simulations was made in the FACET test facility at SLAC using a prototype CLIC accelerating structure. The experiment showed good agreement with the simulations and a strong suppression of the wakefields with an unprecedented minimum resolution of 0.1 V /(pC mm m ) .

  2. Colliding Crystalline Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jie; Sessler, A.M.

    1998-06-01

    The understanding of crystalline beams has advanced to the point where one can now, with reasonable confidence, undertake an analysis of the luminosity of colliding crystalline beams. Such a study is reported here. It is necessary to observe the criteria, previously stated, for the creation and stability of crystalline beams. This requires, firstly, the proper design of a lattice. Secondly, a crystal must be formed, and this can usually be done at various densities. Thirdly, the crystals in a colliding-beam machine are brought into collision. We study all of these processes using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The work parallels what was done previously, but the new part is to study the crystal-crystal interaction in collision. We initially study the zero-temperature situation. If the beam-beam force (or equivalent tune shift) is too large then over-lapping crystals can not be created (rather two spatially separated crystals are formed). However, if the beam-beam force is less than but comparable to that of the space-charge forces between the particles, we find that overlapping crystals can be formed and the beam-beam tune shift can be of the order of unity. Operating at low but non-zero temperature can increase the luminosity by several orders of magnitude over that of a usual collider. The construction of an appropriate lattice, and the development of adequately strong coding, although theoretically achievable, is a challenge in practice.

  3. COLLIDING CRYSTALLINE BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.

    1998-06-26

    The understanding of crystalline beams has advanced to the point where one can now, with reasonable confidence, undertake an analysis of the luminosity of colliding crystalline beams. Such a study is reported here. It is necessary to observe the criteria, previously stated, for the creation and stability of crystalline beams. This requires, firstly, the proper design of a lattice. Secondly, a crystal must be formed, and this can usually be done at various densities. Thirdly, the crystals in a colliding-beam machine are brought into collision. We study all of these processes using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The work parallels what was done previously, but the new part is to study the crystal-crystal interaction in collision. We initially study the zero-temperature situation. If the beam-beam force (or equivalent tune shift) is too large then overlapping crystals can not be created (rather two spatially separated crystals are formed). However, if the beam-beam force is less than but comparable to that of the space-charge forces between the particles, we find that overlapping crystals can be formed and the beam-beam tune shift can be of the order of unity. Operating at low but non-zero temperature can increase the luminosity by several orders of magnitude over that of a usual collider. The construction of an appropriate lattice, and the development of adequately strong cooling, although theoretically achievable, is a challenge in practice.

  4. Studies of the chromatic properties and dynamic aperture of the BNL colliding-beam accelerator. [PATRICIA particle tracking code

    SciTech Connect

    Dell, G.F.

    1983-01-01

    The PATRICIA particle tracking program has been used to study chromatic effects in the Brookhaven CBA (Colliding Beam Accelerator). The short term behavior of particles in the CBA has been followed for particle histories of 300 turns. Contributions from magnet multipoles characteristic of superconducting magnets and closed orbit errors have been included in determining the dynamic aperture of the CBA for on and off momentum particles. The width of the third integer stopband produced by the temperature dependence of magnetization induced sextupoles in the CBA cable dipoles is evaluated for helium distribution systems having periodicity of one and six. The stopband width at a tune of 68/3 is naturally zero for the system having a periodicity of six and is approx. 10/sup -4/ for the system having a periodicity of one. Results from theory are compared with results obtained with PATRICIA; the results agree within a factor of slightly more than two.

  5. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group. Progress report, March 1, 1992--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL.

  6. Relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator as a power source for a 1 TeV next linear collider: A systems study

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.; Deadrick, F.

    1994-10-01

    A physics, engineering, and costing study has been conducted to explore the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator system as a power source candidate for a 1 TeV linear collider. We present a point design example which has acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties. Preliminary ``bottom-up`` cost estimate yields the full power source system at less than 1 billion dollars. The overall efficiency for rf production is estimated to be 36%.

  7. Next linear collider test accelerator injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) is being constructed at SLAC to demonstrate multibunch beam loading compensation, suppression of higher order deflecting modes and measure transverse components of the accelerating fields in X-band accelerating structures. Currently a simple injector which provides the average current necessary for the beam loading compensations studies is under construction. An injector upgrade is planned to produce bunch trains similar to that of the NLC with microbunch intensity, separation and energy spread, identical to that of NLC. We discuss the design of the NLCTA injector upgrade.

  8. Beam Rounders for Circular Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; Ya. Derbenev

    2001-07-01

    By means of linear optics, an arbitrary uncoupled beam can be locally transformed into a round (rotation-invariant) state and then back. This provides an efficient way to round beams in the interaction region of circular colliders.

  9. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group. Progress report, March 1, 1983-February 29, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Topics covered in this research summary include: status of the OPAL collaboration at LEP, CERN; two-photon physics at PLUTO; search for new particles at JADE; neutrinoless double beta decay at DESY; Fermilab jet experiment; neutrino deuterium experiment in the 15 foot bubble chamber at Fermilab; deep inelastic muon experiment at Fermilab; new experiments at the proton-antiproton collider; neutrino-electron scattering at Los Alamos; parity violation in proton-proton scattering; an upgrade of laboratory and computer facilities; and a study of bismuth germanate as a durable scintillation crystal. (GHT)

  10. Colliding Beam Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostoker, Norman; Qerushi, Artan; Binderbauer, Michl

    2003-06-01

    The recirculating power for virtually all types of fusion reactors has previously been calculated [1] with the Fokker-Planck equation. The reactors involve non-Maxwellian plasmas. The calculations are generic in that they do not relate to specific confinement devices. In all cases except for a Tokamak with D-T fuel the recirculating power was found to exceed the fusion power by a large factor. In this paper we criticize the generality claimed for this calculation. The ratio of circulating power to fusion power is calculated for the Colliding Beam Reactor with fuels D-T, D-He3 and p-B11. The results are respectively, 0.070, 0.141 and 0.493.

  11. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  12. FFAG Designs for Muon Collider Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. Scott

    2014-01-13

    I estimate FFAG parameters for a muon collider with a 70mm longitudinal emittance. I do not discuss the lower emittance beam for a Higgs factory. I produce some example designs, giving only parameters relevant to estimating cost and performance. The designs would not track well, but the parameters of a good design will be close to those described. I compare these cost estimates to those for a fast-ramping synchrotron and a recirculating linear accelerator. I conclude that FFAGs do not appear to be cost-effective for the large longitudinal emittance in a high-energy muon collider.

  13. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed.

  14. Introduction to colliding beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.

    1994-10-01

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is currently the site of the world`s highest center-of-mass energy proton-antiproton colliding beam accelerator, the Tevatron. The CDF and D{O} detectors each envelop one of two luminous regions in the collider, and are thus wholly dependent on the accelerator for their success. The Tevatron`s high operating energy, reliability, and record setting integrated luminosity have allowed both experiments to make world-class measurements and defined the region of physics that each can explore. The following sections are an overview of the highlights of the accelerator operation and are compiled from many sources. The major sources for each section are listed at the beginning of that section.

  15. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e{sup +}- e{sup -} colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II).

  16. Preliminary design report of a relativistic-Klystron two-beam-accelerator based power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass next linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.

    1995-02-22

    A preliminary point design for an 11.4 GHz power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass Next Linear Collider (NLC) based on the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam-Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is presented. The present report is the result of a joint LBL-LLNL systems study. consisting of three major thrust areas: physics, engineering, and costing. The new RK-TBA point design, together with our findings in each of these areas, are reported.

  17. Beam Dynamics Considerations in Electron Ion Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    The nuclear physics community is converging on the idea that the next large project after FRIB should be an electron-ion collider. Both Brookhaven National Lab and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility have developed accelerator designs, both of which need novel solutions to accelerator physics problems. In this talk we discuss some of the problems that must be solved and their solutions. Examples in novel beam optics systems, beam cooling, and beam polarization control will be presented. Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177. The U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce this manuscript for U.S. Government purposes.

  18. Two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Selph, F.B.

    1984-09-01

    In the two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept, an electron linear accelerator structure is established in which two beams propagate. One is an intense low energy beam that is made to undergo free electron lasing to produce microwaves. These microwaves are then coupled to another part of the structure where they act to produce a high longitudinal electric gradient that is used to accelerate a second relatively low intensity electron beam to very high energies. The TBA was originally suggested by Sessler as a possible means for economically achieving linear collider energies of 100 GeV and above. Although still in a conceptual stage, the TBA is an inherently plausible concept that combines the free electron laser (FEL) with several well-known technologies - high current induction linacs, microwave waveguides, and traveling-wave linac structures - in a novel and interesting way. Two characteristics of the TBA that make it a particularly suitable candidate for achieving high energies are its ability to operate at higher frequencies than typical present-day linacs (say 30 GHz as compared with 3 GHz), and to be an efficient means for delivering power to a hitherto unattainable high-gradient structure (say 250 MV/m) that the higher frequency makes possible. These high accelerating gradients will permit much shorter linac structures for a given energy.

  19. Accelerator R&D toward Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following LHC discoveries. Such a collider can offer superb energy resolution, smaller size, and potentially cost and power consumption compared to multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders. This article briefly reviews the motivation, design and status of accelerator R&D for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory.

  20. Accelerator R&D toward Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, V.

    2010-12-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following LHC discoveries. Such a collider can offer superb energy resolution, smaller size, and potentially cost and power consumption compared to multi-TeV e + e - linear colliders. This article briefly reviews the motivation, design and status of accelerator R&D for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory.

  1. Beam dynamics issues in linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1989-06-01

    The primary goal of present and future linear colliders is to maximize the integrated luminosity for the experimental program. Beam dynamics plays a central role in the maximization of integrated luminosity. It is the major issue in the production of small beam sizes and low experimental backgrounds and is also an important factor in the production of particle numbers, in the acceleration process, and in the number of bunches. The beam dynamics effects on bunches which are extracted from the damping rings, accelerated in the linac, collimated, momentum analyzed, and finally delivered to the final focus are reviewed. The effects of bunch compression, transverse and longitudinal wakefields, BNS damping, energy definition, dispersion, emittance, bunch aspect ratio, feedback, and stability are all important. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  2. PROTON BEAM REQUIREMENTS FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY AND MUON COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2009-12-11

    Both a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider place stringent demands on the proton beam used to generate the desired beam of muons. Here we discuss the advantages and challenges of muon accelerators and the rationale behind the requirements on proton beam energy, intensity, bunch length, and repetition rate. Example proton driver configurations that have been considered in recent years are also briefly indicated.

  3. Staging optics considerations for a plasma wakefield acceleration linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrøm, C. A.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; Delahaye, J. P.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Muggli, P.; Raubenheimer, T. O.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration offers acceleration gradients of several GeV/m, ideal for a next-generation linear collider. The beam optics requirements between plasma cells include injection and extraction of drive beams, matching the main beam beta functions into the next cell, canceling dispersion as well as constraining bunch lengthening and chromaticity. To maintain a high effective acceleration gradient, this must be accomplished in the shortest distance possible. A working example is presented, using novel methods to correct chromaticity, as well as scaling laws for a high energy regime.

  4. ACCELERATION FOR A HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S

    2000-04-07

    The authors describe a method for designing the acceleration systems for a muon collider, with particular application and examples for a high energy muon collider. This paper primarily concentrates on design considerations coming from longitudinal motion, but some transverse issues are briefly discussed.

  5. Linear accelerators for TeV colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1985-05-01

    This paper summarizes four tutorial lectures on linear electron accelerators: Electron Linacs for TeV Colliders, Emittance and Damping Rings, Wake Fields: Basic Concepts, and Wake Field Effects in Linacs.

  6. High frequency planar accelerating structures for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.; Ben-Menahem, S.; Wilson, P.; Miller, R.; Ruth, R.; Nassiri, A.

    1994-12-31

    Modern microfabrication techniques based on deep etch x-ray lithography, e.g., LIGA, can be used to produce large-aspect-ratio, metallic or dielectric, planar structures suitable for high-frequency RF acceleration of charged particle beams. Specifically, these techniques offer significant advantages over conventional manufacturing methods for future linear colliders (beyond NLC, the Next Linear Collider) because of several unique systems requirements. First, to have the required ac wall plug power within reasonable limits, such future linear colliders (5 TeV) must operate at high frequency (30 GHz). Secondly, luminosity requirements suggest the use of multi-bunch acceleration of electrons and positrons in the linear collider. Thirdly, in order to clearly discriminate physics events in the final interaction point at which electrons and positrons collide, it is required that secondary particle production from beamstrahlung be minimized. Flat electron and positron beams with a large aspect ratio will be beneficial in reducing beamstrahlung in the final focus region, but cause the beam to be more sensitive to wakefields in the vertical dimension. In principle, a flat beam can be accelerated in a planar structure with reduced wakefield in the vertical direction for the entire length of the accelerator. The LIGA process is particularly suitable for manufacturing miniaturized, planar, asymmetric cavities at high frequency. The main advantages of the LIGA process are fabrication of structures with high aspect ratio, small dimensional tolerances, and arbitrary mask shape (cross-section). Other advantages include mass-production with excellent repeatability and precision of up to an entire section of an accelerating structure consisting of a number of cells. It eliminates the need of tedious machining and brazing, for example, of individual disks and cups in conventional disk-loaded structures. Also, planar input/output couplers for the accelerating structure can be easily

  7. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, G. R.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Cormier-Michel, E.

    2010-11-04

    Decoupling injection from acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA). In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy spread, and emittance of the electron beam by injecting electrons in momentum and phase into the accelerating phase of the wake trailing the driver laser pulse. At LBNL, using automated control of spatiotemporal overlap of laser pulses, two-pulse experiments showed stable operation and reproducibility over hours of operation. Arrival time of the colliding beam was scanned, and the measured timing window and density of optimal operation agree with simulations. The accelerator length was mapped by scanning the collision point.

  8. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plateau, G. R.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-01

    Decoupling injection from acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA) [1, 2]. In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy spread, and emittance of the electron beam by injecting electrons in momentum and phase into the accelerating phase of the wake trailing the driver laser pulse [3, 4, 5, 6, 7]. At LBNL, using automated control of spatiotemporal overlap of laser pulses, two-pulse experiments showed stable operation and reproducibility over hours of operation. Arrival time of the colliding beam was scanned, and the measured timing window and density of optimal operation agree with simulations [8]. The accelerator length was mapped by scanning the collision point.

  9. Accelerator physics in ERL based polarized electron ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yue

    2015-05-03

    This talk will present the current accelerator physics challenges and solutions in designing ERL-based polarized electron-hadron colliders, and illustrate them with examples from eRHIC and LHeC designs. These challenges include multi-pass ERL design, highly HOM-damped SRF linacs, cost effective FFAG arcs, suppression of kink instability due to beam-beam effect, and control of ion accumulation and fast ion instabilities.

  10. Accelerator considerations of large circular colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Alex

    2016-07-01

    As we consider the tremendous physics reaches of the big future circular electron-positron and proton-proton colliders, it might be advisable to keep a close track of what accelerator challenges they face. Good progresses are being made, and yet it is reported here that substantial investments in funding, manpower, as well as a long sustained time to the R&D efforts will be required in preparation to realize these dream colliders.

  11. Beam dynamics verification in linacs of linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    The SLAC two-mile linac has been upgraded to accelerate high current, low emittance electron and positron beams to be used in the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). After the upgrade was completed, extensive beam studies were made to verify that the design criteria have been met. These tests involved the measurement of emittance, beam phase space orientation, energy dispersion, trajectory oscillations, bunch length, energy spectrum and wakefields. The methods, the systems and the data cross checks are compared for the various measurements. Implications for the next linear collider are discussed. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Future Accelerators, Muon Colliders, and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A Carrigan, Jr.

    2001-12-19

    Particle physics is driven by five great topics. Neutrino oscillations and masses are now at the fore. The standard model with extensions to supersymmetry and a Higgs to generate mass explains much of the field. The origins of CP violation are not understood. The possibility of extra dimensions has raised tantalizing new questions. A fifth topic lurking in the background is the possibility of something totally different. Many of the questions raised by these topics require powerful new accelerators. It is not an overstatement to say that for some of the issues, the accelerator is almost the experiment. Indeed some of the questions require machines beyond our present capability. As this volume attests, there are parts of the particle physics program that have been significantly advanced without the use of accelerators such as the subject of neutrino oscillations and many aspects of the particle-cosmology interface. At this stage in the development of physics, both approaches are needed and important. This chapter first reviews the status of the great accelerator facilities now in operation or coming on within the decade. Next, midrange possibilities are discussed including linear colliders with the adjunct possibility of gamma-gamma colliders, muon colliders, with precursor neutrino factories, and very large hadron colliders. Finally visionary possibilities are considered including plasma and laser accelerators.

  13. Beam dynamics issues for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this paper we discuss various beam dynamics issues for linear colliders. The emphasis is to explore beam dynamics effects which lead to an effective dilution of the emittance of the beam and thus to a loss of luminosity. These considerations lead to various tolerances which are evaluated for a particular parameter set.

  14. GPU-optimized Code for Long-term Simulations of Beam-beam Effects in Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Roblin, Yves; Morozov, Vasiliy; Terzic, Balsa; Aturban, Mohamed A.; Ranjan, D.; Zubair, Mohammed

    2013-06-01

    We report on the development of the new code for long-term simulation of beam-beam effects in particle colliders. The underlying physical model relies on a matrix-based arbitrary-order symplectic particle tracking for beam transport and the Bassetti-Erskine approximation for beam-beam interaction. The computations are accelerated through a parallel implementation on a hybrid GPU/CPU platform. With the new code, a previously computationally prohibitive long-term simulations become tractable. We use the new code to model the proposed medium-energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab.

  15. Accelerator Test Facility for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2010-06-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following LHC discoveries. This article briefly reviews the needs and possibilities for a Muon Collider beam test facility to carry out the R&D program on the collider front-end and 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

  16. Collider and detector protection at beam accidents

    SciTech Connect

    I. L. Rakhno; N. V. Mokhov; A. I. Drozhdin

    2003-12-10

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section.

  17. LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-05-04

    Design considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-gamma collider is considered. An example of the parameters for a 0.5 TeV laser-plasma-accelerator gamma gamma collider is presented.

