Science.gov

Sample records for colliding hypersonic flows

  1. Workshop on hypersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Povinelli, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of research activity on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CDF) for hypersonic propulsion systems. After the initial consideration of the highly integrated nature of air-breathing hypersonic engines and airframe, attention is directed toward computations carried out for the components of the engine. A generic inlet configuration is considered in order to demonstrate the highly three dimensional viscous flow behavior occurring within rectangular inlets. Reacting flow computations for simple jet injection as well as for more complex combustion chambers are then discussed in order to show the capability of viscous finite rate chemical reaction computer simulations. Finally, the nozzle flow fields are demonstrated, showing the existence of complex shear layers and shock structure in the exhaust plume. The general issues associated with code validation as well as the specific issue associated with the use of CFD for design are discussed. A prognosis for the success of CFD in the design of future propulsion systems is offered.

  2. Technical Seminar: Exploring Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Aeronautics is developing a method for 2D and 3D imaging of hypersonic flows, called Nitric Oxide Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (NO-PLIF). NO-PLIF has been used to study basic transition f...

  3. Proximal bodies in hypersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf; Laurence, Stuart J; Hornung, Hans G

    2007-01-01

    Hypersonic flows involving two or more bodies travelling in close proximity to one another are encountered in several important situations, both natural and man-made. The present work seeks to investigate one aspect of the resulting flow problem by exploring the forces experienced by a secondary body when it is within the domain of influence of a primary body travelling at hypersonic speeds. An analytical methodology based on the blast wave analogy is developed and used to predict the secondary force coefficients for simple geometries in both two and three dimensions. When the secondary body is entirely inside the primary shocked region, the nature of the lateral force coefficient is found to depend strongly on the relative size of the two bodies. For two spheres, the methodology predicts that the secondary body will experience an exclusively attractive lateral force if the secondary diameter is larger than one-sixth the primary diameter. The analytical results are compared with those from numerical simulations and reasonable agreement is observed if an appropriate normalization for the lateral displacement is used. Results from a series of experiments in the T5 hypervelocity shock tunnel are also presented and compared with perfect-gas numerical simulations, with good agreement. A new force-measurement technique for short-duration hypersonic facilities, enabling the experimental simulation of the proximal bodies problem, is described. This technique provides two independent means of measurement, and the agreement observed between the two gives a further degree of confidence in the results obtained.

  4. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows is described and discussed. Starting with the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, methods of statistical averaging are described by means of which the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are developed. Unknown averages in these equations are approximated using various closure concepts. Zero-, one-, and two-equation eddy viscosity models, algebraic stress models and Reynolds stress transport models are discussed. Computations of supersonic and hypersonic flows obtained using several of the models are discussed and compared with experimental results. Specific examples include attached boundary layer flows, shock wave boundary layer interactions and compressible shear layers. From these examples, conclusions regarding the status of modeling and recommendations for future studies are discussed.

  5. Proximal bodies in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurence, Stuart J.

    The problem of proximal bodies in hypersonic flow is encountered in several important situations, both natural and man-made. The present work seeks to investigate one aspect of this problem by exploring the forces experienced by a secondary body when some part of it is within the shocked region created by a primary body travelling at hypersonic speeds. An analytical methodology based on the blast wave analogy is developed and used to predict the secondary force coefficients for simple geometries in both two and three dimensions. When the secondary body is entirely inside the primary shocked region, the nature of the lateral coefficient is found to depend strongly on the relative size of the two bodies. For two spheres, the methodology predicts that the secondary body will experience an exclusively attractive lateral force if the secondary diameter is larger then one-sixth the primary diameter. The analytical results are compared with numerical simulations carried out using the AMROC software and good agreement is obtained if an appropriate normalization for the lateral displacement is used. Results from a series of experiments in the T5 hypervelocity shock tunnel are also presented and compared with perfect-gas numerical simulations, again with good agreement. In order to model this situation experimentally, a new force-measurement technique for short-duration hypersonic facilities has been developed, and results from the validation experiments are included. Finally, the analytical methodology is used to model two physical situations. First, the entry of a binary asteroid system into the Earth's atmosphere is simulated. Second, a model for a fragmenting meteoroid in a planetary atmosphere is developed, and simulations are carried out to determine whether the secondary scatter patterns in the Sikhote-Alin crater field may be attributed to aerodynamic interactions between fragments rather than to secondary fragmentation. It is found that while aerodynamic

  6. Turbulence modeling for complex hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents results of calculations for a range of 2D turbulent hypersonic flows using two-equation models. The baseline models and the model corrections required for good hypersonic-flow predictions will be illustrated. Three experimental data sets were chosen for comparison. They are: (1) the hypersonic flare flows of Kussoy and Horstman, (2) a 2D hypersonic compression corner flow of Coleman and Stollery, and (3) the ogive-cylinder impinging shock-expansion flows of Kussoy and Horstman. Comparisons with the experimental data have shown that baseline models under-predict the extent of flow separation but over-predict the heat transfer rate near flow reattachment. Modifications to the models are described which remove the above-mentioned deficiencies. Although we have restricted the discussion only to the selected baseline models in this paper, the modifications proposed are universal and can in principle be transferred to any existing two-equation model formulation.

  7. Nonequilibrium radiative hypersonic flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, J. S.; Surzhikov, S. T.

    2012-08-01

    Nearly all the required scientific disciplines for computational hypersonic flow simulation have been developed on the framework of gas kinetic theory. However when high-temperature physical phenomena occur beneath the molecular and atomic scales, the knowledge of quantum physics and quantum chemical-physics becomes essential. Therefore the most challenging topics in computational simulation probably can be identified as the chemical-physical models for a high-temperature gaseous medium. The thermal radiation is also associated with quantum transitions of molecular and electronic states. The radiative energy exchange is characterized by the mechanisms of emission, absorption, and scattering. In developing a simulation capability for nonequilibrium radiation, an efficient numerical procedure is equally important both for solving the radiative transfer equation and for generating the required optical data via the ab-initio approach. In computational simulation, the initial values and boundary conditions are paramount for physical fidelity. Precise information at the material interface of ablating environment requires more than just a balance of the fluxes across the interface but must also consider the boundary deformation. The foundation of this theoretic development shall be built on the eigenvalue structure of the governing equations which can be described by Reynolds' transport theorem. Recent innovations for possible aerospace vehicle performance enhancement via an electromagnetic effect appear to be very attractive. The effectiveness of this mechanism is dependent strongly on the degree of ionization of the flow medium, the consecutive interactions of fluid dynamics and electrodynamics, as well as an externally applied magnetic field. Some verified research results in this area will be highlighted. An assessment of all these most recent advancements in nonequilibrium modeling of chemical kinetics, chemical-physics kinetics, ablation, radiative exchange

  8. Speeding Convergence In Simulations Of Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J.; Cheung, S.; Cheer, A.; Hafez, M.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes study aimed at accelerating rates of convergence of iterative schemes for numerical integration of equations of hypersonic flow of viscous and inviscid fluids. Richardson-type overrelaxation method applied.

  9. Vibrational relaxation in hypersonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Willard E.; Miner, Gilda A.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical formulations of vibrational relaxation are derived from first principles for application to fluid dynamic computations of hypersonic flow fields. Relaxation within and immediately behind shock waves is shown to be substantially faster than that described in current numerical codes. The result should be a significant reduction in nonequilibrium radiation overshoot in shock layers and in radiative heating of hypersonic vehicles; these results are precisely the trends needed to bring theoretical predictions more in line with flight data. Errors in existing formulations are identified and qualitative comparisons are made.

  10. Advances in Computational Capabilities for Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Moss, James N.; Drummond, J. Philip

    1997-01-01

    The paper reviews the growth and advances in computational capabilities for hypersonic applications over the period from the mid-1980's to the present day. The current status of the code development issues such as surface and field grid generation, algorithms, physical and chemical modeling, and validation is provided. A brief description of some of the major codes being used at NASA Langley Research Center for hypersonic continuum and rarefied flows is provided, along with their capabilities and deficiencies. A number of application examples are presented, and future areas of research to enhance accuracy, reliability, efficiency, and robustness of computational codes are discussed.

  11. Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. Subba

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

  12. Computational analysis of hypersonic airbreathing aircraft flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, Douglas L.; Kumar, Ajay

    1987-01-01

    The general problem of calculating the flow fields associated with hypersonic airbreathing aircraft is presented. Unique aspects of hypersonic aircraft aerodynamics are introduced and their demands on computational fluid dynamics are outlined. Example calculations associated with inlet/forebody integration and hypersonic nozzle design are presented to illustrate the nature of the problems considered.

  13. Tandem spheres in hypersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, Stuart J; Deiterding, Ralf; Hornung, Hans G

    2009-01-01

    The problem of determining the forces acting on a secondary body when it is travelling at some point within the shocked region created by a hypersonic primary body is of interest in such situations as store or stage separation, re-entry of multiple vehicles, and atmospheric meteoroid fragmentation. The current work is concerned with a special case of this problem, namely that in which both bodies are spheres and are stationary with respect to one another. We first present an approximate analytical model of the problem; subsequently, numerical simulations are described and results are compared with those from the analytical model. Finally, results are presented from a series of experiments in the T5 hypervelocity shock tunnel in which a newly-developed force-measurement technique was employed.

  14. Hypersonic Flow Computations on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, K. L.; Riley, C. J.; Peraire, J.

    1997-01-01

    A method for computing inviscid hypersonic flow over complex configurations using unstructured meshes is presented. The unstructured grid solver uses an edge{based finite{volume formulation. Fluxes are computed using a flux vector splitting scheme that is capable of representing constant enthalpy solutions. Second{order accuracy in smooth flow regions is obtained by linearly reconstructing the solution, and stability near discontinuities is maintained by locally forcing the scheme to reduce to first-order accuracy. The implementation of the algorithm to parallel computers is described. Computations using the proposed method are presented for a sphere-cone configuration at Mach numbers of 5.25 and 10.6, and a complex hypersonic re-entry vehicle at Mach numbers of 4.5 and 9.8. Results are compared to experimental data and computations made with established structured grid methods. The use of the solver as a screening tool for rapid aerodynamic assessment of proposed vehicles is described.

  15. Internal hypersonic flow. [in thin shock layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. C.; Rubin, S. G.

    1974-01-01

    An approach for studying hypersonic internal flow with the aid of a thin-shock-layer approximation is discussed, giving attention to a comparison of thin-shock-layer results with the data obtained on the basis of the imposition theory or a finite-difference integration of the Euler equations. Relations in the case of strong interaction are considered together with questions of pressure distribution and aspects of the boundary-layer solution.

  16. Algorithm For Hypersonic Flow In Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant

    1989-01-01

    Implicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing algorithm calculates inviscid, hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium. Implicit formulation chosen because overcomes limitation on mathematical stability encountered in explicit formulations. For dynamical portion of problem, Euler equations written in conservation-law form in Cartesian coordinate system for two-dimensional or axisymmetric flow. For chemical portion of problem, equilibrium state of gas at each point in computational grid determined by minimizing local Gibbs free energy, subject to local conservation of molecules, atoms, ions, and total enthalpy. Major advantage: resulting algorithm naturally stable and captures strong shocks without help of artificial-dissipation terms to damp out spurious numerical oscillations.

  17. On Numerical Methods For Hypersonic Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, B.; Shu, C. W.; Wang, W.; Magin, T.; Hadjadj, A.

    2011-05-01

    Proper control of numerical dissipation in numerical methods beyond the standard shock-capturing dissipation at discontinuities is an essential element for accurate and stable simulation of hypersonic turbulent flows, including combustion, and thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flows. Unlike rapidly developing shock interaction flows, turbulence computations involve long time integrations. Improper control of numerical dissipation from one time step to another would be compounded over time, resulting in the smearing of turbulent fluctuations to an unrecognizable form. Hypersonic turbulent flows around re- entry space vehicles involve mixed steady strong shocks and turbulence with unsteady shocklets that pose added computational challenges. Stiffness of the source terms and material mixing in combustion pose yet other types of numerical challenges. A low dissipative high order well- balanced scheme, which can preserve certain non-trivial steady solutions of the governing equations exactly, may help minimize some of these difficulties. For stiff reactions it is well known that the wrong propagation speed of discontinuities occurs due to the under-resolved numerical solutions in both space and time. Schemes to improve the wrong propagation speed of discontinuities for systems of stiff reacting flows remain a challenge for algorithm development. Some of the recent algorithm developments for direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large eddy simulations (LES) for the subject physics, including the aforementioned numerical challenges, will be discussed.

  18. The Blunt Plate In Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baradell, Donald L.; Bertram, Mitchel H.

    1960-01-01

    The sonic-wedge characteristics method has been used to obtain the shock shapes and surface pressure distributions on several blunt two-dimensional shapes in a hypersonic stream for several values of the ratio of specific heats. These shapes include the blunt slab at angle of attack and power profiles of the form yb = a)P, where 0 les than m less than 1, Yb and x are coordinates of the body surface, and a is a constant. These numerical results have been compared with the results of blast-wave theory, and methods of predicting the pressure distributions and shock shapes are proposed in each case. The effects of a free-stream conical-flow gradient on the pressure distribution on a blunt slab in hypersonic flow were investigated by the sonic-wedge characteristics method and were found to be sizable in many cases. Procedures which are satisfactory for reducing pressure data obtained in conical flows with small gradients are presented.

  19. Nonequilibrium effects for hypersonic transitional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Simmonds, Ann L.; Cuda, Vincent, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the results of numerical simulations of hypersonic flow about blunt cones and hemispherical nose configurations for reentry velocities of 7.5 and 10 km/s. Cone half angles 0, 5, and 10 deg are considered at zero angle of incidence; however, the focus is for the 5 deg cone. The body size and altitude ranges considered (70 to 110 km) are such that the flow is in the transitional regime. Translational, thermodynamic, and chemical nonequilibrium effects are considered in the numerical simulation by utilizing the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird. The DSMC results are compared with those obtained with viscous shock-layer and Navier-Stokes methods. Comparisons between the DSMC and continuum calculations show the altitude range where differences in flowfield structure and surface quantities become significant. The current calculations show that the binary scaling similitude provides a means of correlating the blunt body surface quantities in the hypersonic, transitional regime. Furthermore, for the higher velocity entry conditions, the results highlight some of the concerns in the application of multitemperature continuum formulations, particularly the use of some proposed functional relations for the chemical rate constants under thermodynamic nonequilibrium conditions.

  20. Downstream Effects on Orbiter Leeside Flow Separation for Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Pulsonetti, Maria V.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    2005-01-01

    Discrepancies between experiment and computation for shuttle leeside flow separation, which came to light in the Columbia accident investigation, are resolved. Tests were run in the Langley Research Center 20-Inch Hypersonic CF4 Tunnel with a baseline orbiter model and two extended trailing edge models. The extended trailing edges altered the wing leeside separation lines, moving the lines toward the fuselage, proving that wing trailing edge modeling does affect the orbiter leeside flow. Computations were then made with a wake grid. These calculations more closely matched baseline experiments. Thus, the present findings demonstrate that it is imperative to include the wake flow domain in CFD calculations in order to accurately predict leeside flow separation for hypersonic vehicles at high angles of attack.

  1. Development of an aerodynamic measurement system for hypersonic rarefied flows.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, T; Fujita, K; Suzuki, T

    2015-01-01

    A hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel (HRWT) has lately been developed at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency in order to improve the prediction of rarefied aerodynamics. Flow characteristics of hypersonic rarefied flows have been investigated experimentally and numerically. By conducting dynamic pressure measurements with pendulous models and pitot pressure measurements, we have probed flow characteristics in the test section. We have also improved understandings of hypersonic rarefied flows by integrating a numerical approach with the HRWT measurement. The development of the integration scheme between HRWT and numerical approach enables us to estimate the hypersonic rarefied flow characteristics as well as the direct measurement of rarefied aerodynamics. Consequently, this wind tunnel is capable of generating 25 mm-core flows with the free stream Mach number greater than 10 and Knudsen number greater than 0.1. PMID:25638120

  2. Assessment of nonequilibrium radiation computation methods for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra

    1993-01-01

    The present understanding of shock-layer radiation in the low density regime, as appropriate to hypersonic vehicles, is surveyed. Based on the relative importance of electron excitation and radiation transport, the hypersonic flows are divided into three groups: weakly ionized, moderately ionized, and highly ionized flows. In the light of this division, the existing laboratory and flight data are scrutinized. Finally, an assessment of the nonequilibrium radiation computation methods for the three regimes in hypersonic flows is presented. The assessment is conducted by comparing experimental data against the values predicted by the physical model.

  3. CFD Validation Studies for Hypersonic Flow Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of experiments to measure pressure and heating for code validation involving hypersonic, laminar, separated flows was conducted at the Calspan-University at Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) in the Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel. The experimental data serves as a focus for a code validation session but are not available to the authors until the conclusion of this session. The first set of experiments considered here involve Mach 9.5 and Mach 11.3 N, flow over a hollow cylinder-flare with 30 deg flare angle at several Reynolds numbers sustaining laminar, separated flow. Truncated and extended flare configurations are considered. The second set of experiments, at similar conditions, involves flow over a sharp, double cone with fore-cone angle of 25 deg and aft-cone angle of 55 deg. Both sets of experiments involve 30 deg compressions. Location of the separation point in the numerical simulation is extremely sensitive to the level of grid refinement in the numerical predictions. The numerical simulations also show a significant influence of Reynolds number on extent of separation. Flow unsteadiness was easily introduced into the double cone simulations using aggressive relaxation parameters that normally promote convergence.

  4. CFD Validation Studies for Hypersonic Flow Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of experiments to measure pressure and heating for code validation involving hypersonic, laminar, separated flows was conducted at the Calspan-University at Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) in the Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel. The experimental data serves as a focus for a code validation session but are not available to the authors until the conclusion of this session. The first set of experiments considered here involve Mach 9.5 and Mach 11.3 N2 flow over a hollow cylinder-flare with 30 degree flare angle at several Reynolds numbers sustaining laminar, separated flow. Truncated and extended flare configurations are considered. The second set of experiments, at similar conditions, involves flow over a sharp, double cone with fore-cone angle of 25 degrees and aft-cone angle of 55 degrees. Both sets of experiments involve 30 degree compressions. Location of the separation point in the numerical simulation is extremely sensitive to the level of grid refinement in the numerical predictions. The numerical simulations also show a significant influence of Reynolds number on extent of separation. Flow unsteadiness was easily introduced into the double cone simulations using aggressive relaxation parameters that normally promote convergence.

  5. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  6. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers of the boundary layers, absolute instability resulting in vortex shedding downstream, is likely to weaken at supersonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for a rectangular or cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation is present.

  7. Scaled Rocket Testing in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrene, Aaron; MacLean, Matthew; Carr, Zakary; Parker, Ron; Holden, Michael; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) uses four clustered liquid rocket engines along with two solid rocket boosters. The interaction between all six rocket exhaust plumes will produce a complex and severe thermal environment in the base of the vehicle. This work focuses on a recent 2% scale, hot-fire SLS base heating test. These base heating tests are short-duration tests executed with chamber pressures near the full-scale values with gaseous hydrogen/oxygen engines and RSRMV analogous solid propellant motors. The LENS II shock tunnel/Ludwieg tube tunnel was used at or near flight duplicated conditions up to Mach 5. Model development was strongly based on the Space Shuttle base heating tests with several improvements including doubling of the maximum chamber pressures and duplication of freestream conditions. Detailed base heating results are outside of the scope of the current work, rather test methodology and techniques are presented along with broader applicability toward scaled rocket testing in supersonic and hypersonic flow.

  8. Study on the numerical schemes for hypersonic flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagdewe, S. P.; Shevare, G. R.; Kim, Heuy-Dong

    2009-10-01

    Hypersonic flow is full of complex physical and chemical processes, hence its investigation needs careful analysis of existing schemes and choosing a suitable scheme or designing a brand new scheme. The present study deals with two numerical schemes Harten, Lax, and van Leer with Contact (HLLC) and advection upstream splitting method (AUSM) to effectively simulate hypersonic flow fields, and accurately predict shock waves with minimal diffusion. In present computations, hypersonic flows have been modeled as a system of hyperbolic equations with one additional equation for non-equilibrium energy and relaxing source terms. Real gas effects, which appear typically in hypersonic flows, have been simulated through energy relaxation method. HLLC and AUSM methods are modified to incorporate the conservation laws for non-equilibrium energy. Numerical implementation have shown that non-equilibrium energy convect with mass, and hence has no bearing on the basic numerical scheme. The numerical simulation carried out shows good comparison with experimental data available in literature. Both numerical schemes have shown identical results at equilibrium. Present study has demonstrated that real gas effects in hypersonic flows can be modeled through energy relaxation method along with either AUSM or HLLC numerical scheme.

  9. Electron-Beam Diagnostic Methods for Hypersonic Flow Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this work was the evaluation of the use of electron-bean fluorescence for flow measurements during hypersonic flight. Both analytical and numerical models were developed in this investigation to evaluate quantitatively flow field imaging concepts based upon the electron beam fluorescence technique for use in flight research and wind tunnel applications. Specific models were developed for: (1) fluorescence excitation/emission for nitrogen, (2) rotational fluorescence spectrum for nitrogen, (3) single and multiple scattering of electrons in a variable density medium, (4) spatial and spectral distribution of fluorescence, (5) measurement of rotational temperature and density, (6) optical filter design for fluorescence imaging, and (7) temperature accuracy and signal acquisition time requirements. Application of these models to a typical hypersonic wind tunnel flow is presented. In particular, the capability of simulating the fluorescence resulting from electron impact ionization in a variable density nitrogen or air flow provides the capability to evaluate the design of imaging instruments for flow field mapping. The result of this analysis is a recommendation that quantitative measurements of hypersonic flow fields using electron-bean fluorescence is a tractable method with electron beam energies of 100 keV. With lower electron energies, electron scattering increases with significant beam divergence which makes quantitative imaging difficult. The potential application of the analytical and numerical models developed in this work is in the design of a flow field imaging instrument for use in hypersonic wind tunnels or onboard a flight research vehicle.

  10. Analytical studies of hypersonic viscous dissociated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inger, George R.

    1995-01-01

    This project primarily dealt with integral boundary-layer solution techniques that are directly applicable to the problem of determining aerodynamic heating rates of hypersonic vehicles like X-33 in the vicinity of stagnation points, windward centerlines, and swept-wing leading edges. The analyses include effects of finite-rate gas chemistry across the boundary layer and finite-rate catalysis of atom recombination at the surface. A new approach for combining the insight afforded by integral boundary-layer analysis with comprehensive (and expensive) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) flowfield solutions of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations was developed. The approach extracts CFD derived quantities at the wall and at the boundary layer edge for inclusion in a post-processing boundary-layer analysis. The post-processed data base allows a designer at a workstation to ask and answer the following questions: (1) How much does the heating change if one uses a thermal protection system (TPS) with different catalytic properties than was used in the original CFD solution? (2) How does the heating change when one moves the interface of two different TPS materials with different catalytic efficiencies for the purpose of reducing vehicle weight and expense? The answer to the second question is particularly critical, because abrupt changes from low catalytic efficiency to high catalytic efficiency can lead to localized increase in heating which exceeds the usually conservative estimate provided by a fully catalytic wall assumption. A secondary issue that was addressed involves the prediction of heating levels in the vicinity of sharp corners that are transverse to or aligned with the flow. An example of the first case is heating at the edge of the COMET reentry module. An example of the second case is heating along the side edge of a deflected body flap on an SSV. The difficulty of putting grids in the vicinity of such corners with continuously varying metric coefficients

  11. Experimental results for a hypersonic nozzle/afterbody flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaid, Frank W.; Keener, Earl R.; Hui, Frank C. L.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to experimentally characterize the flow field created by the interaction of a single-expansion ramp-nozzle (SERN) flow with a hypersonic external stream. Data were obtained from a generic nozzle/afterbody model in the 3.5 Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center, in a cooperative experimental program involving Ames and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The model design and test planning were performed in close cooperation with members of the Ames computational fluid dynamics (CFD) team for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program. This paper presents experimental results consisting of oil-flow and shadow graph flow-visualization photographs, afterbody surface-pressure distributions, rake boundary-layer measurements, Preston-tube skin-friction measurements, and flow field surveys with five-hole and thermocouple probes. The probe data consist of impact pressure, flow direction, and total temperature profiles in the interaction flow field.

  12. Hot-wire anemometry in hypersonic helium flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Weinstein, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry techniques are described that have been developed and used for hypersonic-helium-flow studies. The short run time available dictated certain innovations in applying conventional hot-wire techniques. Some examples are given to show the application of the techniques used. Modifications to conventional equipment are described, including probe modifications and probe heating controls.

  13. Unstructured Mesh Methods for the Simulation of Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, J.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the research undertaken, at Aeronautics Department of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, during the approximately five year period, February 94 - March 99. This work is part of a larger effort aimed at providing a reliable fast turn around capability for the prediction of hypersonic flows over complete vehicle configurations.

  14. The Prospects for Laminar Flow on Hypersonic Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiff, Alvin

    1958-01-01

    The factors which affect the extent of laminar flow on airplanes for hypersonic flight are discussed on the basis of the available data. Factors considered include flight Reynolds number, surface roughness, angle of attack, angle of leading-edge sweepback, and aerodynamic interference. Test data are presented for one complete configuration.

  15. Investigation of Hypersonic Nozzle Flow Uniformity Using NO Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Byrne, S.; Danehy, P. J.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2005-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence visualisation is used to investigate nonuniformities in the flow of a hypersonic conical nozzle. Possible causes for the nonuniformity are outlined and investigated, and the problem is shown to be due to a small step at the nozzle throat. Entrainment of cold boundary layer gas is postulated as the cause of the signal nonuniformity.

  16. Hypersonic, nonequilibrium flow over a cylindrically blunted 6 deg wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1993-01-01

    The numerical simulation of hypersonic flow in chemical nonequilibrium over cylindrically blunted 6 degree wedge is described. The simulation was executed on a Cray C-90 with Program LAURA 92-vl. Code setup procedures and sample results, including grid refinement studies and variations of species number are discussed. This simulation relates to a study of wing leading edge heating on transatmospheric vehicles.

  17. Application of a parallel DSMC method to hypersonic rarefied flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmoth, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a method for doing direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) calculations using parallel processing and presents some results of applying the method to several hypersonic, rarefied flow problems. The performance and efficiency of the parallel method are discussed. The applications described are the flow in a channel and the flow about a flat plate at incidence. The results show significant advantages of parallel processing over conventional scalar processing and demonstrate the scalability of the method to large problems. 8 refs.

  18. Flow visualization and spectroscopy in hypersonic flows: New trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trolinger, James; Eitelberg, Georg; Rapuc, Marc

    1993-04-01

    This paper is based upon a session of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop, New Trends in Instrumentation for Hypersonic Research held at the ONERA La Fauga Facility in France during the week of 27 Apr. 1992. The discussion includes some of the frontiers of the technology of flow visualization and spectroscopy as well as a discussion of the current development needs and trends. Included in the discussion are optical integrated measurements such as resonance absorption, schlieren, interferometry, and holographic methods. The discussion shows that while the technology is mature in a broad sense, a significant number of new development areas exist such as resonant holography and phase shifting holographic interferometry. The maturity of the technology makes it immediately applicable to many problems and the untapped potential offers considerable room for improvement of existing capability. The methods which are described can be used in harsh environments and have the potential for becoming flight test diagnostics for the measurement of temperature, density, constituency, and velocity.

