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1

Design principles for high quality electron beams via colliding pulses in laser plasma accelerators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser plasma based accelerators have the potential to reduce dramatically the size and cost of future particle colliders and light sources. Production of high quality beams along with reproducibility, tunability, and efficiency are required for many applications. We present design principles for two-pulse colliding laser pulse injection mechanisms, which can meet these requirements. Simulations are used to determine the best conditions for the production of high quality beams: high charge, low energy spread, and low emittance. Simulations also allow access to the internal dynamics of the interaction, providing insight regarding further improvement of the beam quality. We find that a 20 pC beam can be accelerated to 300 MeV in 4 mm with only a few percent energy spread and transverse normalized emittance close to 1 mm mrad, using a 10 TW laser. We demonstrate that this design scales according to linear theory. Control of the laser pulse mode content and subsequent evolution in the plasma channel are shown to be critical for achieving the highest beam quality.

Cormier-Michel, E.; Ranjbar, V. H.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Cary, J. R.; Chen, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Plateau, G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Leemans, W. P.

2014-09-01

2

Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

Zisman, Michael S.

2011-09-10

3

Design study of beam dynamics issues for 1 TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator  

SciTech Connect

A design study has recently been conducted for exploring the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a rf power source for a 1 TeV linear collider. The author present, in this paper, the beam dynamics part of this study. They have achieved in their design study acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties for the resulting high efficiency and low cost RK-TBA.

Li, H.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.; Sessler, A.; Yu, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Houck, T.; Westenskow, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-11-01

4

Beam dynamics in linear colliders  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we discuss some basic beam dynamics issues related to obtaining and preserving the luminosity of a next generation linear collider. The beams are extracted from a damping ring and compressed in length by the first bunch compressor. They are then accelerated in a preaccelerator linac up to an energy appropriate for injection into a high gradient linac. In many designs this pre-acceleration is followed by another bunch compression to reach a short bunch. After acceleration in the linac, the bunches are finally focused transversely to a small spot. 27 refs., 1 fig.

Ruth, R.D.

1990-09-01

5

Colliding neutrino beams  

E-print Network

From several neutrino oscillation experiments, we understand now that neutrinos have mass. However, we really don't know what mechanism is responsible for producing this neutrino mass. Current or planned neutrino experiments utilize neutrino beams and long-baseline detectors to explore flavor mixing but do not address the question of the origin of neutrino mass. In order to answer that question, neutrino interactions need to be explored at much higher energies. This paper outlines a program to explore neutrinos and their interactions with various particles through a series of experiments involving colliding neutrino beams.

Reinhard Schwienhorst

2007-08-01

6

Accelerator physics of the Stanford Linear Collider and SLC accelerator experiments towards the Next Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect

The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) was built to collide single bunches of electrons and positrons head-on at a single interaction point with single beam energies up to 55 GeV. The small beam sizes and high currents required for high luminosity operation have significantly pushed traditional beam quality limits. The Polarized Electron Source produces about 8 {times} 10{sup 10} electrons in each of two bunches with up to 28% polarization,. The Damping Rings provide coupled invariant emittances of 1.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} r-m with 4.5 {times} 10{sup 10} particles per bunch. The 57 GeV Linac has successfully accelerated over 3 {times} 10{sup 10} particles with design invariant emittances of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} r-m. Both longitudinal and transverse wakefields affect strongly the trajectory and emittance corrections used for operations. The Arc systems routinely transport decoupled and betatron matched beams. In the Final Focus, the beams are chromatically corrected and demagnified producing spot sizes of 2 to 3 {mu}m at the focal point. Spot sizes below 2 {mu}m have been made during special tests. Instrumentation and feedback systems are well advanced, providing continuous beam monitoring and pulse-by-pulse control. A luminosity of 1.6 {times} 10{sup 29} cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1} has been produced. Several experimental tests for a Next Linear Collider (NLC) are being planned or constructed using the SLC accelerator as a test facility. The Final Focus Test Beam will demagnify a flat 50 GeV electron beam to dimensions near 60 nm vertically and 900 nm horizontally. A potential Emittance Dynamics Test Area has the capability to test the acceleration and transport of very low emittance beams, the compression of bunch lengths to 50 {mu}m, the acceleration and control of multiple bunches, and the properties of wakefields in the very short bunch length regime.

Seeman, J.T.

1992-06-01

7

Generating high-brightness electron beams via ionization injection by transverse colliding lasers in a plasma-wakefield accelerator.  

PubMed

The production of ultrabright electron bunches using ionization injection triggered by two transversely colliding laser pulses inside a beam-driven plasma wake is examined via three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The relatively low intensity lasers are polarized along the wake axis and overlap with the wake for a very short time. The result is that the residual momentum of the ionized electrons in the transverse plane of the wake is reduced, and the injection is localized along the propagation axis of the wake. This minimizes both the initial thermal emittance and the emittance growth due to transverse phase mixing. Simulations show that ultrashort (~8 fs) high-current (0.4 kA) electron bunches with a normalized emittance of 8.5 and 6 nm in the two planes, respectively, and a brightness of 1.7×10(19) A rad(-2) m(-2) can be obtained for realistic parameters. PMID:23863007

Li, F; Hua, J F; Xu, X L; Zhang, C J; Yan, L X; Du, Y C; Huang, W H; Chen, H B; Tang, C X; Lu, W; Joshi, C; Mori, W B; Gu, Y Q

2013-07-01

8

Accelerator R&D toward Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory  

SciTech Connect

Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following LHC discoveries. Such a collider can offer superb energy resolution, smaller size, and potentially cost and power consumption compared to multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders. This article briefly reviews the motivation, design and status of accelerator R&D for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory.

Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

2009-10-01

9

High Frequency Planar Accelerating Structures for Future Linear Colliders  

SciTech Connect

Modern microfabrication techniques based on deep etch x-ray lithography (LIGA) can be used to produce large-aspect-ratio, metallic or dielectric, planar structures suitable for high-frequency RF acceleration of charged particle beams. Specifically, these techniques offer significant advantages over conventional manufacturing methods for future linear colliders (beyond NLC, the Next Linear Collider) because of several unique systems requirements. First, to have the required ac ''wall plug'' power within reasonable limits, such future linear colliders ({ge} 5TeV) must operate at high frequency ({ge} 30GHz). This implies the need of a large number of intricate accelerating structures with ever smaller dimensions and extremely tight manufacturing tolerances, imposing new challenges in mass-production, precision fabrication techniques. Microfabrication is particularly suitable for meeting this need. Secondly, luminosity requirements suggest the use of multi-bunch acceleration of electrons and positrons in the linear collider. In order for these schemes to accelerate low-emittance beams over a long distance, it is important that the wakefield effects be reduced to a minimum in the accelerating structure. Asymmetric planar structures have more geometric degrees of freedom than cylindrically symmetric structures. In addition to detuning, these can be utilized to further reduce the wakefields. Thirdly, in order to clearly discriminate physics events in the final interaction point at which electrons and positrons collide, it is required that secondary particle production from beamstrahlung be minimized. Flat electron and positron beams with a large aspect ratio will be beneficial in reducing beamstrahlung in the final focus region, but cause the beam to be more sensitive to wakefields in the vertical dimension. In principle, a flat beam can be accelerated in a planar structure with reduced wakefield in the vertical direction for the entire length of the accelerator.

Yu, D.

2005-01-26

10

Linear Accelerator -Photon Collider Author: Mitja Krnel  

E-print Network

subatomic particles or ions. In a linear particle accelerator particles are subjected to a series for injecting particles into higher-energy accelerators or for the investi- gation of subatomic particles to produce elemen- tary particles. In photon colliders high energy photons are generated by Compton

Â?umer, Slobodan

11

Particle acceleration in colliding wind binary systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new model for the particle acceleration believed to power the synchrotron emission observed in some Wolf-Rayet binaries. Particles are accelerated in a current sheet formed when the magnetic fields carried in the winds of the two stars are forced together as the winds collide. By modelling this current sheet we are able to determine, for a given

M. Jardine; H. R. Allen; A. M. T. Pollock

1996-01-01

12

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED COLLIDERS C. B. Schroeder  

E-print Network

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED COLLIDERS C. B. Schroeder , E. Esarey, Cs. T´oth, C. G. R. Geddes-generation linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator gamma-gamma () collider is considered. An example of the parameters for a 0.5 TeV laser-plasma-accelerator collider

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

13

Engineering conceptual design of the relativistic Klystron two-beam accelerator based power source for 1-TeV next linear collider  

SciTech Connect

Ultra-high gradient radio frequency linacs require efficient and reliable power sources. The induction linac has proven to be a reliable source of low energy, high current and high brightness electron beams. The low energy beam is bunched, transported through resonant transfer cavities in which it radiates microwave energy that is coupled to an adjacent high energy accelerator. The low energy beam is maintained at a constant energy by periodic induction accelerator cells. This paper describes the engineering aspects of the induction accelerator based relativistic klystron. The physics issues are covered in another paper at this conference.

Reginato, L.; Deadrick, F.; Peters, C.; Vanecek, D.; Yu, S.

1995-04-01

14

The accuracy of beam-beam diagnostics for circular colliders  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the potential of beam-beam deflection techniques for the determination of spot sizes, tilt angle, centering, and angular divergence for circular colliders. Achievable accuracies for all measured quantities are estimated.

Ziemann, V.

1992-08-01

15

LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS  

SciTech Connect

Design considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-gamma collider is considered. An example of the parameters for a 0.5 TeV laser-plasma-accelerator gamma gamma collider is presented.

Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

2009-05-04

16

Advances in beam physics and technology: Colliders of the future  

SciTech Connect

Beams may be viewed as directed and focussed flow of energy and information, carried by particles and electromagnetic radiation fields (ie, photons). Often, they interact with each other (eg, in high energy colliders) or with other forms of matter (eg, in fixed targets, sychrotron radiation, neutron scattering, laser chemistry/physics, medical therapy, etc.). The whole art and science of beams revolve around the fundamental quest for, and ultimate implementation of, mechanisms of production, storage, control and observation of beams -- always directed towards studies of the basic structures and processes of the natural world and various practical applications. Tremendous progress has been made in all aspects of beam physics and technology in the last decades -- nonlinear dynamics, superconducting magnets and rf cavities, beam instrumentation and control, novel concepts and collider praradigms, to name a few. We illustrate this progress with a few examples and remark on the emergence of new collider scenarios where some of these progress might come to use -- the Gamma-Gamma Collider, the Muon Collider, laser acceleration, etc. We close with an outline of future oppotunities and outlook.

Chattopadhyay, S.

1994-11-01

17

Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Muon Production, Capture and Acceleration R&D  

E-print Network

Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider R&D Muon Production, Capture and Acceleration R&D directed at Physics with Intense Muon Beams The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration #12;Alan Bross High Energy Physics Advisory Panel Meeting July 14, 2007 2 A Bit of History Since 1995 the Neutrino Factory

18

Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider  

SciTech Connect

The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

2009-10-01

19

Dielectric Collimators for Linear Collider Beam Delivery System  

E-print Network

The current status of ILC and CLIC concepts require additional research on wakefield reduction in the collimator sections. New materials and new geometries have been considered recently*. Dielectric collimators for the CLIC Beam Delivery System have been discussed with a view to minimize the BDS collimation wakefields**. Dielectric collimator concepts for the linear collider are presented in this paper; cylindrical and planar collimators for the CLIC parameters have been considered, and simulations to minimize the beam impedance have been performed. The prototype collimator system is planned to be fabricated and experimentally tested at Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams (FACET) at SLAC.

Kanareykin, A; Baturin, S; Tomás, R

2011-01-01

20

Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

2011-10-24

21

Polarized muon beams for muon collider  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An option for the production of intense and highly polarized muon beams, suitable for a high-luminosity muon collider, is described briefly. It is based on a multi-channel pion-collection system, narrow-band pion-to-muon decay channels, proper muon spin gymnastics, and ionization cooling to combine all of the muon beams into a single bunch of ultimately low emittance.

Skrinsky, A. N.

1996-11-01

22

Polarized muon beams for muon collider  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An option for the production of intense and highly polarized muon beams, suitable for a high-luminosity muon collider, is described briefly. It is based on a multi-channel pion-collection system, narrow-band pion-to-muon decay channels, proper muon spin gymnastics, and ionization cooling to combine all of the muon beams into a single bunch of ultimately low emittance.

Skrinsky, A. N.

23

Accelerating and storing polarized hadron beams  

SciTech Connect

Polarization hadron experiments at high energies continue to generate surprises. Many questions remain unanswered or unanswerable within the frame work of QCD. These include such basic questions as to why at high energies the polarization analyzing power in pp elastic scattering remains high, why hyperons are produced with high polarizations etc. It is, therefore, interesting to investigate the possibilities of accelerating and storing polarized beams in high energy colliders. On the technical side the recent understanding and confirmation of the actions of partial and multiple Siberian snakes made it possible to contemplate accelerating and storing polarized hadron beams to multi-TeV energies. In this paper, we will examine the equipment, the operation and the procedure required to obtain colliding beams of polarized protons at TeV energies.

Teng, L.C.

1990-10-01

24

SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we report on progress that has been made in beam dynamics simulation, from light sources to colliders, during the first year of SciDAC-II accelerator project,"Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS)." Several parallel computational tools for beam dynamics simulation will be described. A number of applications in current and future accelerator facilities, e.g., LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC, ELIC, are presented.

Qiang, Ji; Qiang, J.; Borland, M.; Kabel, A.; Li, R.; Ryne, R.; Stern, E.; Wang, Y.; Wasserman, H.; Zhang, Y.

2008-06-16

25

FUTURE LEPTON COLLIDERS AND LASER ACCELERATION  

SciTech Connect

Future high energy colliders along with their physics potential, and relationship to new laser technology are discussed. Experimental approaches and requirements for New Physics exploration are also described.

PARSA,Z.

2000-05-30

26

Accelerator and Fusion Research Division Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider  

E-print Network

Accelerator and Fusion Research Division Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) R Accelerator and Fusion Research Division · History · Collaboration organization · Neutrino Factory overview · R&D program goals · R&D activities and plans · R&D funding needs · Summary #12;History Accelerator

27

Demonstration of two-beam acceleration in CTF II  

Microsoft Academic Search

The second phase of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF II) at CERN has demon-strated the feasibility of two-beam acceleration at 30 GHz using a high-charge drive beam, running paral lel to the main beam, as the RF power source. To date accelerating gradients of 59 MV\\/m at 30 GHz have been achieved. In CTF II, the two

Rudolf Bossart; Hans Heinrich Braun; G. Carron; M. Chanudet; F. Chautard; J. P. Delahaye; J. C. Godot; S. Hutchins; I. Kamber; C. Martinez; Guy Suberlucq; P G Tenenbaum; L. Thorndahl; M. Valentini; Ian H Wilson; Walter Wuensch

1998-01-01

28

Laser acceleration of ion beams  

E-print Network

We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

2006-12-18

29

POPAE - A 1000 Gev on 1000 Gev Proton-Proton Colliding Beam Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

A proposal has been developed for the construction of a 1000 GeV on 1000 GeV colliding beam facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. To achieve the same 2000-GeV center-of-mass energy with a fixed target accelerator would require a beam of more than 2 ?? 106 GeV. The total circumference of the facility is 5520 m, including six straight sections, each

D. Ayres; E. Berger; Y. Cho; T. Collins; E. Crosbie; M. Derrick; R. Diebold; D. Edwards; M. Foss; L. Genens; L. Hyman; D. Johnson; E. Malamud; F. Mills; L. Mo; J. Moenich; S. Ohnuma; J. Purcell; C. Quigg; L. Ratner; A. Ruggiero; R. Singer; R. Smith; S. Snowdon; L. Teng; L. Turner; C. Ward

1977-01-01

30

Electron Cloud Effects in Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator and International Linear Collider Damping Ring  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the effects of electron cloud are discussed for the ultra low emittance positron beam in Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (Cesr-TA) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring. We have investigated the electron-cloud instabilities with Cesr-TA which has been operating to experiment for the ILC damping ring with different positron beam energies: 2 and 5

Hyunchang Jin; Moohyun Yoon; Kazuhito Ohmi; John W. Flanagan; Mark A. Palmer

2011-01-01

31

SciDAC Advances in Beam Dynamics Simulation: From Light Sources to Colliders  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we report on progress that has been made in beam dynamics simulation, from light sources to colliders, during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project 'Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS).' Several parallel computational tools for beam dynamics simulation are described. Also presented are number of applications in current and future accelerator facilities (e.g., LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC, and ELIC). Particle accelerators are some of most important tools of scientific discovery. They are widely used in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and other basic and applied sciences to study the interaction of elementary particles, to probe the internal structure of matter, and to generate high-brightness radiation for research in materials science, chemistry, biology, and other fields. Modern accelerators are complex and expensive devices that may be several kilometers long and may consist of thousands of beamline elements. An accelerator may transport trillions of charged particles that interact electromagnetically among themselves, that interact with fields produced by the accelerator components, and that interact with beam-induced fields. Large-scale beam dynamics simulations on massively parallel computers can help provide understanding of these complex physical phenomena, help minimize design cost, and help optimize machine operation. In this paper, we report on beam dynamics simulations in a variety of accelerators ranging from next generation light sources to high-energy ring colliders that have been studied during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project.

Qiang, J.; Borland, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Kabel, A.; /Argonne; Li, R.; /Jefferson Lab; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley; Stern, E.; /Fermilab; Wang, Y.; /Argonne; Wasserman, H.; /LBL, Berkeley; Zhang, Y.; /SLAC

2011-11-14

32

Beam dynamics for induction accelerators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An induction linac uses pulsed power that is applied directly, without any intervening resonant cavities, to accelerate a charged particle pulse. This approach can accommodate a large multiple-beam focusing lattice capable of transporting a large total beam current with a long pulse duration, which may be compressed while accelerating as well as afterward. The mean accelerating gradient is relatively low (less than about 1.5 MV/m), but the potential efficiency of energy transfer can be large up to about 50%. A multiple-beam induction linac is therefore a natural candidate accelerator for a heavy ion fusion (HIF) driver. However, the accelerated beams must meet stringent requirements on occupied phase space volume in order to be focused accurately and with small radius onto the fusion target. Dynamical considerations in the beam injector and linac, as well as in the final compression, final focus, and the fusion chamber, determine the quality of the driver beams as they approach the target. Requirements and tolerances derived from beam dynamics strongly influence the linac configuration and component design.

Lee, Edward P.

2014-01-01

33

Collider-Accelerator Department Overview Derek I. Lowenstein  

E-print Network

-NE) · Booster · NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NASA, $5.5M/year, incl. $2M for Medical and Biology Departments Engineers/Professional 144 114 23 5 2 Designers/Technicians 196 155 32 6 3 Admin./Clerical 24 21 2 1 0 support ~13 FTEs are purchased as Laboratory assigned trades. #12;4 Collider Accelerator Department

34

Proposal of the Next Incarnation of Accelerator Test Facility at KEK for the International Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect

To reach design luminosity, the International Linear Collider (ILC) must be able to create and reliably maintain nanometer size beams. The ATF damping ring is the unique facility where ILC emittances are possible. In this paper we present and evaluate the proposal to create a final focus facility at the ATF which, using compact final focus optics and an ILC-like bunch train, would be capable of achieving 37 nm beam size. Such a facility would enable the development of beam diagnostics and tuning methods, as well as the training of young accelerator physicists.

Araki, S.; Hayano, H.; Higashi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Kanazawa, K.; Kubo, K.; Kume, T.; Kuriki, M.; Kuroda, S.; Masuzawa, M.; Naito, T.; Okugi, T.; Sugahara, R.; Takahashi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Toge, N.; Urakawa, J.; Vogel, V.; Yamaoka, H.; Yokoya, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Novosibirsk, IYF /Daresbury /CERN /Hiroshima

2005-05-27

35

New aspects of beam-beam interactions in hadron colliders  

SciTech Connect

Beam-beam phenomena have until now limited the beam currents and luminosity achievable in the Tevatron. injected proton currents are about ten times larger than the anti-proton currents so beam-beam effects have largely acted on the anti-protons and at all stages of the operational cycle. The effects of the anti-protons on the protons have until now been relatively benign but that may change at higher anti-proton currents. After 36 bunches of protons are injected and placed on the proton helix, anti-protons are injected four bunches at a time. After all bunches are injected, acceleration to top energy takes bout 85 seconds. After reaching flat top, the optics around the interaction regions (IRs) is changed to lower {beta}* from 1.6 m to 0.35 m at B0 and D0. The beams are brought into collision by collapsing the separation bumps around the IPs. During a high energy physics store each bunch experiences two head-on collisions with bunches in the opposing beam and seventy long-range interactions. At all other stages of the operational cycle, each bunch experiences only long-range interactions--seventy two in all. Performance limitations from beam-beam effects until now have been primarily due to these long-range interactions. The anti-proton losses at 150 GeV have decreased during the last year mostly due to better control of the orbits, tunes and chromaticities. During this period proton intensities have increased about 50%, thus anti-proton losses at 150 GeV have not been very dependent on proton intensities. Anti-proton and proton losses on the ramp together with proton losses at 150 GeV are the dominant contributors to the Tevatron inefficiency.

Tanaji Sen

2003-06-02

36

A Concept of Plasma Wake Field Acceleration Linear Collider (PWFA-LC)  

SciTech Connect

Plasma Wake-Field Acceleration (PWFA) has demonstrated acceleration gradients above 50 GeV/m. Simulations have shown drive/witness bunch configurations that yield small energy spreads in the accelerated witness bunch and high energy transfer efficiency from the drive bunch to the witness bunch, ranging from 30% for a Gaussian drive bunch to 95% for a shaped longitudinal profile. These results open the opportunity for a linear collider that could be compact, efficient and more cost effective that the present microwave technologies. A concept of a PWFA-based Linear Collider (PWFA-LC) has been developed and is described in this paper. The drive beam generation and distribution, requirements on the plasma cells, and optimization of the interaction region parameters are described in detail. The R&D steps needed for further development of the concept are also outlined.

Seryi, Andrei; Hogan, Mark; Pei, Shilun; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tenenbaum, Peter; /SLAC; Katsouleas, Tom; /Duke U.; Huang, Chengkun; Joshi, Chan; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

2009-10-30

37

Summary Report of Working Group 5: Electron Beam Driven Plasma Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Electron beam driven plasma accelerators have seen rapid progress over the last decade. Recent efforts have built on this success by constructing a concept for a plasma wakefield accelerator based linear collider. The needs for any future collider to deliver both energy and luminosity have substantial implications for interpreting current experiments and setting priorities for the future. This working group reviewed current experiments and ideas in the context of the demands of a future collider. The many discussions and presentations are summarized here.

Hogan, Mark J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Advanced Accelerator Research Department 2575 SandHill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Conde, Manoel E. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne IL 60439 (United States)

2009-01-22

38

Online calculation of the Tevatron collider luminosity using accelerator instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

The luminosity of a collision region may be calculated if one understands the lattice parameters and measures the beam intensities, the transverse and longitudinal emittances, and the individual proton and antiproton beam trajectories (space and time) through the collision region. This paper explores an attempt to make this calculation using beam instrumentation during Run 1b of the Tevatron. The instrumentation used is briefly described. The calculations and their uncertainties are compared to luminosities calculated independently by the Collider Experiments (CDF and D0).

Hahn, A.A.

1997-07-01

39

Design and construction of vacuum systems for large colliders using superconducting magnets  

SciTech Connect

Vacuum system requirements for proton accelerators and colliders with superconducting megnets are discussed. The vacuum systems for the colliding beam accelerator and the Tevatron are described. (WHK)

Halama, H.J.

1983-01-01

40

Beam-Beam deflection as a beam tuning tool at the SLAC Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect

To achieve maximum integrated luminosity at the SLAC Linear Collider, a method of noninvasive beam tuning is required. Traditional luminosity monitors based on Bhabha scattering are inadequate because of low instantaneous counting rates. Coherent deflections of one beam by the electromagnetic field of the other are sensitive not only to the relative steering of the two bunches but also to their spot sizes. A brief description of beam-beam deflection theory forms the basis for a discussion of this phenomenon as a tool for single-beam tuning and for luminosity optimization at the interaction point of the SLC. 13 refs., 5 figs.

Koska, W.; Bambade, P.; Kozanecki, W.; Phinney, N.; Wagner, S.R.

1989-04-01

41

Linear accelerators for TeV colliders. Revision  

SciTech Connect

The basic scaling relations for important linear collider design parameters are introduced. Some of the basic concepts concerning the design of accelerating structures are presented, and breakdown limitations are discussed. Rf power sources are considered. Some of the key concepts of wakefield accelerators are discussed, and some examples of wake fields for typical linac structures are presented. Some general concepts concerning emittance, and the limitations on the emittance that can be obtained from linac guns and damping rings are discussed. 49 refs., 15 figs. (LEW)

Wilson, P.B.

1985-10-01

42

Design and Interpretation of Colliding Pulse Injected Laser-Plasma Acceleration Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The use of colliding laser pulses to control the injection of plasma electrons into the plasma wake of a laser-plasma accelerator is a promising approach to obtaining GeV scale electron bunches with reduced emittance and energy spread. Colliding Pulse Injection (CPI) experiments are being performed by groups around the world. We present recent particle-in-cell simulations, using the parallel VORPAL framework, of CPI for physical parameters relevant to ongoing experiments of the LOASIS program at LBNL. We perform parameter scans in order to optimize the quality of the bunch, and compare the results with experimental data. Effect of non-ideal gaussian pulses and laser self-focusing in the plasma channel on the trapped bunch are evaluated. For optimized parameters accessible in the experiment, a 20 pC electron beam can be accelerated to 300 MeV with percent level energy spread.

Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Ranjbar, Vahid H.; Bruhwiler, David L. [Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Ave, Suite A, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Chen, Min; Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.; Leemans, Wim P. [LOASIS program, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 cyclotron road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-11-04

43

Design and Interpretation of Colliding Pulse Injected Laser-Plasma Acceleration Experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of colliding laser pulses to control the injection of plasma electrons into the plasma wake of a laser-plasma accelerator is a promising approach to obtaining GeV scale electron bunches with reduced emittance and energy spread. Colliding Pulse Injection (CPI) experiments are being performed by groups around the world. We present recent particle-in-cell simulations, using the parallel VORPAL framework, of CPI for physical parameters relevant to ongoing experiments of the LOASIS program at LBNL. We perform parameter scans in order to optimize the quality of the bunch, and compare the results with experimental data. Effect of non-ideal gaussian pulses and laser self-focusing in the plasma channel on the trapped bunch are evaluated. For optimized parameters accessible in the experiment, a 20 pC electron beam can be accelerated to 300 MeV with percent level energy spread.

Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Ranjbar, Vahid H.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Chen, Min; Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.; Leemans, Wim P.

2010-11-01

44

Summary Report of Working Group 4: e-Beam Driven Accelerators  

Microsoft Academic Search

The working group considered high transformer ration schemes for an afterburner based on the design of a future linear collider. The main linac produces high charge beams of 100 GeV. A multiple stage plasma based accelerator would accelerate a portion of this beam to 500 GeV. The length of each plasma stage is expected to be of the order of

V. Yakimenko; R. Ischebeck

2006-01-01

45

Fresnel diffraction patterns as accelerating beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We demonstrate that beams originating from Fresnel diffraction patterns are self-accelerating in free space. In addition to accelerating and self-healing, they also exhibit parabolic deceleration property, which is in stark contrast to other accelerating beams. We find that the trajectory of Fresnel paraxial accelerating beams is similar to that of nonparaxial Weber beams. Decelerating and accelerating regions are separated by a critical propagation distance, at which no acceleration is present. During deceleration, the Fresnel diffraction beams undergo self-smoothing, in which oscillations of the diffracted waves gradually focus and smooth out at the critical distance.

Zhang, Yiqi; Beli?, Milivoj R.; Zheng, Huaibin; Wu, Zhenkun; Li, Yuanyuan; Lu, Keqing; Zhang, Yanpeng

2013-11-01

46

Demonstration of two-beam acceleration in CTF II  

E-print Network

The second phase of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF II) at CERN has demon-strated the feasibility of two-beam acceleration at 30 GHz using a high-charge drive beam, running paral lel to the main beam, as the RF power source. To date accelerating gradients of 59 MV/m at 30 GHz have been achieved. In CTF II, the two beams are generated by 3 GHz RF photo-injectors and are acceler ated in 3 GHz linacs, before injection into the 30 GHz modules. The drive beam linac has to accelerate a 16 ns long train of 48 bunches, each with a nominal charge of 13.4 nC. To cope with the very su bstantial beam-loading special accelerating structures are used (running slightly off the bunch repetition frequency). A magnetic chicane compresses the bunches to less than 5 ps fwhm, this is needed for efficient 30 GHz power generation. The 30 GHz modules are fully-engineered representative sections of CLIC, they include a 30 GHz decelerator for the drive beam, a 30 GHz accelerator for the main beam, high resolution...

Bossart, Rudolf; Carron, G; Chanudet, M; Chautard, F; Delahaye, J P; Godot, J C; Hutchins, S; Kamber, I; Martínez, C; Suberlucq, Guy; Tenenbaum, P G; Thorndahl, L; Valentini, M; Wilson, Ian H; Wuensch, Walter

1999-01-01

47

International X-Band Linear Collider Accelerator Structure R&D  

SciTech Connect

For more than fifteen years before the International Technology Recommendation Panel (ITRP) decision in August, 2004, there were intensive R&D activities and broad international collaboration among the groups at SLAC, KEK, FNAL, LLNL and other labs for the room temperature X-Band accelerator structures. The goal was to provide an optimized design of the main linac structure for the NLC (Next Linear Collider) or GLC (Global Linear Collider). There have been two major challenges in developing X-band accelerator structures for the linear colliders. The first is to demonstrate stable, long-term operation at the high gradient (65 MV/m) that is required to optimize the machine cost. The second is to strongly suppress the beam induced long-range wakefields, which is required to achieve high luminosity. More than thirty X-band accelerator structures with various RF parameters, cavity shapes and coupler types have been fabricated and tested since 1989. A summary of the main achievements and experiences are presented in this talk including the structure design, manufacturing techniques, high power performance, and other structure related issues. Also, the new progress in collaborating with the CLIC, high gradient structures and X-Band structure applications for RF deflectors and others are briefly introduced.

Wang, J.W.; /SLAC

2009-03-04

48

Study of the beam-beam limit in e{sup +}e{sup -} circular colliders  

SciTech Connect

Beam-beam effects limit the luminosity of circular colliders. Once the bunch population exceeds a threshold, the luminosity increases at a slower rate. This phenomenon is called the beam-beam limit. Onset of the beam-beam limit has been analyzed with various simulation methods based on the weak-strong and strong-strong models. We have observed that an incoherent phenomenon is mainly concerned in the beam-beam limit. The simulation have shown that equilibrium distributions of the two colliding beams are distorted from Gaussians when the luminosity is limited. The beam-beam limit is estimated to be (xi) {approx} 0.1 for a B factory with damping time of several thousand turns.

Ohmi, K.; Tawada, M.; Cai, Y.; Kamada, S.; Oide, K.; Qiang, J.

2004-04-02

49

Nonparaxial Mathieu and Weber Accelerating Beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally nonparaxial Mathieu and Weber accelerating beams, generalizing the concept of previously found accelerating beams. We show that such beams bend into large angles along circular, elliptical, or parabolic trajectories but still retain nondiffracting and self-healing capabilities. The circular nonparaxial accelerating beams can be considered as a special case of the Mathieu accelerating beams, while an Airy beam is only a special case of the Weber beams at the paraxial limit. Not only do generalized nonparaxial accelerating beams open up many possibilities of beam engineering for applications, but the fundamental concept developed here can be applied to other linear wave systems in nature, ranging from electromagnetic and elastic waves to matter waves.

Zhang, Peng; Hu, Yi; Li, Tongcang; Cannan, Drake; Yin, Xiaobo; Morandotti, Roberto; Chen, Zhigang; Zhang, Xiang

2012-11-01

50

A concept of the photon collider beam dump  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Photon beams at photon colliders are very narrow, powerful (10–15 MW) and cannot be spread by fast magnets (because photons are neutral). No material can withstand such energy density. For the ILC-based photon collider, we suggest using a 150 m long, pressurized (P ~ 4 atm) argon gas target in front of a water absorber which solves the overheating and mechanical stress problems. The neutron background at the interaction point is estimated and additionally suppressed using a 20 m long hydrogen gas target in front of the argon.

Shekhtman, L. I.; Telnov, V. I.

2014-09-01

51

A concept of the photon collider beam dump  

E-print Network

Photon beams at photon colliders are very narrow, powerful (10--15 MW) and cannot be spread by fast magnets (because photons are neutral). No material can withstand such energy density. For the ILC-based photon collider, we suggest using a 150 m long, pressurized (P ~ 4 atm) argon gas target in front of a water absorber which solves the overheating and mechanical stress problems. The neutron background at the interaction point is estimated and additionally suppressed using a 20 m long hydrogen gas target in front of the argon.

L. I. Shekhtman; V. I. Telnov

2014-09-19

52

A concept of the photon collider beam dump  

E-print Network

Photon beams at photon colliders are very narrow, powerful (10--15 MW) and cannot be spread by fast magnets (because photons are neutral). No material can withstand such energy density. For the ILC-based photon collider, we suggest using a 150 m long, pressurized (P ~ 4 atm) argon gas target in front of a water absorber which solves the overheating and mechanical stress problems. The neutron background at the interaction point is estimated and additionally suppressed using a 20 m long hydrogen gas target in front of the argon.

Shekhtman, L I

2014-01-01

53

Beam Breakup Effects in Dielectric Based Accelerators  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dynamics of the beam in structure-based wakefield accelerators leads to beam stability issues not ordinarily found in other machines. In particular, the high current drive beam in an efficient wakefield accelerator loses a large fraction of its energy in the decelerator structure, resulting in physical emittance growth, increased energy spread, and the possibility of head-tail instability for an off

P. Schoessow; A. Kanareykin; C. Jing; A. Kustov; A. Altmark; J. G. Power; W. Gai

2009-01-01

54

Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider  

E-print Network

Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the European FP7 HiLumi LHC Design Study, we are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were check...

Stancari, G; Valishev, A; Bruce, R; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Salvachua Ferrando, B

2014-01-01

55

Symmetrization of the beam-beam interaction in an asymmetric collider  

SciTech Connect

This paper studies the idea of symmetrizing both the lattice and the beams of an asymmetric collider, and discusses why this regime should be within the parametric reach of the design in order to credibly ensure its performance. Also examined is the effectiveness of a simple compensation method using the emittance as a free parameter and that it does not work in all cases. At present, when there are no existing asymmetric colliders, it seems prudent to design an asymmetric collider so as to be similar to a symmetric one (without relying on a particular theory of the asymmetric beam-beam interaction that has not passed tests of fidelity). Nevertheless, one must allow for the maximum possible flexibility and freedom in adjusting those parameters that affect luminosity. Such a parameter flexibility will be essential in tuning the collider to the highest luminosity.

Chin, Y.H.

1990-07-01

56

Preservation of Beam Emittance in the Presence of Ion Motion in Future High-Energy Plasma-Wakefield-Based Colliders  

SciTech Connect

The preservation of beam quality in a plasma wakefield accelerator driven by ultrahigh intensity and ultralow emittance beams, characteristic of future particle colliders, is a challenge. The electric field of these beams leads to plasma ions motion, resulting in a nonlinear focusing force and emittance growth of the beam. We propose to use an adiabatic matching section consisting of a short plasma section with a decreasing ion mass to allow for the beam to remain matched to the focusing force. We use analytical models and numerical simulations to show that the emittance growth can be significantly reduced.

Gholizadeh, R.; Muggli, P. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Katsouleas, T. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Huang, C.; Mori, W. [University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2010-04-16

57

A Method for Measuring Emittance in $e^+ e^-$ Colliding Beams  

E-print Network

We have developed techniques that allow simultaneous measurement of the spatial size of the luminous colliding beam region and the angular spread of beams in collision using e+e- --> mu+mu- events. These are demonstrated at the CLEO interaction point of the Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring, CESR, taking advantage of the small and well understood resolution of the CLEO tracking system. These measurements are then used to extract the horizontal beta, horizontal emittance and the vertical emittance and search for dynamic effects at CESR.

D. Cinabro; K. Korbiak; M. Billing. N. Mistry; D. Rice; D. Rubin

2002-12-05

58

Multiple Charge State Beam Acceleration at ATLAS  

E-print Network

A test of the acceleration of multiple charge-state uranium beams was performed at the ATLAS accelerator. A 238U+26 beam was accelerated in the ATLAS PII linac to 286 MeV (~1.2 MeV/u) and stripped in a carbon foil located 0.5 m from the entrance of the ATLAS Booster section. A 58Ni9+ 'guide' beam from the tandem injector was used to tune the Booster for 238U+38. All charge states from the stripping were injected into the booster and accelerated. Up to 94% of the beam was accelerated through the Booster linac, with losses mostly in the lower charge states. The measured beam properties of each charge state and a comparison to numerical simulations are reported in this paper.

Ostroumov, P N; Zinkann, G P; Shepard, K W; Nolen, J A

2000-01-01

59

Beam tube vacuum in future superconducting proton colliders  

SciTech Connect

The beam tube vacuum requirements in future superconducting proton colliders that have been proposed or discussed in the literature -- SSC, LHC, and ELN -- are reviewed. The main beam tube vacuum problem encountered in these machines is how to deal with the magnitude of gas desorption and power deposition by synchrotron radiation while satisfying resistivity, impedance, and space constraints in the cryogenic environment of superconducting magnets. A beam tube vacuum model is developed that treats photodesorption of tightly bound H, C, and 0, photodesorption of physisorbed molecules, and the isotherm vapor pressure of H{sub 2}. Experimental data on cold tube photodesorption experiments are reviewed and applied to model calculations of beam tube vacuum performance for simple cold beam tube and liner configurations. Particular emphasis is placed on the modeling and interpretation of beam tube photodesorpiion experiments at electron synchrotron light sources. The paper also includes discussion of the constraints imposed by beam image current heating, the growth rate of the resistive wall instability, and single-bunch instability impedance limits.

Turner, W.

1994-10-01

60

Demonstration of two-beam acceleration and 30 GHz power production in the CLIC Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF II) at CERN has recently demonstrated Two-Beam power production and acceleration at 30 GHz. With 41 MW of 30 GHz power produced in 14 ns pulses at a repetition rate of 5 Hz, the main beam has been accelerated by 28 MeV. The 30 GHz RF power is extracted in low impedance decelerating structures from a low-energy, high-current 'drive beam' which runs parallel to the main beam. The average current in the drive-beam train is 25 A, while the peak current exceeds 2 kA. Crosschecks between measured drive-beam charge, 30 GHz power and main-beam energy gain are in good agreement. In this paper, some relevant experimental and technical issues on drive-beam generation, two-beam power production and acceleration are presented.

Bossart, R.; Braun, H. H.; Carron, G.; Chanudet, M.; Chautard, F.; Delahaye, J. P.; Godot, J. C.; Hutchins, S.; Martinez, C.; Suberlucq, G.; Tenenbaum, P.; Thorndahl, L.; Trautner, H.; Valentini, M.; Wilson, I.; Wuensch, W. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

1999-05-07

61

Radio Frequency Noise Effects on the CERN Large Hadron Collider Beam Diffusion  

SciTech Connect

Radio frequency (rf) accelerating system noise can have a detrimental impact on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) performance through longitudinal motion and longitudinal emittance growth. A theoretical formalism has been developed to relate the beam and rf station dynamics with the bunch length growth. Measurements were conducted at LHC to determine the performance limiting rf components and validate the formalism through studies of the beam diffusion dependence on rf noise. As a result, a noise threshold was established for acceptable performance which provides the foundation for beam diffusion estimates for higher energies and intensities. Measurements were also conducted to determine the low level rf noise spectrum and its major contributions, as well as to validate models and simulations of this system.

Mastoridis, T.; Baudrenghien, P.; Butterworth, A.; Molendijk, J.; /CERN; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; /SLAC

2012-04-30

62

Simulation Studies of Beam-Beam Effects of a Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider Based on CEBAF  

SciTech Connect

The collective beam-beam effect can potentially cause a rapid growth of beam sizes and reduce the luminosity of a collider to an unacceptably low level. The ELIC, a proposed ultra high luminosity electron-ion collider based on CEBAF, employs high repetition rate crab crossing colliding beams with very small bunch transverse sizes and very short bunch lengths, and collides them at up to 4 interaction points with strong final focusing. All of these features can make the beam-beam effect challenging. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect in ELIC using a self-consistent strong-strong beam-beam simulation code developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This simulation study is used for validating the ELIC design and for searching for an optimal parameter set.

Yuhong Zhang,Ji Qiang

2009-05-01

63

Measurement of nonlinear observables in the Large Hadron Collider using kicked beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The nonlinear dynamics of a circular accelerator such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may significantly impact its performance. As the LHC progresses to more challenging regimes of operation it is to be expected that the nonlinear single particle dynamics in the transverse planes will play an increasing role in limiting the reach of the accelerator. As such it is vital that the nonlinear sources are well understood. The nonlinear fields of a circular accelerator may be probed through measurement of the amplitude detuning: the variation of tune with single particle emittance. This quantity may be assessed experimentally by exciting the beam to large amplitudes with kicks, and obtaining the tunes and actions from turn-by-turn data at Beam Position Monitors. The large amplitude excitations inherent to such a measurement also facilitate measurement of the dynamic aperture from an analysis of beam losses following the kicks. In 2012 these measurements were performed on the LHC Beam 2 at injection energy (450 GeV) with the nominal magnetic configuration. Nonlinear coupling was also observed. A second set of measurements were performed following the application of corrections for b4 and b5 errors. Analysis of the experimental results, and a comparison to simulation are presented herein.

