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Sample records for collision i2-polymeric liquid

  1. Atomic and Molecular Collisions at Liquid Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tesa-Serrate, Maria A; Smoll, Eric J; Minton, Timothy K; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2016-05-27

    The gas-liquid interface remains one of the least explored, but nevertheless most practically important, environments in which molecular collisions take place. These molecular-level processes underlie many bulk phenomena of fundamental and applied interest, spanning evaporation, respiration, multiphase catalysis, and atmospheric chemistry. We review here the research that has, during the past decade or so, been unraveling the molecular-level mechanisms of inelastic and reactive collisions at the gas-liquid interface. Armed with the knowledge that such collisions with the outer layers of the interfacial region can be unambiguously distinguished, we show that the scattering of gas-phase projectiles is a promising new tool for the interrogation of liquid surfaces with extreme surface sensitivity. Especially for reactive scattering, this method also offers absolute chemical selectivity for the groups that react to produce a specific observed product. PMID:27090845

  2. Atomic and Molecular Collisions at Liquid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesa-Serrate, Maria A.; Smoll, Eric J.; Minton, Timothy K.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.

    2016-05-01

    The gas-liquid interface remains one of the least explored, but nevertheless most practically important, environments in which molecular collisions take place. These molecular-level processes underlie many bulk phenomena of fundamental and applied interest, spanning evaporation, respiration, multiphase catalysis, and atmospheric chemistry. We review here the research that has, during the past decade or so, been unraveling the molecular-level mechanisms of inelastic and reactive collisions at the gas-liquid interface. Armed with the knowledge that such collisions with the outer layers of the interfacial region can be unambiguously distinguished, we show that the scattering of gas-phase projectiles is a promising new tool for the interrogation of liquid surfaces with extreme surface sensitivity. Especially for reactive scattering, this method also offers absolute chemical selectivity for the groups that react to produce a specific observed product.

  3. Probing the microscopic corrugation of liquid surfaces with gas-liquid collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Mackenzie E.; Nathanson, Gilbert M.; Hanning-Lee, Mark A.; Minton, Timothy K.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the directions and velocities of Ne, Ar, and Xe atoms scattering from perfluorinated ether and hydrocarbon liquids to probe the relationship between the microscopic roughness of liquid surfaces and gas-liquid collision dynamics. Impulsive energy transfer is governed by the angle of deflection: head-on encounters deposit more energy than grazing collisions. Many atoms scatter in the forward direction, particularly at glancing incidence. These results imply that the incoming atoms recoil locally from protruding C-H and C-F groups in hard spherelike collisions.

  4. Multiscale Simulation of Gas Film Lubrication During Liquid Droplet Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Khare, Prashant; Ma, Dongjun; Yang, Vigor

    2012-02-01

    Droplet collision plays an elementary role in dense spray combustion process. When two droplets approach each other, a gas film forms in between. The pressure generated within the film prevents motion of approaching droplets. This fluid mechanics is fluid film lubrication that occurs when opposing bearing surfaces are completely separated by fluid film. The lubrication flow in gas film decides the collision outcome, coalescence or bouncing. Present study focuses on gas film drainage process over a wide range of Weber numbers during equal- and unequal-sized droplet collision. The formulation is based on complete set of conservation equations for both liquid and surrounding gas phases. An improved volume-of-fluid technique, augmented by an adaptive mesh refinement algorithm, is used to track liquid/gas interfaces. A unique thickness-based refinement algorithm based on topology of interfacial flow is developed and implemented to efficiently resolve the multiscale problem. The grid size on interface is up O(10-4) of droplet size with a max resolution of 0.015 μm. An advanced visualization technique using the Ray-tracing methodology is used to gain direct insights to detailed physics. Theories are established by analyzing the characteristics of shape changing and flow evolution.

  5. Microjets and coated wheels: versatile tools for exploring collisions and reactions at gas-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Faust, Jennifer A; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2016-07-01

    This tutorial review describes experimental aspects of two techniques for investigating collisions and reactions at the surfaces of liquids in vacuum. These gas-liquid scattering experiments provide insights into the dynamics of interfacial processes while minimizing interference from vapor-phase collisions. We begin with a historical survey and then compare attributes of the microjet and coated-wheel techniques, developed by Manfred Faubel and John Fenn, respectively, for studies of high- and low-vapor pressure liquids in vacuum. Our objective is to highlight the strengths and shortcomings of each technique and summarize lessons we have learned in using them for scattering and evaporation experiments. We conclude by describing recent microjet studies of energy transfer between O2 and liquid hydrocarbons, HCl dissociation in salty water, and super-Maxwellian helium evaporation. PMID:27126211

  6. Probing Ion Transfer across Liquid-Liquid Interfaces by Monitoring Collisions of Single Femtoliter Oil Droplets on Ultramicroelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Haiqiang; Dick, Jeffrey E; Kummer, Sina; Kragl, Udo; Strauss, Steven H; Bard, Allen J

    2016-08-01

    We describe a method of observing collisions of single femtoliter (fL) oil (i.e., toluene) droplets that are dispersed in water on an ultramicroelectrode (UME) to probe the ion transfer across the oil/water interface. The oil-in-water emulsion was stabilized by an ionic liquid, in which the oil droplet trapped a highly hydrophobic redox probe, rubrene. The ionic liquid also functions as the supporting electrolyte in toluene. When the potential of the UME was biased such that rubrene oxidation would be possible when a droplet collided with the electrode, no current spikes were observed. This implies that the rubrene radical cation is not hydrophilic enough to transfer into the aqueous phase. We show that current spikes are observed when tetrabutylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate or tetrahexylammonium hexafluorophosphate are introduced into the toluene phase and when tetrabutylammonium perchlorate is introduced into the water phase, implying that the ion transfer facilitates electron transfer in the droplet collisions. The current (i)-time (t) behavior was evaluated quantitatively, which indicated the ion transfer is fast and reversible. Furthermore, the size of these emulsion droplets can also be calculated from the electrochemical collision. We further investigated the potential dependence on the electrochemical collision response in the presence of tetrabutylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate in toluene to obtain the formal ion transfer potential of tetrabutylammonium across the toluene/water interface, which was determined to be 0.754 V in the inner potential scale. The results yield new physical insights into the charge balance mechanism in emulsion droplet collisions and indicate that the electrochemical collision technique can be used to probe formal ion transfer potentials between water and solvents with very low (ε < 5) dielectric constants. PMID:27387789

  7. A stochastic, local mode study of neon-liquid surface collision dynamics.

    PubMed

    Packwood, Daniel M; Phillips, Leon F

    2011-01-14

    Equations of motion for a fast, light rare gas atom passing over a liquid surface are derived and used to infer the dynamics of neon collisions with squalane and perfluorinated polyether surfaces from experimental data. The equations incorporate the local mode model of a liquid surface via a stochastic process and explicitly account for impulsive collisional energy loss to the surface. The equations predict angular distributions for scattering of neon that are in good quantitative agreement with experimental data. Our key dynamical conclusions are that experimental angular distributions derive mainly from local mode surface topography rather than from structural features of individual surface molecules, and that the available data for these systems can be accounted for almost exclusively by single collisions between neon atoms and the liquid surface. PMID:21042647

  8. A generic test of gas phase isolated binary collision theories for vibrational relaxation at liquid state densities based on the rescaling properties of collision frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, M. E.; Harris, C. B.

    1990-09-01

    The X state vibrational relaxation of geminately recombined I2 in liquid Xe is monitored as a function of solvent density by means of transient absorption spectroscopy. Plots of vibrational energy vs time at different solvent density can be exactly overlapped by linearly scaling the time axis. This linear scaling behavior indicates that the isolated binary collision (IBC) model's assumption regarding the density independence of the probability of relaxation per collision is valid at liquid densities, even for a low frequency oscillator (≊200 cm-1). This new method of testing the IBC model's validity at liquid density is independent of the explicit form of the intermolecular potential and is independent of a determination of collision frequency and thus, eliminates the ambiguities associated with evaluating this quantity.

  9. Collision Dynamics and Internal Mixing of Droplets of Non-Newtonian Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kai; Zhang, Peng; Law, Chung K.; Wang, Tianyou

    2015-11-01

    The efficient internal mixing of colliding droplets upon coalescence is critical to various technological processes such as color manipulation in ink-jet printing and the initiation of the liquid-phase reaction of gelled hypergolic propellants in rocket engines. Recognizing that such processes can be optimized by varying the impact inertia as well as employing fluids of non-Newtonian rheology, the head-on collision, coalescence, and internal mixing pattern between two impacting equal-sized droplets of non-Newtonian fluids is computationally investigated by using the lattice Boltzmann method. Results show that, with increasing non-Newtonian effects, droplet deformation and separation following coalescence is promoted for shear-thinning fluids, while permanent coalescence allowing an extended duration for mixing is promoted for shear-thickening fluids. Furthermore, large-scale internal mixing is promoted for the colliding droplets with larger shear-thinning disparity, while coalescence and mixing is synergistically facilitated for the collision between a shear-thinning droplet and a shear-thickening droplet. The individual and coupled influences of viscosity on the droplet deformation and impact inertia, internal motion, viscous loss, and merging of the colliding interfaces leading to the observed outcomes are mechanistically identified and described.

  10. Appropriate choice of collision-induced dissociation energy for qualitative analysis of notoginsenosides based on liquid chromatography hybrid ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Ji; Fu, Han-Xu; Xiao, Jing-Cheng; Ye, Wei; Rao, Tai; Shao, Yu-Hao; Kang, Dian; Xie, Lin; Liang, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Liquid chromatography hybrid ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry possessesd both the MS(n) ability of ion trap and the excellent resolution of a time-of-flight, and has been widely used to identify drug metabolites and determine trace multi-components for in natural products. Collision energy, one of the most important factors in acquiring MS(n) information, could be set freely in the range of 10%-400%. Herein, notoginsenosides were chosen as model compounds to build a novel methodology for the collision energy optimization. Firstly, the fragmental patterns of the representatives for the authentic standards of protopanaxadiol-type and protopanaxatriol-type notoginsenosides authentic standards were obtained based on accurate MS(2) and MS(3) measurements via liquid chromatography hybrid ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Then the extracted ion chromatograms of characteristic product ions of notoginsenosides in Panax Notoginseng Extract, which were produced under a series of collision energies and, were compared to screen out the optimum collision energies values for MS(2) and MS(3). The results demonstrated that the qualitative capability of liquid chromatography hybrid ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry was greatly influenced by collision energies, and 50% of MS(2) collision energy was found to produce the highest collision-induced dissociation efficiency for notoginsenosides. BesidesAddtionally, the highest collision-induced dissociation efficiency appeared when the collision energy was set at 75% in the MS(3) stage. PMID:27114315

  11. Concentration studies of collision-induced fundamental absorption of hydrogen dissolved in liquid neon.

    PubMed

    Herrebout, W A; van der Veken, B J; Kouzov, A P

    2012-08-28

    We report further and more detailed results of our recent investigation [W. A. Herrebout, B. J. van der Veken, and A. P. Kouzov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 093001 (2008)] on the collision-induced fundamental absorption by hydrogen dissolved in liquid neon (T ≈ 25 K). The band shapes were studied in a wide range of concentrations (0.003-0.05 mole fractions) as well as for different ortho/para ratios and at much higher level of accuracy and resolution than before. Due to almost unhindered rotation of the hydrogen molecule and low temperature, an unprecedently rich frequency-domain picture produced by different terms of the interaction-induced polarization was observed. While some of them are conspicuous via fast intracell motion of a light guest (H(2)), others--induced by the electrostatic field of the guest--give rise to lines whose shapes are imprinted by fluctuations of the nearest surrounding. Strong motional narrowing observed on the guest-guest induced lines shows up in their Lorentzian shapes which are signatures of microscopic-scale diffusion. Near-Lorentzian peaks were also detected at the tops of the diffuse lines induced by isolated guests. Their formation may be associated with a long-living defect (vacancy) emerging in the vicinity of the polarization inductor. Altogether, our results give the first unambiguous spectroscopic evidence on the diffusional evolution of isolated binary interactions that emerge in dense chaotic media. PMID:22938252

  12. Ternary drop collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterbichler, Hannes; Planchette, Carole; Brenn, Günter

    2015-10-01

    It has been recently proposed to use drop collisions for producing advanced particles or well-defined capsules, or to perform chemical reactions where the merged drops constitute a micro-reactor. For all these promising applications, it is essential to determine whether the merged drops remain stable after the collision, forming a single entity, or if they break up. This topic, widely investigated for binary drop collisions of miscible and immiscible liquid, is quite unexplored for ternary drop collisions. The current study aims to close this gap by experimentally investigating collisions between three equal-sized drops of the same liquid arranged centri-symmetrically. Three drop generators are simultaneously operated to obtain controlled ternary drop collisions. The collision outcomes are observed via photographs and compared to those of binary collisions. Similar to binary collisions, a regime map is built, showing coalescence and bouncing as well as reflexive and stretching separation. Significant differences are observed in the transitions between these regimes.

  13. New line narrowing effects in the infrared collision-induced spectra of molecular hydrogens in liquid neon.

    PubMed

    Herrebout, W A; van der Veken, B J; Kouzov, A P

    2008-08-29

    The first spectroscopic observation of the relative (solute-solute) diffusion in a fluid environment is reported. New, unusually sharp Q1q(J) lines developing against the diffuse background in the collision-induced fundamental IR bands of hydrogen isotopomers (H2, D2, and HD) dissolved in liquid Ne (T approximately 25 K) are studied as functions of the solute concentration x. In all cases, the Q1q intensity parabolically scales with x, accompanied by a striking narrowing of the line shapes. The narrowing, as revealed by the p-H2 solution studies, is due to a faster growth with x of the sharper solute-solute induced component of the single Q1q(0) line. The latter as well as other observed solute-solute lines are strongly narrowed by fast velocity decorrelations and are signatures of microscopic-scale diffusion. Also, a first observation of the solute-solvent induced J-->J + 4 transitions is reported. PMID:18851607

  14. Recent research directions in Fribourg: nuclear dynamics in resonances revealed by 2-dimensional EEL spectra, electron collisions with ionic liquids and electronic excitation of pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Michael; Regeta, Khrystyna; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.; Mašín, Zdeněk; Grimme, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    The article briefly reviews three subjects recently investigated in Fribourg: (i) electron collisions with surfaces of ionic liquids, (ii) two-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra and (iii) resonances in absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of unsaturated compounds. Electron energy loss spectra of four ionic liquids revealed a number of excited states, including triplet states. A solution of a dye in an ionic liquid showed an energy-loss band of the solute, but not in all ionic liquids. 2D spectra reveal state-to-state information (given resonance to given final state) and are shown to be an interesting means to gain insight into dynamics of nuclear motion in resonances. Absolute cross sections for pyrimidine are reported as a function of scattering angle and as a function of electron energy. They reveal resonant structure which was reproduced very nicely by R-matrix calculations. The calculation provided an assignment of the resonances which reveals common patterns in compounds containing double bonds.

  15. Tailored Noise Waveform/ Collision-Induced Dissociation of Ions Stored in a Linear Ion Trap Combined with Liquid Chromatography/Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vilkov, Andrey N.; Bogdanov, Bogdan; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Prior, David C.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-11-01

    A new collision-induced dissociation (CID) technique based on broadband tailored noise waveform (TNW) excitation of ions stored in a linear ion trap has been developed. In comparison with the conventional sustained off-resonance irradiation (SORI) CID method commonly used in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, this MS/MS technique increases throughput by eliminating the long pump-down delay associated with gas introduction into the high vacuum ICR cell region. In addition, the TNW-CID method speeds spectrum acquisition since it does not require Fourier transformation, calculation of resonant frequencies and generation of the excitation waveforms. We demonstrate TNW-CID coupled with on-line capillary reverse phase liquid chromatography separations for identification of peptides. The experimental results are compared with data obtained using conventional quadrupole ion trap MS/MS and SORI-CID MS/MS in an ICR cell.

  16. Inelastic- collision cross sections for the interactions of H^+, He^2+ and C^6+ ions with liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Mario; Liendo, Jacinto

    2009-05-01

    Monte Carlo codes for ion-nanodosimetry in tissue-like media require a detailed knowledge of the ionization cross sections. Secondary electrons play a main role in the radiobiological effectiveness of any radiation. The HKS and CDW-EIS formalisms are implemented to determine single ionization cross sections (SICS) corresponding to the impact of H^+, He^2+ and C^6+ ions on liquid water, for incident energies from 0.3 to 10 MeV/u. Corrected expressions for the HKS method have been used. The same kind of initial electron wave functions and binding energies have been used with both models, in order to compare the formalisms themselves. Double and single differential as well as total SICS of liquid water have been calculated by use of both methods and comparisons have been made between their theoretical predictions. Also, these results have been compared with experimental values reported previously for ionization of water vapor due to protons and alpha particles. The excitation cross sections are included to determine electronic stopping cross sections in liquid water. The results based on the CDW- EIS method provide the best agreement when stopping powers are compared with corresponding data published in ICRU reports, obtaining discrepancies of about 9 %, 16 % and 19 % for incident protons, alpha particles and carbon ions respectively.

  17. Collision tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, M.P.; Ries, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The motions of lithospheric plates have produced most existing mountain ranges, but structures produced as a result of, and following the collision of continental plates need to be distinguished from those produced before by subduction. If subduction is normally only stopped when collision occurs, then most geologically ancient fold belts must be collisional, so it is essential to recognize and understand the effects of the collision process. This book consists of papers that review collision tectonics, covering tectonics, structure, geochemistry, paleomagnetism, metamorphism, and magmatism.

  18. Linear Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkiewicz, T. A.; Newby, N. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of linear collisions between two or three objects is related to a junior-level course in analytical mechanics. The theoretical discussion uses a geometrical approach that treats elastic and inelastic collisions from a unified point of view. Experiments with a linear air track are described. (Author/TS)

  19. Collisions of Sodium Atoms with Liquid Glycerol: Insights into Na Atom Solvation and Ionization and the Reactions of Near-Interfacial Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathanson, Gilbert

    2014-03-01

    Over the last 70 years, thousands of reactions between solvated electrons and dissolved species have been investigated in water and other protic solvents. Electrons born at the surface of the solvent, however, may react differently than those created within it. We have explored this interfacial reactivity by directing sodium atoms at the surface of liquid glycerol in vacuum. Gas-liquid scattering experiments show that electrons generated from the Na atoms produce hydrogen atoms and hydrogen molecules, hydroxide ions and water, and glycerol fragments. Remarkably, nearly half the hydrogen atoms created near the surface escape into vacuum before reacting with the solvent. Complementary ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of Na striking a 17-molecule glycerol cluster indicate that the glycerol hydroxyl groups reorient around the Na atom as it makes contact with the cluster and begins to ionize on the picosecond timescale. The experiments and simulations together indicate that Na-atom deposition provides a low-energy pathway for generating solvated electrons in the near-interfacial region of protic liquids.

  20. Annihilation of defects in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetec, M.; Ambrožič, M.; Kralj, S.

    The annihilation of defect is studied theoretically in liquid crystals (LCs). We consider the annihilation of point disclinations in nematic and line edge dislocations in smectic A LC phase, respectively. We stress qualitative similarities in these processes. The whole annihilation regime is taken into account, consisting of the pre-collision, collision, and post-collision stage.

  1. Puck collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauge, E. H.

    2012-09-01

    Collisions between two ice hockey pucks sliding on frictionless ice are studied, with both inelasticity and frictional contact between the colliding surfaces of the two pucks taken into account. The latter couples translational and rotational motion. The full solution depends on the sign and magnitude of the initial mismatch between the surface velocities at the point of contact. The initial state defines two physically distinct regimes for the friction coefficient. To illustrate the complexities, we discuss at length the typical situation (well known from curling) when puck number 1 is initially at rest, and is hit by puck number 2 with an arbitrary impact parameter, velocity and angular velocity. We find that the total outgoing angle between the pucks exceeds \\frac{1}{2}\\pi if and only if the collision leads to a net increase in the translational part of the kinetic energy. The conditions for this to happen are scrutinized, and the results are presented both analytically and numerically by a set of representative curves. This paper is written with an ambitious undergraduate, and her teacher, in mind.

  2. RHIC The Perfect Liquid

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2009-09-01

    Evidence to date suggests that gold-gold collisions the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven are indeed creating a new state of hot, dense matter, but one quite different and even more remarkable than had been predicted. Instead of behaving like a gas of free quarks and gluons, as was expected, the matter created in RHIC's heavy ion collisions appears to be more like a "perfect" liquid.

