Science.gov

Sample records for collisionless drift wave

  1. Collisionless inter-species energy transfer and turbulent heating in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-08-15

    We reconsider the classic problems of calculating 'turbulent heating' and collisionless inter-species transfer of energy in drift wave turbulence. These issues are of interest for low collisionality, electron heated plasmas, such as ITER, where collisionless energy transfer from electrons to ions is likely to be significant. From the wave Poynting theorem at steady state, a volume integral over an annulus r{sub 1}=-S{sub r}|{sub r{sub 1}{sup r{sub 2}}}{ne}0. Here S{sub r} is the wave energy density flux in the radial direction. Thus, a wave energy flux differential across an annular region indeed gives rise to a net heating, in contrast to previous predictions. This heating is related to the Reynolds work by the zonal flow, since S{sub r} is directly linked to the zonal flow drive. In addition to net heating, there is inter-species heat transfer. For collisionless electron drift waves, the total turbulent energy source for collisionless heat transfer is due to quasilinear electron cooling. Subsequent quasilinear ion heating occurs through linear ion Landau damping. In addition, perpendicular heating via ion polarization currents contributes to ion heating. Since at steady state, Reynolds work of the turbulence on the zonal flow must balance zonal flow frictional damping ({approx}{nu}{sub ii}{sup 2}{approx}|(e{phi}(tilde sign)/T)|{sup 4}), it is no surprise that zonal flow friction appears as an important channel for ion heating. This process of energy transfer via zonal flow has not previously been accounted for in analyses of energy transfer. As an application, we compare the rate of turbulent energy transfer in a low collisionality plasma with the rate of the energy transfer by collisions. The result shows that the collisionless turbulent energy transfer is a significant energy coupling process for ITER plasma.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann model for collisionless electrostatic drift wave turbulence obeying Charney-Hasegawa-Mima dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, M.; Kendl, A.

    2015-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) approach to the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima (CHM) model for adiabatic drift wave turbulence in magnetised plasmas is implemented. The CHM-LBM model contains a barotropic equation of state for the potential, a force term including a cross-product analogous to the Coriolis force in quasigeostrophic models, and a density gradient source term. Expansion of the resulting lattice Boltzmann model equations leads to cold-ion fluid continuity and momentum equations, which resemble CHM dynamics under drift ordering. The resulting numerical solutions of standard test cases (monopole propagation, stable drift modes and decaying turbulence) are compared to results obtained by a conventional finite difference scheme that directly discretizes the CHM equation. The LB scheme resembles characteristic CHM dynamics apart from an additional shear in the density gradient direction. The occurring shear reduces with the drift ratio and is ascribed to the compressible limit of the underlying LBM.

  3. The complex mixed Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin-full-wave approach and its application to the two dimensional mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z. X.

    2015-05-15

    The complex mixed Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB)-full-wave approach is applied to the 2D mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves in tokamak plasmas. The parallel mode structure is calculated with the full-wave approach, while the radial envelope is calculated with the complex WKB method. The tilting of the global mode structure along radius is demonstrated analytically. The effects of the phase and amplitude variation of the radial envelope on the parallel mode structure are included in terms of a complex radial wave vector in the parallel mode equation. It is shown that the radial equilibrium non-uniformity leads to the asymmetry of the parallel mode structure not only in configuration space but also in spectrum space. The mixed approach provides a practical way to analyze the asymmetric component of the global mode structure due to radial equilibrium non-uniformity.

  4. The complex mixed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin-full-wave approach and its application to the two dimensional mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. X.

    2015-05-01

    The complex mixed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB)-full-wave approach is applied to the 2D mode structure analysis of ion temperature gradient/collisionless trapped electron mode drift waves in tokamak plasmas. The parallel mode structure is calculated with the full-wave approach, while the radial envelope is calculated with the complex WKB method. The tilting of the global mode structure along radius is demonstrated analytically. The effects of the phase and amplitude variation of the radial envelope on the parallel mode structure are included in terms of a complex radial wave vector in the parallel mode equation. It is shown that the radial equilibrium non-uniformity leads to the asymmetry of the parallel mode structure not only in configuration space but also in spectrum space. The mixed approach provides a practical way to analyze the asymmetric component of the global mode structure due to radial equilibrium non-uniformity.

  5. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonjae Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.; Angus, J. R.

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  6. Drift Wave Turbulence and Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, L.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2015-12-01

    An important feature in collisionless magnetic reconnection is the development of sharp discontinuities along the separatrices bounding the Alfvenic outflow. The typical scale length of these features is ρs (the Larmor radius based on the sound speed) for guide field reconnection. Temperature gradients in the inflowing plasma (as might be found in the magnetopause and the magnetotail) can lead to instabilities at these separatrices, specifically drift wave turbulence. We present standalone 2D and 3D PIC simulations of drift wave turbulence to investigate scaling properties and growth rates. We specifically consider stabilization of the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) and the development of this instability in the presence of a sheared magnetic field. Further investigations of the relative importance of drift wave turbulence in the development of reconnection will also be considered.

  7. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves.

    PubMed

    Marcowith, A; Bret, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O'C; Lembège, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics. PMID:27007555

  8. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcowith, A.; Bret, A.; Bykov, A.; Dieckman, M. E.; O'C Drury, L.; Lembège, B.; Lemoine, M.; Morlino, G.; Murphy, G.; Pelletier, G.; Plotnikov, I.; Reville, B.; Riquelme, M.; Sironi, L.; Stockem Novo, A.

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics.

  9. Drift waves in rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Liu, J.

    1983-09-01

    The stability of the electron drift wave is investigated in the presence of E x B plasma rotation typical of the central cell plasma in tandem mirrors. It is shown that a rotationally-driven drift wave may occur at low azimuthal mode numbers. Conditions for rotational instabilities are derived. Quasilinear formulas are given for the anomalous transport associated with the unstable fluctuations.

  10. Low Frequency Waves at and Upstream of Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. B.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter focuses on the range of low frequency electromagnetic modes observed at and upstream of collisionless shocks in the heliosphere. It discusses a specific class of whistler mode wave observed immediately upstream of collisionless shock ramps, called a whistler precursor. Though these modes have been (and are often) observed upstream of quasi-parallel shocks, the authors limit their discussion to those observed upstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. The chapter discusses the various ion velocity distributions observed at and upstream of collisionless shocks. It also introduces some terminology and relevant instabilities for ion foreshock waves. The chapter discusses the most common ultra-low frequency (ULF) wave types, their properties, and their free energy sources. It discusses modes that are mostly Alfvénic (i.e., mostly transverse but can be compressive) in nature.

  11. Nonlinear collisionless damping of Weibel turbulence in relativistic blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The Weibel/filamentation instability is known to play a key role in the physics of weakly magnetized collisionless shock waves. From the point of view of high energy astrophysics, this instability also plays a crucial role because its development in the shock precursor populates the downstream with a small-scale magneto-static turbulence which shapes the acceleration and radiative processes of suprathermal particles. The present work discusses the physics of the dissipation of this Weibel-generated turbulence downstream of relativistic collisionless shock waves. It calculates explicitly the first-order nonlinear terms associated to the diffusive nature of the particle trajectories. These corrections are found to systematically increase the damping rate, assuming that the scattering length remains larger than the coherence length of the magnetic fluctuations. The relevance of such corrections is discussed in a broader astrophysical perspective, in particular regarding the physics of the external relativistic shock wave of a gamma-ray burst.

  12. Distinctive features of collisionless gradient drift instabilities in a high-{beta} plasma in a highly nonuniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Chirkov, A. Yu.; Khvesyuk, V. I.

    2011-05-15

    A set of Vlasov-Maxwell equations for collisionless electromagnetic drift instabilities of high-{beta} plasma configurations with a nonuniform magnetic fields is solved. The effect of the transverse static magnetic field variation and magnetic field line curvature, as well as the plasma temperature and density gradients, is considered. It is shown that, in a nonuniform magnetic field, the behavior of the instabilities differs substantially from that in a uniform field. Electromagnetic modes propagating strictly transverse to the lines of the static magnetic field are analyzed in detail, and unstable solutions are obtained for both extraordinary and ordinary waves. Numerical results show that, in the latter case, instability occurs when the magnetic field decreases toward the periphery and the plasma temperature and density gradients are oppositely directed.

  13. Whistler waves observed upstream from collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Waves in the frequency range 0.5 - 4 Hz were studied in the region upstream of the earth's bow shock using data from the fluxgate magnetic field experiment on IMP-6. Analysis of 150 examples of these waves during a three month interval indicates that amplitudes are generally less than 1 or 2 gammas and propagation directions generally make angles of between 20 and 40 degrees with the field direction. The waves as measured in the spacecraft frame of reference are either left or right hand polarized with respect to the average field direction. It is concluded that the observed waves are right handed waves in the plasma frame of reference with wavelengths of approximately 100 km propagating upstream in the whistler mode. Doppler shifting reduces the observed frequencies in the spacecraft frame and reverses the observed polarization for those waves propagating more directly upstream. Similar waves are seen ahead of most interplanetary shocks.

  14. Whistler waves observed upstream from collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    Waves in the frequency range 0.5-4. Hz have been studied in the region upstream of the earth's bow shock with data from the flux-gate magnetic field experiment on Imp 6. Such waves are invariably detected adjacent to the shock, persisting upstream for intervals often less than a minute but occasionally of the order of many hours. Analysis of 150 examples of these waves during a 3-month interval indicates that propagation directions generally make angles of between 20 and 40 deg with the field direction. The waves as measured in the spacecraft frame of reference are either left- or right-hand-polarized with respect to the average field direction. The left-handed waves generally have lower frequencies than the right-handed waves, and the left-handed frequencies never exceed 2.5 Hz. The measured sense of polarization is found to depend on the propagation direction (or alternatively, the field direction) relative to the solar wind direction.

  15. Acceleration of energetic particles. [in collisionless shock waves in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.; Webb, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Acceleration of some particles from the background plasma to highly superthermal energies is a common feature of collisionless shocks in interplanetary space. The complete in situ measurements of bulk flows, thermal plasma, electromagnetic waves and energetic particles available for interplanetary shocks both suggest and test the models of shock acceleration in the solar system and the rest of the universe. This tutorial will review the present state of shock acceleration theory. Scatter-free acceleration by grad B drift in the plasma electric field E = -V x B/c, and diffusive acceleration resulting from scattering by Alfven waves in the plasma on both sides of the shock are discussed. The diffusive theory in simple steady state gives power-law spectra, but also shows the effects of time-dependent shocks and injection rates, escape and other losses, the self-consistent Alfven wave spectra, and plasma flow fields affected by diffusive energetic particle acceleration.

  16. Plasma waves downstream of weak collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Greenstadt, E. W.; Moses, S. L.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    In September 1983 the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE 3) International Cometary Explorer (ICE) spacecraft made a long traversal of the distant dawnside flank region of the Earth's magnetosphere and had many encounters with the low Mach number bow shock. These weak shocks excite plasma wave electric field turbulence with amplitudes comparable to those detected in the much stronger bow shock near the nose region. Downstream of quasi-perpendicular (quasi-parallel) shocks, the E field spectra exhibit a strong peak (plateau) at midfrequencies (1 - 3 kHz); the plateau shape is produced by a low-frequency (100 - 300 Hz) emission which is more intense behind downstream of two quasi-perpendicular shocks show that the low frequency signals are polarized parallel to the magnetic field, whereas the midfrequency emissions are unpolarized or only weakly polarized. A new high frequency (10 - 30 kHz) emission which is above the maximum Doppler shift exhibit a distinct peak at high frequencies; this peak is often blurred by the large amplitude fluctuations of the midfrequency waves. The high-frequency component is strongly polarized along the magnetic field and varies independently of the lower-frequency waves.

  17. Hydromagnetic waves for a collisionless plasma in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhau, S.; de La Torre, A.

    1985-08-01

    A system of hydrodynamic equations is used to model the behavior of small-amplitude hydromagnetic waves in order to quantify the effects of the electron thermodynamic variables. The system of equations yields a dispersion relationship which is solved with a linear approximation when small perturbations are introduced into the steady state. The disturbances are expressed as a superposition of small amplitude, plane harmonic waves, which are traced as they propagate through a collisionless heat-conducting plasma. Only the mirror stability criterion is found to change when the electron pressure is considered in a zero heat flux. The phase speed will be symmetric with respect to arising from the presence of the heat flux will strongly couple the slow and fast magnetosonic modes with wavenumber vectors in the positive flux vector directions. The subsequent overstability will be independent of the ion anisotropy.

  18. Collisional Drift Waves in Stellarator Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-10-07

    A computational study of resistive drift waves in the edge plasma of a stellarator with an helical magnetic axis is presented. Three coupled field equations, describing the collisional drift wave dynamics in the linear approximation, are solved as an initial-value problem along the magnetic field line. The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is obtained from a three-dimensional local equilibrium model. The use of a local magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium model allows for a computationally efficient systematic study of the impact of the magnetic field structure on drift wave stability.

  19. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-04-25

    A multi-grid part-in-cell algorithm for a shearless slab drift wave model with kinetic electrons is presented. The algorithm, which is based on an exact separation of adiabatic and nonadiabatic electron responses, is used to investigate the presence of strange attractors in drift wave turbulence. Although the simulation model has a large number of degrees of freedom, it is found that the strange attractor is low-dimensional and that it is strongly affected by dissipative (collisional) effects.

  20. The theory of magnetohydrodynamic wave generation by localized sources. II - Collisionless dissipation of wave packets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, William

    1989-01-01

    The dispersion equation of Barnes (1966) is used to study the dissipation of asymptotic wave packets generated by localized periodic sources. The solutions of the equation are linear waves, damped by Landau and transit-time processes, in a collisionless warm plasma. For the case of an ideal MHD system, most of the waves emitted from a source are shown to cancel asympotically through destructive interference. The modes transporting significant flux to asymptotic distances are found to be Alfven waves and fast waves with theta (the angle between the magnetic field and the characteristics of the far-field waves) of about 0 and about pi/2.

  1. Kinetic vortex chain solution in the drift-wave plasma regime

    PubMed

    Jovanovic; Pegoraro

    2000-01-01

    A fully nonlinear Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal stationary solution is found in the form of a quasi-three-dimensional chain of electron holes coupled to hydrodynamic vortices. This new coherent structure is enabled by the trapping and depletion of resonant particles, and the cyclotron dissipation of the singular current sheets. It is expected to play an important role in the collisionless magnetic field line reconnection in the drift-wave plasma regime, where it represents a plausible saturated state. PMID:11015843

  2. Neoclassical polarization drift of collisionless single ions in a sheared radial electric field in a tokamak magnetic geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Hoyul; Ku, Seunghoe; Chang, C. S.

    2006-01-15

    Neoclassical polarization drift is known to play critical role in the dynamical behavior of a sheared radial electric field E{sub r} in a toroidal confinement device. However, basic studies on the effect of radial electric shear on neoclassical polarization drift have not yet appeared in the literature. In the present report, the neoclassical polarization drift speed V{sub NP} of collisionless single ions is studied using a guiding-center code in a time-varying, spatially sheared E{sub r} in a realistic tokamak geometry. It is found numerically that the V{sub NP} for single ions is not only a function of the time derivative {partial_derivative}E{sub r}/{partial_derivative}t, but also a strong function of the radial shear {delta}r{partial_derivative}E{sub r}/{partial_derivative}r if the shear length is on the same order as the ion banana width {delta}r. Comparison with an analytic investigation reveals that this effect is simply due to the finite banana modification to the orbital average E{sub r}. An approximate analytic formula has been presented for collisionless single banana ions in a conventional tokamak magnetic geometry. The trapped-passing boundary layer physics is not treated.

  3. Anomalous electron-ion energy coupling in electron drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei

    Turbulence is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, and it is well known that turbulence couples energy input to dissipation by cascade processes. Plasma turbulence play a critical role in tokamak confinement. Magnetized plasma turbulence is quasi 2D, anisotropic, wave like and two fluid (i.e. electrons and ions) in structure. Thus, weakly collisional plasma turbulence can mediate electron and ion energy transfer. The issue of anomalous electron and ion energy coupling is particularly important for low collisionality, electron heated plasmas, such as ITER. In this work, we reconsider the classic problem of turbulent heating and energy transfer pathways in drift wave turbulence. The total turbulent heating, composed of quasilinear electron cooling, quasilinear ion heating, nonlinear ion heating and zonal flow frictional heating, is analyzed. In Chapter 2, the electron and ion energy exchange via linear wave and particle resonance will be computed. To address net heating, we show the turbulent heating in an annulus arises due to a wave energy flux differential across this region. We show this net heating is proportional to the Reynolds work on the zonal flow. Zonal flow friction heats ions, thus the turbulence and zonal flow interaction enters as an important energy transfer channel. Since zonal flows are nonlinearly generated, it follows that we should apply weak turbulence theory to calculate the nonlinear ion turbulent heating via the virtual mode resonance in the electron drift wave turbulence, which will be discussed in Chapter 3. We defines a new collisionless turbulent energy transfer channel through nonlinear Landau damping in the electron and ion energy coupling process. The result shows that nonlinear ion heating can exceed quasilinear ion heating, so that nonlinear heating becomes the principal collisionless wave energy dissipation channel in electron drift wave turbulence. This follows since the beat mode resonates with the bulk of the ion distribution, in

  4. Drift waves in helically symmetric stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Rafiq, T.; Hegna, C.

    2005-11-15

    The local linear stability of electron drift waves and ion temperature gradient modes (ITG) is investigated in a quasihelically symmetric (QHS) stellarator and a conventional asymmetric (Mirror) stellarator. The geometric details of the different equilibria are emphasized. Eigenvalue equations for the models are derived using the ballooning mode formalism and solved numerically using a standard shooting technique in a fully three-dimensional stellarator configuration. While the eigenfunctions have a similar shape in both magnetic geometries, they are slightly more localized along the field line in the QHS case. The most unstable electron drift modes are strongly localized at the symmetry points (where stellarator symmetry is present) and in the regions where normal curvature is unfavorable and magnitude of the local magnetic shear and magnetic field is minimum. The presence of a large positive local magnetic shear in the bad curvature region is found to be destabilizing. Electron drift modes are found to be more affected by the normal curvature than by the geodesic curvature. The threshold of stability of the ITG modes in terms of {eta}{sub i} is found to be 2/3 in this fluid model consistent with the smallest threshold for toroidal geometry with adiabatic electrons. Optimization to favorable drift wave stability has small field line curvature, short connection lengths, the proper combination of geodesic curvature and local magnetic shear, large values of local magnetic shear, and the compression of flux surfaces in the unfavorable curvature region.

  5. Parallel-velocity-shear-modified drift wave in negative ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiki, R.; Kaneko, T.; Hayashi, K.; Tamura, S.; Hatakeyama, R.

