Sample records for colliding beam accelerator

  1. Beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Parzen, G.

    1982-08-01

    One model for beam growth due to the beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators is that it is due to the presence of non-linear forces generated by the fields produced by the beam plus some radomizing effect like noise, or a tune modulation. According to this model, to limit beam-beam effects, one should try to limit the size of the non-linear forces and the sources of noise or tune modulation. This model can also be used to compare the severity of beam-beam effects in two situations by comparing the size of the non-linear forces. In this paper, this approach will be used to study three problems: to compare the effects of beam-beam non-linear resonances in the ISR with those in ISABELLE; to estimate the strength of a spectrometer magnet that may be placed at one of the beam crossing points, without appreciably increasing the beam-beam effects; and to compare the beam-beam interaction for colliding beam accelerators with different crossing-angles and different ..beta../sub x/ and ..beta../sub y/ at the crossing points.

  2. A DSP based data acquisition module for colliding beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, J.A.; Shea, T.J.

    1995-10-01

    In 1999, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory will accelerate and store two beams of gold ions. The ions will then collide head on at a total energy of nearly 40 trillion electron volts. Attaining these conditions necessitates real-time monitoring of beam parameters and for this purpose a flexible data acquisition platform has been developed. By incorporating a floating point digital signal processor (DSP) and standard input/output modules, this system can acquire and process data from a variety of beam diagnostic devices. The DSP performs real time corrections, filtering, and data buffering to greatly reduce control system computation and bandwidth requirements. We will describe the existing hardware and software while emphasizing the compromises required to achieve a flexible yet cost effective system. Applications in several instrumentation systems currently construction will also be presented.

  3. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant ?-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  4. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group: Progress report, March 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report discusses work carried out by the High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group at the University of Maryland. Particular topics discussed are: OPAL experiment at LEP; deep inelastic muon interactions; B physics with the CLEO detector at CESR; further results from JADE; and search for ''small'' violation of the Pauli principle. (LSP)

  5. Relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D E; Eylon, S; Henestroza, E; Houck, T L; Lidia, M; Vanecek, D L; Westenskow, G A; Yu, S S

    1998-10-05

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2&A, l-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-n-n. The prototype accelerator will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  6. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S. M.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Houck, T. L.; Westenskow, G. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1999-05-07

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  7. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S.M.; Anderson, D.E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D.L.; Yu, S.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Westenskow, G.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1{percent} energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate fundamental'' limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  9. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate ``fundamental`` limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  10. A Multi-drive Beam Scheme for Two-Beam Acceleration in a TeV Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, R.; Delahaye, J. P.; Johnson, C.; Riche, A.; Thorndahl, L.

    1997-05-01

    The CLIC study of an e^+/e^- linear collider in the TeV energy range is based on Two-Beam Acceleration (TBA) in which the overall RF power needed to accelerate the beam is extracted from high intensity relativistic electron beams, the so-called drive beams. As about 100 MW of RF power at high frequency (30 GHz) is typically requested, the generation, acceleration and transport of the drive beams in an efficient and reliable way is specially challenging, mainly because of the unusually high beam power of about 140 MW. An overview of a potentially very effective scheme is presented. It is based on the generation of trains of short bunches, accelerated sequentially in low frequency superconducting cavities in a c.w. mode, stored in an isochronous ring and combined at high energy by funneling before injection by sectors into the drive linac for RF power production. The various systems of the complex are discussed as well as the beam dynamics all along the process. An original method has been specially developed to stabilize such an intense beam during deceleration and RF power production in the drive linac.

  11. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  12. Quality Particle Beams by Laser Injection into Plasma Accelerators using Colliding Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacone, R. E.; Cary, J. R.; Bruhwiler, D.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Shadwick, B. A.; Mardahl, P.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2001-10-01

    The first self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of electron injection into a plasma wake field by colliding laser pulses are presented. This method for injecting electrons in a laser wake field has been proposed recently by Esarey and coworkers [ E. Esarey, R. F. Hubbard, W. P. Leemans, A. Ting and P. Sprangle, "Phys. Rev. Lett 79, 2682 (1997)]. An intense pump pulse generates a plasma wake field. Forward going and backward going injection pulses collide at some distance behind the pump pulse generating a slow ponderomotive beat wave so that plasma electrons can be trapped in the fast wake field and accelerated to high energies. We have modified XOOPIC [ J. P. Verboncoeur,A. B. Langdon and N. T. Gladd, Phys. Comm 87,199 (1995)] to run 2D numerical simulations of the colliding pulse scheme. Our simulations show that injecting particles just above the minimum energy for trapping on an orbit that remains within the region of transverse focussing leads to quality beams, with normalized transverse emittances of a fraction of mm-rad and energy spreads less than a MeV. Results of parameter studies will be presented.

  13. Design study of beam dynamics issues for a one TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Houck, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.; Sessler, A. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Westenskow, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Yu, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1995-06-01

    A design study has recently been conducted for exploring the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a rf power source for a 1 TeV linear collider. We present, in this paper, the beam dynamics part of this study. We have achieved in our design study acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties for the resulting high efficiency and low cost RK-TBA. {copyright} 1995 {ital American Institute of Physics}.

  14. Design study of beam dynamics issues for 1 TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.; Sessler, A.; Yu, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Houck, T.; Westenskow, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    A design study has recently been conducted for exploring the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a rf power source for a 1 TeV linear collider. The author present, in this paper, the beam dynamics part of this study. They have achieved in their design study acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties for the resulting high efficiency and low cost RK-TBA.

  15. Beam Collimation at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, N. V.

    2003-12-01

    Operational and accidental beam losses in hadron colliders can have a serious impact on machine and detector performance, resulting in effects ranging from minor to catastrophic. Principles and realization are described for a reliable beam collimation system required to sustain favorable background conditions in the collider detectors, provide quench stability of superconducting magnets, minimize irradiation of accelerator equipment, maintain operational reliability over the life of the machine, and reduce the impact of radiation on personnel and the environment. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, such a system has been designed and incorporated in the Tevatron collider. Its performance, comparison to measurements and possible ways to further improve the collimation efficiency are described in detail. Specifics of the collimation systems designed for the SSC, LHC, VLHC, and HERA colliders are discussed.

  16. Beam collimation at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-08-12

    Operational and accidental beam losses in hadron colliders can have a serious impact on machine and detector performance, resulting in effects ranging from minor to catastrophic. Principles and realization are described for a reliable beam collimation system required to sustain favorable background conditions in the collider detectors, provide quench stability of superconducting magnets, minimize irradiation of accelerator equipment, maintain operational reliability over the life of the machine, and reduce the impact of radiation on personnel and the environment. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, such a system has been designed and incorporated in the Tevatron collider. Its performance, comparison to measurements and possible ways to further improve the collimation efficiency are described in detail. Specifics of the collimation systems designed for the SSC, LHC, VLHC, and HERA colliders are discussed.

  17. Relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator as a power source for a 1 TeV next linear collider: A systems study

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Deadrick, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    A physics, engineering, and costing study has been conducted to explore the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator system as a power source candidate for a 1 TeV linear collider. We present a point design example which has acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties. Preliminary ``bottom-up`` cost estimate yields the full power source system at less than 1 billion dollars. The overall efficiency for rf production is estimated to be 36%.

  18. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group. Progress report, March 1, 1983-February 29, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Topics covered in this research summary include: status of the OPAL collaboration at LEP, CERN; two-photon physics at PLUTO; search for new particles at JADE; neutrinoless double beta decay at DESY; Fermilab jet experiment; neutrino deuterium experiment in the 15 foot bubble chamber at Fermilab; deep inelastic muon experiment at Fermilab; new experiments at the proton-antiproton collider; neutrino-electron scattering at Los Alamos; parity violation in proton-proton scattering; an upgrade of laboratory and computer facilities; and a study of bismuth germanate as a durable scintillation crystal. (GHT)

  19. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    E-print Network

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    compared with that for low-energy muons. Conceptually, thereunder way. Figure 11: Low-energy Muon Collider accelerationlow- energy pions (~100–350 MeV) is optimal for the downstream systems. Based on muon

  20. Beam instabilities in Very Large Hadron Collider

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Shiltsev; J. Marriner; V. Danilov

    1999-01-01

    The Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) is a superconducting proton-proton collider with approximately 100 TeV cm and approximately 1034 s-1 cm-2 luminosity. Currently, beam dynamics in this future accelerator is the subject of intensive studies within the framework of the US-wide VLHC R&D program. This presentation summarizes recent developments in the field. Besides general discussion on relevant VLHC parameters, we

  1. Two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Selph, F.B.

    1984-09-01

    In the two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept, an electron linear accelerator structure is established in which two beams propagate. One is an intense low energy beam that is made to undergo free electron lasing to produce microwaves. These microwaves are then coupled to another part of the structure where they act to produce a high longitudinal electric gradient that is used to accelerate a second relatively low intensity electron beam to very high energies. The TBA was originally suggested by Sessler as a possible means for economically achieving linear collider energies of 100 GeV and above. Although still in a conceptual stage, the TBA is an inherently plausible concept that combines the free electron laser (FEL) with several well-known technologies - high current induction linacs, microwave waveguides, and traveling-wave linac structures - in a novel and interesting way. Two characteristics of the TBA that make it a particularly suitable candidate for achieving high energies are its ability to operate at higher frequencies than typical present-day linacs (say 30 GHz as compared with 3 GHz), and to be an efficient means for delivering power to a hitherto unattainable high-gradient structure (say 250 MV/m) that the higher frequency makes possible. These high accelerating gradients will permit much shorter linac structures for a given energy.

  2. FFAG Designs for Muon Collider Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. S.

    2014-01-13

    I estimate FFAG parameters for a muon collider with a 70mm longitudinal emittance. I do not discuss the lower emittance beam for a Higgs factory. I produce some example designs, giving only parameters relevant to estimating cost and performance. The designs would not track well, but the parameters of a good design will be close to those described. I compare these cost estimates to those for a fast-ramping synchrotron and a recirculating linear accelerator. I conclude that FFAGs do not appear to be cost-effective for the large longitudinal emittance in a high-energy muon collider.

  3. Beam instabilities in very large hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    J. Marriner; V. Danilov; V. Shiltsev

    1999-05-11

    The Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) is a supercon-ducting proton-proton collider with approximately 100 TeV cm and approximately 10{sup 34} s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} luminosity [1]. Currently, beam dynamics in this future accelerator is the subject of intensive studies within the framework of the US-wide VLHC R&D program. This presentation sum-marizes recent developments in the field. Besides general discussion on relevant VLHC parameters, we consider various beam instabilities and ways to avoid them. Finally, we outline possibilities for theoretical and experimental R&D.

  4. Preliminary design report of a relativistic-Klystron two-beam-accelerator based power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass next linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-22

    A preliminary point design for an 11.4 GHz power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass Next Linear Collider (NLC) based on the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam-Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is presented. The present report is the result of a joint LBL-LLNL systems study. consisting of three major thrust areas: physics, engineering, and costing. The new RK-TBA point design, together with our findings in each of these areas, are reported.

  5. Introduction to colliding beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is currently the site of the world`s highest center-of-mass energy proton-antiproton colliding beam accelerator, the Tevatron. The CDF and D{O} detectors each envelop one of two luminous regions in the collider, and are thus wholly dependent on the accelerator for their success. The Tevatron`s high operating energy, reliability, and record setting integrated luminosity have allowed both experiments to make world-class measurements and defined the region of physics that each can explore. The following sections are an overview of the highlights of the accelerator operation and are compiled from many sources. The major sources for each section are listed at the beginning of that section.

  6. Coherent beam-beam interaction with four colliding beams

    SciTech Connect

    Podobedov, B.; Siemann, R.H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)] [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The coherent beam-beam interaction in the absence of Landau damping is studied with a computer simulation of four space-charge-compensated colliding beams. Results are presented for the modes, phase space structures, widths, and growth rates of coherent beam-beam resonances. These results are compared with solutions of the Vlasov equation, and with measurements made at the Dispositif de Collisions dans l`Igloo (DCI) storage ring in Orsay, France, which operated with space-charge-compensated colliding beams.

  7. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e{sup +}- e{sup -} colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II).

  8. Accelerator based coal positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1987-01-01

    Cold positron beams produced using solid state moderators have been used profitably for condensed matter and positronium research. The low emittance and energy spread of these beams make the technique attractive as a potential positron source for future linear colliders, reducing or eliminating the need for damping rings. However, the intensities attained so far fall short of the requirements of a high energy linear collider. (approx.10/sup 11/ positrons/pulse at 10 kHz was taken as the positron flux necessary for a linear collider-B anti B factory). This report briefly reviews the state of the art in accelerator produced coal positron beams and indicates some areas in which yields might be improved. The discussion here is limited to electroproduced positrons.

  9. Beam Dynamics Considerations in Electron Ion Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    The nuclear physics community is converging on the idea that the next large project after FRIB should be an electron-ion collider. Both Brookhaven National Lab and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility have developed accelerator designs, both of which need novel solutions to accelerator physics problems. In this talk we discuss some of the problems that must be solved and their solutions. Examples in novel beam optics systems, beam cooling, and beam polarization control will be presented. Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177. The U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce this manuscript for U.S. Government purposes.

  10. A systems study of an RF power source for a 1 TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Deadrick, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-11-01

    A systems study, including physics, engineering and costing, has been conducted to assess the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a RF power source candidate for a 1 TeV linear collider. Several key issues associated with a realizable RK-TBA system have been addressed, and corresponding schemes have been developed and examined quantitatively. A point design example has been constructed to present a concrete conceptual design which has acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties. The overall efficiency of RF production for such a power source is estimated to be 36%, and the cost of the full system is estimated to be less than 1 billion dollars.

  11. A systems study of an RF power source for a 1 TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Deadrick, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Houck, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Li, H.; Peters, C.; Reginato, L.; Sessler, A.; Vanecek, D. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Westenskow, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1995-07-05

    A systems study, including physics, engineering, and costing, has been conducted to assess the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a RF power source candidate for a 1 TeV linear collider. Several key issues associated with a realizable RK-TBA system have been addressed, and corresponding schemes have been developed and examined quantitatively. A point design example has been constructed to present a concrete conceptual design which has acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties. The overall efficiency of RF production for such a power source is estimated to be 36%, and the cost of the full system is estimated to be less than 1 billion dollars. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  12. A systems study of an RF power source for a 1 TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S.; Deadrick, F.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Li, H.; Peters, C.; Reginato, L.; Sessler, A.; Vanecek, D.; Westenskow, G.

    1995-07-01

    A systems study, including physics, engineering, and costing, has been conducted to assess the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a RF power source candidate for a 1 TeV linear collider. Several key issues associated with a realizable RK-TBA system have been addressed, and corresponding schemes have been developed and examined quantitatively. A point design example has been constructed to present a concrete conceptual design which has acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties. The overall efficiency of RF production for such a power source is estimated to be 36%, and the cost of the full system is estimated to be less than 1 billion dollars.

  13. Generating high-brightness electron beams via ionization injection by transverse colliding lasers in a plasma-wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Li, F; Hua, J F; Xu, X L; Zhang, C J; Yan, L X; Du, Y C; Huang, W H; Chen, H B; Tang, C X; Lu, W; Joshi, C; Mori, W B; Gu, Y Q

    2013-07-01

    The production of ultrabright electron bunches using ionization injection triggered by two transversely colliding laser pulses inside a beam-driven plasma wake is examined via three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The relatively low intensity lasers are polarized along the wake axis and overlap with the wake for a very short time. The result is that the residual momentum of the ionized electrons in the transverse plane of the wake is reduced, and the injection is localized along the propagation axis of the wake. This minimizes both the initial thermal emittance and the emittance growth due to transverse phase mixing. Simulations show that ultrashort (~8 fs) high-current (0.4 kA) electron bunches with a normalized emittance of 8.5 and 6 nm in the two planes, respectively, and a brightness of 1.7×10(19) A rad(-2) m(-2) can be obtained for realistic parameters. PMID:23863007

  14. PROTON BEAM REQUIREMENTS FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY AND MUON COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2009-12-11

    Both a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider place stringent demands on the proton beam used to generate the desired beam of muons. Here we discuss the advantages and challenges of muon accelerators and the rationale behind the requirements on proton beam energy, intensity, bunch length, and repetition rate. Example proton driver configurations that have been considered in recent years are also briefly indicated.

  15. Colliding Crystalline Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Haffmans, A.F.; Maletic, D.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1995-06-01

    Crystalline Beams* are an ordered state of an ensemble of ions, circulating in a storage ring, with very small velocity fluctuations. They can be obtained from ordinary warm ion beams with the application of powerful cooling techniques (stochastic, electron, laser, ...). Depending on the focussing properties and dimensions of the storage ring, and on the ion beam density, several ground states are possible. All of them can be visualized as a bundle of n{sub s} symmetrically distributed, parallel strings. The longitudinal ion separation {lambda} is the same for all strings. The minimum temperature that can be achieved depends on die background noise of the cooling technique used. It is required for stability that the vibration amplitude of the ions is only a fraction of the separation {lambda}.

  16. Accelerator R&D toward Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following LHC discoveries. Such a collider can offer superb energy resolution, smaller size, and potentially cost and power consumption compared to multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders. This article briefly reviews the motivation, design and status of accelerator R&D for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory.

  17. Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams: Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams: Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders proton driverV of constituent center-of-mass energy? The Solution... · Accelerator facilities based on muon storage rings: Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. 2 #12;Where We Are Coming From · (1956) O'Neill: proposes ionization

  18. Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams: Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams: Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders proton driver targetV of constituent center­of­mass energy? The Solution... ffl Accelerator facilities based on muon storage rings: Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. 2 #12; Where We Are Coming From ffl (1956) O'Neill: proposes

  19. Compact Linear Collider drive beam phase stabilization simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbershagen, A.; Schulte, D.; Burrows, P. N.

    2015-04-01

    The drive beam phase stability is one of the critical feasibility issues of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) project. This paper presents a step-by-step analysis of the error propagation through the CLIC drive beam complex using realistic rf potential and beam loading amplitude functions for the drive and main beam accelerating structures. The impact of planned stabilization systems for drive beam bunch charge and longitudinal phase is simulated and the optimal specifications for such systems are calculated and discussed.

  20. Linear Accelerator -Photon Collider Author: Mitja Krnel

    E-print Network

    ?umer, Slobodan

    be studied with photon colliders. 2 #12;2. Linear accelerator A linear particle accelerator was invented in 1928 by Rolf Wideroe[3]. This type of particle accelerator is used to increase the velocity of charged subatomic particles or ions. In a linear particle accelerator particles are subjected to a series

  1. Beam stability issues in very large hadron collider

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Burov; J. Marriner; V. Shiltsev; V. Danilov; G. Lambertson

    2000-01-01

    The Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) is a superconducting proton–proton collider with approximately 100 TeV c.m. energy and approximately 1034s?1cm?2 luminosity [G. Dugan, in: Proceedings of the 1999 IEEE Particle Acceleration Conference, New York, 1999, p. 48.]11VLHC Web page http:\\/\\/vlhc.org. Currently, beam dynamics in this future accelerator is the subject of intensive studies within the framework of the US-wide VLHC

  2. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  3. Relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.; Houck, T.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1994-10-01

    Relativistic klystrons (RKs) are being developed as an RF power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron-positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. In a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA), the drive beam passes through a large number of RF output structures. High conversion efficiency of electron beam energy to RF energy is achieved in this concept by reacceleration of the modulated drive beam between output structures. The authors have conducted experiments studying the RF power extracted from various RK structures driven by modulated induction accelerator current pulses; the studies include work on improving the transport dynamics of the drive beam. They have started a demonstration in which the modulated induction beam current is reaccelerated by passage through subsequent induction accelerator cells.

  4. The Two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.; Hopkins, D.B.

    1986-06-01

    The Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) consists of a long high-gradient accelerator structure (HGS) adjacent to an equal-length Free Electron Laser (FEL). In the FEL, a beam propagates through a long series of undulators. At regular intervals, waveguides couple microwave power out of the FEL into the HGS. To replenish energy given up by the FEL beam to the microwave field, induction accelerator units are placed periodically along the length of the FEL. In this manner it is expected to achieve gradients of more than 250 MV/m and thus have a serious option for a 1 TeV x 1 TeV linear collider. The state of present theoretical understanding of the TBA is presented with particular emphasis upon operation of the ''steady-state'' FEL, phase and amplitude control of the rf wave, and suppression of sideband instabilities. Experimental work has focused upon the development of a suitable HGS and the testing of this structure using the Electron Laser Facility (ELF). Description is given of a first test at ELF with a seven-cell 2..pi../3 mode structure which without preconditioning and with a not-very-good vacuum nevertheless at 35 GHz yielded an average accelerating gradient of 180 MV/m.

  5. Engineering conceptual design of the relativistic Klystron two-beam accelerator based power source for 1-TeV next linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.; Deadrick, F.; Peters, C.; Vanecek, D.; Yu, S.

    1995-04-01

    Ultra-high gradient radio frequency linacs require efficient and reliable power sources. The induction linac has proven to be a reliable source of low energy, high current and high brightness electron beams. The low energy beam is bunched, transported through resonant transfer cavities in which it radiates microwave energy that is coupled to an adjacent high energy accelerator. The low energy beam is maintained at a constant energy by periodic induction accelerator cells. This paper describes the engineering aspects of the induction accelerator based relativistic klystron. The physics issues are covered in another paper at this conference.

  6. Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Muon Production, Capture and Acceleration R&D

    E-print Network

    Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider R&D Muon Production, Capture and Acceleration R&D directed at Physics with Intense Muon Beams The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration #12;Alan Bross High and Muon Collider Collaboration (a.k.a. Muon Collaboration) has pursued an active R&D program that has

  7. Development of a CVD diamond Beam Condition Monitor for CMS at the Large Hadron Collider

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Fernandez-Hernando; D. Chong; R. Gray; C. Ilgner; A. MacPherson; A. Oh; T. Pritchard; R. Stone; S. Worm

    2005-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will store 2808 bunches per colliding beam, with each bunch consisting of 1011 protons at an energy of 7TeV. If there is a failure in an element of the accelerator, the resulting beam losses could cause damage not only to the machine but also to the experiments. A Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) is foreseen

  8. Coherent beam-beam effects in storage ring colliders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lihui Jin

    2005-01-01

    In storage-ring colliders, it has been a first priority to achieve the highest possible luminosity in order to provide adequate physical data for research in high-energy and nuclear physics. The luminosity is usually limited by beam-beam effects especially in the case of high-intensity beams. Therefore understanding beam-beam effects is important to achieve high luminosity in storage-ring colliders. Theoretically, a complete

  9. LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED COLLIDERS C. B. Schroeder

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED COLLIDERS C. B. Schroeder , E. Esarey, Cs. T´oth, C. G. R. Geddes-generation linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator gamma-gamma () collider is considered. An example of the parameters for a 0.5 TeV laser-plasma-accelerator collider

  10. Future Accelerators, Muon Colliders, and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A Carrigan, Jr.

    2001-12-19

    Particle physics is driven by five great topics. Neutrino oscillations and masses are now at the fore. The standard model with extensions to supersymmetry and a Higgs to generate mass explains much of the field. The origins of CP violation are not understood. The possibility of extra dimensions has raised tantalizing new questions. A fifth topic lurking in the background is the possibility of something totally different. Many of the questions raised by these topics require powerful new accelerators. It is not an overstatement to say that for some of the issues, the accelerator is almost the experiment. Indeed some of the questions require machines beyond our present capability. As this volume attests, there are parts of the particle physics program that have been significantly advanced without the use of accelerators such as the subject of neutrino oscillations and many aspects of the particle-cosmology interface. At this stage in the development of physics, both approaches are needed and important. This chapter first reviews the status of the great accelerator facilities now in operation or coming on within the decade. Next, midrange possibilities are discussed including linear colliders with the adjunct possibility of gamma-gamma colliders, muon colliders, with precursor neutrino factories, and very large hadron colliders. Finally visionary possibilities are considered including plasma and laser accelerators.

  11. Beam dynamics issues for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this paper we discuss various beam dynamics issues for linear colliders. The emphasis is to explore beam dynamics effects which lead to an effective dilution of the emittance of the beam and thus to a loss of luminosity. These considerations lead to various tolerances which are evaluated for a particular parameter set.

  12. Collider and detector protection at beam accidents

    SciTech Connect

    I. L. Rakhno; N. V. Mokhov; A. I. Drozhdin

    2003-12-10

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section.

  13. Transverse mode coupling instability of colliding beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S.; Buffat, X.; Mounet, N.; Pieloni, T.

    2014-04-01

    In high brightness circular colliders, coherent and incoherent beam dynamics are dominated by beam-beam interactions. It is generally assumed that the incoherent tune spread introduced by the beam-beam interactions is sufficiently large to cure any instabilities originating from impedance. However, as the two counterrotating beams interact they can give rise to coherent dipole modes and therefore modify the coherent beam dynamics and stability conditions. In this case, coherent beam-beam effects and impedance cannot be treated independently and their interplay should be taken into account in any realistic attempt to study the beam stability of colliding beams. Due to the complexity of these physics processes, numerical simulations become an important tool for the analysis of this system. Two approaches are proposed in this paper: a fully self-consistent multiparticle tracking including particle-in-cell Poisson solver for the beam-beam interactions and a linearized model taking into account finite bunch length effects. To ensure the validity of the results a detailed benchmarking of these models was performed. It will be shown that under certain conditions coherent beam-beam dipole modes can couple with higher order headtail modes and lead to strong instabilities with characteristics similar to the classical transverse mode coupling instability originating from impedance alone. Possible cures for this instability are explored both for single bunch and multibunch interactions. Simulation results and experimental evidences of the existence of this instability at the LHC will be presented for the specific case of offset collisions.

  14. Beam profile monitoring at the test beam line at the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olvegård, M.; Adli, E.; Andreazza, W.; Bolzon, B.; Bravin, E.; Chritin, N.; Dabrowski, A.; Döbert, S.; Duraffourg, M.; Lefèvre, T.; Lillestøl, R.; Ziemann, V.

    2013-08-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a study for a future linear electron-positron collider based on a two-beam acceleration scheme in which a high-intensity drive beam is decelerated in order to provide the power to accelerate the main beam for collision in the TeV range. The power extracted from the drive beam deteriorates the beam quality and increases the energy spread significantly. Monitoring of the beam properties is therefore challenging but essential. These challenges are being addressed experimentally at the CLIC test facility where up to 55% of the power is extracted from the beam in the test beam line, a small-scale version of the CLIC drive-beam decelerator, leaving the beam with a very wide energy profile. For monitoring of the transverse beam profile and Twiss parameters we use optical transition radiation screens and quadrupole scans. The intra-pulse-train energy spectrum before and after deceleration is measured with segmented beam dumps. In this paper we discuss the performance of these diagnostic devices with a particular emphasis on the large energy spread and its effect on the beam imaging techniques, and with a final outlook to the CLIC drive-beam diagnostics.

  15. Beam stability issues in very large hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, A.; Marriner, J.; Shiltsev, V.; Danilov, V.; Lambertson, G.

    2000-08-01

    The Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) is a superconducting proton-proton collider with approximately 100 TeV c.m. energy and approximately 10 34 s-1 cm-2 luminosity [G. Dugan, in: Proceedings of the 1999 IEEE Particle Acceleration Conference, New York, 1999, p. 48.] Currently, beam dynamics in this future accelerator is the subject of intensive studies within the framework of the US-wide VLHC R&D program. This presentation summarizes recent developments in the field. Besides general discussion on relevant VLHC parameters, we consider various beam instabilities and ways to avoid them. Finally, we outline possibilities for theoretical and experimental R&D. VLHC Web page http://vlhc.org.

  16. Diffusion due to beam-beam resonances in hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Beam-beam tune spread in hadron colliders usually is small enough to avoid most dangerous low-order betatron resonances. However, even weak high-order resonances can be detrimental due to cooperative effect of the external noise. Mechanisms of such cooperation are considered, simple analytical estimates of the diffusion rate being verified with numerical simulations. The developed theory is used to evaluate the beam-beam resonance contribution to the emittance growth in the Tevatron.

  17. Channeling acceleration: A path to ultrahigh energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Huang, Z.; Ruth, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    Acceleration of charged particles along crystal channels has been proposed earlier in an attempt to achieve high acceleration gradient while at the same time to suppress excessive emittance growth. Recently the authors demonstrated that a particle in a generic focusing channel can in principle absolutely damp to its transverse ground state without any quantum excitation. This yields the minimum beam emittance that one can ever attain, {gamma}{epsilon}{sub min} = {h_bar}/2mc, limited only by the uncertainty principle. In this paper they discuss sources of excitation when a more realistic channel is considered, including bremsstrahlung and multiple Coulomb scattering. They investigate the possibility of colliding ultrahigh energy particles in such strong focusing channels without the need of a final focusing system, where the concept of luminosity departs from the conventional approach. They show that a high luminosity can be attained with a rather modest beam power.

  18. Simulations of high disruption colliding beams

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, J.R.; Heifets, S.; Krafft, G.A.

    1990-09-01

    Recent B-factory proposals that use a linac beam colliding with the beam from a storage ring to achieve high luminosities (L > 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1}) result in very high disruption of the linac beam. The effects of such high disruption have been studied using the relativistic, 3-D code SWARM. We discuss the assumptions, parameters, and results of a series of runs that model such collisions. Regimes of high beam loss and methods to avoid them are also discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Accelerator physics and technology limitations to ultimate energy and luminosity in very large hadron colliders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Bauer

    2002-01-01

    The following presents a study of the accelerator physics and technology limitations to ultimate energy and luminosity in very large hadron colliders (VLHCs). The main accelerator physics limitations to ultimate energy and luminosity in future energy frontier hadron colliders are synchrotron radiation (SR) power, proton-collision debris power in the interaction regions (IR), number of events-per-crossing, stored energy per beam and

  20. Fermilab collider run 1b accelerator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, V.; Halling, M.; Lucas, P.; McCrory, E.; Mishra, S.; Pruss, S.; Werkema, S.

    1996-04-01

    This report summarizes the performance of Run 1b as of the end of July 1995. This run is the conclusion of Fermilab Collider Run 1, which consists of Run 1a (May 1992 - May 1993) and Run 1b (January 1994 - February 1996). Run 1b is characterized by being the first with the new 400 MeV Linac. At this time the run is not complete. Colliding beam physics is scheduled to resume after the summer 1995 shut down and continue until mid-February 1996. All of the operation to date is at a Tevatron energy of 900 GeV. This report emphasizes performance numbers and the various improvements made to systems to achieve this performance. It will only discuss the underlying physics to a limited extent. The report is divided into sections on: run statistics, I&C issues, proton source performance, antiproton source performance, main ring performance, Tevatron performance, and a summary.

  1. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control G. R. Plateau, , C. G. R acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA) [1, 2]. In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy

  2. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-print Network

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  3. 62-TeV center of mass hadron collider with capability for super bunch beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuji Yamada and Ken Takayama

    2001-08-22

    A 60 TeV center of mass hadron collider is proposed, which has capability of using Superbunch beam. With Superbunch beam, the luminosity is expected to be increased by a factor of 20, compared with conventional acceleration using RF cavities. This hadron collider will be built in two stages with a low field magnet ring first and a high field magnet ring later in the same tunnel. The low field magnet rig will be built with Pipetron scheme, with 7 TeV and 7 TeV proton beams, making a 14 TeV center of mass energy high luminosity collider, using Superbunch beams. In the second stage 10 Tesla high field magnets with twin beams, will be installed. It also utilizes Superbunch beams, realizing high luminosity collider. To accelerate Superbunch beams, the barrier bucket and acceleration induction cells will be used, which are made of induction cells, utilizing FINEMET material. The core loss of the FINEMET is estimated for the whole collider is estimated. The synchrotron radiation of the collider is also estimated. Merits of Superbunch beams over RF bunched beams for the high energy experiments is described.

  4. Two-Beam Accelerator: structure studies and 35 GHz experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, D.B.; Kuenning, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    The Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) shows great promise for achieving high accelerating gradients, perhaps >250 MV/m, for such machines as electron linear colliders. This paper presents the results of studies of candidate structures for a TBA. Also, the hardware and program for 35 GHz high-gradient testing are described. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  5. The International Linear Collider Beam Dumps

    SciTech Connect

    Appleby, R.; /Cockcroft Inst.; Keller, L.; Markiewicz, T.; Seryi, A.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Sugahara, R.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2006-01-30

    The ILC beam dumps are a key part of the accelerator design. At Snowmass 2005, the current status of the beam dump designs was reviewed, and the options for the overall dump layout considered. This paper describes the available dump options for the baseline and the alternatives and considers issues for the dumps that require resolution.

  6. SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Borland, M.; Kabel, A.; Li, Rui; Ryne, Robert; Stern, E.; Wang, Y.; Wasserman, H.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, we report on progress that has been made in beam dynamics simulation, from light sources to colliders, during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project 'Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS).' Several parallel computational tools for beam dynamics simulation are described. Also presented are number of applications in current and future accelerator facilities (e.g., LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC, and ELIC).

  7. Self accelerating electron Airy beams

    E-print Network

    Voloch-Bloch, Noa; Lilach, Yigal; Gover, Avraham; Arie, Ady

    2013-01-01

    We report the first experimental generation and observation of Airy beams of free electrons. The electron Airy beams are generated by diffraction of electrons through a nanoscale hologram, that imprints a cubic phase modulation on the beams' transverse plane. We observed the spatial evolution dynamics of an arc-shaped, self accelerating and shape preserving electron Airy beams. We directly observed the ability of electrons to self-heal, restoring their original shape after passing an obstacle. This electromagnetic method opens up new avenues for steering electrons, like their photonic counterparts, since their wave packets can be imprinted with arbitrary shapes or trajectories. Furthermore, these beams can be easily manipulated using magnetic or electric potentials. It is also possible to efficiently self mix narrow beams having opposite signs of acceleration, hence obtaining a new type of electron interferometer.

  8. Beam Tube Vacuum In A Very Large Hadron Collider; Stage 1 Vlhc

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Pivi; W. C. Turner

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation induced photodesorption in particle accelerators may lead to pressure rise and to beam-gas scattering losses, finally affecting the beam lifetime. We discuss the beam tube vacuum in the low field Stage 1 Very Large Hadron Collider VLHC. Since VLHC Stage 1 has a room temperature beam tube, a non-evaporable getter (NEG St101 strip) pumping system located inside a

  9. SciDAC Advances in Beam Dynamics Simulation: From Light Sources to Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Borland, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Kabel, A.; /Argonne; Li, R.; /Jefferson Lab; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley; Stern, E.; /Fermilab; Wang, Y.; /Argonne; Wasserman, H.; /LBL, Berkeley; Zhang, Y.; /SLAC

    2011-11-14

    In this paper, we report on progress that has been made in beam dynamics simulation, from light sources to colliders, during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project 'Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS).' Several parallel computational tools for beam dynamics simulation are described. Also presented are number of applications in current and future accelerator facilities (e.g., LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC, and ELIC). Particle accelerators are some of most important tools of scientific discovery. They are widely used in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and other basic and applied sciences to study the interaction of elementary particles, to probe the internal structure of matter, and to generate high-brightness radiation for research in materials science, chemistry, biology, and other fields. Modern accelerators are complex and expensive devices that may be several kilometers long and may consist of thousands of beamline elements. An accelerator may transport trillions of charged particles that interact electromagnetically among themselves, that interact with fields produced by the accelerator components, and that interact with beam-induced fields. Large-scale beam dynamics simulations on massively parallel computers can help provide understanding of these complex physical phenomena, help minimize design cost, and help optimize machine operation. In this paper, we report on beam dynamics simulations in a variety of accelerators ranging from next generation light sources to high-energy ring colliders that have been studied during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project.

  10. When will we know a muon collider is feasible? Status and directions of muon accelerator R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation of lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following the LHC discoveries. This paper briefly reviews the status of the accelerator R&D, addresses the question of the feasibility of a Muon Collider, what needs to be done to prove it and presents projected timeline of the project.

  11. When will we know a muon collider is feasible? Status and directions of muon accelerator R&D

    E-print Network

    Vladimir Shiltsev

    2010-03-16

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following the LHC discoveries. This article briefly reviews the status of the accelerator R&D, addresses the question of the feasibility of a Muon Collider, what needs to be done to prove it and presents projected timeline of the project.

  12. Effects of Ion Motion in Intense Beam-Driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Cook, A.M.; Thompson, M.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Scott, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93016 (United States); Yoder, R.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Physics, Manhattan College, 4513 Manhattan College Parkway, Riverdale, New York 10471 (United States)

    2005-11-04

    Recent proposals for using plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA) as a component of a linear collider have included intense electron beams with densities many times in excess of the plasma density. The beam's electric fields expel the plasma electrons from the beam path to many beam radii in this regime. We analyze here the motion of plasma ions under the beam fields, and find for a proposed PWFA collider scenario that the ions completely collapse inside of the beam. Simulations of ion collapse are presented. Implications of ion motion on the feasibility of the PWFA-based colliders are discussed.

  13. Beam-induced energy deposition issues in the Very Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov; Alexandr I. Drozhdin; G. William Foster

    2001-06-26

    Energy deposition issues are extremely important in the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) with huge energy stored in its 20 TeV (Stage-1) and 87.5 TeV (Stage-2) beams. The status of the VLHC design on these topics, and possible solutions of the problems are discussed. Protective measures are determined based on the operational and accidental beam loss limits for the prompt radiation dose at the surface, residual radiation dose, ground water activation, accelerator components radiation damage and quench stability. The beam abort and beam collimation systems are designed to protect accelerator from accidental and operational beam losses, IP region quadrupoles from irradiation by the products of beam-beam collisions, and to reduce the accelerator-induced backgrounds in the detectors.

  14. Beam-induced energy deposition issues in the Very Large Hadron Collider

    E-print Network

    Mokhov, N V; Foster, G W

    2001-01-01

    Energy deposition issues are extremely important in the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) with huge energy stored in its 20 TeV (Stage-1) and 87.5 TeV (Stage-2) beams. The status of the VLHC design on these topics, and possible solutions of the problems are discussed. Protective measures are determined based on the operational and accidental beam loss limits for the prompt radiation dose at the surface, residual radiation dose, ground water activation, accelerator components radiation damage and quench stability. The beam abort and beam collimation systems are designed to protect accelerator from accidental and operational beam losses, IP region quadrupoles from irradiation by the products of beam-beam collisions, and to reduce the accelerator-induced backgrounds in the detectors. (7 refs).

  15. Accelerator physics and technology limitations to ultimate energy and luminosity in very large hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    P. Bauer et al.

    2002-12-05

    The following presents a study of the accelerator physics and technology limitations to ultimate energy and luminosity in very large hadron colliders (VLHCs). The main accelerator physics limitations to ultimate energy and luminosity in future energy frontier hadron colliders are synchrotron radiation (SR) power, proton-collision debris power in the interaction regions (IR), number of events-per-crossing, stored energy per beam and beam-stability [1]. Quantitative estimates of these limits were made and translated into scaling laws that could be inscribed into the particle energy versus machine size plane to delimit the boundaries for possible VLHCs. Eventually, accelerator simulations were performed to obtain the maximum achievable luminosities within these boundaries. Although this study aimed at investigating a general VLHC, it was unavoidable to refer in some instances to the recently studied, [2], 200 TeV center-of-mass energy VLHC stage-2 design (VLHC-2). A more thorough rendering of this work can be found in [3].

  16. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Birx; L. L. Reginato

    1984-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that

  17. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel L. Birx; Louis L. Reginato

    1988-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module

  18. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel L. Birx; Louis L. Reginato

    1987-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module

  19. Physics with high energy electron-positron colliding beams with the MARK J detector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. P. Barber; U. Becker; H. Benda; A. Böhm; J. G. Branson; J. Bron; D. Buikman; J. D. Burger; C. C. Chang; H. S. Chen; M. Chen; C. P. Cheng; Y. S. Chu; R. Clare; P. Duinker; G. Y. Fang; H. Fesefeldt; D. Fong; M. Fukushima; J. C. Guo; A. Hariri; G. Herten; M. C. Ho; H. K. Hsu; R. W. Kadel; W. Krenz; J. Li; Q. Z. Li; M. Lu; D. Luckey; C. M. Ma; D. A. Ma; G. G. G. Massaro; T. Matsuda; H. Newman; M. Pohl; F. P. Poschmann; J. P. Revol; M. Rohde; H. Rykaczewski; K. Sinram; H. W. Tang; L. G. Tang Samuel; C. C. Ting; K. L. Tung; F. Vannucci; X. R. Wang; P. S. Wei; M. White; G. H. Wu; T. W. Wu; J. P. Xi; P. C. Yang; C. C. Yu; X. H. Yu; N. L. Zhang; R. Y. Zhu

    1980-01-01

    This report reviews the experimental investigation of high energy e+e- interactions by the MARK J collaboration at PETRA, the electron-positron colliding beam accelerator at DESY in Hamburg, Germany. The physics objectives include studies of several purely electromagnetic processes and hadronic final states, which further our knowledge of the nature of the fundamental constituents and of their strong, electromagnetic and weak

  20. Developments in beam-based alignment and steering of the Next Linear Collider main linac

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Tenenbaum; L. Endrickson; T. O. Raubenheimer

    2001-01-01

    The Next Linear Collider main linacs are 13 km linear accelerators which each contain approximately 750 hybrid iron\\/permanent-magnet quadrupoles in a FODO array. The small amount of vertical emittance dilution permitted in the main linacs implies a tight tolerance on the RMS distance between the beam and the centers of the quads. We describe two methods for measuring the offsets

  1. Developments in Beam-Based Alignment and Steering of the Next Linear Collider

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Main Linac

    The Next Linear Collider main linacs are 13 km linear accelerators which each contain approxi- mately 750 hybrid iron\\/permanent-magnet quadrupoles in a FODO array. The small amount of ver- tical emittance dilution permitted in the main linacs implies a tight tolerance on the RMS distance between the beam and the centers of the quads. We describe two methods for measuring

  2. Developments in beam based alignment and steering of the Next Linear Collider main linac

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Tenenbaum; L. Hendrickson; T. O. Raubenheimer

    2001-01-01

    The Next Linear Collider main linacs are 13 km linear accelerators which each contain approximately 750 hybrid iron\\/permanent-magnet quadrupoles in a FODO array. The small amount of vertical emittance dilution permitted in the main linacs implies a tight tolerance on the RMS distance between the beam and the centers of the quads. We describe two methods for measuring the offsets

  3. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two- beam accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidia, Steven Michael

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band (~8-12 GHz) through Ka-band (~30-35 GHz) frequency regions. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. A mapping algorithm is used so that tens or hundreds of thousands of macroparticles can be pushed from the solution of a few hundreds of differential equations. This is a great cost-savings device from the standpoint of CPU cycles. It can increase by several orders of magnitude the number of macroparticles that take place in the simulation, enabling more accurate modeling of the evolution of the beam distribution and enhanced sensitivity to effects due to the beam's halo. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split- operator algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The beam-cavity interaction is analyzed and divided naturally into two distinct times scales. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 TW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rf cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficiently capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional experimental efforts are described. The first is the commissioning of the RTA injector. This electron gun produces a 1 MV, 600 A beam over a 250 ns pulse length. The post-injector beamline is described, and the battery of diagnostics is presented, with initial results reported. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  4. New aspects of beam-beam interactions in hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaji Sen

    2003-06-02

    Beam-beam phenomena have until now limited the beam currents and luminosity achievable in the Tevatron. injected proton currents are about ten times larger than the anti-proton currents so beam-beam effects have largely acted on the anti-protons and at all stages of the operational cycle. The effects of the anti-protons on the protons have until now been relatively benign but that may change at higher anti-proton currents. After 36 bunches of protons are injected and placed on the proton helix, anti-protons are injected four bunches at a time. After all bunches are injected, acceleration to top energy takes bout 85 seconds. After reaching flat top, the optics around the interaction regions (IRs) is changed to lower {beta}* from 1.6 m to 0.35 m at B0 and D0. The beams are brought into collision by collapsing the separation bumps around the IPs. During a high energy physics store each bunch experiences two head-on collisions with bunches in the opposing beam and seventy long-range interactions. At all other stages of the operational cycle, each bunch experiences only long-range interactions--seventy two in all. Performance limitations from beam-beam effects until now have been primarily due to these long-range interactions. The anti-proton losses at 150 GeV have decreased during the last year mostly due to better control of the orbits, tunes and chromaticities. During this period proton intensities have increased about 50%, thus anti-proton losses at 150 GeV have not been very dependent on proton intensities. Anti-proton and proton losses on the ramp together with proton losses at 150 GeV are the dominant contributors to the Tevatron inefficiency.