  3. Stability and Degradation of Caffeoylquinic Acids under Different Storage Conditions Studied by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Photo Diode Array Detection and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Electrospray Ionization Collision-Induced Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xue, Meng; Shi, Hang; Zhang, Jiao; Liu, Qing-Quan; Guan, Jun; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Ma, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs) are main constituents in many herbal medicines with various biological and pharmacological effects. However, CQAs will degrade or isomerize when affected by temperature, pH, light, etc. In this study, high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (HPLC-PDA) and high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was utilized to study the stability and degradation of CQAs (three mono-acyl CQAs and four di-acyl CQAs) under various ordinary storage conditions (involving different temperatures, solvents, and light irradiation). The results indicated that the stability of CQAs was mainly affected by temperature and light irradiation, while solvents did not affect it in any obvious way under the conditions studied. Mono-acyl CQAs were generally much more stable than di-acyl CQAs under the same conditions. Meanwhile, the chemical structures of 30 degradation products were also characterized by HPLC-MS(n), inferring that isomerization, methylation, and hydrolysis were three major degradation pathways. The result provides a meaningful clue for the storage conditions of CQAs standard substances and samples. PMID:27455213

  4. Collision experiments with fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, E. E. B.; Ehlich, R.; Westerburg, M.; Hertel, I. V.

    1993-12-01

    Relative fragmentation cross sections for fullerene ion collisions with rare gas atoms and SF6 are presented over a range of collision energies. Structure in the cross sections and threshold energy determinations can shed some light on the fragmentation dynamics. Cluster cluster collisions with fullerenes are also described which show evidence of fusion reactions.

  5. Elastic Collisions and Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Steven

    2009-04-01

    Elastic collisions are fascinating demonstrations of conservation principles. The mediating force must be conservative in an elastic collision. Truly elastic collisions take place only when the objects in collision do not touch, e.g. magnetic bumpers on low friction carts. This requires that we define a collision as a momentum transfer. Elastic collisions in 1-D can be solved in general and the implications are quite remarkable. For example, a heavy object moving initially towards a light object followed by an elastic collision results in a final velocity of the light object greater than either initial velocity. This is easily demonstrated with low friction carts. Gravitational elastic collisions involving a light spacecraft and an extremely massive body like a moon or planet can be approximated as 1-D collisions, such as the ``free return'' trajectory of Apollo 13 around the moon. The most fascinating gravitational collisions involve the gravitational slingshot effect used to boost spacecraft velocities. The maximum gravitational slingshot effect occurs when approaching a nearly 1-D collision, revealing that the spacecraft can be boosted to greater than twice the planet velocity, enabling the spacecraft to travel much further away from the Sun.

  6. Vortex-Surface Collisions^

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlisk, A. T.

    1998-11-01

    The interaction of vortices with solid surfaces occurs in many different situations including, but not limited to tornadoes, propeller wakes, flows over swept wings and missile forebodies, turbomachinery flows, blade-vortex interactions and tip vortex-surface interactions on helicopters. Often, parts of a system must operate within such flows and thus encounter these vortices. In the present paper we discuss the nature of a particular subset of interactions called ``collisions''. A ``collision'' is characterized by the fact that the core of the vortex is permanently altered; usually the core is locally destroyed. The focus is on fully three-dimensional collisions although two-dimensional collisions are discussed as well. Examples of collisions in helicopter aerodynamics and turbomachinery flows are discussed and the dynamics of the vortex core during a collision process are illustrated for a 90^o collision. ^Supported by the US Army Research Office

  7. Disequilibration by Planetary Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Jutzi, M.

    2010-12-01

    Molten planets equilibrate gravitationally, chemically, and thermally. Large scale collisions (a.k.a. giant impacts, similar-sized collisions) can upset the apple cart by bringing core material, late in the game, into mixture with mantle products, and by shredding stratified planets into strands of mantle and clumps of core (c.g. Asphaug et al. Nature 2006). Atmophiles and volatiles come along for the ride, and can find themselves in disequilibrium mixtures not anticipated by one-dimensional models of planetary evolution, or by planet growth models in which planets stick, merge, and mix perfectly in the aftermath of a collision. We present very high resolution case studies of such collisions.

  8. Particle collision in Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardekani, Arezoo

    2009-11-01

    Particle-particle and particle-wall collision occurs in many natural and industrial applications such as sedimentation, crystal growth, suspension rheology, and microfluidic devices such as those used in mechanical cell lysis. To accurately predict the behavior of particulate flows, fundamental knowledge of the mechanisms of single collision is required. In this work, particle-wall collision in Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids is numerically and experimentally studied. The effect of Stokes number, surface roughness, and Deborah number on the rebound velocity of a colliding spherical particle on a wall is considered. The experimental study of particle-wall collision in poly(ethylene-oxide) mixed with water shows that the results for the coefficient of restitution in polymeric liquids can be collapsed together with the Newtonian fluid behavior if one defines the Stokes number based on the local strain rate. In addition, the effects of particle interaction and collision on the droplet breakup in a particulate shear flow are studied. The presence of particles leads to larger droplet deformation and a perforation in the center of the droplet. It is found that the critical Stokes number above which a perforation occurs increases linearly with the inverse of the capillary number and viscosity ratio.

  9. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  10. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  11. Collision between immiscible drops with large surface tension difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arienti, Marco; Li, Xiaoyi; Soteriou, Marios; Sussman, Mark

    2009-11-01

    Immiscible drop collision, as occurring in fuel-oxidizer sprays or in the release of certain fire-extinguishing agents, tends to exhibit a much richer behavior with respect to miscible drops collision thanks to the formation of a liquid-liquid interface during impact. For instance, in near-head-on diesel-water drop collisions, ``overlaying'' may occur in which the diesel oil flows from the collision point around the water drop to gather at the opposite location of the drop. To simulate this class of multi-material flows, the combined volume-of-fluid / level set methodology that sharply captures a single liquid-gas interface (Sussman et al, J. of Comp. Phys., 2007) needs to be duplicated for a second, independent interface. In this presentation, we will show that simulation results are not affected by the reconstruction order of the interfaces, as in other surface capturing methods. We will also propose different numerical solutions to treat surface tension in the triple point computational cells, and examine the characteristics of the flow developing at the contact line between the two liquids and air in overlaying head-on collisions.

  12. Effects of hydrogen atom spin exchange collisions on atomic hydrogen maser oscillation frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    Frequency shifts due to collisions between hydrogen atoms in an atomic hydrogen maser frequency standard are studied. Investigations of frequency shifts proportional to the spin exchange frequency shift cross section and those proportional to the duration of exchange collisions are discussed. The feasibility of operating a hydrogen frequency standard at liquid helium temperatures is examined.

  13. Newton's Strange Collisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlichson, Herman

    1995-01-01

    Discusses Newton's apparent oversight of the role of energy considerations in collisions between two spherical bodies related to the third corollary of his "Laws of Motion." Investigates several theories that provide solutions to the mysterious oversight. (LZ)

  14. Time rate collision matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenescu, M.L.; Smith, T.M.

    1980-02-01

    The collision integral terms in Boltzmann equation are reformulated numerically leading to the substitution of the multiple integrals with a multiplicative matrix of the two colliding species velocity distribution functions which varies with the differential collision cross section. A matrix of lower rank may be constructed when one of the distribution functions is specified, in which case the matrix elements represent kinetic transition probabilities in the velocity space and the multiplication of the time rate collision matrix with the unknown velocity distribution function expresses the time rate of change of the distribution. The collision matrix may be used to describe the time evolution of systems in nonequilibrium conditions, to evaluate the rate of momentum and energy transfer between given species, or to generate validity criteria for linearized kinetic equations.

  15. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  16. Preheating in bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jun; Piao Yunsong

    2010-08-15

    In a landscape with metastable minima, the bubbles will inevitably nucleate. We show that when the bubbles collide, due to the dramatic oscillation of the field at the collision region, the energy deposited in the bubble walls can be efficiently released by the explosive production of the particles. In this sense, the collision of bubbles is actually highly inelastic. The cosmological implications of this result are discussed.

  17. Launch Collision Probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenbacher, Gary; Guptill, James D.

    1999-01-01

    This report analyzes the probability of a launch vehicle colliding with one of the nearly 10,000 tracked objects orbiting the Earth, given that an object on a near-collision course with the launch vehicle has been identified. Knowledge of the probability of collision throughout the launch window can be used to avoid launching at times when the probability of collision is unacceptably high. The analysis in this report assumes that the positions of the orbiting objects and the launch vehicle can be predicted as a function of time and therefore that any tracked object which comes close to the launch vehicle can be identified. The analysis further assumes that the position uncertainty of the launch vehicle and the approaching space object can be described with position covariance matrices. With these and some additional simplifying assumptions, a closed-form solution is developed using two approaches. The solution shows that the probability of collision is a function of position uncertainties, the size of the two potentially colliding objects, and the nominal separation distance at the point of closest approach. ne impact of the simplifying assumptions on the accuracy of the final result is assessed and the application of the results to the Cassini mission, launched in October 1997, is described. Other factors that affect the probability of collision are also discussed. Finally, the report offers alternative approaches that can be used to evaluate the probability of collision.

  18. Binary droplet collision at high Weber number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Chou, Ping-Chung; Tseng, Yu-Jen

    2009-09-01

    By using the techniques developed for generating high-speed droplets, we have systematically investigated binary droplet collision when the Weber number (We) was increased from the range usually tested in previous studies on the order of 10 to a much larger value of about 5100 for water (a droplet at 23 m/s with a diameter of 0.7 mm). Various liquids were also used to explore the effects of viscosity and surface tension. Specifically, beyond the well-known regimes at moderate We’s, which exhibited coalescence, separation, and separation followed by satellite droplets, we found different behaviors showing a fingering lamella, separation after fingering, breakup of outer fingers, and prompt splattering into multiple secondary droplets as We was increased. The critical Weber numbers that mark the boundaries between these impact regimes are identified. The specific impact behaviors, such as fingering and prompt splattering or splashing, share essential similarity with those also observed in droplet-surface impacts, whereas substantial variations in the transition boundaries may result from the disparity of the boundary conditions at impacts. To compare the outcomes of both types of collisions, a simple model based on energy conservation was carried out to predict the maximum diameter of an expanding liquid disk for a binary droplet collision. The results oppose the dominance of viscous drag, as proposed by previous studies, as the main deceleration force to effect a Rayleigh-Taylor instability and ensuing periphery fingers, which may further lead to the formations of satellite droplets.

  19. Colliding nuclei to colliding galaxies: Illustrations using a simple colliding liquid-drop apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, F. D.; Mack, S. L.; Robinson, W. R.; Ojaruega, M.

    2015-10-01

    A simple apparatus suitable for observing the collisions between drops of fluids of various properties is described. Typical results are shown for experiments performed by undergraduate students using various types of fluids. The collisions take place under free-fall (zero-g) conditions, with analysis employing digital video. Two specific types of collisions are examined in detail, head-on collisions and peripheral, grazing collisions. The collisions for certain fluids illustrate many types of nuclear collisions and provide useful insight into these processes, including both fusion and non-fusion outcomes, often with the formation of exotic shapes or emission of secondary fragments. Collisions of other liquids show a more chaotic behavior, often resembling galactic collisions. As expected, the Weber number associated with a specific collision impact parameter is found to be the important quantity in determining the initial outcome of these colliding systems. The features observed resemble those reported by others using more elaborate experimental techniques.

  20. Ion Collision, Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil K.

    2013-09-11

    The outcome of a collision between an ion and neutral species depends on the chemical and physical properties of the two reactants, their relative velocities, and the impact parameter of their trajectories. These include elastic and inelastic scattering of the colliding particles, charge transfer (including dissociative charge transfer), atom abstraction, complex formation and dissociation of the colliding ion. Each of these reactions may be characterized in terms of their energy-dependent rate coefficients, cross sections and reaction kinetics. A theoretical framework that emphasizes simple models and classical mechanics is presented for these processes. Collision processes are addressed in two categories of low-energy and high-energy collisions. Experiments under thermal or quasi-thermal conditions–swarms, drift tubes, chemical ionization and ion cyclotron resonance are strongly influenced by long-range forces and often involve collisions in which atom exchange and extensive energy exchange are common characteristics. High-energy collisions are typically impulsive, involve short-range intermolecular forces and are direct, fast processes.

  1. Microscope collision protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    DeNure, Charles R.

    2001-10-23

    A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

  2. Collision of cosmic superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Firouzjahi, H.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2008-03-15

    We study the formation of three-string junctions between (p,q)-cosmic superstrings, and collisions between such strings and show that kinematic constraints analogous to those found previously for collisions of Nambu-Goto strings apply here too, with suitable modifications to take account of the additional requirements of flux conservation. We examine in detail several examples involving collisions between strings with low values of p and q, and also examine the rates of growth or shrinkage of strings at a junction. Finally, we briefly discuss the formation of junctions for strings in a warped space, specifically with a Klebanov-Strassler throat, and show that similar constraints still apply with changes to the parameters taking account of the warping and the background flux.

  3. Comprehensive analysis of a multidimensional liquid chromatography mass spectrometry dataset acquired on a quadrupole selecting, quadrupole collision cell, time-of-flight mass spectrometer: I. How much of the data is theoretically interpretable by search engines?

    PubMed

    Chalkley, Robert J; Baker, Peter R; Hansen, Kirk C; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Allen, Nadia P; Rexach, Michael; Burlingame, Alma L

    2005-08-01

    An in-depth analysis of a multidimensional chromatography-mass spectrometry dataset acquired on a quadrupole selecting, quadrupole collision cell, time-of-flight (QqTOF) geometry instrument was carried out. A total of 3269 CID spectra were acquired. Through manual verification of database search results and de novo interpretation of spectra 2368 spectra could be confidently determined as predicted tryptic peptides. A detailed analysis of the non-matching spectra was also carried out, highlighting what the non-matching spectra in a database search typically are composed of. The results of this comprehensive dataset study demonstrate that QqTOF instruments produce information-rich data of which a high percentage of the data is readily interpretable. PMID:15923566

  4. Simulation of Droplets Collisions Using Two-Phase Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazloomi Moqaddam, A.; Chikatamarla, S. S.; Karlin, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    The recently introduced entropic lattice Boltzmann model for multiphase flows (Mazloomi et al. in Phys Rev Lett 114:174502, 2015) is used to simulate binary droplet collisions. The entropy-based stabilization, together with a new polynomial equation of state, enhances performance of the model and allow us to simulate droplet collision for various Weber and Reynolds numbers and large liquid to vapor density ratio. Different types of droplet collision outcomes, namely coalescence, stretching separation and reflexive separation are recovered in a range of impact parameter for two equal sized droplets. The results demonstrated the essential role played by the surface tension, kinematic viscosity, impact parameter and relative velocity in the droplet collision dynamics leading to coalescence or separation collision outcomes. Comparison between numerical results and experiments in both coalescence and separation collisions demonstrate viability of the presented model.

  5. Multi-particle collision dynamics algorithm for nematic fluids.

    PubMed

    Shendruk, Tyler N; Yeomans, Julia M

    2015-07-01

    Research on transport, self-assembly and defect dynamics within confined, flowing liquid crystals requires versatile and computationally efficient mesoscopic algorithms to account for fluctuating nematohydrodynamic interactions. We present a multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) based algorithm to simulate liquid-crystal hydrodynamic and director fields in two and three dimensions. The nematic-MPCD method is shown to successfully reproduce the features of a nematic liquid crystal, including a nematic-isotropic phase transition with hysteresis in 3D, defect dynamics, isotropic Frank elastic coefficients, tumbling and shear alignment regimes and boundary condition-dependent order parameter fields. PMID:26035731

  6. Ultrasensitive characterization of site-specific glycosylation of affinity-purified haptoglobin from lung cancer patient plasma using 10 μm i.d. porous layer open tubular liquid chromatography-linear ion trap collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongdong; Hincapie, Marina; Rejtar, Tomas; Karger, Barry L

    2011-03-15

    Site-specific analysis of protein glycosylation is important for biochemical and clinical research efforts. Glycopeptide analysis using liquid chromatography-collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry (LC-CID/ETD-MS) allows simultaneous characterization of the glycan structure and attached peptide site. However, due to the low ionization efficiency of glycopeptides during electrospray ionization, 200-500 fmol of sample per injection is needed for a single LC-MS run, which makes it challenging for the analysis of limited amounts of glycoprotein purified from biological matrixes. To improve the sensitivity of LC-MS analysis for glycopeptides, an ultranarrow porous layer open tubular (PLOT) LC column (2.5 m × 10 μm i.d.) was coupled to a linear ion trap (LTQ) collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometer to provide sensitive analysis of N-linked protein glycosylation heterogeneity. The potential of the developed method is demonstrated by the characterization of site-specific glycosylation using haptoglobin (Hpt) as a model protein. To limit the amount of haptoglobin to low picomole amounts of protein, we affinity purified it from 1 μL of pooled lung cancer patient plasma. A total of 26 glycoforms/glycan compositions on three Hpt tryptic glycopeptides were identified and quantified from 10 LC-MS runs with a consumption of 100 fmol of Hpt digest (13 ng of protein, 10 fmol per injection). Included in this analysis was the determination of the glycan occupancy level. At this sample consumption level, the high sensitivity of the PLOT LC-LTQ-CID/ETD-MS system allowed glycopeptide identification and structure determination, along with relative quantitation of glycans presented on the same peptide backbone, even for low abundant glycopeptides at the ∼100 amol level. The PLOT LC-MS system is shown to have sufficient sensitivity to allow characterization of site-specific protein glycosylation from trace

  7. The formation of satellite droplets by unstable binary drop collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenn, G.; Valkovska, D.; Danov, K. D.

    2001-09-01

    Experimental investigations on the process of satellite droplet formation by unstable binary drop collisions are presented. The experiments are carried out using two monodisperse streams of drops of equal size. A systematic variation of the parameters influencing the collisions leads to an extended version of the stability nomogram which involves the numbers of satellite droplets formed by stretching separation after off-center collisions. The time scales for the formation of liquid filaments and their breakup into the satellites are measured and, in the case that a single satellite is formed, the satellite size is measured by means of a phase-Doppler anemometer. Furthermore, a theoretical model for the breakup of cylindrical liquid filaments in head-on and off-center collisions is presented. The model is based on a linear stability analysis of the filament formed after the collision. The critical wavelength associated with the largest deformation energy is calculated and identified with the disturbance which eventually breaks the filament and determines the number of satellites formed. Comparisons with experiments by Ashgriz and Poo [J. Fluid Mech. 221, 183 (1990)] for the head-on and near-head-on cases yield agreement of the numbers of satellites formed.

  8. Liquid Argon Calorimetry for ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alan

    2008-05-01

    This summer, the largest collaborative physics project since the Manhattan project will go online. One of four experiments for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, ATLAS, employs over 2000 people. Canadians have helped design, construct, and calibrate the liquid argon calorimeters for ATLAS to capture the products of the high energy collisions produced by the LHC. From an undergraduate's perspective, explore how these calorimeters are made to handle their harsh requirement. From nearly a billion proton-proton collisions a second, physicists hope to discover the Higgs boson and other new fundamental particles.

  9. Atomic collisions, inelastic indeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Herve; Ferrando, Gwenael; Lehoucq, Roland

    At the turn of the twentieth century, a hot controversy raged about the ability of Boltzmann's framework to take care of irreversibility. The so-called Loschmidt's paradox progressively faded with time during the last hundred years, due to the predictive efficiency of statistical mechanics. However, one detail at the origin of the controversy - the elasticity of atomic collisions - was not completely challenged. A semi-classical treatment of two atoms interacting with the vacuum zero-point field permits to predict a friction force acting against the rotation of the pair of atoms. By its form and its level, the calculated torque is a candidate as a physical cause for diffusion of energy and angular momentum, and consequently for entropy growth. It opens the way to a revision of the standard vision of irreversibility. This presentation will focus on two points. First we will discuss the recent result in a broader context of electromagnetic interactions during microscopic collisions. The predicted friction phenomenon can be compared to and distinguished from Collision-Induced Emission and other types of inelastic collisions. Second we will investigate the consequences of the friction torque on calculated trajectories of colliding atoms, quantifying the generation of dimers linked by dispersion forces.

  10. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Neutrino-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino-atom scattering provides a sensitive tool for probing nonstandard interactions of massive neutrinos in laboratory measurements. The ionization channel of this collision process plays an important role in experiments searching for neutrino magnetic moments. We discuss some theoretical aspects of atomic ionization by massive neutrinos. We also outline possible manifestations of neutrino electromagnetic properties in coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  12. Fusion, deep-inelastic collisions, and neck formation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, C.E.; Barbosa, V.C.; Canto, L.F.; Donangelo, R.

    1988-07-01

    We use the liquid drop model to calculate the cross section for neck formation in a heavy-ion collision and show that for the recently measured /sup 58/Ni+/sup 124/Sn case this cross section is strongly related to the sum of the fusion and deep-inelastic cross sections. We note that the observation of deep-inelastic collisions at sub-Coulomb barrier energies may be classically understood by the effective barrier lowering obtained when the neck degree of freedom is considered.

  13. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  14. High energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation covers three broad topics: a brief introduction to the field of nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies; a discussion of several topics illustrating what`s been learned after more than a decade of fixed target experiments; and an indication of what the future may bring at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) under construction at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) planned at CERN.

