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Sample records for collision excitation cross

  1. TlII excitation cross-sections in collisions of slow electrons with thallium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Yu M.

    2016-09-01

    Excitation of a singly-charged thallium ion in electron collisions with thallium atoms has been studied experimentally. Seventy excitation cross sections have been measured at an exciting electron energy of 30 eV. Ten optical excitation functions (OEFs) have been recorded in the incident electron energy range of 0–200 eV. For seven TlII spectral series, the dependence of excitation cross-sections on the principal quantum numbers of upper levels has been studied. A comparison of findings with data from preceding publications is presented.

  2. Cross sections for electron capture and excitation in collisions of Liq+ (q=1, 2, 3) with atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Li, X. Y.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.

    2014-06-01

    The two-center atomic orbital close-coupling method is employed to study electron capture and excitation reactions in collisions of Liq+ (q = 1-3) ions with ground state atomic hydrogen in the ion energy range from 0.1 keV/u to 300 keV/u, where u is the atomic mass unit. The interaction of the active electron with the projectile ions (Li+, Li2+) is represented by a model potential. Total and state-selective cross sections for charge transfer and excitation processes are calculated and compared with data from other sources when available.

  3. Absolute angle-differential vibrational excitation cross sections for electron collisions with diacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.; May, O.; Fedor, J.; Ibanescu, B. C.; Andric, L.

    2011-05-15

    Absolute vibrational excitation cross sections were measured for diacetylene (1,3-butadiyne). The selectivity of vibrational excitation reveals detailed information about the shape resonances. Excitation of the C{identical_to}C stretch and of double quanta of the C-H bend vibrations reveals a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub u} resonance at 1 eV (autodetachment width {approx}30 meV) and a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub g} resonance at 6.2 eV (autodetachment width 1-2 eV). There is a strong preference for excitation of even quanta of the bending vibration. Excitation of the C-H stretch vibration reveals {sigma}* resonances at 4.3, 6.8, and 9.8 eV, with autodetachment widths of {approx}2 eV. Detailed information about resonances permits conclusions about the mechanism of the dissociative electron attachment.

  4. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P.M.Y.

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V{yields}T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V{yields}T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH{sub 3} production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam.

  5. Excitation cross sections in low-energy hydrogen-helium collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Andrey K.

    2015-06-01

    Quantum chemical results for the lowest four potentials of the HeH molecule and the corresponding rotational and radial nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements are reported. Close-coupling calculations of the integral cross sections for the excitation processes H (1 s )+He→H (2 s ,2 p )+He are performed on this basis. The calculated cross sections are in a reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Rotational excitation of AlCl induced by its collision with helium: cross sections and collisional rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamboundom, Mama; Tchakoua, Théophile; Nsangou, Mama

    2016-04-01

    In this work, inelastic rotational collision of AlCl with helium was studied. The CCSD(T) method was used for the computation of an accurate two dimensional potential energy surface (PES). In the calculation of the PES, Al-Cl bond was frozen at the experimental value 4.02678 a0. The aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets of Dunning was used throughout the computational process. This basis was completed with a set of 3s3p2d2f1g bond functions placed at mid-distance between the center of mass of AlCl and He atom for a better description of the van der Waals interaction energy. The PES of AlCl-He was found to have a global minimum at (R=8.65 a0, θ=0 degree), a local minimum at (R=7.45 a0, θ=82 degree) and a saddle point at (R=7.9 a0, θ=56 degree). The depths of the minima were 20.2 cm^{-1} and 19.8 cm^{-1} respectively for θ=0 and 84 degrees. The height of the saddle point with respect to the global minimum was 1.3 cm^{-1}. The PES, the result of an analytical fit, was expanded in terms of Legendre polynomials, then used for the evaluation of state-to-state rotational integral cross sections for the collision of AlCl with He in the close coupling approach. The collisional cross sections for the transitions occurring among the 17 first rotational levels of AlCl were calculated for kinetic energies up to 4000 cm^{-1}. Collisional rate coefficients between these rotational levels were computed for low and moderate kinetic temperatures ranging from 30 to 500 K. A propensity rule that favors odd Δ j transitions was found.

  7. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Itikawa, Yukikazu; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  8. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Carbon Monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2015-03-15

    Cross section data are collected and reviewed for electron collisions with carbon monoxide. Collision processes included are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational and electronic states, ionization, and dissociation. For each process, recommended values of the cross sections are presented, when possible. The literature has been surveyed through to the end of 2013.

  9. Electric quadrupole excitations in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Calculations are presented for electric quadrupole excitations in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The theoretical results are compared to an extensive data set and it is found that electric quadrupole effects provide substantial corrections to cross sections, especially for heavier nuclei.

  10. Temperature Dependence of Electron Drift Velocity and Electron Collision Cross Section Sets for Ground State and Vibrationally Excited State of the CO2 Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Nakamura, Y.

    1998-10-01

    The electron drift velocity in carbon dioxide was calculated at gas temperatures ranging from 193 to 573 K and at E/N values up to 100 Td, assuming that the gas was a mixture of ground state and vibrationally excited molecules and that the mix-ratio was determined by the gas temperature. The elastic momentum cross sections for the ground and the vibrationally excited molecules used in the present calculation were based on the compilation of Hayashi (1990) and recent experiments of Nakamura (1995) and Strakeljahn (1998). We also assumed that all other inelastic cross sections for the ground and the vibrationally excited molecules were the same (Schulz 1969, Srivastava 1983). The calculated electron drift velocity showed marked temperature dependence which agreed fairly well with the measurement of Elford (1980).

  11. Quenching of Excited Na due to He Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. Y.; Stancil, P. C.; Liebermann, H. P.; Funke, P.; Buenker, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    The quenching and elastic scattering of excited Sodium by collisions with Helium have been investigated for energies between 10(exp -13) eV and 10 eV. With the ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial and rotational couplings obtained from multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction approach, we carried out scattering calculations by the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling method. Cross sections for quenching reactions and elastic collisions are presented. Quenching and elastic collisional rate coefficients as a function of temperature between 1 micro-K and 10,000 K are also obtained. The results are relevant to modeling non-LTE effects on Na D absorption lines in extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs.

  12. Fluctuations, Saturation, and Diffractive Excitation in High Energy Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Flensburg, Christoffer

    2011-07-15

    Diffractive excitation is usually described by the Good-Walker formalism for low masses, and by the triple-Regge formalism for high masses. In the Good-Walker formalism the cross section is determined by the fluctuations in the interaction. By taking the fluctuations in the BFKL ladder into account, it is possible to describe both low and high mass excitation in the Good-Walker formalism. In high energy pp collisions the fluctuations are strongly suppressed by saturation, which implies that pomeron exchange does not factorise between DIS and pp collisions. The Dipole Cascade Model reproduces the expected triple-Regge form for the bare pomeron, and the triple-pomeron coupling is estimated.

  13. Quenching of highly rotationally excited HCl in collisions with He

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Benhui; Stancil, P. C. E-mail: stancil@physast.uga.edu

    2014-03-10

    We report rotational quenching cross sections and rate coefficients of HCl due to collisions with He. The close-coupling method and the coupled-states approximation are applied in quantum-mechanical scattering calculations of state-to-state cross sections for HCl with initial rotational levels up to j = 20 for kinetic energies from 10{sup –5} to 15,000 cm{sup –1}. State-to-state rate coefficients for temperatures between 0.1 and 3000 K are also presented. Comparison of the present rate coefficients with previous results reported in the literature for lowly excited rotational levels shows reasonable agreement. Small differences are attributed to the differences in the interaction potential energy surfaces. The uncertainty in the computed cross sections and rate coefficients is estimated by varying the potential well depth. Applications of current results to astrophysical systems are also briefly discussed.

  14. Dissociative Excitation of Even States of Tin Atoms in e-SnCl2 Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Yu. M.

    2001-12-01

    Dissociative excitation of even levels of tin atoms in collisions of slow electrons with tin dichloride molecules is studied experimentally. The levels studied belong to the configurations 5 s 25 pnp 1, 3 L ( n=6, 7; L= S, P, D) and 5 s 25 p 4 f. Absolute values of cross sections for dissociative excitation at the electron energy of 100 eV are 1.05-2.56 times greater than cross sections for excitation in electron-atom collisions at the energy of 50 eV.

  15. Electron impact collision strengths for excitation of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.H. . Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics)

    1990-08-20

    The principle task given us by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform under Subcontract 6181405 was to develop a method and corresponding computer programs to make very rapid, yet accurate, fully relativistic and quasirelativistic calculations of cross sections or collision strengths for electron impact excitation of highly charged ions with any value for the nuclear charge number Z. Also while this major code development was being done we were asked to calculate cross sections of interest using our previous rapid, more approximate codes, which used hydrogenic basis functions and screening constants with both the electron-electron Coulomb interaction and relativistic interactions included by perturbation theory. We were also asked to determine the branching ratio for ionization to various final states in complex cases, where two or more states corresponding to the final configuration of the ion were possible.

  16. Rotational excitation of CO by collisions with He, H, and H2 under conditions in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.; Thaddeus, P.

    1976-01-01

    Cross sections for rotational excitation of small molecules by low-energy collisions with helium and hydrogen can currently be obtained via accurate numerical solution of the quantum equations that describe both intermolecular forces and collision dynamics. The relevant methods are discussed in some detail and applied to compute excitation rates for carbon monoxide. These calculations also predict collision-induced spectral pressure-broadening constants which are in excellent agreement with available experimental data.

  17. Searches for excited fermions in /ep collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; de Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Brock, I.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Brook, N. H.; Cole, J. E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Wing, M.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Jeoung, H. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Ma, K. J.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Mindur, B.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kotański, A.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Crittenden, J.; Dannheim, D.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hebbel, K.; Hillert, S.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labes, H.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Martens, J.; Martínez, M.; Milite, M.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Petrucci, M. C.; Polini, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Stonjek, S.; Surrow, B.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, R.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Coldewey, C.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Glasman, C.; Lee, S. W.; Lupi, A.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Bodmann, B.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Yildirim, A.; Ziegler, A.; Carli, T.; Garfagnini, A.; Gialas, I.; Lohrmann, E.; Foudas, C.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Park, S. K.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; García, G.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Bertolin, A.; Corriveau, F.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; St-Laurent, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Maddox, E.; Schagen, S.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Große-Knetter, J.; Matsushita, T.; Rigby, M.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Adamczyk, L.; Iannotti, L.; Oh, B. Y.; Saull, P. R. B.; Toothacker, W. S.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Heusch, C.; Park, I. H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kohno, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Hayes, M. E.; Heaphy, E. A.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Lightwood, M. S.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Smalska, B.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Sztuk, J.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L. K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Breitweg, J.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Kçira, D.; Lammers, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Straub, P. B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Frisken, W. R.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.

    2002-11-01

    Searches in /ep collisions for heavy excited fermions have been performed with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Excited states of electrons and quarks have been searched for in e+p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 300 GeV using an integrated luminosity of 47.7 pb-1. Excited electrons have been sought via the decays e*-->eγ, e*-->eZ and e*-->νW. Excited quarks have been sought via the decays q*-->qγ and q*-->qW. A search for excited neutrinos decaying via ν*-->νγ, ν*-->νZ and ν*-->eW is presented using e-p collisions at 318 GeV centre-of-mass energy, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 16.7 pb-1. No evidence for any excited fermion is found, and limits on the characteristic couplings are derived for masses /<~250 GeV.

  18. On The Effect of Electron Collisions in the Excitation of Cometary HCN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Amy J.; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Schloerb, F. Peter; Combi, Michael R.; Hansen, Kenneth C.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2004-01-01

    The electron-HCN collision rate for the excitation of rotational transitions of the HCN molecule is evaluated in comets C/1995 01 (Hale-Bopp) and C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake). Based on theoretical models of the cometary atmosphere, we show that collisions with electrons can provide a significant excitation mechanism for rotational transitions in the HCN molecule. Computed values of the cross section sigma(sub e-HCN) can be as high as 1.3 x cm2, more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than the commonly assumed HCN-H2O cross section. For the ground rotational transitions of HCN, the electron-HCN collision rate is found to exceed the HCN-H2O collision rate at distances greater than 3000 km from the cometary nucleus of Hale-Bopp and 1000 km from that of Hyakutake. Collisional excitation processes dominate over radiative excitation processes up to a distance of 160,000 km from the cometary nucleus of Hale-Bopp and 50,000 km from that of Hyakutake. Excitation models that neglect electron collisions can underestimate the HCN gas production rates by as much as a factor of 2.

  19. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO{sub 2} molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, A. Faginas-Lago, N.; Pacifici, L.; Grossi, G.

    2015-07-21

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO{sub 2} characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO{sub 2} + CO{sub 2} collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO{sub 2} structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7.

  20. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO2 molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, A.; Faginas-Lago, N.; Pacifici, L.; Grossi, G.

    2015-07-01

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO2 characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO2 + CO2 collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO2 structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7.

  1. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO2 molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, A; Faginas-Lago, N; Pacifici, L; Grossi, G

    2015-07-21

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO2 characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO2 + CO2 collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO2 structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7. PMID:26203027

  2. Electron impact excitation cross sections for carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganas, P. S.

    1981-04-01

    A realistic analytic atomic independent particle model is used to generate wave functions for the valence and excited states of carbon. Using these wave functions in conjunction with the Born approximation and the Russell-Saunders LS-coupling scheme, we calculate generalized oscillator strengths and integrated cross sections for various excitations from the 2p 2( 3P O) valence state.

  3. The effect of electron collisions on rotational excitation of cometary water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Xingfa; Mumma, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The e-H2O collisional rate for exciting rotational transitions in cometary water is evaluated for conditions found in Comet Halley. The e-H2O collisional rate exceeds that for excitation by neutral-neutral collisions at distances exceeding 3000 km from the cometary nucleus, in the case of the O sub 00 yields 1 sub 11 transition. The estimates are based on theoretical and experimental studies of e-H2O collisions, on ion and electron parameters acquired in-situ by instruments on the Giotto and Vega spacecraft, and on results obtained from models of the cometary ionosphere. The contribution of electron collisions may explain the need for large water-water cross-sections in models which neglect the effect of electrons. The importance of electron collisions is enhanced for populations of water molecules in regions where their rotational lines are optically thick.

  4. Quantum Scattering Study of Ro-Vibrational Excitations in N+N(sub 2) Collisions under Re-entry Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Stallcop, James R.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Huo, Winifred M.

    2004-01-01

    A three-dimensional time-dependent quantum dynamics approach using a recently developed ab initio potential energy surface is applied to study ro-vibrational excitation in N+N2 exchange scattering for collision energies in the range 2.1- 3.2 eV. State-to-state integral exchange cross sections are examined to determine the distribution of excited rotational states of N(sub 2). The results demonstrate that highly-excited rotational states are produced by exchange scattering and furthermore, that the maximum value of (Delta)j increases rapidly with increasing collision energies. Integral exchange cross sections and exchange rate constants for excitation to the lower (upsilon = 0-3) vibrational energy levels are presented as a function of the collision energy. Excited-vibrational-state distributions for temperatures at 2,000 K and 10,000 K are included.

  5. Loss and excitation in single collisions of highly-stripped heavy ions with atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, W.G.; Bernstein, E.M.; Clark, M.W.; Oglesby, C.S.; Tanis, J.A.; Berkner, K.H.; Gohil, P.; Schlachter, A.S.; Stearns, J.W.; Johnson, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Cross sections for projectile loss and excitation (LE) in single collisions of heavy ions with atoms have been measured for 15 to 460 MeV S, Ar, Ca, and V ions, with charge states varying from 12+ to 21+ in H/sub 2/, He, Ne, and Ar gas targets. The results indicate that K x-ray production takes place through excitation rather than loss of a 1s electron. An independent electron model appears to provide a reasonable description of LE for Li-like projectiles. However, there are also indications that loss and excitation events are correlated. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Electron excitation collision strengths for positive atomic ions: a collection of theoretical data

    SciTech Connect

    Merts, A.L.; Mann, J.B.; Robb, W.D.; Magee, N.H. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains data on theoretical and experimental cross sections for electron impact excitation of positive atomic ions. It is an updated and corrected version of a preliminary manuscript which was used during an Atomic Data Workshop on Electron Excitation of Ions held at Los Alamos in November 1978. The current status of quantitative knowledge of collisional excitation collision strengths is shown for highly stripped ions where configuration mixing, relativistic and resonance effects may be important. The results show a reasonably satisfactory state for first-row isoelectronic ions and indicate that a considerable amount of work remains to be done for second-row and heavier ions.

  7. Searches for excited fermions in ep collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Brock, I.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Brook, N. H.; Cole, J. E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Wing, M.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Jeoung, H. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Ma, K. J.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Mindur, B.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kotański, A.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Crittenden, J.; Dannheim, D.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hebbel, K.; Hillert, S.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labes, H.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Martens, J.; Martínez, M.; Milite, M.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Petrucci, M. C.; Polini, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Stonjek, S.; Surrow, B.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, R.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Coldewey, C.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Glasman, C.; Lee, S. W.; Lupi, A.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Bodmann, B.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Yildirim, A.; Ziegler, A.; Carli, T.; Garfagnini, A.; Gialas, I.; Lohrmann, E.; Foudas, C.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Park, S. K.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; García, G.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Bertolin, A.; Corriveau, F.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; St-Laurent, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Maddox, E.; Schagen, S.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Große-Knetter, J.; Matsushita, T.; Rigby, M.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Adamczyk, L.; Iannotti, L.; Oh, B. Y.; Saull, P. R. B.; Toothacker, W. S.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Heusch, C.; Park, I. H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kohno, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Hayes, M. E.; Heaphy, E. A.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Lightwood, M. S.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Smalska, B.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Sztuk, J.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L. K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Breitweg, J.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Kçira, D.; Lammers, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Straub, P. B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Frisken, W. R.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2002-11-01

    Searches in ep collisions for heavy excited fermions have been performed with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Excited states of electrons and quarks have been searched for in e+p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 300 GeV using an integrated luminosity of 47.7 pb-1. Excited electrons have been sought via the decays e∗→eγ, e∗→eZ and e∗→νW. Excited quarks have been sought via the decays q∗→qγ and q∗→qW. A search for excited neutrinos decaying via ν∗→νγ, ν∗→νZ and ν∗→eW is presented using e-p collisions at 318 GeV centre-of-mass energy, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 16.7 pb-1. No evidence for any excited fermion is found, and limits on the characteristic couplings are derived for masses ≲250 GeV.

  8. Excitation into high-lying states in Li3+–H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibaaz, Aicha; Esteban Hernandez, Rosa; Dubois, Alain; Sisourat, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the excitation of atomic hydrogen by fully-stripped lithium ion impact in the intermediate energy range using a new and efficient implementation of the two-center atomic orbital approach with Gaussian-type orbitals. Partial and state-selective cross sections have been obtained for excitation up to H(6 h). A careful investigation of the convergence of the results with respect to the basis set has been performed which allows us to estimate the accuracy of the cross sections. Furthermore, our calculations provide an explanation for the discrepancies between previous calculations on this collision system.

  9. Electronic excitation of ground state atoms by collision with heavy gas particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1993-01-01

    point where the initial and final potentials cross, or at least come very close. Therefore, this mechanism would be applicable to the case where a gas is initially at very low temperature suddenly subjected to high energy heavy particle bombardment. This situation would model the measurement of excitation cross section by molecular beam techniques, for example. The purpose is to report values of cross sections and rate coefficients for collision excitation of ground state atoms estimated with the Landau-Zener transition theory and to compare results with measurement of excitation cross sections for a beam of Hydrogen atoms impacting Argon atom targets. Some very dubious approximations are used, and the comparison with measurement is found less than ideal, but results are at least consistent within order of magnitude. The same model is then applied to the case of N-N atom collisions, even though the approximations then become even more doubtful. Still the rate coefficients obtained are at least plausible in both magnitude and functional form, and as far as I am aware these are the only estimates available for such rate coefficients.

  10. Resonance charge exchange between excited states in slow proton-hydrogen collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Kato, Daiji

    2010-09-15

    The theory of resonance charge exchange in slow collisions of a proton with a hydrogen atom in the excited state is developed. It extends the Firsov-Demkov theory of resonance charge exchange to the case of degenerate initial and final states. The theory is illustrated by semiclassical and quantum calculations of charge exchange cross sections between states with n=2 in parabolic and spherical coordinates. The results are compared with existing close-coupling calculations.

  11. Experimental study of crossing angle collision

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.; Rice, D.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Tigner, M.

    1993-05-01

    The non-linear coupling due to the beam-beam interaction with crossing angle has been studied. The major effect of a small ({approximately}12mrad) crossing angle is to excite 5Q{sub x}{plus_minus}Q{sub s}=integer coupling resonance family on large amplitude particles, which results in bad lifetime. On the CESR, a small crossing angle ({approximately}2.4mr) was created at the IP and a reasonable beam-beam tune-shift was achieved. The decay rate of the beam is measured as a function of horizontal tune with and without crossing angle. The theoretical analysis, simulation and experimental measurements have a good agreement. The resonance strength as a function of crossing angle is also measured.

  12. Modeling of inelastic collisions in a multifluid plasma: Excitation and deexcitation

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Hai P.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2015-09-15

    We describe here a model for inelastic collisions for electronic excitation and deexcitation processes in a general, multifluid plasma. The model is derived from kinetic theory, and applicable to any mixture and mass ratio. The principle of detailed balance is strictly enforced, and the model is consistent with all asymptotic limits. The results are verified with direct Monte Carlo calculations, and various numerical tests are conducted for the case of an electron-hydrogen two-fluid system, using a generic, semi-classical model of collision cross sections. We find that in some cases, the contribution of inelastic collisions to the momentum and thermal resistance coefficients is not negligible, in contrast to the assumptions of current multifluid models. This fundamental model is also applied to ionization and recombination processes, the studies on which are currently underway.

  13. Cross Sections for Electron Impact Excitation of Ions Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, Swaraj S.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research grant was to calculate accurate oscillator strengths and electron collisional excitation strengths for inelastic transitions in atomic species of relevance to Planetary Atmospheres. Large scale configuration-interaction atomic structure calculations have been performed to obtain oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for transitions among the fine-structure levels and R-matrix method has been used in the calculations of electron-ion collision cross sections of C II, S I, S II, S III, and Ar II. A number of strong features due to ions of sulfur have been detected in the spectra of Jupiter satellite Io. The electron excitation cross sections for the C II and S II transitions are studied in collaboration with the experimental atomic physics group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. There is excellent agreement between experiment and theory which provide an accurate and broad-base test of the ability of theoretical methods used in the calculation of atomic processes. Specifically, research problems have been investigated for: electron impact excitation cross sections of C II: electron impact excitation cross sections of S III; energy levels and oscillator strengths for transitions in S III; collision strengths for electron collisional excitation of S II; electron impact excitation of inelastic transitions in Ar II; oscillator strengths of fine-structure transitions in neutral sulfur; cross sections for inelastic scattering of electrons from atomic nitrogen; and excitation of atomic ions by electron impact.

  14. Reactive Collisions in Crossed Molecular Beams

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Herschbach, D. R.

    1962-02-01

    The distribution of velocity vectors of reaction products is discussed with emphasis on the restrictions imposed by the conservation laws. The recoil velocity that carries the products away from the center of mass shows how the energy of reaction is divided between internal excitation and translation. Similarly, the angular distributions, as viewed from the center of mass, reflect the partitioning of the total angular momentum between angular momenta of individual molecules and orbital angular momentum associated with their relative motion. Crossed-beam studies of several reactions of the type M + RI yields R + MI are described, where M = K, Rb, Cs, and R = CH{sub 3}, C{sub 3}H{sub 5}, etc. The results show that most of the energy of reaction goes into internal excitation of the products and that the angular distribution is quite anisotropic, with most of the MI recoiling backward (and R forward) with respect to the incoming K beam. (auth)

  15. Collision cross sections for structural proteomics.

    PubMed

    Marklund, Erik G; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Robinson, Carol V; Baldwin, Andrew J; Benesch, Justin L P

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) allows the structural interrogation of biomolecules by reporting their collision cross sections (CCSs). The major bottleneck for exploiting IM-MS in structural proteomics lies in the lack of speed at which structures and models can be related to experimental data. Here we present IMPACT (Ion Mobility Projection Approximation Calculation Tool), which overcomes these twin challenges, providing accurate CCSs up to 10(6) times faster than alternative methods. This allows us to assess the CCS space presented by the entire structural proteome, interrogate ensembles of protein conformers, and monitor molecular dynamics trajectories. Our data demonstrate that the CCS is a highly informative parameter and that IM-MS is of considerable practical value to structural biologists. PMID:25800554

  16. Calculation of Ground State Rotational Populations for Kinetic Gas Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules including Electron-Impact Excitation and Wall Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Farley

    2010-08-19

    A model has been developed to calculate the ground-state rotational populations of homonuclear diatomic molecules in kinetic gases, including the effects of electron-impact excitation, wall collisions, and gas feed rate. The equations are exact within the accuracy of the cross sections used and of the assumed equilibrating effect of wall collisions. It is found that the inflow of feed gas and equilibrating wall collisions can significantly affect the rotational distribution in competition with non-equilibrating electron-impact effects. The resulting steady-state rotational distributions are generally Boltzmann for N≥3, with a rotational temperature between the wall and feed gas temperatures. The N=0,1,2 rotational level populations depend sensitively on the relative rates of electron-impact excitation versus wall collision and gas feed rates.

  17. Excitation and Ionization in H(1s)-H(1s) Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Merle E.; Ritchie, A. Burke

    1999-07-15

    Hydrogen atom - hydrogen atom scattering is a prototype for many of the fundamental principles of atomic collisions. In this work we present an approximation to the H+H system for scattering in the intermediate energy regime of 1 to 100 keV. The approximation ignores electron exchange and two-electron excitation by assuming that one of the atoms is frozen in the 1s state. We allow for the evolution of the active electron by numerically solving the 3D Schroedinger equation. The results capture many features of the problem and are in harmony with recent theoretical studies. Excitation and ionization cross sections are computed and compared to other theory and experiment. New insight into the mechanism of excitation and ionization is inferred from the solutions.

  18. L-shell resonant transfer excitation in Cuq++H2 (q=18,19) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závodszky, P. A.; Wroblewski, J. A.; Ferguson, S. M.; Gorczyca, T. W.; Houck, J. H.; Woitke, O.; Tanis, J. A.; Badnell, N. R.

    1997-09-01

    Resonant transfer excitation (RTE) involving L-1Mn (n>=M) resonant states has been investigated for Na-like and Ne-like Cuq++H2 collisions (q=18 and 19). The M- to L-shell x-ray production cross sections (RTEX's) of these resonance states are studied by x-ray projectile ion coincidences. Previous measurements of L-shell RTEX for Nbq+ (q=28-31) ions showed the measured cross sections to be nearly a factor of 2 smaller than the calculated ones. For Cu18+ the present results show the position and width of the measured RTEX maximum cross section to be in agreement with the calculations; however, the measured absolute cross sections are about 60% higher than the predicted ones. In the case of Ne-like Cu19+ projectiles, the metastable component in the beam made it impossible to observe RTEX's.

  19. Rotational excitation of symmetric top molecules by collisions with atoms. II - Infinite order sudden approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.

    1979-01-01

    The infinite order sudden (IOS) approximation is extended to rotational excitation of symmetric tops by collisions with atoms. After development of a formalism for 'primitive' or 'one-ended' tops, proper parity-adapted linear combinations describing real rotors are considered and modifications needed for asymmetric rigid rotors are noted. The generalized spectroscopic relaxation cross sections are discussed. IOS calculations for NH3-He and H2CO-He are performed and compared with more accurate calculations, and the IOS approximation is found to provide a reasonably accurate description.

  20. Rotational excitation of linear molecules by collisions with atoms - Comparison of classical and quantum methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, S.; Green, S.

    1977-01-01

    Exact quantum results for the rotational excitation of rigid linear molecules by collisions with atoms are compared with classical trajectory results. The systems studied are CO-He, CS-H2, OCS-H2, HCl-He, and HCl-Ar at collision energies up to 500/cm. Total cross sections and state to state rate constants are compared. The classical results are found to be in good agreement with the quantum results on the average. Differences arising from the existence of purely quantum effects are clearly evident, but consistent and predictable. Two methods of extracting state selective information from moments of the classical distribution are examined and found to be less reliable than the usual histogram method. In conjunction with previous comparisons of classical and quantum results these calculations provide a useful measure of the limitations and reliability of classical trajectories.