  5. Nonparaxial Mathieu and Weber accelerating beams

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Tongcang; Cannan, Drake; Yin, Xiaobo; Morandotti, Roberto; Chen, Zhigang; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally nonparaxial Mathieu and Weber accelerating beams, generalizing the concept of previously found accelerating beams. We show that such beams bend into large angles along circular, elliptical or parabolic trajectories but still retain nondiffracting and self-healing capabilities. The circular nonparaxial accelerating beams can be considered as a special case of the Mathieu accelerating beams, while an Airy beam is only a special case of the Weber beams at the paraxial limit. Not only generalized nonparaxial accelerating beams open up many possibilities of beam engineering for applications, but the fundamental concept developed here can be applied to other linear wave systems in nature, ranging from electromagnetic and elastic waves to matter waves.

  6. INTRA-BEAM SCATTERING SCALING FOR VERY LARGE HADRON COLLIDERS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; PARZEN,G.

    2001-06-18

    For Very Large Hadron Colliders (VLHC), flat hadron beams [2] with their vertical emittance much smaller than their horizontal emittance are proposed to maximize the design luminosity. Emittance growth caused by intra-beam scattering (IBS) is a concern on the realization of such flat-beam conditions. Based on existing IBS formalism on beams of Gaussian distribution, we analytically derive [6] the IBS growth rate and determine the IBS limit on the aspect ratio for a flat beam.

  7. 62-TeV center of mass hadron collider with superbunch beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2001-11-05

    The scheme of a 62-TeV center of mass p-p collider with superbunch beams at Fermilab is proposed as a practical and realistically achievable future project. It will be built in two stages, using the same tunnel, first with a 2 Tesla low field magnet collider ring and later with a 10 Tesla high field magnet collider ring. Both low and high field magnets have twin bore aperture and will be installed in the tunnel with the circumference of 87.25 km. In each bore a proton beam is accelerated, using induction cavities to increase luminosity. In the first stage they install a 7 TeV accelerator ring with operating field of 2 Tesla, based on the superferric transmission-line design. This ring will be operated at a 14-TeV center of mass collider. This will have the same energy as the LHC, but it will have 15 times higher luminosity, namely 1.5 x 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/sec. The estimated synchrotron radiation is negligible with this machine. The existing Fermilab accelerator system, including the 150 GeV main injector, will be used as the injector system. Its rough cost estimation and schedule for this first stage are presented. In the second stage proton beams are accelerated, also using induction cavities up to 31 TeV with the 10 Tesla dipole magnets. The counter circulating beams will collide with the 62-TeV center of mass energy. With the superbunch beams they can expect the luminosity can be increased about 15 times more than the conventional method with RF cavities. It will be 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/sec. In the second stage, the synchrotron radiation power will be about 12 W/m, and they need an elaborated beam screen.

  8. Tests of the FONT3 Linear Collider Intra-Train Beam Feedback System at the ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, P.N.; Christian, G.; Clarke, C.; Hartin, A.; Dabiri Khah, H.; Molloy, S.; White, G.R.; /Queen Mary, U. of London; Frisch, J.C.; Markiewicz, T.W.; McCormick, D.J.; Ross, M.C.; Smith, S.; Smith, T.J.; /SLAC; Kalinin, A.; /Daresbury; Perry, C.; /Oxford Instruments

    2006-03-14

    We report preliminary results of beam tests of the FONT3 Linear Collider intra-train position feedback system prototype at the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK. The feedback system incorporates a novel beam position monitor (BPM) processor with a latency below 5 nanoseconds, and a kicker driver amplifier with similar low latency. The 56 nanosecond-long bunchtrain in the ATF extraction line was used to test the prototype BPM processor. The achieved latency will allow a demonstration of intra-train feedback on timescales relevant even for the CLIC Linear Collider design.

  9. Parallel beam dynamics simulation of linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert D.

    2002-01-31

    In this paper we describe parallel particle-in-cell methods for the large scale simulation of beam dynamics in linear accelerators. These techniques have been implemented in the IMPACT (Integrated Map and Particle Accelerator Tracking) code. IMPACT is being used to study the behavior of intense charged particle beams and as a tool for the design of next-generation linear accelerators. As examples, we present applications of the code to the study of emittance exchange in high intensity beams and to the study of beam transport in a proposed accelerator for the development of accelerator-driven waste transmutation technologies.

  10. RESOLVING BEAM TRANSPORT PROBLEMS IN ELECTROSTATIC ACCELERATORS

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    with the transport of charged particle beams through electros- tatic accelerators originate primarily in a fewRESOLVING BEAM TRANSPORT PROBLEMS IN ELECTROSTATIC ACCELERATORS J. D. LARSON (*) Oak Ridge National are frequently encounte- red during the design, operation and upgrading of electrostatic accelerators. Examples

  11. Coherent instabilities in the booster and collider of the heavy ion accelerator complex NICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinev, D.

    2013-07-01

    In the first part some knowledge about the coherent instabilities in cyclic accelerators and storage rings necessary for the analysis of the collective effects in the heavy ion collider NICA is given. The second part discusses the possibilities for arising of coherent instabilities in the booster and in the collider of the NICA complex. Both coupling impedances and instability thresholds and growth rates have been estimated for single and coupled bunches. Parameters of the beam feedback system for damping of the instabilities have been analyzed. The investigation has been performed at the Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energy Physics, JINR.

  12. ACCELERATING AND COLLIDING POLARIZED PROTONS IN RHIC WITH SIBERIAN SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.; AHRENS,L.; ALESSI,J.; BAI,M.; BEEBE - WANG,J.; BRENNAN,J.M.; BROWN,K.A.; BUNCE,G.; CAMERON,P.; COURANT,E.D.; DREES,A.; FISCHER,W.; ET AL

    2002-06-02

    We successfully injected polarized protons in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. Each snake consists of four helical superconducting dipoles which rotate the polarization by 180{sup o} about a horizontal axis. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV. We report on our experiences during commissioning and operation of collider with polarized protons.

  13. Bessel (axicon) beams and laser driven accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hafizi, B. [Icarus Research, Inc. (United States); [Omega-P, Inc. (United States); Sprangle, P. Ting, A. [Naval Research Lab. (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Analyses of high gradient acceleration schemes utilizing intense electromagnetic waves generally employ Gaussian laser beams. This is natural since the output from a laser cavity is nearly Gaussian, which can be readily focused to a tight spot with high intensity. There are, however, other beam profiles that can be generated with relative ease and may be more advantageous than Gaussian beams, as determined by the acceleration gradient or the energy gain. Examples of these beams include Bessel and axicon beams. The authors shall present a comparison of Bessel and Gaussian beams for several advanced accelerator schemes.

  14. Collider-Accelerator Department Overview Derek I. Lowenstein

    E-print Network

    -NE) · Booster · NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NASA, $5.5M/year, incl. $2M for Medical and Biology Departments Engineers/Professional 144 114 23 5 2 Designers/Technicians 196 155 32 6 3 Admin./Clerical 24 21 2 1 0 support ~13 FTEs are purchased as Laboratory assigned trades. #12;4 Collider Accelerator Department

  15. Synchrotron radiation and beam tube vacuum in a Very Large Hadron Collider, Stage 1 and Stage 2 VLHC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Pivi; W. C. Turner; P. Bauer; P. Limon

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation induced photodesorption in particle accelerators may lead to pressure rise and to beam-gas scattering losses, finally affecting the beam lifetime. We discuss the beam tube vacuum in the low field Stage 1 and Stage 2 Very Large Hadron Collider VLHC. Since VLHC Stage 1 has a room temperature beam tube, a non-evaporable getter (NEG St101 strip) pumping system

  16. Beam-Beam Scans Within a Linear Collider Bunch-Train Crossing

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.R.; /SLAC

    2006-02-22

    Beam-beam deflection scans provide important beam diagnostics at the interaction point of a linear collider. Beam properties such as spot sizes, alignment, and waists are measured by sweeping one beam across the other. Proposed linear colliders use trains of bunches; if beam-beam scans can be done within the time of a bunch-train crossing rather than integrating over the bunch train, the acquisition rate of diagnostic information can be increased and the sensitivity of the scan to pulse-to-pulse jitter and slow drifts reduced. The existence of intra-train deflection feedback provides most of the hardware needed to implement intra-train beam-beam scans for diagnostic purposes. A conceptual design is presented for such beam-beam scans at the Next Linear Collider (NLC).

  17. Beam-Beam Study on the Upgrade of Beijing Electron Positron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Cai, Y.; /SLAC

    2006-02-10

    It is an important issue to study the beam-beam interaction in the design and performance of such a high luminosity collider as BEPCII, the upgrade of Beijing Electron Positron Collider. The weak-strong simulation is generally used during the design of a collider. For performance a large scale tune scan, the weak-strong simulation studies on beam-beam interaction were done, and the geometry effects were taken into account. The strong-strong simulation studies were done for investigating the luminosity goal and the dependence of the luminosity on the beam parameters.

  18. Effect of Beam-Beam Interactions on Stability of Coherent Oscillations in a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab; Ohmi, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-05-01

    In order to achieve peak luminosity of a muon collider in the 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s range the number of muons per bunch should be of the order of a few units of 10{sup 12} rendering the beam-beam parameter as high as 0.1 per IP. Such strong beam-beam interaction can be a source of instability if the working point is chosen close to a coherent beam-beam resonance. On the other hand, the beam-beam tunespread can provide a mechanism of suppression of the beam-wall driven instabilities. In this report the coherent instabilities driven by beam-beam and beam-wall interactions are studied with the help of BBSS code for the case of 1.5 TeV c.o.m muon collider.

  19. Design and Interpretation of Colliding Pulse Injected Laser-Plasma Acceleration Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Ranjbar, Vahid H.; Bruhwiler, David L. [Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Ave, Suite A, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Chen, Min; Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.; Leemans, Wim P. [LOASIS program, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 cyclotron road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-11-04

    The use of colliding laser pulses to control the injection of plasma electrons into the plasma wake of a laser-plasma accelerator is a promising approach to obtaining GeV scale electron bunches with reduced emittance and energy spread. Colliding Pulse Injection (CPI) experiments are being performed by groups around the world. We present recent particle-in-cell simulations, using the parallel VORPAL framework, of CPI for physical parameters relevant to ongoing experiments of the LOASIS program at LBNL. We perform parameter scans in order to optimize the quality of the bunch, and compare the results with experimental data. Effect of non-ideal gaussian pulses and laser self-focusing in the plasma channel on the trapped bunch are evaluated. For optimized parameters accessible in the experiment, a 20 pC electron beam can be accelerated to 300 MeV with percent level energy spread.

  20. Short-pulse dielectric two-beam acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Jing, C.; Jing

    2012-08-01

    We are exploring a new parameter space of the two-beam acceleration (TBA) scheme based on an ultra-short (~20 ns) rf pulse in a dielectric TBA. All two-beam accelerators (TBAs) use an electron drive beam to generate high-power rf in a decelerator and extract this power to drive an accelerating structure to high gradient. Typically, the rf pulse is on the order of hundreds of ns or greater in order to maintain good rf-to-beam efficiency. However, recent scaling arguments show that the rf breakdown threshold improves with decreasing rf pulse length, so it desirable to find a way to run at short-pulse length with good efficiency. In this paper, we discuss how we chose the design parameters of a short-pulse TBA for a TeV linear collider module. We then present plans for an experimental program to demonstrate TBA at Argonne wakefield accelerator (AWA) facility including high-power rf generation, high-gradient acceleration, and staging.

  1. The two-beam accelerator: structure studies and 35 GHz experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, D.B.; Kuennig, R.W.

    1985-10-01

    The Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) shows great promise for achieving high accelerating gradients, perhaps >250 MV/m, for such machines as electron linear colliders. This paper presents the results of studies of candidate structures for a TBA. Also, the hardware and program for 35 GHz high-gradient testing is described.

  2. 27. Accelerator physics of colliders 1 27. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS OF COLLIDERS

    E-print Network

    dynamics is stability. While a reference particle proceeds along the design, or reference, trajectory other trajectory. The independent variable is the distance s of the reference particle along this trajectory rather particles collide head-on with frequency f, a basic expression for the luminosity is L = f n1n2 4xy (27

  3. 25. Accelerator physics of colliders 1 25. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS OF COLLIDERS

    E-print Network

    dynamics is stability. While a reference particle proceeds along the design, or reference, trajectory other trajectory. The independent variable is the distance s of the reference particle along this trajectory rather particles collide head-on with frequency f, a basic expression for the luminosity is L = f n1n2 4xy (25

  4. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Birx; L. L. Reginato

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus capable of acceleration of electrons to energies of at least 1 MeV at currents of at least 100 A over a time interval of at most 1 ..mu..sec. and pulse repetition rates of up to 20 kilohertz, the apparatus comprising: an electron beam injector for generating focused beam of electrons of energy substantially greater than

  5. Single bunch beam measurements for the proposed SLAC linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Truher, J.B.

    1981-02-01

    Single S-band bunches of approx. 10/sup 9/ electrons have been used to study the characteristics of the SLAC linac in anticipation of its operation as a linear collider. Emittance measurements have been made, the longitudinal charge distribution within single bunches has been determined and transverse emittance growth has been produced by deliberately missteering the beam. New equipment is being installed and checked out, and the sensitivity of new traveling-wave beam position monitors has been measured.

  6. Wakefield Damping in a Pair of X-Band Accelerators for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.M.; Adolphsen, C.E.; Wang, J.W.; Li, Z.; /SLAC

    2006-12-18

    We consider means to damp the wake-field left behind ultra-relativistic charges. In particular, we focus on a pair of travelling wave accelerators operating at an X-band frequency of 11.424 GHz. In order to maximize the efficiency of acceleration, in the context of a linear collider, multiple bunches of charged particles are accelerated within a given pulse of the electromagnetic field. The wake-field left behind successive bunches, if left unchecked, can seriously disturb the progress of trailing bunches and can lead to an appreciable dilution in the emittance of the beam. We report on a method to minimize the influence of the wake-field on trailing bunches. This method entails detuning the characteristic mode frequencies which make-up the electromagnetic field, damping the wake-field, and interleaving the frequencies of adjacent accelerating structures. Theoretical predictions of the wake-field and modes, based on a circuit model, are compared with experimental measurements of the wake-field conducted within the ASSET facility at SLAC. Very good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment and this allows us to have some confidence in designing the damping of wake-fields in a future linear collider consisting of several thousand of these accelerating structures.

  7. International X-Band Linear Collider Accelerator Structure R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    For more than fifteen years before the International Technology Recommendation Panel (ITRP) decision in August, 2004, there were intensive R&D activities and broad international collaboration among the groups at SLAC, KEK, FNAL, LLNL and other labs for the room temperature X-Band accelerator structures. The goal was to provide an optimized design of the main linac structure for the NLC (Next Linear Collider) or GLC (Global Linear Collider). There have been two major challenges in developing X-band accelerator structures for the linear colliders. The first is to demonstrate stable, long-term operation at the high gradient (65 MV/m) that is required to optimize the machine cost. The second is to strongly suppress the beam induced long-range wakefields, which is required to achieve high luminosity. More than thirty X-band accelerator structures with various RF parameters, cavity shapes and coupler types have been fabricated and tested since 1989. A summary of the main achievements and experiences are presented in this talk including the structure design, manufacturing techniques, high power performance, and other structure related issues. Also, the new progress in collaborating with the CLIC, high gradient structures and X-Band structure applications for RF deflectors and others are briefly introduced.

  8. Pointing of laser-accelerated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Risse, E.; Kalachnikov, M.P.; Nickles, P.V.; Sandner, W.; Schramm, U.; Habs, D.; Witte, J.; Schnuerer, M. [MPI fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D 85748 Garching (Germany) and LMU Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, D 85748, Garching (Germany); Max Born Institut, Max Born Strasse 2a, D 12489 Berlin (Germany); Max Born Institut, Max Born Strasse 2a, D 12489 Berlin (Germany) and TU Berlin, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, D 10623 Berlin (Germany); LMU Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, D 85748, Garching (Germany); MPI fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D 85748 Garching (Germany); Max Born Institut, Max Born Strasse 2a, D 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Small fluctuations in the acceleration sheath change the pointing of a proton beam accelerated from the rear side of a laser irradiated thin aluminum foil. The proton acceleration was produced with 40 fs pulses of a Ti:sapphire laser at an intensity of approximately 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. This observation has been made with a high spatial resolution Thomson spectrometer. The proton beam pointing has appeared stable in the energy range between the high energy cutoff (3 MeV) and 50% of this value. Deviations of the beam position at lower energies changes in a range of 0-3 mrad. The recorded pictures show wiggled and continuous proton traces which imply a release of the proton beam from the acceleration zone with a velocity chirp.

  9. Acceleration of high charge density electron beams in the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, J.C.; Clendenin, J.E.; Jobe, R.K.; Lueth, V.G.; Millich, A.; Ross, M.C.; Seeman, J.T.; Stiening, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) will require both electron and positron beams of very high charge density and low emittance to be accelerated to about 50 GeV in the SLAC 3-km linac. The linac is in the process of being improved to meet this requirement. The program to accelerate an electron beam of high charge density through the first third of the SLC linac is described and the experimental results are discussed. 7 references, 5 figures.

  10. Failure Studies at the Compact Linear Collider: Main Linac and Beam Delivery System

    E-print Network

    Maidana, C O; Jonker, M

    2012-01-01

    The proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is based on a two-beam acceleration scheme. The energy of two high-intensity, low-energy drive beams is extracted and transferred to two low-intensity, high-energy main beams. The CERN Technology Department - Machine protection and electrical integrity group has the mission to develop and maintain the systems to protect machine components from damage caused by ill controlled conditions. Various failure scenarios were studied and the potential damage these failures could cause to the machine structures was estimated. In this paper, first results of the beam response to kick induced failures in the main LINAC and in the beam delivery system (BDS) sections are presented together with possible collimator damage scenarios.

  11. Beam tube vacuum in a Very Large Hadron Collider; Stage 1 VLHC

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.; Turner, W.C.

    2001-04-20

    Synchrotron radiation induced photodesorption in particle accelerators may lead to pressure rise and to beam-gas scattering losses, finally affecting the beam lifetime. We discuss the beam tube vacuum in the low field Stage 1 Very Large Hadron Collider VLHC. Since VLHC Stage 1 has a room temperature beam tube, a non-evaporable getter (NEG St101 strip) pumping system located inside a pumping antechamber, supplemented by lumped ion pumps for pumping methane is considered. A possible beam conditioning scenario is presented for reaching design intensity. The most important results are summarized in this paper. More detailed reports of the calculations will be presented at the PAC2001 Conference, Chicago, IL to be held in June 2001, and at the Snowmass Conference, CO, to be held on July 2001.

  12. Beam Coupling to Optical Scale Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, C.M.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; Lincoln, M.R.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC; Plettner, T.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-03-27

    Current research efforts into structure based laser acceleration of electrons utilize beams from standard RF linacs. These beams must be coupled into very small structures with transverse dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength. To obtain decent transmission, a permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) triplet with a focusing gradient of 560 T/m is used to focus into the structure. Also of interest is the induced wakefield from the structure, useful for diagnosing potential accelerator structures or as novel radiation sources.

  13. Beam dynamics of low energy muon acceleration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alex Bogacz

    2006-01-01

    A conceptual design of a muon acceleration scheme based on recirculating superconducting linacs is proposed. In the presented scenario, acceleration starts after ionization cooling at 210 MeV\\/c and proceeds to 20 GeV, where the beam is injected into a neutrino factory storage ring. The key technical issues are addressed, such as the choice of acceleration technology (superconducting versus normal conducting)

  14. Towards a plasma wake-field acceleration-based linear collider 1 Work supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy grants DE-FG03-93ER0796, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation grant BR-3225. 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Rosenzweig; N. Barov; A. Murokh; E. Colby; P. Colestock

    1998-01-01

    A proposal for a linear collider based on an advanced accelerator scheme, plasma wake-field acceleration in the extremely nonlinear regime, is discussed. In this regime, many of the drawbacks associated with preservation of beam quality during acceleration in plasma are mitigated. The scaling of all beam and wake parameters with respect to plasma wavelength is examined. Experimental progress towards high-gradient

  15. Approaches to Beam Stabilization in X-Band Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Raubenheimer, Tor; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC; Burrow, Philip; Molloy, Stephen; White, Glen; /Queen Mary U.

    2006-09-05

    In order to stabilize the beams at the interaction point, the X-band linear collider proposes to use a combination of techniques: inter-train and intra-train beam-beam feedback, passive vibration isolation, and active vibration stabilization based on either accelerometers or laser interferometers. These systems operate in a technologically redundant fashion: simulations indicate that if one technique proves unusable in the final machine, the others will still support adequate luminosity. Experiments underway for all of these technologies have already demonstrated adequate performance.

  16. Beam trapping in a modified betatron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapetanakos, C. A.; Dialetis, D.; Marsh, S. J.; Len, L. K.; Smith, T.

    1991-09-01

    Experimental results on the trapping of the beam in the Naval Research Laboratory modified betatron accelerator are reported. These results are in good agreement with a revised model of resistive trapping (see Sprangle and Kapetanakos, 1986). It is indicated that the wall resistivity is responsible for the inward spiral motion of the beam after injection.

  17. Analysis of Gaussian beam and Bessel beam driven laser accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hafizi, B.; Ganguly, A.K.; Moore, C.I. [Omega-P, Inc., P.O. Box 202008, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-2008 (United States)] [Omega-P, Inc., P.O. Box 202008, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-2008 (United States); Ting, A.; Sprangle, P. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375-5346 (United States)] [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375-5346 (United States)

    1999-10-01

    This paper presents a comparison of Gaussian and Bessel beam driven laser accelerators. The emphasis is on the vacuum beat wave accelerator (VBWA), employing two laser beams of differing wavelengths to impart a net acceleration to particles. Generation of Bessel beams by means of circular slits, holographic optical elements, and axicons is outlined and the image space fields are determined by making use of Huygens{close_quote} principle. Bessel beams{emdash}like Gaussian beams{emdash}experience a Guoy phase shift in the vicinity of a focal region, resulting in a phase velocity that exceeds {ital c}, the speed of light {ital in vacuo}. In the VBWA, by appropriate choice of parameters, the Guoy phases of the laser beams cancel out and the beat wave phase velocity equals {ital c}. The particle energy gain and beam quality are determined by making use of an analytical model as well as simulations. The analytical model{emdash}including the {bold v}{times}{bold B} interaction{emdash}predicts that for equal laser powers Gaussian and Bessel beams lead to identical energy gains. However, three-dimensional, finite-emittance simulations, allowing for detuning, transverse displacements, and including all the electromagnetic field components, show that the energy gain of a Gaussian beam driven VBWA exceeds that of a Bessel beam driven VBWA by a factor of 2{endash}3. The particle beam emerging from the interaction is azimuthally symmetric and collimated, with a relatively small angular divergence. A table summarizing the ratios of final energies, acceleration lengths, and gradients for a number of acceleration mechanisms is given. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. A complete six-dimensional beam cooling scheme for a Muon Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys; Berg, Scott; Palmer, Robert

    2014-03-01

    A high luminosity muon collider requires a significant reduction of the six-dimensional emittance prior acceleration. Obtaining the desired emittances requires transporting the muon beam through long section of a bean channel containing rf cavities, absorbers, and focusing solenoids. Here we propose new scheme to improve the performance of the channel, consequently increasing the number of transmitted muons and the lattice cooling efficiency. The key idea of our scheme is to tune progressively the main lattice parameters, such as the cell dimensions, rf frequency, and coil strengths, while always keeping the beam emittance significantly above the equilibrium value. We the aid of this novel approach we present for the first time a complete cooling scheme for a Muon Collider, and demonstrate a notable 6D emittance decrease by five order of magnitude. We review key parameters such as the required fields, frequencies and gradients for a complete muon cooling scenario.

  19. Beam Control for Ion Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T.C.; Ahle, L.

    2000-02-17

    Coordinated bending and acceleration of an intense space-charge-dominated ion beam has been achieved for the first time. This required the development of a variable waveform, precision, bi-polar high voltage pulser and a precision, high repetition rate induction core modulator. Waveforms applied to the induction cores accelerate the beam as the bi-polar high voltage pulser delivers a voltage ramp to electrostatic dipoles which bend the beam through a 90 degree permanent magnet quadrupole lattice. Further work on emittance minimization is also reported.

  20. 25. Accelerator physics of colliders 1 25. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS OF COLLIDERS

    E-print Network

    in later sections. In the Tables, luminosity is stated in units of cm-2s-1. Integrated luminosity.A. Edwards (DESY) and M.J. Syphers (FNAL). 25.1. Luminosity This article provides background for the High-Energy the distribution at the source, by the time the beam reaches high energy, the normal form is a useful approximation

  1. Induction Modulators for a Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. F. Godlove; L. K. Len; F. Mako; J. Shiloh; S. Eylon

    1996-01-01

    We report on preliminary design for the pulse modulators required for the induction accelerating cavities for the low-energy beam of a proposed RK-TBA. (S. Yu et al, RK-TBA-Based Power Source for a 1-TeV Center-of-Mass Next Linear Collider, UCRL-ID-119906\\/LBID-2085, Feb. 1995.) Thousands of these units would be required for a TeV-scale collider. The strong emphasis placed on efficiency and pulse shape

  2. Particle dynamics and its consequences in wakefield acceleration in a high energy collider

    SciTech Connect

    Cheshkov, S.; Tajima, T.; Horton, W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Yokoya, K. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    The performance of a wakefield accelerator in a high energy collider application is analyzed by use of a nonlinear dynamics map built on a simple theoretical model of the wakefield generated by the laser pulse (or whatever other method) and a code based on this map. The crucial figures of merit for such a system other than the final energy include the emittance (that determines the luminosity). The more complex the system is, the more opportunities the system has to degrade the emittance (or entropy of the beam). This the map guides one to identify where the crucial elements lie that affect the emittance. If the focusing force of the wakefield is strong when there is a jitter in the position (or laser aiming) of each stage coupled with the spread in the individual particle betatron frequencies, particles experience a phase space mixing. This effect sensitively controls the emittance degradation. They investigate these effects both in a uniform plasma and in a plasma channel. They also study the effect of beam loading. Further, they briefly consider collision point physics issues for a collider expected or characteristic of such a construction based on a scenario for the multi-staged wakefield accelerators.

  3. Acceleration of trapped particles and beams

    E-print Network

    Er'el Granot; Boris Malomed

    2011-07-30

    The dynamics of a quantum particle bound by an accelerating delta-functional potential is investigated. Three cases are considered, using the reference frame moving along with the {\\delta}-function, in which the acceleration is converted into the additional linear potential. (i) A stationary regime, which corresponds to a resonance state, with a minimum degree of delocalization, supported by the accelerating potential trap. (ii) A pulling scenario: an initially bound particle follows the accelerating delta-functional trap, within a finite time. (iii) The pushing scenario: the particle, which was initially localized to the right of the repulsive delta-function, is shoved to the right by the accelerating potential. For the two latter scenarios, the life time of the trapped particle, and the largest velocity to which it can be accelerated while staying trapped, are found. Analytical approximations are developed for the cases of small and large accelerations in the pulling regime, and also for a small acceleration in the stationary situation, and in the regime of pushing. The same regimes may be realized by Airy-like planar optical beams guided by a narrow bending potential channel or crest. Physical estimates are given for an atom steered by a stylus of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), and for the optical beam guided by a bending stripe.

  4. Intense beams at the micron level for the Next Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    High brightness beams with sub-micron dimensions are needed to produce a high luminosity for electron-positron collisions in the Next Linear Collider (NLC). To generate these small beam sizes, a large number of issues dealing with intense beams have to be resolved. Over the past few years many have been successfully addressed but most need experimental verification. Some of these issues are beam dynamics, emittance control, instrumentation, collimation, and beam-beam interactions. Recently, the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has proven the viability of linear collider technology and is an excellent test facility for future linear collider studies.

  5. Beam Dynamics Challenges in High Energy Physics Accelerators!

    E-print Network

    | Beam Dynamics Challenges in HEP Accelerators!9! #12;Particle Confinement in Rings ! Charged particlesBeam Dynamics Challenges in High Energy Physics Accelerators! Alexander Valishev! University/1/2014!A. Valishev | Beam Dynamics Challenges in HEP Accelerators!2! #12;The Olympic Motto for Accelerators

  6. Design of a relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.; Caporaso, G.; Chen, Y.; Houck, T.; Yu, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Henestroza, E.; Li, H.; Peters, C.; Reginato, L.; Sessler, Andrew M.

    1995-04-01

    We are designing an experiment to study physics, engineering, and costing issues of an extended Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA). The experiment is a prototype for an RK-TBA based microwave power source suitable for driving a 1 TeV linear collider. Major components of the experiment include a 2.5-MV, 1.5-kA electron source, a 11.4-GHz modulator, a bunch compressor, and a 8-m extraction section. The extraction section will be comprised of 4 traveling-wave output structures, each generating about 360 MW of rf power. Induction cells will be used in the extraction section to maintain the average beam energy at 5 MeV. Status of the design is presented.

  7. Design of a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.; Caporaso, G.; Chen, Y. [and others

    1995-10-01

    We are designing an experiment to study physics, engineering, and costing issues of an extended Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA). The experiment is a prototype for an RK-TBA based microwave power source suitable for driving a 1 TeV linear collider. Major components of the experiment include a 2.5-MV, 1.5-kA electron source, a 11.4-GHz modulator, a bunch compressor, and a 8-m extraction section. The extraction section will be comprised of 4 traveling-wave output structures, each generating about 360 MW of rf power. Induction cells will be used in the extraction section to maintain the average beam energy at 5 MeV. Status of the design is presented.

  8. Beam tube vacuum in future superconducting proton colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.

    1994-10-01

    The beam tube vacuum requirements in future superconducting proton colliders that have been proposed or discussed in the literature -- SSC, LHC, and ELN -- are reviewed. The main beam tube vacuum problem encountered in these machines is how to deal with the magnitude of gas desorption and power deposition by synchrotron radiation while satisfying resistivity, impedance, and space constraints in the cryogenic environment of superconducting magnets. A beam tube vacuum model is developed that treats photodesorption of tightly bound H, C, and 0, photodesorption of physisorbed molecules, and the isotherm vapor pressure of H{sub 2}. Experimental data on cold tube photodesorption experiments are reviewed and applied to model calculations of beam tube vacuum performance for simple cold beam tube and liner configurations. Particular emphasis is placed on the modeling and interpretation of beam tube photodesorpiion experiments at electron synchrotron light sources. The paper also includes discussion of the constraints imposed by beam image current heating, the growth rate of the resistive wall instability, and single-bunch instability impedance limits.

  9. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-03-01

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC. Simulations studies and measurements were conducted that clearly show the correlation between RF noise and longitudinal bunch emittance, identify the major LLRF noise contributions, and determine the RF component dominating this effect. With these results, LHC upgrades and alternative algorithms are evaluated to reduce longitudinal emittance growth during operations. The applications of this work are described with regard to future machines and analysis of new technical implementations, as well as to possible future work which would continue the directions of this dissertation.

  10. Heavy ion beam loss mechanisms at an electron-ion collider

    E-print Network

    Spencer R. Klein

    2014-09-18

    There are currently several proposals to build a high-luminosity electron-ion collider, to study the spin structure of matter and measure parton densities in heavy nuclei, and to search for gluon saturation and new phenomena like the colored glass condensate. These measurements require operation with heavy-nuclei. We calculate the cross-sections for two important processes that will affect accelerator and detector operations: bound-free pair production, and Coulomb excitation of the nuclei. Both of these reactions have large cross-sections, 28-56 mb, which can lead to beam ion losses, produce beams of particles with altered charge:mass ratio, and produce a large flux of neutrons in zero degree calorimeters. The loss of beam particles limits the sustainable electron-ion luminosity to levels of several times $10^{32}/$cm$^2$/s.

  11. Heavy ion beam loss mechanisms at an electron-ion collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Spencer R.

    2014-12-01

    There are currently several proposals to build a high-luminosity electron-ion collider, to study the spin structure of matter and measure parton densities in heavy nuclei, and to search for gluon saturation and new phenomena like the colored glass condensate. These measurements require operation with heavy nuclei. We calculate the cross sections for two important processes that will affect accelerator and detector operations: bound-free pair production and Coulomb excitation of the nuclei. Both of these reactions have large cross sections, 28-56 mb, which can lead to beam ion losses, produce beams of particles with altered charge:mass ratio, and produce a large flux of neutrons in zero degree calorimeters. The loss of beam particles limits the sustainable electron-ion luminosity to levels of several times 1032/cm2/s .

  12. Explore the possibility of accelerating polarized He-3 beam in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.

    2012-05-20

    As the world's first high energy polarized proton collider, RHIC has made significant progresses in measuring the proton spin structure in the past decade. In order to have better understanding of the contribution of up quarks and down quarks to the proton spin structure, collisions of high energy polarized neutron beams are required. Polarized He-3 beams offer an effectiveway to provide polarized neutron beams. In this paper, we present studies of accelerating polarized He-3 in RHIC with the current dual snake configuration. Possibilities of adding two more pairs of snakes for accelerating polarized He-3 were explored. Results of six snake configuration in RHIC are also reported in the paper.

  13. Physical Review Special Topics : Accelerators and Beams

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Current and past issues of this free American Physical Society peer-reviewed, electronic journal are available here. The journal is published on an article-by-article basis, and new articles are added to the latest issue. March titles in Physical Review Special Topics--Accelerators and Beams include "Coherent off-axis undulato radiation from short electron bunches."

  14. Principles of high current electron beam acceleration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stanley Humphries

    1987-01-01

    High current pulsed electron accelerators operate with beam currents exceeding 1 kA, pulse lengths from 20 ns to 1 mus, and output energies up to 50 MeV. Potential applications include pulsed radiography, intense microwave generation, free electron laser drivers, directed energy for defense, and industrial radiation processing applications. This paper gives a tutorial on the principles of high current electron

  15. Observations of accelerated high current low emittance beams in the SLC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Ross, M.C.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stiening, R.F.

    1985-05-01

    The Linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is required to accelerate several intense single electron and positron bunches to high energy while not enlarging their small transverse emittances. The improvements needed by the SLAC Linac to meet these goals have very stringent design criteria. As partial systems have become available, beam tests have been performed to confirm the designs. The results of those beam tests are discussed. Future plans of the improvement program are described. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  16. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams: Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders p Source, 8-24 GeV, 1-4MW A Neutrino Factory based on a Muon StorageV Recirculating Linac 50-GeV Muon Storage Ring ~ 1km circumference Neutrino Beam to Near Detector Neutrino Beam

  17. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchi, Marija; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Lari, L.; Rossi, A.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2015-02-01

    The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more) of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  18. Synchrotron radiation and beam tube vacuum in a Very Large Hadron Collider, Stage 1 and Stage 2 VLHC

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.; Turner, W.C.; Bauer, P.; Limon, P.

    2001-06-30

    Synchrotron radiation induced photodesorption in particle accelerators may lead to pressure rise and to beam-gas scattering losses, finally affecting the beam lifetime [1]. We discuss the beam tube vacuum in the low field Stage 1 and Stage 2 Very Large Hadron Collider VLHC. Since VLHC Stage 1 has a room temperature beam tube, a non-evaporable getter (NEG St101 strip) pumping system located inside a pumping antechamber, supplemented by lumped ion pumps for pumping methane is considered. In Stage 2, the {approx}100 K beam screen, or liner, illuminated by the synchrotron radiation, is inserted into the magnet cold bore. Cryo-pumping is provided by the cold bore kept at 4.2 K, through slots covering the beam screen surface. Possible beam conditioning scenarios are presented for reaching design intensity, both for Stage 1 and 2. The most important results are summarized in this paper.

  19. High-efficiency acceleration of an electron beam in a plasma wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Litos, M; Adli, E; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clayton, C E; Corde, S; Delahaye, J P; England, R J; Fisher, A S; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; White, G; Wu, Z; Yakimenko, V; Yocky, G

    2014-11-01

    High-efficiency acceleration of charged particle beams at high gradients of energy gain per unit length is necessary to achieve an affordable and compact high-energy collider. The plasma wakefield accelerator is one concept being developed for this purpose. In plasma wakefield acceleration, a charge-density wake with high accelerating fields is driven by the passage of an ultra-relativistic bunch of charged particles (the drive bunch) through a plasma. If a second bunch of relativistic electrons (the trailing bunch) with sufficient charge follows in the wake of the drive bunch at an appropriate distance, it can be efficiently accelerated to high energy. Previous experiments using just a single 42-gigaelectronvolt drive bunch have accelerated electrons with a continuous energy spectrum and a maximum energy of up to 85 gigaelectronvolts from the tail of the same bunch in less than a metre of plasma. However, the total charge of these accelerated electrons was insufficient to extract a substantial amount of energy from the wake. Here we report high-efficiency acceleration of a discrete trailing bunch of electrons that contains sufficient charge to extract a substantial amount of energy from the high-gradient, nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator. Specifically, we show the acceleration of about 74 picocoulombs of charge contained in the core of the trailing bunch in an accelerating gradient of about 4.4 gigavolts per metre. These core particles gain about 1.6 gigaelectronvolts of energy per particle, with a final energy spread as low as 0.7 per cent (2.0 per cent on average), and an energy-transfer efficiency from the wake to the bunch that can exceed 30 per cent (17.7 per cent on average). This acceleration of a distinct bunch of electrons containing a substantial charge and having a small energy spread with both a high accelerating gradient and a high energy-transfer efficiency represents a milestone in the development of plasma wakefield acceleration into a compact and affordable accelerator technology. PMID:25373678

  20. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  1. Research and Development of Future Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next generation high-energy lepton collider machine. A novel accelerator technology must be developed to overcome several intrinsic issues of muon acceleration. Recent research and development of critical beam elements for a muon accelerator, especially muon beam phase space ionization cooling channel, are reviewed in this paper.

  2. Production of an Accelerated Oxygen-14 Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, James; O'Neil, James P.; Cerny, Joseph

    2002-05-03

    BEARS is an ongoing project to provide a light-ion radioactive-beam capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Light radioactive isotopes are produced at a 10 MeV proton medical cyclotron, transported 350 m via a high-speed gas transport capillary, cryogenically separated, and injected into the 88-Inch Cyclotron's ion source. The first radioactive beam successfully accelerated was Carbon-11 and beams of intensity more than 108 ions/sec have been utilized for experiments. Development of Oxygen-14 as the second BEARS beam presented considerable technical challenges, both due to its short half-life of 71 seconds and the radiation chemistry of oxygen in the target. The usual techniques developed for medical uses of Oxygen-15 involve the addition of significant amounts of carrier oxygen, something that would overload the ion source. As a solution, Oxygen-14 is produced as water in a carrier-free form, and is chemically converted in two steps to carbon dioxide, a form readily usable by the BEARS. This system has been built and is operational, and initial tests of accelerating an Oxygen-14 beam have been performed.

  3. Acceleration of High Intensity Proton Beams

    E-print Network

    Altuna, X; Arimatea, C; Bailey, R; Billen, R; Bohl, T; Collier, Paul; Cornelis, Karel; Crockford, G; Desforges, D; Despas, C; Faugier, A; Ferrari, A; Giachino, R; Hanke, K; Jonker, M; Linnecar, Trevor Paul R; Niquille, C; Normann, L; Robin, G; Roy, G

    1999-01-01

    In 1998 the CERN SPS accelerator finished a five years long program providing 450GeV proton beams for neutrino physics. These experiments required the highest possible beam intensity the SPS can deliver. During the last five years the maximum proton intensity in the SPS has steadily been increased to a maximum of 4.8 1013 protons per cycle. In order to achieve these intensities a careful monitoring and improvement of the vertical aperture was necessary. Improved feedback systems on the different RF cavities were needed in order to avoid instabilities. Also the quality (emittance and extraction spill) of the injector, the CERN PS, had be optimised.

  4. Shock accelerated electron beams in the corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, G.; Klassen, A.

    2003-04-01

    In the solar corona shock waves can be observed as type II radio bursts in dynamic spectra of the solar radio radiation. Some of these type II bursts show sub-structures, so-called "herringbones", which are regarded as signatures of electron beams produced by the associated shock waves. A sample of solar type II radio bursts with "herringbone" - structures has been investigated with respect to their properties in dynamic radio spectra. It is well-known, that the electrons accelerated by a quasi-perpendicular shock establish a shifted loss-cone velocity distribution. The resulting properties of such a distribution for the shock accelerated electrons is compared with the features of "herringbones" in dynamic radio spectra. This study shows that the "herringbones" are mainly produced by nearly perpendicular shocks. The rapid pitch angle diffusion in the velocity space leads to a limited life time of the electron beams associated with the "herringbones".