  15. Operational Collision Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guit, Bill

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will describe the early days of the EOS Aqua and Aura operational collision avoidance process. It will highlight EOS debris avoidance maneuvers, EOS high interest event statistic and A-Train systematic conjunctions and conclude with future challenges. This is related to earlier e-DAA (tracking number 21692) that an abstract was submitted to a different conference. Eric Moyer, ESMO Deputy Project Manager has reviewed and approved this presentation on May 6, 2015

  16. Interstellar Cloud Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, J. C.; Monaghan, J. J.; Pongracic, H.; Schwarz, M. P.

    1985-07-01

    We describe the results of a three-dimensional numerical simulation of isothermal interstellar clouds in the absence of magnetic fields. A wide variety of high and low Mach number, head-on and off-centre collisions of clouds with mass ratios 1, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.1 have been studied. The results show that a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the gravitational instability of a substantial fraction of the matter is that the initial clouds should be either marginally stable or unstable according to the usual Jeans criterion. The collisions, in general, do not result in one or more clouds. Instead we find, in most cases, that the matter disperses in an irregular way. The calculations therefore suggest that if the initial state of the interstellar medium is one of cool dense clouds in a hotter more tenuous background, collisions will rapidly mix the medium rather than produce a steady-state spectrum of cool clouds.

  17. Collision and mountain building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, V. G.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial, chronological, and genetic relationships of recent (Late Alpine) collisions to mountain building are considered at three levels of scale: (i) in separate zones of the Arabian-Caucasus segment of the Alpine-Himalayan Orogenic Belt, (ii) throughout the central segment of this belt from the Alps to the Himalalayas, and (iii) in Central Asia and other mountain belts of continents. Three stages of mountain building are distinguished at all three levels. The first stage starts with widespread collision and similar plate interactions from the end of the Eocene to the middle Miocene and is expressed in the formation of uplifts, commonly no higher than the moderately elevated level in regions that concentrate deformations of transverse shortening induced by compression. The second short stage, which embraces the Pliocene-Quaternary and occasionally the end of the Miocene, differs in general, though differentiated in the value and intensification of vertical movements, when the height of mountains increases by 2-3 times. Elevations are spread over certain platform territories and even frameworks of rift zones. This is related not so much to the intensity of compression and shortening as to the compositional transformation of the upper mantle and the lower crust, leading to their decompaction. Comparison with the Hercynian and Caledonian orogenic stages shows that the second phase, predetermined by widespread collision, reflects a more important geodynamic event expressed in a change of the global plate interaction system and its deep-seated sources.

  18. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2015-06-16

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  19. Binary drop coalescence in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungyong

    Experiments on binary drop collisions within an index-matched liquid were conducted for Weber numbers (We) of 1-50 and collision angles of 15-80° below the horizontal. Drop pairs of water/glycerin mixture were injected into silicone oil and, due to gravitational effects, traveled on downward trajectories before colliding. A dual-field high-speed PIV measurement system was employed to quantify drop trajectories and overall collision conditions while simultaneously examining detailed velocity fields near the collision interface. In the We range examined, for equal size drops, both rebounding and coalescing behavior occurred. The drops coalesced for We > 10 and rebounded for We < 10, and this boundary was found to be insensitive to collision angle. Coalescence was found to result from a combination of vortical flow within drops and strong drop deformation characteristic of higher We. Flow through the centers of opposing ring vortices, strengthened by drop deformation, enhanced drainage of the thin film in the impact region, leading to film rupture and coalescence. The collision angle affected the eventual location of film rupture, with the rupture location moving higher in the thin film region as the collision angle increased. The film rupture location correlated closely with the location of maximum downward velocity in the thin film. The time between collision and rupture increases with We until We = 30. For We > 30, the time decreases as We increases. Unequal size drop collisions with drop size ratios (Ds/D L) of 0.7 and 0.5 were also examined. Coalescence occurs above We* = 11 similar to equal size drops. As drop size ratio decreases, the intervening film deforms more. If the velocity ratio uL/u s < 1, the deformed interface becomes flat before coalescence. The rupture location varies due to the asymmetry of the drops. As collision offset increases (B > 0), the film rupture time is shortened and mixing of the fluid from both drops is enhanced after coalescence

  20. D0 Detector Collision Hall Oxygen Deficiancy Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1992-08-06

    EN-258, D0 Platform ODH Analysts. provided the oxygen deficiency hazard analysts for the D0 detector in the Assembly Hall. This note covers the same analysis. but revised for the Collision Hall. Liquid cryogens. released and warming to atmosphere conditions, expand to, on average, seven hundred times their liquid volume, and displace vital atmospheric oxygen. An oxygen deficiency hazard analysis assesses the increased risk to personnel in areas containing cryogenic systems. The D0 detector Collision Hall ODH analysis has been approached five different ways using established methods. If the low beta quad magnets are powered, and the exhaust rate is below 4220 scfm, the area is ODH class 1. In any other case, the analysis shows the area to be ODH class 0 as equipped (with ventilation fans) and requiring no special safety provisions. System designers have provided for a reduced oxygen level detection and warning system as well as emergency procedures to address fault conditions.

  1. Mixing Diagnostics in Confined, High-Speed Droplet Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Brian; Hidrovo, Carlos

    2012-11-01

    Fast mixing remains a major challenge in droplet-based microfluidics. The low Reynolds number operating regime of most mixing devices signifies orderly flows that are devoid of any inertial characteristics. To increase droplet mixing rates, a novel technique is under development that uses a high Reynolds number gaseous phase for droplet generation and transport and promotes mixing through binary droplet collisions at velocities near 1m/s. Limitations in existing mixing diagnostic methodologies has persuaded cultivation of a new technique for measuring droplet collision mixing in confined microchannels. The technique employs single fluorophore laser-induced fluorescence, custom image processing, and meaningful statistical analysis for monitoring and quantifying mixing in high-speed droplet collisions. Mixing progress is revealed through two statistics that separate the roles of convective rearrangement and molecular diffusion during the mixing process. The end result is a viewing window into the rich dynamics of droplet collisions with spatial and temporal resolutions of 1 μm and 25 μs, respectively. Experimental results obtained across a decade of Reynolds and Peclet numbers reveal a direct link between droplet mixing time and the collision convective timescale. This work provides valuable insight into the emerging field of two-phase gas-liquid microfluidics and opens the door to fundamental research possibilities not offered by traditional oil-based architectures.

  2. Relativistic nuclear collisions: theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.

    1980-07-01

    Some of the recent theoretical developments in relativistic (0.5 to 2.0-GeV/nucleon) nuclear collisions are reviewed. The statistical model, hydrodynamic model, classical equation of motion calculations, billiard ball dynamics, and intranuclear cascade models are discussed in detail. Inclusive proton and pion spectra are analyzed for a variety of reactions. Particular attention is focused on how the complex interplay of the basic reaction mechanism hinders attempts to deduce the nuclear matter equation of state from data. 102 references, 19 figures.

  3. Charge transfer during individual collisions in ice growing by riming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avila, Eldo E.; Caranti, Giorgio M.

    1991-01-01

    The charging of a target by riming in the wind was studied in the temperature range of (-10, -18 C). For each temperature, charge transfers of both signs are observed and, according to the environmental conditions, one of them prevails. The charge is more positive as the liquid water concentration is increased at any particular temperature. It is found that even at the low impact velocities used (5 m/s) there is abundant evidence of fragmentation following the collision.

  4. Collision in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    On June 25, 1997, the Russian supply spacecraft Progress 234 collided with the Mir space station, rupturing Mir's pressure hull, throwing it into an uncontrolled attitude drift, and nearly forcing evacuation of the station. Like many high-profile accidents, this collision was the consequence of a chain of events leading to the final piloting errors that were its immediate cause. The discussion in this article does not resolve the relative contributions of the actions and decisions in this chain. Neither does it suggest corrective measures, many of which are straightforward and have already been implemented by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Russian Space Agency. Rather, its purpose is to identify the human factors that played a pervasive role in the incident. Workplace stress, fatigue, and sleep deprivation were identified by NASA as contributory factors in the Mir-Progress collision (Culbertson, 1997; NASA, forthcoming), but other contributing factors, such as requiring crew to perform difficult tasks for which their training is not current, could potentially become important factors in future situations.

  5. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  6. Water ball collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimoto, K.

    1986-01-01

    What happens if a stainless steel ball hits a water ball in the weightless space ot the Universe? In other words, it was the objective of our experiments in the Space to observe the surface tension of liquid by means of making a solid collide with a liquid. Place a small volume of water between 2 glass sheets to make a thin water membrane: the 2 glass sheets cannot be separated unless an enormous force is applied. It is obvious from this phenomenom that the surface tension of water is far greater than presumed. On Earth, however, it is impossible in most cases to observe only the surface tension of liquid, because gravity always acts on the surface tension. Water and stainless steel balls were chosen the liquid and solids for the experiments. Because water is the liquid most familiar to us, its properties are well known. And it is also of great interest to compare its properties on the Earth with those in the weightless space.

  7. Collision geometry and flow in uranium + uranium collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschmidt, Andy; Qiu, Zhi; Shen, Chun; Heinz, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Using event-by-event viscous fluid dynamics to evolve fluctuating initial density profiles from the Monte Carlo-Glauber model for U+U collisions, we study the predicted "knee"-like structure in the elliptic flow as a function of collision centrality. The knee arises in the two-component Monte Carlo-Glauber model when the initial source ellipticity is plotted as a function of centrality. It results from the preferential selection of tip-on-tip collision geometries by a high-multiplicity trigger. We find that the knee survives hydrodynamic evolution, and that it is located around the 0.5% most central collisions as measured by the final charged multiplicity. Such a knee structure is not seen in the STAR data. This rules out the two-component MC-Glauber model for initial energy and entropy production. Hence an enrichment of tip-tip configurations by triggering solely on high-multiplicity in the U+U collisions does not work. On the other hand, by using zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs) coupled with event-shape engineering such a selection is possible. We identify the selection purity of body-body and tip-tip events in full-overlap U+U collisions. By additionally constraining the asymmetry of the ZDC signals we can further increase the probability of selecting tip-tip events in U+U collisions.

  8. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  9. Collision avoidance sensor skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to totally eliminate the possibility of a robot (or any mechanism for that matter) inducing a collision in space operations. We were particularly concerned that human beings were safe under all circumstances. This was apparently accomplished, and it is shown that GSFC has a system that is ready for space qualification and flight. However, it soon became apparent that much more could be accomplished with this technology. Payloads could be made invulnerable to collision avoidance and the blind spots behind them eliminated. This could be accomplished by a simple, non-imaging set of 'Capaciflector' sensors on each payload. It also is evident that this system could be used to align and dock the system with a wide margin of safety. Throughout, lighting problems could be ignored, and unexpected events and modeling errors taken in stride. At the same time, computational requirements would be reduced. This can be done in a simple, rugged, reliable manner that will not disturb the form factor of space systems. It will be practical for space applications. The lab experiments indicate we are well on the way to accomplishing this. Still, the research trail goes deeper. It now appears that the sensors can be extended to end effectors to provide precontact information and make robot docking (or any docking connection) very smooth, with minimal loads impacted back into the mating structures. This type of ability would be a major step forward in basic control techniques in space. There are, however, baseline and restructuring issues to be tackled. The payloads must get power and signals to them from the robot or from the astronaut servicing tool. This requires a standard electromechanical interface. Any of several could be used. The GSFC prototype shown in this presentation is a good one. Sensors with their attendant electronics must be added to the payloads, end effectors, and robot arms and integrated into the system.

  10. Collisions in the Oort Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S.A.

    1988-03-01

    The present assessment of the consequentiality of physical collisions between Oort Cloud objects by a first-generation model indicates that natural power-law population structures produce significant numbers of collisions between each comet and smaller objects over the age of the solar system. These collisions are held to constitute a feedback mechanism for small debris production. The impacts yield extensive comet surface evolution in the cloud, in conditions where the number of small orbiting objects conforms to the standard power-law populations. 16 references.

  11. Duration of an elastic collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Izarra, Charles

    2012-07-01

    With a pedagogical goal, this paper deals with a study of the duration of an elastic collision of an inflatable spherical ball on a planar surface suitable for undergraduate studies. First, the force generated by the deformed spherical ball is obtained under assumptions that are discussed. The study of the motion of the spherical ball colliding with the planar surface allows us to determine the duration of the elastic collision. In order to check the theoretical model, an experiment is proposed to measure the duration of the collision. A more refined model built with masses and springs gives good agreement between theoretical and experimental values.

  12. Theoretical studies of molecular collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouri, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) total integral reactive cross sections and vibrationally resolved reaction probabilities for F + H2 = HF + H; (2) a theoretical study of inelastic O + N2 collisions; (3) body frame close coupling wave packet approach to gas phase atom-rigit rotor inelastic collisions; (4) wave packet study of gas phase atom-rigit motor scattering; (5) the application of optical potentials for reactive scattering; (6) time dependent, three dimensional body frame quantal wave packet treatment of the H + H2 exchange reaction; (7) a time dependent wave packet approach to atom-diatom reactive collision probabilities; (8) time dependent wave packet for the complete determination of s-matrix elements for reactive molecular collisions in three dimensions; (9) a comparison of three time dependent wave packet methods for calculating electron-atom elastic scattering cross sections; and (10) a numerically exact full wave packet approach to molecule-surface scattering.

  13. Milky Way's Head On Collision

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the collision between our Milky Way galaxy and the Andromeda galaxy. Hubble Space Telescope observations indicate that the two galaxies, pulled together by their mutual gravi...

  14. Theory of slow atomic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, E. E.; Umanskii, S. Ia.

    The theory presented in this book is self-contained. It can be applied to the interpretation of various processes occurring in atomic collisions over a relatively wide energy range, from thermal energies to hundreds of eV. The general formulation of the scattering problem under quasi-classical conditions is discussed, taking into account scattering amplitudes and cross sections, scattering equations, collisions of two many-electron atoms, and integral cross sections for isotropic collisions. Other topics explored are related to diatomic electronic states, approximate calculations of the electronic states of diatoms, elastic scattering, approximate calculations of a multichannel quasi-classical scattering matrix, the two-state scattering problem, the linear two-state Landau-Zener model, nonlinear two-state models of nonadiabatic coupling, multistate models of nonadiabatic coupling, and a case study involving intramultiplet mixing and depolarization of alkalis in collisions with noble gases.

  15. Continental collisions and seismic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, R.; Wever, Th.; Sadowiak, P.

    1991-04-01

    Reflection seismics in compressional belts has revealed the structure of crustal shortening and thickening processes, showing complex patterns of indentation and interfingering of colliding crusts and subcrustal lithospheres. Generally, in the upper crust large zones of detachments develop, often showing duplexes and 'crocodile' structures. The lower crust from zones of active collision (e.g. Alps, Pyrenees) is characterized by strongly dipping reflections. The base of the crust with the Moho must be continuously equilibrating after orogenic collapse as areas of former continental collision exhibit flat Mohos and subhorizontal reflections. The depth to the Moho increases during collision and decreases after the onset of post-orogenic extension, until finally the crustal root disappears completely together with the erosion of the mountains. Processes, active during continental collisions and orogenic collapse, create distinct structures which are imaged by reflection seismic profiling. Examples are shown and discussed.

  16. Galaxy collisions - A preliminary study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, B. F.

    1980-01-01

    Collisions of spherical galaxies were studied in a series of numerical experiments to see what happens when galaxies collide. Each experiment starts with two model galaxies, each consisting of 50,000 stars, moving toward each other along a specified orbit. The series of experiments provides a systematic sampling of the parameter space spanned by the initial orbital energy and the initial angular momentum. Deeply penetrating collisions are emphasized. The collisions reported here scale to relative velocities as great as 500 km/s, well into the range for collisions within clusters of galaxies. It is found that: (1) the galaxies contract momentarily to about half their original sizes shortly after close passage; and (2) the initial galaxies blend into a single dynamical system while they are near each other.

  17. Surface Collisions Involving Particles and Moisture (SCIP'M)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were performed on the collision of a solid sphere with a nearly horizontal flat surface covered with a thin layer of viscous liquid. High-speed collisions were obtained by dropping the ball onto the surface from various heights, using gravitational acceleration. Low-speed collisions were obtained using pendulums with long strings or by launching the balls at low velocities in the reduced-gravity environment of parabolic flight. The sphere bounces only when the impact velocity exceeds a critical value. The coefficient of restitution (ratio of rebound velocity to impact velocity) increases with increasing impact velocity above the critical value, indicating the increasing relative importance of elastic deformation to viscous dissipation. The critical impact velocity increases, and the coefficient of restitution decreases, with increasing viscosity or thickness of the liquid layer and with decreasing density or size of the sphere. The ratio of the wet and dry coefficients is expressed as a function of the Stokes number (ratio of particle inertia and viscous forces), showing good agreement between theory and experiment. Similar experiments were performed with the flat surface inclined at various angles to the approaching sphere. A modified Stokes number, which is a measure of the ratio of inertia of the sphere in the normal direction to the viscous forces exerted by the fluid layer, was used for the analysis of oblique collisions. Even for these oblique collisions, it was found that no rebound of the ball was observed below a certain critical Stokes number. The coefficient of normal restitution, defined as a ratio of normal rebound velocity to normal approach velocity, was found to increase beyond the critical Stokes number and even out as it approaches the value for dry restitution at high Stokes numbers. It was also found that, for smooth spheres like steel, the normal restitution at the same modified Stokes number is independent of the angle of impact

  18. Dynamics of droplet collision and flame-front motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Long

    Three physical phenomena were experimentally and computationally investigated in this research, namely the dynamics of head-on droplet-droplet collision, head-on droplet-film collision, and laminar premixed flames, with emphasis on the transition between bouncing and merging of the liquid surfaces for the droplet collision studies, and on the susceptibility to exhibit hydrodynamic instability for the flame dynamics. All three problems share the common feature of having an active deformable interface separating two flow regions of disparate densities, and as such can be computationally described using the adopted immersed boundary technique. Experimentally, the droplets (˜300 mum diameter) were generated using the ink jet printing technique, and imaged using stroboscopy for the droplet-droplet collision events and high-speed cine-photography for the droplet-film collision events. For the study of droplet-droplet collision, the instant of merging was experimentally determined and then used as an input in the computational simulation of the entire collision event. The simulation identified the differences between collision and merging at small and large Weber numbers, and satisfactorily described the dynamics of the inter-droplet gap including the role of the van der Waals force in effecting surface rupture. For the study of droplet-film collision, extensive experimental mapping showed that the collision dynamics is primarily affected by the droplet Weber number (We) and the film thickness scaled by the droplet radius (H), that while droplet absorption by the film is facilitated with increasing droplet Weber number, the boundary of transition is punctuated by an absorption peninsula, in the We-H space, within which absorption is further facilitated for smaller Weber numbers. Results from computation simulation revealed the essential dependence of the collision dynamics on the restraining nature of the solid surface, the energy exchange between the droplet and the

  19. Dynamics of Bouncing-vs.-Merging Responses in Jet Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minglei; Saha, Abhishek; Zhu, Delin L.; Sun, Chao; Law, Chung K.

    2015-11-01

    Collision of two fluid masses is a common natural and industrial phenomenon. Many kinds of noncoalescence phenomena of collisional fluid masses, such as droplet & droplet, droplet & liquid film, have been studied, and the dynamics of the gas layer between the colliding liquid surfaces was found to play a crucial role. However, many fluid mass collision processes are nonstationary, making it difficult to study this air layer dynamics in detail. Jet bouncing can be in a stationary state with a geometrically simple gas layer, providing an ideal system to investigate the dynamics of the air film between the colliding interfaces. In this work, we observe an entire suite of possible jet collision outcomes of (soft) merging, bouncing and (hard) merging with increasing impact inertia. These transitions between these different regimes are characterized through scaling analysis by considering the competing effects of impact inertia, surface tension and viscous thinning of the interfacial air-gap leading to activate the van der Waals force to effect merging.

  20. Liquid metal nanodroplet dynamics inside nanocontainers

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun Young; Chun, Hyunkyung; Park, Sora; Kang, Seoung-Hun; Ahn, Chi Won; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Jung, Yung Joon

    2013-01-01

    Here we report direct observations of spatial movements of nanodroplets of Pb metal trapped inside sealed carbon nanocontainers. We find drastic changes in the mobility of the liquid droplets as the particle size increases from a few to a few ten nanometers. In open containers the droplet becomes immobile and readily evaporates to the vacuum environment. The particle mobility strongly depends on confinement, particle size, and wetting on the enclosed surface. The collisions between droplets increase mobility but the tendency is reversed if collisions lead to droplet coalescence. The dynamics of confined nanodroplets could provide new insights into the activity of nanostructures in spatially constrained geometries. PMID:24005021

  1. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  2. Spinodal density enhancements in nuclear collisions at the CBM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinheimer, J.; Koch, V.; Randrup, J.; Bleicher, M.