  18. Advances in beam physics and technology: Colliders of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1994-11-01

    Beams may be viewed as directed and focussed flow of energy and information, carried by particles and electromagnetic radiation fields (ie, photons). Often, they interact with each other (eg, in high energy colliders) or with other forms of matter (eg, in fixed targets, sychrotron radiation, neutron scattering, laser chemistry/physics, medical therapy, etc.). The whole art and science of beams revolve around the fundamental quest for, and ultimate implementation of, mechanisms of production, storage, control and observation of beams -- always directed towards studies of the basic structures and processes of the natural world and various practical applications. Tremendous progress has been made in all aspects of beam physics and technology in the last decades -- nonlinear dynamics, superconducting magnets and rf cavities, beam instrumentation and control, novel concepts and collider praradigms, to name a few. We illustrate this progress with a few examples and remark on the emergence of new collider scenarios where some of these progress might come to use -- the Gamma-Gamma Collider, the Muon Collider, laser acceleration, etc. We close with an outline of future oppotunities and outlook.

  19. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  20. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  1. Advances in beam physics and technology: Colliders of the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Swapan

    1996-02-01

    Beams may be viewed as directed and focussed flow of energy and information, carried by particles and electromagnetic radiation fields (i.e. photons). Often, they are brought into interaction with each other (e.g. in high energy colliders) or with other forms of matter (e.g. in fixed target physics, synchrotron radiation sciences, neutron scattering experiments, laser chemistry and physics, medical therapy, etc.). The whole art and science of beams revolve around the fundamental quest for, and ultimate implementation of, mechanisms of production, storage, control and observation of beams—always directed towards studies of the basic structures and processes of the natural world and various practical applications. Tremendous progress has been made in all aspects of beam physics and technology in the last decades—nonlinear dynamics, superconducting magnets and radio frequency cavities, beam instrumentation and control, novel concepts and collider paradigms, to name a few. We will illustrate this progress via a few examples and remark on the emergence of new collider scenarios where some of these progress might come to use—the Gamma-Gamma Collider, the Muon Collider, laser acceleration, etc. We will close with an outline of future opportunities and outlook.

  2. Beam trajectory acquisition system for the arcs of the Stanford Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrin, J.L.; Ross, M.C.; Scott, B.D.; Wilson, D.S.

    1987-02-01

    This report describes the beam position monitoring system of the collider arcs at the Stanford Linear Collider. This beam position monitoring system is different from others at SLAC in its large amount of hardware and its use of ungated, self-triggered electronics. All of the processing electronics are installed in the accelerator tunnel. (JDH)

  3. Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

  4. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  5. Simulations of high disruption colliding beams

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, J.R.; Heifets, S.; Krafft, G.A.

    1990-09-01

    Recent B-factory proposals that use a linac beam colliding with the beam from a storage ring to achieve high luminosities (L > 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1}) result in very high disruption of the linac beam. The effects of such high disruption have been studied using the relativistic, 3-D code SWARM. We discuss the assumptions, parameters, and results of a series of runs that model such collisions. Regimes of high beam loss and methods to avoid them are also discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Polarized muon beams for muon collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrinsky, A. N.

    1996-11-01

    An option for the production of intense and highly polarized muon beams, suitable for a high-luminosity muon collider, is described briefly. It is based on a multi-channel pion-collection system, narrow-band pion-to-muon decay channels, proper muon spin gymnastics, and ionization cooling to combine all of the muon beams into a single bunch of ultimately low emittance.

  7. Beam Instrumentation Challenges at the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, Peter; /SLAC

    2006-05-16

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a proposed facility for the study of high energy physics through electron-positron collisions at center-of-mass energies up to 500 GeV and luminosities up to 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1}. Meeting the ILC's goals will require an extremely sophisticated suite of beam instruments for the preservation of beam emittance, the diagnosis of optical errors and mismatches, the determination of beam properties required for particle physics purposes, and machine protection. The instrumentation foreseen for the ILC is qualitatively similar to equipment in use at other accelerator facilities in the world, but in many cases the precision, accuracy, stability, or dynamic range required by the ILC exceed what is typically available in today's accelerators. In this paper we survey the beam instrumentation requirements of the ILC and describe the system components which are expected to meet those requirements.

  8. Beam Induced Hydrodynamic Tunneling in the Future Circular Collider Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    A future circular collider (FCC) has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80-100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t) at a typical speed of 850 km /h . Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka) and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2) iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the "hydrodynamic tunneling." These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  9. Status and results from the next linear collider test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.

    1996-08-01

    The design for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) at SLAC is based on two 11.4 GHz linacs operating at an unloaded acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m increasing to 85 MV/m as the energy is increased from {1/2} TeV to 1 TeV in the center of mass. During the past several years there has been tremendous progress on the development of 11.4 GHz (X-band) RF systems. These developments include klystrons which operate at the required power and pulse length, pulse compression systems that achieve a factor of four power multiplication and structures that are specially designed to reduce long-range wakefields. Together with these developments, we have constructed a {1/2} GeV test accelerator, the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA). The NLCTA will serve as a test bed as the design of the NLC is refined. In addition to testing the RF system, the NLCTA is designed to address many questions related to the dynamics of the beam during acceleration, in particular the study of multibunch beam loading compensation and transverse beam break-up. In this paper we present the status of the NLCTA and the results of initial commissioning.

  10. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  11. RF properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    With the advent of the SLAC electron-positron linear collider (SLC) in the 100 GeV center-of-mass energy range, research and development work on even higher energy machines of this type has started in several laboratories in the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union and Japan. These linear colliders appear to provide the only promising approach to studying e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// physics at center-of-mass energies approaching 1 TeV. This thesis concerns itself with the study of radio frequency properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders and their interaction with bunched beams. The topics that have been investigated are: experimental measurements of the energy loss of single bunches to longitudinal modes in two types of structures, using an equivalent signal on a coaxial wire to simulate the beam; a method of canceling the energy spread created within a single bunch by longitudinal wakefields, through appropriate shaping of the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch; derivation of the complete transient beam-loading equation for a train of bunches passing through a constant-gradient accelerator section, with application to the calculation and minimization of multi-bunch energy spread; detailed study of field emission and radio frequency breakdown in disk-loaded structures at S-, C- and X-band frequencies under extremely high-gradient conditions, with special attention to thermal effects, radiation, sparking, emission of gases, surface damage through explosive emission and its possible control through RF-gas processing. 53 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Aerogel Cherenkov detectors in colliding beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilyuk, A. F.; Kononov, S. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.

    2015-05-01

    This review discusses the application of aerogel Cherenkov detectors in colliding beam experiments. Such detectors are used for charged particle identification at velocities at which other methods are ineffective. The paper examines aerogel production technology and how the aerogel optical parameters are measured. Data on threshold Cherenkov counters with direct light collection and on those using wavelength shifters are evaluated. Also presented are data on Ring Image Cherenkov detectors with single and multilayer focusing aerogel radiators.

  13. Reply to ``Comment on `Beamstrahlung considerations in laser-plasma-accelerator-based linear colliders' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-10-01

    We reply to Lebedev and Nagaitsev’s foregoing Comment [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 16, 108001 (2013)PRABFM1098-4402]. We disagree with the conclusion of the Comment that scattering imposes a fundamental limitation on plasma-based accelerator technology. Laser-plasma accelerators are compatible with high-luminosity collider concepts.

  14. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; White, S.

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  15. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-20

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton–proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This article briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  16. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-01

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton-proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This paper briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  17. Accelerating and storing polarized hadron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1990-10-01

    Polarization hadron experiments at high energies continue to generate surprises. Many questions remain unanswered or unanswerable within the frame work of QCD. These include such basic questions as to why at high energies the polarization analyzing power in pp elastic scattering remains high, why hyperons are produced with high polarizations etc. It is, therefore, interesting to investigate the possibilities of accelerating and storing polarized beams in high energy colliders. On the technical side the recent understanding and confirmation of the actions of partial and multiple Siberian snakes made it possible to contemplate accelerating and storing polarized hadron beams to multi-TeV energies. In this paper, we will examine the equipment, the operation and the procedure required to obtain colliding beams of polarized protons at TeV energies.

  18. SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Borland, M.; Kabel, A.; Li, Rui; Ryne, Robert; Stern, E.; Wang, Y.; Wasserman, H.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, we report on progress that has been made in beam dynamics simulation, from light sources to colliders, during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project 'Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS).' Several parallel computational tools for beam dynamics simulation are described. Also presented are number of applications in current and future accelerator facilities (e.g., LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC, and ELIC).

  19. SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Qiang, J.; Borland, M.; Kabel, A.; Li, R.; Ryne, R.; Stern, E.; Wang, Y.; Wasserman, H.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-06-16

    In this paper, we report on progress that has been made in beam dynamics simulation, from light sources to colliders, during the first year of SciDAC-II accelerator project,"Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS)." Several parallel computational tools for beam dynamics simulation will be described. A number of applications in current and future accelerator facilities, e.g., LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC, ELIC, are presented.

  20. Calculating Beam Breakup in Superconducting Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft; Joseph Bisognano; Sharon Laubach

    1990-02-09

    As the intensity of a particle beam passing through a linear accelerator is raised, interactions between particles play an increasingly prominent role in determining the overall dynamics of the beam. These many body effects, known collectively as beam breakup, tend to degrade the quality of the transported beam, and hence they must be calculated to accurately predict the evolution of the beam as it traverses the accelerator. Several codes which compute various collective effects have been developed and used to simulate the dynamics of beams passing through superconducting accelerator structures. All the codes use the same basic algorithm: the beam is tracked through elements giving the focusing forces on the particles, and at the appropriate locations in the linac, localized forces are impressed on the particles which model the electromagnetic interactions. Here, a difficulty is that the usual ''Coulomb'' interaction between particles is changed by the electromagnetic environment of the accelerator. By such calculations it has been shown that recirculating linear accelerators such as the one being built at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) should remain stable against multipass beam breakup instability as long as the average current does not exceed about 20 mA, that the beam quality at CEBAF will be degraded when the single bunch charge approaches 10{sup 9} electrons, and that the beam quality of superconducting linacs that are optimized for high current transport begins to decrease at around 10{sup 10} electrons per bunch. The latter result is of interest to individuals who would use superconducting linacs as beam sources for free electron lasers or for superconducting colliders for high energy physics research.

  1. FUTURE LEPTON COLLIDERS AND LASER ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-05-30

    Future high energy colliders along with their physics potential, and relationship to new laser technology are discussed. Experimental approaches and requirements for New Physics exploration are also described.

  2. Fast cooling, muon acceleration and the prospect of muon colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Mark

    Facilities based on stored muons offer unique potential for future high-energy physics capabilities. Three key characteristics of the muon make this possible: * The muon is a lepton; * The muon is roughly 200 times as massive as the electron; * The muon decays to an electron and two neutrinos. As the next heavier members of the lepton family with respect to the electron and positron, μ+ and μ-. beams can be collided to provide a precision lepton probe of the electroweak couplings. This makes a muon collider a suitable option for a lepton collider companion to a hadron collider discovery machine...

  3. Status and future directions for advanced accelerator research - conventional and non-conventional collider concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between advanced accelerator research and future directions for particle physics is discussed. Comments are made about accelerator research trends in hadron colliders, muon colliders, and e{sup +}3{sup {minus}} linear colliders.

  4. Colliding beam fusion reactor space propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Frank J.; Binderbauer, Michl W.; Rostoker, Norman; Rahman, Hafiz Ur; O'Toole, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    We describe a space propulsion system based on the Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor (CBFR). The CBFR is a high-beta, field-reversed, magnetic configuration with ion energies in the range of hundreds of keV. Repetitively-pulsed ion beams sustain the plasma distribution and provide current drive. The confinement physics is based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equation, including a Fokker Planck collision operator and all sources and sinks for energy and particle flow. The mean azimuthal velocities and temperatures of the fuel ion species are equal and the plasma current is unneutralized by the electrons. The resulting distribution functions are thermal in a moving frame of reference. The ion gyro-orbit radius is comparable to the dimensions of the confinement system, hence classical transport of the particles and energy is expected and the device is scaleable. We have analyzed the design over a range of 106-109 Watts of output power (0.15-150 Newtons thrust) with a specific impulse of, Isp~106 sec. A 50 MW propulsion system might involve the following parameters: 4-meters diameter×10-meters length, magnetic field ~7 Tesla, ion beam current ~10 A, and fuels of either D-He3,P-B11,P-Li6,D-Li6, etc. .

  5. Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, A.; Binderbauer, M.; Liu, F.; Qerushi, A.; Rostoker, N.; Wessel, F. J.

    2004-02-01

    The Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion System, CBFR-SPS, is an aneutronic, magnetic-field-reversed configuration, fueled by an energetic-ion mixture of hydrogen and boron11 (H-B11). Particle confinement and transport in the CBFR-SPS are classical, hence the system is scaleable. Fusion products are helium ions, α-particles, expelled axially out of the system. α-particles flowing in one direction are decelerated and their energy recovered to ``power'' the system; particles expelled in the opposite direction provide thrust. Since the fusion products are charged particles, the system does not require the use of a massive-radiation shield. This paper describes a 100 MW CBFR-SPS design, including estimates for the propulsion-system parameters and masses. Specific emphasis is placed on the design of a closed-cycle, Brayton-heat engine, consisting of heat-exchangers, turbo-alternator, compressor, and finned radiators.

  6. Ion Accelerator Merges Several Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.

    1984-01-01

    Intense ion beam formed by merging multiple ion beamlets into one concentrated beam. Beamlet holes in graphite screen and focusing grids arranged in hexagonal pattern. Merged beam passes through single hole in each of aluminum accelerator and decelerator grids. Ion extraction efficiency, beam intensity, and focusing improved.

  7. When will we know a muon collider is feasible? Status and directions of muon accelerator R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation of lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following the LHC discoveries. This paper briefly reviews the status of the accelerator R&D, addresses the question of the feasibility of a Muon Collider, what needs to be done to prove it and presents projected timeline of the project.

  8. Laser cooling of electron beams for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Telnov, V.

    1996-10-01

    A novel method of electron beam cooling is considered which can be used for linear colliders. The electron beam is cooled during collision with focused powerful laser pulse. With reasonable laser parameters (laser flash energy about 10 J) one can decrease transverse beam emittances by a factor about 10 per one stage. The ultimate transverse emittances are much below that given by other methods. Depolarization of a beam during the cooling is about 5--15% for one stage. This method is especially useful for photon colliders and open new possibilities for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders and x-ray FEL based on high energy linacs.

  9. Beam dynamics problems for a {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} collider

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.

    1997-06-01

    A {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} collider requires a high-intensity proton source for {pi}-production, a high-acceptance {pi}-{mu} decay channel, a {mu}-cooling system, a rapid acceleration system, and a high-luminosity collider ring for the collision of short, intense {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} bunches. Significant beam-dynamics problems exist in each of these systems. These problems and some paths to solutions are discussed in this paper.

  10. Experimental demonstration of colliding beam lifetime improvement by electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Alexahin, Yuri; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Bishofberger, Kip; /Los Alamos

    2007-10-01

    We report successful application of space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam for improvement of particle lifetime determined by beam-beam interaction in high-energy collider. In our experiments, an electron lens, a novel instrument developed for the beam-beam compensation, was set on a 980-GeV proton bunch in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The proton bunch losses due to its interaction with antiproton beam were reduced by a factor of 2 when the electron lens was operating. We describe the principle of electron lens operation and present experimental results.

  11. Excitation of Accelerating Plasma Waves by Counter-propagating Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gennady Shvets; Nathaniel J. Fisch; and Alexander Pukhov

    2001-08-30

    Generation of accelerating plasma waves using two counter-propagating laser beams is considered. Colliding-beam accelerator requires two laser pulses: the long pump and the short timing beam. We emphasize the similarities and differences between the conventional laser wakefield accelerator and the colliding-beam accelerator (CBA). The highly nonlinear nature of the wake excitation is explained using both nonlinear optics and plasma physics concepts. Two regimes of CBA are considered: (i) the short-pulse regime, where the timing beam is shorter than the plasma period, and (ii) the parametric excitation regime, where the timing beam is longer than the plasma period. Possible future experiments are also outlined.

  12. SciDAC Advances in Beam Dynamics Simulation: From Light Sources to Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Borland, M.; Kabel, A.; Li, R.; Ryne, R.; Stern, E.; Wang, Y.; Wasserman, H.; Zhang, Y.; /SLAC

    2011-11-14

    In this paper, we report on progress that has been made in beam dynamics simulation, from light sources to colliders, during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project 'Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS).' Several parallel computational tools for beam dynamics simulation are described. Also presented are number of applications in current and future accelerator facilities (e.g., LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC, and ELIC). Particle accelerators are some of most important tools of scientific discovery. They are widely used in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and other basic and applied sciences to study the interaction of elementary particles, to probe the internal structure of matter, and to generate high-brightness radiation for research in materials science, chemistry, biology, and other fields. Modern accelerators are complex and expensive devices that may be several kilometers long and may consist of thousands of beamline elements. An accelerator may transport trillions of charged particles that interact electromagnetically among themselves, that interact with fields produced by the accelerator components, and that interact with beam-induced fields. Large-scale beam dynamics simulations on massively parallel computers can help provide understanding of these complex physical phenomena, help minimize design cost, and help optimize machine operation. In this paper, we report on beam dynamics simulations in a variety of accelerators ranging from next generation light sources to high-energy ring colliders that have been studied during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project.

  13. Beam-induced energy deposition issues in the Very Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov; Alexandr I. Drozhdin; G. William Foster

    2001-06-26

    Energy deposition issues are extremely important in the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) with huge energy stored in its 20 TeV (Stage-1) and 87.5 TeV (Stage-2) beams. The status of the VLHC design on these topics, and possible solutions of the problems are discussed. Protective measures are determined based on the operational and accidental beam loss limits for the prompt radiation dose at the surface, residual radiation dose, ground water activation, accelerator components radiation damage and quench stability. The beam abort and beam collimation systems are designed to protect accelerator from accidental and operational beam losses, IP region quadrupoles from irradiation by the products of beam-beam collisions, and to reduce the accelerator-induced backgrounds in the detectors.