  19. An assessment of laser velocimetry in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Although extensive progress has been made in computational fluid mechanics, reliable flight vehicle designs and modifications still cannot be made without recourse to extensive wind tunnel testing. Future progress in the computation of hypersonic flow fields is restricted by the need for a reliable mean flow and turbulence modeling data base which could be used to aid in the development of improved empirical models for use in numerical codes. Currently, there are few compressible flow measurements which could be used for this purpose. In this report, the results of experiments designed to assess the potential for laser velocimeter measurements of mean flow and turbulent fluctuations in hypersonic flow fields are presented. Details of a new laser velocimeter system which was designed and built for this test program are described.

  20. Review and assessment of turbulence models for hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Christopher J.; Blottner, Frederick G.

    2006-10-01

    Accurate aerodynamic prediction is critical for the design and optimization of hypersonic vehicles. Turbulence modeling remains a major source of uncertainty in the computational prediction of aerodynamic forces and heating for these systems. The first goal of this article is to update the previous comprehensive review of hypersonic shock/turbulent boundary-layer interaction experiments published in 1991 by Settles and Dodson (Hypersonic shock/boundary-layer interaction database. NASA CR 177577, 1991). In their review, Settles and Dodson developed a methodology for assessing experiments appropriate for turbulence model validation and critically surveyed the existing hypersonic experiments. We limit the scope of our current effort by considering only two-dimensional (2D)/axisymmetric flows in the hypersonic flow regime where calorically perfect gas models are appropriate. We extend the prior database of recommended hypersonic experiments (on four 2D and two 3D shock-interaction geometries) by adding three new geometries. The first two geometries, the flat plate/cylinder and the sharp cone, are canonical, zero-pressure gradient flows which are amenable to theory-based correlations, and these correlations are discussed in detail. The third geometry added is the 2D shock impinging on a turbulent flat plate boundary layer. The current 2D hypersonic database for shock-interaction flows thus consists of nine experiments on five different geometries. The second goal of this study is to review and assess the validation usage of various turbulence models on the existing experimental database. Here we limit the scope to one- and two-equation turbulence models where integration to the wall is used (i.e., we omit studies involving wall functions). A methodology for validating turbulence models is given, followed by an extensive evaluation of the turbulence models on the current hypersonic experimental database. A total of 18 one- and two-equation turbulence models are reviewed

  1. Drag Prediction and Transition in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Helen L.; Kimmel, Roger; Schneider, Steven; Arnal, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on issues such as instability studies, nose-bluntness and angle-of-attack effects, and leading-edge-contamination problems from theoretical, computational, and experimental points of view. Also included is a review of wind-tunnel and flight data, including high-Re flight transition data, the levels of noise in flight and in wind tunnels, and how noise levels can affect parametric trends. A review of work done on drag accounting and the role of viscous drag for hypersonic vehicles is also provided.

  2. Approximate convective heating equations for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. V.; Moss, J. N.; Sutton, K.

    1979-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent heating-rate equations appropriate for engineering predictions of the convective heating rates about blunt reentry spacecraft at hypersonic conditions are developed. The approximate methods are applicable to both nonreacting and reacting gas mixtures for either constant or variable-entropy edge conditions. A procedure which accounts for variable-entropy effects and is not based on mass balancing is presented. Results of the approximate heating methods are in good agreement with existing experimental results as well as boundary-layer and viscous-shock-layer solutions.

  3. Three-Dimensional Aeroelastic and Aerothermoelastic Behavior in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Jack J.; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Powell, Kenneth G.; Thuruthimattam, Biju J.; Bartels, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    The aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic behavior of three-dimensional configurations in hypersonic flow regime are studied. The aeroelastic behavior of a low aspect ratio wing, representative of a fin or control surface on a generic hypersonic vehicle, is examined using third order piston theory, Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics. The sensitivity of the aeroelastic behavior generated using Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics to parameters governing temporal accuracy is also examined. Also, a refined aerothermoelastic model, which incorporates the heat transfer between the fluid and structure using CFD generated aerodynamic heating, is used to examine the aerothermoelastic behavior of the low aspect ratio wing in the hypersonic regime. Finally, the hypersonic aeroelastic behavior of a generic hypersonic vehicle with a lifting-body type fuselage and canted fins is studied using piston theory and Euler aerodynamics for the range of 2.5 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 28, at altitudes ranging from 10,000 feet to 80,000 feet. This analysis includes a study on optimal mesh selection for use with Euler aerodynamics. In addition to the aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic results presented, three time domain flutter identification techniques are compared, namely the moving block approach, the least squares curve fitting method, and a system identification technique using an Auto-Regressive model of the aeroelastic system. In general, the three methods agree well. The system identification technique, however, provided quick damping and frequency estimations with minimal response record length, and therefore o ers significant reductions in computational cost. In the present case, the computational cost was reduced by 75%. The aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic results presented illustrate the applicability of the CFL3D code for the hypersonic flight regime.

  4. Multigrid for hypersonic viscous two- and three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, E.; Swanson, R. C.; Vatsa, V. N.; White, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The use of a multigrid method with central differencing to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for hypersonic flows is considered. The time-dependent form of the equations is integrated with an explicit Runge-Kutta scheme accelerated by local time stepping and implicit residual smoothing. Variable coefficients are developed for the implicit process that remove the diffusion limit on the time step, producing significant improvement in convergence. A numerical dissipation formulation that provides good shock-capturing capability for hypersonic flows is presented. This formulation is shown to be a crucial aspect of the multigrid method. Solutions are given for two-dimensional viscous flow over a NACA 0012 airfoil and three-dimensional viscous flow over a blunt biconic.

  5. Two-equation turbulence modeling for 3-D hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, J. E.; Coakley, T. J.; Marvin, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation to verify, incorporate and develop two-equation turbulence models for three-dimensional high speed flows is presented. The current design effort of hypersonic vehicles has led to an intensive study of turbulence models for compressible hypersonic flows. This research complements an extensive review of experimental data and the current development of 2D turbulence models. The review of experimental data on 2D and 3D flows includes complex hypersonic flows with pressure profiles, skin friction, wall heat transfer, and turbulence statistics data. In a parallel effort, turbulence models for high speed flows have been tested against flat plate boundary layers, and are being tested against the 2D database. In the present paper, we present the results of 3D Navier-Stokes numerical simulations with an improved k-omega two-equation turbulence model against experimental data and empirical correlations of an adiabatic flat plate boundary layer, a cold wall flat plate boundary layer, and a 3D database flow, the interaction of an oblique shock wave and a thick turbulent boundary layer with a free stream Mach number = 8.18 and Reynolds number = 5 x 10 to the 6th.

  6. Progress with multigrid schemes for hypersonic flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radespiel, R.; Swanson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    Several multigrid schemes are considered for the numerical computation of viscous hypersonic flows. For each scheme, the basic solution algorithm uses upwind spatial discretization with explicit multistage time stepping. Two level versions of the various multigrid algorithms are applied to the two dimensional advection equation, and Fourier analysis is used to determine their damping properties. The capabilities of the multigrid methods are assessed by solving three different hypersonic flow problems. Some new multigrid schemes based on semicoarsening strategies are shown to be quite effective in relieving the stiffness caused by the high aspect ratio cells required to resolve high Reynolds number flows. These schemes exhibit good convergence rates for Reynolds numbers up to 200 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers up to 25.

  7. Progress with multigrid schemes for hypersonic flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Radespiel, R.; Swanson, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    Several multigrid schemes are considered for the numerical computation of viscous hypersonic flows. For each scheme, the basic solution algorithm employs upwind spatial discretization with explicit multistage time stepping. Two-level versions of the various multigrid algorithms are applied to the two-dimensional advection equation, and Fourier analysis is used to determine their damping properties. The capabilities of the multigrid methods are assessed by solving three different hypersonic flow problems. Some new multigrid schemes based on semicoarsening strategies are shown to be quite effective in relieving the stiffness caused by the high-aspect-ratio cells required to resolve high Reynolds number flows. These schemes exhibit good convergence rates for Reynolds numbers up to 200 X 10{sup 6} and Mach numbers up to 25. 32 refs., 31 figs., 1 tab.

  8. A technique for measuring hypersonic flow velocity profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    A technique for measuring hypersonic flow velocity profiles is described. This technique utilizes an arc-discharge-electron-beam system to produce a luminous disturbance in the flow. The time of flight of this disturbance was measured. Experimental tests were conducted in the Langley pilot model expansion tube. The measured velocities were of the order of 6000 m/sec over a free-stream density range from 0.000196 to 0.00186 kg/cu m. The fractional error in the velocity measurements was less than 5 percent. Long arc discharge columns (0.356 m) were generated under hypersonic flow conditions in the expansion-tube modified to operate as an expansion tunnel.

  9. Portable Fluorescence Imaging System for Hypersonic Flow Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, J. A.; Alderfer, D. W.; Jones, S. B.; Danehy, P. M.

    2003-01-01

    A portable fluorescence imaging system has been developed for use in NASA Langley s hypersonic wind tunnels. The system has been applied to a small-scale free jet flow. Two-dimensional images were taken of the flow out of a nozzle into a low-pressure test section using the portable planar laser-induced fluorescence system. Images were taken from the center of the jet at various test section pressures, showing the formation of a barrel shock at low pressures, transitioning to a turbulent jet at high pressures. A spanwise scan through the jet at constant pressure reveals the three-dimensional structure of the flow. Future capabilities of the system for making measurements in large-scale hypersonic wind tunnel facilities are discussed.

  10. Hypersonic flows as related to the National Aerospace Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussoy, Marvin; Huang, George; Menter, Florian

    1995-01-01

    The object of Cooperative Agreement NCC2-452 was to identify, develop, and document reliable turbulence models for incorporation into CFD codes, which would then subsequently be incorporated into numerical design procedures for the NASP and any other hypersonic vehicles. In a two-pronged effort, consisting of an experimental and a theoretical approach, several key features of flows over complex vehicles were identified, and test bodies were designed which were composed of simple geometric shapes over which these flow features were measured. The experiments were conducted in the 3.5' Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, at nominal Mach numbers from 7 to 8.3 and Re/m from 4.9 x 10(exp 6) to 5.8 x 10(exp 6). Boundary layers approaching the interaction region were 2.5 to 3.7 cm thick. Surface and flow field measurements were conducted, and the initial boundary conditions were experimentally documented.

  11. Perspectives on hypersonic viscous and nonequilibrium flow research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, H. K.

    1992-01-01

    An attempt is made to reflect on current focuses in certain areas of hypersonic flow research by examining recent works and their issues. Aspects of viscous interaction, flow instability, and nonequilibrium aerothermodynamics pertaining to theoretical interest are focused upon. The field is a diverse one, and many exciting works may have either escaped the writer's notice or been abandoned for the sake of space. Students of hypersonic viscous flow must face the transition problems towards the two opposite ends of the Reynolds or Knudsen number range, which represents two regimes where unresolved fluid/gas dynamic problems abound. Central to the hypersonic flow studies is high-temperature physical gas dynamics; here, a number of issues on modelling the intermolecular potentials and inelastic collisions remain the obstacles to quantitative predictions. Research in combustion and scramjet propulsion will certainly be benefitted by advances in turbulent mixing and new computational fluid dynamics (CFD) strategies on multi-scaled complex reactions. Even for the sake of theoretical development, the lack of pertinent experimental data in the right energy and density ranges is believed to be among the major obstacles to progress in aerothermodynamic research for hypersonic flight. To enable laboratory simulation of nonequilibrium effects anticipated for transatmospheric flight, facilities capable of generating high enthalpy flow at density levels higher than in existing laboratories are needed (Hornung 1988). A new free-piston shock tunnel capable of realizing a test-section stagnation temperature of 10(exp 5) at Reynolds number 50 x 10(exp 6)/cm is being completed and preliminary tests has begun (H. Hornung et al. 1992). Another laboratory study worthy of note as well as theoretical support is the nonequilibrium flow experiment of iodine vapor which has low activation energies for vibrational excitation and dissociation, and can be studied in a laboratory with modest

  12. Computational flow predictions for hypersonic drag devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokarcik, Susan A.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1993-01-01

    The effectiveness of two types of hypersonic decelerators is examined: mechanically deployable flares and inflatable ballutes. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used to predict the flowfield around a solid rocket motor (SRM) with a deployed decelerator. The computations are performed with an ideal gas solver using an effective specific heat ratio of 1.15. The results from the ideal gas solver are compared to computational results from a thermochemical nonequilibrium solver. The surface pressure coefficient, the drag, and the extend of the compression corner separation zone predicted by the ideal gas solver compare well with those predicted by the nonequilibrium solver. The ideal gas solver is computationally inexpensive and is shown to be well suited for preliminary design studies. The computed solutions are used to determine the size and shape of the decelerator that are required to achieve a drag coefficient of 5. Heat transfer rates to the SRM and the decelerators are predicted to estimate the amount of thermal protection required.

  13. Computational study of generic hypersonic vehicle flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Johnny R.

    1994-01-01

    The geometric data of the generic hypersonic vehicle configuration included body definitions and preliminary grids for the forebody (nose cone excluded), midsection (propulsion system excluded), and afterbody sections. This data was to be augmented by the nose section geometry (blunt conical section mated with the noncircular cross section of the forebody initial plane) along with a grid and a detailed supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) geometry (inlet and combustor) which should be merged with the nozzle portion of the afterbody geometry. The solutions were to be obtained by using a Navier-Stokes (NS) code such as TUFF for the nose portion, a parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) solver such as the UPS and STUFF codes for the forebody, a NS solver with finite rate hydrogen-air chemistry capability such as TUFF and SPARK for the scramjet and a suitable solver (NS or PNS) for the afterbody and external nozzle flows. The numerical simulation of the hypersonic propulsion system for the generic hypersonic vehicle is the major focus of this entire work. Supersonic combustion ramjet is such a propulsion system, hence the main thrust of the present task has been to establish a solution procedure for the scramjet flow. The scramjet flow is compressible, turbulent, and reacting. The fuel used is hydrogen and the combustion process proceeds at a finite rate. As a result, the solution procedure must be capable of addressing such flows.

  14. Grid sensitivity in low Reynolds number hypersonic continuum flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, W.H. ); Hoffmann, K.A. . Dept. of Aerospace Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    A computational scheme is presented to solve the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations over a blunt body at high altitude, high Mach number atmospheric reentry flow conditions. This continuum approach is directed to low Reynolds/low density hypersonic flows by accounting for non-zero bulk viscosity effects in near frozen flow conditions. A significant difference from previous studies is the inclusion of the capability to model non-zero bulk viscosity effects. The grid definition for these low Reynolds number, viscous dominated flow fields is especially important in terms of numerical stability and accurate heat transfer solutions. 11 refs., 15 figs.

  15. Computation of Hypersonic Flow about Maneuvering Vehicles with Changing Shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Ferencz, R M; Felker, F F; Castillo, V M

    2004-02-23

    Vehicles moving at hypersonic speeds have great importance to the National Security. Ballistic missile re-entry vehicles (RV's) travel at hypersonic speeds, as do missile defense intercept vehicles. Despite the importance of the problem, no computational analysis method is available to predict the aerodynamic environment of maneuvering hypersonic vehicles, and no analysis is available to predict the transient effects of their shape changes. The present state-of-the-art for hypersonic flow calculations typically still considers steady flow about fixed shapes. Additionally, with present computational methods, it is not possible to compute the entire transient structural and thermal loads for a re-entry vehicle. The objective of this research is to provide the required theoretical development and a computational analysis tool for calculating the hypersonic flow about maneuvering, deforming RV's. This key enabling technology will allow the development of a complete multi-mechanics simulation of the entire RV flight sequence, including important transient effects such as complex flight dynamics. This will allow the computation of the as-delivered state of the payload in both normal and unusual operational environments. This new analysis capability could also provide the ability to predict the nonlinear, transient behavior of endo-atmospheric missile interceptor vehicles to the input of advanced control systems. Due to the computational intensity of fluid dynamics for hypersonics, the usual approach for calculating the flow about a vehicle that is changing shape is to complete a series of steady calculations, each with a fixed shape. However, this quasi-steady approach is not adequate to resolve the frequencies characteristic of a vehicle's structural dynamics. Our approach is to include the effects of the unsteady body shape changes in the finite-volume method by allowing for arbitrary translation and deformation of the control volumes. Furthermore, because the Eulerian

  16. Turbulence Models for Accurate Aerothermal Prediction in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-Hong; Wu, Yi-Zao; Wang, Jiang-Feng

    Accurate description of the aerodynamic and aerothermal environment is crucial to the integrated design and optimization for high performance hypersonic vehicles. In the simulation of aerothermal environment, the effect of viscosity is crucial. The turbulence modeling remains a major source of uncertainty in the computational prediction of aerodynamic forces and heating. In this paper, three turbulent models were studied: the one-equation eddy viscosity transport model of Spalart-Allmaras, the Wilcox k-ω model and the Menter SST model. For the k-ω model and SST model, the compressibility correction, press dilatation and low Reynolds number correction were considered. The influence of these corrections for flow properties were discussed by comparing with the results without corrections. In this paper the emphasis is on the assessment and evaluation of the turbulence models in prediction of heat transfer as applied to a range of hypersonic flows with comparison to experimental data. This will enable establishing factor of safety for the design of thermal protection systems of hypersonic vehicle.

  17. Surface pressure measurements for CFD code validation in hypersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Henfling, J.F.; Larson, D.E.

    1995-07-01

    Extensive surface pressure measurements were obtained on a hypersonic vehicle configuration at Mach 8. All of the experimental results were obtained in the Sandia National Laboratories Mach 8 hypersonic wind tunnel for laminar boundary layer conditions. The basic vehicle configuration is a spherically blunted 10{degrees} half-angle cone with a slice parallel with the axis of the vehicle. The bluntness ratio of the geometry is 10% and the slice begins at 70% of the length of the vehicle. Surface pressure measurements were obtained for angles of attack from {minus}10 to + 18{degrees}, for various roll angles, at 96 locations on the body surface. A new and innovative uncertainty analysis was devised to estimate the contributors to surface pressure measurement uncertainty. Quantitative estimates were computed for the uncertainty contributions due to the complete instrumentation system, nonuniformity of flow in the test section of the wind tunnel, and variations in the wind tunnel model. This extensive set of high-quality surface pressure measurements is recommended for use in the calibration and validation of computational fluid dynamics codes for hypersonic flow conditions.

  18. Unstructured Mesh Methods for the Simulation of Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, Jaime; Bibb, K. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the research work undertaken at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The aim of this research is to identify effective algorithms and methodologies for the efficient and routine solution of hypersonic viscous flows about re-entry vehicles. For over ten years we have received support from NASA to develop unstructured mesh methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics. As a result of this effort a methodology based on the use, of unstructured adapted meshes of tetrahedra and finite volume flow solvers has been developed. A number of gridding algorithms flow solvers, and adaptive strategies have been proposed. The most successful algorithms developed from the basis of the unstructured mesh system FELISA. The FELISA system has been extensively for the analysis of transonic and hypersonic flows about complete vehicle configurations. The system is highly automatic and allows for the routine aerodynamic analysis of complex configurations starting from CAD data. The code has been parallelized and utilizes efficient solution algorithms. For hypersonic flows, a version of the, code which incorporates real gas effects, has been produced. One of the latest developments before the start of this grant was to extend the system to include viscous effects. This required the development of viscous generators, capable of generating the anisotropic grids required to represent boundary layers, and viscous flow solvers. In figures I and 2, we show some sample hypersonic viscous computations using the developed viscous generators and solvers. Although these initial results were encouraging, it became apparent that in order to develop a fully functional capability for viscous flows, several advances in gridding, solution accuracy, robustness and efficiency were required. As part of this research we have developed: 1) automatic meshing techniques and the corresponding computer codes have been delivered to NASA and implemented into the GridEx system, 2) a finite

  19. Nonlinear Instability of Hypersonic Flow past a Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seddougui, Sharon O.; Bassom, Andrew P.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear stability of a compressible flow past a wedge is investigated in the hypersonic limit. The analysis follows the ideas of a weakly nonlinear approach. Interest is focussed on Tollmien-Schlichting waves governed by a triple deck structure and it is found that the attached shock can profoundly affect the stability characteristics of the flow. In particular, it is shown that nonlinearity tends to have a stabilizing influence. The nonlinear evolution of the Tollmien-Schlichting mode is described in a number of asymptotic limits.

  20. On the instability of hypersonic flow past a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackaby, Nicholas; Cowley, Stephen; Hall, Philip

    1990-01-01

    The instability of hypersonic boundary-layer flows over flat plates is considered. The viscosity of the fluid is taken to be governed by Sutherland's law, which gives a much more accurate representation of the temperature dependence of fluid viscosity at hypersonic speeds than Chapman's approximate linear law; although at lower speeds the temperature variation of the mean state is less pronounced so that the Chapman law can be used with some confidence. Attention is focussed on the so-called (vorticity) mode of instability of the viscous hypersonic boundary layer. This is thought to be the fastest growing inviscid disturbance at hypersonic speeds; it is also believed to have an asymptotically larger growth rate than any viscous or centrifugal instability. As a starting point the instability of the hypersonic boundary layer which exists far downstream from the leading edge of the plate is investigated. In this regime the shock that is attached to the leading edge of the plate plays no role, so that the basic boundary layer is non-interactive. It is shown that the vorticity mode of instability of this flow operates on a significantly different lengthscale than that obtained if a Chapman viscosity law is assumed. In particular, it is found that the growth rate predicted by a linear viscosity law overestimates the size of the growth rate by O(M(exp 2). Next, the development of the vorticity mode as the wavenumber decreases is described, and it is shown that acoustic modes emerge when the wavenumber has decreased from it's O(1) initial value to O(M (exp -3/2). Finally, the inviscid instability of the boundary layer near the leading edge in the interaction zone is discussed and particular attention is focussed on the strong interaction region which occurs sufficiently close to the leading edge. It is found that the vorticity mode in this regime is again unstable, and that it is concentrated in the transition layer at the edge of the boundary layer where the temperature

  1. Modeling of associative ionization reactions in hypersonic rarefied flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Iain D.

    2007-09-01

    When vehicles reenter the Earth's atmosphere from space, the hypersonic conditions are sufficiently energetic to generate ionizing reactions. The production of a thin plasma layer around a hypersonic vehicle can block radio waves sent to and from the vehicle, leading to communications blackout. For Earth entry from orbit, the maximum energy involved in molecular collisions requires only associative ionization of air-species to be considered. In the present study, the modeling of such reactions is considered in detail using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. For typical Earth entry conditions, with a velocity near 8km/s, it is shown that the average ionizing reaction probabilities are small. Special numerical techniques must therefore be used in the DSMC technique in order to numerically resolve these reactions. Additional simulation problems arise from the relatively small mass of the electrons in comparison to the other atoms and molecules in these flow fields. Artificially increasing the electron mass greatly increases computational efficiency, and the viability of this approach is investigated. Simulation results are presented for conditions corresponding to the RAM-C II hypersonic flight experiment that gathered measurements of electron number density. It is demonstrated that simulation results for electron number density in this energy regime are relatively insensitive to the mass of the electrons. Direct comparison of DSMC results with the RAM-C II measurements for electron number density shows excellent agreement. These satisfactory comparisons represent the first direct verification of the ability of the DSMC technique to successfully predict the weak plasma generated around a hypersonic vehicle.

  2. Simplified Thermo-Chemical Modelling For Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Jorge; Alvarez, Paula; Gonzalez, Ezequiel; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2011-05-01

    Hypersonic flows are connected with high temperatures, generally associated with strong shock waves that appear in such flows. At high temperatures vibrational degrees of freedom of the molecules may become excited, the molecules may dissociate into atoms, the molecules or free atoms may ionize, and molecular or ionic species, unimportant at lower temperatures, may be formed. In order to take into account these effects, a chemical model is needed, but this model should be simplified in order to be handled by a CFD code, but with a sufficient precision to take into account the physics more important. This work is related to a chemical non-equilibrium model validation, implemented into a commercial CFD code, in order to obtain the flow field around bodies in hypersonic flow. The selected non-equilibrium model is composed of seven species and six direct reactions together with their inverse. The commercial CFD code where the non- equilibrium model has been implemented is FLUENT. For the validation, the X38/Sphynx Mach 20 case is rebuilt on a reduced geometry, including the 1/3 Lref forebody. This case has been run in laminar regime, non catalytic wall and with radiative equilibrium wall temperature. The validated non-equilibrium model is applied to the EXPERT (European Experimental Re-entry Test-bed) vehicle at a specified trajectory point (Mach number 14). This case has been run also in laminar regime, non catalytic wall and with radiative equilibrium wall temperature.

  3. Nonintrusive Temperature and Velocity Measurements in a Hypersonic Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OByrne, S.; Danehy, P. M.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of nitric oxide vibrational temperature, rotational temperature and velocity have been measured in the hypersonic freestream at the exit of a conical nozzle, using planar laser-induced fluorescence. Particular attention has been devoted to reducing the major sources of systematic error that can affect fluorescence tempera- ture measurements, including beam attenuation, transition saturation effects, laser mode fluctuations and transition choice. Visualization experiments have been performed to improve the uniformity of the nozzle flow. Comparisons of measured quantities with a simple one-dimensional computation are made, showing good agreement between measurements and theory given the uncertainty of the nozzle reservoir conditions and the vibrational relaxation rate.

  4. Sonic injection through diamond orifices into a hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Huaiguo

    The objective for the present study was to experimentally characterize the performance of diamond shaped injectors for hypersonic flow applications. First, an extensive literature review was performed. Second, a small scale Mach 5.0 wind tunnel facility was installed. Third, a detailed experimental parametric investigation of sonic injection through a diamond orifice (five incidence angles and three momentum ratios) and a circular injector (three momentum ratios) into the Mach 5.0 freestream was performed. Also, the use of downstream plume vorticity control ramps was investigated. Fourth, a detailed analysis of the experimental data to characterize and model the flow for the present range of conditions was achieved. The experimental techniques include surface oil flow visualization, Mie-Scattering flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), shadowgraph photograph, and a five-hole mean flow probe. The results show that the diamond injectors have the potential to produce attached shock depending on the incidence angle and jet momentum ratio. For example, the incidence angles less than or equal to 45° at J = 0.43 generated attached interaction shocks. The attached shock produced reduced total pressure loss (drag for scramjet) and eliminated potential hot spots, associated with the upstream flow separation. The jet interaction shock angle increased with jet incidence angle and momentum ratio due to increased penetration and flow disturbances. The plume penetration and cross-sectional area increased with incidence angle and momentum ratio. The increased jet interaction shock angle and strength produced increased total pressure loss, jet interaction force and total normal force. The characteristic kidney bean shaped plume was not discernable from the diamond injectors indicating increased effectiveness for film cooling applications. A vorticity generation ramp increased the penetration of the plume and the plume shape was indicative of higher levels of

  5. Hypersonic flow separation in shock wave boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Kumar, Ajay

    1992-01-01

    An assessment is presented for the experimental data on separated flow in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions at hypersonic and supersonic speeds. The data base consists mainly of two dimensional and axisymmetric interactions in compression corners or cylinder-flares, and externally generated oblique shock interactions with boundary layers over flat plates or cylindrical surfaces. The conditions leading to flow separation and the subsequent changes in the flow empirical correlations for incipient separation are reviewed. The effects of the Mach number, Reynolds number, surface cooling and the methods of detecting separation are discussed. The pertinent experimental data for the separated flow characteristics in separated turbulent boundary layer shock interaction are also presented and discussed.