  5. Jacobi equations and particle accelerator beam dynamics

    E-print Network

    Ricardo Gallego Torrome

    2012-03-27

    A geometric formulation of the linear beam dynamics in accelerator physics is presented. In particular, it is proved that the linear transverse and longitudinal dynamics can be interpret geometrically as an approximation to the Jacobi equation of an affine averaged Lorentz connection. We introduce a specific notion reference trajectory as integral curves of the main velocity vector field. A perturbation caused by the statistical nature of the bunch of particles is considered.

  6. RF BEAM CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE BROOKHAVEN RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER, RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.; CAMPBELL,A.; DELONG,J.; HAYES,T.; ONILLON,E.; ROSE,J.; VETTER,K.

    1998-06-22

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency.

  7. RF beam control system for the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Campbell, A.; DeLong, J.; Hayes, T.; Onillon, E.; Rose, J.; Vetter, K.

    1998-08-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency.

  8. The beam business: Accelerators in industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Robert W.; Hamm, Marianne E. [Pleasanton, California (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Most physicists know that particle accelerators are widely used for treating cancer. But few are acquainted with the depth and breadth of their use in a myriad of applications outside of pure science and medicine. Society benefits from the use of particle beams in the areas of communications, transportation, the environment, security, health, and safety - in terms both of the global economy and quality of life. On the manufacturing level, the use of industrial accelerators has resulted in the faster and cheaper production of better parts for medical devices, automobiles, aircraft, and virtually all modern electronics. Consumers also benefit from the use of accelerators to explore for oil, gas, and minerals; sterilize food, wastewater, and medical supplies; and aid in the development of drugs and biomaterials.

  9. Nonparaxial accelerating Bessel-like beams

    E-print Network

    Chremmos, Ioannis D

    2013-01-01

    A new class of nonparaxial accelerating optical waves is introduced. These are beams with a Bessel-like profile that are capable of shifting laterally along fairly arbitrary trajectories as the wave propagates in free space. The concept expands on our previous proposal of paraxial accelerating Bessel-like beams to include beams with subwavelength lobes and/or large trajectory angles. Such waves are produced when the phase at the input plane is engineered so that the interfering ray cones are made to focus along the prespecified path. When the angle of these cones is fixed, the beams possess a diffraction-free Bessel profile on planes that stay normal to their trajectory, which can be considered as a generalized definition of diffractionless propagation in the nonparaxial regime. The analytical procedure leading to these results is based on a ray optics interpretation of Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction and is presented in detail. The evolution of the proposed waves is demonstrated through a series of numerical...

  10. Design and Interpretation of Colliding Pulse Injected Laser-Plasma Acceleration Experiments

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    with experimental data. Effect of non-ideal gaussian pulses and laser self-focusing in the plasma channelDesign and Interpretation of Colliding Pulse Injected Laser-Plasma Acceleration Experiments Estelle Abstract. The use of colliding laser pulses to control the injection of plasma electrons into the plasma

  11. The Computer Program LIAR for Beam Dynamics Calculations in Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.W.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Siemann, R.H.; Thompson, K.; /SLAC

    2011-08-26

    Linear accelerators are the central components of the proposed next generation of linear colliders. They need to provide acceleration of up to 750 GeV per beam while maintaining very small normalized emittances. Standard simulation programs, mainly developed for storage rings, do not meet the specific requirements for high energy linear accelerators. We present a new program LIAR ('LInear Accelerator Research code') that includes wakefield effects, a 6D coupled beam description, specific optimization algorithms and other advanced features. Its modular structure allows to use and to extend it easily for different purposes. The program is available for UNIX workstations and Windows PC's. It can be applied to a broad range of accelerators. We present examples of simulations for SLC and NLC.

  12. The beam-beam interaction of finite length bunches in hadron colliders Fermi National Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510

    E-print Network

    Sen, Tanaji

    The beam-beam interaction of finite length bunches in hadron colliders Tanaji Sen Fermi National Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 The influence of finite bunch lengths on the dynamics of head-on beam-beam interactions is studied analytically and by simulation. Compared to infinitesimally short bunches

  13. Method and apparatus for varying accelerator beam output energy

    DOEpatents

    Young, Lloyd M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A coupled cavity accelerator (CCA) accelerates a charged particle beam with rf energy from a rf source. An input accelerating cavity receives the charged particle beam and an output accelerating cavity outputs the charged particle beam at an increased energy. Intermediate accelerating cavities connect the input and the output accelerating cavities to accelerate the charged particle beam. A plurality of tunable coupling cavities are arranged so that each one of the tunable coupling cavities respectively connect an adjacent pair of the input, output, and intermediate accelerating cavities to transfer the rf energy along the accelerating cavities. An output tunable coupling cavity can be detuned to variably change the phase of the rf energy reflected from the output coupling cavity so that regions of the accelerator can be selectively turned off when one of the intermediate tunable coupling cavities is also detuned.

  14. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams: Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders p Source, 8­24 GeV, 1­4MW A Neutrino Factory based on a Muon Storage Linac 2 ­ 50 GeV Recirculating Linac 50­GeV Muon Storage Ring ~ 1km circumference Neutrino Beam to Near

  15. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the RHIC and LHC injector chains for the heaviest ion species used to date. The RHIC pulsed sputter source (PSC) and Tandem electrostatic accelerator are being replaced by an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and short linac [08Ale1]. With EBIS beams of any element can be prepared for RHIC including uranium and spin-polarized 3He. At CERN an ECR ion source is used, followed by an RFQ and Linac. The ions are then accumulated, electron cooled, and accelerated in LEIR. After transfer to and acceleration in the PS, ion beams are injected into the SPS.

  16. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A. [Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  17. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-11-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band ({approximately}8-12 GHz) through Ka band ({approximately} 30-35 GHz) frequency regions. Provided that further prototyping shows stable beam propagation with minimal current loss and production of good quality, high-power rf fields, this technology is compatible with current schemes for electron-positron colliders in the multi-TeV center-of-mass scale. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split-operation algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rv cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficient capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional experimental efforts are also described.

  18. Production of high power microwaves for particle acceleration with an FEL bunched electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardelle, J.; Lefevre, T.; Marchese, G.; Padois, M.; Rullier, J. L.; Donohue, J. T.

    1999-06-01

    Among the studies in the framework of high gradient linear electron-positron collider research, the Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) is a very promising concept, and two projects are in progress, the Compact Linear Collider project at CERN (W. Schnell, Report no. CERN SL/92-51 and CLIC note 184; K. Hübner, CERN/PS 92-43, CLIC note 176; S. Van der Meer, CERN/PS 89-50, CLIC note 97.) and the Relativistic Klystron-TBA project at LBNL (Technical Review Committee, International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee Report 1995, SLAC-R-95-471, 1995). In a TBA an extremely intense low-energy electron beam, called the drive beam, is bunched at the desired operating frequency, and upon passing through resonant cavities generates radio-frequency power for accelerating the main beam. Among the different approaches to the production of a suitable drive beam, the use of an FEL has been proposed and is under active study at CEA/CESTA.

  19. International Linear Collider Accelerator Physics R&D

    SciTech Connect

    George D. Gollin; Michael Davidsaver; Michael J. Haney; Michael Kasten; Jason Chang; Perry Chodash; Will Dluger; Alex Lang; Yehan Liu

    2008-09-03

    ILC work at Illinois has concentrated primarily on technical issues relating to the design of the accelerator. Because many of the problems to be resolved require a working knowledge of classical mechanics and electrodynamics, most of our research projects lend themselves well to the participation of undergraduate research assistants. The undergraduates in the group are scientists, not technicians, and find solutions to problems that, for example, have stumped PhD-level staff elsewhere. The ILC Reference Design Report calls for 6.7 km circumference damping rings (which prepare the beams for focusing) using “conventional” stripline kickers driven by fast HV pulsers. Our primary goal was to determine the suitability of the 16 MeV electron beam in the AØ region at Fermilab for precision kicker studies.We found that the low beam energy and lack of redundancy in the beam position monitor system complicated the analysis of our data. In spite of these issues we concluded that the precision we could obtain was adequate to measure the performance and stability of a production module of an ILC kicker, namely 0.5%. We concluded that the kicker was stable to an accuracy of ~2.0% and that we could measure this precision to an accuracy of ~0.5%. As a result, a low energy beam like that at AØ could be used as a rapid-turnaround facility for testing ILC production kicker modules. The ILC timing precision for arrival of bunches at the collision point is required to be 0.1 picosecond or better. We studied the bunch-to-bunch timing accuracy of a “phase detector” installed in AØ in order to determine its suitability as an ILC bunch timing device. A phase detector is an RF structure excited by the passage of a bunch. Its signal is fed through a 1240 MHz high-Q resonant circuit and then down-mixed with the AØ 1300 MHz accelerator RF. We used a kind of autocorrelation technique to compare the phase detector signal with a reference signal obtained from the phase detector’s response to an event at the beginning of the run. We determined that the device installed in our beam, which was instrumented with an 8-bit 500 MHz ADC, could measure the beam timing to an accuracy of 0.4 picoseconds. Simulations of the device showed that an increase in ADC clock rate to 2 GHz would improve measurement precision by the required factor of four. As a result, we felt that a device of this sort, assuming matters concerning dynamic range and long-term stability can be addressed successfully, would work at the ILC. Cost effective operation of the ILC will demand highly reliable, fault tolerant and adaptive solutions for both hardware and software. The large numbers of subsystems and large multipliers associated with the modules in those subsystems will cause even a strong level of unit reliability to become an unacceptable level of system availability. An evaluation effort is underway to evaluate standards associated with high availability, and to guide ILC development with standard practices and well-supported commercial solutions. One area of evaluation involves the Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture (ATCA) hardware and software. We worked with an ATCA crate, processor monitors, and a small amount of ATCA circuit boards in order to develop a backplane “spy” board that would let us watch the ATCA backplane communications and pursue development of an inexpensive processor monitor that could be used as a physics-driven component of the crate-level controls system. We made good progress, and felt that we had determined a productive direction to extend this work. We felt that we had learned enough to begin designing a workable processor monitor chip if there were to be sufficient interest in ATCA shown by the ILC community. Fault recognition is a challenging issue in the crafting a high reliability controls system. With tens of thousands of independent processors running hundreds of thousands of critical processes, how can the system identify that a problem has arisen and determine the appropriate steps to take to correct, or compensate, for the

  20. Operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    The operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. Beamstrahlung limits the charge per bunch at low plasma densities. Reduced laser intensity is examined to improve accelerator efficiency in the beamstrahlung-limited regime.

  1. Linear beam-beam tune shift calculations for the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.

    1989-01-12

    A realistic estimate of the linear beam-beam tune shift is necessary for the selection of an optimum working point in the tune diagram. Estimates of the beam-beam tune shift using the ''Round Beam Approximation'' (RBA) have over estimated the tune shift for the Tevatron. For a hadron machine with unequal lattice functions and beam sizes, an explicit calculation using the beam size at the crossings is required. Calculations for various Tevatron lattices used in Collider operation are presented. Comparisons between the RBA and the explicit calculation, for elliptical beams, are presented. This paper discusses the calculation of the linear tune shift using the program SYNCH. Selection of a working point is discussed. The magnitude of the tune shift is influenced by the choice of crossing points in the lattice as determined by the pbar ''cogging effects''. Also discussed is current cogging procedures and presents results of calculations for tune shifts at various crossing points in the lattice. Finally, a comparison of early pbar tune measurements with the present linear tune shift calculations is presented. 17 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Accelerator physics issues for the Very Large Hadron Collider

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. S. Mishra; M. Syphers; Alan Jackson

    1999-01-01

    The goal of the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) is to extend the energy frontier beyond LHC. The proposed design center of mass energy for the VLHC pp collider is 100 TeV, with a luminosity of 1×1034 cm-2 sec-1 and an integrated luminosity of about 100 fb-1 per year. In this paper we present a summary of work conducted during

  3. Numerical Verification of the Power Transfer and Wakefield Coupling in the Clic Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2011-08-19

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept envisions complex 3D structures, which must be modeled to high accuracy so that simulation results can be directly used to prepare CAD drawings for machining. The required simulations include not only the fundamental mode properties of the accelerating structures but also the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), as well as the coupling between the two systems. Time-domain simulations will be performed to understand pulse formation, wakefield damping, fundamental power transfer and wakefield coupling in these structures. Applying SLAC's parallel finite element code suite, these large-scale problems will be solved on some of the largest supercomputers available. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel two-beam accelerator scheme.

  4. Automatic beam path analysis of laser wakefield particle acceleration data

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Automatic beam path analysis of laser wakefield particle acceleration data Oliver Rübel1 particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high-energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration

  5. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    E-print Network

    Knowles, David William

    Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data Oliver R¨ubel1 particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration

  6. Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator studies at the RTA test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.; Houck, T.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Anderson, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-16

    A prototype rf power source based on the Relativistic Klystron Two- Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is being constructed at LBNL to study physics, engineering, and costing issues. The prototype, called RTA, is described and compared to a full scale design appropriate for driving the Next Linear Collider. Specific details of the induction core test and pulsed power system are presented. Details of the 1-MeV, 1.2-kA induction gun currently under construction are described.

  7. Suppression of beam-break-up in a standing wave free electron laser two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Kim, J.S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The standing-wave free-electron laser two-beam accelerator (SWFEL/TBA) has been proposed as a candidate for the next generation linear collider and many studies on its feasibility have been carried out. In this device a high-energy , low-current electron or positron beam is expected to be accelerated to a very high energy, {approximately}TeV by microwave power generated from a sequence of many SWFEL cavities driven by a second beam of high current, low energy. Previous studies have revealed many merits of this version of a high gradient linear collider, but they also indicated a potential difficulty in designing its long drive-beam device, which is the so called beam break-up (BBU) problem. Various schemes are examined in this study on the suppression of BBU in a SWFEL/TBA. Two schemes are found to be not only able to effectively suppress the BBU but at the same time have minimum effect on the microwave generation process inside the SWFEL cavities. One is making the cavity-iris junction sufficiently gradual and the other is stagger-tuning the cavities.

  8. Beam Dynamics Measurements for the SLAC Laser Acceleration Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.; Ischebeck, R.; McCormick, D.; McGuinness, C.; Nelson, J.; Noble, R.; Sears, C.; Siemann, R.; Spencer, J.; /SLAC; Plettner, T.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-07-23

    The NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) was built to address beam dynamics issues for the Next Linear Collider and beyond. An S-Band RF gun, diagnostics and low energy spectrometer (LES) at 6 MeV together with a large-angle extraction line at 60 MeV have now been built and commissioned for the laser acceleration experiment, E163. Following a four quad matching section after the NLCTA chicane, the extraction section is followed by another matching section, final focus and buncher. The laser-electron interaction point (IP) is followed by a broad range, high resolving power spectrometer (HES) for electron bunch analysis. Optical symmetries in the design of the 25.5 degree extraction line provide 1:1 phase space transfer without sextupoles for a large, 6D phase space volume and range of input conditions. Spot sizes down to a few microns at the IP (HES object) allow testing microscale structures with high resolving power at the HES image. Tolerances, tuning sensitivities, diagnostics and the latest commissioning results are discussed and compared to design expectations.

  9. The beam energy calibration system for the BEPC-II collider

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. N. Achasov; ChengDong Fu; Xiaohu Mo; N. Yu. Muchnoi; Qing Qin; Huamin Qu; Yifang Wang; Jinqiang Xu

    2008-01-01

    This document contains a proposal of the BEPC-II collider beam energy calibration system (IHEP, Beijing). The system is based on Compton backscattering of carbon dioxide laser radiation, producing a beam of high energy photons. Their energy spectrum is then accurately measured by HPGe detector. The high-energy spectrum edge will allow to determine the average electron or positron beam energy with

  10. "Accelerators and beams," a multimedia tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbar, Richard R.

    1997-02-01

    We are developing a computer-based tutorial for charged-particle beam optics under a grant from the DOE. This subject is important to the DOE not only for its use in providing basic research tools but because the physics is the underpinning for accelerators used in industry and medicine. The tutorial, which will be delivered on Macintosh and Windows platforms, uses multimedia techniques to enhance the student's rate of learning and length of retention of the material. As such, it integrates our interactive On-Screen Laboratories™ with hypertext, line drawings, photographs, animation, video, and sound. We are targeting an audience from technicians to graduate students in science and engineering. At this time we have about a fourth of the material (about equivalent to a one-semester three-credit-hour upper under-graduate physics course) available in prototype form.

  11. Design of rf-extraction structures for the Two-Beam Next Linear Collider*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-S.; Henestroza, E.; Eylon, S.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.

    1996-11-01

    Design issues of rf-extraction structures that can be used as the rf power source of a future TeV center of mass energy electron-positron linear collider based on the relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) concept are as follows. Each structure produces 360 MW of rf power at 11.4 GHz, (2) has acceptable maximum surface electric fields, and (3) shows good beam transport over 100 structures. Based on 2D and 3D computer code simulations, three-cell detuned traveling wave structures (TWS) and three-cell, choked-mode, detuned TWS are found to satisfy all the criterion specified above. We will present the geometry and the properties of the output structures, beam dynamics over many rf structures, along with preliminary cold test results of a model assembly. ( * Work at FAR is supported by DOE SBIR grants DE-FG03-95ER81974 and DE-FG03-96ER82179, at LLNL by DOE contract W-7405-ENG-48, and LBNL by DOE contract AC03-76SF00098. )

  12. Design study of longitudinal dynamics of the drive beam in 1 TeV relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Yu, S.S.; Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    In this paper the authors present a design study on the longitudinal dynamics of a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) scheme which has been proposed as a power source candidate for a 1 TeV next linear collider (NLC). They address the issue of maintaining stable power output at desired level for a 300-m long TBA with 150 extraction cavities and present their simulation results to demonstrate that it can be achieved by inductively detuning the extraction cavities to counter the space charge debunching effect on the drive beam. They then carry out simulation study to show that the beam bunches desired by the RK-TBA can be efficiently obtained by first chopping an initially uniform beam of low energy into a train of beam bunches with modest longitudinal dimension and then using the {open_quotes}adiabatic capture{close_quotes} scheme to bunch and accelerate these beam bunches into tight bunches at the operating energy of the drive beam. The authors have also examined the {open_quotes}after burner{close_quotes} scheme which is implemented in their RK-TBA design for efficiency enhancement.

  13. Studies on longitudinal beam compression in induction accelerator drivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W.-K. Mark; D. D.-M. Ho; S. T. Brandon; C.-L. Chang; A. T. Drobot; A. Faltens; E. P. Lee; G. A. Krafft

    1986-01-01

    Longitudinal beam compression is an integral part of the U.S. induction accelerator development effort for heavy ion fusion. It occurs before final focus and fusion chamber beam transport and is a key process determining initial conditions for final focus hardware. Determining the limits for maximal performance of key accelerator components is an essential element of the effort to reduce driver

  14. A 200 MHz 35 MW Multiple Beam Klystron for Accelerator Applications Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read; Patrick Ferguson; David Marsden

    2011-11-28

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) performed initial development of a compact and reliable 35 MW, multiple beam klystron (MBK) at 200 MHz with a pulse length of 0.125 ms and a 30 Hz repetition rate. The device was targeted for acceleration and ionization cooling of a muon collider, but there are several other potential applications in this frequency range. The klystron uses multiple beams propagating in individual beam tunnels to reduce space charge and allow reduction in the accelerating voltage. This allows a significant reduction in length over a single beam source. More importantly this allows more efficient and less expensive power supplies. At 200 MHz, the interaction circuit for a single beam klystron would be more than six meters long to obtain 50% efficiency and 50 dB gain. This would require a beam voltage of approximately 400 kV and current of 251 A for a microperveance of 1.0. For an eight beam MBK with the same beam perveance, a three meter long interaction circuit achieves the same power and gain. Each beam operates at 142 kV and 70A. The Phase I demonstrated that this device could be fabricated with funding available in a Phase II program and could achieve the program specifications.

  15. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shin, Young-Min

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r)more »from 0.2 ?p to 0.6 ?p in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.« less

  16. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shin, Young-Min [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 Ap to 0.6 .Ap in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  17. Issues and experience with controlling beam loss at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Annala, Gerald; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Controlling beam loss in the Tevatron collider is of great importance because of the delicate nature of the cryogenic magnet system and the collider detectors. Maximizing the physics potential requires optimized performance as well as protection of all equipment. The operating history of the Tevatron has significantly influenced the way losses are managed. The development of beam loss management in the Tevatron will be presented.

  18. Emittance growth mechanisms for laser-accelerated proton beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas J. Kemp; J. Fuchs; Y. Sentoku; V. Sotnikov; M. Bakeman; P. Antici; T. E. Cowan

    2007-01-01

    In recent experiments the transverse normalized rms emittance of laser-accelerated MeV ion beams was found to be <0.002mmmrad , which is at least 100 times smaller than the emittance of thermal ion sources used in accelerators [T. E. Cowan , Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801 (2004)]. We investigate the origin for the low emittance of laser-accelerated proton beams by studying

  19. Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Schechter, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    An electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator has been designed, built, assembled, and tested as a proof-of-principle (POP) apparatus. The main goal of accelerators based on this concept is to use intense electron-beam heating and ablation of a hydrogen propellant stick to accelerate deuterium and/or tritium pellets to ultrahigh speeds (10 to 20 km/s) for plasma fueling of next-generation fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER). The POP apparatus is described and initial results of pellet acceleration experiments are presented. Conceptual ultrahigh-speed pellet accelerators are discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy D. Panasenko, A. J. Shu, C. B., Berkeley, California 94720, USA Abstract. Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies

  1. ONE GEV BEAM ACCELERATION IN A ONE METER LONG

    E-print Network

    ONE GEV BEAM ACCELERATION IN A ONE METER LONG PLASMA CELL A Proposal to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Primary Investigators: R. Assmann, C. Joshi, T. Katsouleas, W. Leemans, R. Siemann. Wang UCLA T. Katsouleas, S. Lee, USC April 1997 Abstract A plasma-based wakefield acceleration (PWFA

  2. ACE3P Computations of Wakefield Coupling in the CLIC Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2010-10-27

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its novel two-beam accelerator concept envisions rf power transfer to the accelerating structures from a separate high-current decelerator beam line consisting of power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). It is critical to numerically verify the fundamental and higher-order mode properties in and between the two beam lines with high accuracy and confidence. To solve these large-scale problems, SLAC's parallel finite element electromagnetic code suite ACE3P is employed. Using curvilinear conformal meshes and higher-order finite element vector basis functions, unprecedented accuracy and computational efficiency are achieved, enabling high-fidelity modeling of complex detuned structures such as the CLIC TD24 accelerating structure. In this paper, time-domain simulations of wakefield coupling effects in the combined system of PETS and the TD24 structures are presented. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel CLIC two-beam accelerator scheme.

  3. Design of the Beam Delivery System for the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, A.; Amann, J.; Arnold, R.; Asiri, F.; Bane, K.; Bellomo, P.; Doyle, E.; Fasso, A.; Jonghoon, K.; Keller, L.; Ko, K.; /SLAC /Brookhaven /Paris, CEA /Birmingham U. /CERN /Lancaster U. /DESY /Fermilab /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Oxford U. /Uppsala U.

    2007-08-14

    The beam delivery system for the linear collider focuses beams to nanometer sizes at its interaction point, collimates the beam halo to provide acceptable background in the detector and has a provision for state-of-the art beam instrumentation in order to reach the ILCs physics goals. This paper describes the design details and status of the baseline configuration considered for the reference design and also lists alternatives.

  4. Design of the beam delivery system for the international linear collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, A.; Amann, J.; Arnold, R.; Asiri, F.; Bane, K.; Carwardine, J.; Saunders, C.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS); SLAC; FNAL

    2008-01-01

    The beam delivery system for the linear collider focuses beams to nanometer sizes at its interaction point, collimates the beam halo to provide acceptable background in the detector and has a provision for state-of-the art beam instrumentation in order to reach the ILCs physics goals. This paper describes the design details and status of the baseline configuration considered for the reference design and also lists alternatives.

  5. Polymeric flocculants processing by accelerated electron beams and microwave heating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diana I. Martin; Elena Mateescu; Gabriela Craciun; Daniel Ighigeanu; Adelina Ighigeanu

    2002-01-01

    Results obtained by accelerated electron beam, microwave and simultaneous microwave and electron beam application in the chemistry of acrylamide and acrylic acid copolymers (polymeric flocculants used for wastewater treatment) are presented. Comparative results concerning the molecular weight and Huggins’ constant for the acrylamide and acrylic acid copolymers obtained by classical heating, microwave heating, electron beam irradiation and simultaneous microwave and

  6. INTRA BEAM SCATTERING IN LINEAR ACCELERATORS, ESPECIALLY ERLS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georg H. Hoffstaetter; Michael P. Ehrlichman; Alexander B. Temnykh

    The theories of beam loss and emittance growth by Tou- schek and Intra Beam Scattering have been formulated for beams in storage rings. It is there that these effects have hitherto been important because of their large currents. However, there are linear accelerators where these effects become important when considering loss rates and radia- tion damage. Prime examples are high

  7. Stochastic Heating and Acceleration of Electrons in Colliding Laser Fields in Plasma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z.-M. Sheng; K. Mima; Y. Sentoku; M. S. Jovanovic; T. Taguchi; J. Zhang; J. Meyer-Ter-Vehn

    2002-01-01

    We propose a mechanism that leads to efficient acceleration of electrons in plasma by two counterpropagating laser pulses. It is triggered by stochastic motion of electrons when the laser fields exceed some threshold amplitudes, as found in single-electron dynamics. It is further confirmed in particle-in-cell simulations. In vacuum or tenuous plasma, electron acceleration in the case with two colliding laser

  8. Tailored electron bunches with smooth current profiles for enhanced transformer ratios in beam-driven acceleration

    E-print Network

    Lemery, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Collinear high-gradient ${\\cal O} (GV/m)$ beam-driven wakefield methods for charged-particle acceleration could be critical to the realization of compact, cost-efficient, accelerators, e.g., in support of TeV-scale lepton colliders or multiple-user free-electron laser facilities. To make these options viable, the high accelerating fields need to be complemented with large transformer ratios $>2$, a parameter characterizing the efficiency of the energy transfer between a wakefield-exciting "drive" bunch to an accelerated "witness" bunch. While several potential current distributions have been discussed, their practical realization appears challenging due to their often discontinuous nature. In this paper we propose several alternative current profiles which are smooth which also lead to enhanced transformer ratios. We especially explore a laser-shaping method capable of generating one the suggested distributions directly out of a photoinjector and discuss a linac concept that could possible drive a dielectric ...

  9. The Effects of Ion Motion in Very Intense Beam-driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Cook, A.M.; Thompson, M.C.; Yoder, R. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, 405 Hilgard Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2004-12-07

    Recent proposals for using plasma wakefield accelerators in the blowout regime as a component of a linear collider have included very intense driver and accelerating beams, which have densities many times in excess of the ambient plasma density. The electric fields of these beams are widely known to be large enough to completely expel plasma electrons from the beam path; the expelled electrons often attain relativistic velocities in the process. We examine here another aspect of this high-beam density scenario: the motion of ions. In the lowest order analysis, for both cylindrically symmetric and 'flat' beams, it is seen that for the 'after-burner' scenario discussed at AAC 2004 the ions completely collapse inside of the electron beam. In this case the ion density is significantly increased, with a large increase in the beam emittance expected as a result. We also examine a less severe scenario, where the ion collapse onset is expected, and new, coupled equilibria in the beam and plasma density are created.

  10. PHYSICAL REVIEW SPECIAL TOPICS -ACCELERATORS AND BEAMS, VOLUME 5, 072801 (2002) Compact high-resolution retarding field energy analyzer for space-charge-dominated

    E-print Network

    Valfells, Ágúst

    2002-01-01

    spread of space-charge-dominated electron beams. This energy analyzer has a cylindrical electrode Advanced particle accelerators for heavy-ion inertial fu- sion, high-energy colliders, free electron lasers Ring (UMER) [2] currently being constructed, re- quire knowledge of the beam's energy spread

  11. Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Milora, S.L.; Schechter, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A proof-of-principle (POP) electron-beam pellet accelerator has been developed and used for accelerating hydrogen and deuterium pellets. An intact hydrogen pellet was accelerated to a speed of 460 m/s by an electron beam of 13.5 keV. 0.3 A, and 2 ms. The maximum speed is limited by the acceleration path length (0.4 m) and pellet integrity. Experimental data have been collected for several hundred hydrogen pellets, which were accelerated by electron beams with parameters of voltage up to 16 kV, current up to 0.4 A, and pulse length up to 10 ms. Preliminary results reveal that the measured burn velocity increases roughly with the square of the beam voltage, as the theoretical model predicts. The final pellet velocity is proportional to the exhaust velocity, which increases with the beam power. To reach the high exhaust velocity needed for accelerating pellets to >1000 m/s, a new electron gun, with its cathode indirectly heated by a graphite heater and an electron beam, is being developed to increase beam current and power. A rocket casing or shell around the pellet has been designed and developed to increase pellet strength and improve the electron-rocket coupling efficiency. We present the characteristics of this pellet accelerator, including new improvements. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Beam-Beam Interaction at the PEP-II E+ E- Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    The PEP-II B-Factory at SLAC (3.1 GeV e{sup +} x 9.0 GeV e{sup -}) operated from 1999 to 2008, delivering luminosity to the BaBar experiment. The design luminosity was reached after one and a half years of operation. PEP-II ultimately surpassed by four times its design luminosity reaching 1.21 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. It also set world records for stored beam currents of 2.1 A e{sup -} and 3.2 A e{sup +}. Continuous injection was implemented with BaBar taking data. The total delivered luminosity to the BaBar detector was 557.4 fb{sup -1} spanning five upsilon resonances. PEP-II was constructed by SLAC, LBNL, and LLNL with help from BINP, IHEP, the BaBar collaboration, and the US DOE OHEP. In order to reach four times the design luminosity the PEP-II accelerator had to manage higher beam currents, lower {beta}{sub y}*s, more bunches, and increased beam-beam tune shifts. In this note the effects of these changes on the beam-beam interaction are discussed.

  13. Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shu, Anthony; Schroeder, Carl; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Matlis, Nicholas; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Plateau, Guillaume; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2008-09-29

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  14. The production of accelerated radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.

    1993-11-01

    During the last few years, substantial work has been done and interest developed in the scientific opportunities available with accelerated radioactive ion beams (RIBs) for nuclear physics, astrophysics, and applied research. This interest has led to the construction, development, and proposed development of both first- and second-generation RIB facilities in Asia, North America, and Europe; international conferences on RIBs at Berkeley and Louvain-la-Neuve; and many workshops on specific aspects of RIB production and science. This paper provides a discussion of both the projectile fragmentation, PF, and isotope separator on-line, ISOL, approach to RIB production with particular emphasis on the latter approach, which employs a postaccelerator and is most suitable for nuclear structure physics. The existing, under construction, and proposed facilities worldwide are discussed. The paper draws heavily from the CERN ISOLDE work, the North American IsoSpin Laboratory (ISL) study, and the operating first-generation RIB facility at Louvain-la-Neuve, and the first-generation RIB project currently being constructed at ORNL.

  15. Influence of proton beam Coulomb explosion in laser proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinqing; Jin, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weimin; Gu, Yuqiu; Zhan, Rongxin; Zhao, Zongqing; Cao, Leifeng; Li, Bin

    2013-12-01

    To further understand proton acceleration driven by the interaction between ultra-intense laser pulse and foil targets, the influence of proton beam Coulomb explosion has been analyzed theoretically and investigated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (2D-PIC) simulations. Employing different proton layer sizes in the simulations, it is found that proton beam Coulomb explosion plays an important role on proton acceleration, in particular on proton cut off energy. Proton dynamics including the effect of both sheath field and proton beam Coulomb explosion was proposed and discussed in detail. This work may serve to improve the understanding of proton acceleration driven by intense laser-foil interactions.

  16. Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; Thieberger, P.; Weng, W.T.; /Brookhaven; McDonald, K.; /Princeton U.; Sheppard, J.; /SLAC; Evangelakis, G.; /Ioannina U.; Yoshimura, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-08-16

    This paper presents results of recent experimental studies focusing on the behavior of special materials and composites under irradiation conditions and their potential use as accelerator targets. The paper also discusses the approach and goals of on-going investigations on an expanded material matrix geared toward the neutrino superbeam and muon collider initiatives.

  17. Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Simos; H. Kirk; H. Ludewig; P. Thieberger; W.-T. Weng; K. McDonald; J. Sheppard; G. Evangelakis; K. Yoshimura

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents results of recent experimental studies focusing on the behavior of special materials and composites under irradiation conditions and their potential use as accelerator targets. The paper also discusses the approach and goals of on-going investigations on an expanded material matrix geared toward the neutrino superbeam and muon collider initiatives. * Work performed under the auspices of the

  18. Progress in advanced accelerator concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-08-01

    A review is given of recent progress in this field, drawing heavily upon material presented at the Workshop on Advanced Accelerator Concepts, The Abbey, June 12--18, 1994. Attention is addressed to (1) plasma based concepts, (2) photo-cathodes, (3) radio frequency sources and Two-Beam Accelerators, (4) near and far-field schemes (including collective accelerators), (5) beam handling and conditioning, and (6) exotic collider concepts (such as photon colliders and muon colliders).

  19. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, ioanis

    2014-06-01

    After a 14 month shutdown accelerator modifications and upgrades are in place to allow us doubling of the Main Injector beam power. We will discuss the past MI high power operation and the current progress towards doubling the power.

  20. Beam dynamics in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Epifanio O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Rita [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cook, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esquibel, Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallegos, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garnett, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harrison, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Jeffrey B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jacquez, Edward B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Cuistian, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Nicholas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nath, Subrato [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nielsen, Kurt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prichard, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rose, Chris R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Manolito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schauer, Martin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seitz, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulze, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bender, Howard A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broste, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frayer, Daniel K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Douglas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tom, C Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trainham, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scarpetti, Raymond [LLNL; Genoni, Thomas [VOSS; Hughes, Thomas [VOSS; Toma, Carsten [VOSS

    2010-01-01

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiography of Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6 microseconds. It accomplishes this by slicing four micro-pulses out of a long 1.8-kA, 16.5-MeV electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The long beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for radiography. High frequency motion, such as from beam breakup instability, would blur the individual spots. Low frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed power variation, would produce spot to spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it.

  1. The TRIUMF-ISAC Post-Accelerator for Radioactive Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxdal, R. E.

    1998-04-01

    The ISAC radioactive ion beam facility under construction at TRIUMF comprises a 500 MeV proton beam (I <= 100 ?A) from the TRIUMF cyclotron impinging on a thick target, an on-line source to ionize the radioactive products, a mass-separator for mass selection, an accelerator complex and experimental areas. The accelerator chain comprises a 35 MHz RF Quadrupole (RFQ) to accelerate beams of q/A >= 1/30 from 2 keV/u to 150 keV/u and a post stripper, 105 MHz variable energy drift tube linac (DTL) to accelerate ions of q/A >= 1/6 to a final energy between 0.15 MeV/u to 1.5 MeV/u. The accelerators have several noteworthy features. Both linacs are required to operate cw to preserve beam intensity. The RFQ, a four vane split-ring structure, has no bunching section; instead the beam is pre-bunched at 11.7 MHz with a single gap pseudo saw tooth buncher. The variable energy DTL is based on a unique separated function approach. Five independent interdigital H-mode (IH) structures operating at 0^circ synchronous phase provide the acceleration while quadrupole triplets and three gap bunching cavities between tanks provide transverse and longitudinal focussing respectively. Details of the accelerator design as well as the present status will be presented.

  2. Beam Test of a High Pressure Cavity for a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Moretti, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab; Kurup, A.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2010-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a high pressure RF cavity for use in the cooling channel of a muon collider, an experimental setup that utilizes 400-MeV Fermilab linac proton beam has been developed. In this paper, we describe the beam diagnostics and the collimator system for the experiment, and report the initial results of the beam commissioning. The transient response of the cavity to the beam is measured by the electric and magnetic pickup probes, and the beam-gas interaction is monitored by the optical diagnostic system composed of a spectrometer and two PMTs.

  3. Beam losses and beam halos in accelerators for new energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    Large particle accelerators are proposed as drivers for new ways to produce electricity from nuclear fusion and fission reactions. The accelerators must be designed to deliver large particle beam currents to a target facility with very little beam spill along the accelerator itself, in order that accelerator maintenance can be accomplished without remote manipulators. Typically, particle loss is preceded by the formation of a tenuous halo of particles around the central beam core, caused by beam dynamics effects, often coupled with the slight imperfections inevitable in a practical design. If the halo becomes large enough, particles may be scraped off along the accelerator. The tolerance for beam spill in different applications is discussed, halo mechanisms and recent work to explore and understand their dynamics are reviewed, and possible directions for future investigation are outlined. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Electrostatic quadrupole focused particle accelerating assembly with laminar flow beam

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1984-04-16

    A charged particle accelerating assembly provided with a predetermined ratio of parametric structural characteristics and with related operating voltages applied to each of its linearly spaced focusing and accelerating quadrupoles, thereby to maintain a particle beam traversing the electrostatic fields of the quadrupoles in the assembly in an essentially laminar flow through the assembly.

  5. Acceleration of ampere class H{sup -} ion beam by MeV accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, M.; Inoue, T.; Umeda, N.; Kashiwagi, M.; Watanabe, K.; Tobari, H.; Dairaku, M.; Sakamoto, K. [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka 311-0193 (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    The H{sup -} ion accelerator R and D to realize the international thermonuclear experimental reactor neutral beam is ongoing at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The required performance for the prototype MeV accelerator developed at JAEA is 1 MeV, 500 mA (current density of 200 A/m{sup 2}) H{sup -} ion beam at the beamlet divergence angle of less than 7 mrad. Up to 2005, 836 keV, 146 A/m{sup 2} H{sup -} ion beam was successfully accelerated as the highest record of the current density at MeV class energy beams. In the present work, high current negative ion beam acceleration test was performed by increasing the beam extraction apertures from 3x3 (9 apertures) to 3x5 (15 apertures). By fixing the air leak at the source chamber due to backstream ions as well as the improvement of voltage holding capability by a new fiber reinforced plastic insulator ring, the performance of the MeV accelerator was improved. So far, H{sup -} ion beam of 320 mA was successfully accelerated up to 796 keV with the beam divergence angle of 5.5 mrad. The accelerated drain current including the electron reaches close to the power supply limit for the MeV test facility. The heat flux by the backstream ion during the above beam acceleration was estimated to be 360 W/cm{sup 2}. The Cs leakage to the accelerator during the test campaign (Cs total input of 5.0 g) was 0.26 mg (7.0 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}). This is considered to be the allowable level from the viewpoint of voltage holding.

  6. Excitation of Accelerating Plasma Waves by Counter-Propagating Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gennady Shvets; Nathaniel J. Fisch; Alexander Pukhov

    2002-04-05

    The conventional approach to exciting high phase velocity waves in plasmas is to employ a laser pulse moving in the direction of the desired particle acceleration. Photon downshifting then causes momentum transfer to the plasma and wave excitation. Novel approaches to plasma wake excitation, colliding-beam accelerator (CBA), which involve photon exchange between the long and short counter-propagating laser beams, are described. Depending on the frequency detuning Dw between beams and duration tL of the short pulse, there are two approaches to CBA. The first approach assumes tL ª 2/wp. Photons exchanged between the beams deposit their recoil momentum in the plasma driving the plasma wake. Frequency detuning between the beams determines the direction of the photon exchange, thereby controlling the phase of the plasma wake. This phase control can be used for reversing the slippage of the accelerated particles with respect to the wake. A variation on the same theme, super-beatwave accelerator, is also described. In the second approach, a short pulse with tL >> 2/wp?1 detuned by Dw ~ 2wp from the counter-propagating beam is employed. While parametric excitation of plasma waves by the electromagnetic beatwave at 2wp of two co-propagating lasers was first predicted by Rosenbluth and Liu [M.N. Rosenbluth, C.S. Liu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 29 (1972) 701], it is demonstrated that the two excitation beams can be counter-propagating. The advantages of using this geometry (higher instability growth rate, insensitivity to plasma inhomogeneity) are explained, and supporting numerical simulations presented.

  7. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics: OPAL experiment at LEP; Deep inelastic muon interactions at TeV II; D{phi} experiment; Physics with the CLEO detector at CESR; CYGNUS experiment; {nu}{sub e}e elastic scattering experiment; Further results from JADE; Theory of polarization in electron storage rings; and Rare kaon decay experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  8. A new high intensity electron beam for wakefield acceleration studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. Conde; Wei Gai; C. Jing; R. Konecny; W. Liu; J. G. Power; H. Wang; Z. Yusof

    2003-01-01

    A new RF photocathode electron gun and beamline have been built for the study of electron beam driven wakefield acceleration. The one and a half cell L-band gun operates with an electric field on the cathode surface of 80 MV\\/m, and generates electron bunches with tens of nanocoulombs of charge and rms bunch lengths of a few picoseconds. The beam

  9. Frontiers of accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.

    1992-08-01

    New technology has permitted significant performance improvements of established instrumentation techniques including beam position and profile monitoring. Fundamentally new profile monitor strategies are required for the next generation of accelerators, especially linear colliders (LC). Beams in these machines may be three orders of magnitude smaller than typical beams in present colliders. In this paper we review both the present performance levels achieved by conventional systems and present some new ideas for future colliders.

  10. High transformer ratio drive beams for wakefield accelerator studies

    SciTech Connect

    England, R. J.; Ng, C.-K.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Muggli, P.; Joshi, C.; An, W.; Andonian, G.; Mori, W.; Lu, W. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Max Planck Institute for Physics, 80805 Munich (Germany); University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2012-12-21

    For wakefield based acceleration schemes, use of an asymmetric (or linearly ramped) drive bunch current profile has been predicted to enhance the transformer ratio and generate large accelerating wakes. We discuss plans and initial results for producing such bunches using the 20 to 23 GeV electron beam at the FACET facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and sending them through plasmas and dielectric tubes to generate transformer ratios greater than 2 (the limit for symmetric bunches). The scheme proposed utilizes the final FACET chicane compressor and transverse collimation to shape the longitudinal phase space of the beam.