Maclean, E. H.; Tomás, R.; Schmidt, F.; Persson, T. H. B.

2014-08-01

64

Beam Breakup Effects in Dielectric Based Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of the beam in structure-based wakefield accelerators leads to beam stability issues not ordinarily found in other machines. In particular, the high current drive beam in an efficient wakefield accelerator loses a large fraction of its energy in the decelerator structure, resulting in physical emittance growth, increased energy spread, and the possibility of head-tail instability for an off axis beam, all of which can lead to severe reduction of beam intensity. Beam breakup (BBU) effects resulting from parasitic wakefields provide a potentially serious limitation to the performance of dielectric structure based wakefield accelerators as well. We report on experimental and numerical investigation of BBU and its mitigation. The experimental program focuses on BBU measurements at the AWA facility in a number of high gradient and high transformer ratio wakefield devices. New pickup-based beam diagnostics will provide methods for studying parasitic wakefields that are currently unavailable. The numerical part of this research is based on a particle-Green's function beam breakup code we are developing that allows rapid, efficient simulation of beam breakup effects in advanced linear accelerators. The goal of this work is to be able to compare the results of detailed experimental measurements with the accurate numerical results and to design an external FODO channel for the control of the beam in the presence of strong transverse wakefields.

Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A. [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, OH 44139 (United States); Jing, C. [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, OH 44139 (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States); Kustov, A. [Dynamics Software, Helsinki (Finland); Altmark, A. [Electrotechnical University Eltech 'LETI', St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Power, J. G.; Gai, W. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

2009-01-22

65

Beam Breakup Effects in Dielectric Based Accelerators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamics of the beam in structure-based wakefield accelerators leads to beam stability issues not ordinarily found in other machines. In particular, the high current drive beam in an efficient wakefield accelerator loses a large fraction of its energy in the decelerator structure, resulting in physical emittance growth, increased energy spread, and the possibility of head-tail instability for an off axis beam, all of which can lead to severe reduction of beam intensity. Beam breakup (BBU) effects resulting from parasitic wakefields provide a potentially serious limitation to the performance of dielectric structure based wakefield accelerators as well. We report on experimental and numerical investigation of BBU and its mitigation. The experimental program focuses on BBU measurements at the AWA facility in a number of high gradient and high transformer ratio wakefield devices. New pickup-based beam diagnostics will provide methods for studying parasitic wakefields that are currently unavailable. The numerical part of this research is based on a particle-Green's function beam breakup code we are developing that allows rapid, efficient simulation of beam breakup effects in advanced linear accelerators. The goal of this work is to be able to compare the results of detailed experimental measurements with the accurate numerical results and to design an external FODO channel for the control of the beam in the presence of strong transverse wakefields.

Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Kustov, A.; Altmark, A.; Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

2009-01-01

66

Review of linear collider beam-beam interaction  

SciTech Connect

Three major effects from the interaction of e/sup +/e/sup /minus// beams---disruption, beamstrahlung, and electron-positron pair creation---are reviewed. For the disruption effects we discuss the luminosity enhancement factor, the maximum and rms disruption angles, and the ''kink instability''. All the results are obtained from computer simulations. Scaling laws for the numerical results and theoretical explanations of the computer acquired phenomena are offered wherever possible. For the beamstrahlung effects we concentrate only on the final electron energy spectrum resulting from multiple photon radiation process, and the deflection angle associated with low energy particles. For the effects from electron-positron pair creation, both coherent and incoherent processes of beamstrahlung pair creation are discussed. In addition to the estimation on total number of such pairs, we also look into the energy spectrum and the deflection angle. 17 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

Chen, P.

1989-01-01

67

RESOLVING BEAM TRANSPORT PROBLEMS IN ELECTROSTATIC ACCELERATORS  

E-print Network

. OPTICS, POLARIZED SOURCES, PULSING, MISCELLANEOUS. 1. Introduction. - What constitutes a problem in beam and to demonstrate again how potent is the lens effect at the entrance to an open acceleration tube. During studies

Boyer, Edmond

68

Pointing of laser-accelerated proton beams  

SciTech Connect

Small fluctuations in the acceleration sheath change the pointing of a proton beam accelerated from the rear side of a laser irradiated thin aluminum foil. The proton acceleration was produced with 40 fs pulses of a Ti:sapphire laser at an intensity of approximately 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. This observation has been made with a high spatial resolution Thomson spectrometer. The proton beam pointing has appeared stable in the energy range between the high energy cutoff (3 MeV) and 50% of this value. Deviations of the beam position at lower energies changes in a range of 0-3 mrad. The recorded pictures show wiggled and continuous proton traces which imply a release of the proton beam from the acceleration zone with a velocity chirp.

Schreiber, J.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Risse, E.; Kalachnikov, M.P.; Nickles, P.V.; Sandner, W.; Schramm, U.; Habs, D.; Witte, J.; Schnuerer, M. [MPI fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D 85748 Garching (Germany) and LMU Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, D 85748, Garching (Germany); Max Born Institut, Max Born Strasse 2a, D 12489 Berlin (Germany); Max Born Institut, Max Born Strasse 2a, D 12489 Berlin (Germany) and TU Berlin, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, D 10623 Berlin (Germany); LMU Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, D 85748, Garching (Germany); MPI fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D 85748 Garching (Germany); Max Born Institut, Max Born Strasse 2a, D 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2006-03-15

69

Beam Coupling to Optical Scale Accelerating Structures  

SciTech Connect

Current research efforts into structure based laser acceleration of electrons utilize beams from standard RF linacs. These beams must be coupled into very small structures with transverse dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength. To obtain decent transmission, a permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) triplet with a focusing gradient of 560 T/m is used to focus into the structure. Also of interest is the induced wakefield from the structure, useful for diagnosing potential accelerator structures or as novel radiation sources.

Sears, C.M.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; Lincoln, M.R.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC; Plettner, T.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2007-03-27

70

Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010-2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5-4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

2014-08-01

71

Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

E-print Network

The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010--2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5--4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An un-controlled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multi-stage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte-Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

R. Bruce; R. W. Assmann; V. Boccone; C. Bracco; M. Brugger; M. Cauchi; F. Cerutti; D. Deboy; A. Ferrari; L. Lari; A. Marsili; A. Mereghetti; D. Mirarchi; E. Quaranta; S. Redaelli; G. Robert-Demolaize; A. Rossi; B. Salvachua; E. Skordis; C. Tambasco; G. Valentino; T. Weiler; V. Vlachoudis; D. Wollmann

2014-09-10

72

Generalized Radially Self-Accelerating Helicon Beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report, in theory and experiment, on a new class of optical beams that are radially self-accelerating and nondiffracting. These beams continuously evolve on spiraling trajectories while maintaining their amplitude and phase distribution in their rotating rest frame. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of radial self-acceleration and prove our findings experimentally. As radially self-accelerating beams are nonparaxial and a solution to the full scalar Helmholtz equation, they can be implemented in many linear wave systems beyond optics, from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and soft matter. Our work generalized the study of classical helicon beams to a complete set of solutions for rotating complex fields.

Vetter, Christian; Eichelkraut, Toni; Ornigotti, Marco; Szameit, Alexander

2014-10-01

73

Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams , H. Ludewig1  

E-print Network

Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams N. Simos1* , H. Kirk1 , H on the behavior of special materials and composites under irradiation conditions and their potential use material matrix geared toward the neutrino superbeam and muon collider initiatives. * Work performed under

McDonald, Kirk

74

Beam measurements on Argonne linac for collider injector design  

SciTech Connect

The 20 MeV electron linac at Argonne produces 5 x 10/sup 10/ electrons in a single bunch. This amount of charge per bunch is required for the proposed single pass collider at SLAC. For this reason the characteristics of the beam from this machine are of interest. The longitudinal charge distribution has been measured by a new technique. The technique is a variation on the deduction of bunch shape from a spectrum measurement. Under favorable conditions a resolution of about 1/sup 0/ of phase is possible, which is considerably better than can be achieved with streak cameras. The bunch length at 4.5 x 10/sup 10/ e/sup -/ per bunch was measured to be 15/sup 0/ FWHM. The transverse emittance has also been measured using standard techniques. The emittance is 16 mm-mrad at 17.2 MeV.

James, M.B.; Koontz, R.F.; Miller, R.H.

1980-07-01

75

The development of laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators as an experimental fielda)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since its inception in the early 1980s, the field of plasma-based particle accelerators has made remarkable advances. Robust plasma accelerating structures can now be excited over centimeter scales using short laser pulses and over meter scales using ultrarelativistic particle beams. Accelerating fields in excess of tens of GV/m can be sustained over these lengths. Laser-driven plasma accelerators now routinely produce monoenergetic, low divergence electron beams in the 100MeV-1GeV range, whereas electron-beam driven plasma accelerators have demonstrated the ability to double the energy of 42GeV electrons using a high-energy collider beam in less than one meter. The development of this field is traced through a series of path breaking experiments.

Joshi, C.

2007-05-01

76

Beam based alignment at the KEK accelerator test facility  

SciTech Connect

The KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) damping ring is a prototype low emittance source for the NLC/JLC linear collider. To achieve the goal normalized vertical emittance {gamma}{var_epsilon}{sub {gamma}} = 20 nm-rad, magnet placement accuracy better than 30 mm must be achieved. Accurate beam-based alignment (BBA) is required. The ATF arc optics uses a FOBO cell with two horizontally focusing quadrupoles, two sextupoles and a horizontally defocusing gradient dipole, all of which must be aligned with BBA. BBA at ATF uses the quadrupole and sextupole trim windings to find the trajectory through the center of each magnet. The results can be interpreted to assess the accuracy of the mechanical alignment and the beam position monitor offsets.

Ross, M.; Nelson, J.; Woodley, M.; Wolski, A.

2002-06-14

77

Operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. Beamstrahlung limits the charge per bunch at low plasma densities. Reduced laser intensity is examined to improve accelerator efficiency in the beamstrahlung-limited regime.

Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-12-21

78

Design of the beam delivery system for the international linear collider  

Microsoft Academic Search

The beam delivery system for the linear collider focuses beams to nanometer sizes at its interaction point, collimates the beam halo to provide acceptable background in the detector and has a provision for state-of-the art beam instrumentation in order to reach the ILC's physics goals. This paper describes the design details and status of the baseline configuration considered for the

A. Seryi; J. Amann; R. Arnold; F. Asiri; K. Bane; P. Bellomo; E. Doyle; A. Fasso; K. Jonghoon; L. Keller; K. Ko; Z. Li; T. Markiewicz; T. Maruyama; K. Moffeit; S. Molloy; Y. Nosochkov; N. Phinney; T. Raubenheimer; S. Seletskiy; S. Smith; C. Spencer; P. Tenenbaum; D. Walz; G. White; M. Woodley; M. Woods; L. Xiao; M. Anerella; A. Jain; A. Marone; B. Parker; O. Delferriere; O. Napoly; J. Payet; D. Uriot; N. Watson; I. Agapov; J.-L. Baldy; D. Schulte; G. Burt; A. Dexter; K. Buesser; W. Lohmann; L. Bellantoni; A. Drozhdin; V. Kashikhin; V. Kuchler; T. Lackowski; N. Mokhov; N. Nakao; T. Peterson; M. Ross; S. Striganov; J. Tompkins; M. Wendt; X. Yang; A. Enomoto; S. Kuroda; T. Okugi; T. Sanami; Y. Suetsugu; T. Tauchi; M. del Carmen Alabau; P. Bambade; J. Brossard; O. Dadoun; P. Burrows; G. Christian; C. Clarke; B. Constance; H. Dabiri Khah; A. Hartin; C. Perry; C. Swinson; A. Ferrari; G. Blair; S. Boogert; J. Carter; D. Angal-Kalinin; C. Beard; C. Densham; L. Fernandez-Hernando; J. Greenhalgh; P. Goudket; F. Jackson; J. Jones; A. Kalinin; L. Ma; P. Mcintosh; H. Yamamoto; T. Mattison; J. Carwardine; C. Saunders; R. Appleby; E. Torrence; J. Gronberg; T. Sanuki; Y. Iwashita; V. Telnov; D. Warner

2007-01-01

79

Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC. Simulations studies and measurements were conducted that clearly show the correlation between RF noise and longitudinal bunch emittance, identify the major LLRF noise contributions, and determine the RF component dominating this effect. With these results, LHC upgrades and alternative algorithms are evaluated to reduce longitudinal emittance growth during operations. The applications of this work are described with regard to future machines and analysis of new technical implementations, as well as to possible future work which would continue the directions of this dissertation.

Mastoridis, Themistoklis; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept. /SLAC

2011-03-01

80

Accelerating diffraction-free beams in photonic lattices.  

PubMed

We study nondiffracting accelerating paraxial optical beams in periodic potentials, in both the linear and the nonlinear domains. In particular, we show that only a unique class of z-dependent lattices can support a true accelerating diffractionless beam. Accelerating lattice solitons, autofocusing beams and accelerating bullets in optical lattices are systematically examined. PMID:24686692

Makris, K G; Kaminer, I; El-Ganainy, R; Efremidis, N K; Chen, Zhigang; Segev, M; Christodoulides, D N

2014-04-01

81

Summary Report of Working Group 4: e-Beam Driven Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The working group considered high transformer ration schemes for an afterburner based on the design of a future linear collider. The main linac produces high charge beams of 100 GeV. A multiple stage plasma based accelerator would accelerate a portion of this beam to 500 GeV. The length of each plasma stage is expected to be of the order of a few meters while the isochronous beam transport required for multiple stages would occupy about a kilometer. Discussions in the working group were centered on issues to be addressed: ion motion in the plasma channel, positron side of accelerator ... The state of present e-beam driven plasma and dielectric Wakefield accelerators is very mature and closely resembles parameters of the afterburner for ILC. The main result of this working group is a multistage afterburner scheme of an afterburner for ILC and discussion of the experimental program to address main issues.

Yakimenko, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Ischebeck, R. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA, 94275 (United States)

2006-11-27

82

Summary Report of Working Group 4: e-Beam Driven Accelerators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The working group considered high transformer ration schemes for an afterburner based on the design of a future linear collider. The main linac produces high charge beams of 100 GeV. A multiple stage plasma based accelerator would accelerate a portion of this beam to 500 GeV. The length of each plasma stage is expected to be of the order of a few meters while the isochronous beam transport required for multiple stages would occupy about a kilometer. Discussions in the working group were centered on issues to be addressed: ion motion in the plasma channel, positron side of accelerator … The state of present e-beam driven plasma and dielectric Wakefield accelerators is very mature and closely resembles parameters of the afterburner for ILC. The main result of this working group is a multistage afterburner scheme of an afterburner for ILC and discussion of the experimental program to address main issues.

Yakimenko, V.; Ischebeck, R.

2006-11-01

83

Solid State Technology Meets Collider Challenge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Probing the frontiers of particle physics and delving into the mysteries of the universe and its beginnings require machines that can accelerate beams of fundamental particles to very high energies and then collide those beams together, producing a multitude of exotic subatomic particles. The proposed Next Linear Collider (NLC), being developed by Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Lawrence Livermore and

Hazi

2005-01-01

84

High-efficiency acceleration of an electron beam in a plasma wakefield accelerator.  

PubMed

High-efficiency acceleration of charged particle beams at high gradients of energy gain per unit length is necessary to achieve an affordable and compact high-energy collider. The plasma wakefield accelerator is one concept being developed for this purpose. In plasma wakefield acceleration, a charge-density wake with high accelerating fields is driven by the passage of an ultra-relativistic bunch of charged particles (the drive bunch) through a plasma. If a second bunch of relativistic electrons (the trailing bunch) with sufficient charge follows in the wake of the drive bunch at an appropriate distance, it can be efficiently accelerated to high energy. Previous experiments using just a single 42-gigaelectronvolt drive bunch have accelerated electrons with a continuous energy spectrum and a maximum energy of up to 85 gigaelectronvolts from the tail of the same bunch in less than a metre of plasma. However, the total charge of these accelerated electrons was insufficient to extract a substantial amount of energy from the wake. Here we report high-efficiency acceleration of a discrete trailing bunch of electrons that contains sufficient charge to extract a substantial amount of energy from the high-gradient, nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator. Specifically, we show the acceleration of about 74 picocoulombs of charge contained in the core of the trailing bunch in an accelerating gradient of about 4.4 gigavolts per metre. These core particles gain about 1.6 gigaelectronvolts of energy per particle, with a final energy spread as low as 0.7 per cent (2.0 per cent on average), and an energy-transfer efficiency from the wake to the bunch that can exceed 30 per cent (17.7 per cent on average). This acceleration of a distinct bunch of electrons containing a substantial charge and having a small energy spread with both a high accelerating gradient and a high energy-transfer efficiency represents a milestone in the development of plasma wakefield acceleration into a compact and affordable accelerator technology. PMID:25373678

Litos, M; Adli, E; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clayton, C E; Corde, S; Delahaye, J P; England, R J; Fisher, A S; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; White, G; Wu, Z; Yakimenko, V; Yocky, G

2014-11-01

85

Annular beam-driven high-gradient accelerators  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the past several years there has been an increasing interest in using wakefield acceleration techniques as a means for achieving TeV energies with the next generation of linear colliders. The principal design goals for a wakefield accelerator that is to be sued in this context are high accelerating gradients and large transformer ratios. Fundamentally any slow wave structure can

R. Keinigs; M. E. Jones

1988-01-01

86

Characterization Of A Wakefield Accelerated Electron Beam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the advancement of femtosecond Terawatt lasers, there has been great interest in their ability of accelerating electrons to high energy within short distances; this effect originating from the GeV/cm gradient created in the plasma (compared to conventional RF systems). We report on new experimental results obtained from a 400 fs/4 J-laser plasma driven electron beam. The data were collected by means of a ~ 3 m QQ¯QD spectrometer especially designed for that experiment. A 32× 16 fiber array detector, along with a scintillating LANEX screen and a Faraday cup were used to detect the electrons, and for charge monitoring. The momentum and spatial distributions of the beam were reconstructed. The results are consistent with a previous experiment, and compatible with a GEANT simulation used for background estimation due primarily to secondaries induced by electron-beam pipe collisions. We also report on the extracted emittance of the beam for the corresponding momentum range.

Guèye, Paul; Keppel, Cynthia; Lane, Bianca; Owens, Judy; Torrence, Rickey; Saleh, Ned; Umstadter, Don; Zhang, Ping; Ent, Rolf; Assamagan, Kétévi

2001-10-01

87

Toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams  

SciTech Connect

We describe a program aiming toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams. A hybrid approach is used, combining knowledge- based system programming techniques and traditional numerical simulations. We use an expert system shell for the symbolic processing and have incorporated the FORTRAN beam optics code TRANSPORT for numerical simulation. The paper discusses the symbolic model we built, the reasoning components, how the knowledge base accesses information from an operating beamline, and the experience gained in merging the two worlds of numeric and symbolic processing. We also discuss plans for a future real-time system. 6 refs., 6 figs.

Schultz, D.E.; Silbar, R.R.

1988-01-01

88

High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport  

SciTech Connect

The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

1981-11-01

89

Radioactive ion beam acceleration at MAFF  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In April 2003, the German safety commission has given the final approval for the oper- ation of the high flux reactor FRM-II. This is an important step towards the development and installation of the Munich accelerator for fission fragments (MAFF), which will deliver highest intensities of neutron rich fission fragments. The acceleration chain of MAFF [1] consists of a charge breeder, which will deliver the ions with a mass to charge ratio of A/q ? 6.3 irrespective of the mass range, and with a repetition rate of maximum 50 Hz. The LINAC operating at 10% duty cycle is composed of a 101.28 IH-RFQ, which will boost up the energy from 2.5 up to 300 keV/u, three IH-tanks that will deliver an energy of 5.4 MeV/u and 2 seven gap IH-resonators that are used to vary the final energy up to a maximum of 5.9 MeV/u. Currently beam dynamics revisions are in progress especially in the low energy section, since the experimental program has requested specific time structures of the beam for TOF experiments. The status of the beam dynamics studies as well as the status of the single components of the accelerator will be presented in this paper.

Pasini, M.; Kester, O.; Habs, D.; Groß, M.; Sieber, T.; Maier, H. J.; Assmann, W.; Krüken, R.; Faestermann, T.; Schempp, A.; Ratzinger, U.; Safvan, C. P.

2004-12-01

90

The beam business: Accelerators in industry  

SciTech Connect

Most physicists know that particle accelerators are widely used for treating cancer. But few are acquainted with the depth and breadth of their use in a myriad of applications outside of pure science and medicine. Society benefits from the use of particle beams in the areas of communications, transportation, the environment, security, health, and safety - in terms both of the global economy and quality of life. On the manufacturing level, the use of industrial accelerators has resulted in the faster and cheaper production of better parts for medical devices, automobiles, aircraft, and virtually all modern electronics. Consumers also benefit from the use of accelerators to explore for oil, gas, and minerals; sterilize food, wastewater, and medical supplies; and aid in the development of drugs and biomaterials.

Hamm, Robert W.; Hamm, Marianne E. [Pleasanton, California (United States)

2011-06-15

91

Beam Momentum Changes due to Discharges in High-gradient Accelerator Structures  

E-print Network

The key questions left unanswered by the Standard Model, and the recent discovery of a Standard Model-like Higgs boson, demand an extension of the research on particle physics to the TeV energy scale. The Compact Linear Collider, CLIC, is a candidate project to achieve such goal. It is a linear lepton collider based on a novel two-beam acceleration scheme capable of high-gradient acceleration in X-band accelerator structures. The high electric fields required, however, entail the occurrence of vacuum discharges, or rf breakdowns, a phenomenon whose microscopic dynamics is not yet completely understood, and whose impact on the beam can lead to a severe degradation of the collider luminosity. The understanding of the physics of rf breakdowns has therefore become a significant issue in the design of a reliable accelerator based on CLIC technology. That is addressed experimentally through the study of accelerator structures performance during high-power operations. We report on such a study carried out on a CLIC...

Palaia, Andrea; Ruber, Roger; Ekelöf, Tord

2013-11-21

92

Method and apparatus for varying accelerator beam output energy  

DOEpatents

A coupled cavity accelerator (CCA) accelerates a charged particle beam with rf energy from a rf source. An input accelerating cavity receives the charged particle beam and an output accelerating cavity outputs the charged particle beam at an increased energy. Intermediate accelerating cavities connect the input and the output accelerating cavities to accelerate the charged particle beam. A plurality of tunable coupling cavities are arranged so that each one of the tunable coupling cavities respectively connect an adjacent pair of the input, output, and intermediate accelerating cavities to transfer the rf energy along the accelerating cavities. An output tunable coupling cavity can be detuned to variably change the phase of the rf energy reflected from the output coupling cavity so that regions of the accelerator can be selectively turned off when one of the intermediate tunable coupling cavities is also detuned.

Young, Lloyd M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01

93

Straw man 900-1000 GeV crystal extraction test beam for Fermilab collider operation  

SciTech Connect

A design for a 900-1000 GeV, 100 khz parasitic test beam for use during collider operations has been developed. The beam makes use of two bent crystals, one for extraction and the other one for redirecting the beam in to the present Switchyard beam system. The beam requires only a few modifications in the A0 area and largely uses existing devices. It should be straight-forward to modify one or two beam lines in the fixed target experimental areas to work above 800 GeV. Possibilities for improvements to the design,to operate at higher fluxes are discussed.

Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

1996-10-01

94

Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A. [Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

2012-12-21

95

E-Beam Driven Accelerators: Working Group Summary  

SciTech Connect

The working group has identified the parameters of an afterburner based on the design of a future linear collider. The new design brings the center of mass energy of the collider from 1 to 2 TeV. The afterburner is located in the final focus section of the collider, operates at a gradient of {approx}4 GeV/m, and is only about 125 m long. Very important issues remain to be addressed, and include the physics and design of the positron side of the afterburner, as well as of the final focus system. Present plasma wakefield accelerator experiments have reached a level of maturity and of relevance to the afterburner, that make it timely to involve the high energy physics and accelerator community in the afterburner design process. The main result of this working group is the first integration of the designs of a future linear collider and an afterburner.

Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.; Ng, J.S.T.; /SLAC

2005-07-12

96

Electron cloud effects on beam evolution in a circular accelerator  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interaction between a low-density electron cloud in a circular particle accelerator with a circulating charged particle beam is considered. The particle beam's space charge attracts the cloud, enhancing the cloud density near the beam axis. It is shown that this enhanced charge and the image charges associated with the cloud charge and the conducting wall of the accelerator may

G. Rumolo; A. Z. Ghalam; T. Katsouleas; C. K. Huang; V. K. Decyk; C. Ren; W. B. Mori; F. Zimmermann; F. Ruggiero

2003-01-01

97

Emittance Growth Due to Multiple Coulomb Scattering in a Linear Collider Based on Plasma Wakefield Acceleration  

E-print Network

Alternative acceleration technologies are currently under development for cost-effective, robust, compact and efficient solutions. One such technology is plasma wakefield acceleration, driven by either a charged particle or laser beam. However, the potential issues must be studied in detail. In this paper, the emittance growth of the witness beam through elastic scattering from gaseous media is derived. The model is compared with the numerical studies.

Mete, Oznur; Xia, Guoxing; Labiche, Marc; Karamyshev, Oleg; Wei, Yelong; Welsch, Carsten; Wing, Matthew

2014-01-01

98

A plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using CLARA beam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a Plasma Accelerator Research Station (PARS) based at proposed FEL test facility CLARA (Compact Linear Accelerator for Research and Applications) at Daresbury Laboratory. The idea is to use the relativistic electron beam from CLARA, to investigate some key issues in electron beam transport and in electron beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration, e.g. high gradient plasma wakefield excitation driven by a relativistic electron bunch, two bunch experiment for CLARA beam energy doubling, high transformer ratio, long bunch self-modulation and some other advanced beam dynamics issues. This paper presents the feasibility studies of electron beam transport to meet the requirements for beam driven wakefield acceleration and presents the plasma wakefield simulation results based on CLARA beam parameters. Other possible experiments which can be conducted at the PARS beam line are also discussed.

Xia, G.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Clarke, J.; Smith, J.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Jones, J.; Williams, P. H.; Mckenzie, J. W.; Militsyn, B. L.; Hanahoe, K.; Mete, O.; Aimidula, A.; Welsch, C. P.

2014-03-01

99

Linear collider development at SLAC  

SciTech Connect

Linear collider R&D at SLAC comprises work on the present Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) and work toward the next linear collider (NLC). Recent SLC developments are summarized. NLC studies are divided into hardware-based and theoretical. We report on the status of the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and the final focus test beam (FFTB), describe plans for ASSET, an installation to measure accelerator structure wakefields, and mention IR design developments. Finally we review recent NLC theoretical studies, ending with the author`s view of next linear collider parameter sets.

Irwin, J.

1993-08-01

100

Polarisation and beam energy measurement at a linear e+e- collider  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a future electron/positron collider at the energy frontier. Its physics goals are clearly focused on precision measurements at the electroweak scale and beyond. Beam energy and beam polarisation are two important beam parameters, which need to be measured and monitored to any possible precision. We discuss in this publication the foreseen concepts of beam energy and beam polarisation measurement at the ILC. Two Compton polarimeters per beam line will determine the beam polarisation. The anticipated precision of this measurement amounts to ?Script P/Script P = 2.5 × 10-3, which is a challenging goal putting highest demands on detector alignment and linearity. Recent detector developments as well as a detector calibration technique are described, which allow for meeting these requirements. The beam energy is measured before and after the interaction point to a targeted precision of ?E/E = 10-4. Thereby, the two foreseen concepts are introduced: a noninvasive energy spectrometer based on beam position monitors is planned to be operated before the interaction region. Behind, a synchrotron radiation imaging detector will allow not only for measuring the beam energy, but also gives access to the beam energy spread of the (disrupted) beam.

Vormwald, B.

2014-08-01

101

Solid Target Studies for Muon Colliders And Neutrino Beams  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents preliminary results from an ongoing post-irradiation analysis of materials that have been irradiated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Isotope facility. The effort is part of an experimental study that focuses on how prone to irradiation damage these materials are and thus what is their potential in playing the role of high power targets in the neutrino superbeam and the muon collider initiatives.

Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; Thieberger, P.; Weng, W.T.; Trung, P.T.; /Brookhaven; McDonald, K.; /Princeton U.; Sheppard, J.; /SLAC; Yoshimura, K.; Hayato, Y.; /KEK,

2006-05-10

102

Non-linear model of particle acceleration at colliding shock flows  

E-print Network

Powerful stellar winds and supernova explosions with intense energy release in the form of strong shock waves can convert a sizeable part of the kinetic energy release into energetic particles. The starforming regions are argued as a favorable site of energetic particle acceleration and could be efficient sources of nonthermal emission. We present here a non-linear time-dependent model of particle acceleration in the vicinity of two closely approaching fast magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks. Such MHD flows are expected to occur in rich young stellar cluster where a supernova is exploding in the vicinity of a strong stellar wind of a nearby massive star. We find that the spectrum of the high energy particles accelerated at the stage of two closely approaching shocks can be harder than that formed at a forward shock of an isolated supernova remnant. The presented method can be applied to model particle acceleration in a variety of systems with colliding MHD flows.

Bykov, A M; Osipov, S M

2012-01-01

103

Radiation Studies for the Environmental Protection at the Beam Delivery System for the Next Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect

The concentration of induced radionuclides in the soil and groundwater around, and air inside the collimation section of the Beam Delivery System of the Next Linear Collider are calculated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The concentration of {sup 3}H and {sup 22}Na in groundwater are comparable to the drinking water limits. The fluence of particles (photon, neutron, proton and pion) in the air inside the tunnel for the collimation section is also calculated with FLUKA. The induced activities of {sup 3}H, {sup 7}Be, {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N, {sup 15}O, and {sup 41}Ar are then estimated by folding the particle fluences with various nuclear cross sections. The worker exposure during access after accelerator shutdown and the general public dose from radioactivity released to the environment are studied. The concern is from the short-lived radioisotopes of {sup 13}N and {sup 15}O, produced mainly by photons, and {sup 41}Ar produced by thermal neutrons. The results show that the radiological consequences from the air activation are minor.

Rokni, Sayed h.

2000-07-03

104

CONCENTRIC RING COLLIDING BEAM MACHINE WITH DUAL APERTURE QUADRUPOLES 1  

E-print Network

on the lower pancake is removed. The current through the remaining coil would necessarily increase 15 are replaced by double bore, side by side magnets, then the counterrotating beams travel concentric orbits of the ring and as many as 180 bunches accommodated. Both beams must remain within the good field region

105

Numerical Simulations of Transverse Beam Diffusion Enhancement by the Use of Electron Lens in the Tevatron Collider  

SciTech Connect

Transverse beam diffusion for the Tevatron machine has been calculated using the Lifetrac code. The following effects were included: random noise (representing residual gas scattering, voltage noise in the accelerating cavities) lattice nonlinearities and beam-beam interactions. The time evolution of particle distributions with different initial amplitudes in Hamiltonian action has been simulated for 6 million turns, corresponding to a time of about 2 minutes. For each particle distribution, several cases have been considered: a single beam in storage ring mode, the collider case and the effects of a hollow electron beam collimator. The diffusion coefficient for some representative points in the amplitude space has been calculated by fitting the time evolution of delta-like particle distributions using the diffusion equation, for different machine conditions. The results confirm a strong efficiency of the electron lens as an halo diffusive enhancer, leading to diffusion coefficients which are at least a factor 10K higher than the values obtained for the collision case. This result is confirmed by the Frequency Map Analysis, which shows a clear intensification of resonance lines for particle amplitudes larger than the electron lens inner radius. If compared with past experiments, the simulations successfully reproduce the diffusion coefficients for the beam core, but still present a large discrepancy for halo particles, still under investigation.

Previtali, V.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

2012-05-01

106

"Accelerators and beams," a multimedia tutorial  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are developing a computer-based tutorial for charged-particle beam optics under a grant from the DOE. This subject is important to the DOE not only for its use in providing basic research tools but because the physics is the underpinning for accelerators used in industry and medicine. The tutorial, which will be delivered on Macintosh and Windows platforms, uses multimedia techniques to enhance the student's rate of learning and length of retention of the material. As such, it integrates our interactive On-Screen Laboratories™ with hypertext, line drawings, photographs, animation, video, and sound. We are targeting an audience from technicians to graduate students in science and engineering. At this time we have about a fourth of the material (about equivalent to a one-semester three-credit-hour upper under-graduate physics course) available in prototype form.

Silbar, Richard R.

1997-02-01

107

A 200 MHz 35 MW Multiple Beam Klystron for Accelerator Applications Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) performed initial development of a compact and reliable 35 MW, multiple beam klystron (MBK) at 200 MHz with a pulse length of 0.125 ms and a 30 Hz repetition rate. The device was targeted for acceleration and ionization cooling of a muon collider, but there are several other potential applications in this frequency range. The klystron uses multiple beams propagating in individual beam tunnels to reduce space charge and allow reduction in the accelerating voltage. This allows a significant reduction in length over a single beam source. More importantly this allows more efficient and less expensive power supplies. At 200 MHz, the interaction circuit for a single beam klystron would be more than six meters long to obtain 50% efficiency and 50 dB gain. This would require a beam voltage of approximately 400 kV and current of 251 A for a microperveance of 1.0. For an eight beam MBK with the same beam perveance, a three meter long interaction circuit achieves the same power and gain. Each beam operates at 142 kV and 70A. The Phase I demonstrated that this device could be fabricated with funding available in a Phase II program and could achieve the program specifications.

R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read; Patrick Ferguson; David Marsden

2011-11-28

108

Beam Dump problem and Neutrino Factory Based on a $e^+e^-$ Linear Collider  

E-print Network

The beam of an $e^+e^-$ Linear Collider after a collision at the main interaction point can be utilized to construct the neutrino factory with exceptional parameters. We also discuss briefly possible applications of some elements of the proposed scheme to standard fixed target experiments and new experiments with $\

Ginzburg, I F

2014-01-01

109

Nuclear Fusion by Colliding Crystalline Beams of Ions of Boron and Hydrogen  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been proposed to produce nuclear fusion power by having two beams of boron and hydrogen ions colliding either in separate or common storage rings at the energy of 675 keV in the center of mass. The storage ring is made of a novel concept, that is the Circular Radio Frequency Quadrupole, which is a regular RFQ completely bent

A. G. Ruggiero; J. S. Machuzak

1998-01-01

110

Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents results of recent experimental studies focusing on the behavior of special materials and composites under irradiation conditions and their potential use as accelerator targets. The paper also discusses the approach and goals of on-going investigations on an expanded material matrix geared toward the neutrino superbeam and muon collider initiatives.

Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; Thieberger, P.; Weng, W.T.; /Brookhaven; McDonald, K.; /Princeton U.; Sheppard, J.; /SLAC; Evangelakis, G.; /Ioannina U.; Yoshimura, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2005-08-16

111

Optimization and beam control in large-emittance accelerators: Neutrino factories;  

SciTech Connect

Schemes for intense sources of high-energy muons require collection, rf capture, and transport of particle beams with unprecedented emittances, both longitudinally and transversely. These large emittances must be reduced or ''cooled'' both in size and in energy spread before the muons can be efficiently accelerated. Therefore, formation of muon beams sufficiently intense to drive a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider requires multi-stage preparation. Further, because of the large beam phase space which must be successfully controlled, accelerated, and transported, the major stages that comprise such a facility: proton driver, production, capture, phase rotation, cooling, acceleration, and storage are complex and strongly interlinked. Each of the stages must be consecutively matched and simultaneously optimized with upstream and downstream systems, meeting challenges not only technically in the optics and component design, but also in the modeling of both new and extended components. One design for transverse cooling, for example, employs meter-diameter solenoids to maintain strong focusing--300-500 mr beam divergences--across ultra-large momentum ranges, {ge} {+-}20% {delta}p/p, defying conventional approximations to the dynamics and field representation. To now, the interplay of the different systems and staging strategies has not been formally addressed. This work discusses two basic, but different approaches to a Neutrino Factory and how the staging strategy depends on beam parameters and method of acceleration.

Carol Johnstone

2004-08-23

112

Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

Gai Wei [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2009-01-22

113

Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

2008-01-01

114

Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a ˜80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

Gai, Wei

2009-01-01

115

The HEB at flat top: Arranging for the HEB to collider beam transfer  

SciTech Connect

The flat top for the High Energy Booster (HEB) is planned to last for only 6.5 seconds, yet during this time the beam must be made to: (1) have the correct central momentum; (2) have the correct bunch-to-bunch spacing; (3) have the correct central phase; and (4) have the correct momentum spread and longitudinal length. All of these attributes must match what the Collider expects or unwanted emittance growth will occur. This paper outlines the techniques necessary to achieve a proper HEB-to-Collider beam transfer within the 6.5 s time constraint. A novel means for cogging is proposed and evaluated. The hardware necessary to implement the beam manipulation and to achieve the four goals is specified, and tolerances on the hardware are evaluated.

Larson, D.J.

1994-03-01

116

Proceedings of the 2005 International Linear Collider Physics and Detector Workshop and 2nd ILC Accelerator Workshop (Snowmass 2005)  

SciTech Connect

For two weeks in August of 2005, 668 physicists gathered in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado to study the physics, the detectors and the accelerator of the International Linear Collider. For the first time, a fully international physics and detector workshop was held in conjunction with the ILC Accelerator workshop.

Graf, Norman A.

2006-06-21

117

Rf-driver linear colliders  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of linear collider after the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) will probably have an energy in the range 300 GeV-1 TeV per linac. A number of exotic accelerating schemes, such as laser and plasma acceleration, have been proposed for linear colliders of the far future. However, the technology which is most mature and which could lead to a collider in the above energy range in the relatively near future is the rf-driven linac, in which externally produced rf is fed into a more or less conventional metallic accelerating structure. Two basic technologies have been proposed for producing the required high peak rf power: discrete microwave power sources, and various two-beam acceleration schemes in which the rf is produced by a high current driving beam running parallel to the main accelerator. The current status of experimental and analytic work on both the discrete source and the two-beam methods for producing rf is discussed. The implications of beam-beam related effects (luminosity, disruption and beamstrahlung) for the design of rf-driven colliders are also considered.

Wilson, P.B.

1987-05-01

118

The ORNL radioactive ion beam project with the ORIC accelerator  

SciTech Connect

The ORNL project to produce medium-intensity, proton-rich, radioactive ion beams (RIBS) for astrophysics, nuclear physics, and applied research with the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) accelerators has been approved. Radioactive atoms will be produced by fusion reactions in an Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL)type target-ion source assembly using light ion beams from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). The radioactive atoms will be converted to negative ions using either (1) direct-surface ionization or (2) charge exchange following positive ionization. After acceleration to approximately 300 keV from a high-voltage platform, these negative ions will be injected into the 25-MV tandem accelerator for acceleration to higher energies. Beams of up to mass 80 will be accelerated to energies greater than 5 MeV/nucleon. For some radioactive beams. intensities greater than I pnA are possible.

Olsen, D.K.; Alton, G.D.; Baktash, C.; Dowling, D.T.; Garrett, J.D.; Haynes, D.L.; Jones, C.M.; Juras, R.C.; Lane, S.N.; Lee, I.Y.; Meigs, M.J.; Mills, G.D.; Mosko, S.W.; Tatum, B.A.; Toth, K.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Carter, H.K.; Kormicki, J. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States))

1992-01-01

119

The ORNL radioactive ion beam project with the ORIC accelerator  

SciTech Connect

The ORNL project to produce medium-intensity, proton-rich, radioactive ion beams (RIBS) for astrophysics, nuclear physics, and applied research with the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) accelerators has been approved. Radioactive atoms will be produced by fusion reactions in an Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL)type target-ion source assembly using light ion beams from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). The radioactive atoms will be converted to negative ions using either (1) direct-surface ionization or (2) charge exchange following positive ionization. After acceleration to approximately 300 keV from a high-voltage platform, these negative ions will be injected into the 25-MV tandem accelerator for acceleration to higher energies. Beams of up to mass 80 will be accelerated to energies greater than 5 MeV/nucleon. For some radioactive beams. intensities greater than I pnA are possible.

Olsen, D.K.; Alton, G.D.; Baktash, C.; Dowling, D.T.; Garrett, J.D.; Haynes, D.L.; Jones, C.M.; Juras, R.C.; Lane, S.N.; Lee, I.Y.; Meigs, M.J.; Mills, G.D.; Mosko, S.W.; Tatum, B.A.; Toth, K.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carter, H.K.; Kormicki, J. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States)

1992-09-01

120

Radioactive beams with the HHIRF accelerators  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing interest in radioactive ion beams for astrophysics and nuclear physics research and applied programs. This interest has led to an International Conference on Radioactive Nuclear Beams and a Workshop on the Science of Intense Radioactive Ion Beams. In addition, a steering committee has been formed to consider the development of a very large and intense RIB facility in North America to produce both proton- and neutron-rich beams. This report discusses development of these beams.

Olsen, D.K.; Alton, G.D.; Baktash, C.; Dowling, D.T.; Garrett, J.D.; Haynes, D.L.; Jones, C.M.; Juras, R.C., Lane, S.N.; Lee, I.Y.; Meigs, M.J.; Mills, G.D.; Mosko, S.W.; Tatum, B.A. Toth, K.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Carter, H.K. (UNISOR, Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1991-01-01

121

A beam energy analysis and monitoring system for linear accelerators  

SciTech Connect

A model-based beam orbit simulation program has been used successfully to analyze the beam energy errors at the two-mile linear accelerator during commissioning of the SLC system. This simulation program has also been used to develop a nondestructive beam energy error monitoring system. The method of analysis, the simulation program, and a beam energy analysis and monitoring system using expert systems techniques will be described.