    2009-03-01

    A systematic investigation of the effects of a parallel velocity shear and negative ions on the collisionless drift wave instability has for the first time been realized by simultaneously using a segmented tungsten hot plate of a Q-machine and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas in a magnetized potassium plasma. The parallel velocity shear of the positive ion flow tends to decrease the fluctuation level of the drift wave. The introduction of negative ions first increases the fluctuation level and then starts to decrease it at the negative ion exchange fraction of around 10%, while keeping the above-mentioned shear effect qualitatively. In addition, a simple dispersion relation based on the local model has been calculated to show that it can predict wave characteristics similar to the experimental results. Our findings provide a potential for gaining a more profound insight into the physics of space/circumterrestrial plasmas.

  6. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves. [plasma simulation model applied to electrostatic waves in collisionless plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuda, Y.

    1974-01-01

    A low-noise plasma simulation model is developed and applied to a series of linear and nonlinear problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. It is demonstrated that use of the hybrid simulation model allows economical studies to be carried out in both the linear and nonlinear regimes with better quantitative results, for comparable computing time, than can be obtained by conventional particle simulation models, or direct solution of the Vlasov equation. The characteristics of the hybrid simulation model itself are first investigated, and it is shown to be capable of verifying the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as .000001 of the plasma thermal energy. Having established the validity of the hybrid simulation model, it is then used to study the nonlinear dynamics of monochromatic wave, sideband instability due to trapped particles, and satellite growth.

  7. Some Basic Concepts of Wave-Particle Interactions in Collisionless Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1997-01-01

    The physical concepts of wave-particle interactions in a collisionless plasma are developed from first principles. Using the Lorentz force, starting with the concepts of gyromotion, particle mirroring and the loss-cone, normal and anomalous cyclotron resonant interactions, pitch-angle scattering, and cross-field diffusion are developed.

  8. Relaxation of heavy ions in collisionless shock waves in cosmic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropotina, Yu. A.; Bykov, A. M.; Krasil'shchikov, A. M.; Levenfish, K. P.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the results of hybrid particle-in-cell simulation of shock waves (SWs) in the cosmic plasma with admixture of heavy weakly charged ions. The dependence of ion relaxation and the SW structure on the angle between the magnetic field and the normal to the wavefront is analyzed. The conditions for invariability of the anisotropic ion velocity distribution behind the front of quasi-transverse SWs are indicated on scales substantially exceeding the width of the collisionless SW front (up to the Coulomb relaxation length). The obtained results are essential for determining the effectiveness of heating of heavy ions and observation diagnostic of collisionless SWs in the cosmic plasma.

  9. Excitation of High Frequency Waves and Plasma Wave Spectroscopy in the Collisionless Terrella Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslovsky, Dmitry; Galayda, S.; Mauel, M.; Socrates, A.; Steinvurzel, P.; Leong, P.

    1998-11-01

    A broad-band antenna with m = 3 symmetry installed at one magnetic pole of the Collisionless Terrella Experiment(H. P. Warren and M. E. Mauel, Phys. Plasmas), 2 (1995) 4185. (CTX) is used to excite waves with frequencies between the ion and electron cyclotron frequencies (10-1000 MHz). Typically, waves are launched using a 100 W amplifier and a coherent signal generator capable of linear frequency sweeping. Launched waves are detected using movable electric and magnetic probes. In CTX, a population of energetic electrons is created using electron cyclotron resonance heating. We have focused on the the excitation of waves bounce-resonant with the energetic electrons which might change the saturation of lower-frequency hot electron interchange instabilities. For example, the inward propagation of ``phase-space holes'' associated with natural frequency sweeping should be arrested by the application of sufficiently intense waves. We report results of plasma wave spectroscopy between 10 MHz - 1 GHz and the identification of natural frequencies of the dipole-confined plasma.

  10. Collisionless damping of dust-acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive ions

    SciTech Connect

    Amour, Rabia; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    The charge variation induced nonlinear dust-acoustic wave damping in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive ions is considered. It is shown that the collisionless damping due to dust charge fluctuation causes the nonlinear dust acoustic wave propagation to be described by a damped Korteweg-de Vries (dK-dV) equation the coefficients of which depend sensitively on the nonextensive parameter q. The damping term, solely due to the dust charge variation, is affected by the ion nonextensivity. For the sake of completeness, the possible effects of nonextensivity and collisionless damping on weakly nonlinear wave packets described by the dK-dV equation are succinctly outlined by deriving a nonlinear Schrödinger-like equation with a complex nonlinear coefficient.

  11. Collisionless damping of dust-acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amour, Rabia; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-01

    The charge variation induced nonlinear dust-acoustic wave damping in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive ions is considered. It is shown that the collisionless damping due to dust charge fluctuation causes the nonlinear dust acoustic wave propagation to be described by a damped Korteweg-de Vries (dK-dV) equation the coefficients of which depend sensitively on the nonextensive parameter q. The damping term, solely due to the dust charge variation, is affected by the ion nonextensivity. For the sake of completeness, the possible effects of nonextensivity and collisionless damping on weakly nonlinear wave packets described by the dK-dV equation are succinctly outlined by deriving a nonlinear Schrödinger-like equation with a complex nonlinear coefficient.

  12. Kinetic Electron Closures for Electromagnetic Simulation of Drift and Shear-Alfven Waves (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I; Dimits, A M; Nevins, W M; Chen, Y; Parker, S

    2001-10-11

    An electromagnetic hybrid scheme (fluid electrons and gyrokinetic ions) is elaborated in example calculations and extended to toroidal geometry. The scheme includes a kinetic electron closure valid for {beta}{sub e} > m{sub e}/m{sub i} ({beta}{sub e} is the ratio of the plasma electron pressure to the magnetic field energy density). The new scheme incorporates partially linearized ({delta}f) drift-kinetic electrons whose pressure and number density moments are used to close the fluid momentum equation for the electron fluid (Ohm's law). The test cases used are small-amplitude kinetic shear-Alfven waves with electron Landau damping, the ion-temperature-gradient instability, and the collisionless drift instability (universal mode) in an unsheared slab as a function of the plasma {beta}{sub e}. Attention is given to resolution and convergence issues in simulations of turbulent steady states.

  13. Spatiotemporal mode structure of nonlinearly coupled drift wave modes

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Christian; Grulke, Olaf; Klinger, Thomas; Negrete, Jose Jr.; Bousselin, Guillaume; Brochard, Frederic; Bonhomme, Gerard; Oldenbuerger, Stella

    2011-11-15

    This paper presents full cross-section measurements of drift waves in the linear magnetized plasma of the Mirabelle device. Drift wave modes are studied in regimes of weakly developed turbulence. The drift wave modes develop azimuthal space-time structures of plasma density, plasma potential, and visible light fluctuations. A fast camera diagnostic is used to record visible light fluctuations of the plasma column in an azimuthal cross section with a temporal resolution of 10 {mu}s corresponding approximately to 10% of the typical drift wave period. Mode coupling and drift wave dispersion are studied by spatiotemporal Fourier decomposition of the camera frames. The observed coupling between modes is compared to calculations of nonlinearly coupled oscillators described by the Kuramoto model.

  14. Charging-delay induced dust acoustic collisionless shock wave: Roles of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran; Bharuthram, R.; Khan, Manoranjan; Gupta, M. R.

    2006-11-15

    The effects of charging-delay and negative ions on nonlinear dust acoustic waves are investigated. It has been found that the charging-delay induced anomalous dissipation causes generation of dust acoustic collisionless shock waves in an electronegative dusty plasma. The small but finite amplitude wave is governed by a Korteweg-de Vries Burger equation in which the Burger term arises due to the charging-delay. Numerical investigations reveal that the charging-delay induced dissipation and shock strength decreases (increases) with the increase of negative ion concentration (temperature)

  15. Anomalous phase shifts in drift wave fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, Ahmed; Skiff, Fred

    2003-10-01

    Ion phase space density fluctuation measurements are performed in a linearly magnetized device using Laser Induced Fluorescence(LIF). An ICP source produces an 8cm diameter plasma column that drifts in a cylindrical vessel whose diameter and length are 40 cm and 3 m, respectively. These experiments are performed using a CW singly ionized Argon plasma that is immersed in a 1kG magnetic field along the axis of the cylinder. A density of the order of 10^9 cm-3 is obtained under a regulated neutral background pressure of 2.× 10-4 torr. The electron and ion temperature are respectively 2 eV and 0.1 eV. LIF is carried out by pumping the Ar II metastable (3d^1)^2G_9/2, using a CW tunable laser centered at 611.6653 nm scanned over 6 GHz, to metastable (4p^1)F_7/2, and then detecting the 460nm photons emitted from its transition to (4s^1)^2F_5/2. This collection is made possible using two low f-umber periscopes that are directed to PMTs. Here we present measurements of the complex two-point correlation function < f(v_i_allel),z_1,ω)f(v_i_allel,z_2,ω)> as a function of the spatial separation of two LIF detection systems Δ d = z_2-z_1, the ion parallel velocity v_i_allel and the frequency ω. Preliminary results show ion particle velocity dependent phase shifts at the drift wave frequency.

  16. Drift laws for spiral waves on curved anisotropic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierckx, Hans; Brisard, Evelien; Verschelde, Henri; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2013-07-01

    Rotating spiral waves organize spatial patterns in chemical, physical, and biological excitable systems. Factors affecting their dynamics, such as spatiotemporal drift, are of great interest for particular applications. Here, we propose a quantitative description for spiral wave dynamics on curved surfaces which shows that for a wide class of systems, including the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction and anisotropic cardiac tissue, the Ricci curvature scalar of the surface is the main determinant of spiral wave drift. The theory provides explicit equations for spiral wave drift direction, drift velocity, and the period of rotation. Depending on the parameters, the drift can be directed to the regions of either maximal or minimal Ricci scalar curvature, which was verified by direct numerical simulations.

  17. Drift laws for spiral waves on curved anisotropic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dierckx, Hans; Brisard, Evelien; Verschelde, Henri; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2013-07-01

    Rotating spiral waves organize spatial patterns in chemical, physical, and biological excitable systems. Factors affecting their dynamics, such as spatiotemporal drift, are of great interest for particular applications. Here, we propose a quantitative description for spiral wave dynamics on curved surfaces which shows that for a wide class of systems, including the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction and anisotropic cardiac tissue, the Ricci curvature scalar of the surface is the main determinant of spiral wave drift. The theory provides explicit equations for spiral wave drift direction, drift velocity, and the period of rotation. Depending on the parameters, the drift can be directed to the regions of either maximal or minimal Ricci scalar curvature, which was verified by direct numerical simulations. PMID:23944539

  18. Drift wave instability in the Io plasma torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. S.; Hill, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    A linear normal mode analysis of the drift wave instability in the Io plasma torus was carried out on the basis of the Richmond (1973) and Huang et al. (1990) analyses of drift waves in the vicinity of the earth's plasmapause. Results indicate that the outer torus boundary is linearly unstable to the growth of electrostatic drift waves. It is shown that the linear growth rate is proportional to the ion drift frequency and to the ratio of the flux tube charge content to the Jovian ionospheric Pedersen conductance. It is also shown that various theoretical models of global radial transport in Jupiter's atmosphere (including corotating convection, interchange diffusion, and transient flux tube convection) can be understood as plausible nonlinear evolutions of electrostatic drift waves.

  19. Drift wave instability in a nonuniform quantum dusty magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Salimullah, M.; Jamil, M.; Zeba, I.; Uzma, Ch.; Shah, H. A.

    2009-03-15

    Using the quantum hydrodynamic model of plasmas and with quantum effects arising through the Bohm potential and the Fermi degenerate pressure, the possible drift waves and their instabilities have been investigated in considerable detail in a nonuniform dusty magnetoplasma. It is found that in the presence of a nonuniform ambient magnetic field, the drift waves grow in amplitude by taking energy from the streaming ions and density inhomogeneity. The implication of the drift wave instability for nonthermal electrostatic fluctuations to laboratory and astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  20. Damping of lower hybrid waves by low-frequency drift waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, Nicholas A.

    1989-11-01

    The conditions under which a spectrum of lower hybrid drift waves will decay into low-frequency drift waves (LFD) are calculated. The purpose is to help understand why lower hybrid drift waves are not seen in all field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiments in which they are predicted. It is concluded that if there is in the plasma a LFD wave amplitude above a critical level, lower hybrid waves will decay into low-frequency drift waves. The critical level required to stabilize TRX-2 [Phys. Fluids 30, 1497 (1987)] is calculated and found to be reasonably consistent with theoretical estimates.

  1. Drift wave transport scalings introduced by varying correlation length

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, J.; Holod, I.

    2005-01-01

    Scalings of the correlation length of drift wave turbulence with magnetic current q, shear, elongation, and temperature ratio have been introduced into a drift wave transport model. The correlation length is calculated from linear scaling of the fastest growing mode. Such a procedure is supported by previous turbulence simulations with absorbing boundaries for short and long wavelengths. The resulting q and s scalings are now in better agreement with experimental scalings. In particular, the simulation results for transport barrier shots improve.

  2. The Saturnian Environment as a Unique Laboratory for Collisionless Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, Ali; Masters, Adam; Dougherty, Michele; Burgess, David; Fujimoto, Masaki; Hospodarsky, George

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves are ubiquitous in the universe and fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. The interplay between particles (ions and electrons) and fields (electromagnetic) introduces a variety of both physical and geometrical parameters such as Mach numbers (e.g. MA, Mf), β, and θBn. These vary drastically from terrestrial to astrophysical regimes resulting in radically different characteristics of shocks. This poses two complexities. Firstly, separating the influences of these parameters on physical mechanisms such as energy dissipation. Secondly, correlating observations of shock waves over a wide range of each parameter, enough to span across different regimes. Investigating the latter has been restricted since the majority of studies on shocks at exotic regimes (such as supernova remnants) have been achieved either remotely or via simulations, but rarely by means of in-situ observations. It is not clear what happens in the higher MA regime. Here we show the parameter space of MA for all bow shock crossings from 2004-2012 as measured by the Cassini spacecraft. We found that the Saturnian bow shock exhibits characteristics akin to both terrestrial and astrophysical regimes (MA of order 100), which is principally controlled by the upstream magnetic field strength. Moreover, we estimated the θbn of each crossing and were able to further constrain the sample into categories of similar features. Our results demonstrate how MA plays a central role in controlling the onset of physical mechanisms in collisionless shocks, particularly reformation. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. We show conclusive evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted timescale of ˜0.3 τc, where τc is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally underpin the relationship between

  3. Ion streaming instabilities with application to collisionless shock wave structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, K. I.; Linson, L. M.; Mani, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    The electromagnetic dispersion relation for two counterstreaming ion beams of arbitrary relative strength flowing parallel to a dc magnetic field is derived. The beams flow through a stationary electron background and the dispersion relation in the fluid approximation is unaffected by the electron thermal pressure. The dispersion relation is solved with a zero net current condition applied and the regions of instability in the k-U space (U is the relative velocity between the two ion beams) are presented. The parameters are then chosen to be applicable for parallel shocks. It was found that unstable waves with zero group velocity in the shock frame can exist near the leading edge of the shock for upstream Alfven Mach numbers greater than 5.5. It is suggested that this mechanism could generate sufficient turbulence within the shock layer to scatter the incoming ions and create the required dissipation for intermediate strength shocks.

  4. Do dispersive waves play a role in collisionless magnetic reconnection?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Daughton, W.; Li, H.; Karimabadi, H.; Peter Gary, S.

    2014-02-15

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we demonstrate that the properly normalized reconnection rate is fast ∼0.1 for guide fields up to 80× larger than the reconnecting field and is insensitive to both the system size and the ion to electron mass ratio. These results challenge conventional explanations of reconnection based on fast dispersive waves, which are completely absent for sufficiently strong guide fields. In this regime, the thickness of the diffusion layer is set predominantly by the electron inertial length with an inner sublayer that is controlled by finite gyro-radius effects. As the Alfvén velocity becomes relativistic for very strong guide fields, the displacement current becomes important and strong deviations from charge neutrality occur, resulting in the build-up of intense electric fields which absorb a portion of the magnetic energy release. Over longer time scales, secondary magnetic islands are generated near the active x-line while an electron inertial scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is driven within the outflow. These secondary instabilities give rise to time variations in the reconnection rate but do not alter the average value.

  5. Collisionless Dissipative Nonlinear Alfvén Waves: Nonlinear Steepening, Particle Trapping, and Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, M. V.

    1998-11-01

    The magnetic field fluctuations frequently observed in the Solar Wind and Interstellar Medium are likely to be nonlinear Alfvén waves, in which the ponderomotive coupling of Alfvénic magnetic energy to ion-acoustic quasi-modes has modified the phase velocity vA and caused wave-front steepening. In the warm, collisionless Solar Wind plasma the resonant particle-wave interactions result in relatively rapid (compared to the particle bounce time) formation of quasi-stationary Alfvénic Rotational Discontinuities, (M.V. Medvedev, P.H. Diamond, V.I. Shevchenko, and V.L. Galinsky, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78), 4934 (1997) and references therein. which have been the subject of intense satellite observations and theoretical investigations, and whose emergence and dynamics has not been previously understood. These discontinuities are shown to be quasi-stationary wave-form remnants of nonlinearly evolved coherent Alfvén waves. In long-time asymptotics, however, the particle distribution function (PDF) is affected by wave magnetic fields. Indeed, the resonant particles are trapped in the quasi-stationary Alfvénic discontinuities by mirroring forces giving rise to the nonlinear Landau damping and, ultimately, to a formation of a plateau on the PDF, so that the linear collisionless damping vanishes. Using Virial theorem for trapped particles, it is analytically demonstrated (M.V. Medvedev, P.H. Diamond, M.N. Rosenbluth, and V.I. Shevchenko, Submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. (1998).) that their effect on the nonlinear dynamics of such discontinuities is highly non-trivial and forces a significant departure of the theory from the conventional paradigm. Considering the strongly compressible MHD (Alfvénic) Solar Wind turbulence as an ensemble of randomly interacting Alfvénic discontinuities and nonlinear waves, it is also shown (M.V. Medvedev and P.H. Diamond, Phys. Rev. E 56), R2371 (1997). that there exist two different phases of turbulence which are due to the collisionless (Landau

  6. Generated Wave Behavior from Laser-Driven Magnetic Pistons Relevant to Magnetized Collisionless Shock Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everson, E. T.; Schaeffer, D. B.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Vincena, S.; Compernolle, B. Van; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Niemann, C.

    2013-10-01

    The dynamics of energetic plasma explosions through a tenuous, magnetized plasma is of relevance to many astrophysical, ionospheric, and magnetospheric phenomena, such as the formation of collisionless shocks. Recent experiments at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) utilized the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) and the Raptor laser system to drive super-Alfvénic laser-plasma explosions through the uniform, magnetized background plasma of the LAPD. The 100 J, 25 ns FWHM Raptor laser ablated a graphite target directing the exploding debris-plasma quasi-perpendicularly to the background magnetic field (300 G). The debris-plasma interacted with the low-density (2 - 5 ×1012 cm-3), He plasma of the LAPD for 60 cm across the field lines and about 8 m along the field lines. Magnetic flux probes were used to measure wave behavior both perpendicular and parallel to the background field. Across field behavior shows signs of collisionless coupling between the debris and ambient plasma, leading to a field compression on the order of the Alfvénic Mach number (~ 1 . 4). The debris-explosion also produced strong parallel wave behavior resulting in large amplitude whistler (ΔB /Bo ~ 4 %) and Alfvén (ΔB /Bo ~ 10 %) waves.