  11. Turn-By Beam Extraction during Acceleration in a Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Trbojevic, Dejan

    2014-02-01

    A synchrotron to accelerate protons or carbon ions for medical applications is being designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Single beam bunches with maximum beam energy of 1.18 GeV and 400 MeV/u for protons and carbon ions respectively will be extracted from the synchrotron at 15 Hz. For protons, the maximum required energy for irradiating a tumor is ˜206 MeV. A pencil-like proton beam containing ˜5.4×107 p/bunch delivers a therapeutic dose of 2.5 Gy in ˜1.5 minutes to treat a tumor of 1 liter volume. It will take ˜80 minutes with bunches containing 4.5×104 ions/bunch to deliver the same dose of 2.5 Gy with a 400 MeV/u pencil-like carbon beam. This extended treatment time when using carbon ions is not acceptable. In addition, the synchrotron cannot be controlled with a beam bunch containing such a low number of carbon ions. To overcome these two problems of the extended treatment time and the low bunch intensity required for the treatment when carbon ions are used, we have devised a method to “peel” the required 4.5×104 carbon-ions/bunch from the accelerating carbon beam bunch containing ˜108 ions/bunch and deliver them to the tumor on a “turn-by-turn” basis. Unlike other methods of beam extraction from a synchrotron, such as resonance extraction, this method does not allow for any beam losses during the extraction and the carbon beam can be peeled off in less than 15 ms during the acceleration or deceleration cycle of the synchrotron. Thus, this turn-by-turn beam extraction method provides beam with variable energy and precisely controlled beam current during the 30 ms acceleration or deceleration time.

  12. Study of a microwave power source for a two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.L.

    1994-08-15

    A theoretical and experimental study of a microwave power source suitable for driving a linear e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider is reported. The power source is based on the Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept, is driven by a 5-MeV, 1-kA induction accelerator electron beam, and operates at X-band frequencies. The development of a computer code to simulate the transverse beam dynamics of an intense relativistic electron beam transiting a system of microwave resonant structures is presented. This code is time dependent with self-consistent beam-cavity interactions and uses realistic beam parameters. Simulations performed with this code are compared with analytical theory and experiments. The concept of spacing resonant structures at distances equal to the betatron wavelength of the focusing system to suppress the growth of transverse instabilities is discussed. Simulations include energy spread over the beam to demonstrate the effect of Landau damping and establish the sensitivity of the betatron wavelength spacing scheme to errors in the focusing system. The design of the Reacceleration Experiment is described in detail and includes essentially all the issues related to a full scale RK-TBA microwave source. A total combined power from three output structures in excess of 170 MW with an amplitude stability of {+-}4% over a 25 ns pulse was achieved. The results of the experiment are compared to simulations used during the design phase to validate the various codes and methods used. The primary issue for the RK-TBA concept is identified as transverse beam instability associated with the excitation of higher order modes in the resonant structures used for extracting microwave power from the modulated beam. This work represents the first successful experimental demonstration of repeated cycles of microwave energy extraction from and reacceleration of a modulated beam.

  13. Rapidly accelerating Mathieu and Weber surface plasmon beams.

    PubMed

    Libster-Hershko, Ana; Epstein, Itai; Arie, Ady

    2014-09-19

    We report the generation of two types of self-accelerating surface plasmon beams which are solutions of the nonparaxial Helmholtz equation in two dimensions. These beams preserve their shape while propagating along either elliptic (Mathieu beam) or parabolic (Weber beam) trajectories. We show that owing to the nonparaxial nature of the Weber beam, it maintains its shape over a much larger distance along the parabolic trajectory, with respect to the corresponding solution of the paraxial equation-the Airy beam. Dynamic control of the trajectory is realized by translating the position of the illuminating free-space beam. Finally, the ability of these beams to self-heal after blocking obstacles is demonstrated as well. PMID:25279631

  14. Beam losses from ultraperipheral nuclear collisions between Pb82+208 ions in the Large Hadron Collider and their alleviation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Bruce; D. Bocian; S. Gilardoni; J. M. Jowett

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between colliding heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will give rise to localized beam losses that may quench superconducting magnets, apart from contributing significantly to the luminosity decay. To quantify their impact on the operation of the collider, we have used a three-step simulation approach, which consists of optical tracking, a Monte Carlo shower

  15. The IFMIF-EVEDA accelerator beam dump design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, D.; Arranz, F.; Arroyo, J. M.; Barrera, G.; Brañas, B.; Casal, N.; García, M.; López, D.; Martínez, J. I.; Mayoral, A.; Ogando, F.; Parro, M.; Oliver, C.; Rapisarda, D.; Sanz, J.; Sauvan, P.; Ibarra, A.

    2011-10-01

    The IFMIF-EVEDA accelerator will be a 9 MeV, 125 mA cw deuteron accelerator prototype for verifying the validity of the 40 MeV accelerator design for IFMIF. A beam dump designed for maximum power of 1.12 MW will be used to stop the beam at the accelerator exit. The conceptual design for the IFMIF-EVEDA accelerator beam dump is based on a conical beam stop made of OFE copper. The cooling system uses an axial high velocity flow of water pressurized up to 3.4 × 10 5 Pa to avoid boiling. The design has been shown to be compliant with ASME mechanical design rules under nominal full power conditions. A sensitivity analysis has been performed to take into account the possible margin on the beam properties at the beam dump entrance. This analysis together with the study of the maintenance issues and the mounting and dismounting operations has led to the complete design definition.

  16. Accelerators (3/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  17. Accelerators (4/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  18. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility.

    PubMed

    Adonin, A A; Hollinger, R

    2014-02-01

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed. PMID:24593461

  19. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Adonin, A. A., E-mail: a.adonin@gsi.de; Hollinger, R. [Linac and Operations/Ion Sources, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)] [Linac and Operations/Ion Sources, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  20. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adonin, A. A.; Hollinger, R.

    2014-02-01

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  1. Beams of different masses in electrostatic accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. L. Andersen; K. Gjotterud; T. Holtebekk; O. Lonsjo

    1958-01-01

    The use of the Hâsup +\\/ beam to obtain yield curves for (p, gamma ; ) reactions is shown to introduce an additional energy spread of about 0.5 kev at ; 500 kev proton energy. A simple explanation for thin effect is suggested. It is ; also found that the use of the Hâsup +\\/ beam leads to lower values

  2. Solid Target Studies for Muon Colliders And Neutrino Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; Thieberger, P.; Weng, W.T.; Trung, P.T.; /Brookhaven; McDonald, K.; /Princeton U.; Sheppard, J.; /SLAC; Yoshimura, K.; Hayato, Y.; /KEK,

    2006-05-10

    This paper presents preliminary results from an ongoing post-irradiation analysis of materials that have been irradiated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Isotope facility. The effort is part of an experimental study that focuses on how prone to irradiation damage these materials are and thus what is their potential in playing the role of high power targets in the neutrino superbeam and the muon collider initiatives.

  3. Design of a 1-MV induction injector for the Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.E.; Eylon, S.; Lidia, S.; Reginato, L.; Vanecek, D.; Yu, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Henestroza, E. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    A Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) is envisioned as a rf power source upgrade of the Next Linear Collider. Construction of a prototype, called the RTA, based on the RK-TBA concept has commenced at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This prototype will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. The first half of the injector, a 1 MeV, 1.2 kA, 300 ns induction electron gun, has been built and is presently being tested. The design of the injector cells and the pulsed power drive units are presented in this paper.

  4. Particle-beam accelerators for radiotherapy and radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, T. J., Jr.; Crandall, K. R.; Hamm, R. W.; Hansborough, L. D.; Hoeberling, R. F.; Jameson, R. A.; Knapp, E. A.; Mueller, D. W.; Potter, J. M.; Stokes, R. H.

    The philosophy used in developing the PIGMI (pion generator for medical irradiation) technology was that the parameters chosen for physics research machines are not necessarily the right ones for a dedicated therapy or radioisotope machine. In particular, the beam current and energy can be optimized, and the design should emphasize minimum size, simplicity and reliability of operation, and economy in capital and operating costs. A major part of achieving these goals lay in raising the operating frequency and voltage gradient of the accelerator, which shrinks the diameter and length of the components. Several other technical innovations resulted in major system improvements. One of these is a radically new type of accelerator structure named the radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. This allowed the elimination of the large, complicated ion source used in previous ion accelerators, and a very high quality accelerated beam. Also, by using advanced permanent magnet materials to make the focusing elements, the system becomes much simpler. Other improvements are described.

  5. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research.

  6. Mitigating performance limitations of single beam-pipe circular e+e- colliders

    E-print Network

    Koratzinos, M

    2015-01-01

    Renewed interest in circular e+e- colliders has spurred designs of single beam-pipe machines, like the CEPC in China, and double beam pipe ones, such as the FCC-ee effort at CERN. Single beam-pipe designs profit from lower costs but are limited by the number of bunches that can be accommodated in the machine. We analyse these performance limitations and propose a solution that can accommodate O(1000) bunches while keeping more than 90% of the ring with a single beam pipe.

  7. High efficiency beam splitting for H/sup -/ accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Stipp, V.; Krieger, C.; Madsen, J.

    1985-01-01

    Beam splitting for high energy accelerators has typically involved a significant loss of beam and radiation. This paper reports on a new method of splitting beams for H/sup -/ accelerators. This technique uses a high intensity flash of light to strip a fraction of the H/sup -/ beam to H/sup 0/ which are then easily separated by a small bending magnet. A system using a 900-watt (average electrical power) flashlamp and a highly efficient collector will provide 10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -2/ splitting of a 50 MeV H/sup -/ beam. Results on the operation and comparisons with stripping cross sections are presented. Also discussed is the possibility for developing this system to yield a higher stripping fraction.

  8. Fast Ignition by Photon-Pressure Accelerated Ion Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Sunahara, Atsushi; Morikawa, Takamasa; Endo, Takuma

    2014-10-01

    For enhancing the core heating efficiency in fast ignition, the ion beam generated by radiative pressure acceleration with circularly-polarized ultra-intense laser pulse is used as a core heating driver. In the present study, on the basis of the integrated simulations (PIC simulations for beam generation and Fokker-Planck simulations for core heating) and demonstrated the potential probability for C6+ beam driven fast ignition. From the coupled transport and hydro simulations, it is found that the beam particle (C6+) energy of 100 ~ 200 MeV minimizes the beam energy required for ignition and the beam duration of ~1 ps is suitable for ignition in terms of beam generation and core heating. From 2D PIC simulations for ion beam generation it is found that fast ion beam with ion energy of 210 MeV is obtained when the carbon target with the ion density of 90 ncr (ncr is the laser critical density) is irradiated with the CP laser with the intensity of 6×1022 W/cm2. In this case, 12% energy convergence efficiency of laser to ion beam is obtained. If assuming the laser spot of 24 micron diameter and pulse duration of 700 fs, the required laser energy for beam generation is ~190 kJ and the resultant beam energy of 23 kJ, which satisfy the beam condition required for ignition.

  9. Linear collider development at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.

    1993-08-01

    Linear collider R&D at SLAC comprises work on the present Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) and work toward the next linear collider (NLC). Recent SLC developments are summarized. NLC studies are divided into hardware-based and theoretical. We report on the status of the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and the final focus test beam (FFTB), describe plans for ASSET, an installation to measure accelerator structure wakefields, and mention IR design developments. Finally we review recent NLC theoretical studies, ending with the author`s view of next linear collider parameter sets.

  10. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Accelerator Physics Center (APC), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 10{sup 25?}m{sup ?3} and 1.6?×?10{sup 28?}m{sup ?3} plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers ?20% higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 ?{sub p} to 0.6 ?{sub p} in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g., nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  11. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 ?p to 0.6 ?p in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  12. Possibility for ultra-bright electron beam acceleration in dielectric wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    We describe a conceptual proposal to combine the Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator (DWA) with the Emittance Exchanger (EEX) to demonstrate a high-brightness DWA with a gradient of above 100 MV/m and less than 0.1% induced energy spread in the accelerated beam. We currently evaluate the DWA concept as a performance upgrade for the future LANL signature facility MaRIE with the goal of significantly reducing the electron beam energy spread. The preconceptual design for MaRIE is underway at LANL, with the design of the electron linear accelerator being one of the main research goals. Although generally the baseline design needs to be conservative and rely on existing technology, any future upgrade would immediately call for looking into the advanced accelerator concepts capable of boosting the electron beam energy up by a few GeV in a very short distance without degrading the beam's quality. Scoping studies have identified large induced energy spreads as the major cause of beam quality degradation in high-gradient advanced accelerators for free-electron lasers. We describe simulations demonstrating that trapezoidal bunch shapes can be used in a DWA to greatly reduce the induced beam energy spread, and, in doing so, also preserve the beam brightness at levels never previously achieved. This concept has the potential to advance DWA technology to a level that would make it suitable for the upgrades of the proposed Los Alamos MaRIE signature facility.

  13. Field-aligned electron beams observed simultaneously with upflowing ion beams in the auroral acceleration region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Yoshioka; W. Miyake; T. Mukai; M. Ito

    2000-01-01

    Upgoing, counterstreaming, and downgoing field-aligned electron beams observed simultaneously with upward ion beams in the auroral acceleration region on Akebono (Exos-D) satellite are studied statistically. These electron beams are narrowly collimated within the local loss cone, generally have lower energies per charge than the potential drop above the satellite, and are associated only with low-energy (<2 keV) ion beams. Their

  14. Transverse Resistive Wall Instability in the Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, Andrew M.; Neil, V.K.

    1990-06-01

    The transverse resistive wall instability in the Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) is investigated analytically and numerically. Without any damping mechanism, we find one to four e-folds in 100 m, depending on the design. It is found that Landau damping, due to energy spread within a beam slice, is not effective, due to rapid synchrotron oscillations in the FEL ponderomotive well. Damping due to an energy sweep along the beam is also considered and it is found that a small variation in energy along the beam, decreasing from head to tail, can significantly reduce growth. We conclude that the resistive wall instability is not a severe design constraint on a TBA.

  15. Beam-induced energy deposition issues in the Very Large Hadron Collider

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nikolai V. Mokhov; Alexandr I. Drozhdin; G. William Foster

    2001-01-01

    Energy deposition issues are extremely important in the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) with huge energy stored in its 20 TeV (Stage-1) and 87.5 TeV (Stage-2) beams. The status of the VLHC design on these topics, and possible solutions of the problems are discussed. Protective measures are determined based on the operational and accidental beam loss limits for the prompt

  16. Beam-Based Feedback System for the International Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Valentin

    The algorithms and computer codes for linac Feedback system were developed at SLAC during 1991-2004. The efficiency of that system have been demonstrated for the SLC, CLIC, TESLA and NLC projects. International Linear Collider (ILC) has its own features. Ground motion (GM) oscillations play a dominant role here. It forced to implement a new version of the Linac Feedback Simulation Code based on the previous developments. A set of benchmark tests and realistic simulations for the whole ILC structure have been performed. The effects of different GM models, BPM resolution, time intervals, initial misalignments, a dispersion-free steering (DFS), and a quad jitter have been studied.

  17. I. ACCELERATION A. Introduction

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    I. ACCELERATION A. Introduction Following cooling and initial bunch compression, the beams must be rapidly accelerated. The acceleration needed for a Higgs collider is probably the most conventional part undertaken. A sequence of linacs would work, but would be expensive. Some form of circulating acceleration

  18. Beam dump problem and neutrino factory based on an e+e- linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, I. F.

    2015-02-01

    After a collision at the main interaction point the beam of an e+e- Linear Collider can be utilized to construct a neutrino factory with exceptional parameters. We also briefly discuss possible applications of some elements of the proposed scheme to standard fixed target experiments and new experiments with ?? N interactions.

  19. Operation of the CDF silicon vertex detector with colliding beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bedeschi, F.; Bolognesi, V.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Galeotti, S.; Grieco, G.; Mariotti, M.; Menzione, A.; Punzi, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Ristori, L.; Tartarelli, F.; Turini, N.; Wenzel, H.; Zetti, F. (INFN, University and Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa, Pisa, Italy, I-56100 (Italy)); Bailey, M.W.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Kruse, M.C.; Shaw, N.M. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)); Carithers, W.C.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester, W.; Wong, M.; Yao, W. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T.R. (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)); Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Skarha, J.; Snider, F.D.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S. (The John Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)); Amidei, D.; Derwent, P.F.; Song, T.Y.; Dunn, A. (Univer

    1992-02-05

    In this paper we briefly describe the main features of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) and discuss its performance during actual colliding beam operation at the Fermilab Tevatron. Details on [ital S]/[ital N] ratio, alignment, resolution, and efficiency are given.

  20. KT McDonald Proton Accelerator Workshop Jan 13, 2012 1 Target-System Challenges at a Muon Collider

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    a Neutrino Factory) A Muon Collider is an energy-frontier particle-physics facility (that also produces lots of high-energy 's). Higher mass of muon Better defined initial state than e+e- at high energy. A muon Muon Collider Technical Challenges (1) · Muons created as tertiary beam (p ) -- low production rate

  1. LINEAR COLLIDER TEST FACILITY: TWISS PARAMETER ANALYSIS AT THE IP/POST-IP LOCATION OF THE ATF2 BEAM LINE *

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    LINEAR COLLIDER TEST FACILITY: TWISS PARAMETER ANALYSIS AT THE IP/POST-IP LOCATION OF THE ATF2 BEAM beam tuning, vertical beam size is usually bigger than 3!m at the IP. Beam waist measurements using to the IP. These measurements are described in this paper for the optics currently used ("x=4cm and "y=1mm

  2. Design of an accelerating cavity for the Superconducting Super Collider Low-Energy Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrichs, C.C.; Walling, L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Campbell, B.M. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (USA))

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the history and current status of the design of the accelerator cavity to be incorporated into the Low-Energy Booster (LEB) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The LEB is a proton synchrotron, 540 meters in circumference, and having 108 buckets around the ring. Acceleration programs, each 50 msec long, take place at a rate of 10 per second. The beta change of the particles from injection to extraction is from 0.8 to 0.997. Since the rf excitation frequency must track beta, the rf frequency must shift from 47.5 to 60 MHz over the 50-msec acceleration program. The cavity will use ferrite in a perpendicular control bias mode to effect the require tuning. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Radiobiological effectiveness of laser accelerated electrons in comparison to electron beams from a conventional linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Laschinsky, Lydia; Baumann, Michael; Beyreuther, Elke; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Kaluza, Malte; Karsch, Leonhard; Lessmann, Elisabeth; Naumburger, Doreen; Nicolai, Maria; Richter, Christian; Sauerbrey, Roland; Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Pawelke, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The notable progress in laser particle acceleration technology promises potential medical application in cancer therapy through compact and cost effective laser devices that are suitable for already existing clinics. Previously, consequences on the radiobiological response by laser driven particle beams characterised by an ultra high peak dose rate have to be investigated. Therefore, tumour and non-malignant cells were irradiated with pulsed laser accelerated electrons at the JETI facility for the comparison with continuous electrons of a conventional therapy LINAC. Dose response curves were measured for the biological endpoints clonogenic survival and residual DNA double strand breaks. The overall results show no significant differences in radiobiological response for in vitro cell experiments between laser accelerated pulsed and clinical used electron beams. These first systematic in vitro cell response studies with precise dosimetry to laser driven electron beams represent a first step toward the long term aim of the application of laser accelerated particles in radiotherapy. PMID:22739009

  4. TRANSVERSE WAKEFIELD EFFECTS IN THE TWO-BEAM ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Selph, F.; Sessler, A.

    1985-08-01

    Transverse wakefield effects in the high-gradient accelerating structure of the Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) [1-3] are analyzed theoretically using three different models. The first is a very simple two-particle model due to Wilson [4]; the second, due to Chao, Richter, and Yao [5], is for a beam with uniform charge distribution, constant betatron wavelength, and a linear wake approximation. Both of these models give analytic scaling laws. The third model has a Gaussian beam (represented by 11 superparticles), energy variation across the bunch, acceleration, variation of betatron focusing with energy, and variation of the wakefield from linearity. The three models are compared, and the third model is used to explore the wakefield effects when accelerator parameters such as energy, energy spread, injection energy, accelerating gradient, and betatron wavelength are varied. Also explored are the sensitivity of the beam to the wakefield profile and to the longitudinal charge distribution. Finally, in consideration of wakefield effects, possible parameters of a TBA are presented.

  5. An Expert System For Tuning Particle-Beam Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lager, Darrel L.; Brand, Hal R.; Maurer, William J.; Searfus, Robert M.; Hernandez, Jose E.

    1989-03-01

    We have developed a proof-of-concept prototype of an expert system for tuning particle beam accelerators. It is designed to function as an intelligent assistant for an operator. In its present form it implements the strategies and reasoning followed by the operator for steering through the beam transport section of the Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Site 300. The system is implemented in the language LISP using the Artificial Intelligence concepts of frames, daemons, and a representation we developed called a Monitored Decision Script.

  6. An expert system for tuning particle-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, D.L.; Brand, H.R.; Maurer, W.J.; Searfus, R.M.; Hernandez, J.E.

    1989-01-12

    We have developed a proof-of-concept prototype of an expert system for tuning particle beam accelerators. It is designed to function as an intelligent assistant for an operator. In its present form it implements the strategies and reasoning followed by the operator for steering through the beam transport section of the Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Site 300. The system is implemented in the language LISP using the Artificial Intelligence concepts of frames, daemons, and a representation we developed called a Monitored Decision Script. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Beam loading and cavity compensation for the ground test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jachim, S.P.; Natter, E.F.

    1989-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) will be a heavily beam-loaded H/sup minus/ linac with tight tolerances on accelerating field parameters. The methods used in modeling the effects of beam loading in this machine are described. The response of the cavity to both beam and radio-frequency (RF) drive stimulus is derived, including the effects of cavity detuning. This derivation is not restricted to a small-signal approximation. An analytical method for synthesizing a predistortion network that decouples the amplitude and phase responses of the cavity is also outlined. Simulation of performance, including beam loading, is achieved through use of a control system analysis software package. A straightforward method is presented for extrapolating this work to model large coupled structures with closely spaced parasitic modes. Results to date have enabled the RF control system designs for GTA to be optimized and have given insight into their operation. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Transport and acceleration of high current uranium ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.E.; Keller, R.; Spaedtke, P.; Mueller, R.W; Bolle, J.

    1985-10-01

    Measurements have been made of the transport of beams produced by the high current ion source, MEVVA, and of the injection of these beams into the GSI heavy ion RFQ linac. This configuration has provided initial tests of the MEVVA ion source in an injector environment, and of the RFQ with uranium as the accelerated species. Beam currents of 78 mA of titanium and 19 mA of uranium, at an extraction voltage of 40 kV, have been transported through a 4.7 m long beam transport channel, and up to 40 mA of uranium has been transported through a single-gap accelerating column at a voltage of about 150 kV. A current of up to 5 mA of UT has been measured at the exit detector of the RFQ.

  9. Electron beam\\/converter target interactions in radiographic accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. McCarrick; G. Caporaso; F. Chambers; Y.-J. Chen; S. Falabella; F. Goldin; G. Guethlein; D. Ho; R. Richardson; J. Weir

    2003-01-01

    Linear induction accelerators used in X-ray radiography have single-pulse parameters of the order 20 MeV of electron beam energy, 2 kA of beam current, pulse lengths of 50-100 ns, and spot sizes of 1-2 mm. The thermal energy deposited in a bremsstrahlung converter target made of tantalum from such a pulse is ?80 kJ\\/cc, more than enough to bring the

  10. Progress on the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator prototype

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D E Anderson; S Eylon; E Henestroza; T L Houck; Lidia S M; D L Vanecek; G A Westenskow; S. S. Yu

    1998-01-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, l-MeV, electron induction prototype injector as a collaborative effort between LBL and LLNL. The electron source will be a 3.5\\

  11. Prototype microwave source for a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.; Deadrick, F.; Westenskow, G.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Giordano, G. [Univ. of Milano, Milan (Italy)] [Univ. of Milano, Milan (Italy); Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Reginato, L.; Vanecek, D.; Yu, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    A test facility is established at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study RF power sources for linear colliders based on the Relativistic Klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) concept. A 24-m long prototype source, the RTA, will be constructed in this facility to study physics, engineering, and cost issues related to RK-TBA`s. The RTA will generate 200-ns 180-MW RF (11.4-GHz) pulses from each of eight output ports. The major components of the RTA include a 2.8-MeV 1.2-kA induction injector, transverse beam modulator, adiabatic compressor, and RF extraction section. The beam energy is increased to 4 MeV and the RF bunch length is shortened from 240{degree} to 110{degree} in the adiabatic compressor. The 8-m long extraction section includes 40 induction accelerator cells to maintain beam energy at an average 4 MeV, eight equally spaced RF output structures, and a ppm quadrupole focusing system. In this paper, the authors describe the RTA and present results of component testing and computer simulations.

  12. High quality electron beams from a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, S. M.; Issac, R. C.; Welsh, G. H.; Brunetti, E.; Shanks, R. P.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Manahan, G. G.; Aniculaesei, C.; Ersfeld, B.; Islam, M. R.; Burgess, R. T. L.; Vieux, G.; Gillespie, W. A.; MacLeod, A. M.; van der Geer, S. B.; de Loos, M. J.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    High quality electron beams have been produced in a laser-plasma accelerator driven by femtosecond laser pulses with a peak power of 26 TW. Electrons are produced with an energy up to 150 MeV from the 2 mm gas jet accelerator and the measured rms relative energy spread is less than 1%. Shot-to-shot stability in the central energy is 3%. Pepper-pot measurements have shown that the normalized transverse emittance is ~1? mm mrad while the beam charge is in the range 2-10 pC. The generation of high quality electron beams is understood from simulations accounting for beam loading of the wakefield accelerating structure. Experiments and self-consistent simulations indicate that the beam peak current is several kiloamperes. Efficient transportation of the beam through an undulator is simulated and progress is being made towards the realization of a compact, high peak brilliance free-electron laser operating in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelength ranges.

  13. Beam Physics of Integrable Optics Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab; Danilov, V.V.; /Oak Ridge; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    Fermilab's Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an electron storage ring designed for testing advanced accelerator physics concepts, including implementation of nonlinear integrable beam optics and experiments on optical stochastic cooling. The machine is currently under construction at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. In this report we present the goals and the current status of the project, and describe the details of machine design. In particular, we concentrate on numerical simulations setting the requirements on the design and supporting the choice of machine parameters.

  14. Production and acceleration of ion beams by laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Velardi, L; Siciliano, M V; Delle Side, D; Nassisi, V

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we present a new pulsed laser ablation technique to obtain energetic ion beams. The accelerator we made is a compact device able to extract and accelerate the ionic components of plasma up to 160 keV per charge state. It is composed by a generating chamber containing an expansion chamber used like first electrode. Next, a second electrode connected to ground and a third electrode connected to negative voltage are used. The third electrode is used also as Faraday cup. By the analysis of the ion signals we studied the plume parameters such as TOF accelerated signals, charge state, and divergence. PMID:22380322

  15. Production and acceleration of ion beams by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Velardi, L.; Siciliano, M. V.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V. [Department of Physics and I.N.F.N., LEAS Laboratory, University of Salento, Via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    In this work, we present a new pulsed laser ablation technique to obtain energetic ion beams. The accelerator we made is a compact device able to extract and accelerate the ionic components of plasma up to 160 keV per charge state. It is composed by a generating chamber containing an expansion chamber used like first electrode. Next, a second electrode connected to ground and a third electrode connected to negative voltage are used. The third electrode is used also as Faraday cup. By the analysis of the ion signals we studied the plume parameters such as TOF accelerated signals, charge state, and divergence.

  16. High energy photon production in strong colliding laser beams

    E-print Network

    Kuchiev, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The collision of two intense, low-frequency laser beams is considered. The $e^-e^+$ pairs created in this field are shown to exhibit recollisions, which take place at high energy accumulated due to the wiggling of fermions. The resulting $e^-e^+$ annihilation produces high energy photons, or heavy particles. The coherent nature of the laser field provides strong enhancement of the probability of these events. Analytical and numerical results are outlined.

  17. Aspects of Stability Related to the Colliding Beam Fusion = Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michl Binderbauer; Norman Rostoker; Hendrik Monkhorst

    1998-01-01

    Recent experiments with TFTR, D-III-D and JET involving the injection and trapping of low density beams of high energy large orbit ions indicate that large orbit non-adiabatic ions slow down and diffuse classically in the presence of anomalous fluctuations and transport of adiabatic majority particles. Accordingly, we consider conceptual fusion reactors(N. Rostoker, M.W. Binderbauer and H.J. Monkhorst, Science) 278, 1419

  18. Indirectly sensing accelerator beam currents for limiting maximum beam current magnitude

    DOEpatents

    Bogaty, John M. (Lombard, IL); Clifft, Benny E. (Park Forest, IL); Bollinger, Lowell M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1995-01-01

    A beam current limiter for sensing and limiting the beam current in a particle accelerator, such as a cyclotron or linear accelerator, used in scientific research and medical treatment. A pair of independently operable capacitive electrodes sense the passage of charged particle bunches to develop an RF signal indicative of the beam current magnitude produced at the output of a bunched beam accelerator. The RF signal produced by each sensing electrode is converted to a variable DC voltage indicative of the beam current magnitude. The variable DC voltages thus developed are compared to each other to verify proper system function and are further compared to known references to detect beam currents in excess of pre-established limits. In the event of a system malfunction, or if the detected beam current exceeds pre-established limits, the beam current limiter automatically inhibits further accelerator operation. A high Q tank circuit associated with each sensing electrode provides a narrow system bandwidth to reduce noise and enhance dynamic range. System linearity is provided by injecting, into each sensing electrode, an RF signal that is offset from the bunching frequency by a pre-determined beat frequency to ensure that subsequent rectifying diodes operate in a linear response region. The system thus provides a large dynamic range in combination with good linearity.

  19. Indirectly sensing accelerator beam currents for limiting maximum beam current magnitude

    DOEpatents

    Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1995-08-08

    A beam current limiter is disclosed for sensing and limiting the beam current in a particle accelerator, such as a cyclotron or linear accelerator, used in scientific research and medical treatment. A pair of independently operable capacitive electrodes sense the passage of charged particle bunches to develop an RF signal indicative of the beam current magnitude produced at the output of a bunched beam accelerator. The RF signal produced by each sensing electrode is converted to a variable DC voltage indicative of the beam current magnitude. The variable DC voltages thus developed are compared to each other to verify proper system function and are further compared to known references to detect beam currents in excess of pre-established limits. In the event of a system malfunction, or if the detected beam current exceeds pre-established limits, the beam current limiter automatically inhibits further accelerator operation. A high Q tank circuit associated with each sensing electrode provides a narrow system bandwidth to reduce noise and enhance dynamic range. System linearity is provided by injecting, into each sensing electrode, an RF signal that is offset from the bunching frequency by a pre-determined beat frequency to ensure that subsequent rectifying diodes operate in a linear response region. The system thus provides a large dynamic range in combination with good linearity. 6 figs.

  20. Beam Head Erosion in Self-Ionized Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, M.K.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2008-01-28

    In the recent plasma wakefield accelerator experiments at SLAC, the energy of the particles in the tail of the 42 GeV electron beam were doubled in less than one meter [1]. Simulations suggest that the acceleration length was limited by a new phenomenon--beam head erosion in self-ionized plasmas. In vacuum, a particle beam expands transversely in a distance given by {beta}*. In the blowout regime of a plasma wakefield [2], the majority of the beam is focused by the ion channel, while the beam head slowly spreads since it takes a finite time for the ion channel to form. It is observed that in self-ionized plasmas, the head spreading is exacerbated compared to that in pre-ionized plasmas, causing the ionization front to move backward (erode). A simple theoretical model is used to estimate the upper limit of the erosion rate for a bi-gaussian beam by assuming free expansion of the beam head before the ionization front. Comparison with simulations suggests that half this maximum value can serve as an estimate for the erosion rate. Critical parameters to the erosion rate are discussed.

  1. Acceleration of beam ions during major radius compression in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.L.; Bitter, M.; Hammett, G.W.; Heidbrink, W.; Hendel, H.; Kaita, R.; Scott, S.; Strachan, J.D.; Tait, G.; Bell, M.G.

    1985-09-01

    Tangentially co-injected deuterium beam ions were accelerated from 82 keV up to 150 keV during a major radius compression experiment in TFTR. The ion energy spectra and the variation in fusion yield were in good agreement with Fokker-Planck code simulations. In addition, the plasma rotation velocity was observed to rise during compression.

  2. Atomic physics with ion accelerators - Beam-foil spectroscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Martinson; A. Gaupp

    1974-01-01

    A survey is given of research in atomic spectroscopy with accelerated, excited ions (beam-foil spectroscopy). After a short experimental section recent studies of atomic energy levels (particularly multiply excited configurations), radiative transition probabilities, a auto-ionization mechanisms, fine- and hyperfine-structure effects and radiative corrections are summarized.

  3. Emittance growth mechanisms for laser-accelerated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Andreas J; Fuchs, J; Sentoku, Y; Sotnikov, V; Bakeman, M; Antici, P; Cowan, T E

    2007-05-01

    In recent experiments the transverse normalized rms emittance of laser-accelerated MeV ion beams was found to be < 0.002 mm mrad, which is at least 100 times smaller than the emittance of thermal ion sources used in accelerators [T. E. Cowan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801 (2004)]. We investigate the origin for the low emittance of laser-accelerated proton beams by studying several candidates for emittance-growth mechanisms. As our main tools, we use analytical models and one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that have been modified to include binary collisions between particles. We find that the dominant source of emittance is filamentation of the laser-generated hot electron jets that drive the ion acceleration. Cold electron-ion collisions that occur before ions are accelerated contribute less than ten percent of the final emittance. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the experiment, for which we present a refined analysis relating emittance to temperature, a better representative of the fundamental beam physics. PMID:17677176

  4. Emittance growth mechanisms for laser-accelerated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Andreas J. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Fuchs, J.; Antici, P. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-Ecole Polytechnique-Universite Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Sentoku, Y.; Sotnikov, V.; Bakeman, M.; Cowan, T. E. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    In recent experiments the transverse normalized rms emittance of laser-accelerated MeV ion beams was found to be <0.002 mm mrad, which is at least 100 times smaller than the emittance of thermal ion sources used in accelerators [T. E. Cowan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801 (2004)]. We investigate the origin for the low emittance of laser-accelerated proton beams by studying several candidates for emittance-growth mechanisms. As our main tools, we use analytical models and one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that have been modified to include binary collisions between particles. We find that the dominant source of emittance is filamentation of the laser-generated hot electron jets that drive the ion acceleration. Cold electron-ion collisions that occur before ions are accelerated contribute less than ten percent of the final emittance. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the experiment, for which we present a refined analysis relating emittance to temperature, a better representative of the fundamental beam physics.

  5. Performance of the CREAM calorimeter in accelerator beam test

    E-print Network

    Yoon, Y S; Bagliesi, M G; Bigongiari, G; Ganel, O; Han, J H; Hyun, H J; Jeon, J A; Kang, T G; Kim, H J; Kim, K C; Lee, J K; Lee, M H; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Malinine, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Nam, S W; Park, H; Park, I H; Park, N H; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Wu, J; Yang, J; Zei, R; Zinn, S Y

    2010-01-01

    The CREAM calorimeter, designed to measure the spectra of cosmic-ray nuclei from under 1 TeV to 1000 TeV, is a 20 radiation length (X0) deep sampling calorimeter. The calorimeter is comprised of 20 layers of tungsten interleaved with 20 layers of scintillating fiber ribbons, and is preceded by a pair of graphite interaction targets providing about 0.42 proton interaction lengths (\\lambda int). The calorimeter was placed in one of CERN's SPS accelerator beams for calibration and testing. Beams of 150 GeV electrons were used for calibration, and a variety of electron, proton, and nuclear fragment beams were used to test the simulation model of the detector. In this paper we discuss the performance of the calorimeter in the electron beam and compare electron beam data with simulation results.

  6. Beam by design: Laser manipulation of electrons in modern accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsing, Erik; Stupakov, Gennady; Xiang, Dao; Zholents, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    Accelerator-based light sources such as storage rings and free-electron lasers use relativistic electron beams to produce intense radiation over a wide spectral range for fundamental research in physics, chemistry, materials science, biology, and medicine. More than a dozen such sources operate worldwide, and new sources are being built to deliver radiation that meets with the ever-increasing sophistication and depth of new research. Even so, conventional accelerator techniques often cannot keep pace with new demands and, thus, new approaches continue to emerge. In this article, a variety of recently developed and promising techniques that rely on lasers to manipulate and rearrange the electron distribution in order to tailor the properties of the radiation are reviewed. Basic theories of electron-laser interactions, techniques to create microstructures and nanostructures in electron beams, and techniques to produce radiation with customizable waveforms are reviewed. An overview of laser-based techniques for the generation of fully coherent x rays, mode-locked x-ray pulse trains, light with orbital angular momentum, and attosecond or even zeptosecond long coherent pulses in free-electron lasers is presented. Several methods to generate femtosecond pulses in storage rings are also discussed. Additionally, various schemes designed to enhance the performance of light sources through precision beam preparation including beam conditioning, laser heating, emittance exchange, and various laser-based diagnostics are described. Together these techniques represent a new emerging concept of "beam by design" in modern accelerators, which is the primary focus of this article.

  7. Shock accelerated electron beams in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, G.; Klassen, A.

    2002-12-01

    In the solar corona shock waves can be produced by flares and/or coronal mass ejections. Type II radio bursts represent the signature of such shock waves in the solar radio radiation. Shock accelerated electron beams appear as rapidly drifting emission stripes (so-called "herringbones") within type II radio bursts. A large sample of "herringbones" and solar type III radio bursts is statistically analysed concerning their properties in dynamic radio spectra. Type III bursts are regarded as being associated with electron beams immediately generated by the flare process. The analysis shows that the drift rates of "herringbones" are significantly smaller (about one half) than those of type III bursts in the same frequency range. Thus, electron beams related to type III bursts have a higher velocity than those generated by coronal shock waves. The velocity of electron beams associated with "herringbones" is found to be about 30,000 km/s. These beams are considered to be produced by shock drift acceleration. Then, the accelerated electrons establish a shifted loss-cone distribution in the upstream region of the associated shock wave. Such a distribution leads to a plasma instabilities leading to the emission of radio waves as observed as "herringbones".

  8. Rf-driver linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1987-05-01

    The next generation of linear collider after the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) will probably have an energy in the range 300 GeV-1 TeV per linac. A number of exotic accelerating schemes, such as laser and plasma acceleration, have been proposed for linear colliders of the far future. However, the technology which is most mature and which could lead to a collider in the above energy range in the relatively near future is the rf-driven linac, in which externally produced rf is fed into a more or less conventional metallic accelerating structure. Two basic technologies have been proposed for producing the required high peak rf power: discrete microwave power sources, and various two-beam acceleration schemes in which the rf is produced by a high current driving beam running parallel to the main accelerator. The current status of experimental and analytic work on both the discrete source and the two-beam methods for producing rf is discussed. The implications of beam-beam related effects (luminosity, disruption and beamstrahlung) for the design of rf-driven colliders are also considered.

  9. Observation of laser multiple filamentation process and multiple electron beams acceleration in a laser wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Wentao; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Hui; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Zhijun; Qi, Rong; Wang, Cheng; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2013-11-15

    The multiple filaments formation process in the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) was observed by imaging the transmitted laser beam after propagating in the plasma of different density. During propagation, the laser first self-focused into a single filament. After that, it began to defocus with energy spreading in the transverse direction. Two filaments then formed from it and began to propagate independently, moving away from each other. We have also demonstrated that the laser multiple filamentation would lead to the multiple electron beams acceleration in the LWFA via ionization-induced injection scheme. Besides, its influences on the accelerated electron beams were also analyzed both in the single-stage LWFA and cascaded LWFA.

  10. Laser-driven ion acceleration with hollow laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brabetz, C.; Busold, S.; Cowan, T.; Deppert, O.; Jahn, D.; Kester, O.; Roth, M.; Schumacher, D.; Bagnoud, V.

    2015-01-01

    The laser-driven acceleration of protons from thin foils irradiated by hollow high-intensity laser beams in the regime of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) is reported for the first time. The use of hollow beams aims at reducing the initial emission solid angle of the TNSA source, due to a flattening of the electron sheath at the target rear side. The experiments were conducted at the PHELIX laser facility at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH with laser intensities in the range from 1018 W cm-2 to 1020 W cm-2 . We observed an average reduction of the half opening angle by (3.07 ±0.42 )° or (13.2 ±2.0 )% when the targets have a thickness between 12 ?m and 14 ?m. In addition, the highest proton energies were achieved with the hollow laser beam in comparison to the typical Gaussian focal spot.

  11. Acceleration of electrons in strong beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of strong beam-plasma interactions on the electron population of the upper atmosphere have been investigated in an electron acceleration experiment performed with a sounding rocket. The rocket carried the Several Complex Experiments (SCEX) payload which included an electron accelerator, three disposable 'throwaway' detectors (TADs), and a stepped electron energy analyzer. The payload was launched in an auroral arc over the rocket at altitudes of 157 and 178 km, respectively. The performance characteristics of the instruments are discussed in detail. The data are combined with the results of laboratory measurements and show that electrons with energies of at least two and probably four times the injection energy of 2 keV were observed during strong beam-plasma interaction events. The interaction events occurred at pitch angles of 54 and 126 degrees. On the basis of the data it is proposed that the superenergization of the electrons is correlated with the length of the beam-plasma interaction region.

  12. Beam dynamics design for uranium drift tube linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Wei-Ping; He, Yuan; Lu, Yuan-Rong

    2014-07-01

    KONUS beam dynamics design of uranium DTL with LORASR code is presented. The 238U34+ beam, whose current is 5.0 emA, is accelerated from injection energy of 0.35 MeV/u to output energy of 1.30 MeV/u by IH-DTL operated at 81.25 MHz in HIAF project at IMP of CAS. It achieves a transmission efficiency of 94.95% with a cavity length of 267.8 cm. The optimization aims are the reduction of emittance growth, beam loss and project costs. Because of the requirements of CW mode operation, the designed average acceleration gradient is about 2.48 MV/m. The maximum axial field is 10.2 MV/m, meanwhile the Kilpatrick breakdown field is 10.56 MV/m at 81.25 MHz.