  14. INTRA-BEAM SCATTERING SCALING FOR VERY LARGE HADRON COLLIDERS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; PARZEN,G.

    2001-06-18

    For Very Large Hadron Colliders (VLHC), flat hadron beams [2] with their vertical emittance much smaller than their horizontal emittance are proposed to maximize the design luminosity. Emittance growth caused by intra-beam scattering (IBS) is a concern on the realization of such flat-beam conditions. Based on existing IBS formalism on beams of Gaussian distribution, we analytically derive [6] the IBS growth rate and determine the IBS limit on the aspect ratio for a flat beam.

  15. Laser triggered injection of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator with the colliding pulse method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Fubiani, G.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Michel, P.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, C.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-10-22

    An injection scheme for a laser wakefield accelerator that employs a counter propagating laser (colliding with the drive laser pulse, used to generate a plasma wake) is discussed. The threshold laser intensity for electron injection into the wakefield was analyzed using a heuristic model based on phase-space island overlap. Analysis shows that the injection can be performed using modest counter propagating laser intensity a{sub 1} < 0.5 for a drive laser intensity of a{sub 0} = 1.0. Preliminary experiments were preformed using a drive beam and colliding beam. Charge enhancement by the colliding pulse was observed. Increasing the signal-to-noise ratio by means of a preformed plasma channel is discussed.

  16. Precision measurements of the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) beam energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, J.; King, M.; Von Zanthier, C.; Watson, S.; Levi, M.; Rouse, F.; Bambade, P.; Erickson, R.; Jung, C.K.; Nash, J.

    1989-03-01

    A method of precisely determining the beam energy in high energy linear colliders has been developed using dipole spectrometers and synchrotron radiation detectors. Beam lines implementing this method have been installed on the Stanford Linear Collider. An absolute energy measurement with an accuracy of better than deltaE/E = 5 /times/ 10/sup /minus/4/ can be achieved on a pulse-to-pulse basis. The operation of this system will be described. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Beam-based alignment technique for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) linac

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.E.; Lavine, T.L.; Atwood, W.B.; Himel, T.M.; Lee, M.J.; Mattison, T.S.; Pitthan, R.; Seeman, J.T.; Williams, S.H.; Trilling, G.H.

    1989-03-01

    Misalignment of quadrupole magnets and beam position monitors (BPMs) in the linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) cause the electron and positron beams to be steered off-center in the disk-loaded waveguide accelerator structures. Off-center beams produce wakefields which limit the SLC performance at high beam intensities by causing emittance growth. Here, we present a general method for simultaneously determining quadrupole magnet and BPM offsets using beam trajectory measurements. Results from the application of the method to the SLC linac are described. The alignment precision achieved is approximately 100 ..mu..m, which is significantly better than that obtained using optical surveying techniques. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Beam dump experiment at future electron-positron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemura, Shinya; Moroi, Takeo; Tanabe, Tomohiko

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new beam dump experiment at future colliders with electron (e-) and positron (e+) beams, BDee, which will provide a new possibility to search for hidden particles, like hidden photon. If a particle detector is installed behind the beam dump, it can detect the signal of in-flight decay of the hidden particles produced by the scatterings of e± beams off materials for dumping. We show that, compared to past experiments, BDee (in particular BDee at e+e- linear collider) significantly enlarges the parameter region where the signal of the hidden particle can be discovered.

  19. Tests of the FONT3 Linear Collider Intra-Train Beam Feedback System at the ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, P.N.; Christian, G.; Clarke, C.; Hartin, A.; Dabiri Khah, H.; Molloy, S.; White, G.R.; Frisch, J.C.; Markiewicz, T.W.; McCormick, D.J.; Ross, M.C.; Smith, S.; Smith, T.J.; Kalinin, A.; Perry, C.; /Oxford Instruments

    2006-03-14

    We report preliminary results of beam tests of the FONT3 Linear Collider intra-train position feedback system prototype at the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK. The feedback system incorporates a novel beam position monitor (BPM) processor with a latency below 5 nanoseconds, and a kicker driver amplifier with similar low latency. The 56 nanosecond-long bunchtrain in the ATF extraction line was used to test the prototype BPM processor. The achieved latency will allow a demonstration of intra-train feedback on timescales relevant even for the CLIC Linear Collider design.

  20. 62-TeV center of mass hadron collider with superbunch beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2001-11-05

    The scheme of a 62-TeV center of mass p-p collider with superbunch beams at Fermilab is proposed as a practical and realistically achievable future project. It will be built in two stages, using the same tunnel, first with a 2 Tesla low field magnet collider ring and later with a 10 Tesla high field magnet collider ring. Both low and high field magnets have twin bore aperture and will be installed in the tunnel with the circumference of 87.25 km. In each bore a proton beam is accelerated, using induction cavities to increase luminosity. In the first stage they install a 7 TeV accelerator ring with operating field of 2 Tesla, based on the superferric transmission-line design. This ring will be operated at a 14-TeV center of mass collider. This will have the same energy as the LHC, but it will have 15 times higher luminosity, namely 1.5 x 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/sec. The estimated synchrotron radiation is negligible with this machine. The existing Fermilab accelerator system, including the 150 GeV main injector, will be used as the injector system. Its rough cost estimation and schedule for this first stage are presented. In the second stage proton beams are accelerated, also using induction cavities up to 31 TeV with the 10 Tesla dipole magnets. The counter circulating beams will collide with the 62-TeV center of mass energy. With the superbunch beams they can expect the luminosity can be increased about 15 times more than the conventional method with RF cavities. It will be 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/sec. In the second stage, the synchrotron radiation power will be about 12 W/m, and they need an elaborated beam screen.

  1. Proposal of the Next Incarnation of Accelerator Test Facility at KEK for the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, S.; Hayano, H.; Higashi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Kanazawa, K.; Kubo, K.; Kume, T.; Kuriki, M.; Kuroda, S.; Masuzawa, M.; Naito, T.; Okugi, T.; Sugahara, R.; Takahashi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Toge, N.; Urakawa, J.; Vogel, V.; Yamaoka, H.; Yokoya, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Novosibirsk, IYF /Daresbury /CERN /Hiroshima U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /North Carolina A-T State U. /Oxford U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /DESY /SLAC /University Coll. London /Oregon U. /Tokyo U.

    2005-05-27

    To reach design luminosity, the International Linear Collider (ILC) must be able to create and reliably maintain nanometer size beams. The ATF damping ring is the unique facility where ILC emittances are possible. In this paper we present and evaluate the proposal to create a final focus facility at the ATF which, using compact final focus optics and an ILC-like bunch train, would be capable of achieving 37 nm beam size. Such a facility would enable the development of beam diagnostics and tuning methods, as well as the training of young accelerator physicists.

  2. A Concept of Plasma Wake Field Acceleration Linear Collider (PWFA-LC)

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei; Hogan, Mark; Pei, Shilun; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tenenbaum, Peter; Katsouleas, Tom; Huang, Chengkun; Joshi, Chan; Mori, Warren; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

    2009-10-30

    Plasma Wake-Field Acceleration (PWFA) has demonstrated acceleration gradients above 50 GeV/m. Simulations have shown drive/witness bunch configurations that yield small energy spreads in the accelerated witness bunch and high energy transfer efficiency from the drive bunch to the witness bunch, ranging from 30% for a Gaussian drive bunch to 95% for a shaped longitudinal profile. These results open the opportunity for a linear collider that could be compact, efficient and more cost effective that the present microwave technologies. A concept of a PWFA-based Linear Collider (PWFA-LC) has been developed and is described in this paper. The drive beam generation and distribution, requirements on the plasma cells, and optimization of the interaction region parameters are described in detail. The R&D steps needed for further development of the concept are also outlined.

  3. Injection of electrons by colliding laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, M.; Aurand, B.; Ekerfelt, H.; Persson, A.; Lundh, O.

    2016-09-01

    To improve the stability and reproducibility of laser wakefield accelerators and to allow for future applications, controlling the injection of electrons is of great importance. This allows us to control the amount of charge in the beams of accelerated electrons and final energy of the electrons. Results are presented from a recent experiment on controlled injection using the scheme of colliding pulses and performed using the Lund multi-terawatt laser. Each laser pulse is split into two parts close to the interaction point. The main pulse is focused on a 2 mm diameter gas jet to drive a nonlinear plasma wave below threshold for self-trapping. The second pulse, containing only a fraction of the total laser energy, is focused to collide with the main pulse in the gas jet under an angle of 150°. Beams of accelerated electrons with low divergence and small energy spread are produced using this set-up. Control over the amount of accelerated charge is achieved by rotating the plane of polarization of the second pulse in relation to the main pulse. Furthermore, the peak energy of the electrons in the beams is controlled by moving the collision point along the optical axis of the main pulse, and thereby changing the acceleration length in the plasma.

  4. Controlled laser plasma wakefield acceleration of electrons via colliding pulse injection in non-collinear geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Csaba; Nakamura, Kei; Geddes, Cameron; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2007-11-01

    Colliding laser pulses [1] have been proposed as a method for controlling injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) and hence producing high quality electron beams with energy spread below 1% and normalized emittances < 1 micron. The. One pulse excites a plasma wake, and a collinear pulse following behind it collides with a counterpropagating pulse forming a beat pattern that boosts background electrons into accelerating phase. A variation of the original method uses only two laser pulses [2] which may be non-collinear. The first pulse drives the wake, and beating of the trailing edge of this pulse with the colliding pulse injects electrons. Non-collinear injection avoids optical elements on the electron beam path (avoiding emittance growth). We report on progress of non-collinear experiments at LBNL, using the Ti:Sapphire laser at the LOASIS facility of LBNL. New results indicate that the electron beam properties are affected by the presence of the second beam. [1] E. Esarey, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett 79, 2682 (1997) [2] G. Fubiani, Phys. Rev. E 70, 016402 (2004)

  5. Summary Report of Working Group 5: Electron Beam Driven Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark J.; Conde, Manoel E.

    2009-01-22

    Electron beam driven plasma accelerators have seen rapid progress over the last decade. Recent efforts have built on this success by constructing a concept for a plasma wakefield accelerator based linear collider. The needs for any future collider to deliver both energy and luminosity have substantial implications for interpreting current experiments and setting priorities for the future. This working group reviewed current experiments and ideas in the context of the demands of a future collider. The many discussions and presentations are summarized here.

  6. A new method for RF power generation for two-beam linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, H.; Corsini, R.; DAmico, T.; Delahaye, J.P.; Guignard, G.; Johnson, C.; Millich, A.; Pearce, P.; Rinolfi, L.; Riche, A.; Schulte, D.; Thorndahl, L.; Valentini, M.; Wilson, I.; Ruth, R.D.

    1999-05-01

    In this paper we discuss a new approach to two-beam acceleration. The energy for RF production is initially stored in a long-pulse electron beam which is efficiently accelerated to about 1.2 GeV by a fully loaded, conventional, low frequency ({approximately}1 GHz) linac. The beam pulse length is twice the length of the high-gradient linac. Segments of this long pulse beam are compressed using combiner rings to create a sequence of higher peak power drive beams with gaps in between. This train of drive beams is distributed from the end of the linac against the main beam direction down a common transport line so that each drive beam can power a section of the main linac. After a 180-degree turn, each high-current, low-energy drive beam is decelerated in low-impedance decelerator structures, and the resulting power is used to accelerate the low-current, high-energy beam in the main linac. The method discussed here seems relatively inexpensive, is very flexible and can be used to accelerate beams for linear colliders over the entire frequency and energy range. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. A new method for RF power generation for two-beam linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, H.; Corsini, R.; D'Amico, T.; Delahaye, J. P.; Guignard, G.; Johnson, C.; Millich, A.; Pearce, P.; Rinolfi, L.; Riche, A.; Schulte, D.; Thorndahl, L.; Valentini, M.; Wilson, I.; Ruth, R. D.

    1999-05-07

    In this paper we discuss a new approach to two-beam acceleration. The energy for RF production is initially stored in a long-pulse electron beam which is efficiently accelerated to about 1.2 GeV by a fully loaded, conventional, low frequency ({approx}1 GHz) linac. The beam pulse length is twice the length of the high-gradient linac. Segments of this long pulse beam are compressed using combiner rings to create a sequence of higher peak power drive beams with gaps in between. This train of drive beams is distributed from the end of the linac against the main beam direction down a common transport line so that each drive beam can power a section of the main linac. After a 180-degree turn, each high-current, low-energy drive beam is decelerated in low-impedance decelerator structures, and the resulting power is used to accelerate the low-current, high-energy beam in the main linac. The method discussed here seems relatively inexpensive, is very flexible and can be used to accelerate beams for linear colliders over the entire frequency and energy range.

  8. An MCNPX accelerator beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Durkee, Joe W.; Elson, Jay S.; Jason, Andrew; Johns, Russell C.; Waters, Laurie S.

    2009-06-04

    MCNPX is a powerful Monte Carlo code that can be used to conduct sophisticated radiation-transport simulations involving complex physics and geometry. Although MCNPX possesses a wide assortment of standardized modeling tools, there are instances in which a user's needs can eclipse existing code capabilities. Fortunately, although it may not be widely known, MCNPX can accommodate many customization needs. In this article, we demonstrate source-customization capability for a new SOURCE subroutine as part of our development to enable simulations involving accelerator beams for active-interrogation studies. Simulation results for a muon beam are presented to illustrate the new accelerator-source capability.

  9. Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Bazilevsky, A.

    2011-08-18

    The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. {bar P}), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g.

    ).

  10. Linear accelerators for TeV colliders. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1985-10-01

    The basic scaling relations for important linear collider design parameters are introduced. Some of the basic concepts concerning the design of accelerating structures are presented, and breakdown limitations are discussed. Rf power sources are considered. Some of the key concepts of wakefield accelerators are discussed, and some examples of wake fields for typical linac structures are presented. Some general concepts concerning emittance, and the limitations on the emittance that can be obtained from linac guns and damping rings are discussed. 49 refs., 15 figs. (LEW)

  11. Fundamental beam-beam limit from head-on interaction in the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Kazuhito; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The beam-beam limit at hadron colliders manifests itself in the form of degraded luminosity lifetime and/or reduced beam lifetime. In particular, for increasing beam intensity, the nonlinear beam-beam force causes incoherent emittance growth, while the (linear) coupling force between the two colliding beams can result in coherent beam-beam instabilities. These phenomena may be enhanced (or suppressed) by lattice errors, external noise, and other perturbations. We investigate the luminosity degradation caused both by incoherent emittance growth and by coherent beam-beam instability. The resulting beam-beam limit for an ideal machine and the of question how it is affected by some of the aforementioned errors are discussed in theory and simulation.

  12. Advances in Beam Cooling for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev

    2006-09-01

    A six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas is the basis for the latest plans for muon colliders. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields, where emittance exchange is achieved by using a continuous homogeneous absorber. Momentum-dependent path length differences in the dense hydrogen energy absorber provide the required correlation between momentum and ionization loss to accomplish longitudinal cooling. Recent studies of an 800 MHz RF cavity pressurized with hydrogen, as would be used in this application, show that the maximum gradient is not limited by a large external magnetic field, unlike vacuum cavities. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, will be employed to further reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that is being developed for an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment. The status of the designs, simulations, and tests of the cooling components for a high luminosity, low emittance muon collider will be reviewed.

  13. Effect of Beam-Beam Interactions on Stability of Coherent Oscillations in a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Ohmi, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-05-01

    In order to achieve peak luminosity of a muon collider in the 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s range the number of muons per bunch should be of the order of a few units of 10{sup 12} rendering the beam-beam parameter as high as 0.1 per IP. Such strong beam-beam interaction can be a source of instability if the working point is chosen close to a coherent beam-beam resonance. On the other hand, the beam-beam tunespread can provide a mechanism of suppression of the beam-wall driven instabilities. In this report the coherent instabilities driven by beam-beam and beam-wall interactions are studied with the help of BBSS code for the case of 1.5 TeV c.o.m muon collider.

  14. Catalogue of particle-accelerating colliding-wind binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Becker, M.; Raucq, F.

    2013-10-01

    Massive systems made of two or more stars are known to be the site for interesting physical processes - including at least in some cases - particle acceleration. Over the past decade, this topic motivated a particular effort to unveil the properties of these systems and characterize the circumstances responsible for the acceleration of particles and the potential role of pre-supernova massive stars in the production of high energy particles in our Galaxy. Although previous studies on this topic were mostly devoted to processes in general, or to a few individual objects in particular, a unified target-oriented census of particle-accelerating colliding-wind binaries (hereafter PACWBs) does not exist yet. This paper aims at making a general and unified census of these systems, emphasizing their main properties. A general discussion includes energetic considerations along with wind properties in relation with non-thermal emission processes that are likely at work in colliding-wind binaries. Finally, some guidelines for future observational and theoretical studies are drawn.

  15. New fast beam profile monitor for electron-positron colliders.

    PubMed

    Bogomyagkov, A V; Gurko, V F; Zhuravlev, A N; Zubarev, P V; Kiselev, V A; Meshkov, O I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Selivanov, A N; Smaluk, V V; Khilchenko, A D

    2007-04-01

    A new fast beam profile monitor has been developed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. This monitor is based on the Hamamatsu multianode photomultiplier with 16 anode strips and provides turn-by-turn measurement of the transverse beam profile. The device is equipped with an internal memory, which has enough capacity to store 131,072 samples of the beam profile. The dynamic range of the beam profile monitor allows us to study turn-by-turn beam dynamics within the bunch charge range from 1 pC up to 10 nC. Using this instrument, we have investigated at the VEPP-4M electron-positron collider a number of beam dynamics effects which cannot be observed by other beam diagnostics tools. PMID:17477653

  16. Electron Injection into Laser Wakefields by the Two-Beam Colliding Pulse Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Michel, P.; Toth, C. S.; Geddes, C. G. R.; van Tilborg, J.; Fubiani, G.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Cary, J. R.; Giacone, R.; Bruhwiler, D.