  7. Two-fluid MHD Regime of Drift Wave Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shang-Chuan; Zhu, Ping; Xie, Jin-Lin; Liu, Wan-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Drift wave instabilities contribute to the formation of edge turbulence and zonal flows, and thus are believed to play essential roles in the anomalous transport processes in tokamaks. Whereas drift waves are generally assumed to be local and electrostatic, experiments have often found regimes where the spatial scales and the magnetic components of drift waves approach those of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes. In this work we study such a drift wave regime in a cylindrical magnetized plasma using a full two-fluid MHD model implemented in the NIMROD code. The linear dependency of growth rates on resistivity and the dispersion relation found in the NIMROD calculations qualitatively agree with theoretical analysis. As the azimuthal mode number increases, the drift modes become highly localized radially; however, unlike the conventional local approximation, the radial profile of the drift mode tends to shift toward the edge away from the center of the density gradient slope, suggesting the inhomogeneity of two-fluid effects. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 11275200 and National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant 2014GB124002.

  8. Plasma waves around separatrix in collisionless magnetic reconnection with weak guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yangao; Fujimoto, Keizo; Xiao, Chijie; Ji, Hantao

    2015-11-01

    Electrostatic and electromagnetic waves excited by electron beam around the separatrix region are analyzed in detail during the collisionless magnetic reconnection with a weak guide field by using 2D particle-in-cell simulation with the adaptive mesh refinement. Broadband electrostatic waves are excited both in the inflow and outflow regions around the separatrices due to the electron bump-on-tail, two-stream, and Buneman instabilities. In contrast, the quasi-monochromatic electromagnetic waves are excited only in the inflow side of the separatrices due to a beam-driven Whistler instability. The localization of the Whistler waves is attributed to the non-uniformity of the out-of-plane magnetic field By. The Whistler instability is suppressed in the outflow side where By is too small for the oblique propagation. The electrostatic waves with distinct speeds can explain the in situ spacecraft observations. From the causality point of view, the waves are generated as the consequence of the electron bulk acceleration to thermalize the particles through wave-particle interactions. These simulation results provide guidance to analyze high-resolution wave observations during reconnection in the ongoing and upcoming satellite missions, as well as in dedicated laboratory experiments.

  9. Plasma waves around separatrix in collisionless magnetic reconnection with weak guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yangao; Fujimoto, Keizo; Xiao, Chijie; Ji, Hantao

    2015-08-01

    Electrostatic and electromagnetic waves excited by electron beam around the separatrix region are analyzed in detail during the collisionless magnetic reconnection with a weak guide field by using 2-D particle-in-cell simulation with the adaptive mesh refinement. Broadband electrostatic waves are excited both in the inflow and outflow regions around the separatrices due to the electron bump-on-tail, two-stream, and Buneman instabilities. In contrast, the quasi-monochromatic electromagnetic waves are excited only in the inflow side of the separatrices due to a beam-driven whistler instability. The localization of the whistler waves is attributed to the nonuniformity of the out-of-plane magnetic field By. The whistler instability is suppressed in the outflow side where By is too small for the oblique propagation. The electrostatic waves with distinct speeds can explain the in situ spacecraft observations. From the causality point of view, the waves are generated as the consequence of the electron bulk acceleration to thermalize the particles through wave-particle interactions. These simulation results provide guidance to analyze high-resolution wave observations during reconnection in the ongoing and upcoming satellite missions, as well as in dedicated laboratory experiments.

  10. On the drift magnetosonic waves in anisotropic low beta plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Naim, Hafsa; Bashir, M. F.; Murtaza, G.

    2014-10-15

    A generalized dispersion relation of obliquely propagating drift magnetosonic waves is derived by using the gyrokinetic theory for anisotropic low beta plasmas. The stability analysis applicable to a wide range of plasma parameters is performed to understand the stabilization mechanism of the drift magnetosonic instability and the estimation of the growth rate is also presented. It is noted that the growth rate of the drift instability enhances for small anisotropy (A{sub e,i} = T{sub ⊥e,i}/T{sub ∥e,i} < 1) whereas it is suppressed for large anisotropy (A{sub e,i} > 1)

  11. The interplanetary scattering mean free path - Collisionless wave-damping effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, J. M.; Scott, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    The role of dissipation in the scattering of charged particles in the interplanetary medium (IPM) is analyzed to obtain a model for the interplanetary magnetic turbulence spectrum that yields particle free paths (PEP) which agree with observational data. The scattering processes are attributed to waves with small wavelengths intersected by particles with zero pitch angles. The waves, being strongly damped by collisionless cyclotron damping in the ambient thermal plasma, produce reduced scattering and longer MFPs. The model, which includes the damping factor, was used to generate proton propagation maps at kinetic energy levels of under, over, and within the 5 MeV-2 GeV range. The results, when compared with observational data, displayed good agreement. The same held true for the MFP propagation of energetic electrons.

  12. Antenna excitation of drift wave in a toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, A.; Ricci, P.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Mueller, S. H.; Podesta, M.; Poli, F. M.; Skiff, F.

    2007-10-15

    In a magnetized toroidal plasma, an antenna tunable in vertical wave number is used to excite density perturbations. Coherent detection is performed by means of Langmuir probes to directly determine both the wave vector and the plasma response induced by the antenna. Comparison between the theoretical density response predicted by the generalized Hasegawa-Wakatani model, and the experimentally determined density response enables us the identification of one peak of the plasma response as a drift wave.

  13. Drift and ion acoustic wave driven vortices with superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Shan, S.; Haque, Q.

    2012-08-15

    Linear and nonlinear analysis of coupled drift and acoustic mode is presented in an inhomogeneous electron-ion plasma with {kappa}-distributed electrons. A linear dispersion relation is found which shows that the phase speed of both the drift wave and the ion acoustic wave decreases in the presence of superthermal electrons. Several limiting cases are also discussed. In the nonlinear regime, stationary solutions in the form of dipolar and monopolar vortices are obtained. It is shown that the condition for the boundedness of the solution implies that the speed of drift wave driven vortices reduces with increase in superthermality effect. Ignoring density inhomogeniety, it is investigated that the lower and upper limits on the speed of the ion acoustic driven vortices spread with the inclusion of high energy electrons. The importance of results with reference to space plasmas is also pointed out.

  14. Spatiotemporal synchronization of drift waves in a magnetron sputtering plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Antoni, V.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Adámek, J.

    2014-10-15

    A feedforward scheme is applied for drift waves control in a magnetized magnetron sputtering plasma. A system of driven electrodes collecting electron current in a limited region of the explored plasma is used to interact with unstable drift waves. Drift waves actually appear as electrostatic modes characterized by discrete wavelengths of the order of few centimeters and frequencies of about 100 kHz. The effect of external quasi-periodic, both in time and space, travelling perturbations is studied. Particular emphasis is given to the role played by the phase relation between the natural and the imposed fluctuations. It is observed that it is possible by means of localized electrodes, collecting currents which are negligible with respect to those flowing in the plasma, to transfer energy to one single mode and to reduce that associated to the others. Due to the weakness of the external action, only partial control has been achieved.

  15. Scroll wave drift along steps, troughs, and corners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Hua; Zhang, Zhihui; Steinbock, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Three-dimensional excitable systems can create nonlinear scroll waves that rotate around one-dimensional phase singularities. Recent theoretical work predicts that these filaments drift along step-like height variations. Here, we test this prediction using experiments with thin layers of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. We observe that over short distances scroll waves are attracted towards the step and then rapidly commence a steady drift along the step line. The translating filaments always reside on the shallow side of the step near the edge. Accordingly, filaments in the deep domain initially collide with and shorten at the step wall. The drift speeds obey the predicted proportional dependence on the logarithm of the height ratio and the direction depends on the vortex chirality. We also observe drift along the perimeter of rectangular plateaus and find that the filaments perform sharp turns at the corners. In addition, we investigate rectangular troughs for which vortices of equal chirality can drift in different directions. The latter two effects are reproduced in numerical simulations with the Barkley model. The simulations show that narrow troughs instigate scroll wave encounters that induce repulsive interaction and symmetry breaking. Similar phenomena could exist in the geometrically complicated ventricles of the human heart where reentrant vortex waves cause tachycardia and fibrillation.

  16. Nonlinear interaction of drift waves with driven plasma currents

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Christian; Grulke, Olaf; Klinger, Thomas

    2010-03-15

    In a cylindrical magnetized plasma, coherent drift wave modes are synchronized by a mode selective drive of plasma currents. Nonlinear effects of the synchronization are investigated in detail. Frequency pulling is observed over a certain frequency range. The dependence of the width of this synchronization range on the amplitude of the driven plasma currents forms Arnold tongues. The transition between complete and incomplete synchronization is indicated by the onset of periodic pulling and phase slippage. Synchronization is observed for driven current amplitudes, which are some percent of the typical value of parallel currents generated by drift waves.

  17. The Frequency and Damping of Ion Acoustic Waves in Collisional and Collisionless Two-species Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Berger; E.J. Valeo

    2004-08-18

    The dispersion properties of ion acoustic waves (IAW) are sensitive to the strength of ion-ion collisions in multi-species plasma in which the different species usually have differing charge-to-mass ratios. The modification of the frequency and damping of the fast and slow acoustic modes in a plasma composed of light (low Z) and heavy (high Z) ions is considered. In the fluid limit where the light ion scattering mean free path, {lambda}{sub th} is smaller than the acoustic wavelength, {lambda} = 2{pi}/k, the interspecies friction and heat flow carried by the light ions scattering from the heavy ions causes the damping. In the collisionless limit, k{lambda}{sub th} >> 1, Landau damping by the light ions provides the dissipation. In the intermediate regime when k{lambda}{sub th} {approx} 1, the damping is at least as large as the sum of the collisional and Landau damping.

  18. Drift induced by repeated hydropeaking waves in controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiolini, Bruno; Bruno, M. Cristina; Biffi, Sofia; Cashman, Matthew J.

    2014-05-01

    Repeated hydropeaking events characterize most alpine rivers downstream of power plants fed by high elevation reservoirs. The effects of hydropeaking on the benthic communities are well known, and usually each hydropeaking wave causes an increase in tractive force and changes in temperature and water quality. Simulations of hydropeaking in artificial system can help to disentangle the direct effects of the modified flow regime from impacts associated with other associated physio-chemical changes, and with the effects of river regulation and land-use changes that often accompany water resource development. In September 2013 we conducted a set of controlled simulations in five steel flumes fed by an Alpine stream (Fersina stream, Adige River catchment, Trentino, Italy), where benthic invertebrates can freely colonize the flumes. One flume was used as control with no change in flow, in the other four flumes we simulated an hydropeaking wave lasting six hours, and repeated for five consecutive days. Flow was increased by twice baseflow in two flumes, and three times in the other two. We collected benthic samples before the beginning (morning of day 1) and after the end (afternoon of day 5) of the set of simulations to evaluate changes in the benthic communities due to induced drift migration. During each simulation, we collected drifting organisms at short time intervals to assess the responses to: 1) the initial discharge increase, 2) the persistence of high flows for several hours; 3) the decrease of discharge to the baseflow; 4) the change in drift with each successive day. Preliminary results indicate typical strong increases of catastrophic drift on the onset of each simulated hydropeaking, drift responses proportional to the absolute discharge increase, a decrease in the drift responses over successive days. Different taxa responded with different patterns: taxa which resist tractive force increased in drift only during the periods of baseflow that follow the

  19. Nonlinear frequency shift of electrostatic waves in general collisionless plasma: Unifying theory of fluid and kinetic nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chang; Dodin, Ilya Y.

    2015-08-15

    The nonlinear frequency shift is derived in a transparent asymptotic form for intense Langmuir waves in general collisionless plasma. The formula describes both fluid and kinetic effects simultaneously. The fluid nonlinearity is expressed, for the first time, through the plasma dielectric function, and the kinetic nonlinearity accounts for both smooth distributions and trapped-particle beams. Various known limiting scalings are reproduced as special cases. The calculation avoids differential equations and can be extended straightforwardly to other nonlinear plasma waves.

  20. Evolution of relative drifts and temperature anisotropies in expanding collisionless plasmas—1.5D vs. 2.5D hybrid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Y. G.; Poedts, S.; Araneda, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    We compare the results from 1.5D and 2.5D hybrid simulations (with fluid electrons, and kinetic/particle-in-cell protons and α particles) to investigate the effect of the solar wind expansion on the evolution of ion relative drifts in collisionless fast wind streams. We initialize the system with initial relative drifts and follow its evolution in time within and without the expanding box model, which takes into account the gradual solar wind expansion in the interplanetary medium. The decay of the differential streaming follows similar pattern in the 1.5D and 2.5D non-expanding cases. For the 1.5D studies we find no difference in the evolution of the initial relative drift speed with and without expansion, whereas in the two-dimensional case the differential streaming is further suppressed once the solar wind expansion is taken into account. This implies that a stronger acceleration source is required to compensate for the effect of the expansion and produce the observed solar wind acceleration rate. The 1.5D case shows stronger oscillations in all plasma properties with higher temperature anisotropies for the minor ions in the first few hundred gyro-periods of the simulations. Yet the preferential perpendicular heating for the minor ions is stronger in the 2.5D case with higher temperature anisotropies at the final stage.

  1. Impacts of wave spreading and multidirectional waves on estimating Stokes drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, A.; Fox-Kemper, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Stokes drift, and its leading-order approximation, for a random sea depend upon the interaction of different wave groups and the process of wave spreading. Here Stokes drift direction and magnitude from prescribed spectra, local observational buoy data, and global model WAVEWATCH III output are used to analyze approximations of Stokes drift for directional random seas in deep water. To facilitate analysis, a new approximation is defined to incorporate the systematic effects of wave spreading. Stokes drift is typically overestimated by ignoring these effects or by ignoring directional differences in swell and wind seas. These two errors are differentiated and found to be largely uncorrelated. These errors depend strongly on depth, with deeper Stokes drift favoring narrow-banded swell and shallower Stokes drift favoring wind seas. Results are consistent among the data examined. Mean Stokes drift magnitude reductions from wave spreading and multidirectional wave effects alone are 14-20% and 7-23% respectively, giving a combined reduction of 20-40% versus unidirectional waves, depending on wave age and depth. Approximations that do not include these reductions however, will on average overestimate Stokes drift by 16-26%, 26-43%, and 45-71% respectively. In addition to magnitude, the direction of Stokes drift is also affected and multidirectional waves generate a directional veer with depth: the 30/60/90% confidence intervals are bounded (approximately) by ± 0.12/0.28/0.84 radians (± 7/16/48 deg) at the surface, with smaller intervals at depth. Complementary depth-integrated approximations are also investigated and directional effects are similar with depth-dependent subsurface results. Furthermore, an optimized directional spread correction for the surface is nearly identical for global simulations and a buoy located at Ocean Weather Station P (50°N 145°W), and does not require directional wave spectrum data.

  2. Conditions for Debris-Background Ion Interactions and Collisionless Shock Wave Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, Dan; Cowee, Misa

    2012-07-10

    We use hybrid simulations and simple theoretical arguments to determine when debris ions streaming relative to background ions in a collisionless, magnetized plasma couple strongly enough to generate a magnetosonic shock wave. We consider three types of configurations: one-dimensional, the two-dimensional extension of the 1-D case, and a more complex 2-D geometry that contains some effects that would be found in a laser-produced, laboratory plasma. We show that the simulation results as well as previous Russian and LLNL results reduce to a simple condition (R{sub m}/{rho}{sub d} = equal mass radius/debris ion gyroradius {ge} 0.7) for the generation of a shock wave. Strong debris interaction with the background is characterized by the formation of a magnetic pulse that steepens and speeds up as it encounters the debris ions deflected by the magnetic field. The pulse further evolves into a shock. As the earlier work has indicated, the process also involves the generation of a transverse electric field perpendicular to the flow and the magnetic field that accelerates the background ions radially outward, which in turn causes the speedup of the pulse. With electric and magnetic field probes, the UCLA laser experiments should be able to detect these signatures of coupling as well as the generation of the shock wave.

  3. Drift waves and vortices: a dynamical point vortex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoncini, Xavier; Verga, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Interactions of localized vortices with drift waves are investigated using a model of point vortices in the presence of a transverse or longitudinal wave. This simple model shows a rich dynamical behavior including oscillations of a dipole, splitting and merging of two like-circulation vortices, and chaos. The analytical and numerical results of this model have been found to predict under certain conditions, the behavior of more complex systems, such as the vortices of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation, where the presence of waves strongly affects the evolution of large coherent structures.

  4. Drift waves and chaos in a LAPTAG plasma physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Birge-Lee, Henry; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Wolman, Ben; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Patankar, Vedang; Bridges, Gabriel; Buckley-Bonanno, Samuel; Buckley, Susan; Ge, Andrew; Thomas, Sam

    2016-02-01

    In a project involving an alliance between universities and high schools, a magnetized plasma column with a steep pressure gradient was established in an experimental device. A two-dimensional probe measured fluctuations in the plasma column in a plane transverse to the background magnetic field. Correlation techniques determined that the fluctuations were that of electrostatic drift waves. The time series data were used to generate the Bandt-Pompe entropy and Jensen-Shannon complexity for the data. These quantities, when plotted against one another, revealed that a combination of drift waves and other background fluctuations were a deterministically chaotic system. Our analysis can be used to tell the difference between deterministic chaos and random noise, making it a potentially useful technique in nonlinear dynamics.

  5. The stability of the dust acoustic waves under transverse perturbations in a magnetized and collisionless dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dong-Ning; Qi, Xin; Hong, Xue-Ren; Yang, Xue; Duan, Wen-Shan; Yang, Lei; Yang

    2014-06-01

    Numerical and theoretical investigations are carried out for the stability of the dust acoustic waves (DAWs) under the transverse perturbation in a two-ion temperature magnetized and collisionless dusty plasma. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation, modified ZK equation, and Extended ZK (EZK) equation of the DAWs are given by using the reductive perturbation technique. The cut-off frequency is obtained by applying higher-order transverse perturbations to the soliton solution of the EZK equation. The propagation velocity of solitary waves, the real cut-off frequency, as well as the growth rate of the higher-order perturbation to the solitary wave are obtained.

  6. The resolved layer of a collisionless, high beta, supercritical, quasi-perpendicular shock wave. III - Vlasov electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Mangeney, A.; Lacombe, C.; Harvey, C. C.; Wu, C. S.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the fluid continuum level within the shock layer observed on November 7, 1977 by the ISEE satellites (Scudder et al., 1986) is extended to examine, within the framework of Vlasov electrodynamics, direct observational evidence for 'collisionless' resistivity. The analysis is based on the measured wave turbulence and the deviation of the observed electron velocity distribution function from the form predicted using the reversible individual electron trajectories in the presence of dc forces.