Lee, M.J.; Kleban, S.D.; Zambre, Y.B.; Seeman, J.T.; Adolphsen, C.E.; Abrams, G.S.; Iverson, R.; Stanek, M.; Turner, J.L.; Blanchette, C.J.

1988-02-01

122

Accelerators (4/5)  

ScienceCinema

1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

None

2011-10-06

123

Accelerators (5/5)  

ScienceCinema

1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

None

2011-10-06

124

Accelerators (4/5)  

SciTech Connect

1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

None

2009-07-08

125

Accelerators (3/5)  

SciTech Connect

1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

None

2009-07-07

126

Accelerators (5/5)  

SciTech Connect

1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

None

2009-07-09

127

Accelerators (3/5)  

ScienceCinema

1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

None

2011-10-06

128

Accelerating Airy beams with non-parabolic trajectories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A class of Airy accelerating beams with non-parabolic trajectories are derived by means of a novel application of a conformal transformation originally due to Bateman. It is also shown that the salient features of these beams are very simply incorporated in a solution which is derived by applying a conventional conformal transformation together with a Galilean translation to the basic accelerating Airy beam solution of the two-dimensional paraxial equation. Motivation for the non-parabolic beam trajectories is provided and the effects of finite-energy requirements are discussed.

Besieris, Ioannis M.; Shaarawi, Amr M.

2014-11-01

129

Beam-Dynamics Studies and Advanced Accelerator Research at CTF-3 Compact Final Focus, Laser Compton Scattering, Plasmas, etc.  

E-print Network

Preliminary investigations are summarized on the possible use of the CTF3 facility for extended beam-dynamics studies and advanced accelerator R&D, which would exploit its unique properties and beam availability. The key element of these considerations is the possible addition of a test beam-delivery system comprising a compact final focus and advanced collimation concepts, scaled from 3 TeV down to low energy and having a short total length. Operational experience, verification of critical questions (octupole tail folding, beam halo transport, etc.), diagnostics (e.g., rf BPMs) and stabilization could all be explored in such a facility, which would benefit not only the CLIC study, but all linear collider projects. Another interesting application would be the study of plasma-beam interaction, which may include plasma focusing, plasma acceleration, ion-channel radiation, and plasma wigglers.

Assmann, R W; Burkhardt, H; Corsini, R; Faus-Golfe, A; Gronberg, J; Redaelli, S; Schulte, Daniel; Velasco, M; Zimmermann, Frank

2002-01-01

130

Studies and Application of Bent Crystals for Beam Steering at 70 GEV Ihep Accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report overviews studies accomplished in the U70 proton synchrotron of IHEP-Protvino during the recent two decades. Major attention is paid to a routine application of bent crystals for beam extraction from the machine. It has been confirmed experimentally that efficiency of beam extraction with a crystal deflector of around 85% is well feasible for a proton beam with intensity up to 1012 protons per cycle. Another trend is to use bent crystals for halo collimation in a high energy collider. New promising options emerge for, say, LHC and ILC based on the "volume reflection" effect, which has been discovered recently in machine study runs at U70 of IHEP (50 GeV) and SPS of CERN (400 GeV). Perspectives to use bent crystals for extraction of light ions from the U70 accelerator are also disclosed.

Afonin, A. G.; Baranov, V. T.; Britvich, G. I.; Chepegin, V. N.; Chesnokov, Yu. A.; Kotov, V. I.; Maisheev, V. A.; Iterekhov, V.; Yazynin, I. A.

2010-04-01

131

Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2  

SciTech Connect

The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM) system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1 {mu}m for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

Kim, Y.I.; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Ainsworth, R.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Aryshev, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Boogert, S.T.; Boorman, G.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Heo, A.; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Honda, Y.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Hwang, W.H.; Huang, J.Y.; /Pohang Accelerator Lab.; Kim, E-S.; /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /KEK, Tsukuba

2012-04-02

132

The LICPA accelerator of dense plasma and ion beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration (LICPA) is a novel scheme of acceleration of dense matter having a potential to accelerate plasma projectiles with the energetic efficiency much higher than the achieved so far with other methods. In this scheme, a projectile placed in a cavity is irradiated by a laser beam introduced into the cavity through a hole and accelerated along a guiding channel by the thermal pressure created in the cavity by the laser-produced plasma or by the photon pressure of the ultraintense laser radiation trapped in the cavity. This paper summarizes briefly the main results of our recent LICPA studies, in particular, experimental investigations of ion beam generation and heavy macroparticle acceleration in the hydrodynamic LICPA regime (at moderate laser intensities ~ 1015W/cm2) and numerical, particle-in-cell (PIC) studies of production of ultraintense ion beams and fast macroparticles using the photon pressure LICPA regime (at high laser intensities > 1020 W/cm2). It is shown that in both LICPA regimes the macroparticles and ion beams can be accelerated much more efficiently than in other laser-based acceleration scheme commonly used and the accelerated plasma/ion bunches can have a wide variety of parameters. It creates a prospect for a broad range of applications of the LICPA accelerator, in particular in such domains as high energy density physics, ICF research (ion fast ignition, impact ignition) or nuclear physics.

Badziak, J.; Jablo?ski, S.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Parys, P.; Raczka, P.; Rosi?ski, M.; Krousky, E.; Ullschmied, J.; Liska, R.; Kucharik, M.; Torrisi, L.

2014-04-01

133

Development of the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) trim coil beam tube assembly  

SciTech Connect

The Superconducting Super Collider uses approx. =9600 dipole magnets. The magnets have been carefully designed to exhibit minimal magnetic field harmonics. However, because of superconductor magnetization effects, iron saturation and conductor/coil positioning errors, certain harmonic errors are possible and must be corrected by use of multipole correctors called trim coils. For the most efficient use of axial space in the magnet, and lowest possible current, a distributed internal correction coil design is planned. The trim coil assembly is secured to the beam tube, a uhv tube with special strength, size, conductivity and vacuum. The report details the SSC trim coil/beam tube assembly specifications, history, and ongoing development.

Skaritka, J.; Kelly, E.; Schneider, W.; Shutt, R.; Thompson, P.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Bintinger, D.; Coluccio, R.; Schieber, L.

1987-01-01

134

Sterilization of Mail by Means of an Electron Beam Accelerator  

Microsoft Academic Search

In view of the recent cases of postal bioterrorism with the use of anthrax spores in sealed envelopes (see [11] and http:\\/\\/www. bt.cdc.gov), we experimentally checked and demonstrated the possibility of using an industrial electron beam accelerator for sterilization of mail. Industrial electron beam accelerators are widely used for sterilization of medical equipment, drugs, food, and packing materials. In some

V. L. Auslender; V. A. Vedernikov; M. A. Grachev; V. V. Drukker; A. I. Korchagin; E. P. Kruglyakov; A. M. Kudryavtsev; N. S. Kulikova; O. G. Netsvetaeva; O. N. Pavlova; V. V. Parfenova; E. A. Semenova; V. I. Serbin; I. A. Terkina; A. V. Tkov; E. P. Chebykin

2002-01-01

135

ISABELLE accelerator software, control system, and beam diagnostic philosophy  

SciTech Connect

The ISABELLE Project combines two large proton accelerators with two storage rings in the same facility using superconducting magnet technology. This combination leads to severe constraints on beam loss in magnets and involves complex treatment of magnetic field imperfections and correction elements. The consequent demands placed upon beam diagnostics, accelerator model programs, and the computer oriented control system are discussed in terms of an illustrative operation scenario.

Cornacchia, M.; Humphrey, J.W.; Niederer, J.; Poole, J.H.

1981-01-01

136

SLAC linear collider conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds. (GHT)

Not Available

1980-06-01

137

Beam extraction from TeV accelerators using channeling in bent crystals  

SciTech Connect

Bent crystal channeling offers an interesting alternative for beam extraction from trans-GeV accelerators. Conventional extraction employs resonant beam blow-up coupled with electromagnetic beam deflecting channels. It is limited by the length of the available accelerator straight section. Channeling crystals require much less space. A five-step approach to applying crystal extraction in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is discussed. Two steps, extraction from the 8 GeV Dubna Synchrophasotron and the 76 GeV Serpukhov accelerator, have occurred. The next possibility is extraction from a multi-hundred GeV superconducting accelerator. In the nineties the program could continue at UNK (3 TeV) and culminate at the TeV SSC. The possibilities and limitations of crystal extraction are reviewed. More information is needed on dechanneling in bent crystals including the effects of dislocations at TeV energies. Long, dislocation-free'' crystals are required. A more thorough understanding of the theory of crystal extraction is also desirable. 12 refs.

Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Toohig, T.E.; Tsyganov, E.N. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA); Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (USA); Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (USSR))

1989-08-01

138

Transverse envelope analysis for accelerating relativistic electron beams in a linear accelerator as a photon source  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since recent progress of electron guns extends the application of linear accelerators to photon radiation sources, the design and optimization of transverse beam optics over a linear accelerator become important. In this paper, we propose a transverse beam envelope analysis for accelerating beams in a linear accelerator using symplectic matrices based on a normalized emittance. This approach allows a description of the transverse envelope function, which reflects the characteristics of beam optics. Since the envelope function is described in the same phase space as photon radiation, it provides an effective and powerful tool for the design and optimization of the beam optics as a photon source. The emittance based formalism of the beam envelope, which was previously described by Douglas, Kewisch, and York, is first introduced for impulse acceleration, and then extended to a thick accelerator structure. The transverse beam envelope analyses, such as error sensitivity, chromatic aberration, and emittance growth, are presented by applying second-order perturbation treatment to a formulated matrix describing a quasi-periodic lattice in the linear accelerator system.

Hara, Toru; Togawa, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Hitoshi

2010-12-01

139

Sustained Acceleration of Over-dense Plasmas by Colliding Laser Pulses  

E-print Network

We review recent PIC simulation results which show that double-sided irradiaton of a thin overdense plasma slab by ultra-intense laser pulses from both sides can lead to sustained comoving acceleration of surface electrons to energies much higher than the conventional ponderomotive limit. The acceleration stops only when the electrons drift transversely out of the laser beam. We show results of parameter studies based on this concept and discuss future laser experiments that can be used to test these computer results.

E. Liang

2006-03-21

140

Acceleration of ampere class H(-) ion beam by MeV accelerator.  

PubMed

The H(-) ion accelerator R&D to realize the international thermonuclear experimental reactor neutral beam is ongoing at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The required performance for the prototype MeV accelerator developed at JAEA is 1 MeV, 500 mA (current density of 200 A/m(2)) H(-) ion beam at the beamlet divergence angle of less than 7 mrad. Up to 2005, 836 keV, 146 A/m(2) H(-) ion beam was successfully accelerated as the highest record of the current density at MeV class energy beams. In the present work, high current negative ion beam acceleration test was performed by increasing the beam extraction apertures from 3 x 3 (9 apertures) to 3 x 5 (15 apertures). By fixing the air leak at the source chamber due to backstream ions as well as the improvement of voltage holding capability by a new fiber reinforced plastic insulator ring, the performance of the MeV accelerator was improved. So far, H(-) ion beam of 320 mA was successfully accelerated up to 796 keV with the beam divergence angle of 5.5 mrad. The accelerated drain current including the electron reaches close to the power supply limit for the MeV test facility. The heat flux by the backstream ion during the above beam acceleration was estimated to be 360 W/cm(2). The Cs leakage to the accelerator during the test campaign (Cs total input of 5.0 g) was 0.26 mg (7.0 microg/cm(2)). This is considered to be the allowable level from the viewpoint of voltage holding. PMID:18315236

Taniguchi, M; Inoue, T; Umeda, N; Kashiwagi, M; Watanabe, K; Tobari, H; Dairaku, M; Sakamoto, K

2008-02-01

141

Alternative options for beam cooling for a muon accelerator  

E-print Network

1 Alternative options for beam cooling for a muon accelerator front-end Diktys Stratakis Physics for a Muon Accelerator · Recent engineering studies suggest to: · Increase the gap between coils in buncher cavities · Results do not seem sensitive to rf gradient, phase and absorber length variations. Optimum

McDonald, Kirk

142

Beam losses and beam halos in accelerators for new energy sources  

SciTech Connect

Large particle accelerators are proposed as drivers for new ways to produce electricity from nuclear fusion and fission reactions. The accelerators must be designed to deliver large particle beam currents to a target facility with very little beam spill along the accelerator itself, in order that accelerator maintenance can be accomplished without remote manipulators. Typically, particle loss is preceded by the formation of a tenuous halo of particles around the central beam core, caused by beam dynamics effects, often coupled with the slight imperfections inevitable in a practical design. If the halo becomes large enough, particles may be scraped off along the accelerator. The tolerance for beam spill in different applications is discussed, halo mechanisms and recent work to explore and understand their dynamics are reviewed, and possible directions for future investigation are outlined. 17 refs., 10 figs.

Jameson, R.A.

1995-12-31

143

Beam dynamics in the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA)  

SciTech Connect

We will review the performance of the Advanced Test Accelerator, a 50 MeV, 10 KA induction linac. The discussion will cover the operation of the plasma cathode electron source, beam transport throughout the accelerator, and transverse instabilities. Particular emphasis will be placed on the beam breakup instability and on the methods used to minimize it. These include a program of design changes that lead to an order of magnitude reduction in the Q's of the accelerator cavity modes and optimization of the transport tune.

Caporaso, G.J.; Barletta, W.A.; Birx, D.L.; Briggs, R.J.; Chong, Y.P.; Cole, A.G.; Fessenden, T.J.; Hester, R.E.; Lauer, E.J.; Neil, V.K.

1983-09-28

144

High transformer ratio drive beams for wakefield accelerator studies  

SciTech Connect

For wakefield based acceleration schemes, use of an asymmetric (or linearly ramped) drive bunch current profile has been predicted to enhance the transformer ratio and generate large accelerating wakes. We discuss plans and initial results for producing such bunches using the 20 to 23 GeV electron beam at the FACET facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and sending them through plasmas and dielectric tubes to generate transformer ratios greater than 2 (the limit for symmetric bunches). The scheme proposed utilizes the final FACET chicane compressor and transverse collimation to shape the longitudinal phase space of the beam.

England, R. J.; Ng, C.-K.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Muggli, P.; Joshi, C.; An, W.; Andonian, G.; Mori, W.; Lu, W. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Max Planck Institute for Physics, 80805 Munich (Germany); University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

2012-12-21

145

High transformer ratio drive beams for wakefield accelerator studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For wakefield based acceleration schemes, use of an asymmetric (or linearly ramped) drive bunch current profile has been predicted to enhance the transformer ratio and generate large accelerating wakes. We discuss plans and initial results for producing such bunches using the 20 to 23 GeV electron beam at the FACET facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and sending them through plasmas and dielectric tubes to generate transformer ratios greater than 2 (the limit for symmetric bunches). The scheme proposed utilizes the final FACET chicane compressor and transverse collimation to shape the longitudinal phase space of the beam.

England, R. J.; Ng, C.-K.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Muggli, P.; Joshi, C.; An, W.; Andonian, G.; Mori, W.; Lu, W.

2012-12-01

146

Beam Losses and Background Loads on Collider Detectors Due to Beam-Gas Interactions in the LHC  

SciTech Connect

With a fully-operational high-efficient collimation system in the LHC, nuclear interactions of circulating protons with residual gas in the machine beam pipe can be a major source of beam losses in the vicinity of the collider detectors, responsible for the machine-induced backgrounds. Realistic modeling of Coulomb scattering, elastic and inelastic interactions of 7-TeV protons with nuclei in the vacuum chamber of the cold and warm sections of the LHC ring--with an appropriate pressure profile--is performed with the STRUCT and MARS15 codes. Multi-turn tracking of the primary beams, propagation of secondaries through the lattice, their interception by the tertiary collimators TCT as well as properties of corresponding particle distributions at the CMS and ATLAS detectors are studied in great detail and results presented in this paper.

Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

2009-04-01

147

Rapidly Accelerating Mathieu and Weber Surface Plasmon Beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the generation of two types of self-accelerating surface plasmon beams which are solutions of the nonparaxial Helmholtz equation in two dimensions. These beams preserve their shape while propagating along either elliptic (Mathieu beam) or parabolic (Weber beam) trajectories. We show that owing to the nonparaxial nature of the Weber beam, it maintains its shape over a much larger distance along the parabolic trajectory, with respect to the corresponding solution of the paraxial equation—the Airy beam. Dynamic control of the trajectory is realized by translating the position of the illuminating free-space beam. Finally, the ability of these beams to self-heal after blocking obstacles is demonstrated as well.

Libster-Hershko, Ana; Epstein, Itai; Arie, Ady

2014-09-01

148

Rapidly accelerating mathieu and weber surface plasmon beams.  

PubMed

We report the generation of two types of self-accelerating surface plasmon beams which are solutions of the nonparaxial Helmholtz equation in two dimensions. These beams preserve their shape while propagating along either elliptic (Mathieu beam) or parabolic (Weber beam) trajectories. We show that owing to the nonparaxial nature of the Weber beam, it maintains its shape over a much larger distance along the parabolic trajectory, with respect to the corresponding solution of the paraxial equation-the Airy beam. Dynamic control of the trajectory is realized by translating the position of the illuminating free-space beam. Finally, the ability of these beams to self-heal after blocking obstacles is demonstrated as well. PMID:25279631

Libster-Hershko, Ana; Epstein, Itai; Arie, Ady

2014-09-19

149

Experimental demonstration of dielectric structure based two beam acceleration.  

SciTech Connect

We report on the experimental results of the dielectric based two beam accelerator (step-up transformer). By using a single high charge beam, we have generated and extracted a high power RF pulse from a 7.8 GHz primary dielectric structure and then subsequently transferred to a second accelerating structure with higher dielectric constant and smaller transverse dimensions. We have measured the energy change of a second (witness) beam passing through the acceleration stage. The measured gradient is >4 times the deceleration gradient. The detailed experiment of set-up and results of the measurements are dimmed. Future plans for the development of a 100 MeV demonstration accelerator based on this technique is presented.

Gai, W.; Conde, M. E.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Schoessow, P.; Sun, X.; Zou, P.

2000-11-28

150

Heavy-ion beam dynamics in the RIA accelerators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Nuclear Science Community in the United States has unanimously concluded that developments in both nuclear science and its supporting technologies make building a Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility for production of radioactive beams. The RIA development effort involves several US Laboratories (ANL, JLAB, LANL, LBNL, MSU, ORNL). The RIA project includes a continuous wave 1.4 GV driver linac and a 123 MV post-accelerator, both based on superconducting (SC) cavities operating at frequencies from 48 to 805 MHz. Several new conceptual solutions in physics design of heavy-ion SC linacs have been developed recently. In particular, the concept of multiple charge state beam acceleration in SC linacs was tested and will be used in the driver linac to increase available accelerated beam power. A detailed design has been developed for the focusing-accelerating lattice of the RIA linacs which are configured as an array of short SC cavities, each with independently controllable RF phase. Independent phasing allows the velocity profile to be varied: the linac can be tuned to provide higher energies for the lighter ions. For example, the reference design linac can be tuned to provide a uranium beam at an energy of 403 MeV/ u and can be re-tuned to provide a proton beam at 900 MeV. The linac must provide 100 kW beam power with the possibility to upgrade up to 400 kW.

Ostroumov, P. N.

2004-02-01

151

Transformer ratio improvement for beam based plasma accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Increasing the transformer ratio of wakefield accelerating systems improves the viability of present novel accelerating schemes. The use of asymmetric bunches to improve the transformer ratio of beam based plasma systems has been proposed for some time[1, 2] but suffered from lack appropriate beam creation systems. Recently these impediments have been overcome [3, 4] and the ability now exists to create bunches with current profiles shaped to overcome the symmetric beam limit of R {<=} 2. We present here work towards experiments designed to measure the transformer ratio of such beams, including theoretical models and simulations using VORPAL (a 3D capable PIC code) [5]. Specifically we discuss projects to be carried out in the quasi-nonlinear regime [6] at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory and the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Lab.

O'Shea, Brendan; Rosenzweig, James; Barber, Samuel; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Williams, Oliver; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Kusche, Karl [University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); University of Southern California, Department of Electrical Engineering, Los Angeles, CA 90089 U.S.A. and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Muenchen (Germany); Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

2012-12-21

152

Challenges in plasma and laser wakefield accelerated beams diagnostic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The new frontier in the particle beam accelerator is the so called plasma acceleration. Using the strong electric field inside a plasma it is possible to achieve accelerating gradients in the order of magnitude larger with respect to the actual technologies. Different schemes have been proposed and several already tested, producing beams of energy of several GeV. Mainly two approaches are followed: either the beam is directly produced by the interaction of a TW/PW class laser with a gas jet or a preexisting particle beam is accelerated in a plasma channel. In both cases a precise determination of the emerging beam parameters is mandatory for the fine tuning of the devices. The measurement of these parameters, in particular the emittance, is not trivial, mainly due to the large energy spread and to the tight focusing of these beams or to the background noise produced in the plasma channel. We show the problems related to the diagnostic of this kind of beams and the proposed or already realized solutions.

Cianchi, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Marchetti, B.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Ronsivalle, C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.

2013-08-01

153

Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility.  

PubMed

In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed. PMID:24593461

Adonin, A A; Hollinger, R

2014-02-01

154

Reliability of Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider  

E-print Network

The employment of superconducting magnets, in the high energies colliders, opens challenging failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole system protection. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particles losses, while at medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standar...

Guaglio, Gianluca; Santoni, C

2004-01-01

155

High efficiency beam splitting for H/sup -/ accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Beam splitting for high energy accelerators has typically involved a significant loss of beam and radiation. This paper reports on a new method of splitting beams for H/sup -/ accelerators. This technique uses a high intensity flash of light to strip a fraction of the H/sup -/ beam to H/sup 0/ which are then easily separated by a small bending magnet. A system using a 900-watt (average electrical power) flashlamp and a highly efficient collector will provide 10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -2/ splitting of a 50 MeV H/sup -/ beam. Results on the operation and comparisons with stripping cross sections are presented. Also discussed is the possibility for developing this system to yield a higher stripping fraction.

Kramer, S.L.; Stipp, V.; Krieger, C.; Madsen, J.

1985-01-01

156

Possibility for ultra-bright electron beam acceleration in dielectric wakefield accelerators  

SciTech Connect

We describe a conceptual proposal to combine the Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator (DWA) with the Emittance Exchanger (EEX) to demonstrate a high-brightness DWA with a gradient of above 100 MV/m and less than 0.1% induced energy spread in the accelerated beam. We currently evaluate the DWA concept as a performance upgrade for the future LANL signature facility MaRIE with the goal of significantly reducing the electron beam energy spread. The preconceptual design for MaRIE is underway at LANL, with the design of the electron linear accelerator being one of the main research goals. Although generally the baseline design needs to be conservative and rely on existing technology, any future upgrade would immediately call for looking into the advanced accelerator concepts capable of boosting the electron beam energy up by a few GeV in a very short distance without degrading the beam's quality. Scoping studies have identified large induced energy spreads as the major cause of beam quality degradation in high-gradient advanced accelerators for free-electron lasers. We describe simulations demonstrating that trapezoidal bunch shapes can be used in a DWA to greatly reduce the induced beam energy spread, and, in doing so, also preserve the beam brightness at levels never previously achieved. This concept has the potential to advance DWA technology to a level that would make it suitable for the upgrades of the proposed Los Alamos MaRIE signature facility.

Simakov, Evgenya I.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2012-12-21

157

Long pulse H- ion beam acceleration in MeV accelerator.  

PubMed

A multiaperture multigrid accelerator called "MeV accelerator" has been developed for neutral beam injection system of international thermonuclear experimental reactor. In the present work, long pulse H(-) ion beam acceleration was performed by the MeV accelerator equipped with new water-cooled grids. At present, the pulse length was extended to 5 s for the beams of 750 keV, 221 mA, and 10 s for the beams of 600 keV, 158 mA. Energy density, defined as products of beam energy (keV), current (mA), and pulse (s) divided by aperture area (m(2)), increased more than one order of magnitude higher compared with original MeV accelerator without water cooling in its grids. At higher energy and current, the grid was melted by beam deflection. Due to this grid melting, breakdowns occurred between the grids, and hence, the pulse length was limited. Beam deflection will be compensated by aperture displacement in next experiment. PMID:20192408

Taniguchi, M; Mizuno, T; Umeda, N; Kashiwagi, M; Watanabe, K; Tobari, H; Kojima, A; Tanaka, Y; Dairaku, M; Hanada, M; Sakamoto, K; Inoue, T

2010-02-01

158

Possibility for ultra-bright electron beam acceleration in dielectric wakefield accelerators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a conceptual proposal to combine the Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator (DWA) with the Emittance Exchanger (EEX) to demonstrate a high-brightness DWA with a gradient of above 100 MV/m and less than 0.1% induced energy spread in the accelerated beam. We currently evaluate the DWA concept as a performance upgrade for the future LANL signature facility MaRIE with the goal of significantly reducing the electron beam energy spread. The preconceptual design for MaRIE is underway at LANL, with the design of the electron linear accelerator being one of the main research goals. Although generally the baseline design needs to be conservative and rely on existing technology, any future upgrade would immediately call for looking into the advanced accelerator concepts capable of boosting the electron beam energy up by a few GeV in a very short distance without degrading the beam's quality. Scoping studies have identified large induced energy spreads as the major cause of beam quality degradation in high-gradient advanced accelerators for free-electron lasers. We describe simulations demonstrating that trapezoidal bunch shapes can be used in a DWA to greatly reduce the induced beam energy spread, and, in doing so, also preserve the beam brightness at levels never previously achieved. This concept has the potential to advance DWA technology to a level that would make it suitable for the upgrades of the proposed Los Alamos MaRIE signature facility.

Simakov, Evgenya I.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.

2012-12-01

159

ALPI Setup as the SPES Accelerator of Exotic Beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) project for a national exotic beam facility in Legnaro includes pivotal upgrades of the existing superconducting linac ALPI (Acceleratore Lineare Per Ioni), to make it appropriate as the RIB (Radioactive Ion Beam) accelerator. The new injector, consisting of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR)-type charge breeder and a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ), will be described. Upgrade measures in ALPI to improve beam transmission and final energy, and handle low-intensity RIB will be explained, with the aim of increasing transmission to T > 90%, Ef by ~ 20%, reaching 10 MeV/u for the reference beam 132Sn.

Bisoffi, G.; Bassato, G.; Battistella, A.; Bermudez, J.; Bortolato, D.; Canella, S.; Chalykh, B.; Comunian, M.; Facco, A.; Fagotti, E.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Gramegna, F.; Lamy, T.; Modanese, P.; Palmieri, A.; Pengo, R.; Pisent, A.; Poggi, M.; Porcellato, A.; Roncolato, C.; Scarpa, D.

2014-03-01

160

Discovery limits for a new contact interaction at future hadronic colliders with polarized beams  

E-print Network

The production of high-transverse energy jets in hadron-hadroncollisions is sensitive to the presence of new contact interactions between quarks. If proton polarization were available, the measurement of some parity violating spin asymmetries in one-jet production at large transverse energy would complement the usual search for deviations from the expected QCD cross section. In the same time, a unique information on the chirality structure of the new interaction could be obtained. In this context, we compare the potentialities of various $pp$ and $p\\bar p$ colliders that are planned or have been proposed, with the additional requirement of beam polarization.

P. Taxil; J. -M. Virey

1996-07-22

161

Radiation Damage to Electronics in the Beam Tunnel of the Next Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect

Radiation damage to electronics in the Linac tunnel of the Next Linear Collider due to ionizing and non-ionizing effects has been estimated with detailed FLUKA simulations. Results for total dose deposited in silicon and for displacement damage by neutrons, protons and charged pions are presented. It is shown that non-radiation-hard electronics could be severely damaged unless sufficiently shielded against radiation. A scenario is proposed in which the electronic components are located in niches in the beam tunnel wall which are shielded by layers of polyethylene.

Roesler, Stefan

2000-06-27

162

Cold- and Beam Test of the First Prototypes of the Superstructure for the TESLA Collider  

SciTech Connect

After three years of preparation, two superstructures, each made of two superconducting 7-cell weakly coupled subunits, have been installed in the TESLA Test Facility linac (TTF) for the cold- and beam-test. The energy stability, the HOMs damping, the frequency and the field adjustment methods were tested. The measured results confirmed expectation on the superstructure performance and proved that alternative layout for the 800 GeV upgrade of the TESLA collider, as it was proposed in TDR, is feasible. We report on the test and give here an overview of its results which are commented in more detail elsewhere in these Proceedings.

Baboi, Nicoleta

2003-08-08

163

Electron Accelerators for Radioactive Ion Beams  

SciTech Connect

The summary of this paper is that to optimize the design of an electron drive, one must: (a) specify carefully the user requirements--beam energy, beam power, duty factor, and longitudinal and transverse emittance; (b) evaluate different machine options including capital cost, 10-year operating cost and delivery time. The author is convinced elegant solutions are available with existing technology. There are several design options and technology choices. Decisions will depend on system optimization, in-house infrastructure and expertise (e.g. cryogenics, SRF, lasers), synergy with other programs.

Lia Merminga

2007-10-10

164

Data handling facility for the Sandia Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an on-line data handling facility for Sandia's Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator, PBFA-I, and the upgrade prototype machine Supermite. These accelerators are used for research on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) using particle beams. The main objectives in designing the data acquisition system were: (1) process both experiment and machine performance diagnostic signals, (2) record high signal-to-noise ratio, wideband waveforms in a severe EMP environment, (3) support multiple users recording and analyzing data simultaneously, and (4) provide fast turnaround for experimental results. Commercially available equipment is used wherever possible. However, several special purpose devices were developed. This data handling facility is a significant upgrade of an existing system that supports other Sandia particle beam fusion research accelerators.

Boyer, W. B.; Neau, E. L.

1980-01-01

165

Phenomenology of crystalline beams in smooth accelerators  

SciTech Connect

We present a phenomenology of crystalline beams in storage rings. We use the smooth approximation to solve the equations of a test particle moving in the focussing potential of the storage ring, and in that of the other ions We find simple confinement, and stability conditions.

Haffmans, A.F.; Maletic, D.; Ruggiero, A.G.

1995-06-01

166

Coherent beam-beam effects observation and mitigation at the RHIC collider  

SciTech Connect

In polarized proton operation in RHIC coherent beam-beam modes are routinely observed with beam transfer function measurements in the vertical plane. With the existence of coherent modes a larger space is required in the tune diagram than without them and stable conditions can be compromised for operation with high intensity beams as foreseen for future luminosity upgrades. We report on experiments and simulations carried out to understand the existence of coherent modes in the vertical plane and their absence in the horizontal plane, and investigate possible mitigation strategies.

White S.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

2012-05-20

167

Beam loading and cavity compensation for the ground test accelerator  

SciTech Connect

The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) will be a heavily beam-loaded H/sup minus/ linac with tight tolerances on accelerating field parameters. The methods used in modeling the effects of beam loading in this machine are described. The response of the cavity to both beam and radio-frequency (RF) drive stimulus is derived, including the effects of cavity detuning. This derivation is not restricted to a small-signal approximation. An analytical method for synthesizing a predistortion network that decouples the amplitude and phase responses of the cavity is also outlined. Simulation of performance, including beam loading, is achieved through use of a control system analysis software package. A straightforward method is presented for extrapolating this work to model large coupled structures with closely spaced parasitic modes. Results to date have enabled the RF control system designs for GTA to be optimized and have given insight into their operation. 6 refs., 10 figs.

Jachim, S.P.; Natter, E.F.

1989-01-01

168

Transport and acceleration of high current uranium ion beams  

SciTech Connect

Measurements have been made of the transport of beams produced by the high current ion source, MEVVA, and of the injection of these beams into the GSI heavy ion RFQ linac. This configuration has provided initial tests of the MEVVA ion source in an injector environment, and of the RFQ with uranium as the accelerated species. Beam currents of 78 mA of titanium and 19 mA of uranium, at an extraction voltage of 40 kV, have been transported through a 4.7 m long beam transport channel, and up to 40 mA of uranium has been transported through a single-gap accelerating column at a voltage of about 150 kV. A current of up to 5 mA of UT has been measured at the exit detector of the RFQ.

Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.E.; Keller, R.; Spaedtke, P.; Mueller, R.W; Bolle, J.

1985-10-01

169

Particle beam tracker for an accelerating target  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose is to use a PI(Proportional plus INTEGRAL) controller to point the centroid of a particle beam at an intended target. Multiple Model Adaptive Estimator is used to estimate the centroid of a one-dimensional Gaussian shaped source of photo-electron events. Merge Method of filter pruning is used to limit the size of this filter. A standard Kalman filter is

L. C. Jamerson

1985-01-01

170

Accelerators for the PS neutrino beam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A recent memorandum for an experimental proposal [1] was discussed during the CERN PS and SPS experimental committee (SPSC) of April 2011 and at the Research Board of June 2011. The proposed experiment, with objective to investigate the anomalous ?? ? ?e oscillations, aims at re-using the discontinued CERN PS Neutrino Facility (PSNF) and experimental zones to install a 150 ton liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) as near detector and a 600 ton LArTPC as far detector. This article will summarize the experimental needs, the proposed facility layout, a primary beam production scheme and the requirements for the reconstruction of the PSNF.

Steerenberg, R.; Calviani, M.; Gschwendtner, E.; Pardons, A.; Vincke, H.

2013-02-01

171

Investigation of accelerated neutral atom beams created from gas cluster ion beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new concept for ultra-shallow processing of surfaces known as accelerated neutral atom beam (ANAB) technique employs conversion of energetic gas cluster ions produced by the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) method into intense collimated beams of coincident neutral gas atoms having controllable average energies from less than 10 eV per atom to beyond 100 eV per atom. A beam of accelerated gas cluster ions is first produced as is usual in GCIB, but conditions within the source ionizer and extraction regions are adjusted such that immediately after ionization and acceleration the clusters undergo collisions with non-ionized gas atoms. Energy transfer during these collisions causes the energetic cluster ions to release many of their constituent atoms. An electrostatic deflector is then used to eliminate charged species, leaving the released neutral atoms to still travel collectively at the same velocities they had as bonded components of their parent clusters. Upon target impact, the accelerated neutral atom beams produce effects similar to those normally associated with GCIB, but to shallower depths, with less surface damage and with superior subsurface interfaces. The paper discusses generation and characterization of the accelerated neutral atom beams, describes interactions of the beams with target surfaces, and presents examples of ongoing work on applications for biomedical devices.

Kirkpatrick, A.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Chau, S.; Mack, M.; Harrison, S.; Svrluga, R.; Khoury, J.

2013-07-01

172

Laser-Driven Proton Beams: Acceleration Mechanism, Beam Optimization, and Radiographic Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews recent experimental activity in the area of optimization, control, and application of laser-accelerated proton beams, carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Laboratoire pour lpsilaUtilisation des Lasers Intenses 100 TW facility in France. In particular, experiments have investigated the role of the scale length at the rear of the plasma in reducing target-normal-sheath-acceleration acceleration efficiency.

Marco Borghesi; Carlo Alberto Cecchetti; Toma Toncian; Julien Fuchs; Lorenzo Romagnani; Satyabrata Kar; P. A. Wilson; Patrizio Antici; Patrick Audebert; Erik Brambrink; Ariane Pipahl; Munib Amin; Ralph Jung; Jens Osterholz; Oswald Willi; Wigen Nazarov; Robert J. Clarke; Margaret Notley; David Neely; Patrick Mora; Thomas Grismayer; Guy Schurtz; Angelo Schiavi; Yasuhiko Sentoku

2008-01-01

173

Low energy beam transport for facility for rare isotope beams driver linear particle accelerator  

SciTech Connect

The driver linac for the facility for rare isotope beams (FRIB) will provide a wide range of primary ion beams for nuclear physics research. The linac will be capable of accelerating a uranium beam to an energy of up to 200 Mev/u and delivering it to a fragmentation target with a maximum power of 400 kW. Stable ion beams will be produced by a high performance electron cyclotron resonance ion source operating at 28 GHz. The ion source will be located on a high voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 12 keV/u. After extraction, the ion beam will be transported vertically down to the linac tunnel in a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system and injected into a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) operating at a frequency of 80.5 MHz. To meet the beam power requirements, simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states will be used for heavier ions ({>=}Xe). This paper presents the layout of the FRIB LEBT and the beam dynamics in the LEBT. In particular, simulation and design of the beam line section before charge state selection will be detailed. The need to use an achromatic design for the charge state selection system and the advantage of an ion beam collimation system to limit the emittance of the beam injected into the RFQ will be discussed in this paper.

Sun, L. T.; Leitner, D.; Machicoane, G.; Pozdeyev, E.; Winklehner, D.; Zhao, Q. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Smirnov, V.; Vorozhtsov, S. B. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow 141980 (Russian Federation)

2012-02-15

174

Low energy beam transport for facility for rare isotope beams driver linear particle accelerator.  

PubMed

The driver linac for the facility for rare isotope beams (FRIB) will provide a wide range of primary ion beams for nuclear physics research. The linac will be capable of accelerating a uranium beam to an energy of up to 200 Mev?u and delivering it to a fragmentation target with a maximum power of 400 kW. Stable ion beams will be produced by a high performance electron cyclotron resonance ion source operating at 28 GHz. The ion source will be located on a high voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 12 keV?u. After extraction, the ion beam will be transported vertically down to the linac tunnel in a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system and injected into a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) operating at a frequency of 80.5 MHz. To meet the beam power requirements, simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states will be used for heavier ions (?Xe). This paper presents the layout of the FRIB LEBT and the beam dynamics in the LEBT. In particular, simulation and design of the beam line section before charge state selection will be detailed. The need to use an achromatic design for the charge state selection system and the advantage of an ion beam collimation system to limit the emittance of the beam injected into the RFQ will be discussed in this paper. PMID:22380310

Sun, L T; Leitner, D; Machicoane, G; Pozdeyev, E; Smirnov, V; Vorozhtsov, S B; Winklehner, D; Zhao, Q

2012-02-01

175

Indirectly sensing accelerator beam currents for limiting maximum beam current magnitude  

DOEpatents

A beam current limiter is disclosed for sensing and limiting the beam current in a particle accelerator, such as a cyclotron or linear accelerator, used in scientific research and medical treatment. A pair of independently operable capacitive electrodes sense the passage of charged particle bunches to develop an RF signal indicative of the beam current magnitude produced at the output of a bunched beam accelerator. The RF signal produced by each sensing electrode is converted to a variable DC voltage indicative of the beam current magnitude. The variable DC voltages thus developed are compared to each other to verify proper system function and are further compared to known references to detect beam currents in excess of pre-established limits. In the event of a system malfunction, or if the detected beam current exceeds pre-established limits, the beam current limiter automatically inhibits further accelerator operation. A high Q tank circuit associated with each sensing electrode provides a narrow system bandwidth to reduce noise and enhance dynamic range. System linearity is provided by injecting, into each sensing electrode, an RF signal that is offset from the bunching frequency by a pre-determined beat frequency to ensure that subsequent rectifying diodes operate in a linear response region. The system thus provides a large dynamic range in combination with good linearity. 6 figs.

Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Bollinger, L.M.

1995-08-08

176

Interactions of Airy beams, nonlinear accelerating beams, and induced solitons in Kerr and saturable nonlinear media.  

PubMed

We investigate numerically interactions between two in-phase or out-of-phase Airy beams and nonlinear accelerating beams in Kerr and saturable nonlinear media in one transverse dimension. We discuss different cases in which the beams with different intensities are launched into the medium, but accelerate in opposite directions. Since both the Airy beams and nonlinear accelerating beams possess infinite oscillating tails, we discuss interactions between truncated beams, with finite energies. During interactions we see solitons and soliton pairs generated that are not accelerating. In general, the higher the intensities of interacting beams, the easier to form solitons; when the intensities are small enough, no solitons are generated. Upon adjusting the interval between the launched beams, their interaction exhibits different properties. If the interval is large relative to the width of the first lobes, the generated soliton pairs just propagate individually and do not interact much. However, if the interval is comparable to the widths of the maximum lobes, the pairs strongly interact and display varied behavior. PMID:24664064

Zhang, Yiqi; Beli?, Milivoj R; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Haixia; Li, Changbiao; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yanpeng

2014-03-24

177

Beam Head Erosion in Self-Ionized Plasma Wakefield Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

In the recent plasma wakefield accelerator experiments at SLAC, the energy of the particles in the tail of the 42 GeV electron beam were doubled in less than one meter [1]. Simulations suggest that the acceleration length was limited by a new phenomenon--beam head erosion in self-ionized plasmas. In vacuum, a particle beam expands transversely in a distance given by {beta}*. In the blowout regime of a plasma wakefield [2], the majority of the beam is focused by the ion channel, while the beam head slowly spreads since it takes a finite time for the ion channel to form. It is observed that in self-ionized plasmas, the head spreading is exacerbated compared to that in pre-ionized plasmas, causing the ionization front to move backward (erode). A simple theoretical model is used to estimate the upper limit of the erosion rate for a bi-gaussian beam by assuming free expansion of the beam head before the ionization front. Comparison with simulations suggests that half this maximum value can serve as an estimate for the erosion rate. Critical parameters to the erosion rate are discussed.

Berry, M.K.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

2008-01-28

178

LATTICES FOR HIGH-POWER PROTON BEAM ACCELERATION AND SECONDARY BEAM COLLECTION AND COOLING.  