  6. Numerical simulation of laminar hypersonic flows about an ellipsoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedelbauch, S.; Mueller, B.

    The laminar hypersonic flow about a double ellipsoid, which idealizes the nose and cockpit of a spacecraft, were numerically simulated. The calculation method solves the three dimensional thin layer Navier-Stokes equations in a conservative formulation on a surface oriented calculation grid using an implicit/explicit finite difference technique. The conservative formulation allows the correct calculation of embedded compression shocks, while the head wave was treated with a shock-fitting procedure. The calculated flow fields about the ellipsoid show shock-shock and shock-boundary layer interactions in connection with separated flow. Wall flow lines and heat transfer agree qualitatively very well with film-of-oil and thermographic pictures.

  7. Flow-Tagging Velocimetry for Hypersonic Flows Using Fluorescence of Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; OByrne, S.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate a new type of flow-tagging velocimetry technique for hypersonic flows. The technique involves exciting a thin line of nitric oxide molecules with a laser beam and then, after some delay, acquiring an image of the displaced line. One component of velocity is determined from the time of flight. This method is applied to measure the velocity profile in a Mach 8.5 laminar, hypersonic boundary layer in the Australian National Universities T2 free-piston shock tunnel. The velocity is measured with an uncertainty of approximately 2%. Comparison with a CFD simulation of the flow shows reasonable agreement.

  8. Laser ignition of hypersonic air-hydrogen flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieschenk, S.; Kleine, H.; O'Byrne, S.

    2013-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the behaviour of laser-induced ignition in a hypersonic air-hydrogen flow is presented. A compression-ramp model with port-hole injection, fuelled with hydrogen gas, is used in the study. The experiments were conducted in the T-ADFA shock tunnel using a flow condition with a specific total enthalpy of 2.5 MJ/kg and a freestream velocity of 2 km/s. This study is the first comprehensive laser spark study in a hypersonic flow and demonstrates that laser-induced ignition at the fuel-injection site can be effective in terms of hydroxyl production. A semi-empirical method to estimate the conditions in the laser-heated gas kernel is presented in the paper. This method uses blast-wave theory together with an expansion-wave model to estimate the laser-heated gas conditions. The spatially averaged conditions found with this approach are matched to enthalpy curves generated using a standard chemical equilibrium code (NASA CEA). This allows us to account for differences that are introduced due to the idealised description of the blast wave, the isentropic expansion wave as well as thermochemical effects.

  9. A CFD validation roadmap for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Joseph G.

    1992-01-01

    A roadmap for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code validation is developed. The elements of the roadmap are consistent with air-breathing vehicle design requirements and related to the important flow path components: forebody, inlet, combustor, and nozzle. Building block and benchmark validation experiments are identified along with their test conditions and measurements. Based on an evaluation criteria, recommendations for an initial CFD validation data base are given and gaps identified where future experiments would provide the needed validation data.

  10. High enthalpy hypersonic boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanow, G.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of an ionizing laminar boundary layer formed by a very high enthalpy flow (in excess of 12 eV per atom or 7000 cal/gm) with allowance for the presence of helium driver gas is described. The theoretical investigation has shown that the use of variable transport properties and their respective derivatives is very important in the solution of equilibrium boundary layer equations of high enthalpy flow. The effect of low level helium contamination on the surface heat transfer rate is minimal. The variation of ionization is much smaller in a chemically frozen boundary layer solution than in an equilibrium boundary layer calculation and consequently, the variation of the transport properties in the case of the former was not essential in the integration. The experiments have been conducted in a free piston shock tunnel, and a detailed study of its nozzle operation, including the effects of low levels of helium driver gas contamination has been made. Neither the extreme solutions of an equilibrium nor of a frozen boundary layer will adequately predict surface heat transfer rate in very high enthalpy flows.

  11. Hypersonic Flow Control Using Upstream Focused Energy Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggins David W.; Nelson, H. F.

    1999-01-01

    A numerical study of centerline and off-centerline power deposition at a point upstream of a two-dimensional blunt body at Mach 6.5 at 30 km altitude are presented. The full Navier-Stokes equations are used. Wave drag, lift, and pitching moment are presented as a function of amount of power absorbed in the flow and absorption point location. It is shown that wave drag is considerably reduced. Modifications to the pressure distribution in the flow field due to the injected energy create lift and a pitching moment when the injection is off-centerline. This flow control concept may lead to effective ways to improve the performance and to stabilize and control hypersonic vehicles.

  12. Hypersonic flow over a multi-step afterbody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, V.; Kumar, S.; Maruta, K.; Reddy, K. P. J.; Takayama, K.

    2005-12-01

    Effect of a multi-step base on the total drag of a missile shaped body was studied in a shock tunnel at a hypersonic Mach number of 5.75. Total drag over the body was measured using a single component accelerometer force balance. Experimental results indicated a reduction of 8% in total drag over the body with a multi-step base in comparison with the base-line (model with a flat base) configuration.The flow fields around the above bodies were simulated using a 2-D axisymmetric Navier Stokes solver and the simulated results on total drag were compared with the measured results. The simulated flow field pictures give an insight into the involved flow physics.

  13. Convergence acceleration of viscous and inviscid hypersonic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheer, A.; Hafez, M.; Cheung, S.; Flores, J.

    1989-01-01

    The convergence of inviscid and viscous hypersonic flow calculations using a two-dimensional flux-splitting code is accelerated by applying a Richardson-type overrelaxation method. Successful results are presented for various cases; and a 50 percent savings in computer time is usually achieved. An analytical formula for the overrelaxation factor is derived, and the performance of this scheme is confirmed numerically. Moreover, application of this overrelaxation scheme produces a favorable preconditioning for Wynn's epsilon-algorithm. Both techniques have been extended to viscous three-dimensional flows and applied to accelerate the convergence of the compressible Navier-Stokes code. A savings of 40 percent in computer time is achieved in this case.

  14. Vibrational Energy Transfer of Diatomic Gases in Hypersonic Expanding Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Stephen Merrick

    In high temperature flows related to vehicles at hypersonic speeds significant excitation of the vibrational energy modes of the gas can occur. Accurate predictions of the vibrational state of the gas and the rates of vibrational energy transfer are essential to achieve optimum engine performance, for design of heat shields, and for studies of ground based hypersonic test facilities. The Landau -Teller relaxation model is widely used because it has been shown to give accurate predictions in vibrationally heating flows such as behind forebody shocks. However, a number of experiments in nozzles have indicated that it fails to accurately predict the rate of energy transfer in expanding, or cooling, flow regions and fails to predict the distribution of energy in the vibrational quantum levels. The present study examines the range of applicability of the Landau -Teller model in expanding flows and develops techniques which provide accurate predictions in expanding flows. In the present study, detailed calculations of the vibrational relaxation process of N_2 and CO in cooling flows are conducted. A coupled set of vibrational transition rate equations and quasi one-dimensional fluid dynamic equations is solved. Rapid anharmonic Vibration-Translation transition rates and Vibration -Vibration exchange collisions are found to be responsible for vibrational relaxation acceleration in situations of high vibrational temperature and low translational temperature. The predictions of the detailed master equation solver are in excellent agreement with experimental results. The exact degree of acceleration is cataloged in this study for N_2 and is found to be a function of both the translational temperature (T) and the ratio of vibrational to translational temperatures (T_{vib}/T). Non-Boltzmann population distributions are observed for values of T _{vib}/T as low as 2.0. The local energy transfer rate is shown to be an order of magnitude or more faster than the Landau-Teller model

  15. Numerical Solutions of Supersonic and Hypersonic Laminar Compression Corner Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. M.; MacCormack, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    An efficient time-splitting, second-order accurate, numerical scheme is used to solve the complete Navier-Stokes equations for supersonic and hypersonic laminar flow over a two-dimensional compression corner. A fine, exponentially stretched mesh spacing is used in the region near the wall for resolving the viscous layer. Good agreement is obtained between the present computed results and experimental measurement for a Mach number of 14.1 and a Reynolds number of 1.04 x 10(exp 5) with wedge angles of 15 deg, 18 deg, and 24 deg. The details of the pressure variation across the boundary layer are given, and a correlation between the leading edge shock and the peaks in surface pressure and heat transfer is observed.

  16. Hypersonic Flows About a 25 degree Sharp Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a numerical study that examines the surface heating discrepancies observed between computed and measured values along a sharp cone. With Mach numbers of an order of 10 and the freestream length Reynolds number of an order of 10 000, the present computations have been made with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method by using the G2 code of Bird. The flow conditions are those specified for two experiments conducted in the Veridian 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel. Axisymmetric simulations are made since the test model was assumed to be at zero incidence. Details of the current calculations are presented, along with comparisons between the experimental data, for surface heating and pressure distributions. Results of the comparisons show major differences in measured and calculated results for heating distributions, with differences in excess of 25 percent for the two cases examined.

  17. High-resolution shock-capturing schemes for inviscid and viscous hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Klopfer, G. H.; Montagne, J.-L.

    1988-01-01

    A class of implicit Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) type algorithms suitable for transonic and supersonic multidimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations was extended to hypersonic computations. The improved conservative shock-capturing schemes are spatially second- and third-order, and are fully implicit. They can be first- or second-order accurate in time and are suitable for either steady or unsteady calculations. Enhancement of stability and convergence rate for hypersonic flows is discussed. With the proper choice of the temporal discretization and suitable implicit linearization, these schemes are fairly efficient and accurate for very complex two-dimensional hypersonic inviscid and viscous shock interactions. This study is complimented by a variety of steady and unsteady viscous and inviscid hypersonic blunt-body flow computations. Due to the inherent stiffness of viscous flow problems, numerical experiments indicated that the convergence rate is in general slower for viscous flows than for inviscid steady flows.

  18. Aerothermal characteristics of bleed slot in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, LianJie; Lu, HongBo; Xu, Xiao; Chang, XinYu

    2015-10-01

    Two types of flow configurations with bleed in two-dimensional hypersonic flows are numerically examined to investigate their aerodynamic thermal loads and related flow structures at choked conditions. One is a turbulent boundary layer flow without shock impingement where the effects of the slot angle are discussed, and the other is shock wave boundary layer interactions where the effects of slot angle and slot location relative to shock impingement point are surveyed. A key separation is induced by bleed barrier shock on the upstream slot wall, resulting in a localized maximum heat flux at the reattachment point. For slanted slots, the dominating flow patterns are not much affected by the change in slot angle, but vary dramatically with slot location relative to the shock impingement point. Different flow structures are found in the case of normal slot, such as a flow pattern similar to typical Laval nozzle flow, the largest separation bubble which is almost independent of the shock position. Its larger detached distance results in 20% lower stagnation heat flux on the downstream slot corner, but with much wider area suffering from severe thermal loads. In spite of the complexity of the flow patterns, it is clearly revealed that the heat flux generally rises with the slot location moving downstream, and an increase in slot angle from 20° to 40° reduces 50% the heat flux peak at the reattachment point in the slot passage. The results further indicate that the bleed does not raise the heat flux around the slot for all cases except for the area around the downstream slot corner. Among all bleed configurations, the slot angle of 40° located slightly upstream of the incident shock is regarded as the best.

  19. Mutual effect of thermochemical surface decomposition and viscous interaction during hypersonic flow past a sharp cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limanskiy, A. V.; Timoshenko, V. I.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical results on the hypersonic gas flow in viscous interaction regime past sharp circular cones with thermally destructible Teflon surface are presented. Characteristics of the mutual influence between the thermochemical decomposition of the surface and the viscous interaction are revealed.

  20. Pressure Gradient Effects on Hypersonic Cavity Flow Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.; Prabhu, Ramdas K.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated in support of the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program. Two blunted-nose test surface geometries were developed, including an expansion plate test surface with nearly constant negative pressure gradient and a flat plate surface with nearly zero pressure gradient. The test surface designs and flow characterizations were performed using two-dimensional laminar computational methods, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process. Both open-flow and closed-flow cavities were tested on each test surface. The cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary conclusions based on an analysis of only the cavity centerline data indicate that the presence of the pressure gradient did not alter the open cavity heating for laminar-entry/laminar-exit flows, but did raise the average floor heating for closed cavities. The results of these risk-reduction studies will be used to formulate a heating assessment of potential damage scenarios occurring during future Space Shuttle flights.

  1. Pressure Gradient Effects on Hypersonic Cavity Flow Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated in support of the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program. Two blunted-nose test surface geometries were developed, including an expansion plate test surface with nearly constant negative pressure gradient and a flat plate surface with nearly zero pressure gradient. The test surface designs and flow characterizations were performed using two-dimensional laminar computational methods, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process. Both open-flow and closed-flow cavities were tested on each test surface. The cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary conclusions based on an analysis of only the cavity centerline data indicate that the presence of the pressure gradient did not alter the open cavity heating for laminar-entry/laminar-exit flows, but did raise the average floor heating for closed cavities. The results of these risk-reduction studies will be used to formulate a heating assessment of potential damage scenarios occurring during future Space Shuttle flights.

  2. Computations of Axisymmetric Flows in Hypersonic Shock Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Wilson, Gregory J.

    1995-01-01

    A time-accurate two-dimensional fluid code is used to compute test times in shock tubes operated at supersonic speeds. Unlike previous studies, this investigation resolves the finer temporal details of the shock-tube flow by making use of modern supercomputers and state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamic solution techniques. The code, besides solving the time-dependent fluid equations, also accounts for the finite rate chemistry in the hypersonic environment. The flowfield solutions are used to estimate relevant shock-tube parameters for laminar flow, such as test times, and to predict density and velocity profiles. Boundary-layer parameters such as bar-delta(sub u), bar-delta(sup *), and bar-tau(sub w), and test time parameters such as bar-tau and particle time of flight t(sub f), are computed and compared with those evaluated by using Mirels' correlations. This article then discusses in detail the effects of flow nonuniformities on particle time-of-flight behind the normal shock and, consequently, on the interpretation of shock-tube data. This article concludes that for accurate interpretation of shock-tube data, a detailed analysis of flowfield parameters, using a computer code such as used in this study, must be performed.

  3. Wind Instability and Interaction of Vibrations of a Thin Plate with a Magnetohydrodynamic Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestrin, S. G.; Gorbatenko, B. B.; Mezhonnova, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that the resonance effect of a magnetohydrodynamic hypersonic shear flow on an elastic plate placed in it causes the development of wind instability. Plate bending oscillations propagating along the flow are stabilized in the hypersonic flow regime, whereas waves running at an angle to the flow remain unstable. Expression derived for the instability increment allows conclusions about the effect of the magnetic field on the interaction of waves with the flow to be drawn as well as about the feasibility of its suppression in an unstable flow regime.

  4. Direct simulation of hypersonic flows over blunt slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.; Cuda, V., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Results of a numerical study of low-density hypersonic flow about cylindrically blunted wedges and spherically blunted cones with body half angles of 0, 5, and 10 deg are presented. Most of the transitional flow regime encountered during entry between the free molecule and continuum regimes is simulated for a reentry velocity of 7.5 km/s by including freestream conditions of 70 to 100 km. The bodies are at zero angle of incidence and have diffuse and finite catalytic surfaces. Translational, thermodynamic, and chemical nonequilibrium effects are considered in the numerical simulation by utilizing the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The numerical simulations show that noncontinuum effects such as surface temperature jump, and velocity slip are evident for all cases considered. The onset of chemical dissociation occurs at a simulated altitude of 96 km for the two-dimensional configurations. Comparisons between the DSMC and continuum viscous shock-layer calculations highlight the significant difference in flowfield structure predicted by the two methods.

  5. Numerical simulation of supersonic and hypersonic inlet flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcrae, D. Scott; Kontinos, Dean A.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the research performed by North Carolina State University and NASA Ames Research Center under Cooperative Agreement NCA2-719, 'Numerical Simulation of Supersonic and Hypersonic Inlet Flow Fields". Four distinct rotated upwind schemes were developed and investigated to determine accuracy and practicality. The scheme found to have the best combination of attributes, including reduction to grid alignment with no rotation, was the cell centered non-orthogonal (CCNO) scheme. In 2D, the CCNO scheme improved rotation when flux interpolation was extended to second order. In 3D, improvements were less dramatic in all cases, with second order flux interpolation showing the least improvement over grid aligned upwinding. The reduction in improvement is attributed to uncertainty in determining optimum rotation angle and difficulty in performing accurate and efficient interpolation of the angle in 3D. The CCNO rotational technique will prove very useful for increasing accuracy when second order interpolation is not appropriate and will materially improve inlet flow solutions.

  6. Reattachment heating upstream of short compression ramps in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estruch-Samper, David

    2016-05-01

    Hypersonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions with separation induce unsteady thermal loads of particularly high intensity in flow reattachment regions. Building on earlier semi-empirical correlations, the maximum heat transfer rates upstream of short compression ramp obstacles of angles 15° ⩽ θ ⩽ 135° are here discretised based on time-dependent experimental measurements to develop insight into their transient nature (Me = 8.2-12.3, Re_h= 0.17× 105-0.47× 105). Interactions with an incoming laminar boundary layer experience transition at separation, with heat transfer oscillating between laminar and turbulent levels exceeding slightly those in fully turbulent interactions. Peak heat transfer rates are strongly influenced by the stagnation of the flow upon reattachment close ahead of obstacles and increase with ramp angle all the way up to θ =135°, whereby rates well over two orders of magnitude above the undisturbed laminar levels are intermittently measured (q'_max>10^2q_{u,L}). Bearing in mind the varying degrees of strength in the competing effect between the inviscid and viscous terms—namely the square of the hypersonic similarity parameter (Mθ )^2 for strong interactions and the viscous interaction parameter bar{χ } (primarily a function of Re and M)—the two physical factors that appear to most globally encompass the effects of peak heating for blunt ramps (θ ⩾ 45°) are deflection angle and stagnation heat transfer, so that this may be fundamentally expressed as q'_max∝ {q_{o,2D}} θ ^2 with further parameters in turn influencing the interaction to a lesser extent. The dominant effect of deflection angle is restricted to short obstacle heights, where the rapid expansion at the top edge of the obstacle influences the relaxation region just downstream of reattachment and leads to an upstream displacement of the separation front. The extreme heating rates result from the strengthening of the reattaching shear layer with the increase in

  7. Computation of hypersonic flows with finite rate condensation and evaporation of water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrell, Eric R.; Candler, Graham V.; Erickson, Wayne D.; Wieting, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    A computer program for modelling 2D hypersonic flows of gases containing water vapor and liquid water droplets is presented. The effects of interphase mass, momentum and energy transfer are studied. Computations are compared with existing quasi-1D calculations on the nozzle of the NASA Langley Eight Foot High Temperature Tunnel, a hypersonic wind tunnel driven by combustion of natural gas in oxygen enriched air.

  8. Blunt Body Aerodynamics for Hypersonic Low Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Glass, Christopher E.; Greene, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed for the Apollo capsule from the hypersonic rarefied to the continuum regimes. The focus is on flow conditions similar to those experienced by the Apollo 6 Command Module during the high altitude portion of its reentry. The present focus is to highlight some of the current activities that serve as a precursor for computational tool assessments that will be used to support the development of aerodynamic data bases for future capsule flight environments, particularly those for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Results for aerodynamic forces and moments are presented that demonstrate their sensitivity to rarefaction; that is, free molecular to continuum conditions. Also, aerodynamic data are presented that shows their sensitivity to a range of reentry velocities, encompassing conditions that include reentry from low Earth orbit, lunar return, and Mars return velocities (7.7 to 15 km/s). The rarefied results obtained with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) codes are anchored in the continuum regime with data from Navier-Stokes simulations.

  9. Adiabatic Shock Capturing in Perfect Gas Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the streamline-upwind Petrov/Galerkin (SUPG) method applied to the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in conservation-variable form. The spatial discretization, including a modified approach for interpolating the inviscid flux terms in the SUPG finite element formulation, is briefly reviewed. Of particular interest is the behavior of the shock capturing operator, which is required to regularize the scheme in the presence of strong, shock-induced gradients. A standard shock capturing operator which has been widely used in previous studies by several authors is presented and discussed. Specific modifications are then made to this standard operator which are designed to produce a more physically consistent discretization in the presence of strong shock waves. The actual implementation of the term in a finite dimensional approximation is also discussed. The behavior of the standard and modified scheme is then compared for several supersonic/hypersonic flows. The modified shock capturing operator is found to preserve enthalpy in the inviscid portion of the flowfield substantially better than the standard operator.

  10. Viscous, radiating hypersonic flow about a blunt body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passamaneck, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    The viscous, radiating hypersonic flow past an axisymmetric blunt body is analyzed based on the Navier-Stokes equations, plus a radiative equation of transfer derived from the Milne-Eddington differential approximation. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas with constant specific heats, a constant Prandtl number of order unity, a viscosity coefficient varying as a power of the temperature, and an absorption coefficient varying as the first power of the density and as a power of the temperature. The gray gas assumption is invoked, thereby making the absorption coefficient independent of the spectral frequency. Limiting forms of the solutions are studied as the freestream Mach number freestream Reynolds number and the temperature ratio across the shock wave, go to infinity, and as the Bouguer number and the density ratio across the shock wave go to zero. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used in the analysis, and it is shown that there is a far-field precursor, composed of two regions, in which the fluid mechanics can be neglected for all practical purposes but included for completeness.

  11. Direct Monte Carlo Simulations of Hypersonic Low-Density Flows about an ASTV Including Wake Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dogra, V. K.; Moss, J. N.; Wilmoth, R. G.; Price, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a numerical study concerning flow past a 70-deg blunted cone in hypersonic low-density flow environments are presented using the direct simulation Monte-Carlo method. The flow conditions simulated are those that can be obtained in existing low-density hypersonic wind tunnels. Results indicate that a stable vortex forms in the near wake at and below a freestream Knudsen number (based on cone diameter) of 0.01 and the size of the vortex increases with decreasing Knudsen number. The base region of the flow remains in thermal nonequilibrium for all cases considered herein.

  12. Application of Pressure Sensitive Paint in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol; Carbonaro, Mario; Zemsch, Stephan

    1995-01-01

    It is well known in the aerodynamic field that pressure distribution measurement over the surface of an aircraft model is a problem in experimental aerodynamics. For one thing, a continuous pressure map can not be obtained with the current experimental methods since they are discrete. Therefore, interpolation or CFD methods must be used for a more complete picture of the phenomenon under study. For this study, a new technique was investigated which would provide a continuous pressure distribution over the surface under consideration. The new method is pressure sensitive paint. When pressure sensitive paint is applied to an aerodynamic surface and placed in an operating wind-tunnel under appropriate lighting, the molecules luminesce as a function of the local pressure of oxygen over the surface of interest during aerodynamic flow. The resulting image will be brightest in the areas of low pressure (low oxygen concentration), and less intense in the areas of high pressure (where oxygen is most abundant on the surface). The objective of this investigation was to use pressure sensitive paint samples from McDonnell Douglas (MDD) for calibration purpose in order to assess the response of the paint under appropriate lighting and to use the samples over a flat plate/conical fin mounted at 75 degrees from the center of the plate in order to study the shock/boundary layer interaction at Mach 6 in the Von Karman wind-tunnel. From the result obtained it was concluded that temperature significantly affects the response of the paint and should be given the uppermost attention in the case of hypersonic flows. Also, it was found that past a certain temperature threshold, the paint intensity degradation became irreversible. The comparison between the pressure tap measurement and the pressure sensitive paint showed the right trend. However, there exists a shift when it comes to the actual value. Therefore, further investigation is under way to find the cause of the shift.

  13. The computation of thermo-chemical nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham

    1989-01-01

    Several conceptual designs for vehicles that would fly in the atmosphere at hypersonic speeds have been developed recently. For the proposed flight conditions the air in the shock layer that envelops the body is at a sufficiently high temperature to cause chemical reaction, vibrational excitation, and ionization. However, these processes occur at finite rates which, when coupled with large convection speeds, cause the gas to be removed from thermo-chemical equilibrium. This non-ideal behavior affects the aerothermal loading on the vehicle and has ramifications in its design. A numerical method to solve the equations that describe these types of flows in 2-D was developed. The state of the gas is represented with seven chemical species, a separate vibrational temperature for each diatomic species, an electron translational temperature, and a mass-average translational-rotational temperature for the heavy particles. The equations for this gas model are solved numerically in a fully coupled fashion using an implicit finite volume time-marching technique. Gauss-Seidel line-relaxation is used to reduce the cost of the solution and flux-dependent differencing is employed to maintain stability. The numerical method was tested against several experiments. The calculated bow shock wave detachment on a sphere and two cones was compared to those measured in ground testing facilities. The computed peak electron number density on a sphere-cone was compared to that measured in a flight test. In each case the results from the numerical method were in excellent agreement with experiment. The technique was used to predict the aerothermal loads on an Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle including radiative heating. These results indicate that the current physical model of high temperature air is appropriate and that the numerical algorithm is capable of treating this class of flows.

  14. Simulation of 3D flows past hypersonic vehicles in FlowVision software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, A. A.; Zhluktov, S. V.; Savitskiy, D. V.; Bartenev, G. Y.; Pokhilko, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    A new implicit velocity-pressure split method is discussed in the given presentation. The method implies using conservative velocities, obtained at the given time step, for integration of the momentum equation and other convection-diffusion equations. This enables simulation of super- and hypersonic flows with account of motion of solid boundaries. Calculations of known test cases performed in the FlowVision software are demonstrated. It is shown that the method allows one to carry out calculations at high Mach numbers with integration step essentially exceeding the explicit time step.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Compression Corners and Hypersonic Inlet Flows Using the RPLUS2D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional computational code, PRLUS2D, which was developed for the reactive propulsive flows of ramjets and scramjets, was validated for two-dimensional shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions. The problem of compression corners at supersonic speeds was solved using the RPLUS2D code. To validate the RPLUS2D code for hypersonic speeds, it was applied to a realistic hypersonic inlet geometry. Both the Baldwin-Lomax and the Chien two-equation turbulence models were used. Computational results showed that the RPLUS2D code compared very well with experimentally obtained data for supersonic compression corner flows, except in the case of large separated flows resulting from the interactions between the shock wave and turbulent boundary layer. The computational results compared well with the experiment results in a hypersonic NASA P8 inlet case, with the Chien two-equation turbulence model performing better than the Baldwin-Lomax model.

  16. Hypersonic High-Enthalpy Flow in a Leading-Edge Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepak, N. R.; Gai, S. L.; O'Byrne, Sean; Moss, J. N.

    Flow separation in/over a hypersonic space vehicle is an important phenomenon which occurs due to flow interaction with various geometric elements of the vehicle. This however can lead to adverse pressure gradient and localised intense heating resulting in detrimental consequences for the successful performance of the vehicle.

  17. Tests of Hypersonic Inlet Oscillatory Flows in a Shock Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhufei; Gao, Wenzhi; Jiang, Hongliang; Yang, Jiming

    For efficient operation, hypersonic air breathing engine requires the inlet to operate in a starting mode [1]. High backpressure induced by the combustion may cause the inlet to unstart in the engine actual operation [2].When unstarted, shock wave oscillations are typically observed in the inlet, a phenomenon known as buzz.

  18. Thermal flux measurements in hypersonic flows: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, J. F.; Balageas, D.; Neumann, R. D.

    1993-04-01

    This contribution reviews the papers presented in the Session on 'Heat Flux' and 'Thermography' at a NATO Advanced Research Workshop entitled 'New Trends in Instrumentation for Hypersonic Research', 27 April-1 May, 1992, Le Fauga, France. The present status and problem areas associated with specific methods are discussed and recommendations for future research and development are presented.