  7. Fast wave stabilization/destabilization of drift waves in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-03-15

    Four wave-nonlinear coupling of a large amplitude whistler with low frequency drift wave and whistler wave sidebands is examined. The pump and whistler sidebands exert a low frequency ponderomotive force on electrons introducing a frequency shift in the drift wave. For whistler pump propagating along the ambient magnetic field B{sub s}z-caret with wave number k(vector sign){sub 0}, drift waves of wave number k(vector sign)=k(vector sign){sub Up-Tack }+k{sub ||}z-caret see an upward frequency shift when k{sub Up-Tack }{sup 2}/k{sub 0}{sup 2}>4k{sub ||}/k{sub 0} and are stabilized once the whistler power exceeds a threshold value. The drift waves of low transverse wavelength tend to be destabilized by the nonlinear coupling. Oblique propagating whistler pump with transverse wave vector parallel to k(vector sign){sub Up-Tack} is also effective but with reduced effectiveness.

  8. Shock drift acceleration in the presence of waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. B.; Vlahos, L.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the initial results of a model designed to study the modification of the scatter-free, shock drift acceleration of energetic test particles by wave activity in the vicinity of a quasi-perpendicular, fast-mode MHD shock. It is emphasized that the concept of magnetic moment conservation is a valid approximation only in the perpendicular and nearly perpendicular regimes, when the angle theta-Bn between the shock normal and the upstream magnetic field vector is in the range from 70 deg to 90 deg. The present investigation is concerned with one step in a program which is being developed to combine the shock drift and diffusive processes at a shock of arbitrary theta-Bn.

  9. Drift-Wave Instabilities and Transport in Non - Tokamak Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Daniel Duc

    Motivated by experimental scaling laws that suggest an improvement in the confinement time of fusion plasmas in tokamaks with elongated cross section, we search theoretically for favorable dependence on elongation for drift-wave instabilities, which may be responsible for anomalous transport in tokamaks. First, using thermodynamic methods, we derive upper bounds on thermal diffusivities for drift-wave instabilities in tokamaks but find no elongation dependence to lowest order. Also, compared with experimentally inferred ion thermal diffusivities from the DIIID tokamak, the thermodynamic bounds are as much as 100 times bigger in the plasma core. Second, utilizing a simulation code to calculate linear growth rates, we obtain mixing-length estimates of ion thermal diffusivities for a specific drift wave, the ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) mode, which becomes unstable only if the temperature gradient exceeds a finite threshold value (whereas the thermodynamic constraints allow instability for any value). We find that the simulation growth rates and the diffusivities estimated from them do decrease for increasing elongation, due to finite Larmor radius effects (which do not explicitly appear in the thermodynamic constraints). Compared with the experimentally inferred diffusivities, the simulation diffusivities are similar near the edge but are 10 times bigger in the core. However, a small adjustment in the temperature profile, within experimental and theoretical uncertainties, would produce good agreement everywhere. Therefore, we suggest that for the DIIID experiments studied, the plasma is actually very close to the ITG instability threshold in the core and farther away from threshold near the edge, but not far enough to induce the full thermodynamic level of diffusivities. This conjecture is supported by model transport calculations that reproduce the experimental diffusivity profile fairly well.

  10. Atomic physics effects on dissipative toroidal drift wave stability

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M.A.; Hahm, T.S.

    1992-02-01

    The effects of atomic physics processes such as ionization, charge exchange, and radiation on the linear stability of dissipative drift waves are investigated in toroidal geometry both numerically and analytically. For typical TFTR and TEXT edge parameters, overall linear stability is determined by the competition between the destabilizing influence of ionization and the stabilizing effect due to the electron temperature gradient. An analytical expression for the linear marginal stability condition, {eta}{sub e}{sup crit}, is derived. The instability is most likely to occur at the extreme edge of tokamaks with a significant ionization source and a steep electron density gradient.

  11. Large-scale drift and Rossby wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, K. L.; Nazarenko, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    We study drift/Rossby wave turbulence described by the large-scale limit of the Charney–Hasegawa–Mima equation. We define the zonal and meridional regions as Z:= \\{{k} :| {k}y| \\gt \\sqrt{3}{k}x\\} and M:= \\{{k} :| {k}y| \\lt \\sqrt{3}{k}x\\} respectively, where {k}=({k}x,{k}y) is in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field such that k x is along the isopycnals and k y is along the plasma density gradient. We prove that the only types of resonant triads allowed are M≤ftrightarrow M+Z and Z≤ftrightarrow Z+Z. Therefore, if the spectrum of weak large-scale drift/Rossby turbulence is initially in Z it will remain in Z indefinitely. We present a generalised Fjørtoft’s argument to find transfer directions for the quadratic invariants in the two-dimensional {k}-space. Using direct numerical simulations, we test and confirm our theoretical predictions for weak large-scale drift/Rossby turbulence, and establish qualitative differences with cases when turbulence is strong. We demonstrate that the qualitative features of the large-scale limit survive when the typical turbulent scale is only moderately greater than the Larmor/Rossby radius.

  12. Dust gravitational drift wave in complex plasma under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Salahshoor, M. Niknam, A. R.

    2014-12-15

    The dispersion relation of electrostatic waves in a complex plasma under gravity is presented. It is assumed that the waves propagate parallel to the external fields. The effects of weak electric field, neutral drag force, and ion drag force are also taken into account. The dispersion relation is numerically examined in an appropriate parameter space in which the gravity plays the dominant role in the dynamics of microparticles. The numerical results show that, in the low pressure complex plasma under gravity, a low frequency drift wave can be developed in the long wavelength limit. The stability state of this wave is switched at a certain critical wavenumber in such a way that the damped mode is transformed into a growing one. Furthermore, the influence of the external fields on the dispersion properties is analyzed. It is shown that the wave instability is essentially due to the electrostatic streaming of plasma particles. It is also found that by increasing the electric field strength, the stability switching occurs at smaller wavenumbers.

  13. Non-linear Paradigm for Drift Wave - Zonal Flow interplay: coherence, chaos and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, Fulvio

    2003-10-01

    Non-linear equations for the slow space-time evolution of the radial drift wave (DW) envelope and zonal flow (ZF) amplitude have been self-consistently derived for a model nonuniform tokamak equilibrium within the coherent 4-wave drift wave-zonal flow modulation interaction model of Chen, Lin and White(chen00). For the sake of simplicity, in this work we assume electrostatic fluctuations; but our formalism is readily extended to electromagnetic fluctuations(chen01). In the local limit, i.e. neglecting equilibrium profile variations, the coherent 4-wave DW-ZF modulation interaction model has successfully demonstrated spontaneous generation of ZFs and non-linear DW/ITG-ZF dynamics in toroidal plasmas(chen00). The present work is an extension of previous analyses to allow both (slow) temporal and spatial variations of the DW/ITG radial envelope; thus, it naturally incorporates the effects of equilibrium variations; i.e., turbulence spreading and size-dependence of the saturated wave intensities and transport coefficients(lin99). This approach makes it possible to treat equilibrium profile variations and non-linear interactions on the same footing, assuming that coupling among different DWs on the shortest non-linear time scale is mediated by ZF only. At this level, the competition between linear drive/damping, DW spreading due to finite linear (and nonlinear) group velocity(lin02,chen02,kim02) and non-linear energy transfer between DWs and ZF, determines the saturation levels of the fluctuating fields. Despite the coherence of the underlying non-linear dynamics at this level, this system exhibits both chaotic behavior and intermittency, depending on system size and proximity to marginal stability(chen02). The present model can be further extended to include longer time-scale physics such as 3-wave interactions and collisionless damping of zonal flows. 9 chen00 Liu Chen, Zhihong Lin and Roscoe White, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3129, (2000). chen01 L. Chen, Z. Lin, R.B. White and

  14. Interactions between Drift-Wave Microturbulence and the Tearing Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S. D.; Brennan, D. P.; Izacard, O.; Holland, C.

    2014-10-01

    Turbulent dynamics are known to be affected by the presence of a magnetic island. The evolution of a magnetic island is also known to be affected by evolving turbulent fields. Capturing this interaction is a challenging computational problem due to the disparate scales involved. Using a Hasegawa-Wakatani model for the small spatial and temporal scale drift-wave microturbulence and coupling it to Ohm's Law for evolving the larger-scale magnetic island we can capture the dynamics of this interaction self-consistently. We have developed a new code, TURBO, to simulate this system using an equilibrium with prescribed turbulent drives and magnetohydrodynamic stability properties. We present progress toward understanding this interaction via comparisons with analytic predictions for a turbulent resistivity and turbulent viscosity. These two transport coefficients are calculated as integrals over the wave spectrum and the scaling with wave number is investigated. An extension to a five-field model including the ion temperature gradient is also presented. Supported in part by US DOE Grant DE-SC0007851

  15. Drift-wave fluctuation in an inviscid tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian-Rong; Mao, Jie-Jian; Tang, Xiao-Yan

    2013-11-01

    In order to describe the characterization of resistive drift-wave fluctuation in a tokamak plasma, a coupled inviscid two-dimensional Hasegawa—Wakatani model is investigated. Two groups of new analytic solutions with and without phase shift between the fluctuant density and the fluctuant potential are obtained by using the special function transformation method. It is demonstrated that the fluctuant potential shares similar spatio—temporal variations with the density. It is found from the solutions without phase shift that the effect of the diffusion and adiabaticity on the fluctuant density is quite complex, and that the fluctuation may be controlled through the adiabaticity and diffusion. By using the typical parameters in the quasi-adiabatic regime in the solutions with phase shift, it is shown that the density gradient becomes larger as the contours become dense toward the plasma edge and the contours have irregular structures, which reveal the nonuniform distribution in the tokamak edge.

  16. Propagations of drift waves in toroidal plasma systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-05-01

    Drift wave patterns in toroidal plasmas are studied. The dispersion relation was simplified to retain both the shear and the toroidal coupling effects. Since the dispersion relation does not depend on the toroidal angle, {phi}, the dispersion is solved in the two- dimensional space made up with minor radius and poloidal angle. The dispersion relation can be reduced into second-order, partial differential equations of a hyperbolic type. The one-dimensional convective mode analysis, which was originated in the 1960's, was extended into the two-dimensional analysis. Depending on the strength of the magnetic shear, one can obtain either the convective or the localized solutions. The results show that the plasma is expected to be unstable for large azimuthal mode number and that the plasma instability tends to be more stabilized for large mass ions. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Drift-wave transport in the velocity shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalem, K. C.; Roberto, M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    Particle drift driven by electrostatic wave fluctuations is numerically computed to describe the transport in a gradient velocity layer at the tokamak plasma edge. We consider an equilibrium plasma in large aspect ratio approximation with E × B flow and specified toroidal plasma velocity, electric field, and magnetic field profiles. A symplectic map, previously derived for infinite coherent time modes, is used to describe the transport dependence on the electric, magnetic, and plasma velocity shears. We also show that resonant perturbations and their correspondent islands in the Poincaré maps are much affected by the toroidal velocity profiles. Moreover, shearless transport barriers, identified by extremum values of the perturbed rotation number profiles of the invariant curves, allow chaotic trajectories trapped into the plasma. We investigate the influence of the toroidal plasma velocity profile on these shearless transport barriers.

  18. Coupling of magnetic electron drift vortex mode with longitudinal perturbations in collision-less and dissipative electron and electron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.

    2015-08-15

    The plasma density non-uniformity gives rise to the coupling of transverse magnetic electron drift vortex (MEDV) mode with the longitudinal perturbations in dissipative and non-dissipative electron plasmas. This coupling produces partially transverse and partially longitudinal low frequency instabilities in classical un-magnetized laser plasmas. The MEDV mode couples with the ion acoustic wave, when the ion dynamics is also included. Both the modes have frequencies of the same order of magnitude and couple to give rise to electromagnetic instabilities in un-magnetized plasmas.

  19. Stability of dust ion acoustic solitary waves in a collisionless unmagnetized nonthermal plasma in presence of isothermal positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardar, Sankirtan; Bandyopadhyay, Anup; Das, K. P.

    2016-07-01

    A three-dimensional KP (Kadomtsev Petviashvili) equation is derived here describing the propagation of weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive dust ion acoustic wave in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions, static negatively charged dust grains, nonthermal electrons, and isothermal positrons. When the coefficient of the nonlinear term of the KP-equation vanishes an appropriate modified KP (MKP) equation describing the propagation of dust ion acoustic wave is derived. Again when the coefficient of the nonlinear term of this MKP equation vanishes, a further modified KP equation is derived. Finally, the stability of the solitary wave solutions of the KP and the different modified KP equations are investigated by the small-k perturbation expansion method of Rowlands and Infeld [J. Plasma Phys. 3, 567 (1969); 8, 105 (1972); 10, 293 (1973); 33, 171 (1985); 41, 139 (1989); Sov. Phys. - JETP 38, 494 (1974)] at the lowest order of k, where k is the wave number of a long-wavelength plane-wave perturbation. The solitary wave solutions of the different evolution equations are found to be stable at this order.

  20. Physical mechanism behind zonal-flow generation in drift-wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Manz, P; Ramisch, M; Stroth, U

    2009-10-16

    The energetic interaction between drift-wave turbulence and zonal flows is studied experimentally in two-dimensional wave number space. The kinetic energy is found to be transferred nonlocally from the drift waves to the zonal flow. This confirms the theoretical prediction that the parametric-modulational instability is the driving mechanism of zonal flows. The physical mechanism of this nonlocal energetic interaction between and zonal flows and turbulent drift-wave eddies in relation to the suppression of turbulent transport is discussed. PMID:19905704

  1. Electrostatic Drift-Wave Instability in Field-Reversed Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Calvin; Fulton, Daniel; Holod, Ihor; Lin, Zhihong; Binderbauer, Michl; Tajima, Toshiki; Schmitz, Lothar

    2015-11-01

    Recent progress in the C-2 advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment [Binderbauer 2015] at Tri Alpha Energy has led to consistently reproducible plasma lifetimes of 5+ ms, ie. transport regimes. To understand the mechanisms, gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations of drift-wave instabilities have been carried out for the FRC [Fulton 2015]. The realistic magnetic geometry is represented in Boozer coordinates in the upgraded gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) [Lin 1998]. Radially local simulations find that, in the FRC core, ion scale modes are stable for realistic pressure gradients while the electron scale modes are unstable. On the other hand, in the scrape-off layer (SOL) outside of the separatrix, both ion and electron scale modes are unstable. These findings and linear instability thresholds found in simulation are consistent with the C-2 experimental measurements of density fluctuations [Schmitz 2015]. Collisional effects and instability drive mechanism will be clarified. Nonlocal and nonlinear simulation results will also be reported. supported by TAE.

  2. Rescaling effects on a low-frequency drift wave in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xin; Liu, Sanqiu

    2015-03-01

    The effect of dust on the low-frequency drift wave in inhomogeneous magnetized dusty plasmas is investigated. It is shown that a low-frequency drift wave can be modeled by the Hasegawa-Mima equation (HME) both in mobile and immobile dusty plasmas, which are dust-modified HME and HME in dusty background, respectively. The former is rescaled significantly by the presence of the dust and the space-time scale greatly increases with the increasing density and mass of dust, while the latter is not rescaled, but an additional driving force appears to drive the drift waves.

  3. Linear study of the nonmodal growth of drift waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Greiner, F.

    2010-06-15

    The main effect of dust on drift wave turbulence is the enhancement of the nonadiabaticity. Previous work found that nonmodal behavior is important in the nonadiabatic regime of the drift wave system. Here, the modal and nonmodal properties of the linear Hasegawa-Wakatani system of dusty plasmas are investigated. The non-normality of the linear evolution operator can lead to enhanced transient growth rates compared to the modal growth rates.

  4. Streamers generation by small-scale drift-Alfvén waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. S.; Yu, M. Y.

    2014-10-15

    Excitation of streamers by modulationally unstable small-scale drift-Alfvén wave (SSDAW) is investigated. It is found that the excitation depends strongly on the propagation direction of the SSDAW, and the ion and electron diamagnetic drift waves are both unstable due to the generation of streamers. It is also shown that zonal flows can be effectively excited by the SSDAW with the propagation direction different from that for streamer excitation.

  5. Drift kinetic Alfvén wave in temperature anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Naim, Hafsa Bashir, M. F.; Murtaza, G.

    2014-03-15

    By using the gyrokinetic theory, the kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) are discussed to emphasize the drift effects through the density inhomogeneity and the temperature anisotropy on their dispersion characteristics. The dependence of stabilization mechanism of the drift-Alfvén wave instability on the temperature anisotropy is highlighted. The estimate of the growth rate and the threshold condition for a wide range of parameters are also discussed.

  6. Collisionless Trapped Electron Mode Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Jianying; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott

    2006-10-01

    Collisionless Trapped Electron Mode (CTEM) turbulence is a likely canidate for explaining anomolous transport in tokamak discharges that have a strong density gradient relative to the ion temperature gradient. Here, CTEM turbulence is investigated using the Gyrokinetic δf GEM code. GEM is electromagnetic, includes full drift-kinetic electrons, generaly axisymmetric equilbria, collisions and minority species. Here, the flux-tube limit is taken and β is so small that the simulations are essentially electrostatic. Linear theory predicts that the instability occurs at √2ɛRLn>1, which agrees very well with the simulation results. With increasing density gradient, it is observed that the most unstable mode transitions from a CTEM to drift wave mode and the short-wavelength modes are most unstable ( 2 > kρi> 1). Nonlinear simulations are underway to address the parametric dependence of particle and energy transport. The importance of zonal flows for CTEM turbulence, is still not well understood and is under investigation. D. R. Ernst et. al., Phys. Plasma 11 (2004) 2637 T. Dannert and F. Jenko, Phys. Plasma 12 (2005) 072309 R. Gatto et. al., Phys. Plasma 13 (2006) 022306 Y. Chen and S. E. Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 189 (2003) 463 Y. Chen ad S.E. Parker, accepted, to appear in J. Comput. Phys. (2006) J. Wesson (1997) Tokamaks, Oxford Science

  7. Drift ion acoustic shock waves in an inhomogeneous two-dimensional quantum magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Karim, S.; Shah, H. A.

    2009-04-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation characteristics of drift ion acoustic waves are investigated in an inhomogeneous quantum plasma with neutrals in the background employing the quantum hydrodynamics (QHD) model. In this regard, a quantum Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burgers (KPB) equation is derived for the first time. It is shown that the ion acoustic wave couples with the drift wave if the parallel motion of ions is taken into account. Discrepancies in the earlier works on drift solitons and shocks in inhomogeneous plasmas are also pointed out and a correct theoretical framework is presented to study the one-dimensional as well as the two-dimensional propagation of shock waves in an inhomogeneous quantum plasma. Furthermore, the solution of KPB equation is presented using the tangent hyperbolic (tanh) method. The variation of the shock profile with the quantum Bohm potential, collision frequency, and ratio of drift to shock velocity in the comoving frame, v{sub *}/u, are also investigated. It is found that increasing the number density and collision frequency enhances the strength of the shock. It is also shown that the fast drift shock (i.e., v{sub *}/u>0) increases, whereas the slow drift shock (i.e., v{sub *}/u<0) decreases the strength of the shock. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to dense astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  8. Nonlinear Drift-Kinetic Equation in the Presence of a Circularly Polarized Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Equations of the single particle motion and nonlinear kinetic equation for plasma in the presence of a circularly polarized wave of arbitrary frequency in the drift approximation are presented. The nonstationarity and inhomogeneity of the plasma-wave system are taken into account.