    2004-11-01

    Laser driven acceleration in plasmas has succeeded in producing electron beams containing considerable amount of charge (> 100 pC) at energies in excess of 100 MeV. Control of the trapping process is needed to generate monoenergetic electron beams in a reproducible manner. We report on experimental progress of laser triggered injection of electrons into laser wakefields with a two-pulse colliding laser scheme[1]. The experiments use the multi-beam, multi-terawatt Ti:Al_2O3 laser at the l'OASIS facility of LBNL. In the experiments, two counter propagating beams 30^rc angle are focused onto a high density ( ˜10^19/cm^3) gas jet. Preliminary results indicate that electron beam properties are affected by the second beam. Details of the experiments will be shown as well as comparisons with simulations. [1] G. Fubiani, et., al, Phys. Rev. E 70, 016402 (2004).

  17. Scraping beam halo in {mu} {sup +} {mu} {sup minus} colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.; Mokhov, N.; Johnstone, C.; Wan, W.; Garren, A.

    1998-01-01

    Beam halo scraping schemes have been explored in the 50 x 50 GeV and 2 x 2 TeV {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders using both absorbers and electrostatic deflectors. Utility sections have been specially designed into the rings for scraping. Results of realistic STRUCT- MARS Monte-Carlo simulations show that for the low-energy machine a scheme with a 5 m long steel absorber suppresses losses in the interaction region by three orders of magnitude. The same scraping efficiency at 2 TeV is achieved only by complete extraction of beam halo from the machine. The effect of beam-induced power dissipation in the collider superconducting magnets and detector backgrounds is shown both for the first few turns after injection and for the rest of the cycle.

  18. Wakefield Damping in a Pair of X-Band Accelerators for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.M.; Adolphsen, C.E.; Wang, J.W.; Li, Z.; /SLAC

    2006-12-18

    We consider means to damp the wake-field left behind ultra-relativistic charges. In particular, we focus on a pair of travelling wave accelerators operating at an X-band frequency of 11.424 GHz. In order to maximize the efficiency of acceleration, in the context of a linear collider, multiple bunches of charged particles are accelerated within a given pulse of the electromagnetic field. The wake-field left behind successive bunches, if left unchecked, can seriously disturb the progress of trailing bunches and can lead to an appreciable dilution in the emittance of the beam. We report on a method to minimize the influence of the wake-field on trailing bunches. This method entails detuning the characteristic mode frequencies which make-up the electromagnetic field, damping the wake-field, and interleaving the frequencies of adjacent accelerating structures. Theoretical predictions of the wake-field and modes, based on a circuit model, are compared with experimental measurements of the wake-field conducted within the ASSET facility at SLAC. Very good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment and this allows us to have some confidence in designing the damping of wake-fields in a future linear collider consisting of several thousand of these accelerating structures.

  19. Multi-beam linear accelerator EVT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teryaev, Vladimir E.; Kazakov, Sergey Yu.; Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2016-09-01

    A novel electron multi-beam accelerator is presented. The accelerator, short-named EVT (Electron Voltage Transformer) belongs to the class of two-beam accelerators. It combines an RF generator and essentially an accelerator within the same vacuum envelope. Drive beam-lets and an accelerated beam are modulated in RF modulators and then bunches pass into an accelerating structure, comprising uncoupled with each other and inductive tuned cavities, where the energy transfer from the drive beams to the accelerated beam occurs. A phasing of bunches is solved by choice correspond distances between gaps of the adjacent cavities. Preliminary results of numerical simulations and the initial specification of EVT operating in S-band, with a 60 kV gun and generating a 2.7 A, 1.1 MV beam at its output is presented. A relatively high efficiency of 67% and high design average power suggest that EVT can find its use in industrial applications.

  20. Interplay of space-charge and beam-beam effects in a collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-09-27

    Operation of a collider at low energy or use of cooling techniques to increase beam density may result in luminosity limitation due to the space-charge effects. Understanding of such limitation became important for Low-Energy RHIC physics program with heavy ions at the center of mass energies of 5-20 GeV/nucleon. For a collider, we are interested in a long beam lifetime, which limits the allowable space-charge tune shift. An additional complication comes from the fact that ion beams are colliding, which requires careful consideration of the interplay of direct space-charge and beam-beam effects. This paper summarizes the initial observations during experimental studies in RHIC at low energies.

  1. Annular beam-driven high-gradient accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Keinigs, R.; Jones, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    During the past several years there has been an increasing interest in using wakefield acceleration techniques as a means for achieving TeV energies with the next generation of linear colliders. The principal design goals for a wakefield accelerator that is to be sued in this context are high accelerating gradients and large transformer ratios. Fundamentally any slow wave structure can function as a wakefield accelerator, and several interesting concepts have been proposed. In this paper we consider for the slow wave structure a dielectrically loaded waveguide. The Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator is a very simple device. The geometry consists of a gapless cavity filled with a dielectric. The dielectric may fill all or just part of the cavity. Here we investigate driving the system with an intense annular beam, so the dielectric is separated from the wall by a vacuum region in which this beam is propagated. The primary advantage of driving with an annular beam is that larger currents can be achieved, and thus larger accelerating gradients can be generated. The drive beam is stabilized by a strong, axial magnetic field. The wall is coated with a dielectric liner to provide for better coupling. A small hole is drilled in the center of the dielectric to allow for the passage of a low current, witness beam.

  2. Renormalization theory of beam-beam interaction in electron-positron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Y.H.

    1989-07-01

    This note is devoted to explaining the essence of the renormalization theory of beam-beam interaction for carrying out analytical calculations of equilibrium particle distributions in electron-positron colliding beam storage rings. Some new numerical examples are presented such as for betatron tune dependence of the rms beam size. The theory shows reasonably good agreements with the results of computer simulations. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Essay: Accelerators, Beams and Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemann, Robert H.

    2008-05-01

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  4. Colliding pulse injection experiments in non-collinear geometry for controlled laser plasma wakefield acceleration of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Csaba; Nakamura, K.; Geddes, C.; Michel, P.; Schroeder, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.

    2006-10-01

    A method for controlled injection of electrons into a plasma wakefield relying on colliding laser pulses [1] has been proposed a decade ago to produce high quality relativistic electron beams with energy spread below 1% and normalized emittances < 1 micron from a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). The original idea uses three pulses in which one pulse excites the plasma wake and a trailing laser pulse collides with a counterpropagating one to form a beat pattern that boosts background electrons to catch the plasma wave. Another, two-beam off-axis injection method [2] with crossing angles varying from 180 to 90 degrees avoids having optical elements on the path of the electron beam and has been studied at the LOASIS facility of LBNL as a viable method for laser triggered injection. It allows low dark current operation with controllable final beam energy and low energy spread. Here, we report on progress of electron optical injection via the two-beam non-collinear colliding pulse scheme using multi-terawatt Ti:Sapphire laser beams (45 fs, 100s of mJ) focused onto a Hydrogen gas plume. Experimental results indicate that electron beam properties are affected by the second beam. *This work is supported by DoE under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. [1] E. Esarey, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett 79, 2682 (1997) [2] G. Fubiani, Phys. Rev. E 70, 016402 (2004)

  5. Optical beam profile monitor and residual gas fluorescence at the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized hydrogen jet.

    PubMed

    Tsang, T; Bellavia, S; Connolly, R; Gassner, D; Makdisi, Y; Russo, T; Thieberger, P; Trbojevic, D; Zelenski, A

    2008-10-01

    A gas fluorescence beam profile monitor has been implemented at the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) using the polarized atomic hydrogen gas jet, which is part of the polarized proton polarimeter. RHIC proton beam profiles in the vertical plane of the accelerator are obtained as well as measurements of the width of the gas jet in the beam direction. For gold ion beams, the fluorescence cross section is sufficiently large so that profiles can be obtained from the residual gas alone, albeit with long light integration times. We estimate the fluorescence cross sections that were not known in this ultrarelativistic regime and calculate the beam emittance to provide an independent measurement of the RHIC beam. This optical beam diagnostic technique, utilizing the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas, offers a noninvasive particle beam characterization and provides visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. PMID:19044742

  6. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  7. Proposing a Laser Based Beam Size Monitor for the Future Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Marc C

    2001-12-10

    Compton scattering techniques for the measurement of the transverse beam size of particle beams at future linear colliders (FLC) are proposed. At several locations of the beam delivery system (BDS) of the FLC, beam spot sizes ranging from several hundreds to a few micrometers have to be measured. This is necessary to verify beam optics, to obtain the transverse beam emittance, and to achieve the highest possible luminosity. The large demagnification of the beam in the BDS and the high beam power puts extreme conditions on any measuring device. With conventional techniques at their operational limit in FLC scenarios, new methods for the detection of the transverse beam size have to be developed. For this laser based techniques are proposed capable of measuring high power beams with sizes in the micrometer range. In this paper general aspects and critical issues of a generic device are outlined and specific solutions proposed. Plans to install a laser wire experiment at an accelerator test facility are presented.

  8. Colliding pulse injection experiments in non-collinear geometryfor controlled laser plasma wakefield acceleration of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric H.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Leemans,Wim P.; Nakamura, Kei; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Schroeder, Carl B.; Bruhwiler,D.; Cary, J.R.

    2007-06-25

    An optical injection scheme for a laser-plasma basedaccelerator which employs a non-collinear counter-propagating laser beamto push background electrons in the focusing and acceleration phase viaponderomotive beat with the trailing part of the wakefield driver pulseis discussed. Preliminary experiments were performed using a drive beamof a_0 = 2.6 and colliding beam of a_1 = 0.8 both focused on the middleof a 200 mu m slit jet backed with 20 bar, which provided ~; 260 mu mlong gas plume. The enhancement in the total charge by the collidingpulse was observed with sharp dependence on the delay time of thecolliding beam. Enhancement of the neutron yield was also measured, whichsuggests a generation of electrons above 10 MeV.

  9. Beam tube vacuum in future superconducting proton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, William C.

    1995-02-01

    The beam tube vacuum requirements in future superconducting proton colliders that have been proposed or discussed in the literature—SSC, LHC, and ELN—are reviewed. The main beam tube vacuum problem encountered in these machines is how to deal with the magnitude of gas desorption and power deposition by synchrotron radiation while satisfying resistivity, impedance, and space constraints in the cryogenic environment of superconducting magnets. A beam tube vacuum model is developed that treats photodesorption of tightly bound H, C, and O, photodesorption of physisorbed molecules, and the isotherm vapor pressure of H2. Experimental data on cold tube photodesorption experiments are reviewed and applied to model calculations of beam tube vacuum performance for simple cold beam tube and liner configurations. Particular emphasis is placed on the modeling and interpretation of beam tube photodesorption experiments at electron synchrotron light sources. The paper also includes discussion of the constraints imposed by beam image current heating, the growth rate of the resistive wall instability, and single-bunch instability impedance limits.

  10. Beam tube vacuum in future superconducting proton colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.

    1994-10-01

    The beam tube vacuum requirements in future superconducting proton colliders that have been proposed or discussed in the literature -- SSC, LHC, and ELN -- are reviewed. The main beam tube vacuum problem encountered in these machines is how to deal with the magnitude of gas desorption and power deposition by synchrotron radiation while satisfying resistivity, impedance, and space constraints in the cryogenic environment of superconducting magnets. A beam tube vacuum model is developed that treats photodesorption of tightly bound H, C, and 0, photodesorption of physisorbed molecules, and the isotherm vapor pressure of H{sub 2}. Experimental data on cold tube photodesorption experiments are reviewed and applied to model calculations of beam tube vacuum performance for simple cold beam tube and liner configurations. Particular emphasis is placed on the modeling and interpretation of beam tube photodesorpiion experiments at electron synchrotron light sources. The paper also includes discussion of the constraints imposed by beam image current heating, the growth rate of the resistive wall instability, and single-bunch instability impedance limits.

  11. Beam diagnostics for high intensity hadron accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausset, Patrick; Gardès, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    High intensity hadron beam accelerators have been recently proposed and developed either for the production of high intensity secondary beams for Nuclear and Particle Physics research (EURISOL, SPIRAL2, FAIR), or Applied Physics in the field of Accelerator Driven System and waste transmutation (EUROTRANS). For these applications, high power Linear Accelerator (LINAC) are planned to produce and accelerate hadron beams up to 1 GeV. Both commissioning and operation of these accelerators require dedicated beam instrumentation able to monitor and characterize on line as completely as possible the produced beams having a power in the range of 1 MW. Beam current, transverse beam centroı¨d position and profiles and beam energy are the most important characteristics that have to be measured. Due to the high average power of the beam, nondestructive or at least minimally intercepting beam sensors are required. Beam instrumentation for IPHI (CEA/DSM and CNRS/IN2P3 collaboration) which is a high intensity proton (3 MeV, 100 mA, CW operation) injector initially designed to be a possible front end for this kind of LINAC is under realization. Beam diagnostics already under operation, developments in progress will be described and will introduce a more general description of high power beam instrumentation.

  12. Thermomechanical response of Large Hadron Collider collimators to proton and ion beam impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchi, Marija; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Cerutti, F.; Lari, L.; Redaelli, S.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2015-04-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to accelerate and bring into collision high-energy protons as well as heavy ions. Accidents involving direct beam impacts on collimators can happen in both cases. The LHC collimation system is designed to handle the demanding requirements of high-intensity proton beams. Although proton beams have 100 times higher beam power than the nominal LHC lead ion beams, specific problems might arise in case of ion losses due to different particle-collimator interaction mechanisms when compared to protons. This paper investigates and compares direct ion and proton beam impacts on collimators, in particular tertiary collimators (TCTs), made of the tungsten heavy alloy INERMET® 180. Recent measurements of the mechanical behavior of this alloy under static and dynamic loading conditions at different temperatures have been done and used for realistic estimates of the collimator response to beam impact. Using these new measurements, a numerical finite element method (FEM) approach is presented in this paper. Sequential fast-transient thermostructural analyses are performed in the elastic-plastic domain in order to evaluate and compare the thermomechanical response of TCTs in case of critical beam load cases involving proton and heavy ion beam impacts.

  13. Simulation Studies of Beam-Beam Effects of a Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider Based on CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhong Zhang,Ji Qiang

    2009-05-01

    The collective beam-beam effect can potentially cause a rapid growth of beam sizes and reduce the luminosity of a collider to an unacceptably low level. The ELIC, a proposed ultra high luminosity electron-ion collider based on CEBAF, employs high repetition rate crab crossing colliding beams with very small bunch transverse sizes and very short bunch lengths, and collides them at up to 4 interaction points with strong final focusing. All of these features can make the beam-beam effect challenging. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect in ELIC using a self-consistent strong-strong beam-beam simulation code developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This simulation study is used for validating the ELIC design and for searching for an optimal parameter set.

  14. To study the emittance dilution in Superconducting Linear Accelerator Design for International Linear Collider (ILC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Kirti; Solyak, Nikolay; Tenenbaum, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Recently the particle physics community has chosen a single technology for the new accelerator, opening the way for the world community to unite and concentrate resources on the design of an International Linear collider (ILC) using superconducting technology. One of the key operational issues in the design of the ILC will be the preservation of the small beam emittances during passage through the main linear accelerator (linac). Sources of emittance dilution include incoherent misalignments of the quadrupole magnets and rf-structure misalignments. In this work, the study of emittance dilution for the 500-GeV center of mass energy main linac of the Superconducting Linear Accelerator design, based on adaptation of the TESLA TDR design is performed using LIAR simulation program. Based on the tolerances of the present design, effect of two important Beam-Based steering algorithms, Flat Steering and Dispersion Free Steering, are compared with respect to the emittance dilution in the main linac. We also investigated the effect of various misalignments on the emittance dilution for these two steering algorithms.

  15. Review of linear collider beam-beam interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1989-01-01

    Three major effects from the interaction of e/sup +/e/sup /minus// beams---disruption, beamstrahlung, and electron-positron pair creation---are reviewed. For the disruption effects we discuss the luminosity enhancement factor, the maximum and rms disruption angles, and the ''kink instability''. All the results are obtained from computer simulations. Scaling laws for the numerical results and theoretical explanations of the computer acquired phenomena are offered wherever possible. For the beamstrahlung effects we concentrate only on the final electron energy spectrum resulting from multiple photon radiation process, and the deflection angle associated with low energy particles. For the effects from electron-positron pair creation, both coherent and incoherent processes of beamstrahlung pair creation are discussed. In addition to the estimation on total number of such pairs, we also look into the energy spectrum and the deflection angle. 17 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Demonstration of two-beam acceleration and 30 GHz power production in the CLIC Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, R.; Braun, H. H.; Carron, G.; Chanudet, M.; Chautard, F.; Delahaye, J. P.; Godot, J. C.; Hutchins, S.; Martinez, C.; Suberlucq, G.; Tenenbaum, P.; Thorndahl, L.; Trautner, H.; Valentini, M.; Wilson, I.; Wuensch, W.

    1999-05-07

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF II) at CERN has recently demonstrated Two-Beam power production and acceleration at 30 GHz. With 41 MW of 30 GHz power produced in 14 ns pulses at a repetition rate of 5 Hz, the main beam has been accelerated by 28 MeV. The 30 GHz RF power is extracted in low impedance decelerating structures from a low-energy, high-current 'drive beam' which runs parallel to the main beam. The average current in the drive-beam train is 25 A, while the peak current exceeds 2 kA. Crosschecks between measured drive-beam charge, 30 GHz power and main-beam energy gain are in good agreement. In this paper, some relevant experimental and technical issues on drive-beam generation, two-beam power production and acceleration are presented.

  17. Acceleration of high charge density electron beams in the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, J.C.; Clendenin, J.E.; Jobe, R.K.; Lueth, V.G.; Millich, A.; Ross, M.C.; Seeman, J.T.; Stiening, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) will require both electron and positron beams of very high charge density and low emittance to be accelerated to about 50 GeV in the SLAC 3-km linac. The linac is in the process of being improved to meet this requirement. The program to accelerate an electron beam of high charge density through the first third of the SLC linac is described and the experimental results are discussed. 7 references, 5 figures.

  18. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  19. Effects of Collisional Dissipation on the "Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampe, Martin; Manheimer, Wallace M.