  13. Particle-beam accelerators for radiotherapy and radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, T.J.; Crandall, K.R.; Hamm, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    The philosophy used in developing the new PIGMI technology was that the parameters chosen for physics research machines are not necessarily the right ones for a dedicated therapy or radioisotope machine. In particular, the beam current and energy can be optimized, and the design should emphasize minimum size, simplicity and reliability of operation, and economy in capital and operating costs. A major part of achieving these goals lay in raising the operating frequency and voltage gradient of the accelerator, which shrinks the diameter and length of the components. Several other technical innovations resulted in major system improvements. One of these is a radically new type of accelerator structure named the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator. This allowed us to eliminate the large, complicated ion source used in previous ion accelerators, and to achieve a very high quality accelerated beam. Also, by using advanced permanent magnet materials to make the focusing elements, the system becomes much simpler. Other improvements have been made in all of the accelerator components and in the methods for operating them. These will be described, and design and costing information examples given for several possible therapy and radioisotope production machines.

  14. Stochastic heating and acceleration of electrons in colliding laser fields in plasma.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Z-M; Mima, K; Sentoku, Y; Jovanovi?, M S; Taguchi, T; Zhang, J; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J

    2002-02-01

    We propose a mechanism that leads to efficient acceleration of electrons in plasma by two counterpropagating laser pulses. It is triggered by stochastic motion of electrons when the laser fields exceed some threshold amplitudes, as found in single-electron dynamics. It is further confirmed in particle-in-cell simulations. In vacuum or tenuous plasma, electron acceleration in the case with two colliding laser pulses can be much more efficient than with one laser pulse only. In plasma at moderate densities, such as a few percent of the critical density, the amplitude of the Raman-backscattered wave is high enough to serve as the second counterpropagating pulse to trigger the electron stochastic motion. As a result, even with one intense laser pulse only, electrons can be heated up to a temperature much higher than the corresponding laser ponderomotive potential. PMID:11863737

  15. Particle beams in ultrastrong laser fields: direct laser acceleration and radiation reaction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamin, Yousef I.; Li, Jian-Xing; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Tamburini, Matteo; Di Piazza, Antonino; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2015-03-01

    Several aspects of the interaction of particle beams with ultrastrong laser fields are discussed. Firstly, we consider regimes when radiation reaction is not essential and it is demonstrated that employing chirped laser pulses, significant improvement of the direct acceleration of particles can be achieved. Results from single- and many-particle calculations of the particle acceleration, in vacuum, by plane-wave fields, as well as in tightly-focused laser beams, show that the mean energies and their spreads qualify them for important applications. Secondly, we investigate the effect of radiation reaction in electron-laser-beam interactions. Signatures of the quantum radiation reaction during the interaction of an electron bunch with a focused superstrong ultrashort laser pulse can be observed in a characteristic behavior of the spectral bandwidth, and the angular spread of the nonlinear Compton radiation on the laser pulse duration. Furthermore, it is shown that the radiation reaction effects can be employed to control the electron dynamics via the nonlinear interplay between the Lorentz and radiation reaction forces. In particular, it is shown that an ultrarelativistic electron bunch colliding head- on with a strong bichromatic laser pulse can be deflected in a controllable way, by changing either the relative phase or the relative amplitude between the two frequency components of the bichromatic field.

  16. ACCELERATOR RESEARCH STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    P.G. O'Shea, M. Reiser, V. L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, I. Haber, R. Kishek

    2004-01-23

    ACCELERATOR RESEARCH STUDIES Task A: Study of the Physics of Space-Charge Dominated Beams for Advanced Accelerator Applications Task B: Studies of High-Power Gyroklystrons and Application to Linear Colliders Task C: Theory and Simulation of the Physics Space-Charge Dominated Beams Annual Report for the Period June 1, 2003 to May 31, 2004

  17. Sustained Acceleration of Over-dense Plasmas by Colliding Laser Pulses

    E-print Network

    E. Liang

    2006-03-21

    We review recent PIC simulation results which show that double-sided irradiaton of a thin overdense plasma slab by ultra-intense laser pulses from both sides can lead to sustained comoving acceleration of surface electrons to energies much higher than the conventional ponderomotive limit. The acceleration stops only when the electrons drift transversely out of the laser beam. We show results of parameter studies based on this concept and discuss future laser experiments that can be used to test these computer results.

  18. Summary of beam coupling impedance measurements and simulations of collider liner with pumping holes or slots

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, L.; Ruiz, E.D.; Spayd, N.

    1994-04-01

    We report the results of measurements using the wire method and numerical simulations using the code HFSS (High-Frequency Structure Simulator) of the beam coupling impedance of the proposed liner for the collider ring of the SSC. We compare the results of the measurements and simulations to analytical estimates by R. Gluckstern and S. Kurennoy, and conclude that the additional coupling impedance introduced by a liner with pumping holes can be acceptable.

  19. Development of the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) trim coil beam tube assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Skaritka, J.; Kelly, E.; Schneider, W.; Shutt, R.; Thompson, P.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Bintinger, D.; Coluccio, R.; Schieber, L.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider uses approx. =9600 dipole magnets. The magnets have been carefully designed to exhibit minimal magnetic field harmonics. However, because of superconductor magnetization effects, iron saturation and conductor/coil positioning errors, certain harmonic errors are possible and must be corrected by use of multipole correctors called trim coils. For the most efficient use of axial space in the magnet, and lowest possible current, a distributed internal correction coil design is planned. The trim coil assembly is secured to the beam tube, a uhv tube with special strength, size, conductivity and vacuum. The report details the SSC trim coil/beam tube assembly specifications, history, and ongoing development.

  20. UNDULATOR-BASED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M.S.; Fawley, W.M.; Leemans, W. P.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.

    2009-05-04

    to couple the THUNDER undulator to the LOASIS Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Currently the LWFA has achieved quasi-monoenergetic electron beams with energies up to 1 GeV. These ultra-short, high-peak-current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact XUV free electron laser (FEL). Understanding the electron beam properties such as the energy spread and emittance is critical for achieving high quality light sources with high brightness. By using an insertion device such as an undulator and observing changes in the spontaneous emission spectrum, the electron beam energy spread and emittance can be measured with high precision. The initial experiments will use spontaneous emission from 1.5 m of undulator. Later experiments will use up to 5 m of undulator with a goal of a high gain, XUV FEL.

  1. NOTE: Blood irradiation with accelerator produced electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, M. J.; Cheung, T.; Yu, P. K. N.; Stokes, M. J.

    2000-11-01

    Blood and blood products are irradiated with gamma rays to reduce the risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD). A simple technique using electron beams produced by a medical linear accelerator has been studied to evaluate irradiation of blood and blood products. Variations in applied doses for a single field 20 MeV electron beam are measured in a phantom study. Doses have been verified with ionization chambers and commercial diode detectors. Results show that the blood product volume can be given a relatively homogeneous dose to within 6% using 20 MeV electrons without the need to rotate the blood bags or the beam entry point. The irradiation process takes approximately 6.5 minutes for 30 Gy applied dose to complete as opposed to 12 minutes for a dual field x-ray field irradiation at our centre. Electron beams can be used to satisfactorily irradiate blood and blood products in a minimal amount of time.

  2. On Shock Accelerated Electron Beams In The Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, G.; Klassen, A.

    Electron beams accelerated at coronal shock waves appear as rapidly drifting emission stripes (so-called "herringbones") withih solar type II radio bursts. Such shock waves can be produced eihter by flares or by coronal masse ejections. A large sample of solar type III radio bursts and "herringbones" within solar type II radio bursts is statistically analyzed with respect to their properties in dynamic radio spectra. The analysis reveals that the drift rate of the "herringbones" are significanlty smaller (about one half) than those of type III bursts in the same frequency range. Consequently, the electron beams related to type III bursts have a higher velocity than those produced by coronal shock waves. The velocity of electromn beams assiciated with the "herringbones" is deduced to be 40,000 km/s. This result is discussed in terms of the different velocity distribution functions of electron beams associated to type III bursts and "herringbone" bursts.

  3. Beam transportation lines for the NICA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, A.; Angelov, B.; Eliseev, A.; Meshkov, I.; Mikhailov, V.; Sidorin, A.; Topilin, N.; Trubnikov, G.; Tuzikov, A.

    2012-07-01

    A heavy-ion collider, i.e., the Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility (NICA), is being developed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. The aim of this project is to construct a new accelerator complex for conducting experiments with colliding ion beam (at the first stage of the project) and with polarized proton and deuteron beams (at the second stage). The NICA accelerator complex will consist of two linear accelerators, two synchrotrons, two collider rings, and beam transportation lines. The magnetic lattice and diagnostic and correction systems for the NICA beam transportation lines are described in this report.

  4. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams C. B. Schroeder, E of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator-charge force of a charged particle beam. Laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs) were first proposed in 1979

  5. Beam Losses and Background Loads on Collider Detectors Due to Beam-Gas Interactions in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    With a fully-operational high-efficient collimation system in the LHC, nuclear interactions of circulating protons with residual gas in the machine beam pipe can be a major source of beam losses in the vicinity of the collider detectors, responsible for the machine-induced backgrounds. Realistic modeling of Coulomb scattering, elastic and inelastic interactions of 7-TeV protons with nuclei in the vacuum chamber of the cold and warm sections of the LHC ring--with an appropriate pressure profile--is performed with the STRUCT and MARS15 codes. Multi-turn tracking of the primary beams, propagation of secondaries through the lattice, their interception by the tertiary collimators TCT as well as properties of corresponding particle distributions at the CMS and ATLAS detectors are studied in great detail and results presented in this paper.

  6. Accelerator column models for low-current beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoi, D.P.; Allison, P.; Crandall, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes three analytic approaches used to model electrostatic accelerator columns in beam-transport codes for low-current beams and compares the results of each approach with the results obtained by numerically calculating the electric field based on charge distribution on equipotential surfaces. The three analytic approaches described are (1) a cubic energy-gain approximation, (2) a cubic longitudinal electric-field approximation, and (3) the aperture equation. The first two approaches calculate impulse approximations at the apertures, whereas the third is an integration of particle trajectories through the column filed. The conditions under which the solutions tend to break down are discussed. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Low-field permanent magnet quadrupoles in a new relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator design

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Sessler, A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Permanent magnets play a central role in the new relativistic klystron two-beam-accelerator design. The two key goals of this new design, low cost and the suppression of beam break-up instability are both intimately tied to the permanent magnet quadrupole focusing system. A recently completed systems study by a joint LBL-LLNL team concludes that a power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass Next Linear Collider based on the new TBA design can be as low as $1 billion, and the efficiency (wall plug to rf) is estimated to be 36%. End-to-end simulations of longitudinal and transverse beam dynamics show that the drive beam is stable over the entire TBA unit.

  8. High fidelity 3-dimensional models of beam-electron cloud interactions in circular accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiz Zarrin Ghalam, Ali

    Electron cloud is a low-density electron profile created inside the vacuum chamber of circular machines with positively charged beams. Electron cloud limits the peak current of the beam and degrades the beams' quality through luminosity degradation, emittance growth and head to tail or bunch to bunch instability. The adverse effects of electron cloud on long-term beam dynamics becomes more and more important as the beams go to higher and higher energies. This problem has become a major concern in many future circular machines design like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Due to the importance of the problem several simulation models have been developed to model long-term beam-electron cloud interaction. These models are based on "single kick approximation" where the electron cloud is assumed to be concentrated at one thin slab around the ring. While this model is efficient in terms of computational costs, it does not reflect the real physical situation as the forces from electron cloud to the beam are non-linear contrary to this model's assumption. To address the existing codes limitation, in this thesis a new model is developed to continuously model the beam-electron cloud interaction. The code is derived from a 3-D parallel Particle-In-Cell (PIC) model (QuickPIC) originally used for plasma wakefield acceleration research. To make the original model fit into circular machines environment, betatron and synchrotron equations of motions have been added to the code, also the effect of chromaticity, lattice structure have been included. QuickPIC is then benchmarked against one of the codes developed based on single kick approximation (HEAD-TAIL) for the transverse spot size of the beam in CERN-LHC. The growth predicted by QuickPIC is less than the one predicted by HEAD-TAIL. The code is then used to investigate the effect of electron cloud image charges on the long-term beam dynamics, particularly on the transverse tune shift of the beam at CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) ring. The force from the electron cloud image charges on the beam cancels the force due to cloud compression formed on the beam axis and therefore the tune shift is mainly due to the uniform electron cloud density. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  9. Polarized Proton Acceleration in AGS and RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, Thomas [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11793-5000 (United States)

    2008-02-06

    As the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent superconducting rings RHIC has operated with a wide range of beam energies and particle species including polarized proton beams. The acceleration of polarized beams in both the injector and the collider rings is complicated by numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Partial and full Siberian snakes have made it possible to overcome the depolarization and beam polarizations of up to 65% have been reached at 100 GeV in RHIC.

  10. POLARIZED PROTON ACCELERATION IN AGS AND RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.

    2007-09-10

    As the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent superconducting rings RHIC has operated with a wide range of beam energies and particle species including polarized proton beams. The acceleration of polarized beams in both the injector and the collider rings is complicated by numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Partial and full Siberian snakes have made it possible to overcome the depolarization and beam polarizations of up to 65% have been reached at 100 GeV in RHIC.

  11. Microbunching and Beam Break Up in DUV FEL Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shaftan, T.; Carr, L.; Loos, H.; Sheehy, B.; Graves, William S.; Huang, Z.; Limborg, C.G.; /Brookhaven /MIT /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    We present the results of electron beam longitudinal modulation studies in the DUV-FEL accelerator. For bunch length determination we used the 'zero-phasing' method, based on a measurement of the chirped electron bunch energy spectra. The measurements revealed a spiky structure in the longitudinal phase space [1]. A model based on space charge effect is considered [2] to explain of the obtained phenomena. The analysis of the energy spectra has shown a sensitivity of the structure to the electron beam peak current, energy and longitudinal non-uniformity of the RF gun drive laser. Analytical calculations have demonstrated a qualitative agreement with experimental observations. Several experiments have been made to compare with theory; measured results are reviewed in this paper. The obtained effect is briefly discussed in relation to high brightness accelerators.

  12. Trends for Electron Beam Accelerator Applications in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machi, Sueo

    2011-02-01

    Electron beam (EB) accelerators are major pieces of industrial equipment used for many commercial radiation processing applications. The industrial use of EB accelerators has a history of more than 50 years and is still growing in terms of both its economic scale and new applications. Major applications involve the modification of polymeric materials to create value-added products, such as heat-resistant wires, heat-shrinkable sheets, automobile tires, foamed plastics, battery separators and hydrogel wound dressing. The surface curing of coatings and printing inks is a growing application for low energy electron accelerators, resulting in an environmentally friendly and an energy-saving process. Recently there has been the acceptance of the use of EB accelerators in lieu of the radioactive isotope cobalt-60 as a source for sterilizing disposable medical products. Environmental protection by the use of EB accelerators is a new and important field of application. A commercial plant for the cleaning flue gases from a coal-burning power plant is in operation in Poland, employing high power EB accelerators. In Korea, a commercial plant uses EB to clean waste water from a dye factory.

  13. Results of the SINGAP Neutral Beam Accelerator Experiment at JAEA

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, H. P. L. de; Svensson, L. [CEA Cadarache, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Inoue, T.; Taniguchi, M.; Umeda, N.; Kashiwagi, M. [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Fubiani, G. [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE) Universite Paul Sabatier, Bt 3R2, 118 Route de Narbonne (France)

    2009-03-12

    IRFM (CEA Cadarache) and JAEA Naka have entered into a collaboration in order to test a SINGAP accelerator at the JAEA Megavolt Test Facility (MTF) at Naka, Japan. Whereas at the CEA testbed the acceleration current was limited to 0.1 A, at JAEA 0.5 A is available. This allows the acceleration of 15 H- beamlets in SINGAP to be tested and a direct comparison between SINGAP and MAMuG to be made. High-voltage conditioning in the SINGAP configuration has been quite slow, with 581 kV in vacuum achieved after 140 hours of conditioning. With 0.1 Pa of H2 gas present in the accelerator 787 kV could be achieved. The conditioning curve for MAMuG is 200 kV higher. SINGAP beam optics appears in agreement with calculation results. A beamlet divergence better than 5 mrad was obtained. SINGAP accelerates electrons to a higher energy than MAMuG. Measurements of the power intercepted on one of the electron dumps have been compared with EAMCC code calculations. Based on the experiments described here, electron production by a SINGAP accelerator scaled up to ITER size was estimated to be too high for comfort.

  14. Accelerated cone beam CT reconstruction based on OpenCL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bo Wang; Lei Zhu; Kebin Jia; Jie Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Open Computing Language (OpenCL) is a fundamental technology for cross-platform parallel programming. The emerging of OpenCL provides portable and efficient access to the power of modern processors. This revolutionary new technology is applied to accelerate the reconstruction of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) in this paper. An OpenCL-based implementation of the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm is

  15. Negative hydrogen ion source research and beam parameters for accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timofey V. Zolkin

    2006-01-01

    H beams are useful for multi-turn charge-exchange stripping injection into circular accelerators. Studies on a modified ion source for this purpose are presented. This paper includes some theory about a H magnetron discharge, ion-electron emission, emittance and problems linked with emittance measurement and calculations. Investigated parameters of the emittance probe for optimal performance give a screen voltage of 150 V

  16. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K. W.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Fuerst, J. D.; Waldschmidt, G.; Gonin, I. V.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting (SC) accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the U.S. and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front end of such linacs, particularly for the postacceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  17. Beam tube vacuum in low field and high field very large hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.

    1996-10-01

    Bounds on the beam tube gas pressure and the required pumping speed are estimated for {approximately} 2 T low field (LF) and - 12 T high field (HF) 100 TeV center-of-mass hadron colliders. In both cases photodesorption by synchrotron radiation is the dominant source of gas. Assuming beam-gas scattering limited luminosity lifetime five times the IP scattering lifetime, the required CO equivalent beam tube pressure is 0.25 ntorr for LF and 1.8 ntorr for HF, ambient room temperature equivalent. The CO equivalent pumping speeds required to achieve this pressure within a reasonable beam conditioning time (a few tenths of an operational year at design intensity) are estimated to be {approximately} 300 I/s-m for LF and - 40 I/s-m for HF. For the LF case with a superferric warm and a distributed NEG plus lumped ion or cryo pump system is considered. The size of antechamber needed, ID- 6 cm, requires that it be located outside the - 2 cm C-coil magnet gap. Lumped pumps for pumping CH{sub 4} need to be spaced at - 20 in intervals on the antechamber. For the HF case the likely beam tube temperature .is 15-20 K and cryopumping with a beam screen system is considered. The necessary pumping speed can be achieved with slots covering {approximately} 2 per cent of the beam screen surface.

  18. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma

    E-print Network

    C. Labaune; C. Baccou; S. Depierreux; C. Goyon; G. Loisel; V. Yahia; J. Rafelski

    2013-10-08

    The advent of high-intensity pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei, by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments.

  19. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, K. [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Radiation Laboratory, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Kanesue, T. [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Tamura, J. [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  20. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented. PMID:20192366

  1. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Tamura, J.; Okamura, M.

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  2. 600 kV modulator design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.; de Lamare, J.; Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1992-07-01

    Preliminary design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) requires a pulse power source to produce a 600 kV, 600 A, 1.4 {mu}s, 0.1% flat top pulse with rise and fall times of approximately 100 ns to power an X-Band klystron with a microperveance of 1.25 at {approx} 100 MW peak RF power. The design goals for the modulator, including those previously listed, are peak modulator pulse power of 340 MW operating at 120 Hz. A three-stage darlington pulse-forming network, which produces a >100 kV, 1.4 {mu}s pulse, is coupled to the klystron load through a 6:1 pulse transformer. Careful consideration of the transformer leakage inductance, klystron capacitance, system layout, and component choice is necessary to produce the very fast rise and fall times at 600 kV operating continuously at 120 Hz.

  3. Coherent beam-beam effects observation and mitigation at the RHIC collider

    SciTech Connect

    White S.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

    2012-05-20

    In polarized proton operation in RHIC coherent beam-beam modes are routinely observed with beam transfer function measurements in the vertical plane. With the existence of coherent modes a larger space is required in the tune diagram than without them and stable conditions can be compromised for operation with high intensity beams as foreseen for future luminosity upgrades. We report on experiments and simulations carried out to understand the existence of coherent modes in the vertical plane and their absence in the horizontal plane, and investigate possible mitigation strategies.

  4. Experimental characterization of a coaxial plasma accelerator for a colliding plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiechula, J.; Hock, C.; Iberler, M.; Manegold, T.; Schönlein, A.; Jacoby, J.

    2015-04-01

    We report experimental results of a single coaxial plasma accelerator in preparation for a colliding plasma experiment. The utilized device consisted of a coaxial pair of electrodes, accelerating the plasma due to J ×B forces. A pulse forming network, composed of three capacitors connected in parallel, with a total capacitance of 27 ?F was set up. A thyratron allowed to switch the maximum applied voltage of 9 kV. Under these conditions, the pulsed currents reached peak values of about 103 kA. The measurements were performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill at gas pressures between 10 Pa and 14 000 Pa. A gas mixture of ArH2 with 2.8% H2 served as the discharge medium. H2 was chosen in order to observe the broadening of the H? emission line and thus estimate the electron density. The electron density for a single plasma accelerator reached peak values on the order of 1016 cm-3 . Electrical parameters, inter alia inductance and resistance, were determined for the LCR circuit during the plasma acceleration as well as in a short circuit case. Depending on the applied voltage, the inductance and resistance reached values ranging from 194 nH to 216 nH and 13 m? to 23 m?, respectively. Furthermore, the plasma velocity was measured using a fast CCD camera. Plasma velocities of 2 km/s up to 17 km/s were observed, the magnitude being highly correlated with gas pressure and applied voltage.

  5. High-energy lattice for first-beam operation of the SRF test accelerator at NML

    SciTech Connect

    Prokop, C.; /NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, P.; /NICADD, DeKalb /Fermilab; Church, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The Superconducting Radio Frequency Test Accelerator, a linear electron accelerator currently in construction at Fermilab's New Muon Laboratory, will eventually reach energies of {approx} 900 MeV using four ILC-type superconducting accelerating cryomodules. The accelerator's construction is staged according to cryomodules availability. The first phase that will support first beam operation incorporates one cryomodule. In this Note, we summarize a possible design for the first-beam accelerator configuration.

  6. High energy electron beam processing experiments with induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, D. L.; Birx, D. L.; Dave, V. R.

    1995-05-01

    Induction accelerators are capable of producing very high electron beam power for processing at energies of 1-10 MeV. A high energy electron beam (HEEB) material processing system based on all-solid-state induction accelerator technology is in operation at Science Research Laboratory. The system delivers 50 ns 500 A current pulses at 1.5 MeV and is capable of operating at high power (500 kW) and high (˜ 5 kHz) repetition rate. HEEB processing with induction accelerators is useful for a wide variety of applications including the joining of high temperature materials, powder metallurgical fabrication, treatment of organic-contaminated wastewater and the curing of polymer matrix composites. High temperature HEEB experiments at SRL have demonstrated the brazing of carbon-carbon composites to metallic substrates and the melting and sintering of powders for graded-alloy fabrication. Other experiments have demonstrated efficient destruction of low-concentration organic contaminants in water and low temperature free-radical cross-linking of fiber-reinforced composites with acrylated resin matrices.

  7. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  8. Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities in Laser-Accelerated Colliding Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Metzler, N.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Oh, J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Velikovich, A. L.; Zalesak, S. T.; Gardner, J. H.; Harding, E. C.

    2008-11-01

    In our experiments done on the Nike KrF laser, we study instability growth at shock-decelerated interfaces in planar colliding-foil experiments. We use streaked monochromatic (1.86 keV) x-ray face-on imaging diagnostics to measure the areal mass modulation growth caused by the instability. Higher x-ray energies up to 5.25 keV are used to follow the shock propagation as well as the 1D dynamics of the collision. While a laser-driven foil is accelerated towards the stationary low-density foam layer, an ablative RT instability develops. Having reached a high velocity, the foil hits the foam layer. The impact generates strong shocks in the plastic and in the foam. The reflected shock wave re-shocks the ablation front, its acceleration stops, and so does the observed RT growth. This is followed by areal mass oscillations due to the ablative RM instability and feedout mechanisms, of which the latter dominates.

  9. Cold- and Beam Test of the First Prototypes of the Superstructure for the TESLA Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Baboi, Nicoleta

    2003-08-08

    After three years of preparation, two superstructures, each made of two superconducting 7-cell weakly coupled subunits, have been installed in the TESLA Test Facility linac (TTF) for the cold- and beam-test. The energy stability, the HOMs damping, the frequency and the field adjustment methods were tested. The measured results confirmed expectation on the superstructure performance and proved that alternative layout for the 800 GeV upgrade of the TESLA collider, as it was proposed in TDR, is feasible. We report on the test and give here an overview of its results which are commented in more detail elsewhere in these Proceedings.

  10. Beam Slicing for a High-Transformer-Ratio Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Gennady; Stoltz, Peter

    1997-05-01

    Several objectives are important to achieve in a multi-stage plasma wakefield accelerator (PWA): (i) acceleration rate of the witness beam much larger than the deceleration rate of the low-energy drive beam (high transformer ratio) and (ii) high energy efficiency with small beam loading (to insure beam quality). Shaping of the drive beam is one method of achieving high transformer ratio. We propose to use sub-picosecond laser pulses, co-propagating through the plasma with a long, low-energy beam (several plasma wavelengths), to slice out a short (one plasma wavelength) section of the beam; such shaping of the drive beam results in high transformer ratio. The low-energy beam is now split into two: a leading (drive) beam and a trailing (clean-up) beam. High efficiency of energy coupling between the drive beam and witness beam, with low beam loading, can be achieved by recovering the energy of the drive beam with an RF cavity. In the limit of small loading by the witness beam, the clean-up beam recovers all energy in the plasma wake generated by the drive beam. We demonstrate analytically and numerically the plausibility of beam slicing and high transformer ratio acceleration with present-day technologies. A straw-man design for a TeV accelerator is presented and its efficiency estimated. We outline experiments testing these concepts that could be carried out at Fermilab Test Facility and LBNL Beam Test Facility.

  11. Acceleration and stability of a high-current ion beam in induction fields

    SciTech Connect

    Karas', V. I.; Manuilenko, O. V. [National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (Ukraine)] [National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (Ukraine); Tarakanov, V. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperature (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperature (Russian Federation); Federovskaya, O. V. [National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (Ukraine)] [National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (Ukraine)

    2013-03-15

    A one-dimensional nonlinear analytic theory of the filamentation instability of a high-current ion beam is formulated. The results of 2.5-dimensional numerical particle-in-cell simulations of acceleration and stability of an annular compensated ion beam (CIB) in a linear induction particle accelerator are presented. It is shown that additional transverse injection of electron beams in magnetically insulated gaps (cusps) improves the quality of the ion-beam distribution function and provides uniform beam acceleration along the accelerator. The CIB filamentation instability in both the presence and the absence of an external magnetic field is considered.

  12. Niobium resonator development for high-brightness ion beam acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    Two niobium resonant cavities for high-brightness ion beam acceleration have been constructed and tested. The first was based on a coaxial quarter-wave geometry and was optimized for phase velocity {beta}{sub o} = 0.15. This cavity, which resonates at 400 MHz in the fundamental mode, operated at an average (wall-to-wall) accelerating gradient of 12.9 MV/m under continuous-wave (cw) fields. At this gradient, a cavity Q of 1.4 {times} 10{sup 8} was measured. The second was based on a coaxial half-wave geometry and was optimized for {beta}{sub o} = 0.12. This cavity, which resonates at 355 MHz in the fundamental mode, operated at an average accelerating gradient of 18.0 MV/m under cw fields. This is the highest average accelerating gradient achieved to date in low-velocity structures designed for cw operation. At this gradient, a cavity Q of 1.2 {times} 10{sup 8} was measured.

  13. Electron beam dynamics in the DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Epifanio O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Rita [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cook, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esquibel, Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallegos, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garnett, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harrison, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Jeffrey B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jacquez, Edward B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccuistian, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Nicholas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nath, Subrata [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nielsen, Kurt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prichard, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowton, Lawrence [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Manolito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scarpetti, Raymond [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schauer, Martin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seitz, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulze, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bender, Howard A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broste, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frayer, Daniel K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Douglas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tom, C Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trainham, C [NSTEC/STL; Williams, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Genoni, Thomas [VOSS; Hughes, Thomas [VOSS; Toma, Carsten [VOSS

    2008-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) accelerates a 2-kA electron beam to more than 17 MeV. The beam pulse has a greater than 1.5-microsecond flattop region over which the electron kinetic energy is constant to within 1%. The beam dynamics are diagnosed with 21 beam-position monitors located throughout the injector, accelerator, and after the accelerator exit, where we also have beam imaging diagnostics. We discuss the tuning of the injector and accelerator, and present data for the resulting beam dynamics. We discuss the tuning procedures and other methods used to minimize beam motion, which is undesirable for its application as a bremsstrahlung source for multi-pulse radiography of exlosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. We also present beam stability measurements, which we relate to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  14. Longitudinal Coupling Impedance of a Hole In the Accelerator Beam Pipe

    E-print Network

    Kemner, Ken

    Longitudinal Coupling Impedance of a Hole In the Accelerator Beam Pipe Yong-Chul Chae Advanced in the accelerator beam pipe. In various discontinuities such as RF cavities, bellows, and collimators, the coupling of a discontinuity in a typical beam pipe, often imposing a fundamental limitation of the numerical approach

  15. Particle Beam Stability in the Hollow Plasma Channel Wake Field Accelerator

    E-print Network

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Particle Beam Stability in the Hollow Plasma Channel Wake Field Accelerator Carl B. Schroeder1 structure is the transverse instability of the particle beam. INTRODUCTION Plasma-based accelerators have. The electromagnetic wake field response of a hollow plasma channel to a driver (laser or charged particle beam

  16. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED BEAMS USING MULTIPLE STRONG PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.AHRENS,L.BAI,M.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult since depolarizing spin resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions. Using a 20-30% partial Siberian snake both imperfection and intrinsic resonances can be overcome. Such a strong partial Siberian snake was designed for the Brookhaven AGS using a dual pitch helical superconducting dipole. Multiple strong partial snakes are also discussed for spin matching at beam injection and extraction.

  17. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED BEAMS USING MULTIPLE STRONG PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKES.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.; AHRENS,L.; BAI,M.; COURANT,E.; GLENN,J.W.; GUPTA,R.C.; HUANG,H.; LUCCIO,A.U.; MACKAY,W.W.; TSOUPAS,N.; WILLEN,E.; OKAMURA,M.; TAKANO,J.

    2004-10-10

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult since depolarizing spin resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions. Using a 20-30% partial Siberian snake both imperfection and intrinsic resonances can be overcome. Such a strong partial Siberian snake was designed for the Brookhaven AGS using a dual pitch helical superconducting dipole. Multiple strong partial snakes are also discussed for spin matching at beam injection and extraction.

  18. Imaging by injection of accelerated radioactive particle beams.

    PubMed

    Llacer, J; Chatterjee, A; Alpen, E L; Saunders, W; Andreae, S; Jackson, H C

    1984-01-01

    The process of imaging by detection of the annihilation gamma rays generated from positron emitters which have been injected into a patient by a particle accelerator has been studied in detail. The relationships between patient dose and injected activity have been calculated for C-11, N-13, C-15, F-17, and Ne-19 and measured for C-11 and Ne-19 with good agreement with the calculations. The requirements for imaging of the small amounts of activity that can be injected safely have been analyzed in terms of one specific application of the radioactive beam injection technique, that of Bragg peak localization in support of radiotherapy by heavy ions. The characteristics of an existing camera with sufficient sensitivity and spatial accuracy for that task are described. Results of the calculations of radioactive beam flux requirements are shown. PMID:18234615

  19. Beam-induced Electron Loading Effects in High Pressure Cavities for a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Tollestrup, A.; Jansson, A.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab; Insepov, Z.; /Argonne

    2010-05-01

    Ionization cooling is a critical building block for the realization of a muon collider. To suppress breakdown in the presence of the external magnetic field, an idea of using an RF cavity filled with high pressure hydrogen gas is being considered for the cooling channel design. One possible problem expected in the high pressure RF cavity is, however, the dissipation of significant RF power through the beam-induced electrons accumulated inside the cavity. To characterize this detrimental loading effect, we develop a simplified model that relates the electron density evolution and the observed pickup voltage signal in the cavity, with consideration of several key molecular processes such as the formation of the polyatomic molecules, recombination and attachment. This model is expected to be compared with the actual beam test of the cavity in the MuCool Test Area (MTA) of Fermilab.

  20. Vacuum electron acceleration and bunch compression by a flat-top laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Wang, P. X.; Ho, Y. K.; Kong, Q.; Gu, Y.; Wang, S. J.

    2007-09-01

    The field intensity distribution and phase velocity characteristics of a flat-top laser beam are analyzed and discussed. The dynamics of electron acceleration in this kind of beam are investigated using three-dimensional test particle simulations. Compared with the standard (i.e., TEM00 mode) Gaussian beam, a flat-top laser beam has a stronger longitudinal electric field and a larger diffraction angle. These characteristics make it easier for electrons to be trapped and accelerated by the beam. With a flat-top shape, the laser beam is also applicable to the acceleration of low energy electron and bunch compression.

  1. Performance and beam characteristics of the Siemens Primus linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Sontag, M R; Steinberg, T H

    1999-05-01

    Siemens Primus is a small footprint, klystron driven medical linear accelerator incorporating a compact solid state modulator. A double focused multileaf collimator (MLC) replaces the lower jaw. The first Primus in the world was installed at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in early 1997 with x-ray energies of 6 and 15 MV and electron energies of 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, and 21 MeV. The 10 cm depth dose for a 100 cm SSD 10 X 10 cm2 beam is 68% and 77% for 6 and 15 MV x rays, respectively. For both x-ray energies, beam flatness is slightly better than the manufacturers specification of 3% and beam symmetry is considerably better than 1%. The double focus design of the MLC produces a sharp penumbra (5-7 mm at 6 MV and 6-8 mm at 15 MV), increasing modestly with beam size. MLC leaf leakage is less than 1.25%. The depths of the 80% depth dose for the six electron energies of 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, and 21 MeV are 2.6, 3.2, 4.0, 4.9, 6.0, and 7.4 cm, respectively. Beam flatness is typically 2%-3% for all electron energies except 21 MeV, where it reaches 4% for a 25 X 25 cm2 cone. Electron beam symmetry is better than 1% for all energies except 21 MeV, where it is equal to 1%. The results are stored electronically and may be retrieved using anonymous ftp from the American Institute of Physics, Physics Auxiliary Publication Service. PMID:10360534

  2. Levy-Student distributions for halos in accelerator beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cufaro Petroni, Nicola; De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Matematica dell'Universita di Bari and INFN Sezione di Bari, via E. Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Salerno, INFM Unita di Salerno, and INFN Sezione di Napoli Gruppo collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy)

    2005-12-15

    We describe the transverse beam distribution in particle accelerators within the controlled, stochastic dynamical scheme of stochastic mechanics (SM) which produces time reversal invariant diffusion processes. This leads to a linearized theory summarized in a Schroedinger-like (SL) equation. The space charge effects have been introduced in recent papers by coupling this S-L equation with the Maxwell equations. We analyze the space-charge effects to understand how the dynamics produces the actual beam distributions, and in particular we show how the stationary, self-consistent solutions are related to the (external and space-charge) potentials both when we suppose that the external field is harmonic (constant focusing), and when we a priori prescribe the shape of the stationary solution. We then proceed to discuss a few other ideas by introducing generalized Student distributions, namely, non-Gaussian, Levy infinitely divisible (but not stable) distributions. We will discuss this idea from two different standpoints: (a) first by supposing that the stationary distribution of our (Wiener powered) SM model is a Student distribution; (b) by supposing that our model is based on a (non-Gaussian) Levy process whose increments are Student distributed. We show that in the case (a) the longer tails of the power decay of the Student laws and in the case (b) the discontinuities of the Levy-Student process can well account for the rare escape of particles from the beam core, and hence for the formation of a halo in intense beams.

  3. Lévy-Student distributions for halos in accelerator beams.

    PubMed

    Cufaro Petroni, Nicola; De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2005-12-01

    We describe the transverse beam distribution in particle accelerators within the controlled, stochastic dynamical scheme of stochastic mechanics (SM) which produces time reversal invariant diffusion processes. This leads to a linearized theory summarized in a Schrödinger-like (SL) equation. The space charge effects have been introduced in recent papers by coupling this S-L equation with the Maxwell equations. We analyze the space-charge effects to understand how the dynamics produces the actual beam distributions, and in particular we show how the stationary, self-consistent solutions are related to the (external and space-charge) potentials both when we suppose that the external field is harmonic (constant focusing), and when we a priori prescribe the shape of the stationary solution. We then proceed to discuss a few other ideas by introducing generalized Student distributions, namely, non-Gaussian, Lévy infinitely divisible (but not stable) distributions. We will discuss this idea from two different standpoints: (a) first by supposing that the stationary distribution of our (Wiener powered) SM model is a Student distribution; (b) by supposing that our model is based on a (non-Gaussian) Lévy process whose increments are Student distributed. We show that in the case (a) the longer tails of the power decay of the Student laws and in the case (b) the discontinuities of the Lévy-Student process can well account for the rare escape of particles from the beam core, and hence for the formation of a halo in intense beams. PMID:16486070

  4. Progress on the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D E; Eylon, S; Henestroza,E; Houck, T L; S M, Lidia; Vanecek, D L; Westenskow, G A; Yu, S S

    1998-07-05

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, l-MeV, electron induction prototype injector as a collaborative effort between LBL and LLNL. The electron source will be a 3.5"-diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 120-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 200 {pi}-mm-mr. Planned diagnostics include an isolated cathode with resistive divider for direct measurement of current emission, resistive-wall and magnetic probe current monitors for measuring beam current and centroid position, capacitive probes for measuring A-K gap voltage, an energy spectrometer, and a pepper-pot emittance diagnostic. Details of the injector, beam line, and diagnostics are presented.

  5. Progress on the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westenskow, G. A.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Houck, T. L.; Lidia, S. M.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S.

    1999-07-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, electron induction prototype injector as a collaborative effort between LBL and LLNL. The electron source will be a 3.5?-diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 120-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 200 ?-mm-mr. Planned diagnostics include an isolated cathode with resistive divider for direct measurement of current emission, resistive-wall and magnetic probe current monitors for measuring beam current and centroid position, capacitive probes for measuring A-K gap voltage, an energy spectrometer, and a pepper-pot emittance diagnostic. Details of the injector, beam line, and diagnostics are presented.

  6. Progress on the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G. A.; Houck, T. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S. M.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1999-07-12

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, electron induction prototype injector as a collaborative effort between LBL and LLNL. The electron source will be a 3.5''-diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 120-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 200 {pi}-mm-mr. Planned diagnostics include an isolated cathode with resistive divider for direct measurement of current emission, resistive-wall and magnetic probe current monitors for measuring beam current and centroid position, capacitive probes for measuring A-K gap voltage, an energy spectrometer, and a pepper-pot emittance diagnostic. Details of the injector, beam line, and diagnostics are presented.

  7. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Sc?rer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin, S Mangles, L O Silva, R Fonseca and P A Norreys Electro-optic shocks from blowout laser wakefields D F Gordon, A Ting, M H Helle, D Kaganovich and B Hafizi Onset of self-steepening of intense laser pulses in plasmas J Vieira, F Fiúza, L O Silva, M Tzoufras and W B Mori Analysis of laser wakefield dynamics in capillary tubes N E Andreev, K Cassou, F Wojda, G Genoud, M Burza, O Lundh, A Persson, B Cros, V E Fortov and C-G Wahlstrom Characterization of the beam loading effects in a laser plasma accelerator C Rechatin, J Faure, X Davoine, O Lundh, J Lim, A Ben-Ismaïl, F Burgy, A Tafzi, A Lifschitz, E Lefebvre and V Malka Energy gain scaling with plasma length and density in the plasma wakefield accelerator P Muggli, I Blumenfeld, C E Clayton, F J Decker, M J Hogan, C Huang, R Ischebeck, R H Iverson, C Joshi, T Katsouleas, N Kirby, W Lu, K A Marsh, W B Mori, E Oz, R H Siemann, D R Walz and M Zhou Generation of tens of GeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beams from a moving double layer formed by ultraintense lasers at intensity 1021-1023Wcm-2 Lu-Le Yu, Han Xu, Wei-Min Wang, Zheng-Ming Sheng, Bai-Fei Shen, Wei Yu and Jie Zhang Carbon ion acceleration from thin foil targets irradiated by ultrahigh-contrast, ultraintense laser pulses D C Carroll, O Tresca, R Prasad, L Romagnani, P S Foster, P Gallegos, S Ter-Avetisyan, J S Green, M J V Streeter, N Dover, C A J Palmer, C M Brenner, F H Cameron, K E Quinn, J Schreiber, A P L Robinson, T Baeva, M N Quinn, X H Yuan, Z Najmudin, M Zepf, D Neely, M Borghesi and P McKenna Numerical modelling of a 10-cm-long multi-GeV laser wakefield accelerator driven by a self-guided petawatt pulse S Y Kalmykov, S A Yi, A Beck, A F Lifschitz, X Davoine, E Lefebvre, A Pukhov, V Khudik, G Shvets, S A Reed, P Dong, X Wang, D Du, S Bedacht, R Zgadzaj, W Henderson, A Bernstein, G Dyer, M Martinez, E Gaul, T Ditmire and M C Downer Effects of laser prepulses on laser-induced proton generation D Batani, R Jafer, M Veltcheva, R Dezulian, O Lundh, F Lindau, A Persson, K Osvay, C-G Wahlström, D C Carroll, P McKenna, A Flacco and V Malka Proton accelerati

  8. Design study of low energy beam transport line for ion beams of the post-accelerator at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yumi; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-07-01

    Low-energy ions produced by the ion source pass through the focusing and acceleration sections. During this process, the ions accumulate energy and are finally transported to the apparatus that utilizes them for a specific purpose. Thus, in order to increase the transmission efficiency of the ion beams, the low energy beam transport (LEBT) system must minimize the beam loss and the emittance growth. The LEBT system is designed and optimized to transmit 132Sn16+ and 58Ni8+ beams of the post-accelerator at RAON that is the accelerator complex for the rare isotope science. The post-accelerator LEBT line comprises solenoids and electrostatic quadrupoles for transverse focusing and a multi-harmonic buncher for longitudinal focusing. This paper presents the results of the optical design and beam tracking for the post-accelerator LEBT obtained by using TraceWIN and TRACK codes.