  1. Influence of Electron Molecule Resonant Vibrational Collisions over the Symmetric Mode and Direct Excitation-Dissociation Cross Sections of CO2 on the Electron Energy Distribution Function and Dissociation Mechanisms in Cold Pure CO2 Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Pietanza, L D; Colonna, G; Laporta, V; Celiberto, R; D'Ammando, G; Laricchiuta, A; Capitelli, M

    2016-05-01

    A new set of electron-vibrational (e-V) processes linking the first 10 vibrational levels of the symmetric mode of CO2 is derived by using a decoupled vibrational model and inserted in the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function (eedf). The new eedf and dissociation rates are in satisfactory agreement with the corresponding ones obtained by using the e-V cross sections reported in the database of Hake and Phelps (H-P). Large differences are, on the contrary, found when the experimental dissociation cross sections of Cosby and Helm are inserted in the Boltzman equation. Comparison of the corresponding rates with those obtained by using the low-energy threshold energy, reported in the H-P database, shows differences up to orders of magnitude, which decrease with the increasing of the reduced electric field. In all cases, we show the importance of superelastic vibrational collisions in affecting eedf and dissociation rates either in the direct electron impact mechanism or in the pure vibrational mechanism. PMID:27064438

  2. Low-energy electron elastic scattering cross sections for excited Au and Pt atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfli, Zineb; Eure, Amanda R.; Msezane, Alfred Z.; Sokolovski, Dmitri

    2010-05-01

    Electron elastic total cross sections (TCSs) and differential cross sections (DCSs) in both impact energy and scattering angle for the excited Au and Pt atoms are calculated in the electron impact energy range 0 ⩽ E ⩽ 4.0 eV. The cross sections are found to be characterized by very sharp long-lived resonances whose positions are identified with the binding energies of the excited anions formed during the collisions. The recent novel Regge-pole methodology wherein is embedded through the Mulholland formula the electron-electron correlations is used together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential incorporating the crucial core-polarization interaction for the calculations of the TCSs. The DCSs are evaluated using a partial wave expansion. The Ramsauer-Townsend minima, the shape resonances and the binding energies of the excited Au - and Pt - anions are extracted from the cross sections, while the critical minima are determined from the DCSs.

  3. Ionization and excitation in collisions between antiprotons and H(1s) atoms studied with Sturmian bases

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Thomas G.

    2011-02-15

    Coupled two-center as well as one-center Sturmian cross sections have been determined for ionization and excitation in p-bar-H(1s) collisions at p-bar energies from 1 to 16 000 keV, following the author's recent work for p-H(1s) collisions [Phys. Rev. A 80, 032701 (2009)]. Basis convergence is studied in detail. Results for ionization and excitation are compared to other coupled-state results and to numerical results, as well as limited experimental results for ionization only. Except for the large, two-center coupled-Gaussian-pseudostate calculation of Toshima for ionization only [Phys. Rev. A 64, 024701 (2001)], previous calculations employed one-center bases, including a one-center Sturmian calculation by Igarashi et al. [Phys. Rev. A 61, 062712 (2000)]. A strong contrast with p-H collisions is confirmed at intermediate energies, while at high energies the extent of agreement is revealed between coupled-state results for the two collisional systems, as well as with first Born results.

  4. Angular momentum and orientation effects in excitation-ionization collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. L.; Esposito, T. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present theoretical fully differential cross sections (FDCS) for electron-impact excitation-ionization of helium in which the final state He+ ion is oriented in a particular direction. Specifically, we study the process for He+ ions in the 2p0 state. Using our 4-body distorted wave model, we show a strong dependence of the FDCS on the ion’s orientation and trace some unexpected structures in the FDCS to the L = 2 term in the partial wave expansion for the ionized electron. A comparison is drawn to the ionization of oriented Mg (3p0) atoms, and unlike that process, we find that for excitation-ionization angular momentum must be transferred from either the projectile or the target atom.

  5. Determination of Electron Collision Cross Sections Set for Tetramethysilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordage, Marie-Claude

    2007-12-01

    A swarm analysis technique based on the solution of the Boltzmann equation is used to derive low energy electron collision cross sections for tetramethylsilane (TMS). The calculated swarm parameters with this first available cross sections set is consistent with measured values of the swarm parameters. Calculations of transport parameters in mixtures of TMS with argon are also presented.

  6. Electron Attachment in Low-Energy Electron Elastic Collisions with Au and Pt Atoms: Identification of Excited Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Eure, A.; Felfli, Z.; Sokolovski, D.

    2009-11-01

    The recent Regge-pole methodology has been benchmarked [1] on the accurately measured binding energies of the excited Ge= and Sn= anions [2] through the binding energies (BEs) extracted from the Regge-pole calculated elastic total cross sections (TCSs). Here the methodology is applied together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential that incorporates the vital core polarization interaction to investigate the possibility of forming excited Au= and Pt= anions in low-energy electron elastic collisions with Au and Pt atoms. From the positions of the characteristic extremely narrow resonances in the total cross sections, we extract the binding energies of the excited Au= and Pt= anions formed as Regge resonances during the collisions. The angular life of the complexes thus formed is used to differentiate the stable excited bound states of the anions from the shape resonances [3]. The BEs for the excited Au= and Pt= anions are found to be 0.475eVand 0.543eV, respectively, challenging both theory and experiment to verify. [1] A. Msezane et al, Phys. Rev. A, Submitted (2009) [2] M. Scheer et al, Phys. Rev. A 58, 2844 (1998) [3] Z. Felfli et al, Phys. Rev. A 79, 012714 (2009)

  7. Dissociation of internally excited UF 6- ions in collision with argon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, J. A. D.

    1987-06-01

    Uranium hexafluoride negative ions (UF 6-) of controlled average internal and kinetic energy were collided with argon. A qualitative change was observed in the dependence of ionic fragmentation on internal excitation prior to collision, as the laboratory collision energy was increased above 150 eV.

  8. Excited-state positronium formation in positron–hydrogen collisions under weakly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2016-06-01

    The effect of screening of weakly coupled plasma on positronium (Ps) formation in excited states in the scattering of a positron from the ground state of a hydrogen atom has been investigated using a distorted wave theory which includes screened dipole polarization potential. The effect of external plasma has been incorporated by using the Debye–Hückel screening model of the interacting charge particles. Variationally determined simple hydrogenic wave functions have been used to obtain the distorted wave scattering amplitude in a closed form. Effects of plasma screening on the differential and total cross sections have been studied in detail in the energy range 20–300 eV of incident positron. For the free atomic case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for Ps formation in highly excited states in positron–hydrogen collisions under weakly coupled plasma is reported first time in the literature.

  9. Calculation of total electron excitation cross-sections and partial electron ionization cross-sections for the elements. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    Computer programs were used to calculate the total electron excitation cross-section for atoms and the partial ionization cross-section. The approximations to the scattering amplitude used are as follows: (1) Born, Bethe, and Modified Bethe for non-exchange excitation; (2) Ochkur for exchange excitation; and (3) Coulomb-Born of non-exchange ionization. The amplitudes are related to the differential cross-sections which are integrated to give the total excitation (or partial ionization) cross-section for the collision. The atomic wave functions used are Hartree-Fock-Slater functions for bound states and the coulomb wave function for the continuum. The programs are presented and the results are examined.

  10. Rydberg transitions for positron-hydrogen collisions: asymptotic cross section and scaling law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of 1s → nlm excitations of hydrogen, for arbitrary n, l, m, by positron impact has been investigated using a distorted-wave theory in the momentum space. It has been possible to obtain the distorted-wave scattering amplitude in a closed analytical form. A detailed study has been made on the differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20-300 eV of incident positron. A simple law has been presented for obtaining asymptotic cross sections for excitation into different angular momentum states. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for 1s → nlm inelastic positron-hydrogen collisions using distorted-wave theory is the first reported in the literature.

  11. L X-ray emission from fast highly charged Cu ions in collisions with gaseous targets: Saturation effect in excitation and transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Misra, D.; Kadhane, U.; Kelkar, A. H.; Dhal, B. B.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2006-11-01

    We have measured L X-ray production cross sections for highly charged 156 MeV Be-like Cu ions in collisions with gaseous targets of H 2, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe. In the present collision systems, measured projectile L X-ray intensity is contributed by the excitation as well as electron transfer processes. The projectile L X-ray production cross sections are found to increase initially and then saturate with increasing target atomic number. The charge state dependence of projectile L X-ray production cross sections have been measured with Kr target.

  12. Electron-impact excitation and ionization cross sections for ground state and excited helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ralchenko, Yu. Janev, R.K.; Kato, T.; Fursa, D.V.; Bray, I.; Heer, F.J. de

    2008-07-15

    Comprehensive and critically assessed cross sections for the electron-impact excitation and ionization of ground state and excited helium atoms are presented. All states (atomic terms) with n{<=}4 are treated individually, while the states with n{>=}5 are considered degenerate. For the processes involving transitions to and from n{>=}5 levels, suitable cross section scaling relations are presented. For a large number of transitions, from both ground and excited states, convergent close coupling calculations were performed to achieve a high accuracy of the data. The evaluated/recommended cross section data are presented by analytic fit functions, which preserve the correct asymptotic behavior of the cross sections. The cross sections are also displayed in graphical form.

  13. Differential double capture cross sections in p+He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, M.; Brand, J. A.; Vajnai, T.

    2007-02-15

    We have measured differential double capture cross sections for 15 to 150 keV p+He collisions. We also analyzed differential double to single capture ratios, where we find pronounced peak structures. An explanation of these structures probably requires a quantum-mechanical description of elastic scattering between the projectile and the target nucleus. Strong final-state correlations have a large effect on the magnitude of the double capture cross sections.

  14. Cross sections for 14-eV e-H{sub 2} resonant collisions: Dissociative electron attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Celiberto, R.; Janev, R. K.; Wadehra, J. M.; Laricchiuta, A.

    2009-07-15

    The dissociative electron attachment (DEA) process in electron-H{sub 2} molecule collisions, involving the {sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} excited electronic Rydberg state of molecular hydrogen ion H{sub 2}{sup -}, is investigated theoretically. The DEA cross section has been calculated within the local complex potential approximation. The convoluted cross section, which presents a peak located at the incident energy of about 14 eV, compares favorably with available experimental data.

  15. Boltzmann equation analysis of electron-molecule collision cross sections in water vapor and ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Yousfi, M.; Benabdessadok, M.D.

    1996-12-01

    Sets of electron-molecule collision cross sections for H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} have been determined from a classical technique of electron swarm parameter unfolding. This deconvolution method is based on a simplex algorithm using a powerful multiterm Boltzmann equation analysis established in the framework of the classical hydrodynamic approximation. It is well adapted for the simulation of the different classes of swarm experiments (i.e., time resolved, time of flight, and steady state experiments). The sets of collision cross sections that exist in the literature are reviewed and analyzed. Fitted sets of cross sections are determined for H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} which exhibit features characteristic of polar molecules such as high rotational excitation collision cross sections. The hydrodynamic swarm parameters (i.e., drift velocity, longitudinal and transverse diffusion coefficients, ionization and attachment coefficients) calculated from the fitted sets are in excellent agreement with the measured ones. These sets are finally used to calculate the transport and reaction coefficients needed for discharge modeling in two cases of typical gas mixtures for which experimental swarm data are very sparse or nonexistent (i.e., flue gas mixtures and gas mixtures for rf plasma surface treatment). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Ultracold collisions of O(1D) and H2: The effects of H2 vibrational excitation on the production of vibrationally and rotationally excited OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, G. B.; Balakrishnan, N.; Kendrick, Brian K.

    2013-04-01

    A quantum dynamics study of the O(1D) + H2(v = 0 - 2, j = 0) system has been carried out using the potential energy surfaces of Dobbyn and Knowles [Mol. Phys. 91, 1107 (1997), 10.1080/002689797170842]. A time-independent quantum mechanical method based on hyperspherical coordinates is adopted for the dynamics calculations. Energy dependent cross section, probability, and rate coefficients are computed for the elastic, inelastic, and reactive channels over collision energies ranging from the ultracold to thermal regimes and for total angular momentum quantum number J = 0. The effect of initial vibrational excitation of the H2 molecule on vibrational and rotational populations of the OH product is investigated as a function of the collision energy. Comparison of results for vibrational levels v = 0 - 2 of H2 demonstrates that the vibrational excitation of H2 and its non-reactive relaxation pathway play a minor role in the overall collisional outcome of O(1D) and H2. It is also found that while the state-resolved product vibrational distributions are sensitive to the initial collision energy and H2 vibrational level, the product rotational distribution depicts an inverted population that is largely insensitive to initial conditions. Rate coefficients evaluated using a J-shifting approximation show reasonable agreement with available theoretical and experimental results suggesting that the J-shifting approximation may be used to evaluate the rate coefficients for O(1D) + H2 reaction.

  17. Rovibrationally Inelastic Atom-Molecule Collision Cross Sections from a Hard Sphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashner, Jacob; Stewart, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Hard-shell models have long been used to elucidate the principal features of molecular energy transfer and exchange reaction in the A + BC system. Nevertheless, no three-dimensional hard-shell calculation of inelastic collision cross sections has been reported. This work aims to fill that void. A particular motivation comes from our experimental results, which show the importance of equatorial impacts in the vibrational excitation process. Working with the simple hard-sphere model, we incorporated secondary impacts, defined as those in which A strikes C after striking B. Such collisions are important in systems such as Li2 - X, in which vibrational energy transfer occurs principally through side impacts. We discuss the complexity this adds to the model and present fully three-dimensional cross sections for rovibrational excitation of an initially stationary molecule in the homonuclear A + B2 system, examining the cross section as a function of the masses and radii of the atoms. We show how the features in the cross section evolve as these parameters are varied and calculate the contribution of secondary (near-equatorial) impacts to the dynamics. We compare with recent measurements in our laboratory and with the results of quasiclassical trajectories.

  18. Resonant coherent excitation of Mg sup 11+ : Electronic collisions of state specified short-lived excited states in a crystal channel

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, S.; Dittner, P.F.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Krause, H.F.; Rosseel, T.M.; Vane, C.R. ); Iwata, I.; Komaki, I.; Kimura, M.; Yamazaki, Y. ); Fujimoto, F.; Honda, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogenic ions passing through axial and planar channels can be excited from n = 1 to n = 2 when the frequency of perturbation by the atoms in the crystal spaced a distance d apart comes into resonance with the spacing between eigenstates i and j {Delta}E{sub ij} = hK(v{sub i}/d) where K is a harmonic 1,2,3{hor ellipsis} of the (v{sub i}/d) frequency. The degeneracy in the n = 2 levels is removed; first by the assymetry in the crystal field and second by Stark mixing of 2s with 2p{sub x} which is caused by the wake field. Thus, the resonant frequency, and hence velocity, for excitation to 2p{sub x,y} is different than that for 2p{sub x} and they can be excited selectively. In the present work we used Mg{sup 11+}, where the n = 2 ionization cross section is small enough to permit escape of some of the excited ions from the crystal without being ionized by subsequent collisions and with the subsequent emission of radiation. Since we can excite different orientations of the ion selectively by varying the velocity we can measure the separate ionization cross sections for these states by determining the yields of totally stripped ions compared to those which emit a Ly {alpha} x-ray. A comparison of the two channels shows that the probability of escape from the crystal without ionizations is greater for ions in the 2p{sub x} state than those in the 2p{sub x,y} state. These RCE data and are presented as proof of principal for experiments which measure electron bombardment ionization cross sections for short lived excited states with specific polarization.

  19. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in collisions between protons and the ions N6+ and O7+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Coupled-state cross sections are being determined for electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in collisions between keV-energy protons and the hydrogenic ions N6+ and O7+, extending early and more recent work on the less highly charged target ions He+, Li2+, Be3+, B4+, and C5+. As in the more recent work, a basis of 60 Sturmians on each center is being used, and in a second calculation, a basis of 280 Sturmians on the target nucleus and a single 1 s function on the proton is being used. The extent to which high-energy scaling rules with target nuclear charge Z are valid is being examined further for transfer to the ground state, total transfer, and ionization, as well as for excitation and individual-state processes at intermediate energies near where the cross sections peak.

  20. Review of electron impact excitation cross sections for copper atom

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, N.W.; Hazi, A.U.

    1982-02-01

    Excitation of atomic copper by electron impact plays an important role in the copper vapor laser and accurate cross sections are needed for understanding and modeling laser performance. During the past seven years, there have been several attempts to normalize the relative elastic and inelastic cross sections measured by Trajmar and coworkers. However, each of these efforts have yielded different cross sections, and the uncertainty in the correct normalization of the data has been a source of confusion and concern for the kinetic modeling efforts. This difficulty has motivated us to review previous work on the electron impact excitation of copper atom and to perform new calculations of the inelastic cross sections using the impact parameter method. In this memorandum we review the previous attempts to normalize the experimental data and provide a critical assessment of the accuracy of the resulting cross sections. We also present new theoretical cross sections for the electron impact excitation of the /sup 2/S ..-->.. /sup 2/P/sup 0/ and /sup 2/S ..-->.. /sup 2/D transitions in copper. When the experimental cross sections are renormalized to the results of the impact parameter calculations, they are a factor of three smaller than those published in the latest paper of Trajmar et. al. At impact energies above 60 eV the excitation cross sections obtained with the impact parameter method agree well with the results of the very recent, unpublished, close-coupling calculations of Henry. This agreement suggests that the present normalization of the experimental cross sections is probably the most reliable one obtained to date.

  1. Excitation function Analysis for Charmonium Production in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Both color screening and regeneration are hot medium effects on charmonium production in heavy ion collisions. While they affect in an opposite way the charmonium yield, their competition in transverse dynamics bring sensitivity to the ratio of averaged transverse momentum square for charmonium, which thus can reveal more nature of the QCD medium created from the collisions. We make an excitation analysis based on transport approach to illustrate such a picuture.

  2. Differential collision cross-sections for atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    Differential collision cross-sections of O on N2 and other gases were measured to understand vehicle-environmental contamination effects in orbit. The following subject areas are also covered: groundbased scientific observations of rocket releases during NICARE-1; data compression study for the UVI; science priorities for UV imaging in the mid-1990's; and assessment of optimizations possible in UV imaging systems.

  3. Influence of collision energy and reagent rotation on the cross sections and product polarizations of the reaction F+ HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhi Xin; Li, Wen Liang; Qiu, Ming Hui

    2012-04-01

    Quasiclassical trajectory calculations have been carried out for the F+HCl reaction in three dimensions on a recent DHSN PES of the ground 12A' electronic state [M. P. Deskevich, M. Y. Hayes, K. Takahashi, R. T. Skodje, and D. J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224303 (2006)]. The effects of the collision energy and the reagent initial rotational excitation on the cross sections and product polarization are studied for the v = 0 and j ⩽ 10 states of HCl over a wide collision energy range. It has been found that either the collision energy or the HCl rotational excitation increase remarkably reaction cross sections. The QCT-calculated integral cross sections are in good agreement with previous QM results. A detailed study on product polarization for the title reaction is also performed. The calculated results show that the product rotational angular momentum j' is not only aligned, but also oriented along the direction perpendicular to the scattering plane. The orientation of the HF product rotational angular momentum vector j' depends very sensitively on the collision energy and also affected by the reagent rotation. The theoretical findings and especially the roles of the collision energy and initial rotational momentum on the product polarization are discussed and reasonably explained by the HLH mass combination, the property of the PES, as well as the reactive mechanism.

  4. Three-body collision contributions to recombination and collision-induced dissociation. 1: Cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, R.T.; Walker, R.B.; Kendrick, B.K.

    1998-04-10

    Atomic and molecular recombination and collision-induced dissociation (CID) reactions comprise two of the most fundamental types of chemical reactions. They are important in all gas phase chemistry; for example, about half of the 196 reactions identified as important in combustion chemistry are recombination or CID reactions. Many of the current chemical kinetics textbooks and kinetics papers treat atomic and molecular recombination and CID as occurring only via sequences of two-body collisions. Actually, there is considerable evidence from experiment and classical trajectory calculations for contributions by true three-body collisions to the recombination of atomic and diatomic radicals, and that evidence is reviewed. Then, an approximate quantum method treating both two-body and three-body collisions simultaneously and on equal footing is used to calculate cross sections for the reaction Ne{sub 2} + H {rightleftharpoons} Ne + Ne + H. The results provide clear quantum evidence that direct three-body collisions do contribute significantly to recombination and CID.

  5. Differential cross sections of positron–hydrogen collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong-Mei, Yu; Chun-Ying, Pu; Xiao-Yu, Huang; Fu-Rong, Yin; Xu-Yan, Liu; Li-Guang, Jiao; Ya-Jun, Zhou

    2016-07-01

    We make a detailed study on the angular differential cross sections of positron–hydrogen collisions by using the momentum-space coupled-channels optical (CCO) method for incident energies below the H ionization threshold. The target continuum and the positronium (Ps) formation channels are included in the coupled-channels calculations via a complex equivalent-local optical potential. The critical points, which show minima in the differential cross sections, as a function of the scattering angle and the incident energy are investigated. The resonances in the angular differential cross sections are reported for the first time in this energy range. The effects of the target continuum and the Ps formation channels on the different cross sections are discussed. Project supported by the Nanyang Normal University Science Foundation of China (Grant No. ZX2013017) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174066, 61306007, and U1304114).

  6. Theoretical study of electronic excitation, ion-pair formation, and mutual neutralization in cesium-hydrogen collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Lepetit, Bruno; Gadéa, Florent Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Inelastic cross sections for the excitation, deexcitation, ion-pair formation, and mutual neutralization processes in cesium-hydrogen collisions Cs (6 s ,6 p ,5 d ,7 s )+H and Cs ++H- are calculated by means of the recently proposed branching-probability-current method and the recently calculated accurate ab initio adiabatic potential energies. Scattering calculations are performed in the low-energy range from 0.01 eV to 1 keV. It is shown that among the endothermic processes, the highest values of the partial cross sections correspond to the ion-pair formation processes with the maximum values up to 23 Å2 . Among the exothermic processes in the low-energy range, the largest partial cross section corresponds to the mutual neutralization process into the Cs (5 d )+H final state.

  7. Electron impact excitation collision strengths for extreme ultraviolet lines of Fe VII

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O. E-mail: oleg.zatsarinny@drake.edu

    2014-06-10

    Extensive calculations have been performed for electron impact excitation collision strengths and oscillator strengths for the Fe VII extreme ultraviolet lines of astrophysical importance. The collision strengths for fine-structure transitions are calculated in the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach. The target wavefunctions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The close-coupling expansion includes 189 fine-structure levels of Fe VII belonging to terms of the ground 3p {sup 6}3d {sup 2} and excited 3p {sup 5}3d {sup 3}, 3p {sup 6}3d4l, 3p {sup 6}3d5s, and 3p {sup 6}3d5p configurations. The effective collision strengths are determined from the electron excitation collision strengths by integration over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. The effective collision strengths are provided for 17766 fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} K. Our results normally agree with the previous R-matrix frame-transformation calculations by Witthoeft and Badnell. However, there are important differences for some transitions with the previous calculations. The corrections to the previous results are mainly due to more extensive expansions for the Fe VII target states.

  8. Pion Total Cross Section in Nucleon - Nucleon Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Total cross section parameterizations for neutral and charged pion production in nucleon - nucleon collisions are compared to experimental data over the projectile momentum range from threshold to 300 GeV. Both proton - proton and proton - neutron reactions are considered. Overall excellent agreement between parameterizations and experiment is found, except for notable disagreements near threshold. In addition, the hypothesis that the neutral pion production cross section can be obtained from the average charged pion cross section is checked. The theoretical formulas presented in the paper obey this hypothesis for projectile momenta below 500 GeV. The results presented provide a test of engineering tools used to calculate the pion component of space radiation.

  9. The contribution of electron collisions to rotational excitations of cometary water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Xingfa; Mumma, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The e-H2O collisional rate for exciting rotational transitions in cometary water is evaluated for conditions found in comet Halley during the Giotto spacecraft encounter. In the case of the O(sub 00) yields 1(sub 11) rotational transition, the e-H2O collisional rate exceeds that for excitation by neutral-neutral collisions at distances exceeding 3000 km from the cometary nucleus. Thus, the rotational temperature of the water molecule in the intermediate coma may be controlled by collisions with electrons rather than with neutral collisions, and the rotational temperature retrieved from high resolution infrared spectra of water in comet Halley may reflect electron temperatures rather than neutral gas temperature in the intermediate coma.

  10. Electron collision cross sections for H{sub 2} II

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, H.; Wada, H.; Ikuta, N.

    1993-12-01

    It is now an open but serious problem that the vibrational excitation cross sections of H{sub 2} molecule theoretically obtained by Morrison and that deduced by England from the swarm data disagree to each other. The results of beam experiment, on the other hand, agree with the theoretical cross section. Examinations in order to find the cause of these discrepancies have been carried out using the FTI method. The authors obtained the cross sections which fit to the drift velocity data and the D{sub {tau}}/{mu} data independently, but it has been impossible to obtain a cross section that fits to both of them. Theoretically derived cross section for vibrational excitation by Morrison can not give swarm parameters that agree with the data of swarm experiments. These facts show that there may be a fault in the present swarm theory. A possible cause of errors is the anisotropy in scatterings which has not been strictly included to the analyses.

  11. ROTATIONAL QUENCHING OF ROTATIONALLY EXCITED H{sub 2}O IN COLLISIONS WITH He

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Benhui; Stancil, P. C.; Nagao, M.; Satomi, W.; Kimura, M. E-mail: stancil@physast.uga.edu

    2013-03-10

    Theoretical rotational quenching cross sections and rate coefficients of ortho- and para-H{sub 2}O due to collisions with He atoms are presented. The complete angular momentum close-coupling approach as well as the coupled-states approximation for the angular momentum decoupling was applied to solve the scattering problem for a large range of rotationally excited states of water. Results are obtained for quenching from initial levels 1{sub 1,0}, 2{sub 1,2}, 2{sub 2,1}, 3{sub 0,3}, 3{sub 1,2}, 3{sub 2,1}, 4{sub 1,4}, 3{sub 3,0}, and 4{sub 2,3} of ortho-H{sub 2}O and from initial levels 1{sub 1,1}, 2{sub 0,2}, 2{sub 1,1}, 2{sub 2,0}, 3{sub 1,3}, 3{sub 2,2}, 4{sub 0,4}, 4{sub 1,3}, and 3{sub 3,1} of para-H{sub 2}O for kinetic energies from 10{sup -5} to 10{sup 4} cm{sup -1}. State-to-state and total deexcitation cross sections and rate coefficients for temperatures between 0.1 and 3000 K are reported. The present state-to-state rate coefficients are found to be in good agreement with previous results obtained by Green and coworkers at high temperatures, but significant discrepancies are obtained at lower temperatures likely due to differences in the adopted potential energy surfaces. Astrophysical applications of the current rate coefficients are briefly discussed.

  12. A model for energy transfer in collisions of atoms with highly excited molecules.

    PubMed

    Houston, Paul L; Conte, Riccardo; Bowman, Joel M

    2015-05-21

    A model for energy transfer in the collision between an atom and a highly excited target molecule has been developed on the basis of classical mechanics and turning point analysis. The predictions of the model have been tested against the results of trajectory calculations for collisions of five different target molecules with argon or helium under a variety of temperatures, collision energies, and initial rotational levels. The model predicts selected moments of the joint probability distribution, P(Jf,ΔE) with an R(2) ≈ 0.90. The calculation is efficient, in most cases taking less than one CPU-hour. The model provides several insights into the energy transfer process. The joint probability distribution is strongly dependent on rotational energy transfer and conservation laws and less dependent on vibrational energy transfer. There are two mechanisms for rotational excitation, one due to motion normal to the intermolecular potential and one due to motion tangential to it and perpendicular to the line of centers. Energy transfer is found to depend strongly on the intermolecular potential and only weakly on the intramolecular potential. Highly efficient collisions are a natural consequence of the energy transfer and arise due to collisions at "sweet spots" in the space of impact parameter and molecular orientation. PMID:25907301

  13. Excitation cross-sections by electron impact for O V and O VI levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elabidi, H.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.

    2013-12-01

    Radiative atomic and electron impact excitation data for O V and O VI ions have been calculated. The radiative atomic data have been calculated with the AUTOSTRUCTURE code. Besides the one-body and the two-body fine structure interactions, the two-body non-fine structure operators of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian, namely contact spin-spin, two-body Darwin and orbit-orbit are incorporated in AUTOSTRUCTURE. The scattering problem has been treated in the Breit-Pauli distorted wave approximation using the same code AUTOSTRUCTURE. The O V atomic calculations have been extended from 46 to 92 levels. We have calculated excitation cross-sections for the O V 2s2-2s2p and the O VI 2s-2p transitions at energies near the corresponding excitation threshold regions. We have also calculated collision strengths for transitions from the most important levels for collisional excitation at electron energies up to 120 Ry for O V and up to 140 Ry for O VI. Our results have been compared with the available theoretical/experimental ones and a satisfactory agreement has been found between them.