  19. A new Lagrangian random choice method for steady two-dimensional supersonic/hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, C. Y.; Hui, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    Glimm's (1965) random choice method has been successfully applied to compute steady two-dimensional supersonic/hypersonic flow using a new Lagrangian formulation. The method is easy to program, fast to execute, yet it is very accurate and robust. It requires no grid generation, resolves slipline and shock discontinuities crisply, can handle boundary conditions most easily, and is applicable to hypersonic as well as supersonic flow. It represents an accurate and fast alternative to the existing Eulerian methods. Many computed examples are given.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of laminar-turbulent flow over a flat plate at hypersonic flow speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, I. V.; Novikov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    A method for direct numerical simulation of a laminar-turbulent flow around bodies at hypersonic flow speeds is proposed. The simulation is performed by solving the full three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The method of calculation is oriented to application of supercomputers and is based on implicit monotonic approximation schemes and a modified Newton-Raphson method for solving nonlinear difference equations. By this method, the development of three-dimensional perturbations in the boundary layer over a flat plate and in a near-wall flow in a compression corner is studied at the Mach numbers of the free-stream of M = 5.37. In addition to pulsation characteristic, distributions of the mean coefficients of the viscous flow in the transient section of the streamlined surface are obtained, which enables one to determine the beginning of the laminar-turbulent transition and estimate the characteristics of the turbulent flow in the boundary layer.

  1. Flow-Tagging Velocimetry for Hypersonic Flows Using Fluorescence of Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; OByrne, Sean; Houwing, A. Frank P.; Fox, Jodie S.; Smith, Daniel R.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a new variation of molecular-tagging velocimetry for hypersonic flows based on laser-induced fluorescence. A thin line of nitric-oxide molecules is excited with a laser beam and then, after a time delay, a fluorescence image of the displaced line is acquired. One component of velocity is determined from the time of flight. This method is applied to measure the velocity profile in a Mach 8.5 laminar, hypersonic boundary layer in the Australian National University s T2 free-piston shock tunnel. The single-shot velocity measurement uncertainty in the freestream was found to be 3.5%, based on 90% confidence. The method is also demonstrated in the separated flow region forward of a blunt fin attached to a flat plate in a Mach 7.4 flow produced by the Australian National University s T3 free-piston shock tunnel. The measurement uncertainty in the blunt fin experiment is approximately 30%, owing mainly to low fluorescence intensities, which could be improved significantly in future experiments. This velocimetry method is applicable to very high-speed flows that have low collisional quenching of the fluorescing species. It is particularly convenient in facilities where planar laser-induced fluorescence is already being performed.

  2. Aero-Heating of Shallow Cavities in Hypersonic Freestream Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Berger, Karen T.; Merski, N. R., Jr.; Woods, William A.; Hollingsworth, Kevin E.; Hyatt, Andrew; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of these experiments and analysis was to augment the heating database and tools used for assessment of impact-induced shallow-cavity damage to the thermal protection system of the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The effect of length and depth on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These rapid-response experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated immediately prior to the launch of STS-114, the initial flight in the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program, and continued during the first week of the mission. Previously-designed and numerically-characterized blunted-nose baseline flat plates were used as the test surfaces. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process and the two-dimensional flow assumptions used for the data analysis. The experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions on a no-cavity test article. Two test plates were developed, each containing 4 equally-spaced spanwise-distributed cavities. The first test plate contained cavities with a constant length-to-depth ratio of 8 with design point depth-to-boundary-layer-thickness ratios of 0.1, 0.2, 0.35, and 0.5. The second test plate contained cavities with a constant design point depth-to-boundary-layer-thickness ratio of 0.35 with length-to-depth ratios of 8, 12, 16, and 20. Cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary results indicate that the floor-averaged Bump Factor (local heating rate nondimensionalized by upstream reference) at the tested conditions is approximately 0.3 with a standard deviation of 0.04 for laminar-in/laminar-out conditions when the cavity length-to-boundary-layer thickness is between 2.5 and 10 and for

  3. DSMC simulation of hypersonic flows using an improved SBT-TAS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goshayeshi, Bijan; Roohi, Ehsan; Stefanov, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    The current paper examines a new DSMC approach to hypersonic flow simulation consisting of a combination between the Simplified Bernoulli Trials (SBT) collision algorithm and the transient adaptive subcell (TAS) selection procedure. The SBT collision algorithm has already been introduced as a scheme that provides accurate results with a quite small number of particles per cells and its combination with the transient adaptive subcell (TAS) technique will enable SBT to have coarser grid sizes as well. In the current research, the no-time-counter (NTC) collision algorithm and nearest neighbor (NN) pair selection procedure of Bird DS2V code are substituted by the SBT-TAS and comparisons between the new algorithm and NTC-NN are made considering appropriate test cases including hypersonic cylinder flow and axisymmetric biconic flow. Hypersonic cylinder flow is a well-known benchmark problem with a wide collision frequency range while the biconic flow exhibits laminar shock/shock and shock/boundary-layer interactions. Improvements implemented in the SBT-TAS technique, including subcell volume estimation, surface properties filter, and time controller, are discussed in detail. The simulations of these hypersonic test cases demonstrated that from the viewpoint of consumed sample-size, SBT-TAS is an efficient collision technique.

  4. Application of parallel time-implicit discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods to hypersonic nonequilibrium flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Ankush

    Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods are high-order accurate, compact-stencil methods, proven to possess favorable properties for highly efficient parallel systems, complex geometries and unstructured meshes. Coding effort is significantly reduced for compact-stencil DG methods in comparison to main stream finite difference and finite volume methods. This work successfully introduces DG methods to thermal ablation and non-equilibrium hypersonic flows. In the state-of-the-art hypersonic flow codes, surface heating predictions are very sensitive to mesh resolution in the shock. A minor misalignment can cause major changes in the heating predictions. This is due to the lack of high-order accuracy in current streamline methods and numerical errors associated with the shock capturing approach. Shock capturing methods like slope limiter or artificial viscosity, being empirical have errors in the shock region. This work employs r-p adaptivity to accurately capture the shock with p = 0 elements (first order accuracy). Smooth flow regions are captured using p greater than 0. This method is stable. Implicit methods are developed for solution advancement with high CFL numbers. Error in the shock is reduced by redistributing the elements (outside of the shock) to within the shock (r adaptivity). Inviscid and viscous hypersonic flow problems, with same accuracy as in h-p adaptivity method, are simulated with one-third elements. This methodology requires no a priori knowledge of the shock's location, and is suitable for detached shock problems. r-p adaptivity method has allowed for successful prediction of surface heating rate for hypersonic flow over cylinder. Additionally, good comparisons are made, for non-equilibrium hypersonic flows, to the published results. This tool is also used to determine the effect of micro-second pulsed sinusoidal Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators on the surface heating reduction for hypersonic flow over cylinder. A significant

  5. Numerical simulations of heat and mass transfer at ablating surface in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, A. N.; Golovin, N. N.; Petrovskiy, V. P.; Teplyakov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    The numerical technique was developed to solve heat and mass transfer problem in 3D hypersonic flow taking into account destruction of thermal protection system. Described technique was applied for calculation of heat and mass transfer in sphere-cone shaped body. The data on temperature, heat flux and mass flux were obtained.

  6. Multi Laser Pulse Investigation of the DEAS Concept in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Minucci, M.A.S.; Toro, P.G.P.; Oliveira, A.C.; Chanes, J.B. Jr.; Ramos, A.G.; Nagamatsu, H.T.; Myrabo, L.N.

    2004-03-30

    The present paper presents recent experimental results on the Laser-Supported Directed Energy 'Air Spike' - DEAS in hypersonic flow achieved by the Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics - LAH, Brazil. Two CO2 TEA lasers, sharing the same optical cavity, have been used in conjunction with the IEAv 0.3m Hypersonic Shock Tunnel - HST to demonstrate the Laser-Supported DEAS concept. A single and double laser pulse, generated during the tunnel useful test time, were focused through a NaCl lens upstream of a Double Apollo Disc model fitted with seven piezoelectric pressure transducers and six platinum thin film heat transfer gauges. The objective being to corroborate previous results as well as to obtain additional pressure and heat flux distributions information when two laser pulses are used.

  7. Wall catalytic recombination and boundary conditions in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows - With applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.

    1992-01-01

    The meaning of catalysis and its relation to aerodynamic heating in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows are discussed. The species equations are described and boundary conditions for them are derived for a multicomponent gas and for a binary gas. Slip effects are included for application of continuum methods to low-density flows. Measurement techniques for determining catalytic wall recombination rates are discussed. Among them are experiments carried out in arc jets as well as flow reactors. Diagnostic methods for determining the atom or molecule concentrations in the flow are included. Results are given for a number of materials of interest to the aerospace community, including glassy coatings such as the RCG coating of the Space Shuttle and for high temperature refractory metals such as coated niobium. Methods of calculating the heat flux to space vehicles in nonequilibrium flows are described. These methods are applied to the Space Shuttle, the planned Aeroassist Flight Experiment, and a hypersonic slender vehicle such as a transatmospheric vehicle.

  8. Multiscale Computational Analysis of Nitrogen and Oxygen Gas-Phase Thermochemistry in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Jason D.

    Understanding hypersonic aerodynamics is important for the design of next-generation aerospace vehicles for space exploration, national security, and other applications. Ground-level experimental studies of hypersonic flows are difficult and expensive; thus, computational science plays a crucial role in this field. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of extremely high-speed flows require models of chemical and thermal nonequilibrium processes, such as dissociation of diatomic molecules and vibrational energy relaxation. Current models are outdated and inadequate for advanced applications. We describe a multiscale computational study of gas-phase thermochemical processes in hypersonic flows, starting at the atomic scale and building systematically up to the continuum scale. The project was part of a larger effort centered on collaborations between aerospace scientists and computational chemists. We discuss the construction of potential energy surfaces for the N4, N2O2, and O4 systems, focusing especially on the multi-dimensional fitting problem. A new local fitting method named L-IMLS-G2 is presented and compared with a global fitting method. Then, we describe the theory of the quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) approach for modeling molecular collisions. We explain how we implemented the approach in a new parallel code for high-performance computing platforms. Results from billions of QCT simulations of high-energy N2 + N2, N2 + N, and N2 + O2 collisions are reported and analyzed. Reaction rate constants are calculated and sets of reactive trajectories are characterized at both thermal equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. The data shed light on fundamental mechanisms of dissociation and exchange reactions -- and their coupling to internal energy transfer processes -- in thermal environments typical of hypersonic flows. We discuss how the outcomes of this investigation and other related studies lay a rigorous foundation for new macroscopic models for

  9. Use of arc-jet hypersonic blunted wedge flows for evaluating performance of Orbiter TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochelle, W. C.; Battley, H. H.; Gallegos, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    Arc-jet tests at NASA/JSC have been conducted recently to evaluate the performance of the Orbiter Thermal Protection System (TPS) on three critical areas of the side and top of the Orbiter fuselage: (1) cargo bay door, (2) crew access door, and (3) LRSI/FRSI joint regions. Test articles corresponding to these three areas on the Orbiter were mounted in an arc-jet test chamber in a blunted-wedge holder and exposed to hypersonic flow at various angles of attack. The effects of flow direction, heating load, and overtemperature were investigated. In addition, the reuse capability of the TPS materials was evaluated, along with the protection of the pressure seals within the test articles. Thermal match model predictions correlated well with primary structure thermocouple data. Heating rate and pressure predictions based on a nonequilibrium flow field computer program showed good agreement with arc-jet test data and existing hypersonic flow theories.

  10. Hypersonic Nozzle/Afterbody Experiment: Flow Visualization and Boundary Layer Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, Earl R.; Spaid, Frank W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This study was conducted to experimentally characterize the flow field created by the interaction of a single-expansion-ramp-nozzle (SERN) flow with a hypersonic external stream Data were obtained from a generic nozzle/afterbody model in the 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel of the NASA Ames Research Center in a cooperative experimental program involving Ames and the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The model design and test planning were performed in close cooperation with members of the Ames computational fluid dynamics (CFD) team for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program. This paper presents experimental results consisting of oil-flow and shadowgraph flow-visualization photographs, afterbody surface-pressure distributions, boundary-layer rake measurements, and Preston-tube skin-friction measurements.

  11. Evaluation of thermochemical models for particle and continuum simulations of hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain D.; Gokcen, Tahir

    1992-01-01

    Computations are presented for one-dimensional, strong shock waves that are typical of those that form in front of a reentering spacecraft. The fluid mechanics and thermochemistry are modeled using two different approaches. The first employs traditional continuum techniques in solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The second approach employs a particle simulation technique (the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, DSMC). The thermochemical models employed in these two techniques are quite different. The present investigation presents an evaluation of thermochemical models for nitrogen under hypersonic flow conditions. Four separate cases are considered that are dominated in turn by vibrational relaxation, weak dissociation, strong dissociation and weak ionization. In near-continuum, hypersonic flow, the nonequilibrium thermochemical models employed in continuum and particle simulations produce nearly identical solutions. Further, the two approaches are evaluated successfully against available experimental data for weakly and strongly dissociating flows.

  12. Comparative study of turbulence models in predicting hypersonic inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to analyze the performance of different turbulence models when applied to the hypersonic NASA P8 inlet. Computational results from the PARC2D code, which solves the full two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation, were compared with experimental data. The zero-equation models considered for the study were the Baldwin-Lomax model, the Thomas model, and a combination of the Baldwin-Lomax and Thomas models; the two-equation models considered were the Chien model, the Speziale model (both low Reynolds number), and the Launder and Spalding model (high Reynolds number). The Thomas model performed best among the zero-equation models, and predicted good pressure distributions. The Chien and Speziale models compared very well with the experimental data, and performed better than the Thomas model near the walls.

  13. Comparative study of turbulence models in predicting hypersonic inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to analyze the performance of different turbulence models when applied to the hypersonic NASA P8 inlet. Computational results from the PARC2D code, which solves the full two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation, were compared with experimental data. The zero-equation models considered for the study were the Baldwin-Lomax model, the Thomas model, and a combination of the Baldwin-Lomax and Thomas models; the two-equation models considered were the Chien model, the Speziale model (both low Reynolds number), and the Launder and Spalding model (high Reynolds number). The Thomas model performed best among the zero-equation models, and predicted good pressure distributions. The Chien and Speziale models compared wery well with the experimental data, and performed better than the Thomas model near the walls.

  14. Transition in Hypersonic Flows Including High-temperature Gas Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stemmer, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Hypersonic transition poses a special challenge for direct numerical simulations. Comparable data from Wind-tunnel tests or free-flight testing are not available or not accurate enough for comparison. The wind-tunnel testing does not allow for the exact match to the free-flight conditions at such high Mach-numbers. Flat-plate boundary-layer transition at high Mach-numbers is investigated in this work. A simulation case was chosen where chemical non-equilibrium plays an important role but ionization can be neglected. The chosen case at an altitude of H=50Km lies close to one point on the descent path of the Space Shuttle. The failure of the Space Shuttle has shown that an improved vehicle for space transportation is imperative in the close future. Transition research for an improved space-transportation vehicle is crucial in order to estimate the heat load during re-entry.

  15. Documentation of Two- and Three-Dimensional Hypersonic Shock Wave/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussoy, Marvin I.; Horstman, Clifford C.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data for a series of two- and three-dimensional shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows at Mach 7 are presented. Test bodies, composed of simple geometric shapes, were designed to generate flows with varying degrees of pressure gradient, boundary-layer separation, and turning angle. The data include surface-pressure and heat-transfer distributions as well as limited mean-flow-field surveys in both the undisturbed and the interaction regimes. The data are presented in a convenient form for use in validating existing or future computational models of these generic hypersonic flows.

  16. Spatially resolved excitation temperature measurements in a hypersonic flow using the hook method.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, R J; Ebrahim, N A

    1977-05-01

    The extension of the hook method to include spatial resolution of nonuniformities in the test plane as suggested by Huber (1971) and Sandeman (1971) is demonstrated experimentally by measurements of the variation of the integrated line density of ground state sodium in a flame. Experiments are also described in which the variations in the flow of CO(2) in a hypersonic shock tunnel are spatially resolved along the spectrometer slit. The variations in the hook separations of the 425.4-nm Cr1 resonance and the 434.4-nm CrI 1-eV lower state line are simultaneously measured. The chromium exists as an impurity in the hypersonic flow of CO(2) over a cylinder in a shock tunnel. The populations of the levels so obtained have enabled the comparison of the excitation temperature of the Cr 1-eV level with the calculated gas temperature. PMID:20168704

  17. Review of blunt body wake flows at hypersonic low density conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.; Price, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Recent results of experimental and computational studies concerning hypersonic flows about blunted cones including their near wake are reviewed. Attention is focused on conditions where rarefaction effects are present, particularly in the wake. The experiments have been performed for a common model configuration (70 deg spherically-blunted cone) in five hypersonic facilities that encompass a significant range of rarefaction and nonequilibrium effects. Computational studies using direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Navier-Stokes solvers have been applied to selected experiments performed in each of the facilities. In addition, computations have been made for typical flight conditions in both Earth and Mars atmospheres, hence more energetic flows than produced in the ground-based tests. Also, comparisons of DSMC calculations and forebody measurements made for the Japanese Orbital Reentry Experiment (OREX) vehicle (a 50 deg spherically-blunted cone) are presented to bridge the spectrum of ground to flight conditions.

  18. Real-Gas Correction Factors for Hypersonic Flow Parameters in Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Wayne D.

    1960-01-01

    The real-gas hypersonic flow parameters for helium have been calculated for stagnation temperatures from 0 F to 600 F and stagnation pressures up to 6,000 pounds per square inch absolute. The results of these calculations are presented in the form of simple correction factors which must be applied to the tabulated ideal-gas parameters. It has been shown that the deviations from the ideal-gas law which exist at high pressures may cause a corresponding significant error in the hypersonic flow parameters when calculated as an ideal gas. For example the ratio of the free-stream static to stagnation pressure as calculated from the thermodynamic properties of helium for a stagnation temperature of 80 F and pressure of 4,000 pounds per square inch absolute was found to be approximately 13 percent greater than that determined from the ideal-gas tabulation with a specific heat ratio of 5/3.

  19. Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Myrabo, L. N.

    2008-04-28

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed.

  20. Detailed numerical modeling of chemical and thermal nonequilibrium in hypersonic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, U.; Maas, U.; Warnatz, J. )

    1993-03-01

    Interest in hypersonic flows has created a large demand for physicochemical models for air flow computations around reentry bodies. Detailed physicochemical models for air in chemical and thermal nonequilibrium are needed for a realistic prediction of hypersonic flowfields. In this paper we develop a model, based on elementary physicochemical processes, for a detailed description of chemical nonequilibrium together with the excitation of internal DOFs. This model is implemented in a 2D Navier-Stokes code in order to show the strong influence of thermal nonequilibrium on the flowfields. The algorithm presented here is based on a fully conservative discretization of the inviscid fluxes in the conservation equations and uses the chain rule conservation law form for the viscous fluxes. The large system of ordinary differential and algebraic equations resulting from the spatial discretization is solved by a time-accurate semiimplicit extrapolation method. 34 refs.

  1. Approximate Analytical Solutions for Hypersonic Flow Over Slender Power Law Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirels, Harold

    1959-01-01

    Approximate analytical solutions are presented for two-dimensional and axisymmetric hypersonic flow over slender power law bodies. Both zero order (M approaches infinity) and first order (small but nonvanishing values of 1/(M(Delta)(sup 2) solutions are presented, where M is free-stream Mach number and Delta is a characteristic slope. These solutions are compared with exact numerical integration of the equations of motion and appear to be accurate particularly when the shock is relatively close to the body.

  2. Surface Characterization of LMMS Molybdenum Disilicide Coated HTP-8 Using Arc- Jet Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Surface properties for an advanced Lockheed Martin Missile and Space (LMMS) molybdenum disilicide coated insulation (HTP-8) were determined using arc-jet flow to simulate Earth entry at hypersonic speeds. The catalytic efficiency (atom recombination coefficients) for this advanced thermal protection system was determined from arc-jet data taken in both oxygen and nitrogen streams at temperatures ranging from 1255 K to roughly 1600 K. In addition, optical and chemical stability data were obtained from these test samples.

  3. Hypersonic, nonequilibrium flow over the FIRE 2 forebody at 1634 sec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Lin Hartung

    1994-01-01

    The numerical simulation of hypersonic flow in thermochemical nonequilibrium over the forebody of the FIRE 2 vehicle at 1634 sec in its trajectory is described. The simulation was executed on a Cray C90 with the program Langley Aerodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) 4.0.2. Code setup procedures and sample results, including grid refinement studies, are discussed. This simulation relates to a study of radiative heating predictions on aerobrake type vehicles.

  4. Stagnation temperature in a cold hypersonic flow produced by a light free piston compression facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widodo, Agung; Buttsworth, David

    2013-04-01

    Stagnation temperatures at the nozzle exit of the University of Southern Queensland hypersonic wind tunnel facility have been identified using an aspirating tube device with a 0.075 mm diameter k-type butt-welded thermocouple junction positioned at its inlet. Because of the finite thermal inertia of the thermocouple, a response time correction is introduced, and uncertainties in the response time correction are assessed and minimized by operating the aspirating device over a range of different initial temperatures. Pressure measurements within the barrel of the wind tunnel facility were used to estimate a theoretical upper bound on the flow stagnation temperature by assuming isentropic compression of the test gas. Results demonstrate that for the current operating conditions, the gas which is first delivered into the hypersonic nozzle has a stagnation temperature almost identical to the isentropic compression value of around 560 K, but a cooling effect is registered for the duration of the test flow which is about 200 ms. Thermodynamic simulations based on an unsteady energy balance model with turbulent heat transfer from the test gas within the barrel demonstrate a cooling effect of a similar magnitude to that indicated by the measured temperature variation, suggesting that strong mixing of the test gas occurs within the barrel during flow discharge through the hypersonic nozzle.

  5. Toluene-based planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of temperature in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estruch-Samper, D.; Vanstone, L.; Hillier, R.; Ganapathisubramani, B.

    2015-06-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging is carried out in a hypersonic gun tunnel at a freestream Mach number of 8.9 and Reynolds number of ( is the test gas). The fluorescence of toluene is correlated with the red shift of the emission spectra with increasing temperature. A two-colour approach is used where, following an excitation at 266 nm, emission spectra at two different bands are captured in separate runs using two different filters. Two different flow fields are investigated using this method: (i) hypersonic flow past a blunt nose, which is characterised by a bow shock with strong entropy effects, and (ii) an attached shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction induced by a flare located further downstream on the same blunt cylinder body. Measurements from as low as the freestream temperature of K all the way up to K are obtained. The uncertainty at the higher temperature level is approximately %, while at the low end of the temperature, an additional % uncertainty is expected. Application of the technique is further challenged at high temperatures due to the exponentially reduced fluorescence quantum yields and the occurrence of toluene pyrolysis near the stagnation region ( K). Overall, results are found to be within % agreement with the expected distributions, thus demonstrating suitability of the technique for hypersonic flow thermometry applications in low-enthalpy facilities.

  6. Simulation of Stagnation Region Heating in Hypersonic Flow on Tetrahedral Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Hypersonic flow simulations using the node based, unstructured grid code FUN3D are presented. Applications include simple (cylinder) and complex (towed ballute) configurations. Emphasis throughout is on computation of stagnation region heating in hypersonic flow on tetrahedral grids. Hypersonic flow over a cylinder provides a simple test problem for exposing any flaws in a simulation algorithm with regard to its ability to compute accurate heating on such grids. Such flaws predominantly derive from the quality of the captured shock. The importance of pure tetrahedral formulations are discussed. Algorithm adjustments for the baseline Roe / Symmetric, Total-Variation-Diminishing (STVD) formulation to deal with simulation accuracy are presented. Formulations of surface normal gradients to compute heating and diffusion to the surface as needed for a radiative equilibrium wall boundary condition and finite catalytic wall boundary in the node-based unstructured environment are developed. A satisfactory resolution of the heating problem on tetrahedral grids is not realized here; however, a definition of a test problem, and discussion of observed algorithm behaviors to date are presented in order to promote further research on this important problem.

  7. DSMC Simulation and Experimental Validation of Shock Interaction in Hypersonic Low Density Flow

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) of shock interaction in hypersonic low density flow is developed. Three collision molecular models, including hard sphere (HS), variable hard sphere (VHS), and variable soft sphere (VSS), are employed in the DSMC study. The simulations of double-cone and Edney's type IV hypersonic shock interactions in low density flow are performed. Comparisons between DSMC and experimental data are conducted. Investigation of the double-cone hypersonic flow shows that three collision molecular models can predict the trend of pressure coefficient and the Stanton number. HS model shows the best agreement between DSMC simulation and experiment among three collision molecular models. Also, it shows that the agreement between DSMC and experiment is generally good for HS and VHS models in Edney's type IV shock interaction. However, it fails in the VSS model. Both double-cone and Edney's type IV shock interaction simulations show that the DSMC errors depend on the Knudsen number and the models employed for intermolecular interaction. With the increase in the Knudsen number, the DSMC error is decreased. The error is the smallest in HS compared with those in the VHS and VSS models. When the Knudsen number is in the level of 10−4, the DSMC errors, for pressure coefficient, the Stanton number, and the scale of interaction region, are controlled within 10%. PMID:24672360

  8. DSMC simulation and experimental validation of shock interaction in hypersonic low density flow.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hong; Shang, Yuhe; Wu, Di

    2014-01-01

    Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) of shock interaction in hypersonic low density flow is developed. Three collision molecular models, including hard sphere (HS), variable hard sphere (VHS), and variable soft sphere (VSS), are employed in the DSMC study. The simulations of double-cone and Edney's type IV hypersonic shock interactions in low density flow are performed. Comparisons between DSMC and experimental data are conducted. Investigation of the double-cone hypersonic flow shows that three collision molecular models can predict the trend of pressure coefficient and the Stanton number. HS model shows the best agreement between DSMC simulation and experiment among three collision molecular models. Also, it shows that the agreement between DSMC and experiment is generally good for HS and VHS models in Edney's type IV shock interaction. However, it fails in the VSS model. Both double-cone and Edney's type IV shock interaction simulations show that the DSMC errors depend on the Knudsen number and the models employed for intermolecular interaction. With the increase in the Knudsen number, the DSMC error is decreased. The error is the smallest in HS compared with those in the VHS and VSS models. When the Knudsen number is in the level of 10(-4), the DSMC errors, for pressure coefficient, the Stanton number, and the scale of interaction region, are controlled within 10%. PMID:24672360

  9. Effect of local energy supply to a hypersonic flow on the drag of bodies with different nose bluntness

    SciTech Connect

    Borzov, V.Yu.; Rybka, I.V.; Yur`ev, A.S.

    1995-06-01

    Parameters of the axisymmetric flow around bodies with different bluntness are compared in the case of constant energy supply to the main hypersonic flow. Flow structures, drag coefficients, and expenditure of energy on overcoming drag are analyzed with the effect of thermal energy on the flow taken into account for different bodies with equal volume.