  9. An epithermal neutron beam from the MURR and from an accelerator source compared to the beam at the BMRR

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.B.; Brugger, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    An ideal neutron beam for BNCT is a beam of epithermal neutrons, forward directed, and free of gamma rays and thermal and fast neutrons. Three neutron beams were evaluated, and compared: (1) the operating Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) epithermal beam, (2) the designed Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) epithermal beam, and (3) the accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam designed by Wu. These neutron beams were compared with respect to the neutron spectra, neutron and gamma fluxes and doses, and beam directionality. The epithermal neutron beams were inter-compared for different beam parameters in air at the irradiation point. The BMRR beam has the highest neutron plus gamma doses per epithermal neutron among these neutron beams but is satisfactory for patient trials by BNCT at the present time. The RBE dose delivered to the normal brain reaches the tolerance dose limit before the skin RBE dose reaches its limit, so the skin dose can be controlled under the limit. Generally speaking, a treatment can be completed in 54 minutes using the BMRR beam for irradiation at a full-power operation of the reactor. The MURR beam has better beam parameters, including lower neutron and gamma doses per epithermal neutron, higher in intensity, and also directed. The irradiation time could be 5 minutes to complete a treatment. The accelerator-based neutron beam which has shown promising beam parameters similar to the BMRR beam could be a choice in hospitals. However, a complete system at the required power has not yet been demonstrated.

  10. An epithermal neutron beam from the MURR and from an accelerator source compared to the beam at the BMRR

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.B.; Brugger, R.M.

    1992-12-31

    An ideal neutron beam for BNCT is a beam of epithermal neutrons, forward directed, and free of gamma rays and thermal and fast neutrons. Three neutron beams were evaluated, and compared: (1) the operating Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) epithermal beam, (2) the designed Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) epithermal beam, and (3) the accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam designed by Wu. These neutron beams were compared with respect to the neutron spectra, neutron and gamma fluxes and doses, and beam directionality. The epithermal neutron beams were inter-compared for different beam parameters in air at the irradiation point. The BMRR beam has the highest neutron plus gamma doses per epithermal neutron among these neutron beams but is satisfactory for patient trials by BNCT at the present time. The RBE dose delivered to the normal brain reaches the tolerance dose limit before the skin RBE dose reaches its limit, so the skin dose can be controlled under the limit. Generally speaking, a treatment can be completed in 54 minutes using the BMRR beam for irradiation at a full-power operation of the reactor. The MURR beam has better beam parameters, including lower neutron and gamma doses per epithermal neutron, higher in intensity, and also directed. The irradiation time could be 5 minutes to complete a treatment. The accelerator-based neutron beam which has shown promising beam parameters similar to the BMRR beam could be a choice in hospitals. However, a complete system at the required power has not yet been demonstrated.

  11. Performance Modeling and Optimization of a High Energy CollidingBeam Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Qiang, Ji; Bailey, David H.; Yelick, Kathy

    2006-06-01

    An accurate modeling of the beam-beam interaction is essential to maximizing the luminosity in existing and future colliders. BeamBeam3D was the first parallel code that can be used to study this interaction fully self-consistently on high-performance computing platforms. Various all-to-all personalized communication (AAPC) algorithms dominate its communication patterns, for which we developed a sequence of performance models using a series of micro-benchmarks. We find that for SMP based systems the most important performance constraint is node-adapter contention, while for 3D-Torus topologies good performance models are not possible without considering link contention. The best average model prediction error is very low on SMP based systems with of 3% to 7%. On torus based systems errors of 29% are higher but optimized performance can again be predicted within 8% in some cases. These excellent results across five different systems indicate that this methodology for performance modeling can be applied to a large class of algorithms.

  12. On the development of an ion-beam stochastic cooling system for the nuclotron superconducting accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobets, A. G.; Sidorin, A. O.; Trubnikov, G. V.; Shurkhno, N. A.

    2012-07-01

    The Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) initiated the creation of a unique heavy-ion collider, the Nuclotron-based ion collider facility (NICA), which is planned to be put into commission in 2016. According to the calculation data, the collider luminosity, which should be kept at a record high level of 1027 cm-2 s-1, will gradually decrease, mainly due to intrabeam scattering. To maintain luminosity at a high level, it is necessary to include a cooling system in the base project of the accelerator. Among the two cooling methods (electron and stochastic) most frequently used for heavy ion beams, stochastic cooling seems more attractive. However, there has been a lack of experience in the development and commissioning of such systems in Russia. For this reason, an experiment on stochastic cooling on the Nuclotron accelerator is being prepared to explore the technology and possibilities of this method. In this work, the method of stochastic cooling, the technique for calculating the cooling dynamics, and the experimental setup under development are briefly described.

  13. Beam Polarization at the ILC: the Physics Impact and the Accelerator Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Aurand, B.; /Bonn U.; Bailey, I.; /Liverpool U.; Bartels, C.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen; Brachmann, A.; /SLAC; Clarke, J.; /Daresbury; Hartin, A.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Oxford U., JAI; Hauptman, J.; /Iowa State U.; Helebrant, C.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen; Hesselbach, S.; /Durham U., IPPP; Kafer, D.; List, J.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen; Lorenzon, W.; /Michigan U.; Marchesini, I.; Monig, Klaus; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen; Moffeit, K.C.; /SLAC; Moortgat-Pick, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Riemann, S.; Schalicke, A.; Schuler, P.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen; Starovoitov, P.; /Minsk, NCPHEP; Ushakov, A.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Bonn U. /SLAC

    2011-11-23

    In this contribution accelerator solutions for polarized beams and their impact on physics measurements are discussed. Focus are physics requirements for precision polarimetry near the interaction point and their realization with polarized sources. Based on the ILC baseline programme as described in the Reference Design Report (RDR), recent developments are discussed and evaluated taking into account physics runs at beam energies between 100 GeV and 250 GeV, as well as calibration runs on the Z-pole and options as the 1TeV upgrade and GigaZ. The studies, talks and discussions presented at this conference demonstrated that beam polarization and its measurement are crucial for the physics success of any future linear collider. To achieve the required precision it is absolutely decisive to employ multiple devices for testing and controlling the systematic uncertainties of each polarimeter. The polarimetry methods for the ILC are complementary: with the upstream polarimeter the measurements are performed in a clean environment, they are fast and allow to monitor time-dependent variations of polarization. The polarimeter downstream the IP will measure the disrupted beam resulting in high background and much lower statistics, but it allows access to the depolarization at the IP. Cross checks between the polarimeter results give redundancy and inter-calibration which is essential for high precision measurements. Current plans and issues for polarimeters and also energy spectrometers in the Beam Delivery System of the ILC are summarized in reference [28]. The ILC baseline design allows already from the beginning the operation with polarized electrons and polarized positrons provided the spin rotation and the fast helicity reversal for positrons will be implemented. A reversal of the positron helicity significantly slower than that of electrons is not recommended to not compromise the precision and hence the success of the ILC. Recently to use calibration data at the Z resonance for physics has been discussed. It looks promising but further studies are needed to evaluate and to optimize these measurements. Finally it should be remarked: many studies on different physics processes and scenarios at a future linear collider are done for high luminosities and high energy assuming small and well-known uncertainties. Polarization, especially positron polarization, is often considered as not that important. But in order to interpret data and to reduce ambiguities in the measurements, the polarization of electrons and positrons and their very precise knowledge are essential. The ILC design must offer this from the beginning to be prepared for the physics questions after years of LHC operation.

  14. Environmental radiation effects from muon and tau colliders and their impact on facility licensing.

    PubMed

    Bevelacqua, J J

    2012-11-01

    Although contemporary accelerators only affect their local radiation environment, muon and tau colliders produce radiation profiles that extend far beyond their site boundaries. These radiation profiles affect the licensing and siting of these planned accelerators. The analysis presented herein suggests that a linear collider concept with the lepton beams collided in air offers a means to limit the environmental radiation effects from these accelerators. PMID:22721942

  15. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  16. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2010-11-04

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  17. Beam losses from ultra-peripheral nuclear collisions between $^{208}$Pb$^{82+}$ ions in the Large Hadron Collider and their alleviation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Bruce; S. Gildardoni; J Jowett; D Bocian

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between colliding heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will give rise to localized beam losses that may quench superconducting magnets, apart from contributing significantly to the luminosity decay. To quantify their impact on the operation of the collider, we have used a three-step simulation approach, which consists of optical tracking, a Monte-Carlo shower simulation

  18. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitor Systems for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Guaglio, G. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23. Switzerland (Switzerland); Universite Blaise Pascal, 34 avenue Carnot, BP 185, F-63006 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Dehning, B. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23. Switzerland (Switzerland); Santoni, C. [Universite Blaise Pascal, 34 avenue Carnot, BP 185, F-63006 Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2005-06-08

    The increase of beam energy and beam intensity, together with the use of super conducting magnets, opens new failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole accelerator protection system. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system, and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particles losses at 7 TeV and assisted by the Fast Beam Current Decay Monitors at 450 GeV. At medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data has been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis spaces from the components data to the system configuration.

  19. The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator : diagnostics and beam characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Li, X.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Barov, N.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of California at Los Angeles

    1998-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is comprised of two L-band photocathode RF guns and standing wave linac structures. The high charge bunches (20- 100 nC) produced by the main gun (drive gun) allow us to study the generation of wakefields in dielectric lined structures and plasmas. The secondary gun (witness gun) generates low charge bunches (80- 300 pC) that are used to probe the wakefields excited by the drive bunches. We use insertable phosphor screens for beam position monitoring. Beam intensity is measured with Faraday cups and integrating current transformers. Quartz or aerogel Cerenkov radiators are used in conjunction with a Hamamatsu streak-camera for bunch length measurements. The beam emittance is measured with a pepper-pot plate and also by quadrupole scan techniques. We present a description of the various diagnostics and the results of the measurements. These measurements are of particular interest for the high current (drive) linac, which operates in a much higher charge regime than other photoinjector-based linacs.

  20. The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator: Diagnostics and Beam Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Li, X.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Barov, N.

    1997-05-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is comprised of two L-band photocathode RF guns and standing wave linac structures. The high charge bunches (20 - 100 nC) produced by the main gun (drive gun) allow us to study the generation of wakefields in dielectric lined structures and plasmas. The secondary gun (witness gun) generates low charge bunches (80 - 300 pC) that are used to probe the wakefields excited by the drive bunches. We use insertable phosphor screens for beam position monitoring. Beam intensity is measured with Faraday cups and integrating current transformers. Quartz or aerogel Cherenkov radiators are used in conjunction with a Hamamatsu streak-camera for bunch length measurements. The beam emittance is measured by using a pepper-pot plate and also by quadrupole scan techniques. We will present a description of the various diagnostics and the results of the measurements. These measurements are of particular interest for the high current (drive) linac, which operates in a much higher charge regime than other photoinjector-based linacs.

  1. Neutrino factory and beta beam: accelerator options for future neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2012-06-03

    Two accelerator options for producing intense neutrino beams a Neutrino Factory based on stored muon beams and a Beta Beam facility based on stored beams of beta unstable ions are described. Technical challenges for each are described and current R&D efforts aimed at mitigating these challenges are indicated. Progress is being made in the design of both types of facility, each of which would extend the state-of-the-art in accelerator science.

  2. Particle acceleration fields derived from a wavefront-divided laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. C.

    1998-12-01

    In a crossed-laser-beam linear accelerator, the longitudinal acceleration field is obtained by crossing two fundamental Gaussian laser beams with a ? phase difference from one another. We show by numerical calculation that a comparable acceleration field can be obtained by crossing two half-Gaussian laser beams wavefront-divided from a fundamental Gaussian laser beam. Since the relative phase between the two wavefront-divided, half-Gaussian beams is determined by a dielectric step at the splitting point, the ? relative phase can be preserved even though background acoustic noises are present.

  3. Modification & alignment of beam line of 10 MeV RF electron beam accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnwal, R.; Ghodke, S. R.; Bhattacharjee, D.; Kumar, M.; Jayaprakash, D.; Chindarkar, A. R.; Mishra, R. L.; Dolas, S.; Kulkarni, S. Y.; Kumar, M.; P, Dixit K.; S, Acharya; Barje, S. R.; Lawangare, N. K.; C, Saroj P.; Nimje, V. T.; Chandan, S.; Tillu, A. R.; V, Sharma; Chavan, R. B.; V, Yadav; P, Roychowdhury; Mittal, K. C.; Chakravarthy, D. P.; Ray, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    A 10 MeV, 10 kW RF industrial Electron linac designed and developed at BARC is installed at the Electron Beam Center Kharghar, Navi Mumbai. The entire RF accelerator assembly consists of Electron gun, RF source, RF linac structure, Beam diagnostic chamber, Drift tube, Scanning magnet, Beam sensing aperture, Scan horn, and is spread over two floors at EBC. The paper discusses in detail about the alignment procedure adopted for the equipments of 10 MeV RF beamline. The complete electron beamline will be maintained under ultra high vacuum of the order of 10-7 torr. The paper discusses about the present problem of alignment, measurement technique of alignment, reason for misalignment, possible ways to solve the problem, equipment used for alignment, supports & arrestors, verification of alignment under vacuum

  4. Beam-Beam Interaction at the PEP-II E+ E- Collider

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Seeman; M. Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    The PEP-II B-Factory at SLAC (3.1 GeV e{sup +} x 9.0 GeV e⁻) operated from 1999 to 2008, delivering luminosity to the BaBar experiment. The design luminosity was reached after one and a half years of operation. PEP-II ultimately surpassed by four times its design luminosity reaching 1.21 x 10³⁴ cm⁻² s⁻¹. It also set world records for stored beam

  5. H-mode accelerating structures with PMQ focusing for low-beta ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olivas, Eric R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Such IH-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications, e.g. a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the energy of several MeV. Results of combined 3-D modeling for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank - electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis - are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best beam propagation using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. A cold model of the IH-PMQ tank is being manufactured.

  6. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Guaglio, G. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); UNIVERSITE BLAISE PASCAL, 34 avenue Carnot BP 185, 63006 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Dehning, B. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Santoni, C. [UNIVERSITE BLAISE PASCAL, 34 avenue Carnot BP 185, 63006 Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2004-11-10

    The employment of superconducting magnets in high energy colliders opens challenging failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole system protection. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particle losses, while at medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data have been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis ranges from the components data to the system configuration.

  7. Spin transport and polarimetry in the beam delivery system of the international linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, M.; List, J.; Vauth, A.; Vormwald, B.

    2014-07-01

    Polarised electron and positron beams are key ingredients to the physics programme of future linear colliders. Due to the chiral nature of weak interactions in the Standard Model — and possibly beyond — the knowledge of the luminosity-weighted average beam polarisation at the e+e- interaction point is of similar importance as the knowledge of the luminosity and has to be controlled to permille-level precision in order to fully exploit the physics potential. The current concept to reach this challenging goal combines measurements from Laser-Compton polarimeters before and after the interaction point with measurements at the interaction point. A key element for this enterprise is the understanding of spin-transport effects between the polarimeters and the interaction point as well as collision effects. We show that without collisions, the polarimeters can be cross-calibrated to 0.1 %, and we discuss in detail the impact of collision effects and beam parameters on the polarisation value relevant for the interpretation of the e+e- collision data.

  8. Beam Slicing for a High-Transformer-Ratio Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshkovich, Emil; Shvets, Gennady; Stoltz, Peter H.

    1997-11-01

    Two characteristics of a successful plasma wakefield accelerator are: (i) the acceleration rate of the witness beam is much than the deceleration rate of the drive beam (high transformer ratio), and (ii) high energy efficiency with small beam loading to insure beam quality. Low transformer ratio is an inherent problem with plasma wakefield accelerators; one way to increase the transformer ratio is with pulse shaping of the drive beam. We propose to slice out a short (one plasma wavelength) section of a low-energy beam many plasma wavelengths long by using a sub-picosecond laser pulse, co-propagating through the plasma with the beam. As a result of the slicing, the low-energy beam is split into two: a leading (drive) beam and a trailing (clean-up) beam. We derive requirements on laser intensity and plasma density for slicing a given fraction of the beam electrons and show these are achievable with present-day technologies. The presence of the clean-up beam results in high energy efficiency, as the energy in the clean-up beam can be recovered with an RF cavity. We have developed a novel numerical code which treats the beams kinetically and the plasma as a fluid to simulate beam slicing and multi-stage TeV acceleration.

  9. Characteristics of the photon beam from a new 25-MV linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, J E; Andrew, J W; Michaels, H B; O'Brien, P F

    1985-01-01

    The Therac 25 is a relatively compact therapy machine, the heart of which is a double-pass electron linear accelerator. The electron beam is injected into the accelerator at the treatment head end of the machine and is accelerated back down the arm to an energy of 13 MeV. At this end of the machine a magnet system reflects the beam back into the structure where it gains up to an additional 12 MeV of energy. After leaving the linear accelerator the beam is bent by an achromatic head magnet through 270 degrees to the treatment head. The machine produces eight electron beams and a 25-MV photon beam. In this work only the parameters of the photon beam are addressed based on measurements at the first two clinical sites. Percentage depth doses, tissue phantom ratios, and beam symmetry and stability are presented and discussed. PMID:4046997

  10. METHOD OF PRODUCING AND ACCELERATING AN ION BEAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method of producing and accelerating an ion beam comprising the steps of providing a magnetic field with a cusp that opens in an outward direction along a centerline that passes through a vertex of the cusp: providing an ionizing gas that sprays outward through at least one capillary-like orifice in a plenum that is positioned such that the orifice is on the centerline in the cusp, outward of the vortex of the cusp; providing a cathode electron source, and positioning it outward of the orifice and off of the centerline; and positively charging the plenum relative to the cathode electron source such that the plenum functions as m anode. A hot filament may be used as the cathode electron source, and permanent magnets may be used to provide the magnetic field.

  11. Effect of Field Errors in Muon Collider IR Magnets on Beam Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    In order to achieve peak luminosity of a Muon Collider (MC) in the 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} range very small values of beta-function at the interaction point (IP) are necessary ({beta}* {le} 1 cm) while the distance from IP to the first quadrupole can not be made shorter than {approx}6 m as dictated by the necessity of detector protection from backgrounds. In the result the beta-function at the final focus quadrupoles can reach 100 km making beam dynamics very sensitive to all kind of errors. In the present report we consider the effects on momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture of multipole field errors in the body of IR dipoles as well as of fringe-fields in both dipoles and quadrupoles in the ase of 1.5 TeV (c.o.m.) MC. Analysis shows these effects to be strong but correctable with dedicated multipole correctors.

  12. Gas delivery system and beamline studies for the test beam facility of the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    E-print Network

    Franke, Henry Gerhart

    1987-01-01

    of the Collider Detector at Fermilab. (December 1987) Henry Gerhart Franke III, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Thomas Meyer A fixed-target test beam facility hss been designed and constructed at the Meson Test (MT) site... of the MT beamline to meet the needs of CDF. Analysis of the preliminary performance data on MT beamline components and beam tunes at required particle energies is presented. Preliminary studies show that the MT beamline has the necessary flexibility...

  13. ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) ion source beams for accelerator applications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B.; Cornelius, W.D.

    1987-01-01

    Reliable, easily operated ion sources are always in demand for accelerator applications. This paper reports on a systematic study of ion-beam characterisrtics and optimization of beam quality for production of light ion beams in an ECR ion source. Of particular interest is the optimization of beam brightness (defined as ion current divided by the square of the emittance), which is typically used as a figure-of-merit for accelerator-quality beams. Other areas to be discussed include the measurement of beam emittance values, the effects of various source parameters on emittances, and scaling effects from operating the same ECR source at different frequencies. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Means and method for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W. (East Moriches, NY)

    1983-07-05

    A novel apparatus and method for focussing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The quadrupole arrays may comprise electrodes which are shared by two or more quadrupoles. Such quadrupole arrays are particularly adapted to providing strong focussing forces for high current, high brightness, beams of charged particles, said beams further comprising a plurality of parallel beams, or beamlets, each such beamlet being focussed by one quadrupole of the array. Such arrays may be incorporated in various devices wherein beams of charged particles are accelerated or transported, such as linear accelerators, klystron tubes, beam transport lines, etc.

  15. Separation and matching of ion beams between sources and accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wollnik, H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-05-01

    For radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities that provide accelerated ions of short lived nuclei it is essential that the produced short-lived nuclei of interest are ionized and delivered most efficiently to the postaccelerator. Equally important is, however, that isotopes of neighboring isobars and of neighboring elements within the same isobar are eliminated as effectively as possible. This is difficult to achieve, especially if the nuclei of interest are produced by spallation or by fission reactions since those reactions are not very specific and usually produce neighboring isobars and elements at intensities that often exceed considerably the produced intensities of the nuclei of interest. For this reason very efficient separation techniques are required. Such techniques make use of differences in chemical properties and ionization probabilities of the atoms in question in the target ion source. Most importantly, however, such ions of different mass-to-charge ratios are accelerated by the same potential difference (perhaps 60 kV) and passed through large magnetic dipole fields that deflect ions differently if they have different momentum-to-charge ratios.

  16. Fluence and dose measurements for an accelerator neutron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Byun, S. H.; McNeill, F. E.; Mothersill, C. E.; Seymour, C. B.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2007-10-01

    The 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at McMaster University accelerator laboratory is extended to a neutron irradiation facility for low-dose bystander effects research. A long counter and an Anderson-Braun type neutron monitor have been used as monitors for the determination of the total fluence. Activation foils were used to determine the thermal neutron fluence rate (around 10 6 neutrons s -1). Meanwhile, the interactions of neutrons with the monitors have been simulated using a Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) code. Bystander effects, i.e. damage occurring in cells that were not traversed by radiation but were in the same radiation environment, have been well observed following both alpha and gamma irradiation of many cell lines. Since neutron radiation involves mixed field (including gamma and neutron radiations), we need to differentiate the doses for the bystander effects from the two radiations. A tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) filled with propane based tissue equivalent gas simulating a 2 ?m diameter tissue sphere has been investigated to estimate the neutron and gamma absorbed doses. A photon dose contamination of the neutron beam is less than 3%. The axial dose distribution follows the inverse square law and lateral and vertical dose distributions are relatively uniform over the irradiation area required by the biological study.

  17. External-Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Multiple Proton Beam Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun; Amos, Richard A.; Zhang Xiaodong; Taddei, Phillip J. [Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Woodward, Wendy A., E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org [Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hoffman, Karen E.; Yu, Tse Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Oh, Julia; Perkins, George H.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Zhang, Sean X.; Sun, Tzou Liang; Gillin, Michael; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Strom, Eric A. [Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To explore multiple proton beam configurations for optimizing dosimetry and minimizing uncertainties for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare the dosimetry of proton with that of photon radiotherapy for treatment of the same clinical volumes. Methods and Materials: Proton treatment plans were created for 11 sequential patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) photon APBI using passive scattering proton beams (PSPB) and were compared with clinically treated 3DCRT photon plans. Monte Carlo calculations were used to verify the accuracy of the proton dose calculation from the treatment planning system. The impact of range, motion, and setup uncertainty was evaluated with tangential vs. en face beams. Results: Compared with 3DCRT photons, the absolute reduction of the mean of V100 (the volume receiving 100% of prescription dose), V90, V75, V50, and V20 for normal breast using protons are 3.4%, 8.6%, 11.8%, 17.9%, and 23.6%, respectively. For breast skin, with the similar V90 as 3DCRT photons, the proton plan significantly reduced V75, V50, V30, and V10. The proton plan also significantly reduced the dose to the lung and heart. Dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated minimal deviation from the treatment planning system. The tangential beam configuration showed significantly less dose fluctuation in the chest wall region but was more vulnerable to respiratory motion than that for the en face beams. Worst-case analysis demonstrated the robustness of designed proton beams with range and patient setup uncertainties. Conclusions: APBI using multiple proton beams spares significantly more normal tissue, including nontarget breast and breast skin, than 3DCRT using photons. It is robust, considering the range and patient setup uncertainties.

  18. The real-time system electron beam dose measurements for industrial accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Korenev; I. Korenev

    2003-01-01

    The real-time system for electron beam dose measurements for industrial accelerators is considered in the report. The system is acceptable for all types of industrial and research accelerators: CW, DC, RF LINAC and PULSED HIGH CURRENT. The main concept consists in the measurements of beam parameters using partial absorption effect and mathematical treatment of signals from sensors. The 2 modes

  19. Approaching maximal performance of longitudinal beam compression in induction accelerator drivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. K. Mark; D. D. M. Ho; S. T. Brandon; C. L. Chang; A. T. Drobot; A. Faltens; E. P. Lee; G. A. Krafft

    1986-01-01

    Longitudinal beam compression is an integral part of the US induction accelerator development effort for heavy ion fusion. Producing maximal performance for key accelerator components is an essential element of the effort to reduce driver costs. We outline here initial studies directed towards defining the limits of final beam compression including considerations such as: maximal available compression, effects of longitudinal

  20. Failure Analysis of the Beam Vacuum in the Superconducting Cavities of the TESLA Main Linear Accelerator

    E-print Network

    1 Failure Analysis of the Beam Vacuum in the Superconducting Cavities of the TESLA Main Linear Hamburg, Germany Abstract For the long term successful operation of the superconducting TESLA accelerator The beam vacuum system of the TESLA main linear accelerators contains about 20.000 superconducting cavities

  1. PREVENTING POLLUTION USING ISO 14001 AT A PARTICLE ACCELERATOR THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER PROJECT.

    SciTech Connect

    BRIGGS,S.L.K.; MUSOLINO,S.V.

    2001-06-01

    In early 1997 Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) discovered that the spent fuel pool of their High Flux Beam Reactor was leaking tritium into the groundwater. Community members, activist groups, politicians and regulators were outraged with the poor environmental management practices at BNL. The reactor was shut down and the Department of Energy (DOE) terminated the contract with the existing Management Company. At this same time, a major new scientific facility, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), was nearing the end of construction and readying for commissioning. Although environmental considerations had been incorporated into the design of the facility; some interested parties were skeptical that this new facility would not cause significant environmental impacts. RHIC management recognized that the future of its operation was dependent on preventing pollution and allaying concerns of its stakeholders. Although never done at a DOE National Laboratory before Brookhaven Science Associates, the new management firm, committed to implementing an Environmental Management System (EMS) and RHIC managers volunteered to deploy it within their facility on an extremely aggressive schedule. Several of these IS0 requirements contribute directly to preventing pollution, an area where particular emphasis was placed. This paper describes how Brookhaven used the following key IS0 14001 elements to institutionalize Pollution Prevention concepts: Environmental Policy, Aspects, Objectives and Targets, Environmental Management Program, Structure and Responsibility, Operational Controls, Training, and Management Review. In addition, examples of implementation at the RHIC Project illustrate how BNL's premiere facility was able to demonstrate to interested parties that care had been taken to implement technological and administrative controls to minimize environmental impacts, while at the same time reduce the applicability of regulatory requirements to their operations.

  2. Trapping, compression, and acceleration of an electron beam by the laser wake wave

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. G. Khachatryan

    2001-01-01

    The scheme of laser wake-field acceleration in plasma is proposed and considered for the case where a relatively rare nonrelativistic\\u000a or weakly relativistic electron beam is initially situated ahead of the intense laser pulse. It is shown that an electron\\u000a beam is trapped in the region of the first accelerating wake maximum; then it is strongly compressed and accelerated to

  3. Phase dependence of electron acceleration in a tightly focused laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    He Xinkui; Li, R.X.; Shuai, B.; Ge, X.C.; Xu, Z.Z. [Laboratory for High Intensity Optics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2005-07-15

    Electron acceleration using a tightly focused ultraintensity laser beam is investigated numerically and strong phase dependence is found. The acceleration is periodic to the variety of the initial laser field phase, and the accelerated electrons are emitted in pulses of which the full width is the half period of the laser field. When a 10 PW intense laser beam is used, the electron with energy less than 1 Mev can be accelerated up to energies about 1.4 GeV. The optimal initial condition for electron acceleration is found.

  4. Review of Basic Physics of Laser-Accelerated Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, H.; Hur, M. S.; Jang, H.; Kim, J. [Center for Advanced Accelerators, KERI, Seongju-Dong 28-1, Changwon, 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-11

    Laser-plasma wake wave can accelerate charged particles, especially electrons with an enormously large acceleration gradient. The electrons in the plasma wake wave have complicated motions in the longitudinal and transverse directions. In this paper, basic physics of the laser-accelerated electron beam is reviewed.

  5. A monolithic relativistic electron beam source based on a dielectric laser accelerator structure

    SciTech Connect

    McNeur, Josh; Carranza, Nestor; Travish, Gil; Yin Hairong; Yoder, Rodney [UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); College of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610054 (China); Manhattanville College, Physics Dept., 2900 Purchase St., Purchase, NY 10577 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    Work towards a monolithic device capable of producing relativistic particle beams within a cubic-centimeter is detailed. We will discuss the Micro-Accelerator Platform (MAP), an optical laser powered dielectric accelerator as the main building block of this chip-scale source along with a field enhanced emitter and a region for sub-relativistic acceleration.

  6. Acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam in the presence of quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aki, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model and obtaining the dispersion relation of the Cherenkov and cyclotron waves, the acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam is investigated. The Cherenkov and cyclotron acceleration mechanisms of positrons are compared together. It is shown that growth rate and, therefore, the acceleration of positrons can be increased in the presence of quantum effects.

  7. Design of a subnanometer resolution beam position monitor for dielectric laser accelerators

    E-print Network

    Byer, Robert L.

    , this device is ideal for future x-ray sources and laser-driven particle accelerators "on a chip." © 2012 expensive and far more compact way to build the particle accelerators that will power future generationsDesign of a subnanometer resolution beam position monitor for dielectric laser accelerators Ken

  8. Simulation of the Beam-Ion Instability in the Electron Damping Ring of the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Cai, Y.; Raubenheimer, T.; /SLAC

    2007-07-06

    Ion induced beam instability is one critical issue for the electron damping ring of the International Linear Collider (ILC) due to its ultra small emittance of 2pm. Bunch train filling pattern is proposed to mitigate the instability and bunch-by-bunch feedback is applied to suppress it. Multibunch train fill pattern is introduced in the electron beam to reduce the number of trapped ions. Our study shows that the ion effects can be significantly mitigated by using multiple gaps. However, the beam can still suffer from the beam-ion instability driven by the accumulated ions that cannot escape from the beam during the gaps. The effects of beam fill pattern, emittance, vacuum and various damping mechanism are studied using self-consistent program, which includes the optics of the ring.

  9. Precision modeling of the internal injection and beam dynamics for a high-power RF accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiunov, M. A.; Auslender, V. L.; Ivanov, A. V.; Karliner, M. M.; Kuznetsov, G. I.; Makarov, I. G.; Panfilov, A. D.; Tarnetsky, V. V.

    2006-03-01

    A new high-power electron accelerator for industrial applications has been developed in Novosibirsk. The main parameters of the accelerator are: operating frequency of 178 MHz, electron energy of 5 MeV, and average beam power of up to 300 kW. The accelerator consists of a chain of accelerating cavities connected by on-axis coupling cavities with coupling slots in the walls. A triode RF gun on the base of a grid-cathode unit placed on the wall of the first accelerating cavity is used for internal injection of electrons. The paper presents the results of modeling and optimization of the accelerating structure, internal injection, and beam dynamics. A modification of the electrostatic computer code SAM designed for simulation of beam dynamics in linear RF accelerators by the long-wave approximation method is described.

  10. A theory of two-beam acceleration of charged particles in a plasma waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, A.O. [Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (Ukraine)

    1993-11-01

    The progress made in recent years in the field of high-current relativistic electron beam (REB) generation has aroused a considerable interest in studying REB potentialities for charged particle acceleration with a high acceleration rate T = 100MeV/m. It was proposed, in particular, to employ high-current REB in two-beam acceleration schemes (TBA). In these schemes high current REB (driving beam) excites intense electromagnetic waves in the electrodynamic structure which, in their turn, accelerate particles of the other beam (driven beam). The TBA schemes can be divided into two groups. The first group includes the schemes, where the two beams (driving and driven) propagate in different electrodynamic structures coupled with each other through the waveguides which ensure the microwave power transmission to accelerate driven beam particles. The second group includes the TBA schemes, where the driving and driven beams propagate in one electrodynamic structure. The main aim of this work is to demonstrate by theory the possibility of realizing effectively the TBA scheme in the plasma waveguide. The physical model of the TBA scheme under study is formulated. A set of equations describing the excitation of RF fields by a high-current REB and the acceleration of driven beam electrons is also derived. Results are presented on the the linear theory of plasma wave amplification by the driving beam. The range of system parameters, at which the plasma-beam instability develops, is defined. Results of numerical simulation of the TBA scheme under study are also presented. The same section gives the description of the dynamics of accelerated particle bunching in the high-current REB-excited field. Estimates are given for the accelerating field intensities in the plasma and electron acceleration rates.

  11. Useful technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the azimuthally varying field cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Yuyama, Takahiro; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Fukuda, Mitsuhiro [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    We have developed a new technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the cyclotron. In this technique, the beam current pattern at a fixed radius r is measured by slightly scanning the acceleration frequency in the cyclotron. The acceleration beam phase is obtained by analyzing symmetry of the current pattern. Simple procedure to control the acceleration beam phase by changing coil currents of a few trim coils was established. The beam phase width is also obtained by analyzing gradient of the decreasing part of the current pattern. We verified reliability of this technique with 260 MeV {sup 20}Ne{sup 7+} beams which were accelerated on different tuning condition of the cyclotron. When the acceleration beam phase was around 0 deg., top of the energy gain of cosine wave, and the beam phase width was about 6 deg. in full width at half maximum, a clear turn pattern of the beam was observed with a differential beam probe in the extraction region. Beam phase widths of ion beams at acceleration harmonics of h=1 and h=2 were estimated without beam cutting by phase-defining slits. We also calculated the beam phase widths roughly from the beam current ratio between the injected beam and the accelerated beam in the cyclotron without operating the beam buncher. Both beam phase widths were almost the same for h=1, while phase compressions by a factor of about 3 were confirmed for h=2.

  12. Approaching maximal performance of longitudinal beam compression in induction accelerator drivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. K. Mark; D. D. M. Ho; S. T. Brandon; C. L. Chang; A. T. Drobot; A. Faltens; E. P. Lee; G. A. Krafft

    1986-01-01

    Longitudinal beam compression occurs before final focus and fusion chamber beam transport and is a key process determining initial conditions for final focus hardware. Determining the limits for maximal performance of key accelerator components is an essential element of the effort to reduce driver costs. Studies directed towards defining the limits of final beam compression including considerations such as maximal

  13. Direct particle acceleration by two identical crossed radially polarized laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Salamin, Yousef I. [Department of Physics, American University of Sharjah, P.O. Box 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)

    2010-07-15

    Electrons and {alpha} particles injected midway between two ultrahigh intensity crossed laser beams of radial polarization are shown to be accelerated in vacuum to several gigaelectron volts and to have average energy gradients in excess of 150 GeV/m. A unique model of the crossing beams is suggested, which maximizes the particle energy gain and minimizes the particle-beam diffraction.

  14. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    E-print Network

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Piriz, A R

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding...

  15. Review of linear colliders in the framework of future world accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loew, G.

    2003-04-01

    The HEP communities in three major regions, Asia, Europe and North America, have recently agreed that experimental particle physics in the next twenty years will be greatly enriched if an e+e- linear collider were to be available in the TeV c.m. energy range to supplement the opportunities offered by the LHC. This abridged paper of a longer oral presentation at ICHEP 2002 outlines several current design options for such an e+e- linear collider, which are presently under intense study by the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee (ILC-TRC).

  16. Review of Linear Colliders in the Framework of Future World Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, Gregory A.

    2003-05-09

    The HEP communities in three major regions, Asia, Europe and North America, have recently agreed that experimental particle physics in the next twenty years will be greatly enriched if an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider were to be available in the TeV c.m. energy range to supplement the opportunities offered by the LHC. This abridged paper of a longer oral presentation at ICHEP 2002 outlines several current design options for such an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider, which are presently under intense study by the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee (ILC-TRC).

  17. Improvement of voltage holding and high current beam acceleration by MeV accelerator for ITER NB

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Inoue, T.; Umeda, N.; Watanabe, K.; Tobari, H.; Dairaku, M.; Yamanaka, H.; Tsuchida, K.; Kojima, A.; Hanada, M.; Sakamoto, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, 311-0193 (Japan)

    2011-09-26

    Voltage holding of -1 MV is an essential issue in development of a multi-aperture multi-grid (MAMuG) negative ion accelerator, of which target is to accelerate 200 A/m{sup 2} H{sup -} ion beam up to the energy of 1 MeV for several tens seconds. Review of voltage holding results ever obtained with various geometries of the accelerators showed that the voltage holding capability was about a half of designed value based on the experiment obtained from ideal small electrode. This is considered due to local electric field concentration in the accelerators, such as edge and steps between multi-aperture grids and its support structures. Based on the detailed investigation with electric field analysis, accelerator was modified to reduce the electric field concentration by reshaping the support structures and expanding the gap length between the grid supports. After the modifications, the accelerator succeeded in sustaining -1 MV for more than one hour in vacuum. Improvement of the voltage holding characteristics progressed the energy and current accelerated by the MeV accelerator. Up to 2010, beam parameters achieved by the MAMuG accelerator were increased to 879 keV, 0.36 A (157 A/m{sup 2}) at perveance matched condition and 937 keV, 0.33 A (144 A/m{sup 2}) slightly under perveance.

  18. Absorbed dose distributions for X-ray beams and beams of electrons from the Therac 20 Saturne linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Tronc, D; Noël, A

    1978-11-01

    After a brief description of the Therac 20 Saturne linear accelerator a complete set of absorbed-dose distribution values is given. These values define the depths on the axis as a function of the depth dose and define the penumbra (as characterized by the positions of the intersections of the isodose curves with planes parallel to the phantom surface) for beams of X-rays and for beams of electrons. Tissue-maximum ratios are given for beams of X-rays. Analytical values for the electron depth dose curve are compared with the values obtained on the Sagittaire linear accelerator. PMID:715810

  19. Far Future Colliders and Required R&D Program

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    Particle colliders for high energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the collider has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size and the cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but its pace of progress has greatly slowed down. In this paper we very briefly review the R&D toward near future colliders and make an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and outline the changes in the paradigm required for the next breakthroughs.

  20. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations 367 Automated detection and analysis

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations 367 0 Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations Daniela M (particle) accelerators [Geddes et al. (2009); Tajima & Dawson (1979)] model the acceleration of electrons

  1. Challenges in future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Swapan Chattopadhyay; Kaoru Yokoya

    2002-09-02

    For decades, electron-positron colliders have been complementing proton-proton colliders. But the circular LEP, the largest e-e+ collider, represented an energy limit beyond which energy losses to synchrotron radiation necessitate moving to e-e+ linear colliders (LCs), thereby raising new challenges for accelerator builders. Japanese-American, German, and European collaborations have presented options for the Future Linear Collider (FLC). Key accelerator issues for any FLC option are the achievement of high enough energy and luminosity. Damping rings, taking advantage of the phenomenon of synchrotron radiation, have been developed as the means for decreasing beam size, which is crucial for ensuring a sufficiently high rate of particle-particle collisions. Related challenges are alignment and stability in an environment where even minute ground motion can disrupt performance, and the ability to monitor beam size. The technical challenges exist within a wider context of socioeconomic and political challenges, likely necessitating continued development of international collaboration among parties involved in accelerator-based physics.

  2. Observations and open questions in beam-beam interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    The first of the hadron colliders, ISR, started operation in 1970. In the following years, the hadron colliders to follow were the SPS (started 1980), the Tevatron (started 1987 first as a fixed target machine), RHIC (started 2000) and most recently the LHC, which started in 2008. HERA was a hybrid that collided electrons and protons. All of these accelerators had or have their performance limited by the effects of the beam-beam interactions. That has also been true for the electron-positron colliders such as LEP, CESR, KEKB and PEPII. In this article I will discuss how the beam-beam limitations arose in some of these machines. The discussion will be focused on common themes that span the different colliders. I will mostly discuss the hadron colliders but sometimes discuss the lepton colliders where relevant. Only a handful of common accelerator physics topics are chosen here, the list is not meant to be exhaustive. A comparative review of beam-beam performance in the ISR, SPS and Tevatron (ca 1989) can be found in reference. Table 1 shows the relevant parameters of colliders (excluding the LHC), which have accelerated protons.

  3. Beam losses from ultra-peripheral nuclear collisions between Pb ions in the Large Hadron Collider and their alleviation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, R.; /CERN; Bocian, D.; /Fermilab /CERN; Gilardoni, S.; Jowett, J.M.; /CERN

    2009-08-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between colliding heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will give rise to localized beam losses that may quench superconducting magnets, apart from contributing significantly to the luminosity decay. To quantify their impact on the operation of the collider, we have used a three-step simulation approach, which consists of optical tracking, a Monte-Carlo shower simulation and a thermal network model of the heat flow inside a magnet. We present simulation results for the case of {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} ion operation in the LHC, with focus on the alice interaction region, and show that the expected heat load during nominal {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} operation is 40% above the quench level. This limits the maximum achievable luminosity. Furthermore, we discuss methods of monitoring the losses and possible ways to alleviate their effect.

  4. The DE-AC accelerator system for high beam current density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.; Deininger, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    A radically different ion accelerator system design has been developed to increase the extracted beam current density of ion thrusters. By independently controlling plasma ion extraction and acceleration, the Decoupled Extraction and Amplified Current (DE-AC) accelerator system gives higher beam currents at lower electric field stress levels. Results are presented for DE-AC grid system operation with the Test Bed Ion Engine. Using argon propellant, feasibility of a 60 mA/sq cm beam current density is shown. A discussion of power supply requirements, specific impulse operation and grid system geometrical design is presented also.

  5. Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-06-01

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors. PMID:24345525

  6. Beam loading in a laser-plasma accelerator using a near-hollow plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Beam loading in laser-plasma accelerators using a near-hollow plasma channel is examined in the linear wake regime. It is shown that, by properly shaping and phasing the witness particle beam, high-gradient acceleration can be achieved with high-efficiency, and without induced energy spread or emittance growth. Both electron and positron beams can be accelerated in this plasma channel geometry. Matched propagation of electron beams can be achieved by the focusing force provided by the channel density. For positron beams, matched propagation can be achieved in a hollow plasma channel with external focusing. The efficiency of energy transfer from the wake to a witness beam is calculated for single ultra-short bunches and bunch trains.