SciTech Connect

Rapid cycling synchrotrons are used to accelerate high-intensity proton beams to energies of tens of GeV for secondary beam production. After primary beam collision with a target, the secondary beam can be collected, cooled, accelerated or decelerated by ancillary synchrotrons for various applications. In this paper, we first present a lattice for the main synchrotron. This lattice has: (a) flexible momentum compaction to avoid transition and to facilitate RF gymnastics (b) long straight sections for low-loss injection, extraction, and high-efficiency collimation (c) dispersion-free straights to avoid longitudinal-transverse coupling, and (d) momentum cleaning at locations of large dispersion with missing dipoles. Then, we present a lattice for a cooler ring for the secondary beam. The momentum compaction across half of this ring is near zero, while for the other half it is normal. Thus, bad mixing is minimized while good mixing is maintained for stochastic beam cooling.

WANG, S.; WEI, J.; BROWN, K.; GARDNER, C.; LEE, Y.Y.; LOWENSTEIN, D.; PEGGS, S.; SIMOS, N.

2006-06-23

179

Reliability of the Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN  

E-print Network

The energy stored in the Large Hadron Collider is unprecedented. The impact of the beam particles can cause severe damage on the superconductive magnets, resulting in significant downtime for repairing. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) detects the secondary particles shower of the lost beam particles and initiates the extraction of the beam before any serious damage to the equipment can occur. This thesis defines the BLMS specifications in term of reliability. The main goal is the design of a system minimizing both the probability to not detect a dangerous loss and the number of false alarms generated. The reliability theory and techniques utilized are described. The prediction of the hazard rates, the testing procedures, the Failure Modes Effects and Criticalities Analysis and the Fault Tree Analysis have been used to provide an estimation of the probability to damage a magnet, of the number of false alarms and of the number of generated warnings. The weakest components in the BLMS have been pointed out....

Guaglio, G; Santoni, C

2005-01-01

180

Performance Modeling and Optimization of a High Energy CollidingBeam Simulation Code  

SciTech Connect

An accurate modeling of the beam-beam interaction is essential to maximizing the luminosity in existing and future colliders. BeamBeam3D was the first parallel code that can be used to study this interaction fully self-consistently on high-performance computing platforms. Various all-to-all personalized communication (AAPC) algorithms dominate its communication patterns, for which we developed a sequence of performance models using a series of micro-benchmarks. We find that for SMP based systems the most important performance constraint is node-adapter contention, while for 3D-Torus topologies good performance models are not possible without considering link contention. The best average model prediction error is very low on SMP based systems with of 3% to 7%. On torus based systems errors of 29% are higher but optimized performance can again be predicted within 8% in some cases. These excellent results across five different systems indicate that this methodology for performance modeling can be applied to a large class of algorithms.

Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Qiang, Ji; Bailey, David H.; Yelick, Kathy

2006-06-01

181

Ion bunch length effects on the beam-beam interaction in a high luminosity ring-ring electron-ion collider with head-on beam-beam compensation  

SciTech Connect

The luminosity of a ring-ring electron-ion collider is limited by the beam-beam effect on the electrons. Simulation studies have shown that for short ion bunches this limit can be significantly increased by head-on beam-beam compensation via an electron lens. However, due to the large beam-beam parameter experienced by the electrons, together with an ion bunch length comparable to the beta-function at the IP, electrons perform a sizeable fraction of a betatron oscillation period inside both the long ion bunches and the electron lens. Recent results of our simulation studies of this effect will be presented.

Montag, C.; Fischer, W.

2010-05-23

182

Observation of laser multiple filamentation process and multiple electron beams acceleration in a laser wakefield accelerator  

SciTech Connect

The multiple filaments formation process in the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) was observed by imaging the transmitted laser beam after propagating in the plasma of different density. During propagation, the laser first self-focused into a single filament. After that, it began to defocus with energy spreading in the transverse direction. Two filaments then formed from it and began to propagate independently, moving away from each other. We have also demonstrated that the laser multiple filamentation would lead to the multiple electron beams acceleration in the LWFA via ionization-induced injection scheme. Besides, its influences on the accelerated electron beams were also analyzed both in the single-stage LWFA and cascaded LWFA.

Li, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Wentao; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Hui; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Zhijun; Qi, Rong; Wang, Cheng; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)

2013-11-15

183

Beam by design: Laser manipulation of electrons in modern accelerators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accelerator-based light sources such as storage rings and free-electron lasers use relativistic electron beams to produce intense radiation over a wide spectral range for fundamental research in physics, chemistry, materials science, biology, and medicine. More than a dozen such sources operate worldwide, and new sources are being built to deliver radiation that meets with the ever-increasing sophistication and depth of new research. Even so, conventional accelerator techniques often cannot keep pace with new demands and, thus, new approaches continue to emerge. In this article, a variety of recently developed and promising techniques that rely on lasers to manipulate and rearrange the electron distribution in order to tailor the properties of the radiation are reviewed. Basic theories of electron-laser interactions, techniques to create microstructures and nanostructures in electron beams, and techniques to produce radiation with customizable waveforms are reviewed. An overview of laser-based techniques for the generation of fully coherent x rays, mode-locked x-ray pulse trains, light with orbital angular momentum, and attosecond or even zeptosecond long coherent pulses in free-electron lasers is presented. Several methods to generate femtosecond pulses in storage rings are also discussed. Additionally, various schemes designed to enhance the performance of light sources through precision beam preparation including beam conditioning, laser heating, emittance exchange, and various laser-based diagnostics are described. Together these techniques represent a new emerging concept of "beam by design" in modern accelerators, which is the primary focus of this article.

Hemsing, Erik; Stupakov, Gennady; Xiang, Dao; Zholents, Alexander

2014-07-01

184

ELECTROMAGNETIC SIMULATIONS OF DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR STRUCTURES FOR ELECTRON BEAM ACCELERATION  

SciTech Connect

Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA) technology incorporates the energy storage mechanism, the switching mechanism, and the acceleration mechanism for electron beams. Electromagnetic simulations of DWA structures includes these effects and also details of the switch configuration and how that switch time affects the electric field pulse which accelerates the particle beam. DWA structures include both bi-linear and bi-spiral configurations with field gradients on the order of 20MV/m and the simulations include the effects of the beampipe, the beampipe walls, the DWA High Gradient Insulator (HGI) insulating stack, wakefield impedance calculations, and test particle trajectories with low emittance gain. Design trade-offs include the transmission line impedance (typically a few ohms), equilibration ring optimization, driving switch inductances, and layer-to-layer coupling effects and the associated affect on the acceleration pulse's peak value.

Nelson, S D; Poole, B R

2005-05-05

185

Beam dynamics design for uranium drift tube linear accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

KONUS beam dynamics design of uranium DTL with LORASR code is presented. The 238U34+ beam, whose current is 5.0 emA, is accelerated from injection energy of 0.35 MeV/u to output energy of 1.30 MeV/u by IH-DTL operated at 81.25 MHz in HIAF project at IMP of CAS. It achieves a transmission efficiency of 94.95% with a cavity length of 267.8 cm. The optimization aims are the reduction of emittance growth, beam loss and project costs. Because of the requirements of CW mode operation, the designed average acceleration gradient is about 2.48 MV/m. The maximum axial field is 10.2 MV/m, meanwhile the Kilpatrick breakdown field is 10.56 MV/m at 81.25 MHz.

Dou, Wei-Ping; He, Yuan; Lu, Yuan-Rong

2014-07-01

186

SINGLE BUNCH TRANSIENT DETECTION FOR THE BEAM PHASE MEASUREMENT IN SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATORS  

Microsoft Academic Search

During commissioning and operation of linear accelerators the beam phase must be determined with respect to the accelerating rf fields. It is desirable to perform these measurements at low beam current and with a short beam pulse duration to avoid unnecessary beam loss during start-up when the correct beam phase is not guaranteed. In the case of the European X-FEL

P. Pawlik; M. Grecki

187

First year of Mark-J: physics with high energy electron-positron colliding beams. Report No. 107  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the experimental investigation of high energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions by the MARK J collaboration at PETRA, the electron-positron colliding beam accelerator at DESY in Hamburg, West Germany. The physics objectives include studies of several purely electromagnetic processes and hadronic final states, which further our knowledge of the nature of the fundamental constituents and of their strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions. Before discussing the physics results, the main features and the principal components of the MARK J detector are discussed in terms of design, function, and performance. Several aspects of the online data collection and the offline analysis are also outlined. Results are presented on tests of quantum electrodynamics using e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. e/sup +/e/sup -/, ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/ and tau/sup +/tau/sup -/, on the measurement of R, the ratio of the hadronic to the point-like muon pair cross section, on the search for new quark flavors, on the discovery of three jet events arising from the radiation of hard noncollinear gluons as predicted by quantum chromodynamics, and on the determination of the strong coupling constant ..cap alpha../sub s/.

Aachen DESY M.I.T. NIKHEF Peking Collaboration

1980-04-01

188

FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) Booster Intensity, Extraction, and Synchronization Control for Collider Operation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Booster operation for collider physics is considerably different than for fixed target operation. Various scenarios for collider physics, machine studies, and P-Bar targeting may require that the intensity vary from 5E10 PPP to 3E12 PPP at a 15 Hertz mach...

R. J. Ducar, J. R. Lackey, S. R. Tawzer

1987-01-01

189

Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling and Prospects for Muon Colliders  

SciTech Connect

A six-dimensional(6D)cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas* is used to achieve the small transverse emittances demanded by a high-luminosity muon collider. This helical cooling channel**(HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange. Simulations verify the analytic predictions and have shown a 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m HCC segment. Using three such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost six orders of magnitude. After this, two new post-cooling ideas can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to one or two mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. In this report we discuss the status of and the plans for the HCC simulation and engineering efforts. We also describe the new post-cooling ideas and comment on the prospects for a Higgs factory or energy frontier muon collider using existing laboratory infrastructure.

R.P. Johnson; M. Alsharo'a; P.M. Hanlet; R. E. Hartline; M. Kuchnir; K. Paul; T.J. Roberts; C.M. Ankenbrandt; E. Barzi; L. DelFrate; I.G. Gonin; A. Moretti; D.V. Neuffer; M. Popovic; G. Romanov; D. Turrioni; V. Yarba; K. Beard; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev; D.M. Kaplan; K. Yonehara

2005-05-16

190

Reliability of Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The employment of superconducting magnets in high energy colliders opens challenging failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole system protection. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particle losses, while at medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data have been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis ranges from the components data to the system configuration.

Guaglio, G.; Dehning, B.; Santoni, C.

2004-11-01

191

Spin transport and polarimetry in the beam delivery system of the international linear collider  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Polarised electron and positron beams are key ingredients to the physics programme of future linear colliders. Due to the chiral nature of weak interactions in the Standard Model — and possibly beyond — the knowledge of the luminosity-weighted average beam polarisation at the e+e- interaction point is of similar importance as the knowledge of the luminosity and has to be controlled to permille-level precision in order to fully exploit the physics potential. The current concept to reach this challenging goal combines measurements from Laser-Compton polarimeters before and after the interaction point with measurements at the interaction point. A key element for this enterprise is the understanding of spin-transport effects between the polarimeters and the interaction point as well as collision effects. We show that without collisions, the polarimeters can be cross-calibrated to 0.1 %, and we discuss in detail the impact of collision effects and beam parameters on the polarisation value relevant for the interpretation of the e+e- collision data.

Beckmann, M.; List, J.; Vauth, A.; Vormwald, B.

2014-07-01

192

Laser-driven shock acceleration of monoenergetic ion beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ion acceleration from laser-plasma interactions is a promising approach for compact and bright ion sources. However, the conditions for optimization of the beam quality and energy are not yet fully understood. We show that the use of tailored critical-density targets, with a steep density ramp at the front and an exponential ramp at the back, which can be obtained in realistic experimental conditions, enables the generation of high quality and high energy ion beams accelerated by a laser-driven electrostatic shock. The laser deposits most of its energy in a localized region at critical density, heating the electrons and generating an electrostatic shock. The shock can then reflect most of the ions from the back of the target to high energies before competing accelerating fields (like TNSA) develop significantly, leading to high quality beams. Our PIC simulation results illustrate the possibility of generating high quality proton beams with energies in the required range for medical applications (100-300 MeV) with moderate laser intensities (a0 ˜ 10).

Boella, Elisabetta; Fiuza, Frederico; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Silva, Luis O.; Haberberger, Dan; Tochitsky, Sergei; Gong, Chao; Mori, Warren B.; Joshi, Chan

2011-11-01

193

Effect of Field Errors in Muon Collider IR Magnets on Beam Dynamics  

SciTech Connect

In order to achieve peak luminosity of a Muon Collider (MC) in the 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} range very small values of beta-function at the interaction point (IP) are necessary ({beta}* {le} 1 cm) while the distance from IP to the first quadrupole can not be made shorter than {approx}6 m as dictated by the necessity of detector protection from backgrounds. In the result the beta-function at the final focus quadrupoles can reach 100 km making beam dynamics very sensitive to all kind of errors. In the present report we consider the effects on momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture of multipole field errors in the body of IR dipoles as well as of fringe-fields in both dipoles and quadrupoles in the ase of 1.5 TeV (c.o.m.) MC. Analysis shows these effects to be strong but correctable with dedicated multipole correctors.

Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.V.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01

194

UNDULATOR-BASED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC  

SciTech Connect

to couple the THUNDER undulator to the LOASIS Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Currently the LWFA has achieved quasi-monoenergetic electron beams with energies up to 1 GeV. These ultra-short, high-peak-current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact XUV free electron laser (FEL). Understanding the electron beam properties such as the energy spread and emittance is critical for achieving high quality light sources with high brightness. By using an insertion device such as an undulator and observing changes in the spontaneous emission spectrum, the electron beam energy spread and emittance can be measured with high precision. The initial experiments will use spontaneous emission from 1.5 m of undulator. Later experiments will use up to 5 m of undulator with a goal of a high gain, XUV FEL.

Bakeman, M.S.; Fawley, W.M.; Leemans, W. P.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.

2009-05-04

195

Reliability of Beam Loss Monitor Systems for the Large Hadron Collider  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increase of beam energy and beam intensity, together with the use of super conducting magnets, opens new failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole accelerator protection system. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system, and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particles losses at 7 TeV and assisted by the Fast Beam Current Decay Monitors at 450 GeV. At medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data has been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis spaces from the components data to the system configuration.

Guaglio, G.; Dehning, B.; Santoni, C.

2005-06-01

196

PREVENTING POLLUTION USING ISO 14001 AT A PARTICLE ACCELERATOR THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER PROJECT.  

SciTech Connect

In early 1997 Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) discovered that the spent fuel pool of their High Flux Beam Reactor was leaking tritium into the groundwater. Community members, activist groups, politicians and regulators were outraged with the poor environmental management practices at BNL. The reactor was shut down and the Department of Energy (DOE) terminated the contract with the existing Management Company. At this same time, a major new scientific facility, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), was nearing the end of construction and readying for commissioning. Although environmental considerations had been incorporated into the design of the facility; some interested parties were skeptical that this new facility would not cause significant environmental impacts. RHIC management recognized that the future of its operation was dependent on preventing pollution and allaying concerns of its stakeholders. Although never done at a DOE National Laboratory before Brookhaven Science Associates, the new management firm, committed to implementing an Environmental Management System (EMS) and RHIC managers volunteered to deploy it within their facility on an extremely aggressive schedule. Several of these IS0 requirements contribute directly to preventing pollution, an area where particular emphasis was placed. This paper describes how Brookhaven used the following key IS0 14001 elements to institutionalize Pollution Prevention concepts: Environmental Policy, Aspects, Objectives and Targets, Environmental Management Program, Structure and Responsibility, Operational Controls, Training, and Management Review. In addition, examples of implementation at the RHIC Project illustrate how BNL's premiere facility was able to demonstrate to interested parties that care had been taken to implement technological and administrative controls to minimize environmental impacts, while at the same time reduce the applicability of regulatory requirements to their operations.

BRIGGS,S.L.K.; MUSOLINO,S.V.

2001-06-01

197

Quasimonoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield acceleration in pure nitrogen  

SciTech Connect

Quasimonoenergetic electron beams with maximum energy >0.5 GeV and 2 mrad divergence have been generated in pure nitrogen gas via wakefield acceleration with 80 TW, 30 fs laser pulses. Long low energy tail features were typically observed due to continuous ionization injection. The measured peak electron energy decreased with the plasma density, agreeing with the predicted scaling for electrons. The experiments showed a threshold electron density of 3x10{sup 18}cm{sup -3} for self-trapping. Our experiments suggest that pure Nitrogen is a potential candidate gas to achieve GeV monoenergetic electrons using the ionization induced injection scheme for laser wakefield acceleration.

Mo, M. Z.; Ali, A.; Fedosejevs, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada); Fourmaux, S.; Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J. C. [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

2012-02-13

198

Simulation study of electron cloud induced instabilities and emittance growth for the CERN Large Hadron Collider proton beam  

Microsoft Academic Search

The electron cloud may cause transverse single-bunch instabilities of proton beams such as those in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). We simulate these instabilities and the consequent emittance growth with the code HEADTAIL, which models the turn-by-turn interaction between the cloud and the beam. Recently some new features were added to the code,

Elena Benedetto; D. Schulte; F. Zimmermann; Giovanni Rumolo

2005-01-01

199

Accelerator column models for low-current beams  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes three analytic approaches used to model electrostatic accelerator columns in beam-transport codes for low-current beams and compares the results of each approach with the results obtained by numerically calculating the electric field based on charge distribution on equipotential surfaces. The three analytic approaches described are (1) a cubic energy-gain approximation, (2) a cubic longitudinal electric-field approximation, and (3) the aperture equation. The first two approaches calculate impulse approximations at the apertures, whereas the third is an integration of particle trajectories through the column filed. The conditions under which the solutions tend to break down are discussed. 4 refs., 8 figs.

Rusthoi, D.P.; Allison, P.; Crandall, K.R.

1985-01-01

200

Study of a multi-beam accelerator driven thorium reactor  

SciTech Connect

The primary advantages that accelerator driven systems have over critical reactors are: (1) Greater flexibility regarding the composition and placement of fissile, fertile, or fission product waste within the blanket surrounding the target, and (2) Potentially enhanced safety brought about by operating at a sufficiently low value of the multiplication factor to preclude reactivity induced events. The control of the power production can be achieved by vary the accelerator beam current. Furthermore, once the beam is shut off the system shuts down. The primary difference between the operation of an accelerator driven system and a critical system is the issue of beam interruptions of the accelerator. These beam interruptions impose thermo-mechanical loads on the fuel and mechanical components not found in critical systems. Studies have been performed to estimate an acceptable number of trips, and the value is significantly less stringent than had been previously estimated. The number of acceptable beam interruptions is a function of the length of the interruption and the mission of the system. Thus, for demonstration type systems and interruption durations of 1sec < t < 5mins, and t > 5mins 2500/yr and 50/yr are deemed acceptable. However, for industrial scale power generation without energy storage type systems and interruption durations of t < 1sec., 1sec < t < 10secs., 10secs < t < 5mins, and t > 5mins, the acceptable number of interruptions are 25000, 2500, 250, and 3 respectively. However, it has also been concluded that further development is required to reduce the number of trips. It is with this in mind that the following study was undertaken. The primary focus of this study will be the merit of a multi-beam target system, which allows for multiple spallation sources within the target/blanket assembly. In this manner it is possible to ameliorate the effects of sudden accelerator beam interruption on the surrounding reactor, since the remaining beams will still be supplying source neutrons. The proton beam will be assumed to have an energy of 1 GeV, and the target material will be natural lead, which will also be the coolant for the reactor assembly. Three proton beam arrangements will be considered, first a single beam (the traditional arrangement) with an entry at the assembly center, two more options will consist of three and six entry locations. The reactor fuel assembly parameters will be based on those of the S-PRISM fast reactor proposed by GE, and the fuel composition and type will be based on that proposed by Aker Solutions for use in their accelerator driven thorium reactor. The following table summarizes the parameters to be used in this study. The isotopic composition of the fertile material is 100% Th-232, and the plutonium isotopic distribution corresponds to that characteristic of the discharge from a typical LWR, following five years of decay. Thus, the isotopic distribution for the plutonium is; Pu-238 2.5%, Pu-239 53.3%, Pu-240 25.1%, Pu-241 11.8%, and Pu-242 7.3%.

Ludewig, H.; Aronson, A.

2011-03-01

201

Beam by design: laser manipulation of electrons in modern accelerators  

E-print Network

Accelerator-based light sources such as storage rings and free-electron lasers use relativistic electron beams to produce intense radiation over a wide spectral range for fundamental research in physics, chemistry, materials science, biology and medicine. More than a dozen such sources operate worldwide, and new sources are being built to deliver radiation that meets with the ever increasing sophistication and depth of new research. Even so, conventional accelerator techniques often cannot keep pace with new demands and, thus, new approaches continue to emerge. In this article, we review a variety of recently developed and promising techniques that rely on lasers to manipulate and rearrange the electron distribution in order to tailor the properties of the radiation. Basic theories of electron-laser interactions, techniques to create micro- and nano-structures in electron beams, and techniques to produce radiation with customizable waveforms are reviewed. We overview laser-based techniques for the generation ...

Hemsing, Erik; Xiang, Dao; Zholents, Alexander

2014-01-01

202

Million revolution accelerator beam instrument for logging and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

A data acquisition and analysis instrument for the processing of accelerator beam position monitor (BPM) signals has been assembled and used preliminarily for beam diagnosis of the Fermilab accelerators. Up to eight BPM (or other analogue) channels are digitized and transmitted to an acquisition Sun workstation and from there both to a monitor workstation and a workstation for off-line (but immediate) data analysis. A coherent data description format permits fast data object transfers to and from memory, disk and tape, across the Sun ethernet. This has helped the development of both general purpose and experiment-specific data analysis, presentation and control tools. Flexible software permits immediate graphical display in both time and frequency domains. The instrument acts simultaneously as a digital oscilloscope, as a network analyzer and as a correlating, noise-reducing spectrum analyzer. 2 refs., 3 figs.

Peggs, S.; Saltmarsh, C.; Talman, R.

1988-03-01

203

Bipolar pulse generator for intense pulsed ion beam accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new type of pulsed ion beam accelerator named "bipolar pulse accelerator" (BPA) has been proposed in order to improve the purity of intense pulsed ion beams. To confirm the principle of the BPA, we developed a bipolar pulse generator for the bipolar pulse experiment, which consists of a Marx generator and a pulse forming line (PFL) with a rail gap switch on its end. In this article, we report the first experimental result of the bipolar pulse and evaluate the electrical characteristics of the bipolar pulse generator. When the bipolar pulse generator was operated at 70% of the full charge condition of the PFL, the bipolar pulse with the first (-138kV, 72ns) and the second pulse (+130kV, 70ns) was successfully obtained. The evaluation of the electrical characteristics indicates that the developed generator can produce the bipolar pulse with fast rise time and sharp reversing time.

Ito, H.; Igawa, K.; Kitamura, I.; Masugata, K.

2007-01-01

204

First Beam Waist Measurements in the Final Focus Beam Line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The ATF2 project is the final focus system prototype for the ILC and CLIC linear collider projects, with a purpose to reach a 37 nm vertical beam size at the interaction point using compact optics based on a novel scheme of local chromaticity correction. Construction of all components and installation were completed at the end of 2008. An initial commissioning phase followed in 2009, using larger than nominal {beta} functions at the interaction point, corresponding to reduced demagnification factors in comparison to the design, to limit effects from higher-order optical aberrations and hence simplify beam tuning procedures while key instrumentation was being tested and calibrated. In this paper, first measurements of dispersion and Twiss parameters are presented based on scanning the beam during this period with a set of tungsten wires located just behind the interaction point, using two complementary analysis methods.

Bai, Sha; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Aryshev, Alexander; /KEK, Tsukuba; Bambade, Philip; /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, IPN; McCormick, Doug; /SLAC; Bolzon, Benoit; /Annecy, LAPP; Gao, Jie; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Tauchi, Toshiaki; /KEK, Tsukuba; Zhou, Feng; /SLAC

2012-06-22

205

Trends for Electron Beam Accelerator Applications in Industry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electron beam (EB) accelerators are major pieces of industrial equipment used for many commercial radiation processing applications. The industrial use of EB accelerators has a history of more than 50 years and is still growing in terms of both its economic scale and new applications. Major applications involve the modification of polymeric materials to create value-added products, such as heat-resistant wires, heat-shrinkable sheets, automobile tires, foamed plastics, battery separators and hydrogel wound dressing. The surface curing of coatings and printing inks is a growing application for low energy electron accelerators, resulting in an environmentally friendly and an energy-saving process. Recently there has been the acceptance of the use of EB accelerators in lieu of the radioactive isotope cobalt-60 as a source for sterilizing disposable medical products. Environmental protection by the use of EB accelerators is a new and important field of application. A commercial plant for the cleaning flue gases from a coal-burning power plant is in operation in Poland, employing high power EB accelerators. In Korea, a commercial plant uses EB to clean waste water from a dye factory.

Machi, Sueo

2011-02-01

206

Negative hydrogen ion source research and beam parameters for accelerators  

Microsoft Academic Search

H beams are useful for multi-turn charge-exchange stripping injection into circular accelerators. Studies on a modified ion source for this purpose are presented. This paper includes some theory about a H magnetron discharge, ion-electron emission, emittance and problems linked with emittance measurement and calculations. Investigated parameters of the emittance probe for optimal performance give a screen voltage of 150 V

Timofey V. Zolkin

2006-01-01

207

Isochoric heating with laser-accelerated proton beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerical simulations are used to study acceleration of protons by intense laser pulses and the induced heating of a secondary target using this proton beam. Laser-plasma interaction and ion acceleration are modeled with a multidimensional, relativistic particle-in-cell code. Proton slowing-down and secondary target heating are computed with a two-dimensional Monte Carlo and a one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamics codes. Strategies for optimization of heating uniformity include tailoring the accelerated proton spectrum with specific target geometries or laser pulse parameters. A trade-off must then be found between heating uniformity and efficiency. The parameters (temperature, depth and radius of heated zone, characteristic heating and hydrodynamics times) that could be obtained on current short pulse laser facilities, using a typical 50 fs Gaussian pulse with an intensity of several 1019 W/cm2, are explored.

Carrié, M.; Combis, P.; Lefebvre, E.

2010-12-01

208

Space-time structure of new physics with polarized beams at the linear collider  

E-print Network

We approach the issue of the discovery of new physics at high energies associated with the proposed International Linear Collider in the presence of longitudinal as well as transverse electron and positron beam polarization. We determine the beam polarization dependence and the angular distribution of a particle of arbitrary spin in a one-particle inclusive final state produced in e+ e- collisions through the interference of gamma or Z amplitude with the amplitude from new interactions having arbitrary space-time structure. We thus extend the results of Dass and Ross proposed at the time of the discovery of neutral currents, to beyond the standard model currents. We also extend the case of e+ e- annihilation in the s-channel to the production of bosons due to t- and u-channel processes. Our work provides an approach to model-independent determination of the space-time structure of beyond the standard model interactions. We briefly discuss applications of the framework to popular extensions of the standard model, and demonstrate that our framework is general enough to account for certain results in the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

B. Ananthanarayan; Saurabh D. Rindani

2006-01-25

209

ROKK-1M is the Compton source of the high intensity polarized and tagged gamma beam at the VEPP-4M collider  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Backward Scattered Compton Quanta light source (ROKK-1M) developed for the high intensity polarized and tagged gamma beam at the Novosibirsk VEPP-4M Collider is described. Energy calibration of the electron and positron beams, real-time measurement of the beam polarization, and the electron-positron beam emittance at the interaction point are discussed. (AIP)

G. Ya. Kezerashvili; A. M. Milov; N. Yu. Muchnoi; A. N. Dubrovin; V. A. Kiselev; A. I. Naumenkov; A. N. Skrinsky; D. N. Shatilov; E. A. Simonov; V. V. Petrov; I. Ya. Protopopov

1995-01-01

210

Challenges in future linear colliders  

SciTech Connect

For decades, electron-positron colliders have been complementing proton-proton colliders. But the circular LEP, the largest e-e+ collider, represented an energy limit beyond which energy losses to synchrotron radiation necessitate moving to e-e+ linear colliders (LCs), thereby raising new challenges for accelerator builders. Japanese-American, German, and European collaborations have presented options for the Future Linear Collider (FLC). Key accelerator issues for any FLC option are the achievement of high enough energy and luminosity. Damping rings, taking advantage of the phenomenon of synchrotron radiation, have been developed as the means for decreasing beam size, which is crucial for ensuring a sufficiently high rate of particle-particle collisions. Related challenges are alignment and stability in an environment where even minute ground motion can disrupt performance, and the ability to monitor beam size. The technical challenges exist within a wider context of socioeconomic and political challenges, likely necessitating continued development of international collaboration among parties involved in accelerator-based physics.

Swapan Chattopadhyay; Kaoru Yokoya

2002-09-02

211

Resolving EMI Issues To Optimize Accelerator Beam Diagnostic Performance  

SciTech Connect

If you have struggled to get the last bit of performance from a beam diagnostic only to find your dynamic range limited by external sources of electromagnetic interference (EMI) once the system is installed, then you will find this tutorial on electromagnetic compatibility and grounding useful. The tutorial will provide some simple, direct methods to analyze, understand and mitigate the impact of EMI on beam diagnostic systems. Several common and unique accelerator EMI sources will be characterized. The dependencies of source frequency and distance to the source on the optimal choice of grounding and shielding methods will be illustrated. The emphasis is on a stepwise process that leads to understanding and cost-effective resolution of EMI impacts on beam diagnostic systems.

Thuot, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE Division, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)

2004-11-10

212

Negative hydrogen ion source research and beam parameters for accelerators  

SciTech Connect

H{sup -} beams are useful for multi-turn charge-exchange stripping injection into circular accelerators. Studies on a modified ion source for this purpose are presented. This paper includes some theory about a H{sup -} magnetron discharge, ion-electron emission, emittance and problems linked with emittance measurement and calculations. Investigated parameters of the emittance probe for optimal performance give a screen voltage of 150 V and a probe step of about 5 mil. Normalized 90% emittance obtained for this H{sup -} source is 0.22 {pi} mm-mr, for an extraction voltage of 18 kV at a beam energy of 30 keV and a beam current of 11 mA.

Zolkin, Timofey V.; /Fermilab

2006-09-01

213

Commissioning measurements for photon beam data on three TrueBeam linear accelerators, and comparison with Trilogy and Clinac 2100 linear accelerators.  

PubMed

This study presents the beam data measurement results from the commissioning of three TrueBeam linear accelerators. An additional evaluation of the measured beam data within the TrueBeam linear accelerators contrasted with two other linear accelerators from the same manufacturer (i.e., Clinac and Trilogy) was performed to identify and evaluate any differences in the beam characteristics between the machines and to evaluate the possibility of beam matching for standard photon energies. We performed a comparison of commissioned photon beam data for two standard photon energies (6 MV and 15 MV) and one flattening filter-free ("FFF") photon energy (10 FFF) between three different TrueBeam linear accelerators. An analysis of the beam data was then performed to evaluate the reproducibility of the results and the possibility of "beam matching" between the TrueBeam linear accelerators. Additionally, the data from the TrueBeam linear accelerator was compared with comparable data obtained from one Clinac and one Trilogy linear accelerator models produced by the same manufacturer to evaluate the possibility of "beam matching" between the TrueBeam linear accelerators and the previous models. The energies evaluated between the linear accelerator models are the 6 MV for low energy and the 15 MV for high energy. PDD and output factor data showed less than 1% variation and profile data showed variations within 1% or 2 mm between the three TrueBeam linear accelerators. PDD and profile data between the TrueBeam, the Clinac, and Trilogy linear accelerators were almost identical (less than 1% variation). Small variations were observed in the shape of the profile for 15 MV at shallow depths (< 5 cm) probably due to the differences in the flattening filter design. A difference in the penumbra shape was observed between the TrueBeam and the other linear accelerators; the TrueBeam data resulted in a slightly greater penumbra width. The diagonal scans demonstrated significant differences in the profile shapes at a distance greater than 20 cm from the central axis, and this was more notable for the 15 MV energy. Output factor differences were found primarily at the ends of the field size spectrum, with observed differences of less than 2% as compared to the other linear accelerators. The TrueBeam's output factor varied less as a function of field size than the output factors for the previous models; this was especially true for the 6 MV. Photon beam data were found to be reproducible between different TrueBeam linear accelerators well within the accepted clinical tolerance of ± 2%. The results indicate reproducibility in the TrueBeam machine head construction and a potential for beam matching between these types of linear accelerators. Photon beam data (6 MV and 15 MV) from the Trilogy and Clinac 2100 showed several similarities and some small variations when compared to the same data measured on the TrueBeam linear accelerator. The differences found could affect small field data and also very large field sizes in beam matching considerations between the TrueBeam and previous linear accelerator models from the same manufacturer, but should be within the accepted clinical tolerance for standard field sizes and standard treatments. PMID:23318395

Beyer, Gloria P

2013-01-01

214

Observation and Characterization of Coherent Optical Radiation and Microbunching Instability in the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

The NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC is currently configured for a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) experiment using an 120 MeV beam. During commissioning, unexpected coherent optical undulator radiation (CUR) and coherent optical transition radiation (COTR) was observed when beam is accelerated off-crest and compressed after the chicanes. The CUR and COTR is likely due to a microbunching instability where the initial small ripples in cathode drive laser is compressed and amplified. In this paper we present the observation and characterization of the CUR, COTR and microbunching instability at NLCTA.

Weathersby, S.; Dunning, M.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Xiang, D.; /SLAC

2011-06-02

215

Beam losses from ultra-peripheral nuclear collisions between Pb ions in the Large Hadron Collider and their alleviation  

SciTech Connect

Electromagnetic interactions between colliding heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will give rise to localized beam losses that may quench superconducting magnets, apart from contributing significantly to the luminosity decay. To quantify their impact on the operation of the collider, we have used a three-step simulation approach, which consists of optical tracking, a Monte-Carlo shower simulation and a thermal network model of the heat flow inside a magnet. We present simulation results for the case of {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} ion operation in the LHC, with focus on the alice interaction region, and show that the expected heat load during nominal {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} operation is 40% above the quench level. This limits the maximum achievable luminosity. Furthermore, we discuss methods of monitoring the losses and possible ways to alleviate their effect.

Bruce, R.; /CERN; Bocian, D.; /Fermilab /CERN; Gilardoni, S.; Jowett, J.M.; /CERN

2009-08-01

216

Correcting the beam centroid motion in an induction accelerator and reducing the beam breakup instability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Axial beam centroid and beam breakup (BBU) measurements were conducted on an 80 ns FWHM, intense relativistic electron bunch with an injected energy of 3.8 MV and current of 2.9 kA. The intense relativistic electron bunch is accelerated and transported through a nested solenoid and ferrite induction core lattice consisting of 64 elements, exiting the accelerator with a nominal energy of 19.8 MeV. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the coupling of the beam centroid motion to the BBU instability and validate the theory of this coupling for the first time. Time resolved centroid measurements indicate a reduction in the BBU amplitude, ???, of 19% and a reduction in the BBU growth rate (?) of 4% by reducing beam centroid misalignments ˜50% throughout the accelerator. An investigation into the contribution of the misaligned elements is made. An alignment algorithm is presented in addition to a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results which include axial beam centroid oscillations, BBU amplitude, and growth with different dipole steering.

Coleman, J. E.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Moir, D. C.; Sullivan, G. W.; Crawford, M. T.

2014-09-01

217

Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

Sandri, S.; Poggi, C. [ENEA, Radiation Protection Institute, IRP-FUAC, Frascati (Italy); Coniglio, A. [Medical Physics Department, S. Giovanni Calibita Hospital, Fatebenefratelli, Isola Tiberina, Roma (Italy); D'Arienzo, M. [ENEA, Ionizing Radiation Metrology National Institute, METR, Casaccia, Rome (Italy)

2011-12-13

218

Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

2011-06-27

219

Suppressing Electron Cloud in Future Linear Colliders  

SciTech Connect

Any accelerator circulating positively charged beams can suffer from a build-up of an electron cloud (EC) in the beam pipe. The cloud develops through ionization of residual gases, synchrotron radiation and secondary electron emission and, when severe, can cause instability, emittance blow-up or loss of the circulating beam. The electron cloud is potentially a luminosity limiting effect for both the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the ILC positron damping ring, the development of the electron cloud must be suppressed. This paper discusses the state-of-the-art of the ongoing SLAC and international R&D program to study potential remedies.

Pivi, M; Kirby, R.E.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; /SLAC; Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen

2005-05-27

220

Beam Polarization at the ILC: the Physics Impact and the Accelerator Solutions  

SciTech Connect

In this contribution accelerator solutions for polarized beams and their impact on physics measurements are discussed. Focus are physics requirements for precision polarimetry near the interaction point and their realization with polarized sources. Based on the ILC baseline programme as described in the Reference Design Report (RDR), recent developments are discussed and evaluated taking into account physics runs at beam energies between 100 GeV and 250 GeV, as well as calibration runs on the Z-pole and options as the 1TeV upgrade and GigaZ. The studies, talks and discussions presented at this conference demonstrated that beam polarization and its measurement are crucial for the physics success of any future linear collider. To achieve the required precision it is absolutely decisive to employ multiple devices for testing and controlling the systematic uncertainties of each polarimeter. The polarimetry methods for the ILC are complementary: with the upstream polarimeter the measurements are performed in a clean environment, they are fast and allow to monitor time-dependent variations of polarization. The polarimeter downstream the IP will measure the disrupted beam resulting in high background and much lower statistics, but it allows access to the depolarization at the IP. Cross checks between the polarimeter results give redundancy and inter-calibration which is essential for high precision measurements. Current plans and issues for polarimeters and also energy spectrometers in the Beam Delivery System of the ILC are summarized in reference [28]. The ILC baseline design allows already from the beginning the operation with polarized electrons and polarized positrons provided the spin rotation and the fast helicity reversal for positrons will be implemented. A reversal of the positron helicity significantly slower than that of electrons is not recommended to not compromise the precision and hence the success of the ILC. Recently to use calibration data at the Z resonance for physics has been discussed. It looks promising but further studies are needed to evaluate and to optimize these measurements. Finally it should be remarked: many studies on different physics processes and scenarios at a future linear collider are done for high luminosities and high energy assuming small and well-known uncertainties. Polarization, especially positron polarization, is often considered as not that important. But in order to interpret data and to reduce ambiguities in the measurements, the polarization of electrons and positrons and their very precise knowledge are essential. The ILC design must offer this from the beginning to be prepared for the physics questions after years of LHC operation.

Aurand, B.; /Bonn U.; Bailey, I.; /Liverpool U.; Bartels, C.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen; Brachmann, A.; /SLAC; Clarke, J.; /Daresbury; Hartin, A.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Oxford U., JAI; Hauptman, J.; /Iowa State U.; Helebrant, C.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen; Hesselbach, S.; /Durham U., IPPP; Kafer, D.; List, J.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen; Lorenzon, W.; /Michigan U.; Marchesini, I.; Monig, Klaus; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen; Moffeit, K.C.; /SLAC; Moortgat-Pick, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Riemann, S.; Schalicke, A.; Schuler, P.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen; Starovoitov, P.; /Minsk, NCPHEP; Ushakov, A.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Bonn U. /SLAC

2011-11-23

221

Niobium resonator development for high-brightness ion beam acceleration  

SciTech Connect

Two niobium resonant cavities for high-brightness ion beam acceleration have been constructed and tested. The first was based on a coaxial quarter-wave geometry and was optimized for phase velocity {beta}{sub o} = 0.15. This cavity, which resonates at 400 MHz in the fundamental mode, operated at an average (wall-to-wall) accelerating gradient of 12.9 MV/m under continuous-wave (cw) fields. At this gradient, a cavity Q of 1.4 {times} 10{sup 8} was measured. The second was based on a coaxial half-wave geometry and was optimized for {beta}{sub o} = 0.12. This cavity, which resonates at 355 MHz in the fundamental mode, operated at an average accelerating gradient of 18.0 MV/m under cw fields. This is the highest average accelerating gradient achieved to date in low-velocity structures designed for cw operation. At this gradient, a cavity Q of 1.2 {times} 10{sup 8} was measured.

Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Roche, C.T.

1990-01-01

222

Electron Beam Transport in Advanced Plasma Wave Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this grant was to develop a diagnostic for relativistic plasma wave accelerators based on injecting a low energy electron beam (5-50keV) perpendicular to the plasma wave and observing the distortion of the electron beam's cross section due to the plasma wave's electrostatic fields. The amount of distortion would be proportional to the plasma wave amplitude, and is the basis for the diagnostic. The beat-wave scheme for producing plasma waves, using two CO2 laser beam, was modeled using a leap-frog integration scheme to solve the equations of motion. Single electron trajectories and corresponding phase space diagrams were generated in order to study and understand the details of the interaction dynamics. The electron beam was simulated by combining thousands of single electrons, whose initial positions and momenta were selected by random number generators. The model was extended by including the interactions of the electrons with the CO2 laser fields of the beat wave, superimposed with the plasma wave fields. The results of the model were used to guide the design and construction of a small laboratory experiment that may be used to test the diagnostic idea.

Williams, Ronald L

2013-01-31

223

Levy-Student distributions for halos in accelerator beams  

SciTech Connect

We describe the transverse beam distribution in particle accelerators within the controlled, stochastic dynamical scheme of stochastic mechanics (SM) which produces time reversal invariant diffusion processes. This leads to a linearized theory summarized in a Schroedinger-like (SL) equation. The space charge effects have been introduced in recent papers by coupling this S-L equation with the Maxwell equations. We analyze the space-charge effects to understand how the dynamics produces the actual beam distributions, and in particular we show how the stationary, self-consistent solutions are related to the (external and space-charge) potentials both when we suppose that the external field is harmonic (constant focusing), and when we a priori prescribe the shape of the stationary solution. We then proceed to discuss a few other ideas by introducing generalized Student distributions, namely, non-Gaussian, Levy infinitely divisible (but not stable) distributions. We will discuss this idea from two different standpoints: (a) first by supposing that the stationary distribution of our (Wiener powered) SM model is a Student distribution; (b) by supposing that our model is based on a (non-Gaussian) Levy process whose increments are Student distributed. We show that in the case (a) the longer tails of the power decay of the Student laws and in the case (b) the discontinuities of the Levy-Student process can well account for the rare escape of particles from the beam core, and hence for the formation of a halo in intense beams.