  10. Computational Study of Flow Establishment in Hypersonic Pulse Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, S.; Radhakrishnan, K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the temporal evolution of the combustion flowfield established by the interaction of ram-accelerator-type projectiles with an explosive gas mixture accelerated to hypersonic speeds in an expansion tube. The Navier-Stokes equations for a chemically reacting gas are solved in a fully coupled manner using an implicit, time accurate algorithm. The solution procedure is based on a spatially second order, total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme and a temporally second order, variable-step, backward differentiation formula method. The hydrogen-oxygen chemistry is modeled with a 9-species, 19-step mechanism. The accuracy of the solution method is first demonstrated by several benchmark calculations. Numerical simulations of expansion tube flowfields are then presented for two different configurations. In particular, the development of the shock-induced combustion process is followed. In one case, designed to ensure ignition only in the boundary layer, the lateral extent of the combustion front during the initial transient phase was surprisingly large. The time histories of the calculated thrust and drag forces on the ram accelerator projectile are also presented.

  11. Leading-edge receptivity to free-stream disturbance waves for hypersonic flow over a parabola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2001-08-01

    The receptivity of hypersonic boundary layers to free-stream disturbances, which is the process of environmental disturbances initially entering the boundary layers and generating disturbance waves, is altered considerably by the presence of bow shocks in hypersonic flow fields. This paper presents a numerical simulation study of the generation of boundary layer disturbance waves due to free-stream waves, for a two-dimensional Mach 15 viscous flow over a parabola. Both steady and unsteady flow solutions of the receptivity problem are obtained by computing the full Navier Stokes equations using a high-order-accurate shock-fitting finite difference scheme. The effects of bow-shock/free-stream-sound interactions on the receptivity process are accurately taken into account by treating the shock as a discontinuity surface, governed by the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. The results show that the disturbance waves generated and developed in the hypersonic boundary layer contain both first-, second-, and third-mode waves. A parametric study is carried out on the receptivity characteristics for different free-stream waves, frequencies, nose bluntness characterized by Strouhal numbers, Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers, and wall cooling. In this paper, the hypersonic boundary-layer receptivity is characterized by a receptivity parameter defined as the ratio of the maximum induced wave amplitude in the first-mode-dominated region to the amplitude of the free-stream forcing wave. It is found that the receptivity parameter decreases when the forcing frequency or nose bluntness increase. The results also show that the generation of boundary layer waves is mainly due to the interaction of the boundary layer with the acoustic wave field behind the bow shock, rather than interactions with the entropy and vorticity wave fields.

  12. Hypersonic Laminar Viscous Flow Past Spinning Cones at Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh; Rakich, John V.

    1982-01-01

    Computational results are presented for hypersonic viscous flow past spinning sharp and blunt cones of angle of attack, obtained with a parabolic Navier-Stokes marching code. The code takes into account the asymmetries in the flowfield resulting from spinning motion and computes the asymmetric shock shape, cross-flow and streamwise shear, heat transfer, cross-flow separation, and vortex structure. The Magnus force and moments are also computed. Comparisons are made with other theoretical analyses based on boundary-layer and boundary-region equations, and an anomaly is discovered in the displacement thickness contribution to the Magnus force when compared with boundary-layer results.

  13. Line-shape flattening resulting from hypersonic nozzle wedge flow in low-pressure chemical lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, P.M.; Bullock, D.L.

    1980-07-01

    The new hypersonic wedge nozzle (HYWN) supersonic wedge nozzle design produces a significant component of directed gas flow along the optical axis of a laser cavity comparable to thermal speeds. The gain-line-shape function is broadened and the refractive-index line shape is also spread as a function of wedge-flow half-angle. An analytical treatment as well as a numerical study is presented that evaluates the Doppler-directed-flow impact on the number of longitudinal modes and their frequencies as well as on gain and refractive-index saturation of those that lase in a Fabry--Perot cavity.

  14. Line-shape flattening resulting from hypersonic nozzle wedge flow in low-pressure chemical lasers.

    PubMed

    Livingston, P M; Bullock, D L

    1980-07-01

    The new hypersonic wedge nozzle (HYWN) supersonic wedge nozzle design produces a significant component of directed gas flow along the optical axis of a laser cavity comparable to thermal speeds. The gain-line-shape function is broadened and the refractive-index line shape is also spread as a function of wedge-flow half-angle. An analytical treatment as well as a numerical study is presented that evaluates the Doppler-directed-flow impact on the number of longitudinal modes and their frequencies as well as on gain and refractive-index saturation of those that lase in a Fabry-Perot cavity. PMID:19693204

  15. New method of asymmetric flow field measurement in hypersonic shock tunnel.

    PubMed

    Yan, D P; He, A Z; Ni, X W

    1991-03-01

    In this paper a method of large aperture (?500 mm) high sensitivity moire deflectometry is used to obtain multidirectional deflectograms of the asymmetric flow field in hypersonic (M = 10.29) shock tunnel. At the same time, a 3-D reconstructive method of the asymmetric flow field is presented which is based on the integration of the moire deflective angle and the double-cubic many-knot interpolating splines; it is used to calculate the 3-D density distribution of the asymmetric flow field. PMID:20582058

  16. Interference effects on the hypersonic, rarefied flow about a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, Richard G.

    1988-01-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method is used to study the hypersonic, rarified flow interference effects on a flat plate caused by nearby surfaces. Calculations focus on shock-boundary-layer and shock-lip interactions in hypersonic inlets. Results are presented for geometries consisting of a flat plate with different leading-edge shapes over a flat lower wall and a blunt-edge flat plate over a 5-degree wedge. The problems simulated correspond to a typical entry flight condition of 7.5 km/s at altitudes of 75 to 90 km. The results show increases in predicted local heating rates for shock-boundary-layer and shock-lip interactions that are quantitatively similar to those observed experimentally at much higher densities.

  17. The application of laser Rayleigh scattering to gas density measurements in hypersonic helium flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, J. C.; Honaker, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the mean static free-stream gas density have been made in two Langley Research Center helium facilities, the 3-inch leg of the high-Reynolds-number helium complex and the 22-inch hypersonic helium tunnel. Rayleigh scattering of a CW argon ion laser beam at 514.5 nm provided the basic physical mechanism. The behavior of the scattered signal was linear, confirmed by a preliminary laboratory study. That study also revealed the need to introduce baffles to reduce stray light. A relatively simple optical system and associated photon-counting electronics were utilized to obtain data for densities from 10 to the 23rd to 10 to the 25th per cu m. The major purpose, to confirm the applicability of this technique in the hypersonic helium flow, was accomplished.

  18. Ir Thermographic Measurements of Temperatures and Heat Fluxes in Hypersonic Plasma Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardone, G.; Tortora, G.; del Vecchio, A.

    2005-02-01

    The technological development achieved in instruments and methodology concerning both flights and ground hypersonic experiment (employed in space plane planning) goes towards an updating and a standardization of the heat flux technical measurements. In fact, the possibility to simulate high enthalpy flow relative to reentry condition by hypersonic arc-jet facility needs devoted methods to measure heat fluxes. Aim of this work is to develop an experimental numerical technique for the evaluation of heat fluxes over Thermal Protection System (TPS) by means of InfraRed (IR) thermographic temperature measurements and a new heat flux sensor (IR-HFS). We tackle the numerical validation of IR-HFS, apply the same one to the Hyflex nose cap model and compare the obtained results with others ones obtained by others methodology.

  19. DSMC Simulation of Separated Flows About Flared Bodies at Hypersonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a numerical study of interacting hypersonic flows at conditions that can be produced in ground-based test facilities. The computations are made with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird. The focus is on Mach 10 flows about flared axisymmetric configurations, both hollow cylinder flares and double cones. The flow conditions are those for which experiments have been or will be performed in the ONERA R5Ch low-density wind tunnel and the Calspan-University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel. The range of flow conditions, model configurations, and model sizes provides a significant range of shock/shock and shock/boundary layer interactions at low Reynolds number conditions. Results presented will highlight the sensitivity of the calculations to grid resolution, contrast the differences in flow structure for hypersonic cold flows and those of more energetic but still low enthalpy flows, and compare the present results with experimental measurements for surface heating, pressure, and extent of separation.

  20. Effects of nose bluntness and shock-shock interactions on blunt bodies in viscous hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D. J.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to investigate the effects of blunt leading edges on the viscous flow field around a hypersonic vehicle such as the proposed National Aero-Space Plane. Attention is focused on two specific regions of the flow field. In the first region, effects of nose bluntness on the forebody flow field are investigated. The second region of the flow considered is around the leading edges of the scramjet inlet. In this region, the interaction of the forebody shock with the shock produced by the blunt leading edges of the inlet compression surfaces is analyzed. Analysis of these flow regions is required to accurately predict the overall flow field as well as to get necessary information on localized zones of high pressure and intense heating. The results for the forebody flow field are discussed first, followed by the results for the shock interaction in the inlet leading edge region.

  1. A Numerical Simulation of a Normal Sonic Jet into a Hypersonic Cross-Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffries, Damon K.; Krishnamurthy, Ramesh; Chandra, Suresh

    1997-01-01

    This study involves numerical modeling of a normal sonic jet injection into a hypersonic cross-flow. The numerical code used for simulation is GASP (General Aerodynamic Simulation Program.) First the numerical predictions are compared with well established solutions for compressible laminar flow. Then comparisons are made with non-injection test case measurements of surface pressure distributions. Good agreement with the measurements is observed. Currently comparisons are underway with the injection case. All the experimental data were generated at the Southampton University Light Piston Isentropic Compression Tube.

  2. An unstructured shock-fitting solver for hypersonic plasma flows in chemical non-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, R.; Bonfiglioli, A.; D'Angola, A.; Colonna, G.; Paciorri, R.

    2015-11-01

    A CFD solver, using Residual Distribution Schemes on unstructured grids, has been extended to deal with inviscid chemical non-equilibrium flows. The conservative equations have been coupled with a kinetic model for argon plasma which includes the argon metastable state as independent species, taking into account electron-atom and atom-atom processes. Results in the case of an hypersonic flow around an infinite cylinder, obtained by using both shock-capturing and shock-fitting approaches, show higher accuracy of the shock-fitting approach.

  3. Automatic liquid crystal thermography for transient heat transfer measurements in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babinsky, H.; Edwards, J. A.

    1996-08-01

    A technique has been developed to measure surface heat transfer on windtunnel models in hypersonic flow based on the colour response of encapsulated thermochromic liquid crystals. The method supplies results of a superior spatial resolution at experimental uncertainties comparable to traditional methods. The approach is different from other liquid crystal applications in several key areas. It combines the calibration of the liquid crystal coating with the actual mesurement and therefore allows for an efficient experiment. The method is automated in most steps involved. Results are shown for the flow over an axisymmetric compression corner at Mach 5 and compared with surface thermocouple measurements.

  4. Fluid flow analysis of a hot-core hypersonic wind-tunnel nozzle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, J. B.; Sebacher, D. I.; Boatright, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    A hypersonic-wind-tunnel nozzle concept which incorporates a hot-core flow surrounded by an annular flow of cold air offers a promising technique for maximizing the model size while minimizing the power required to heat the test core. This capability becomes especially important when providing the true-temperature duplication needed for hypersonic propulsion testing. Several two-dimensional wind-tunnel nozzle configurations that are designed according to this concept are analyzed by using recently developed analytical techniques for prediction of the boundary-layer growth and the mixing between the hot and cold coaxial supersonic airflows. The analyses indicate that introduction of the cold annular flow near the throat results in an unacceptable test core for the nozzle size and stagnation conditions considered because of both mixing and condensation effects. Use of a half-nozzle with a ramp on the flat portion does not appear promising because of the thick boundary layer associated with the extra length. However, the analyses indicate that if the cold annular flow is introduced at the exit of a full two-dimensional nozzle, an acceptable test core will be produced. Predictions of the mixing between the hot and cold supersonic streams for this configuration show that mixing effects from the cold flow do not appreciably penetrate into the hot core for the large downstream distances of interest.

  5. Liquid crystal coatings for surface shear stress visualization in hypersonic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, D.C.; Aeschliman, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to test the surface-shear-stress visualization capabilities of shear-stress-sensitive/temperature- insensitive liquid crystal compounds in hypersonic flow. Liquid crystal coatings were applied to the surface of a conical model, which was then exposed to a high-unit-Reynolds-number (2.3 {times} 10{sup 7}/m) Mach 5 flow. The coating was illuminated by white light, and its response to the various flow situations was monitored and recorded with standard video and high-speed movie cameras. Boundary layer transition to turbulence was clearly demarcated by the technique. The dynamic location of the transition front as a function of model angle of attack (for sharp and blunt cones, with and without boundary-layer trips) was recorded, and observations were found to be consistent with established (published) trends for hypersonic flows over conical bodies. Normal shock passage over the model during tunnel shutdown was recorded (at 400 frames/second), and the liquid crystal coating was observed to respond to this event in a time interval less than or equal to the time between sequential movie frame exposures ({le} 0.0025 seconds). The liquid crystal technique has thus been demonstrated as a viable diagnostic tool for use in transient/compressible flows. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  6. An experimental study on the efficiency of transpiration cooling in laminar and turbulent hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülhan, A.; Braun, S.

    2011-03-01

    An experimental study on the efficiency of transpiration cooling in hypersonic laminar and turbulent flow regimes is carried out in the Hypersonic Windtunnel Cologne with a focus on the aerothermal problems downstream of the cooled model part. The model is made of a material of low thermal conductivity (PEEK) with an integrated probe of a porous material. The experimental setup allows the direct comparison of the thermal behavior of transpiration cooling to a well-defined and radiatively cooled reference surface. Experiments are performed at Mach number of 6 and two different Reynolds numbers. Air, argon and helium are used as coolants at various flow rates, in order to identify the influence of coolant medium on cooling efficiency. The cooling efficiency of air and argon is comparable. Helium provides significantly higher cooling efficiency at the same blowing ratio, i.e. same coolant mass flow rate. The experimental data shows that the efficiency of the transpiration cooling in turbulent flows is much lower than in laminar flow.

  7. A Computational and Experimental Investigation of a Three-Dimensional Hypersonic Scramjet Inlet Flow Field. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott Douglas

    1991-01-01

    A combined computational and experimental parametric study of the internal aerodynamics of a generic three dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlet configuration was performed. The study was designed to demonstrate the utility of computational fluid dynamics as a design tool in hypersonic inlet flow fields, to provide a detailed account of the nature and structure of the internal flow interactions, and to provide a comprehensive surface property and flow field database to determine the effects of contraction ratio, cowl position, and Reynolds number on the performance of a hypersonic scramjet inlet configuration.

  8. Flow analysis and design optimization methods for nozzle-afterbody of a hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, O.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the methods developed for the aerodynamic analysis and the shape optimization of the nozzle-afterbody section of a hypersonic vehicle. Initially, exhaust gases were assumed to be air. Internal-external flows around a single scramjet module were analyzed by solving the 3D Navier-Stokes equations. Then, exhaust gases were simulated by a cold mixture of Freon and Ar. Two different models were used to compute these multispecies flows as they mixed with the hypersonic airflow. Surface and off-surface properties were successfully compared with the experimental data. The Aerodynamic Design Optimization with Sensitivity analysis was then developed. Pre- and postoptimization sensitivity coefficients were derived and used in this quasi-analytical method. These coefficients were also used to predict inexpensively the flow field around a changed shape when the flow field of an unchanged shape was given. Starting with totally arbitrary initial afterbody shapes, independent computations were converged to the same optimum shape, which rendered the maximum axial thrust.

  9. Flow analysis and design optimization methods for nozzle afterbody of a hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the methods developed for the aerodynamic analysis and the shape optimization of the nozzle-afterbody section of a hypersonic vehicle. Initially, exhaust gases were assumed to be air. Internal-external flows around a single scramjet module were analyzed by solving the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Then, exhaust gases were simulated by a cold mixture of Freon and Argon. Two different models were used to compute these multispecies flows as they mixed with the hypersonic airflow. Surface and off-surface properties were successfully compared with the experimental data. In the second phase of this project, the Aerodynamic Design Optimization with Sensitivity analysis (ADOS) was developed. Pre and post optimization sensitivity coefficients were derived and used in this quasi-analytical method. These coefficients were also used to predict inexpensively the flow field around a changed shape when the flow field of an unchanged shape was given. Starting with totally arbitrary initial afterbody shapes, independent computations were converged to the same optimum shape, which rendered the maximum axial thrust.

  10. Fluid dynamic modeling and numerical simulation of low-density hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, H. K.; Wong, Eric Y.

    1988-01-01

    The concept of a viscous shock-layer and several related versions of continuum theories/methods are examined for their adequacy as a viable framework to study flow physics and aerothermodynamics of relevance to sustained hypersonic flights. Considering the flat plate at angle of attack, or the wedge, as a generic example for the major aerodynamic component of a hypersonic vehicle, the relative importance of the molecular-transport effects behind the shock (in the form of the 'shock slip') and the wall-slip effects are studied. In the flow regime where the shock-transition-zone thickness remains small compared to the shock radius of curvature, a quasi-one-dimensional shock structure under the Burnett/thirteen-moment approximation, as well as particulate/collisional models, can be consistently developed. The fully viscous version of the shock-layer model is shown to provide the crucial boundary condition downstream the shock in this case. The gas-kinetic basis of the continuum description for the flow behind the bow shock, and certain features affecting the non-equilibrium flow chemistry, are also discussed.

  11. Effect of bulk viscosity in low density, hypersonic blunt body flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, W.H. ); Hoffmann, K.A. )

    1991-01-01

    A computational fluids dynamics scheme is presented to solve the unsteady Thin-Layer Navier-Stokes (TLNS) equations over a blunt body at high altitude, high Mach number atmospheric reentry flow conditions. This continuum approach is directed to low density hypersonic flows by accounting for non-zero bulk viscosity effects in near frozen flow conditions. The TLNS equations are solved over an axisymmetric body at zero incidence relative to the free stream. The time dependent axisymmetric governing equations are transformed into a computational plane, then cast into weak conservative form and solved using a first-order fully implicit scheme in time with second-order flux vector splitting for spatial derivatives. The physical domain is defined over representative sphere and sphere/cone geometries using a body-fitted clustered algebraic grid within a fixed domain (i.e., shock capturing). At the present time, nonequilibrium thermo-chemistry effects are not modeled. Catalytic wall, ionization and radiation effects are also excluded from the current analysis. However, the significant difference from previous studies is the inclusion of the capability to model non-zero bulk viscosity effects. The importance of bulk viscosity is reviewed and blunt body flow field solutions are presented to illustrate the potential contribution of this phenomena at high altitude hypersonic conditions. The current technique is compared with experimental data and other approximate continuum solutions. A variety of test cases are also presented for a wide range of free stream Mach conditions. 18 refs., 42 figs.

  12. General Reynolds Analogy for Blunt-Nosed Bodies in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing-Xing; Wang, Zhi-Hui; Yu, Yong-Liang

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the relation between skin friction and heat transfer along windward sides of blunt-nosed bodies in hypersonic flows is investigated. The self-similar boundary layer analysis is accepted to figure out the distribution of the ratio of skin friction to heat transfer coefficients along the wall. It is theoretically obtained that the ratio depends linearly on the local slope angle of the wall surface, and an explicit analogy expression is presented for circular cylinders, although the linear distribution is also found for other nose shapes and even in gas flows with chemical reactions. Furthermore, based on the theoretical modelling of the second order shear and heat transfer terms in Burnett equations, a modified analogy is derived in the near continuum regime by considering the rarefied gas effects. And a bridge function is also constructed to describe the nonlinear analogy in the transition flow regime. At last, the direct simulation Monte Carlo method is used to validate the theoretical results. The general analogy, beyond the classical Reynolds analogy, is applicable to both flat plates and blunt-nosed bodies, in either continuous or rarefied hypersonic flows.

  13. Method for obtaining aerodynamic data on hypersonic configurations with scramjet exhaust flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartill, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    A hypersonic wind tunnel test method for obtaining credible aerodynamic data on a complete hypersonic vehicle (generic X-24c) with scramjet exhaust flow simulation is described. The general problems of simulating the scramjet exhaust as well as accounting for scramjet inlet flow and vehicle forces are analyzed, and candidate test methods are described and compared. The method selected as most useful makes use of a thrust-minus-drag flow-through balance with a completely metric model. Inlet flow is diverted by a fairing. The incremental effect of the fairing is determined in the testing of two reference models. The net thrust of the scramjet module is an input to be determined in large-scale module tests with scramjet combustion. Force accounting is described, and examples of force component levels are predicted. Compatibility of the test method with candidate wind tunnel facilities is described, and a preliminary model mechanical arrangement drawing is presented. The balance design and performance requirements are described in a detailed specification. Calibration procedures, model instrumentation, and a test plan for the model are outlined.

  14. Schlieren Visualization Technique Applied to the Study of Laser-Induced Breakdown in Low Density Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Salvador, I. I.; Myrabo, L. N.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    2006-05-02

    Experimental results on the visualization of the time evolution of the laser-plasma induced breakdown produced in low density hypersonic flow using the Schlieren technique are presented. The plasma was generated by focusing the high power laser pulse of a CO2 TEA laser in the test section of the IEAv 0.3m Hypersonic Shock Tunnel. An ultra-high speed electronic tube camera was used to register the event. The photographs reveal the expansion of the shock wave produced by the laser generated hot plasma and the convection of the plasma kernel by the hypersonic flow. It is also observed the interaction between the plasma disturbed region and the shock established by the flow around an hemisphere-cylinder model. A strong change in the shock wave structure near the model was observed, corroborating the DEAS concept.

  15. Translation-vibration-dissociation coupling in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham

    1989-01-01

    A new simple and computationally efficient model was developed, describing the evolution of vibrational states during relaxation and dissociation. The model is based on dividing the nitrogen molecules into two types, those in the vibrational states at a lower level, whose vibrational energy is below a cutoff energy, and those in an upper level, with vibrational energy above the cutoff. Dissociation occurs at the upper level, and recombination returns molecules to the lower level. The model was applied to two flows of engineering interest, the flow through a normal Mach 15 shock wave at 60 km, and a supersonic quasi-one-dimensional flow in a nozzle. Results are compared to those obtained by existing translation-vibration-dissociation coupling models, with results indicating significant differences between the models.

  16. A Structured-Grid Quality Measure for Simulated Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    A structured-grid quality measure is proposed, combining three traditional measurements: intersection angles, stretching, and curvature. Quality assesses whether the grid generated provides the best possible tradeoffs in grid stretching and skewness that enable accurate flow predictions, whereas the grid density is assumed to be a constraint imposed by the available computational resources and the desired resolution of the flow field. The usefulness of this quality measure is assessed by comparing heat transfer predictions from grid convergence studies for grids of varying quality in the range of [0.6-0.8] on an 8'half-angle sphere-cone, at laminar, perfect gas, Mach 10 wind tunnel conditions.

  17. Temperature measurements in hypersonic air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is reported of the use of laser-induced fluorescence on oxygen for the measurement of air temperature and its fluctuations owing to turbulence in hypersonic wind tunnel flows. The results show that for temperatures higher than 60 K and densities higher than 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature measurement can be less than 2 percent if it is limited by photon-statistical noise. The measurement is unaffected by collisional quenching and, if the laser fluence is kept below 1.5 J/sq cm, it is also unaffected by nonlinear effects which are associated with depletion of the absorbing states.

  18. Aerodynamic Modeling of Oscillating Wing in Hypersonic Flow: a Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Hou, Ying-Yu; Ji, Chen; Liu, Zi-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Various approximations to unsteady aerodynamics are examined for the unsteady aerodynamic force of a pitching thin double wedge airfoil in hypersonic flow. Results of piston theory, Van Dyke’s second-order theory, Newtonian impact theory, and CFD method are compared in the same motion and Mach number effects. The results indicate that, for this thin double wedge airfoil, Newtonian impact theory is not suitable for these Mach number, while piston theory and Van Dyke’s second-order theory are in good agreement with CFD method for Ma<7.

  19. An iodine hypersonic wind tunnel for the study of nonequilibrium reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham-Van-diep, G. C.; Muntz, E. P.; Weaver, D. P.; Dewitt, T. G.; Bradley, M. K.; Erwin, D. A.; Kunc, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A pilot scale hypersonic wind tunnel operating on pure iodine vapor has been designed and tested. The wind tunnel operates intermittently with a run phase lasting approximately 20 minutes. Successful recirculation of the iodine used during the run phase has been achieved but can be improved. Relevant issues regarding the full scale facility's design and operation, and the use of iodine as a working gas are discussed. Continuous wave laser induced fluorescence was used to monitor number densities within the plume flowfield, while pulsed laser induced fluorescence was used in an initial attempt to measure vibrational energy state population distributions. Preliminary nozzle flow calculations based on finite rate chemistry are presented.

  20. Unified nonlinear approach to both weak and strong-interaction problems. [heat transfer in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Rodkiewicz, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    The numerical results are obtained for heat transfer, skin-friction, and viscous interaction induced pressure for a step-wise accelerated flat plate in hypersonic flow. In the unified approach here the results are presented for both weak and strong-interaction problems without employing any linearization scheme. With the help of the numerical method used in this work an accurate prediction of wall shear can be made for the problems with plate velocity changes of 1% or larger. The obtained results indicate that the transient contribution to the induced pressure for helium is greater than that for air.

  1. Accurate Navier-Stokes results for the hypersonic flow over a spherical nosetip

    SciTech Connect

    Blottner, F.G.

    1989-01-01

    The unsteady thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations for a perfect gas are solved with a linearized block Alternating Direction Implicit finite-difference solution procedure. Solution errors due to numerical dissipation added to the governing equations are evaluated. Errors in the numerical predictions on three different grids are determined where Richardson extrapolation is used to estimate the exact solution. Accurate computational results are tabulated for the hypersonic laminar flow over a spherical body which can be used as a benchmark test case. Predictions obtained from the code are in good agreement with inviscid numerical results and experimental data. 9 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Effects of vibrational nonequilibrium on the inviscid design of an axisymmetric nozzle for hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, J. B., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An axisymmetric, hypersonic nozzle for arc-heated air is described. The method of characteristics is used to compute an inviscid nozzle contour in which vibrational nonequilibrium is approximated by the sudden-freeze technique. Chemical reactions are shown to freeze early in the nozzle expansion, and the result of vibrational and chemical freezing on the nozzle contour is demonstrated. The approximate nozzle design is analyzed by an exact calculation based on the method of characteristics for flow with vibrational nonequilibrium. Exit profiles are computed, and the usefulness of the approximate design is discussed. An analysis of the nozzle performance at off-design conditions is presented.

  3. Development of braided rope seals for hypersonic engine applications. Part 2: Flow modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutharasan, Rajakkannu; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Tao, Xiaoming; Ko, Frank

    1991-01-01

    Two models based on the Kozeny-Carmen equation were developed to analyze the fluid flow through a new class of braided rope seals under development for advanced hypersonic engines. A hybrid seal geometry consisting of a braided sleeve and a substantial amount of longitudinal fibers with high packing density was selected for development based on its low leakage rates. The models developed allow prediction of the gas leakage rate as a function of fiber diameter, fiber packing density, gas properties, and pressure drop across the seal.