  14. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1995-08-01

    The research program of Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom, ion-ion, and ion-molecule collisions. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-core interaction can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. Winter has focussed on intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), in which many electron states are strongly coupled during the collision and a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. Alston has concentrated on higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies), or asymmetric collision systems, for which the coupling of the projectile is weaker with, however, many more target states being coupled together so that high-order perturbation theory is essential. Several calculations by Winter and Alston are described, as set forth in the original proposal.

  15. Rotational and translational effects in collisions of electronically excited diatomic hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, David R.

    1988-01-01

    Collisional quenching and vibrational energy proceed competitively with rotational energy transfer for several excited states of the diatomic radicals OH, NH, and CH. This occurs for a wide variety of molecular collision partners. This phenomenon permits the examination of the influence of rotational motion on the collision dynamics of these theoretically tractable species. Measurements can also be made as a function of temperature, i.e., collision velocity. In OH (sup 2 sigma +), both vibrational transfer and quenching are found to decrease with an increase in rotational level, while quenching decreases with increasing temperature. This behavior indicates that for OH, anisotropic attractive forces govern the entrance channel dynamics for these collisions. The quenching of NH (sup 3 pi sub i) by many (although not all) collision partners also decreases with increasing rotational and translational energy, and NH (sup 1 pi) behaves much like OH (sup 2 sigma +). However, the quenching of CH (sup 2 delta) appears to decrease with increasing rotation but increases with increasing temperature, suggesting in this case anisotropic forces involving a barrier or repulsive wall. Such similarities and differences should furnish useful comparisons with both simple and detailed theoretical pictures of the appropriate collision dynamics.

  16. Effective collision strengths for excitation and de-excitation of nebular [O III] optical and infrared lines with κ distributed electron energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, Taha

    2015-05-01

    We present effective collision strengths for electron excitation and de-excitation of the 10 forbidden transitions between the five lowest energy levels of the astronomically abundant doubly ionized oxygen ion, O2+. The raw collision strength data were obtained from an R-matrix intermediate coupling calculation using the Breit-Pauli relativistic approximation published previously by the authors. The effective collision strengths were calculated with κ-distributed electron energies and are tabulated as a function of the electron temperature and κ.

  17. Electron-ion collisions. [Basic physics of inelastic processes of excitation, ionization, and recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    This discussion concentrates on basic physics aspects of inelastic processes of excitation, ionization, and recombination that occur during electron-ion collisions. Except for cases of illustration along isoelectronic sequences, only multicharged (at least +2) ions will be specifically discussed with some emphasis of unique physics aspects associated with ionic charge. The material presented will be discussed from a primarily experimental viewpoint with most attention to electron-ion interacting beams experiments.

  18. Rotational excitation of hydrogen molecules by collisions with hydrogen atoms. [interstellar gas energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.; Truhlar, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    Rate constants for rotational excitation of hydrogen molecules by collisions with hydrogen atoms have been obtained from quantum-mechanical calculations for kinetic temperatures between 100 and 5000 K. These calculations involve the rigid-rotator approximation, but other possible sources of error should be small. The calculations indicate that the early values of Nishimura are larger than accurate rigid-rotator values by about a factor of 20 or more.

  19. Classical sudden model for vibrational and rotational excitations in ion-molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimura, Atsushi; Nakamura, Masato

    2004-02-01

    We develop a classical model of an ideally sudden character for vibrational and rotational excitations in collisions of an atom (or an ion) with a diatomic molecule at energies as high as 10-10{sup 2} eV. The energy-loss spectra with vibrotational levels left unresolved are analytically expressed with a repulsive intermolecular potential in a hard potential limit (i.e., a vanishing range of force). It turns out to be an extension of the hard shell model for a rigid-rotor molecule developed by Beck et al. two decades ago. For a homonuclear molecule, the hard potential model generally derives spectra with double peaks at both edges, one nearly elastic and another deeply inelastic. They are analogous to rotational rainbows though their positions are affected by vibrational excitation. Classical trajectory calculations with a finite-range model potential are carried out for collision systems of H{sup +}+N{sub 2} and Li{sup +}+N{sub 2}, and systematically compared with the model. It is found that the effect of vibrational excitation manifests itself the way the model predicts. It is also demonstrated that the spectra are virtually reduced to the hard potential model when the vibrational period is artificially taken much longer than a collision time, while reduced to the hard shell model when much shorter.

  20. Scaling of collision strengths for highly-excited states of ions of the H- and He-like sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Menchero, L.; Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2016-08-01

    Emission lines from highly-excited states (n ≥ 5) of H- and He-like ions have been detected in astrophysical sources and fusion plasmas. For such excited states, R-matrix or distorted wave calculations for electron-impact excitation are very limited, due to the large size of the atomic basis set needed to describe them. Calculations for n ≥ 6 are also not generally available. We study the behaviour of the electron-impact excitation collision strengths and effective collision strengths for the most important transitions used to model electron collision dominated astrophysical plasmas, solar, for example. We investigate the dependence on the relevant parameters: the principal quantum number n or the nuclear charge Z. We also estimate the importance of coupling to highly-excited states and the continuum by comparing the results of different sized calculations. We provide analytic formulae to calculate the electron-impact excitation collision strengths and effective collision strengths to highly-excited states (n ≥ 8) of H- and He-like ions. These extrapolated effective collision strengths can be used to interpret astrophysical and fusion plasma via collisional-radiative modelling. Tables of atomic data for Si xiii and S xv are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A135

  1. Transfer-excitation processes in collisions of N{sup 3+} ions with H{sub 2}, He, Ne, and Ar targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kamber, E.Y.; Akguengoer, K.; Leather, C.; Brenton, A.G.

    1996-08-01

    High-resolution translational energy-gain spectra for single-electron capture by N{sup 3+} ions from H{sub 2}, He, Ne, and Ar have been measured experimentally at laboratory impact energies of 6, 9, 12, and 15 keV. For N{sup 3+}-He and Ne collisions, transfer excitation into the 2{ital s}2{ital p}{sup 2} state of N{sup 2+} is significantly populated, while in N{sup 3+}-H{sub 2} collisions, transfer excitation into the 2{ital s}2{ital p}{sup 2}{sup 2}{ital P} state dominates at low energies. In N{sup 3+}-Ar collisions, pure single-electron capture into 3{ital s} is selectively populated. In all the collision systems studied here, contributions from processes commencing with a long-lived metastable state of N{sup 3+}{bold (}2{ital s}({sup 2}{ital S})2{ital p}{sup 3}{ital P}{bold )} are detected. The translational energy-gain spectra are interpreted qualitatively in terms of the reaction windows, which are calculated using the single-crossing Landau-Zener model and the extended version of the classical over-the-barrier model. Total cross sections for single-electron capture for N{sup 3+} ions colliding with He and H{sub 2} are also measured and compared with available measurements and theoretical calculations. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. A search for excited leptons in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-10-01

    A search for excited leptons is carried out with the CMS detector at the LHC, using 36 inverse picobarns of pp collision data recorded at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. The search is performed for associated production of a lepton and an oppositely charged excited lepton pp to l l*, followed by the decay l* to l gamma, resulting in the l l gamma final state, where l = electron or muon. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed. Interpreting the findings in the context of l* production through four-fermion contact interactions and subsequent decay via electroweak processes, first upper limits are reported for l* production at this collision energy. The exclusion region in the compositeness scale Lambda and excited lepton mass M(l*) parameter space is extended beyond previously established limits. For Lambda = M(l*), excited lepton masses are excluded below 1070 GeV/c^2 for e* and 1090 GeV/c^2 for mu* at the 95% confidence level.

  3. Cross section calculations for subthreshold pion production in peripheral heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Deutchman, P. A.; Townsend, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Total cross sections angular distributions, and spectral distributions for the exclusive production of charged and neutral subthreshold pions produced in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions are calculated by using a particle-hole formalism. The pions result from the formation and decay of an isobar giant resonance state formed in a C-12 nucleus. From considerations of angular momentum conservation and for the sake of providing a unique experimental signature, the other nucleus, chosen for this work to be C-12 also, is assumed to be excited to one of its isovector (1+) giant resonance states. The effects of nucleon recoil by the pion emission are included, and Pauli blocking and pion absorption effects are studied by varying the isobar width. Detailed comparisons with experimental subthreshold pion data for incident energies between 35 and 86 MeV/nucleon are made.

  4. Dynamical excitations in the collision of two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Xiong, B.; Benedict, Keith A.

    2013-02-01

    We investigate the way in which the pattern of fringes in a coherent pair of two-dimensional Bose condensed clouds of ultracold atoms traveling in opposite directions subject to a harmonic trapping potential can seed the irreversible formation of internal excitations in the clouds, notably solitons and vortices. We identify underdamped, overdamped, and critically damped regimes in the dipole oscillations of the condensates according to the balance of internal and center-of-mass energies of the clouds. We carry out simulations of the collision of two clouds with respect to different initial phase differences in these regimes to investigate the creation of internal excitations. We distinguish the behavior of this system from previous studies of quasi-one-dimensional BECs. In particular we note that the nature of the internal excitations is only essentially sensitive to an initial phase difference between the clouds in the overdamped regime.

  5. Collision energy dependence of the cross sections for the electronic excitation transfer reactions: Rg(3P0,2)+N2(X 1Σg)→Rg(1S0) +N2(C 3Πu) (Rg=Ar, Kr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabayashi, Kiyohiko; Shobatake, Kosuke

    1986-05-01

    The collision energy dependence of the integral cross sections for the title reactions were determined using crossed molecular beams and time-of-flight energy selection techniques. Applying arc-heated rare gas atom beams, the relative collision energies of metastable Ar(3P0,2) and Kr(3P0,2) atoms were selected between 0.4 and 2.5 eV for Ar(3P0,2)+N2, and 0.6 and 1.7 eV for Kr(3P0,2)+N2 systems. The negative energy dependence of the cross sections for the prototype reaction Ar(3P0,2)+N2 agrees well with the results of Parr and Martin in the overlapped energy range (0.4-0.8 eV). The absolute cross sections were determined by normalizing our cross sections to the ones of Parr and Martin. As to the endoergic Kr(3P0,2)+N2 reaction, the product fluorescence from N2(C 3Πu-B 3Πg) was also observed. The total cross section for this reaction exhibits a steep increase near the threshold for each component state [ΔH(3P0)=0.47 and ΔH(3P2)=1.12 eV] and then tends to level off. Assuming the component ratio Kr(3P2)/Kr(3P0) to be statistical in the arc-heated beams, the cross section for each reaction was evaluated by convolution analysis. The post-threshold cross sections for these processes are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than those obtained for Ar(3P0,2)+N2 reaction. The higher reactivity found for Kr(3P2) than for Kr(3P0) is consistent with the quenching rates of Ar(3P0) and Ar(3P2) by N2 obtained by Piper, Velazco, and Setser [J. Chem. Phys. 59, 3323 (1973)]. The present findings suggest that the same type of interaction is also effective for these collision-induced nonadiabatic Kr(3P0,2)+N2 processes as the one, such as spin-orbit interaction, which is applicable between Ar(3P0,2) and N2.

  6. Parity-dependent rotational rainbows in D2-NO and He-NO differential collision cross sections.

    PubMed

    Gijsbertsen, Arjan; Linnartz, Harold; Stolte, Steven

    2006-10-01

    The (j', Omega', epsilon') dependent differential collision cross sections of D2 with fully state selected (j = 12, Omega = 12, epsilon = -1) NO have been determined at a collision energy of about 550 cm(-1). The collisionally excited NO molecules are detected by (1+1') resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization combined using velocity-mapped ion-imaging. The results are compared to He-NO scattering results and tend to be more forward scattered for the same final rotational state. Both for collisions of the atomic He and the molecular D2 with NO, scattering into pairs of rotational states with the same value of n = j' - epsilon epsilon'2 yields the same angular dependence of the cross section. This "parity propensity rule" remains present both for spin-orbit conserving and spin-orbit changing transitions. The maxima in the differential cross sections-that reflect rotational rainbows-have been extracted from the D2-NO and the He-NO differential cross sections. These maxima are found to be distinct for odd and even parity pair number n. Rainbow positions of parity changing transitions (n is odd) occur at larger scattering angles than those of parity conserving transitions (n is even). Parity conserving transitions exhibit-from a classical point of view-a larger effective eccentricity of the shell. No rainbow doubling due to collisions onto either the N-end or the O-end was observed. From a classical point of view the presence of a double rainbow is expected. Rotational excitation of the D2 molecules has not been observed. PMID:17029438

  7. Mass Spectra and Ion Collision Cross Sections of Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yang; Terrier, Peran; Douglas, D. J.

    2011-02-01

    Mass spectra of commercially obtained hemoglobin (Hb) show higher levels of monomer and dimer ions, heme-deficient dimer ions, and apo-monomer ions than hemoglobin freshly prepared from blood. This has previously been attributed to oxidation of commercial Hb. Further, it has been reported that that dimer ions from commercial bovine Hb have lower collision cross sections than low charge state monomer ions. To investigate these effects further, we have recorded mass spectra of fresh human Hb, commercial human and bovine Hb, fresh human Hb oxidized with H2O2, lyophilized fresh human Hb, fresh human Hb both lyophilized and chemically oxidized, and commercial human Hb oxidized with H2O2. Masses of α-monomer ions of all hemoglobins agree with the masses expected from the sequences within 3 Da or better. Mass spectra of the β chains of commercial Hb and oxidized fresh human Hb show a peak or shoulder on the high mass side, consistent with oxidation of the protein. Both commercial proteins and oxidized fresh human Hb produce heme-deficient dimers with masses 32 Da greater than expected and higher levels of monomer and dimer ions than fresh Hb. Lyophilization or oxidation of Hb both produce higher levels of monomer and dimer ions in mass spectra. Fresh human Hb, commercial human Hb, commercial bovine Hb, and oxidized commercial human Hb all give dimer ions with cross sections greater than monomer ions. Thus, neither oxidation of Hb or the difference in sequence between human and bovine Hb make substantial differences to cross sections of ions.

  8. Synergy of Electronic Excitations and Elastic Collision Spikes in Sputtering of Heavy Metal Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, T.; Barnes, A.V.; Hamza, A.V.; Schneider, D.H.; Banks, J.C.; Doyle, B.L.

    1998-05-01

    The emission of secondary ions and neutrals from uranium oxide has been measured for impact of highly charged, heavy ions. Total ablation rates and secondary ion yields increase strongly with projectile charge. The dependencies on projectile charge (16{lt}q{lt}70) , impact energy (10 keV{lt}E{sub kin }{lt}1 MeV) , and projectile mass of secondary ion yields demonstrate the presence of an interaction regime where electronic excitation by charge neutralization and elastic collision spikes combine synergistically. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Ultrashort optical waveguide excitations in uniaxial silica fibers: elastic collision scenarios.

    PubMed

    Kuetche, Victor K; Youssoufa, Saliou; Kofane, Timoleon C

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamics of an uniaxial silica fiber under the viewpoint of propagation of ultimately ultrashort optical waveguide channels. As a result, we unveil the existence of three typical kinds of ultrabroadband excitations whose profiles strongly depend upon their angular momenta. Looking forward to surveying their scattering features, we unearth some underlying head-on scenarios of elastic collisions. Accordingly, we address some useful and straightforward applications in nonlinear optics through secured data transmission systems, as well as laser physics and soliton theory with optical soliton dynamics. PMID:25615214

  10. Accurate Cross Sections for Excitation of Resonance Transitions in Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2004-01-01

    Electron collision excitation cross sections for the resonance 2p(sup)4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)S(sup 0), 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3d (sup 3)D(sup 0), 2p4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)D(sup 0), 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)P(sup 0) and 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2s2p(sup 5) (sup 3)P(sup 0) transitions have been calculated by using the R matrix with a pseudostates approach for incident electron energies from near threshold to 100 eV. The excitation of these transition sgives rise to strong atomic oxygen emission features at 1304, 1027, 989, 878, and 792 Angstrom in the spectra of several planetary atmospheres. We included 22 spectroscopic bound and autoionizing states and 30 pseudostates in the close-coupling expansion. The target wave functions are chosen to properly account for the important correlation and relaxation effects. The effect of coupling to the continuum is included through the use of pseudostates. The contribution of the ionization continuum is significant for resonance transitions. Measured absolute direct excitation cross sections of 0 I are reported by experimental groups from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Johns Hopkins University. Good agreement is noted for the 2p(sup)4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)S(sup 0) transition (lambda 1304 Ang) with measured cross sections from both groups that agree well with each other. There is disagreement between experiments for other transitions. Our results support the measured cross sections from the Johns Hopkins University for the 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3d (sup 3)D(sup 0) and 2p4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)D(sup 0) transitions, while for the 2p4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)D(sup 0) transition the agreement is switched to the measured cross sections from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  11. Nonmonotonic Target Excitation Dependence of Pion Clans in Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Deb, Argha; Dutta, Srimonti

    Target excitation dependence of fluctuation of produced pions (i.e. classifying data of the fluctuation pattern on pions on the basis of the number of gray tracks) is studied for nucleus-nucleus collisions at different projectile energies. In each set the experimental multiplicity distribution is compared with the negative binomial distribution (NBD), which is found to describe the experimental distribution quite well. Target excitation dependence is studied in respect of the clan model parameters bar {n}c and bar {N}, which are extracted from the NBD fit parameters bar {n} and k. A detailed comparison between different interactions at the same energy and the same interactions at different energies is also drawn. A nonmonotonic dependence of D2/bar {n} on is revealed, which is also a characteristic of multiplicity fluctuations at RHIC data.

  12. Effect of collision energy and vibrational excitation on endothermic ion-molecule reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, T.P.

    1984-07-01

    This thesis is divided into two major parts. In the first part an experimental study of proton and deuteron transfer in H/sub 2//sup +/ + He and HD/sup +/ + He has been carried out as a function of kinetic and vibrational energy. The data gives evidence that at lower kinetic energies, the spectator stripping mechanism indeed plays an important role when H/sub 2//sup +/ or HD/sup +/ is vibrationally excited. The second half of this thesis examines the relative efficiencies between the excitation of C-C stretching vibration and collision energy on the promotion of the H atom transfer reaction of C/sub 2/H/sub 2//sup +/ + H/sub 2/ ..-->.. C/sub 2/H/sub 3//sup +/ + H.

  13. ELECTRON-IMPACT EXCITATION OF Cr II: A THEORETICAL CALCULATION OF EFFECTIVE COLLISION STRENGTHS FOR OPTICALLY ALLOWED TRANSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wasson, I. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we present electron-impact excitation collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the complicated iron-peak ion Cr II. We consider specifically the allowed lines for transitions from the 3d {sup 5} and 3d {sup 4}4s even parity configuration states to the 3d {sup 4}4p odd parity configuration levels. The parallel suite of R-Matrix packages, RMATRX II, which have recently been extended to allow for the inclusion of relativistic effects, were used to compute the collision cross sections. A total of 108 LS{pi}/280 J{pi} levels from the basis configurations 3d {sup 5}, 3d {sup 4}4s, and 3d {sup 4}4p were included in the wavefunction representation of the target including all doublet, quartet, and sextet terms. Configuration interaction and correlation effects were carefully considered by the inclusion of seven more configurations and a pseudo-corrector 4d-bar type orbital. The 10 configurations incorporated into the Cr II model thus listed are 3d {sup 5}, 3d {sup 4}4s, 3d {sup 4}4p, 3d {sup 3}4s {sup 2}, 3d {sup 3}4p {sup 2}, 3d {sup 3}4s4p, 3d{sup 4}4d-bar, 3d{sup 3}4s4d-bar, 3d{sup 3}4p4d-bar, and 3d{sup 3}4d-bar{sup 2}, constituting the largest Cr II target model considered to date in a scattering calculation. The Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths are computed for a wide range of electron temperatures 2000-100,000 K which are astrophysically significant. Care has been taken to ensure that the partial wave contributions to the collision strengths for these allowed lines have converged with 'top-up' from the Burgess-Tully sum rule incorporated. Comparisons are made with the results of Bautista et al. and significant differences are found for some of the optically allowed lines considered.

  14. Resonant-transfer-and-excitation for highly charged ions (16 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 23) in collisions with helium

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.; Bernstein, E.M.; Oglesby, C.S.; Graham, W.G.; Clark, M.; McFarland, R.H.; Morgan, T.J.; Stockli, M.P.; Berkner, K.H.; Johnson, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    Significant new evidence is presented for resonant-transfer-and-excitation (RTE) in ion-atom collisions. This process occurs when a target electron is captured simultaneously with the excitation of the projectile followed by deexcitation via photon emission. RTE, which is analogous to dielectronic recombination (DR), proceeds via the inverse of an Auger transition, and is expected to be resonant for projectile velocities corresponding to the energy of the ejected electron in the Auger process. RTE was investigated by measuring cross sections for projectile K x-ray emission coincident with single electron capture for 15 to 200 MeV /sub 16/S/sup 13 +/, 100 to 360 MeV /sub 20/Ca/sup 16 +/ /sup 17 +/ /sup 18 +/ and 180 to 460 MeV /sub 23/V/sup 19 +/ /sup 20 +/ /sup 21 +/ ions colliding with helium. Strong resonant behavior, in agreement with theoretical calculations of RTE, was observed in the coincidence cross sections.

  15. Effect of collective response on electron capture and excitation in collisions of highly charged ions with fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Kadhane, U; Misra, D; Singh, Y P; Tribedi, Lokesh C

    2003-03-01

    Projectile deexcitation Lyman x-ray emission following electron capture and K excitation has been studied in collisions of bare and Li-like sulphur ions (of energy 110 MeV) with fullerenes (C(60)/C(70)) and different gaseous targets. The intensity ratios of different Lyman x-ray lines in collisions with fullerenes are found to be substantially lower than those for the gas targets, both for capture and excitation. This has been explained in terms of a model based on "solidlike" effect, namely, wakefield induced stark mixing of the excited states populated via electron capture or K excitation: a collective phenomenon of plasmon excitation in the fullerenes under the influence of heavy, highly charged ions. PMID:12689221

  16. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A.; Dearden, David V.

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy.

  17. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results.

    PubMed

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A; Dearden, David V

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27220844

  18. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A.; Dearden, David V.

    2016-05-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy.

  19. New Accurate Oscillator Strengths and Electron Excitation Collision Strengths for N1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    The nonorthogonal orbitals technique in a multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities of N(I) lines. The relativistic effects are allowed by means of Breit-Pauli operators. The length and velocity forms of oscillator strengths show good agreement for most transitions. The B-spline R-matrix with pseudostates approach has been used to calculate electron excitation collision strengths and rates. The nonorthogonal orbitals are used for an accurate description of both target wave functions and the R-matrix basis functions. The 24 spectroscopic bound and autoionizing states together with 15 pseudostates are included in the close-coupling expansion. The collision strengths for transitions between fine-structure levels are calculated by transforming the LS-coupled K-matrices to K-matrices in an intermediate coupling scheme. Thermally averaged collision strengths have been determined by integrating collision strength over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies over a temperature range suitable for the modeling of astrophysical plasmas. The oscillator strengths and thermally averaged collision strengths are presented for transitions between the fine-structure levels of the 2s(sup 2)p(sup 3) (sup 4)S(sup 0), (sup 2)D(sup 0), (sup 2)P(sup 0), 2s2p(sup 4) (sup 4)P, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s (sup 4)P, and (sup 2)P terms and from these levels to the levels of the 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3p (sup 2)S(sup 0), (sup 4)D(sup 0), (sup 4)P(sup 0), (sup 4)S(sup 0), (sup 2)D(sup 0), (sup 2)P(sup 0),2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s(sup 2)D, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)4s(sup 4)P, (sup 2)P, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3d(sup 2)P, (sup 4)F,(sup 2)F,(sup 4)P, (sup 4)D, and (sup 2)D terms. Thermally averaged collision strengths are tabulated over a temperature range from 500 to 50,000 K.

  20. Excitation of atoms and molecules in collisions with highly charged ions. [Cyclotron Inst. , Texas A M Univ. , College Station, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the double ionization of He by high-energy N[sup 7+] ions was extended up in energy to 40 MeV/amu. Coincidence time-of-flight studies of multicharged N[sub 2], O[sub 2], and CO molecular ions produced in collisions with 97-MeV Ar[sup 14+] ions were completed. Analysis of the total kinetic energy distributions and comparison with the available data for CO[sup 2+] and CO[sup 3+] from synchrotron radiation experiments led to the conclusion that ionization by Ar-ion impact populates states having considerably higher excitation energies than those accessed by photoionization. The dissociation fractions for CO[sup 1+] and CO[sup 2+] molecular ions, and the branching ratios for the most prominent charge division channels of CO[sup 2+] through CO[sup 7+] were determined from time-of-flight singles and coincidence data. An experiment designed to investigate the orientation dependence of dissociative multielectron ionization of molecules by heavy ion impact was completed. Measurements of the cross sections for K-shell ionization of intermediate-Z elements by 30-MeV/amu H, N, Ne, and Ar ions were completed. The cross sections were determined for solid targets of Z = 13, 22, 26, 29, 32, 40, 42, 46, and 50 by recording the spectra of K x rays with a Si(Li) spectrometer.

  1. Excitation of atoms and molecules in collisions with highly charged ions. Progress report, January 1, 1990--December 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the double ionization of He by high-energy N{sup 7+} ions was extended up in energy to 40 MeV/amu. Coincidence time-of-flight studies of multicharged N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO molecular ions produced in collisions with 97-MeV Ar{sup 14+} ions were completed. Analysis of the total kinetic energy distributions and comparison with the available data for CO{sup 2+} and CO{sup 3+} from synchrotron radiation experiments led to the conclusion that ionization by Ar-ion impact populates states having considerably higher excitation energies than those accessed by photoionization. The dissociation fractions for CO{sup 1+} and CO{sup 2+} molecular ions, and the branching ratios for the most prominent charge division channels of CO{sup 2+} through CO{sup 7+} were determined from time-of-flight singles and coincidence data. An experiment designed to investigate the orientation dependence of dissociative multielectron ionization of molecules by heavy ion impact was completed. Measurements of the cross sections for K-shell ionization of intermediate-Z elements by 30-MeV/amu H, N, Ne, and Ar ions were completed. The cross sections were determined for solid targets of Z = 13, 22, 26, 29, 32, 40, 42, 46, and 50 by recording the spectra of K x rays with a Si(Li) spectrometer.

  2. Vector correlations study of the reaction N(2D)+H2(X1Σg+)→NH(a1Δ)+H(2S) with different collision energies and reagent vibration excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Qing; Zhang, Yong-Jia; Zhao, Jin-Feng; Zhao, Mei-Yu; Ding, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Vector correlations of the reaction are studied based on a recent DMBE-SEC PES for the first excited state of NH2 [J. Phys. Chem. A 114 9644 (2010)] by using a quasi-classical trajectory method. The effects of collision energy and the reagent initial vibrational excitation on cross section and product polarization are investigated for v = 0-5 and j = 0 states in a wide collision energy range (10-50 kcal/mol). The integral cross section could be increased by H2 vibration excitation remarkably based on the DMBE-SEC PES. The different phenomena of differential cross sections with different collision energies and reagent vibration excitations are explained. Particularly, the NH molecules are scattered mainly in the backward hemisphere at low vibration quantum number and evolve from backward to forward direction with increasing vibration quantum number, which could be explained by the fact that the vibrational excitation enlarges the H-H distance in the entrance channel, thus enhancing the probability of collision between N atom and H atom. A further study on product polarization demonstrates that the collision energy and vibrational excitation of the reagent remarkably influence the distributions of P(θr), P(ϕr), and P(θr, ϕr). Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474141 and 11404080), the Special Fund Based Research New Technology of Methanol conversion and Coal Instead of Oil, the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M550158) , the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry of China (Grant No. 2014-1685), and the Program for Liaoning Excellent Talents in University, China (Grant Nos. LJQ2015040 and LJQ2014001).

  3. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in collisions between protons and the ions He+, Li2+, Be3+, B4+, and C5+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Coupled-state cross sections have been determined for electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in collisions between keV-energy protons and the hydrogenic ions He+, Li2+, Be3+, B4+, and C5+, extending work reported 26 years ago with a limited basis for electron transfer and ionization only; the C5+ process was also considered in a later study. In the present calculation, a basis of 60 Sturmians on each center has been used, and in a second calculation, a basis of 280 Sturmians on the target nucleus and a single 1 s function on the proton, with greater overall accuracy than the previously published results. Further, cross sections for direct excitation and capture to individual excited states up to 3 d have been determined. The extent to which high-energy scaling rules with target nuclear charge Z are valid has been re-examined for transfer to the ground state, total transfer, and ionization, and is now considered also for excitation and individual-state processes at intermediate energies near where the cross sections peak.