  9. Nonlinear Drift-Kinetic Equation in the Presence of a Circularly Polarized Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Equations of the single particle motion and nonlinear kinetic equation for plasma in the presence of a circularly polarized wave of arbitrary frequency in the drift approximation are presented. The nonstationarity and inhomogeneity of the plasma-wave system are taken into account. The time dependent part of the ponderomotive force is discussed.

  10. A Computer Simulation Study of Anatomy Induced Drift of Spiral Waves in the Human Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Kharche, Sanjay R.; Biktasheva, Irina V.; Seemann, Gunnar; Zhang, Henggui; Biktashev, Vadim N.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of spiral waves of excitation with atrial anatomy remains unclear. This simulation study isolates the role of atrial anatomical structures on spiral wave spontaneous drift in the human atrium. We implemented realistic and idealised 3D human atria models to investigate the functional impact of anatomical structures on the long-term (∼40 s) behaviour of spiral waves. The drift of a spiral wave was quantified by tracing its tip trajectory, which was correlated to atrial anatomical features. The interaction of spiral waves with the following idealised geometries was investigated: (a) a wedge-like structure with a continuously varying atrial wall thickness; (b) a ridge-like structure with a sudden change in atrial wall thickness; (c) multiple bridge-like structures consisting of a bridge connected to the atrial wall. Spiral waves drifted from thicker to thinner regions and along ridge-like structures. Breakthrough patterns caused by pectinate muscles (PM) bridges were also observed, albeit infrequently. Apparent anchoring close to PM-atrial wall junctions was observed. These observations were similar in both the realistic and the idealised models. We conclude that spatially altering atrial wall thickness is a significant cause of drift of spiral waves. PM bridges cause breakthrough patterns and induce transient anchoring of spiral waves. PMID:26587545

  11. Instability of Drift Waves in Two-Component Solid-State Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgakov, A.A.; Shramkova, O.V.

    2005-09-15

    The instabilities of longitudinal waves in infinite semiconductor plasma containing charge carriers of two types are considered under the assumption that the thermal velocity of electrons slightly exceeds that of holes. The main result of this study is that instability can occur in intrinsic semiconductors if the electron drift velocity is lower than the thermal velocity. Drift wave instabilities are studied in intrinsic semiconductors and semiconductors with identical plasma frequencies of electrons and holes. The influence of dissipation on the instability of these waves is also considered.

  12. Linear and nonlinear coupled drift and ion acoustic waves in collisional pair ion-electron magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mushtaq, A.; Saeed, R.; Haque, Q.

    2011-04-15

    Linear and nonlinear coupled electrostatic drift and ion acoustic waves are studied in inhomogeneous, collisional pair ion-electron plasma. The Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) equation for a medium where both dispersion and dissipation are present is derived. An attempt is made to obtain exact solution of KdVB equation by using modified tanh-coth method for arbitrary velocity of nonlinear drift wave. Another exact solution for KdVB is obtained, which gives a structure of shock wave. Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and Burgers equations are derived in limiting cases with solitary and monotonic shock solutions, respectively. Effects of species density, magnetic field, obliqueness, and the acoustic to drift velocity ratio on the solitary and shock solutions are investigated. The results discussed are useful in understanding of low frequency electrostatic waves at laboratory pair ion plasmas.

  13. Observation of drift compressional waves with a mid-latitude decameter coherent radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelpanov, Maksim; Mager, Pavel; Klimushkin, Dmitriy; Berngardt, Oleg; Mager, Olga

    2016-06-01

    Magnetospheric Pc5 pulsations observed on December 26, 2014 are analyzed. They were recorded in the nightside magnetosphere with a mid-latitude coherent decameter radar located near Ekaterinburg. It registers velocity variations in electric drift of ionospheric plasma caused by ULF waves in the magnetosphere. The westward direction of azimuthal propagation of wave coincides with the direction of magnetic drift of protons. A cross-wavelet analysis reveals that the frequency of oscillations depends on the wave number m, and the correlation between them is 0.90. The frequency increase from 2.5 to 5 mHz was followed by an increase in the absolute value m from 20 to 80. These features of the wave under study testify that it should be classified as a drift compressional mode which is typical for the ULF mode in kinetics. Existence conditions for it are the terminal pressure of plasma and its inhomogeneity across magnetic shells.

  14. Up-gradient particle flux in a drift wave-zonal flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, L.; Tynan, G. R.; Thakur, S. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Brandt, C.

    2015-05-15

    We report a net inward, up-gradient turbulent particle flux in a cylindrical plasma when collisional drift waves generate a sufficiently strong sheared azimuthal flow that drives positive (negative) density fluctuations up (down) the background density gradient, resulting in a steepening of the mean density gradient. The results show the existence of a saturation mechanism for drift-turbulence driven sheared flows that can cause up-gradient particle transport and density profile steepening.

  15. Numerical experiments on the drift wave-zonal flow paradigm for nonlinear saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Holland, C.

    2008-12-15

    This paper confirms that ExB shearing from toroidally symmetric (toroidal mode number n=0) 'radial modes' provides the dominant nonlinear saturation mechanism for drift wave (n{ne}0) turbulence, which in turn nonlinearly drives the modes. In common usage, this is loosely referred to as the 'drift wave-zonal flow paradigm' for nonlinear saturation despite the fact that radial modes have several components distinguished in this paper: a residual or zero mean frequency 'zonal flow' part and an oscillatory 'geodesic acoustic mode' (GAM) part. Linearly, the zonal flows (and GAMs) are weakly damped only by ion-ion collisions, while the GAMs are strongly Landau damped only at low safety factor q. At high q the Hinton-Rosenbluth residual flow from an impulse vanishes and only the weakly damped GAMs remain. With the linear physics and driving rates of the finite-n transport modes unchanged, this paper argues that GAMs are only somewhat less effective than the residual zonal flows in providing the nonlinear saturation, and in some cases ExB shearing from GAMs (or at least the GAM physics) appears to dominate: transport appears to be nearly linear in the GAM frequency. By deleting the drift wave-drift wave nonlinear coupling, it is found that drift wave-radial mode nonlinear coupling triads account for most of the nonlinear saturation. Furthermore, the ExB shear components of the radial modes nonlinearly stabilize the finite-n modes, while the diamagnetic components nonlinearly destabilize them. Finally, from wave number spectral contour plots of the time average nonlinear entropy transfer function (and rates), it is shown that the peak in entropy generation coincides with the peak in transport production, while entropy dissipation (like Landau damping) is spread equally over all n modes (including n=0). Most of these conclusions appear to hold about equally well for all types of drift wave turbulence.

  16. Wave-number spectrum of dissipative drift waves and a transition scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, K.; Gürcan, Ö. D.

    2015-09-01

    We study the steady state spectrum of the Hasegawa-Wakatani (HW) equations that describe drift wave turbulence. Beyond a critical scale kc, which appears as a balance between the nonlinear time and the parallel conduction time, the adiabatic electron response breaks down nonlinearly and an internal energy density spectrum of the form F (k⊥)∝k⊥-3 , associated with the background gradient, is established. More generally a dual power law spectrum, approximately of the form F (k⊥)∝k⊥-3(kc-2+k⊥-2) is obtained, which captures this transition. Using dimensional analysis, an expression of the form kc∝C /κ is derived for the transition scale, where C and κ are normalized parameters of the HW equations signifying the electron adiabaticity and the density gradient, respectively. The results are numerically confirmed using a shell model developed and used for the Hasegawa-Wakatani system.

  17. Numerical studies of electron dynamics in oblique quasi-perpendicular collisionless shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liewer, P. C.; Decyk, V. K.; Dawson, J. M.; Lembege, B.

    1991-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear electron damping of the whistler precursor wave train to low Mach number quasi-perpendicular oblique shocks is studied using a one-dimensional electromagnetic plasma simulation code with particle electrons and ions. In some parameter regimes, electrons are observed to trap along the magnetic field lines in the potential of the whistler precursor wave train. This trapping can lead to significant electron heating in front of the shock for low beta(e). Use of a 64-processor hypercube concurrent computer has enabled long runs using realistic mass ratios in the full particle in-cell code and thus simulate shock parameter regimes and phenomena not previously studied numerically.

  18. Wave-Particle Decorrelation and Transport of Anisotropic Turbulence in Collisionless Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Holod, I.; Chen, L.; Diamond, P. H.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.

    2007-12-31

    Comprehensive analysis of the largest first-principles simulations to date shows that stochastic wave-particle decorrelation is the dominant mechanism responsible for electron heat transport driven by electron temperature gradient turbulence with extended radial streamers. The transport is proportional to the local fluctuation intensity, and phase-space island overlap leads to a diffusive process with a time scale comparable to the wave-particle decorrelation time, determined by the fluctuation spectral width. This kinetic time scale is much shorter than the fluid time scale of eddy mixing.

  19. Solitary fast magnetosonic waves propagating obliquely to the magnetic field in cold collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kichigin, G. N.

    2016-01-01

    Solutions describing solitary fast magnetosonic (FMS) waves (FMS solitons) in cold magnetized plasma are obtained by numerically solving two-fluid hydrodynamic equations. The parameter domain within which steady-state solitary waves can propagate is determined. It is established that the Mach number for rarefaction FMS solitons is always less than unity. The restriction on the propagation velocity leads to the limitation on the amplitudes of the magnetic field components of rarefaction solitons. It is shown that, as the soliton propagates in plasma, the transverse component of its magnetic field rotates and makes a complete turn around the axis along which the soliton propagates.

  20. Modulation of drift-wave envelopes in a nonuniform quantum magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, A. P. E-mail: apmisra@gmail.com

    2014-04-15

    We study the amplitude modulation of low-frequency, long-wavelength electrostatic drift-wave envelopes in a nonuniform quantum magnetoplasma consisting of cold ions and degenerate electrons. The effects of tunneling associated with the quantum Bohm potential and the Fermi pressure for nonrelativistic degenerate electrons, as well as the equilibrium density and magnetic field inhomogeneities are taken into account. Starting from a set of quantum magnetohydrodynamic equations, we derive a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) that governs the dynamics of the modulated quantum drift-wave packets. The NLSE is used to study the modulational instability (MI) of a Stoke's wave train to a small plane wave perturbation. It is shown that the quantum tunneling effect as well as the scale length of inhomogeneity plays crucial roles for the MI of the drift-wave packets. Thus, the latter can propagate in the form of bright and dark envelope solitons or as drift-wave rogons in degenerate dense magnetoplasmas.

  1. Drift Wave Chaos and Turbulence in a LAPTAG Plasma Physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Cami; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Wise, Joe; Birge-Lee, Henry; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Thomas, Sam; Buckley-Bonnano, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    Whenever there is a pressure gradient in a magnetized plasma drift waves occur spontaneously. Drift waves have density and electrical potential fluctuations but no self magnetic field. In our experiment the drift waves form spontaneously in a narrow plasma column. (ne = 5 ×1011 cm3 , Te = 5 eV , B = 200 Gauss, dia = 25 cm , L = 1 . 5 m). As the drift waves grow from noise simple averaging techniques cannot be used to map them out in space and time. The ion saturation current Isat n√{Te} is recorded for an ensemble of 50 shots on a fixed probe located on the density gradient and for a movable probe. The probe signals are not sinusoidal and are filtered to calculate the cross-spectral function CSF = ∫ ∑ nshot Ifix, ωr->1 , tImov , ω (r->1 + δr-> , t + τ) dt , which can be used to extract the temporal and spatially varying wave patterns. The dominant wave at 18 kHz is a rotating spiral with m =2. LAPTAG is a university-high school alliance outreach program, which has been in existence for over 20 years. Work done at the BaPSF and supported by NSF/DOE.

  2. Numerical comparison between a gyrofluid and gyrokinetic model investigating collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, O.; Kleiber, R.; Borchardt, M.; Comisso, L.; Grasso, D.; Hatzky, R.

    2014-06-15

    The first detailed comparison between gyrokinetic and gyrofluid simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection has been carried out. Both the linear and nonlinear evolution of the collisionless tearing mode have been analyzed. In the linear regime, we have found a good agreement between the two approaches over the whole spectrum of linearly unstable wave numbers, both in the drift kinetic limit and for finite ion temperature. Nonlinearly, focusing on the small-Δ′ regime, with Δ′ indicating the standard tearing stability parameter, we have compared relevant observables such as the evolution and saturation of the island width, as well as the island oscillation frequency in the saturated phase. The results are basically the same, with small discrepancies only in the value of the saturated island width for moderately high values of Δ′. Therefore, in the regimes investigated here, the gyrofluid approach can describe the collisionless reconnection process as well as the more complete gyrokinetic model.

  3. A theory of non-local linear drift wave transport

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, S.; Anderson, J.; Weyssow, B.

    2011-06-15

    Transport events in turbulent tokamak plasmas often exhibit non-local or non-diffusive action at a distance features that so far have eluded a conclusive theoretical description. In this paper a theory of non-local transport is investigated through a Fokker-Planck equation with fractional velocity derivatives. A dispersion relation for density gradient driven linear drift modes is derived including the effects of the fractional velocity derivative in the Fokker-Planck equation. It is found that a small deviation (a few percent) from the Maxwellian distribution function alters the dispersion relation such that the growth rates are substantially increased and thereby may cause enhanced levels of transport.

  4. Low-frequency waves in a high-beta collisionless plasma Polarization, compressibility and helicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper considers the linear theory of waves near and below the ion cyclotron frequency in an isothermal electron-ion Vlasov plasma which is isotropic, homogeneous and magnetized. Numerical solutions of the full dispersion equation for the magnetosonic/whistler and Alfven/ion cyclotron modes at beta(i) = 1.0 are presented, and the polarizations, compressibilities, helicities, ion Alfven ratios and ion cross-helicities are exhibited and compared. At sufficiently large beta(i) and theta, the angle of propagation with respect to the magnetic field, the real part of the polarization of the Alfven/ion cyclotron wave changes sign, so that, for such parameters, this mode is no longer left-hand polarized. The Alfven/ion cyclotron mode becomes more compressive as the wavenumber increases, whereas the magnetosonic/whistler becomes more compressive with increasing theta.

  5. Dynamics of vortices and drift waves: a point vortex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoncini, Xavier; Verga, Alberto

    2013-03-01

    The complex interactions of localized vortices with waves are investigated using a model of point vortices in the presence of a transverse or longitudinal wave. This simple model shows a rich dynamical behavior including oscillations of a dipole, splitting and merging of two like-circulation vortices, and chaos. The analytical and numerical results of this model have been found to predict under certain conditions, the behavior of more complex systems, such as the vortices of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation, where the presence of waves strongly affects the evolution of large coherent structures.

  6. Ionospheric vertical plasma drift perturbations due to the quasi 2 day wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Sheng-Yang; Liu, Han-Li; Li, Tao; Dou, Xiankang

    2015-05-01

    The thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics-general circulation model is utilized to study the vertical E × B drift perturbations due to the westward quasi 2 day wave with zonal wave numbers 2 and 3 (W2 and W3). The simulations show that both wind components contribute directly and significantly to the vertical drift, which is not merely confined to low latitudes. The vertical drifts at the equator induced by the total wind perturbations of W2 are comparable with that at middle latitudes, while the vertical drifts from W3 are much stronger at middle latitudes than at the equator. The ion drift perturbations induced by the zonal and meridional wind perturbations of W2 are nearly in-phase with each other, whereas the phase discrepancies of the ion drift induced by the individual wind component of W3 are much larger. This is because the wind perturbations of W2 and W3 have different latitudinal structures and phases, which result in different ionospheric responses through wind dynamo.

  7. Current-Driven Drift Wave Turbulence and Electron Thermal Transport in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Diamond, P. H.; Porkolab, M.

    2009-11-01

    Recent analyses (Y. Lin, M. Porkolab; 2009) have indicated that the ``usual suspects'' for the mechanism of electron thermal transport, such as ITG, ETG, CTEM modes, etc, cannot explain results from modest density, Te>Ti plasmas, in either OH or ECH heating regimes. Interestingly, such plasmas exhibit very large toroidal current drift parameters vd/cs, thus naturally suggesting a re-visitation of current driven drift waves. In this paper, we discuss the linear, quasilinear and non-linear theory of current driven drift waves in tokamaks. Parallel electron velocity scattering, a critical effect beyond the capacity of most, gyrokinetic codes is a major focus of investigations. The coupled transport of current density and heat are considered. Work is ongoing and results will be presented.

  8. A probe array for the investigation of spatio-temporal structures in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Latten, A.; Klinger, T.; Piel, A.; Pierre, T.

    1995-05-01

    A probe array with 64 azimuthally arranged Langmuir probes is presented as a new diagnostic tool for the investigation of drift waves. A parallel data acquisition system provides full spatio-temporal data of azimuthally propagating waves. For both regular and turbulent states of current-driven drift waves, the information provided by such space-time patterns is compared with results obtained from conventional two-point correlation methods. The probe array allows one to directly estimate the time-averaged wave number spectrum. In a turbulent state, the spectrum yields to a power law of {ital S}({ital k}){proportional_to}{ital k}{sup {minus}3.6{plus_minus}0.1}. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  9. Models for electrostatic drift waves with density variations along magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, O. E.; Pécseli, H. L.

    2013-11-01

    Drift waves with vertical magnetic fields in gravitational ionospheres are considered where the unperturbed plasma density is enhanced in a magnetic flux tube. The gravitational field gives rise to an overall decrease of plasma density for increasing altitude. Simple models predict that drift waves with finite vertical wave vector components can increase in amplitude merely due to a conservation of energy density flux of the waves. Field-aligned currents are some of the mechanisms that can give rise to fluctuations that are truly unstable. We suggest a self-consistent generator or "battery" mechanism that in the polar ionospheres can give rise to magnetic field-aligned currents even in the absence of electron precipitation. The free energy here is supplied by steady state electric fields imposed in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field in the collisional lower parts of the ionosphere or by neutral winds that have similar effects.

  10. Route to Drift Wave Chaos and Turbulence in a Bounded Low-{beta} Plasma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, T.; Latten, A.; Piel, A.; Bonhomme, G.; Pierre, T.; Dudok de Wit, T.

    1997-11-01

    The transition scenario from stability to drift wave turbulence is experimentally investigated in a magnetized low-{beta} plasma with cylindrical geometry. It is demonstrated that the temporal dynamics is determined by the interaction and destabilization of spatiotemporal patterns, in particular, traveling waves. The analysis of the temporal and the spatiotemporal data shows that the bifurcations sequence towards weakly developed turbulence follows the Ruelle-Takens scenario. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Plasma diffusion at the magnetopause - The case of lower hybrid drift waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treumann, R. A.; Labelle, J.; Pottelette, R.

    1991-01-01

    The diffusion expected from the quasi-linear theory of the lower hybrid drift instability at the earth's magnetopause is recalculated. The resulting diffusion coefficient is marginally large enough to explain the thickness of the boundary layer under quiet conditions, based on observational upper limits for the wave intensities. Thus, one possible model for the boundary layer could involve equilibrium between the diffusion arising from lower hybrid waves and various loss processes.