  4. Gas-kinetic unified algorithm for hypersonic flows covering various flow regimes solving Boltzmann model equation in nonequilibrium effect

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhihui; Ma, Qiang; Wu, Junlin; Jiang, Xinyu; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-12-09

    Based on the Gas-Kinetic Unified Algorithm (GKUA) directly solving the Boltzmann model equation, the effect of rotational non-equilibrium is investigated recurring to the kinetic Rykov model with relaxation property of rotational degrees of freedom. The spin movement of diatomic molecule is described by moment of inertia, and the conservation of total angle momentum is taken as a new Boltzmann collision invariant. The molecular velocity distribution function is integrated by the weight factor on the internal energy, and the closed system of two kinetic controlling equations is obtained with inelastic and elastic collisions. The optimization selection technique of discrete velocity ordinate points and numerical quadrature rules for macroscopic flow variables with dynamic updating evolvement are developed to simulate hypersonic flows, and the gas-kinetic numerical scheme is constructed to capture the time evolution of the discretized velocity distribution functions. The gas-kinetic boundary conditions in thermodynamic non-equilibrium and numerical procedures are studied and implemented by directly acting on the velocity distribution function, and then the unified algorithm of Boltzmann model equation involving non-equilibrium effect is presented for the whole range of flow regimes. The hypersonic flows involving non-equilibrium effect are numerically simulated including the inner flows of shock wave structures in nitrogen with different Mach numbers of 1.5-Ma-25, the planar ramp flow with the whole range of Knudsen numbers of 0.0009-Kn-10 and the three-dimensional re-entering flows around tine double-cone body.

  5. Investigation of nose bluntness and angle of attack effects on slender bodies in viscous hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehgal, A. K.; Tiwari, S. N.; Singh, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Hypersonic flows over cones and straight biconic configurations are calculated for a wide range of free stream conditions in which the gas behind the shock is treated as perfect. Effect of angle of attack and nose bluntness on these slender cones in air is studied extensively. The numerical procedures are based on the solution of complete Navier-Stokes equations at the nose section and parabolized Navier-Stokes equations further downstream. The flow field variables and surface quantities show significant differences when the angle of attack and nose bluntness are varied. The complete flow field is thoroughly analyzed with respect to velocity, temperature, pressure, and entropy profiles. The post shock flow field is studied in detail from the contour plots of Mach number, density, pressure, and temperature. The effect of nose bluntness for slender cones persists as far as 200 nose radii downstream.

  6. A hybrid CFD/characteristics method for fast characterization of hypersonic blunt forebody/inlet flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, WenZhi; Li, ZhuFei; Yang, JiMing

    2015-10-01

    A hybrid CFD/characteristic method (CCM) was proposed for fast design and evaluation of hypersonic inlet flow with nose bluntness, which targets the combined advantages of CFD and method of characteristics. Both the accuracy and efficiency of the developed CCM were verified reliably, and it was well demonstrated for the external surfaces design of a hypersonic forebody/inlet with nose bluntness. With the help of CCM method, effects of nose bluntness on forebody shock shapes and the flowfield qualities which dominate inlet performance were examined and analyzed on the two-dimensional and axisymmetric configurations. The results showed that blunt effects of a wedge forebody are more substantial than that of related cone cases. For a conical forebody with a properly blunted nose, a recovery of the shock front back to that of corresponding sharp nose is exhibited, accompanied with a gradually fading out of entropy layer effects. Consequently a simplification is thought to be reasonable for an axisymmetric inlet with a proper compression angle, and a blunt nose of limited radius can be idealized as a sharp nose, as the spillage and flow variations at the entrance are negligible, even though the nose scale increases to 10% cowl lip radius. Whereas for two-dimensional inlets, the blunt effects are substantial since not only the inlet capturing/starting capabilities, but also the flow uniformities are obviously degraded.

  7. Aerodynamic Performance and Flow-Field Characteristics of Two Waverider-Derived Hypersonic Cruise Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; Finley, Dennis B.

    1995-01-01

    The component integration of a class of hypersonic high-lift configurations known as waveriders into hypersonic cruise vehicles was evaluated. A wind-tunnel model was developed which integrates realistic vehicle components with two waverider shapes, referred to as the straight-wing and cranked-wing shapes. Both shapes were conical-flow-derived waveriders for a design Mach number of 4.0. Experimental data and limited computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions were obtained over a Mach number range of 1.6 to 4.63 at a Reynolds number of 2.0 x 10(exp 6) per foot. The CFD predictions and flow visualization data confirmed the shock attachment characteristics of the baseline waverider shapes and illustrated the waverider flow-field properties. Experimental data showed that no significant performance degradations, in terms of maximum lift-to-drag ratios, occur at off-design Mach numbers for the waverider shapes and the integrated configurations. A comparison of the fully-integrated waverider vehicles to the baseline shapes showed that the performance was significantly degraded when all of the components were added to the waveriders, with the most significant degradation resulting from aftbody closure and the addition of control surfaces. Both fully-integrated configurations were longitudinally unstable over the Mach number range studied with the selected center of gravity location and for unpowered conditions. The cranked-wing configuration provided better lateral-directional stability characteristics than the straight-wing configuration.

  8. Conservation equations and physical models for hypersonic air flows over the aeroassist flight experiment vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    The code development and application program for the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA), with emphasis directed toward support of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) in the near term and Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV) design in the long term is reviewed. LAURA is an upwind-biased, point-implicit relaxation algorithm for obtaining the numerical solution to the governing equations for 3-D, viscous, hypersonic flows in chemical and thermal nonequilibrium. The algorithm is derived using a finite volume formulation in which the inviscid components of flux across cell walls are described with Roe's averaging and Harten's entropy fix with second-order corrections based on Yee's Symmetric Total Variation Diminishing scheme. Because of the point-implicit relaxation strategy, the algorithm remains stable at large Courant numbers without the necessity of solving large, block tri-diagonal systems. A single relaxation step depends only on information from nearest neighbors. Predictions for pressure distributions, surface heating, and aerodynamic coefficients compare well with experimental data for Mach 10 flow over an AFE wind tunnel model. Predictions for the hypersonic flow of air in chemical and thermal nonequilibrium over the full scale AFE configuration obtained on a multi-domain grid are discussed.

  9. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  10. DSMC Simulations of Hypersonic Flows and Comparison With Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Bird, Graeme A.; Markelov, Gennady N.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents computational results obtained with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for several biconic test cases in which shock interactions and flow separation-reattachment are key features of the flow. Recent ground-based experiments have been performed for several biconic configurations, and surface heating rate and pressure measurements have been proposed for code validation studies. The present focus is to expand on the current validating activities for a relatively new DSMC code called DS2V that Bird (second author) has developed. Comparisons with experiments and other computations help clarify the agreement currently being achieved between computations and experiments and to identify the range of measurement variability of the proposed validation data when benchmarked with respect to the current computations. For the test cases with significant vibrational nonequilibrium, the effect of the vibrational energy surface accommodation on heating and other quantities is demonstrated.

  11. Computer simulation of hypersonic flow over the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inouye, M.

    1977-01-01

    Computer simulations of the flow field around the Space Shuttle Orbiter are described. Results of inviscid calculations are presented for the shock wave pattern and bottom centerline pressure distribution at 30 deg angle of attack. Results of viscous calculations are presented for wall pressure and heat transfer distributions for simple configurations representative of regions where shock wave-boundary layer interactions occur. The computer codes are verified by comparisons with wind-tunnel data and can be applied to flight conditions.

  12. Downstream influence of swept slot injection in hypersonic turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, J. N.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Bushnell, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Results of an experimental and numerical investigation of tangential swept slot injection into a thick turbulent boundary layer at Mach 6 are presented. Film cooling effectiveness, skin friction, and flow structure downstream of the swept slot injection were investigated. The data were compared with that for unswept slots, and it was found that cooling effectiveness and skin friction reductions are not significantly affected by sweeping the slot.

  13. Optimum shape of a blunt forebody in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Ting, L.

    1989-01-01

    The optimum shape of a blunt forebody attached to a symmetric wedge or cone is determined. The length of the forebody, its semi-thickness or base radius, the nose radius and the radius of the fillet joining the forebody to the wedge or cone are specified. The optimum shape is composed of simple curves. Thus experimental models can be built readily to investigate the utilization of aerodynamic heating for boundary layer control. The optimum shape based on the modified Newtonian theory can also serve as the preliminary shape for the numerical solution of the optimum shape using the governing equations for a compressible inviscid or viscous flow.

  14. Kinetic simulation of rarefied and weakly ionized hypersonic flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farbar, Erin D.

    When a vehicle enters the Earth's atmosphere at the very large velocities associated with Lunar and Mars return, a strong bow shock is formed in front of the vehicle. The shock heats the air to very high temperatures, causing collisions that are sufficiently energetic to produce ionized particles. As a result, a weakly ionized plasma is formed in the region between the bow shock and the vehicle surface. The presence of this plasma impedes the transport of radio frequency waves to the vehicle, causing the phenomenon known as "communications black out". The plasma also interacts with the neutral particles in the flow field, and contributes to the heat flux at the vehicle surface. Since it is difficult to characterize these flow fields using flight or ground based experiments, computational tools play an important role in the design of reentry vehicles. It is important to include the physical phenomena associated with the presence of the plasma in the computational analysis of the flow fields about these vehicles. Physical models for the plasma phenomena are investigated using a state of the art, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code. Models for collisions between charged particles, plasma chemistry, and the self-induced electric field that currently exist in the literature are implemented. Using these baseline models, steady state flow field solutions are computed for the FIRE II reentry vehicle at two different trajectory points. The accuracy of each baseline plasma model is assessed in a systematic fashion, using one flight condition of the FIRE II vehicle as the test case. Experimental collision cross section data is implemented to model collisions of electrons with neutral particles. Theoretical and experimental reaction cross section data are implemented to model chemical reactions that involve electron impact, and an associative ionization reaction. One-dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) routines are developed and coupled to the DSMC code, to assess the

  15. Hypersonic flows generated by parabolic and paraboloidal shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    A computer algorithm has been developed to determine the blunt-body flowfields supporting symmetric parabolic and paraboloidal shock waves at infinite free-stream Mach number. Solutions are expressed in an analytic form as high-order power series, in the coordinate normal to the shock, whose coefficients can be determined exactly. Analytic continuation is provided by the use of Pade approximations. Test cases provide solutions of very high accuracy. In the axisymmetric case for gamma equals 715 the solution has been found far downstream, where it agrees with the modified blast-wave results. For plane flow, on the other hand, a limit line appears within the shock layer, a short distance past the sonic line, suggesting the presence of an imbedded shock. Local solutions in the downstream limit are discussed.

  16. An Engineering Aerodynamic Heating Method for Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; DeJarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  17. PNS calculations for 3-D hypersonic corner flow with two turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gregory E.; Liou, May-Fun; Benson, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes code has been used as a testbed to investigate two turbulence models, the McDonald Camarata and Bushnell Beckwith model, in the hypersonic regime. The Bushnell Beckwith form factor correction to the McDonald Camarata mixing length model has been extended to three-dimensional flow by use of an inverse averaging of the resultant length scale contributions from each wall. Two-dimensional calculations are compared with experiment for Mach 18 helium flow over a 4-deg wedge. Corner flow calculations have been performed at Mach 11.8 for a Reynolds number of .67 x 10 to the 6th, based on the duct half-width, and a freestream stagnation temperature of 1750-deg Rankine.

  18. On the Numerical Convergence to Steady State of Hypersonic Flows Over Bodies with Concavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    Two recent numerical studies of hypersonic flows over bodies with concavities revealed problems with convergence to a steady state with an oft-used application of local-time-stepping. Both simulated flows showed a time-like, periodic shedding of vortices in a subsonic domain bounded by supersonic external flow although the simulations, using local-time-stepping, were not time accurate. Simple modifications to the numerical algorithm were implemented to enable implicit, first-order accurate in time simulations. Subsequent time-accurate simulations of the two test problems converged to a steady state. The baseline algorithm and modifications for temporal accuracy are described. The requirement for sub-iterations to achieve convergence is demonstrated. Failure to achieve convergence without time accuracy is conjectured to arise from temporal errors being continuously refocused into a subsonic domain.

  19. Nonreactive viscous solver for hypersonic flows over recessed cone with injection

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, C.H.; Lee, Y.K.

    1995-01-01

    A nonreactive two-species flow in which the gas is injected from the downstream wall of the recess on a hypersonic sharp cone has been investigated by solving the steady full Navier-Stokes equations. The discretization methods have combined Roe`s scheme and multiblock grids for accurate calculations. The species equation has been included in order to simulate the flowfield by injecting different gases. The flow structure and cooling effect has been investigated at M(sub infinity) = 6.0. The flow structure of the recess has been shown by the perfect gas computational results to be significantly affected by injecting cool species gases. An optimal injection rate for the cooling effect has also been shown to exist on the downstream wall of the cone. The cooling effect of injecting helium has been shown to be better than nitrogen and air for both isothermal and adiabatic wall conditions. 18 refs.

  20. Engine panel seals for hypersonic engine applications: High temperature leakage assessments and flow modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Mutharasan, Rajakkannu; Du, Guang-Wu; Miller, Jeffrey H.; Ko, Frank

    1992-01-01

    A critical mechanical system in advanced hypersonic engines is the panel-edge seal system that seals gaps between the articulating horizontal engine panels and the adjacent engine splitter walls. Significant advancements in seal technology are required to meet the extreme demands placed on the seals, including the simultaneous requirements of low leakage, conformable, high temperature, high pressure, sliding operation. In this investigation, the seal concept design and development of two new seal classes that show promise of meeting these demands will be presented. These seals include the ceramic wafer seal and the braided ceramic rope seal. Presented are key elements of leakage flow models for each of these seal types. Flow models such as these help designers to predict performance-robbing parasitic losses past the seals, and estimate purge coolant flow rates. Comparisons are made between measured and predicted leakage rates over a wide range of engine simulated temperatures and pressures, showing good agreement.

  1. Planar Laser-Induced Iodine Fluorescence Measurements in Rarefied Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Eric; McDaniel, James C.

    2005-01-01

    A planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique is discussed and applied to measurement of time-averaged values of velocity and temperature in an I(sub 2)-seeded N(sub 2) hypersonic free jet facility. Using this technique, a low temperature, non-reacting, hypersonic flow over a simplified model of a reaction control system (RCS) was investigated. Data are presented of rarefied Mach 12 flow over a sharp leading edge flat plate at zero incidence, both with and without an interacting jet issuing from a nozzle built into the plate. The velocity profile in the boundary layer on the plate was resolved. The slip velocity along the plate, extrapolated from the velocity profile data, varied from nearly 100% down to 10% of the freestream value. These measurements are compared with results of a DSMC solution. The velocity variation along the centerline of a jet issuing from the plate was measured and found to match closely with the correlation of Ashkenas and Sherman. The velocity variation in the oblique shock terminating the jet was resolved sufficiently to measure the shock wave thickness.

  2. Multiple Velocity Profile Measurements in Hypersonic Flows Using Sequentially-Imaged Fluorescence Tagging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Ivey,Christopher b.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) was used to perform velocity measurements in hypersonic flows by generating multiple tagged lines which fluoresce as they convect downstream. For each laser pulse, a single interline, progressive scan intensified CCD (charge-coupled device) camera was used to obtain two sequential images of the NO molecules that had been tagged by the laser. The CCD configuration allowed for sub-microsecond acquisition of both images, resulting in sub-microsecond temporal resolution as well as sub-mm spatial resolution (0.5-mm horizontal, 0.7-mm vertical). Determination of axial velocity was made by application of a cross-correlation analysis of the horizontal shift of individual tagged lines. A numerical study of measured velocity error due to a uniform and linearly-varying collisional rate distribution was performed. Quantification of systematic errors, the contribution of gating/exposure duration errors, and the influence of collision rate on temporal uncertainty were made. Quantification of the spatial uncertainty depended upon the signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired profiles. This velocity measurement technique has been demonstrated for two hypersonic flow experiments: (1) a reaction control system (RCS) jet on an Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) wind tunnel model and (2) a 10-degree half-angle wedge containing a 2-mm tall, 4-mm wide cylindrical boundary layer trip. The experiments were performed at the NASA Langley Research Center's 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel.

  3. Multiple Velocity Profile Measurements in Hypersonic Flows using Sequentially-Imaged Fluorescence Tagging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inmian, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Ivey, Christopher B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) was used to perform velocity measurements in hypersonic flows by generating multiple tagged lines which fluoresce as they convect downstream. For each laser pulse, a single interline, progressive scan intensified CCD camera was used to obtain separate images of the initial undelayed and delayed NO molecules that had been tagged by the laser. The CCD configuration allowed for sub-microsecond acquisition of both images, resulting in sub-microsecond temporal resolution as well as sub-mm spatial resolution (0.5-mm x 0.7-mm). Determination of axial velocity was made by application of a cross-correlation analysis of the horizontal shift of individual tagged lines. Quantification of systematic errors, the contribution of gating/exposure duration errors, and influence of collision rate on fluorescence to temporal uncertainty were made. Quantification of the spatial uncertainty depended upon the analysis technique and signal-to-noise of the acquired profiles. This investigation focused on two hypersonic flow experiments: (1) a reaction control system (RCS) jet on an Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) wind tunnel model and (2) a 10-degree half-angle wedge containing a 2-mm tall, 4-mm wide cylindrical boundary layer trip. The experiments were performed at the NASA Langley Research Center's 31-inch Mach 10 wind tunnel.

  4. Schlieren Visualization of the Energy Addition by Multi Laser Pulse in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Myrabo, L. N.

    2008-04-28

    The experimental results of the energy addition by multi laser pulse in Mach 7 hypersonic flow are presented. Two high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA lasers (TEA1 5.5 J, TEA2 3.9 J) were assembled sharing the same optical cavity to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The lasers can be triggered with a selectable time delay and in the present report the results obtained with delay between 30 {mu}s and 80 {mu}s are shown. The schlieren technique associated with a high speed camera was used to accomplish the influence of the energy addition in the mitigation of the shock wave formed on the model surface by the hypersonic flow. A piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to obtain the time history of the impact pressure at stagnation point of the model and the pressure reduction could be measured. The total recovery of the shock wave between pulses as well as the prolonged effect of the mitigation without recovery was observed by changing the delay.

  5. Stability of hypersonic reacting stagnation flow of a detonatable gas mixture by dynamical systems analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tivanov, G.; Rom, J.

    1995-12-01

    The stability characteristics of the reacting hypersonic flow of the fuel/oxidizer mixture in the stagnation region of a blunt body are studied. The conditions for oscillations of the combustion front are assumed to be determined mainly by the flow conditions at the stagnation region. The density at the stagnation region is assumed to be constant at hypersonic flow conditions. By assuming a simplified flow model, the time dependent flow equations, including the heat addition due to the chemical reactions, are reduced to a second-order nonlinear differential equation for the instantaneous temperature. The solutions are analyzed assuming a one-step chemical reaction with zero-order and first-order processes using dynamical systems methods. These methods are used to determine the stability boundaries in terms of the flow and chemical reaction parameters. It is shown that the zero-order reaction has nonperiodic solutions that may lead to explosion whereas the first-order and higher-order reactions may have periodic solutions indicating oscillations. The zero-order analysis also reaffirms the requirements for a minimum size blunt body for the establishment of a detonation (in agreement with classical detonation theory) and the first-order analysis indicates a minimum body size for establishment of oscillations. The oscillation frequencies are calculated using the small perturbation approximation for the temperature oscillations. These frequencies are compared with results from published data on spheres and hemisphere cylindrical bodies fired into hydrogen-oxygen and acetylene oxygen mixtures. Very good agreement is found between the measured and calculated results.

  6. Hypersonic Separated Flows About "Tick" Configurations With Sensitivity to Model Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.; O'Byrne, S.; Gai, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents computational results obtained by applying the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for hypersonic nonequilibrium flow about "tick-shaped" model configurations. These test models produces a complex flow where the nonequilibrium and rarefied aspects of the flow are initially enhanced as the flow passes over an expansion surface, and then the flow encounters a compression surface that can induce flow separation. The resulting flow is such that meaningful numerical simulations must have the capability to account for a significant range of rarefaction effects; hence the application of the DSMC method in the current study as the flow spans several flow regimes, including transitional, slip, and continuum. The current focus is to examine the sensitivity of both the model surface response (heating, friction and pressure) and flowfield structure to assumptions regarding surface boundary conditions and more extensively the impact of model design as influenced by leading edge configuration as well as the geometrical features of the expansion and compression surfaces. Numerical results indicate a strong sensitivity to both the extent of the leading edge sharpness and the magnitude of the leading edge bevel angle. Also, the length of the expansion surface for a fixed compression surface has a significant impact on the extent of separated flow.

  7. Hypersonic turbulent expansion-corner flow with shock impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Kung-Ming; Lu, Frank K.

    1992-01-01

    Mean and fluctuating surface pressure data were obtained in a Mach 8, turbulent, cold flow past an expansion corner subjected to shock impingement. The expansion corner of 2.5 or 4.25 deg was located at 0.77 m (30.25 in.) from the leading edge of a shape-edged flat plate while an external shock, generated by either a 2- or 4-deg sharp wedge, impinged at the corner, or at one boundary layer thickness ahead or behind the corner. The mean pressure distribution was strongly influenced by the mutual interaction between the shock and the expansion. For example, the upstream influence decreased when the shock impinged downstream of the corner. Also, the unsteadiness of the interactions was characterized by an intermittent region and a local rms pressure peak near the upstream influence line. The peak rms pressure fluctuations increased with a larger overall interaction strength. Shock impingement downstream of the corner resulted in lower peaks and also in a shorter region of reduced fluctuation levels. These features may be exploited in inlet design by impinging the cowl shock downstream of an expansion corner instead of at the corner. In addition, a limited Pitot pressure survey showed a thinning of the boundary layer downstream of the corner.

  8. Molecular cloud formation in high-shear, magnetized colliding flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogerty, E.; Frank, A.; Heitsch, F.; Carroll-Nellenback, J.; Haig, C.; Adams, M.

    2016-08-01

    The colliding flows (CF) model is a well-supported mechanism for generating molecular clouds. However, to-date most CF simulations have focused on the formation of clouds in the normal-shock layer between head-on colliding flows. We performed simulations of magnetized colliding flows that instead meet at an oblique-shock layer. Oblique shocks generate shear in the post-shock environment, and this shear creates inhospitable environments for star formation. As the degree of shear increases (i.e. the obliquity of the shock increases), we find that it takes longer for sink particles to form, they form in lower numbers, and they tend to be less massive. With regard to magnetic fields, we find that even a weak field stalls gravitational collapse within forming clouds. Additionally, an initially oblique collision interface tends to reorient over time in the presence of a magnetic field, so that it becomes normal to the oncoming flows. This was demonstrated by our most oblique shock interface, which became fully normal by the end of the simulation.

  9. Assessment of a flow-through balance for hypersonic wind tunnel models with scramjet exhaust flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, Lawrence D.; Kniskern, Marc W.; Monta, William J.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation were twofold: first, to determine whether accurate force and moment data could be obtained during hypersonic wind tunnel tests of a model with a scramjet exhaust flow simulation that uses a representative nonwatercooled, flow-through balance; second, to analyze temperature time histories on various parts of the balance to address thermal effects on force and moment data. The tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Wind Tunnel at free-stream Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.5 to 7.4 x 10(exp 6)/ft and nominal angles of attack of -3.5 deg, 0 deg, and 5 deg. The simulant exhaust gases were cold air, hot air, and a mixture of 50 percent Argon and 50 percent Freon by volume, which reached stagnation temperatures within the balance of 111, 214, and 283 F, respectively. All force and moment values were unaffected by the balance thermal response from exhaust gas simulation and external aerodynamic heating except for axial-force measurements, which were significantly affected by balance heating. This investigation showed that for this model at the conditions tested, a nonwatercooled, flow-through balance is not suitable for axial-force measurements during scramjet exhaust flow simulation tests at hypersonic speeds. In general, heated exhaust gas may produce unacceptable force and moment uncertainties when used with thermally sensitive balances.

  10. An improved flux-split algorithm applied to hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant

    1988-01-01

    An explicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing numerical algorithm is presented and applied to hypersonic flows assumed to be in thermochemical equilibrium. Real-gas chemistry is either loosely coupled to the gasdynamics by way of a Gibbs free energy minimization package or fully coupled using species mass conservation equations with finite-rate chemical reactions. A scheme is developed that maintains stability in the explicit, finite-rate formulation while allowing relatively high time steps. The codes use flux vector splitting to difference the inviscid fluxes and employ real-gas corrections to viscosity and thermal conductivity. Numerical results are compared against existing ballistic range and flight data. Flows about complex geometries are also computed.

  11. Flow fields and aerodynamic characteristics for hypersonic missiles with mid-fuselage inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Johnston, P. J.; Riebe, G. D.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made to quantify forebody flow fields and to evaluate aerodynamic performance trends on a matrix of fuselage shapes for the mid-inlet/bolt-on-engine class of hypersonic airbreathing missiles for the Navy's vertical box launcher. The study indicated that inlet mass flow and pressure recovery can be increased by cambering the nose and increasing the width of the fuselage at both Mach 4 acceleration and Mach 6 cruise conditions. Aerodynamic trim predictions show that the drag at zero lift at Mach 4 decreases while the L/D max at Mach 6 increases with the nose camber, although these tendencies reverse with increasing width of maximum fuselage cross section.

  12. An approximate viscous shock layer technique for calculating nonequilibrium hypersonic flows about blunt-nosed bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. M.; Dejarnette, F. R.

    1992-01-01

    An approximate axisymmetric method has been developed which can reliably calculate nonequilibrium fully viscous hypersonic flows over blunt-nosed bodies. By substituting Maslen's second-order pressure expression for the normal momentum equation, a simplified form of the viscous shock layer (VSL) equations is obtained. This approach can solve both the subsonic and supersonic regions of the shock layer without a starting solution for the shock shape. This procedure is significantly faster than the parabolized Navier-Stokes and VSL solvers and would be useful in a preliminary design environment. Solutions have been generated for air flows over several analytic body shapes. Surface heat transfer and pressure predictions are comparable to VSL results. Computed heating rates are in good agreement with experimental data. The present technique generates its own shock shape as part of its solution, and therefore could be used to provide more accurate initial shock shapes for higher-order procedures which require starting solutions.

  13. Implementation of Radiation, Ablation, and Free Energy Minimization Modules for Coupled Simulations of Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Thompson, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A description of models and boundary conditions required for coupling radiation and ablation physics to a hypersonic flow simulation is provided. Chemical equilibrium routines for varying elemental mass fraction are required in the flow solver to integrate with the equilibrium chemistry assumption employed in the ablation models. The capability also enables an equilibrium catalytic wall boundary condition in the non-ablating case. The paper focuses on numerical implementation issues using FIRE II, Mars return, and Apollo 4 applications to provide context for discussion. Variable relaxation factors applied to the Jacobian elements of partial equilibrium relations required for convergence are defined. Challenges of strong radiation coupling in a shock capturing algorithm are addressed. Results are presented to show how the current suite of models responds to a wide variety of conditions involving coupled radiation and ablation.

  14. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  15. Computational analysis of a rarefied hypersonic flow over combined gap/step geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, P. H. M.; Santos, W. F. N.

    2015-06-01

    This work describes a computational analysis of a hypersonic flow over a combined gap/step configuration at zero degree angle of attack, in chemical equilibrium and thermal nonequilibrium. Effects on the flowfield structure due to changes on the step frontal-face height have been investigated by employing the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The work focuses the attention of designers of hypersonic configurations on the fundamental parameter of surface discontinuity, which can have an important impact on even initial designs. The results highlight the sensitivity of the primary flowfield properties, velocity, density, pressure, and temperature due to changes on the step frontal-face height. The analysis showed that the upstream disturbance in the gap/step configuration increased with increasing the frontal-face height. In addition, it was observed that the separation region for the gap/step configuration increased with increasing the step frontal-face height. It was found that density and pressure for the gap/step configuration dramatically increased inside the gap as compared to those observed for the gap configuration, i. e., a gap without a step.