  4. Electron transfer, excitation, and ionization in collisions between protons and the ions He+, Li2+, Be3+, B4+, and C5+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Thomas G.

    2013-03-01

    Coupled-state cross sections have been determined for electron transfer and excitation to individual states up to 3d, as well as ionization, in collisions between protons and ground-state hydrogenic ions He+, Li2+, Be3+, B4+, and C5+ at intermediate and higher proton energies using two-center 120- and 281-Sturmian bases, extending previous smaller basis results by the author [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.35.3799 35, 3799 (1987)] at intermediate energies, and reexamining scaling rules with target nuclear charge Z.

  5. H2 formation and excitation in the Stephan's Quintet galaxy-wide collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillard, P.; Boulanger, F.; Pineau Des Forêts, G.; Appleton, P. N.

    2009-08-01

    Context: The Spitzer Space Telescope has detected a powerful (L_H_2˜1041 erg s-1) mid-infrared H{2} emission towards the galaxy-wide collision in the Stephan's Quintet (henceforth SQ) galaxy group. This discovery was followed by the detection of more distant H{2}-luminous extragalactic sources, with almost no spectroscopic signatures of star formation. These observations place molecular gas in a new context where one has to describe its role as a cooling agent of energetic phases of galaxy evolution. Aims: The SQ postshock medium is observed to be multiphase, with H{2} gas coexisting with a hot (˜5 × 106 K), X-ray emitting plasma. The surface brightness of H{2} lines exceeds that of the X-rays and the 0-0 S(1) H2 linewidth is ˜900 km s-1, of the order of the collision velocity. These observations raise three questions we propose to answer: (i) why is H{2} present in the postshock gas? (ii) How can we account for the H2 excitation? (iii) Why is H2 a dominant coolant? Methods: We consider the collision of two flows of multiphase dusty gas. Our model quantifies the gas cooling, dust destruction, H{2} formation and excitation in the postshock medium. Results: (i) The shock velocity, the post-shock temperature and the gas cooling timescale depend on the preshock gas density. The collision velocity is the shock velocity in the low density volume-filling intercloud gas. This produces a ˜5 × 10^6 K, dust-free, X-ray emitting plasma. The shock velocity is lower in clouds. We show that gas heated to temperatures of less than 10^6 K cools, keeps its dust content and becomes H2 within the SQ collision age (˜5 × 10^6 years). (ii) Since the bulk kinetic energy of the H2 gas is the dominant energy reservoir, we consider that the H2 emission is powered by the dissipation of kinetic turbulent energy. We model this dissipation with non-dissociative MHD shocks and show that the H2 excitation can be reproduced by a combination of low velocities shocks (5-20 km s-1) within

  6. Low-Temperature Rate Constants for Rotational Excitation and De-excitation of C3 (X1Σg+) by Collisions with He (1S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Abdallah, D.; Hammami, K.; Najar, F.; Jaidane, N.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.; Senent, M. L.; Chambaud, G.; Hochlaf, M.

    2008-10-01

    The low-temperature rotational (de-) excitation of C3 (X1Σg+) by collisions with He (1S) is studied using an ab initio potential energy surface (PES). This PES has been calculated using the single- and double-excitation coupled-cluster approach with noniterative perturbational treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)] and the augmented correlation-consistent triple-ζ basis set (aug-cc-pVTZ) with bond functions. This PES is then incorporated in full close-coupling quantum scattering calculations for collision energies between 0.1 and 50 cm-1 in order to deduce the rate constants for rotational levels of C3 up to j = 10, covering the temperature range 5-15 K.

  7. Collision cross section measurements for biomolecules within a high-resolution FT-ICR cell: theory.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dan; Xin, Yi; Li, Dayu; Xu, Wei

    2015-04-14

    In this study, an energetic hard-sphere ion-neutral collision model was proposed to bridge-link ion collision cross section (CCS) with the image current collected from a high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) cell. By investigating the nonlinear effects induced by high-order electric fields and image charge forces, the energetic hard-sphere collision model was validated through experiments. Suitable application regions for the energetic hard-sphere collision model, as well as for the conventional Langevin and hard-sphere collision models, were also discussed. The energetic hard-sphere collision model was applied in the extraction of ion CCSs from high-resolution FT-ICR mass spectra. Discussions in the present study also apply to FT-Orbitraps and FT-quadrupole ion traps. PMID:25754983

  8. Measurement of the Total Cross Section for Excitation of the 2p State of Atomic Hydrogen by Electron Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Geoffrey

    1996-10-01

    The excitation function of prompt Lyman-α radiation, produced by electron impact excitation of atomic hydrogen in the energy range from threshold to 1.8keV, has been measured in a crossed-beam experiment footnote This work was performed in collaboration with J.A.Slevin, D.E.Shemansky, J.W.McConkey, D.Dziczek, I.Kanik and J.M.Ajello. Measurements were carried out using both magnetically confined and electrostatically focused electron beams in collision with atomic hydrogen produced by an intense discharge source. A vacuum ultraviolet monochromator was used to measure the emitted Lyman-α radiation. The absolute H (1s - 2p) cross section was obtained from the experimental excitation function by normalization to the known oscillator strength, with appropriate corrections for polarization and cascade. The present data are significantly different from earlier experimental results footnote R.L.Long, D.M.Cox and S.J.Smith, J.Res.Nat.Bur.Stand.Sect.A:Phys. Chem. 72A, 521 (1968) footnote J.F.Williams, J.Phys.B.:At.Mol.Opt.Phys. 14, 1197 (1981) and are in good agreement with recent theoretical convergent close coupling calculations footnote I.Bray, private communication (1996) over a two order of magnitude range in impact energy. Multistate coupling affecting the excitation function to 1keV is apparent in both the present experimental and recent theoretical results.

  9. Excitation of Helium to the n=2 States in Intermediate Energy H^- + He Collisions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvale, T. J.; Lu, C. E.; Theodosiou, D. G.; Seely

    1996-05-01

    The first measurements and calculations of excitation of helium to the n=2 states by H^- impact are reported. The experimental method that was employed in these measurements was Ion Energy-Loss Spectroscopy which resulted in absolute cross section determinations. A H^- ion beam was accelerated into a gas target cell containing helium and the scattered H^- beam was magnetically separated from the other charge state components of the emerging projectile beam and directed into an energy analyzer in the decelerator terminal. The potential placed on the accelerator was varied to produce the energy-loss spectra. These spectra were analyzed in order to deduce the cross section values. Cross section predictions using the VPSA model, with explicit allowance for the internal structure of H^-, are also reported and will be compared to the experimentally determined cross sections.

  10. Excited-state evolution probed by convoy-electron emission in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabayashi, Y.; Ito, T.; Azuma, T.; Komaki, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Tawara, H.; Takada, E.; Murakami, T.; Seliger, M.; Tökési, K.; O. Reinhold, C.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2003-10-01

    We present a joint experimental and theoretical study of convoy-electron emission resulting from highly-charged-ion transport through carbon foils at moderately relativistic speeds. Energy spectra of electrons ejected at 0° have been measured for 390 MeV/u hydrogen-like Ar17+ ions and 460 MeV/u (β=v/c=0.74,γ=1.49) Fe25+ (1s), Fe24+ (1s2), and Fe23+ (1s22s) incident on carbon foils with thicknesses from 25 to 8700 μg/cm2. Due to this unprecedented wide range of thicknesses, the sequential excitation and ionization of initially deeply bound electrons to highly excited states and continuum states can be followed in considerable detail. The analysis of the spectra is aided by simulations based on the classical transport theory which has been extended to relativistic energies and to multielectron projectiles. The motion of the projectile electron inside the solid target is calculated taking into account the Coulomb potential of the projectile ion and the multiple stochastic collisions with target cores and target electrons. Different phases of the convoy-electron emissions can be disentangled: direct ejection to the continuum, the transient buildup of an excited-state wave packet followed by ionization, and postionization modification of the continuum spectrum. We find good agreement between experiment and simulation for the evolution of charge states and the emission spectrum.

  11. Effective Collision Strengths for Electron Impact Excitation of Inelastic Transitions in S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have calculated electron collisional excitation strengths for all electric dipole forbidden, semi-forbidden, and allowed transitions among the lowest 17 LS states 3s(exp 2)3p(exp 2) P-3, D-1, S-1, 3s3p(exp 3)S-5(exp 0), D-3(exp 0), P-3(exp 0), P-1(exp 0), S-3(exp 0), D-1(exp 0), 3S(exp 2)3p3d D-1(exp 0), F-3(exp 0), P-3(exp 0), D-3(exp 0), F-3(exp 0), P-1(exp 0), and 3S(exp 2)3p4S P-3(exp 0), P-l(exp 0) of S III using the R-matrix method. These S m states are represented by fairly extensive configuration-interaction wave functions that yield excited state energies in close agreement with recent laboratory measurements. Rydberg series of resonances converging to the excited state thresholds are explicitly included in the scattering calculation. The effective collision strengths are determined assuming Maxwellian distribution of electron energies. These are listed over a wide temperature range ([0.5-10] x 10(exp 4) K) and compared, where possible, with other available calculations. Subject headings: atomic data - atomic processes

  12. Implementation of Dipolar Resonant Excitation Collision Induced Dissociation with Ion Mobility/Time-of-Flight MS

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Ian K.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Danielson, William F.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-01-28

    Under and overfragmentation are significant hurdles to the data independent “bottom-up” approach to proteomics. Another challenge to the data independent approach is the convolution of fragments from different peptides that coelute in reverse-phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (RPLC/MS). The ion mobility/collision induced dissociation/time-of flight mass spectrometry (IMS/CID/TOF MS) approach gives drift-time aligned fragment ions that have the same arrival time distributions as precursor ions, greatly aiding in fragment and peptide ion identification. We have modified an IMS/TOF MS platform to allow for resonant excitation CID experiments. Resonant excitation CID leads to highly efficient, mass-resolved fragmentation without additional excitation of product ions, alleviating the overfragmentation problem. The ability to apply resonant waveforms in mobility-resolved windows has been demonstrated with a peptide mixture yielding fragmentation over a range of mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios within a single IMS separation experiment.

  13. Quenching of highly vibrationally excited pyrimidine by collisions with CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jeremy A.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Hom, Brian J.; Jackson, Karl E.; Sevy, Eric T.

    2008-02-07

    Relaxation of highly vibrationally excited pyrimidine (C{sub 4}N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) by collisions with carbon dioxide has been investigated using diode laser transient absorption spectroscopy. Vibrationally hot pyrimidine (E{sup '}=40 635 cm{sup -1}) was prepared by 248-nm excimer laser excitation, followed by rapid radiationless relaxation to the ground electronic state. The nascent rotational population distribution (J=58-80) of the 00{sup 0}0 ground state of CO{sub 2} resulting from collisions with hot pyrimidine was probed at short times following the excimer laser pulse. Doppler spectroscopy was used to measure the CO{sub 2} recoil velocity distribution for J=58-80 of the 00{sup 0}0 state. Rate constants and probabilities for collisions populating these CO{sub 2} rotational states were determined. The measured energy transfer probabilities, indexed by final bath state, were resorted as a function of {delta}E to create the energy transfer distribution function, P(E,E{sup '}), from E{sup '}-E{approx}1300-7000 cm{sup -1}. P(E,E{sup '}) is fitted to a single exponential and a biexponential function to determine the average energy transferred in a single collision between pyrimidine and CO{sub 2} and parameters that can be compared to previously studied systems using this technique, pyrazine/CO{sub 2}, C{sub 6}F{sub 6}/CO{sub 2}, and methylpyrazine/CO{sub 2}. P(E,E{sup '}) parameters for these four systems are also compared to various molecular properties of the donor molecules. Finally, P(E,E{sup '}) is analyzed in the context of two models, one which suggests that the shape of P(E,E{sup '}) is primarily determined by the low-frequency out-of-plane donor vibrational modes and one which suggests that the shape of P(E,E{sup '}) can be determined by how the donor molecule final density of states changes with {delta}E.

  14. Large increase in the electron capture and excitation cross sections for Li+ colliding with atomic H under UV laser assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Gutiérrez, F. J.; Cabrera-Trujillo, R.

    2015-07-01

    Neutralization and ash products due to electron capture processes in plasmas reduce the efficiency of energy generation in fusion Tokamak reactors. Therefore, lithium ions have been used to improve the efficiency of energy generation where good control of the electron capture process is required. Here, we show that an intense (1.4× {{10}13} W cm-2), ultra-short (1 fs at full width half-maximum) Gaussian laser pulse in the UV region can enhance the electron capture process on L{{i}+}+H(1s) in the low collision keV energy region. We find a factor of 10 enhancement in electron capture cross-section at impact energies lower than 10 keV amu-1 for an 80 nm wavelength laser and a factor of 2 for the excitation process in the hydrogen atom as compared to the laser-free case. In contrast, for a 200 nm wavelength laser the increase of the electron capture cross-sections takes place around 1 keV amu-1 by a factor of 3 and no enhancement for the excitation process. Our results show that the UV assisted production of Li can be controlled, particularly for short UV wave-length for a specific collision energy range. We anticipate that our findings will facilitate UV laser control of the Li production in Tokamak reactors and encourage further experimental work in this system.

  15. Transfer Excitation Processes Observed in N3+-He and O3+-He Collisions at Elab = 33 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yoh

    2016-09-01

    We measured the relative state-selective differential cross sections (DCSs) for one-electron capture reactions using a crossed-beam apparatus. The scattering angle θlab studied in the laboratory frame ranged from -3.0 to 22° and the laboratory collision energy Elab was 33 eV. Only the transfer excitation processes, i.e., the electron capture reactions with the simultaneous excitation of the projectile, were observed. The DCSs were determined for the following reactions: N3+ (1s2 2s2 1S) + He (1s2 1S) → N2+ (1s2 2s2p2 2D) + He+ (1s 2S) + 10.3 eV, O3+ (1s2 2s2 2p 2P) + He (1s2 1S) → O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3P) + He+ (1s 2S) + 12.7 eV, and O3+ (1s2 2s2 2p 2P) + He (1s2 1S) → O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3D) + He+ (1s 2S) + 15.5 eV. In the N3+-He system, the DCSs for the reaction are zero at the center-of-mass angle θcm = 0 and show a peak at a certain angle and a shoulder at a larger angle. In the O3+-He system, the DCSs are again zero at θcm = 0. The capture process to the O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3P) state is mainly observed at smaller scattering angles, and the reaction to the O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3D) state becomes dominant with increasing scattering angle. A classical trajectory analysis within the two-state approximation based on the ab initio potentials for (NHe)3+ revealed that the transfer excitation of a two-electron process takes place through a single crossing of the relevant potentials.

  16. Band-structure-based collisional model for electronic excitations in ion-surface collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Faraggi, M.N.; Gravielle, M.S.; Alducin, M.; Silkin, V.M.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2005-07-15

    Energy loss per unit path in grazing collisions with metal surfaces is studied by using the collisional and dielectric formalisms. Within both theories we make use of the band-structure-based (BSB) model to represent the surface interaction. The BSB approach is based on a model potential and provides a precise description of the one-electron states and the surface-induced potential. The method is applied to evaluate the energy lost by 100 keV protons impinging on aluminum surfaces at glancing angles. We found that when the realistic BSB description of the surface is used, the energy loss obtained from the collisional formalism agrees with the dielectric one, which includes not only binary but also plasmon excitations. The distance-dependent stopping power derived from the BSB model is in good agreement with available experimental data. We have also investigated the influence of the surface band structure in collisions with the Al(100) surface. Surface-state contributions to the energy loss and electron emission probability are analyzed.

  17. Theoretical estimates of photoproduction cross sections for neutral subthreshold pions in carbon-carbon collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Using the Weizsacher-Williams method of virtual quanta, total cross section estimates for the photoproduction of neutral subthreshold pins in carbon-carbon collisions at incident energies below 300 MeV/nucleon are made. Comparisons with recent experimental data indicate that the photoproduction mechanism makes an insignificant contribution to these measured cross sections.

  18. Absolute angle-differential elastic cross sections for electron collisions with diacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2011-06-15

    We report measured and calculated differential elastic cross sections for collisions of low-energy electrons with diacetylene (1,3-butadiyne). A generally satisfactory agreement between theory and experiment has been found. The calculated cross sections provide interesting insight into the underlying resonant structure.

  19. Electron Collision Cross Sections for the Cl2 Molecule from Electron Transport Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan, Do Anh; Jeon, Byung-Hoon

    2011-08-01

    The measured electron transport coefficients (electron drift velocity, Townsend first ionization coefficient, electron attachment coefficient, and density-normalized effective ionization coefficient) in pure Cl2 have been analyzed to derive the currently best available electron collision cross section set of the elastic and inelastic electron collision cross sections for the Cl2 molecule using an electron swarm study and a two-term approximation of the Boltzmann equation for energy. The electron transport coefficients calculated using the derived cross sections are consistent with the experimental data over a wide range of E/N values (ratio of the electric field E to the neutral number density N). The present electron collision cross section set for the Cl2 molecule is the best available so far for quantitative numerical modeling plasma discharges for processing procedures with materials containing Cl2 molecules.

  20. Hyperspherical hidden crossing calculation of Ps formation in low-energy e+-Na collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, S. J.; Shertzer, J.

    2011-05-01

    The hyperspherical hidden crossing method (HHCM) can provide important insight into scattering processes. Previously, we have used the HHCM to calculate the Ps(1s)-formation cross section in low-energy e+-H and e+-Li collisions. Here we apply the HHCM to low-energy e+-Na collisions. We use the Peach model potential and treat e+e-Na+ as an effective three-body system. We calculate the Ps(1s)-formation cross sections for 0 <= L <= 3 and compare our results with a hyperspherical close-coupling calculation. The HHCM provides an explanation for the small S-wave Ps(1s)-formation cross section. The S-wave Stückelberg phase is close to π for the three collision systems due to destructive interference between the two amplitudes that correspond to different paths leading to Ps(1s) formation.

  1. Nucleon emission via electromagnetic excitation in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions: Re-analysis of the Weizsacker-Williams method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Previous analyses of the comparison of Weizsacker-Williams (WW) theory to experiment for nucleon emission via electromagnetic (EM) excitations in nucleus-nucleus collisions were not definitive because of different assumptions concerning the value of the minimum impact parameter. This situation is corrected by providing criteria that allows definitive statements to be made concerning agreement or disagreement between WW theory and experiment.

  2. Dynamic screening and wake effects on electronic excitation in ion-solid and ion-surface collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J. . Dept. of Physics Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1991-01-01

    The collective electronic response in a solid effectively alters ionic and atomic potentials giving rise to dynamic screening and to a wake'' of density fluctuations trailing ions as they propagate through the solid. The presence of dynamic screening modifies electronic excitation processes of projectiles in ion-solid collisions as compared to binary ion-atom collisions. We review recent theoretical and experimental studies directed at the search for and identification of signatures of dynamic screening and wake effects. Examples include the formation of excited projectile bound states under channeling conditions, radiative electron capture, the search for wake riding'' electrons in antiproton-solid collisions, and the neutralization of highly charged ions near surfaces. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen-atom collisions with neutral atoms: Theory, comparisons, and application to Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul S.

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical method is presented for the estimation of cross sections and rates for excitation and charge-transfer processes in low-energy hydrogen-atom collisions with neutral atoms, based on an asymptotic two-electron model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen-atom system. The calculation of potentials and nonadiabatic radial couplings using the method is demonstrated. The potentials are used together with the multichannel Landau-Zener model to calculate cross sections and rate coefficients. The main feature of the method is that it employs asymptotically exact atomic wave functions, which can be determined from known atomic parameters. The method is applied to Li+H , Na+H , and Mg+H collisions, and the results compare well with existing detailed full-quantum calculations. The method is applied to the astrophysically important problem of Ca+H collisions, and rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20 000 K.

  4. Compact Collision Kernels for Hard Sphere and Coulomb Cross Sections; Fokker-Planck Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yongbin; Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2008-12-31

    A compact collision kernel is derived for both hard sphere and Coulomb cross sections. The difference between hard sphere interaction and Coulomb interaction is characterized by a parameter {eta}. With this compact collision kernel, the calculation of Fokker-Planck coefficients can be done for both the Coulomb and hard sphere interactions. The results for arbitrary order Fokker-Planck coefficients are greatly simplified. An alternate form for the Coulomb logarithm is derived with concern to the temperature relaxation in a binary plasma.

  5. Collision Cross Sections for O + Ar(+) Collisions in the Energy Range 0.03-500 eV.

    PubMed

    Sycheva, A A; Balint-Kurti, G G; Palov, A P

    2016-07-14

    The interatomic potentials of the a(2)Π and b(2)Π states of the OAr(+) molecule are calculated using the relativistic complete-active space Hartree-Fock method followed by a multireference configuration interaction calculation with an aug-cc-pwCVNZ-DK basis sets where N is 4 and 5. The calculations were followed by an extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. An avoided crossing between the two potential energy curves is found at an internuclear separation of 5.75 bohr (3.04 Å). As the transition probability between the curves is negligible in the relative collision energy range 0.03-500 eV of interest here, collisions on the lower adiabatic a(2)Π potential may be treated without reference to the upper state. For low energies and orbital angular momentum quantum numbers, the one-dimensional radial Schrödinger equation is solved numerically using a Numerov algorithm method to determine the phase shift. The semiclassical JWKB approximation was employed for relative energies greater than 5 eV and orbital angular quantum numbers higher than 500. Differential, integral, transport (diffusion), and viscosity cross sections for elastic collisions of oxygen atoms with argon ions are calculated for the first time for the range of relative collision energies studied. The calculated cross sections are expected to be of utility in the fields of nanotechnology and arc welding. The combination of an Ar(+)((2)P) ion and a O((3)P) atom gives rise to a total of 12 different molecular electronic states that are all coupled by spin-orbit interactions. Potential energy curves for all 12 states are computed at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level and scattering calculations performed. The results are compared with those obtained using just the lowest potential energy curve. PMID:26741565

  6. Chemical reaction versus vibrational quenching in low energy collisions of vibrationally excited OH with O

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, G. B.; Juanes-Marcos, J. C.; Balakrishnan, N.; Kendrick, Brian K.

    2013-11-21

    Quantum scattering calculations are reported for state-to-state vibrational relaxation and reactive scattering in O + OH(v = 2 − 3, j = 0) collisions on the electronically adiabatic ground state {sup 2}A′′ potential energy surface of the HO{sub 2} molecule. The time-independent Schrödinger equation in hyperspherical coordinates is solved to determine energy dependent probabilities and cross sections over collision energies ranging from ultracold to 0.35 eV and for total angular momentum quantum number J = 0. A J-shifting approximation is then used to compute initial state selected reactive rate coefficients in the temperature range T = 1 − 400 K. Results are found to be in reasonable agreement with available quasiclassical trajectory calculations. Results indicate that rate coefficients for O{sub 2} formation increase with increasing the OH vibrational level except at low and ultralow temperatures where OH(v = 0) exhibits a slightly different trend. It is found that vibrational relaxation of OH in v = 2 and v = 3 vibrational levels is dominated by a multi-quantum process.

  7. Polarization and electronic excitation in nonreactive collisions: Basic formulation for quantum calculations of collisions between /sup 2/P-state alkali-metal atoms and H/sub 2/ or D/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Baylis, W.E.; Pascale, J.; Rossi, F.

    1987-11-01

    The inelastic scattering of two structured systems: for example, an excited atom and a molecule: is considered in the case of nonreactive collisions. Explicit formulas are presented for cross sections corresponding to transitions between arbitrary eigenstates of the two isolated systems. These formulas are then used to derive cross sections for polarization transfer and multipole relaxation in one system when the other system is unpolarized. Both space-fixed and body-fixed formulations are given. Explicit matrix elements are worked out for interactions such as occur between model alkali-metal atoms and rigid-rotor diatomic molecules. An effective interaction method is also discussed and related to an adiabatic-state approach.

  8. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of pyrimidine by electron impact.

    PubMed

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Allan, Michael; Mašín, Zdeněk; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D

    2016-01-14

    We measured differential cross sections for electron-impact electronic excitation of pyrimidine, both as a function of electron energy up to 18 eV, and of scattering angle up to 180°. The emphasis of the present work is on recording detailed excitation functions revealing resonances in the excitation process. The differential cross sections were summed to obtain integral cross sections. These are compared to results of R-matrix calculations, which successfully reproduce both the magnitude of the cross section and the major resonant features. Comparison of the experiment to the calculated contributions of different symmetries to the integral cross section permitted assignment of several features to specific core-excited resonances. Comparison of the resonant structure of pyrimidine with that of benzene revealed pronounced similarities and thus a dominant role of π-π(∗) excited states and resonances. Electron energy loss spectra were measured as a preparation for the cross section measurements and vibrational structure was observed for some of the triplet states. A detailed analysis of the electronic excited states of pyrimidine is also presented. PMID:26772566

  9. Impact of Reaction Cross Section on the Unified Description of Fusion Excitation Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basrak, Z.; Eudes, P.; de la Mota, V.; Sébille, F.; Royer, G.

    A systematics of over 300 complete and incomplete fusion cross section data points covering energies beyond the barrier for fusion is presented. Owing to a usual reduction of the fusion cross sections by the total reaction cross sections and an original scaling of energy, a fusion excitation function common to all the data points is established. A universal description of the fusion exci- tation function relying on basic nuclear concepts is proposed and its dependence on the reaction cross section used for the cross section normalization is discussed. The pioneering empirical model proposed by Bass in 1974 to describe the complete fusion cross sections is rather successful for the incomplete fusion too and provides cross section predictions in satisfactory agreement with the observed universality of the fusion excitation function. The sophisticated microscopic transport DYWAN model not only reproduces the data but also predicts that fusion reaction mechanism disappears due to weakened nuclear stopping power around the Fermi energy.

  10. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths and theoretical line intensities for transitions in S III

    SciTech Connect

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E.; Keenan, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log T{sub e} (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}, 3s3p {sup 3}, 3s {sup 2}3p3d, 3s {sup 2}3p4s, 3s {sup 2}3p4p, and 3s {sup 2}3p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  11. Cross-cultural and cross-ecotype production of a killer whale `excitement' call suggests universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehn, Nicola; Filatova, Olga A.; Durban, John W.; Foote, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    Facial and vocal expressions of emotion have been found in a number of social mammal species and are thought to have evolved to aid social communication. There has been much debate about whether such signals are culturally inherited or are truly biologically innate. Evidence for the innateness of such signals can come from cross-cultural studies. Previous studies have identified a vocalisation (the V4 or `excitement' call) associated with high arousal behaviours in a population of killer whales in British Columbia, Canada. In this study, we compared recordings from three different socially and reproductively isolated ecotypes of killer whales, including five vocal clans of one ecotype, each clan having discrete culturally transmitted vocal traditions. The V4 call was found in recordings of each ecotype and each vocal clan. Nine independent observers reproduced our classification of the V4 call from each population with high inter-observer agreement. Our results suggest the V4 call may be universal in Pacific killer whale populations and that transmission of this call is independent of cultural tradition or ecotype. We argue that such universality is more consistent with an innate vocalisation than one acquired through social learning and may be linked to its apparent function of motivational expression.

  12. Cross Sections for Electron Impact Excitation of Astrophysically Abundant Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    Electron collisional excitation rates and transition probabilities are important for computing electron temperatures and densities, ionization equilibria, and for deriving elemental abundances from emission lines formed in the collisional and photoionized astrophysical plasmas. Accurate representation of target wave functions that properly account for the important correlation and relaxation effects and inclusion of coupling effects including coupling to the continuum are essential components of a reliable collision calculation. Non-orthogonal orbitals technique in multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities. The effect of coupling to the continuum spectrum is included through the use of pseudostates which are chosen to account for most of the dipole polarizabilities of target states. The B-spline basis is used in the R-matrix approach to calculate electron excitation collision strengths and rates. Results for oscillator strengths and electron excitation collision strengths for transitions in N I, O I, O II, O IV, S X and Fe XIV have been produced

  13. Laser-Induced Optical Pumping Measurements of Cross Section for Fine- and Hyperfine-Structure Transitions in Sodium Induced by Collisions with Helium and Argon Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Sung, C. C.

    1999-01-01

    Optical pumping of the ground states of sodium can radically alter the shape of the laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectrum, complicating measurements of temperature, pressure, etc., which are based on these spectra. Modeling of the fluorescence using rate equations for the eight hyperfine states of the sodium D manifolds can be used to quantify the contribution to the ground state pumping of transitions among the hyperfine excited states induced by collisions with buffer gas atoms. This model is used here to determine, from the shape of experimental spectra, cross sections lor DELTA.F transitions of the P(sub 3/2) state induced by collisions with helium and argon atoms, for a range of values assumed for the P(sub 1/2), DELTA.F cross sections. The hyperfine cross sections measured using this method, which to our knowledge is novel, are compared with cross sections for transitions involving polarized magnetic substates m(sub F) measured previously using polarization sensitive absorption. Also, fine-structure transition cross sections were measured in the pumped vapor, giving agreement with previous measurements made in the absence of pumping.