    2015-04-01

    We discuss a novel approach to describe the evolution of a fireball, created in a high-energy nuclear collision, experiencing spinodal instabilities due to the first-order deconfinement phase transition of quantum chromo dynamics (QCD). We show that initial density fluctuations in these collisions are enhanced in the mechanically unstable region of the QCD phase diagram. In our study we find that the most favorable energy range for observing these density enhancements is at the lower end of the SIS100 accelerator at FAIR, currently under construction. Furthermore we discuss how one can distinguish and constrain different types of QCD phase transitions, one of hadron-quark type and one of liquid-gas type, leading to strong differences in the dynamical evolution of the QCD medium.

  3. Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swihart, Donald E.; Skoog, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    This document represents two views of the Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). One viewgraph presentation reviews the development and system design of Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). Two types of ACAT exist: Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance (AGCAS) and Automatic Air Collision Avoidance (AACAS). The AGCAS Uses Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) for mapping functions, and uses Navigation data to place aircraft on map. It then scans DTED in front of and around aircraft and uses future aircraft trajectory (5g) to provide automatic flyup maneuver when required. The AACAS uses data link to determine position and closing rate. It contains several canned maneuvers to avoid collision. Automatic maneuvers can occur at last instant and both aircraft maneuver when using data link. The system can use sensor in place of data link. The second viewgraph presentation reviews the development of a flight test and an evaluation of the test. A review of the operation and comparison of the AGCAS and a pilot's performance are given. The same review is given for the AACAS is given.

  4. A problem of collision avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, T. L.; Cliff, E. M.; Grantham, W. J.; Peng, W. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Collision avoidance between two vehicles of constant speed with limited turning radii, moving in a horizontal plane is investigated. Collision avoidance is viewed as a game by assuming that the operator of one vehicle has perfect knowledge of the state of the other, whereas the operator of the second vehicle is unaware of any impending danger. The situation envisioned is that of an encounter between a commercial aircraft and a small light aircraft. This worse case situation is examined to determine the conditions under which the commercial aircraft should execute a collision avoidance maneuver. Three different zones of vulnerability are defined and the boundaries, or barriers, between these zones are determined for a typical aircraft encounter. A discussion of the methods used to obtain the results as well as some of the salient features associated with the resultant barriers is included.

  5. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  6. LIQUID TARGET

    DOEpatents

    Martin, M.D.; Salsig, W.W. Jr.

    1959-01-13

    A liquid handling apparatus is presented for a liquid material which is to be irradiated. The apparatus consists essentially of a reservoir for the liquid, a target element, a drain tank and a drain lock chamber. The target is in the form of a looped tube, the upper end of which is adapted to be disposed in a beam of atomic particles. The lower end of the target tube is in communication with the liquid in the reservoir and a means is provided to continuously circulate the liquid material to be irradiated through the target tube. Means to heat the reservoir tank is provided in the event that a metal is to be used as the target material. The apparatus is provided with suitable valves and shielding to provide maximum safety in operation.

  7. ACAT Ground Collision Avoidance Flight Tests Over

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has concluded flight tests of an Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto GCAS) under the joint U.S. Air Force/NASA F-16D Automatic Collision Avoidance...

  8. Space debris collision and production analytic estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-08-01

    Analytic estimates provide useful estimates of collision rates, fragment production rates, and average collision masses and numbers in good agreement with analytic and numerical estimates for the principal quantities of interest.

  9. 46 CFR 171.085 - Collision bulkhead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... forward perpendicular if the space forward of the collision bulkhead is not subject to damage stability... forward of the collision bulkhead is subject to damage stability requirements. ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL...

  10. 46 CFR 171.085 - Collision bulkhead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... forward perpendicular if the space forward of the collision bulkhead is not subject to damage stability... forward of the collision bulkhead is subject to damage stability requirements. ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL...

  11. Dissipative heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmeier, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    This report is a compilation of lecture notes of a series of lectures held at Argonne National Laboratory in October and November 1984. The lectures are a discussion of dissipative phenomena as observed in collisions of atomic nuclei. The model is based on a system which has initially zero temperature and the initial energy is kinetic and binding energy. Collisions excite the nuclei, and outgoing fragments or the compound system deexcite before they are detected. Brownian motion is used to introduce the concept of dissipation. The master equation and the Fokker-Planck equation are derived. 73 refs., 59 figs. (WRF)

  12. Collisions in Chiral Kinetic Theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Yuan; Son, Dam T; Stephanov, Mikhail A

    2015-07-10

    Using a covariant formalism, we construct a chiral kinetic theory Lorentz invariant to order O(ℏ), which includes collisions. We find a new contribution to the particle number current due to the side jumps required by the conservation of angular momentum during collisions. We also find a conserved symmetric stress-energy tensor as well as the H function obeying Boltzmann's H theorem. We demonstrate their use by finding a general equilibrium solution and the values of the anomalous transport coefficients characterizing the chiral vortical effect. PMID:26207458

  13. Cold collisions between boson or fermion molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    We theoretically investigate collisions between electrostatically trapped cold polar molecules and compare boson and fermion isotopes. Evaporative cooling seems possible for fermion molecules as the ratio of the collision loss cross section to the elastic collision cross section (R) gets smaller as the molecular temperature T lowers. With boson molecules, R gets larger as T lowers, which makes evaporative cooling difficult. The elastic collision cross section between fermion molecules can be larger than that for boson molecules with certain conditions.

  14. Electron-electron collisions at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Siegfried; Reyzl, Ingrid

    2001-07-01

    Electron-electron collisions at the future TESLA linear collider is a promising complement to e+e- collisions. A critical issue for the physics potential of this option is the achievable luminosity. For e+e- collisions, the pinch effect enhances the luminosity, while due to the repelling forces for e-e- collisions, the luminosity is significantly reduced and is more sensitive to beam separations. This report discusses the e-e- option for TESLA and the expected luminosity.

  15. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... body structure. (3) Prior to or during structural deformation, each collision post acting together with... structural protection described in paragraph (a) of this section, either: (1) Two forward collision posts... structural protection described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, two forward collision...

  16. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... body structure. (3) Prior to or during structural deformation, each collision post acting together with... structural protection described in paragraph (a) of this section, either: (1) Two forward collision posts... structural protection described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, two forward collision...

  17. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... body structure. (3) Prior to or during structural deformation, each collision post acting together with... structural protection described in paragraph (a) of this section, either: (1) Two forward collision posts... structural protection described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, two forward collision...

  18. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... body structure. (3) Prior to or during structural deformation, each collision post acting together with... structural protection described in paragraph (a) of this section, either: (1) Two forward collision posts... structural protection described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, two forward collision...

  19. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... body structure. (3) Prior to or during structural deformation, each collision post acting together with... structural protection described in paragraph (a) of this section, either: (1) Two forward collision posts... structural protection described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, two forward collision...

  20. Probing GPDs in ultraperipheral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, D.Yu.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Wagner, J.

    2015-04-10

    Ultraperipheral collisions in hadron colliders give new opportunities to investigate the hadron structure through exclusive photoproduction processes. We describe the possibility of measuring the Generalized Parton Distributions in the Timelike Compton Scattering process and in the production of heavy vector meson.

  1. Quarkonium production in hadronic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavai, R.; Schuler, G.A.; Sridhar, K.

    1995-07-01

    We summarize the theoretical description of charmonium and bottonium production in hadronic collisions and compare it to the available data from hadron-nucleon interactions. With the parameters of the theory established by these data, we obtain predictions for quarkonium production at RHIC and LHC energies.

  2. Electron Collisions with Large Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKoy, Vincent

    2006-10-01

    In recent years, interest in electron-molecule collisions has increasingly shifted to large molecules. Applications within the semiconductor industry, for example, require electron collision data for molecules such as perfluorocyclobutane, while almost all biological applications involve macromolecules such as DNA. A significant development in recent years has been the realization that slow electrons can directly damage DNA. This discovery has spurred studies of low-energy collisions with the constituents of DNA, including the bases, deoxyribose, the phosphate, and larger moieties assembled from them. In semiconductor applications, a key goal is development of electron cross section sets for plasma chemistry modeling, while biological studies are largely focused on understanding the role of localized resonances in inducing DNA strand breaks. Accurate calculations of low-energy electron collisions with polyatomic molecules are computationally demanding because of the low symmetry and inherent many-electron nature of the problem; moreover, the computational requirements scale rapidly with the size of the molecule. To pursue such studies, we have adapted our computational procedure, known as the Schwinger multichannel method, to run efficiently on highly parallel computers. In this talk, we will present some of our recent results for fluorocarbon etchants used in the semiconductor industry and for constituents of DNA and RNA. In collaboration with Carl Winstead, California Institute of Technology.

  3. Duration of an Elastic Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Izarra, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With a pedagogical goal, this paper deals with a study of the duration of an elastic collision of an inflatable spherical ball on a planar surface suitable for undergraduate studies. First, the force generated by the deformed spherical ball is obtained under assumptions that are discussed. The study of the motion of the spherical ball colliding…

  4. Liquid atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayvel, L.; Orzechowski, Z.

    The present text defines the physical processes of liquid atomization, the primary types of atomizers and their design, and ways of measuring spray characteristics; it also presents experimental investigation results on atomizers and illustrative applications for them. Attention is given to the macrostructural and microstructural parameters of atomized liquids; swirl, pneumatic, and rotary atomizers; and optical drop sizing methods, with emphasis on nonintrusive optical methods.

  5. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    Plenary. Electron collisions - past, present and future / J. W. McConkey. Collisions of slow highly charged ions with surfaces / J. Burgdörfer ... [et al.]. Atomic collisions studied with "reaction-microscopes" / R. Moshammer ... [et al.]. Rydberg atoms: a microscale laboratory for studying electron-molecule tnteractions / F. B. Dunning -- Collisions involvintg photons. Quantum control of photochemical reaction dynamics and molecular functions / M. Yamaki ... [et al.]. Manipulating and viewing Rydberg wavepackets / R. R. Jones. Angle-resolved photoelectrons as a probe of strong-field interactions / M. Vrakking. Ultracold Rydberg atoms in a structured environment / I. C. H. Liu and J. M. Rost. Synchrotron-radiation-based recoil ion momentum spectroscopy of laser cooled and trapped cesium atoms / L. H. Coutinho. Reconstruction of attosecond pulse trains / Y. Mairesse ... [et al.]. Selective excitation of metastable atomic states by Femto- and attosecond laser pulses / A. D. Kondorskiy. Accurate calculations of triple differential cross sections for double photoionization of the hygrogen molecule / W. Vanroose ... [et al.]. Double and triple photoionization of Li and Be / J. Colgan, M. S. Pindzola and F. Robicheaux. Few/many body dynamics in strong laser fields / J. Zanghellini and T. Brabec. Rescattering-induced effects in electron-atom scattering in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field / A. V. Flegel ... [et al.]. Multidimensional photoelectron spectroscopy / P. Lablanquie ... [et al.]. Few photon and strongly driven transitions in the XUV and beyond / P. Lambropoulos, L. A. A. Nikolopoulos and S. I. Themelis. Ionization dynamics of atomic clusters in intense laser pulses / U. Saalmann and J. M. Rost. On the second order autocorrelation of an XUV attosecond pulse train / E. P. Benis ... [et al.]. Evidence for rescattering in molecular dissociation / I. D. Williams ... [et al.]. Photoionizing ions using synchrotron radiation / R. Phaneuf. Photo double

  6. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    Plenary. Electron collisions - past, present and future / J. W. McConkey. Collisions of slow highly charged ions with surfaces / J. Burgdörfer ... [et al.]. Atomic collisions studied with "reaction-microscopes" / R. Moshammer ... [et al.]. Rydberg atoms: a microscale laboratory for studying electron-molecule tnteractions / F. B. Dunning -- Collisions involvintg photons. Quantum control of photochemical reaction dynamics and molecular functions / M. Yamaki ... [et al.]. Manipulating and viewing Rydberg wavepackets / R. R. Jones. Angle-resolved photoelectrons as a probe of strong-field interactions / M. Vrakking. Ultracold Rydberg atoms in a structured environment / I. C. H. Liu and J. M. Rost. Synchrotron-radiation-based recoil ion momentum spectroscopy of laser cooled and trapped cesium atoms / L. H. Coutinho. Reconstruction of attosecond pulse trains / Y. Mairesse ... [et al.]. Selective excitation of metastable atomic states by Femto- and attosecond laser pulses / A. D. Kondorskiy. Accurate calculations of triple differential cross sections for double photoionization of the hygrogen molecule / W. Vanroose ... [et al.]. Double and triple photoionization of Li and Be / J. Colgan, M. S. Pindzola and F. Robicheaux. Few/many body dynamics in strong laser fields / J. Zanghellini and T. Brabec. Rescattering-induced effects in electron-atom scattering in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field / A. V. Flegel ... [et al.]. Multidimensional photoelectron spectroscopy / P. Lablanquie ... [et al.]. Few photon and strongly driven transitions in the XUV and beyond / P. Lambropoulos, L. A. A. Nikolopoulos and S. I. Themelis. Ionization dynamics of atomic clusters in intense laser pulses / U. Saalmann and J. M. Rost. On the second order autocorrelation of an XUV attosecond pulse train / E. P. Benis ... [et al.]. Evidence for rescattering in molecular dissociation / I. D. Williams ... [et al.]. Photoionizing ions using synchrotron radiation / R. Phaneuf. Photo double

  7. A numerical study on collisions of icy bodies using SPH method combined with GRAPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, M.; Genda, H.; Ida, S.

    2009-12-01

    We have worked on the collisions of icy bodies using Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics (SPH) method combined with Gravity PipE (GRAPE) in order to understand the basic behavior of icy bodies during impacts. Collisions of Mars-size rocky bodies have been investigated well, because those collisions are related to the origin of the moon and the formation of the terrestrial planets. On the other hand, collisions of icy bodies have not been studied yet, although these collisions would frequently occur in the solar and extra-solar systems, such as the formation of icy exoplanets. Through our research, we figure out the effect of ice during impact in detail. Our SPH code has two special features. First, GRAvity PipE computer (GRAPE) is used, which calculates the gravitational force of each particle up to 100 times faster than usual computers. Second, SESAME equation of state database is used to build a realistic model, taking into account the effect of phase change. In this research, we focused on differences and similarities between collisions of icy bodies and those of rocky ones, such as a merging criterion. Agnor & Asphaug (2004) have shown that a collision of rocky Mars-size protoplanets leads to an inelastic collision when its relative velocities are smaller than 1.4-1.5v, 1.1-1.2v, 1.1-1.2v when its impact angles are 30, 45, and 60 degrees, respectively. Here, v means escape velocity. The same calculations for icy bodies are performed in our numerical code. They have shown that the merging criterion of icy bodies is the same as that of rocky bodies. In addition to the merging criterion, we also clarify the relationship between impact parameters and the change of solid, liquid/vapor mass ratio due to impacts.

  8. Continuum and molecular-dynamics simulation of nanodroplet collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardia, Raunak; Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2016-05-01

    The extent to which the continuum treatment holds in binary droplet collisions is examined in the present work by using a continuum-based implicit surface capturing strategy (volume-of-fluid coupled to Navier-Stokes) and a molecular dynamics methodology. The droplet pairs are arranged in a head-on-collision configuration with an initial separation distance of 5.3 nm and a velocity of 3 ms-1. The size of droplets ranges from 10-50 nm. Inspecting the results, the collision process can be described as consisting of two periods: a preimpact phase that ends with the initial contact of both droplets, and a postimpact phase characterized by the merging, deformation, and coalescence of the droplets. The largest difference between the continuum and molecular dynamics (MD) predictions is observed in the preimpact period, where the continuum-based viscous and pressure drag forces significantly overestimate the MD predictions. Due to large value of Knudsen number in the gas (Kngas=1.972 ), this behavior is expected. Besides the differences between continuum and MD, it is also observed that the continuum simulations do not converge for the set of grid sizes considered. This is shown to be directly related to the initial velocity profile and the minute size of the nanodroplets. For instance, for micrometer-size droplets, this numerical sensitivity is not an issue. During the postimpact period, both MD and continuum-based simulations are strikingly similar, with only a moderate difference in the peak kinetic energy recorded during the collision process. With values for the Knudsen number in the liquid (Knliquid=0.01 for D =36 nm ) much closer to the continuum regime, this behavior is expected. The 50 nm droplet case is sufficiently large to be predicted reasonably well with the continuum treatment. However, for droplets smaller than approximately 36 nm, the departure from continuum behavior becomes noticeably pronounced, and becomes drastically different for the 10 nm droplets.

  9. Liquid marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aussillous, Pascale; Quéré, David

    2001-06-01

    The transport of a small amount of liquid on a solid is not a simple process, owing to the nature of the contact between the two phases. Setting a liquid droplet in motion requires non-negligible forces (because the contact-angle hysteresis generates a force opposing the motion), and often results in the deposition of liquid behind the drop. Different methods of levitation-electrostatic, electromagnetic, acoustic, or even simpler aerodynamic techniques-have been proposed to avoid this wetting problem, but all have proved to be rather cumbersome. Here we propose a simple alternative, which consists of encapsulating an aqueous liquid droplet with a hydrophobic powder. The resulting `liquid marbles' are found to behave like a soft solid, and show dramatically reduced adhesion to a solid surface. As a result, motion can be generated using gravitational, electrical and magnetic fields. Moreover, because the viscous friction associated with motion is very small, we can achieve quick displacements of the droplets without any leaks. All of these features are of potential benefit in microfluidic applications, and also permit the study of a drop in a non-wetting situation-an issue of renewed interest following the recent achievement of super-hydrophobic substrates.

  10. Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  11. Liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Aussillous, P; Quéré, D

    2001-06-21

    The transport of a small amount of liquid on a solid is not a simple process, owing to the nature of the contact between the two phases. Setting a liquid droplet in motion requires non-negligible forces (because the contact-angle hysteresis generates a force opposing the motion), and often results in the deposition of liquid behind the drop. Different methods of levitation-electrostatic, electromagnetic, acoustic, or even simpler aerodynamic techniques-have been proposed to avoid this wetting problem, but all have proved to be rather cumbersome. Here we propose a simple alternative, which consists of encapsulating an aqueous liquid droplet with a hydrophobic powder. The resulting 'liquid marbles' are found to behave like a soft solid, and show dramatically reduced adhesion to a solid surface. As a result, motion can be generated using gravitational, electrical and magnetic fields. Moreover, because the viscous friction associated with motion is very small, we can achieve quick displacements of the droplets without any leaks. All of these features are of potential benefit in microfluidic applications, and also permit the study of a drop in a non-wetting situation-an issue of renewed interest following the recent achievement of super-hydrophobic substrates. PMID:11418851

  12. Grazing Ion-Surface Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravielle, M. S.

    Electron emission after grazing ion-surface collisions is studied for high impact velocities. We have focused on glancing angles of electron emission where the dominant mechanism is the ionization from atomic bound states. To describe this process, we introduce a quantum model called field distorted-wave (FDW) approximation, which takes into account the effect of the surface interaction on the electronic transition. The FDW model is applied to analyze electron distributions produced by impact of protons on Al and LiF surfaces, which are metal and insulator materials respectively. In the case of metals, we also evaluate the contibution coming from the valence band by employing the binary collisional formalism. Calculated electron emission yields are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data. We find that the maximum of the convoy electron distribution is accelerated for Al and decelerated for LiF, with respect to its position in ion-atom collisions, in quantitative accordance with experiments.

  13. Collision detection for moving polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Canny, J

    1986-02-01

    We consider the collision-detection problem for a three-dimensional solid object moving among polyhedral obstacles. The configuration space for this problem is six-dimensional, and the traditional representation of the space uses three translational parameters and three angles (typically Euler angles). The constraints between the object and obstacles then involve trigonometric functions. We show that a quaternion representation of rotation yields constraints which are purely algebraic in a seven-dimensional space. By simple manipulation, the constraints may be projected down into a six-dimensional space with no increase in complexity. The algebraic form of the constraints greatly simplifies computation of collision points, and allows us to derive an efficient exact intersection test for an object which is translating and rotating among obstacles. PMID:21869338

  14. COLLIDE: Collisions into Dust Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, Joshua E.

    1999-01-01

    The Collisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) was completed and flew on STS-90 in April and May of 1998. After the experiment was returned to Earth, the data and experiment were analyzed. Some anomalies occurred during the flight which prevented a complete set of data from being obtained. However, the experiment did meet its criteria for scientific success and returned surprising results on the outcomes of very low energy collisions into powder. The attached publication, "Low Velocity Microgravity Impact Experiments into Simulated Regolith," describes in detail the scientific background, engineering, and scientific results of COLLIDE. Our scientific conclusions, along with a summary of the anomalies which occurred during flight, are contained in that publication. We offer it as our final report on this grant.

  15. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  16. QCD studies in ep collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F{sub 2}, which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q{sup 2} regimes are discussed. The low Q{sup 2} transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure {alpha}{sub s}, and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs.