    1998-11-01

    Rostoker, Binderbauer and Monkhorst have recently proposed a "colliding beam fusion reactor" (CBFR) for use with the p-B11 reaction. We have examined the various dissipative processes resulting from Coulomb collisions, and have concluded that the CBFR equilibrium cannot be sustained for long enough to permit net fusion gain. There are many collisional processes which occur considerably faster than fusion, and result in particle loss, energy loss, or detuning of the resonant energy for the p-B reaction. Pitch-angle scattering of protons off the boron beam, which occurs 100 times faster than fusion, isotropizes the proton beam and results in proton loss. Energy exchange between protons and boron, which is 20 times faster than fusion, detunes the resonance. Proton-proton scattering, which is faster than fusion for all CBFR scenarios, Maxwellianizes the protons and thus detunes the resonance. Ion-electron collisions lead indirectly to a friction between the two ion beams, which is typically fast compared to the fusion process. Results of Fokker-Planck analyses of each process will be shown.

  20. HOM-Free Linear Accelerating Structure for e+ e- Linear Collider at C-Band

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Kiyoshi

    2003-07-07

    HOM-free linear acceleration structure using the choke mode cavity (damped cavity) is now under design for e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider project at C-band frequency (5712 MHz). Since this structure shows powerful damping effect on most of all HOMs, there is no multibunch problem due to long range wakefields. The structure will be equipped with the microwave absorbers in each cells and also the in-line dummy load in the last few cells. The straightness tolerance for 1.8 m long structure is closer than 30 {micro}m for 25% emittance dilution limit, which can be achieved by standard machining and braising techniques. Since it has good vacuum pumping conductance through annular gaps in each cell, instabilities due to the interaction of beam with the residual-gas and ions can be minimized.

  1. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

    2014-08-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010-2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5-4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

  2. Beam Breakup Effects in Dielectric Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Kustov, A.; Altmark, A.; Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

    2009-01-22

    The dynamics of the beam in structure-based wakefield accelerators leads to beam stability issues not ordinarily found in other machines. In particular, the high current drive beam in an efficient wakefield accelerator loses a large fraction of its energy in the decelerator structure, resulting in physical emittance growth, increased energy spread, and the possibility of head-tail instability for an off axis beam, all of which can lead to severe reduction of beam intensity. Beam breakup (BBU) effects resulting from parasitic wakefields provide a potentially serious limitation to the performance of dielectric structure based wakefield accelerators as well. We report on experimental and numerical investigation of BBU and its mitigation. The experimental program focuses on BBU measurements at the AWA facility in a number of high gradient and high transformer ratio wakefield devices. New pickup-based beam diagnostics will provide methods for studying parasitic wakefields that are currently unavailable. The numerical part of this research is based on a particle-Green's function beam breakup code we are developing that allows rapid, efficient simulation of beam breakup effects in advanced linear accelerators. The goal of this work is to be able to compare the results of detailed experimental measurements with the accurate numerical results and to design an external FODO channel for the control of the beam in the presence of strong transverse wakefields.

  3. Research and Development of Future Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next generation high-energy lepton collider machine. A novel accelerator technology must be developed to overcome several intrinsic issues of muon acceleration. Recent research and development of critical beam elements for a muon accelerator, especially muon beam phase space ionization cooling channel, are reviewed in this paper.

  4. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchi, Marija; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Lari, L.; Rossi, A.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2015-02-01

    The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more) of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  5. RF beam control system for the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Campbell, A.; DeLong, J.; Hayes, T.; Onillon, E.; Rose, J.; Vetter, K.

    1998-08-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency.

  6. RF BEAM CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE BROOKHAVEN RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER, RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.; CAMPBELL,A.; DELONG,J.; HAYES,T.; ONILLON,E.; ROSE,J.; VETTER,K.

    1998-06-22

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency.

  7. Microwave accelerator E-beam pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Stein, William E.; Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    A device and method for pumping gaseous lasers by means of a microwave accelerator. The microwave accelerator produces a relativistic electron beam which is applied along the longitudinal axis of the laser through an electron beam window. The incident points of the electron beam on the electron beam window are varied by deflection coils to enhance the cooling characteristics of the foil. A thyratron is used to reliably modulate the microwave accelerator to produce electron beam pulses which excite the laser medium to produce laser pulse repetition frequencies not previously obtainable. An aerodynamic window is also disclosed which eliminates foil heating problems, as well as a magnetic bottle for reducing laser cavity length and pressures while maintaining efficient energy deposition.

  8. A nonlinear particle dynamics map of wakefield acceleration in a linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Cheshkov, S.; Horton, W.; Yokoya, K.

    1998-08-01

    The performance of a wakefield accelerator in a high energy collider application is analyzed. In order to carry out this task, it is necessary to construct a strawman design system (no matter how preliminary) and build a code of the systems approach. A nonlinear dynamics map built on a simple theoretical model of the wakefield generated by the laser pulse (or whatever other method) is obtained and they employ this as a base for building a system with multi-stages (and components) as a high energy collider. The crucial figures of merit for such a system other than the final energy include the emittance (that determines the luminosity). The more complex the system is, the more opportunities the system has to degrade the emittance (or entropy of the beam). Thus the map gu ides one to identify where the crucial elements lie that affect the emittance. They find that a strong focusing force of the wakefield coupled with a possible jitter of the axis (or laser aiming) of each stage and a spread in the betatron frequencies arising from different phase space positions for individual particles leads to a phase space mixing. This sensitively controls the emittance degradation. They show that in the case of a uniform plasma the effect of emittance growth is large and may cause serious problems. They discuss possibilities to avoid it and control the situation.

  9. Impact of 7-TeV/c large hadron collider proton beam on a copper target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Goddard, B.; Kain, V.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Piriz, A. R.; Temporal, M.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Fortov, V. E.

    2005-04-01

    The large hadron collider (LHC) will allow for collision between two 7TeV/c proton beams, each comprising 2808 bunches with 1.1×1011 protons per bunch, traveling in opposite direction. The bunch length is 0.5ns and two neighboring bunches are separated by 25ns so that the duration of the entire beam is about 89μs. The beam power profile in the transverse direction is a Gaussian with a standard deviation of 0.2mm. The energy stored in each beam is about 350MJ that is sufficient to melt 500kg of copper. In case of a failure in the machine protection systems, the entire beam could impact directly onto an accelerator equipment. A first estimate of the scale of damage resulting from such a failure has been assessed for a solid copper target hit by the beam by carrying out three-dimensional energy deposition calculations and two-dimensional numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic response of the target. This work has shown that the penetration depth of the LHC protons will be between 10 and 40m in solid copper. These calculations show that material conditions obtained in the target are similar to those planned for beam impact at dedicated accelerators designed to study the physics of high-energy-density states of matter, for example, the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt [W. F. Henning, Nucl. Instrum Methods Phys. Res. B 214, 211 (2004)].

  10. International Linear Collider Accelerator Physics R&D

    SciTech Connect

    George D. Gollin; Michael Davidsaver; Michael J. Haney; Michael Kasten; Jason Chang; Perry Chodash; Will Dluger; Alex Lang; Yehan Liu

    2008-09-03

    ILC work at Illinois has concentrated primarily on technical issues relating to the design of the accelerator. Because many of the problems to be resolved require a working knowledge of classical mechanics and electrodynamics, most of our research projects lend themselves well to the participation of undergraduate research assistants. The undergraduates in the group are scientists, not technicians, and find solutions to problems that, for example, have stumped PhD-level staff elsewhere. The ILC Reference Design Report calls for 6.7 km circumference damping rings (which prepare the beams for focusing) using “conventional” stripline kickers driven by fast HV pulsers. Our primary goal was to determine the suitability of the 16 MeV electron beam in the AØ region at Fermilab for precision kicker studies.We found that the low beam energy and lack of redundancy in the beam position monitor system complicated the analysis of our data. In spite of these issues we concluded that the precision we could obtain was adequate to measure the performance and stability of a production module of an ILC kicker, namely 0.5%. We concluded that the kicker was stable to an accuracy of ~2.0% and that we could measure this precision to an accuracy of ~0.5%. As a result, a low energy beam like that at AØ could be used as a rapid-turnaround facility for testing ILC production kicker modules. The ILC timing precision for arrival of bunches at the collision point is required to be 0.1 picosecond or better. We studied the bunch-to-bunch timing accuracy of a “phase detector” installed in AØ in order to determine its suitability as an ILC bunch timing device. A phase detector is an RF structure excited by the passage of a bunch. Its signal is fed through a 1240 MHz high-Q resonant circuit and then down-mixed with the AØ 1300 MHz accelerator RF. We used a kind of autocorrelation technique to compare the phase detector signal with a reference signal obtained from the phase detector

  11. Beam Control for Ion Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T.C.; Ahle, L.

    2000-02-17

    Coordinated bending and acceleration of an intense space-charge-dominated ion beam has been achieved for the first time. This required the development of a variable waveform, precision, bi-polar high voltage pulser and a precision, high repetition rate induction core modulator. Waveforms applied to the induction cores accelerate the beam as the bi-polar high voltage pulser delivers a voltage ramp to electrostatic dipoles which bend the beam through a 90 degree permanent magnet quadrupole lattice. Further work on emittance minimization is also reported.

  12. Generalized radially self-accelerating helicon beams.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Christian; Eichelkraut, Toni; Ornigotti, Marco; Szameit, Alexander

    2014-10-31

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a new class of optical beams that are radially self-accelerating and nondiffracting. These beams continuously evolve on spiraling trajectories while maintaining their amplitude and phase distribution in their rotating rest frame. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of radial self-acceleration and prove our findings experimentally. As radially self-accelerating beams are nonparaxial and a solution to the full scalar Helmholtz equation, they can be implemented in many linear wave systems beyond optics, from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and soft matter. Our work generalized the study of classical helicon beams to a complete set of solutions for rotating complex fields. PMID:25396370

  13. Operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    The operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. Beamstrahlung limits the charge per bunch at low plasma densities. Reduced laser intensity is examined to improve accelerator efficiency in the beamstrahlung-limited regime.

  14. Distinguishing new physics scenarios at a linear collider with polarized beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pankov, A.A.; Tsytrinov, A.V.; Paver, N.

    2006-06-01

    Numerous nonstandard dynamics dominated by very high mass exchanges are described at current and future accelerator energies by appropriate contactlike effective interactions among the standard model particles. Correspondingly, they can manifest themselves only through deviations of the cross sections from the standard model predictions. If one such deviation were observed, it would be important to definitely identify, to a given confidence level, the actual source among the various possible nonstandard interactions that, in principle, can explain it. Here we estimate the identification reach on different new physics effective interactions, obtainable from angular distributions of lepton pair production processes at the planned electron-positron International Linear Collider with polarized beams. For each nonstandard model, such an identification reach defines the range in the relevant heavy mass scale parameter where it can be unambiguously distinguished from the other nonstandard models as the source of corrections to the standard model cross sections, in case these are observed. The effective interactions for which we estimate the expected identification reach are the interactions based on gravity in large extra dimensions, in TeV{sup -1} extra dimensions and the compositeness-inspired four-fermion contact interactions. The availability of both beams polarized at the International Linear Collider turns out, in many cases, to dramatically enhance the identification sensitivity.

  15. Beam acceleration through proton radio frequency quadrupole accelerator in BARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, P. V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Mathew, J. V.; Singh, S. K.; Jain, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, M.; Kumar, R.; Roychowdhury, P.; Kelwani, H.; Rama Rao, B. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Agarwal, A.; Kukreti, B. M.; Singh, P.

    2016-05-01

    A 3 MeV proton Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India, for the Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) programme. The 352 MHz RFQ is built in 4 segments and in the first phase two segments of the LEHIPA RFQ were commissioned, accelerating a 50 keV, 1 mA pulsed proton beam from the ion source, to an energy of 1.24 MeV. The successful operation of the RFQ gave confidence in the physics understanding and technology development that have been achieved, and indicate that the road forward can now be traversed rather more quickly.

  16. Single crystal niobium tubes for particle colliders accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James E

    2013-02-28

    The objective of this research project is to produce single crystal niobium (Nb) tubes for use as particle accelerator cavities for the Fermi laboratory’s International Linear Collider project. Single crystal Nb tubes may have superior performance compared to a polycrystalline tubes because the absence of grain boundaries may permit the use of higher accelerating voltages. In addition, Nb tubes that are subjected to the high temperature, high vacuum crystallization process are very pure and well annealed. Any impurity with a significantly higher vapor pressure than Nb should be decreased by the relatively long exposure at high temperature to the high vacuum environment. After application of the single crystal process, the surfaces of the Nb tubes are bright and shiny, and the tube resembles an electro polished Nb tube. For these reasons, there is interest in single crystal Nb tubes and in a process that will produce single crystal tubes. To convert a polycrystalline niobium tube into a single crystal, the tube is heated to within a few hundred °C of the melting temperature of niobium, which is 2477 °C. RF heating is used to rapidly heat the tube in a narrow zone and after reaching the operating temperature, the hot zone is slowly passed along the length of the tube. For crystallization tests with Nb tubes, the traverse rate was in the range of 1-10 cm per hour. All the crystallization tests in this study were performed in a water-cooled, stainless steel chamber under a vacuum of 5 x10-6 torr or better. In earliest tests of the single crystal growth process, the Nb tubes had an OD of 1.9 cm and a wall thickness of 0.15 mm. With these relatively small Nb tubes, the single crystal process was always successful in producing single crystal tubes. In these early tests, the operating temperature was normally maintained at 2200 °C, and the traverse rate was 5 cm per hour. In the next test series, the Nb tube size was increased to 3.8 cm OD and the wall thickness was

  17. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed.

  18. Explore the possibility of accelerating polarized He-3 beam in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.

    2012-05-20

    As the world's first high energy polarized proton collider, RHIC has made significant progresses in measuring the proton spin structure in the past decade. In order to have better understanding of the contribution of up quarks and down quarks to the proton spin structure, collisions of high energy polarized neutron beams are required. Polarized He-3 beams offer an effectiveway to provide polarized neutron beams. In this paper, we present studies of accelerating polarized He-3 in RHIC with the current dual snake configuration. Possibilities of adding two more pairs of snakes for accelerating polarized He-3 were explored. Results of six snake configuration in RHIC are also reported in the paper.

  19. Ion acceleration mechanism in electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A.F.

    1982-07-01

    Analysis of experimental data reveals that several processes observed in diodes and during the transport of intense electron beams in a neutral gas result from polarization of a plasma in an electric field. Under certain conditions this effect gives rise to a high-field region at the boundary of a plasma column. The electron beam is strongly focused in this region. As a result, a two-dimensional potential well forms at the crossover point of a strongly focused beam. The electric field at this well can reach several megavolts per centimeter. The crossover point moves as a result of expansion of the plasma cloud. The ions trapped in the potential well are accelerated. There is effective acceleration over a distance of the order of a few times the beam radius. A new physical model gives a satisfactory explanation of the experimental results.

  20. Discrete beam acceleration in uniform waveguide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    El-Ganainy, Ramy; Makris, Konstantinos G.; Miri, Mohammad Ali; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Chen Zhigang

    2011-08-15

    Within the framework of the tight-binding model we demonstrate that Wannier-Stark states can freely accelerate in uniform optical lattices. As opposed to accelerating Airy wave packets in free space, our analysis reveals that in this case the beam main intensity features self-bend along two opposite hyperbolic trajectories. Two-dimensional geometries are also considered and an asymptotic connection between these Wannier-Stark ladders and Airy profiles is presented.

  1. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis

    2010-08-01

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC

  2. Summary Report of Working Group 4: e-Beam Driven Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimenko, V.; Ischebeck, R.

    2006-11-27

    The working group considered high transformer ration schemes for an afterburner based on the design of a future linear collider. The main linac produces high charge beams of 100 GeV. A multiple stage plasma based accelerator would accelerate a portion of this beam to 500 GeV. The length of each plasma stage is expected to be of the order of a few meters while the isochronous beam transport required for multiple stages would occupy about a kilometer. Discussions in the working group were centered on issues to be addressed: ion motion in the plasma channel, positron side of accelerator ... The state of present e-beam driven plasma and dielectric Wakefield accelerators is very mature and closely resembles parameters of the afterburner for ILC. The main result of this working group is a multistage afterburner scheme of an afterburner for ILC and discussion of the experimental program to address main issues.

  3. Summary Report of Working Group 4: e-Beam Driven Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimenko, V.; Ischebeck, R.

    2006-11-01

    The working group considered high transformer ration schemes for an afterburner based on the design of a future linear collider. The main linac produces high charge beams of 100 GeV. A multiple stage plasma based accelerator would accelerate a portion of this beam to 500 GeV. The length of each plasma stage is expected to be of the order of a few meters while the isochronous beam transport required for multiple stages would occupy about a kilometer. Discussions in the working group were centered on issues to be addressed: ion motion in the plasma channel, positron side of accelerator … The state of present e-beam driven plasma and dielectric Wakefield accelerators is very mature and closely resembles parameters of the afterburner for ILC. The main result of this working group is a multistage afterburner scheme of an afterburner for ILC and discussion of the experimental program to address main issues.

  4. Issues and experience with controlling beam loss at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Annala, Gerald; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Controlling beam loss in the Tevatron collider is of great importance because of the delicate nature of the cryogenic magnet system and the collider detectors. Maximizing the physics potential requires optimized performance as well as protection of all equipment. The operating history of the Tevatron has significantly influenced the way losses are managed. The development of beam loss management in the Tevatron will be presented.

  5. Theories of statistical equilibrium in electron-positron colliding-beam storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schonfeld, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    In this lecture I introduce you to some recent theoretical work that represents a significant and long overdue departure from the mainstream of ideas on the physics of colliding- beam storage rings. The goal of the work in question is to understand analytically - without recourse to computer simulation - the role that dissipation and noise play in the observed colliding-beam behavior of electron-positron storage rings.