  14. Laser Induced Optical Pumping Measurements of Cross Sections for Fine and Hyperfine Structure Transitions in Sodium Induced by Collisions with Helium Argon Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Sung, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    Optical pumping of the ground states of sodium can radically alter the shape of the laser induced fluorescence excitation spectrum, complicating measurements of temperature, pressure, etc., which are based on these spectra. Modeling of the fluorescence using rate equations for the eight hyperfine states of the sodium D manifolds can be used to quantify the contribution to the ground state pumping of transitions among the hyperfine excited states induced by collisions with buffer gas atoms. This model is used here to determine, from the shape of experimental spectra, cross sections for (Delta)F transitions of the P(sub 3/2) state induced by collisions with helium and argon atoms, for a range of values assumed for the P(sub 1/2), (Delta)F cross sections. The hyperfine cross sections measured using this method, which is thought to be novel, are compared with cross sections for transitions involving polarized magnetic substates, m(sub F), measured previously using polarization sensitive absorption. Also, fine structure transition ((Delta)J) cross sections were measured in the pumped vapor, giving agreement with previous measurements made in the absence of pumping.

  15. Theoretical spectral distributions and total cross sections for neutral subthreshold pion production in carbon-carbon collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Deutchman, P. A.; Townsend, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    A coherent isobar formalism is employed to model subthreshold production of neutral pions in carbon-carbon collisions at energies below 100 MeV/nucleon. No arbitrary scale factors or adjustable free parameters are used in calculation of the Lorentz-invariant cross sections for pion production in the projectile, which produces an excited state that goes to M1 resonance in the target by conservation of spin and isospin. Pion production is also modeled for the projectile, which also reaches M1 resonance. The overall pion spectral distribution in the center of mass system is then integrated over the energy range 35-84 MeV/nucleon. The results expose an energy loss in the incident ions, as observed experimentally, and indicate that an isobar mechanism is responsible for higher energy pion production. Lower energy pions are a result of thermal processes.

  16. Electron impact excitation of atomic oxygen - Revised cross sections. [in thermosphere and auroral substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipf, E. C.; Erdman, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Revised cross-section values for the excitation of three O I resonance transitions at 1304, 1027, and 989 A, by electron impact on atomic oxygen are presented from threshold to 300 eV. These results are smaller than the excitation cross sections used in some airglow models by a factor of about 2.8. The revised values are in good agreement with recent quantum-scattering calculations. The downward revision is required by new laboratory studies in which the direct and dissociative cross sections for 1304 A excitation were normalized with small probable error to the O and O2 ionization cross sections. The results also reflect new advances in VUV optical calibration techniques. A number of outstanding airglow problems are simplified by these revisions.

  17. Trajectory and Model Studies of Collisions of Highly Excited Methane with Water Using an ab Initio Potential.

    PubMed

    Conte, Riccardo; Houston, Paul L; Bowman, Joel M

    2015-12-17

    Quasi-classical trajectory studies have been performed for the collision of internally excited methane with water using an accurate methane-water potential based on a full-dimensional, permutationally invariant analytical representation of energies calculated at a high level of theory. The results suggest that most energy transfer takes place at impact parameters smaller than about 8 Bohr; collisions at higher impact parameters are mostly elastic. Overall, energy transfer is fairly facile, with values for ⟨ΔEdown⟩ and ⟨ΔEup⟩ approaching almost 2% of the total excitation energy. A classical model previously developed for the collision of internally excited molecules with atoms (Houston, P. L.; Conte, R.; Bowman, J. M. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, 119, 4695-4710) has been extended to cover collisions of internally excited molecules with other molecules. For high initial rotational levels, the agreement with the trajectory results is quite good (R(2) ≈ 0.9), whereas for low initial rotational levels it is only fair (R(2) ≈ 0.7). Both the model and the trajectories can be characterized by a four-dimensional joint probability distribution, P(J1,f,ΔE1,J2,f,ΔE2), where J1,f and J2,f are the final rotational levels of molecules 1 and 2 and ΔE1 and ΔE2 are the respective changes in internal energy. A strong anticorrelation between ΔE1 and ΔE2 is observed in both the model and trajectory results and can be explained by the model. There is evidence in the trajectory results for a small amount of V ↔ V energy transfer from the water, which has low internal energy, to the methane, which has substantial internal energy. This observation suggests that V ↔ V energy transfer in the other direction also occurs. PMID:26299678

  18. Cross sections for vibrational inhibition at low collision energies for the reaction H + Li2(X1Σ{g/+}) → Li + LiH (X1Σ+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shoubao; Zhang, Jing; Song, Yuzhi; Meng, Qing-Tian

    2015-05-01

    A time-dependent wave packet dynamics study of the H + Li2 reaction has been performed on the novel HLi2(X2A') potential energy surface [Y.Z. Song, Y.Q. Li, S.B. Gao, Q.T. Meng, Eur. Phys. J. D 68, 1 (2014)]. The v-dependent reaction probabilities and integral cross sections are presented as a function of collision energies. From the v-dependent behaviour of integral cross sections, it can be seen that the vibrational excitation of the reactant Li2 hinders the reactivity at low collision energies. Furthermore, the comparison of j-dependent reaction probabilities indicates that Li2 rotation also hinders the reaction.

  19. Intersystem crossing from highly excited states. rhodamine 6G

    SciTech Connect

    Ryl'kov, V.V.; Cheshev, E.A.

    1985-09-01

    The authors carried out an investigation of ethanolic solutions of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) at 20 C by laser flash photolysis. The excitation of dilute (3 /SUP ./ 10/sup -5/ M) solutions of R6G with an initial optical density of 1.5 up to an intensity of 100 MW/cm/sup 2/ resulted in only weak triplet-triplet absorption. The introduction of additions of lithium chloride or lithium bromide in 0.1 M concentrations into a solution of R6G (3.10/sup -5/ M) resulted in the appearance of induced absorption and the introduction of an addition of lithium nitrate in the same concentration into the solution did not result in enhancement of triplet-triplet absorption.

  20. Convergent-close-coupling calculations for excitation and ionization processes of electron-hydrogen collisions in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zammit, Mark C.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2010-11-15

    Electron-hydrogen scattering in weakly coupled hot-dense plasmas has been investigated using the convergent-close-coupling method. The Yukawa-type Debye-Hueckel potential has been used to describe the plasma screening effects. The target structure, excitation dynamics, and ionization process change dramatically as the screening is increased. Excitation cross sections for the 1s{yields}2s,2p,3s,3p,3d and 2s{yields}2p,3s,3p,3d transitions and total and total ionization cross sections for the scattering from the 1s and 2s states are presented. Calculations cover the energy range from thresholds to high energies (250 eV) for various Debye lengths. We find that as the screening increases, the excitation and total cross sections decrease, while the total ionization cross sections increase.

  1. Calculation of nuclear reaction cross sections on excited nuclei with the coupled-channels method

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Talou, P.; Lynn, J. E.; Chadwick, M. B.; Madland, D. G.

    2009-08-15

    We calculate nuclear cross sections on excited nuclei in the fast neutron energy range. We partition the whole process into two contributions: the direct reaction part and the compound nuclear reactions. A coupled-channels method is used for calculating the direct transition of the nucleus from the initial excited state, which is a member of the ground-state rotational band, to the final ground and excited low-lying levels. This process is strongly affected by the channel coupling. The compound nuclear reactions on the excited state are calculated with the statistical Hauser-Feshbach model, with the transmission coefficients obtained from the coupled-channels calculation. The calculations are performed for a strongly deformed nucleus {sup 169}Tm, and selected cross sections for the ground and first excited states are compared. The calculation is also made for actinides to investigate possible modification to the fission cross section when the target is excited. It is shown that both the level coupling for the entrance channel, and the different target spin, change the fission cross section.

  2. Measurements of total cross sections of the n = 2 excitation of helium from the impact of 10--25 keV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Gregory Scott

    Absolute, total cross sections of n = 2 excitation of helium by intermediate-energy proton impact are determined using the energy-loss experimental method. The incident proton beam is accelerated to kinetic energies of 10-25 keV, and is focused into a target cell containing helium gas at room temperature. A hemispherical energy analyzer is used to measure energy-loss spectra of the incident and scattered proton beams. The excitation cross sections are determined by the measurement of the energy-loss peaks corresponding to excitation of the n = 2 states of helium. A deconvolution technique is applied to each spectrum to obtain the 21S, 2 1P, and n = 2 excitation cross section values. The present cross sections are compared to theoretical predictions which utilized the First and Second Born Approximation, the Distorted Wave Born Approximation, the Glauber Approximation, the Vainshtein-Presnyakov-Sobelman Approximation (VPSA), and the Multistate Impact Parameter Approximation (MSIPA) methods. The theoretical models that incorporate coupling of many states in the calculation, such as the MSIPA, are in reasonable agreement with the present data, suggesting that strong coupling between states must be considered in intermediate-energy, multi-electron ion-target collision systems.

  3. Negative ion clusters in oxygen: collision cross sections and transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Urquijo, J.; Bekstein, A.; Ducasse, O.; Ruíz-Vargas, G.; Yousfi, M.; Benhenni, M.

    2009-12-01

    Using a pulsed Townsend experiment, we have observed the formation of two negative ion species in oxygen over the pressure range 100-600 torr, and the density-normalised electric field strength, E/N, from 2 to 14 Td. The peculiar shape of these transients has led us to propose a scheme of three-body ion-molecule reactions leading to the formation of O4 - and O6 -, which is substantiated by a curve fitting procedure. The resulting mobility data of these two ionic species have been used to calculate their respective momentum transfer collision cross sections, together with the dissociation cross sections that are needed to extend the range of calculation of mobility and diffusion (transverse and longitudinal) to 1000 Td. These calculations were based on an optimised Monte Carlo algorithm, using collision cross sections obtained from a JWKB approximation (Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin) or taken from literature.

  4. Differential and integral cross sections in OH(X) + Xe collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Gautam; Saha, Ashim Kumar; Meulen, J. J. ter; Parker, David H.; Marinakis, Sarantos

    2015-01-21

    Differential cross sections (DCSs) for inelastic collisions of OH(X) with Xe have been measured at a collision energy of 483 cm{sup −1}. The hydroxyl (OH) radicals were initially prepared in the X{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} (v = 0, j = 1.5, f) level using the hexapole electric field selection method. Products were detected state-selectively by [2 + 1] resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of OH, combined with velocity-map imaging. Integral cross sections in OH(X) + Xe at a collision energy of 490 cm{sup −1} were also measured by laser-induced fluorescence. The results are compared with exact close-coupling quantum mechanical scattering calculations on the only available ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The agreement between experimental and theoretical results is generally very satisfactory. This highlights the ability of such measurements to test the available PES for such a benchmark open-shell system. The agreement between experiment and theory for DCSs is less satisfactory at low scattering angles, and possible reasons for this disagreement are discussed. Finally, theoretical calculations of OH(X) + He DCSs have been obtained at various collision energies and are compared with those of OH(X) + Xe. The role of the reduced mass in the DCSs and partial cross sections is also examined.

  5. Differential and integral cross sections in OH(X) + Xe collisions.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Gautam; Saha, Ashim Kumar; ter Meulen, J J; Parker, David H; Marinakis, Sarantos

    2015-01-21

    Differential cross sections (DCSs) for inelastic collisions of OH(X) with Xe have been measured at a collision energy of 483 cm(-1). The hydroxyl (OH) radicals were initially prepared in the X(2)Π3/2 (v = 0, j = 1.5, f) level using the hexapole electric field selection method. Products were detected state-selectively by [2 + 1] resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of OH, combined with velocity-map imaging. Integral cross sections in OH(X) + Xe at a collision energy of 490 cm(-1) were also measured by laser-induced fluorescence. The results are compared with exact close-coupling quantum mechanical scattering calculations on the only available ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The agreement between experimental and theoretical results is generally very satisfactory. This highlights the ability of such measurements to test the available PES for such a benchmark open-shell system. The agreement between experiment and theory for DCSs is less satisfactory at low scattering angles, and possible reasons for this disagreement are discussed. Finally, theoretical calculations of OH(X) + He DCSs have been obtained at various collision energies and are compared with those of OH(X) + Xe. The role of the reduced mass in the DCSs and partial cross sections is also examined. PMID:25612711

  6. Dynamical formation and scattering of hierarchical triples: cross-sections, Kozai-Lidov oscillations, and collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antognini, Joseph M. O.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2016-03-01

    Dynamical scattering of binaries and triple systems of stars, planets, and compact objects may produce highly inclined triple systems subject to Kozai-Lidov (KL) oscillations, potentially leading to collisions, mergers, Type Ia supernovae, and other phenomena. We present the results of more than 400 million gravitational scattering experiments of binary-binary, triple-single, and triple-binary scattering. We compute the cross-sections for all possible outcomes and explore their dependences on incoming velocity, mass, semimajor axis, and eccentricity, including analytic fits and discussion of the velocity dependence. For the production of new triple systems by scattering we find that compact triples are preferred, with ratios of outer to inner semimajor axes of ˜few-100, flat or quasi-thermal eccentricity distributions, and flat distributions in cosine of the mutual inclination. Dynamically formed triples are thus subject to strong KL oscillations, the `eccentric Kozai mechanism', and non-secular effects. For single and binary flyby encounters with triple systems, we compute the cumulative cross-section for changes to the mutual inclination, eccentricity, and semimajor axis ratio. We apply these results to scattering events in the field, open clusters, and globular clusters, and explore the implications for Type Ia supernovae via collisions and mergers, stellar collisions, and the lifetime and dynamical isolation of triple systems undergoing KL oscillations. An appendix provides an analysis of the velocity dependence of the collision cross-section in binary-single scattering.

  7. H-N2 interaction energies, transport cross sections, and collision integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Walch, Stephen P.; Levin, Eugene

    1992-01-01

    The energies for the interaction of a hydrogen atom with a nitrogen molecule have been calculated for large separation distances using a complete-active-space self-consistent-field/externally contracted configuration interaction method. H-N2 transport cross sections and collision integrals have been calculated using sudden approximations and a semiclassical description of the scattering. The values of these quantities are found to be close to the corresponding values determined from the average (isotropic) potential energy. The collision integrals are applied to determine diffusion and viscosity coefficients; the theoretical diffusion agrees well with the measured data available from experiments at low temperatures.

  8. Parameterized Cross Sections for Pion Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, Steve R.; Swaminathan, Sudha R.; Kruger, Adam T.; Ngom, Moussa; Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    An accurate knowledge of cross sections for pion production in proton-proton collisions finds wide application in particle physics, astrophysics, cosmic ray physics, and space radiation problems, especially in situations where an incident proton is transported through some medium and knowledge of the output particle spectrum is required when given the input spectrum. In these cases, accurate parameterizations of the cross sections are desired. In this paper much of the experimental data are reviewed and compared with a wide variety of different cross section parameterizations. Therefore, parameterizations of neutral and charged pion cross sections are provided that give a very accurate description of the experimental data. Lorentz invariant differential cross sections, spectral distributions, and total cross section parameterizations are presented.

  9. Cross-Section Parameterizations for Pion and Nucleon Production From Negative Pion-Proton Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    Ranft has provided parameterizations of Lorentz invariant differential cross sections for pion and nucleon production in pion-proton collisions that are compared to some recent data. The Ranft parameterizations are then numerically integrated to form spectral and total cross sections. These numerical integrations are further parameterized to provide formula for spectral and total cross sections suitable for use in radiation transport codes. The reactions analyzed are for charged pions in the initial state and both charged and neutral pions in the final state.

  10. Cross sections for electron impact excitation of the b 3Sigma(+)u state of H2 - An application of the Schwinger multichannel variational method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lima, M. A. P.; Gibson, T. L.; Mckoy, V.; Huo, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    In this and the two accompanying letters, the results of calculations of the cross sections for electron impact excitation of the b 3Sigma(+)u state of H2, for collision energies from near threshold to 30 eV, are presented. These results are obtained using a multichannel extension of the Schwinger variational principle at the two-state level. The quantitative agreement between the integral cross sections of these three studies is very good. Inclusion of correlation terms in the scattering wavefunctions, which relax the orthogonality between bound and continuum orbitals, is seen to affect the cross sections substantially. Although a comparison of these calculated cross sections with available experimental data is encouraging, some seious discrepancies exist.

  11. A Study into the Collision-induced Dissociation (CID) Behavior of Cross-Linked Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Giese, Sven H.; Fischer, Lutz; Rappsilber, Juri

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linking/mass spectrometry resolves protein–protein interactions or protein folds by help of distance constraints. Cross-linkers with specific properties such as isotope-labeled or collision-induced dissociation (CID)-cleavable cross-linkers are in frequent use to simplify the identification of cross-linked peptides. Here, we analyzed the mass spectrometric behavior of 910 unique cross-linked peptides in high-resolution MS1 and MS2 from published data and validate the observation by a ninefold larger set from currently unpublished data to explore if detailed understanding of their fragmentation behavior would allow computational delivery of information that otherwise would be obtained via isotope labels or CID cleavage of cross-linkers. Isotope-labeled cross-linkers reveal cross-linked and linear fragments in fragmentation spectra. We show that fragment mass and charge alone provide this information, alleviating the need for isotope-labeling for this purpose. Isotope-labeled cross-linkers also indicate cross-linker-containing, albeit not specifically cross-linked, peptides in MS1. We observed that acquisition can be guided to better than twofold enrich cross-linked peptides with minimal losses based on peptide mass and charge alone. By help of CID-cleavable cross-linkers, individual spectra with only linear fragments can be recorded for each peptide in a cross-link. We show that cross-linked fragments of ordinary cross-linked peptides can be linearized computationally and that a simplified subspectrum can be extracted that is enriched in information on one of the two linked peptides. This allows identifying candidates for this peptide in a simplified database search as we propose in a search strategy here. We conclude that the specific behavior of cross-linked peptides in mass spectrometers can be exploited to relax the requirements on cross-linkers. PMID:26719564

  12. Cross focusing of two laser beams and plasma wave excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, M.K.; Sharma, R.P.; Gupta, V.L.

    2005-12-15

    This article presents the cross focusing of two high power laser beams in a plasma when relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities are operative. The effect of electron density modification changes the critical power significantly in contrast to (only) relativistic case. The plasma wave generation at the difference frequency and particle acceleration has also been studied. In a typical case when laser wavelengths are 1047 and 1064 nm and electron density 1.9x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, the maximum electron plasma wave power flux comes out to be 6x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} (laser power P{sub 1}=3.6x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} and P{sub 2}=3.2x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2})

  13. Measurement of Absolute Excitation Cross Sections in Highly-Charged Ions Using Electron Energy Loss and Merged Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Smith, Steven J.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    There is increasing emphasis during this decade on understanding energy balance and phenomena observed in high electron temperature plasmas. The UV spectral return from FUSE, the X-ray spectral return from the HETG on Chandra and the LETGS 011 XMM-Newton are just beginning. Line emissions are almost entirely from highly-charged ions (HCIs) of C, N, 0, Ne, Mg, S, Si, Ca, and Fe. The Constellation-X mission will provide X-ray spectroscopy up to photon energies of 0.12 nm (10 keV) where primary line emitters will be HCIs. A variety of atomic parameters are required to model the stellar and solar plasma. These include cross sections for excitation, ionization, charge-exchange, X-ray emission, direct and indirect recombination, lifetimes and branching ratios, and dependences on l, m mixing by external E and B fields. In almost all cases the atomic quantities are calculated, and few comparisons to experiment have been carried out. Collision strengths and Einstein A-values are required to convert the observed spectral intensities to electron temperatures and densities in the stellar plasma. The JPL electron energy-loss and merged beam approach has been used to measure absolute collision strengths in a number of ions, with critical comparison made to the best available theories.

  14. Thick-target transmission method for excitation functions of interaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, M.; Ebata, S.; Imai, S.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a method, called as thick-target transmission (T3) method, to obtain an excitation function of interaction cross sections. In an ordinal experiment to measure the excitation function of interaction cross sections by the transmission method, we need to change the beam energy for each cross section. In the T3 method, the excitation function is derived from the beam attenuations measured at the targets of different thicknesses without changing the beam energy. The advantage of the T3 method is the simplicity and availability for radioactive beams. To confirm the availability, we perform a simulation for the 12C + 27Al system with the PHITS code instead of actual experiments. Our results have large uncertainties but well reproduce the tendency of the experimental data.

  15. Electron-impact ionization cross sections out of the ground and excited states of cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Lukomski, M.; Sutton, S.; Kedzierski, W.; Reddish, T. J.; Bartschat, K.; Bartlett, P. L.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A. T.; McConkey, J. W.

    2006-09-15

    An atom trapping technique for determining absolute, total ionization cross sections (TICS) out of an excited atom is presented. The unique feature of our method is in utilizing Doppler cooling of neutral atoms to determine ionization cross sections. This fluorescence-monitoring experiment, which is a variant of the 'trap loss' technique, has enabled us to obtain the experimental electron impact ionization cross sections out of the Cs state between 7 eV and 400 eV. CCC, RMPS, and Born theoretical results are also presented for both the ground and excited states of cesium and rubidium. In the low energy region (<11 eV) where best agreement between these excited state measurements and theory might be expected, a discrepancy of approximately a factor of five is observed. Above this energy there are significant contributions to the TICS from both autoionization and multiple ionization.

  16. Search for excited electrons in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Michigan U.

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of a search for the production of an excited state of the electron, e*, in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and correspond to an integrated luminosity of approximately 1 fb{sup -1}. We search for e* in the process p{bar p} {yields} e*e, with the e* subsequently decaying to an electron plus photon. No excess above the standard model background is observed. Interpreting our data in the context of a model that describes e* production by four-fermion contact interactions and e* decay via electroweak processes, we set 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section ranging from 8:9 fb to 27 fb, depending on the mass of the excited electron. Choosing the scale for contact interactions to be {Lambda} = 1 TeV, excited electron masses below 756 GeV are excluded at the 95% C.L.

  17. Recent research directions in Fribourg: nuclear dynamics in resonances revealed by 2-dimensional EEL spectra, electron collisions with ionic liquids and electronic excitation of pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Michael; Regeta, Khrystyna; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.; Mašín, Zdeněk; Grimme, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    The article briefly reviews three subjects recently investigated in Fribourg: (i) electron collisions with surfaces of ionic liquids, (ii) two-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra and (iii) resonances in absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of unsaturated compounds. Electron energy loss spectra of four ionic liquids revealed a number of excited states, including triplet states. A solution of a dye in an ionic liquid showed an energy-loss band of the solute, but not in all ionic liquids. 2D spectra reveal state-to-state information (given resonance to given final state) and are shown to be an interesting means to gain insight into dynamics of nuclear motion in resonances. Absolute cross sections for pyrimidine are reported as a function of scattering angle and as a function of electron energy. They reveal resonant structure which was reproduced very nicely by R-matrix calculations. The calculation provided an assignment of the resonances which reveals common patterns in compounds containing double bonds.

  18. Formation of excited Cu II levels through second-kind collisions in a Ne-Cu discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akihiro; Hattori, Shuzo

    1983-01-01

    Transient spectroscopic techniques have been used to discriminate between various processes forming excited Cu II levels in a Ne-Cu discharge. Ratio of the cross sections for Ne +-Cu charge transfer reaction into individual Cu II 5s levels has been determined. The Cu II 4p levels were found to be excited through some unidentified process as well as Ne(metastable) -Cu Penning reaction, and the former was more effective.

  19. Collision avoidance in TV white spaces: a cross-layer design approach for cognitive radio networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foukalas, Fotis; Karetsos, George T.

    2015-07-01

    One of the most promising applications of cognitive radio networks (CRNs) is the efficient exploitation of TV white spaces (TVWSs) for enhancing the performance of wireless networks. In this paper, we propose a cross-layer design (CLD) of carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) mechanism at the medium access control (MAC) layer with spectrum sensing (SpSe) at the physical layer, for identifying the occupancy status of TV bands. The proposed CLD relies on a Markov chain model with a state pair containing both the SpSe and the CSMA/CA from which we derive the collision probability and the achievable throughput. Analytical and simulation results are obtained for different collision avoidance and SpSe implementation scenarios by varying the contention window, back off stage and probability of detection. The obtained results depict the achievable throughput under different collision avoidance and SpSe implementation scenarios indicating thereby the performance of collision avoidance in TVWSs-based CRNs.

  20. Close-coupling calculations of fine-structure excitation of Ne II due to H and electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Phillip C.; Cumbee, Renata; Wang, Qianxia; Loch, Stuart; Pindzola, Michael; Schultz, David R.; Buenker, Robert; McLaughlin, Brendan; Ballance, Connor

    2016-06-01

    Fine-structure transitions within the ground term of ions and neutral atoms dominate the cooling in a variety of molecular regions and also provide important density and temperature diagnostics. While fine-structure rates due to electron collisions have been studied for many systems, data are generally sparse for elements larger than oxygen, at low temperatures, and for collisions due to heavy particles. We provide rate coefficients for H collisions for the first time. The calculations were performed using the quantum molecular-orbital close-coupling approach and the elastic approximation. The heavy-particle collisions use new potential energies for the lowest-lying NeH+ states computed with the MRDCI method. The focus of the electron-impact calculations is to provide fine-structure excitation rate coefficients down to 10 K. We compare with previous calculations at higher temperatures (Griffin et al. 2001), and use a range of calculations to provide an estimate of the uncertainty on our recommended rate coefficients. A brief discussion of astrophysical applications is also provided.Griffin, D.C., et al., 2001, J. Phys. B, 34, 4401This work partially supported by NASA grant No. NNX15AE47G.

  1. Derivation of capture cross sections from quasi-elastic excitation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Gomes, P. R. S.

    2013-04-01

    The relationship between the quasi-elastic excitation function and the capture cross section is derived. The quasi-elastic data is shown to be a useful tool to extract the capture cross sections and the angular momenta of the captured systems for the reactions 16O+144,154Sm,208Pb, 20Ne+208Pb, and 32S+90,96Zr near and above the Coulomb barrier energies.

  2. Ion collision cross section measurements in Fourier transform-based mass analyzers.

    PubMed

    Li, Dayu; Tang, Yang; Xu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing demands of molecular structure analysis, several methods have been developed to measure ion collision cross sections within Fourier transform (FT) based mass analyzers. Particularly in the recent three years since 2012, the method of obtaining biomolecule collision cross sections was achieved in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) cells. Furthermore, similar methods have been realized or proposed for orbitraps and quadrupole ion traps. This technique adds a new ion structure analysis capability to FT-based mass analyzers. By providing complementary ion structure information, it could be used together with tandem mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectroscopy techniques. Although many questions and challenges remain, this technique potentially would greatly enhance the ion structure analysis capability of a mass spectrometer, and provide a new tool for chemists and biochemists. PMID:26788551

  3. Asymptotic form of the charge exchange cross section in the three body rearrangement collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1975-01-01

    A three body general rearrangement collision is considered where the initial and final bound states are described by the hydrogen-like wave functions. Mathematical models are developed to establish the relationships of quantum number, the reduced mass, and the nuclear charge of the final state. It is shown that for the low lying levels, the reciprocal of n cubed scaling law at all incident energies is only approximately satisfied. The case of the symmetric collisions is considered and it is shown that for high n and high incident energy, E, the cross section behaves as the reciprocal of E cubed. Zeros and minima in the differential cross sections in the limit of high n for protons on atomic hydrogen and positrons on atomic hydrogen are given.

  4. Search for excited leptons in proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-03-17

    Our search for compositeness of electrons and muons is presented using a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √(s) = 8 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. Excited leptons (ℓ*) produced via contact interactions in conjunction with a standard model lepton are considered, and a search is made for their gauge decay modes. The decays considered are ℓ* →ℓγ and ℓ* → ℓZ, which give final states of two leptons and a photon or, depending on the Z-boson decay mode, four leptons or twomore » leptons and two jets. The number of events observed in data is consistent with the standard model prediction. Exclusion limits are set on the excited lepton mass, and the compositeness scale L. For the case Mℓ* = L the existence of excited electrons (muons) is excluded up to masses of 2.45 (2.47) TeV at 95% confidence level. The neutral current decays of excited leptons are considered for the first time, and limits are extended to include the possibility that the weight factors f and f ', which determine the couplings between standard model leptons and excited leptons via gauge mediated interactions, have opposite sign.« less

  5. Search for excited leptons in proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-05

    Our search for compositeness of electrons and muons is presented using a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √(s) = 8 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. Excited leptons (ℓ*) produced via contact interactions in conjunction with a standard model lepton are considered, and a search is made for their gauge decay modes. The decays considered are ℓ* →ℓγ and ℓ* → ℓZ, which give final states of two leptons and a photon or, depending on the Z-boson decay mode, four leptons or two leptons and two jets. The number of events observed in data is consistent with the standard model prediction. Exclusion limits are set on the excited lepton mass, and the compositeness scale L. For the case Mℓ* = L the existence of excited electrons (muons) is excluded up to masses of 2.45 (2.47) TeV at 95% confidence level. The neutral current decays of excited leptons are considered for the first time, and limits are extended to include the possibility that the weight factors f and f ', which determine the couplings between standard model leptons and excited leptons via gauge mediated interactions, have opposite sign.