Cufaro Petroni, Nicola; De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Matematica dell'Universita di Bari and INFN Sezione di Bari, via E. Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Salerno, INFM Unita di Salerno, and INFN Sezione di Napoli Gruppo collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy)

2005-12-15

224

Accelerating Radioactive Ion Beams With REX-ISOLDE  

SciTech Connect

The post accelerator REX-ISOLDE is installed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN, where a broad variety of radioactive ions can be addressed. Since the end of 2001 beams at the final energy of 2.2 MeV/u are available. REX-ISOLDE uses a unique system of beam bunching and charge breeding. First a Penning trap accumulates and bunches the ions, which are delivered as a quasi-continuous beam from the ISOLDE target-ion-source, and then an electron beam ion source (EBIS) charge-breeds them to a mass-to-charge ratio below 4.5. This enables a very compact design for the following LINAC, consisting of a 4 rod RFQ, an IH structure and three 7-gap-resonators. The later ones allow a variation of the final energy between 0.8 and 2.2 MeV/u. Although the machine is still in the commissioning phase, first physics experiments have been done with neutron rich Na and Mg isotopes and 9Li. A total efficiency of several percent has already been obtained.

Ames, F.; Emhofer, S.; Habs, D.; Kester, O.; Reisinger, K.; Sieber, T. [Sektion Physik, LMU, Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bollen, G. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Cederkaell, J.; Forstner, O.; Wenander, F. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Huber, G.; Wolf, B. [Institut fuer Physik, J. Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Schwalm, D.; Hahn, R. von [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bergh, P. van den; Duppen, P. van [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, K.U. Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2003-08-26

225

Monoenergetic proton beams accelerated by radiation pressure driven shocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The radiation pressure of an intense high intensity laser will bore a hole into the surface of an opaque (overdense) plasma forming an electrostatic shock. Ions bounced off this shock front can gain twice the hole-boring velocity, which corresponds to an energy E = 4I/nc. By using a lower density (n) target, it should be possible to witness radiation pressure driven phenomena at greatly reduced intensity (I). This can be achieved by using a longer wavelength (infrared) driver, which reduces the critical density, and thus the minimum density at which these effects can be observed. In experiments performed with the ?= 10 ,m CO2 laser at Brookhaven National Laboratory, we have observed the radiation pressure driven recession of the critical surface of a plasma formed by ionisation of a hydrogen gas target at densities as low as ne= 2x10^19,-3. The motion of the electrostatic shock is directly observed by transverse optical probing. Perhaps most interesting is the observation of a proton beam with small energy spread (< 4%), and low background. The beam also features low emittance (nm) and high spectral brightness (>10^12 protons MeV-1sr-1). These properties are a major improvement on previous schemes for producing narrow energy spread ion beams, which have been achieved at the expense of reduced charge and increased complexity. Hence they demonstrate that radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) provides an alternative route to producing high quality laser-driven monoenergetic ion beams.

Najmudin, Zulfikar

2010-11-01

226

CONSTRAINTS ON LASER-DRIVEN ACCELERATORS FOR A HIGH-ENERGY LINEAR COLLIDER*  

E-print Network

dimension at the interaction point, R is the ratio of horizontal to vertical size of the beam, re is the classical particle radius, z is the longitudinal rms dimension of the bunch, and the beam energy

Wurtele, Jonathan

227

Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Sc?rer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin, S Mangles, L O Silva, R Fonseca and P A Norreys Electro-optic shocks from blowout laser wakefields D F Gordon, A Ting, M H Helle, D Kaganovich and B Hafizi Onset of self-steepening of intense laser pulses in plasmas J Vieira, F Fiúza, L O Silva, M Tzoufras and W B Mori Analysis of laser wakefield dynamics in capillary tubes N E Andreev, K Cassou, F Wojda, G Genoud, M Burza, O Lundh, A Persson, B Cros, V E Fortov and C-G Wahlstrom Characterization of the beam loading effects in a laser plasma accelerator C Rechatin, J Faure, X Davoine, O Lundh, J Lim, A Ben-Ismaïl, F Burgy, A Tafzi, A Lifschitz, E Lefebvre and V Malka Energy gain scaling with plasma length and density in the plasma wakefield accelerator P Muggli, I Blumenfeld, C E Clayton, F J Decker, M J Hogan, C Huang, R Ischebeck, R H Iverson, C Joshi, T Katsouleas, N Kirby, W Lu, K A Marsh, W B Mori, E Oz, R H Siemann, D R Walz and M Zhou Generation of tens of GeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beams from a moving double layer formed by ultraintense lasers at intensity 1021-1023Wcm-2 Lu-Le Yu, Han Xu, Wei-Min Wang, Zheng-Ming Sheng, Bai-Fei Shen, Wei Yu and Jie Zhang Carbon ion acceleration from thin foil targets irradiated by ultrahigh-contrast, ultraintense laser pulses D C Carroll, O Tresca, R Prasad, L Romagnani, P S Foster, P Gallegos, S Ter-Avetisyan, J S Green, M J V Streeter, N Dover, C A J Palmer, C M Brenner, F H Cameron, K E Quinn, J Schreiber, A P L Robinson, T Baeva, M N Quinn, X H Yuan, Z Najmudin, M Zepf, D Neely, M Borghesi and P McKenna Numerical modelling of a 10-cm-long multi-GeV laser wakefield accelerator driven by a self-guided petawatt pulse S Y Kalmykov, S A Yi, A Beck, A F Lifschitz, X Davoine, E Lefebvre, A Pukhov, V Khudik, G Shvets, S A Reed, P Dong, X Wang, D Du, S Bedacht, R Zgadzaj, W Henderson, A Bernstein, G Dyer, M Martinez, E Gaul, T Ditmire and M C Downer Effects of laser prepulses on laser-induced proton generation D Batani, R Jafer, M Veltcheva, R Dezulian, O Lundh, F Lindau, A Persson, K Osvay, C-G Wahlström, D C Carroll, P McKenna, A Flacco and V Malka Proton accelerati

Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

2010-04-01

228

Physics of a repetitively pulsed 10 kAmp electron beam accelerator  

SciTech Connect

Some aspects of physics that contributed to design and operation of the ETA 10 kAmp electron accelerator are discussed. These include: the electron source, the emittance growth in the injector, beam transport through the accelerator, and the influence of the beam breakup accelerator instability.

Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.A.; Birx, D.L.; Briggs, R.J.; Clark, J.C.; Hester, R.E.; Neil, V.K.; Paul, A.C.; Rogers, D. Jr.; Struve, K.W.

1981-01-01

229

A structure of angular acceleration sensor using silicon cantilevered beam with piezoresistors  

Microsoft Academic Search

A piezoresistive angular acceleration sensor is developed by micromachining. The proposed angular acceleration sensor consists of four identical silicon cantilevered beams with piezoresistors which are arranged at the circumference of the rotary machine. The value of the piezoresistor changes according to the acceleration. The fabrication method of the silicon cantilevered beams and the electrical characteristics of the piezoresistors are shown.

Naoyuki FURUKAWA; Kouhei OHNISHI

1992-01-01

230

Experimental estimate of beam loading and minimum rf voltage for acceleration of high intensity beam in the Fermilab Booster  

SciTech Connect

The difference between the rf voltage seen by the beam and the accelerating voltage required to match the rate of change of the Booster magnetic field is used to estimate the energy loss per beam turn. Because the rf voltage (RFSUM) and the synchronous phase can be experimentally measured, they can be used to calculate the effective accelerating voltage. Also an RFSUM reduction technique has been applied to measure experimentally the RFSUM limit at which the beam loss starts. With information on beam energy loss, the running conditions, especially for the high intensity beam, can be optimized in order to achieve a higher intensity beam from the Fermilab Booster.

Xi Yang; Charles M Ankenbrandt and Jim Norem

2004-04-01

231

Beam dynamics activities at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab)  

SciTech Connect

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has been funded by the US Navy to build an infra-red FEL driven by an energy-recovering compact SRF-based linear accelerator. The machine is to produce a 1 kW IR photon beam. The Jefferson Lab Accelerator Division is presently engaged in detailed design and beam dynamics studies for the driver accelerator. Principle beam dynamics and beam transport considerations include: (1) generation and transport of a high-quality, high-current, space-charge dominated beam; (2) the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) during beam recirculation transport; (3) low-loss transport of a large momentum spread, high-current beam; (4) beam break up (BBU) instabilities in the recirculating accelerator; (5) impedance policing of transport system components; and (6) RF drive system control during energy recovery and FEL operation.

Douglas, D.R.

1997-12-01

232

Numerical simulations of intense charged particle beam propagation in a dielectric wakefield accelerator  

Microsoft Academic Search

The propagation of an intense electron beam through a long dielectric tube is a critical issue for the success of the dielectric wakefield acceleration scheme. Due to the head-tail instability, a high current charged particle beam cannot propagate long distance without external focusing. In this paper we examine the beam handling and control problem in the dielectric wakefield accelerator. We

W. Gai; A. D. Kanareykin; A. L. Kustov; J. Simpson

1995-01-01

233

Feasibility study of aluminum beam tube for the collider: An option for no-coating and no-liner  

SciTech Connect

This report proposes to use a single-layer beam tube made of high strength, high resistivity aluminum alloy (such as 7039-T61 or A7N01) to replace the double-layer copper coated stainless steel tube in the SSC Collider. The main reasons are: (1) a potential saving of about $23 million which is basically the baseline cost of the copper coating and (2) the use of an extruded aluminum tube consisting of a beam chamber and a pumping chamber may solve the vacuum problem without any liner.

Chou, W.

1994-07-01

234

Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper were investigated to develop procedures for joining precision machined copper components for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Diffusion bonds were made over a range of temperatures from 400 °C to 1000 °C, under two different loading conditions [3.45 kPa (0.5 psi) and 3.45 MPa (500 psi)], and on two different diamond machined

J. W. Elmer; J. Klingmann; K. van Bibber

2001-01-01

235

The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration High-Power Targets and Particle Collection  

E-print Network

-4 MW). · Neutron Spallation Sources (1-5 MW). · Fusion Materials Test Facilities (10 MW). · Accelerator Collider Collaboration Beam-Induced Cavitation in Liquids Can Break Pipes ISOLDE: BINP: SNS: Snapping

McDonald, Kirk

236

Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

2009-10-19

237

Positron acceleration by plasma wake fields driven by a hollow electron beam  

E-print Network

A scheme of wake field generation for positron acceleration using hollow or donut shaped electron driver beams is studied. An annular shaped, electron free region forms around a hollow driver beam creating a favorable region (longitudinal field is accelerating and transverse field is focusing and radially linear) for positron acceleration. Accelerating gradients of the order of 10 GV/m are produced by a hollow electron beam driver with FACET like parameters. The peak accelerating field increases linearly with the total charge in the beam driver while the axial size of the favorable region ($\\sim$ one plasma wavelength) remains approximately fixed. The radial size drops with the total charge but remains large enough for the placement of a witness positron beam. We simulate an efficient acceleration of a 23 GeV positron beam to 35.4 GeV with a maximum energy spread of 0.4\\% and very small emittance over a plasma length of 140 cm.

Jain, Neeraj; Palastro, J P

2014-01-01

238

GeV ELECTRON BEAMS FROM A CENTIMETER-SCALE LASER-DRIVEN PLASMA ACCELERATOR  

E-print Network

GeV ELECTRON BEAMS FROM A CENTIMETER-SCALE LASER-DRIVEN PLASMA ACCELERATOR A. J. Gonsalves, K of laser and plasma parameters. INTRODUCTION The accelerating gradient achievable with conventional radio frequency (RF) accelerators is limited by electrical breakdown within the accelerating cavity to a few tens

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

239

BEAM PULSE SHAPING EXPERIMENTS FOR UNIFORM HIGH GRADIENT DIELECTRIC WAKEFIELD ACCELERATION*  

E-print Network

BEAM PULSE SHAPING EXPERIMENTS FOR UNIFORM HIGH GRADIENT DIELECTRIC WAKEFIELD ACCELERATION* D Abstract Dielectric wakefield accelerators (DWA) can produce high accelerating gradients and could possibly in an increased interest in dielectric wakefield accelerators (DWAs). The DWA is formed by one or several co

Brookhaven National Laboratory

240

A review of high beam current RFQ accelerators and funnels  

SciTech Connect

The authors review the design features of several high-current (> 20-mA) and high-power (> 1-mA average) proton or H{sup {minus}} injectors, RFQs, and funnels. They include a summary of observed performance and will mention a sampling of new designs, including the proposed incorporation of beam choppers. Different programs and organizations have chosen to build the RFQ in diverse configurations. Although the majority of RFQs are either low-current or very low duty-factor, several versions have included high-current and/or high-power designs for either protons or H{sup {minus}} ions. The challenges of cooling, handling high space-charge forces, and coupling with injectors and subsequent accelerators are significant. In all instances, beam tests were a valuable learning experience, because not always did these as-built structures perform exactly as predicted by the earlier design codes. They summarize the key operational parameters, indicate what was achieved, and highlight what was learned in these tests. Based on this generally good performance and high promise, even more challenging designs are being considered for new applications that include even higher powers, beam funnels and choppers.

Schneider, J.D.

1998-12-01

241

Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams  

SciTech Connect

Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W.P.

2010-06-01

242

Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams  

SciTech Connect

Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-11-04

243

Annular Cherenkov High Gradient Wakefield Accelerator: Beam-Breakup Analysis and Energy Transfer Efficiency  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we give a complete analytical solution for Cherenkov wakefields generated by an azimuthally asymmetric annular beam propagating in a coaxial two-channel dielectric structure. The transformer ratio of this type of structure is dramatically increased in comparison to a cylindrical wakefield accelerating structure. A particle-Green's function beam dynamics code (BBU-3000) to study beam breakup effects has been upgraded to incorporate annular drive beams and coaxial dielectric wakefield accelerating structures. Beam dynamics simulations of the annular drive beam with asymmetric charge distributions have been carried out to determine the sensitivity of this method to beam imperfections.

Altmark, A. M.; Kanareykin, A. D.

2012-05-01

244

``Accelerators and Beams,'' multimedia computer-based training in accelerator physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are developing a set of computer-based tutorials on accelerators and charged-particle beams under an SBIR grant from the DOE. These self-paced, interactive tutorials, available for Macintosh and Windows platforms, use multimedia techniques to enhance the user's rate of learning and length of retention of the material. They integrate interactive "On-Screen Laboratories," hypertext, line drawings, photographs, two- and three-dimensional animations, video, and sound. They target a broad audience, from undergraduates or technicians to professionals. Presently, three modules have been published (Vectors, Forces, and Motion), a fourth (Dipole Magnets) has been submitted for review, and three more exist in prototype form (Quadrupoles, Matrix Transport, and Properties of Charged-Particle Beams). Participants in the poster session will have the opportunity to try out these modules on a laptop computer.

Silbar, R. R.; Browman, A. A.; Mead, W. C.; Williams, R. A.

1999-06-01

245

Monte Carlo linear accelerator simulation of megavoltage photon beams: Independent determination of initial beam parameters  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To individually benchmark the incident electron parameters in a Monte Carlo model of an Elekta linear accelerator operating at 6 and 15 MV. The main objective is to establish a simplified but still precise benchmarking procedure that allows accurate dose calculations of advanced treatment techniques. Methods: The EGSnrc Monte Carlo user codes BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc are used for photon beam simulations and dose calculations, respectively. A 5 x 5 cm{sup 2} field is used to determine both the incident electron energy and the electron radial intensity. First, the electron energy is adjusted to match the calculated depth dose to the measured one. Second, the electron radial intensity is adjusted to make the calculated dose profile in the penumbrae region match the penumbrae measured by GafChromic EBT film. Finally, the mean angular spread of the incident electron beam is determined by matching calculated and measured cross-field profiles of large fields. The beam parameters are verified for various field sizes and shapes. Results: The penumbrae measurements revealed a non-circular electron radial intensity distribution for the 6 MV beam, while a circular electron radial intensity distribution could best describe the 15 MV beam. These electron radial intensity distributions, given as the standard deviation of a Gaussian distribution, were found to be 0.25 mm (in-plane) and 1.0 mm (cross-plane) for the 6 MV beam and 0.5 mm (both in-plane and cross-plane) for the 15 MV beam. Introducing a small mean angular spread of the incident electron beam has a considerable impact on the lateral dose profiles of large fields. The mean angular spread was found to be 0.7 deg. and 0.5 deg. for the 6 and 15 MV beams, respectively. Conclusions: The incident electron beam parameters in a Monte Carlo model of a linear accelerator could be precisely and independently determined by the benchmarking procedure proposed. As the dose distribution in the penumbra region is insensitive to moderate changes in electron energy and angular spread, accurate penumbra measurements is feasible for benchmarking the electron radial intensity distribution. This parameter is particularly important for accurate dosimetry of mlc-shaped fields and small fields.

Almberg, Sigrun Saur; Frengen, Jomar; Kylling, Arve; Lindmo, Tore [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway) and Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, St. Olavs University Hospital, NO-7006 Trondheim (Norway); Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, St. Olavs University Hospital, NO-7006 Trondheim (Norway); Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Aalesund Hospital, NO-6026 Aalesund (Norway); Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

2012-01-15

246

Frequency multiplying oscillator with an electron beam accelerated in a drift space  

SciTech Connect

In a uniform acceleration region, the behavior of a velocity-modulated electron beam has been analyzed using a particle-in-cell code. By making use of one of the accelerated harmonic components of the velocity-modulated electron beam, we demonstrate a frequency multiplying oscillator for a compact THz emitter, which employs multiple electron beams and a higher order mode resonator to modulate the electron beam without an additional driving source.

Jang, Kyu-Ha; Lee, Kitae; Hee Park, Seong; Uk Jeong, Young [WCI Center for Quantum Beam-based Radiation Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Deadeok, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Miginsky, S. [WCI Center for Quantum Beam-based Radiation Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Deadeok, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, SB RAS, Academician Lavrentyev St. 11, Novosibrisk (Russian Federation)

2012-07-02

247

Neutrino factory and beta beam: accelerator options for future neutrino experiments  

SciTech Connect

Two accelerator options for producing intense neutrino beams a Neutrino Factory based on stored muon beams and a Beta Beam facility based on stored beams of beta unstable ions are described. Technical challenges for each are described and current R&D efforts aimed at mitigating these challenges are indicated. Progress is being made in the design of both types of facility, each of which would extend the state-of-the-art in accelerator science.

Zisman, Michael S.

2012-06-03

248

The Stanford Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect

The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has been in operation for several years with the initial and accelerator physics experiments just completed. A synopsis of these results is included. The second round of experiments is now under preparation to install the new physics detector (SLD) in Fall 1990 and to increase the luminosity significantly by late 1991. Collisions at high intensity and with polarized electrons are planned. Many beam dynamics and technological advances are in progress to meet these goals. 10 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

Seeman, J.T.

1990-10-01

249

Demonstration of a Narrow Energy Spread, ˜0.5GeV Electron Beam from a Two-Stage Laser Wakefield Accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultracompact stages of GeV scale, high-quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high-energy colliders. Ultrahigh intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves (the wake) over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1GeV energy in centimeter-scale low density plasmas using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake even at low densities. By restricting electron injection to a distinct short region, the injector stage, energetic electron beams (of the order of 100 MeV) with a relatively large energy spread are generated. Some of these electrons are then further accelerated by a second, longer accelerator stage, which increases their energy to ˜0.5GeV while reducing the relative energy spread to <5% FWHM.

Pollock, B. B.; Clayton, C. E.; Ralph, J. E.; Albert, F.; Davidson, A.; Divol, L.; Filip, C.; Glenzer, S. H.; Herpoldt, K.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Meinecke, J.; Mori, W. B.; Pak, A.; Rensink, T. C.; Ross, J. S.; Shaw, J.; Tynan, G. R.; Joshi, C.; Froula, D. H.

2011-07-01

250

ROKK-1M is the Compton source of the high intensity polarized and tagged gamma beam at the VEPP-4M collider  

SciTech Connect

The Backward Scattered Compton Quanta light source (ROKK-1M) developed for the high intensity polarized and tagged gamma beam at the Novosibirsk VEPP-4M Collider is described. Energy calibration of the electron and positron beams, real-time measurement of the beam polarization, and the electron-positron beam emittance at the interaction point are discussed. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

Kezerashvili, G.Y.; Milov, A.M.; Muchnoi, N.Y.; Dubrovin, A.N.; Kiselev, V.A.; Naumenkov, A.I.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Shatilov, D.N.; Simonov, E.A.; Petrov, V.V.; Protopopov, I.Y. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russia)

1995-09-01

251

Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations.

Chen, Teng; Elias, Luis R.

252

Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations.

Teng, Chen; Elias, Luis R.

1995-02-01

253

Fluence and dose measurements for an accelerator neutron beam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at McMaster University accelerator laboratory is extended to a neutron irradiation facility for low-dose bystander effects research. A long counter and an Anderson-Braun type neutron monitor have been used as monitors for the determination of the total fluence. Activation foils were used to determine the thermal neutron fluence rate (around 10 6 neutrons s -1). Meanwhile, the interactions of neutrons with the monitors have been simulated using a Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) code. Bystander effects, i.e. damage occurring in cells that were not traversed by radiation but were in the same radiation environment, have been well observed following both alpha and gamma irradiation of many cell lines. Since neutron radiation involves mixed field (including gamma and neutron radiations), we need to differentiate the doses for the bystander effects from the two radiations. A tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) filled with propane based tissue equivalent gas simulating a 2 ?m diameter tissue sphere has been investigated to estimate the neutron and gamma absorbed doses. A photon dose contamination of the neutron beam is less than 3%. The axial dose distribution follows the inverse square law and lateral and vertical dose distributions are relatively uniform over the irradiation area required by the biological study.

Liu, Z.; Byun, S. H.; McNeill, F. E.; Mothersill, C. E.; Seymour, C. B.; Prestwich, W. V.

2007-10-01

254

Education in a rapidly advancing technology: Accelerators and beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The field of accelerators and beams (A&B) is one of today's fast changing technologies. Because university faculties have not been able to keep pace with the associated advancing knowledge, universities have not been able to play their traditional role of educating the scientists and engineers needed to sustain this technology for use in science, industry, commerce, and defense. This problem for A&B is described and addressed. The solution proposed, a type of "distance" education, is the U.S. Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) created in the early 1980s. USPAS provides the universities with a means of serving the education needs of the institutions using A&B, primarily but not exclusively the national laboratories. The field of A&B is briefly summarized. The need for education outside the university framework, the raison d'être for USPAS, the USPAS method, program structure, and curriculum, and particular USPAS-university connections are explained. The management of USPAS is analyzed, including its unique administrative structure, its institutional ties, and its operations, finance, marketing, and governmental relations. USPAS performance over the years is documented and a business assessment is made. Finally, there is a brief discussion of the future potential for this type of educational program, including possible extrapolation to new areas and/or different environments, in particular, its extra-government potential and its international possibilities.

Month, Mel

2000-06-01

255

Scintillator diagnostics for the detection of laser accelerated ion beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser plasma interaction with ultraintense pulses present exciting schemes for accelerating ions. One of the advantages conferred by using a gaseous laser and target is the potential for a fast (several Hz) repetition rate. This requires diagnostics which are not only suited for a single shot configuration, but also for repeated use. We consider several scintillators as candidates for an imaging diagnostic for protons accelerated to MeV energies by a CO2 laser focused on a gas jet target. We have measured the response of chromium-doped alumina (chromox) and polyvinyl toluene (PVT) screens to protons in the 2-8 MeV range. We have calibrated the luminescent yield in terms of photons emitted per incident proton for each scintillator. We also discuss how light scattering and material properties affect detector resolution. Furthermore, we consider material damage and the presence of an afterglow under intense exposures. Our analysis reveals a near order of magnitude greater yield from chromox in response to proton beams at > 8 MeV energies, while scattering effects favor PVT-based scintillators at lower energies.

Cook, N.; Tresca, O.; Lefferts, R.

2014-09-01

256

Levy-Student Distributions for Halos in Accelerator Beams  

E-print Network

We describe the transverse beam distribution in particle accelerators within the controlled, stochastic dynamical scheme of the Stochastic Mechanics (SM) which produces time reversal invariant diffusion processes. This leads to a linearized theory summarized in a Shchr\\"odinger--like (\\Sl) equation. The space charge effects have been introduced in a recent paper \\cite{prstab} by coupling this \\Sl equation with the Maxwell equations. We analyze the space charge effects to understand how the dynamics produces the actual beam distributions, and in particular we show how the stationary, self--consistent solutions are related to the (external, and space--charge) potentials both when we suppose that the external field is harmonic (\\emph{constant focusing}), and when we \\emph{a priori} prescribe the shape of the stationary solution. We then proceed to discuss a few new ideas \\cite{epac04} by introducing the generalized Student distributions, namely non--Gaussian, L\\'evy \\emph{infinitely divisible} (but not \\emph{sta...

Petroni, N C; De Siena, S; Illuminati, F

2005-01-01

257

Means and method for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles  

DOEpatents

A novel apparatus and method for focussing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The quadrupole arrays may comprise electrodes which are shared by two or more quadrupoles. Such quadrupole arrays are particularly adapted to providing strong focussing forces for high current, high brightness, beams of charged particles, said beams further comprising a plurality of parallel beams, or beamlets, each such beamlet being focussed by one quadrupole of the array. Such arrays may be incorporated in various devices wherein beams of charged particles are accelerated or transported, such as linear accelerators, klystron tubes, beam transport lines, etc.

Maschke, Alfred W. (East Moriches, NY)

1983-07-05

258

External-Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Multiple Proton Beam Configurations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To explore multiple proton beam configurations for optimizing dosimetry and minimizing uncertainties for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare the dosimetry of proton with that of photon radiotherapy for treatment of the same clinical volumes. Methods and Materials: Proton treatment plans were created for 11 sequential patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) photon APBI using passive scattering proton beams (PSPB) and were compared with clinically treated 3DCRT photon plans. Monte Carlo calculations were used to verify the accuracy of the proton dose calculation from the treatment planning system. The impact of range, motion, and setup uncertainty was evaluated with tangential vs. en face beams. Results: Compared with 3DCRT photons, the absolute reduction of the mean of V100 (the volume receiving 100% of prescription dose), V90, V75, V50, and V20 for normal breast using protons are 3.4%, 8.6%, 11.8%, 17.9%, and 23.6%, respectively. For breast skin, with the similar V90 as 3DCRT photons, the proton plan significantly reduced V75, V50, V30, and V10. The proton plan also significantly reduced the dose to the lung and heart. Dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated minimal deviation from the treatment planning system. The tangential beam configuration showed significantly less dose fluctuation in the chest wall region but was more vulnerable to respiratory motion than that for the en face beams. Worst-case analysis demonstrated the robustness of designed proton beams with range and patient setup uncertainties. Conclusions: APBI using multiple proton beams spares significantly more normal tissue, including nontarget breast and breast skin, than 3DCRT using photons. It is robust, considering the range and patient setup uncertainties.

Wang Xiaochun; Amos, Richard A.; Zhang Xiaodong; Taddei, Phillip J. [Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Woodward, Wendy A., E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org [Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hoffman, Karen E.; Yu, Tse Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Oh, Julia; Perkins, George H.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Zhang, Sean X.; Sun, Tzou Liang; Gillin, Michael; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Strom, Eric A. [Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2011-08-01

259

Muon Collider Task Force Report  

SciTech Connect

Muon Colliders offer a possible long term path to lepton-lepton collisions at center-of-mass energies {radical}s {ge} 1 TeV. In October 2006 the Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) proposed a program of advanced accelerator R&D aimed at developing the Muon Collider concept. The proposed R&D program was motivated by progress on Muon Collider design in general, and in particular, by new ideas that have emerged on muon cooling channel design. The scope of the proposed MCTF R&D program includes muon collider design studies, helical cooling channel design and simulation, high temperature superconducting solenoid studies, an experimental program using beams to test cooling channel RF cavities and a 6D cooling demonstration channel. The first year of MCTF activities are summarized in this report together with a brief description of the anticipated FY08 R&D activities. In its first year the MCTF has made progress on (1) Muon Collider ring studies, (2) 6D cooling channel design and simulation studies with an emphasis on the HCC scheme, (3) beam preparations for the first HPRF cavity beam test, (4) preparations for an HCC four-coil test, (5) further development of the MANX experiment ideas and studies of the muon beam possibilities at Fermilab, (6) studies of how to integrate RF into an HCC in preparation for a component development program, and (7) HTS conductor and magnet studies to prepare for an evaluation of the prospects for of an HTS high-field solenoid build for a muon cooling channel.

Ankenbrandt, C.; Alexahin, Y.; Balbekov, V.; Barzi, E.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bross, A.; Burov, A.; Drozhdin, A.; Finley, D.; Geer, S.; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /Jefferson Lab /LBL, Berkeley /MUONS Inc., Batavia /UCLA /UC, Riverside /Mississippi U.

2007-12-01

260

Simulation of beam-electron cloud interactions in circular accelerators using plasma models  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we study the effect of low-density electron clouds on intense positively charged beams in circular accelerators. We apply one of the simulation tools we have been developing for the study of plasma-based accelerators to the problem of wake production and beam propagation in electron clouds. Particularly, we apply it to the electron cloud wakefields in the SPS

A. Z. Ghalam; T. Katsouleas; C. Huang; V. Decyk; W. B. Mori

2003-01-01

261

Failure Analysis of the Beam Vacuum in the Superconducting Cavities of the TESLA Main Linear Accelerator  

E-print Network

1 Failure Analysis of the Beam Vacuum in the Superconducting Cavities of the TESLA Main Linear Hamburg, Germany Abstract For the long term successful operation of the superconducting TESLA accelerator The beam vacuum system of the TESLA main linear accelerators contains about 20.000 superconducting cavities

262

Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal`s photo multiplier tube (PMT).

Hutton, R.D.

1994-01-01

263

Control of Airy-beam self-acceleration by photonic lattices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We demonstrate control over the acceleration of two-dimensional Airy beams propagating in optically induced photonic lattices. Depending on the lattice strength, we observe a slowing-down and suppression of the self-acceleration of Airy beams, as well as a formation of discrete lattice beams. Moreover, we explore the effects of different artificial single-side defects on the propagation and acceleration. For positive defects, the localization of the Airy beam to the defect site is further enhanced, while for negative defects most of the power is repelled from this site.

Diebel, Falko; Boki?, Bojana M.; Boguslawski, Martin; Piper, Aleksandra; Timotijevi?, Dejan V.; Jovi?, Dragana M.; Denz, Cornelia

2014-09-01

264

Collective acceleration of protons in relativistic electron beam propagation in evacuated drift tubes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results are presented of a series of experiments investigating the mechanisms leading to the collective acceleration of protons occurring in electron beam propagation through evacuated drift tubes. Detailed measurements have been made of the electron and ion beam propagation and of the ion energy spectra. The results show that the acceleration cannot occur as a result of a beam head or deep potential well mechanism. It seems likely that the acceleration is due to the self-excitation of a wave on the beam, possibly the electron-ion two-stream instability.

Adler, R.; Nation, J. A.; Serlin, V.

1981-02-01

265

Confined flow multiple beam shaping at the powerful klystron for the superconducting linear electron-positron colliders  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results of modeling of the electro-optic system proposed and designed for the powerful multiple beam klystron Toshiba E3736 have been represented. Toshiba E3736 is the 10MW L-band six-beam klystron being developed for the superconductive accelerator projects TESLA (XFEL), ILC. The key features of device are the new compact scheme of the confined flow multiple beam shaping, the most low cathode loading (<2.1 A/cm2) in comparison with analogues, a controlled beamlet size (diameter) in the drift tubes of klystron.

Larionov, A. V.

2006-05-01

266

Quasi-static modeling of beam-plasma and laser-plasma interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plasma wave wakefields excited by either laser or particle beams can sustain acceleration gradients three orders of magnitude larger than conventional RF accelerators. They are promising for accelerating particles in short distances for applications such as future high-energy colliders, and medical and industrial accelerators. In a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator (PWFA) or a Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA), an intense particle or

Chengkun Huang

2005-01-01

267

GeV electron beams from a centimetre-scale accelerator  

E-print Network

GeV electron beams from a centimetre-scale accelerator W. P. LEEMANS1 * , B. NAGLER1 , A. JV) electron accelerators are essential to synchrotron radiation facilities and free-electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radiofrequency-based accelerators are limited to relatively low

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

268

Acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam in the presence of quantum effects  

SciTech Connect

Using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model and obtaining the dispersion relation of the Cherenkov and cyclotron waves, the acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam is investigated. The Cherenkov and cyclotron acceleration mechanisms of positrons are compared together. It is shown that growth rate and, therefore, the acceleration of positrons can be increased in the presence of quantum effects.

Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aki, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-09-15

269

A monolithic relativistic electron beam source based on a dielectric laser accelerator structure  

SciTech Connect

Work towards a monolithic device capable of producing relativistic particle beams within a cubic-centimeter is detailed. We will discuss the Micro-Accelerator Platform (MAP), an optical laser powered dielectric accelerator as the main building block of this chip-scale source along with a field enhanced emitter and a region for sub-relativistic acceleration.

McNeur, Josh; Carranza, Nestor; Travish, Gil; Yin Hairong; Yoder, Rodney [UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); College of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610054 (China); Manhattanville College, Physics Dept., 2900 Purchase St., Purchase, NY 10577 (United States)

2012-12-21

270

Low emittance electron beam generation from a laser wakefield accelerator using two laser pulses with different wavelengths  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ionization injection triggered by short wavelength laser pulses inside a nonlinear wakefield driven by a longer wavelength laser is examined via multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We find that very bright electron beams can be generated through this two-color scheme in either collinear propagating or transverse colliding geometry. For a fixed laser intensity I, lasers with longer/shorter wavelength ? have larger/smaller ponderomotive potential (?I ?2). The two-color scheme utilizes this property to separate the injection process from the wakefield excitation process. Very strong wakes can be generated at relatively low laser intensities by using a longer wavelength laser driver (e.g., a 10 ?m CO2 laser) due to its very large ponderomotive potential. On the other hand, a short wavelength laser can produce electrons with very small residual momenta (p ? ˜a0˜?I ?) inside the wake, leading to electron beams with very small normalized emittances (tens of nm). Using particle-in-cell simulations we show that a ˜10 fs electron beam with ˜4 pC of charge and a normalized emittance of ˜50 nm can be generated by combining a 10 ?m driving laser with a 400 nm injection laser, which is an improvement of more than 1 order of magnitude compared to the typical results obtained when a single wavelength laser is used for both the wake formation and ionization injection. With the transverse colliding geometry, simulations show that similarly low emittance and much lower slice energy spread (˜30 keV, comparing with the typical value of few MeV in the longitudinal injection scheme) can be simultaneously obtained for electron beams with a few pC charge. Such low slice energy spread may have significant advantages in applications relevant to future coherent light sources driven by plasma accelerators.

Xu, X. L.; Wu, Y. P.; Zhang, C. J.; Li, F.; Wan, Y.; Hua, J. F.; Pai, C.-H.; Lu, W.; Yu, P.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.

2014-06-01

271

The Production and Acceleration of Radioactive Ion Beams at the HRIBF  

SciTech Connect

The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) includes a cyclotron (ORIC) which provides high-intensity light-ions for producing radioactive atoms, and a 25 MV tandem electrostatic accelerator which is used to accelerate the radioactive-ions for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics research. Ion sources and targets suitable for the production of various radioactive ion beams (RIBs) have been developed. Operational experiences, problem areas, and plans for future beam development are discussed.

Auble, R.L.

1998-11-04

272

Calculation of abort thresholds for the Beam Loss Monitoring System of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN  

E-print Network

The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is one of the most critical machine protection systems for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Switzerland. Its main purpose is to protect the superconducting magnets from quenches and other equipment from damage by requesting a beam abort when the measured losses exceed any of the predefined threshold levels. The system consist of circa 4000 ionization chambers which are installed around the 27 kilometres ring (LHC). This study aims to choose a technical platform and produce a system that addresses all of the limitations with the current system that is used for the calculation of the LHC BLM abort threshold values. To achieve this, a comparison and benchmarking of the Java and .NET technical platforms is performed in order to establish the most suitable solution. To establish which technical platform is a successful replacement of the current abort threshold calculator, comparable prototype systems in Java and .NET we...

Nemcic, Martin; Dehning, Bernd

273

Proceedings of the international workshop on next-generation linear colliders  

SciTech Connect

This report contains papers on the next-generation of linear colliders. The particular areas of discussion are: parameters; beam dynamics and wakefields; damping rings and sources; rf power sources; accelerator structures; instrumentation; final focus; and review of beam-beam interaction.

Riordan, M. (ed.)

1988-12-01

274

A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

2014-12-01

275

Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders  

SciTech Connect

Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is currently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. Six-dimensional cooling schemes will reduce the longitudinal emittance of a muon beam so that smaller high frequency RF cavities can be used for later stages of cooling and for acceleration. However, the bunch length at collision energy is then shorter than needed to match the interaction region beta function. New ideas to shrink transverse beam dimensions by lengthening each bunch will help achieve high luminosity in muon colliders. Analytic expressions for the reverse emittance exchange mechanism were derived, including a new resonant method of beam focusing.

V. Ivanov, A. Afanasev, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, G.M. Wang, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev

2009-05-01

276

Coupled longitudinal-transverse dynamics of an axially accelerating beam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The coupled longitudinal-transverse nonlinear dynamics of an axially accelerating beam is numerically investigated; this problem is classified as a parametrically excited gyroscopic system. The axial speed is assumed to be comprised of a constant mean value along with harmonic fluctuations. Hamilton's principle is employed to derive the equations of motion of the system which are in the form of two coupled partial differential equations. The equations are discretized using the Galerkin method, which yields a set of coupled second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations with time-dependent coefficients. The sub-critical dynamics of the system is examined via the pseudo-arclength continuation technique, while the global dynamics is investigated using direct time integration. The mean axial speed and the amplitude of the speed variations are varied so as to construct the bifurcation diagrams of Poincaré maps. The vibration specifications of the system are investigated more detailed via plotting time histories, phase-plane portraits, and fast Fourier transforms (FFTs).

Ghayesh, Mergen H.

2012-11-01

277

Center for Beam Physics papers  

SciTech Connect

Six papers are included in this collection. They cover: a second interaction region for gamma-gamma, gamma-electron and electron- electron collisions; constraints on laser-driven accelerators for a high-energy linear collider; progress on the design of a high luminosity muon-muon collider; RF power source development at the RTA test facility; sensitivity studies of crystalline beams; and single bunch collective effects in muon colliders.

Sessler, A.M. [ed.

1996-06-01

278

Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper were investigated to develop procedures for joining precision machined copper components for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Diffusion bonds were made over a range of temperatures from 400 °C to 1000 °C, under two different loading conditions [3.45 kPa (0.5 psi) and 3.45 MPa (500 psi)], and on two different diamond machined surface finishes. Brazes were made using pure silver, pure gold, and gold-nickel alloys, and different heating rates produced by both radiation and induction heating. Braze materials were applied by both physical vapor deposition (PVD) and conventional braze alloy shims. Results of the diffusion bonding experiments showed that bond strengths very near that of the copper base metal could be made at bonding temperatures of 700 °C or higher at 3.45 MPa bonding pressure. At lower temperatures, only partial strength diffusion bonds could be made. At low bonding pressures (3.45 kPa), full strength bonds were made at temperatures of 800 °C and higher, while no bonding (zero strength) was observed at temperatures of 700 °C and lower. Observations of the fracture surfaces of the diffusion bonded samples showed the effects of surface finish on the bonding mechanism. These observations clearly indicate that bonding began by point asperity contact, and flatter surfaces resulted in a higher percentage of bonded area under similar bonding conditions. Results of the brazing experiments indicated that pure silver worked very well for brazing under both conventional and high heating rate scenarios. Similarly, pure silver brazed well for both the PVD layers and the braze alloy shims. The gold and gold-containing brazes had problems, mainly due to the high diffusivity of gold in copper. These problems led to the necessity of overdriving the temperature to ensure melting, the presence of porosity in the joint, and very wide braze joints. Based on the overall findings of this study, a two-step joining method is proposed for fabricating the NLC structures. The structure would be assembled with pure silver braze inserts using a self-aligning step joint design, then the assembly would be vacuum diffusion bonded at 700 °C and 3.45 MPa pressure to seal the critical inner portion of the assembly. Finally, during the same furnace cycle, the temperature would be increased to 800 °C in order to react the silver with the copper to form a liquid braze alloy that would join and seal the outer portion of the cells together.

Elmer, J. W.; Klingmann, J.; van Bibber, K.