  17. Macromolecular liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Safinya, C.R.; Safran, S.A. ); Pincus, P.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Liquids include a broad range of material systems which are of high scientific and technological interest. Generally speaking, these are partially ordered or disordered phases where the individual molecular species have organized themselves on length scales which are larger than simple fluids, typically between 10 Angstroms and several microns. The specific systems reported on in this book include membranes, microemulsions, micelles, liquid crystals, colloidal suspensions, and polymers. They have a major impact on a broad spectrum of technological industries such as displays, plastics, soap and detergents, chemicals and petroleum, and pharmaceuticals.

  18. Fraction of space debris collisions that are catastrophic

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-08-01

    Analytic calculations estimate the fraction of catalog collisions that are catastrophic by a modification of collision rates. Most catalog collisions are catastrophic. Impactors of 60 kg or larger participate in about half of the catastrophic collisions. Analytic estimates give accurate values for catastrophic collisions, which are complicated numerically.

  19. Analyzing Collisions in Terms of Newton's Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, John L.

    2003-02-01

    Although the principle of momentum conservation is a consequence of Newton's second and third laws of motion, as recognized by Newton himself, this principle is typically applied in analyzing collisions as if it is a separate concept of its own. This year I sought to integrate my treatment of collisions with my coverage of Newton's laws by asking students to calculate the effect on the motion of two particles due to the forces they exerted for a specified time interval on each other. For example, "A 50-kg crate slides across the ice at 3 m/s and collides with a 25-kg crate at rest. During the collision process the 50-kg crate exerts a 500 N time-averaged force on the 25 kg for 0.1 s. What are the accelerations of the crates during the collision, and what are their velocities after the collision? What are the momenta of the crates before and after collision?"

  20. A Collective Collision Operator for DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    GALLIS,MICHAIL A.; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.

    2000-06-21

    A new scheme to simulate elastic collisions in particle simulation codes is presented. The new scheme aims at simulating the collisions in the highly collisional regime, in which particle simulation techniques typically become computationally expensive.The new scheme is based on the concept of a grid-based collision field. According to this scheme, the particles perform a single collision with the background grid during a time step. The properties of the background field are calculated from the moments of the distribution function accumulated on the grid. The collision operator is based on the Langevin equation. Based on comparisons with other methods, it is found that the Langevin method overestimates the collision frequency for dilute gases.

  1. Experimental Study of the Effects of Collision of Water Droplets in a Flow of High-Temperature Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, D. V.; Volkov, R. S.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Using high-speed video recording and cross-correlation "tracer" visualization, the authors have investigated the regularities of the processes of collision of water droplets (characteristic parameters: radii 0.025-0.25 mm, velocities of motion 0.5-12 m/s, and relative concentration 0.001-0.0012 m3 of liquid droplets in 1 m3 of the gas) in their motion in a flow of high-temperature (about 1100 K) gases. The characteristic effects of collision of two droplets, at which combined droplets are formed (coagulation occurs) and conditions for spreading or fragmentation of the latter are implemented, have been singled out. The values of the Weber and Reynolds numbers for droplets before and after the collisions have been established. The influences of the velocities of motion, the dimensions, and the angles of intersection of mechanical trajectories of droplets on the effects of collisions have been determined.

  2. Integrated Collision Avoidance System for Air Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Collision with ground/water/terrain and midair obstacles is one of the common causes of severe aircraft accidents. The various data from the coremicro AHRS/INS/GPS Integration Unit, terrain data base, and object detection sensors are processed to produce collision warning audio/visual messages and collision detection and avoidance of terrain and obstacles through generation of guidance commands in a closed-loop system. The vision sensors provide more information for the Integrated System, such as, terrain recognition and ranging of terrain and obstacles, which plays an important role to the improvement of the Integrated Collision Avoidance System.

  3. Flight Tests Validate Collision-Avoidance System

    NASA Video Gallery

    Flights tests of a smartphone-assisted automatic ground collision avoidance system at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center consistently commanded evasive maneuvers when it sensed that the unmanned ...

  4. Telerobotics with whole arm collision avoidance

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, K.; Strenn, S.

    1993-09-01

    The complexity of teleorbotic operations in a cluttered environment is exacerbated by the need to present collision information to the operator in an understandable fashion. In addition to preventing movements which will cause collisions, a system providing some form of virtual force reflection (VFR) is desirable. With this goal in mind, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has installed a kinematically master/slave system and developed a whole arm collision avoidance system which interacts directly with the telerobotic controller. LLNL has also provided a structure to allow for automated upgrades of workcell models and provide collision avoidance even in a dynamically changing workcell.

  5. Collinear Collision Chemistry: 1. A Simple Model for Inelastic and Reactive Collision Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahan, Bruce H.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses a model for the collinear collision of an atom with a diatomic molecule on a simple potential surface. Indicates that the model can provide a framework for thinking about molecular collisions and reveal many factors which affect the dynamics of reactive and inelastic collisions. (CC)

  6. Exotics from Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Akira; Jido, Daisuke; Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Yazaki, Koichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2011-10-21

    Discriminating hadronic molecular and multi-quark states is a long standing problem in hadronic physics. We propose here to utilize relativistic heavy ion collisions to resolve this problem, as exotic hadron yields are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model, we find that the exotic hadron yield relative to the statistical model result is typically an order of magnitude smaller for a compact multi-quark state, and larger by a factor of two or more for a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured at RHIC and LHC.

  7. Liquid atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Walzel, P. )

    1993-01-01

    A systematic review of different liquid atomizers is presented, accompanied by a discussion of various mechanisms of droplet formation in a gas atmosphere as a function of the liquid flow-regime and the geometry of the atomizer. Equations are presented for the calculation of the mean droplet-diameter. In many applications, details of the droplet size distribution are, also, important, e.g., approximate values of the breadth of the droplet formation are given. The efficiency of utilization of mechanical energy in droplet formation is indicated for the different types of atomizers. Atomization is used, in particular, for the following purposes: (1) atomization of fuels; (2) making granular products; (3) carrying out mass-transfer operations; and (4) coating of surfaces.

  8. Morphological stability of Cu-Nb nanocomposites under high-energy collision cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Liang; Demkowicz, Michael J.

    2013-08-05

    We use molecular dynamics and phase field simulations to demonstrate that Cu-Nb multilayered nanocomposites with individual layer thicknesses above 2–4 nm remain morphologically stable when subjected to 100 keV collision cascades, characteristic of neutron or heavy ion irradiation. The probability of morphological instability rapidly increases as the layer thickness decreases to 1 nm, which we attribute to overlap of zones of liquid-like interdiffusion inside radiation-induced thermal spikes at neighboring interfaces in the multilayer.

  9. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    1994-01-01

    A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

  10. Initial conditions in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopalan, Raju

    2001-10-01

    At very high energies, partons in nuclei form a color glass condensate (CGC). In a nuclear collision, the color glass shatters, producing a high multiplicity of gluons. We discuss the results of numerical simulations which describe the real time evolution of the CGC in a heavy ion collision.

  11. 46 CFR 174.340 - Collision bulkhead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Collision bulkhead. 174.340 Section 174.340 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Hopper Dredges With Working Freeboard Assignments Design § 174.340 Collision bulkhead. Each hopper dredge must have...

  12. 46 CFR 174.190 - Collision bulkhead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Collision bulkhead. 174.190 Section 174.190 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Offshore Supply Vessels § 174.190 Collision bulkhead. (a) Each OSV must have a...

  13. Positron collisions with alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gien, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The total cross sections for positron and electron collisions with potassium, sodium, lithium and rubidium are calculated, employing the modified Glauber approximation. The Modified Glauber cross sections for positron collision with potassium and sodium at low intermediate energies are found to agree reasonably well with existing experimental data.

  14. Graphical Method of Teaching Elementary Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Harley D.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses a graphical method of teaching elementary collisions. This method yields universal solutions to head-on collision problems with the target at rest by the use of parameters and graphical analysis at a mathematical level that beginning physics students can understand. The author concludes that this method is better than the traditional…

  15. Mechanical Energy Changes in Perfectly Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Suppose a block of mass "m"[subscript 1] traveling at speed "v"[subscript 1] makes a one-dimensional perfectly inelastic collision with another block of mass "m"[subscript 2]. What else does one need to know to calculate the fraction of the mechanical energy that is dissipated in the collision? (Contains 1 figure.)

  16. Details Of Collision-Avoidance Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Sheryl L.; Billings, Charles E.; Olsen, M. Christine; Scott, Barry C.; Tuttell, Robert J.; Kozon, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    Report provides background information on and detailed description of study of pilots' use of traffic-alert and collision-avoidance system (TCAS II) in simulated flights. Described in article, "Evaluation of an Aircraft-Collision-Avoidance System" (ARC-12367). Plans, forms, training narratives, scripts, questionnaires, and other information compiled.

  17. Oblique and Head-On Elastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2008-01-01

    When a moving ball collides elastically with an identical, initially stationary ball, the incident ball will either come to rest (head-on collision; see Fig. 1) or will acquire a velocity that is perpendicular to that acquired by the target ball (oblique collision; see Fig. 2). These two possible outcomes are related in an interesting way, which…

  18. Variation of transverse momentum in hadronic collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Amand, J.; Uritam, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed parameterization of the transverse momentum in hadronic collisions on multiplicity and on beam momentum. Hadronic collisions are considered at energies below the ultra-high energy domain, on the basis of an uncertainty relation and a naive eikonal model with an impact-parameter-dependent multiplicity.

  19. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

    2013-10-01

    Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

  20. Molecular collisions coming into focus.

    PubMed

    Onvlee, Jolijn; Vogels, Sjoerd N; von Zastrow, Alexander; Parker, David H; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

    2014-08-14

    The Stark deceleration method exploits the concepts of charged particle accelerator physics to produce beams of neutral polar molecules with an almost perfect quantum state purity, a tunable velocity and a narrow velocity distribution. These monochromatic molecular beams offer interesting perspectives for precise studies of molecular scattering processes, in particular when used in conjunction with state-of-the-art laser-based detection techniques such as velocity map imaging. Here, we describe crossed beam scattering experiments in which the Stark deceleration method is combined with the velocity map imaging technique. The narrow velocity spread of Stark-decelerated molecular beams results in scattering images with unprecedented velocity and angular resolution. We demonstrate this by resolving quantum diffraction oscillations in state-to-state inelastic differential scattering cross sections for collisions between NO radicals and rare gas atoms. We describe the future prospects of this "best-of-two-worlds" combination, ranging from scattering studies at low collision energies to bimolecular scattering using two decelerators, and discuss the challenges that lie ahead to achieve these goals. PMID:24967721

  1. Energy coupling in catastrophic collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holsapple, K. A.; Choe, K. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The prediction of events leading to the catastrophic collisions and disruption of solar system bodies is fraught with the same difficulties as are other theories of impact events; since one simply cannot perform experiments in the regime of interest. In the catastrophic collisions of asteroids that regime involves bodies of a few tons to hundred of kilometers in diameter, and velocities of several kilometers pre second. For hundred kilometer bodies, gravitational stresses dominate material fracture strengths, but those gravitational stresses are essentially absent for laboratory experiments. Only numerical simulations using hydrocodes can in principle analyze the true problems, but they have their own major uncertainties about the correctness of the physical models and properties. The question of the measure of the impactor and its energy coupling is investigated using numerical code calculations. The material model was that of a generic silicate rock, including high pressure melt and vapor phases, and includes material nonlinearity and dissipation via a Mie-Gruniesen model. A series of calculations with various size ratios and impact velocities are reported.

  2. Crab Waist Collision at DAFNE

    SciTech Connect

    Milardi, C.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, G.; Murtas, F.; Pellegrino, L.; /Frascati /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN /INFN, Cosenza /INFN, Rome /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Rome U. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Rome3 /SLAC

    2011-11-30

    DAFNE is an accelerator complex consisting of a double ring lepton collider working at the c.m. energy of the {Phi}-resonance (1.02 GeV) and an injection system. In its original configuration the collider consisted of two independent rings, each {approx}97 m long, sharing two 10 m long interaction regions (IR1 and IR2) where the KLOE and FINUDA or DEAR detectors were respectively installed. A full energy injection system, including an S-band linac, 180 m long transfer lines and an accumulator/damping ring, provides fast and high efficiency electron positron injection also in topping-up mode during collisions. Recently the DAFNE collider has been upgraded in order to implement a new collision scheme based on large Piwinski angle and cancellation of the synchro-betatron resonances by means of electromagnetic sextupoles (Crab-Waist compensation). The novel approach has proved to be effective in improving beam-beam interaction and collider luminosity.

  3. Pump for Saturated Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    Boiling liquids pumped by device based on proven components. Expanding saturated liquid in nozzle and diverting its phases along separate paths in liquid/vapor separator raises pressure of liquid. Liquid cooled in process. Pump makes it unnecessary to pressurize cryogenic liquids in order to pump them. Problems of introducing noncondensable pressurizing gas avoided.

  4. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  5. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  6. Collisions in fast droplet streams for the production of spherolyophilisates.

    PubMed

    Süverkrüp, Richard; Eggerstedt, Sören N; Gruner, Katja; Kuschel, Matthias; Sommerfeld, Martin; Lamprecht, Alf

    2013-07-16

    Standard spray freeze drying usually leads to highly polydisperse particles, while a fast jet method allows for the preparation of lyophilisates with low polydispersity which is beneficial for a homogeneous drying process. Droplets of a monodisperse stream generated by Rayleigh disintegration of a fast liquid jet exiting from a piezoelectric dispenser are apparently subject to uncontrolled collisions. The process has been visualized by high-speed stroboscopic imaging, laser diffraction spectroscopy and image analysis of the footprint on a target moving at constant velocity across the spray plume. The analyses of the data sets obtained by these complementary methods yield an integrated picture of the processes leading to the loss of monodispersity and increased median size of droplets from 90 μm up to 264 ± 29 μm. Droplets collided and merged together which has in case of spray freeze drying to the same extent a direct impact on particle size and size distribution. These observations suggest utilizing measures to reduce the collision-related product changes. PMID:23707544

  7. Thermally induced collision of droplets in an immiscible outer fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davanlou, Ashkan; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2015-05-01

    Micro-total analysis systems (μTAS) have attracted wide attention and are identified as a promising solution for sample transport, filtration, chemical reactions, separation and detection. Despite their popularity, the selection of an appropriate mechanism for droplet transport and coalescence has always been a challenge. This paper investigates the use of Marangoni flow as a mechanism for levitating and transporting droplets on immiscible liquid films at higher speeds than is possible currently. For the first time, we show that it is possible to realize the natural coalescence of droplets through Marangoni effect without any external stimulation, and deliver the coalesced droplet to a certain destination through the use of surface tension gradients. The effects of shape and size on collision outcome are studied. Regions of coalescence and stretching separation of colliding droplets are delineated based on Weber number and impact number. In addition, the effect of viscosity on post collision regimes is studied. The findings in this fundamental study can be beneficial to many applications such as welding, drug delivery and microfluidics devices in controlling small droplets and targeting them to various locations.

  8. Particle accumulation on periodic orbits by repeated free surface collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ernst; Kuhlmann, Hendrik C.

    2011-07-01

    The motion of small particles suspended in cylindrical thermocapillary liquid bridges is investigated numerically in order to explain the experimentally observed particle accumulation structures (PAS) in steady two- and time-dependent three-dimensional flows. Particles moving in this flow are modeled as perfect tracers in the bulk, which can undergo collisions with the free surface. By way of free-surface collisions the particles are transferred among different streamlines which represents the particle trajectories in the bulk. The inter-streamline transfer-process near the free surface together with the passive transport through the bulk is used to construct an iterative map that can describe the accumulation process as an attraction to a stable fixed point which represents PAS. The flow topology of the underlying azimuthally traveling hydrothermal wave turns out to be of key importance for the existence of PAS. In a frame of reference exactly rotating with the hydrothermal wave the three-dimensional flow is steady and exhibits co-existing regular and chaotic streamlines. We find that particles are attracted to accumulation structures if a closed regular streamline exists in the rotating frame of reference which closely approaches the free surface locally. Depending on the closed streamline and the particle radius PAS can arise as a specific trajectory which winds about the closed regular streamline or as the surface of a particular stream tube containing the closed streamline.

  9. Restricted Collision List method for faster Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrossan, Michael N.

    2016-08-01

    The 'Restricted Collision List' (RCL) method for speeding up the calculation of DSMC Variable Soft Sphere collisions, with Borgnakke-Larsen (BL) energy exchange, is presented. The method cuts down considerably on the number of random collision parameters which must be calculated (deflection and azimuthal angles, and the BL energy exchange factors). A relatively short list of these parameters is generated and the parameters required in any cell are selected from this list. The list is regenerated at intervals approximately equal to the smallest mean collision time in the flow, and the chance of any particle re-using the same collision parameters in two successive collisions is negligible. The results using this method are indistinguishable from those obtained with standard DSMC. The CPU time saving depends on how much of a DSMC calculation is devoted to collisions and how much is devoted to other tasks, such as moving particles and calculating particle interactions with flow boundaries. For 1-dimensional calculations of flow in a tube, the new method saves 20% of the CPU time per collision for VSS scattering with no energy exchange. With RCL applied to rotational energy exchange, the CPU saving can be greater; for small values of the rotational collision number, for which most collisions involve some rotational energy exchange, the CPU may be reduced by 50% or more.

  10. Calculation of the Trubnikov and Nanbu Collision Kernels: Implications for Numerical Modeling of Coulomb Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dimits, A M; Wang, C; Caflisch, R; Cohen, B I; Huang, Y

    2008-08-06

    We investigate the accuracy of and assumptions underlying the numerical binary Monte-Carlo collision operator due to Nanbu [K. Nanbu, Phys. Rev. E 55 (1997)]. The numerical experiments that resulted in the parameterization of the collision kernel used in Nanbu's operator are argued to be an approximate realization of the Coulomb-Lorentz pitch-angle scattering process, for which an analytical solution for the collision kernel is available. It is demonstrated empirically that Nanbu's collision operator quite accurately recovers the effects of Coulomb-Lorentz pitch-angle collisions, or processes that approximate these (such interspecies Coulomb collisions with very small mass ratio) even for very large values of the collisional time step. An investigation of the analytical solution shows that Nanbu's parameterized kernel is highly accurate for small values of the normalized collision time step, but loses some of its accuracy for larger values of the time step. Careful numerical and analytical investigations are presented, which show that the time dependence of the relaxation of a temperature anisotropy by Coulomb-Lorentz collisions has a richer structure than previously thought, and is not accurately represented by an exponential decay with a single decay rate. Finally, a practical collision algorithm is proposed that for small-mass-ratio interspecies Coulomb collisions improves on the accuracy of Nanbu's algorithm.

  11. Continuum modeling of catastrophic collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Eileen V.; Aspaug, Erik; Melosh, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    A two dimensional hydrocode based on 2-D SALE was modified to include strength effects and fragmentation equations for fracture resulting from tensile stress in one dimension. Output from this code includes a complete fragmentation summary for each cell of the modeled object: fragment size (mass) distribution, vector velocities of particles, peak values of pressure and tensile stress, and peak strain rates associated with fragmentation. Contour plots showing pressure and temperature at given times within the object are also produced. By invoking axial symmetry, three dimensional events can be modeled such as zero impact parameter collisions between asteroids. The code was tested against the one dimensional model and the analytical solution for a linearly increasing tensile stress under constant strain rate.

  12. Collisions in the Kuiper belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael

    2007-07-01

    For most of the 15 year history of observations of Kuiper belt objects, it has been speculated that impacts must have played a major role in shaping the physical and chemical characteristics of these objects, yet little direct evidence of the effects of such impacts has been seen. The past 18 months, however, have seen an explosion of major new discoveries giving some of the first insights into the influence of this critical process. From a diversity of observations we have been led to the hypotheses that: {1} satellite-forming impacts must have been common in the Kuiper belt; {2} such impacts led to significant chemical modification; and {3} the outcomes of these impacts are sufficiently predictable that we can now find and study these impact-derived systems by the chemical and physical attributes of both the satellites and the primaries. If our picture is correct, we now have in hand for the first time a set of incredibly powerful tools to study the frequency and outcome of collisions in the outer solar system. Here we propose three linked projects that would answer questions critical to the multiple prongs of our hypothesis. In these projects we will study the chemical effects of collisions through spectrophotometric observations of collisionally formed satellites and through the search for additional satellites around primaries with potential impact signatures, and we will study the physical effects of impacts through the examination of tidal evolution in proposed impact systems. The intensive HST program that we propose here will allow us to fully test our new hypotheses and will provide the ability to obtain the first extensive insights into outer solar system impact processes.