  12. Theory on excitations of drift Alfvén waves by energetic particles. I. Variational formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zonca, Fulvio; Chen, Liu

    2014-07-15

    A unified theoretical framework is presented for analyzing various branches of drift Alfvén waves and describing their linear and nonlinear behaviors, covering a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Nonlinear gyrokinetic quasineutrality condition and vorticity equation, derived for drift Alfvén waves excited by energetic particles in fusion plasmas, are cast in integral form, which is generally variational in the linear limit; and the corresponding gyrokinetic energy principle is obtained. Well known forms of the kinetic energy principle are readily recovered from this general formulation. Furthermore, it is possible to demonstrate that the general fishbone like dispersion relation, obtained within the present theoretical framework, provides a unified description of drift Alfvén waves excited by energetic particles as either Alfvén eigenmodes or energetic particle modes. The advantage of the present approach stands in its capability of extracting underlying linear and nonlinear physics as well as spatial and temporal scales of the considered fluctuation spectrum. For these reasons, this unified theoretical framework can help understanding experimental observations as well as numerical simulation and analytic results with different levels of approximation. Examples and applications are given in Paper II [F. Zonca and L. Chen, “Theory on excitations of drift Alfvén waves by energetic particles. II. The general fishbone-like dispersion relation,” Phys. Plasmas 21, 072121 (2014)].

  13. The Use of the Information Wave Function in a Drift Dependent Option Price: A Simple Example

    SciTech Connect

    Haven, Emmanuel

    2009-03-10

    This paper briefly describes how a drift-dependent option price is obtained, following the work of Tan. We briefly argue how the information wave function concept, which has now been used in various financial settings, can be used in this type of option price.

  14. Dust magneto-gravitational drift wave in g×B configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Salahshoor, M. Niknam, A. R.

    2014-11-15

    The dispersion relation of electrostatic waves in a magnetized complex plasma under gravity is presented. It is assumed that the waves propagate perpendicular to the external fields. The effects of weak electric field, neutral drag force, and ion drag force are also taken into account. The dispersion relation is numerically examined in an appropriate parameter space in which the gravity plays the dominant role in the dynamics of magnetized microparticles. The numerical results show that an unstable low frequency drift wave can be developed in the long wavelength limit. This unstable mode is transformed into an aperiodic stationary structure at a cut-off wavenumber. Furthermore, the influence of the external fields on the dispersion properties is analyzed. It is shown that the instability is essentially due to the E×B drift motion of plasma particles. However, in the absence of weak electric field, the g×B drift motion of microparticles can cause the instability in a wide range of wavenumbers. It is also found that by increasing the magnetic field strength, the wave frequency is first increased and then decreased. This behaviour is explained by the existence of an extremum point in the dust magneto-gravitational drift velocity.

  15. Generation of zonal flows by electrostatic drift waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaladze, T. D.; Shad, M.; Tsamalashvili, L. V.

    2010-02-15

    Generation of large-scale zonal flows by comparatively small-scale electrostatic drift waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas is considered. The generation mechanism is based on the parametric excitation of convective cells by finite amplitude drift waves having arbitrary wavelengths (as compared with the ion Larmor radius of plasma ions at the plasma electron temperature). Temperature inhomogeneity of electrons and positrons is taken into account assuming ions to be cold. To describe the generation of zonal flow generalized Hasegawa-Mima equation containing both vector and two scalar (of different nature) nonlinearities is used. A set of coupled equations describing the nonlinear interaction of drift waves and zonal flows is deduced. Explicit expressions for the maximum growth rate as well as for the optimal spatial dimensions of the zonal flows are obtained. Enriched possibilities of zonal flow generation with different growth rates are revealed. The present theory can be used for interpretations of drift wave observations in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  16. The Entropy and Complexity of Drift waves in a LAPTAG Plasma Physics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birge-Lee, Henry; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Thomas, Sam; Buckley-Bonnano, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    Drift waves grow from noise on a density gradient in a narrow (dia = 3 cm, L = 1.5 m) magnetized (Boz = 160G) plasma column. A two-dimensional probe drive measured fluctuations in the plasma column in a plane transverse to the background magnetic field. Correlation techniques determined that the fluctuations were that of electrostatic drift waves. The time series data was used to generate the Bandt-Pompe/Shannon entropy, H, and Jensen-Shannon complexity, CJS. C-H diagrams can be used to tell the difference between deterministic chaos, random noise and stochastic processes and simple waves, which makes it a powerful tool in nonlinear dynamics. The C-H diagram in this experiment, reveal that the combination of drift waves and other background fluctuations is a deterministically chaotic system. The PDF of the time series, the wave spectra the spatial dependence of the entropy wave complexity will be presented. LAPTAG is a university-high school alliance outreach program, which has been in existence for over 20 years. Work done at BaPSF at UCLA and supported by NSF and DOE.

  17. Drift wave model for geomagnetic pulsations in a high. beta. plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, V.L.; Ng, P.H.; Cahill, L.J. Jr.

    1983-07-01

    A dispersion relation for the instability of the coupled drift compressional drift mirror, and shear Alven waves in the magnetospheric plasma is analyzed by numerical method. The analysis is suitable for the storm time plasma conditions in the magnetosphere which usually has gradients in plasma density temperature, magnetic field, and anisotropy in temperature. The effect of high ..beta.. which is characteristic of storm time plasma is included in the model. For a given appropriate set of plasma parameters, and wave parameters of a mode relative wave amplitudes are calculated from the model. A comparison is made of model generated and observed relative wave amplitudes by using two sample wave events observed by Explorer 45 during the August 4--6, 1972, magnetic storm. The quantitative analysis shows good agreement between theory and observations for a gradient-driven Alvenlike instability; however, growth rates are veery small for this mode. The anisotropy-driven drift mirror instability has large growth rates but does not show correlation between theory and observations of relative wave amplitudes.

  18. Ion-Neutral Collisions in the Interstellar Medium: Wave Damping and Elimination of Collisionless Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Spangler, Steven R.; Savage, Allison H.; Redfield, Seth

    2011-09-21

    Most phases of the interstellar medium contain neutral atoms in addition to ions and electrons. This introduces differences in plasma physics processes in those media relative to the solar corona and the solar wind at a heliocentric distance of 1 astronomical unit. In this paper, we consider two well-diagnosed, partially-ionized interstellar plasmas. The first is the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM) which is probably the most extensive phase in terms of volume. The second is the gas of the Local Clouds of the Very Local Interstellar Medium (VLISM). Ion-neutral interactions seem to be important in both media. In the WIM, ion-neutral collisions are relatively rare, but sufficiently frequent to damp magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves (as well as propagating MHD eddies) within less than a parsec of the site of generation. This result raises interesting questions about the sources of turbulence in the WIM. In the case of the VLISM, the ion-neutral collision frequency is higher than that in the WIM, because the hydrogen is partially neutral rather than fully ionized. We present results showing that prominent features of coronal and solar wind turbulence seem to be absent in VLISM turbulence. For example, ion temperature does not depend on ion mass. This difference may be due to ion-neutral collisions, which distribute power from more effectively heated massive ions such as iron to other ion species and neutral atoms.

  19. Ion-Neutral Collisions in the Interstellar Medium: Wave Damping and Elimination of Collisionless Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.; Savage, Allison H.; Redfield, Seth

    2011-09-01

    Most phases of the interstellar medium contain neutral atoms in addition to ions and electrons. This introduces differences in plasma physics processes in those media relative to the solar corona and the solar wind at a heliocentric distance of 1 astronomical unit. In this paper, we consider two well-diagnosed, partially-ionized interstellar plasmas. The first is the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM) which is probably the most extensive phase in terms of volume. The second is the gas of the Local Clouds of the Very Local Interstellar Medium (VLISM). Ion-neutral interactions seem to be important in both media. In the WIM, ion-neutral collisions are relatively rare, but sufficiently frequent to damp magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves (as well as propagating MHD eddies) within less than a parsec of the site of generation. This result raises interesting questions about the sources of turbulence in the WIM. In the case of the VLISM, the ion-neutral collision frequency is higher than that in the WIM, because the hydrogen is partially neutral rather than fully ionized. We present results showing that prominent features of coronal and solar wind turbulence seem to be absent in VLISM turbulence. For example, ion temperature does not depend on ion mass. This difference may be due to ion-neutral collisions, which distribute power from more effectively heated massive ions such as iron to other ion species and neutral atoms.

  20. Truncated Painleve expansion: Tanh-traveling wave solutions and reduction of sine-Poisson equation to a quadrature for stationary and nonstationary three-dimensional collisionless cold plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, R. S.; El-Kalaawy, O. H.

    2006-10-15

    The relativistic nonlinear self-consistent equations for a collisionless cold plasma with stationary ions [R. S. Ibrahim, IMA J. Appl. Math. 68, 523 (2003)] are extended to 3 and 3+1 dimensions. The resulting system of equations is reduced to the sine-Poisson equation. The truncated Painleve expansion and reduction of the partial differential equation to a quadrature problem (RQ method) are described and applied to obtain the traveling wave solutions of the sine-Poisson equation for stationary and nonstationary equations in 3 and 3+1 dimensions describing the charge-density equilibrium configuration model.

  1. The role of coherent vorticity in turbulent transport in resistive drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, W. J. T.; Futatani, S.; Benkadda, S.; Schneider, K.

    2008-07-15

    The coherent vortex extraction method, a wavelet technique for extracting coherent vortices out of turbulent flows, is applied to simulations of resistive drift-wave turbulence in magnetized plasma (Hasegawa-Wakatani system). The aim is to retain only the essential degrees of freedom, responsible for the transport. It is shown that the radial density flux is carried by these coherent modes. In the quasi-hydrodynamic regime, coherent vortices exhibit depletion of the polarization-drift nonlinearity and vorticity strongly dominates strain, in contrast to the quasiadiabatic regime.

  2. The Role of Large Amplitude Upstream Low-frequency Waves in the Generation of Superthermal Ions at a Quasi-parallel Collisionless Shock: Cluster Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mingyu; Hao, Yufei; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Guo, Fan; Wang, Shui

    2015-07-01

    The superthermal ions at a quasi-parallel collisionless shock are considered to be generated during the reformation of the shock. Recently, hybrid simulations of a quasi-parallel shock have shown that during the reformation of a quasi-parallel shock the large-amplitude upstream low-frequency waves can trap the reflected ions at the shock front when they try to move upstream, and then these reflected ions can be accelerated several times to become superthermal ions. In this paper, with the Cluster observations of a quasi-parallel shock event, the relevance between the large-amplitude upstream low-frequency waves and the superthermal ions (about several keV) have been studied. The observations clearly show that the differential energy flux of superthermal ions in the upstream region is modulated by the upstream low-frequency waves, and the maxima of the differential energy flux are usually located between the peaks of these waves (including the shock front and the peak of the upstream wave just in front of the shock front). These superthermal ions are considered to originate from the reflected ions at the shock front, and the modulation is caused due to the trapping of the reflected ions between the upstream waves or the upstream waves and the shock front when these reflected ions try to travel upstream. It verifies the results from hybrid simulations, where the upstream waves play an important role in the generation of superthermal ions in a quasi-parallel shock.

  3. Collisionless Zonal Flow Saturation for Weak Magnetic Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhixin; Wang, Weixing; Diamond, Patrick; Ashourvan, Arash; Tynan, George

    2015-11-01

    The damping of the zonal flow, either collisional or collisionless, plays an important role in regulating the drift wave-zonal flow system, and can affect the transport and confinement. The tertiary instability, e.g., a generalized Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability driven by flow shear, has been suggested theoretically as a possible damping mechanism [Rogers 2000 PRL, Diamond 2005 PPCF]. The sensitivity of the tertiary mode to magnetic shear has not been quantified, especially in weak magnetic shear regimes. In this work, parametric scans using gyrokinetic simulation demonstrate that the zonal electric field energy normalized by the turbulence electric field energy decreases as magnetic shear decreases. With ITG drive artificially eliminated, the time evolution of the zonal structure indicates that the zonal electric field damps more rapidly at weak shear. This suggests larger collisionless zonal flow damping or larger effective turbulent viscosity at weak magnetic shear. The effects of the zonal components of specific variables, e.g., the parallel shear flow and the radial electric field, on tertiary instability, are also studied. Quantitative studies on the magnetic shear scaling of tertiary instability excitation and the collisionless zonal flow saturation are ongoing.

  4. Zonal flow generation and its feedback on turbulence production in drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, Andrey V.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Nazarenko, Sergey V.

    2013-04-01

    Plasma turbulence described by the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations is simulated numerically for different models and values of the adiabaticity parameter C. It is found that for low values of C turbulence remains isotropic, zonal flows are not generated and there is no suppression of the meridional drift waves and particle transport. For high values of C, turbulence evolves towards highly anisotropic states with a dominant contribution of the zonal sector to the kinetic energy. This anisotropic flow leads to a decrease of turbulence production in the meridional sector and limits the particle transport across the mean isopycnal surfaces. This behavior allows to consider the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations a minimal PDE model, which contains the drift-wave/zonal-flow feedback loop mechanism.

  5. Zonal flow generation and its feedback on turbulence production in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, Andrey V.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Nazarenko, Sergey V.

    2013-04-15

    Plasma turbulence described by the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations is simulated numerically for different models and values of the adiabaticity parameter C. It is found that for low values of C turbulence remains isotropic, zonal flows are not generated and there is no suppression of the meridional drift waves and particle transport. For high values of C, turbulence evolves towards highly anisotropic states with a dominant contribution of the zonal sector to the kinetic energy. This anisotropic flow leads to a decrease of turbulence production in the meridional sector and limits the particle transport across the mean isopycnal surfaces. This behavior allows to consider the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations a minimal PDE model, which contains the drift-wave/zonal-flow feedback loop mechanism.

  6. A link between nonlinear self-organization and dissipation in drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Stroth, U.; Ramisch, M.

    2012-08-15

    Structure formation and self-organization in two-dimensional drift-wave turbulence show up in many different faces. Fluctuation data from a magnetized plasma are analyzed and three mechanisms transferring kinetic energy to large-scale structures are identified. Beside the common vortex merger, clustering of vortices constituting a large-scale strain field and vortex thinning, where due to the interactions of vortices of different scales larger vortices are amplified by the smaller ones, are observed. The vortex thinning mechanism appears to be the most efficient one to generate large scale structures in drift-wave turbulence. Vortex merging as well as vortex clustering are accompanied by strong energy transfer to small-scale noncoherent fluctuations (dissipation) balancing the negative entropy generation due to the self-organization process.

  7. Shear flow driven drift waves and the counter-rotating vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Saleem, H.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2005-10-01

    It is shown that the drift waves can become unstable due to the shear flow produced by externally applied electric field. The modified Rayleigh instability condition is obtained which is applicable to both electron-ion and electron-positron-ion plasmas. It is proposed that the shear flow driven drift waves can be responsible for large amplitude electrostatic fluctuations in tokamak edges. In the nonlinear regime the stationary structures may appear in electron-positron-ion plasmas as well as electron-ion plasmas. A particular form of the shear flow can give rise to counter-rotating dipole vortices and vortex chains. The speed and amplitude of the structures are affected by the presence of positrons in the electron ion plasma. The relevance of this investigation to laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is pointed out.

  8. Spatiotemporal control and synchronization of flute modes and drift waves in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Brochard, F.; Bonhomme, G.; Gravier, E.; Oldenbuerger, S.; Philipp, M.

    2006-05-15

    An open-loop spatiotemporal synchronization method is applied to flute modes in a cylindrical magnetized plasma. It is demonstrated that synchronization can be achieved only if the exciter signal rotates in the same direction as the propagating mode. Moreover, the efficiency of the synchronization is shown to depend on the radial properties of the instability under consideration. It is also demonstrated that the control disposition can alternatively be used to produce strongly developed turbulence of drift waves or flute instabilities.

  9. Observation of Quasi-Two-Dimensional Nonlinear Interactions in a Drift-Wave Streamer

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.; Inagaki, S.; Kamataki, K.; Yagi, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Kasuya, N.; Itoh, K.; Arakawa, H.; Kobayashi, T.

    2010-11-26

    A streamer, which is a bunching of drift-wave fluctuations, and its mediator, which generates the streamer by coupling with other fluctuations, have been observed in a cylindrical magnetized plasma. Their radial structures were investigated in detail by using the biphase analysis. Their quasi-two-dimensional structures were revealed to be equivalent with a pair of fast and slow modes predicted by a nonlinear Schroedinger equation based on the Hasegawa-Mima model.

  10. An analysis of the role of drift waves in equatorial spread F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labelle, J.; Kelley, M. C.; Seyler, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of results of rocket measurements of the wave number spectrum of equatorial spread F irregularities, with emphasis on wavelengths less than 100 m. The measurements were made from two sounding rockets launched from Peru as part of Project Condor. The Condor density fluctuation spectra display a break at a wavelength near 100 m, identical to that found in the PLUMEX experiment (Kelley et al., 1982). The Condor data also confirm a subrange in which the density and the wave potential obey the Boltzmann relation - a strong indication of the presence of low-frequency electrostatic waves with finite wavelength parallel to the magnetic field, perhaps low-frequency drift waves as proposed by Kelley et al. The Condor data are also consistent with the previous conjecture that drift waves only exist above 300 km altitude. To investigate the difference in spectra observed over two altitude ranges, the data must be fitted to a form for the power spectrum taken from Keskinen and Ossakow (1981). The fitted spectrum, along with empirically determined growth and dissipation rates, is used to calculate the energy pumped into the spectrum at long wavelengths as well as the energy dissipated at shorter wavelengths. It is found that the energy is balanced by classical collisional effects in the low-altitude case, but energy balance in the high-altitude case requires an enhanced dissipation of about 500 times that due to classical diffusion. The model is consistent with, but does not uniquely imply, an inverse cascade of drift wave turbulence in equatorial spread F.

  11. Anatomy of Drift Ridges Revealed by Shallow Seismic Shear Wave Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, A. C.

    2005-12-01

    Ridges, up to 30 m high and generally oriented NE-SW across the Illinois Episode drift plain in southern Illinois, USA, have been variously interpreted as eskers, crevasse fills, moraines, and kames. The ice contact diamictons and sorted sediments that occur in these ridges are typically Illinois Episode in age and likely record the final melting of the Laurentide Ice Sheet near its southernmost extent in the continental U.S. Shallow shear wave seismic profiles across several of these ridges help reveal their complex origins. Borehole control includes sediment cores with shear wave and natural gamma logs. The shear wave profiles reveal m-scale features of drift and bedrock over a depth range of 1 up to 100 m. Terrapin Ridge overlies a bedrock valley with drift up to 70 m thick. Dipping seismic reflectors on the stoss side are interpreted as imbricated till sheets, whereas horizontal reflectors on the lee side are interpreted as mainly outwash sediments over basal till and glacilacustrine sediment. Although most ridges were probably formed during the Illinois Episode, based on current data, the core of this particular ridge may be a remnant moraine from a pre-Illinois Episode glaciation.