  7. Transverse modulation of an electron beam generated in self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator experiments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. I. Moore; K. Krushelnick; A. Ting; H. R. Burris; R. F. Hubbard; P. Sprangle

    2000-01-01

    Low energy electron beams (E~300 keV) generated in a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator experiment were observed to filament and be deflected away from the laser axis forming radial jets in the electron beam profile. At higher energies (E>900 keV), the filamentation and jets were suppressed and smooth electron beams copropagating with the laser were observed. The observed electron beam filamentation

  8. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF ACCELERATOR DATA REPORTING SYSTEM AND ITS APPLICATION TO TREND ANALYSIS OF BEAM CURRENT DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, M.J.; Blokland, W.

    2009-01-01

    Detailed ongoing information about the ion beam quality is crucial to the successful operation of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In order to provide the highest possible neutron production time, ion beam quality is monitored to isolate possible problems or performance-related issues throughout the accelerator and accumulator ring. For example, beam current monitor (BCM) data is used to determine the quality of the beam transport through the accelerator. In this study, a reporting system infrastructure was implemented and used to generate a trend analysis report of the BCM data. The BCM data was analyzed to facilitate the identifi cation of monitor calibration issues, beam trends, beam abnormalities, beam deviations and overall beam quality. A comparison between transformed BCM report data and accelerator log entries shows promising results which represent correlations between the data and changes made within the accelerator. The BCM analysis report is one of many reports within a system that assist in providing overall beam quality information to facilitate successful beam operation. In future reports, additional data manipulation functions and analysis can be implemented and applied. Built-in and user-defi ned analytic functions are available throughout the reporting system and can be reused with new data.

  10. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and FACET - Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Seryi

    2009-09-09

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is one of the most promising approaches to advancing accelerator technology. This approach offers a potential 1,000-fold or more increase in acceleration over a given distance, compared to existing accelerators.  FACET, enabled by the Recovery Act funds, will study plasma acceleration, using short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons. In this lecture, the physics of plasma acceleration and features of FACET will be presented.  

  11. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and FACET - Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams at SLAC

    ScienceCinema

    Andrei Seryi

    2010-01-08

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is one of the most promising approaches to advancing accelerator technology. This approach offers a potential 1,000-fold or more increase in acceleration over a given distance, compared to existing accelerators.  FACET, enabled by the Recovery Act funds, will study plasma acceleration, using short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons. In this lecture, the physics of plasma acceleration and features of FACET will be presented.  

  12. Generation of annular, high-charge electron beams at the Argonne wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, E. E.; Li, C.; Gai, W.; Power, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present and discuss the results from the experimental generation of high-charge annular(ring-shaped)electron beams at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). These beams were produced by using laser masks to project annular laser profiles of various inner and outer diameters onto the photocathode of an RF gun. The ring beam is accelerated to 15 MeV, then it is imaged by means of solenoid lenses. Transverse profiles are compared for different solenoid settings. Discussion includes a comparison with Parmela simulations, some applications of high-charge ring beams,and an outline of a planned extension of this study.

  13. BEAM DYNAMICS: Conceptual and technological evolutions of particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Teng C.

    2009-06-01

    We give here an ordered list of all types of particle accelerators and exhibit how each type evolves conceptually and/or technologically from the preceding. This is in contrast to the usual “history of particle accelerators" in which unrelated accelerator types are listed in the chronological order. It is hoped that this discussion and understanding of the rationale and logic in the evolution of one accelerator type to the next will help to educe future inventions.

  14. The development of an annular-beam, high power free-electron maser for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.; Carlsten, B.E.; Earley, L.M.; Fortgang, C.M.; Haddock, P.C.; Haynes, W.B.

    1996-09-01

    Work is under way to develop a 17 GHz free electron maser (FEM) for producing a 500 MW output pulse with a phase stability appropriate for linear collider applications. We plan to use a 500 keV, 5 kV, 6 cm diameter annular electron beam to excite a TM{sub 02} mode Raman FEM amplifier in a corrugated cylindrical waveguide. The annular beam will run close to the interaction device walls to reduce the power density in the fields, and to greatly reduce the kinetic energy loss caused by beam potential depression associated with the space charge which is a significant advantage in comparison with conventional solid beam microwave tubes at the same beam current. A key advantage of the annular beam is that the reduced plasma wave number can be tuned to achieve phase stability for an arbitrary correlation on interaction strength with beam velocity. It should be noted that this technique for improving phase stability of an EM in not possible with a solid beam klystron. The annular beam FEM provides the opportunity to extend the output power of sources in the 17 GHz regime by well over an order of magnitude with enhanced phase stability. The design and experimental status are discussed.

  15. Seismic studies for Fermilab future collider projects

    SciTech Connect

    Lauh, J.; Shiltsev, V.

    1997-11-01

    Ground motion can cause significant beam emittance growth and orbit oscillations in large hadron colliders due to a vibration of numerous focusing magnets. Larger accelerator ring circumference leads to smaller revolution frequency and, e.g. for the Fermilab Very Large Hadron Collider(VLHC) 50-150 Hz vibrations are of particular interest as they are resonant with the beam betatron frequency. Seismic measurements at an existing large accelerator under operation can help to estimate the vibrations generated by the technical systems in future machines. Comparison of noisy and quiet microseismic conditions might be useful for proper choice of technical solutions for future colliders. This article presents results of wide-band seismic measurements at the Fermilab site, namely, in the tunnel of the Tevatron and on the surface nearby, and in two deep tunnels in the Illinois dolomite which is though to be a possible geological environment of the future accelerators.

  16. Time average neutralized migma: A colliding beam\\/plasma hybrid physical state as aneutronic energy source - A review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bogdan C. Maglich

    1988-01-01

    A D+ beam of kinetic energy Ti = 0.7 MeV was stored in a ``simple mirror'' magnetic field as self-colliding orbits or migma and neutralized by ambient, oscillating electrons whose bounce frequencies were externally controlled. Space charge density was exceeded by an order of magnitude without instabilities. Three nondestructive diagnostic methods allowed measurements of ion orbit distribution, ion storage times,

  17. Energy spectrum and angular distribution of muons from the decay of heavy leptons produced in colliding electron-positron beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M. Aliev; N. A. Guliev; I. G. Dzhafarov; F. T. Khalil-Zade

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of an arbitrary (V, A) structure of the neutral weak ¯ee and LL currents (L=t-, M0) a study is made of the processes of production in colliding electron-positron beams of pairs of heavy leptons with subsequent decays in accordance with the schemes e+e-?t-(?µ-vµvt) + t+(? anything) and e+e-?M0(?µ-e+ve) + M0(? anything). The energy spectrum and asymmetry of

  18. Energy spectrum and angular distribution of muons from the decay of heavy leptons produced in colliding electron-positron beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M. Aliev; N. A. Guliev; I. G. Dzhafarov; F. T. Khalil-Zade

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of an arbitrary (V, A) structure of the neutral weak ¯ee and LL currents (L=tau-, M0) a study is made of the processes of production in colliding electron-positron beams of pairs of heavy leptons with subsequent decays in accordance with the schemes e+e--->tau-(-->µ-vµvtau) + tau+(--> anything) and e+e--->M0(-->µ-e+ve) + M0(--> anything). The energy spectrum and asymmetry of

  19. Feasibility study of aluminum beam tube for the collider: An option for no-coating and no-liner

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.

    1994-07-01

    This report proposes to use a single-layer beam tube made of high strength, high resistivity aluminum alloy (such as 7039-T61 or A7N01) to replace the double-layer copper coated stainless steel tube in the SSC Collider. The main reasons are: (1) a potential saving of about $23 million which is basically the baseline cost of the copper coating and (2) the use of an extruded aluminum tube consisting of a beam chamber and a pumping chamber may solve the vacuum problem without any liner.

  20. Beam collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harres, K.; Alber, I.; Tauschwitz, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Daido, H.; Günther, M.; Nürnberg, F.; Otten, A.; Schollmeier, M.; Schütrumpf, J.; Tampo, M.; Roth, M.

    2010-08-01

    A pulsed high field solenoid was used in a laser-proton acceleration experiment to collimate and transport the proton beam that was generated at the irradiation of a flat foil by a high intensity laser pulse. 1012 particles at an energy of 2.3 MeV could be caught and transported over a distance of more than 240 mm. Strong space charge effects occur, induced by the high field of the solenoid that forces all co-moving electrons down the the solenoid's axis, building up a strong negative space charge that interacts with the proton beam. This leads to an aggregation of the proton beam around the solenoid's axis and therefore to a stronger focusing effect. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications like post-acceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  1. The Proceedings of Joint 28th ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics and Advanced Nova Accelerator Workshops on Quantum Aspects of Beam Physics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2004-01-01

    The Joint 28th ICFA (International Committee for Future Accelerators) Advanced Beam Dynamics and Advanced and Novel Accelerators Workshop on ''QUANTUM ASPECTS OF BEAM PHYSICS and Other Critical Issues of Beams in Physics and Astrophysics'', was held on January 7-11, 2003, in Hiroshima, Japan. This was the third in the QABP workshop series. The first QABP workshop was launched in January

  2. Cryogenic systems for the HEB accelerator of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Abramovich, S.; Yuecel, A.

    1994-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics related to the Superconducting Super Collider: Cryogenic system -- general requirements; cryogenic system components; heat load budgets and refrigeration plant capacities; flow and thermal characteristics; process descriptions; cryogenic control instrumentation and value engineering trade-offs.

  3. Flyer Acceleration by Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation and Application for Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Nobuhiro; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Kashine, Kenji [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kagoshima National College of Technology, 1460-1 Shinko, Hayato-cho, Aira-gun, Kagoshima 899-5193 (Japan); Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi [Extreme Energy Density Research Institute, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

    2004-02-04

    Flyer acceleration by ablation plasma pressure produced by irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam has been studied. Acceleration process including expansion of ablation plasma was simulated based on fluid model. And interaction between incident pulsed ion beam and a flyer target was considered as accounting stopping power of it. In experiments, we used ETIGO-II intense pulsed ion beam generator with two kinds of diodes; 1) Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID, power densities of <100 J/cm2) and 2) Spherical-focused Plasma Focus Diode (SPFD, power densities of up to 4.3 kJ/cm2). Numerical results of accelerated flyer velocity agreed well with measured one over wide range of incident ion beam energy density. Flyer velocity of 5.6 km/s and ablation plasma pressure of 15 GPa was demonstrated by the present experiments. Acceleration of double-layer target consists of gold/aluminum was studied. For adequate layer thickness, such a flyer target could be much more accelerated than a single layer. Effect of waveform of ion beam was also examined. Parabolic waveform could accelerate more efficiently than rectangular waveform. Applicability of ablation propulsion was discussed. Specific impulse of 7000{approx}8000 seconds and time averaged thrust of up to 5000{approx}6000N can be expected. Their values can be controllable by changing power density of incident ion beam and pulse duration.

  4. The program in muon and neutrino physics: Superbeams, cold muon beams, neutrino factory and the muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    R. Raja et al.

    2001-08-08

    The concept of a Muon Collider was first proposed by Budker [10] and by Skrinsky [11] in the 60s and early 70s. However, there was little substance to the concept until the idea of ionization cooling was developed by Skrinsky and Parkhomchuk [12]. The ionization cooling approach was expanded by Neufer [13] and then by Palmer [14], whose work led to the formation of the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) [3] in 1995. The concept of a neutrino source based on a pion storage ring was originally considered by Koshkarev [18]. However, the intensity of the muons created within the ring from pion decay was too low to provide a useful neutrino source. The Muon Collider concept provided a way to produce a very intense muon source. The physics potential of neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings was investigated by Geer in 1997 at a Fermilab workshop [19, 20] where it became evident that the neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings needed for the muon collider were exciting on their own merit. The neutrino factory concept quickly captured the imagination of the particle physics community, driven in large part by the exciting atmospheric neutrino deficit results from the SuperKamiokande experiment. As a result, the MC realized that a Neutrino Factory could be an important first step toward a Muon Collider and the physics that could be addressed by a Neutrino Factory was interesting in its own right. With this in mind, the MC has shifted its primary emphasis toward the issues relevant to a Neutrino Factory. There is also considerable international activity on Neutrino Factories, with international conferences held at Lyon in 1999, Monterey in 2000 [21], Tsukuba in 2001 [22], and another planned for London in 2002.

  5. Electron beam optimization using 3D printed gas cells in a laser-plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Keegan; Vargas, Michael; Schumaker, William; Zhao, Zhen; Chvykov, Vladimir; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Yanovsky, Victor; Thomas, Alexander; Krushelnick, Karl

    2013-10-01

    Laser driven tabletop accelerators have made it possible to produce tunable relativistic beams of electrons. One of the ways in which these electron beams can be optimized is by changing the plasma environment that creates and accelerates the electrons. Using a rapid prototyped gas cell built with a 3D printer to create a relatively contained environment for the plasma has increased the electron beam pointing stability and has created more monoenergetic beams than what was achieved with a gas jet. Several different gas cell designs have been studied and tested to determine the optimum configuration and gas mixture for stable, monoenergetic electron beams. Two-staged gas cells have produced the highest quality electron beams with greatest pointing and beam stability. The purpose of the two-staged gas cell is to divide the laser wakefield acceleration process into two steps, an injection stage, where a helium-nitrogen mixture is used to inject more charge into the wake of the laser, and an acceleration stage where pure helium is used to create a plasma conducive for accelerating the electrons captured in the first stage.

  6. The Application of Radiation and Particle Beams from Laser Plasma Wakefield Accelerators to Oncology

    E-print Network

    Strathclyde, University of

    strengths of electric field as Potential of LWFA for Medical Applications A particle accelerator is a device to recent improvements in laserplasma wakefield accelerator (LWFA) technology, high quality electron beams sources for medical application. Xrays with energies of a few MeV represent the vast majority of the range

  7. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  8. Educating the next generation in the science and technology of plasmas, beams and accelerators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wiliam Barletta

    2007-01-01

    Accelerators are essential tools for discovery in fundamental physics, biology, and chemistry. Particle beam based instruments in medicine, industry and national security constitute a multi-billion dollar per year industry. More than 55,000 peer-reviewed papers having accelerator as a keyword are available on the Web. Yet only a handful of universities offer any formal training in accelerator science. Several reasons can

  9. Status of LBL/LLNL FEL (free electron laser) research for two beam accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, D.B.; Sessler, A.M.

    1989-03-01

    We review the status of free electron laser (FEL) research being conducted at LBL and LLNL as part of a broader program of research on two beam accelerators (TBAs). Induction accelerator-driven FELs for use as power sources for high-gradient accelerators are discussed, along with preliminary cost estimates for this type of power source. Finally, a promising new version of an FEL/TBA is described. 25 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. GeV electron beams from a centimetre-scale accelerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. P. Leemans; B. Nagler; A. J. Gonsalves; Cs. Tóth; K. Nakamura; C. G. R. Geddes; E. Esarey; C. B. Schroeder; S. M. Hooker

    2006-01-01

    Gigaelectron volt (GeV) electron accelerators are essential to synchrotron radiation facilities and free-electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radiofrequency-based accelerators are limited to relatively low accelerating fields (10-50MVm-1), requiring tens to hundreds of metres to reach the multi-GeV beam energies needed to drive radiation sources, and many kilometres to generate particle energies of interest to high-energy physics.

  11. Radiological dose calculations for the particle beam fusion accelerator upgrade (PBFA-U)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Y Khater; M. E Sawan

    1995-01-01

    Biological dose rate calculations are performed for different locations in the vicinity of the target chamber and diode of the particle beam fusion accelerator upgrade (PBFA-U) facility. The facility is to be used for research on light ion beam driven inertial confinement fusion. Depending on the diagnostic shots, Bremsstrahlung radiation as well as neutrons are produced. On interacting with the

  12. Recording of current accompanying an ion beam in a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatov, D. A.; Makarov, A. N.; Taskaev, S. Yu.; Shchudlo, I. M.

    2015-02-01

    A proton beam (2 MeV and 1.6 mA) has been obtained on a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation. Experimental results are given that outline the reasons for current limits, and approaches to increasing the current of a proton beam are proposed.

  13. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator-beam transport, laser-plasma acceleration, permanent magnet quadrupole, beam-position monitor PACS: 52.38.Kd, 41 by electro-magnetic coils, which are typically bulky and in case of quadrupole fields achieve gradients

  14. A NEW DIFFERENTIAL AND ERRANT BEAM CURRENT MONITOR FOR THE SNS* ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem [ORNL; Peters, Charles C [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A new Differential and errant Beam Current Monitor (DBCM) is being implemented for both the Spallation Neutron Source's Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) and the Super Conducting Linac (SCL) accelerator sections. These new current monitors will abort the beam when the difference between two toroidal pickups exceeds a threshold. The MEBT DBCM will protect the MEBT chopper target, while the SCL DBCM will abort beam to minimize fast beam losses in the SCL cavities. The new DBCM will also record instances of errant beam, such as beam dropouts, to assist in further optimization of the SNS Accelerator. A software Errant Beam Monitor was implemented on the regular BCM hardware to study errant beam pulses. The new system will take over this functionality and will also be able to abort beam on pulse-to-pulse variations. Because the system is based on the FlexRIO hardware and programmed in LabVIEW FPGA, it will be able to abort beam in about 5 us. This paper describes the development, implementation, and initial test results of the DBCM, as well as errant beam examples.

  15. Suppression of beam-break-up in a standing wave free electron laser two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Kim, J.S.

    1994-03-01

    Various schemes are examined in this study on the suppression of beam break-up (BBU) in a standing wave free electron laser two-beam accelerator (SWFEL/TBA). Two schemes are found to be not only able to effectively suppress the BBU but at the same time have minimum effect on the microwave generation process inside the SWFEL cavities. One is making the cavity-iris junction sufficiently gradual and the other is stagger-tuning the cavities.

  16. High-Energy Laser-Accelerated Electron Beams for Long-Range Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Cummingham, N. J. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Banerjee, Sudeep [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Ramanathan, Vidya [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Powell, Nathan [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Chandler-Smith, Nate [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Schultz, David Robert [ORNL; Pozzi, Sara [University of Michigan; Clarke, Shaun [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Umstadter, Donald [University of Nebraska, Lincoln

    2009-01-01

    We are studying the use of 0.1 1.0 GeV laser-accelerated electron beams as active interrogation probes for long-standoff radiography or nuclear activation of concealed special nuclear material. Use of beams in this energy range is largely unexplored, but such beams could provide notable advantages over lower-energy beams and x-rays. High-energy laser-accelerated electrons exhibit large penetration range through air and solids, and low beam divergence for both direct beams and secondary Bremsstrahlung x-rays. We present laboratory measurements of radiography and activation, using the high-power Diodes laser system at the University of Nebraska, as well as MCNP and GEANT Monte Carlo simulation results used to aid experiment design and interpretation.

  17. Beam Based HOM Analysis of Accelerating Structures at the TESLA Test Facility Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Schreiber, S.; Castro, P.; Gossel, A.; /DESY; Huning, M.; /Fermilab; Devanz, G.; Jablonka, M.; Magne, C.; Napoly, O.; /Saclay; Baboi, N.; /SLAC

    2005-08-09

    The beam emittance in future linear accelerators for high energy physics and SASE-FEL applications depends highly on the field performance in the accelerating structures, i.e. the damping of higher order modes (HOM). Besides theoretical and laboratory analysis, a beam based analysis technique was established [1] at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac. It uses a charge modulated beam of variable modulation frequency to excite dipole modes. This causes a modulation of the transverse beam displacement, which is observed at a downstream BPM and associated with a direct analysis of the modes at the HOM-couplers. A brief introduction of eigenmodes of a resonator and the concept of the wake potential is given. Emphasis is put on beam instrumentation and signal analysis aspects, required for this beam based HOM measurement technique.

  18. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)

    1995-07-05

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0--1.5 TeV, 5 TeV, and 25 TeV. In order to keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0--1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150--200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30--40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-II system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternatively, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0--1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  19. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1995-05-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0--1.5 TeV, 5 TeV and 25 TeV. In order keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0--1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150--200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30--40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-11 system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternately, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0--1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  20. Interaction of the ATA beam with the TM/sub 030/ mode of the accelerating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neil, V.K.

    1985-02-14

    The interaction of the electron beam in the Advanced Test Accelerator with an azimuthally symmetric mode of the accelerating cells is investigated theoretically. The interaction possibly could cause modulation of the beam current at the resonant frequency of the mode. Values of the shunt impedance and Q value of the mode were obtained from previous measurement and analysis. Lagranian hydrodynamics is employed and a WKB solution to the equation of motion is obtained. Results indicate that the interaction will not be a problem in the accelerator.

  1. A cascaded laser acceleration scheme for the generation of spectrally controlled proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfotenhauer, S. M.; Jäckel, O.; Polz, J.; Steinke, S.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Heymann, J.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Kaluza, M. C.

    2010-10-01

    We present a novel, cascaded acceleration scheme for the generation of spectrally controlled ion beams using a laser-based accelerator in a 'double-stage' setup. An MeV proton beam produced during a relativistic laser-plasma interaction on a thin foil target is spectrally shaped by a secondary laser-plasma interaction on a separate foil, reliably creating well-separated quasi-monoenergetic features in the energy spectrum. The observed modulations are fully explained by a one-dimensional (1D) model supported by numerical simulations. These findings demonstrate that laser acceleration can, in principle, be applied in an additive manner.

  2. Generating self-accelerating Airy beams using a digital micromirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qinwei; Wang, Yongdong; Siew, Shi Yong; Lin, Jiao; Zhang, Yilei

    2014-10-01

    We report a new approach for generating an Airy beam by using a digital micromirror device (DMD) and a holographic technique where the DMD loads the desired hologram. Unique characteristics of an Airy beam, such as the non-diffraction and self-acceleration properties, were demonstrated to prove the successful construction of this type of waveform. Experimental results showed good agreement with theoretical calculations. This approach can also be used to generate other special beams.

  3. Crystal-assisted beam extraction and collimation at the U-70 circular accelerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. G. Afonin; V. T. Baranov; S. Bellucci; S. A. Belov; S. Bini; V. N. Gorlov; G. Giannini; A. D. Ermolaev; I. V. Ivanova; D. M. Krylov; V. A. Maisheev; D. A. Savin; E. A. Syshchikov; V. I. Terekhov; V. N. Chepegin; Yu. A. Chesnokov; P. N. Chirkov; I. A. Yazynin

    2011-01-01

    New crystal devices—an array of bent strips and a fan-type reflector based on thin straight plates—have been used to study\\u000a extraction and collimation of the beam circulating in the accelerator at energies of 50 and 1.3 GeV. It is shown that these\\u000a devices allow high-efficiency beam steering in a wide energy range. For 50-GeV protons, the efficiency of beam extraction

  4. Beam characterization of a new continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, A.; Dickerson, C.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Zinkann, G.

    2014-01-01

    A new Continuous Wave (CW) Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) for the ATLAS (Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System) Intensity Upgrade was developed, built and tested at Argonne National Laboratory. We present here a characterization of the RFQ output beam in the longitudinal phase space, as well as a measurement of the transverse beam halo. Measurement results are compared to simulations performed using the beam dynamics code TRACK.

  5. Ultra-Low Emittance Proton Beams From A Laser-Virtual Cathode Plasma Accelerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Fuchs; T. E. Cowan; H. Ruhl; Y. Sentoku; A. Kemp; P. Audebert; M. Roth; R. Stephens; I. Barton; A. Blazevic; E. Brambrink; J. Cobble; J. C. Fernández; J.-C. Gauthier; M. Geissel; M. Hegelich; J. Kaae; S. Karsch; G. P. Le Sage; S. Letzring; M. Manclossi; S. Meyroneinc; A. Newkirk; H. Pépin; N. Renard-Legalloudec

    2004-01-01

    The laminarity of high current multi-MeV proton beams produced by irradiating thin metallic foils with ultra-intense lasers has been measured. For proton energies >10 MeV, the transverse and longitudinal emittance are respectively <0.004 mm-mrad and <10-4 eV-s, i.e. at least 100-fold and may be as much as 104-fold better than conventional accelerators beams. The ion beam source size is measured

  6. Beam instrumentation for future high intense hadron accelerators at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Hu, M.; Tassotto, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Scarpine, V.; Shin, S.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    High intensity hadron beams of up to 2 MW beam power are a key element of new proposed experimental facilities at Fermilab. Project X, which includes a SCRF 8 GeV H{sup -} linac, will be the centerpiece of future HEP activities in the neutrino sector. After a short overview of this, and other proposed projects, we present the current status of the beam instrumentation activities at Fermilab with a few examples. With upgrades and improvements they can meet the requirements of the new beam facilities, however design and development of new instruments is needed, as shown by the prototype and conceptual examples in the last section.

  7. Acceleration of electrons by a tightly focused intense laser beam.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Xing; Zang, Wei-Ping; Li, Ya-Dong; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2009-07-01

    The recent proposal to use Weinger transformation field (WTF) [Opt. Express 17, 4959-4969 (2009)] for describing tightly focused laser beams is investigated here in detail. In order to validate the accuracy of WTF, we derive the numerical field (NF) from the plane wave spectrum method. WTF is compared with NF and Lax series field (LSF). Results show that LSF is accurate close to the beam axis and divergent far from the beam axis, and WTF is always accurate. Moreover, electron dynamics in a tightly focused intense laser beam are simulated by LSF, WTF and NF, respectively. The results obtained by WTF are shown to be accurate. PMID:19582099

  8. Unveiling the orbital angular momentum and acceleration of electron beams.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Roy; Tsur, Yuval; Remez, Roei; Lereah, Yossi; Malomed, Boris A; Shvedov, Vladlen; Hnatovsky, Cyril; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Arie, Ady

    2015-03-01

    New forms of electron beams have been intensively investigated recently, including vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum, as well as Airy beams propagating along a parabolic trajectory. Their traits may be harnessed for applications in materials science, electron microscopy, and interferometry, and so it is important to measure their properties with ease. Here, we show how one may immediately quantify these beams' parameters without need for additional fabrication or nonstandard microscopic tools. Our experimental results are backed by numerical simulations and analytic derivation. PMID:25793830

  9. The development of colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1993-02-01

    Don Kerst, Gersh Budker, and Bruno Touschek were the individuals, and the motivating force, which brought about the development of colliders, while the laboratories at which it happened were Stanford, MURA, the Cambridge Electron Accelerator, Orsay, Frascati, CERN, and Novosibirsk. These laboratories supported, during many years, this rather speculative activity. Of course, many hundreds of physicists contributed to the development of colliders but the men who started it, set it in the right direction, and forcefully made it happen, were Don, Gersh, and Bruno. Don was instrumental in the development of proton-proton colliders, while Bruno and Gersh spearheaded the development of electron-positron colliders. In this brief review of the history, I will sketch the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological developments which made possible the development of colliders. It may look as if the emphasis is on theoretical concepts, but that is really not the case, for in this field -- the physics of beams -- the theory and experiment go hand in hand; theoretical understanding and advances are almost always motivated by the need to explain experimental results or the desire to construct better experimental devices.

  10. Transverse Beam Instability due to a Broad-band Impedance in Very Large Hadron-Collider Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-San; Yoon, Moohyun

    2003-03-01

    The strong head-tail instability due to a broad-band impedance in the very large hadron-collider (VLHC) ring of 20 TeV is numerically investigated. It is shown that the beam size increases significantly when the impedance, Z\\|/n, is 0.6 ?, which is the estimated impedance budget in the design. The beam instability is shown to be cured by introducing tune spreads, such as RF quadrupole, chromaticity and amplitude-dependent tune shift. It is shown that any of these tune spreads limits the growth of the beam size to less than 3%. It is shown that threshold impedance for the instability is estimated to be about Z\\|/n=0.3 ?.

  11. Study of colliding dense foils accelerated by high-power laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotin, V.A.; Velikovich, A.L.; Gavrilov, V.V.; Gold`berg, S.M.; Gol`tsov, A.Yu.; Zavyalets, S.V.; Koval`skii, N.G.; Kondrashov, V.N.

    1993-04-01

    Results are presented from experimental investigations of collisions between dense aluminum and mylar foils of micron thickness accelerated by high-power laser radiation [{lambda} = 1.054 {mu}m, I = (5-7)]{center_dot}10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, pulse length 2 ns. The {open_quotes}method of induced opacity{close_quotes} developed in the present work allows the density of the accelerated plasma foil to be estimated when it strikes a fixed obstacle. The experimental data and the results of numerical simulations show that a {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} acceleration regime can occur in a two-stage scheme, in which a thin-film target is accelerated by the action of a plasmoid incident on it to several tens of kilometers per second while maintaining its condensed state. 28 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Center for Beam Physics papers

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M. [ed.

    1996-06-01

    Six papers are included in this collection. They cover: a second interaction region for gamma-gamma, gamma-electron and electron- electron collisions; constraints on laser-driven accelerators for a high-energy linear collider; progress on the design of a high luminosity muon-muon collider; RF power source development at the RTA test facility; sensitivity studies of crystalline beams; and single bunch collective effects in muon colliders.

  13. A linear accelerator in the space: The beam experiment aboard rocket

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, P.G.; Butler, T.A.; Lynch, M.T.; McKenna, K.F.; Pongratz, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    On July 13, 1989 the BEAM experiment Aboard Rocket (BEAR) linear accelerator was successfully launched and operated in space. The flight demonstrated that a neutral hydrogen beam could be successfully propagated in an exoatmospheric environment. The accelerator, which was the result of an extensive collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and industrial partners, was designed to produce a 10 mA (equivalent), 1 MeV neutral hydrogen beam in 50 {mu}s pulses at 5 Hz. The major components were a 30 keV H{sup {minus}} injector a 1 MeV radio frequency quadrupole, two 425 Mhz RF amplifiers, a gas cell neutralizer, beam optics, vacuum system and controls. The design was strongly constrained by the need for a lightweight rugged system that would survive the rigors of launch and operate autonomously. Following the flight the accelerator was recovered and operated again on the laboratory. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Beam manipulation for compact laser wakefield accelerator based free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loulergue, A.; Labat, M.; Evain, C.; Benabderrahmane, C.; Malka, V.; Couprie, M. E.

    2015-02-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) are a unique source of light, particularly in the x-ray domain. After the success of FELs based on conventional acceleration using radio-frequency cavities, an important challenge is the development of FELs based on electron bunching accelerated by a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). However, the present LWFA electron bunch properties do not permit use directly for a significant FEL amplification. It is known that longitudinal decompression of electron beams delivered by state-of-the-art LWFA eases the FEL process. We propose here a second order transverse beam manipulation turning the large inherent transverse chromatic emittances of LWFA beams into direct FEL gain advantage. Numerical simulations are presented showing that this beam manipulation can further enhance by orders of magnitude the peak power of the radiation.

  15. HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDERS.

    SciTech Connect

    KING, B.J.

    2001-06-18

    A plausible ''straw-man'' scenario and collider ring parameter sets are presented for future energy frontier muon colliders in symbiotic facilities with e{sup +}e{sup -} and hadron colliders: 1.6-10 TeV ''mu-linear colliders'' (mu-LC) where the muons are accelerated in the linacs of a TeV-scale linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, and a 100 TeV Very Large Muon Collider (VLMC) that shares a facility with a 200 TeV Very Large Hadron collider (VLHC) and a 140 TeV muon-proton collider.

  16. Using Nonlinear RF Acceleration for FEL Beam Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    We consider a new approach to condition an electron beam using nonlinear effects in the RF field. We demonstrate that such effects can generate a desirable--for the FEL interaction--radial variation of the particle's energy in the beam, and calculate the induced energy spread in the limit of weak field.

  17. Simultaneous observation of angularly separated laser-driven proton beams accelerated via two different mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.; Bedacht, S.; Bagnoud, V.; Deppert, O.; Geschwind, S.; Jaeger, R.; Ortner, A.; Tebartz, A.; Zielbauer, B.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Roth, M.

    2015-06-01

    We present experimental data showing an angular separation of laser accelerated proton beams. Using flat plastic targets with thicknesses ranging from 200 nm to 1200 nm, a laser intensity of 6 ×1020 W cm-2 incident with an angle of 10°, we observe accelerated protons in target normal direction with cutoff energies around 30 MeV independent from the target thickness. For the best match of laser and target conditions, an additional proton signature is detected along the laser axis with a maximum energy of 65 MeV. These different beams can be attributed to two acceleration mechanisms acting simultaneously, i.e., target normal sheath acceleration and acceleration based on relativistic transparency, e.g., laser breakout afterburner, respectively.

  18. SUPERFLIC: A recirculating superconducting linear collider toponium factory

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.

    1990-10-01

    The conceptual design of a 0.3--0.4 TeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider which uses superconducting RF (SRF) accelerating cavities is presented. This machine is intended to provide high luminosity and low collision energy spread to allow precise studies of the t{bar t} resonant states. Only through use of SRF is such a collider made possible. It features use of recirculation arcs as a partial remedy to presently low SRF accelerating gradients. Development of this type of collider is motivated by and could serve as a stepping stone to exploiting SRF at higher energies. In TeV-range SRF colliders the serious difficulties arising from the beam-beam interaction, very small beam sizes and tolerances characteristic of normal conducting machines can be greatly diminished. 21 refs.

  19. A high average power beam dump for an electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianghong; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce M.; Kostroun, Vaclav O.; Li, Yulin; Smolenski, Karl W.

    2013-05-01

    The electron beam dump for Cornell University's Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) prototype injector was designed and manufactured to absorb 600 kW of electron beam power at beam energies between 5 and 15 MeV. It is constructed from an aluminum alloy using a cylindrical/conical geometry, with water cooling channels between an inner vacuum chamber and an outer jacket. The electron beam is defocused and its centroid is rastered around the axis of the dump to dilute the power density. A flexible joint connects the inner body and the outer jacket to minimize thermal stress. A quadrant detector at the entrance to the dump monitors the electron beam position and rastering. Electron scattering calculations, thermal and thermomechanical stress analysis, and radiation calculations are presented.

  20. First observations of beam losses due to bound-free pairproduction in a heavy-ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, R.; Jowett, J.M.; Gilardoni, S.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Tepikian, S.; Klein, S.R.

    2007-06-15

    We report the first observations of beam losses due tobound-free pair production at the interaction point of a heavy-ioncollider. This process is expected to be a major luminosity limit for theLarge Hadron Collider (LHC) when it operates with 208Pb82+ ions becausethe localized energy deposition by the lost ions may quenchsuperconducting magnet coils. Measurements were performed at theRelativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) during operation with 100GeV/nucleon 63Cu29+ ions. At RHIC, the rate, energy and magnetic fieldare low enough so that magnet quenching is not an issue. The hadronicshowers produced when the single-electron ions struck the RHIC beampipewere observed using an array of photodiodes. The measurement confirms theorder of magnitude of the theoretical cross section previously calculatedby others.

  1. Ion acceleration by an electron beam with neutral gas ionization by an external source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherov, Victor I.; Kurilko, Victor I.; Ostrovsky, Alexey O.

    1995-02-01

    The theoretical results for ion acceleration by a high current relativistic electron beam (REB) at the neutral-gas ionization front are presented. For a significant increase in the ion energy it is necessary to control the drift velocity of the ionization front so that it is close to the synchronous particle velocity. The most feasible way for such a control is gas ionization by an external source moving in synchronism with the accelerated particles. This work is devoted to estimating the characteristics of such a source. The space-time distribution of accelerating field is also analyzed and the dynamics of accelerated ion bunch formation is studied.

  2. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal`s photo multiplier tube (PMT).

  3. Physics considerations for laser-plasma linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2010-06-11

    Physics considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. The ultra-high accelerating gradient of a laser-plasma accelerator and short laser coupling distance between accelerator stages allows for a compact linac. Two regimes of laser-plasma acceleration are discussed. The highly nonlinear regime has the advantages of higher accelerating fields and uniform focusing forces, whereas the quasi-linear regime has the advantage of symmetric accelerating properties for electrons and positrons. Scaling of various accelerator and collider parameters with respect to plasma density and laser wavelength are derived. Reduction of beamstrahlung effects implies the use of ultra-short bunches of moderate charge. The total linac length scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density, whereas the total power scales proportional to the square root of the density. A 1 TeV center-of-mass collider based on stages using a plasma density of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} requires tens of J of laser energy per stage (using 1 {micro}m wavelength lasers) with tens of kHz repetition rate. Coulomb scattering and synchrotron radiation are examined and found not to significantly degrade beam quality. A photon collider based on laser-plasma accelerated beams is also considered. The requirements for the scattering laser energy are comparable to those of a single laser-plasma accelerator stage.

  4. European particle accelerator conference

    SciTech Connect

    Tazzari, S.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the following topics: The LEP project, Superconducting RF cavities for accelerator application, Commissioning of super-ACO, Pulsed high-power beams, RF Power sources, Astrid, A storage ring for ions and electrons, Linear collider studies in Europe.

  5. Application of Real-time Digitization Technique in Beam Measurement for Accelerators

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Lei; Gao, Xingshun; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Beam measurement is very important for accelerators. With the development of analog-to-digital conversion techniques, digital beam measurement becomes a research hot spot. IQ (In-phase & Quadrature-phase) analysis based method is an important beam measurement approach, the principle of which is presented and discussed in this paper. The State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics in University of Science and Technology of China has devoted efforts to the research of digital beam measurement based on high-speed high-resolution analog-to-digital conversion, and a series of beam measurement instruments were designed for China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS), Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), and Accelerator Driven Sub-critical system (ADS).

  6. Characteristics of the high-energy photon beam of a 25-MeV accelerator.

    PubMed

    Luxton, G; Astrahan, M A

    1988-01-01

    The CGR Saturne 25 is an isocentrically mounted standing wave medical linear accelerator that produces dual-energy photon beams and a scanned electron beam with six selectable energies between 4 and 25 MeV. The highest energy photon beam is nominally referred to as 23 MV. For this beam the mean energy of the accelerated electron beam on the 1.3 radiation length (4 mm) tungsten x-ray target is found to be approximately 21 MeV, with the energy acceptance stated to be +/- 5%. The electron beam traverses a 270 degrees bending magnet upstream of the x-ray production target. The resulting bremsstrahlung beam passes through a combination steel and lead flattening filter, 4-cm maximum thickness. Dosimetric data for the 23-MV beam are presented with respect to rectangular field output factor, depth of maximum dose as a function of field size, surface and buildup dose, central axis percent depth dose, tissue-phantom ratios, beam profile, applicability of inverse square, and block transmission. Some data are also presented on the effect of different flattening filter designs on apparent beam energy. PMID:3127667

  7. Proceedings of the international workshop on next-generation linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Riordan, M. (ed.)

    1988-12-01

    This report contains papers on the next-generation of linear colliders. The particular areas of discussion are: parameters; beam dynamics and wakefields; damping rings and sources; rf power sources; accelerator structures; instrumentation; final focus; and review of beam-beam interaction.

  8. A Low Energy Beam Transport Design with high SCC for TAC Proton Accelerator

    E-print Network

    Caliskan, A; Sultansoy, S; Yilmaz, M

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a low energy beam transport (LEBT) channel for the proton linac section of the Turkic Accelerator Complex (TAC) has been designed by using TRACE 2D and TRAVEL codes. The LEBT channel is located between an ion source and a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) structure. The aims of the design studies are perfect matching between input and output beams with two solenoid magnets, small emittance growth and sufficient space for beam diagnostics. Total length of such LEBT channel is about 1.3 m. The current of H- ion beam from ion source is 80 mA. In the beam dynamical simulations, we have taken into account some space charge compensation (SCC) factors between %93.75 and %100. The results of both codes have been compared for the selected SCC factors. Additionally, beam aperture study for % 95 SCC factor has been done to discard unwanted particles and increase the beam brightness.

  9. Treatment of industrial effluents using electron beam accelerator and adsorption with activated carbon: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira Sampa, Maria Helena; Rela, Paulo Roberto; Casas, Alexandre Las; Mori, Manoel Nunes; Duarte, Celina Lopes

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of a study that compares the use of electron beam processing and activated carbon adsorption to clean up a standardized organic aqueous solution and a real industrial effluent. The electron beam treatment was performed in a batch system using the IPEN's Electron Beam Accelerators from Radiation Dynamics Inc., Dynamitron 37.5 kW. The granular activated carbon removal treatment was performed using charcoal made from wood "pinus". If the adequate irradiation dose is delivered to the organic pollutant, it is possible to conclude for the studied compounds that the Electron Beam Process is similar to the activated carbon process in organic removal efficiency.

  10. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  11. Cyclotron Autoresonance Accelerator for Electron Beam Dry Scrubbing of Flue Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfield, J. L.; Wang, Changbiao

    1997-05-01

    A novel, self-scanning, highly-efficient electron beam source is proposed for electron beam dry scrubbing (EBDS) of flue gases. The beam is prepared using cyclotron autoresonance acceleration (CARA),(C. Wang and J. L. Hirshfield, Phys. Rev. E 51), 2456 (1995); B. Hafizi, P. Sprangle , and J. L. Hirshfield, Phys. Rev. E 50, 3077 (1994). which has already demonstrated an rf efficiency of above 90% experimentally.(M. A. LaPointe, R. B. Yoder, C. Wang, A. K. Ganguly, and J. L. Hirshfield, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 2718 (1996). Simulations were done for a 250 kV, 25 A warm beam which is accelerated in a 130 cm CARA using an rf power of 21 MW at 2.856 GHz. The accelerated beam has an energy of up to 1.0 MV, corresponding to 98% acceleration efficiency. The beam can scan across the escaping flue gas with a conical angle of about 11 degrees after a 60-cm down-tapered-to-zero magnetic field. The conical scan angle is adjustable by changing the slope of the tapered magnetic field.

  12. Fast beam chopper at SARAF accelerator via RF deflector before RFQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shor, A.; Vartsky, D.; Dangendorf, V.; Bar, D.; Ben Aliz, Y.; Berkovits, D.; Brandis, M.; Goldberg, M. B.; Grin, A.; Mardor, I.; Mor, I.; Weissman, L.

    2012-06-01

    We describe design and simulations of a fast beam chopper for the SARAF accelerator based on an RF deflector preceding the RFQ. The SARAF 176 MHz RFQ, takes a DC proton or deuteron beam and accelerates and bunches the beam to 1.5 MeV/u and bunches of 0.3 ns width (FWHM) every 5.5 ns respectively. The deflector acts on the DC beam and sweeps away all but one of the pre-accelerated (pre)-bunches prior to the actual bunching and acceleration in the RFQ. Simulations were performed for a fast beam chopper, where several deflection voltage pulsing schemes have been investigated. The simulations show effective chopping with alternating positive and negative HV applied to the deflector with a fast HV switch, where the beam is transmitted to the RFQ during the cross-over of the rise(fall) of the HV switching. The simulations show that we can obtain efficient deflection of unwanted bunches, with 60% transmission efficiency for the desired bunch. The present design is for a chopper that will provide 0.3 ns bunches with a repetition rate of ~ 105bunches/sec. Plans for a fast chopper with higher repetition rates of ~ 106 Hz are discussed.