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF WILD PIG VEHICLE COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J; Paul E. Johns, P

    2007-05-23

    Wild pig (Sus scrofa) collisions with vehicles are known to occur in the United States, but only minimal information describing these accidents has been reported. In an effort to better characterize these accidents, data were collected from 179 wild pig-vehicle collisions from a location in west central South Carolina. Data included accident parameters pertaining to the animals involved, time, location, and human impacts. The age structure of the animals involved was significantly older than that found in the population. Most collisions involved single animals; however, up to seven animals were involved in individual accidents. As the number of animals per collision increased, the age and body mass of the individuals involved decreased. The percentage of males was significantly higher in the single-animal accidents. Annual attrition due to vehicle collisions averaged 0.8 percent of the population. Wild pig-vehicle collisions occurred year-round and throughout the 24-hour daily time period. Most accidents were at night. The presence of lateral barriers was significantly more frequent at the collision locations. Human injuries were infrequent but potentially serious. The mean vehicle damage estimate was $1,173.

  14. A collision avoidance system for workpiece protection

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, D.J.; Weber, T.M.; Novak, J.L.; Maslakowski, J.E.

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes an application of Sandia`s non-contact capacitive sensing technology for collision avoidance during the manufacturing of rocket engine thrust chambers. The collision avoidance system consists of an octagon shaped collar with a capacitive proximity sensor mounted on each face. The sensors produced electric fields which extend several inches from the face of the collar and detect potential collisions between the robot and the workpiece. A signal conditioning system processes the sensor output and provides varying voltage signals to the robot controller for stopping the robot.

  15. Vorticity in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-06-01

    We study the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Au +Au collisions and CERN Large Hadron Collider Pb +Pb collisions by using the hijing model. Different definitions of the vorticity field and velocity field are considered. A variety of properties of the vorticity are explored, including the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction, and the time evolution. In addition, the spatial distribution of the flow helicity is also studied.

  16. Cosmic string collision in cosmological backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Khoeini-Moghaddam, Salomeh; Khosravi, Shahram

    2010-06-15

    The collisions of cosmic string loops and the dynamics of junction formations in expanding backgrounds are studied. The key parameter controlling the dynamics of junction formation, the cosmic strings zipping and unzipping, is the relative size of the loops compared to the Hubble radius at the time of collision. We study analytically and numerically these processes for large superhorizon size loops, for small subhorizon size loops as well as for loops with the radii comparable to the Hubble radius at the time of collision.

  17. Computing with liquid crystal fingers: models of geometric and logical computation.

    PubMed

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Kitson, Stephen; Costello, Ben De Lacy; Matranga, Mario Ariosto; Younger, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    When a voltage is applied across a thin layer of cholesteric liquid crystal, fingers of cholesteric alignment can form and propagate in the layer. In computer simulation, based on experimental laboratory results, we demonstrate that these cholesteric fingers can solve selected problems of computational geometry, logic, and arithmetics. We show that branching fingers approximate a planar Voronoi diagram, and nonbranching fingers produce a convex subdivision of concave polygons. We also provide a detailed blueprint and simulation of a one-bit half-adder functioning on the principles of collision-based computing, where the implementation is via collision of liquid crystal fingers with obstacles and other fingers. PMID:22304104

  18. Extremely-efficient, miniaturized, long-lived alpha-voltaic power source using liquid gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Patel, Jagdishbhai (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A power source converts .alpha.-particle energy to electricity for use in electrical systems. Liquid gallium or other liquid medium is subjected to .alpha.-particle emissions. Electrons are freed by collision from neutral gallium atoms to provide gallium ions. The electrons migrate to a cathode while the gallium ions migrate to an anode. A current and/or voltage difference then arises between the cathode and anode because of the work function difference of the cathode and anode. Gallium atoms are regenerated by the receiving of electrons from the anode enabling the generation of additional electrons from additional .alpha.-particle collisions.

  19. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Rovibrationally Inelastic Collisions of Ultracold Lithium Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasmine, William; Stewart, Brian

    2016-05-01

    We have calculated cross sections for rovibrationally inelastic collisions of Li2 A(1) 1Σu+ colliding with neon and xenon on ab initio potentials. We find that the inelastic cross section can be very large and increasing at low collision velocity. This behavior is very well modeled as a Langevin process. The total inelastic cross section is a sizable fraction of the total capture cross section, typically about a third. For Li2 - Xe, the total inelastic rate constants are several thousand square angstroms, and level-to-level rate constants are several hundred square angstroms at collision speeds below 1000 cm/s, implying that such collisions might be observable in photoassociated lithium dimer.

  1. Atomic Collisions and free Lepton Pair Production

    SciTech Connect

    Gueclue, M.C.; Yilmaz, M.

    2005-10-26

    In this work, we have calculated the total cross sections of electron-positron pair production for the collisions of fully stripped gold ions for various energies. We have also compared our calculation with other methods.

  2. Electron impact collision strengths in Ne VII

    SciTech Connect

    Di, L.; Shi, J.R.; Zhao, G.

    2012-07-15

    The lines of Ne VII have been observed in many astronomical objects, and some transitions from high energy levels were observed both in Seyfert galaxies and stellar coronae. Thus, the atomic data for these transitions are important for modeling. Using the code FAC we calculated the collision strengths based on the distorted-wave method with large configuration interactions included. The Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths covering the typical temperature range of astronomical and laboratory hot plasmas are presented. We extend the calculation of the energy levels to n=4 and 5. The energy levels, wavelengths, spontaneous transition rates, weighted oscillator strengths, and effective collision strengths were reported. Compared with the results from experiment or previous theoretical calculations a general agreement is found. It is found that the resonance effects are important in calculating the effective collision strengths.

  3. Efficient DSMC collision-partner selection schemes.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert

    2010-07-01

    The effect of collision-partner selection schemes on the accuracy and the efficiency of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird is investigated. Several schemes to reduce the total discretization error as a function of the mean collision separation and the mean collision time are examined. These include the historically first sub-cell scheme, the more recent nearest-neighbor scheme, and various near-neighbor schemes, which are evaluated for their effect on the thermal conductivity for Fourier flow. Their convergence characteristics as a function of spatial and temporal discretization and the number of simulators per cell are compared to the convergence characteristics of the sophisticated and standard DSMC algorithms. Improved performance is obtained if the population from which possible collision partners are selected is an appropriate fraction of the population of the cell.

  4. Efficient DSMC collision-partner selection schemes.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert

    2010-05-01

    The effect of collision-partner selection schemes on the accuracy and the efficiency of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird is investigated. Several schemes to reduce the total discretization error as a function of the mean collision separation and the mean collision time are examined. These include the historically first sub-cell scheme, the more recent nearest-neighbor scheme, and various near-neighbor schemes, which are evaluated for their effect on the thermal conductivity for Fourier flow. Their convergence characteristics as a function of spatial and temporal discretization and the number of simulators per cell are compared to the convergence characteristics of the sophisticated and standard DSMC algorithms. Improved performance is obtained if the population from which possible collision partners are selected is an appropriate fraction of the population of the cell.

  5. Collision integrals for isotopic hydrogen molecules.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, N. J.; Munn, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the effects of reduced mass and differences in asymmetry on the collision integrals and thermal diffusion factors of isotopic hydrogen systems. Each system selected for study consisted of two diatoms, one in the j = 0 rotation state and the other in the j = 1 state. The molecules interacted with a Lennard-Jones type potential modified to include angular terms. A set of cross sections and collision integrals were obtained for each system.

  6. Molecular vibrational states during a collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Recamier, Jose A.; Jauregui, Rocio

    1995-01-01

    Alternative algebraic techniques to approximate a given Hamiltonian by a harmonic oscillator are described both for time-independent and time-dependent systems. We apply them to the description of a one dimensional atom-diatom collision. From the resulting evolution operator, we evaluate vibrational transition probabilities as well as other time-dependent properties. As expected, the ground vibrational state becomes a squeezed state during the collision.

  7. Spatial Kerr soliton collisions at arbitrary angles.

    PubMed

    Chamorro-Posada, P; McDonald, G S

    2006-09-01

    The theory of spatial Kerr solitons is extended to colliding beams that are neither almost-exactly copropagating nor almost-exactly counterpropagating. Our new Helmholtz formalism yields results that are consistent with the inherent symmetry of the collision process and that are not predicted by existing paraxial descriptions. Full numerical and approximate analytical results are presented. These show excellent agreement. In particular, Kerr solitons are found to be remarkably robust under nonparaxial collisions. PMID:17025766

  8. Kink Collisions in Curved Field Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlqvist, Pontus; Eckerle, Kate; Greene, Brian

    2015-04-01

    We study bubble universe collisions in the ultrarelativistic limit with the new feature of allowing for nontrivial curvature in field space. We establish a simple geometrical interpretation of such collisions in terms of a double family of field profiles whose tangent vector fields stand in mutual parallel transport. This provides a generalization of the well-known flat field space limit of the free passage approximation. We investigate the limits of this approximation and illustrate our analytical results with numerical simulations.

  9. Polarization effects in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Barros, C. C. Jr.

    2010-11-12

    Recent experiments at RHIC have shown that in 200 GeV Au-Au collisions, the {Lambda} and {Lambda}-bar hyperons are produced with very small polarizations, almost consistent with zero. These results can be understood in terms of a model that we recently proposed. In this work, we show how this model may be applied in such collisions, and also will discuss the relation of our results with other models, in order to explain the experimental data.

  10. Modelling Coulomb Collisions in Anisotropic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P. M.

    2009-12-01

    Collisional transport in anisotropic plasmas is investigated comparing the theoretical transport coefficients (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2009) for anisotropic particles with the results of the corresponding Langevin equation, obtained as a generalization of Manheimer et al. (1997). References: Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2009), On Coulomb collisions in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 16, 054501. Manheimer, W. M., M. Lampe and G. Joyce (1997), Langevin representation of Coulomb collisions in PIC simulations, J. Comput. Phys., 138, 563-584.

  11. COMMISSIONING OF RHIC DEUTERON - GOLD COLLISIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA,T.AHRENS,L.BAI,M.BEEBE-WANG,J.

    2003-05-12

    Deuteron and gold beams have been accelerated to a collision energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV/u in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), providing the first asymmetric-species collisions of this complex. Necessary changes for this mode of operation include new ramping software and asymmetric crossing angle geometries. This paper reviews machine performance, problem encountered and their solutions, and accomplishments during the 16 weeks of ramp-up and operations.

  12. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  13. Transition rates in proton - Rydberg atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrinceanu, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for energy and angular momentum transfer processes in proton - Ryderg atom collisions were performed and the corresponding rates are reported.The relevance of these rates in the context of cosmological recombination is discussed. The rates are contrasted with the similar rates in electron - Rydberg atom collisions. This work has been supported by National Science Foundation through grants for the Center for Research on Complex Networks (HRD-1137732) and Research Infrastructure for Science and Engineering (RISE) (HRD-1345173).

  14. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  15. Liquid Crystal Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marroum, Renata-Maria

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the properties and classification of liquid crystals. Presents a simple experiment that illustrates the structure of liquid crystals and the differences between the various phases liquid crystals can assume. (JRH)

  16. Estimating collision efficiencies from contact freezing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, B.; Marcolli, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-04-01

    Interactions of atmospheric aerosols with clouds influence cloud properties and modify the aerosol life cycle. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles or become incorporated into cloud droplets by scavenging. For an accurate description of aerosol scavenging and ice nucleation in contact mode, collision efficiency between droplets and aerosol particles needs to be known. This study derives the collision rate from experimental contact freezing data obtained with the ETH Collision Ice Nucleation Chamber CLINCH. Freely falling 80 μm water droplets are exposed to an aerosol consisting of 200 nm diameter silver iodide particles of concentrations from 500-5000 cm-3, which act as ice nucleating particles in contact mode. The chamber is kept at ice saturation in the temperature range from 236-261 K leading to slow evaporation of water droplets giving rise to thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis. Droplets and particles bear charges inducing electrophoresis. The experimentally derived collision efficiency of 0.13 is around one order of magnitude higher than theoretical formulations which include Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and electric forces. This discrepancy is most probably due to uncertainties and inaccuracies in the description of thermophoretic and diffusiophoretic processes acting together. This is to the authors knowledge the first dataset of collision efficiencies acquired below 273 K. More such experiments with different droplet and particle diameters are needed to improve our understanding of collision processes acting together.

  17. Icy Collisions - Planet Building beyond the snowline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Sabrina; Hill, Catherine; Heisselmann, Daniel; Blum, Juergen; Fraser, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Collisions of small icy and dust particles beyond the “snow-line” are a key step in planet formation. Whilst the physical forces that underpin the aggregation of the smallest grains (van der Waals) and the largest planetessimals (gravity) are well understood, the processes involving mm - cm sized particles remain a mystery.In a unique set of experiments, we investigated low velocity collisions of dust and icy particles in this size range under microgravity conditions - utilizing parabolic flight (e.g. Salter 2009, Hill 2015 (a) & (b)). Experiments were performed at cryogenic temperatures (below 140 K) for icy aggregates and ambient as well as cryogenic temperatures (80 - 220 K) for dust aggregates.The kinetic analysis of the observed collisions of different aggregate types in different shapes and sizes revealed astonishing results - as the collisional properties of all investigated particles differ strongly from the usual assumptions in models of planet formation.Here, we present a summary of the results on the collisions of icy particles as well as first results on the collisions of dust aggregates. Focus will be on the coefficient of restitution, which measures the loss of translational energy in bouncing collisions and is a key parameter in models of planet formation.

  18. Gas-Microjet Reactive Scattering: Collisions of HCl and DCl with Cool Salty Water.

    PubMed

    Faust, Jennifer A; Sobyra, Thomas B; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2016-02-18

    Liquid microjets provide a powerful means to investigate reactions of gases with salty water in vacuum while minimizing gas-vapor collisions. We use this technique to explore the fate of gaseous HCl and DCl molecules impinging on 8 molal LiCl and LiBr solutions at 238 K. The experiments reveal that HCl or DCl evaporate infrequently if they become thermally accommodated at the surface of either solution. In particular, we observe minimal thermal desorption of HCl following HCl collisions and no distinct evidence for rapid, interfacial DCl→HCl exchange following DCl collisions. These results imply that surface thermal motions are not generally strong enough to propel momentarily trapped HCl or DCl back into the gas phase before they ionize and disappear into solution. Instead, only HCl and DCl molecules that scatter directly from the surface escape entry. These recoiling molecules transfer less energy upon collision to LiBr/H2O than to LiCl/H2O, reflecting the heavier mass of Br(-) than of Cl(-) in the interfacial region. PMID:26828574

  19. REDISTRIBUTOR FOR LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, J.G.

    1957-10-29

    An improved baffle plate construction to intimately mix immiscible liquid solvents for solvent extraction processes in a liquid-liquid pulse column is described. To prevent the light and heavy liquids from forming separate continuous homogeneous vertical channels through sections of the column, a baffle having radially placed rectangular louvers with deflection plates opening upon alternate sides of the baffle is placed in the column, normal to the axis. This improvement substantially completely reduces strippiig losses due to poor mixing.

  20. A zero-gravity demonstration of the collision and coalescence of water droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Vaughan, O. H.; Smith, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The mechanics of the collision and coalescence of liquid droplets is one of the main research areas in the fields of nuclear physics, astrophysics, meteorology and fluid mechanics. The crew members on the Skylab 3 and 4 missions were requested to perform demonstrations of the collision and coalescence of water droplets under the low gravity environment at orbital altitude. In Skylab 4 two water droplets with equal volumes, 30 cu cm each, were used. A dark colored droplet (contaminated with grape drink) moving with a velocity of 3.14 cm/sec collided with a stationary pink colored droplet (contaminated with strawberry drink) and coalescence occurred. Theoretical models are proposed to study the various stages of the collision-coalescence processes. Special considerations are concentrated in the investigation of the bounce-coalescence and coalescence-instability processes. The surface tension of the coalesced droplets was calculated to be 52 dynes/cm in perfect agreement with laboratory measurements made after the flight using a reproduction of the liquids.

  1. Annihilation of nematic point defects: Pre-collision and post-collision evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetec, M.; Kralj, S.; Bradač, Z.; Žumer, S.

    2006-05-01

    The annihilation of the nematic hedgehog and anti-hedgehog within an infinite cylinder of radius R is studied. The semi-microscopic lattice-type model and Brownian molecular dynamics are used. We distinguish among the i) early pre-collision, ii) late pre-collision, iii) early post-collision, and iv) late post-collision stages. In the pre-collision stage our results agree qualitatively with the existing experimental observations and also continuum-type simulations. The core of each defect exhibits a ring-like structure, where the ring axis is set perpendicular to the cylinder symmetry axis. For ξ(0)d/(2R) > 1 the interaction between defects is negligible, where ξ(0)d describes the initial separation of defects. Consequently, the defects annihilate within the simulation time window for ξ(0)d/(2R) < 1. For close enough defects their separation scales as ξd \\varpropto (tc - t)0.4±0.1, where tc stands for the collision time. In elastically anisotropic medium the hedgehog is faster than the anti-hedgehog. In the early pre-collision stage the defects can be treated as point-like particles, possessing inherent core structure, that interact via the nematic director field. In the late pre-collision stage the cores reflect the interaction between defects. After the collision a charge-less ring structure is first formed. In the early post-collision stage the ring adopts an essentially untwisted circular structure of the radius ξr. In the late post-collision stage we observe two qualitatively different scenarios. For μ = ξr/R < μc ˜ 0.25 the ring collapses leading to the escaped radial equilibrium structure. For μ > μc the chargeless ring triggers the nucleation growth into the planar polar structure with line defects.

  2. Liquid annulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludewig, Hans

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the specific impulse varies with the square root of the temperature and inversely with the square root of the molecular weight of the propellant. Typical values for specific impulse corresponding to various rocket concepts are shown. The Liquid Annulus core concept consists of a fuel element which will be arranged in a moderator block. The advantages as seen for the system are: high specific impulse; structural material will all run at low temperature; and lower fission product inventory because of evaporation. It is felt that this concept is worth at least a first look because of the promise of very high specific impulse. Because of the low thrust, one would probably need a cluster of engines. This is not necessarily bad because there would be some redundancy, but because of the low thrust one might have to refuel while running. Depending on the fuel vaporization, material can be included in the uranium that is injected as one is running along.

  3. Liquid supercoiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribe, Neil; Habibi, Mehdi; Hosseini, Hossein; Hassan Khatami, Mohammad

    2011-11-01

    Supercoiling is defined as the large-scale secondary coiling of a slender body that is already coiled at a smaller scale (e.g., telephone cords and DNA strands). We demonstrate experimentally a novel fluid-mechanical form of supercoiling that occurs in the context of the familiar ``liquid rope coiling'' instability of a thin thread of viscous fluid falling onto a rigid surface. Under appropriate conditions, the coiling instability generates a tall pile of coils in the form of a hollow cylindrical column, which in turn becomes unstable to a secondary coiling instability with a frequency ~ 10 % of the primary one. To place this phenomenon in a broader context, we determine experimentally the phase diagram for the different possible behaviors of the thread (stagnation flow, simple coiling, rotatory folding, periodic column collapse, supercoiling) in the space of the fluid viscosity, the flow rate, and the fall height. We formulate a mathematical model for supercoiling by combining a thin-shell description of the column wall with a slender-thread description of the column as a whole. This leads to a set of coupled ordinary differential equations in one space dimension (the arclength along the axis of the coiling column) that we solve numerically using a continuation method. A comparison of the predicted and observed frequencies of secondary coiling will be shown.

  4. Bouncing and Merging of Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Li, Minglei; Law, Chung K.

    2014-11-01

    Collision of two fluid jets is a technique that is utilized in many industrial applications, such as in rocket engines, to achieve controlled mixing, atomization and sometimes liquid phase reactions. Thus, the dynamics of colliding jets have direct impact on the performance, efficiency and reliability of such applications. In analogy with the dynamics of droplet-droplet collision, in this work we have experimentally demonstrated, for n-alkane hydrocarbons as well as water, that with increasing impact inertia obliquely colliding jets also exhibit the same nonmonotonic responses of merging, bouncing, merging again, and merging followed by disintegration; and that the continuous entrainment of the boundary layer air over the jet surface into the colliding interfacial region leads to two distinguishing features of jet collision, namely: there exists a maximum impact angle beyond which merging is always possible, and that merging is inhibited and then promoted with increasing pressure. These distinct response regimes were mapped and explained on the bases of impact inertia, deformation of the jet surface, viscous loss within the jet interior, and the thickness and pressure build-up within the interfacial region in order to activate the attractive surface van der Waals force to effect merging.

  5. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS: EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, Erwin M.; Heckman, Harry H.

    1982-04-01

    Relativistic heavy ion physics began as a 'no man's land' between particle and nuclear physics, with both sides frowning upon it as 'unclean', because on one hand, hadronic interactions and particle production cloud nuclear structure effects, while on the other, the baryonic environment complicates the interpretation of production experiments. They have attempted to review here the experimental evidence on RHI collisions from the point of view that it represents a new endeavor in the understanding of strong interaction physics. Such an approach appears increasingly justified; first, by the accumulation of data and observations of new features of hadronic interactions that could not have been detected outside a baryonic environment; second, by the maturation of the field owing to the advances made over the past several years in experimental inquiries on particle production by RHI, including pions, kaons, hyperons, and searches for antiprotons; and third, by the steady and progressive increase in the energy and mass ranges of light nuclear beams that have become available to the experiment; indeed the energy range has widened from the {approx} 0.2 to 2 AGeV at the Bevalac to {approx}4 AGeV at Dubna and recently, to the quantum jump in energies to {approx} 1000 equivalent AGeV at the CERN PS-ISR. Accompanying these expansions in the energy frontier are the immediate prospects for very heavy ion beams at the Bevalac up to, and including, 1 AGeV {sup 238}U, thereby extending the 'mass frontier' to its ultimate extent.