  12. Observation of anomalous ion heating by broadband drift-wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Enge, S; Birkenmeier, G; Manz, P; Ramisch, M; Stroth, U

    2010-10-22

    Using laser induced fluorescence and passive spectroscopy on a magnetically confined low-temperature plasma, anomalous ion heating is observed which exceeds collisional heating from the electrons by a factor of up to five. Direct wave heating due to the 2.45 GHz microwave as well as stochastic heating by large-amplitude fluctuations could be ruled out as explanations. Good quantitative agreement is found when comparing the missing power in the ion species with heating power due to the dissipation of drift-wave turbulence. This turbulent energy transfer into the ion channel could have important consequences for the interpretation of transport in fusion plasmas. PMID:21231054

  13. Integrated Study of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Collisional Drift Wave Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    George R. Tynan

    2012-04-24

    An existing linear magnetized plasma device, the Controlled Shear Decorrelation experiment (CSDX) was used to study the transition from a state of coherent wave like activity to a state of turbulent activity using the magnetic field and thus magnetization of the plasma as the control parameter. The results show the onset of coherent drift waves consistent with linear stability analysis. As the magnetization is raised, at first multiple harmonics appear, consistent with wave steepening. This period is then followed by the beginning of nonlinear interactions between different wave modes, which then results in the formation of narrow frequency but distributed azimuthal wave number fluctuations that are consistent with the formation of long-lived coherent nonlinear structures within the plasmas. These structures, termed quasicoherent modes, persist as the magnetic field is raised. Measurements of turbulent momentum flux indicate that the plasma is also forming an azimuthally symmetric radially sheared fluid flow that is nonlinearly driven by smaller scaled turbulent fluctuations. Further increases in the magnetic field result in the breakup of the quasicoherent mode, and the clear formation of the sheared flow. Numerical simulations of the experiment reproduce the formation of the sheared flow via a vortex merging process, and confirm that the experiment is providing the first clear experimental evidence of the formation of sheared zonal flows from drift turbulent fluctuations in a magnetized plasma.

  14. Generation of laser plasma bunches with a high efficiency of energy concentration for laboratory simulation of collisionless shock waves in magnetised cosmic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Yu P.; Ponomarenko, A. G.; Tishchenko, V. N.; Antonov, V. M.; Melekhov, A. V.; Posukh, V. G.; Prokopov, P. A.; Terekhin, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of first experiments on the formation of collisionless shock waves (CSWs) in background plasma by injecting laser plasma bunches transverse to the magnetic field (as a piston) with a maximum energy up to 100 J per unit of solid angle and with a high enough degree of ion magnetisation. With this aim in view, on a unique KI-1 facility at the Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ILP), a plastic (polyethylene) target irradiated by a CO2 laser in the most energy-efficient regime (near the plasma formation threshold) and a highly ionised hydrogen plasma with a high concentration in a large volume (not less than 1 m3) have been employed. As a result of model experiments performed on the basis of a model of collisionless interaction of plasma flows, developed at the VNIIEF and being adequate to the problem under consideration, not only an intensive, background-induced, deceleration of a super-Alfven laser plasma flow, but also the formation in that flow of a strong perturbation having the properties of a subcritical CSW and propagating transverse to the magnetic field, have been first registered in the laboratory conditions.

  15. Coupled nonlinear drift and ion acoustic waves in dense dissipative electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Karim, S.; Shah, H. A.

    2009-11-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation characteristics of drift ion acoustic waves are investigated in an inhomogeneous electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) quantum magnetoplasma with neutrals in the background using the well known quantum hydrodynamic model. In this regard, Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) and Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burgers (KPB) equations are obtained. Furthermore, the solutions of KdVB and KPB equations are presented by using the tangent hyperbolic (tanh) method. The variation in the shock profile with the quantum Bohm potential, collision frequency, and the ratio of drift to shock velocity in the comoving frame, v{sub *}/u, is also investigated. It is found that increasing the positron concentration and collision frequency decreases the strength of the shock. It is also shown that when the localized structure propagates with velocity greater than the diamagnetic drift velocity (i.e., u>v{sub *}), the shock strength decreases. However, the shock strength is observed to increase when the localized structure propagates with velocity less than that of drift velocity (i.e., u

  16. On the onset of surface wind drift at short fetches as observed in a wind wave flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert; Osuna, Pedro; Robles, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    Ocean surface drift is of great relevance to properly model wind waves and specially the early stages of surface waves development and ocean-atmosphere fluxes during incipient wind events and storms. In particular, wave models are not so accurate predicting wave behaviour at short fetches, where wind drift onset might be very important. The onset of surface drift induced by wind and waves is being studied through detailed laboratory measurements in a large wind-wave flume. Wind stress over the water surface, waves and surface drift are measured in the 40m long wind-wave tank at IRPHE, Marseille. While momentum fluxes are estimated directly through the eddy correlation method in a station about the middle of the tank, they provide reference information to the corresponding surface drift onset recorded at rather short non-dimensional fetches. At each experimental run very low wind was on (about 1m/s) for a certain period and suddenly it was constantly accelerated to reach about 13 m/s (as well as 8 and 5 m/s during different runs) in about 15 sec to as long as 600 sec. The wind was kept constant at that high speed for 2 to 10 min, and then suddenly and constantly decelerate to 0. Surface drift values were up to 0.5 cm/s for the highest wind while very distinctive shear was detected in the upper 1.5 cm. Rather linear variation of surface drift was observed with depth. Evolution of the surface drift velocity is analysed and onset behaviour is addressed with particular emphasis in accelerated winds. This work represents a RugDiSMar Project (CONACYT 155793) contribution. The support from ANUIES-ECOS M09-U01 project, CONACYT-187112 Estancia Sabática, and Institute Carnot, is greatly acknowledged.

  17. Electrostatic drift waves in a 2D magnetic current sheet - a new kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, G.; Louarn, P.; Tur, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of the magnetotail before a substorm, a kinetic model for electromagnetic instabilities in resonant interaction with trapped bouncing electrons has been proposed for several years. Fruit et al. 2013 already used it to investigate the possibilities for electrostatic instabilities. Tur et al. 2014 generalizes the model for full electromagnetic perturbations.It turns out that some corrections should be added to the electrostatic version of Fruit et al. 2013. We propose to revist the theory in this present paper.Starting with a modified 2D Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electrostatic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period (a few seconds). The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electrostatic modes is finally obtained through the quasineutrality condition.The new feature of the present model is the inclusion of diamagnetic drift effects due to the density gradient in the tail. It is well known in MHD theory that drift waves are driven unstable through collisions or other dissipative effects. Here electrostatic drift waves are revisited in this more complete kinetic model including bouncing electrons and finite Larmor radius effects. A new mode has been found with original propagation proprieties. It is moreover mildly unstable due to electron or ion damping (dissipative instability).

  18. Transition from flute modes to drift waves in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Brochard, F.; Gravier, E.; Bonhomme, G.

    2005-06-15

    Recent experiments performed on the low {beta} plasma device Mirabelle [T. Pierre, G. Leclert, and F. Braun, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 58, 6 (1987)] using a limiter have shown that transitions between various gradient driven instabilities occurred on increasing the magnetic field strength. New thorough measurements allow to identify unambiguously three instability regimes. At low magnetic field the strong ExB velocity shear drives a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, whereas at high magnetic field drift waves are only observed. A centrifugal (Rayleigh-Taylor) instability is also observed in between when the ExB velocity is shearless and strong enough. A close connection is made between the ratio {rho}{sub s}/L{sub perpendicular} of the drift parameter to the radial density gradient length and each instability regime.

  19. Effects of water depth and spectral bandwidth on Stokes drift estimation based on short-term variation of wave conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrhaug, Dag; Wang, Hong; Holmedal, Lars Erik

    2016-04-01

    The Stokes drift represents an important transport component of ocean circulation models. Locally it is responsible for transport of e.g. contaminated ballast water from ships, oil spills, plankton and larvae. It also plays an important role in mixing processes across the interphase between the atmosphere and the ocean. The Stokes drift is the mean Lagrangian velocity obtained from the water particle trajectory in the wave propagation direction; it is maximum at the surface, decreasing rapidly with the depth below the surface. The total mean mass transport is obtained by integrating the Stokes drift over the water depth; this is also referred to as the volume Stokes transport. The paper provides a simple analytical method which can be used to give estimates of the Stokes drift in moderate intermediate water depth based on short-term variation of wave conditions. This is achieved by using a joint distribution of individual wave heights and wave periods together with an explicit solution of the wave dispersion equation. The mean values of the surface Stokes drift and the volume Stokes transport for individual random waves within a sea state are presented, and the effects of water depth and spectral bandwidth parameter are discussed. Furthermore, example of results corresponding to typical field conditions are presented to demonstrate the application of the method, including the Stokes drift profile in the water column beneath the surface. Thus, the present analytical method can be used to estimate the Stokes drift in moderate intermediate water depth for random waves within a sea state based on available wave statistics.

  20. Anomalous perturbative transport in tokamaks due to drift-Alfven-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Thoul, A.A. ); Similon, P.L. ); Sudan, R.N. )

    1994-03-01

    The method developed in Thoul, Similon, and Sudan [Phys. Plasmas [bold 1], 579 (1994)] is used to calculate the transport due to drift-Alfven-wave turbulence, in which electromagnetic effects such as the fluttering of the magnetic field lines are important. Explicit expressions are obtained for all coefficients of the anomalous transport matrix relating particle and heat fluxes to density and temperature gradients in the plasma. Although the magnetic terms leave the transport by trapped electrons unaffected, they are important for the transport by circulating electrons.

  1. Collisional Behaviors of Astrophysical Collisionless Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bret, A.

    2015-12-01

    In collisional fluids, a number of key processes rely on the frequency of binary collisions. Collisions seem necessary to generate a shock wave when two fluids collide fast enough, to fulfill the Rankine-Hugoniot (RH) relations, to establish an equation of state or a Maxwellian distribution. Yet, these seemingly collisional features are routinely either observed or assumed, in relation with collisionless astrophysical plasmas. This article will review our current answers to the following questions: How do colliding collisionless plasmas end-up generating a shock as if they were fluids? To which extent are the RH relations fulfilled in this case? Do collisionless shocks propagate like fluid ones? Can we use an equation of state to describe collisionless plasmas, like MHD codes for astrophysics do? Why are Maxwellian distributions ubiquitous in particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless shocks? Time and length scales defining the border between the collisional and the collisionless behavior will be given when relevant. In general, when the time and length scales involved in the collisionless processes responsible for the fluid-like behavior may be neglected, the system may be treated like a fluid.

  2. Possible inverse cascade behavior for drift-wave turbulence. [in plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fyfe, D.; Montgomery, D.

    1979-01-01

    The turbulent spectral properties of the dynamical equation of Hasegawa and Mima (1978) governing the evolution of the electrostatic potential in drift-wave turbulence is investigated for two formulations of the problem: (1) as a nondissipative initial value problem, with the potential represented by a truncated Fourier series with large number of terms, and (2) as a dissipative problem with a small viscous dissipation at very short spatial scales, and a long wavelength forcing term at longer wavelengths. It is found that Hasegawa and Mima's prediction for the nondissipative, truncated initial value modal problem is accurate, but substantial differences exist for the forced dissipative case between computer results and analytical predictions based on a wave kinetic equation of Kadomtsev. Much better agreement is found with a simple dual-cascade model based on Kraichnan's generalization of Kolmogorov's cascade arguments.

  3. Spatial localization of resistive drift wave structure in tokamak edge plasmas with an embedded magnetic island

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shilin; Qu, Hongpeng; Li, Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.

    2014-10-15

    Resistive drift wave instability is investigated numerically in tokamak edge plasma confined by sheared slab magnetic field geometry with an embedded magnetic island. The focus is on the structural characteristics of eigenmode inside the island, where the density profile tends to be flattened. A transition of the dominant eigenmode occurs around a critical island width w{sub c}. For thin islands with a width below w{sub c}, two global long wavelength eigenmodes with approximately the same growth rate but different eigenfrequency are excited, which are stabilized by the magnetic island through two-dimensional mode coupling in both x and y (corresponding to radial and poloidal in tokamak) directions. On the other hand, a short wavelength eigenmode, which is destabilized by thick islands with a width above w{sub c}, dominates the edge fluctuation, showing a prominent structural localization in the region between the X-point and the O-point of the magnetic island. The main destabilization mechanism is identified as the mode coupling in the y direction, which is similar to the so-called toroidal coupling in tokamak plasmas. These three eigenmodes may coexist in the drift wave fluctuation for the island with a width around w{sub c}. It is demonstrated that the structural localization results mainly from the quasilinear flattening of density profile inside the magnetic island.

  4. Effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on secondary structures in drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, M.; Diamond, P. H.

    2011-08-15

    Recent experiments showed a decrease of long range correlations during the application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) [Y. Xu et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 063020 (2011)]. This finding suggests that RMPs damp zonal flows. To elucidate the effect of the RMPs on zonal structures in drift wave turbulence, we construct a generalized Hasegawa-Wakatani model including RMP fields. The effect of the RMPs is to induce a linear coupling between the zonal electric field and the zonal density gradient, which drives the system to a state of electron radial force balance for large RMP amplitude. A predator-prey model coupling the primary drift wave dynamics to the zonal modes evolution is derived. This model has both turbulence drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. The novel regime has a power threshold which increases with RMP amplitude as {gamma}{sub c}{approx}[({delta}B{sub r}/B)]{sup 2}.

  5. Simulating the coupled evolution of drift-wave turbulence and the tearing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S. D.; Brennan, D. P.; Izacard, O.; Holland, C.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations of turbulence and MHD instabilities such as the tearing mode can be computationally expensive and only recently have simulations begun to address their coupled, self-consistent interactions. The disparate scales involved in simulating the coupled evolution of small-scale turbulence and the larger-scale tearing mode make this a challenging numerical problem. Using the newly developed code, TURBO, we have performed nonlinear simulations of Hasegawa-Wakatani drift-wave turbulence coupled to Ohm's law. An equilibrium with prescribed stability properties and turbulent drives is used to examine the impact of drift-wave turbulence on the stability of the tearing mode and the energy transport between them in the context of a turbulent resistivity and turbulent viscosity. We find that the spatial structure of the density flux and these transport coefficients are asymmetric in the poloidal direction and peaked away from the X-point in the presence of an island in a poloidal flow. Similar effects are seen in simulations of ITG turbulence in the presence of a magnetic island and we discuss the connections to our work. Supported by US DOE Grant DE-SC0007851.

  6. Spontaneous profile self-organization in a simple realization of drift-wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, L.; Ashourvan, A.; Thakur, S. C.; Hong, R.; Diamond, P. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-05-01

    We report the observation of a transport bifurcation that occurs by spontaneous self-organization of a drift-wave and shear flow system in a linear plasma device. As we increase the magnetic field above a threshold ( BC r = 1200 G), a global transition occurs, with steepening of mean density and ion pressure profiles, onset of strong E ×B shearing, a reduction of turbulence, and improved turbulent radial particle transport. An abrupt transition appears in the graph of turbulent particle flux versus density gradient. Hysteresis in the density gradient further confirms this transport bifurcation. The total Reynolds work on the flow sharply increases above threshold. This correlates with the increase of density steepness, which suggests the Reynolds stress-driven flow that plays an essential role in density steepening and transport bifurcation. A change in turbulence feature from drift waves (DWs) to a mix of DWs and ion temperature gradients also coincides with the transport bifurcation. Interesting phenomena related to the transport bifurcation are also reported; a local inward particle flux, the co-existence of ion and electron features, and a self-sustained axial flow absent momentum input.

  7. Nonlinear mode coupling theory of the lower-hybrid-drift instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, J. F.; Guzdar, P. N.; Hassam, A. B.; Huba, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A nonlinear mode coupling theory of the lower-hybrid-drift instability is presented. A two-dimensional nonlinear wave equation is derived which describes lower-hybrid drift wave turbulence in the plane transverse to B (k.B = 0), and which is valid for finite beta, collisional and collisionless plasmas. The instability saturates by transferring energy from growing, long wavelength modes to damped, short wavelength modes. Detailed numerical results are presented which compare favorably to both recent computer simulations and experimental observations. Applications of this theory to space plasmas, the earth's magnetotail and the equatorial F region ionosphere, are discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N84-17734

  8. Resolving Structural Isomers of Monosaccharide Methyl Glycosides Using Drift Tube and Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongli; Giles, Kevin; Bendiak, Brad; Kaplan, Kimberly; Siems, William F.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2013-01-01

    Monosaccharide structural isomers including sixteen methyl-D-glycopyranosides and four methyl-N-acetylhexosamines were subjected to ion mobility measurements by electrospray ion mobility mass spectrometry. Two ion mobility-MS systems were employed: atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry and a Synapt G2 HDMS system which incorporates a low pressure traveling wave ion mobility separator. All the compounds were investigated as [M+Na]+ ions in the positive mode. A majority of the monosaccharide structural isomers exhibited different mobility drift times in either system, depending on differences in their anomeric and stereochemical configurations. In general, drift time patterns (relative drift times of isomers) matched between the two instruments. Higher resolving power was observed using the atmospheric pressure drift tube. Collision cross section values of monosaccharide structural isomers were directly calculated from the atmospheric pressure ion mobility experiments and a collision cross section calibration curve was made for the traveling wave ion mobility instrument. Overall, it was demonstrated that ion mobility-mass spectrometry using either drift tube or traveling wave ion mobility is a valuable technique for resolving subtle variations in stereochemistry among the sodium adducts of monosaccharide methyl glycosides. PMID:22339760

  9. Kinetic water-bag model of global collisional drift waves and ion temperature gradient instabilities in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gravier, E.; Plaut, E.

    2013-04-15

    Collisional drift waves and ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities are studied using a linear water-bag kinetic model [P. Morel et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 112109 (2007)]. An efficient spectral method, already validated in the case of drift waves instabilities [E. Gravier et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 67, 7 (2013)], allows a fast solving of the global linear problem in cylindrical geometry. The comparison between the linear ITG instability properties thus computed and the ones given by the COLUMBIA experiment [R. G. Greaves et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 34, 1253 (1992)] shows a qualitative agreement. Moreover, the transition between collisional drift waves and ITG instabilities is studied theoretically as a function of the ion temperature profile.

  10. Reduction effect of neutral density on the excitation of turbulent drift waves in a linear magnetized plasma with flow

    SciTech Connect

    Saitou, Y.; Yonesu, A.; Shinohara, S.; Ignatenko, M. V.; Kasuya, N.; Kawaguchi, M.; Terasaka, K.; Nishijima, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Kawai, Y.; Yagi, M.; Itoh, S.-I.; Azumi, M.; Itoh, K.

    2007-07-15

    The importance of reducing the neutral density to reach strong drift wave turbulence is clarified from the results of the extended magnetohydrodynamics and Monte Carlo simulations in a linear magnetized plasma. An upper bound of the neutral density relating to the ion-neutral collision frequency for the excitation of drift wave instability is shown, and the necessary flow velocity to excite this instability is also estimated from the neutral distributions. Measurements of the Mach number and the electron density distributions using Mach probe in the large mirror device (LMD) of Kyushu University [S. Shinohara et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 37, 1015 (1995)] are reported as well. The obtained results show a controllability of the neutral density and provide the basis for neutral density reduction and a possibility to excite strong drift wave turbulence in the LMD.