  6. High-efficiency acceleration of an electron beam in a plasma wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Litos, M; Adli, E; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clayton, C E; Corde, S; Delahaye, J P; England, R J; Fisher, A S; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; White, G; Wu, Z; Yakimenko, V; Yocky, G

    2014-11-01

    High-efficiency acceleration of charged particle beams at high gradients of energy gain per unit length is necessary to achieve an affordable and compact high-energy collider. The plasma wakefield accelerator is one concept being developed for this purpose. In plasma wakefield acceleration, a charge-density wake with high accelerating fields is driven by the passage of an ultra-relativistic bunch of charged particles (the drive bunch) through a plasma. If a second bunch of relativistic electrons (the trailing bunch) with sufficient charge follows in the wake of the drive bunch at an appropriate distance, it can be efficiently accelerated to high energy. Previous experiments using just a single 42-gigaelectronvolt drive bunch have accelerated electrons with a continuous energy spectrum and a maximum energy of up to 85 gigaelectronvolts from the tail of the same bunch in less than a metre of plasma. However, the total charge of these accelerated electrons was insufficient to extract a substantial amount of energy from the wake. Here we report high-efficiency acceleration of a discrete trailing bunch of electrons that contains sufficient charge to extract a substantial amount of energy from the high-gradient, nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator. Specifically, we show the acceleration of about 74 picocoulombs of charge contained in the core of the trailing bunch in an accelerating gradient of about 4.4 gigavolts per metre. These core particles gain about 1.6 gigaelectronvolts of energy per particle, with a final energy spread as low as 0.7 per cent (2.0 per cent on average), and an energy-transfer efficiency from the wake to the bunch that can exceed 30 per cent (17.7 per cent on average). This acceleration of a distinct bunch of electrons containing a substantial charge and having a small energy spread with both a high accelerating gradient and a high energy-transfer efficiency represents a milestone in the development of plasma wakefield acceleration into a

  7. A parallel particle-in-cell model for beam-beam interaction in high energy ring colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper we present a self-consistent simulation model of colliding beams in high energy ring colliders. The model, which is based on a particle-in-cell method, uses a new developed shifted effective Green function algorithm for the efficient calculation of the beam-beam interaction with arbitrary separation and large aspect ratio. The model uses transfer maps to treat the external focusing elements and a stochastic map to treat radiation damping and quantum excitation of the beams. In the parallel implementation we studied various strategies to deal with the particular nature of the colliding beam system - a system in which there can be significant particle movement between beam-beam collisions. We chose a particle-field decomposition approach instead of the conventional domain decomposition or particle decomposition approach. The particle-field approach leads to good load balance, reduced communication cost, and shows the best scalability on an IBM SP3 among the three parallel implementations we studied. A performance test of the beam-beam model on a Cray T3E, IBM SP3, and a PC cluster is presented. As an application, we studied the flip-flop instability in an electron-positron collider.

  8. Characterization Of A Wakefield Accelerated Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guèye, Paul; Keppel, Cynthia; Lane, Bianca; Owens, Judy; Torrence, Rickey; Saleh, Ned; Umstadter, Don; Zhang, Ping; Ent, Rolf; Assamagan, Kétévi

    2001-10-01

    With the advancement of femtosecond Terawatt lasers, there has been great interest in their ability of accelerating electrons to high energy within short distances; this effect originating from the GeV/cm gradient created in the plasma (compared to conventional RF systems). We report on new experimental results obtained from a 400 fs/4 J-laser plasma driven electron beam. The data were collected by means of a ~ 3 m QQ¯QD spectrometer especially designed for that experiment. A 32× 16 fiber array detector, along with a scintillating LANEX screen and a Faraday cup were used to detect the electrons, and for charge monitoring. The momentum and spatial distributions of the beam were reconstructed. The results are consistent with a previous experiment, and compatible with a GEANT simulation used for background estimation due primarily to secondaries induced by electron-beam pipe collisions. We also report on the extracted emittance of the beam for the corresponding momentum range.

  9. Technical Challenges and Scientific Payoffs of Muon BeamAccelerators for Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2007-09-25

    Historically, progress in particle physics has largely beendetermined by development of more capable particle accelerators. Thistrend continues today with the recent advent of high-luminosityelectron-positron colliders at KEK and SLAC operating as "B factories,"the imminent commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and theworldwide development effort toward the International Linear Collider.Looking to the future, one of the most promising approaches is thedevelopment of muon-beam accelerators. Such machines have very highscientific potential, and would substantially advance thestate-of-the-art in accelerator design. A 20-50 GeV muon storage ringcould serve as a copious source of well-characterized electron neutrinosor antineutrinos (a Neutrino Factory), providing beams aimed at detectorslocated 3000-7500 km from the ring. Such long baseline experiments areexpected to be able to observe and characterize the phenomenon ofcharge-conjugation-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector, and thusprovide an answer to one of the most fundamental questions in science,namely, why the matter-dominated universe in which we reside exists atall. By accelerating muons to even higher energies of several TeV, we canenvision a Muon Collider. In contrast with composite particles likeprotons, muons are point particles. This means that the full collisionenergy is available to create new particles. A Muon Collider has roughlyten times the energy reach of a proton collider at the same collisionenergy, and has a much smaller footprint. Indeed, an energy frontier MuonCollider could fit on the site of an existing laboratory, such asFermilab or BNL. The challenges of muon-beam accelerators are related tothe facts that i) muons are produced as a tertiary beam, with very large6D phase space, and ii) muons are unstable, with a lifetime at rest ofonly 2 microseconds. How these challenges are accommodated in theaccelerator design will be described. Both a Neutrino Factory and a MuonCollider

  10. Production of an Accelerated Oxygen-14 Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, James; O'Neil, James P.; Cerny, Joseph

    2002-05-03

    BEARS is an ongoing project to provide a light-ion radioactive-beam capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Light radioactive isotopes are produced at a 10 MeV proton medical cyclotron, transported 350 m via a high-speed gas transport capillary, cryogenically separated, and injected into the 88-Inch Cyclotron's ion source. The first radioactive beam successfully accelerated was Carbon-11 and beams of intensity more than 108 ions/sec have been utilized for experiments. Development of Oxygen-14 as the second BEARS beam presented considerable technical challenges, both due to its short half-life of 71 seconds and the radiation chemistry of oxygen in the target. The usual techniques developed for medical uses of Oxygen-15 involve the addition of significant amounts of carrier oxygen, something that would overload the ion source. As a solution, Oxygen-14 is produced as water in a carrier-free form, and is chemically converted in two steps to carbon dioxide, a form readily usable by the BEARS. This system has been built and is operational, and initial tests of accelerating an Oxygen-14 beam have been performed.

  11. Production of an accelerated oxygen-14 beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J.; O'Neil, J. P.; Cerny, Joseph

    2003-05-01

    BEARS is an ongoing project to provide a light-ion radioactive-beam capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Light radioactive isotopes are produced at a 10 MeV proton medical cyclotron, transported 350 m via a high-speed gas transport capillary, cryogenically separated, and injected into the 88-Inch Cyclotron's ion source. The first radioactive beam successfully accelerated was carbon-11 and beams of intensity more than 10 8 ions/s have been utilized for experiments. Development of oxygen-14 as the second BEARS beam presented considerable technical challenges, both due to its short half-life of 71 s and the radiation chemistry of oxygen in the target. The usual techniques developed for medical uses of oxygen-15 involve the addition of significant amounts of carrier oxygen, something that would overload the ion source. As a solution, oxygen-14 is produced as water in a carrier-free form, and is chemically converted in two steps to carbon dioxide, a form readily usable by the BEARS. This system has been built and is operational, and initial tests of accelerating an oxygen-14 beam have been performed.

  12. Beam alignment tests for therapy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, W.R.; Larsen, R.D.; Bjarngard, B.E.

    1981-12-01

    Beam spot displacement, collimator asymmetry, and movement of either collimator or gantry rotational axis can cause misalignment of the X ray beam from a therapy accelerator. A test method, sensitive to all the above problems, consists of double-exposing a film, located at the isocenter, for two gantry positions, 180/sup 0/ apart. Opposite halves of the field are blocked for each exposure. A lateral shift of one half with respect to the other indicates the presence of one of the problems mentioned above. Additional tests are described, each of which is sensitive to only one of the problems and capable of quantifying the error.

  13. Toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.E.; Silbar, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a program aiming toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams. A hybrid approach is used, combining knowledge- based system programming techniques and traditional numerical simulations. We use an expert system shell for the symbolic processing and have incorporated the FORTRAN beam optics code TRANSPORT for numerical simulation. The paper discusses the symbolic model we built, the reasoning components, how the knowledge base accesses information from an operating beamline, and the experience gained in merging the two worlds of numeric and symbolic processing. We also discuss plans for a future real-time system. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  14. POLARIZED ION SOURCES FOR HIGH ENERGY ACCELERATORS AND COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    ZELENSKI,A.N.

    2000-10-16

    The recent progress in polarized ion source development is reviewed. In dc operation a 1.0 mA polarized H{sup -} ion current is now available from the Optically-Pumped Polarized Ion Source (OPPIS) . In pulsed operation a 10 mA polarized H{sup -} ion current was demonstrated at the TRIUMF pulsed OPPIS test bench and a 3.5 mA peak current was obtained from an Atomic Beam Source (ABS) at the INR Moscow test bench. The possibilities for future improvements with both techniques are discussed. A new OPPIS for RHIC spin physics is described. The OPPIS reliably delivered polarized beam for the polarized run at RHIC. The results obtained with a new pulsed ABS injector for the IUCF Cooler Ring are also discussed.

  15. POLARIZED ION SOURCES FOR HIGH ENERGY ACCELERATORS AND COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    ZELENSKI,A.N.

    2000-10-16

    The recent progress in polarized ion source development is reviewed. In dc operation a 1.0 mA polarized H{sup -} ion current is now available from the Optically-Pumped Polarized Ion Source (OPPIS). In pulsed operation a 10 mA polarized H{sup -} ion current was demonstrated at the TRIUMF pulsed OPPIS test bench and a 3.5 mA peak current was obtained from an Atomic Beam Source (ABS) at the INR Moscow test bench. The possibilities for future improvements with both techniques are discussed. A new OPPIS for RHIC spin physics is described. The OPPIS reliably delivered polarized beam for the polarized run at RHIC. The results obtained with a new pulsed ABS injector for the IUCF Cooler Ring are also discussed.

  16. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  17. The beam business: Accelerators in industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Robert W.; Hamm, Marianne E.

    2011-06-15

    Most physicists know that particle accelerators are widely used for treating cancer. But few are acquainted with the depth and breadth of their use in a myriad of applications outside of pure science and medicine. Society benefits from the use of particle beams in the areas of communications, transportation, the environment, security, health, and safety - in terms both of the global economy and quality of life. On the manufacturing level, the use of industrial accelerators has resulted in the faster and cheaper production of better parts for medical devices, automobiles, aircraft, and virtually all modern electronics. Consumers also benefit from the use of accelerators to explore for oil, gas, and minerals; sterilize food, wastewater, and medical supplies; and aid in the development of drugs and biomaterials.

  18. BEAM-BASED NON-LINEAR OPTICS CORRECTIONS IN COLLIDERS.

    SciTech Connect

    PILAT, R.; LUO, Y.; MALITSKY, N.; PTITSYN, V.

    2005-05-16

    A method has been developed to measure and correct operationally the non-linear effects of the final focusing magnets in colliders, that gives access to the effects of multi-pole errors by applying closed orbit bumps, and analyzing the resulting tune and orbit shifts. This technique has been tested and used during 4 years of RHIC (the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL) operations. I will discuss here the theoretical basis of the method, the experimental set-up, the correction results, the present understanding of the machine model, the potential and limitations of the method itself as compared with other non-linear correction techniques.

  19. Particle trapping and beam transport issues in laser driven accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwenael, Fubiani; Wim, Leemans; Eric, Esarey

    2000-10-01

    The LWFA and colliding pulses [1][2] sheme are capable of producing very compact electron bunches where the longitudinal size is much smaller than the transverse size. In this case, even if the electrons are relativistic, space charge force can affect the longitudinal and transverse bunch properties [3][4]. In the Self-modulated regime and the colliding pulse sheme, electrons are trapped from the background plasma and rapidly accelerated. We present theoretical studies of the generation and transport of electron bunches in LWFAs. The space charge effect induced in the bunch is modelled assuming the bunch is ellipsoid like. Beam transport in vacuum, comparison between gaussian and waterbag distribution, comparison between envelope model and PIC simulation will be discussed. This work is supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy & Nuclear Physics, High Energy Physics Division, of the U.S Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 [1]E.Esarey et al.,IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-24,252 (1996); W.P. Leemans et al, ibidem, 331. [2]D. Umstadter et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2073 (1996); E.Esarey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2682 (1997); C.B Schroeder et al., Phys. Rev. E59, 6037 (1999) [3]DESY M87-161 (1987); DESY M88-013 (1988) [4] R.W. Garnett and T.P Wangler, IEEE Part. Acce. Conf. (1991)

  20. Colliding ionization injection in a plasma wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Y.; Zhang, C. J.; Li, F.; Wu, Y. P.; Hua, J. F.; Pai, C.-H.; Lu, W.; Gu, Y. Q.; Xu, X. L.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.

    2016-03-01

    A new scheme of generating high quality electron bunches via ionization injection triggered by an counter propagating laser pulse inside a beam driven plasma wake is proposed and examined via two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This scheme has two major advantages: first, the injection distance is easily tunable by varying the launching time or the focal position of the laser pulse; second, the electrons in each injected slice are released at nearly the same time. Both factors can significantly reduce the phase space mixing during the ionization injection process (Xu et al 2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 035003, Xu et al 2014 Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.: Accel. Beams 17 061301, Li et al 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 015003), leading to very small energy spreads (˜10 keV for slice,˜100 keV for the whole bunch) and very small normalized emittance (˜few nm). As an example, a 4.5 fs 0.4 pC electron bunch with normalized emittance of 3.3 nm, slice energy spread of 13 keV, absolute energy spread of 80 keV, and a brightness of 7.2× {{10}18} A m-2rad-2 is obtained under realistic conditions. This scheme may have potential applications for future compact coherent light sources.

  1. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Jowett, J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.

    2010-09-01

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy-ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from run-7), colliding 100GeV/nucleon Au79+197 beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multiparticle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the rf bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future Pb82+208 beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  2. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, R.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Jowett, J.M.; Fischer, W.

    2010-09-07

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon {sup 197}Au{sup 79}+ beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future {sup 208}Pb+{sup 82+} beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  3. Straw man 900-1000 GeV crystal extraction test beam for Fermilab collider operation

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    A design for a 900-1000 GeV, 100 khz parasitic test beam for use during collider operations has been developed. The beam makes use of two bent crystals, one for extraction and the other one for redirecting the beam in to the present Switchyard beam system. The beam requires only a few modifications in the A0 area and largely uses existing devices. It should be straight-forward to modify one or two beam lines in the fixed target experimental areas to work above 800 GeV. Possibilities for improvements to the design,to operate at higher fluxes are discussed.

  4. Production of high power microwaves for particle acceleration with an FEL bunched electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardelle, J.; Lefevre, T.; Marchese, G.; Padois, M.; Rullier, J. L.; Donohue, J. T.

    1999-06-01

    Among the studies in the framework of high gradient linear electron-positron collider research, the Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) is a very promising concept, and two projects are in progress, the Compact Linear Collider project at CERN (W. Schnell, Report no. CERN SL/92-51 and CLIC note 184; K. Hübner, CERN/PS 92-43, CLIC note 176; S. Van der Meer, CERN/PS 89-50, CLIC note 97.) and the Relativistic Klystron-TBA project at LBNL (Technical Review Committee, International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee Report 1995, SLAC-R-95-471, 1995). In a TBA an extremely intense low-energy electron beam, called the drive beam, is bunched at the desired operating frequency, and upon passing through resonant cavities generates radio-frequency power for accelerating the main beam. Among the different approaches to the production of a suitable drive beam, the use of an FEL has been proposed and is under active study at CEA/CESTA.

  5. Beam dynamics aspects of crab cavities in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Calaga, R.; Assmann, R.; Barranco, J.; Tomas, R.; Weiler, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Morita, A.

    2009-10-14

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The long-range beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing a crossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The use of crab cavities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may not only raise the luminosity, but it could also complicate the beam dynamics, e.g., crab cavities might not only cancel synchrobetatron resonances excited by the crossing angle but they could also excite new ones, they could reduce the dynamic aperture for off-momentum particles, they could influence the aperture and orbit, also degrade the collimation cleaning efficiency, and so on. In this paper, we explore the principal feasibility of LHC crab cavities from a beam dynamics point of view. The implications of the crab cavities for the LHC optics, analytical and numerical luminosity studies, dynamic aperture, aperture and beta beating, emittance growth, beam-beam tune shift, long-range collisions, and synchrobetatron resonances, crab dispersion, and collimation efficiency will be discussed.

  6. SLAC linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.; Bell, R.A.; Brown, K.L.

    1980-06-01

    The SLAC LINEAR COLLIDER is designed to achieve an energy of 100 GeV in the electron-positron center-of-mass system by accelerating intense bunches of particles in the SLAC linac and transporting the electron and positron bunches in a special magnet system to a point where they are focused to a radius of about 2 microns and made to collide head on. The rationale for this new type of colliding beam system is discussed, the project is described, some of the novel accelerator physics issues involved are discussed, and some of the critical technical components are described.

  7. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-11-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band ({approximately}8-12 GHz) through Ka band ({approximately} 30-35 GHz) frequency regions. Provided that further prototyping shows stable beam propagation with minimal current loss and production of good quality, high-power rf fields, this technology is compatible with current schemes for electron-positron colliders in the multi-TeV center-of-mass scale. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split-operation algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rv cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficient capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional

  8. Method and apparatus for varying accelerator beam output energy

    DOEpatents

    Young, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    A coupled cavity accelerator (CCA) accelerates a charged particle beam with rf energy from a rf source. An input accelerating cavity receives the charged particle beam and an output accelerating cavity outputs the charged particle beam at an increased energy. Intermediate accelerating cavities connect the input and the output accelerating cavities to accelerate the charged particle beam. A plurality of tunable coupling cavities are arranged so that each one of the tunable coupling cavities respectively connect an adjacent pair of the input, output, and intermediate accelerating cavities to transfer the rf energy along the accelerating cavities. An output tunable coupling cavity can be detuned to variably change the phase of the rf energy reflected from the output coupling cavity so that regions of the accelerator can be selectively turned off when one of the intermediate tunable coupling cavities is also detuned.