  16. The similarity law for hypersonic flow and requirements for dynamic similarity of related bodies in free flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaker, Frank M; Neice, Stanford E; Wong, Thomas J

    1953-01-01

    The similarity law for nonsteady, inviscid, hypersonic flow about slender three-dimensional shapes is derived. Conclusions drawn are shown to be valid for rotational flow. Requirements for dynamic similarity of related shapes in free flight are obtained. The law is examined for steady flow about related three-dimensional shapes. Results of an experimental investigation of the pressures acting on two inclined cones are found to check the law as it applies to bodies of revolution.

  17. Hypersonic engine component experiments in high heat flux, supersonic flow environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1993-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Even though progress has been made in the computational understanding of fluid dynamics and the physics/chemistry of high speed flight, there is also a need for experimental facilities capable of providing a high heat flux environment for testing component concepts and verifying/calibrating these analyses. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to fulfill this need. This 'Hot Gas Facility' is capable of providing heat fluxes up to 450 w/sq cm on flat surfaces and up to 5,000 w/sq cm at the leading edge stagnation point of a strut in a supersonic flow stream. Gas temperatures up to 3050 K can also be attained. Two recent experimental programs conducted in this facility are discussed. The objective of the first experiment is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Macrophotographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight. The objective of the second experiment is to assess the capability of cooling a porous surface exposed to a high temperature, high velocity flow environment and to provide a heat transfer data base for a design procedure. Experimental results from transpiration cooled surfaces in a supersonic flow environment are presented.

  18. Exhausted Plume Flow Field Prediction Near the Afterbody of Hypersonic Flight Vehicles in High Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Lynn Chen; Mach, Kervyn D.; Deng, Zheng-Tao; Liaw, Goang-Shin

    1995-01-01

    A two-dimensional computer code to solve the Burnett equations has been developed which computes the flow interaction between an exhausted plume and hypersonic external flow near the afterbody of a flight vehicle. This Burnett-2D code extends the capability of Navier-Stokes solver (RPLUS2D code) to include high-order Burnett source terms and slip-wall conditions for velocity and temperature. Higher-order Burnett viscous stress and heat flux terms are discretized using central-differencing and treated as source terms. Blocking logic is adopted in order to overcome the difficulty of grid generation. The computation of exhaust plume flow field is divided into two steps. In the first step, the thruster nozzle exit conditions are computed which generates inflow conditions in the base area near the afterbody. Results demonstrated that at high altitudes, the computations of nozzle exit conditions must include the effects of base flow since significant expansion exists in the base region. In the second step, Burnett equations were solved for exhaust plume flow field near the afterbody. The free stream conditions are set at an altitude equal to 80km and the Mach number is equal to 5.0. The preliminary results show that the plume expansion, as altitude increases, will eventually cause upstream flow separation.

  19. Rarefied hypersonic flow simulations using the Navier-Stokes equations with non-equilibrium boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenshields, Christopher J.; Reese, Jason M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the use of Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations with non-equilibrium boundary conditions (BCs) for simulation of rarefied hypersonic flows. It revisits a largely forgotten derivation of velocity slip and temperature jump by Patterson, based on Grad's moment method. Mach 10 flow around a cylinder and Mach 12.7 flow over a flat plate are simulated using both computational fluid dynamics using the temperature jump BCs of Patterson and Smoluchowski and the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method. These flows exhibit such strongly non-equilibrium behaviour that, following Patterson's analysis, they are strictly beyond the range of applicability of the BCs. Nevertheless, the results using Patterson's temperature jump BC compare quite well with the DSMC and are consistently better than those using the standard Smoluchowski temperature jump BC. One explanation for this better performance is that an assumption made by Patterson, based on the flow being only slightly non-equilibrium, introduces an additional constraint to the resulting BC model in the case of highly non-equilibrium flows.

  20. Solution of the Burnett equations for hypersonic flows near the continuum limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlay, Scott T.

    1992-01-01

    The INCA code, a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for analysis of hypersonic flowfields, was modified to analyze the lower reaches of the continuum transition regime, where the Navier-Stokes equations become inaccurate and Monte Carlo methods become too computationally expensive. The two-dimensional Burnett equations and the three-dimensional rotational energy transport equation were added to the code and one- and two-dimensional calculations were performed. For the structure of normal shock waves, the Burnett equations give consistently better results than Navier-Stokes equations and compare reasonably well with Monte Carlo methods. For two-dimensional flow of Nitrogen past a circular cylinder the Burnett equations predict the total drag reasonably well. Care must be taken, however, not to exceed the range of validity of the Burnett equations.

  1. DSMC Grid Methodologies for Computing Low-Density, Hypersonic Flows About Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, Richard G.; LeBeau, Gerald J.; Carlson, Ann B.

    1996-01-01

    Two different grid methodologies are studied for application to DSMC simulations about reusable launch vehicles. One method uses an unstructured, tetrahedral grid while the other uses a structured, variable-resolution Cartesian grid. The relative merits of each method are discussed in terms of accuracy, computational efficiency, and overall ease of use. Both methods are applied to the computation of a low-density, hypersonic flow about a winged single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle concept at conditions corresponding to an altitude of 120 km. Both methods are shown to give comparable results for both surface and flowfield quantities as well as for the overall aerodynamic behavior. For the conditions simulated, the flowfield about the vehicle is very rarefied but the DSMC simulations show significant departure from free-molecular predictions for the surface friction and heat transfer as well as certain aerodynamic quantities.

  2. Applications of Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Scattering to Problems in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, F. Bary

    1995-01-01

    The general status of a grant to investigate the applications of quantum theory in atomic and molecular scattering problems in hypersonic flow is summarized. Abstracts of five articles and eleven full-length articles published or submitted for publication are included as attachments. The following topics are addressed in these articles: fragmentation of heavy ions (HZE particles); parameterization of absorption cross sections; light ion transport; emission of light fragments as an indicator of equilibrated populations; quantum mechanical, optical model methods for calculating cross sections for particle fragmentation by hydrogen; evaluation of NUCFRG2, the semi-empirical nuclear fragmentation database; investigation of the single- and double-ionization of He by proton and anti-proton collisions; Bose-Einstein condensation of nuclei; and a liquid drop model in HZE particle fragmentation by hydrogen.

  3. Conservation equations and physical models for hypersonic air flows in thermal and chemical nonequilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Gnoffo, P.A.; Gupta, R.N.; Shinn, J.L.

    1989-02-01

    The conservation equations for simulating hypersonic flows in thermal and chemical nonequilibrium and details of the associated physical models are presented. These details include the curve fits used for defining thermodynamic properties of the 11 species air model, curve fits for collision cross sections, expressions for transport properties, the chemical kinetics models, and the vibrational and electronic energy relaxation models. The expressions are formulated in the context of either a two or three temperature model. Greater emphasis is placed on the two temperature model in which it is assumed that the translational and rotational energy models are in equilibrium at the translational temperature, T, and the vibrational, electronic, and electron translational energy modes are in equilibrium at the vibrational temperature, T sub v. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors associated with the Jacobian of the flux vector are also presented in order to accommodate the upwind based numerical solutions of the complete equation set.

  4. Conservation equations and physical models for hypersonic air flows in thermal and chemical nonequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Gupta, Roop N.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1989-01-01

    The conservation equations for simulating hypersonic flows in thermal and chemical nonequilibrium and details of the associated physical models are presented. These details include the curve fits used for defining thermodynamic properties of the 11 species air model, curve fits for collision cross sections, expressions for transport properties, the chemical kinetics models, and the vibrational and electronic energy relaxation models. The expressions are formulated in the context of either a two or three temperature model. Greater emphasis is placed on the two temperature model in which it is assumed that the translational and rotational energy models are in equilibrium at the translational temperature, T, and the vibrational, electronic, and electron translational energy modes are in equilibrium at the vibrational temperature, T sub v. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors associated with the Jacobian of the flux vector are also presented in order to accommodate the upwind based numerical solutions of the complete equation set.

  5. Chemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes solutions for hypersonic flow over an ablating graphite nosetip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. K.; Henline, W. D.

    1993-01-01

    The general boundary conditions including mass and energy balances of chemically equilibrated or nonequilibrated gas adjacent to ablating surfaces have been derived. A computer procedure based on these conditions was developed and interfaced with the Navier-Stokes solver for predictions of the flow field, surface temperature, and surface ablation rates over re-entry space vehicles with ablating Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). The Navier-Stokes solver with general surface thermochemistry boundary conditions can predict more realistic solutions and provide useful information for the design of TPS. A test case with a proposed hypersonic test vehicle configuration and associated free stream conditions was developed. Solutions with various surface boundary conditions were obtained, and the effect of nonequilibrium gas as well as surface chemistry on surface heating and ablation rate were examined. The solutions of the GASP code with complete ablating surface conditions were compared with those of the ASC code. The direction of future work is also discussed.

  6. A fast sorting algorithm for a hypersonic rarefied flow particle simulation on the connection machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, Leonardo

    1989-01-01

    The data parallel implementation of a particle simulation for hypersonic rarefied flow described by Dagum associates a single parallel data element with each particle in the simulation. The simulated space is divided into discrete regions called cells containing a variable and constantly changing number of particles. The implementation requires a global sort of the parallel data elements so as to arrange them in an order that allows immediate access to the information associated with cells in the simulation. Described here is a very fast algorithm for performing the necessary ranking of the parallel data elements. The performance of the new algorithm is compared with that of the microcoded instruction for ranking on the Connection Machine.

  7. Prediction of Drag Reduction in Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows with Counterflow Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, Endwell O.; Beaulieu, Warren; Hager, James O.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics solutions of the flowfield of a truncated cone-cylinder with and without counterflow jets have been obtained for the short penetration mode (SPM) and long penetration mode (LPM) of the freestream-counterflow jet interaction flowfield. For the case without the counterflow jet, the comparison of the normalized surface pressures showed very good agreement with experimental data. For the case with the SPM jet, the predicted surface pressures did not compare as well with the experimental data upstream of the expansion corner, while aft of the expansion corner, the comparison of the solution and the data is seen to give much better agreement. The difference in the prediction and the data could be due to the transient character of the jet penetration modes, possible effects of the plasma physics that are not accounted for here, or even the less likely effect of flow turbulence, etc. For the LPM jet computations, one-dimensional isentropic relations were used to derived the jet exit conditions in order to obtain the LPM solutions. The solution for the jet exit Mach number of 3 shows a jet penetration several times longer than that of the SPM, and therefore much weaker bow shock, with an attendant reduction in wave drag. The LPM jet is, in essence, seen to be a "pencil" of fluid, with much higher dynamic pressure, embedded in the oncoming supersonic or hypersonic freestream. The methodology for determining the conditions for the LPM jet could enable a practical approach for the design and application of counterflow LPM jets for the reduction of wave drag and heat flux, thus significantly enhancing the aerodynamic characteristics and aerothermal performance of supersonic and hypersonic vehicles. The solutions show that the qualitative flow structure is very well captured. The obtained results, therefore, suggest that counterflowing jets are viable candidate technology concepts that can be employed to give significant reductions in wave drag, heat

  8. Development of braided rope seals for hypersonic engine applications: Flow modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutharasan, Rajakkannu; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Tao, Xiaoming; Du, Guang-Wu; Ko, Frank

    1992-01-01

    A new type of engine seal is being developed to meet the needs of advanced hypersonic engines. A seal braided of emerging high temperature ceramic fibers comprised of a sheath-core construction was selected for study based on its low leakage rates. Flexible, low-leakage, high temperature seals are required to seal the movable engine panels of advanced ramjet-scramjet engines either preventing potentially dangerous leakage into backside engine cavities or limiting the purge coolant flow rates through the seals. To predict the leakage through these flexible, porous seal structures new analytical flow models are required. Two such models based on the Kozeny-Carman equations are developed herein and are compared to experimental leakage measurements for simulated pressure and seal gap conditions. The models developed allow prediction of the gas leakage rate as a function of fiber diameter, fiber packing density, gas properties, and pressure drop across the seal. The first model treats the seal as a homogeneous fiber bed. The second model divides the seal into two homogeneous fiber beds identified as the core and the sheath of the seal. Flow resistances of each of the main seal elements are combined to determine the total flow resistance. Comparisons between measured leakage rates and model predictions for seal structures covering a wide range of braid architectures show good agreement. Within the experimental range, the second model provides a prediction within 6 to 13 percent of the flow for many of the cases examined. Areas where future model refinements are required are identified.

  9. DSMC Simulations of Hypersonic Flows With Shock Interactions and Validation With Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Bird, Graeme A.

    2004-01-01

    The capabilities of a relatively new direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code are examined for the problem of hypersonic laminar shock/shock and shock/boundary layer interactions, where boundary layer separation is an important feature of the flow. Flow about two model configurations is considered, where both configurations (a biconic and a hollow cylinder-flare) have recent published experimental measurements. The computations are made by using the DS2V code of Bird, a general two-dimensional/axisymmetric time accurate code that incorporates many of the advances in DSMC over the past decade. The current focus is on flows produced in ground-based facilities at Mach 12 and 16 test conditions with nitrogen as the test gas and the test models at zero incidence. Results presented highlight the sensitivity of the calculations to grid resolutions, sensitivity to physical modeling parameters, and comparison with experimental measurements. Information is provided concerning the flow structure and surface results for the extent of separation, heating, pressure, and skin friction.

  10. DSMC Simulations of Hypersonic Flows With Shock Interactions and Validation With Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Bird, Graeme A.

    2004-01-01

    The capabilities of a relatively new direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code are examined for the problem of hypersonic laminar shock/shock and shock/boundary layer interactions, where boundary layer separation is an important feature of the flow. Flow about two model configurations is considered, where both configurations (a biconic and a hollow cylinder-flare) have recent published experimental measurements. The computations are made by using the DS2V code of Bird, a general two-dimensional/axisymmetric time accurate code that incorporates many of the advances in DSMC over the past decade. The current focus is on flows produced in ground-based facilities at Mach 12 and 16 test conditions with nitrogen as the test gas and the test models at zero incidence. Results presented highlight the sensitivity of the calculations to grid resolution, sensitivity to physical modeling parameters, and comparison with experimental measurements. Information is provided concerning the flow structure and surface results for the extent of separation, heating, pressure, and skin friction.

  11. Characterization of CO2 flow in a hypersonic impulse facility using DLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, J. M.; Paris, S.; Fletcher, D. G.

    2016-02-01

    This work documents diode laser absorption measurements of CO2 flow in the free stream of the Longshot hypersonic impulse facility at Mach numbers ranging from 10 to 12. The diode laser sensor was designed to measure absorption of the P12 (30013) ← (00001) transition near 1.6 \\upmum, which yields relatively weak direct absorption levels (3.5 % per meter at peak Longshot free-stream conditions). Despite this weak absorption, measurements yielded valuable flow property information during the first 20 ms of facility runs. Simultaneous measurements of static temperature, pressure, and velocity were acquired in the inviscid core flow region using a laser wavelength scanning frequency of 600 Hz. The free-stream values obtained from DLAS measurements were then compared to Longshot probe-derived values determined from settling chamber and probe measurements. This comparison enabled an assessment of the traditional method of flow characterization in the facility, which indicated negligible influence from possible vibrational freezing of reservoir gases.

  12. Application of a Modular Particle-Continuum Method to Partially Rarefied, Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschenes, Timothy R.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2011-05-01

    The Modular Particle-Continuum (MPC) method is used to simulate partially-rarefied, hypersonic flow over a sting-mounted planetary probe configuration. This hybrid method uses computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to solve the Navier-Stokes equations in regions that are continuum, while using direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) in portions of the flow that are rarefied. The MPC method uses state-based coupling to pass information between the two flow solvers and decouples both time-step and mesh densities required by each solver. It is parallelized for distributed memory systems using dynamic domain decomposition and internal energy modes can be consistently modeled to be out of equilibrium with the translational mode in both solvers. The MPC results are compared to both full DSMC and CFD predictions and available experimental measurements. By using DSMC in only regions where the flow is nonequilibrium, the MPC method is able to reproduce full DSMC results down to the level of velocity and rotational energy probability density functions while requiring a fraction of the computational time.

  13. Modeling of electronic excitation and radiation in non-continuum hypersonic reentry flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Ozawa, Takashi; Sohn, Ilyoup; Levin, Deborah A.

    2011-06-01

    The modeling of hypersonic radiation in non-equilibrium, non-continuum flows is considered in the framework of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) approach. The study explores the influence of electronic states on the flow chemistry and degree of ionization as well as the assumption that the electronic states can be described by a steady state solution to a system of rate equations of excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transfer processes. The work implements selected excited levels of atomic nitrogen and oxygen and the corresponding electron impact excitation/de-excitation and ionization processes in DSMC. The simulations show that when excitation models are included, the degree of ionization in the Stardust transitional re-entry flow increases due to additional intermediate steps to ionization. The extra ionization reactions consume the electron energy to reduce the electron temperature. The DSMC predicted excited state level populations are lower than those predicted by a quasi steady state calculation, but the differences can be understood in terms of the flow distribution functions.

  14. Fluorescence Visualization of Hypersonic Flow Past Triangular and Rectangular Boundary-layer Trips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Garcia, A. P.; Borg, Stephen E.; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Berry, Scott A.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization has been used to investigate the hypersonic flow of air over surface protrusions that are sized to force laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition. These trips were selected to simulate protruding Space Shuttle Orbiter heat shield gap-filler material. Experiments were performed in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Wind Tunnel, which is an electrically-heated, blowdown facility. Two-mm high by 8-mm wide triangular and rectangular trips were attached to a flat plate and were oriented at an angle of 45 degrees with respect to the oncoming flow. Upstream of these trips, nitric oxide (NO) was seeded into the boundary layer. PLIF visualization of this NO allowed observation of both laminar and turbulent boundary layer flow downstream of the trips for varying flow conditions as the flat plate angle of attack was varied. By varying the angle of attack, the Mach number above the boundary layer was varied between 4.2 and 9.8, according to analytical oblique-shock calculations. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the flowfield with a laminar boundary layer were also performed to better understand the flow environment. The PLIF images of the tripped boundary layer flow were compared to a case with no trip for which the flow remained laminar over the entire angle-of-attack range studied. Qualitative agreement is found between the present observed transition measurements and a previous experimental roughness-induced transition database determined by other means, which is used by the shuttle return-to-flight program.

  15. Modeling and simulation of radiation from hypersonic flows with Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Ilyoup

    During extreme-Mach number reentry into Earth's atmosphere, spacecraft experience hypersonic non-equilibrium flow conditions that dissociate molecules and ionize atoms. Such situations occur behind a shock wave leading to high temperatures, which have an adverse effect on the thermal protection system and radar communications. Since the electronic energy levels of gaseous species are strongly excited for high Mach number conditions, the radiative contribution to the total heat load can be significant. In addition, radiative heat source within the shock layer may affect the internal energy distribution of dissociated and weakly ionized gas species and the number density of ablative species released from the surface of vehicles. Due to the radiation total heat load to the heat shield surface of the vehicle may be altered beyond mission tolerances. Therefore, in the design process of spacecrafts the effect of radiation must be considered and radiation analyses coupled with flow solvers have to be implemented to improve the reliability during the vehicle design stage. To perform the first stage for radiation analyses coupled with gas-dynamics, efficient databasing schemes for emission and absorption coefficients were developed to model radiation from hypersonic, non-equilibrium flows. For bound-bound transitions, spectral information including the line-center wavelength and assembled parameters for efficient calculations of emission and absorption coefficients are stored for typical air plasma species. Since the flow is non-equilibrium, a rate equation approach including both collisional and radiatively induced transitions was used to calculate the electronic state populations, assuming quasi-steady-state (QSS). The Voigt line shape function was assumed for modeling the line broadening effect. The accuracy and efficiency of the databasing scheme was examined by comparing results of the databasing scheme with those of NEQAIR for the Stardust flowfield. An accuracy of

  16. Comparative study on aerodynamic heating under perfect and nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiu; Li, JinPing; Zhao, Wei; Jiang, ZongLin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, comparative heat flux measurements for a sharp cone model were conducted by utilizing a high enthalpy shock tunnel JF-10 and a large-scale shock tunnel JF-12, responsible for providing nonequilibrium and perfect gas flows, respectively. Experiments were performed at the Key Laboratory of High Temperature Gas Dynamics (LHD), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Corresponding numerical simulations were also conducted in effort to better understand the phenomena accompanying in these experiments. By assessing the consistency and accuracy of all the data gathered during this study, a detailed comparison of sharp cone heat transfer under a totally different kind of freestream conditions was build and analyzed. One specific parameter, defined as the product of the Stanton number and the square root of the Reynold number, was found to be more characteristic for the aerodynamic heating phenomena encountered in hypersonic flight. Adequate use of said parameter practically eliminates the variability caused by the deferent flow conditions, regardless of whether the flow is in dissociation or the boundary condition is catalytic. Essentially, the parameter identified in this study reduces the amount of ground experimental data necessary and eases data extrapolation to flight.

  17. An implicit multigrid algorithm for computing hypersonic, chemically reacting viscous flows

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    An implicit algorithm for computing viscous flows in chemical nonequilibrium is presented. Emphasis is placed on the numerical efficiency of the time integration scheme, both in terms of periteration workload and overall convergence rate. In this context, several techniques are introduced, including a stable, O(m{sup 2}) approximate factorization of the chemical source Jacobian and implementations of V-cycle and filtered multigrid acceleration methods. A five species-seventeen reaction air model is used to calculate hypersonic viscous flow over a cylinder at conditions corresponding to flight at 5 km/s, 60 km altitude and at 11.36 km/s, 76.42 km altitude. Inviscid calculations using an eleven-species reaction mechanism including ionization are presented for a case involving 11.37 km/s flow at an altitude of 84.6 km. Comparisons among various options for the implicit treatment of the chemical source terms and among different multilevel approaches for convergence acceleration are presented for all simulations.

  18. Investigation of hypersonic rarefied flow on a spherical nose of the AOTV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Amolak C.; Woods, G. Hamilton

    1987-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes (NS) equations were integrated numerically for investigating the flow characteristics on the forepart of the spherical nose of a space vehicle such as the AOTV or AFE by a modified Accelerated Successive Replacement (ASR) scheme under hypersonic rarefied conditions. Technical feasibility of the mathematical approach was demonstrated by computing the flowfield on a spherical nose under conditions that the AFE encounters at times t = 15 and 20 seconds after its reentry into the atmosphere. Local similar solutions for the merged layer flow along the stagnation line of the sphere were developed. These are correct to the same degree of accuracy as the NS equations. These solutions provided stagnation line boundary conditions for the domain of integration on the spherical noise. Also, a parametric study of the stagnation line solution was made with a view to understand the flow characteristics in tunnels with different ambient fluids. Analytical expressions for surface slip temperature, jump conditions, and concentration level in the presence of the real gas effects at the top of the Knudsen layer were derived and used to calculate the stagnation line flowfield with nonequilibrium dissociation and ionization. A number of graphics were drawn to illustrate the basic physics of the flowfields. The present analysis can be extended to include real gas effects and to bodies of arbitrary shapes. It can further provide boundary conditions for integrating the NS equations in the near wake region.

  19. Aerodynamic and inlet flow characteristics of several hypersonic airbreathing missile concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, J. L.; Marcum, D. C., Jr.; Johnston, P. J.; Hunt, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Four conceptual hypersonic missile configurations were examined experimentally and theoretically. Two of the concepts employed twin module bottom-mounted engines and two were designed for upper surface inlets or engines with the intent of reducing the vehicle observables. The tests were conducted at Mach 6 and Reynolds numbers of 6 to 7.5 x 10 to the 6th per foot. Flow field surveys in the vicinity of the engine inlet were made on all configurations and force and moment tests were conducted on three of the vehicles. Stability and control characteristics of the bottom-mounted engine configurations which incorporated slender, low wings were dominated by strong vortices that promoted severe pitchup tendencies. The shock layer and flow quality in the vicinity of the bottom-mounted engine inlets were dependent on nose shape. The spatula-like upper surface engine concept demonstrated good performance and had uniform flow entering the engine inlet, while the upper surface inlet concept with a highly swept forebody incurred large gradients due to interactions with leading edge shocks.

  20. Numerical simulation of hypersonic inlet flows with equilibrium or finite rate chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao; Hsieh, Kwang-Chung; Shuen, Jian-Shun; Mcbride, Bonnie J.

    1988-01-01

    An efficient numerical program incorporated with comprehensive high temperature gas property models has been developed to simulate hypersonic inlet flows. The computer program employs an implicit lower-upper time marching scheme to solve the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with variable thermodynamic and transport properties. Both finite-rate and local-equilibrium approaches are adopted in the chemical reaction model for dissociation and ionization of the inlet air. In the finite rate approach, eleven species equations coupled with fluid dynamic equations are solved simultaneously. In the local-equilibrium approach, instead of solving species equations, an efficient chemical equilibrium package has been developed and incorporated into the flow code to obtain chemical compositions directly. Gas properties for the reaction products species are calculated by methods of statistical mechanics and fit to a polynomial form for C(p). In the present study, since the chemical reaction time is comparable to the flow residence time, the local-equilibrium model underpredicts the temperature in the shock layer. Significant differences of predicted chemical compositions in shock layer between finite rate and local-equilibrium approaches have been observed.

  1. Computation of axisymmetric and ionized hypersonic flows using particle and continuum methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain D.; Gokcen, Tahir

    1994-01-01

    Comparisons between particle and continuum simulations of hypersonic near-continuum flows are presented. The particle approach employs the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, and the continuum approach solves the appropriate equations of fluid flow. Both simulations have thermochemistry models for air implemented including ionization. A new axisymmetric DSMC code that is efficiently vectorized is developed for this study. In this DSMC code, particular attention is paid to matching the relaxation rates employed in the continuum approach. This investigation represents a continuum of a previous study that considered thermochemical relaxation in one-dimensional shock waves of nitrogen. Comparison of the particle and continuum methods is first made for an axisymmetric blunt-body flow of air at 7 km/s. Very good agreement is obtained for the two solutions. The two techniques also compare well for a one-dimensional shock wave in air at 10 km/s. In both applications, the results are found to be sensitive to various aspects of the chemistry model employed.

  2. A survey of simulation and diagnostic techniques for hypersonic nonequilibrium flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Park, Chul

    1987-01-01

    The possible means of simulating nonequilibrium reacting flows in hypersonic environments, and the required diagnostic techniques, are surveyed in two categories: bulk flow behavior and determination of chemical rate parameters. Flow visualization of shock shapes for validation of computational-fluid dynamic calculations is proposed. The facilities and the operating conditions necessary to produce the required nonequilibrium conditions, the suitable optical techniques, and their sensitivity requirements, are surveyed. Shock-tubes, shock-tunnels, and ballistic ranges in a wide range of sizes and strengths are found to be useful for this purpose, but severe sensitivity requirements are indicated for the optical instruments, which can be met only by using highly-collimated laser sources. Likewise, for the determination of chemical parameters, this paper summarizes the quantities that need to be determined, required facilities and their operating conditions, and the suitable diagnostic techniques and their performance requirements. Shock tubes of various strengths are found to be useful for this purpose. Vacuum ultraviolet absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy are found to be the techniques best suited for the measurements of the chemical data.

  3. Viscous-shock-layer analysis of hypersonic flows over long slender vehicles. Ph.D. Thesis, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kam-Pui; Gupta, Roop N.