  6. Search for excited leptons in proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s}=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Rougny, R.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.

    2016-03-01

    A search for compositeness of electrons and muons is presented using a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt{s} = 8 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. Excited leptons (ℓ *) produced via contact interactions in conjunction with a standard model lepton are considered, and a search is made for their gauge decay modes. The decays considered are ℓ * → ℓγ and ℓ * → ℓZ, which give final states of two leptons and a photon or, depending on the Z-boson decay mode, four leptons or two leptons and two jets. The number of events observed in data is consistent with the standard model prediction. Exclusion limits are set on the excited lepton mass, and the compositeness scale Λ. For the case M ℓ* = Λ the existence of excited electrons (muons) is excluded up to masses of 2.45 (2.47) TeV at 95% confidence level. Neutral current decays of excited leptons are considered for the first time, and limits are extended to include the possibility that the weight factors f and f', which determine the couplings between standard model leptons and excited leptons via gauge mediated interactions, have opposite sign. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Excitation cross sections of hydrogen relevant to neutral-beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Y.K.; Burrell, C.F.; MacFarland, R.H.

    1981-09-01

    Data were measured for the excitation of H atom projectiles, dissociation of H/sub 2//sup +/ and H/sub 3//sup +/ projectiles into the 3p or 3d states of the H atom, and the collisional destruction cross section for the n = 3 levels in the energy range between 40 and 120 keV.

  8. Cross sections for low-energy inelastic H+Li collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Barklem, Paul S.

    2003-12-01

    We report calculations for the low-energy near-threshold inelastic collision cross sections between the Li(2s,2p,3s,3p)+H(1s) states. Results are obtained by solving the coupled-channel equations. Order-of-magnitude estimates for higher states have been made with the multichannel Landau-Zener model. Potentials and couplings from H. Croft et al [J. Phys. B 32, 81 (1999)] are employed. The calculated cross sections are much smaller than ones predicted by the classical Thomsom atom formula currently employed in astrophysics. This result is important for the interpretation of stellar spectra.

  9. Total single electron capture cross sections for collisions of multicharged ions with He atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmanian, M.; Shojaei, F.; Fathi, R.

    2016-09-01

    The three-body boundary corrected Born distorted wave method is utilized to compute the total cross sections for single electron capture in the collisions of the fast ions ({{{H}}}1+, He{}2+, Li{}3+, {{{B}}}5+ and {{{C}}}6+) with helium targets in their ground states. Both post and prior forms of the transition amplitude are obtained in terms of two-dimensional integrals and the total cross sections are computed via three-dimensional numerical integrations. The present results show reasonable agreement with the measurements and three- and four-body theoretical computations, especially at higher incident energies.

  10. Pion and Kaon Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Intermediate Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes require accurate models for hadron production in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Codes require cross sections to be written in terms of lab frame variables and it is important to be able to verify models against experimental data in the lab frame. Several models are compared to lab frame data. It is found that models based on algebraic parameterizations are unable to describe intermediate energy differential cross section data. However, simple thermal model parameterizations, when appropriately transformed from the center of momentum to the lab frame, are able to account for the data.

  11. Measurement of the forward W boson cross-section in pp collisions at TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-12-01

    A measurement of the inclusive W → μν production cross-section using data from pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of TeV is presented. The analysis is based on an integrated luminosity of about 1 .0 fb-1 recorded with the LHCb detector. Results are reported for muons with a transverse momentum greater than 20 GeV/ c and pseudorapidity between 2.0 and 4.5. The W + and W - production cross-sections are measured to be

  12. The coherent cross section of vector mesons in ultraperipheral PbPb collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ya-ping; Chen, Xurong

    2016-06-01

    The coherent cross section of J/ψ , ρ , and φ are computed in the dipole model in the ultraperipheral PbPb collisions. The IP-Sat and IIM model are applied in the calculation of the differential cross section of the dipole scattering off the nucleon, and three kinds of forward vector meson wave functions are used in the overlap. The prediction of J/ψ and ρ is compared with the experimental data of the ALICE collaboration, and the prediction of φ is also given in this paper.

  13. Energy-dependent excitation cross section measurements of the diagnostic lines of Fe XVII

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Scofield, J H; Boyce, K R; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Kahn, S M; Szymkowiak, A E

    2005-01-24

    By implementing a large-area, gain-stabilized microcalorimeter array on an electron beam ion trap, the electron-impact excitation cross sections for the dominant x-ray lines in the Fe XVII spectrum have been measured as a function of electron energy up to greater than three times the threshold energy, establishing a benchmark for atomic calculations. The results reveal a consistent overestimation by recent calculations of the excitation cross section of the resonance transition, which is shown to be at the root of several long-standing problems associated with modeling solar and astrophysical Fe XVII spectra. The data do not show strong contributions from resonance excitation contrary to recent statements in the literature.

  14. Comparative study on contribution of charge-transfer collision to excitations of iron ion between argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma and nitrogen microwave induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Kozue; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an ionization/excitation phenomenon of singly-ionized iron occurring in an Okamoto-cavity microwave induced plasma (MIP) as well as an argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma (ICP), by comparing the Boltzmann distribution among iron ionic lines (Fe II) having a wide range of the excitation energy from 4.76 to 9.01 eV. It indicated in both the plasmas that plots of Fe II lines having lower excitation energies (4.76 to 5.88 eV) were fitted on each linear relationship, implying that their excitations were caused by a dominant thermal process such as collision with energetic electron. However, Fe II lines having higher excitation energies (more than 7.55 eV) had a different behavior from each other. In the ICP, Boltzmann plots of Fe II lines assigned to the higher excited levels also followed the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels, even including a deviation from it in particular excited levels having an excitation energy of ca. 7.8 eV. This deviation can be attributed to a charge-transfer collision with argon ion, which results in the overpopulation of these excited levels, but the contribution is small. On the other hand, the distribution of the high-lying excited levels was non-thermal in the Okamoto-cavity MIP, which did not follow the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels. A probable reason for the non-thermal characteristics in the MIP is that a charge-transfer collision with nitrogen molecule ion having many vibrational/rotational levels could work for populating the 3d64p (3d54s4p) excited levels of iron ion broadly over an energy range of 7.6-9.0 eV, while collisional excitation by energetic electron would occur insufficiently to excite these high-energy levels.

  15. Angular differential cross sections for excitation of atomic hydrogen to its N = 2 level by impact of 15-100 keV He/sup +/ ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aldag, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Differential cross section for excitation of atomic hydrogen to its n = 2 level by 15-100 keV He/sup +/ ions have been determned for c.m. angles from 0 to 8 mrad. The cross sections were obtained from an analysis of the angular distribution of the scattered ions which had lost an energy corresponding to the excitation of the target to its n = 2 level. The shape of the differential cross section changes rapidly with increasing incident energy. At 15 keV, the cross section changes rapidly with increasing incident energy. At 15 keV, the cross section falls off by a factor of 5 in 6 mrad. At 100 keV, the cross section decreases by nearly six orders or magnitude in the same angular range. The middle and high energy results are in good agreement with a recent Glauber approximation calculation for the scattering. Comparison of the present reduced cross section results with those at lower energy (0.75 to 1.5 keV) indicates that the collision mechanism is not the same. Excitation to n greater than or equal to 3 levels was clearly present in the energy-loss spectra for the process in contradiction to the molecular orbital description of the mechanism. Total cross section results are given for the same scattering process in the 15-200 keV range and are also in good agreement with the Glauber and VPSA theory results. The experimental and Glauber differential results, however, are clearly different at 25 keV.

  16. Elastic and absorption cross sections for electron-nitrous oxide collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.-T.; Iga, I.; Homem, M. G.; Machado, L. E.; Brescansin, L. M.

    2002-06-01

    In this work, we present a joint theoretical-experimental study on electron-N2O collisions in the intermediate energy range. More specifically, calculated and measured elastic differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections, as well as calculated total and absorption cross sections are reported. The measurements were performed using a crossed electron-beam-molecular-beam geometry. The angular distribution of the scattered electrons was converted to absolute cross sections using the relative-flow technique. Theoretically, a complex optical potential is used to represent the electron-molecule interaction dynamics in the present calculation. The Schwinger variational iterative method combined with the distorted-wave approximation is used to solve the scattering equations. The comparison of the present calculated results with the measured results as well as with the existing experimental and theoretical data shows good agreement.

  17. Excitation and Charge Exchange Phenomena in Astronomical Objects: Measurement of Cross Sections and Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Smith, S.; Lozano, J.; Cadez, I.; Greewnood, J.; Mawhovter, R.; Williams, I.; Niimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    This document addresses extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-ray emissions from comets, planets and heliospheric gases focusing on the measurement of charge-exchange cross sections and radiative lifetimes. Highly-charged heavy ions present in the solar wind, and their abundance relative to the total oxygen-ion abundance are detailed. The plan for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory high-charge ion facility is outlined detailing its ability to measure absolute collisional excitation cross sections, absolute charge-exchange cross sections, lifetimes of metastable ion levels, and X-ray emission spectra following charge changes.

  18. Energy-dependent excitation cross section measurements of the diagnostic lines of Fe XVII.

    PubMed

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Scofield, J H; Boyce, K R; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Gu, M F; Kahn, S M; Szymkowiak, A E

    2006-06-30

    By implementing a large-area, gain-stabilized microcalorimeter array on an electron beam ion trap, the electron-impact excitation cross sections for the dominant x-ray lines in the Fe XVII spectrum have been measured as a function of electron energy establishing a benchmark for atomic calculations. The results show that the calculations consistently predict the cross section of the resonance line to be significantly larger than measured. The lower cross section accounts for several problems found when modeling solar and astrophysical Fe XVII spectra. PMID:16907303

  19. Differential electron-Cu5+ elastic scattering cross sections extracted from electron emission in ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C.; Hagmann, S.; Bhalla, C. P.; Grabbe, S. R.; Cocke, C. L.; Richard, P.

    1999-04-01

    We present a method of deriving energy and angle-dependent electron-ion elastic scattering cross sections from doubly differential cross sections for electron emission in ion-atom collisions. By analyzing the laboratory frame binary encounter electron production cross sections in energetic ion-atom collisions, we derive projectile frame differential cross sections for electrons elastically scattered from highly charged projectile ions in the range between 60° and 180°. The elastic scattering cross sections are observed to deviate strongly from the Rutherford cross sections for electron scattering from bare nuclei. They exhibit strong Ramsauer-Townsend electron diffraction in the angular distribution of elastically scattered electrons, providing evidence for the strong role of screening played in the collision. Experimental data are compared with partial-wave calculations using the Hartree-Fock model.

  20. State resolved photodissociation of vibrationally excited water: Rotations, stretching vibrations, and relative cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Wal, R.L.; Scott, J.L.; Crim, F.F. )

    1991-02-01

    The state resolved photodissociation of highly vibrationally excited water molecules using laser induced fluorescence detection of the OH product demonstrates the control that the initially selected state exerts over product state populations. These vibrationally mediated photodissociation experiments, in which one photon prepares a highly vibrationally excited molecule and a second photon dissociates it, determine the role of overall rotations and of O--H stretching vibrations as well as measure the relative cross section for the photodissociation of water. The {ital rotational} {ital state} of the vibrationally excited water molecule governs the rotational state of the OH product of the dissociation, in agreement with {ital ab} {ital initio} calculations and previous measurements on single rotational states excited in the fundamental asymmetric stretching vibration band. The initially selected {ital vibrational} {ital state} of the water molecule determines the vibrational energy disposal in the products, which agrees with a simple qualitative model based on the pattern of the initially selected vibrational wave function. Dissociating vibrational states with similar energies but very different nuclear motions produces dramatically different product vibrational state populations. The vibrational energy initially present in the surviving bond primarily appears as vibrational excitation of the product. Dissociation of the {vert bar}04{r angle}{sup {minus}} state produces no vibrationally excited OH, but dissociation of the {vert bar}13{r angle}{sup {minus}} state produces mostly vibrationally excited products.

  1. State-selective differential cross sections for double-electron capture in 0.25{endash}0.75-MeV He{sup 2+}-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Doerner, R.; Mergel, V.; Spielberger, L.; Jagutzki, O.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Ullrich, J.

    1998-01-01

    For 0.25{endash}0.75-MeV He{sup 2+} on He collisions we have measured total state selective double capture cross sections and cross sections differential in projectile scattering angle. For 0.25 MeV we present also state-selective scattering-angle-dependent double-capture cross sections. The projectile energy loss (the final electronic state) as well as the transverse momentum transfer (i.e., the projectile scattering angle) have been obtained by measuring the momentum vector of the recoil ion using cold target recoil ion momenum spectroscopy. The resonant transfer to the ground state is found to be by far the dominant double-capture channel. Capture to nonautoionizing excited states is smaller by about a factor of 7, and results in larger scattering angles than the ground-state double capture. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Collision-induced dissociation of Nb x O{/y +} ( x = 1, 2, y = 2-12) clusters: crossed molecular beams and collision cell studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihesan, Claudia; Glodić, Pavle; Velegrakis, Michalis

    2015-03-01

    Oxygen-rich niobium oxide clusters are formed by mixing laser-produced Nb plasma with pure oxygen, and their stability is investigated by mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation. We use an experimental configuration recently developed by our group, where the cluster ions beam is crossed with a secondary beam of noble gas atoms, and the fragments are rejected by a retarding field energy analyzer. In this way, the relative collision cross sections of Nb x O{/y +} ( x = 1, 2, y = 2-12) clusters have been measured and information about their fragmentation channels has been obtained.

  3. Measurements of single-electron detachment cross-sections for Cu- and Ag- in collision with He and N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuemei; Wu, Shimin; Li, Guangwu; Lu, Fuquan; Tang, Jiayong; Yang, Fujia

    2001-12-01

    Electron detachment of negative ions, in collision with a static gas target, is known to be one of the most fundamental processes occurring in negative-ion-atom collisions. The experimental results of cross-section data for transition element ions in collision with gases are of great interest not only for their potential application value, but also as a challenge to a theoretical study of complex negative ions in collision with atoms or molecules. In the present work, the single-electron detachment (SED) cross-sections for Cu- and Ag- in collision with He, N2 have been obtained in the energy region of 10-30 keV. By using a single-particle detector for both neutral atoms and ions, the experimental uncertainty of the results is improved in this work.

  4. Spin-resolved electron capture cross sections for C5+-H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Y.; Liu, L.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.

    2015-10-01

    The charge transfer process in C5+-H collisions has been theoretically studied using the two-center atomic orbital close-coupling method in the energy interval from 0.1 to 300 keV u-1. The interaction of active electron with the projectile ion is represented by model potentials different for the singlet and triplet systems of C4+(1snl) states. The results of the present calculations are compared with other theoretical results and experimental measurements and good agreement is obtained for the total spin-averaged cross sections in the overlapping energy range. For the spin-resolved cross sections, we found that the present total and n-shell electron capture cross sections are also in good agreement with the results of other theoretical studies in the overlapping energy range for both the singlet and triplet cases. Good overall agreement has been obtained with the results of other authors for the nl-state-selective cross sections, except for the capture to 3p and 4p singlet states at the low collision energies.

  5. Absolute cross sections for vibrational excitations of cytosine by low energy electron impact

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, M.; Bazin, M.; Sanche, L.

    2013-01-01

    The absolute cross sections (CSs) for vibrational excitations of cytosine by electron impact between 0.5 and 18 eV were measured by electron-energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy of the molecule deposited at monolayer coverage on an inert Ar substrate. The vibrational energies compare to those that have been reported from IR spectroscopy of cytosine isolated in Ar matrix, IR and Raman spectra of poly-crystalline cytosine, and ab initio calculation. The CSs for the various H bending modes at 142 and 160 meV are both rising from their energy threshold up to 1.7 and 2.1 × 10−17 cm2 at about 4 eV, respectively, and then decrease moderately while maintaining some intensity at 18 eV. The latter trend is displayed as well for the CS assigned to the NH2 scissor along with bending of all H at 179 meV. This overall behavior in electron-molecule collision is attributed to direct processes such as the dipole, quadrupole, and polarization contributions, etc. of the interaction of the incident electron with a molecule. The CSs for the ring deformation at 61 meV, the ring deformation with N-H symmetric wag at 77 meV, and the ring deformations with symmetric bending of all H at 119 meV exhibit common enhancement maxima at 1.5, 3.5, and 5.5 eV followed by a broad hump at about 12 eV, which are superimposed on the contribution due to the direct processes. At 3.5 eV, the CS values for the 61-, 77-, and 119-meV modes reach 4.0, 3.0, and 4.5 × 10−17 cm2, respectively. The CS for the C-C and C-O stretches at 202 meV, which dominates in the intermediate EEL region, rises sharply until 1.5 eV, reaches its maximum of 5.7 × 10−17 cm2 at 3.5 eV and then decreases toward 18 eV. The present vibrational enhancements, correspond to the features found around 1.5 and 4.5 eV in electron transmission spectroscopy (ETS) and those lying within 1.5–2.1 eV, 5.2–6.8 eV, and 9.5–10.9 eV range in dissociative electron attachment (DEA) experiments with cytosine in gas phase. While the ETS features

  6. The two-photon excitation cross section of 6MAP, a fluorescent adenine analogue.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Robert J; Hou, Zhanjia; Yang, Aiping; Hawkins, Mary E

    2005-03-01

    6MAP is a fluorescent analogue of adenine that undergoes Watson-Crick base pairing and base stacking in double-stranded DNA. The one-photon absorption spectrum of 6MAP is characterized by a maximum around 330 nm with moderate quantum yield fluorescence centered at about 420 nm. To take advantage of this probe for confocal and single-molecule microscopy, it would be advantageous to be able to excite the analogue via two photons. We report the first determination of the two-photon excitation cross section and spectrum for 6MAP from 614 to 700 nm. The power dependence of the fluorescence indicates that emission results from the absorption of two photons. The one-photon and two-photon emission line shapes are identical within experimental error. A study of the concentration dependence of the fluorescence yield for one-photon excitation shows no measurable quenching up to about 5 microM. The maximum in the two-photon excitation spectrum gives a two-photon cross section, delta(TPE), of 3.4 +/- 0.1 Goeppert-Mayer (G.M.) at 659 nm, which correlates well with the one-photon absorption maximum. This compares quite favorably with cross sections of various naturally fluorescent biological molecules such as flavins and nicotiamide. In addition, we have also obtained the two-photon-induced fluorescence emission spectrum of quinine sulfate. It is approximately the same as that for one-photon excitation, suggesting that two-photon excitation of quinine sulfate may be used for calibration purposes. PMID:16851408

  7. Elastic cross sections for electron-ketenylidene (C{sub 2}O) collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, M.M.; Lee, M.-T.; Michelin, S.E.

    2004-05-01

    In this work we report on a theoretical study on elastic electron collisions with ketenylidene radicals in the low and intermediate energy range. Calculated differential and momentum transfer cross sections for the e{sup -}-C{sub 2}O collision are reported in the (1-500)-eV range. A complex optical potential composed by static, exchange, correlation-polarization plus absorption contributions, derived from a fully molecular wave function, is used to describe the interaction dynamics. The Schwinger variational iterative method combined with the distorted-wave approximation is applied to calculate scattering amplitudes. Comparison made between our calculated cross sections with the theoretical and experimental results for elastic e{sup -}-N{sub 2}O collisions has revealed remarkable similarity for incident energies equal to 20 eV and above. Also, two shape resonances located at around 3 eV and 4.5 eV are observed and identified as due to the {sup 2}{pi} and the {sup 4}{pi} scattering channels, respectively.

  8. Differential cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran at intermediate impact energies

    SciTech Connect

    Do, T. P. T.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au; Jones, D. B. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au

    2015-03-28

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran, at intermediate incident electron energies (15-50 eV) and over the 10°-90° scattered electron angular range. These measurements extend the available DCS data for vibrational excitation for this species, which have previously been obtained at lower incident electron energies (≤20 eV). Where possible, our data are compared to the earlier measurements in the overlapping energy ranges. Here, quite good agreement was generally observed where the measurements overlapped.

  9. Elastic cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with tetrahydropyran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza Barbosa, Alessandra; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2016-02-01

    We report on calculated elastic cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with the cyclic ether tetrahydropyran (C5H10O). The calculations were carried out with the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with norm-conserving pseudopotentials in the static-exchange-polarization approximation for energies up to 20 eV. Our cross sections are compared with previous results obtained for cyclohexane and 1,4-dioxane, since the three molecules present similar structures. The calculated differential cross sections for these three molecules present similarities, except at low scattering angles, where the differential cross sections of tetrahydropyran present a sharp increase due to the permanent dipole moment of the molecule. The similarities observed in the cross sections reveal that the molecular geometry plays an important role in the description of scattering process. We also compared our calculated elastic integral cross section for tetrahydropyran with experimental total cross sections data available in the literature and found a good qualitative agreement between both results. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  10. Elastic cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with tetrahydropyran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2016-02-01

    We report on calculated elastic cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with the cyclic ether tetrahydropyran (C5H10O). The calculations were carried out with the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with norm-conserving pseudopotentials in the static-exchange-polarization approximation for energies up to 20 eV. Our cross sections are compared with previous results obtained for cyclohexane and 1,4-dioxane, since the three molecules present similar structures. The calculated differential cross sections for these three molecules present similarities, except at low scattering angles, where the differential cross sections of tetrahydropyran present a sharp increase due to the permanent dipole moment of the molecule. The similarities observed in the cross sections reveal that the molecular geometry plays an important role in the description of scattering process. We also compared our calculated elastic integral cross section for tetrahydropyran with experimental total cross sections data available in the literature and found a good qualitative agreement between both results.

  11. Code System to Calculate Group-Averaged Cross Sections Using the Collision Probability Method.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-05-17

    Version 00 This program calculates group-averaged cross sections for specific zones in a one-dimensional geometry. ROLAIDS-CPM is an extension of ROLAIDS from the PSR-315/AMPX-77 package. The main extension is the capability to use the collision probability method for a slab- or cylinder-geometry rather than the interface-currents method. This new version allows slowing down of neutrons in the energy range where the scattering is elastic and upscattering does not occur. The scattering sources are assumed tomore » be flat and isotropic in the different zones. The extra assumption of cosine currents at the interfaces of the zones (interface currents method) is not necessary for the collision probability method.« less

  12. Earth-crossing asteroids - Orbital classes, collision rates with earth, and origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, E. M.; Williams, J. G.; Helin, E. F.; Wolfe, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Asteroids that can intersect the orbit of the earth are discussed, which include Aten asteroids (semimajor axis (a) less than 1 AU, aphelion greater than 0.983 AU), Apollo asteroids (a greater than 1 AU, perihelion less than 1.017 AU), and Amor asteroids (perihelion distance between 1.017 and 1.3 AU). The principal sources of earth-crossing asteroids appear to be extinct comet nuclei and collision fragments from regions in the main asteroid belt. The total population of earth-crossers is estimated at 13,000, of which approximately 8% are Atens, 50% are Apollos, and 40% are Amors,and the present collision rate of such asteroids with the earth is estimated at about 3.5 objects, to absolute magnitude 18, per million years.

  13. Code System to Calculate Group-Averaged Cross Sections Using the Collision Probability Method.

    SciTech Connect

    KRUIJF, W. D.

    1995-05-17

    Version 00 This program calculates group-averaged cross sections for specific zones in a one-dimensional geometry. ROLAIDS-CPM is an extension of ROLAIDS from the PSR-315/AMPX-77 package. The main extension is the capability to use the collision probability method for a slab- or cylinder-geometry rather than the interface-currents method. This new version allows slowing down of neutrons in the energy range where the scattering is elastic and upscattering does not occur. The scattering sources are assumed to be flat and isotropic in the different zones. The extra assumption of cosine currents at the interfaces of the zones (interface currents method) is not necessary for the collision probability method.

  14. Ab initio cross sections for low-energy inelastic H+Na collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A. K.; Grosser, J.; Hahne, J.; Menzel, T.

    1999-09-01

    We report ab initio results for the integral cross section of the process H+Na(3s)-->H+Na(3p) for collision energies from the threshold (2.1 eV) to 600 eV. We achieve a reasonable agreement with the experimental data, which are available for energies above 10 eV. The main contributions to the cross section come from a rotational coupling mechanism in the NaH triplet molecular system and from a curve-crossing mechanism in the singlet system. At very low energy (2.1-2.4 eV), the process is governed by a centrifugal barrier in the exit channel leading to orbital resonances. The Landau-Zener model provides a reasonable qualitative description of the radial coupling mechanism at high energies, but fails below 10 eV.

  15. Differential cross sections of D*+/- photoproduction in ep collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitweg, J.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Yoshida, R.; Zhang, H.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Anselmo, F.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Romeo, G. Cara; Castellini, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; de Pasquale, S.; Pesci, A.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Garcia, Y. Zamora; Zichichi, A.; Amelung, C.; Bornheim, A.; Brock, I.; Coböken, K.; Crittenden, J.; Deffner, R.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Grothe, M.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, K.; Heinz, L.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Paul, E.; Pfeiffer, M.; Rembser, Ch.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cottingham, W. N.; Foster, B.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Hayes, M. E.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Piccioni, D.; Roff, D. G.; Tapper, R. J.; Arneodo, M.; Ayad, R.; Capua, M.; Garfagnini, A.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Jing, Z.; Liu, W.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sampson, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Jakubowski, Z.; Przybycień, M. B.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajac, J.; Duliński, Z.; Kotański, A.; Kotański, A.; Abbiendi, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Cases, G.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Glasman, C.; Göttlicher, P.; Große-Knetter, J.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Heßling, H.; Iga, Y.; Johnson, K. F.; Kasemann, M.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Lindemann, L.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Mainusch, J.; Mańczak, O.; Milewski, J.; Monteiro, T.; Ng, J. S. T.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Park, I. H.; Pellegrino, A.; Pelucchi, F.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Savin, A. A.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Surrow, B.; Tassi, E.; Voß, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zeuner, W.; Burow, B. D.; Grabosch, H. J.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P.; Maccarrone, G.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Markun, P.; Trefzger, T.; Wölfle, S.; Bromley, J. T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Saxon, D. H.; Sinclair, L. E.; Strickland, E.; Utley, M. L.; Waugh, R.; Wilson, A. S.; Bohnet, I.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Meyer-Larsen, A.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Cole, J. E.; Harris, V. L.; Howell, G.; Hung, B. H. Y.; Lamberti, L.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Pavel, N.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Sideris, D.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Nam, S. W.; Park, H. S.; Park, S. K.; Barreiro, F.; Fernandez, J. P.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; Martinez, M.; del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; Terron, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Murray, W. N.; Ochs, A.; Riveline, M.; Stairs, D. G.; St-Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Tsurugai, T.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Bokel, C.; Botje, M.; Brümmer, N.; Chlebana, F.; Engelen, J.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; van Sighem, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vossebeld, J.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Nylander, P.; Romanowski, T. A.; Blaikley, H. E.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Edmonds, J. K.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; McFall, J. D.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Tickner, J. R.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Waters, D. S.; Yip, T.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; dal Corso, F.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Okrasiński, J. R.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Shah, T. P.; Barberis, E.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; van Hook, M.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Schwarzer, O.; Walenta, A. H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Doeker, T.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fleck, J. I.; Inuzuka, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Umemori, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Matsushita, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Petrucci, M. C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Brkic, M.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Polenz, S.; Sampson, C. R.; Simmons, D.; Teuscher, R. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Sutton, M. R.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlak, R.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Adamus, M.; Coldewey, C.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Zer-Zion, D.; Badgett, W. F.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Dasu, S.; Foudas, C.; Loveless, R. J.; Mattingly, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Bhadra, S.; Frisken, W. R.; Khakzad, M.; Schmidke, W. B.

    1997-02-01

    Inclusive photoproduction of D*+/- in ep collisions at HERA has been measured with the ZEUS detector for photon-proton centre of mass energies in the range 115 < W < 280 GeV and photon virtuality Q2 < 4 GeV2. The cross section σep -> D* X integrated over the kinematic region pD*⊥ > 3 GeV and -1.5 < ηD* < 1.0 is (10.6 +/- 1.7 (stat.) +/-1.61.3 (syst.)) nb. Differential cross sections as functions of pD*⊥, ηD* and W are given. The data are compared with two next-to-leading order perturbative QCD predictions. For a calculation using a massive charm scheme the predicted cross sections are smaller than the measured ones. A recent calculation using a massless charm scheme is in agreement with the data.