  9. Generation of periodic accelerating structures in plasma by colliding laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Shvets, G; Fisch, N J; Pukhov, A; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J

    1999-08-01

    A mechanism for generating large (>1 GeV/m) accelerating wakes in a plasma is proposed. Two slightly detuned counterpropagating laser beams, an ultrashort timing pulse and a long pump, exchange photons and deposit the recoil momentum in plasma electrons. This produces a localized region of electron current, which acts as a virtual electron beam, inducing intense plasma wakes with phase velocity equal to the group velocity of the short pulse. Modulating the pumping beam generates periodic accelerating structures in the plasma ("plasma linac") which can be used for particle acceleration unlimited by the dephasing between the particles and the wake. An important difference between this type of plasma accelerator and the conventional wakefield accelerators is that this type can be achieved with laser intensities I<10(18) W/cm(2). PMID:11970016

  10. Numerical Verification of the Power Transfer and Wakefield Coupling in the Clic Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2011-08-19

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept envisions complex 3D structures, which must be modeled to high accuracy so that simulation results can be directly used to prepare CAD drawings for machining. The required simulations include not only the fundamental mode properties of the accelerating structures but also the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), as well as the coupling between the two systems. Time-domain simulations will be performed to understand pulse formation, wakefield damping, fundamental power transfer and wakefield coupling in these structures. Applying SLAC's parallel finite element code suite, these large-scale problems will be solved on some of the largest supercomputers available. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel two-beam accelerator scheme.

  11. Accelerator development for a radioactive beam facility based on ATLAS.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-01-08

    The existing superconducting linac ATLAS is in many respects an ideal secondary beam accelerator for an ISOL (Isotope separator on-line) type radioactive beam facility. Such a facility would require the addition of two major accelerator elements: a low charge state injector for the existing heavy ion linac, and a primary beam accelerator providing 220 MV of acceleration for protons and light ions. Development work for both of these elements, including the option of superconducting cavities for the primary beam accelerator is discussed.

  12. E-Beam Driven Accelerators: Working Group Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, P.; Ng, J.S.T.; /SLAC

    2005-07-12

    The working group has identified the parameters of an afterburner based on the design of a future linear collider. The new design brings the center of mass energy of the collider from 1 to 2 TeV. The afterburner is located in the final focus section of the collider, operates at a gradient of {approx}4 GeV/m, and is only about 125 m long. Very important issues remain to be addressed, and include the physics and design of the positron side of the afterburner, as well as of the final focus system. Present plasma wakefield accelerator experiments have reached a level of maturity and of relevance to the afterburner, that make it timely to involve the high energy physics and accelerator community in the afterburner design process. The main result of this working group is the first integration of the designs of a future linear collider and an afterburner.

  13. e-Beam Driven Accelerators: Working Group Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, P.; Ng, J.S.T.

    2004-12-07

    The working group has identified the parameters of an afterburner based on the design of a future linear collider. The new design brings the center of mass energy of the collider from 1 to 2 TeV. The afterburner is located in the final focus section of the collider, operates at a gradient of {approx_equal}4 GeV/m, and is only about 125 m long. Very important issues remain to be addressed, and include the physics and design of the positron side of the afterburner, as well as of the final focus system. Present plasma wakefield accelerator experiments have reached a level of maturity and of relevance to the afterburner, that make it timely to involve the high energy physics and accelerator community in the afterburner design process. The main result of this working group is the first integration of the designs of a future linear collider and an afterburner.

  14. Observation of shape-preserving accelerating underwater acoustic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Ziv, Uri; Postan, Aharon; Segev, Mordechai

    2015-09-01

    We present the experimental generation and observation of an underwater acoustic accelerating beam. The beam was generated by phase modulating a single projector using a tailored acoustic phase mask. The beam is propagating for a range in excess of 800 wavelengths, which are about six Rayleigh lengths, while preserving its shape and transversely accelerating. Such beams have promising applications in the fields of sonar, hydrography, and medical ultrasound and can provide new means to study nonlinear interaction of acoustic beams.

  15. Linear collider development at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.

    1993-08-01

    Linear collider R&D at SLAC comprises work on the present Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) and work toward the next linear collider (NLC). Recent SLC developments are summarized. NLC studies are divided into hardware-based and theoretical. We report on the status of the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and the final focus test beam (FFTB), describe plans for ASSET, an installation to measure accelerator structure wakefields, and mention IR design developments. Finally we review recent NLC theoretical studies, ending with the author`s view of next linear collider parameter sets.

  16. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  17. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics: OPAL experiment at LEP; Deep inelastic muon interactions at TeV II; D{phi} experiment; Physics with the CLEO detector at CESR; CYGNUS experiment; {nu}{sub e}e elastic scattering experiment; Further results from JADE; Theory of polarization in electron storage rings; and Rare kaon decay experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  18. First Beam and High-Gradient Cryomodule Commissioning Results of the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Darren; et al.

    2015-06-01

    The advanced superconducting test accelerator at Fermilab has accelerated electrons to 20 MeV and, separately, the International Linear Collider (ILC) style 8-cavity cryomodule has achieved the ILC performance milestone of 31.5 MV/m per cavity. When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one ILC-type cryomodule, multiple accelerator R&D beamlines, and a downstream beamline to inject 300 MeV electrons into the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We report on the results of first beam, the achievement of our cryomodule to ILC gradient specifications, and near-term future plans for the facility.

  19. Numerical studies of International Linear Collider positron target and optical matching device field effects on beam

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, Sergey; Spentzouris, Linda; Liu Wanming; Gai Wei

    2007-07-01

    For an International Linear Collider (ILC) undulator-based positron source target configuration, a strong optical matching device (OMD) field is needed inside the target to increase the positron yield (by more than 40%) [Y. K. Batygin, Proceedings of the 2005 ALCPG and ILC Workshops, Snowmas, CO, 14-27 August 2005 (unpublished)] It is also required that the positron target be constantly rotated to reduce thermal and radiation damages. Eddy currents, produced by an OMD field in turn, interact with the magnetic field and produce a drag (stopping) force. This force not only produces heat in the disk but also creates a dipole deflecting field, which affects the beam. Therefore it is important to simulate such a system in detail to design the motor and cooling system and also a correction magnet system. In order to guide the ILC target design, an exact simulation of the spinning disk in a magnetic field is required. In this paper we present a simulation method implemented using COMSOL and compare it with the experimental results recently obtained at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Good agreement between the simulation and the experiment gives confidence in the validity of the method. We give detailed results on the proposed ILC target system, such as parametric studies for reduction of the power required to keep the target spinning. We present simulation results of the induced deflection field and of the reduction of the OMD field effect.

  20. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research.

  1. Operational head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Costanzo, M.; Hock, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T. A.; et al

    2015-12-23

    Head-on beam-beam compensation has been implemented in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in order to increase the luminosity delivered to the experiments. We discuss the principle of combining a lattice for resonance driving term compensation and an electron lens for tune spread compensation. We describe the electron lens technology and its operational use. As of this date the implemented compensation scheme approximately doubled the peak and average luminosities.

  2. BEAM DELIVERY LAYOUT FOR THE NEXT LINEAR COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, A

    2004-07-13

    This paper presents the latest design and layout of the NLC Beam Delivery System (BDS) for the first and second interaction region (IR). This includes the beam switchyard, skew correction and emittance diagnostics section, the collimation system integrated with the final focus, the primary and post linac tune-up beam dumps, and the arcs of the second interaction region beamline. The layout and optics are optimized to deliver design luminosity in the entire energy range from 90 GeV to 1.3 TeV CM, with the first IR BDS also having the capability of being extended to multi-TeV.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Transverse Beam Diffusion Enhancement by the Use of Electron Lens in the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Previtali, V.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    Transverse beam diffusion for the Tevatron machine has been calculated using the Lifetrac code. The following effects were included: random noise (representing residual gas scattering, voltage noise in the accelerating cavities) lattice nonlinearities and beam-beam interactions. The time evolution of particle distributions with different initial amplitudes in Hamiltonian action has been simulated for 6 million turns, corresponding to a time of about 2 minutes. For each particle distribution, several cases have been considered: a single beam in storage ring mode, the collider case and the effects of a hollow electron beam collimator. The diffusion coefficient for some representative points in the amplitude space has been calculated by fitting the time evolution of delta-like particle distributions using the diffusion equation, for different machine conditions. The results confirm a strong efficiency of the electron lens as an halo diffusive enhancer, leading to diffusion coefficients which are at least a factor 10K higher than the values obtained for the collision case. This result is confirmed by the Frequency Map Analysis, which shows a clear intensification of resonance lines for particle amplitudes larger than the electron lens inner radius. If compared with past experiments, the simulations successfully reproduce the diffusion coefficients for the beam core, but still present a large discrepancy for halo particles, still under investigation.

  4. Operation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector with colliding beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bedeschi, F.; Bolognesi, V.; Dell`Agnello, S.; Galeotti, S.; Grieco, G.; Mariotti, M.; Menzione, A.; Punzi, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Ristori, L.; Tartarelli, F.; Turini, N.; Wenzel, H.; Zetti, F.; Bailey, M.W.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Kruse, M.C.; Shaw, N.M.; Carithers, W.C.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester, W.; Wong, M.; Yao, W.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T.R.; Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Skarha, J.; Snider, F.D.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S.; Amidei, D.; Derwent, P.F.; Song, T.Y.; Dunn, A.; Gold, M.; Matthews, J.; Bacchetta, N.; Azzi, P.; Bisello, D.; Busetto, G.; Castro, A.; Loreti, M.; Pescara, L.; Tipton, P.; Watts, G.

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the main features of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) and discuss its performance during actual colliding beam operation at the Fermilab Tevatron. Details on S/N ratio, alignment, resolution and efficiency are given.

  5. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, Ioanis

    2014-07-01

    After a 16 month shutdown to reconfigure the Fermilab Accelerators for high power operations, the Fermilab Accelerator Complex is again providing beams for numerous Physics Experiments. By using the Recycler to slip stack protons while the Main Injector is ramping, the beam power at 120 GeV can reach 700 KW, a factor of 2 increase. The progress towards doubling the Fermilab's Accelerator complex beam power will be presented.

  6. Requirements of a proton beam accelerator for an accelerator-driven reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Zhao, Y.; Tsoupas, N.; An, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.

    1997-12-31

    When the authors first proposed an accelerator-driven reactor, the concept was opposed by physicists who had earlier used the accelerator for their physics experiments. This opposition arose because they had nuisance experiences in that the accelerator was not reliable, and very often disrupted their work as the accelerator shut down due to electric tripping. This paper discusses the requirements for the proton beam accelerator. It addresses how to solve the tripping problem and how to shape the proton beam.

  7. Electron acceleration using two crossed Bessel beams in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Lü, Baida

    2007-09-01

    The direct acceleration of electrons by using two crossed linearly polarized Bessel beams with equal frequency and amplitude in vacuum is studied and compared with the case of single linearly polarized Bessel beam. It is found that two zeroth- and first-order Bessel beams with π-rad phase difference have a nonvanishing longitudinal electric field on the z-axis, which can be maximized under certain conditions and used to accelerate electrons. Two crossed zeroth- and first-order Bessel beams have a larger maximum longitudinal electric field on the z-axis than that of a single first-order Bessel beam, and are suited for laser electron acceleration.

  8. Design study of longitudinal dynamics of the drive beam in 1 TeV relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Yu, S.S.; Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    In this paper the authors present a design study on the longitudinal dynamics of a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) scheme which has been proposed as a power source candidate for a 1 TeV next linear collider (NLC). They address the issue of maintaining stable power output at desired level for a 300-m long TBA with 150 extraction cavities and present their simulation results to demonstrate that it can be achieved by inductively detuning the extraction cavities to counter the space charge debunching effect on the drive beam. They then carry out simulation study to show that the beam bunches desired by the RK-TBA can be efficiently obtained by first chopping an initially uniform beam of low energy into a train of beam bunches with modest longitudinal dimension and then using the {open_quotes}adiabatic capture{close_quotes} scheme to bunch and accelerate these beam bunches into tight bunches at the operating energy of the drive beam. The authors have also examined the {open_quotes}after burner{close_quotes} scheme which is implemented in their RK-TBA design for efficiency enhancement.

  9. A 200 MHz 35 MW Multiple Beam Klystron for Accelerator Applications Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read; Patrick Ferguson; David Marsden

    2011-11-28

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) performed initial development of a compact and reliable 35 MW, multiple beam klystron (MBK) at 200 MHz with a pulse length of 0.125 ms and a 30 Hz repetition rate. The device was targeted for acceleration and ionization cooling of a muon collider, but there are several other potential applications in this frequency range. The klystron uses multiple beams propagating in individual beam tunnels to reduce space charge and allow reduction in the accelerating voltage. This allows a significant reduction in length over a single beam source. More importantly this allows more efficient and less expensive power supplies. At 200 MHz, the interaction circuit for a single beam klystron would be more than six meters long to obtain 50% efficiency and 50 dB gain. This would require a beam voltage of approximately 400 kV and current of 251 A for a microperveance of 1.0. For an eight beam MBK with the same beam perveance, a three meter long interaction circuit achieves the same power and gain. Each beam operates at 142 kV and 70A. The Phase I demonstrated that this device could be fabricated with funding available in a Phase II program and could achieve the program specifications.

  10. Calculation of integrated luminosity for beams stored in the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, D.A.

    1989-03-20

    A model for calculating the integrated luminosity of beams stored in the Tevatron collider will be presented. The model determines the instantaneous luminosity by calculating the overlap integral of bunched beams passing through the interaction region. The calculation accounts for the variation in beam size due to the beta functions and also for effects due to finite longitudinal emittance and non-zero dispersion in the interaction region. The integrated luminosity is calculated for the beams as they evolve due to processes including collisions and intrabeam scattering. The model has been applied to both the extant and upgraded Tevatron collider, but is not limited to them. The original motivation for developing the computer model was to determine the reduction in luminosity due to beams with non-zero longitudinal emittances. There are two effects: the transverse beam size is increased where the dispersion is non-zero; the finite length of the beam bunch combined with an increasing /beta/ function results in an increased transverse beam size at the ends of the bunch. The derivation of a sufficiently useful analytic expression for the luminosity proved to be intractable. Instead, a numerical integration computer program was developed to calculate the luminosity in the presence of a finite longitudinal emittance. The program was then expanded into a model which allows the luminosity to vary due to changes in emittances and reduction in bunch intensities. At that point, it was not difficult to calculate the integrated luminosity. 5 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. The HEB at flat top: Arranging for the HEB to collider beam transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.J.

    1994-03-01

    The flat top for the High Energy Booster (HEB) is planned to last for only 6.5 seconds, yet during this time the beam must be made to: (1) have the correct central momentum; (2) have the correct bunch-to-bunch spacing; (3) have the correct central phase; and (4) have the correct momentum spread and longitudinal length. All of these attributes must match what the Collider expects or unwanted emittance growth will occur. This paper outlines the techniques necessary to achieve a proper HEB-to-Collider beam transfer within the 6.5 s time constraint. A novel means for cogging is proposed and evaluated. The hardware necessary to implement the beam manipulation and to achieve the four goals is specified, and tolerances on the hardware are evaluated.

  12. High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.; Arnold, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

  13. Orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Siberian snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Filatov, Yu N.

    2016-02-01

    Two solenoid Siberian snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in the “spin transparency” mode of the NICA collider. The field integrals of the solenoid snakes for protons and deuterons at maximum momentum of 13.5 GeV/c are equal to 2×50 T·m and 2×160 T·m respectively. The snakes introduce strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in NICA collider with solenoid snakes are presented.

  14. Disentangling the unparticles with polarized beams at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Huitu, Katri; Rai, Santosh Kumar

    2008-02-01

    A recently proposed idea of unparticles arising due to a scale invariant sector in the theory can give rise to effective operators with different Lorentz structures. We show that, by using the different polarization options at the future linear e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders, the nature of these effective operators can be easily understood. The unique feature of a complex phase in the propagator of the unparticle can also be understood distinctively for the different spins by exploiting the initial beam polarizations at the International Linear Collider.

  15. Progress in advanced accelerator concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-08-01

    A review is given of recent progress in this field, drawing heavily upon material presented at the Workshop on Advanced Accelerator Concepts, The Abbey, June 12--18, 1994. Attention is addressed to (1) plasma based concepts, (2) photo-cathodes, (3) radio frequency sources and Two-Beam Accelerators, (4) near and far-field schemes (including collective accelerators), (5) beam handling and conditioning, and (6) exotic collider concepts (such as photon colliders and muon colliders).

  16. Interactive beam tuning simulator for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, W.T.; Kozanecki, W.; Lohse, T.; Servranckx, R.V.

    1989-03-01

    An interface to the DIMAD beam optics computer program enables the operator to perform in simulation the sequence of magnet adjustments that would be used online for tuning the Stanford Linear Collider Final Focus System. The program accepts any input beam matrix from a disk file and presents a menu of magnet adjustments and scan and display options. The results of a ray trace calculation are presented as profiles or envelope plots on the graphics screen. We give results from studies of the optimization of the beam under various input conditions. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; Thieberger, P.; Weng, W.T.; McDonald, K.; Sheppard, J.; Evangelakis, G.; Yoshimura, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-08-16

    This paper presents results of recent experimental studies focusing on the behavior of special materials and composites under irradiation conditions and their potential use as accelerator targets. The paper also discusses the approach and goals of on-going investigations on an expanded material matrix geared toward the neutrino superbeam and muon collider initiatives.

  18. Proceedings of the 2005 International Linear Collider Physics and Detector Workshop and 2nd ILC Accelerator Workshop (Snowmass 2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Norman A.

    2006-06-21

    For two weeks in August of 2005, 668 physicists gathered in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado to study the physics, the detectors and the accelerator of the International Linear Collider. For the first time, a fully international physics and detector workshop was held in conjunction with the ILC Accelerator workshop.