  6. Impulsive model for reactive collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marron, M. T.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    A simple classical mechanical model of the reactive scattering of a structureless atom A and a quasi-diatomic BC is developed which takes full advantage of energy, linear and angular momentum conservation relations but introduces a minimum of further assumptions. These are as follows: (1) the vibrational degree of freedom of the reactant (BC) and product (AB) molecules is suppressed, so the change in vibrational energy is simply a parameter; (2) straight-line trajectories are assumed outside of a reaction shell; (3) within this zone, momentum transfer occurs impulsively (essentially instantaneously) following mass transfer; (4) the impulse, which may be either positive or negative, is directed along the BC axis, which may, however, assume all orientations with respect to the incident relative velocity. The model yields differential and total cross sections and product rotational energy distributions for a given collision exoergicity Q, or for any known distribution over Q. Numerical results are presented for several prototype reactions whose dynamics have been well-studied.

  7. A numerical investigation of continental collision styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazian, Reza Khabbaz; Buiter, Susanne J. H.

    2013-06-01

    Continental collision after closure of an ocean can lead to different deformation styles: subduction of continental crust and lithosphere, lithospheric thickening, folding of the unsubducted continents, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities and/or slab break-off. We use 2-D thermomechanical models of oceanic subduction followed by continental collision to investigate the sensitivity of these collision styles to driving velocity, crustal and lithospheric temperature, continental rheology and the initial density difference between the oceanic lithosphere and the asthenosphere. We find that these parameters influence the collision system, but that driving velocity, rheology and lithospheric (rather than Moho and mantle) temperature can be classified as important controls, whereas reasonable variations in the initial density contrast between oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere are not necessarily important. Stable continental subduction occurs over a relatively large range of values of driving velocity and lithospheric temperature. Fast and cold systems are more likely to show folding, whereas slow and warm systems can experience RT-type dripping. Our results show that a continent with a strong upper crust can experience subduction of the entire crust and is more likely to fold. Accretion of the upper crust at the trench is feasible when the upper crust has a moderate to weak strength, whereas the entire crust can be scraped-off in the case of a weak lower crust. We also illustrate that weakening of the lithospheric mantle promotes RT-type of dripping in a collision system. We use a dynamic collision model, in which collision is driven by slab pull only, to illustrate that adjacent plates can play an important role in continental collision systems. In dynamic collision models, exhumation of subducted continental material and sediments is triggered by slab retreat and opening of a subduction channel, which allows upward flow of buoyant materials. Exhumation continues

  8. Collision prediction software for radiotherapy treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, Laura; Pearson, Erik A.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This work presents a method of collision predictions for external beam radiotherapy using surface imaging. The present methodology focuses on collision prediction during treatment simulation to evaluate the clearance of a patient’s treatment position and allow for its modification if necessary. Methods: A Kinect camera (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) is used to scan the patient and immobilization devices in the treatment position at the simulator. The surface is reconstructed using the SKANECT software (Occipital, Inc., San Francisco, CA). The treatment isocenter is marked using simulated orthogonal lasers projected on the surface scan. The point cloud of this surface is then shifted to isocenter and converted from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates. A slab models the treatment couch. A cylinder with a radius equal to the normal distance from isocenter to the collimator plate, and a height defined by the collimator diameter is used to estimate collisions. Points within the cylinder clear through a full gantry rotation with the treatment couch at 0° , while points outside of it collide. The angles of collision are reported. This methodology was experimentally verified using a mannequin positioned in an alpha cradle with both arms up. A planning CT scan of the mannequin was performed, two isocenters were marked in PINNACLE, and this information was exported to AlignRT (VisionRT, London, UK)—a surface imaging system for patient positioning. This was used to ensure accurate positioning of the mannequin in the treatment room, when available. Collision calculations were performed for the two treatment isocenters and the results compared to the collisions detected the room. The accuracy of the Kinect-Skanect surface was evaluated by comparing it to the external surface of the planning CT scan. Results: Experimental verification results showed that the predicted angles of collision matched those recorded in the room within 0.5°, in most cases (largest deviation

  9. Thermal Conductivity of Spin-Polarized Liquid {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Sawkey, D.; Puech, L.; Wolf, P.E.

    2006-06-02

    We present the first measurements of the thermal conductivity of spin-polarized normal liquid {sup 3}He. Using the rapid melting technique to produce nuclear polarizations up to 0.7, and a vibrating wire both as a heater and a thermometer, we show that, unlike the viscosity, the conductivity increases much less than predicted for s-wave scattering. We suggest that this might be due to a small probability for head-on collisions between quasiparticles.

  10. Fluid Dynamics of Bubbly Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Y. H.; Koch, D. L.; Zenit, R.; Sangani, A.; Kushch, V. I.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Hoffman, M.; Nahra, H.; Fritz, C.; Dolesh, R.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to study the average flow properties of inertially dominated bubbly liquids which may be described by a novel analysis. Bubbles with high Reynolds number and low Weber number may produce a fluid velocity disturbance that can be approximated by a potential flow. We studied the behavior of suspensions of bubbles of about 1.5 mm diameter in vertical and inclined channels. The suspension was produced using a bank of 900 glass capillaries with inner diameter of about 100 microns in a quasi-steady fashion. In addition, salt was added to the suspension to prevent bubble-bubble coalescence. As a result, a nearly monodisperse suspension of bubble was produced. By increasing the inclination angle, we were able to explore an increasing amount of shear to buoyancy motion. A pipe flow experiment with the liquid being recirculated is under construction. This will provide an even larger range of shear to buoyancy motion. We are planning a microgravity experiment in which a bubble suspension is subjected to shearing in a couette cell in the absence of a buoyancy-driven relative motion of the two phases. By employing a single-wire, hot film anemometer, we were able to obtain the liquid velocity fluctuations. The shear stress at the wall was measured using a hot film probe flush mounted on the wall. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, and bubble velocity fluctuations were measured using a homemade, dual impedance probe. In addition, we also employed a high-speed camera to obtain the bubble size distribution and bubble shape in a dilute suspension. A rapid decrease in bubble velocity for a dilute bubble suspension is attributed to the effects of bubble-wall collisions. The more gradual decrease of bubble velocity as gas volume fraction increases, due to subsequent hindering of bubble motion, is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani for the effects of potential-flow bubble-bubble interactions on the mean velocity. The

  11. Minimizing liquid contaminants in natural gas liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.L.; Wines, T.H.; Williamson, K.M.

    1996-12-31

    In processing natural gas liquids, significant contamination occurs with liquid dispersions and emulsions. Natural gas liquids (NGL) and liquid petroleum gas (LPG) streams are treated with caustic to remove residual organic sulfur compounds such as mercaptans and with amines to remove hydrogen sulfide. In both cases a liquid/liquid contactor is used. Significant amounts of the caustic or amine can be carried over into the product stream in process units that are running at rates above design capacity, are treating high sulfur feed stocks, or have other operational problems. The carried over liquid results in off-spec products, excessive loses of caustic or amine, and can cause operating problems in downstream processes. In addition, water is a significant contaminant which can cause LPG and natural gasoline to be off-specification. This paper discusses a new technique for separating very stable liquid dispersions of caustic, amine, or water from natural gas liquids using liquid/liquid cartridge coalescers constructed with specially formulated polymer and fluoropolymer medium with enhanced surface properties. In addition, factors influencing the coalescer mechanism will be discussed including interfacial tension, concentration of surface active compounds, steric repulsion, and electrostatic charge affects. Results from field tests, operating data from commercial installations, and economic benefits will also be presented.

  12. Charge Transfer Process During Collision of Riming Graupel Pellet with Small Ice Crystals within a Thundercloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Saswati; De, Utpal K.; Goswami, K.; Jones, Linwood

    1999-01-01

    A charge transfer process during the collision of a riming graupel pellet and an ice-crystal at low temperature is proposed. During riming, the surface structure of graupel deviates from perfect crystalline structure. A concept of quasi-solid layer (QSL) formation on the surface is introduced. This QSL contains defects formed during riming. In absence of impurities, positively charged X-defect abundance is considered in the outer layer. These defects are assumed to be the charge carriers during the charge transfer process. Some part of the QSL is stripped off by the colliding ice crystals, which thereby gain some positive charge, leaving the graupel pellet negatively charged. With the proposed model, fC to pC of charge transfer is observed per collision. A transition temperature between -10 C to -15 C is also noted beyond which the QSL concept does not hold. This transition temperature is dependent on the bulk liquid water content of the cloud.

  13. Probing the nuclear equation-of-state and the symmetry energy with heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verde, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    The present status of studies aimed at constraining the nuclear equation of state with heavy-ion collision dynamics is presented. Multifragmentation phenomena, including their isotopic distributions, charge correlations and emission time-scales, may revel the existence of liquid-gas transitions in the phase diagram. Exploring the isotopic degree of freedom in nuclear dynamics is then required in order to constrain the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter which presently represents a major priority due to its relevance to both nuclear physics and astrophysics. Some observables that have successfully constrained the density dependence of the symmetry energy are presented, such as neutron-proton yield ratios and isospin diffusion and drift phenomena. The reported results and status of the art is discussed by also considering some of the present problems and some future perspectives for the heavy-ion collision community.

  14. Fatal pedestrian-bicycle collisions.

    PubMed

    Graw, M; König, H G

    2002-05-23

    Although, fatal collisions between pedestrians and bicycles are relatively rare, they are still of forensic relevance because of the need to explore the circumstances of the accident. Based on three reconstructed cases, situation and injury patterns are presented that might prove useful in future cases: usually the person causing the accident is the cyclist while the pedestrian generally suffers more severe injuries; the situation at the site of accident is important for its reconstruction: end location of the persons involved in the accident, injuries and traces on pedestrians and cyclists, traces at the site of accident and on the bicycle; because of the lack of pre-crash traces and any eyewitness accounts, the pedestrian's injuries are the best starting point for the reconstruction of the accident; a characteristic wound on the lower leg of the pedestrian that reveals the initial impact between the front wheel and the leg is crucial not because of its seriousness, but because of its external morphology; the injuries that can be expected by the following impact between body and handlebar are unspecific and only minor; the most severe injuries to the pedestrian as a result of the accident are caused secondarily by falling and hitting the head on the road; the fall of the cyclist, however, corresponds to a throw-off followed by a sliding phase with less impact load when the head hits the ground [maximum abbreviated injury scale 1 (MAIS 1)]; the cyclists involved are mainly younger persons on fashionable bicycles (here: mountain bikes); in the great majority of cases, the injured pedestrians are frail, elderly people with a lower tolerance of trauma. PMID:12062948

  15. Simulating immersed particle collisions: the Devil's in the details

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegert, Edward; Vowinckel, Bernhard; Meiburg, Eckart

    2015-11-01

    Simulating densely-packed particle-laden flows with any degree of confidence requires accurate modeling of particle-particle collisions. To this end, we investigate a few collision models from the fluids and granular flow communities using sphere-wall collisions, which have been studied by a number of experimental groups. These collisions involve enough complexities--gravity, particle-wall lubrication forces, particle-wall contact stresses, particle-wake interactions--to challenge any collision model. Evaluating the successes and shortcomings of the collision models, we seek improvements in order to obtain more consistent results. We will highlight several implementation details that are crucial for obtaining accurate results.

  16. Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 147 Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo) (Web, free access)   IUPAC Ionic Liquids Database, ILThermo, is a free web research tool that allows users worldwide to access an up-to-date data collection from the publications on experimental investigations of thermodynamic, and transport properties of ionic liquids as well as binary and ternary mixtures containing ionic liquids.

  17. Analysis of particle-particle interactions in fluidized catalytic cracking units: Effects of collisions, agglomeration, and vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Kruis, F.E.; Terguer, V.; Lede, J.

    1996-12-31

    A theoretical background is developed for the understanding of the role of particulate interactions in three-phase reactors resulting from turbulent motion, with special application to the Fluid Catalytic Cracking unit. The characteristic times between two collisions in a mixture of catalyst particles and liquid droplets in a gas, the strength of aggregates and efficiency of particle collisions are discussed. A new model has been developed to describe the interaction process between a hot particle, e.g. a catalyst: particle, and a liquid droplet. The vaporization from the droplet surface results in a overpressure in the film around the droplet, thus preventing the droplets and catalysts particles touching each other (similar to the so-called Leidenfrost: phenomenon). A balance of the relevant forces in combination with the heat balance permits the calculation of both the time-dependent distance between the particle and the droplet and the diameter of the evaporating droplet. 10 refs.

  18. Variational collision integrator for polymer chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyendecker, Sigrid; Hartmann, Carsten; Koch, Michael

    2012-05-01

    The numerical simulation of many-particle systems (e.g. in molecular dynamics) often involves constraints of various forms. We present a symplectic integrator for mechanical systems with holonomic (bilateral) and unilateral contact constraints, the latter being in the form of a non-penetration condition. The scheme is based on a discrete variant of Hamilton's principle in which both the discrete trajectory and the unknown collision time are varied (cf. [R. Fetecau, J. Marsden, M. Ortiz, M. West, Nonsmooth Lagrangian mechanics and variational collision integrators, SIAM J. Appl. Dyn. Syst. 2 (2003) 381-416]). As a consequence, the collision event enters the discrete equations of motion as an unknown that has to be computed on-the-fly whenever a collision is imminent. The additional bilateral constraints are efficiently dealt with employing a discrete null space reduction (including a projection and a local reparametrisation step) which considerably reduces the number of unknowns and improves the condition number during each time-step as compared to a standard treatment with Lagrange multipliers. We illustrate the numerical scheme with a simple example from polymer dynamics, a linear chain of beads, and test it against other standard numerical schemes for collision problems.

  19. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1990-11-01

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (i) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (ii) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (iii) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. For elastic collisions, a simple expression for the proton matter distribution is proposed which fits well the elastic {bar p}p scattering from ISR to S{bar p}pS energies within the geometrical model. The proton form factor is of the dipole form with an energy-dependent range parameter. The {bar p}p elastic differential cross section at Tevatron energies obtained by extrapolation is in good agreement with experiments. For multiparticle emission processes a unified physical picture for hadron-hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions was proposed. A number of predictions were made, including the one that KNO-scaling does not obtain for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} two-jet events. An extension of the considerations within the geometrical model led to a theory of the momentum distributions of the outgoing particles which are found in good agreement with current experimental data. Extrapolations of results to higher energies have been made. The cluster size of hadrons produced in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation is found to increase slowly with energy.

  20. Modelling of a collision between two smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus, V. L. B.; Sasaki, D. G. G.

    2016-09-01

    In the predominant approach in physics textbooks, the collision between particles is treated as a black box, where no physical quantity can be measured. This approach becomes even more evident in experimental classes where collisions are the simplest and most common way of applying the theorem of conservation of linear momentum in the asymptotic behavior. In this paper we develop and analyse an experiment on collisions using only two smartphones. The experimental setup is amazingly simple; the two devices are aligned on a horizontal table of lacquered wood, in order to slide more easily. At the edge of one of them a piece of common sponge is glued using double-sided tape. By using a free smartphone application, the values generated by the accelerometer of the two devices in full motion are measured and tabulated. Through numerical iteration, the speed graphs of the smartphones before, during, and after the collision are obtained. The main conclusions were: (i) the demonstration of the feasibility of using smartphones as an alternative to air tracks and electronic sensors employed in a teaching lab, (ii) the possibility of investigating the collision itself, its characteristics and effects; this is the great advantage of the use of smartphones over traditional experiments, (iii) the compatibility of the results with the impulse-momentum theorem, within the margin of uncertainty.

  1. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Benicewicz, B.C.; Hoyt, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of curable liquid crystal polyester monomers and to thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions prepared therefrom. It is an object of this invention to provide curable liquid crystalline polyester materials. Another object of this invention is to provide a process of preparing curable liquid crystal polyester monomers. Yet another object of this invention is to provide liquid crystalline blends of polyester materials. It is a further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions. It is a still further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions having a high heat resistance. 1 fig.

  2. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Benicewicz, B.C.; Hoyt, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    The present invention relates to the field of curable liquid crystal polyester monomers and to thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions prepared therefrom. It is an object of this invention to provide curable liquid crystalline polyester materials. Another object of this invention is to provide a process of preparing curable liquid crystal polyester monomers. Yet another object of this invention is to provide liquid crystalline blends of polyester materials. It is a further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions. It is a still further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions having a high heat resistance. 1 fig.

  3. A framework of boundary collision data aggregation into neighbourhoods.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ge; Wang, Xin; Kwon, Dae-Won

    2015-10-01

    A large portion of the total number of motor collisions can be boundary collisions; therefore, exaggerated or underestimated numbers for boundary collisions aggregated into neighbourhoods may hamper road safety analyses and management. In this paper, we propose a systematic framework for boundary collision aggregation. First, an entropy-based histogram thresholding method is utilized to determine the boundary zone size and identify boundary collisions. Next, the collision density probability distribution is then established, based on the collisions in each neighbourhood. Last, an effective boundary collision aggregation method, called the collision density ratio (CDR), is used to aggregate boundary collisions into neighbourhoods. The proposed framework is applied to collision data in the City of Edmonton for a case study. The experimental results show that the proposed entropy-based histogram thresholding method can identify boundary collision with the high precision and recall, and the proposed CDR method is more effective than the existing methods, the half-to-half ratio method and the one-to-one ratio method, to aggregate boundary collisions into neighbourhoods. PMID:26143631

  4. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapiditymore » spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.« less

  5. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapidity spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.

  6. Classical chromodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappi, T.

    2005-05-01

    This paper is a slightly modified version of the introductory part of a doctoral dissertation also containing the articles hep-ph/0303076, hep-ph/0409328 and hep-ph/0409058. The paper focuses on the calculation of particle production in a relativistic heavy ion collision using the McLerran-Venugopalan model. The main part of the paper summarizes the background of these numerical calculations. First we relate this calculation of the initial stage af a heavy ion collision to our understanding of the whole collision process. Then we discuss the saturation physics of the small x wavefunction of a hadron or a nucleus. The classical field model of Kovner, McLerran and Weigert is then introduced before moving to discuss the numerical algorithms used to compute gluon and quark pair production in this model. Finally we shortly review the results on gluon and quark-antiquark production obtained in the three articles mentioned above.

  7. Collision-spike Sputtering of Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2015-12-01

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering. PMID:26245857

  8. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  9. Neutrino quantum kinetic equations: The collision term

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Blaschke, Daniel N.; Cirigliano, Vincenzo

    2016-08-25

    We derive the collision term relevant for neutrino quantum kinetic equations in the early universe and compact astrophysical objects, displaying its full matrix structure in both flavor and spin degrees of freedom. We include in our analysis neutrino-neutrino processes, scattering and annihilation with electrons and positrons, and neutrino scattering off nucleons (the latter in the low-density limit). After presenting the general structure of the collision terms, we take two instructive limiting cases. The one-flavor limit highlights the structure in helicity space and allows for a straightforward interpretation of the off-diagonal entries in terms of the product of scattering amplitudes ofmore » the two helicity states. As a result, the isotropic limit is relevant for studies of the early universe: in this case the terms involving spin coherence vanish and the collision term can be expressed in terms of two-dimensional integrals, suitable for computational implementation.« less

  10. Real barchan dune collisions and ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenholtz, Chris H.; Barchyn, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    From high-resolution satellite imagery of barchan sand dunes, we provide geomorphological evidence of collisions that result in the ejection of a barchan from the wake of another barchan dune. Previous interpretations suggest this outcome is evidence of soliton or solitary wave behaviour; however, the physical mechanisms for mass exchange are not fully understood, resulting in debate. Our evidence and interpretation indicates that mass is transferred to the upwind barchan by shadowing a portion of downwind barchan's stoss slope. Turbulent, unsaturated airflow erodes the surface between the dunes, creating a smaller dune that ejects from the wake region. Previous observations lacked the spatial resolution required to document this process; therefore, our observations clarify the collision dynamics of barchans. A broader implication of our observations is the role of collisions in maintaining an “equilibrium” size distribution in barchan swarms.