  16. Collision cross section calculations for polyatomic ions considering rotating diatomic/linear gas molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos Hogan, Christopher J.

    2014-11-21

    Structural characterization of ions in the gas phase is facilitated by measurement of ion collision cross sections (CCS) using techniques such as ion mobility spectrometry. Further information is gained from CCS measurement when comparison is made between measurements and accurately predicted CCSs for model ion structures and the gas in which measurements are made. While diatomic gases, namely molecular nitrogen and air, are being used in CCS measurement with increasingly prevalency, the majority of studies in which measurements are compared to predictions use models in which gas molecules are spherical or non-rotating, which is not necessarily appropriate for diatomic gases. Here, we adapt a momentum transfer based CCS calculation approach to consider rotating, diatomic gas molecule collisions with polyatomic ions, and compare CCS predictions with a diatomic gas molecule to those made with a spherical gas molecular for model spherical ions, tetra-alkylammonium ions, and multiply charged polyethylene glycol ions. CCS calculations are performed using both specular-elastic and diffuse-inelastic collisions rules, which mimic negligible internal energy exchange and complete thermal accommodation, respectively, between gas molecule and ion. The influence of the long range ion-induced dipole potential on calculations is also examined with both gas molecule models. In large part we find that CCSs calculated with specular-elastic collision rules decrease, while they increase with diffuse-inelastic collision rules when using diatomic gas molecules. Results clearly show the structural model of both the ion and gas molecule, the potential energy field between ion and gas molecule, and finally the modeled degree of kinetic energy exchange between ion and gas molecule internal energy are coupled to one another in CCS calculations, and must be considered carefully to obtain results which agree with measurements.

  17. Collision cross section calculations for polyatomic ions considering rotating diatomic/linear gas molecules.

    PubMed

    Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Hogan, Christopher J

    2014-11-21

    Structural characterization of ions in the gas phase is facilitated by measurement of ion collision cross sections (CCS) using techniques such as ion mobility spectrometry. Further information is gained from CCS measurement when comparison is made between measurements and accurately predicted CCSs for model ion structures and the gas in which measurements are made. While diatomic gases, namely molecular nitrogen and air, are being used in CCS measurement with increasingly prevalency, the majority of studies in which measurements are compared to predictions use models in which gas molecules are spherical or non-rotating, which is not necessarily appropriate for diatomic gases. Here, we adapt a momentum transfer based CCS calculation approach to consider rotating, diatomic gas molecule collisions with polyatomic ions, and compare CCS predictions with a diatomic gas molecule to those made with a spherical gas molecular for model spherical ions, tetra-alkylammonium ions, and multiply charged polyethylene glycol ions. CCS calculations are performed using both specular-elastic and diffuse-inelastic collisions rules, which mimic negligible internal energy exchange and complete thermal accommodation, respectively, between gas molecule and ion. The influence of the long range ion-induced dipole potential on calculations is also examined with both gas molecule models. In large part we find that CCSs calculated with specular-elastic collision rules decrease, while they increase with diffuse-inelastic collision rules when using diatomic gas molecules. Results clearly show the structural model of both the ion and gas molecule, the potential energy field between ion and gas molecule, and finally the modeled degree of kinetic energy exchange between ion and gas molecule internal energy are coupled to one another in CCS calculations, and must be considered carefully to obtain results which agree with measurements. PMID:25416874

  18. S((1)D) + ortho-D2 Reaction Dynamics at Low Collision Energies: Complementary Crossed Molecular Beam Experiments and Theoretical Investigations.

    PubMed

    Lara, Manuel; Chefdeville, Simon; Larregaray, Pascal; Bonnet, Laurent; Launay, Jean-Michel; Costes, Michel; Naulin, Christian; Bergeat, Astrid

    2016-07-14

    The excitation function of the S((1)D) + D2 reaction was determined in a crossed molecular beam apparatus for collision energies ranging from 1817 to 47 J mol(-1) in the near-cold regime. A very good overall agreement was found between experimental data and the theoretical results obtained using the ab initio potential energy surface built by Ho and coworkers and different methods: time-independent quantum dynamics (QM), semiclassical mean potential capture theory (sc-MPCT), and quasi-classical trajectories (QCT). The general trend of the experimental excitation function is well reproduced in most of the range by a simple capture calculation with an R(-6) dispersion potential. The present results are discussed in the light of previous studies on the isotopic variants S((1)D) + H2 and HD. PMID:26986452

  19. Electron collisions with phenol: Total, integral, differential, and momentum transfer cross sections and the role of multichannel coupling effects on the elastic channel

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Romarly F. da; Oliveira, Eliane M. de; Lima, Marco A. P.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Varella, Márcio T. do N.; Jones, Darryl B.; Brunger, Michael J.; Blanco, Francisco; Colmenares, Rafael; and others

    2015-03-14

    We report theoretical and experimental total cross sections for electron scattering by phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). The experimental data were obtained with an apparatus based in Madrid and the calculated cross sections with two different methodologies, the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR), and the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP). The SMCPP method in the N{sub open}-channel coupling scheme, at the static-exchange-plus-polarization approximation, is employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies ranging from 5.0 eV to 50 eV. We discuss the multichannel coupling effects in the calculated cross sections, in particular how the number of excited states included in the open-channel space impacts upon the convergence of the elastic cross sections at higher collision energies. The IAM-SCAR approach was also used to obtain the elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) and for correcting the experimental total cross sections for the so-called forward angle scattering effect. We found a very good agreement between our SMCPP theoretical differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections and experimental data for benzene (a molecule differing from phenol by replacing a hydrogen atom in benzene with a hydroxyl group). Although some discrepancies were found for lower energies, the agreement between the SMCPP data and the DCSs obtained with the IAM-SCAR method improves, as expected, as the impact energy increases. We also have a good agreement among the present SMCPP calculated total cross section (which includes elastic, 32 inelastic electronic excitation processes and ionization contributions, the latter estimated with the binary-encounter-Bethe model), the IAM-SCAR total cross section, and the experimental data when the latter is corrected for the forward angle scattering effect [Fuss et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 042702 (2013)].

  20. Absolute Doubly Differential Cross Sections for Ejection of Electrons in - and Five-Body Collisions of 20 TO 114-KEV Protons on Atomic and Molecular Hydrogen.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, George W., III

    A crossed-beam experiment was performed to detect ejected electrons from ground-state atomic and molecular hydrogen after collisions with 20- to 114-keV protons. Because a pure atomic hydrogen target is not readily attainable, a method has been devised which yields atomic to molecular hydrogen doubly differential cross section (DDCS) ratios. Since the molecular hydrogen DDCS's were independently measured, the atomic cross sections could be directly calculated. Absolute cross sections differential in electron energy and angle were measured for electron energies ranging from 1.5 to 400 eV and scattering angles from 15^circ to 165^circ with respect to the fast beam. Electrons and ions were energy analyzed by an electrostatic hemispherical analyzer, which has an energy resolution of 5% and is rotatable in the scattering plane about the collision center. Atomic hydrogen is produced by a radio-frequency discharge of the type devised by J. Slevin. Hydrogen gas effuses from a 1 mm diameter nozzle in a nearly cos theta distribution. The projectile beam intersects the thermal gas targets 4 mm below the tip of the nozzle. Dissociation fractions of 74% and atomic hydrogen densities of 7 times 10 ^{11} cm^ {-3} were typical. The fraction of dissociated hydrogen was measured by detecting the reduced 9-eV ion signal from the molecular target when the RF is on. This characteristic ion signal originates from the coulomb breakup of the molecule and dissociative channels of excited H _sp{2}{+}. An auxiliary experiment was performed to determine the target densities with the aid of a low-resolution magnetic mass spectrometer after the slow recoil ions were extracted from the collision volume by a weak electric field. Comparisons of the atomic cross sections are made with theories such as the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method, the plane-wave Born approximation (PWBA) and the continuum-distorted-wave eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) approximation.

  1. Search for the production of an excited bottom quark decaying to tW in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhu, S.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Awad, A.; El-Khateeb, E.; Mohamed, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    A search is presented for a singly produced excited bottom quark (b*) decaying to a top quark and a W boson in the all-hadronic, lepton+jets, and dilepton final states in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. Data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 are used. No significant excess of events is observed with respect to standard model expectations. We set limits at 95% confidence on the product of the b* quark production cross section and its branching fraction to tW. The cross section limits are interpreted for scenarios including left-handed, right-handed, and vector-like couplings of the b* quark and are presented in the two-dimensional coupling plane based on the production and decay coupling constants. The masses of the left-handed, right-handed, and vector-like b* quark states are excluded at 95% confidence below 1390, 1430, and 1530 GeV, respectively, for benchmark couplings. This analysis gives the most stringent limits on the mass of the b∗ quark to date. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Search for the production of an excited bottom quark decaying to tW in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-01-27

    Our search is presented for a singly produced excited bottom quark (b*) decaying to a top quark and a W boson in the all-hadronic, lepton+jets, and dilepton final states in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. Data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 are used. No significant excess of events is observed with respect to standard model expectations. We set limits at 95% confidence on the product of the b* quark production cross section and its branching fraction to tW. Furthermore, the cross section limits are interpreted formore » scenarios including left-handed, right-handed, and vector-like couplings of the b* quark and are presented in the two-dimensional coupling plane based on the production and decay coupling constants. The masses of the left-handed, right-handed, and vectorlike b* quark states are excluded at 95% confidence below 1390, 1430, and 1530 GeV, respectively, for benchmark couplings. This analysis gives the most stringent limits on the mass of the b* quark to date.« less

  3. Search for the production of an excited bottom quark decaying to tW in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-29

    Our search is presented for a singly produced excited bottom quark (b*) decaying to a top quark and a W boson in the all-hadronic, lepton+jets, and dilepton final states in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. Data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 are used. No significant excess of events is observed with respect to standard model expectations. We set limits at 95% confidence on the product of the b* quark production cross section and its branching fraction to tW. Furthermore, the cross section limits are interpreted for scenarios including left-handed, right-handed, and vector-like couplings of the b* quark and are presented in the two-dimensional coupling plane based on the production and decay coupling constants. The masses of the left-handed, right-handed, and vectorlike b* quark states are excluded at 95% confidence below 1390, 1430, and 1530 GeV, respectively, for benchmark couplings. This analysis gives the most stringent limits on the mass of the b* quark to date.

  4. Total and state-to-state electron capture and excitation cross-sections for Li+, Be{}^{2+}, and {{\\rm{B}}}^{3+} colliding with {\\rm{H}}(1\\;s) at low-to-intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Gutiérrez, F. J.; Cabrera-Trujillo, R.

    2016-01-01

    The electron capture process plays an important role as a diagnostic tool for measuring the temperature, plasma rotation, and impurity densities of plasma in tokamaks. In this work we report the electron capture and excitation cross-sections for Li+, Be{}2+, and {{{B}}}3+ colliding with atomic hydrogen in the collision energy range 0.25-25 keV/amu. For this, we solve numerically the time dependent Schrödinger equation by using a finite difference approach. We model the ion projectile interaction with the target using a pseudopotential obtained within a Hartree-Fock method. We use classical trajectories, obtained self-consistently, for the projectile at collision energies lower than 2 keV/amu and a straight line trajectory at high collision energies. We report new results for the total, n=2,3, and 4 state projectile electron capture cross-section, as well as the n = 2-state target excitation cross-section. We find a good agreement between our cross-section results when compared with available theoretical and experimental data found in the literature. Finally, we find that the electron capture probability, as a function of the impact parameter, shows Stückelberg oscillations at low collision energies for the n = 2 of Be+ and n = 3 of {{{B}}}2+, in the radial range (large impact parameters). Our results assess the validity of the adiabatic basis set at low collision energies and confirm the use of a finite difference method as an accurate approach to study a time-dependent process in charge exchange collisions. A discussion of our results is provided.

  5. Collision geometry dependence of the thermal excitation-energy deposition in 8-15 GeV/c hadron-Au reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Soltz, R; Newby, R J; Klay, J; Heffner, M; Beaulieu, L; Lefort, T; Kwiatkowski, K; Viola, V E

    2008-05-08

    The mean number of primary hadron-nucleon scatterings (<{nu}>) and mean impact parameter () are extracted from the distribution of fast protons in 14.6 GeV p-Au and 8.0 GeV {pi}-Au and {bar p}-Au collisions. The mean excitation energy per residue nucleon (E*/A) and fast and thermal light particle multiplicities are studied as a function of collision geometry.

  6. Stationary electron velocity distribution function in crossed electric and magnetic fields with collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Shagayda, Andrey

    2012-08-15

    Analytical studies and numerical simulations show that the electron velocity distribution function in a Hall thruster discharge with crossed electric and magnetic fields is not Maxwellian. This is due to the fact that the mean free path between collisions is greater than both the Larmor radius and the characteristic dimensions of the discharge channel. However in numerical models of Hall thrusters, a hydrodynamic approach is often used to describe the electron dynamics, because discharge simulation in a fully kinetic approach requires large computing resources and is time consuming. A more accurate modeling of the electron flow in the hydrodynamic approximation requires taking into account the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution function and finding its moments, an approach that reflects the properties of electrons drifting in crossed electric and magnetic fields better than the commonly used Euler or Navier-Stokes approximations. In the present paper, an expression for the electron velocity distribution function in rarefied spatially homogeneous stationary plasma with crossed electric and magnetic fields and predominance of collisions with heavy particles is derived in the relaxation approximation. The main moments of the distribution function including longitudinal and transversal temperatures, the components of the viscous stress tensor, and of the heat flux vector are calculated. Distinctive features of the hydrodynamic description of electrons with a strongly non-equilibrium distribution function and the prospects for further development of the proposed approach for calculating the distribution function in spatially inhomogeneous plasma are discussed.

  7. Differential and total cross sections of mutual neutralization in low-energy collisions of isotopes of H++H-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkambule, Sifiso M.; Elander, Nils; Larson, Åsa; Lecointre, Julien; Urbain, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Mutual neutralization in the collisions of H+ and H- is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The quantum-mechanical ab initio model includes covalent states associated with the H (1 )+H (n ≤3 ) limits and the collision energy ranges from 1 meV to 100 eV. The reaction is theoretically studied for collisions between different isotopes of the hydrogen ions. From the partial wave scattering amplitude, the differential and total cross sections are computed. The differential cross section is analyzed in terms of forward- and backward-scattering events, showing a dominance of backward scattering which can be understood by examining the phase of the scattering amplitudes for the gerade and ungerade set of states. The isotope dependence of the total cross section is compared with the one obtained using a semiclassical multistate Landau-Zener model. The final state distribution analysis emphasizes the dominance of the n =3 channel for collisions below 10 eV, while at higher collision energies, the n =2 channel starts to become important. For collisions of ions forming a molecular system with a larger reduced mass, the n =2 channel starts to dominate at lower energies. Using a merged ion-beam apparatus, the branching ratios for mutual neutralization in H+ and H- collisions in the energy range from 11 to 185 eV are measured with position- and time-sensitive particle detectors. The measured and calculated branching ratios satisfactorily agree with respect to state contributions.

  8. Near Threshold Excitation of Molecular Nitrogen: Benchmarking Cross Sections for Upper Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, C. P.; Johnson, P. V.; Hein, J. D.; Grisanti, B.; Khakoo, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Molecular nitrogen is the major component in the atmospheres of Earth, Titan, and Triton. The airglow emissions of N2 from the atmospheres of Earth and planetary satellites have been extensively observed. Accurate, consistent cross section data is a necessity for accurate models of how upper atmospheres behave. We present electron energy-loss (EEL) derived excitation cross sections for near-threshold electron impact of N2. Differential cross sections (DCSs) and integral cross sections (ICSs) were obtained by unfolding EEL spectra in the ~6-11eV range for the A 3Σu+, B 3Πg, W 3Δu, B‧ 3Σu-, a‧ 1Σu-, a 1Πg, w 1Δu, and C 1Πu electronic states over the ~15-130° scattering angular range. Vibrationally-resolved DCSs and ICSs were obtained for stronger vibronic transitions, including the a 1Πg state, which generates the atmospherically important Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) emissions. The summed near-threshold excitation cross sections (A+...+C) generally are larger than previous measurements. Acknowledgement: This work was performed at CSUF and JPL, Caltech, under contract with NASA. We gratefully acknowledge financial support through NASA's PATM and GEO programs and NSF-PHY-RUI-0965793.

  9. Photoionization of Synchrotron-Radiation-Excited Atoms: Separating Partial Cross Sections by Full Polarization Control

    SciTech Connect

    Aloiese, S.; Meyer, M.; Cubaynes, D.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.

    2005-06-10

    Resonant atomic excitation by synchrotron radiation and subsequent ionization by a tunable dye laser is used to study the photoionization of short-lived Rydberg states in Xe. By combining circular and linear polarization of the synchrotron as well as of the laser photons the partial photoionization cross sections were separated in the region of overlapping autoionizing resonances of different symmetry and the parameters of the resonances were extracted.

  10. Measurement of the differential dijet production cross section in proton–proton collisions at

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-06-01

    A measurement of the double-differential inclusive dijet production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV is presented as a function of the dijet invariant mass and jet rapidity. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns, recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement covers the dijet mass range 0.2 TeV to 3.5 TeV and jet rapidities up to |y|=2.5. It is found to be in good agreement with next-to-leading-order QCD predictions.

  11. Excitation of helium to the n=2 states in intermediate energy H{sup {minus}} + He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kvale, T.J.; Yushan Lu; Theodosiou, C.E.; Seely, D.G.

    1996-05-01

    The first measurements and calculations of excitation of helium to the n=2 states by H{sup {minus}} impact are reported. The experimental method that was employed in these measurements was Ion Energy-Loss Spectroscopy which resulted in absolute cross section determinations. A H{sup {minus}} ion beam was accelerated into a gas target cell containing helium and the scattered H{sup {minus}} beam was magnetically separated from the other charge state components of the emerging projectile beam and directed into an energy analyzer in the decelerator terminal. The potential placed on the accelerator was varied to produce the energy-loss spectra. These spectra were analyzed in order to deduce the cross section values. Cross section predictions using the VPSA model, with explicit allowance for the internal structure of H{sup {minus}}, are also reported and will be compared to the experimentally determined cross sections.

  12. Observation of an anomalous increase in total cross sections with high vibrational excitation in the Li2 (v=0-21)+Na reactive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubahn, H.-G.; Slenczka, A.; Toennies, J. P.

    1994-07-01

    The effect of initial vibrational excitation on Li2(v,J)+Na collisions was studied experimentally and theoretically. The relative integral cross sections σ(v,J) were measured in a crossed beam experiment for vibrational states v populated thermally or by optical pumping, and for final states detected by laser induced fluorescence. It is found that σ(v,J) increases by 35±7% between v=0 and v=20, while the dependence on the initial rotational state J is insignificant, within ±5%. The effect of vibrational enhancement is about twice as large as that found for the Li2-rare gas systems for the same amount of vibrational excitation. The effect is about an order of magnitude larger than predicted by our quasiclassical trajectory calculations on a LEPS potential energy surface, thus suggesting that additional long-range potential terms ought to be included. We also attempted to measure state-selectively the LiNa (v',J') products from the thermal reaction and found an upper limit of the reactive cross section of 1 Å2. This contrasts with the trajectory calculations that predict a 20 times larger cross section; we thus conclude that the reactive part of the potential also needs to be re-evaluated.

  13. Effective collision strengths for electron impact excitations in S II. [Plasma torus of Io

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S.S.; Henry, R.J.W.; Nakazaki, S.

    1987-02-01

    Electron impact collision strengths for forbidden, semiforbidden, and allowed transitions in S II calculated using the R-matrix method are presented. Configuration interaction wave functions are used to represent the six target states included in the calculation. At low impact energies the collision strengths are dominated by resonances for several transitions. The contribution from higher partial waves is obtained in the close-coupling approximation with exchange terms omitted. Results are presented for the effective collision strengths over a wide temperature range (5000-150,000 K) of astrophysical interest. The present results for the 4S(0) yields 2P(0) transition are 20-30 percent lower than previous calculations, while for the 4S(0) yields 2D(0) transition they are in good agreement. The results are approximately 30 percent higher than those of Ho and Henry (1983) for the 4S(0) yields 2P(0) transition at 80,000 K, and the difference between the two results increases with decreasing temperatures (under 80,000 K). 38 references.

  14. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Oscillation structures in elastic and electron capture cross sections for H+-H collisions in Debye plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Wang, J. G.; Krstic, P. S.; Janev, R. K.

    2010-10-01

    We find that the number of vibrational states in the ground potential of a H2+ molecular ion embedded in the Debye plasma and the number of Regge oscillations in the resonant charge transfer cross section of the H+ + H collision system in the plasma are quasi-conserved when the Debye radius D is larger than 1.4a0. The elastic and resonant charge transfer processes in the H+ + H collision have been studied in the 0.1 meV-100 eV collision energy range for a wide range of Debye radii using a highly accurate calculation based on the modified ab initio multireference configuration interaction code. Remarkable plasma screening effects have been found in both the molecular structure and the collision dynamics of this system. Shape resonances, Regge and glory oscillations have been found in the integral cross sections in the considered energy range even for strong interaction screening, showing their ubiquitous nature.

  15. The effect of halo nuclear density on reaction cross-section for light ion collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. A. M.; Nour El-Din, M. S. M.; Ellithi, A.; Ismail, E.; Hosny, H.

    2015-08-01

    In the framework of the optical limit approximation (OLA), the reaction cross-section for halo nucleus — stable nucleus collision at intermediate energy, has been studied. The projectile nuclei are taken to be one-neutron halo (1NHP) and two-neutron halo (2NHP). The calculations are carried out for Gaussian-Gaussian (GG), Gaussian-Oscillator (GO), and Gaussian-2S (G2S) densities for each considered projectile. As a target, the stable nuclei in the range 4-28 of the mass number are used. An analytic expression of the phase shift function has been derived. The zero range approximation is considered in the calculations. Also, the in-medium effect is studied. The obtained results are analyzed and compared with the geometrical reaction cross-section and the available experimental data.

  16. Measurement of the production cross-section in proton-proton collisions via the decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Beteta, C. Abellán; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elena, E.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sánchez, A. Martín; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Alvarez, A. Pazos; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Trigo, E. Perez; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2015-07-01

    The production of the state in proton-proton collisions is probed via its decay to the final state with the LHCb detector, in the rapidity range and in the meson transverse-momentum range . The cross-section for prompt production of mesons relative to the prompt cross-section is measured, for the first time, to be at a centre-of-mass energy using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb, and at using 2.0 fb. The uncertainties quoted are, in order, statistical, systematic, and that on the ratio of branching fractions of the and decays to the final state. In addition, the inclusive branching fraction of -hadron decays into mesons is measured, for the first time, to be , where the third uncertainty includes also the uncertainty on the inclusive branching fraction from -hadron decays. The difference between the and meson masses is determined to be.

  17. Charge transfer cross sections for Hg + , Xe + , and Cs + in collision with various metals and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, J. A.; Vroom, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Cross sections for charge transfer between Hg+, Xe+, and Cs+ and the atomic species Fe, Mo, Al, Ti, Ta, and C have been measured in the ion energy range from 1 to 5000 eV. In general, the cross sections for charge transfer were found to be less than 2×10-15 cm2 for most processes over the total energy range. The one exception is Hg+ in collision with Ti. The reactants are all open shell atomic species and in most cases where the charge transfer process is exothermic, several resonant pathways exist leading to the products. Some discussion of possible reaction paths is given. The techniques used to form neutral beams of the various species studied is included.

  18. Electron-impact excitation of argon: Optical emission cross sections in the range of 300-2500 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Boffard, John B. Chiaro, B.; Weber, Tobin; Lin, Chun C.

    2007-11-15

    We present measurements of optical emission cross sections for excitation from the ground state of the Ar atom into over 185 excited atomic and ionic levels. Measurements were made at electron energies of 25, 50, and 100 eV, at a gas pressure of 5 mTorr. Due to radiation trapping of resonance levels, many of the cross sections depend on the target pressure. Detailed pressure dependence for over 50 levels is also provided. The energy dependence of the excitation cross sections for over 175 levels in the energy range of 0-250 eV are provided as fitted parameters for a standard analytical function.

  19. Ionization Cross Sections and Dissociation Channels of DNA Bases by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    Free secondary electrons are the most abundant secondary species in ionizing radiation. Their role in DNA damage, both direct and indirect, is an active area of research. While indirect damage by free radicals, particularly by the hydroxyl radical generated by electron collision with water. is relatively well studied, damage by direct electron collision with DNA is less well understood. Only recently Boudaiffa et al. demonstrated that electrons at energies well below ionization thresholds can induce substantial yields of single- and double-strand breaks in DNA by a resonant, dissociative attachment process. This study attracted renewed interest in electron collisions with DNA, especially in the low energy region. At higher energies ionization becomes important. While Monte Carlo track simulations of radiation damage always include ionization, the probability of dissociative ionization, i.e., simultaneous ionization and dissociation, is ignored. Just like dissociative attachment, dissociative ionization may be an important contributor to double-strand breaks since the radicals and ions produced by dissociative ionization, located in the vicinity of the DNA coil, can readily interact with other parts of the DNA. Using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) formulation, we calculated the ionization cross sections of the four DNA bases, adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine, by electrons at energies from threshold to 1 KeV. The present calculation gives cross sections approximately 20% lower than the results by Bemhardt and Paretzke using the Deutsch-Mark and Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The difference is most likely due to the lack of a shielding term in the dipole potential used in the Deutsch-Mark and BEB formalisms. The dissociation channels of ionization for the bases are currently being studied.

  20. Integrated cross sections for excitation of nuclear isomers by inelastic photon scattering at giant resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáfár, József; Lakosi, László

    2014-02-01

    In the view of the evidences arising from our experimental and theoretical studies, the long-standing picture of a two-humped excitation function for photoexcitation of isomers cannot be confirmed. Whereas the first maximum (at the photoneutron threshold) of the cross section of nuclear photon scattering can be attributed to inelastic (compound) scattering, the second large peak at about giant dipole resonance is mostly due to the elastic (direct) process. A second large peak or increase reported to appear in isomer production has been shown to be practically vanishing. On realizing such a situation, calculated estimates have been given for saturated integral cross section values for isomer activation, based on photoabsorption cross sections taken from the usual Lorentzian parametrization up to the photoneutron threshold. Results compare reasonably well to available experimental data acquired by gamma-ray spectrometry in a large set of stable nuclides having long-lived isomeric states.

  1. Differential cross sections for electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of N sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Brunger, M.J.; Teubner, P.J.O. )

    1990-02-01

    Differential cross sections for the electron-impact excitation of the first ten electronic states of N{sub 2} have been determined at five incident energies ranging from 15 to 50 eV. These differential cross sections were obtained for the scattering range 10{degree}--90{degree} by analyzing electron-energy-loss spectra in N{sub 2} at a number of fixed scattering angles within that range. The present study represents a comprehensive remeasurement of the earlier work of Cartwright and co-workers (Phys. Rev. A 16, 1013 (1977)) and was undertaken with a view to resolving certain anomalies which have been reported in the literature when the earlier cross-section set has been applied to model calculations of swarm parameters.

  2. Collision-Induced Dissociation Cross Sections Relevant to Atmospheric Loss from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Hayley N.; Tully, Cathy; Johnson, Robert

    2015-11-01

    The flow onto an atmosphere of the solar wind plasma, a plasma trapped in a planetary magnetic field, or a local pick-up ion plasma produces chemistry, heating and atmospheric loss. These processes, which affect its evolution, are often lumped together as atmospheric sputtering (Johnson 1994). When the atmosphere near the exobase is atomic, then laboratory data, calculations or scaled models for the collision cross sections are usually available for use in Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric sputtering. However, atmospheres on a number of planetary bodies have molecules at the exobase and in the corona for which cross section data is often not available. Of particular interest are studies of the atmosphere of Mars in which there can be are significant levels of CO2 and CO in the exobase region. Here we present new calculations using improved potential energy surfaces of collision-induced dissociation of incident O atoms (~10eV-1keV), formed by neutralization of pick-up O+ incident on CO and CO2 molecules and compare their importance to our earlier estimates (e.g., Johnson and Liu 1998; Johnson et al. 2002) and discuss their relevance to simulations of atmospheric loss from Mars.

  3. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of two tandem cylinders in cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohany, A.; Ziada, S.