    1992-01-01

    An efficient and accurate method for solving the viscous shock layer equations for hypersonic flows over long slender bodies is presented. The two first order equations, continuity and normal momentum, are solved simultaneously as a coupled set. The flow conditions included are from high Reynolds numbers at low altitudes to low Reynolds numbers at high altitudes. For high Reynolds number flows, both chemical nonequilibrium and perfect gas cases are analyzed with surface catalytic effects and different turbulence models, respectively. At low Reynolds number flow conditions, corrected slip models are implemented with perfect gas case. Detailed comparisons are included with other predictions and experimental data.

  4. Low-density real gas flows about hypersonic vehicles. Interim report, 25 September 1986-25 September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J.J.; Wong, R.S.; Bussing, T.R.; Birch, S.F.

    1988-03-01

    Phase I results include selection of the three components of the computational of the computational algorithm (a Navier-Stokes solution algorithm, a chemistry solution algorithm, and vectorization and parallel-processing requirements for both algorithms). Development of a nonequilibrium air-chemistry reaction model is included, as well as studies of leeside models, turbulence models, and wall catalysis effects appropriate to the hypersonic flows to be considered. Mach 20 test cases were performed using the Navier-Stokes and chemistry algorithms, and a comprehensive sensitivity study was completed for the selection of an air-chemistry model. Transport property calculations are also discussed. The components of the computational algorithm developed during Phase I will be assembled during Phase II into a unified computer code capable of accurately and efficiently calculating low-density real gas flows about hypersonic vehicles.

  5. Flow field measurements for cylindrical configurations in a hypersonic wind tunnel: Windward and leeward flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, J. J.; Lamb, J. P.; Center, K. R.; Graumann, B. W.

    1971-01-01

    Windward and leeward measurements were made for a variety of simulated infinite cylinders exposed to hypersonic streams over an angle of attack from 30 deg to 90 deg. For the range of conditions included in the study, the following conclusions are made: (1) Swept cylinder theory provides a reasonable correlation of the measured laminar heat transfer rates from the plane of symmetry. (2) The boundary layer transition criteria in the plane of symmetry are a function of the transverse curvature. (3) Relaminarization of the circumferential boundary layer for a right circular cylinder was observed at the highest Reynolds number tested. (4) The effect of leeside geometry on the average heat transfer rate can be correlated with a single geometric parameter which is dependent on the location of separation. (5) The relationship of leeward heating to angle of attack is virtually linear for each cross section. (6) No systematic effect of free stream Reynolds number was observed.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Hypersonic Flow over a Cylinder Using Axial- and Transverse-Oriented Magnetic Dipoles

    PubMed Central

    Guarendi, Andrew N.; Chandy, Abhilash J.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hypersonic flow over a cylinder are presented for axial- and transverse-oriented dipoles with different strengths. ANSYS CFX is used to carry out calculations for steady, laminar flows at a Mach number of 6.1, with a model for electrical conductivity as a function of temperature and pressure. The low magnetic Reynolds number (≪1) calculated based on the velocity and length scales in this problem justifies the quasistatic approximation, which assumes negligible effect of velocity on magnetic fields. Therefore, the governing equations employed in the simulations are the compressible Navier-Stokes and the energy equations with MHD-related source terms such as Lorentz force and Joule dissipation. The results demonstrate the ability of the magnetic field to affect the flowfield around the cylinder, which results in an increase in shock stand-off distance and reduction in overall temperature. Also, it is observed that there is a noticeable decrease in drag with the addition of the magnetic field. PMID:24307870

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow over a cylinder using axial- and transverse-oriented magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Guarendi, Andrew N; Chandy, Abhilash J

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hypersonic flow over a cylinder are presented for axial- and transverse-oriented dipoles with different strengths. ANSYS CFX is used to carry out calculations for steady, laminar flows at a Mach number of 6.1, with a model for electrical conductivity as a function of temperature and pressure. The low magnetic Reynolds number (<1) calculated based on the velocity and length scales in this problem justifies the quasistatic approximation, which assumes negligible effect of velocity on magnetic fields. Therefore, the governing equations employed in the simulations are the compressible Navier-Stokes and the energy equations with MHD-related source terms such as Lorentz force and Joule dissipation. The results demonstrate the ability of the magnetic field to affect the flowfield around the cylinder, which results in an increase in shock stand-off distance and reduction in overall temperature. Also, it is observed that there is a noticeable decrease in drag with the addition of the magnetic field. PMID:24307870

  8. Investigations on the turbulent wake of a generic space launcher geometry in the hypersonic flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saile, D.; Gülhan, A.; Henckels, A.; Glatzer, C.; Statnikov, V.; Meinke, M.

    2013-06-01

    The turbulent wake flow of generic rocket configurations is investigated experimentally and numerically at a freestream Mach number of 6.0 and a unit Reynolds number of 10·106 m-1. The flow condition is based on the trajectory of Ariane V-like launcher at an altitude of 50 km, which is used as the baseline to address the overarching tasks of wake flows in the hypersonic regime like fluid-structural coupling, reverse hot jets and base heating. Experimental results using pressure transducers and the high-speed Schlieren measurement technique are shown to gain insight into the local pressure fluctuations on the base and the oscillations of the recompression shock. This experimental configuration features a wedgeprofiled strut orthogonally mounted to the main body. Additionally, the influence of cylindrical dummy nozzles attached to the base of the rocket is investigated, which is the link to the numerical investigations. Here, the axisymmetric model possesses a cylindrical sting support of the same diameter as the dummy nozzles. The sting support allows investigations for an undisturbed wake flow. A time-accurate zonal Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes/Large Eddy Simulation (RANS/LES) approach is applied to identify shocks, expansion waves, and the highly unsteady recompression region numerically. Subsequently, experimental and numerical results in the strut-averted region are compared with regard to the wall pressure and recompression shock frequency spectra. For the compared configurations, experimental pressure spectra exhibit dominant Strouhal numbers at about SrD = 0.03 and 0.27, and the recompression shock oscillates at 0.2. In general, the pressure and recompression shock fluctuations numerically calculated agree reasonably with the experimental results. The experiments with a blunt base reveal base-pressure spectra with dominant Strouhal numbers at 0.08 at the center position and 0.145, 0.21-0.22, and 0.31-0.33 at the outskirts of the base.

  9. Aerodynamic Design of a Dual-Flow Mach 7 Hypersonic Inlet System for a Turbine-Based Combined-Cycle Hypersonic Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Bobby W.; Weir, Lois J.

    2008-01-01

    A new hypersonic inlet for a turbine-based combined-cycle (TBCC) engine has been designed. This split-flow inlet is designed to provide flow to an over-under propulsion system with turbofan and dual-mode scramjet engines for flight from takeoff to Mach 7. It utilizes a variable-geometry ramp, high-speed cowl lip rotation, and a rotating low-speed cowl that serves as a splitter to divide the flow between the low-speed turbofan and the high-speed scramjet and to isolate the turbofan at high Mach numbers. The low-speed inlet was designed for Mach 4, the maximum mode transition Mach number. Integration of the Mach 4 inlet into the Mach 7 inlet imposed significant constraints on the low-speed inlet design, including a large amount of internal compression. The inlet design was used to develop mechanical designs for two inlet mode transition test models: small-scale (IMX) and large-scale (LIMX) research models. The large-scale model is designed to facilitate multi-phase testing including inlet mode transition and inlet performance assessment, controls development, and integrated systems testing with turbofan and scramjet engines.

  10. Swept-slot film-cooling effectiveness in hypersonic turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, J. N.; Cary, A. M., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Measurement results are presented for the surface equilibrium temperature downstream of swept slots, with sonic tangential air injection into a thick hypersonic turbulent boundary layer. These results are compared with unswept slot results for cooling effectiveness.

  11. A low-computational-cost inverse heat transfer technique for convective heat transfer measurements in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avallone, F.; Greco, C. S.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; Cardone, G.

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of the convective wall heat flux in hypersonic flows may be particularly challenging in the presence of high-temperature gradients and when using high-thermal-conductivity materials. In this case, the solution of multidimensional problems is necessary, but it considerably increases the computational cost. In this paper, a low-computational-cost inverse data reduction technique is presented. It uses a recursive least-squares approach in combination with the trust-region-reflective algorithm as optimization procedure. The computational cost is reduced by performing the discrete Fourier transform on the discrete convective heat flux function and by identifying the most relevant coefficients as objects of the optimization algorithm. In the paper, the technique is validated by means of both synthetic data, built in order to reproduce physical conditions, and experimental data, carried out in the Hypersonic Test Facility Delft at Mach 7.5 on two wind tunnel models having different thermal properties.

  12. A study of boundary layer transition on outgassing cones in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalmach, C. J., Jr.; Bertin, J. J.; Pope, T. C.; Mccloskey, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    Surface heat-transfer rates and pressures were measured at hypersonic speeds on sharp cones at zero angle of attack with and without gas injection. Using the non-injection results for reference data the effects on heating and transition location of surface roughness and injectant rate, distribution and composition were determined. The transition location was sensitive to the injectant distribution. The transition Reynolds numbers were significantly greater when the injectant distribution was constant than with a variable distribution. The measured heat-transfer distribution were also strongly dependent upon the injectant distribution. Transition Reynolds number results obtained during this program with a variable injectant distribution were correlated with a limited amount of data available for a degrading model tested in a different facility. Transitional data with constant injectant distribution were correlated with earlier results. An empirical correlation of heat-transfer reduction due to gas injection in turbulent flow was developed for both distributions tested. Several effects of mass addition on heating and transition, which have been earlier reported, were observed.

  13. Laminar heat-transfer distributions on biconics at incidence in hypersonic-hypervelocity flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Micol, J. R.; Gnoffo, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laminar heating distributions were measured at hypersonic-hypervelocity flow conditions on a 1.9-percent-scale model of an aeroassisted vehiclee proposed for missions to a number of planets. This vehicle is a spherically blunted, 12.84/7deg biconic with the fore-cone axis bent upward 7 deg relative to the aft-cone axis to provide selftrim capability. Also tested was a straight biconic (i.e., without nose bend) with the same nose radius and half-angles as the bent-nose biconic. These measurements were made in the Langley Expansion Tube at free-stream velocities from 4.5 to 6.9 km/sec and Mach numbers from 6.0 to 9.0 with helium, nitrogen, air, and carbon dioxide test gases. The range of calculated thermochemical equilibrium normal-shock density ratios for these four test gases was 4 to 19. Angles of attack, referenced to the aft-cone, varied from 0 to 20 deg. Heating distributions predicted with a parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code were compared with measurement for helium and air test gases. Measured windward and leeward heating levels were generally underpredicted by the PNS code for both test gases, and agreement was poorer on the leeward side than on the windward side.

  14. Wavefront sensor testing in hypersonic flows using a laser-spark guide star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Daniel R.; Armstrong, Darrell J.; Hedlund, Eric; Lederer, Melissa; Collier, Arnold S.; Spring, Charles; Gruetzner, James K.; Hebner, Gregory A.; Mansell, Justin D.

    1997-11-01

    The flight environment of next-generation theater missile defense interceptors involves hypersonic speeds that place severe aero-thermodynamic loads on missile components including the windows used for optical seekers. These heating effects can lead to significant boresight error and aberration. Ground-based tests are required to characterize these effects. We have developed methods to measure aberrations in seeker windows using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Light from a laser or other source with a well known wavefront is passed through the window and falls on the sensor. The sensor uses an array of micro-lenses to generate a grid of focal spots on a CCD detector. The positions of the focal spots provide a measure of the wavefront slope over each micro-lens. The wavefront is reconstructed by integrating the slopes, and analyzed to characterize aberrations. During flight, optical seekers look upstream through a window at 'look angles' angles near 0 degrees relative to the free stream flow. A 0 degree angle corresponds to large angles approaching 90 degrees when measured relative to the normal of the window, and is difficult to simulate using conventional techniques to illuminate the wavefront sensor during wind tunnel tests. For this reason, we developed a technique using laser- induced optical breakdown that allows arbitrary look angles down to 0 degrees.

  15. An approximate viscous shock layer approach to calculating hypersonic flows about blunt-nosed bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. MCN.; Dejarnette, F. R.

    1991-01-01

    An approximate axisymmetric method has been developed which can reliably calculate fully viscous hypersonic flows over blunt-nosed bodies. By substituting Maslen's second order pressure expression for the normal momentum equation, a simplified form of the viscous shock layer (VSL) equations is obtained. This approach can solve both the subsonic and supersonic regions of the shock layer without a starting solution for the shock shape. Since the method is fully viscous, the problems associated with coupling a boundary-layer solution with an inviscid-layer solution are avoided. This procedure is significantly faster than the parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) or VSL solvers and would be useful in a preliminary design environment. Problems associated with a previously developed approximate VSL technique are addressed. Surface heat transfer and pressure predictions are comparable to both VSL results and experimental data. The present technique generates its own shock shape as part of its solution, and therefore could be used to provide more accurate initial shock shapes for higher-order procedures which require starting solutions.

  16. Numerical study of hypersonic flows over reentry configurations with different chemical nonequilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jiaao; Wang, Jingying; Lee, Chunhian

    2016-09-01

    Effects of two different 11-species chemical reaction models on hypersonic reentry flow simulations are numerically investigated. These two models were proposed by Gupta (1990) and Park (1990) [12,15], respectively. In this study, two typical configurations, the RAM-C II vehicle and FIRE II capsule, are selected as test cases, whose thermo-chemical nonequilibrium flowfields are computed by a multi-block finite volume code using a two-temperature model (a translational-rotational temperature and a vibrational-electron-electronic temperature). In the RAM-C II case, it is indicated that although electron number density distributions of the two reaction models appear in a similar trend, their values are distinctively different. Results of the Gupta's model show a better agreement with the electrostatic probe data, while those of the Park's model are more consistent with the reflectometers data. Both models give similar temperature distributions. In the FIRE II case, the two models yield significantly different distribution profiles of ions and electrons, whose differences could reach an order of magnitude. In addition, an abnormal nonequilibrium relaxation process in the shock layer is found in the FIRE II flowfield simulated by the Gupta's model, which proves to be a consequence of electron impact ionization reactions.

  17. Computational methods for hypersonic viscous flow over finite ellipsoid-cones at incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical method, which is simpler than others currently in use, is proposed for determining the full viscous flow over a finite body in hypersonic stream at high altitude. It treats the shock layer surrounding the blunt foebody and the near wake behind the base simultaneously by formulating the Navier-Stokes equations in conformal and azimuthal-angle coordinates. The computational domain is confined to the body wall, outflow surface and the bow shock, which is adjusted along the coordinate normal to the wall in the course of iterations. Because of the optimal grid and a well developed alternating direction implicit factorization technique for the governing equations, reasonably accurate results can be obtained on a 30 by 36 by 6 grid with 400 time-marching iterations. Results for body shapes belonging to the ellipsoid-cone family are compared with the experimental data for the Apollo command module and the Viking aeroshell. Validation of the method based on self-consistency is also discussed.

  18. Velocity Field Measurements in Rarefied, Hypersonic Flows of Nitrogen Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Eric

    Velocity fields are measured in the shock layer and boundary layer on a plate with a cylindrical fin immersed in a hypersonic, free jet of nitrogen, using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of iodine. A sheet beam from a single-mode argon laser at 514 nm is used to excite hyperfine components of the P(13), R(15) and P(48), P(103) blended rotational-vibrational lines in the B-X electronic transition for iodine seeded in the flow. The Doppler broadening and shift of these lines, and the relative rotational line strengths are determined for excitation spectra recorded in a planar grid. Using this measurement technique, estimates for iodine of the mass velocity component and kinetic temperature of translation in the direction of laser propagation, rotational temperature, and relative number density are determined at each point. Sectional planes of the flow over the body are investigated at a spatial resolution on the scale of the molecular mean-free-path in the free jet near the plate leading edge. Two directions within each plane are examined, to determine the velocity vector and to investigate translational non-equilibrium. Predictions from two direct simulation Monte Carlo computations of the flow are compared with the measurements. Large values of slip velocity and temperature jump at the plate surface are observed for iodine. Measurements and DSMC predictions indicate strong translational non-equilibrium effects for the iodine in the shock wave and the thick boundary layer on the plate, and are qualitatively consistent with a bimodal velocity distribution function. As a consequence of the ratio of molecular masses, the translational non-equilibrium of iodine is much greater than for nitrogen.

  19. Scientific Transactions No. 11 of the Institute of Mechanics, Moscow State University. [supersonic and hypersonic gas flow and the movement of gas with exothermic reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonor, A. L. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The results of flow around wings, the determination of the optimal form, and the interaction of the wake with the accompanying flow at supersonic and hypersonic speeds of the free-stream flow are given. Methods of numerical and analytical calculation of one dimensional unsteady and two dimensional steady motions of fuel-gas mixtures with exothermic reactions are also considered.

  20. On the solution of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for hypersonic flow about axially-symmetric blunt bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warsi, Z. U. A.; Weed, R. A.; Thompson, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    A formulation of the complete Navier-Stokes problem for a viscous hypersonic flow in general curvilinear coordinates is presented. This formulation is applicable to both the axially symmetric and three dimensional flows past bodies of revolution. The equations for the case of zero angle of attack were solved past a circular cylinder with hemispherical caps by point SOR finite difference approximation. The free stream Mach number and the Reynolds number for the test case are respectively 22.04 and 168883. The whole algorithm is presented in detail along with the preliminary results for pressure, temperature, density and velocity distributions along the stagnation line.

  1. Modeling and simulation of radiation from hypersonic flows with Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Ilyoup

    During extreme-Mach number reentry into Earth's atmosphere, spacecraft experience hypersonic non-equilibrium flow conditions that dissociate molecules and ionize atoms. Such situations occur behind a shock wave leading to high temperatures, which have an adverse effect on the thermal protection system and radar communications. Since the electronic energy levels of gaseous species are strongly excited for high Mach number conditions, the radiative contribution to the total heat load can be significant. In addition, radiative heat source within the shock layer may affect the internal energy distribution of dissociated and weakly ionized gas species and the number density of ablative species released from the surface of vehicles. Due to the radiation total heat load to the heat shield surface of the vehicle may be altered beyond mission tolerances. Therefore, in the design process of spacecrafts the effect of radiation must be considered and radiation analyses coupled with flow solvers have to be implemented to improve the reliability during the vehicle design stage. To perform the first stage for radiation analyses coupled with gas-dynamics, efficient databasing schemes for emission and absorption coefficients were developed to model radiation from hypersonic, non-equilibrium flows. For bound-bound transitions, spectral information including the line-center wavelength and assembled parameters for efficient calculations of emission and absorption coefficients are stored for typical air plasma species. Since the flow is non-equilibrium, a rate equation approach including both collisional and radiatively induced transitions was used to calculate the electronic state populations, assuming quasi-steady-state (QSS). The Voigt line shape function was assumed for modeling the line broadening effect. The accuracy and efficiency of the databasing scheme was examined by comparing results of the databasing scheme with those of NEQAIR for the Stardust flowfield. An accuracy of

  2. Determination of the hypersonic-continuum/rarefied-flow drag coefficient of the Viking lander capsule 1 aeroshell from flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Walberg, G. D.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an investigation to determine the full scale drag coefficient in the high speed, low density regime of the Viking lander capsule 1 entry vehicle are presented. The principal flight data used in the study were from onboard pressure, mass spectrometer, and accelerometer instrumentation. The hypersonic continuum flow drag coefficient was unambiguously obtained from pressure and accelerometer data; the free molecule flow drag coefficient was indirectly estimated from accelerometer and mass spectrometer data; the slip flow drag coefficient variation was obtained from an appropriate scaling of existing experimental sphere data. Comparison of the flight derived drag hypersonic continuum flow regime except for Reynolds numbers from 1000 to 100,000, for which an unaccountable difference between flight and ground test data of about 8% existed. The flight derived drag coefficients in the free molecule flow regime were considerably larger than those previously calculated with classical theory. The general character of the previously determined temperature profile was not changed appreciably by the results of this investigation; however, a slightly more symmetrical temperature variation at the highest altitudes was obtained.

  3. Interaction theory of hypersonic laminar near-wake flow behind an adiabatic circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinman, W. Schuyler; Johansen, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    The separation and shock wave formation on the aft-body of a hypersonic adiabatic circular cylinder were studied numerically using the open source software OpenFOAM. The simulations of laminar flow were performed over a range of Reynolds numbers (8× 10^3 < Re < 8× 10^4 ) at a free-stream Mach number of 5.9. Off-body viscous forces were isolated by controlling the wall boundary condition. It was observed that the off-body viscous forces play a dominant role compared to the boundary layer in displacement of the interaction onset in response to a change in Reynolds number. A modified free-interaction equation and correlation parameter has been presented which accounts for wall curvature effects on the interaction. The free-interaction equation was manipulated to isolate the contribution of the viscous-inviscid interaction to the overall pressure rise and shock formation. Using these equations coupled with high-quality simulation data, the underlying mechanisms resulting in Reynolds number dependence of the lip-shock formation were investigated. A constant value for the interaction parameter representing the part of the pressure rise due to viscous-inviscid interaction has been observed at separation over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The effect of curvature has been shown to be the primary contributor to the Reynolds number dependence of the free-interaction mechanism at separation. The observations in this work have been discussed here to create a thorough analysis of the Reynolds number-dependent nature of the lip-shock.

  4. The prediction of viscous hypersonic flows about complex configurations using an upwind parabolized Navier-Stokes code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narain, J. P.; Muramoto, K. K.; Lawrence, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    A three-dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes computer code which employs an upwind algorithm is used to conduct a numerical study of an advanced maneuvering reentry vehicle configuration. Comparisons between numerical solutions and experimental data are presented for surface pressure, wall heat flux, and overall forces and moments. The effects of angle of attack, angle of yaw, and surface mass injection are investigated. Good agreement is observed between the calculated and measured data. The results of this investigation demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of an upwind scheme in predicting the hypersonic flow field characteristics about a complex configuration.

  5. NASA Ames's electric arc-driven shock tube facility and research on nonequilibrium phenomena in low density hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.

    1992-01-01

    Basic requirements for a ground test facility simulating low density hypersonic flows are discussed. Such facilities should be able to produce shock velocities in the range of 10-17 km/sec in an initial pressure of 0.010 to 0.050 Torr. The facility should be equipped with diagnostics systems to be able to measure the emitted radiation, characteristic temperatures and populations in various energy levels. In the light of these requirements, NASA Ames's electric arc-driven low density shock tube facility is described and available experimental diagnostics systems and computational tools are discussed.

  6. Second-order small disturbance theory for hypersonic flow over power-law bodies. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical method for determining the flow field about power-law bodies in hypersonic flow conditions is developed. The second-order solutions, which reflect the effects of the second-order terms in the equations, are obtained by applying the method of small perturbations in terms of body slenderness parameter to the zeroth-order solutions. The method is applied by writing each flow variable as the sum of a zeroth-order and a perturbation function, each multiplied by the axial variable raised to a power. The similarity solutions are developed for infinite Mach number. All results obtained are for no flow through the body surface (as a boundary condition), but the derivation indicates that small amounts of blowing or suction through the wall can be accommodated.

  7. Development of a computer code for calculating the steady super/hypersonic inviscid flow around real configurations. Volume 1: Computational technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marconi, F.; Salas, M.; Yaeger, L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to compute the inviscid super/hypersonic flow field about complex vehicle geometries accurately and efficiently. A second order accurate finite difference scheme is used to integrate the three dimensional Euler equations in regions of continuous flow, while all shock waves are computed as discontinuities via the Rankine Hugoniot jump conditions. Conformal mappings are used to develop a computational grid. The effects of blunt nose entropy layers are computed in detail. Real gas effects for equilibrium air are included using curve fits of Mollier charts. Typical calculated results for shuttle orbiter, hypersonic transport, and supersonic aircraft configurations are included to demonstrate the usefulness of this tool.

  8. Experimental studies of shock-wave/wall-jet interaction in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have been conducted to examine slot film cooling effectiveness and the interaction between the cooling film and an incident planar shock wave in turbulent hypersonic flow. The experimental studies were conducted in the 48-inch shock tunnel at Calspan at a freestream Mach number of close to 6.4 and at a Reynolds number of 35 x 10(exp 6) based on the length of the model at the injection point. The Mach 2.3 planar wall jet was generated from 40 transverse nozzles (with heights of both 0.080 inch and 0.120 inch), producing a film that extended the full width of the model. The nozzles were operated at pressures and velocities close to matching the freestream, as well as at conditions where the nozzle flows were over- and under-expanded. A two-dimensional shock generator was used to generate oblique shocks that deflected the flow through total turnings of 11, 16, and 21 degrees; the flows impinged downstream of the nozzle exits. Detailed measurements of heat transfer and pressure were made both ahead and downstream of the injection station, with the greatest concentration of measurements in the regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction. The major objectives of these experimental studies were to explore the effectiveness of film cooling in the presence of regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction and, more specifically, to determine how boundary layer separation and the large recompression heating rates were modified by film cooling. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure were obtained in the incident shock/wall-jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for each of the two nozzle heights. Measurements were also made to examine the effects of nozzle lip thickness on cooling effectiveness. The major conclusion from these studies was that the effect of the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks, so the peak heating in the recompression region was not

  9. Experimental studies of shock-wave/wall-jet interaction in hypersonic flow, part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have been conducted to examine slot film cooling effectiveness and the interaction between the cooling film and an incident planar shock wave in turbulent hypersonic flow. The experimental studies were conducted in the 48-inch shock tunnel at Calspan at a freestream Mach number of close to 6.4 and at a Reynolds number of 35 x 10(exp 6) based on the length of the model at the injection point. The Mach 2.3 planar wall jet was generated from 40 transverse nozzles (with heights of both 0.080 inch and 0.120 inch), producing a film that extended the full width of the model. The nozzles were operated at pressures and velocities close to matching the freestream, as well as at conditions where the nozzle flows were over- and under-expanded. A two-dimensional shock generator was used to generate oblique shocks that deflected the flow through total turnings of 11, 16, and 21 degrees; the flows impinged downstream of the nozzle exits. Detailed measurements of heat transfer and pressure were made both ahead and downstream of the injection station, with the greatest concentration of measurements in the regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction. The major objectives of these experimental studies were to explore the effectiveness of film cooling in the presence of regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction and, more specifically, to determine how boundary layer separation and the large recompression heating rates were modified by film cooling. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure were obtained in the incident-shock/wall-jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for each of the two nozzle heights. Measurements were also made to examine the effects of nozzle lip thickness on cooling effectiveness. The major conclusion from these studies was that the effect of the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks, so the peak heating in the recompression region was not

  10. Computation of hypersonic laminar viscous flow past spinning sharp and blunt cones at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, R.; Rakich, J. V.

    1978-01-01

    Computational results, obtained with a parabolic Navier-Stokes marching code, are presented for hypersonic viscous flow past spinning sharp and blunt cones at angle of attack. The code takes into account the asymmetries in the flow field resulting from spinning motion and computes the asymmetric shock shape, crossflow and streamwise shear, heat transfer, crossflow separation, and vortex structure. The Magnus force and moments are also computed. Comparisons are made with other theoretical analyses based on boundary-layer and boundary-region equations, and an anomaly is discovered in the displacement thickness contribution to the Magnus force when compared with boundary-layer results. In addition, a new criterion for defining crossflow separation behind spinning bodies is introduced which generalizes the Moore-Rott-Sears criterion for two-dimensional unsteady separation. A condition which characterizes the onset of separation in the flow field is defined.