  19. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Previtali, Valentina; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  20. Optimization and beam control in large-emittance accelerators: Neutrino factories;

    SciTech Connect

    Carol Johnstone

    2004-08-23

    Schemes for intense sources of high-energy muons require collection, rf capture, and transport of particle beams with unprecedented emittances, both longitudinally and transversely. These large emittances must be reduced or ''cooled'' both in size and in energy spread before the muons can be efficiently accelerated. Therefore, formation of muon beams sufficiently intense to drive a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider requires multi-stage preparation. Further, because of the large beam phase space which must be successfully controlled, accelerated, and transported, the major stages that comprise such a facility: proton driver, production, capture, phase rotation, cooling, acceleration, and storage are complex and strongly interlinked. Each of the stages must be consecutively matched and simultaneously optimized with upstream and downstream systems, meeting challenges not only technically in the optics and component design, but also in the modeling of both new and extended components. One design for transverse cooling, for example, employs meter-diameter solenoids to maintain strong focusing--300-500 mr beam divergences--across ultra-large momentum ranges, {ge} {+-}20% {delta}p/p, defying conventional approximations to the dynamics and field representation. To now, the interplay of the different systems and staging strategies has not been formally addressed. This work discusses two basic, but different approaches to a Neutrino Factory and how the staging strategy depends on beam parameters and method of acceleration.

  1. Minimal interference beam size/profile measurement techniques applicable to the Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nexsen, W.; Dutt, S.; Kauffmann, S.; Lebedev, V.; Maschke, A.; Mokhov, N.; Richardson, R.; Tsyganov, E.; Zinchenko, A.

    1993-05-01

    The imaging of synchrotron radiation (SR) has been suggested as a technique for providing a continuous, non-interfering monitor of the beam profile in the Collider rings at the Superconducting Super Collider. A closer examination has raised questions concerning the applicability of SR imaging in this case because of the diffraction broadening of the image, the requirements for axial space and location in the lattice, and the complexity of the system. We have surveyed the known, alternative, minimal interference techniques for measuring beam size and have evaluated them for possible Collider usage. We conclude that of the approaches that appear feasible, all require at least some development for our usage and that the development of an electron beam probe offers the best promise. We recommend that flying wires be used for cross-checking and calibrating the electron beam probe diagnostic and for luminosity measurements when the highest accuracy is required, but flying wires should not be used as the primary diagnostic because of their limited lifetime.

  2. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  3. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  4. Amplification of Beam Acceleration in a Plasma by Plasma Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Valeri Lebedev

    1998-09-01

    Although achieving of high accelerating field in a plasma has been demonstrated experimentally, a practical use of such a scheme for building a large accelerator is questionable. A novel scheme of beam acceleration by a plasma wave is considered in this article. The scheme is based on an initial excitation of a plasma wave by a probe beam with comparatively modest intensity. This seed excitation is then amplified by plasma instability, so that the test beam which follows the probe beam with a small delay will be accelerated by the plasma wave with an amplitude significantly exceeding the initial amplitude of the wave. Because of small interaction between the synchronization beam and the plasma, such a scheme allows one to excite a plasma over large length and, consequently, to build a large accelerator.

  5. Accelerating Airy beams in the presence of inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besieris, Ioannis M.; Shaarawi, Amr M.; Zamboni-Rached, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Studies have already been made of accelerating Airy beams in the presence of deterministic inhomogeneities, illustrating, in particular, that the inherent self-healing properties of such beams are preserved. The cases of a range-dependent linear transverse potential and a converging GRIN structure (harmonic oscillator) have been examined thoroughly. Examples will be given in this article of novel accelerating Airy beams in the presence of five other types of potential functions. Three of the resulting exact analytical solutions have a common salient characteristic property: they are constructed using the free-space accelerating Airy beam solution as a seed.

  6. Design of inductively detuned RF extraction cavities for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Li, H.

    1995-04-01

    An inductively detuned traveling wave cavity for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator expected to extract high RF power at 11. 424 GHz for the 1 TeV Center of Mass Next Linear Collider has been designed. Longitudinal beam dynamics studies led to the following requirements on cavity design: (a) Extraction of 360 MW of RF power with RF component of the current being 1.15 kAmps at 11.424 GHz, (b) Inductively detuned traveling wave cavity with wave phase velocity equal to 4/3 the speed of light, (c) Output cavity with appropriate Q{sub ext} and eigenfrequency for proper matching. Furthermore, transverse beam dynamics require low shunt impedances to avoid the beam break-up instability. We describe the design effort to meet these criteria based on frequency-domain and time-domain computations using 2D- and 3D- electromagnetic codes.

  7. Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Schechter, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    An electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator has been designed, built, assembled, and tested as a proof-of-principle (POP) apparatus. The main goal of accelerators based on this concept is to use intense electron-beam heating and ablation of a hydrogen propellant stick to accelerate deuterium and/or tritium pellets to ultrahigh speeds (10 to 20 km/s) for plasma fueling of next-generation fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER). The POP apparatus is described and initial results of pellet acceleration experiments are presented. Conceptual ultrahigh-speed pellet accelerators are discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Post-acceleration of laser-induced ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassisi, V.; Delle Side, D.

    2015-04-01

    A complete review of the essential and recent developments in the field of post-acceleration of laser-induced ion beams is presented. After a brief introduction to the physics of low-intensity nanosecond laser-matter interaction, the details of ions extraction and acceleration are critically analyzed and the key parameters to obtain good-quality ion beams are illustrated. A description of the most common ion beam diagnosis system is given, together with the associated analytical techniques.

  9. Controlled injection and acceleration of electrons in plasma wakefields by colliding laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Faure, J; Rechatin, C; Norlin, A; Lifschitz, A; Glinec, Y; Malka, V

    2006-12-01

    In laser-plasma-based accelerators, an intense laser pulse drives a large electric field (the wakefield) which accelerates particles to high energies in distances much shorter than in conventional accelerators. These high acceleration gradients, of a few hundreds of gigavolts per metre, hold the promise of compact high-energy particle accelerators. Recently, several experiments have shown that laser-plasma accelerators can produce high-quality electron beams, with quasi-monoenergetic energy distributions at the 100 MeV level. However, these beams do not have the stability and reproducibility that are required for applications. This is because the mechanism responsible for injecting electrons into the wakefield is based on highly nonlinear phenomena, and is therefore hard to control. Here we demonstrate that the injection and subsequent acceleration of electrons can be controlled by using a second laser pulse. The collision of the two laser pulses provides a pre-acceleration stage which provokes the injection of electrons into the wakefield. The experimental results show that the electron beams obtained in this manner are collimated (5 mrad divergence), monoenergetic (with energy spread <10 per cent), tuneable (between 15 and 250 MeV) and, most importantly, stable. In addition, the experimental observations are compatible with electron bunch durations shorter than 10 fs. We anticipate that this stable and compact electron source will have a strong impact on applications requiring short bunches, such as the femtolysis of water, or high stability, such as radiotherapy with high-energy electrons or radiography for materials science. PMID:17151663

  10. Transition Radiation Detector in the D0 colliding beam experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, H.

    1995-04-01

    The construction, operation and response of the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) at DO colliding beam experiment at Fermilab are presented. The use of the TRD signal to enhance electron identification and hadronic rejection in the multiparticle background characteristic for the antiproton-proton interactions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV is also described and results are discussed.

  11. Development of the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) trim coil beam tube assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Skaritka, J.; Kelly, E.; Schneider, W.; Shutt, R.; Thompson, P.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Bintinger, D.; Coluccio, R.; Schieber, L.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider uses approx. =9600 dipole magnets. The magnets have been carefully designed to exhibit minimal magnetic field harmonics. However, because of superconductor magnetization effects, iron saturation and conductor/coil positioning errors, certain harmonic errors are possible and must be corrected by use of multipole correctors called trim coils. For the most efficient use of axial space in the magnet, and lowest possible current, a distributed internal correction coil design is planned. The trim coil assembly is secured to the beam tube, a uhv tube with special strength, size, conductivity and vacuum. The report details the SSC trim coil/beam tube assembly specifications, history, and ongoing development.

  12. Progress on optimization of the nonlinear beam dynamics in the MEIC collider rings

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-07-13

    One of the key design features of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is a small beta function at the interaction point (IP) allowing one to achieve a high luminosity of up to 1034 cm-2s-1. The required strong beam focusing unavoidably causes large chromatic effects such as chromatic tune spread and beam smear at the IP, which need to be compensated. This paper reports recent progress in our development of a chromaticity correction scheme for the ion ring including optimization of dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance.

  13. Progress on Optimization of the Nonlinear Beam Dynamics in the MEIC Collider Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Lin, Fanglei; Pilat, Fulvia; Zhang, Yuhong; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, Michael; Wang, M.-H.; Wienands, Uli

    2015-09-01

    One of the key design features of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is a small beta function at the interaction point (IP) allowing one to achieve a high luminosity of up to 1034 cm-2s-1. The required strong beam focusing unavoidably causes large chromatic effects such as chromatic tune spread and beam smear at the IP, which need to be compensated. This paper reports recent progress in our development of a chromaticity correction scheme for the ion ring including optimization of dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance.

  14. Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Milora, S.L.; Schechter, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A proof-of-principle (POP) electron-beam pellet accelerator has been developed and used for accelerating hydrogen and deuterium pellets. An intact hydrogen pellet was accelerated to a speed of 460 m/s by an electron beam of 13.5 keV. 0.3 A, and 2 ms. The maximum speed is limited by the acceleration path length (0.4 m) and pellet integrity. Experimental data have been collected for several hundred hydrogen pellets, which were accelerated by electron beams with parameters of voltage up to 16 kV, current up to 0.4 A, and pulse length up to 10 ms. Preliminary results reveal that the measured burn velocity increases roughly with the square of the beam voltage, as the theoretical model predicts. The final pellet velocity is proportional to the exhaust velocity, which increases with the beam power. To reach the high exhaust velocity needed for accelerating pellets to >1000 m/s, a new electron gun, with its cathode indirectly heated by a graphite heater and an electron beam, is being developed to increase beam current and power. A rocket casing or shell around the pellet has been designed and developed to increase pellet strength and improve the electron-rocket coupling efficiency. We present the characteristics of this pellet accelerator, including new improvements. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Energy compensation of slow extracted beams with RF acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Souda, Hikaru; Torikoshi, Masami; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yamada, Satoru; Noda, Koji

    2016-03-01

    In a conventional carbon-ion radiotherapy facility, a carbon-ion beam is typically accelerated up to an optimum energy, slowly extracted from a synchrotron ring by a resonant slow extraction method, and ultimately delivered to a patient through a beam-delivery system. At Japan's Gunma University, a method employing slow-beam extraction along with beam-acceleration has been adopted. This method slightly alters the extracted-beam's energy owing to the acceleration component of the process, which subsequently results in a residual-range variation of approximately 2 mm in water-equivalent length. However, this range variation does not disturb a distal dose distribution with broad-beam methods such as the single beam-wobbling method. With the pencil-beam 3D scanning method, however, such a range variation disturbs a distal dose distribution because the variation is comparable to slice thickness. Therefore, for pencil-beam 3D scanning, an energy compensation method for a slow extracted beam is proposed in this paper. This method can compensate for the aforementioned energy variances by controlling net energy losses through a rotatable energy absorber set fixed between the synchrotron exit channel and the isocenter. Experimental results demonstrate that beam energies can be maintained constant, as originally hypothesized. Moreover, energy-absorber positions were found to be significantly enhanced by optimizing beam optics for reducing beam-size growth by implementation of the multiple-scattering effect option.

  16. Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shu, Anthony; Schroeder, Carl; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Matlis, Nicholas; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Plateau, Guillaume; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2008-09-29

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  17. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, D.; Shu, A. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G.; Lin, C.; Toth, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10 m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  18. Beam collimation and machine detector interface at the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Kostin, M.A.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation, beam-gas scattering and beam halo interactions with collimators and other components in the ILC beam delivery system (BDS) would create fluxes of muons and other secondaries which could exceed the tolerable levels at a detector by a few orders of magnitude. It is shown that with a multi-stage collimation system, magnetized iron spoilers which fill the tunnel and a set of masks in the detector, one can hopefully meet the design goals. Results of modeling with the STRUCT and MARS15 codes of beam loss and energy deposition effects are presented in this paper. We focus on the collimation system and mask performance optimization, short- and long-term survivability of the critical components (spoilers, absorbers and magnets), dynamic heat loads and radiation levels in magnets and other components, and machine-related backgrounds in collider detectors.

  19. Intense ion beams accelerated by relativistic laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus; Cowan, Thomas E.; Gauthier, Jean-Claude J.; Allen, Matthew; Audebert, Patrick; Blazevic, Abel; Fuchs, Julien; Geissel, Matthias; Hegelich, Manuel; Karsch, S.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Jurgen; Pukhov, Alexander; Schlegel, Theodor

    2001-12-01

    We have studied the influence of the target properties on laser-accelerated proton and ion beams generated by the LULI multi-terawatt laser. A strong dependence of the ion emission on the surface conditions, conductivity, shape and material of the thin foil targets were observed. We have performed a full characterization of the ion beam using magnetic spectrometers, Thompson parabolas, radiochromic film and nuclear activation techniques. The strong dependence of the ion beam acceleration on the conditions on the target back surface was found in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. Proton kinetic energies up to 25 MeV have been observed.

  20. Laser-and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chandrashekhar

    2006-10-01

    Scientists have been trying to use the tremendous electric fields in relativistic plasma waves to accelerate charged particles, and are now making substantial progress. If they succeed, future high energy accelerators will use plasma waves rather than microwave cavities as accelerating structures.Some accelerators, such as those used for radiation therapy will fit on a tabletop. Research on using plasma waves to accelerate particles began in earnest following the suggestion by John Dawson and his colleagues [1-3] that a relativistically propagating plasma wave or a wake field could be excited by using a powerful but short laser -or electron -beam as a driver pulse.Since their original suggestion the research on plasma --based accelerators has spread worldwide A series of experiments by the UCLA/USC/SLAC collaboration ,using the 30 GeV beam of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), has demonstrated high-gradient acceleration of electrons and positrons using the the wake left by the SLAC beam as it passes through a lithium plasma. Electrons have been accelerated by more than 30 GeV in less than one meter. This acceleration gradient is about a thousand times larger than in conventional microwave-driven accelerators. It is a first step toward a ``plasma afterburner,'' which would be placed at the end of a kilometers-long conventional accelerator and double its beam energy in a few tens of meters. In addition to the acceleration of particle beams, these experiments have demonstrated the rich physics bounty to be reaped from relativistic beam-plasma interactions. This includes the generation of intense and narrowly collimated x-ray beams, refraction of particles at a plasma interface, and the creation of intense beams of positrons. These results are leading the way to similar tabletop accelerators based on plasma wakes excited by lasers rather than electron beams. Applications for tabletop accelerators include gamma radiography, radiation therapy, and ultra

  1. Long bunch trains measured using a prototype cavity beam position monitor for the Compact Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullinan, F. J.; Boogert, S. T.; Farabolini, W.; Lefevre, T.; Lunin, A.; Lyapin, A.; Søby, L.; Towler, J.; Wendt, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires beam position monitors (BPMs) with 50 nm spatial resolution for alignment of the beam line elements in the main linac and beam delivery system. Furthermore, the BPMs must be able to make multiple independent measurements within a single 156 ns long bunch train. A prototype cavity BPM for CLIC has been manufactured and tested on the probe beam line at the 3rd CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN. The transverse beam position is determined from the electromagnetic resonant modes excited by the beam in the two cavities of the pickup, the position cavity and the reference cavity. The mode that is measured in each cavity resonates at 15 GHz and has a loaded quality factor that is below 200. Analytical expressions for the amplitude, phase and total energy of signals from long trains of bunches have been derived and the main conclusions are discussed. The results of the beam tests are presented. The variable gain of the receiver electronics has been characterized using beam excited signals and the form of the signals for different beam pulse lengths with the 2 /3 ns bunch spacing has been observed. The sensitivity of the reference cavity signal to charge and the horizontal position signal to beam offset have been measured and are compared with theoretical predictions based on laboratory measurements of the BPM pickup and the form of the resonant cavity modes as determined by numerical simulation. Finally, the BPM was calibrated so that the beam position jitter at the BPM location could be measured. It is expected that the beam jitter scales linearly with the beam size and so the results are compared to predicted values for the latter.

  2. High-gradient two-beam electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2014-11-04

    The main goal for this project was to design, build, and evaluate a detuned-cavity, collinear, two-beam accelerator structure. Testing was to be at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory, under terms of a sub-grant from Omega-P to Yale. Facilities available at Yale for this project include a 6-MeV S-band RF gun and associated beam line for forming and transporting a ~1 A drive beam , a 300 kV beam source for use as a test beam, and a full panoply of laboratory infrastructure and test equipment. During the first year of this project, availability and functionality of the 6-MeV drive beam and 300 kV test beam were confirmed, and the beam line was restored to a layout to be used with the two-beam accelerator project. Major efforts during the first year were also focused on computational design and simulation of the accelerator structure itself, on beam dynamics, and on beam transport. Effort during the second year was focussed on building and preparing to test the structure, including extensive cold testing. Detailed results from work under this project have been published in twelve archival journal articles, listed in Section IV of the technical report.

  3. Design of a 1-MV induction injector for the Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.E.; Eylon, S.; Lidia, S.; Reginato, L.; Vanecek, D.; Yu, S.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.A.; Henestroza, E.

    1997-05-01

    A Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) is envisioned as a rf power source upgrade of the Next Linear Collider. Construction of a prototype, called the RTA, based on the RK-TBA concept has commenced at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This prototype will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. The first half of the injector, a 1 MeV, 1.2 kA, 300 ns induction electron gun, has been built and is presently being tested. The design of the injector cells and the pulsed power drive units are presented in this paper.

  4. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds. (GHT)

  5. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyojae; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  6. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyojae; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described. PMID:26932088

  7. Accelerators (3/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  8. Accelerators (4/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  9. Accelerators (5/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  10. 600 kV modulator design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.; de Lamare, J.; Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1992-07-01

    Preliminary design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) requires a pulse power source to produce a 600 kV, 600 A, 1.4 {mu}s, 0.1% flat top pulse with rise and fall times of approximately 100 ns to power an X-Band klystron with a microperveance of 1.25 at {approx} 100 MW peak RF power. The design goals for the modulator, including those previously listed, are peak modulator pulse power of 340 MW operating at 120 Hz. A three-stage darlington pulse-forming network, which produces a >100 kV, 1.4 {mu}s pulse, is coupled to the klystron load through a 6:1 pulse transformer. Careful consideration of the transformer leakage inductance, klystron capacitance, system layout, and component choice is necessary to produce the very fast rise and fall times at 600 kV operating continuously at 120 Hz.