    2005-11-01

    The aeroacoustic response of two tandem cylinders in cross-flow is investigated experimentally. Eleven spacing ratios between the cylinders, in the range of L/D=1.2 4.5, have been tested to investigate the effect of the gap between the cylinders on the excitation mechanism of acoustic resonance. During the tests, the acoustic cross-modes of the duct housing the cylinders are self-excited. Similar tests are performed on isolated cylinders. The aeroacoustic response of the tandem cylinders is found to be considerably different from that of isolated cylinders. For isolated cylinders, acoustic resonance of a given mode occurs over a single range of flow velocity and is excited by the natural vortex shedding process observed in the absence of acoustic resonance. In the case of tandem cylinders with a spacing ratio inside the proximity region, L/D is less than 3.5, the resonance occurs over two different ranges of flow velocity. One of these ranges is similar to that observed for isolated cylinders and the other occurs at much lower flow velocities. The latter resonance range seems to be triggered by the instability of the separated flow in the gap between the cylinders. Outside the proximity region, the aeroacoustic response of the two tandem cylinders is similar to that of isolated cylinder.

  4. Partial cross sections of doubly excited helium below the ionization threshold I{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y.H.; Puettner, R.; Poiguine, M.; Kaindl, G.; Hentges, R.; Viefhaus, J.; Becker, U.; Rost, J.M.

    2004-04-01

    Partial photoionization cross sections (PCSs), {sigma}{sub n}, leading to final ionic states of helium, He{sup +}(n), were measured at BESSY II in the region of doubly excited helium up to the ionization threshold I{sub 7} of He{sup +}. The experiments were performed with a time-of-flight (TOF) electron spectrometer and high photon resolution, {delta}E congruent with 6 meV. The results of these measurements are a most critical assessment of the decay dynamics of double-excitation resonances and agree well with those of recent eigenchannel R-matrix calculations. They also confirm the propensity rules set up for the autoionization of doubly excitated states. The mirroring behavior in the PCSs predicted recently by Liu and Starace is only partially observed. By discussing the formulas given by these authors in a more general context, the specific behavior of the PCSs of helium with respect to mirroring can be understood. The mirroring compensation properties between the 'fractional partial cross sections' {gamma}{sub P}={sigma}{sub P}/{sigma}{sub T} and {gamma}{sub Q}={sigma}{sub Q}/{sigma}{sub T}, with {sigma}{sub T}={sigma}{sub P}+{sigma}{sub Q}, are introduced and discussed.

  5. Rotational Energy Transfer Cross Sections in N2-N2 Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Green, Sheldon; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Rotational inelastic transitions of N2 have been studied in the coupled state (CS, also called centrifugal sudden) and infinite-order-sudden (IOS) approximations, using the N2-N2 rigid-rotor potential of van der Avoird et al. For benchmarking purposes, close coupling (CC) calculations have also been carried out over a limited energy range and for even j - even j collisions only. Both the CC and CS cross sections have been obtained with and without exchange symmetry, whereas exchange is neglected in the IOS calculations. The CS results track the CC cross sections rather well. At total energies between 113 to 219 cm(exp -1) the average deviation is 14%. The deviation decrease with increasing energy, indicating that the CS approximation can be used as a substitute at higher energies when the CC calculations become impractical. Comparison between the CS and IOS cross sections at the high energy end of the CS calculation, 500 - 680 cm(exp-1), shows significant differences between the two. In addition, the IOS results exhibits sensitivity to the amount of inelasticity and the results for large DELTA J transitions are subjected to bigger errors. At total energy 113 cm(exp -1) and above, the average deviation between state-to-state cross sections calculated with even and odd exchange symmetries is 1.5%.

  6. Integral cross sections for electron impact excitation of vibrational and electronic states in phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Neves, R. F. C.; Jones, D. B.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Ratnavelu, K.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-05-21

    We report on measurements of integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of composite vibrational modes and electronic-states in phenol, where the energy range of those experiments was 15–250 eV. There are currently no other results against which we can directly compare those measured data. We also report results from our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction computations, namely, for the inelastic ICS (all discrete electronic states and neutral dissociation) and the total ionisation ICS. In addition, for the relevant dipole-allowed excited electronic states, we also report f-scaled Born-level and energy-corrected and f-scaled Born-level (BEf-scaled) ICS. Where possible, our measured and calculated ICSs are compared against one another with the general level of accord between them being satisfactory to within the measurement uncertainties.

  7. Integral cross sections for electron impact excitation of vibrational and electronic states in phenol.

    PubMed

    Neves, R F C; Jones, D B; Lopes, M C A; Blanco, F; García, G; Ratnavelu, K; Brunger, M J

    2015-05-21

    We report on measurements of integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of composite vibrational modes and electronic-states in phenol, where the energy range of those experiments was 15-250 eV. There are currently no other results against which we can directly compare those measured data. We also report results from our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction computations, namely, for the inelastic ICS (all discrete electronic states and neutral dissociation) and the total ionisation ICS. In addition, for the relevant dipole-allowed excited electronic states, we also report f-scaled Born-level and energy-corrected and f-scaled Born-level (BEf-scaled) ICS. Where possible, our measured and calculated ICSs are compared against one another with the general level of accord between them being satisfactory to within the measurement uncertainties. PMID:26001459

  8. Intermediate-energy differential and integral cross sections for vibrational excitation in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Duque, H. V.; Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Pettifer, Z.; Silva, G. B. da; Limão-Vieira, P.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; White, R. D.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-06-07

    Differential and integral cross section measurements, for incident electron energies in the 20–50 eV range, are reported for excitation of several composite vibrational modes in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). Optimisation and frequency calculations, using GAUSSIAN 09 at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level, were also undertaken for the two most abundant conformers of THFA, with results being reported for their respective mode classifications and excitation energies. Those calculations assisted us in the experimental assignments of the composite features observed in our measured energy loss spectra. There are, to the best of our knowledge, no other experimental or theoretical data currently available in the literature against which we can compare the present results.

  9. Intermediate energy cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D. B.; Ellis-Gibbings, L.; García, G.; Nixon, K. L.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-09-07

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) and integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine, at incident electron energies in the range 15–50 eV. The scattered electron angular range for the DCS measurements was 15°–90°. The measurements at the DCS-level are the first to be reported for vibrational-excitation in pyrimidine via electron impact, while for the ICS we extend the results from the only previous condensed-phase study [P. L. Levesque, M. Michaud, and L. Sanche, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094701 (2005)], for electron energies ⩽12 eV, to higher energies. Interestingly, the trend in the magnitude of the lower energy condensed-phase ICSs is much smaller when compared to the corresponding gas phase results. As there is no evidence for the existence of any shape-resonances, in the available pyrimidine total cross sections [Baek et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 032702 (2013); Fuss et al., ibid. 88, 042702 (2013)], between 10 and 20 eV, this mismatch in absolute magnitude between the condensed-phase and gas-phase ICSs might be indicative for collective-behaviour effects in the condensed-phase results.

  10. Pressure Dependence of Excitation Cross Sections for Resonant Levels of Rare Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Michael D.; Chilton, J. Ethan; Lin, Chun C.

    2000-06-01

    In the rare gases, the excited n'p^5ns and n'p^5nd levels with J = 1 are optically coupled to ground as well as lower lying p levels. Resonant photons emitted when the atom decays to ground can be reabsorbed by another ground-state atom. At low gas pressures this reabsorption occurs infrequently, but at higher pressures becomes increasingly likely until the resonant transition is completely suppressed. This enhances the cascade transitions into lower p levels, resulting in pressure dependent optical emission cross sections. This reabsorption process can be understood quantitatively with a model developed by Heddle et al(D. W. O. Heddle and N. J. Samuel, J. Phys. B 3), 1593 (1970).. The radiation from transitions into the nonresonant levels often lie in the ir, while the resonant radiation is always in the uv spectral region. Using a Fourier-transform spectrometer, one can measure the cross sections for the ir transitions as a function of pressure. The Heddle model can be fit to these data with the use of theoretical values for the Einstein A coefficients. This provides a test of the accuracy of calculated A values. Discussion will include cross section measurements for Ne, Ar, and Kr excited by electron impact over a range of gas pressures.

  11. R-matrix calculations of differential and integral cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, M. M.; Brigg, W. J.; Tennyson, J.

    2012-08-01

    Electron collisions with C2H5OH are studied up to impact energies of 10 eV using several theoretical models. Calculated differential cross sections suggest that the extrapolation to low angles used to extend experimental data and hence give integral cross sections significantly underestimates the large, dipole-driven forward scattering cross section. An improved set of values for the rotationally-unresolved elastic cross section is proposed; the corresponding rotationally resolved cross sections are also presented. Static exchange plus polarisation calculations find a very broad shape resonance in each of the 2A' and 2A'' symmetries in the 7 eV collision region however no resonance at lower energies, in qualitative agreement with the interpretation of some but not all dissociative electron attachment measurements.

  12. Tandem crossed-beam collision-induced dissociation of CO{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, R.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Shukla, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    Angle and energy resolved CID provides valuable information about energy transfer reaction mechanisms and role of excited states in activation and dissociation steps. Recent studies from this laboratory have demonstrated that electronic excitation is a prominent mechanism in low and moderate collision energy CID of certain molecules (acetone, nitromethane) but others (enol acetone, methane, propane, methyl nitrite) dissociate predominantly on the ground state hypersurface. A current focus of this research is angle and energy resolved CID studies of triatomic cations whose potential surfaces are relatively well described. They are a logical bridge between diatomics (which dissociate in a single vibration) and more complex polyatomics (which generally follow RRKM/QET delayed dissociation mechanisms). In the accompanying poster the authors develop a prompt dissociation kinematics model and demonstrate that CID of CS{sub 2}{sup +} is well described by this model. Although the structure and energetics of CO{sub 2}{sup +} are similar to CS{sub 2}{sup +}, the authors find rather different dissociation dynamics for the analogous O{sup +} and CO{sup +} products.

  13. The electron excited ultraviolet spectrum of HD : cross sections and transition probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, Joseph; Palle, Prahlad Vatti; Abgrall, Herve'; Roueff, Evelyne; Bhardwaj, Anil; Gustin, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed the high-resolution ultraviolet (UV) emission spectrum of molecular deuterium hydride (HD) excited by electron impact at 100 eV under optically thin, single-scattering experimental conditions. The high-resolution spectrum (FWHM=160 mA) spans the wavelength range from 900 to 1650 A and contains the two Rydberg series of HD: (sup 1)Sigma(sub u)(sup +)1s(sigma), np(si n=2, 3, 4) --> X(sup 1)Sigma(sub g)(sup +) and (sup 1)Pi(sub u)(sup +)1s(sigma), np(pi)(C,D,D',D'', n=2, 3, 4, 5) -->X(sup 1)Sigma(sub g)(sup +). A model spectrum of HD, based on newly calculated tra rovibrational coupling for the strongest band systems, B (sup 1)Sigma(sub u)(sup +)-X(sup 1)Sigma(sub g)(sup +),B'(sup 1)Sigma(sub g)(sup +)-X(sup 1)Sigma(sub g)(sup +),C(sup 1)Pi(sub u)-X(sup 1)Sigm sections for direct excitation at 100 eV of the B (sup 1)Sigma(sub u)(sup +), B' (sup 1)Sigma(sub u)(sup +), C(sup 1)Pi(sub u), and D(sup 1)Pi(sub u) states were derived from a model analysis of the state. The absolute cross section values for excitation to the B (sup 1)Sigma(sub u)(sup +), B' (sup 1)Sigma(sub u)(sup +), C(sup 1)Pi(sub u), and D(sup 1)Pi(sub u) states were found to be (2.57+/-0. and (0.17+/-0.04)x10(exp -17) sq cm, respectively. We have also determined the dissociative excitation cross sections at 100 eV for the emission of Ly(alpha) at 1216 A and Ly(Beta) at 1025 A lines, which are (7.98+/-1.12)x10(exp -18) and (0.40+/-0.10)x10(exp -18) sq cm, respectively. The summed excitation function of the closely spaced pair of lines, H Ly(alpha) and D Ly(Beta), resulting from excitation of HD, has been measured from the threshold to 800 eV and is analytically modeled with a semiempirical relation. The model cross sections are in good agreement with the corrected Ly(alpha) cross sections of Mohlmann et al. up to 2 keV. Based on measurements of H, D (2s) production cross section values by Mohlmann et al., the H, D (n=2) cross section is estimated to be 1.6 x 10(exp -17) sq cm at 100 eV.

  14. State-Selective and Total Single-Capture Cross Sections for Fast Collisions of Multiply Charged Ions with Helium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mančev, Ivan; Milojević, Nenad; Belkić, Dževad

    2013-11-01

    The four-body boundary corrected first Born approximation (CB1-4B) is used to calculate the single electron capture cross sections for collisions between fully stripped ions (He2+, Be4+, B5+ and C6+) and helium target at intermediate and high impact energies. The main goal of this study is to assess the usefulness of the CB1-4B method at intermediate and high impact energies for these collisions. Detailed comparisons with the measurements are carried out and the obtained theoretical cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data.

  15. Probing Excited Nuclear Matter Using Particle Yields from Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Alan J.

    Nuclear fragment yields from central Au + Au collisions are presented at the Bevalac beam energies of 0.25, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, and 1.15A GeV using the EOS Time Projection Chamber. For these central events, we reconstruct almost all of the charge in the forward hemisphere, y _{cm}>0. The accuracy of yield measurements and particle identification performance can be improved by fully understanding the systematics of the energy loss signal provided by the detector. With appropriate corrections, excellent hydrogen and helium isotopic identification can be achieved. These measurements are compared with the predictions from two theoretical models. One of these models is based on a statistical disassembly and is called the Quantum Statistical Model (QSM). This model is used to extract an entropy per nucleon (S/A) as a function of bombarding energy. These entropy values were found to be most sensitive to the yields of light fragments and steadily increased up to an energy of 1.15A GeV. Methods to constrain the breakup densities are discussed with the hope to reduce the uncertainty in determining the S/A values. These yield measurements have also been compared to those predicted by the microscopic transport theory Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD). QMD is the only model that attempts the ambitious goal of dynamically simulating fragment formation. This model significantly underpredicts the yield of composite fragments and poorly reproduces the shape of their distribution as a function of rapidity. However, it does match the aggregate abundance of nucleons as a function of rapidity, especially for the higher energies. Furthermore, QMD performs better than the QSM model in predicting the abundance of heavier mass fragments (A > 4) for central collisions, especially at the higher energies.

  16. Nuclear de-excitation processes following medium energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.

    1986-09-01

    As heavy ion reaction studies have progressed from beam energies below 10 MeV/nucleon to higher energies, many non-equilibrium reaction phenomena have been observed. Among these are nucleon emission with velocities in excess of the beam velocity, incomplete momentum transfer to evaporation residue and fission-like fragments, ..gamma..-rays with energies in excess of 100 MeV, and ..pi../sup 0/ production when beam energies are below the threshold for production by the nucleon-nucleon collision mechanism. Additionally, prefission neutrons have been observed in excess of numbers expected from equilibrium models. A few of the approaches which have been applied to these phenomena are as follows: Intranuclear cascade: two body collisions are assumed to mediate the equilibration. The geometry and momentum space is followed semiclassically. The approach has many successes though it may suffer in a few applications is not following holes; TDHF considers one body processes only; in the energy regime of interest, two body processes are important so that this may not be a viable approach; Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck or Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU/VUU) equations combine both one body and two body dynamics. The spatial and momentum evolution of the reactions are followed in a mean field. These should be the Cadillacs of the models. They are computationally tedious, and sometimes significant approximations are made in order to achieve computational tract ability; models of collective deceleration. A very simple model approach is discussed to interpret these phenomena, the Boltzmann master equation (BME). The hybrid model was the first to be applied to the question of heavy ion precompound decay, and the BME second. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. A search for an excited muon decaying to a muon and two jets in pp collisions at \\sqrt{s}\\;=\\;8\\;{\\rm{TeV}} with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, B. H.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. 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F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; C-L Tseng, J.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Boeriu, O. E. Vickey; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.; The ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    A new search signature for excited leptons is explored. Excited muons are sought in the channel {pp}\\to μ {μ }* \\to μ μ {{jet}} {{jet}}, assuming both the production and decay occur via a contact interaction. The analysis is based on 20.3 fb‑1 of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of \\sqrt{s} = 8 {{TeV}} taken with the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. No evidence of excited muons is found, and limits are set at the 95% confidence level on the cross section times branching ratio as a function of the excited-muon mass {m}{μ * }. For {m}{μ * } between 1.3 and 3.0 TeV, the upper limit on σ B({μ }* \\to μ q\\bar{q}) is between 0.6 and 1 fb. Limits on σ B are converted to lower bounds on the compositeness scale Λ. In the limiting case {{Λ }}={m}{μ * }, excited muons with a mass below 2.8 TeV are excluded. With the same model assumptions, these limits at larger {μ }* masses improve upon previous limits from traditional searches based on the gauge-mediated decay {μ }* \\to μ γ .

  18. A search for an excited muon decaying to a muon and two jets in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}\\;=\\;8\\;{\\rm{TeV}}$$ with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2016-07-11

    In this study, a new search signature for excited leptons is explored. Excited muons are sought in the channelmore » $${pp}\\to \\mu {\\mu }^{* }\\to \\mu \\mu \\ {\\rm{jet}}\\;{\\rm{jet}}$$, assuming both the production and decay occur via a contact interaction. The analysis is based on 20.3 fb–1 of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of $$\\sqrt{s}\\;=\\;8\\;{\\rm{TeV}}$$ taken with the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. No evidence of excited muons is found, and limits are set at the 95% confidence level on the cross section times branching ratio as a function of the excited-muon mass $${m}_{{\\mu }^{* }}$$. For $${m}_{{\\mu }^{* }}$$ between 1.3 and 3.0 TeV, the upper limit on $$\\sigma B({\\mu }^{* }\\to \\mu q\\bar{q}$$) is between 0.6 and 1 fb. Limits on $$\\sigma B$$ are converted to lower bounds on the compositeness scale Λ. In the limiting case $${\\rm{\\Lambda }}={m}_{{\\mu }^{* }}$$, excited muons with a mass below 2.8 TeV are excluded. With the same model assumptions, these limits at larger $${\\mu }^{* }$$ masses improve upon previous limits from traditional searches based on the gauge-mediated decay $${\\mu }^{* }\\to \\mu \\gamma $$.« less

  19. Electron-Impact Excitation Cross Sections for Modeling Non-Equilibrium Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Munafo, Alessandro; Wray, Alan; Carbon, Duane F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide a database for modeling hypersonic entry in a partially ionized gas under non-equilibrium, the electron-impact excitation cross sections of atoms have been calculated using perturbation theory. The energy levels covered in the calculation are retrieved from the level list in the HyperRad code. The downstream flow-field is determined by solving a set of continuity equations for each component. The individual structure of each energy level is included. These equations are then complemented by the Euler system of equations. Finally, the radiation field is modeled by solving the radiative transfer equation.

  20. Excitation Cross Section Measurement for n=3 to n=2 Line Emission in Fe17+ to Fe23+

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Gu, M F; Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Scofield, J H

    2006-02-08

    The authors report the measurement of electron impact excitation cross sections for the strong iron L-shell 3 {yields} 2 lines of Fe XVIII through Fe XXIV at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap using a crystal spectrometer and a 6 x 6 pixel array microcalorimeter. The cross sections were determined by direct normalization to the well established cross section of radiative electron capture through a sophisticated model analysis which results in the excitation cross section for 48 lines at multiple electron energies. They also studied the electron density dependent nature of the emission lines, which is demonstrated by the effective excitation cross section of the 3d {yields} 2p transition in Fe XXI.

  1. Electron-impact dissociation cross sections of vibrationally excited He_{2}^{+} molecular ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celiberto, R.; Baluja, K. L.; Janev, R. K.; Laporta, V.

    2016-01-01

    Electron-impact cross sections for the dissociation process of vibrationally excited He2+ molecular ion, as a function of the incident electron energy are calculated for the dissociative transition \\text{X}{{ }2}Σu+\\to \\text{A}{{ }2}Σg+ by using the R-matrix method in the adiabatic-nuclei approximation. The potential energy curves for the involved electronic states and transition dipole moment, also calculated with the R-matrix method, were found to be in good agreement with the results reported in literature. The vibrationally resolved dissociation cross sections of He2+(v) exhibit a resonant structure around 7 eV. The observed strong variation of the magnitude of this structure with the vibrational level is explained in terms of the overlap of initial and final (continuum) state wave functions in the Franck–Condon region.

  2. Photoionization cross section measurements of the excited states of cobalt in the near-threshold region

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xianfeng Zhou, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Zaiqi; Jia, Dandan; Qu, Zehua; Yao, Guanxin; Zhang, Xianyi; Cui, Zhifeng

    2014-10-15

    We present measurements of photoionization cross-sections of the excited states of cobalt using a two-color, two-step resonance ionization technique in conjunction with a molecular beam time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The atoms were produced by the laser vaporization of a cobalt rod, coupled with a supersonic gas jet. The absolute photoionization cross-sections at threshold and near-threshold regions (0-1.2 eV) were measured, and the measured values ranged from 4.2±0.7 Mb to 10.5±1.8 Mb. The lifetimes of four odd parity energy levels are reported for the first time.

  3. Decoupling indirect topographic cross-talk in band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy imaging and spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mazet, Lucie; Jesse, Stephen; Niu, Gang; Schroeder, Thomas; Schamm-Chardon, Sylvie; Dubourdieu, Catherine; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Yang, Sang Mo; Okatan, M. Baris

    2016-06-20

    Here, all scanning probe microscopies are subjected to topographic cross-talk, meaning the topography-related contrast in functional images. Here, we investigate the signatures of indirect topographic cross-talk in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging and spectroscopy and its decoupling using band excitation (BE) method in ferroelectric BaTiO3 deposited on the Si substrates with free standing nanopillars of diameter 50 nm. Comparison between the single-frequency PFM and BE-PFM results shows that the measured signal can be significantly distorted by topography-induced shifts in the contact resonance frequency and cantilever transfer function. However, with proper correction, such shifts do not affect PFM imaging and hysteresismore » loop measurements. This suggests the necessity of an advanced approach, such as BE-PFM, for detection of intrinsic sample piezoresponse on the topographically non-uniform surfaces.« less

  4. Extracting biomolecule collision cross sections from the high-resolution FT-ICR mass spectral linewidths.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ting; Chen, Yu; Mao, Lu; Marshall, Alan G; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-14

    It is known that the ion collision cross section (CCS) may be calculated from the linewidth of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectral peak at elevated pressure (e.g., ∼10(-6) Torr). However, the high mass resolution of FT-ICR is sacrificed in those experiments due to high buffer gas pressure. In this study, we describe a linewidth correction method to eliminate the windowing-induced peak broadening effect. Together with the energetic ion-neutral collision model previously developed by our group, this method enables the extraction of CCSs of biomolecules from high-resolution FT-ICR mass spectral linewidths, obtained at a typical operating buffer gas pressure of modern FT-ICR instruments (∼10(-10) Torr). CCS values of peptides including MRFA, angiotensin I, and bradykinin measured by the proposed method agree well with ion mobility measurements, and the unfolding of protein ions (ubiquitin) at higher charge states is also observed. PMID:26314765

  5. Integral cross section measurements and product recoil velocity distributions of Xe(2+) + N2 hyperthermal charge-transfer collisions.

    PubMed

    Hause, Michael L; Prince, Benjamin D; Bemish, Raymond J

    2016-07-28

    Charge exchange from doubly charged rare gas cations to simple diatomics proceeds with a large cross section and results in populations of many vibrational and electronic product states. The charge exchange between Xe(2+) and N2, in particular, is known to create N2 (+) in both the A and B electronic states. In this work, we present integral charge exchange cross section measurements of the Xe(2+) + N2 reaction as well as axial recoil velocity distributions of the Xe(+) and N2 (+) product ions for collision energies between 0.3 and 100 eV in the center-of-mass (COM) frame. Total charge-exchange cross sections decrease from 70 Å(2) to about 40 Å(2) with increasing collision energy through this range. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions indicates that a Xe(2+) - N2 complex exists at low collision energies but is absent by 17.6 eV COM. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions reveals evidence for complexes with lifetimes comparable to the rotational period at low collision energies. The velocity distributions are consistent with quasi-resonant single charge transfer at high collision energies. PMID:27475363

  6. Integral cross section measurements and product recoil velocity distributions of Xe2+ + N2 hyperthermal charge-transfer collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, Michael L.; Prince, Benjamin D.; Bemish, Raymond J.

    2016-07-01

    Charge exchange from doubly charged rare gas cations to simple diatomics proceeds with a large cross section and results in populations of many vibrational and electronic product states. The charge exchange between Xe2+ and N2, in particular, is known to create N2 + in both the A and B electronic states. In this work, we present integral charge exchange cross section measurements of the Xe2+ + N2 reaction as well as axial recoil velocity distributions of the Xe+ and N2 + product ions for collision energies between 0.3 and 100 eV in the center-of-mass (COM) frame. Total charge-exchange cross sections decrease from 70 Å2 to about 40 Å2 with increasing collision energy through this range. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions indicates that a Xe2+ - N2 complex exists at low collision energies but is absent by 17.6 eV COM. Analysis of the axial velocity distributions reveals evidence for complexes with lifetimes comparable to the rotational period at low collision energies. The velocity distributions are consistent with quasi-resonant single charge transfer at high collision energies.

  7. GlycoMob: an ion mobility-mass spectrometry collision cross section database for glycomics.

    PubMed

    Struwe, Weston B; Pagel, Kevin; Benesch, Justin L P; Harvey, David J; Campbell, Matthew P

    2016-06-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is a promising analytical technique for glycomics that separates glycan ions based on their collision cross section (CCS) and provides glycan precursor and fragment masses. It has been shown that isomeric oligosaccharide species can be separated by IM and identified on basis of their CCS and fragmentation. These results indicate that adding CCSs information for glycans and glycan fragments to searchable databases and analysis pipelines will increase identification confidence and accuracy. We have developed a freely accessible database, GlycoMob ( http://www.glycomob.org ), containing over 900 CCSs values of glycans, oligosaccharide standards and their fragments that will be continually updated. We have measured the absolute CCSs of calibration standards, biologically derived and synthetic N-glycans ionized with various adducts in positive and negative mode or as protonated (positive ion) and deprotonated (negative ion) ions. PMID:26314736

  8. Vacuum ultraviolet electron impact excitation of the styrene molecule: cross sections and oscillator strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boechat-Roberty, H. M.; Lucas, C. A.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Rocco, M. L. M.; de Souza, G. G. B.

    2009-05-01

    The vacuum ultraviolet electronic excitation of the styrene molecule has been studied in the 0-50 eV energy range, using angle-resolved electron-energy-loss spectroscopy at an incident energy of 1 keV. Intense new features have been observed at 10.3, 11.8, 13.7 and 17.1 eV. They were tentatively assigned to high-energy transitions originating from σ electrons or to double excitations involving π electrons. The absolute generalized oscillator strengths and absolute inelastic differential cross sections have been determined for the band centred at 5.3 eV, associated with the 2,3 1A'<--1 1A' transitions. The absolute elastic differential cross section has also been determined over an angular range of 2.5°-22.0°. The valence photoabsorption spectrum of styrene, derived from the electron-energy-loss spectrum, is compared to a previously measured benzene spectrum in the 3-45 eV energy range.

  9. State-to-state cross-sections for rotationally inelastic collision of LiH with Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Eryin; Huang, Wuyin; Cui, Zhifeng; Zhang, Weijun

    2004-08-01

    The close coupling calculation of rotationally inelastic collision of Ne with LiH is first performed by employing a recently computed ab initio potential energy surface [Chem. Phys. Lett. 327 (2000) 305]. State-to-state differential, partial and integral cross-sections are calculated. Differential cross-sections show the feature of forward scattering for low Δ j inelastic transitions and backward scattering for high Δ j transitions. Two maxima exist in the curve of partial cross-sections and they are originated from different mechanism. The dependence of the integral cross-sections on j' for initial states j=0,1 displays a pronounced oscillatory structure rather than a monotonic one, and dependence on low collision energy presents resonance feature. These features are related to the anisotropic interaction potential.

  10. The relation between momentum transfer and capture and total scattering cross sections for ion-dipole collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, J. V., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Numerical values of momentum transfer cross sections sigma sub m for ion-dipole collisions are compared with the corresponding capture cross sections sigma sub c as a function of ion velocity and rotational temperature. For values of dipole moment mu from 1 to 4 Debyes the sigma sub m/sigma sub c ratio is in the range 1.2 to 2.0 (roughly). This is in contrast to the simple relation for Langevin collisions where sigma sub m/sigma sub c is equal to or approximately 1.10 independent of polarizability of the target atom. At low temperatures, the momentum transfer cross sections can be as large as 2000 A squared but they are only about 15 to 30 percent of the total scattering cross sections sigma sub S.