2001-05-01

279

Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders  

SciTech Connect

Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Shulte, D.; /CERN; Jones, Roger M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; /Fermilab; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

2011-11-08

280

Conceptual design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: RHIC  

SciTech Connect

The complete Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility will be a complex set of accelerators and beam transfer equipment connecting them. A significant portion of the total facility either exists or is under construction. Two existing Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will serve for the initial ion acceleration. Ions with a charge of -1 would be accelerated from ground to +15 MV potential, pass through a stripping foil, and accelerate back to ground potential, where they would pass through a second stripping foil. From there the ions will traverse a long transfer line to the AGS tunnel and be injected into the Booster accelerator. The Booster accelerates the ion bunch, and then the ions pass through one more stripper and then enter the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), where they are accelerated to the top AGS energy and transferred to the collider. Bending and focusing of ion beams is to be achieved by superconducting magnets. The physics goals behind the RHIC are enumerated, particularly as regards the study of quark matter and the characteristics of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. The design of the collider and all its components is described, including the injector, the lattice, magnet system, cryogenic and vacuum systems, beam transfer, injection, and dump, rf system, and beam instrumentation and control system. Also given are cost estimates, construction schedules, and a management plan. (LEW)

Not Available

1986-05-01

281

HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLE COLLIDERS: PAST 20 YEARS, NEXT 20 YEARS, AND BEYOND  

SciTech Connect

Particle colliders for high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This paper briefly reviews the colliding beam method and the history of colliders, discusses the development of the method over the last two decades in detail, and examines near-term collider projects that are currently under development. The paper concludes with an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and to find what paradigm changes are necessary

Shiltsev, V.

2013-09-25

282

High-energy Particle Colliders: Past 20 Years, Next 20 Years, And Beyond  

E-print Network

Particle colliders for high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This paper briefly reviews the colliding beam method and the history of colliders, discusses the development of the method over the last two decades in detail, and examines near-term collider projects that are currently under development. The paper concludes with an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and to find what paradigm changes are necessary for breakthroughs in the field.

Shiltsev, V

2014-01-01

283

Circuit and Scattering Matrix Analysis of the Wire Measurement Method of Beam Impedance in Accelerating Structures  

SciTech Connect

In order to measure the wakefield left behind multiple bunches of energetic electrons we have previously used the ASSET facility in the SLC [1]. However, in order to produce a more rapid and cost-effective determination of the wakefields we have designed a wire experimental method to measure the beam impedance and from the Fourier transform thereof, the wakefields. In this paper we present studies of the wire effect on the properties of X-band structures in study for the JLC/NLC (Japanese Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider) project. Simulations are made on infinite and finite periodical structures. The results are discussed.

Jones, Roger M

2003-05-23

284

Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and FACET - Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams at SLAC  

SciTech Connect

Plasma wakefield acceleration is one of the most promising approaches to advancing accelerator technology. This approach offers a potential 1,000-fold or more increase in acceleration over a given distance, compared to existing accelerators.  FACET, enabled by the Recovery Act funds, will study plasma acceleration, using short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons. In this lecture, the physics of plasma acceleration and features of FACET will be presented.  

Andrei Seryi

2009-09-09

285

Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.  

PubMed

Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors. PMID:24345525

Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

2014-06-01

286

Beam position and energy monitoring in compact linear accelerators for radiotherapy.  

PubMed

The experimental verification of a novel sensor topology capable of measuring both the position and energy of an electron beam inside a compact electron linear accelerator for radiotherapy is presented. The method applies microwave sensing techniques and allows for the noninterceptive monitoring of the respective beam parameters within compact accelerators for medical or industrial purposes. A state space feedback approach is described with the help of which beam displacements, once detected, can be corrected within a few system macropulses. The proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted with a prototype accelerator and customized hardware. Additionally, closed-loop operation with high accuracy is demonstrated. PMID:23996534

Ruf, Marcel; Müller, Sven; Setzer, Stefan; Schmidt, Lorenz-Peter

2014-02-01

287

Capture and Control of Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams: Experiment and Simulation  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the ongoing studies on the possibilities for transport and RF capture of laser-accelerated proton beams in conventional accelerator structures. First results on the capture of laser-accelerated proton beams are presented, supported by Trace3D, CST particle studio and Warp simulations. Based on these results, the development of the pulsed high-field solenoid is guided by our desire to optimize the output particle number for this highly divergent beam with an exponential energy spectrum. A future experimental test stand is proposed to do studies concerning the application as a new particle source.

Nurnberg, F; Alber, I; Harres, K; Schollmeier, M; Roth, M; Barth, W; Eickhoff, H; Hofmann, I; Friedman, A; Grote, D; Logan, B G

2009-05-13

288

Beam loading in a laser-plasma accelerator using a near-hollow plasma channel  

SciTech Connect

Beam loading in laser-plasma accelerators using a near-hollow plasma channel is examined in the linear wake regime. It is shown that, by properly shaping and phasing the witness particle beam, high-gradient acceleration can be achieved with high-efficiency, and without induced energy spread or emittance growth. Both electron and positron beams can be accelerated in this plasma channel geometry. Matched propagation of electron beams can be achieved by the focusing force provided by the channel density. For positron beams, matched propagation can be achieved in a hollow plasma channel with external focusing. The efficiency of energy transfer from the wake to a witness beam is calculated for single ultra-short bunches and bunch trains.

Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2013-12-15

289

Strategies for mitigating the ionization-induced beam head erosion problem in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Strategies for mitigating ionization-induced beam head erosion in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) are explored when the plasma and the wake are both formed by the transverse electric field of the beam itself. Beam head erosion can occur in a preformed plasma because of a lack of focusing force from the wake at the rising edge (head) of the beam due to the finite inertia of the electrons. When the plasma is produced by field ionization from the space charge field of the beam, the head erosion is significantly exacerbated due to the gradual recession (in the beam frame) of the 100% ionization contour. Beam particles in front of the ionization front cannot be focused (guided) causing them to expand as in vacuum. When they expand, the location of the ionization front recedes such that even more beam particles are completely unguided. Eventually this process terminates the wake formation prematurely, i.e., well before the beam is depleted of its energy. Ionization-induced head erosion can be mitigated by controlling the beam parameters (emittance, charge, and energy) and/or the plasma conditions. In this paper we explore how the latter can be optimized so as to extend the beam propagation distance and thereby increase the energy gain. In particular we show that, by using a combination of the alkali atoms of the lowest practical ionization potential (Cs) for plasma formation and a precursor laser pulse to generate a narrow plasma filament in front of the beam, the head erosion rate can be dramatically reduced. Simulation results show that in the upcoming “two-bunch PWFA experiments” on the FACET facility at SLAC national accelerator laboratory the energy gain of the trailing beam can be up to 10 times larger for the given parameters when employing these techniques. Comparison of the effect of beam head erosion in preformed and ionization produced plasmas is also presented.

An, W.; Zhou, M.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.; Lu, W.; Adli, E.; Corde, S.; Litos, M.; Li, S.; Gessner, S.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Walz, D.; England, J.; Delahaye, J. P.; Muggli, P.

2013-10-01

290

DEVELOPMENT OF ACCELERATOR DATA REPORTING SYSTEM AND ITS APPLICATION TO TREND ANALYSIS OF BEAM CURRENT DATA  

SciTech Connect

Detailed ongoing information about the ion beam quality is crucial to the successful operation of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In order to provide the highest possible neutron production time, ion beam quality is monitored to isolate possible problems or performance-related issues throughout the accelerator and accumulator ring. For example, beam current monitor (BCM) data is used to determine the quality of the beam transport through the accelerator. In this study, a reporting system infrastructure was implemented and used to generate a trend analysis report of the BCM data. The BCM data was analyzed to facilitate the identifi cation of monitor calibration issues, beam trends, beam abnormalities, beam deviations and overall beam quality. A comparison between transformed BCM report data and accelerator log entries shows promising results which represent correlations between the data and changes made within the accelerator. The BCM analysis report is one of many reports within a system that assist in providing overall beam quality information to facilitate successful beam operation. In future reports, additional data manipulation functions and analysis can be implemented and applied. Built-in and user-defi ned analytic functions are available throughout the reporting system and can be reused with new data.

Padilla, M.J.; Blokland, W.

2009-01-01

291

A double-foil target for improving beam quality in laser ion acceleration with thin foils  

SciTech Connect

A double-foil target is proposed for laser ion acceleration with thin targets to take advantage of high efficiency of such targets while avoiding beam degradation in late stage of acceleration. Laser heating of electrons co-moving with the ion beam is stopped by the second foil. It is found that the second foil can also modify and substantially improve the spectral and spatial properties of the ion beam and reduce the temperature of the co-moving electrons, leading to better preservation of the beam quality. Details of the dynamics are studied with particle-in-cell simulations.

Huang, C.-K.; Albright, B. J.; Yin, L.; Wu, H.-C.; Bowers, K. J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Fernandez, J. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2011-05-15

292

Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic  

SciTech Connect

The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

2010-06-01

293

Potential-Well Distortion, Microwave Instability, and Their Effects with Colliding Beams at KEKB  

SciTech Connect

Microwave instability in the Low Energy Ring of KEKB was studied using a broadband impedance model. The model gave excellent descriptions of longitudinal dynamics for both positive and negative momentum compactions. Moreover, it predicted that the threshold of microwave instability was a factor of two lower than the machine nominal operating bunch current. The prediction was confirmed by a measurement using the Belle detector. Furthermore, we integrated the longitudinal wakefield into the beam-beam simulation and applied it to study the combined effects in KEKB. As a result, the beam-beam simulation became truly three-dimensional with emittance growth in all three dimensions simultaneously as the beam currents increase. In addition, an observed mystery of asymmetry in the horizontal scan could also be explained by our simulations.

Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC; Flanagan, J.; Fukuma, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Ieiri, T.; Ohmi, K.; Oide, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Rorie, Jamal; /Hawaii U.

2009-04-01

294

Towards stable acceleration in LINACS  

E-print Network

Ultra-stable and -reproducible high-energy particle beams with short bunches are needed in novel linear accelerators and, in particular, in the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. A passive beam phase stabilization system based on a bunch compression with a negative transfer matrix element R56 and acceleration at a positive off-crest phase is proposed. The motivation and expected advantages of the proposed scheme are outlined.

Dubrovskiy, A D

2014-01-01

295

Energy matching of 1. 2 GeV positron beam to the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) damping ring  

SciTech Connect

Positrons collected at the SLC positron source are transported over a 2-km path at 220 MeV to be reinjected into the linac for acceleration to 1.2 GeV, the energy of the emittance damping ring. Since the positron bunch length is a significant fraction of a cycle of the linac-accelerating RF, the energy spread at 1.2 GeV is considerably larger than the acceptance of the linac-to-ring (LTR) transport system. Making use of the large pathlength difference at the beginning of the LTR due to this energy spread, a standard SLAC 3-m accelerating section has been installed in the LTR to match the longitudinal phase space of the positron beam to the acceptance of the damping ring. The design of the matching system is described, and a comparison of operating results within simulations is presented. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Clendenin, J.E.; Helm, R.H.; Jobe, R.K.; Kulikov, A.; Sheppard, J.C.

1989-08-01

296

High quality electron beams from a plasma channel guided laser wakefield accelerator  

SciTech Connect

Laser driven accelerators, in which particles are accelerated by the electric field of a plasma wave driven by an intense laser, have demonstrated accelerating electric fields of hundreds of GV/m. These fields are thousands of times those achievable in conventional radiofrequency (RF) accelerators, spurring interest in laser accelerators as compact next generation sources of energetic electrons and radiation. To date however, acceleration distances have been severely limited by lack of a controllable method for extending the propagation distance of the focused laser pulse. The ensuing short acceleration distance results in low energy beams with 100% electron energy spread, limiting applications. Here we demonstrate that a relativistically intense laser can be guided by a preformed plasma density channel and that the longer propagation distance can result in electron beams of percent energy spread with low emittance and increased energy, containing >10{sup 9} electrons above 80 MeV. The preformed plasma channel technique forms the basis of a new class of accelerators, combining beam quality comparable to RF accelerators with the high gradients of laser accelerators to produce compact tunable high brightness electron and radiation sources.

Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, Cs.; van Tilborg, J.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Bruhwiler, D.; Nieter, C.; Cary, J.; Leemans, W.P.

2004-07-08

297

Electron Cloud Effects on Long-Term Beam Dynamics in a Circular Accelerator  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we study long term dynamics of an intense positively charged beam in the presence of electron clouds in a circular accelerator. Particularly, we study strong head-tail beam instabilities, emmitance growth and tune shift caused by electron cloud. We adopt a Particle-in-cell (PIC) code, QuickPIC, which we have been developing for plasma based accelerators studies to the problem

Ali Ghalam; Tom Katsouleas; Giovanni Rumolo; Frank Zimmermann; Viktor Decyk; Chengkun Huang; Warren Mori; Francesco Ruggiero

2003-01-01

298

Ultralow Emittance, Multi-MeV Proton Beams from a Laser Virtual-Cathode Plasma Accelerator  

Microsoft Academic Search

The laminarity of high-current multi-MeV proton beams produced by irradiating thin metallic foils with ultraintense lasers has been measured. For proton energies >10 MeV, the transverse and longitudinal emittance are, respectively, <0.004 mm mrad and <10-4 eV s, i.e., at least 100-fold and may be as much as 104-fold better than conventional accelerator beams. The fast acceleration being electrostatic from

T. E. Cowan; J. Fuchs; H. Ruhl; A. Kemp; P. Audebert; M. Roth; R. Stephens; I. Barton; A. Blazevic; E. Brambrink; J. Cobble; J. Fernández; J.-C. Gauthier; M. Geissel; M. Hegelich; J. Kaae; S. Karsch; G. P. Le Sage; S. Letzring; M. Manclossi; S. Meyroneinc; A. Newkirk; H. Pépin; N. Renard-Legalloudec

2004-01-01

299

Laser ion acceleration toward future ion beam cancer therapy - Numerical simulation study -  

PubMed Central

Background: Ion beam has been used in cancer treatment, and has a unique preferable feature to deposit its main energy inside a human body so that cancer cell could be killed by the ion beam. However, conventional ion accelerator tends to be huge in its size and its cost. In this paper a future intense-laser ion accelerator is proposed to make the ion accelerator compact. Subjects and methods: An intense femtosecond pulsed laser was employed to accelerate ions. The issues in the laser ion accelerator include the energy efficiency from the laser to the ions, the ion beam collimation, the ion energy spectrum control, the ion beam bunching and the ion particle energy control. In the study particle computer simulations were performed to solve the issues, and each component was designed to control the ion beam quality. Results: When an intense laser illuminates a target, electrons in the target are accelerated and leave from the target; temporarily a strong electric field is formed between the high-energy electrons and the target ions, and the target ions are accelerated. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions was improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or by a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation was realized by holes behind the solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching were successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. Conclusions: The present study proposed a novel concept for a future compact laser ion accelerator, based on each component study required to control the ion beam quality and parameters. PMID:24155555

Kawata, Shigeo; Izumiyama, Takeshi; Nagashima, Toshihiro; Takano, Masahiro; Barada, Daisuke; Kong, Qing; Gu, Yan Jun; Wang, Ping Xiao; Ma, Yan Yun; Wang, Wei Min

2013-01-01

300

Testing General Relativity With Laser Accelerated Electron Beams  

E-print Network

Electron accelerations of the order of $10^{21} g$ obtained by laser fields open up the possibility of experimentally testing one of the cornerstones of general relativity, the weak equivalence principle, which states that the local effects of a gravitational field are indistinguishable from those sensed by a properly accelerated observer in flat space-time. We illustrate how this can be done by solving the Einstein equations in vacuum and integrating the geodesic equations of motion for a uniformly accelerated particle.

L. Á. Gergely; T. Harko

2012-07-16

301

Acceleration of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays in the Colliding Shells of Blazars and GRBs: Constraints from the Fermi Gamma ray Space Telescope  

E-print Network

Fermi Gamma ray Space Telescope measurements of spectra, variability time scale, and maximum photon energy give lower limits to the apparent jet powers and, through gammagamma opacity arguments, the bulk Lorentz factors of relativistic jets. The maximum cosmic-ray particle energy is limited by these two quantities in Fermi acceleration scenarios. Recent data are used to constrain the maximum energies of cosmic-ray protons and Fe nuclei accelerated in colliding shells of GRBs and blazars. The Fermi results indicate that Fe rather than protons are more likely to be accelerated to ultra-high energies in AGNs, whereas powerful GRBs can accelerate both protons and Fe to >~ 10^{20} eV. Emissivity of nonthermal radiation from radio galaxies and blazars is estimated from the First Fermi AGN Catalog, and shown to favor BL Lac objects and FR1 radio galaxies over flat spectrum radio quasars, FR2 radio galaxies, and long-duration GRBs as the sources of UHECRs.

Charles D. Dermer; Soebur Razzaque

2010-04-24

302

Flyer Acceleration by Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation and Application for Space Propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Flyer acceleration by ablation plasma pressure produced by irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam has been studied. Acceleration process including expansion of ablation plasma was simulated based on fluid model. And interaction between incident pulsed ion beam and a flyer target was considered as accounting stopping power of it. In experiments, we used ETIGO-II intense pulsed ion beam generator with two kinds of diodes; 1) Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID, power densities of <100 J/cm2) and 2) Spherical-focused Plasma Focus Diode (SPFD, power densities of up to 4.3 kJ/cm2). Numerical results of accelerated flyer velocity agreed well with measured one over wide range of incident ion beam energy density. Flyer velocity of 5.6 km/s and ablation plasma pressure of 15 GPa was demonstrated by the present experiments. Acceleration of double-layer target consists of gold/aluminum was studied. For adequate layer thickness, such a flyer target could be much more accelerated than a single layer. Effect of waveform of ion beam was also examined. Parabolic waveform could accelerate more efficiently than rectangular waveform. Applicability of ablation propulsion was discussed. Specific impulse of 7000~8000 seconds and time averaged thrust of up to 5000~6000N can be expected. Their values can be controllable by changing power density of incident ion beam and pulse duration.

Harada, Nobuhiro; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Kashine, Kenji; Jiang, Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

2004-02-01

303

Sensitivity analysis of an asymmetric Monte Carlo beam model of a Siemens Primus accelerator.  

PubMed

The assumption of cylindrical symmetry in radiotherapy accelerator models can pose a challenge for precise Monte Carlo modeling. This assumption makes it difficult to account for measured asymmetries in clinical dose distributions. We have performed a sensitivity study examining the effect of varying symmetric and asymmetric beam and geometric parameters of a Monte Carlo model for a Siemens PRIMUS accelerator. The accelerator and dose output were simulated using modified versions of BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc that allow lateral offsets of accelerator components and lateral and angular offsets for the incident electron beam. Dose distributions were studied for 40 × 40 cm² fields. The resulting dose distributions were analyzed for changes in flatness, symmetry, and off-axis ratio (OAR). The electron beam parameters having the greatest effect on the resulting dose distributions were found to be electron energy and angle of incidence, as high as 5% for a 0.25° deflection. Electron spot size and lateral offset of the electron beam were found to have a smaller impact. Variations in photon target thickness were found to have a small effect. Small lateral offsets of the flattening filter caused significant variation to the OAR. In general, the greatest sensitivity to accelerator parameters could be observed for higher energies and off-axis ratios closer to the central axis. Lateral and angular offsets of beam and accelerator components have strong effects on dose distributions, and should be included in any high-accuracy beam model. PMID:22402376

Schreiber, Eric C; Sawkey, Daren L; Faddegon, Bruce A

2012-01-01

304

Noninterceptive method to measure longitudinal Twiss parameters of a beam in a hadron linear accelerator using beam position monitors  

A new method of measuring of the rms longitudinal Twiss parameters of a beam in linear accelerators is presented. It is based on using sum signals from beam position monitors sensitive to the longitudinal charge distribution in the bunch. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on the superconducting section of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source linear accelerator. The results are compared to a direct measurement of the bunch longitudinal profiles using an interceptive bunch shape monitor in the linac warm section of the same accelerator. Limitations of the method are discussed. The method is fast and simple, and can be used to obtain the initial parameters for the longitudinal matching in linear accelerators where interceptive diagnostics are not desirable.

Shishlo, A.; Aleksandrov, A.

2013-06-01

305

LOW ENERGY BEAM MEASUREMENTS USING PHIL ACCELERATOR AT LAL, COMPARISON WITH PARMELA SIMULATIONS  

E-print Network

X gun, a 2.5 cell S-band cavity designed by LAL for the plasma accelerator studies performed at LAL [1,2]. This accelerator is dedicated to test and characterize electron RF-guns and to deliver). The first beam has been obtained on the 4th of November 2009. The current RF-gun tested on PHIL is the Alpha

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

306

A prototype of a beam steering assistant tool for accelerator operations  

SciTech Connect

The CEBAF accelerator provides nuclear physics experiments at Jefferson Lab with high quality electron beams. Three experimental end stations can simultaneously receive the beams with different energies and intensities. For each operational mode, the accelerator setup procedures are complicated and require very careful checking of beam spot sizes and positions on multiple beam viewers. To simplify these procedures and make them reproducible, a beam steering assistant GUI tool has been created. The tool is implemented as a multi-window control screen. The screen has an interactive graphical object window, which is an overlay on top of a digitized live video image from a beam viewer. It allows a user to easily create and edit any graphical objects consisting of text, ellipses, and lines, right above the live beam viewer image and then save them in a file that is called a beam steering template. The template can show, for example, the area within which the beam must always be on the viewer. Later, this template can be loaded in the interactive graphical object window to help accelerator operators steer the beam to the specified area on the viewer.

M. Bickley; P. Chevtsov

2006-10-24

307

Beam instrumentation for future high intense hadron accelerators at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

High intensity hadron beams of up to 2 MW beam power are a key element of new proposed experimental facilities at Fermilab. Project X, which includes a SCRF 8 GeV H{sup -} linac, will be the centerpiece of future HEP activities in the neutrino sector. After a short overview of this, and other proposed projects, we present the current status of the beam instrumentation activities at Fermilab with a few examples. With upgrades and improvements they can meet the requirements of the new beam facilities, however design and development of new instruments is needed, as shown by the prototype and conceptual examples in the last section.

Wendt, M.; Hu, M.; Tassotto, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Scarpine, V.; Shin, S.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

2008-08-01

308

[Stereotactic radiotherapy with linear accelerators. Dosage considerations on collimators and photon beam energy].  

PubMed

The small X-ray beam profiles produced by linear accelerators and used in stereotactic radiosurgery were studied. Circular focusing and not-focusing beams outlined by additional collimators (diameter ranging 10 to 30 mm) and square field outlined by the jaws (field size 10 to 30 mm) were measured. 6 and 18-MV X-ray beams from a dual energy accelerator and 6 and 15-MV X-ray beams produced by 2 single-energy accelerators were used. Measurements were carried out with Kodak X Omat V films in a perspex phantom in the same conditions for all the fields. To study the profile characteristics we introduced the V80/V20 = (R80/R20)3 ratio where R80 and R20 are respectively the mean distance of the 80% and 20% isodose lines from the beams axis. Measurement results show that 6-MV X-ray beams have a higher V80/V20 ratio than the ones obtained with the other energies. There is no significant difference between the beams produced with focused collimators and those produced with not-focused collimators. Square fields outlined by the jaws have a V80/V20 ratio greatly dependent on the accelerator used. This ratio is generally worse than the ones obtained with beams outlined by additional collimators. PMID:7617913

Somigliana, A B; Filice, S; Stucchi, C; Gramaglia, A; Villa, S; Pasqualotto, C; Brusa, A; Crippa, M; Casolino, D; Scorsetti, M

1995-05-01

309

High-Energy Laser-Accelerated Electron Beams for Long-Range Interrogation  

SciTech Connect

We are studying the use of 0.1 1.0 GeV laser-accelerated electron beams as active interrogation probes for long-standoff radiography or nuclear activation of concealed special nuclear material. Use of beams in this energy range is largely unexplored, but such beams could provide notable advantages over lower-energy beams and x-rays. High-energy laser-accelerated electrons exhibit large penetration range through air and solids, and low beam divergence for both direct beams and secondary Bremsstrahlung x-rays. We present laboratory measurements of radiography and activation, using the high-power Diodes laser system at the University of Nebraska, as well as MCNP and GEANT Monte Carlo simulation results used to aid experiment design and interpretation.

Cummingham, N. J. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Banerjee, Sudeep [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Ramanathan, Vidya [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Powell, Nathan [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Chandler-Smith, Nate [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Schultz, David Robert [ORNL; Pozzi, Sara [University of Michigan; Clarke, Shaun [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Umstadter, Donald [University of Nebraska, Lincoln

2009-01-01

310

Application of MO-Type Flange for Accelerator Beam Ducts 3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on experiences in the precedent stain-less steel case, a possibility of employing copper-alloy and aluminum-alloy Matsumoto-Ohtsuka (MO)-type flanges in a vacuum beam pipes for a particle accelerator is experimentally studied. They can mitigate the heating problems found in the case of stainless-steel flanges under high-intensity beams, and also simplify the manufacturing procedure of beam pipes. Copper-alloy flanges show a

Yusuke Suetsugu; Mitsuru Shirai; Michio Ohtsuka; Toshiro Nishidono; Kazuhiko Watanabe; Yasuaki Suzuki; Akira Morishige; Masao Tsuchiya; Tomohiro Yonemoto

2010-01-01

311

Recent Progress in the Development of a Circular Ion Induction Accelerator for Space Charge Dominated Beams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Heavy Ion Fusion Group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been developing the world's first ion induction accelerator. This machine has recently been extended to 90 degress, or 10 half-lattice periods(HLP) with full beam transport. As part of this extension, two new diagnostic systems have been fully enabled, the Capacitive Beam Probes(C-probes) and the Gated Beam Imager(GBI). The C-probes

L. Ahle; T. C. Sangster; D. Autrey; J. Barnard; G. Craig; A. Friedman; D. P. Grote; E. Halaxa; R. L. Hanks; M. Hernandez; H. C. Kirbie; B. G. Logan; S. M. Lund; G. Mant; A. Molvik; W. Sharp; D. Berners; S. Eylon; D. L. Judd; L. Reginato; A. Debeling; W. Fritz

1998-01-01

312

Annular Cherenkov High Gradient Wakefield Accelerator: Beam-Breakup Analysis and Energy Transfer Efficiency  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we give a complete analytical solution for Cherenkov wakefields generated by an azimuthally asymmetric annular beam propagating in a coaxial two-channel dielectric structure. The transformer ratio of this type of structure is dramatically increased in comparison to a cylindrical wakefield accelerating structure. A particle-Green's function beam dynamics code (BBU-3000) to study beam breakup effects has been upgraded

A M Altmark; A D Kanareykin

2012-01-01

313

Design of a 3 GHz Accelerator Structure for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF 3) Drive Beam  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the CLIC two-beam scheme, a high-current, long-pulse drive beam is required for RF power generation. Taking advantage of the 3 GHz klystrons available at the LEP injector once LEP stops, a 180 MeV electron accelerator is being constructed for a nominal beam current of 3.5 A and 1.5 microsecond pulse length. The high current requires highly effective suppression of

Erk Jensen; E. Jensen; M. Luong; Antonio Millich; E. Rugo; I V Syratchev; L. Thorndahl

2000-01-01

314

Experimental Studies of Temporal Electron Beam Shaping at the DUV-FEL Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

The photoinjectors for future short wavelength high brightness accelerator driven light sources need to produce an electron beam with ultra-low emittance. At the DUVFEL facility at BNL, we studied the effect of longitudinally shaping the photocathode laser pulses on the electron beam dynamics. We report on measurements of the longitudinal phase space distributions and the time-resolved transverse beam parameters for both a Gaussian and a flat-top temporal laser pulse profile.

Loos, H.; Doweel, D.; /SLAC; Sheehy, B.; Shen, Y.; Tsang, T.; Wang, X.; /Brookhaven; Serafini, L.; /INFN, Milan; Boscolo, M.; Ferrario, M.; Petrarca, M.; Vicario, C.; /Frascati

2005-09-28

315

Generating self-accelerating Airy beams using a digital micromirror device  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a new approach for generating an Airy beam by using a digital micromirror device (DMD) and a holographic technique where the DMD loads the desired hologram. Unique characteristics of an Airy beam, such as the non-diffraction and self-acceleration properties, were demonstrated to prove the successful construction of this type of waveform. Experimental results showed good agreement with theoretical calculations. This approach can also be used to generate other special beams.

Xu, Qinwei; Wang, Yongdong; Siew, Shi Yong; Lin, Jiao; Zhang, Yilei

2014-10-01

316

Using Nonlinear RF Acceleration for FEL Beam Conditioning  

SciTech Connect

We consider a new approach to condition an electron beam using nonlinear effects in the RF field. We demonstrate that such effects can generate a desirable--for the FEL interaction--radial variation of the particle's energy in the beam, and calculate the induced energy spread in the limit of weak field.

Stupakov, G.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

2005-12-14

317

A high average power beam dump for an electron accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The electron beam dump for Cornell University's Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) prototype injector was designed and manufactured to absorb 600 kW of electron beam power at beam energies between 5 and 15 MeV. It is constructed from an aluminum alloy using a cylindrical/conical geometry, with water cooling channels between an inner vacuum chamber and an outer jacket. The electron beam is defocused and its centroid is rastered around the axis of the dump to dilute the power density. A flexible joint connects the inner body and the outer jacket to minimize thermal stress. A quadrant detector at the entrance to the dump monitors the electron beam position and rastering. Electron scattering calculations, thermal and thermomechanical stress analysis, and radiation calculations are presented.

Liu, Xianghong; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce M.; Kostroun, Vaclav O.; Li, Yulin; Smolenski, Karl W.

2013-05-01

318

Linear collider research and development at SLAC, LBL and LLNL  

SciTech Connect

The study of electron-positron (e/sup +/e/sup /minus//) annihilation in storage ring colliders has been very fruitful. It is by now well understood that the optimized cost and size of e/sup +/e/sup /minus// storage rings scales as E(sub cm//sup 2/ due to the need to replace energy lost to synchrotron radiation in the ring bending magnets. Linear colliders, using the beams from linear accelerators, evade this scaling law. The study of e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collisions at TeV energy will require linear colliders. The luminosity requirements for a TeV linear collider are set by the physics. Advanced accelerator research and development at SLAC is focused toward a TeV Linear Collider (TLC) of 0.5--1 TeV in the center of mass, with a luminosity of 10/sup 33/--10/sup 34/. The goal is a design for two linacs of less than 3 km each, and requiring less than 100 MW of power each. With a 1 km final focus, the TLC could be fit on Stanford University land (although not entirely within the present SLAC site). The emphasis is on technologies feasible for a proposal to be framed in 1992. Linear collider development work is progressing on three fronts: delivering electrical energy to a beam, delivering a focused high quality beam, and system optimization. Sources of high peak microwave radio frequency (RF) power to drive the high gradient linacs are being developed in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Beam generation, beam dynamics and final focus work has been done at SLAC and in collaboration with KEK. Both the accelerator physics and the utilization of TeV linear colliders were topics at the 1988 Snowmass Summer Study. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Mattison, T.S.

1988-10-01

319

System modeling for the longitudinal beam dynamics control problem in heavy ion induction accelerators  

SciTech Connect

We address the problem of developing system models that are suitable for studying the control of the longitudinal beam dynamics in induction accelerators for heavy ions. In particular, we present the preliminary results of our efforts to devise a general framework for building detailed, integrated models of accelerator systems consisting of pulsed power modular circuits, induction cells, beam dynamics, and control system elements. Such a framework will permit us to analyze and design the pulsed power modulators and the control systems required to effect precise control over the longitudinal beam dynamics.

Payne, A.N.

1993-05-17

320

Two-screen single-shot electron spectrometer for laser wakefield accelerated electron beams.  

PubMed

The laser wakefield acceleration electron beams can essentially deviate from the axis of the system, which distinguishes them greatly from beams of conventional accelerators. In case of energy measurements by means of a permanent-magnet electron spectrometer, the deviation angle can affect accuracy, especially for high energies. A two-screen single-shot electron spectrometer that correctly allows for variations of the angle of entry is considered. The spectrometer design enables enhancing accuracy of measuring narrow electron beams significantly as compared to a one-screen spectrometer with analogous magnetic field, size, and angular acceptance. PMID:21529002

Soloviev, A A; Starodubtsev, M V; Burdonov, K F; Kostyukov, I Yu; Nerush, E N; Shaykin, A A; Khazanov, E A

2011-04-01

321

Two-screen single-shot electron spectrometer for laser wakefield accelerated electron beams  

SciTech Connect

The laser wakefield acceleration electron beams can essentially deviate from the axis of the system, which distinguishes them greatly from beams of conventional accelerators. In case of energy measurements by means of a permanent-magnet electron spectrometer, the deviation angle can affect accuracy, especially for high energies. A two-screen single-shot electron spectrometer that correctly allows for variations of the angle of entry is considered. The spectrometer design enables enhancing accuracy of measuring narrow electron beams significantly as compared to a one-screen spectrometer with analogous magnetic field, size, and angular acceptance.

Soloviev, A. A.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Burdonov, K. F.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Nerush, E. N.; Shaykin, A. A.; Khazanov, E. A. [Institute of Applied Physics RAS, 46 Ulyanov Street, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

2011-04-15

322

Initial electron-beam results from the DARHT-II linear induction accelerator  

Microsoft Academic Search

The DARHT-II linear-induction accelerator has been successfully operated at 1.2-1.3 kA and 12.5-12.7 MeV to demonstrate the production and acceleration of an electron beam. Beam pulse lengths for these experiments were varied from 0.5 ?s to 1.2 ?s full-width half-maximum. A low-frequency inductance-capacitance (LC) oscillation of diode voltage and current resulted in an oscillation of the beam position through interaction

Carl Ekdahl; E. O. Abeyta; H. Bender; W. Broste; C. Carlson; L. Caudill; K. C. D. Chan; Y. J. Chen; D. Dalmas; G. Durtschi; S. Eversole; S. Eylon; W. Fawley; D. Frayer; R. Gallegos; J. Harrison; E. Henestroza; M. Holzscheiter; T. Houck; T. Hughes; S. Humphries; D. Johnson; J. Johnson; K. Jones; E. Jacquez; B. Trent McCuistian; A. Meidinger; N. Montoya; C. Mostrom; K. Moy; K. Nielsen; D. Oro; L. Rodriguez; P. Rodriguez; M. Sanchez; M. Schauer; D. Simmons; H. V. Smith; J. Studebaker; R. Sturgess; G. Sullivan; C. Swinney; R. Temple; C. Y. Tom; S. S. Yu

2005-01-01

323

Generation of electron beams from a laser-based advanced accelerator at Shanghai Jiao Tong University  

E-print Network

At Shanghai Jiao Tong University, we have established a research laboratory for advanced acceleration research based on high-power lasers and plasma technologies. In a primary experiment based on the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) scheme, multi-hundred MeV electron beams having a reasonable quality are generated using 20-40 TW, 30 femtosecond laser pulses interacting independently with helium, neon, nitrogen and argon gas jet targets. The laser-plasma interaction conditions are optimized for stabilizing the electron beam generation from each type of gas. The electron beam pointing angle stability and divergence angle as well as the energy spectra from each gas jet are measured and compared.

Elsied, Ahmed M M; Li, Song; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Sokollik, Thomas; Zhang, Jie

2014-01-01

324

Generation of a rectangular beam distribution for irradiation of the accelerator production of tritium target  

SciTech Connect

A scheme has been developed to produce a well-confined rectangular beam-intensity distribution of greatly enhanced uniformity from initially-peaked intensity distributions such as Gaussian or parabolic distributions without beam scraping. This scheme employs a system of linear and nonlinear transport-line elements. The linear elements prepare the beam for the nonlinear focusing and govern the beam size at the target. Uniformity is achieved with octupoles, and beam confinement is assured with duodecapoles. The scheme was applied to the target focus for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) system. An initially Gaussian-distributed beam of 1.6-GeV protons was shaped into a rectangular 4 m by 2 m beam spot of acceptably uniform intensity at the tritium-production target. The scheme eliminates the need for sweeping the beam in a raster pattern to produce uniform target illumination. Details of the scheme are discussed.

Blind, B.

1990-01-01

325

Use of Oriented Crystals at High-Energy Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The application of bent crystals for extracting accelerated beams from high-energy accelerators is reviewed. The results of realizing highly efficient extraction of protons from the IHEP accelerator are presented. Proposals on using oriented crystals for designing efficient positron sources at linear colliders and on developing new undulators are discussed.

Kotov, V.I.; Afonin, A.G.; Baranov, V.T.; Biryukov, V.M.; Ivanov, Yu.M.; Kardash, A.A.; Maisheev, V.A.; Terekhov, V.I.; Troyanov, E.F.; Fedotov, Yu.S.; Chepegin, V.N.; Chesnokov, Yu.A. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino, Moscow oblast, 142284 (Russian Federation)

2005-06-01

326

SLAC linear collider: the machine, the physics, and the future  

SciTech Connect

The SLAC linear collider, in which beams of electrons and positrons are accelerated simultaneously, is described. Specifications of the proposed system are given, with calculated preditions of performance. New areas of research made possible by energies in the TeV range are discussed. (GHT)

Richter, B.

1981-11-01

327

NSAC Recommends a Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the plan submitted by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee to the Department of Energy and National Science Foundation urging construction of an ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collider designed to accelerate nucleon beams of ions as heavy as uranium. Discusses the process of selecting the type of facility as well as siting. (JM)

Physics Today, 1984

1984-01-01

328

Cresting Algorithm Using Fourier Analysis of Beam Position for CEBAF Accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) accelerator contains two linear accelerators with Radio frequency (RF) cavities to accelerate electrons. For this to happen, the maxima of the sinusoidal electric fields in each cavity must be precisely matched to the timing of the particle's trajectories. Optimization of the beam energy is achieved by modulating the phase of cavities one at a time until the electrons are observed have the maximum energy. The focus of this project is to improve the process of finding the crest (maxima) phase of multiple cavities by modulating several cavities simultaneously. This was done by modulating the phase of each cavity at a different frequency and observing the position of the beam. The position of the beam over the period of modulation was then Fourier Transformed, producing peaks at the frequencies that corresponded to the different cavities. This was repeated with different amplitudes of modulation to fit a relationship between the amplitude of modulation and the Fourier Transform spike amplitude, which contained phase information. It has been shown that multiple cavities can be crested at the same time through the phase modulation of cavities at different frequencies and Fourier transforming the positions of the resulting beam. This has ramifications for accelerator operation because it dramatically decreases tuning time needed for beam optimization.

Roussel, Ryan; Roblin, Yves

2012-10-01

329

H-mode accelerating structures with permanent-magnet quadrupole beam focusing  

We have developed high-efficiency normal-conducting rf accelerating structures by combining H -mode resonator cavities and a transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of interdigital H -mode (IH-PMQ) structures is 10–20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4–5 times smaller. Results of the combined 3D modeling—electromagnetic computations, multiparticle beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis—for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating-field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. Measurements of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank show a good agreement with the calculations. Examples of cross-bar H -mode structures with PMQ focusing for higher beam velocities are also presented. H -PMQ accelerating structures following a short radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications.

Kurennoy, S. S.; Rybarcyk, L. J.; O’Hara, J. F.; Olivas, E. R.; Wangler, T. P.

2012-09-01

330

DTL cavity design and beam dynamics for a TAC linear proton accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A 30 mA drift tube linac (DTL) accelerator has been designed using SUPERFISH code in the energy range of 3-55 MeV in the framework of the Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) project. Optimization criteria in cavity design are effective shunt impedance (ZTT), transit-time factor and electrical breakdown limit. In geometrical optimization we have aimed to increase the energy gain in each RF gap of the DTL cells by maximizing the effective shunt impedance (ZTT) and the transit-time factor. Beam dynamics studies of the DTL accelerator have been performed using beam dynamics simulation codes of PATH and PARMILA. The results of both codes have been compared. In the beam dynamical studies, the rms values of beam emittance have been taken into account and a low emittance growth in both x and y directions has been attempted.

Caliskan, A.; Y?lmaz, M.

2012-02-01

331

Cold ion beams in the low latitude boundary layer during accelerated flow events  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurements made with the Fast Plasma Experiment on ISEE 1 and 2 reveal that accelerated beams of cold (1-30 eV for H/+/) ions are present sporadically on reconnected field lines within the low latitude boundary layer (LLBI). H(+) normally is the major constituent of these beams, but He(+) and O(+) are also occasionally detected in variable concentrations. Because of the low temperatures and the compositional makeup of these beams, the ionosphere must ultimately be the source of these ions. Observed beam speeds (between 120 and 250 km/s) are always less than that of the magnetosheath ions which penetrate into the LLBL on reconnected field lines, but both ion populations share the same E x B convective drift. Analysis reveals that reflection at the magnetopause cannot be the mechanism accelerating these ions. A more likely possibility is that the ions are accelerated primarily by the large transverse drift of recently reconnected field lines.

Gosling, J. T.; Thomsen, M. F.; Bame, S. J.; Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.

1990-01-01

332

The extension of the HHIRF accelerators to produce radioactive ion beams  

SciTech Connect

The production of medium-intensity, proton-rich, radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics, astrophysics, and applied research with the HHIRF accelerators is discussed. Radioactive atoms will be produced with fusion reactions by light-ion beams from the K = 105 Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron stopping in an ISOLDE-type thick target mounted on a 300-kV high-voltage platform. These radioactive atoms will be ionized, mass separated, and charge exchanged to negative ions on the high-voltage platform prior to injection into the HHIRF 25-MV tandem accelerator. Beams of up to mass 80 will be accelerated to energies greater than 5 MeV/nucleon. For some radioactive beams, intensities greater than 1 pnA can be expected. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Olsen, D.K.; Alton, G.D.; Baktash, C.; Dowling, D.T.; Garrett, J.D.; Haynes, D.L.; Jones, C.M.; Juras, R.C.; Lane, S.N.; Lee, I.Y.; Meigs, M.J.; Mills, G.D.; Mosko, S.W.; Tatum, B.A.; Toth, K.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Carter, H.K. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States))

1991-01-01

333

CHARACTERIZATION OF A HIGH CURRENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM VIA OPTICAL TRANSITION RADIATION FROM DIELECTRIC FOILS  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, thin metal foils are employed for optical transition radiation (OTR) beam diagnostics but the possibility of shorting accelerator insulating surfaces and modifying accelerating fields are concerns. The successful utilization of dielectric foils in place of metal ones could alleviate these issues but necessitates more understanding of the OTR data for inferring desired beam parameters because of the dielectric's finite permittivity. Additionally, the temperature dependence of the relevant foil parameters due to beam heating should be accounted for. Here, we present and discuss sample synthetic diagnostic results of Kapton OTR spot-size measurements from the Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator which studies these and sightline effects. These simulations show that in some cases, the observed spot-sizes and radii are noticeably larger than the beam radii.