  11. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remaindermore » is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.« less

  12. Electron Impact Collision Strength in Si IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noman, Hala; Gokce, Y.; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Results from work in progress under Iron Project on the electron impact excitation collision strengths and rate coefficients for transitions between the fine-structure levels of the 2s2 2p2 , 2 s 2p3 , 2p4 , 2s2 2 p 3 s , 2s2 2 p 3 p , and 2s2 2 p 3 d configurations in Si IX will be presented. The fine structure collision strength has been calculated at very fine energy mesh using relativistic effects in Breit-Pauli R-matrix method. Maxwellian averaged collision strengths have been tabulated for all possible transitions among all 46 enrgy levels. We made comparisions of our results with the previously reported results in the literature and found significant differences in low the temperature range (Te < 106 K) for few of the transitions. The correction to the previous reported values results due to more extensive expansion for Si IX target states.

  13. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-10-15

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  14. Active Collision Avoidance for Planetary Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Hannan, Mike; Srinivasan, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Present day robotic missions to other planets require precise, a priori knowledge of the terrain to pre-determine a landing spot that is safe. Landing sites can be miles from the mission objective, or, mission objectives may be tailored to suit landing sites. Future robotic exploration missions should be capable of autonomously identifying a safe landing target within a specified target area selected by mission requirements. Such autonomous landing sites must (1) 'see' the surface, (2) identify a target, and (3) land the vehicle. Recent advances in radar technology have resulted in small, lightweight, low power radars that are used for collision avoidance and cruise control systems in automobiles. Such radar systems can be adapted for use as active hazard avoidance systems for planetary landers. The focus of this CIF proposal is to leverage earlier work on collision avoidance systems for MSFC's Mighty Eagle lander and evaluate the use of automotive radar systems for collision avoidance in planetary landers.

  15. Computations of Drop Collision and Coalescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Juric, Damir; Nas, Selman; Mortazavi, Saeed

    1996-01-01

    Computations of drops collisions, coalescence, and other problems involving drops are presented. The computations are made possible by a finite difference/front tracking technique that allows direct solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for a multi-fluid system with complex, unsteady internal boundaries. This method has been used to examine the various collision modes for binary collisions of drops of equal size, mixing of two drops of unequal size, behavior of a suspension of drops in linear and parabolic shear flows, and the thermal migration of several drops. The key results from these simulations are reviewed. Extensions of the method to phase change problems and preliminary results for boiling are also shown.

  16. Conserved quantities in a black hole collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dain, S.; Valiente-Kroon, J. A.

    2002-02-01

    The Newman-Penrose constants of the spacetime corresponding to the development of the Brill-Lindquist initial data are calculated by making use of a particular representation of spatial infinity due to H Friedrich. The Brill-Lindquist initial data set represents the head-on collision of two non-rotating black holes. In this case one non-zero constant is obtained. Its value is given in terms of the product of the individual masses of the black holes and the square of a distance parameter separating the two black holes. This constant retains its value all along null infinity, and therefore it provides information about the late time evolution of the collision process. In particular, it is argued that the magnitude of the constants provides information about the amount of residual radiation contained in the spacetime after the collision of the black holes.

  17. Physics of Ultra-Peripheral Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertulani, Carlos A.; Klein, Spencer R.; Nystrand, Joakim

    2005-02-02

    Moving highly-charged ions carry strong electromagnetic fields which act as a field of photons. In collisions at large impact parameters, hadronic interactions are not possible, and the ions interact through photon-ion and photon-photon collisions known as ultra-peripheral collisions (UPC). Hadron colliders like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) produce photonuclear and two-photon interactions at luminosities and energies beyond that accessible elsewhere; the LHC will reach a {gamma}p energy ten times that of the Hadron-Electron Ring Accelerator (HERA). Reactions as diverse as the production of anti-hydrogen, photoproduction of the {rho}{sup 0}, transmutation of lead into bismuth and excitation of collective nuclear resonances have already been studied. At the LHC, UPCs can study many types of ''new physics''.

  18. Affordable MMW aircraft collision avoidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almsted, Larry D.; Becker, Robert C.; Zelenka, Richard E.

    1997-06-01

    Collision avoidance is of concern to all aircraft, requiring the detection and identification of hazardous terrain or obstacles in sufficient time for clearance maneuvers. The collision avoidance requirement is even more demanding for helicopters, as their unique capabilities result in extensive operations at low-altitude, near to terrain and other hazardous obstacles. TO augment the pilot's visual collision avoidance abilities, some aircraft are equipped with 'enhanced-vision' systems or terrain collision warning systems. Enhanced-vision systems are typically very large and costly systems that are not very covert and are also difficult to install in a helicopter. The display is typically raw images from infrared or radar sensors, and can require a high degree of pilot interpretation and attention. Terrain collision warning system that rely on stored terrain maps are often of low resolution and accuracy and do not represent hazards to the aircraft placed after map sampling. Such hazards could include aircraft parked on runway, man- made towers or buildings and hills. In this paper, a low cost dual-function scanning pencil-beam, millimeter-wave radar forward sensor is used to determine whether an aircraft's flight path is clear of obstructions. Due to the limited space and weight budget in helicopters, the system is a dual function system that is substituted in place of the existing radar altimeter. The system combines a 35 GHz forward looking obstacle avoidance radar and a 4.3 GHz radar altimeter. The forward looking 35 GHz 3D radar's returns are used to construct a terrain and obstruction database surrounding an aircraft, which is presented to the pilot as a synthetic perspective display. The 35 GHz forward looking radar and the associated display was evaluated in a joint NASA Honeywell flight test program in 1996. The tests were conducted on a NASA/Army test helicopter. The test program clearly demonstrated the systems potential usefulness for collision avoidance.

  19. Early hydrodynamic evolution of a stellar collision

    SciTech Connect

    Kushnir, Doron; Katz, Boaz

    2014-04-20

    The early phase of the hydrodynamic evolution following the collision of two stars is analyzed. Two strong shocks propagate from the contact surface and move toward the center of each star at a velocity that is a small fraction of the velocity of the approaching stars. The shocked region near the contact surface has a planar symmetry and a uniform pressure. The density vanishes at the (Lagrangian) surface of contact, and the speed of sound diverges there. The temperature, however, reaches a finite value, since as the density vanishes, the finite pressure is radiation dominated. For carbon-oxygen white dwarf (CO WD) collisions, this temperature is too low for any appreciable nuclear burning shortly after the collision, which allows for a significant fraction of the mass to be highly compressed to the density required for efficient {sup 56}Ni production in the detonation wave that follows. This property is crucial for the viability of collisions of typical CO WD as progenitors of type Ia supernovae, since otherwise only massive (>0.9 M {sub ☉}) CO WDs would have led to such explosions (as required by all other progenitor models). The divergence of the speed of sound limits numerical studies of stellar collisions, as it makes convergence tests exceedingly expensive unless dedicated schemes are used. We provide a new one-dimensional Lagrangian numerical scheme to achieve this. A self-similar planar solution is derived for zero-impact parameter collisions between two identical stars, under some simplifying assumptions (including a power-law density profile), which is the planar version of previous piston problems that were studied in cylindrical and spherical symmetries.

  20. Intelligent Sensor Tasking for Space Collision Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Pertica, A J; Henderson, J R

    2010-04-01

    Orbital collisions pose a hazard to space operations. Using a high performance computer modeling and simulation environment for space situational awareness, we explore a new paradigm for improving satellite conjunction analysis by obtaining more precise orbital information only for those objects that pose a collision risk greater than a defined threshold to a specific set of satellites during a specified time interval. In particular, we assess the improvement in the quality of the conjunction analysis that can be achieved using a distributed network of ground-based telescopes.

  1. Dijet production in hadron collisions at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    We have studied dijet final states produced in hard hadron collisions at Fermilab using the E-609 calorimetric detector. Using dijet events produced in ..pi../sup -/p, ..pi../sup +/p and pp collisions at 200 GeV, we have made a detailed search for the higher-twist process proposed by Berger and Brodsky. In this process, the entire energy at the incident pion goes into dijet production, leaving an event with no forward beam jet and satisfying two-body kinematics.

  2. GEO Collision Avoidance using a Service Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, M.; Concha, M.

    2013-09-01

    Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is defined as the knowledge and characterization of all aspects of space. SSA is now a fundamental and critical component of space operations. The increased dependence on our space assets has in turn lead to a greater need for accurate, near real-time knowledge of all space activities. Key areas of SSA include improved tracking of small objects, determining the intent of maneuvering spacecraft, identifying all potential high risk conjunction events, and leveraging non-traditional sensors in support of the SSA mission. As the size of the space object population grows, the number of collision avoidance maneuvers grows. Moreover, as the SSA mission evolves to near real-time assessment and analysis, the need for new, more sophisticated collision avoidance methods are required. This paper demonstrates the utility of using a service vehicle to perform collision avoidance maneuver for GEO satellites. We present the planning and execution details required to successfully execute a maneuver; given the traditional conjunction analysis timelines. Various operational constraints and scenarios are considered as part of the demonstration. Development of the collision avoidance strategy is created using SpaceNav's collision risk management tool suite. This study aims to determine the agility required of any proposed servicing capability to provide collision avoidance within traditional conjunction analysis and collision avoidance operations timelines. Key trades and analysis items are given to be: 1. How do we fuse the spacecraft state data with the tracking data collected from the proximity sensor that resides on the servicing spacecraft? 2. How do we deal with the possibility that the collision threat for the event may change as the time to close approach is reduced? 3. Perform trade space of maneuver/thrust time versus achievable change in the spacecraft's orbit. 4. Perform trade space of proximity of service vehicle to spacecraft versus time

  3. Automobile Collisions, Kinematics and Related Injury Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    It has been determined clinically that fatalities and injury severity resulting from automobile collisions have decreased during the last five years for low impact speeds. This reduction is a direct result of the application of biomechanics and occupant kinematics, as well as changes in automobile design. The paper defines terminology used in the field of mechanics and develops examples and illustrations of the physical concepts of acceleration, force strength, magnitude duration, rate of onset and others, as they apply to collision phenomena and injury. The mechanism of injury pattern reduction through the use of restraint systems is illustrated. PMID:5059661

  4. Space-time dimensionality from brane collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2009-04-01

    Collisions and subsequent decays of higher dimensional branes leave behind three-dimensional branes and anti-branes, one of which could play the rôle of our universe. This process also leads to the production of one-dimensional branes and anti-branes, however their number is expected to be suppressed. Brane collisions may also lead to the formation of bound states of branes. Their existence does not alter this result, it just allows for the existence of one-dimensional branes captured within the three-dimensional ones.

  5. Collective flow in Au + Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, H.G.; EOS Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    Based on a preliminary sample of Au + Au collisions in the EOS time projection chamber at the Bevalac, we study sideward flow as a function of bombarding energy between 0.25A GeV and 1.2A GeV. We focus on the increase in in-plane transverse momentum per nucleon with fragment mass. We also find event shapes to be close to spherical in the most central collisions, independent of bombarding energy and fragment mass up to {sup 4}He.

  6. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosek, Thomas; Rourke, Kenneth

    Collision avoidance must be ensured during Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) operations near the space station. The design of the Collision Avoidance Maneuver (CAM) will involve analysis of CTV failure modes during rendezvous and proximity operations as well as analysis of possible problems external to the CTV, but that would require CTV to execute a CAM. In considering the requirements and design of the CAM for the CTV, the CAM design for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) is a useful reference point from which some lessons can be learned and many CTV design options can be set forth.

  7. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosek, Thomas; Rourke, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    Collision avoidance must be ensured during Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) operations near the space station. The design of the Collision Avoidance Maneuver (CAM) will involve analysis of CTV failure modes during rendezvous and proximity operations as well as analysis of possible problems external to the CTV, but that would require CTV to execute a CAM. In considering the requirements and design of the CAM for the CTV, the CAM design for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) is a useful reference point from which some lessons can be learned and many CTV design options can be set forth.

  8. Nonrelativistic theory of heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, G.

    1984-07-17

    A wide range of phenomena is observed in heavy-ion collisions, calling for a comprehensive theory based on fundamental principles of many-particle quantum mechanics. At low energies, the nuclear dynamics is controlled by the mean field, as we know from spectroscopic nuclear physics. We therefore expect the comprehensive theory of collisions to contain mean-field theory at low energies. The mean-field theory is the subject of the first lectures in this chapter. This theory can be studied quantum mechanically, in which form it is called TDHF (time-dependent Hartree-Fock), or classically, where the equation is called the Vlasov equation. 25 references, 14 figures.

  9. Fully dynamical simulation of central nuclear collisions.

    PubMed

    van der Schee, Wilke; Romatschke, Paul; Pratt, Scott

    2013-11-27

    We present a fully dynamical simulation of central nuclear collisions around midrapidity at LHC energies. Unlike previous treatments, we simulate all phases of the collision, including the equilibration of the system. For the simulation, we use numerical relativity solutions to anti-de Sitter space/conformal field theory for the preequilibrium stage, viscous hydrodynamics for the plasma equilibrium stage, and kinetic theory for the low-density hadronic stage. Our preequilibrium stage provides initial conditions for hydrodynamics, resulting in sizable radial flow. The resulting light particle spectra reproduce the measurements from the ALICE experiment at all transverse momenta. PMID:24329444

  10. Heat and mass transport in nanoscale phase transitions induced by collision cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caro, A.; Alurralde, M.; Saliba, R.; Caro, M.

    1997-11-01

    Irradiation of materials with energetic particles produces changes in the microstructure that affect mechanical properties. In previous work we studied the thermal aspects of the quenching of collision cascades that involve nanoscale phase transitions between the solid and the liquid states of the target. In this work we present a rigorous treatment of these phenomena, including a detailed description of the Stefan problem in three dimensions and diffusion in thermal gradients. This approach is oriented to give a quantitative description of the influence of the primary knock-on spectrum on the microstructure short after the quenching of the heat spike. 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. 46 CFR 173.056 - Collision and other watertight bulkheads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Collision and other watertight bulkheads. 173.056 Section 173.056 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.056 Collision and other watertight bulkheads. (a) Collision bulkheads required by...

  12. 14 CFR 417.231 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 417.231..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.231 Collision avoidance analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a collision avoidance analysis...

  13. 14 CFR 417.231 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 417.231..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.231 Collision avoidance analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a collision avoidance analysis...

  14. 14 CFR 417.231 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 417.231..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.231 Collision avoidance analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a collision avoidance analysis...

  15. 14 CFR 417.231 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 417.231..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.231 Collision avoidance analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a collision avoidance analysis...

  16. 14 CFR 417.231 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 417.231..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.231 Collision avoidance analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a collision avoidance analysis...

  17. Meson multiplicity versus energy in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, T. W.; Freier, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic study of meson multiplicity as a function of energy at energies up to 100 GeV/u in nucleus-nucleus collisions has been made, using cosmic-ray data in nuclear emulsion. The data are consistent with simple nucleon-nucleon superposition models. Multiplicity per interacting nucleon in AA collisions does not appear to differ significantly from pp collisions.

  18. Analysing Collisions Using Minkowski Diagrams in Momentum Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokor, Nandor

    2011-01-01

    Momentum space and Minkowski diagrams are powerful tools for interpreting and analysing relativistic collisions in one or two spatial dimensions. All relevant quantities that characterize a collision, including the mass, velocity, momentum and energy of the interacting particles, both before and after collision, can be directly seen from a single…

  19. 46 CFR 173.056 - Collision and other watertight bulkheads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Collision and other watertight bulkheads. 173.056 Section 173.056 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.056 Collision and other watertight bulkheads. (a) Collision bulkheads required by...

  20. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Grasso, A.P.

    1984-02-21

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  1. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Grasso, Albert P.

    1986-01-01

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  2. Semiconductor nanorod liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang-shi; Walda, Joost; Manna, Liberato; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2002-01-28

    Rodlike molecules form liquid crystalline phases with orientational order and positional disorder. The great majority of materials in which liquid crystalline phases have been observed are comprised of organic molecules or polymers, even though there has been continuing and growing interest in inorganic liquid crystals. Recent advances in the control of the sizes and shapes of inorganic nanocrystals allow for the formation of a broad class of new inorganic liquid crystals. Here we show the formation of liquid crystalline phases of CdSe semiconductor nanorods. These new liquid crystalline phases may have great importance for both application and fundamental study.

  3. Collision detection for spacecraft proximity operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Robin M.; Bergmann, Edward V.; Walker, Bruce K.

    1991-01-01

    A new collision detection algorithm has been developed for use when two spacecraft are operating in the same vicinity. The two spacecraft are modeled as unions of convex polyhedra, where the resulting polyhedron many be either convex or nonconvex. The relative motion of the two spacecraft is assumed to be such that one vehicle is moving with constant linear and angular velocity with respect to the other. Contacts between the vertices, faces, and edges of the polyhedra representing the two spacecraft are shown to occur when the value of one or more of a set of functions is zero. The collision detection algorithm is then formulated as a search for the zeros (roots) of these functions. Special properties of the functions for the assumed relative trajectory are exploited to expedite the zero search. The new algorithm is the first algorithm that can solve the collision detection problem exactly for relative motion with constant angular velocity. This is a significant improvement over models of rotational motion used in previous collision detection algorithms.

  4. QCD in hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.

    1997-03-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics provides a good description of many aspects of high energy hadron-hadron collisions, and this will be described, along with some aspects that are not yet understood in QCD. Topics include high E{sub T} jet production, direct photon, W, Z and heavy flavor production, rapidity gaps and hard diffraction.

  5. Behavioral training to improve collision detection

    PubMed Central

    DeLoss, Denton J.; Bian, Zheng; Watanabe, Takeo; Andersen, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Young drivers are a high-risk group for vehicle crashes due to inexperience in detecting an impending collision and are one group that may benefit from perceptual learning (PL) training. The present study assessed whether PL could be used to improve performance in collision detection. Ten college-aged subjects participated in the first experiment, which consisted of seven 1-hr sessions conducted on separate days. Thresholds at three observer/object speeds were measured prior to training using a two-alternative forced choice procedure during which they indicated whether an approaching object would result in a collision or noncollision event. Participants were then trained near threshold at one of these speeds for 5 days. After training, participants showed a significant reduction in the time needed to detect a collision at the trained speed. This improvement was also found to transfer to the higher observer speed condition. A second experiment was conducted to determine whether this improvement was due to training near threshold or whether this improvement was merely due to practice with the task. Training with stimuli well above threshold showed no significant improvement in performance, indicating that the improvement seen in the first experiment was not solely due to task practice. PMID:26230917

  6. A collision detection algorithm for telerobotic arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Doan Minh; Bartholomew, Maureen Obrien

    1991-01-01

    The telerobotic manipulator's collision detection algorithm is described. Its applied structural model of the world environment and template representation of objects is evaluated. Functional issues that are required for the manipulator to operate in a more complex and realistic environment are discussed.

  7. Birthday Paradox for Multi-Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Tonien, Dongvu; Kurosawa, Kaoru; Toyota, Koji

    In this paper, we study multi-collision probability. For a hash function H:D→R with |R|=n, it has been believed that we can find an s-collision by hashing Q=n(s-1)/s times. We first show that this probability is at most 1/s! for any s, which is very small for large s. (for example, s=n(s-1)/s) Thus the above folklore is wrong for large s. We next show that if s is small, so that we can assume Q-s≈Q, then this probability is at least 1/s!-1/2(s!)2, which is very high for small s (for example, s is a constant). Thus the above folklore is true for small s. Moreover, we show that by hashing (s!)1/s×Q+s-1(≤n) times, an s-collision is found with probability approximately 0.5 for any n and s such that (s!/n)1/s≈0. Note that if s=2, it coincides with the usual birthday paradox. Hence it is a generalization of the birthday paradox to multi-collisions.

  8. Head-on collisions of boson stars

    SciTech Connect

    Palenzuela, C.; Lehner, L.; Olabarrieta, I.; Liebling, S. L.

    2007-03-15

    We study head-on collisions of boson stars in three dimensions. We consider evolutions of two boson stars which may differ in their phase or have opposite frequencies but are otherwise identical. Our studies show that these phase differences result in different late time behavior and gravitational wave output.

  9. Initial conditions in high-energy collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petreska, Elena

    This thesis is focused on the initial stages of high-energy collisions in the saturation regime. We start by extending the McLerran-Venugopalan distribution of color sources in the initial wave-function of nuclei in heavy-ion collisions. We derive a fourth-order operator in the action and discuss its relevance for the description of color charge distributions in protons in high-energy experiments. We calculate the dipole scattering amplitude in proton-proton collisions with the quartic action and find an agreement with experimental data. We also obtain a modification to the fluctuation parameter of the negative binomial distribution of particle multiplicities in proton-proton experiments. The result implies an advancement of the fourth-order action towards Gaussian when the energy is increased. Finally, we calculate perturbatively the expectation value of the magnetic Wilson loop operator in the first moments of heavy-ion collisions. For the magnetic flux we obtain a first non-trivial term that is proportional to the square of the area of the loop. The result is close to numerical calculations for small area loops.

  10. 'Collision contest' draws in artists and physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Three winners have bagged the 2013 "collision contest" run by the Australia Research Council's Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale. More than 20 artists from around the world - together with a few physicists - entered the competition in which artists were asked to depict "new physics" and could choose any medium such as a painting or video for their artwork.