  13. The beat in laser-accelerated ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schnürer, M.; Abicht, F.; Bränzel, J.; Koschitzki, Ch. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Andreev, A. A. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany) [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Vavilov State Optical Institut, Birzhevaya line 12, 199064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg University, 199064 St. Petersburg, University emb.6 (Russian Federation); Platonov, K. Yu. [Vavilov State Optical Institut, Birzhevaya line 12, 199064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)] [Vavilov State Optical Institut, Birzhevaya line 12, 199064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Priebe, G. [XFEL GmbH, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [XFEL GmbH, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Sandner, W. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany) [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Technical University Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Regular modulation in the ion velocity distribution becomes detectable if intense femtosecond laser pulses with very high temporal contrast are used for target normal sheath acceleration of ions. Analytical and numerical analysis of the experimental observation associates the modulation with the half-cycle of the driving laser field period. In processes like ion acceleration, the collective and laser-frequency determined electron dynamics creates strong fields in plasma to accelerate the ions. Even the oscillatory motion of electrons and its influence on the acceleration field can dominate over smoothing effects in plasma if a high temporal contrast of the driving laser pulse is given. Acceleration parameters can be directly concluded out of the experimentally observed modulation period in ion velocity spectra. The appearance of the phenomenon at a temporal contrast of ten orders between the intensity of the pulse peak and the spontaneous amplified emission background as well as remaining intensity wings at picosecond time-scale might trigger further parameter studies with even higher contrast.

  14. Derivation of scaling laws for intense light ion beam divergence with the KALIF-HELIA accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppé, P.; Bauer, W.; Baumann, K.; Bluhm, H.; Buth, L.; Carboni, V.; Desjarlais, M.; Fockler, J.; Keßler, G.; Leber, K.; Marek, J.; Massier, H.; Nielsen, K.; Petri, T.; Ratajczak, W.; Rusch, D.; Singer, J.; Smith, I.; Spence, P.; Stoltz, O.

    A short description of a new accelerator called KALIF-HELIA is given, that is presently under construction at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. This High Energy Linear Induction Accelerator couples a self-magnetically insulated transmission line with the induction linac technology: the 1 MV pulses from 6 induction cells are added in a "magnetically insulated voltage adder" (MIVA) delivering for 50 ns a pulse of 6 MV and 400 kA to a matched load. This technology is considered in all light ion beam driven reactor concepts as a low cost alternative for the production of energy by inertial fusion (IFE). The pulses delivered by these generators are coupled to diodes that generate the intense light ion beams. Focusing of these beams is presently insufficient and requires scaling to IFE conditions. However, the available scaling laws for beam divergence are not in agreement with the few results from experiments performed at high power levels. Therefore, a verification and improvement of these scaling laws is necessary in order to extrapolate more reliably to beams needed for IFE conditions. For the start-up phase - foreseen for end 1997 - KALIF-HELIA will be operated first in negative polarity generating an electron beam. The subsequent operation of the accelerator in positive polarity will allow the verification of the voltage dependence in the divergence scaling laws for proton beams and acceleration voltages up to 6 MV. In a second step, the predicted influence of the ion mass on the beam divergence will be investigated by accelerating Li + ions instead of protons.

  15. Observation of Electron Cloud Stabilized 1 MeV Beam-Beam d+d Reactons in Self-Colliding Orbits and Feasibility of Electric Isotope Breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglich, Bogdan; Druey, Christian; Iyengar, P. K.; Srinivasan, Mahadeva

    2012-03-01

    D-D Self-Collider ^1,2 is only system in which beam-beam nuclear reactions demonstrated MeV energies. 1.45 MeV DC beam of D2^+ was injected into center of a weak-focusing magnetic field (Ni Ti) B=3.12 Tesla, and dissociated into 2 d^+ stored in Self-Colliding Orbits^3. Energy confinement time T = 23 s (vacuum limited p=10-9 torr), stabilized by driven electron oscillations^4. A simulation^5 shows that 1 DD neutron is produced at an energy cost of 5.36 MeV/n i.e. 140 MWh/g= 8,360/g vs. 160,000/g from beam - target. Simultaneously produced He^3 and T are not only free, but bring 45 fold gain. 5 d's of 0.75 MeV generate 1He^3 +1T +1p+ 1n at cost 5.36 MeV. Hence, it will produce 2 He^3 nuclei (1 He-3, 1 T) plus energy gain of 161 MeV. This will be reduced by the energy gain thus reducing cost to 4.5 from 5.6 MeV. Assumed ion density 5x10 ^14 was achieved in plasmas. Beam injection 100 mA. 1. PRL 54, 796 (1985) NIM A 271 p,.1-167; 2. AIP CP 311, 292 (93); 3. PRL 70, 1818 (93); 4.Part. Acc.1, (70); 5. ``50 Years with Fission'' Symp.Nat. Ac Sci., p. 761 (89)

  16. Optimization of Drive-Bunch Current Profile for Enhanced Transformer Ratio in Beam-Driven Acceleration Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Prokop, C.R.; /Northern Illinois U.; Piot, P.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2012-07-08

    In recent years, wakefield acceleration has gained attention due to its high acceleration gradients and cost effectiveness. In beam-driven wakefield acceleration, a critical parameter to optimize is the transformer ratio. It has been shown that current shaping of electron beams allows for enhanced (> 2) transformer ratios. In this paper we present the optimization of the pulse shape of the drive bunch for dielectric-wakefield acceleration.

  17. Spectrum shaping of accelerator-based neutron beams for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnini, B.; Cerullo, N.; Esposito, J.; Giusti, V.; Mattioda, F.; Varone, R.

    2002-01-01

    We describe Monte Carlo simulations of three facilities for the production of epithermal neutrons for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) and examine general aspects and problems of designing the spectrum-shaping assemblies to be used with these neutron sources. The first facility is based on an accelerator-driven low-power subcritical reactor, operating as a neutron amplifier. The other two facilities have no amplifier and rely entirely on their primary sources, a D-T fusion reaction device and a conventional 2.5 MeV proton accelerator with a Li target, respectively.

  18. Transverse emittance-preserving arc compressor for high-brightness electron beam-based light sources and colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mitri, S.; Cornacchia, M.

    2015-03-01

    Bunch length magnetic compression is used in high-brightness linacs driving free-electron lasers (FELs) and particle colliders to increase the peak current of the injected beam. To date, it is performed in dedicated insertions made of few degrees bending magnets and the compression factor is limited by the degradation of the beam transverse emittance owing to emission of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). We reformulate the known concept of CSR-driven optics balance for the general case of varying bunch length and demonstrate, through analytical and numerical results, that a 500 pC charge beam can be time-compressed in a periodic 180 deg arc at 2.4 GeV beam energy and lower, by a factor of up to 45, reaching peak currents of up to 2 kA and with a normalized emittance growth at the 0.1 ? \\text{m} rad level. The proposed solution offers new schemes of beam longitudinal gymnastics; an application to an energy recovery linac driving FEL is discussed.

  19. Electron pinch effect in beam-beam interaction of ERL based eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hao,Y.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2009-05-04

    Beam-beam effects present one of major factors limiting the luminosity of colliders. In the linac-ring option of the eRHIC design, an electron beam accelerated in a superconducting energy recovery linac(ERL) collides with a proton beam circulating in the Rille ring. Some specific features of beam-beam interactions should be carefully evaluated for the linac-ring configuration. One of the most important effects on the ion beam stability originates from a strongly focus ed electron beam because of the beam-beam force. This electron pinch effect makes the beam-beam parameter of the ion beam several times larger than the design value, and leads to a fast emittance grow th of the ion beam. The electron pinch effect can be controlled by adjustments of the electron lattice and the incident emittance. We present results of simulations optimizing the ion beam parameters in the presence of this pinch effect.

  20. Low emittance plasma ions beam by a new double accelerating configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, A.; Siciliano, M. V.; Velardi, L.; Nassisi, V.

    2010-03-01

    High intensity ion beams can be obtained by laser plasma or applying high electric fields or utilising large acceleration gaps. We get it developing a double acceleration gap system supplied by two power generators of different bias voltages. In this way we realized a new LIS accelerator configuration in order to produce and to accelerate ions of different elements. The LIS consists of a laser-induced plasma from solid targets, where the plume freely expands before the action of the accelerating fields. Our system provides ion beams of maximum energy up to 160 keV per charge state. We extracted charge from a Cu plasma as a function of the accelerating voltage at laser fluence values of 1.8, 2.2 and 3.4 J/cm 2. At 60 kV of total accelerating voltage, the peak currents were 3.9 and 5.3 mA corresponding to 1.8 and 2.2 J/cm 2 laser fluences, respectively. At the highest laser fluence, the maximum output current was 11.7 mA with an accelerating voltage of 50 kV and a corresponding ion flux of 10 12 ions/cm 2. Under the condition of 60 kV accelerating voltage and 5.3 mA output current (ion flux 3.4×10 11 ions/cm 2) the normalized emittance of the beam measured by pepper pot method resulted of 0.22? mm mrad. Under the condition of 160 kV accelerating voltage the ion flux was higher than 1.0×10 11 ions/cm 2.

  1. Reduction of beam corkscrew motion on the ETAII linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.; Allen, S.L.; Brand, H.R.; Caporaso, G.J.; Chambers, F.W.; Chen, Y.-J.; Coffield, F.E.; Deadrick, F.J.; Decker, T.A.; Griffith, L.V.; Lager, D.L.; Mauer, W.J.; Nexsen, W.E.; Paul, A.C.; Renbarger, V.L.; Sampayan, S.

    1990-09-04

    The ETAII linear induction accelerator (6MeV, 3kA, 70ns) is designed to drive a microwave free electron laser (FEL) and demonstrate the front end accelerator technology for a shorter wavelength FEL. Performance to date has been limited by beam corkscrew motion that is driven by energy sweep and misalignment of the solenoidal focusing magnets. Modifications to the pulse power distribution system and magnetic alignment are expected to reduce the radius of corkscrew motion from its present value of 1 cm to less than 1 mm. The modifications have so far been carried out on the first 2.7 MeV (injector plus 20 accelerator cells) and experiments are beginning. In this paper we will present calculations of central flux line alignment, beam corkscrew motion and beam brightness that are anticipated with the modified ETAII. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. High-energy high-luminosity electron-ion collider eRHIC

    E-print Network

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Belomestnykh, Sergei; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael M; Calaga, Rama; Chang, Xiangyun; Fedotov, Alexei; Gassner, David; Hammons, Lee; Hahn, Harald; Hao, Yue; He, Ping; Jackson, William; Jain, Animesh; Johnson, Elliott C; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jrg; Luo, Yun; Mahler, George; McIntyre, Gary; Meng, Wuzheng; Minty, Michiko; Parker, Brett; Pikin, Alexander; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Rao, Triveni; Roser, Thomas; Skaritka, John; Sheehy, Brian; Tepikian, Steven; Than, Yatming; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsentalovich, Evgeni; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Wang, Gang; Webb, Stephen; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Wencan; Zelenski, Anatoly

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a future electron-ion collider (EIC), based on the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility, with two intersecting superconducting rings, each 3.8 km in circumference. A new ERL accelerator, which provide 5-30 GeV electron beam, will ensure 10^33 to 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1 level luminosity.

  3. Start-to-end beam dynamics simulation of double triangular current profile generation in Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, G.; Power, J.; Kim, S. H.; Gai, W.; Kim, K.-J.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W. [POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of) and Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of) and Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-21

    Double triangular current profile (DT) gives a high transformer ratio which is the determining factor of the performance of collinear wakefield accelerator. This current profile can be generated using the emittance exchange (EEX) beam line. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility plans to generate DT using the EEX beam line. We conducted start-to-end simulation for the AWA beam line using PARMELA code. Also, we discuss requirements of beam parameters for the generation of DT.

  4. An experimental program for collective acceleration of ions using intense relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, T.; Raychowdhury, P.; Iyengar, S. K.

    A program of collective ion acceleration using intense relativistic electron beam (IREB) of 0.25-1MeV, 6-80kA, 60ns on the Kilo Ampere Linear Injector (KALI) systems to accelerate light and heavy ions to high energies approaching GeV with currents over tens of amperes, is envisaged. The accelerator will make use of the intense space-charge field of electron beam in vacuum for accelerating ions which are injected into it. For ion injection, various alternatives, such as, localized gas puff, dielectric insert, laser plasma, etc. were considered as present and long-term objectives. Among the variety of diagnostic methods chosen for characterizing the accelerated ions include range-energy in foil, CR-39 track detector, nuclear activation technique and time-of-flight for energy and species determination; ion Faraday cup for current measurement; and Thomson parabola analyzer for determining the post-acceleration charge-state. In the proposed MAHAKALI collective accelerator, protons of energy over 10 MeV and higher charge state metal ions around a GeV are predicted using a REB of 1MeV, 30kA, 60ns from KALI-5000. In present experiments using KALI-200 with REB parameters of 250keV, 60kA, 80ns, protons over a MeV and carbon and fluorine ions respectively for 12MeV and 16MeV in significant currents were accelerated.

  5. 2005 ALCPG & ILC Workshops -Snowmass, U.S.A. The International Linear Collider beam dumps

    E-print Network

    with a region of cold, pressurized water. The beam dumps its energy into this water, which rapidly moves away exchangers. Sufficiently beyond shower maximum the beam is sufficiently large that steel or tungsten plates

  6. Acceleration of 100A/m2 Negative Hydrogen Ion Beams in a 1 MeV Vacuum Insulated Beam Source

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, M.; Inoue, T.; Kashiwagi, M.; Hanada, M.; Watanabe, K.; Seki, K.; Sakamoto, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 311-0193 (Japan)

    2005-04-06

    In the ITER NB, conventional gas insulated beam source (GIBS) cannot be utilized because of the radiation-induced conductivity of the insulation gas. Thus a vacuum insulated beam source (VIBS), where the whole beam source is immersed in vacuum, has been developed at JAERI. Recently, voltage holding capability of the VIBS was drastically improved by the large stress ring, which reduces the electric field concentration at the triple junction. Up to now, a high current density H- beam of 102 A/m2 (140 mA) at 800 keV has been accelerated. The beam acceleration was quite stable and accomplished for several hundreds shots. The degradation of the voltage holding due to the beam acceleration and/or Cs seeding was not observed. Thus the development of vacuum insulated beam source has solved technical issues of high voltage insulation of 1 MV level under the presence of the H- ion beams.

  7. Calculation of abort thresholds for the Beam Loss Monitoring System of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    E-print Network

    Nemcic, Martin; Dehning, Bernd

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is one of the most critical machine protection systems for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Switzerland. Its main purpose is to protect the superconducting magnets from quenches and other equipment from damage by requesting a beam abort when the measured losses exceed any of the predefined threshold levels. The system consist of circa 4000 ionization chambers which are installed around the 27 kilometres ring (LHC). This study aims to choose a technical platform and produce a system that addresses all of the limitations with the current system that is used for the calculation of the LHC BLM abort threshold values. To achieve this, a comparison and benchmarking of the Java and .NET technical platforms is performed in order to establish the most suitable solution. To establish which technical platform is a successful replacement of the current abort threshold calculator, comparable prototype systems in Java and .NET we...

  8. Injection of electrons by colliding pulses in front of and at a density down ramp and multi-stage acceleration based on

    E-print Network

    region to that at the low density region #12;Experimental setup SS18 Relay image Electron imager: ICT: IF Line Focusing Image Relay Image Interferometry Side Scattering Image electron beam imager Magnet Knife machining pulse to achieve tomography of ion channel laser in the bubble regime. #12;Colliding pulse

  9. GENERATION AND CONTROL OF HIGH PRECISION BEAMS AT LEPTON ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Chiu Chao

    2007-06-25

    Parity violation experiments require precision manipulation of helicity-correlated beam coordinates on target at the nm/nrad-level. Achieving this unprecedented level of control requires a detailed understanding of the particle optics and careful tuning of the beam transport to keep anomalies from compromising the design adiabatic damping. Such efforts are often hindered by machine configuration and instrumentation limitations at the low energy end. A technique has been developed at CEBAF including high precision measurements, Mathematica-based analysis for obtaining corrective solutions, and control hardware/software developments for realizing such level of control at energies up to 5 GeV.

  10. Emittance Measurements of a Laser-Wakefield-Accelerated Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzler, S.; Lefebvre, E.; Malka, V.; Burgy, F.; Dangor, A. E.; Krushelnick, K.; Mangles, S. P.; Najmudin, Z.; Rousseau, J.-P.; Walton, B.

    2004-04-01

    The transverse emittance of a relativistic electron beam generated by the interaction of a high-intensity laser with an underdense plasma has been measured with the “pepper-pot” method. For parameters pertaining to the forced laser wakefield regime, we have measured an emittance as low as (2.7±0.9) ? mm mrad for (55±2) MeV electrons. These measurements are consistent with 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the experiment, which additionally show the existence of a relatively large halo around the beam core.

  11. Emittance measurements of a laser-wakefield-accelerated electron beam.

    PubMed

    Fritzler, S; Lefebvre, E; Malka, V; Burgy, F; Dangor, A E; Krushelnick, K; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z; Rousseau, J-P; Walton, B

    2004-04-23

    The transverse emittance of a relativistic electron beam generated by the interaction of a high-intensity laser with an underdense plasma has been measured with the "pepper-pot" method. For parameters pertaining to the forced laser wakefield regime, we have measured an emittance as low as (2.7+/-0.9) pi mm mrad for (55+/-2) MeV electrons. These measurements are consistent with 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the experiment, which additionally show the existence of a relatively large halo around the beam core. PMID:15169242

  12. Applied-B ion diode experiments on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. L. Dreike; E. J. T. Burns; S. A. Slutz; J. T. Crow; D. J. Johnson; P. R. Johnson; R. J. Leeper; P. A. Miller; L. P. Mix; D. B. Seidel; D. F. Wenger

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed with an Applied-B ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I, with peak voltage, current, and power of approximately 1.8 MV, 6 MA, and 6 TW, respectively. The purpose of these experiments was to explore issues of scaling of Applied-B diode operation from the sub-TW level on single module accelerators to the multi-TW level

  13. Electron cyclotron resonance 140 mA D+ beam extraction optimization for IFMIF EVEDA accelerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Delferrière; D. de Menezes; R. Gobin; F. Harrault; O. Tuske

    2008-01-01

    Based on the experience of the SILHI electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for the IPHI accelerator, which produces routinely 100-120 mA H+ beam, the CEA-Saclay is in charge of the design and realization of the 140 mA cw deuteron source for the IFMIF project (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility). IFMIF is an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility consisting of two

  14. Low Emittance, High Brilliance Relativistic Electron Beams from a Laser-Plasma Accelerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Brunetti; R. P. Shanks; G. G. Manahan; M. R. Islam; B. Ersfeld; M. P. Anania; S. Cipiccia; R. C. Issac; G. Raj; G. Vieux; G. H. Welsh; S. M. Wiggins; D. A. Jaroszynski

    2010-01-01

    Progress in laser wakefield accelerators indicates their suitability as a driver of compact free-electron lasers (FELs). High brightness is defined by the normalized transverse emittance, which should be less than 1pimmmrad for an x-ray FEL. We report high-resolution measurements of the emittance of 125 MeV, monoenergetic beams from a wakefield accelerator. An emittance as low as 1.1±0.1pimmmrad is measured using

  15. Low Emittance, High Brilliance Relativistic Electron Beams from a Laser-Plasma Accelerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Brunetti; R. P. Shanks; G. G. Manahan; M. R. Islam; B. Ersfeld; M. P. Anania; S. Cipiccia; R. C. Issac; G. Raj; G. Vieux; G. H. Welsh; S. M. Wiggins; D. A. Jaroszynski

    2010-01-01

    Progress in laser wakefield accelerators indicates their suitability as a driver of compact free-electron lasers (FELs). High brightness is defined by the normalized transverse emittance, which should be less than 1 mm mrad for an x-ray FEL. We report high-resolution measurements of the emittance of 125 MeV, monoenergetic beams from a wakefield accelerator. An emittance as low as 1.1{+-}0.1 mm

  16. Progress towards a 200 MW electron beam accelerator for the RDHWT/Mariah II Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Reed, Kim Warren; Pena, Gary Edward; Schneider, Larry X.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Glover, Steven Frank

    2004-06-01

    The Radiatively Driven Hypersonic Wind Tunnel (RDHWT) program requires an unprecedented 2-3 MeV electron beam energy source at an average beam power of approximately 200MW. This system injects energy downstream of a conventional supersonic air nozzle to minimize plenum temperature requirements for duplicating flight conditions above Mach 8 for long run-times. Direct-current electron accelerator technology is being developed to meet the objectives of a radiatively driven Mach 12 wind tunnel with a free stream dynamic pressure q=2000 psf. Due to the nature of research and industrial applications, there has never been a requirement for a single accelerator module with an output power exceeding approximately 500 kW. Although a 200MW module is a two-order of magnitude extrapolation from demonstrated power levels, the scaling of accelerator components to this level appears feasible. Accelerator system concepts are rapidly maturing and a clear technology development path has been established. Additionally, energy addition experiments have been conducted up to 800 kW into a supersonic airflow. This paper will discuss progress in the development of electron beam accelerator technology as an energy addition source for the RDHWT program and results of electron beam energy addition experiments conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

  17. Accelerator research on MBE-4, an experimental multi-beam induction linac

    SciTech Connect

    Meuth, H.; Fessenden, T.J.; Keefe, D.; Warwick, A.I.

    1988-06-01

    The multiple beam accelerator MBE-4 is a device for research toward a heavy ion driver for inertial confinement fusion, based on the induction linac concept. Its main goal is proof of the principle of current amplification by acceleration and controlled self-similar beam pulse compression. Into the 16-m long device four beams, each with an initial current of 10 mA are injected from a Marx-driven diode at 200 keV. The current amplification is up to nine-fold, with a final beam energy of about 800 keV in the middle of the bunch. Now that all the apparatus' accelerator sections have been completed, installed and aligned, and its unaccelerated transport properties have been studied, our experimental research has reached the crucial phase of implementing appropriate accelerator schedules that approximate self-similar current-pulse compression. These schedules are established through a close interplay of computations using a one-dimensional simulation code and a manual empirical tuning procedure. In a first approach, with a rather vigorous schedule that uses most of the accelerator modules to their voltage limits, we have determined the limits of our capability for controlled pulse compression, mainly due to waveform shaping of the driving pulse-forming networks. We shall report on these results. In the future, we will also aim for gentler schedules that would model more closely an inertial confinement fusion scenario. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Induction-accelerator heavy-ion fusion: Status and beam physics issues

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.

    1996-01-26

    Inertial confinement fusion driven by beams of heavy ions is an attractive route to controlled fusion. In the U.S., induction accelerators are being developed as {open_quotes}drivers{close_quotes} for this process. This paper is divided into two main sections. In the first section, the concept of induction-accelerator driven heavy-ion fusion is briefly reviewed, and the U.S. program of experiments and theoretical investigations is described. In the second, a {open_quotes}taxonomy{close_quotes} of space-charge-dominated beam physics issues is presented, accompanied by a brief discussion of each area.

  19. Investigation of Beam Loading Effects for the Neutrino Factory Muon Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    J. Pozimski,M. Aslaninejad,C. Bontoiu,S. Berg,Alex Bogacz

    2010-05-01

    The International design study (IDS) study showed that a Neutrino Factory [1] seems to be the most promising candidate for the next phase of high precision neutrino oscillation experiments. One part of the increased precision is due to the fact that in a Neutrino Factory the decay of muons produces a neutrino beam with narrow energy distribution and divergence. The effect of beam loading on the energy distribution of the muon beam in the Neutrino Factory decay rings has been investigated numerically. The simulations have been performed using the baseline accelerator design including cavities for different number of bunch trains and bunch train timing. A detailed analysis of the beam energy distribution expected is given together with a discussion of the energy spread produced by the gutter acceleration in the FFAG and the implications for the neutrino oscillation experiments will be presented.

  20. Conceptual design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, Nicholas P.

    1986-05-01

    The complete Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility will be a complex set of accelerators and beam transfer equipment connecting them. A significant portion of the total facility either exists or is under construction. Two existing Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will serve for the initial ion acceleration. Ions with a charge of -1 would be accelerated from ground to +15 MV potential, pass through a stripping foil, and accelerate back to ground potential, where they would pass through a second stripping foil. From there the ions will traverse a long transfer line to the AGS tunnel and be injected into the Booster accelerator. The Booster accelerates the ion bunch, and then the ions pass through one more stripper and then enter the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), where they are accelerated to the top AGS energy and transferred to the collider. Bending and focusing of ion beams is to be achieved by superconducting magnets. The physics goals behind the RHIC are enumerated, particularly as regards the study of quark matter and the characteristics of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. The design of the collider and all its components is described, including the injector, the lattice, magnet system, cryogenic and vacuum systems, beam transfer, injection, and dump, rf system, and beam instrumentation and control system. Also given are cost estimates, construction schedules, and a management plan. (LEW)

  1. Initial measurements of beam breakup instability in the advanced test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Y.P.; Caporaso, G.J.; Struve, K.W.

    1985-05-13

    This paper reports the measurements of beam breakup (BBU) instability performed on the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) up to the end of February, 1984. The main objective was to produce a high current usable electron beam at the ATA output. A well-known instability is BBU which arises from the accelerator cavity modes interacting with the electron beam. The dominant mode is TM/sub 130/ at a frequency of approximately 785 MHz. It couples most strongly to the beam motion and has been observed to grow in the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) which has only eight accelerator cavities. ATA has one hundred and seventy cavities and, therefore, the growth of BBU is expected to be more severe. In this paper, BBU measurements are reported for ATA with beam currents of 4 to 7 kA. Analysis showed that the growth of the instability with propagation distance was as expected for the lower currents. However, the high-current data showed an apparent higher growth rate than expected. An explanation for this anomaly is given in terms of a ''corkscrew'' excitation. The injector BBU noise level for a field emission brush cathode was found to be an order of magnitude lower than for a cold plasma discharge cathode. These injector rf amplitudes agree very well with values obtained using the method of differenced B sub solar loops.

  2. Plasmas in particle accelerators: adiabatic theories for bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1981-03-03

    Three different formalisms for discussing Vlasov's equation for bunched beam problems with anharmonic space charge forces are outlined. These correspond to the use of a drift kinetic equation averaged over random betatron motions; a fluidkinetic adiabatic regime analogous to the theory of Chew, Goldberger, and Low; and an adiabatic hydrodynamic theory.

  3. Accelerated radioactive nuclear beams: Existing and planned facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1992-07-01

    An over-view of existing and planned radioactive nuclear beam facilities world-wide. Two types of production methods are distinguished: projectile fragmentation and the on-line isotope separator (ISOL) method. While most of the projectile fragmentation facilities are already in operation, almost all the ISOL-based facilities are in still the planning stage.

  4. High-quality electron beams from a helical inverse free-electron laser accelerator.

    PubMed

    Duris, J; Musumeci, P; Babzien, M; Fedurin, M; Kusche, K; Li, R K; Moody, J; Pogorelsky, I; Polyanskiy, M; Rosenzweig, J B; Sakai, Y; Swinson, C; Threlkeld, E; Williams, O; Yakimenko, V

    2014-01-01

    Compact, table-top sized accelerators are key to improving access to high-quality beams for use in industry, medicine and academic research. Among laser-based accelerating schemes, the inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) enjoys unique advantages. By using an undulator magnetic field in combination with a laser, GeV m(-1) gradients may be sustained over metre-scale distances using laser intensities several orders of magnitude less than those used in laser wake-field accelerators. Here we show for the first time the capture and high-gradient acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams from a helical IFEL. Using a modest intensity (~10(13)?W cm(-2)) laser pulse and strongly tapered 0.5 m long undulator, we demonstrate >100 MV m(-1) accelerating gradient, >50 MeV energy gain and excellent output beam quality. Our results pave the way towards compact, tunable GeV IFEL accelerators for applications such as driving soft X-ray free-electron lasers and producing ?-rays by inverse Compton scattering. PMID:25222026

  5. Revealing the large extra dimension effective interaction at an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider with polarized beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pankov, A. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.; Paver, N. [ICTP Affiliated Centre, Pavel Sukhoi Technical University, Gomel 246746 (Belarus); University of Trieste and INFN-Trieste Section, 34100 Trieste (Italy)

    2007-05-01

    Several types of new physics scenarios are represented by contactlike effective interactions. An example is the exchange of nonstandard quanta of very large mass scales, beyond the kinematical limit for direct production set by the available collider energy. This kind of interactions can be revealed only through deviations of observables from the standard model predictions. If such deviations were observed, the relevant source should be identified among the possible models that could explain them. Here, we assess the expected 'identification reach' on the ADD model of gravity in large compactified extra dimensions, against the compositeness-inspired four-fermion contact interaction. As basic observables we take the differential cross sections for fermion-pair production at a 0.5-1 TeV electron-positron linear collider with both beams longitudinally polarized. For the four-fermion contact interaction, we assume a general linear combination of the individual models with definite chiralities, with arbitrary coupling constants. In this sense, the estimated identification reach on the ADD model can be considered as 'model independent'. In the analysis, we give estimates also for the expected 'discovery reaches' on the various scenarios. We emphasize the substantial role of beams polarization in enhancing the sensitivity to the contactlike interactions under consideration.

  6. Observation of high current effects in high energy linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1991-12-01

    The acceleration and transport of electron beams with high currents and low emittances are subjects studied very carefully for many operating accelerators and most future accelerators. For a example, several Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) presently operate with high energy intense beams. The next generation of synchrotron light sources and future linear colliders require a much higher degree of component precision and beam control. In this note the basic concepts governing the effects of high currents in accelerators are explored, including observations of high currents in present accelerators. The effects of longitudinal wakefields on acceleration and energy spreads are studied first. Then, the transverse equations of motion are developed including the technique of BNS damping to control wakefield growth. These wakefield effects are investigated to characterize their influence on the control and observation of beam oscillations. Finally, the reduction of transverse wakefield effects is important for maintaining the emittance of intense beams. 49 refs., 48 figs.

  7. Vacuum propagation of a shaped laser beam and direct vacuum acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Liu, C. P.; Wang, C.; Shen, B. F.

    2015-07-01

    The vacuum propagation of a laser beam is strictly solved on the basis of (1) the wave equation, (2) Gauss's law, (3) finite power, and (4) a group velocity equal to c. The direct vacuum acceleration of the classic charge is then studied based on the strictly solved vacuum laser field. Different vacuum states of the laser beam are chosen by the physical nature of the interface between the vacuum and the solid optical material.

  8. Narrowband beam loading compensation in the Fermilab Main Injector accelerating cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph E. Dey; John S. Reid and James Steimel

    2001-07-12

    A narrowband beam loading compensation system was installed for the Main Injector Accelerating Cavities. This feedback operates solely on the fundamental resonant mode of the cavity. This paper describes modifications to the high level Radio Frequency system required to make the system operational. These modifications decreased the effect of steady-state beam loading by a factor of 10 and improved the reliability of paraphasing for coalescing.

  9. Results of beam parameter measurement of the ELBE electron accelerator after commissioning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Teichert; A. Büchner; P. Evtushenko; F. Gabriel; U. Lehnert; P. Michel; J. The ELBE Crew Voigtländer

    2003-01-01

    The ELBE accelerator, an electron linac with superconducting cavities, is designed for a beam energy of 40MeV, a CW current up to 1mA, and a maximum bunch charge of 77pC. The electron beam will be used to generate a variety of electromagnetic radiations with different wave length. For the first commissioning tests, the injector with a thermionic electron gun, one

  10. Dosimetric characteristics of electron beams produced by a mobile accelerator for IORT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimpinella, M.; Mihailescu, D.; Guerra, A. S.; Laitano, R. F.

    2007-10-01

    Energy and angular distributions of electron beams with different energies were simulated by Monte Carlo calculations. These beams were generated by the NOVAC7® system (Hitesys, Italy), a mobile electron accelerator specifically dedicated to intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT). The electron beam simulations were verified by comparing the measured dose distributions with the corresponding calculated distributions. As expected, a considerable difference was observed in the energy and angular distributions between the IORT beams studied in the present work and the electron beams produced by conventional accelerators for non-IORT applications. It was also found that significant differences exist between the IORT beams used in this work and other IORT beams with different collimation systems. For example, the contribution from the scattered electrons to the total dose was found to be up to 15% higher in the NOVAC7® beams. The water-to-air stopping power ratios of the IORT beams used in this work were calculated on the basis of the beam energy distributions obtained by the Monte Carlo simulations. These calculated stopping power ratios, sw,air, were compared with the corresponding sw,air values recommended by the TRS-381 and TRS-398 IAEA dosimetry protocols in order to estimate the deviations between a dosimetry based on generic parameters and a dosimetry based on parameters specifically obtained for the actual IORT beams. The deviations in the sw,air values were found to be as large as up to about 1%. Therefore, we recommend that a preliminary analysis should always be made when dealing with IORT beams in order to assess to what extent the possible differences in the sw,air values have to be accounted for or may be neglected on the basis of the specific accuracy needed in clinical dosimetry.

  11. Studies of beam induced dipole-mode signals in accelerating structures at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, M.

    1997-06-01

    Beam emittance dilution by self induced transverse fields (wakefields) in accelerating structures is a key problem in linear accelerators. To minimize the wakefield effects the beam trajectory must be precisely centered within the structures. An efficient way to achieve this is to detect beam induced microwave signals in the lowest dipole mode band and to steer the beam by minimizing these signals. This paper briefly covers some experiences from SLC S-band structures, but mainly concentrates on results of a wakefield instrumentation scheme applied to a NLC prototype X-band structure and tested with beam in the SLC linac. A beam based in-situ structure straightness measurement is shown as well as results of beam steering experiments based on phase and amplitude detection of two separated modes in the structure. After centering the beam the reduction of the wakefield was demonstrated independently by probing it with a test bunch that is deflected by the residual wakefield at a short distance behind the drive bunch.

  12. The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator: diagnostics and beam characterization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Conde; W. Gai; R. Konecny; X. Li; J. Power; P. Schoessow; N. Barov

    1997-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is comprised of two L-band photocathode RF guns and standing wave linac structures. The high charge bunches (20-100 nC) produced by the main gun (drive gun) allow us to study the generation of wakefields in dielectric lined structures and plasmas. The secondary gun (witness gun) generates low charge bunches (80-300 pC) that are used to probe

  13. Long pulse acceleration of MeV class high power density negative H- ion beam for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, N.; Kojima, A.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Hiratsuka, J.; Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Yamanaka, H.; Hanada, M.

    2015-04-01

    R&D of high power density negative ion beam acceleration has been carried out at MeV test facility in JAEA to realize ITER neutral beam accelerator. The main target is H- ion beam acceleration up to 1 MeV with 200 A/m2 for 60 s whose pulse length is the present facility limit. For long pulse acceleration at high power density, new extraction grid (EXG) has been developed with high cooling capability, which electron suppression magnet is placed under cooling channel similar to ITER. In addition, aperture size of electron suppression grid (ESG) is enlarged from 14 mm to 16 mm to reduce direct interception on the ESG and emission of secondary electron which leads to high heat load on the upstream acceleration grid. By enlarging ESG aperture, beam current increased 10 % at high current beam and total acceleration grid heat load reduced from 13 % to 10 % of input power at long pulse beam. In addition, heat load by back stream positive ion into the EXG is measured for the first time and is estimated as 0.3 % of beam power, while heat load by back stream ion into the source chamber is estimated as 3.5 ~ 4.0 % of beam power. Beam acceleration up to 60 s which is the facility limit, has achieved at 683 keV, 100 A/m2 of negative ion beam, whose energy density increases two orders of magnitude since 2011.

  14. Muon Collider Task Force Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Alexahin, Y.; Balbekov, V.; Barzi, E.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bross, A.; Burov, A.; Drozhdin, A.; Finley, D.; Geer, S.; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /Jefferson Lab /LBL, Berkeley /MUONS Inc., Batavia /UCLA /UC, Riverside /Mississippi U.

    2007-12-01

    Muon Colliders offer a possible long term path to lepton-lepton collisions at center-of-mass energies {radical}s {ge} 1 TeV. In October 2006 the Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) proposed a program of advanced accelerator R&D aimed at developing the Muon Collider concept. The proposed R&D program was motivated by progress on Muon Collider design in general, and in particular, by new ideas that have emerged on muon cooling channel design. The scope of the proposed MCTF R&D program includes muon collider design studies, helical cooling channel design and simulation, high temperature superconducting solenoid studies, an experimental program using beams to test cooling channel RF cavities and a 6D cooling demonstration channel. The first year of MCTF activities are summarized in this report together with a brief description of the anticipated FY08 R&D activities. In its first year the MCTF has made progress on (1) Muon Collider ring studies, (2) 6D cooling channel design and simulation studies with an emphasis on the HCC scheme, (3) beam preparations for the first HPRF cavity beam test, (4) preparations for an HCC four-coil test, (5) further development of the MANX experiment ideas and studies of the muon beam possibilities at Fermilab, (6) studies of how to integrate RF into an HCC in preparation for a component development program, and (7) HTS conductor and magnet studies to prepare for an evaluation of the prospects for of an HTS high-field solenoid build for a muon cooling channel.

  15. Operational status of the uranium beam upgrade of the ATLAS accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Bollinger, L.M.; Nolen, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    The Positive-Ion Injector (PII) for ATLAS is complete. First beams from the new injector have been accelerated and used for experiments at ATLAS. The PH consists of an ECR ion source on a 350-kV platform and a low-velocity superconducting linac. The first acceleration of uranium for the experimental program has demonstrated the design goals of the project have been met. Since the summer of 1992, the new injecter has been used for the research program approximately 50% of the time. Longitudinal beam quality from the new injector has been measured to be significantly better than comparable beams from the tandem injecter. Changes to the mix of resonators in the main ATLAS accelerator to match better the velocity profile for heavy beams such as uranium are nearly complete and uranium energies up to 6.45 MeV per nucleon have been achieved. The operating experience of the new ATLAS facility will be discussed with emphasis on the measured beam quality as well as achieved beam energies and currents.

  16. Supervision Software for the Integration of the Beam Interlock System with the CERN Accelerator Complex

    E-print Network

    Audrain, M; Dragu, M; Fuchsberger, K; Garnier, JC; Gorzawski, AA; Koza, M; Krol, K; Moscatelli, A; Puccio, B; Stamos, K; Zerlauth, M

    2014-01-01

    The Accelerator complex at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) is composed of many systems which are required to function in a valid state to ensure safe beam operation. One key component of machine protection, the Beam Interlock System (BIS), was designed to interface critical systems around the accelerator chain, provide fast and reliable transmission of beam dump requests and trigger beam extraction in case of malfunctioning of equipment systems or beam losses. Numerous upgrades of accelerator and controls components during the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) are followed by subsequent software updates that need to be thoroughly validated before the restart of beam operation in 2015. In parallel, the ongoing deployments of the BIS hardware in the PS booster (PSB) and the future LINAC4 give rise to new requirements for the related controls and monitoring software due to their fast cycle times. This paper describes the current status and ongoing work as well as the long-term vision for the integratio...

  17. Beam collimation and transport of quasineutral laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harres, K.; Alber, I.; Tauschwitz, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Daido, H.; Günther, M.; Nürnberg, F.; Otten, A.; Schollmeier, M.; Schütrumpf, J.; Tampo, M.; Roth, M.

    2010-02-01

    This article reports about controlling laser-accelerated proton beams with respect to beam divergence and energy. The particles are captured by a pulsed high field solenoid with a magnetic field strength of 8.6 T directly behind a flat target foil that is irradiated by a high intensity laser pulse. Proton beams with energies around 2.3 MeV and particle numbers of 1012 could be collimated and transported over a distance of more than 300 mm. In contrast to the protons the comoving electrons are strongly deflected by the solenoid field. They propagate at a submillimeter gyroradius around the solenoid's axis which could be experimentally verified. The originated high flux electron beam produces a high space charge resulting in a stronger focusing of the proton beam than expected by tracking results. Leadoff particle-in-cell simulations show qualitatively that this effect is caused by space charge attraction due to the comoving electrons. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications such as postacceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  18. Beam Transport in a Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Caporaso, G; Blackfield, D; Nelson, S D; Poole, B

    2011-03-16

    To attain the highest accelerating gradient in the compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator, the DWA will be operated in the 'virtual' traveling mode with potentially non-uniform and time-dependent axial accelerating field profiles, especially near the DWA entrance and exit, which makes beam transport challenging. We have established a baseline transport case without using any external lenses. Results of simulations using the 3-D, EM PIC code, LSP indicate that the DWA transport performance meets the medical specifications for proton treatment. Sensitivity of the transport performance to Blumlein block failure will be presented.

  19. Low Emittance, High Brilliance Relativistic Electron Beams from a Laser-Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, E.; Shanks, R. P.; Manahan, G. G.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Raj, G.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2010-11-01

    Progress in laser wakefield accelerators indicates their suitability as a driver of compact free-electron lasers (FELs). High brightness is defined by the normalized transverse emittance, which should be less than 1?mmmrad for an x-ray FEL. We report high-resolution measurements of the emittance of 125 MeV, monoenergetic beams from a wakefield accelerator. An emittance as low as 1.1±0.1?mmmrad is measured using a pepper-pot mask. This sets an upper limit on the emittance, which is comparable with conventional linear accelerators. A peak transverse brightness of 5×1015Am-1rad-1 makes it suitable for compact XUV FELs.

  20. Trends and applications for MeV electrostatic ion beam accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, G. A.; Stodola, S. E.

    2014-08-01

    The 1970s into the 1980s saw a major broadening of applications for electrostatic accelerators. Prior to this time, all accelerators were used primarily for nuclear structure research. In the 70s there was a significant move into production ion implantation with the necessary MeV ion beam analysis techniques such as RBS and ERD. Accelerators are still being built for these materials analysis techniques today. However, there is still a great ongoing expansion of applications for these machines. At the present time, the demand for electrostatic accelerators is near an all time high. The number of applications continues to grow. This paper will touch on some of the current applications which are as diverse as nuclear fission reactor developments and pharmacokinetics. In the field of nuclear engineering, MeV ion beams from electrostatic accelerators are being used in material damage studies and for iodine and actinide accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). In the field of pharmacokinetics, electrostatic MeV accelerators are being used to detect extremely small amounts of above background 14C. This has significantly reduced the time required to reach first in human studies. These and other applications will be discussed.