Tang, V; Brown, C; Houck, T

2007-06-13

334

Industrial application of e-beam accelerators in Korea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electron Accelerators are the most common means of radiation processing, and they are used in diverse industries to enhance the physical and the chemical properties of materials and to reduce undesirable contaminants, such as pathogens or toxic by-products of materials. Fifteen thousand [1,500] electron accelerators are commercially used in the world, and this number is eight or nine times greater than the number of Gamma irradiation facilities. Electron accelerators are reliable and durable electrically-sourced equipment that can produce ionizing radiation when it is needed for a particular commercial use. Electron accelerators were introduced in Korea during the 1970s, firstly for research and later for insulated wire and cable production. At present, over sixty electron accelerators are in commercial use, providing several billion USD annually in Korean industries, mainly for purposes such as, productions of wires, cables, thermo-shrinkable materials, foam sheets, and coating, curing of materials, sterilization of medical products, environmental protection, and others. With the increasing needs in the automobile and electronics industries, applicable areas for electron accelerator will be extended greatly in the future.

Han, Bumsoo; Kim, JinKyu; Kim, Yuri; Jeong, Kwang-Young

2012-07-01

335

Optimization of Drive-Bunch Current Profile for Enhanced Transformer Ratio in Beam-Driven Acceleration Techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, wakefield acceleration has gained attention due to its high acceleration gradients and cost effectiveness. In beam-driven wakefield acceleration, a critical parameter to optimize is the transformer ratio. It has been shown that current shaping of electron beams allows for enhanced (> 2) transformer ratios. In this paper we present the optimization of the pulse shape of the

F. Lemery; D. Mihalcea; C. R. Prokop; P. Piot

2012-01-01

336

Acceleration in the linear non-scaling fixed-field alternating-gradient accelerator EMMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a fixed-field alternating-gradient (FFAG) accelerator, eliminating pulsed magnet operation permits rapid acceleration to synchrotron energies, but with a much higher beam-pulse repetition rate. Conceived in the 1950s, FFAGs are enjoying renewed interest, fuelled by the need to rapidly accelerate unstable muons for future high-energy physics colliders. Until now a ‘scaling’ principle has been applied to avoid beam blow-up and

R. Barlow; J. S. Berg; N. Bliss; R. K. Buckley; J. A. Clarke; M. K. Craddock; R. D’Arcy; R. Edgecock; J. M. Garland; Y. Giboudot; P. Goudket; S. Griffiths; C. Hill; S. F. Hill; K. M. Hock; D. J. Holder; M. G. Ibison; F. Jackson; S. P. Jamison; C. Johnstone; J. K. Jones; L. B. Jones; A. Kalinin; E. Keil; D. J. Kelliher; I. W. Kirkman; S. Koscielniak; K. Marinov; N. Marks; B. Martlew; P. A. McIntosh; J. W. McKenzie; F. Méot; K. J. Middleman; A. Moss; B. D. Muratori; J. Orrett; H. L. Owen; J. Pasternak; K. J. Peach; M. W. Poole; Y. N. Rao; Y. Saveliev; D. J. Scott; S. L. Sheehy; B. J. A. Shepherd; R. Smith; S. L. Smith; D. Trbojevic; S. Tzenov; T. Weston; A. Wheelhouse; P. H. Williams; A. Wolski; T. Yokoi; S. Machida

2012-01-01

337

Resonant ion acceleration by electron-beam space-charge waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The possible resonant acceleration of ions by a space-charge wave of a magnetized electron beam is analyzed for a system in which the motion of the ions and the wave are kept synchronized. The required variation in the wave phase velocity is produced by a special profile of the external magnetic field. The amplitude of the space-charge wave grows as the ions are accelerated by virtue of a two-stream instability. The ion motion has been simulated numerically to study the capture of the ions by the wave and the subsequent dynamics of the ion bunches. The electron motion is assumed to be linear. The numerical simulation is also used to study the effect of a nonlinearity of the electron motion, which drives a satellite instability of the accelerating wave. The beam parameters at which this acceleration mechanism can operate are given. The efficiency of this acceleration is evaluated.

Loshkov, I. V.; Shevchenko, V. I.

1983-05-01

338

The Future of High Energy Accelerators  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper begins with a review of those high energy accelerators which are now in operation. Accelerators under construction are discussed and very high energy machines, still far in the future, are listed and described. Possible uses of cryogenic and superconducting magnets are mentioned. Colliding beam projects in operation and planned are presented. High energy physics has become very expensive.

John P. Blewett

1969-01-01

339

Incompatibility of FRC `Self--Colliding Beams' with Classical Large Orbit Theory and Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rosenbluth^1: ``One key physics issue is the behavior of very large gyro radius systems, for which the usual thermal physics is inadequate.''- Rostoker^2 posited (1) 0.42 KeV d^+ FRC can achieve confinement^ ? =30 s observed^3 in self-colliding orbits (SCO) of 725 KeV d^+,^ stabilized by magnet focusing^4 and electrons^5 ; (2) FRC result ^6?=2 x10-3 s is ``record long lived plasma state for advanced, aneutronic fuels ''; (3) non-intersecting collision-less orbits produce nuclear reactions. (i) Bz(r) of FRC is defocusing, field index n>0. From single particle orbit theory^7,8 destructive instability must occur with ?^ <= 10-3 s. (ii) ? cannot be scaled up by ion energy increase. (iii) Luminosity in SCO^3: L˜10^31s-1 cm-2; in co-revolving FRC orbits: L=0 unless 2 species in same orbit, which requires v2/v1= z1m1/z2m2 and N? ˜ 10^17 by Lawson^ 9-11. See http://www.aneutronicfusion.org 1. NIM271, p.1 (88); 2. PRL 70, 1818 (93); 3.PRL 54, 796 (1985); 4.PRL 29, 1590 (72); 5.PRL 70, 299 (93); 6.PRL 105, 045003-1,(10); 7.Part. Acc.1, (70); 8. AIP CP 311, 292 (93); 9. J.App.Phys.46, 2915 (75); 10. NIM A346 322 (93); 11.NIM 144, 65 (77)

Maglich, Bogdan

2012-03-01

340

Beam loading by distributed injection of electrons in a plasma wakefield accelerator.  

PubMed

We show through experiments and supporting simulations that propagation of a highly relativistic and dense electron bunch through a plasma can lead to distributed injection of electrons, which depletes the accelerating field, i.e., beam loads the wake. The source of the injected electrons is ionization of the second electron of rubidium (Rb II) within the wake. This injection of excess charge is large enough to severely beam load the wake, and thereby reduce the transformer ratio T. The reduction of the average T with increasing beam loading is quantified for the first time by measuring the ratio of peak energy gain and loss of electrons while changing the beam emittance. Simulations show that beam loading by Rb II electrons contributes to the reduction of the peak accelerating field from its weakly loaded value of 43??GV/m to a strongly loaded value of 26??GV/m. PMID:24484020

Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Marsh, K A; Clayton, C E; An, W; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Adli, E; Corde, S; Litos, M; Li, S; Gessner, S; Frederico, J; Fisher, A S; Wu, Z; Walz, D; England, R J; Delahaye, J P; Clarke, C I; Hogan, M J; Muggli, P

2014-01-17

341

Beam Loading by Distributed Injection of Electrons in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show through experiments and supporting simulations that propagation of a highly relativistic and dense electron bunch through a plasma can lead to distributed injection of electrons, which depletes the accelerating field, i.e., beam loads the wake. The source of the injected electrons is ionization of the second electron of rubidium (Rb II) within the wake. This injection of excess charge is large enough to severely beam load the wake, and thereby reduce the transformer ratio T. The reduction of the average T with increasing beam loading is quantified for the first time by measuring the ratio of peak energy gain and loss of electrons while changing the beam emittance. Simulations show that beam loading by Rb II electrons contributes to the reduction of the peak accelerating field from its weakly loaded value of 43 GV/m to a strongly loaded value of 26 GV/m.

Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Clayton, C. E.; An, W.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Adli, E.; Corde, S.; Litos, M.; Li, S.; Gessner, S.; Frederico, J.; Fisher, A. S.; Wu, Z.; Walz, D.; England, R. J.; Delahaye, J. P.; Clarke, C. I.; Hogan, M. J.; Muggli, P.

2014-01-01

342

Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator  

SciTech Connect

The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

Chitarin, G. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Department of Engineering and Management, University of Padova, Vicenza (Italy); Agostinetti, P.; Marconato, N.; Marcuzzi, D.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

2012-02-15

343

Characteristics of the high-energy photon beam of a 25-MeV accelerator.  

PubMed

The CGR Saturne 25 is an isocentrically mounted standing wave medical linear accelerator that produces dual-energy photon beams and a scanned electron beam with six selectable energies between 4 and 25 MeV. The highest energy photon beam is nominally referred to as 23 MV. For this beam the mean energy of the accelerated electron beam on the 1.3 radiation length (4 mm) tungsten x-ray target is found to be approximately 21 MeV, with the energy acceptance stated to be +/- 5%. The electron beam traverses a 270 degrees bending magnet upstream of the x-ray production target. The resulting bremsstrahlung beam passes through a combination steel and lead flattening filter, 4-cm maximum thickness. Dosimetric data for the 23-MV beam are presented with respect to rectangular field output factor, depth of maximum dose as a function of field size, surface and buildup dose, central axis percent depth dose, tissue-phantom ratios, beam profile, applicability of inverse square, and block transmission. Some data are also presented on the effect of different flattening filter designs on apparent beam energy. PMID:3127667

Luxton, G; Astrahan, M A

1988-01-01

344

The CEBAF cryogenic system: Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility  

SciTech Connect

The CEBAF superconducting linear accelerator incorporates cryogenic refrigeration equipment at three locations within the site: the Central Helium Liquefier, located in the center of the accelerator; the experimental end station refrigerator; and the test laboratory refrigerator located in the Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) adjacent to the test laboratory. The CEBAF cryogenic system will provide 2K refrigeration to the linacs of the accelerator and test laboratory and 4.5K refrigeration for the end station experimental halls. The Central Helium Liquefier and the test laboratory systems will produce 45K supercritical gaseous helium for shield refrigeration. Liquid nitrogen shields will also be incorporated in the test laboratory and end stations. 6 refs., 5 figs.

Chronis, W.C.; Arenius, D.; Kashy, D.; Keesee, M.; Rode, C.H.

1989-01-01

345

Polarization exchange in colliding photon beams in a medium of an atomic gas  

E-print Network

Photon-photon interactions mediated by an atomic gas can effect efficient polarization exchanges between two beams, leaving the medium exactly in its initial state. In, e.g., hydrogen, the distance required for macroscopic exchange is of order one tenth the distance in which the ordinary non-linear index of refraction would induce a phase change of pi. Several examples are worked out that show the variety of behaviors that can result, depending on the initial respective polarizations stated and the angle between the beams. Of particular interest are initial conditions in which there is no exchange at a mean field level, conventionally believed to apply when the number of photons, N, is large. Then the full theory leads both to large exchange and to large entanglement between the beams. Our most solid results indicate that one would have to wait a time proportional to log[N] to see this effect, but there are some indications that this behavior can be circumvented.

R. F. Sawyer

2014-02-20

346

Spectrum shaping of accelerator-based neutron beams for BNCT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe Monte Carlo simulations of three facilities for the production of epithermal neutrons for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) and examine general aspects and problems of designing the spectrum-shaping assemblies to be used with these neutron sources. The first facility is based on an accelerator-driven low-power subcritical reactor, operating as a neutron amplifier. The other two facilities have no amplifier and rely entirely on their primary sources, a D-T fusion reaction device and a conventional 2.5 MeV proton accelerator with a Li target, respectively.

Montagnini, B.; Cerullo, N.; Esposito, J.; Giusti, V.; Mattioda, F.; Varone, R.

2002-01-01

347

A Low Energy Beam Transport Design with high SCC for TAC Proton Accelerator  

E-print Network

In this study, a low energy beam transport (LEBT) channel for the proton linac section of the Turkic Accelerator Complex (TAC) has been designed by using TRACE 2D and TRAVEL codes. The LEBT channel is located between an ion source and a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) structure. The aims of the design studies are perfect matching between input and output beams with two solenoid magnets, small emittance growth and sufficient space for beam diagnostics. Total length of such LEBT channel is about 1.3 m. The current of H- ion beam from ion source is 80 mA. In the beam dynamical simulations, we have taken into account some space charge compensation (SCC) factors between %93.75 and %100. The results of both codes have been compared for the selected SCC factors. Additionally, beam aperture study for % 95 SCC factor has been done to discard unwanted particles and increase the beam brightness.

Caliskan, A; Sultansoy, S; Yilmaz, M

2012-01-01

348

Beam profile of the advanced test accelerator under laser-ion guiding  

SciTech Connect

Laser-ion guiding is currently deployed on the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA). Beam profiles are measured as a function of time by detecting optical emissions from foils inserted into the beam path. The beam size is observed to grow with time into the pulse. Two other experimental measurements support this observation: (1) vacuum expansion of the beam shows a loss of current in the latter part of the pulse; (2) beam transport through a pipe of reduced diameter results in a similar loss of current in the tail. These observations of increasing beam size are contrary to expectations based on increasing focus strength due to beam-induced ionization. Possible explanations will be presented.

Chong, Y.P.; Caporaso, G.J.; Lauer, E.J.; Prono, D.S.; Rainer, F.; Struve, K.W.; Weir, J.T.

1986-01-01

349

International linear collider reference design report  

SciTech Connect

The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

Aarons, G.

2007-06-22

350

Radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy of laser-accelerated proton beams  

E-print Network

. The acceleration of protons during the laser-plasma in- teraction up to energies above 60 MeV4,7 is qualitatively de- scribed by a plasma expansion model.17 Relativistic electrons generated by the laser-plasma and their energy deposition with respect to further applications. © 2009 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10

Strathclyde, University of

351

E-157: A 1.4-m-long plasma wake field acceleration experiment using a 30 GeV electron beam from the Stanford Linear Accelerator  

E-print Network

E-157: A 1.4-m-long plasma wake field acceleration experiment using a 30 GeV electron beam from the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Linac* M. J. Hogan, R. Assmann,a) F.-J. Decker, R. Iverson, P. Raimondi, S. Rokni, R. H. Siemann, D. Walz, and D. Whittum Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford

352

GENERATION AND CONTROL OF HIGH PRECISION BEAMS AT LEPTON ACCELERATORS  

SciTech Connect

Parity violation experiments require precision manipulation of helicity-correlated beam coordinates on target at the nm/nrad-level. Achieving this unprecedented level of control requires a detailed understanding of the particle optics and careful tuning of the beam transport to keep anomalies from compromising the design adiabatic damping. Such efforts are often hindered by machine configuration and instrumentation limitations at the low energy end. A technique has been developed at CEBAF including high precision measurements, Mathematica-based analysis for obtaining corrective solutions, and control hardware/software developments for realizing such level of control at energies up to 5 GeV.

Yu-Chiu Chao

2007-06-25

353

Course Notes: United States Particle Accelerator School Beam Physics with Intense Space-Charge  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the physics of beams with intense space charge. This course is suitable for graduate students and researchers interested in accelerator systems that require sufficient high intensity where mutual particle interactions in the beam can no longer be neglected. This course is intended to give the student a broad overview of the dynamics of beams with strong space charge. The emphasis is on theoretical and analytical methods of describing the acceleration and transport of beams. Some aspects of numerical and experimental methods will also be covered. Students will become familiar with standard methods employed to understand the transverse and longitudinal evolution of beams with strong space charge. The material covered will provide a foundation to design practical architectures. In this course, we will introduce you to the physics of intense charged particle beams, focusing on the role of space charge. The topics include: particle equations of motion, the paraxial ray equation, and the Vlasov equation; 4-D and 2-D equilibrium distribution functions (such as the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij, thermal equilibrium, and Neuffer distributions), reduced moment and envelope equation formulations of beam evolution; transport limits and focusing methods; the concept of emittance and the calculation of its growth from mismatches in beam envelope and from space-charge non-uniformities using system conservation constraints; the role of space-charge in producing beam halos; longitudinal space-charge effects including small amplitude and rarefaction waves; stable and unstable oscillation modes of beams (including envelope and kinetic modes); the role of space charge in the injector; and algorithms to calculate space-charge effects in particle codes. Examples of intense beams will be given primarily from the ion and proton accelerator communities with applications from, for example, heavy-ion fusion, spallation neutron sources, nuclear waste transmutation, etc.

Barnard, J.J.; Lund, S.M.

2008-05-30

354

Optimization of Drive-Bunch Current Profile for Enhanced Transformer Ratio in Beam-Driven Acceleration Techniques  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, wakefield acceleration has gained attention due to its high acceleration gradients and cost effectiveness. In beam-driven wakefield acceleration, a critical parameter to optimize is the transformer ratio. It has been shown that current shaping of electron beams allows for enhanced (> 2) transformer ratios. In this paper we present the optimization of the pulse shape of the drive bunch for dielectric-wakefield acceleration.

Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Prokop, C.R.; /Northern Illinois U.; Piot, P.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

2012-07-08

355

Particle-beam tracker for an accelerating target. Master's thesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose is to use a PI(Proportional plus INTEGRAL) controller to point the centroid of a particle beam at an intended target. Multiple Model Adaptive Estimator is used to estimate the centroid of a one-dimensionald Gaussian shaped source of photoelectron events. Merge Method of filter pruning is used to limit the size of this filter. A standard Kalman filter is

Jamerson

1985-01-01

356

Tungsten Powder as an accelerator target & InBeam Testing  

E-print Network

: tungsten powder jet High speed image: tungsten powder flow in a pipe Dense-phase delivery Lean-phase lift - Reliability in harsh environment? - High static stress levels require much larger beam sigma than baseline) ­ Containment / erosion ­ Heat transfer and cooling of powder Unstable tungsten powder jet High speed image

McDonald, Kirk

357

Summary II - Fusion Ion sources, Beam Formation, Acceleration and Neutralisation  

SciTech Connect

The 11th International Symposium on the Production and Neutralization of Negative Ions and Beams was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 13th - 15th September 2006 and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This summary covers the sessions of the Symposium devoted to the topics listed in the title.

Jones, T. T. C. [UKAEA Culham Division, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2007-08-10

358

Studies and application of bent crystals for beam steering at 70-GeV IHEP accelerator  

E-print Network

This report overviews studies accomplished in the U70 proton synchrotron of IHEP-Protvino during the recent two decades. Major attention is paid to a routine application of bent crystals for beam extraction from the machine. It has been confirmed experimentally that efficiency of beam extraction with a crystal deflector of around 85% is well feasible for a proton beam with intensity up to 1012 protons per cycle. Another trend is to use bent crystals for halo collimation in a high energy collider. New promising options emerge for, say, LHC and ILC based on the "volume reflection" effect, which has been discovered recently in machine study runs at U70 of IHEP (50 GeV) and SPS of CERN (400 GeV).

Afonin, A G; Britvich, G I; Chepegin, V N; Chesnokov, Yu A; Kotov, V I; Maisheev, V A; Terekhov, V I; Yazynin, I A

2011-01-01

359

Feasibility of electron cooling and luminosity potentials of colliders  

SciTech Connect

Luminosity upgrades of colliders with hadron beams tend to require decreased and maintained beam emittances using a suitable cooling technique. The breakthroughs of recent years: realization of beam energy recovery in superconducting linear accelerators; flat to round beam transformations; and new beam transport concepts (discontinuous solenoid, circulator rings, hollow beams, dispersive cooling); have promoted the feasibility of efficient electron cooling of intense high energy hadron beams. Electron cooling, in cooperation with strong SRF fields in storage rings, will allow one to obtain very short hadron bunches, as result of which the luminosity can be raised by making a low beta-star. Short bunches also would make feasible crab crossing, that allows one to remove the parasitic beam-beam interactions and maximize the collision rate. Cooling also results in flatness of uncoupled beam equilibrium; this can be used to diminish the IBS impact on luminosity.

Yaroslav Derbenev

2004-07-02

360

Progress report on the SLAC Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we report on the status of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC), the prototype of a new generation of colliding beam accelerators. This novel type of machine holds the potential of extending electron-positron colliding beam studies to center-of-mass (c.m.) energies far in excess of what is economically achievable with colliding beam storage rings. If the technical challenges posed by linear colliders are solvable at a reasonable cost, this new approach would provide an attractive alternative to electron-positron rings, where, because of rapidly rising synchrotron radiation losses, the cost and size of the ring increases with the square of the c.m. energy. In addition to its role as a test vehicle for the linear collider principle, the SLC aims at providing an abundant source of Z/sup 0/ decays to high energy physics experiments. Accordingly, two major detectors, the upgraded Mark II, now installed on the SLC beam line, and the state-of-the-art SLD, currently under construction, are preparing to probe the Standard Model at the Z/sup 0/ pole. The SLC project was originally funded in 1983. Since the completion of construction, we have been commissioning the machine to bring it up to a performance level adequate for starting the high energy physics program. In the remainder of this paper, we will discuss the status, problems and performance of the major subsystems of the SLC. We will conclude with a brief outline of the physics program, and of the planned enhancements to the capabilities of the machine. 26 refs., 7 figs.

Kozanecki, W.

1987-11-01

361

Plasma modeling of beam-electron cloud instabilities in circular accelerators  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 3D Particle-In-Cell model for continuous modeling of beam and electron cloud interaction in a circular accelerator is presented. A simple model for lattice structure, mainly the Quadruple and dipole magnets and chromaticity have been added to a plasma PIC code, QuickPIC, used extensively to model plasma wakefield acceleration concept. The code utilizes parallel processing techniques with domain decomposition in

Ali Ghalam

2005-01-01

362

Accelerator Technology Division annual report, FY 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; {Phi} Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

Not Available

1992-04-01

363

Start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of double triangular current profile generation in Argonne Wakefield Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

Double triangular current profile (DT) gives a high transformer ratio which is the determining factor of the performance of collinear wakefield accelerator. This current profile can be generated using the emittance exchange (EEX) beam line. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility plans to generate DT using the EEX beam line. We conducted start-to-end simulation for the AWA beam line using PARMELA code. Also, we discuss requirements of beam parameters for the generation of DT.

Ha, G.; Power, J.; Kim, S. H.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.-J.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W. [POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of) and Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of) and Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-12-21

364

Progress towards a 200 MW electron beam accelerator for the RDHWT/Mariah II Program.  

SciTech Connect

The Radiatively Driven Hypersonic Wind Tunnel (RDHWT) program requires an unprecedented 2-3 MeV electron beam energy source at an average beam power of approximately 200MW. This system injects energy downstream of a conventional supersonic air nozzle to minimize plenum temperature requirements for duplicating flight conditions above Mach 8 for long run-times. Direct-current electron accelerator technology is being developed to meet the objectives of a radiatively driven Mach 12 wind tunnel with a free stream dynamic pressure q=2000 psf. Due to the nature of research and industrial applications, there has never been a requirement for a single accelerator module with an output power exceeding approximately 500 kW. Although a 200MW module is a two-order of magnitude extrapolation from demonstrated power levels, the scaling of accelerator components to this level appears feasible. Accelerator system concepts are rapidly maturing and a clear technology development path has been established. Additionally, energy addition experiments have been conducted up to 800 kW into a supersonic airflow. This paper will discuss progress in the development of electron beam accelerator technology as an energy addition source for the RDHWT program and results of electron beam energy addition experiments conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Reed, Kim Warren; Pena, Gary Edward; Schneider, Larry X.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Glover, Steven Frank

2004-06-01

365

Irradiation damage to the beam window in the 800MWth accelerator-driven system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Irradiation damage to the beam window in the concept of 800MWth accelerator-driven system is evaluated. Heat produced in the window is also evaluated. Transport of proton and neutron up to 3.0 GeV is calculated by both PHITS that is the Monte Carlo code for particles and heavy ions and TWODANT that is two-dimensional deterministic transport code. The beam window is irradiated at the center of the accelerator-driven system with 20 MW proton beam power and neutron from the core during 300 full power days. Heat, displacement per atom, production rate of hydrogen and helium isotopes, and neutron and proton fields are estimated, assuming the Gaussian and flat beam profiles.

Nishihara, Kenji; Kikuchi, Kenji

2008-06-01

366

Design of a 3 GHz Accelerator Structure for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF 3) Drive Beam  

E-print Network

For the CLIC two-beam scheme, a high-current, long-pulse drive beam is required for RF power generation. Taking advantage of the 3 GHz klystrons available at the LEP injector once LEP stops, a 180 MeV electron accelerator is being constructed for a nominal beam current of 3.5 A and 1.5 ms pulse length. The high current requires highly effective suppression of dipolar wakes. Two concepts are investigated for the accelerating structure design: the "Tapered Damped Structure" developed for the CLIC main beam, and the "Slotted Iris - Constant Aperture" structure. Both use 4 SiC loads per cell for effective higher-order mode damping. A full-size prototype of the TDS structure has been built and tested successfully at full power. A first prototype of the SICA structure is being built

Carron, G; Luong, M; Millich, Antonio; Rugo, E; Syratchev, I V; Thorndahl, L

2000-01-01

367

Accelerator and Ion Beam Tradeoffs for Studies of Warm DenseMatter  

SciTech Connect

One approach for heating a target to ''Warm Dense Matter'' conditions (similar, for example, to the interiors of giant planets or certain stages in inertial confinement fusion targets), is to use intense ion beams as the heating source (see refs.[6] and [7] and references therein for motivation and accelerator concepts). By consideration of ion beam phase-space constraints, both at the injector, and at the final focus, and consideration of simple equations of state and relations for ion stopping, approximate conditions at the target foil may be calculated. Thus, target temperature and pressure may be calculated as a function of ion mass, ion energy, pulse duration, velocity tilt, and other accelerator parameters. We connect some of these basic parameters to help search the extensive parameter space including ion mass, ion energy, total charge in beam pulse, beam emittance, target thickness and density.

Barnard, J.J.; Briggs, R.J.; Callahan, D.A.; Davidson, R.C.; Friedman, A.; Grisham, L.; Lee, E.P.; Lee, R.W.; Logan, B.G.; Olson,C.L.; Rose, D.V.; Santhanam, P.; Sessler, A.M.; Staples, J.W.; Tabak, M.; Welch, D.R.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yu, S.S.

2006-01-30

368

Electron trapping and acceleration by the plasma wakefield of a self-modulating proton beam  

E-print Network

It is shown that co-linear injection of electrons or positrons into the wakefield of the self-modulating particle beam is possible and ensures high energy gain. The witness beam must co-propagate with the tail part of the driver, since the plasma wave phase velocity there can exceed the light velocity, which is necessary for efficient acceleration. If the witness beam is many wakefield periods long, then the trapped charge is limited by beam loading effects. The initial trapping is better for positrons, but at the acceleration stage a considerable fraction of positrons is lost from the wave. For efficient trapping of electrons, the plasma boundary must be sharp, with the density transition region shorter than several centimeters. Positrons are not susceptible to the initial plasma density gradient.

Lotov, K V; Petrenko, A V; Amorim, L D; Vieira, J; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O; Gschwendtner, E; Muggli, P

2014-01-01

369

Dosimetric analysis of beam-matching procedure of two similar linear accelerators  

PubMed Central

Linear accelerators from the same vendor in a radiation therapy center are usually beam-matched following Vendor's acceptance criteria. This protocol is limited to check the difference at particular points on the ionization curve for depth dose or beam profiles. This article describes different tests done after commissioning to evaluate the level of agreement between matched beams of two ONCOR Impression plus linear accelerators from Siemens. Total scatter factors, collimator scatter factors, wedge transmission factors were measured in water for 6-MV photon. All these factors for ONCOR2 were within ±1% of those values for ONCOR1. Along with these point dose measurements we have essentially used ?-index to compare the planar dose distribution from two beam-matched accelerators. For this study a set of ready packed EDR2 films was exposed on both accelerators. The set consisted of films for percentage depth dose, beam profiles, a pyramid shape, multileaf collimator's positional and dose delivery accuracy, and a film to compare head scatter at tray level. To include treatment planning system calculations, a film kept in axial plane was exposed to 3DCRT and IMRT plans with actual gantry angles and monitor units. These films were analyzed for ? in OmniPro IMRT software using different combinations of ?dose and - ?distances. All these films have shown good agreement for - ?distance of 3 mm and ?dose of 3 %. PMID:21897563

Bhangle, Janhavi R.; Narayanan, V. K. Sathiya; Kumar, Namitha K.; Vaitheeswaran, R.

2011-01-01

370

Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration of a Relativistic Electron Beam in a Slab-Symmetric Dielectric Lined Waveguide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report first evidence of wakefield acceleration of a relativistic electron beam in a dielectric-lined slab-symmetric structure. The high energy tail of a ˜60MeV electron beam was accelerated by ˜150keV in a 2 cm-long, slab-symmetric SiO2 waveguide, with the acceleration or deceleration clearly visible due to the use of a beam with a bifurcated longitudinal distribution that serves to approximate a driver-witness beam pair. This split-bunch distribution is verified by longitudinal reconstruction analysis of the emitted coherent transition radiation. The dielectric waveguide structure is further characterized by spectral analysis of the emitted coherent Cherenkov radiation at THz frequencies, from a single electron bunch, and from a relativistic bunch train with spacing selectively tuned to the second longitudinal mode (TM02). Start-to-end simulation results reproduce aspects of the electron beam bifurcation dynamics, emitted THz radiation properties, and the observation of acceleration in the dielectric-lined, slab-symmetric waveguide.

Andonian, G.; Stratakis, D.; Babzien, M.; Barber, S.; Fedurin, M.; Hemsing, E.; Kusche, K.; Muggli, P.; O'Shea, B.; Wei, X.; Williams, O.; Yakimenko, V.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

2012-06-01

371

Dielectric wakefield acceleration of a relativistic electron beam in a slab-symmetric dielectric lined waveguide.  

PubMed

We report first evidence of wakefield acceleration of a relativistic electron beam in a dielectric-lined slab-symmetric structure. The high energy tail of a ?60??MeV electron beam was accelerated by ?150??keV in a 2 cm-long, slab-symmetric SiO2 waveguide, with the acceleration or deceleration clearly visible due to the use of a beam with a bifurcated longitudinal distribution that serves to approximate a driver-witness beam pair. This split-bunch distribution is verified by longitudinal reconstruction analysis of the emitted coherent transition radiation. The dielectric waveguide structure is further characterized by spectral analysis of the emitted coherent Cherenkov radiation at THz frequencies, from a single electron bunch, and from a relativistic bunch train with spacing selectively tuned to the second longitudinal mode (TM02). Start-to-end simulation results reproduce aspects of the electron beam bifurcation dynamics, emitted THz radiation properties, and the observation of acceleration in the dielectric-lined, slab-symmetric waveguide. PMID:23004279

Andonian, G; Stratakis, D; Babzien, M; Barber, S; Fedurin, M; Hemsing, E; Kusche, K; Muggli, P; O'Shea, B; Wei, X; Williams, O; Yakimenko, V; Rosenzweig, J B

2012-06-15

372

High-quality electron beams from a helical inverse free-electron laser accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Compact, table-top sized accelerators are key to improving access to high-quality beams for use in industry, medicine and academic research. Among laser-based accelerating schemes, the inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) enjoys unique advantages. By using an undulator magnetic field in combination with a laser, GeV?m?1 gradients may be sustained over metre-scale distances using laser intensities several orders of magnitude less than those used in laser wake-field accelerators. Here we show for the first time the capture and high-gradient acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams from a helical IFEL. Using a modest intensity (~1013?W?cm?2) laser pulse and strongly tapered 0.5?m long undulator, we demonstrate >100?MV?m?1 accelerating gradient, >50?MeV energy gain and excellent output beam quality. Our results pave the way towards compact, tunable GeV IFEL accelerators for applications such as driving soft X-ray free-electron lasers and producing ?-rays by inverse Compton scattering.

Duris, J.; Musumeci, P.; Babzien, M.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Li, R. K.; Moody, J.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Sakai, Y.; Swinson, C.; Threlkeld, E.; Williams, O.; Yakimenko, V.

2014-09-01

373

High-quality electron beams from a helical inverse free-electron laser accelerator.  

PubMed

Compact, table-top sized accelerators are key to improving access to high-quality beams for use in industry, medicine and academic research. Among laser-based accelerating schemes, the inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) enjoys unique advantages. By using an undulator magnetic field in combination with a laser, GeV m(-1) gradients may be sustained over metre-scale distances using laser intensities several orders of magnitude less than those used in laser wake-field accelerators. Here we show for the first time the capture and high-gradient acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams from a helical IFEL. Using a modest intensity (~10(13)?W cm(-2)) laser pulse and strongly tapered 0.5 m long undulator, we demonstrate >100 MV m(-1) accelerating gradient, >50 MeV energy gain and excellent output beam quality. Our results pave the way towards compact, tunable GeV IFEL accelerators for applications such as driving soft X-ray free-electron lasers and producing ?-rays by inverse Compton scattering. PMID:25222026

Duris, J; Musumeci, P; Babzien, M; Fedurin, M; Kusche, K; Li, R K; Moody, J; Pogorelsky, I; Polyanskiy, M; Rosenzweig, J B; Sakai, Y; Swinson, C; Threlkeld, E; Williams, O; Yakimenko, V

2014-01-01

374

The use of photographic film to pinpoint accelerator beam losses.  

PubMed

Following removal of a superconducting wiggler that has a maximum magnetic-field of 7 T in a high-energy synchrotron facility, sufficient lead shielding was placed upstream of the removal point in the normal-conducting electron storage ring to account for any radiation sources from the upstream components. As is customary in such cases, when vacuum has been breached, there is a period of time required for vacuum re-conditioning of the ring. During this re-conditioning phase, poor vacuum contributes to gas bremsstrahlung formation that typically is visualized as an increase in overall radiation exposure from standard operating conditions. However, in this case, new radiation patterns emerged and persisted throughout the re-commissioning phase. Subsequently, additional shielding was then placed upstream but still failed to resolve the source of radiation. The radiation source point consisted of two distinct components: a point parallel to the position originally covered by the wiggler and a strong forward-directed peak (i.e., bremsstrahlung). The only feedback mechanism to track the beam position is the beam position monitors (BPM's). BPM's were located forward and aft of the parallel source point. The BPM's suggested that the beam was in the correct position. To investigate the elevated radiation level, commercial photographic film was used as a monitoring ruler and the focal point of the radiation source was clearly identified using this novel approach. The silver halide grain contained within the film emulsion possessed sufficient cross section and was activated from Ag to Ag, which has a half-life of 2.39 min and emits easily detectable radiation. Further, the exposed film is ready for reuse after 25 min due to the short half-life of Ag. The proposed method proved to be an easy, economic, and effective approach to rapidly and qualitatively identify the location of the beam losses. PMID:21709493

Marceau-Day, Marie Lorraine; Teague, Richard E; Wang, Wei-Hsung

2011-08-01

375

Narrowband beam loading compensation in the Fermilab Main Injector accelerating cavities  

SciTech Connect

A narrowband beam loading compensation system was installed for the Main Injector Accelerating Cavities. This feedback operates solely on the fundamental resonant mode of the cavity. This paper describes modifications to the high level Radio Frequency system required to make the system operational. These modifications decreased the effect of steady-state beam loading by a factor of 10 and improved the reliability of paraphasing for coalescing.

Joseph E. Dey; John S. Reid and James Steimel

2001-07-12

376

Low-beam-loss design of a compact, high-current deuteron radio frequency quadrupole accelerator  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 201.5MHz, 50mA, 2.0MeV deuteron radio frequency quadrupole accelerator is proposed as the neutron generator for the neutron experiment facility project at Peking University, China. Based on better understanding of beam losses, some new optimization procedures concerning both longitudinal and transverse dynamics are adopted. Accordingly, the beam transmission efficiency is improved from 91.2% to 98.3% and the electrode length is

C. Zhang; Z. Y. Guo; A. Schempp; R. A. Jameson; J. E. Chen; J. X. Fang

2004-01-01

377

Tutorial on Linear Colliders  

E-print Network

Proceeding from the collision point towards the source, we discuss purpose and design concepts of the various linear-collider subsystems, as well as important mechanisms of emittance dilution, beam diagnostics, and advanced tuning methods. In particular, we address beamstrahlung, linac emittance degradation due to dispersion and wake fields, scaling of damping-ring parameters with collider energy, fast beam-ion and electron-cloud instabilities, coherent synchrotron radiation, and rf guns. Five case studies are examined in detail.

Zimmermann, Frank

2001-01-01

378

Status of the TRIUMF ISAC-Facility for Accelerating Radioactive Beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ISAC, a new facility for accelerating intense ion beams of unstable nucleii is under construction at TRIUMF. The radioactive nucleii will be produced by up to 100 ?A of 500 MeV protons impinging on one of two target/ion-source stations located in an underground vault. The ionized beam will be transported at energies up to 60 keV to a high-acceptance, high-resolution mass analyser by electrostatic ion optics. Following mass selection the beam is further transported vertically to grade level and then horizontally to either a low-energy experimental area or to a system of accelerators. First, a 35 MHz cw RFQ accelerates isotopes with a charge/mass ratio greater than 1/30 from 2 keV/u to 150 keV/u. To meet experimental requirements the beam must be prebunched at 11.67 MHz. Following the RFQ the beam is passed through a stripper and magnetic bend to select one charge state having a charge/mass greater than 1/6 prior to rebunching and injection into a cw drift tube linac (DTL) operating at 105 MHz. The beam out of the DTL, with energy continuously variable from 0.15 to 1.5 MeV/u, is transported to one of a number of experimental stations. This paper briefly outlines the plans, schedule and status of the project.

Schmor, P. W.; Baartman, R.; Bricault, P.; Dombsky, M.; Dutto, G.; Koscielniak, S.; Laxdal, R. E.; Mammarella, F.; MacKenzie, G. H.; Poirier, R.; Root, L.; Stanford, G.; Welz, J.

1997-05-01

379

Beam collimation and transport of quasineutral laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field  

SciTech Connect

This article reports about controlling laser-accelerated proton beams with respect to beam divergence and energy. The particles are captured by a pulsed high field solenoid with a magnetic field strength of 8.6 T directly behind a flat target foil that is irradiated by a high intensity laser pulse. Proton beams with energies around 2.3 MeV and particle numbers of 10{sup 12} could be collimated and transported over a distance of more than 300 mm. In contrast to the protons the comoving electrons are strongly deflected by the solenoid field. They propagate at a submillimeter gyroradius around the solenoid's axis which could be experimentally verified. The originated high flux electron beam produces a high space charge resulting in a stronger focusing of the proton beam than expected by tracking results. Leadoff particle-in-cell simulations show qualitatively that this effect is caused by space charge attraction due to the comoving electrons. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications such as postacceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

Harres, K.; Alber, I.; Guenther, M.; Nuernberg, F.; Otten, A.; Schuetrumpf, J.; Roth, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Tauschwitz, A.; Bagnoud, V. [Plasmaphysik and PHELIX, GSI-Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Daido, H.; Tampo, M. [Photo Medical Research Center, JAEA, 8-1 Umemidai, Kizugawa City, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Schollmeier, M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2010-02-15

380

Injector and beam transport simulation study of proton dielectric wall accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simulation study of a short-pulsed proton injector for, and beam transport in, a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) has been carried out using the particle-in-cell (PIC) code Warp. It was shown that applying "tilt pulse" voltage waveforms on three electrodes enables the production of a shorter bunch by the injector. The fields in the DWA beam tube were simulated using Computer Simulation Technology's Microwave Studio (CST MWS) package, with various choices for the boundary conditions. For acceleration in the DWA, the beam transport was simulated with Warp, using applied fields obtained by running CST MWS. Our simulations showed that the electric field at the entrance to the DWA represents a challenging issue for the beam transport. We thus simulated a configuration with a mesh at the entrance of the DWA, intended to improve the entrance field. In these latter simulations, a proton bunch was successfully accelerated from 130 keV to about 36 MeV in a DWA with a length of 36.75 cm. As the beam bunch progresses, its transverse dimensions diminish from (roughly) 0.5×0.5 cm to 0.2×0.4 cm. The beam pulse lengthens from 1 cm to 2 cm due to lack of longitudinal compression fields.

Zhao, Quantang; Yuan, P.; Zhang, Z. M.; Cao, S. C.; Shen, X. K.; Jing, Y.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yu, C. S.; Li, Z. P.; Liu, M.; Xiao, R. Q.; Zhao, H. W.

2012-12-01

381

Supervision Software for the Integration of the Beam Interlock System with the CERN Accelerator Complex  

E-print Network

The Accelerator complex at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) is composed of many systems which are required to function in a valid state to ensure safe beam operation. One key component of machine protection, the Beam Interlock System (BIS), was designed to interface critical systems around the accelerator chain, provide fast and reliable transmission of beam dump requests and trigger beam extraction in case of malfunctioning of equipment systems or beam losses. Numerous upgrades of accelerator and controls components during the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) are followed by subsequent software updates that need to be thoroughly validated before the restart of beam operation in 2015. In parallel, the ongoing deployments of the BIS hardware in the PS booster (PSB) and the future LINAC4 give rise to new requirements for the related controls and monitoring software due to their fast cycle times. This paper describes the current status and ongoing work as well as the long-term vision for the integratio...

Audrain, M; Dragu, M; Fuchsberger, K; Garnier, JC; Gorzawski, AA; Koza, M; Krol, K; Moscatelli, A; Puccio, B; Stamos, K; Zerlauth, M

2014-01-01

382

2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probea)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C.; Wang, L.; Xu, M.; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J.

2014-11-01

383

High gradient limits due to single bunch beam breakup in a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A study into the maximum acceleration gradient, Ezmax, in a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator due to single bunch beam breakup (SBBU) is presented. The longitudinal wakefield is proportional to charge over radius squared (Ez˜Q /a2) which implies small a is favorable for fixed Q. However, when the transverse wakefield (E?˜Q/a3) is also considered then the SBBU instability severely limits the charge that can pass through a long structure as required for a large transfer of energy from the drive bunch to the witness bunch and hence limits the sustained acceleration that can be obtained.

Li, C.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Power, J. G.; Tang, C. X.; Zholents, A.

2014-09-01

384

Beam Transport in a Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator for Proton Therapy  

SciTech Connect

To attain the highest accelerating gradient in the compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator, the DWA will be operated in the 'virtual' traveling mode with potentially non-uniform and time-dependent axial accelerating field profiles, especially near the DWA entrance and exit, which makes beam transport challenging. We have established a baseline transport case without using any external lenses. Results of simulations using the 3-D, EM PIC code, LSP indicate that the DWA transport performance meets the medical specifications for proton treatment. Sensitivity of the transport performance to Blumlein block failure will be presented.

Chen, Y; Caporaso, G; Blackfield, D; Nelson, S D; Poole, B

2011-03-16

385

Induction accelerators and free-electron lasers at LLNL: Beam Research Program  

SciTech Connect

Linear induction accelerators have been developed to produce pulses of charged particles at voltages exceeding the capabilities of single-stage, diode-type accelerators and at currents too high rf accelerators. In principle, one can accelerate charged particles to arbitrarily high voltages using a multistage induction machine. The advent of magnetic pulse power systems makes sustained operation at high repetition rates practical, and high-average-power capability is very likely to open up many new applications of induction machines. In Part A of this paper, we survey the US induction linac technology, emphasizing electron machines. We also give a simplified description of how induction machines couple energy to the electron beam to illustrate many general issues that designers of high-brightness and high-average-power induction linacs must consider. We give an example of the application of induction accelerator technology to the relativistic klystron, a power source for high-gradient accelerators. In Part B we address the application of LIAs to free-electron lasers. The multikiloampere peak currents available from linear induction accelerators make high-gain, free-electron laser amplifier configurations feasible. High extraction efficiencies in a single mass of the electron beam are possible if the wiggler parameters are appropriately ''tapered'', as recently demonstrated at millimeter wavelengths on the 4-MeV ELF facility. Key issues involved in extending the technology to shorter wavelengths and higher average powers are described. Current FEL experiments at LLNL are discussed. 5 refs., 16 figs.

Briggs, R.J.

1989-02-15

386

Generation of multi-giga-electron-volt monoenergetic electron beams via laser wakefield acceleration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In plasma-based acceleration a particle bunch surfs a plasma wave, driven by a laser or a particle beam, in order to achieve high energy in a very short distance. Powerful modern drivers create strongly nonlinear wavefields in which the plasma electrons are radially expelled. These wakefields can generate well-defined particle beams in what is referred to as the "blowout" regime. In this dissertation we study with theory and simulations some key physics of the blowout regime and offer methods for designing plasma-based accelerators which are stable, efficient and generate particle beams with good quality. Starting from a phenomenological theory, originally presented in Ref. [51], which includes the concepts of nonlinear multi-dimensional wake excitation, local pump depletion, dephasing and laser guiding, we design laser wakefield accelerators which accelerate electron beams efficiently in a single stage. Simulations carried out using the Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code QuickPIC confirm much of the theoretical predictions. They show that in this nonlinear blowout regime, the laser excites a stable wake over distances hundreds of Rayleigh lengths long, as long as its spot size and duration are properly matched, kpw0 = optauL = 2a0. In the simulations a0 is held fixed at 2 and the plasma density is decreased while the spot size is kept matched. Stages that provide an average gradient 3.6GV/m (7.2 GV/m) with a final energy of 100GeV (25 GeV) were demonstrated. We discuss the optimal laser profile of an ultraintense pulse used for plasma-based acceleration and develop a method for describing how such a laser evolves. The first beam loading theory for electrons in nonlinear wakes is developed starting from the work in Ref. [48, 49]. By assuming that the blowout radius is large, analytical solutions for the shape of the bubble and the loaded wakefield are derived. It is found analytically and confirmed in PIC simulations with OSIRIS, that beam-loading efficiencies exceeding 90% can be achieved while the energy spread of the accelerating electron bunch is essentially conserved for trapezoidally-shaped trailing beams. Analytical solutions for flat-top current profiles are also calculated and it is found through simulations that the results are similar to those for Gaussian-shaped beams. Based on these solutions the amount of loaded charge is calculated for a given acceleration gradient.

Tzoufras, Michail

387

Plasma-wakefield acceleration of a positron beam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plasma-wakefield excitation by positron beams is examined in a regime for which the plasma dynamics are highly nonlinear. Three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and physical models are presented. In the nonlinear wake regime known as the blowout regime for electrons, positron wakes exhibit an analogous ``suck-in'' behavior. Although analogous, the two wakefield cases are quite different in terms of their amplitudes, wavelengths, waveforms, transverse profiles, and plasma density dependence. In a homogenous plasma, nonlinear positron wakes are smaller than those of the corresponding electron case. However, hollow channels are shown to enhance the amplitude of the positron wakes.

Lee, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Hemker, R. G.; Dodd, E. S.; Mori, W. B.

2001-10-01

388

Development work for a superconducting linear collider  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For future linear e(+)e(-) colliders in the TeV range several alternatives are under discussion. The TESLA approach is based on the advantages of superconductivity. High Q values of the accelerator structures give high efficiency for converting RF power into beam power. A low resonance frequency for the RF structures can be chosen to obtain a large number of electrons (positrons) per bunch. For a given luminosity the beam dimensions can be chosen conservatively which leads to relaxed beam emittance and tolerances at the final focus. Each individual superconducting accelerator component (resonator cavity) of this linear collider has to deliver an energy gain of 25 MeV/m to the beam. Today s.c. resonators are in use at CEBAF/USA, at DESY/Germany, Darmstadt/Germany KEK/Japan and CERN/Geneva. They show acceleration gradients between 5 MV/m and 10 MV/m. Encouraging experiments at CEA Saclay and Cornell University showed acceleration gradients of 20 MV/m and 25 MV/m in single and multicell structures. In an activity centered at DESY in Hamburg/Germany the TESLA collaboration is constructing a 500 MeV superconducting accelerator test facility (TTF) to demonstrate that a linear collider based on this technique can be built in a cost effective manner and that the necessary acceleration gradients of more than 15 MeV/m can be reached reproducibly. The test facility built at DESY covers an area of 3.000 m2 and is divided into 3 major activity areas: (1) The testlinac, where the performance ofthe modular components with an electron beam passing the 40 m long acceleration section can be demonstrated. (2) The test area, where all individual resonators are tested before installation into a module. (3) The preparation and assembly area, where assembly of cavities and modules take place. We report here on the design work to reach a reduction of costs compared to actual existing superconducting accelerator structures and on the facility set up to reach high acceleration gradients in a reproducible way.

Matheisen, Axel

1995-01-01

389

Photon beam quality variations of a flattening filter free linear accelerator  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Recently, there has been an increasing interest in operating conventional linear accelerators without a flattening filter. The aim of this study was to determine beam quality variations as a function of off-axis ray angle for unflattened beams. In addition, a comparison was made with the off-axis energy variation in flattened beams. Methods: Two Elekta Precise linear accelerators were modified in order to enable radiation delivery with and without the flattening filter in the beam line. At the Medical University Vienna (Vienna, Austria), half value layer (HVL) measurements were performed for 6 and 10 MV with an in-house developed device that can be easily mounted on the gantry. At St. Luke's Hospital (Dublin, Ireland), measurements were performed at 6 MV in narrow beam geometry with the gantry tilted around 270 deg. with pinhole collimators, an attenuator, and the chamber positioned on the table. All attenuation measurements were performed with ionization chambers and a buildup cap (2 mm brass) or a PMMA mini phantom (diameter 3 cm, measurement depth 2.5 cm). Results: For flattened 6 and 10 MV photon beams from the Elekta linac the relative HVL({theta}) varies by about 11% for an off-axis ray angle {theta}=10 deg. These results agree within {+-}2% with a previously proposed generic off-axis energy correction. For unflattened beams, the variation was less than 5% in the whole range of off-axis ray angles up to 10 deg. The difference in relative HVL data was less than 1% for unflattened beams at 6 and 10 MV. Conclusions: Off-axis energy variation is rather small in unflattened beams and less than half the one for flattened beams. Thus, ignoring the effect of off-axis energy variation for dose calculations in unflattened beams can be clinically justified.

Georg, Dietmar; Kragl, Gabriele; Wetterstedt, Sacha af; McCavana, Patrick; McClean, Brendan; Knoeoes, Tommy [Department of Radiotherapy, Division Medical Radiation Physics, Medical University of Vienna, AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiotherapy, St Luke's Hospital, Dublin 6 (Ireland); Radiation Physics, Lund University and Lund University Hospital, 22185 Lund (Sweden)

2010-01-15

390

Beam commissioning of the RFQ for the RHIC-EBIS project  

SciTech Connect

Beam commissioning of a new 4 rod RFQ has started at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The RFQ will accelerate intense heavy ion beams provided by an Electron Beam ion Source (EBIS) up to 300 keV/u. The RFQ will accelerate a range of Q/M from 1 to 1/6, and the accelerated beam will be finally delivered to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The first beam was successfully accelerated and the bunch structures of He{sup +} and Cu{sup 10+} beams were measured. The further beam tests are in progress.

Okamura,M.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Lodestro, V.; Pikin, A.; Ritter, J.; Tamura, J.; Kanesue, T.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt, J.; Vossberg, M.

2009-05-04

391

Design for low beam loss in accelerators for intense neutron source applications  

SciTech Connect

Control of beam loss in intense ion linacs involves keeping beam spill below parts in 10[sup [minus]5]--10[sup [minus]8]/m by preventing total beam size from extending to the limiting apertures. Starting from good rms design practices, new analysis of the machine architecture is described in terms of the effects of the machine tune with space-charge, free-energy constraint, and halo-producing mechanisms. It is shown that halos are produced by the time- (or position-) varying nature of common linac aspects (such as misalignment, mismatching, acceleration, and construction techniques) through collective core/single-particle interaction dynamics plus resonances.

Jameson, R.A.

1993-01-01

392

Design for low beam loss in accelerators for intense neutron source applications  

SciTech Connect

Control of beam loss in intense ion linacs involves keeping beam spill below parts in 10{sup {minus}5}--10{sup {minus}8}/m by preventing total beam size from extending to the limiting apertures. Starting from good rms design practices, new analysis of the machine architecture is described in terms of the effects of the machine tune with space-charge, free-energy constraint, and halo-producing mechanisms. It is shown that halos are produced by the time- (or position-) varying nature of common linac aspects (such as misalignment, mismatching, acceleration, and construction techniques) through collective core/single-particle interaction dynamics plus resonances.

Jameson, R.A.

1993-06-01

393

Correlation of Beam Parameters to Decelerating Gradient in the E-167 Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Recent experiments at SLAC have shown that high gradient acceleration of electrons is achievable in meter scale plasmas [1,2]. Results from these experiments show that the wakefield is sensitive to parameters in the electron beam which drives it. In the experiment the bunch length and beam waist location were varied systematically at constant charge. Here we investigate the correlation of peak beam current to the decelerating gradient. Limits on the transformer ratio will also be discussed. The results are compared to simulation.

Blumenfeld, I.; Berry, M.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

2007-06-27

394

Proceedings of the workshop on prospects for research with radioactive beams from heavy ion accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The SuperHILAC Users Executive Committee organized a workshop on Prospects for Research with Radioactive Beams from Heavy Ion Accelerators. The main purpose of the workshop was to bring together a diverse group of scientists who had already done experients with radioactive beams or were interested in their use in the future. The topics of the talks ranged from general nuclear physics, astrophysics, production of radioactive beams and high energy projectile fragmentation to biomedical applications. This publication contains the abstracts of the talks given at the workshop and copies of the viewgraphs as they were supplied to the editor.

Nitschke, J.M. (ed.)

1984-04-01

395

High-quality electron beams from beam-driven plasma accelerators by wakefield-induced ionization injection.  

PubMed

We propose a new and simple strategy for controlled ionization-induced trapping of electrons in a beam-driven plasma accelerator. The presented method directly exploits electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and capture them into a well-defined volume of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to high-quality witness bunches. This injection principle is explained by example of three-dimensional particle-in-cell calculations using the code OSIRIS. In these simulations a high-current-density electron-beam driver excites plasma waves in the blowout regime inside a fully ionized hydrogen plasma of density 5×10(17)cm-3. Within an embedded 100???m long plasma column contaminated with neutral helium gas, the wakefields trigger ionization, trapping of a defined fraction of the released electrons, and subsequent acceleration. The hereby generated electron beam features a 1.5 kA peak current, 1.5???m transverse normalized emittance, an uncorrelated energy spread of 0.3% on a GeV-energy scale, and few femtosecond bunch length. PMID:24483670

Martinez de la Ossa, A; Grebenyuk, J; Mehrling, T; Schaper, L; Osterhoff, J

2013-12-13

396

Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 6: Accelerator Capabilities  

E-print Network

These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 6, on Accelerator Capabilities, discusses the future progress of accelerator technology, including issues for high-energy hadron and lepton colliders, high-intensity beams, electron-ion colliders, and necessary R&D for future accelerator technologies.

Barletta, W A; Battaglia, M; Bruning, O; Byrd, J; Ent, R; Flanagan, J; Gai, W; Galambos, J; Hoffstaetter, G; Hogan, M; Klute, M; Nagaitsev, S; Palmer, M; Prestemon, S; Roser, T; Rossi, L; Shiltsev, V; Varner, G; Yokoya, K

2014-01-01

397

Propagation dynamics, Poynting vector and accelerating vortices of a focused Airy vortex beam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Analytical propagation expression of a focused Airy vortex beam (AiVB) is derived, and used to investigate propagation dynamics, Poynting vector and accelerating vortices of a focused AiVB. It is shown that the focused AiVB represents singular behavior at the focal plane, and the ballistic dynamics of the Airy beam is no longer parabolic but polynomial trajectory because its acceleration is a variant value relating to propagation distance. At critical distance the main lobe of Airy beam is overlapped by vortex core, and then it presents rotating about the closest vortex and the Airy-like pattern is self-reconstructed as the propagation distance further increase, which is due to the self-healing property of the Airy beam, on the other hand it is result of the rotation of vortex. The accelerating vortex deflections of the focused AiVB and an individual component are also illustrated by numerical examples. The results show that the vortices exhibit transverse deflection and their accelerating vortex behaviors also follow polynomial rather than parabolic trajectories.

Cheng, Ke; Zhong, Xianqiong; Xiang, Anping

2014-04-01

398

MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL OF THE BEAM ENERGY FOR THE SPIRAL2 ACCELERATOR  

E-print Network

and the protection of the machine (MPS). The energy is measured by a method of time of flight (TOF) [1) and the measurement uncertainty are required on this control device. ELECTRONIC DESCRIPTION The phase measurementMEASUREMENT AND CONTROL OF THE BEAM ENERGY FOR THE SPIRAL2 ACCELERATOR W. Le Coz# , C

Boyer, Edmond

399

H-mode Accelerating Structures with PMQ Focusing for Low-Beta Beams  

SciTech Connect

We report on results of the project developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of IH-PMQ structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. The H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications. Results of the combined 3-D modeling -- electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis -- for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of EM and beamdynamics modeling. Multi-particle simulations withParmela and CST Particle Studio have been used to confirm the design. Measurement results of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank are presented.

Kurennoy, Sergey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O'Hara, James F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olivas, Eric R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01

400

Beam-driven dielectric wakefield accelerating structure as a ThZ radiation source  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental work is planned to study the performance of a beam-driven cylindrical dielectric wakefield accelerating structure as a source of THz coherent Cerenkov radiation (CCR). For an appropriate choice of dielectric tube geometry and driving electron bunch parameters, the device operates in a single-mode regime, producing radiation in the THz range. This source can potentially produce high power levels relative

A. M. Cook; H. Badakov; R. J. England; J. B. Rosenzweig; R. Tikhoplav; G. Travish; O. B. Williams; M. C. Thompson; A. Kanareykin

2007-01-01

401

Increasing the intensity of an induction accelerator and reduction of the beam breakup instability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A 7 cm cathode has been deployed for use on a 3.8 MV, 80 ns (FWHM) Blumlein, to increase the extracted electron current from the nominal 1.7 to 2.9 kA. The intense relativistic electron bunch is accelerated and transported through a nested solenoid and ferrite induction core lattice consisting of 64 elements, exiting the accelerator with a nominal energy of 19.8 MeV. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the space-charge limitations on the beam quality, its coupling with the beam breakup (BBU) instability, and provide an independent validation of the BBU theory in a higher current regime, I >2 kA. Time resolved centroid measurements indicate a reduction in BBU >10× with simply a 50% increase in the average B-field used to transport the beam through the accelerator. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, which include time resolved current density distributions, radial BBU amplitude relative to the calculated beam envelope, and frequency analyzed BBU amplitude with different accelerator lattice tunes.

Coleman, J. E.; Moir, D. C.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Johnson, J. B.; McCuistian, B. T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Crawford, M. T.

2014-03-01

402

State-of-the-art post-accelerators for radioactive beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increased availability of rare isotope beams in the field of low energy nuclear physics has enabled dramatic advancements in the understanding of nuclear matter during the last decade. The energy required for these nuclear physics experiments range from thermal energies to energies around the Coulomb barrier, as well as fast beams from 50 MeV/nucleon to several hundred MeV/nucleon generated by fragmentation facilities. This paper focuses on radioactive ion beam facilities utilizing rare isotope post-accelerators which cover beam energies ranging from a few hundred keV/nucleon to about 20 MeV/nucleon. An overview of the various existing post-accelerator facilities is given and the design features and challenges associated with these facilities are explored. A dedicated section of the paper will focus on describing the ReAccelerator facility (ReA) at Michigan State University as an example of a recently installed state-of-the-art post-accelerator.

Leitner, D.

2013-12-01

403

Wake-fields Induced by the Electron Beam Passing through theTESLA Accelerating System  

E-print Network

in 1990 [1]. The solution of an accelerating system is based up on superconducting RF structures operating. All interconnecting flexible beam tubes (bellows) are designed to be as smooth as possible. The shape of their longitudinal momentum. If exciting particle pass off the axis, also the transverse deflections are excited

404

Cost optimization of induction linac drivers for linear colliders  

SciTech Connect

Recent developments in high reliability components for linear induction accelerators (LIA) make possible the use of these devices as economical power drives for very high gradient linear colliders. A particularly attractive realization of this ''two-beam accelerator'' approach is to configure the LIA as a monolithic relativistic klystron operating at 10 to 12 GHz with induction cells providing periodic reacceleration of the high current beam. Based upon a recent engineering design of a state-of-the-art, 10- to 20-MeV LIA at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, this paper presents an algorithm for scaling the cost of the relativistic klystron to the parameter regime of interest for the next generation high energy physics machines. The algorithm allows optimization of the collider luminosity with respect to cost by varying the characteristics (pulse length, drive current, repetition rate, etc.) of the klystron. It also allows us to explore cost sensitivities as a guide to research strategies for developing advanced accelerator technologies.

Barletta, W.A.

1986-12-29

405

EMITTANCE DILUTION SIMULATIONS FOR NORMAL CONDUCTING AND SUPERCONDUCTING LINEAR COLLIDERS  

SciTech Connect

An electron (or positron) multi-bunch train traversing several thousand accelerator structures can be distorted by the long-range wakefields left behind accelerated bunches. These wakefields can at the very least, give rise to a dilution in the emittance of the beam and, at worst can lead to a beam break up instability. The authors investigate the emittance dilution that occurs for various frequency errors (corresponding to small errors made in the design or fabrication of the structure) for the GLC/NLC (Global Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider) and for TESLA (TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator). Resonant effects, which can be particularly damaging, are studied for X-band and L-band linacs.

Jones, R

2004-07-30

406

ACCELERATION OF ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS IN THE COLLIDING SHELLS OF BLAZARS AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY SPACE TELESCOPE  

SciTech Connect

Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope measurements of spectra, variability timescales, and maximum photon energies give lower limits to the apparent jet powers and, through {gamma}{gamma} opacity arguments, the bulk Lorentz factors of relativistic jets. The maximum cosmic-ray particle energy is limited by these two quantities in Fermi acceleration scenarios. Recent data are used to constrain the maximum energies of cosmic-ray protons and Fe nuclei accelerated in colliding shells of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and blazars. The Fermi results indicate that Fe rather than protons are more likely to be accelerated to ultra-high energies in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), whereas powerful GRBs can accelerate both protons and Fe to {approx}>10{sup 20} eV. Emissivity of nonthermal radiation from radio galaxies and blazars is estimated from the First Fermi AGN Catalog, and shown to favor BL Lac objects and FR1 radio galaxies over flat spectrum radio quasars, FR2 radio galaxies, and long-duration GRBs as the sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

Dermer, Charles D.; Razzaque, Soebur, E-mail: dermer@nrl.navy.mi [Space Science Division, Code 7653, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)

2010-12-01

407

Design and beam test of a high intensity continuous wave RFQ accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A four-vane continuous wave (CW) RFQ has been designed for the injector II LINAC of China ADS project. To acquire the experience of a CW RFQ on design, tuning, conditioning, running, etc., a 1-m-long RFQ accelerator prototype has been built. Working at 162.5 MHz, the RFQ prototype accelerates protons of 10 mA from 20 keV to 560 keV in one meter length with a low inter-vane voltage of 65 kV and a safe Kilpatric factor of 1.3. Conditioning and beam test of the accelerator prototype have been completed, and it shows the transmission efficiency can reach 90% with a 10 mA CW proton beam. Design, fabrication and tests of the RFQ prototype will be presented in detail in the paper.

Zhang, Zhouli; Sun, Liepeng; Jia, Huan; He, Yuan; Shi, Aimin; Du, Xiaonan; Wang, Jing; Jin, Xiaofeng; Pan, Gang; Xu, Xianbo; Li, Chenxing; Shi, Longbo; Lu, Liang; Zhang, Zimin; Wu, Junxia; Wang, Haoning; Zhu, Tieming; Wang, Xianwu; Guo, Yuhui; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hongwei

2014-11-01

408

Particle in cell simulation of laser-accelerated proton beams for radiation therapy.  

PubMed

In this article we present the results of particle in cell (PIC) simulations of laser plasma interaction for proton acceleration for radiation therapy treatments. We show that under optimal interaction conditions protons can be accelerated up to relativistic energies of 300 MeV by a petawatt laser field. The proton acceleration is due to the dragging Coulomb force arising from charge separation induced by the ponderomotive pressure (light pressure) of high-intensity laser. The proton energy and phase space distribution functions obtained from the PIC simulations are used in the calculations of dose distributions using the GEANT Monte Carlo simulation code. Because of the broad energy and angular spectra of the protons, a compact particle selection and beam collimation system will be needed to generate small beams of polyenergetic protons for intensity modulated proton therapy. PMID:12512712

Fourkal, E; Shahine, B; Ding, M; Li, J S; Tajima, T; Ma, C M

2002-12-01

409

Stable Laser-Driven Proton Beam Acceleration from a Two-Ion-Species Ultrathin Foil  

SciTech Connect

By using multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we present a new regime of stable proton beam acceleration which takes place when a two-ion-species shaped foil is illuminated by a circularly polarized laser pulse. In the simulations, the lighter protons are nearly instantaneously separated from the heavier carbon ions due to the charge-to-mass ratio difference. The heavy ion layer expands in space and acts to buffer the proton layer from the Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) instability that would have otherwise degraded the proton beam acceleration. A simple three-interface model is formulated to explain qualitatively the stable acceleration of the light ions. In the absence of the RT instability, the high quality monoenergetic proton bunch persists even after the laser-foil interaction ends.

Yu, Tong-Pu [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik I, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Department of Physics, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Pukhov, Alexander [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik I, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Shvets, Gennady [Univ Texas Austin, Dept Phys, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Univ Texas Austin, Inst Fus Studies, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Chen, Min [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik I, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Accelerator Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-08-06

410

Electron acceleration to energies beyond GeV by a relativistic ion beam instability.  

PubMed

Synchrotron emission suggests the presence of TeV electrons at various astrophysical objects. We propose a mechanism for the acceleration of electrons to ultrahigh energies (UHE) by intense electrostatic waves (ESWs). The latter are driven by dense proton beams that move at relativistic speeds relative to a background plasma and the electrons are accelerated by their nonlinear interaction with the ESWs. We follow the evolution of the wave instability by means of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. After the instability has saturated, we obtain spatially confined electron voids in which secondary instabilities develop due to resonant interactions between the beams and the background protons, generating intense ESWs which accelerate electrons to ultrarelativistic speeds within times of a few hundred inverse plasma frequencies. PMID:15524640

Dieckmann, M E; Eliasson, B; Shukla, P K

2004-09-01

411

GeV electron beams from a cm-scale accelerator  

SciTech Connect

GeV electron accelerators are essential to synchrotron radiation facilities and free electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radio frequency based accelerators are limited to relatively low accelerating fields (10-50 MV/m) and hence require tens to hundreds of meters to reach the multi-GeV beam energies needed to drive radiation sources, and many kilometers to generate particle energies of interest to the frontiers of high-energy physics.Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) in which particles are accelerated by the field of a plasma wave driven by an intense laser pulse produce electric fields several orders of magnitude stronger (10-100 GV/m) and so offer the potential of very compact devices. However, until now it has not been possible to maintain the required laser intensity, and hence acceleration, over the several centimeters needed to reach GeV energies.For this reason laser-driven accelerators have to date been limited to the 100 MeV scale. Contrary to predictions that PW-class lasers would be needed to reach GeV energies, here we demonstrate production of a high-quality electron beam with 1 GeV energy by channeling a 40 TW peak power laser pulse in a 3.3 cm long gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide. We anticipate that laser-plasma accelerators based on capillary discharge waveguides will have a major impact on the development of future femtosecond radiation sources such as x-ray free electron lasers and become a standard building block for next generation high-energy accelerators.

Leemans, W.P.; Nagler, B.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Toth, C.; Nakamura,K.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.B.; Schroeder, C.; Hooker, S.M.

2006-05-04

412

ACCELERATING STRUCTURE: Beam dynamics and RF design of trapezoidal IH-RFQ with low energy spread  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beam dynamics and RF design have been performed of a new type trapezoidal IH-RFQ operating at 104 MHz for acceleration of 14C+ in the framework of RFQ based 14C AMS facility at Peking University. Low energy spread RFQ beam dynamics design was approached by the method of internal discrete bunching. 14C+ will be accelerated from 40 keV to 500 keV with the length of about 1.1 m. The designed transmission efficiency is better than 95% and the energy spread is as low as 0.6%. Combining the beam dynamics design, a trapezoidal IH-RFQ structure was proposed, which can be cooled more easily and has better mechanical performance than traditional RFQ. Electromagnetic field distribution was simulated by using CST Microwave Studio (MWS). The specific shunt impedance and the quality factor were optimized primarily.

Nie, Yuan-Cun; Lu, Yuan-Rong; Chen, Jia-Er; Yan, Xue-Qing; Guo, Zhi-Yu; Zhu, Kun; Fang, Jia-Xun

2009-06-01

413

Crystal-Assisted Beam Extraction and Collimation at the U-70 Circular Accelerator  

E-print Network

New crystal technique - array of bent strips and a fan-type reflector, based on thin straight plates - have been used for research of extraction and collimation a circulating beam in the U-70 accelerator at the energy 50 GeV and 1.3 GeV. It is shown, that new devices can effectively steer a beam in a wide energy range. For protons with energy 50 GeV efficiency of extraction and collimation about 90 % has been achieved which is record for this method. Reduction of particle losses in 2-3 times was observed also in accelerator at application of different crystals in comparison with the usual one-stage collimation scheme of beam with a steel absorber.

Afonin, A G; Bellucci, S; Belov, S A; Bini, S; Gorlov, V N; Giannini, G; Ermolaev, A D; Ivanova, I V; Krylov, D M; Maisheev, V A; Savin, D A; Syshchikov, E A; Terekhov, V I; Chepegin, V N; Chesnokov, Yu A; Chirkov, P N; Yazynin, I A

2011-01-01

414

High-quality stable electron beams from laser wakefield acceleration in high density plasma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-quality, stable electron beams are produced from self-injected laser wakefield acceleration using the interaction of moderate 3 TW, 45 fs duration Ti:sapphire laser pulses with high density (>5×1019 cm-3) helium gas jet plasma. The electron beam has virtually background-free quasimonoenergetic distribution with energy 35.6-2.5+3.9 MeV, charge 3.8-1.2+2.8 pC, divergence and pointing variation ˜10 mrad. The stable and high quality of the electron beam opens an easy way for applications of the laser wakefield accelerator in the future, particularly due to the widespread availability of sub-10 TW class lasers with a number of laser plasma laboratories around the world.

Rao, B. S.; Moorti, A.; Rathore, R.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

2014-01-01

415

An improved 8 GeV beam transport system for the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A new 8 GeV beam transport system between the Booster and Main Ring synchrotrons at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is presented. The system was developed in an effort to improve the transverse phase space area occupied by the proton beam upon injection into the Main Ring accelerator. Problems with the original system are described and general methods of beamline design are formulated. Errors in the transverse properties of a beamline at the injection point of the second synchrotron and their effects on the region in transverse phase space occupied by a beam of particles are discussed. Results from the commissioning phase of the project are presented as well as measurements of the degree of phase space dilution generated by the transfer of 8 GeV protons from the Booster synchrotron to the Main Ring synchrotron.

Syphers, M.J.

1987-06-01

416

Artificial intelligence research in particle accelerator control systems for beam line tuning  

SciTech Connect

Tuning particle accelerators is time consuming and expensive, with a number of inherently non-linear interactions between system components. Conventional control methods have not been successful in this domain and the result is constant and expensive monitoring of the systems by human operators. This is particularly true for the start-up and conditioning phase after a maintenance period or an unexpected fault. In turn, this often requires a step-by-step restart of the accelerator. Surprisingly few attempts have been made to apply intelligent accelerator control techniques to help with beam tuning, fault detection, and fault recovery problems. The reason for that might be that accelerator facilities are rare and difficult to understand systems that require detailed expert knowledge about the underlying physics as well as months if not years of experience to understand the relationship between individual components, particularly if they are geographically disjoint. This paper will give an overview about the research effort in the accelerator community that has been dedicated to the use of artificial intelligence methods for accelerator beam line tuning.

Pieck, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01

417

Accelerated Nuclear Energy Materials Development with Multiple Ion Beams  

SciTech Connect

A fundamental issue in nuclear energy is the changes in material properties as a consequence of time, temperature, and neutron fluence. Usually, candidate materials for nuclear energy applications are tested in nuclear reactors to understand and model the changes that arise from a combination of atomic displacements, helium and hydrogen production, and other nuclear transmutations (e.g. fission and the production of fission products). Experiments may be carried out under neutron irradiation conditions in existing nuclear materials test reactors (at rates of 10 to 20 displacements per atom (DPA) per year or burn-up rates of a few percent per year for fertile fuels), but such an approach takes much too long for many high neutron fluence scenarios (300 DPA for example) expected in reactors of the next generation. Indeed it is reasonable to say that there are no neutron sources available today to accomplish sufficiently rapid accelerated aging let alone also provide the temperature and spectral characteristics of future fast spectrum nuclear energy systems (fusion and fission both). Consequently, materials research and development progress continues to be severely limited by this bottleneck.

Fluss, M J; Bench, G

2009-08-19

418

The Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect

We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

Zisman, Michael S

2010-05-17

419

The Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect

We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

Zisman, Michael S.

2011-01-05

420

Mutual colliding impact fast ignition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is proposed to apply the well established colliding beam technology of high energy physics to the fast hot spot ignition of a highly compressed DT (deuterium-tritium) target igniting a larger D (deuterium) burn, by accelerating a small amount of solid deuterium, and likewise a small amount of tritium, making a head-on collision in the center of the target, projecting them through conical ducts situated at the opposite side of the target and converging in its center. In their head-on collision, the relative collision velocity is 5/3 times larger compared to the collision velocity of a stationary target. The two pieces have for this reason to be accelerated to a smaller velocity than would otherwise be needed to reach upon impact the same temperature. Since the velocity distribution of the two head-on colliding projectiles is with its two velocity peaks non-Maxwellian, the maximum cross section velocity product turns out to be substantially larger than the maximum if averaged over a Maxwellian. The D and T projectiles would have to be accelerated with two sabots driven by powerful particle or laser beams, permitting a rather large acceleration length. With the substantially larger cross section-velocity product by virtue of the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution, a further advantage is that the head-on collision produces a large magnetic field by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect, enhancing propagating burn. With this concept, the ignition of the neutron-less hydrogen-boron (HB11) reaction might even be possible in a heterogeneous assembly of the hydrogen and the boron to reduce the bremsstrahlung-losses, resembling the heterogeneous assembly in a graphite-natural uranium reactor, there to reduce the neutron losses.

Winterberg, Friedwardt

2014-09-01

421

A Phenomenological Cost Model for High Energy Particle Accelerators  

E-print Network

Accelerator-based high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. In this paper we derive a simple scaling model for the cost of large accelerators and colliding beam facilities based on costs of 17 big facilities which have been either built or carefully estimated. Although this approach cannot replace an actual cost estimate based on an engineering design, this parameterization is to indicate a somewhat realistic cost range for consideration of what future frontier accelerator facilities might be fiscally realizable.

Vladimir Shiltsev

2014-04-15

422

CANCELLED Microwave Ion Source and Beam Injection for anAccelerator-Driven Neut ron Source  

SciTech Connect

An over-dense microwave driven ion source capable of producing deuterium (or hydrogen) beams at 100-200 mA/cm{sup 2} and with atomic fraction > 90% was designed and tested with an electrostatic low energy beam transport section (LEBT). This ion source was incorporated into the design of an Accelerator Driven Neutron Source (ADNS). The other key components in the ADNS include a 6 MeV RFQ accelerator, a beam bending and scanning system, and a deuterium gas target. In this design a 40 mA D{sup +} beam is produced from a 6 mm diameter aperture using a 60 kV extraction voltage. The LEBT section consists of 5 electrodes arranged to form 2 Einzel lenses that focus the beam into the RFQ entrance. To create the ECR condition, 2 induction coils are used to create {approx} 875 Gauss on axis inside the source chamber. To prevent HV breakdown in the LEBT a magnetic field clamp is necessary to minimize the field in this region. Matching of the microwave power from the waveguide to the plasma is done by an autotuner. They observed significant improvement of the beam quality after installing a boron nitride liner inside the ion source. The measured emittance data are compared with PBGUNS simulations.

Vainionpaa, J.H.; Gough, R.; Hoff, M.; Kwan, J.W.; Ludewigt,B.A.; Regis, M.J.; Wallig, J.G.; Wells, R.

2007-02-27

423

Ion acceleration and abundance enhancements by electron beam instabilities in impulsive solar flares  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show that a nonrelativistic electron beam in a hydrogen-helium solar flare plasma will excite H(+) electromagnetic ion cyclotron, shear Alfven, and R-X waves, in addition to waves resulting from the two-stream instability. The H(+) electromagnetic ion cyclotron and shear Alfven waves are able to selectively accelerate ambient He-3 and Fe, respectively, to MeV energies through first harmonic gyroresonance, and thereby account for the large (He-3)/(He-4) and Fe/C ratios seen in the energetic particles from impulsive solar flares. In this model, separate heating and acceleration mechanisms for either He-3 or Fe are not required, and Fe acceleration is quite efficient since it does not need to occur by second harmonic gyroresonance. The combination of the other two unstable modes is able to accelerate ions to hundreds of MeV if the particles become trapped in an electrostatic potential well of a two-stream wave.

Miller, James A.; Vinas, Adolfo F.

1993-07-01

424

Ion acceleration and abundance enhancements by electron beam instabilities in impulsive solar flares  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We show that a nonrelativistic electron beam in a hydrogen-helium solar flare plasma will excite H(+) electromagnetic ion cyclotron, shear Alfven, and R-X waves, in addition to waves resulting from the two-stream instability. The H(+) electromagnetic ion cyclotron and shear Alfven waves are able to selectively accelerate ambient He-3 and Fe, respectively, to MeV energies through first harmonic gyroresonance, and thereby account for the large (He-3)/(He-4) and Fe/C ratios seen in the energetic particles from impulsive solar flares. In this model, separate heating and acceleration mechanisms for either He-3 or Fe are not required, and Fe acceleration is quite efficient since it does not need to occur by second harmonic gyroresonance. The combination of the other two unstable modes is able to accelerate ions to hundreds of MeV if the particles become trapped in an electrostatic potential well of a two-stream wave.

Miller, James A.; Vinas, Adolfo F.

1993-01-01

425

Investigation of beam transmission in A 9SDH-2 3.0 MV NEC pelletron tandem accelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electrostatic tandem accelerators are widely used to accelerate ions for experiments in materials science such as high energy ion implantation, materials modification, and analyses. Many applications require high beam current as well as high beam brightness at the target; thus, maximizing the beam transmission through such electrostatic accelerators becomes important. The Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) at University of North Texas is equipped with four accelerators, one of which is a 9SDH-2 3.0 MV National Electrostatic Corporation (NEC) Pelletron® tandem accelerator. The tandem accelerator is equipped with three ion sources: one radio frequency-He ion source (Alphatross) and two ion sources of Cs-sputter type, the SNICS II (Source of Negative Ions by Cesium Sputtering) and a Cs-sputter source for trace-element accelerator based mass spectrometry. This work presents a detailed study of the beam transmission of hydrogen, silicon, and silver ions through the accelerator using the SNICS ion source with injection energies ranging from 20 keV to 70 keV. The beam transmission is quantified for three different terminal voltages: 1.5 MV, 2.0 MV and 2.5 MV. For a given terminal voltage, it has been found that beam transmission is strongly dependent on the ion source injector potential. Details of experiments and data analysis are presented.

Deoli, Naresh T.; Kummari, Venkata C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Duggan, Jerome L.; Glass, Gary A.; McDaniel, Floyd D.; Reinert, Tilo; Rout, Bibhudutta; Weathers, Duncan L.

2013-04-01

426

SLC beam dynamics issues  

SciTech Connect

The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC){sup 1,2} accelerates single bunches of electrons and positrons to 47 GeV per beam and collides them with small beam sizes and at high currents. The beam emittances and intensities required for present operation have significantly extended traditional beam quality limits. The electron source produces over 10{sup 11} e{sup {minus}} in each of two bunches. The damping rings provide coupled invariant emittances of 1.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} r-m at 4.5 {times} 10{sup 10} particles. The 50 GeV linac has successfully accelerated over 3 {times} 10{sup 10} particles with design invariant emittances of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} r-m. The collider arcs are now sufficiently decoupled and matched in betatron space, so that the final focus can be chromatically corrected, routinely producing spot sizes ({sigma}{sub x}, {sigma}{sub y}) of 2.5 {mu}m at the interaction point. Spot sizes below 2 {mu}m have been made during tests. Instrumentation and feedback systems are well advanced, providing continuous beam monitoring and considerable pulse-by-pulse control. The luminosity reliability is about 60%. Overviews of the recent accelerator physics achievements used to obtain these parameters and the present limiting phenomena are described for each accelerator subsystem.

Seeman, J.T.

1991-12-01

427

Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type SRF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. The potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

Baffes, C.; Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Oplt, S.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

2012-05-10

428

Advanced treatment planning methods for efficient radiation therapy with laser accelerated proton and ion beams  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Laser plasma acceleration can potentially replace large and expensive cyclotrons or synchrotrons for radiotherapy with protons and ions. On the way toward a clinical implementation, various challenges such as the maximum obtainable energy still remain to be solved. In any case, laser accelerated particles exhibit differences compared to particles from conventional accelerators. They typically have a wide energy spread and the beam is extremely pulsed (i.e., quantized) due to the pulsed nature of the employed lasers. The energy spread leads to depth dose curves that do not show a pristine Bragg peak but a wide high dose area, making precise radiotherapy impossible without an additional energy selection system. Problems with the beam quantization include the limited repetition rate and the number of accelerated particles per laser shot. This number might be too low, which requires a high repetition rate, or it might be too high, which requires an additional fluence selection system to reduce the number of particles. Trying to use laser accelerated particles in a conventional way such as spot scanning leads to long treatment times and a high amount of secondary radiation produced when blocking unwanted particles. Methods: The authors present methods of beam delivery and treatment planning that are specifically adapted to laser accelerated particles. In general, it is not necessary to fully utilize the energy selection system to create monoenergetic beams for the whole treatment plan. Instead, within wide parts of the target volume, beams with broader energy spectra can be used to simultaneously cover multiple axially adjacent spots of a conventional dose delivery grid as applied in intensity modulated particle therapy. If one laser shot produces too many particles, they can be distributed over a wider area with the help of a scattering foil and a multileaf collimator to cover multiple lateral spot positions at the same time. These methods are called axial and lateral clustering and reduce the number of particles that have to be blocked in the beam delivery system. Furthermore, the optimization routine can be adjusted to reduce the number of dose spots and laser shots. The authors implemented these methods into a research treatment planning system for laser accelerated partic