  11. Fast and Ultra-fast Kelvin wave modulations of the equatorial evening F region vertical drift and spread F development.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett Marques Brum, C.; Abdu, M. A.; Batista, P. P.; Gurubaran, S.; Pancheva, D.; Bageston, J. V.; Batista, I. S.; Takahashi, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the role of eastward and upward propagating Fast (FK) and Ultrafast Kelvin (UFK) waves in the day-to-day variability of equatorial evening prereversal vertical drift and post sunset generation of spread F/plasma bubbles irregularities. Meteor wind data from Cariri and Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil) and medium Frequency (MF) radar wind data from Tirunelveli (India) are analyzed together with TIMED/SABER temperature in the 40 km - 100 km region to characterize the zonal and vertical propagations of these waves. Also analyzed are the F region evening vertical drift and spread F (ESF) development features as diagnosed by Digisondes operated at Fortaleza and Sao Luis in Brazil. The SABER temperature data permitted determination of the upward propagation characteristics of the FK (E1) waves with propagation speed in the range of 4 km/day. The radar Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) winds in the widely separated longitude sectors have yielded the eastward phase velocity of the both the FK and UFK waves. The vertical propagation of these waves cause strong oscillation in the F region evening prereversal vertical drift, observed for the first time at both FK and UFK periodicities. A delay of a few (~10) days is observed in the F region vertical drift perturbation with respect to the corresponding FK/UFK zonal wind oscillations, or temperature oscillations in the MLT region, which has permitted a direct identification of the sunset electro dynamic coupling process as responsible for the generation of the FK/UFK induced vertical drift oscillation. The vertical drift oscillations are found to cause significant modulation in the spread F/ plasma bubble irregularity development. The overall results highlight the role of FK/UFK waves in the day-to-day variability of the ESF in its occurrence season.

  12. Fast and ultrafast Kelvin wave modulations of the equatorial evening F region vertical drift and spread F development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil A.; Brum, Christiano GM; Batista, Paulo P.; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Pancheva, Dora; Bageston, Jose V.; Batista, Inez S.; Takahashi, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the role of eastward and upward propagating fast (FK) and ultrafast Kelvin (UFK) waves in the day-to-day variability of equatorial evening prereversal vertical drift and post sunset generation of spread F/plasma bubble irregularities. Meteor wind data from Cariri and Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil) and medium frequency (MF) radar wind data from Tirunelveli (India) are analyzed together with Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (TIMED/SABER) temperature in the 40- to 100-km region to characterize the zonal and vertical propagations of these waves. Also analyzed are the F region evening vertical drift and spread F (ESF) development features as diagnosed by Digisonde (Lowell Digisonde International, LLC, Lowell, MA, USA) operated at Fortaleza and Sao Luis in Brazil. The SABER temperature data permitted determination of the upward propagation characteristics of the FK (E1) waves with propagation speed in the range of 4 km/day. The radar mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) winds in the widely separated longitude sectors have yielded the eastward phase velocity of both the FK and UFK waves. The vertical propagation of these waves cause strong oscillation in the F region evening prereversal vertical drift, observed for the first time at both FK and UFK periodicities. A delay of a few (approximately 10) days is observed in the F region vertical drift perturbation with respect to the corresponding FK/UFK zonal wind oscillations, or temperature oscillations in the MLT region, which has permitted a direct identification of the sunset electrodynamic coupling process as being responsible for the generation of the FK/UFK-induced vertical drift oscillation. The vertical drift oscillations are found to cause significant modulation in the spread F/plasma bubble irregularity development. The overall results highlight the role of FK/UFK waves in the day

  13. Seismic architecture and morphology of Neogenic sediment waves and drifts, offshore West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglioni, Luca; Bonamini, Enrico

    2013-04-01

    The three dimension visualisation softwares of seismic data and the recent development of semi-automatic interpretation tools allow to define the 3D morphology of ancient depositional systems at a resolution never achieved before. This study analyses a Neogenic stratigraphic interval in the deep water of the West African margin. The purpose of the work is the understanding of the sedimentary architectures and the link with the genetic depositional processes. The study is mainly based on the interpretation of seismic geometries and amplitude/isochron maps derived from newly-interpreted seismic horizons. The seismic stratigraphy reveals abrupt changes in depositional styles and sedimentary processes. Transitions between Sediment Drifts (SD), Sediment Waves (SWs) and Mass Transport Complexes (MTCs) are here frequently observed, suggesting that cyclically either bottom-current intensity decreased or gravity-flow input overwhelmed the bottom-current signal. The lower studied interval corresponds to a SD sequence, made up of stacked individual packages and having a maximum thickness of 300 ms. The landward drift morphology is characterized by convex-upward, mounded seismic reflections. Each drift onlaps on a seaward-dipping reflection interpreted as paleo-slope. These contouritic deposits are concentrated near the base of slope, and fade out downdip. The drift appears to be grown from the deeper part of the basin and backstepped up the slope. It is inferred that the deposition of the drifts took place under the influence of a marine current, subparallel to the southern margin of West African coast. The backstepping of the onlapping architecture may have resulted from bottom current acceleration across the ramp. The intermediate studied interval represents a transitional sequence in which SW are alternated with MTDs of minor size (up to 60 ms thick). In this transition interval, onlap relationships and thickness variations suggest that gravity flow deposits preferentially

  14. Drift-Alfven wave mediated particle transport in an elongated density depression

    SciTech Connect

    Vincena, Stephen; Gekelman, Walter

    2006-06-15

    Cross-field particle transport due to drift-Alfven waves is measured in an elongated density depression within an otherwise uniform, magnetized helium plasma column. The depression is formed by drawing an electron current to a biased copper plate with cross-field dimensions of 28x0.24 ion sound-gyroradii {rho}{sub s}=c{sub s}/{omega}{sub ci}. The process of density depletion and replenishment via particle flux repeats in a quasiperiodic fashion for the duration of the current collection. The mode structure of the wave density fluctuations in the plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field is revealed using a two-probe correlation technique. The particle flux as a function of frequency is measured using a linear array of Langmuir probes and the only significant transport occurs for waves with frequencies between 15%-25% of the ion cyclotron frequency (measured in the laboratory frame) and with perpendicular wavelengths k{sub perpendicular}{rho}{sub s}{approx}0.7. The frequency-integrated particle flux is in rough agreement with observed increases in density in the center of the depletion as a function of time. The experiments are carried out in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] at the Basic Plasma Science Facility located at the University of California, Los Angeles.

  15. A flowing plasma model to describe drift waves in a cylindrical helicon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L.; Hole, M. J.; Corr, C. S.

    2011-04-01

    A two-fluid model developed originally to describe wave oscillations in the vacuum arc centrifuge, a cylindrical, rapidly rotating, low temperature, and confined plasma column, is applied to interpret plasma oscillations in a RF generated linear magnetized plasma [WOMBAT (waves on magnetized beams and turbulence)], with similar density and field strength. Compared to typical centrifuge plasmas, WOMBAT plasmas have slower normalized rotation frequency, lower temperature, and lower axial velocity. Despite these differences, the two-fluid model provides a consistent description of the WOMBAT plasma configuration and yields qualitative agreement between measured and predicted wave oscillation frequencies with axial field strength. In addition, the radial profile of the density perturbation predicted by this model is consistent with the data. Parameter scans show that the dispersion curve is sensitive to the axial field strength and the electron temperature, and the dependence of oscillation frequency with electron temperature matches the experiment. These results consolidate earlier claims that the density and floating potential oscillations are a resistive drift mode, driven by the density gradient. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed physics model of flowing plasmas in the diffusion region away from the RF source. Possible extensions to the model, including temperature nonuniformity and magnetic field oscillations, are also discussed.

  16. A flowing plasma model to describe drift waves in a cylindrical helicon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.; Hole, M. J.; Corr, C. S.

    2011-04-15

    A two-fluid model developed originally to describe wave oscillations in the vacuum arc centrifuge, a cylindrical, rapidly rotating, low temperature, and confined plasma column, is applied to interpret plasma oscillations in a RF generated linear magnetized plasma [WOMBAT (waves on magnetized beams and turbulence)], with similar density and field strength. Compared to typical centrifuge plasmas, WOMBAT plasmas have slower normalized rotation frequency, lower temperature, and lower axial velocity. Despite these differences, the two-fluid model provides a consistent description of the WOMBAT plasma configuration and yields qualitative agreement between measured and predicted wave oscillation frequencies with axial field strength. In addition, the radial profile of the density perturbation predicted by this model is consistent with the data. Parameter scans show that the dispersion curve is sensitive to the axial field strength and the electron temperature, and the dependence of oscillation frequency with electron temperature matches the experiment. These results consolidate earlier claims that the density and floating potential oscillations are a resistive drift mode, driven by the density gradient. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed physics model of flowing plasmas in the diffusion region away from the RF source. Possible extensions to the model, including temperature nonuniformity and magnetic field oscillations, are also discussed.

  17. Anomalous perturbative transport in tokamaks due to drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Thoul, A.A. ); Similon, P.L. ); Sudan, R.N. )

    1994-03-01

    A new method for calculating the anomalous transport in tokamak plasmas is presented. The renormalized nonlinear plasma response function is derived using the direct-interaction approximation (DIA). A complete calculation for the case of electrostatic drift-wave turbulence is presented. Explicit expressions for all coefficients of the anomalous transport matrix relating particle and heat fluxes to density and temperature gradients in the plasma are obtained. The anomalous transport matrix calculated using the DIA does not have the Onsager symmetry. As an example of application, the parameters of the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) [Nucl. Technol. Fusion [bold 1], 479 (1981)] are used to evaluate all transport coefficients numerically, as well as the spectrum modulation. The relation between the theoretical results and the experimental data is discussed. Although this paper focuses on electron transport for simplicity, the method can also be used to calculate anomalous transport due to ion instabilities, such as the ion-temperature-gradient instability.

  18. Small scale coherent vortex generation in drift wave-zonal flow turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Z. B. Hahm, T. S.; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-12-15

    We present a paradigm for the generation of small scale coherent vortex (SSCV) in drift wave-zonal flow (DW-ZF) turbulence. We demonstrate that phases of DWs can couple coherently, mediated by the ZF shearing. A SSCV is formed when the phases of the DWs are “attracted” to form a stable “phase cluster.” We show that the ZF shearing induces asymmetry between “attractive” and “repulsive” phase couplings, so that a net attractive phase coupling results. The turbulent DWs will (partially)synchronize into a stable SSCV at locations, where the attractive phase coupling induced by the ZF shearing exceeds the “detuning” effects by the DW dispersion and random phase scattering. We also discuss the “self-binding” effect of the newly formed SSCV.

  19. A mini-max principle for drift waves and mesoscale fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2011-01-01

    A mini-max principle for the system of the drift waves and mesoscale fluctuations (e.g. zonal flows, etc) is studied. For the system of model equations a Lyapunov function is constructed, which takes the minimum when the stationary state is realized. The dynamical evolution describes the access to the state that is realized. The competition between different mesoscale fluctuations is explained. The origins of irreversibility that cause an approach to the stationary state are discussed. A selection rule among fluctuations is derived, and conditions, under which different kinds of mesocale fluctuations coexist, are investigated. An analogy of this minimum principle to the principle of 'minimum Helmholtz free energy' in thermal equilibrium is shown.

  20. ECE Imaging of Temperature Fluctuations and Drift Waves in DIII-D Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemedkun, Samuel; Munsat, Tobin; Tobias, Benjamin; Luhmann, Neville; Domier, Calvin

    2012-10-01

    Recent observations of 2-D turbulent structures have been performed with the ECEI instrument on DIII-D. The experiments were performed in NBI and ECH-heated plasmas, over a range of external heating power. Correlation techniques similar to those used in Correlation Electron Cyclotron Emission (CECE) systems are employed, with the advantage that the ECEI system detects a full 2-D array of plasma locations: vertical separation is provided by an optical system and horizontal separation is provided by frequency discrimination in the detection electronics. Among the results are 2-D images of poloidally-propagating drift-waves, and correlation properties of fluctuations (<200 kHz) in both the radial and poloidal directions. Scaling and parameter dependencies on plasma and heating conditions will be presented. In addition to the physics results, the data demonstrates the viability of the ECEI system in the presence of ECH heating, which will also be discussed.

  1. Excitation of kinetic geodesic acoustic modes by drift waves in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Z.; Chen, L.; Zonca, F.

    2014-02-15

    Effects of system nonuniformities and kinetic dispersiveness on the spontaneous excitation of Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) by Drift Wave (DW) turbulence are investigated based on nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. The coupled nonlinear equations describing parametric decay of DW into GAM and DW lower sideband are derived and then solved both analytically and numerically to investigate the effects on the parametric decay process due to system nonuniformities, such as nonuniform diamagnetic frequency, finite radial envelope of DW pump, and kinetic dispersiveness. It is found that the parametric decay process is a convective instability for typical tokamak parameters when finite group velocities of DW and GAM associated with kinetic dispersiveness and finite radial envelope are taken into account. When, however, nonuniformity of diamagnetic frequency is taken into account, the parametric decay process becomes, time asymptotically, a quasi-exponentially growing absolute instability.

  2. Gyroaverage effects on chaotic transport by drift waves in zonal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Martinell, J.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B

    2013-01-01

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on E x B test particle chaotic transport in the presence of zonal flows is studied. The FLR effects are introduced by the gyro-average of a simplified E x B guiding center model consisting of the linear superposition of a non-monotonic zonal flow and drift waves. Non-monotonic zonal flows play a critical role on transport because they exhibit robust barriers to chaotic transport in the region(s) where the shear vanishes. In addition, the non-monotonicity gives rise to nontrivial changes in the topology of the orbits of the E x B Hamiltonian due to separatrix reconnection. The present study focuses on the role of FLR effects on these two signatures of non-monotonic zonal flows: shearless transport barriers and separatrix reconnection. It is shown that, as the Larmor radius increases, the effective zonal flow profile bifurcates and multiple shearless regions are created. As a result, the topology of the gyro-averaged Hamiltonian exhibits very complex separatrix reconnection bifurcations. It is also shown that FLR effects tend to reduce chaotic transport. In particular, the restoration of destroyed transport barriers is observed as the Larmor radius increases. A detailed numerical study is presented on the onset of global chaotic transport as function of the amplitude of the drift waves and the Larmor radius. For a given amplitude, the threshold for the destruction of the shearless transport barrier, as function of the Larmor radius, exhibits a fractal-like structure. The FLR effects on a thermal distribution of test particles are also studied. In particular, the fraction of confined particles with a Maxwellian distribution of gyroradii is computed, and an effective transport suppression is found for high enough temperatures.

  3. Gyroaverage effects on chaotic transport by drift waves in zonal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Martinell, Julio J.; Castillo-Negrete, Diego del

    2013-02-15

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on E Multiplication-Sign B test particle chaotic transport in the presence of zonal flows is studied. The FLR effects are introduced by the gyro-average of a simplified E Multiplication-Sign B guiding center model consisting of the linear superposition of a non-monotonic zonal flow and drift waves. Non-monotonic zonal flows play a critical role on transport because they exhibit robust barriers to chaotic transport in the region(s) where the shear vanishes. In addition, the non-monotonicity gives rise to nontrivial changes in the topology of the orbits of the E Multiplication-Sign B Hamiltonian due to separatrix reconnection. The present study focuses on the role of FLR effects on these two signatures of non-monotonic zonal flows: shearless transport barriers and separatrix reconnection. It is shown that, as the Larmor radius increases, the effective zonal flow profile bifurcates and multiple shearless regions are created. As a result, the topology of the gyro-averaged Hamiltonian exhibits very complex separatrix reconnection bifurcations. It is also shown that FLR effects tend to reduce chaotic transport. In particular, the restoration of destroyed transport barriers is observed as the Larmor radius increases. A detailed numerical study is presented on the onset of global chaotic transport as function of the amplitude of the drift waves and the Larmor radius. For a given amplitude, the threshold for the destruction of the shearless transport barrier, as function of the Larmor radius, exhibits a fractal-like structure. The FLR effects on a thermal distribution of test particles are also studied. In particular, the fraction of confined particles with a Maxwellian distribution of gyroradii is computed, and an effective transport suppression is found for high enough temperatures.

  4. The adiabatic energy change of plasma electrons and the frame dependence of the cross-shock potential at collisionless magnetosonic shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. C.; Scudder, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The adiabatic energy gain of electrons in the stationary electric and magnetic field structure of collisionless shock waves was examined analytically in reference to conditions of the earth's bow shock. The study was performed to characterize the behavior of electrons interacting with the cross-shock potential. A normal incidence frame (NIF) was adopted in order to calculate the reversible energy change across a time stationary shock, and comparisons were made with predictions made by the de Hoffman-Teller (HT) model (1950). The electron energy gain, about 20-50 eV, is demonstrated to be consistent with a 200-500 eV potential jump in the bow shock quasi-perpendicular geometry. The electrons lose energy working against the solar wind motional electric field. The reversible energy process is close to that modeled by HT, which predicts that the motional electric field vanishes and the electron energy gain from the electric potential is equated to the ion energy loss to the potential.

  5. Selecting, Characterizing, and Acting on Drift Waves and Flute Modes Turbulence in a Low-{beta} Magnetized Plasma Column

    SciTech Connect

    Bonhomme, G.; Brochard, F.; Gravier, E.; Oldenbuerger, S.; Philipp, M.

    2006-01-15

    We report on experiments performed on the low-{beta} plasma device MIRABELLE. Using a limiter, we recently observed that when increasing the magnetic field strength transitions between various gradient driven instabilities occur. New thorough measurements allow to identify unambiguously three instability regimes. At low magnetic field the strong ErxB velocity shear drives a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, whereas at high magnetic field drift waves are only observed. A centrifugal (Rayleigh-Taylor) instability is also observed in between when the poloidal velocity field is shearless and strong enough. A close connection is made between the ratio {rho}s /L perpendicular of the drift parameter to the radial density gradient length and each instability regime. The transition scenario from regular waves to turbulence was experimentally investigated. As for drift waves the transition from regular state to spatio-temporal chaos and turbulence follows the quasi-periodicity (or Ruelle-Takens-Newhouse) route. Eventually we present new results on the efficiency of control and synchronization methods on Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor spatio-temporal chaos in comparison with drift waves.

  6. Estimates of Lagrangian particle transport by wave groups: forward transport by Stokes drift and backward transport by the return flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bremer, Ton S.; Taylor, Paul H.

    2014-11-01

    Although the literature has examined Stokes drift, the net Lagrangian transport by particles due to of surface gravity waves, in great detail, the motion of fluid particles transported by surface gravity wave groups has received considerably less attention. In practice nevertheless, the wave field on the open sea often has a group-like structure. The motion of particles is different, as particles at sufficient depth are transported backwards by the Eulerian return current that was first described by Longuet-Higgins & Stewart (1962) and forms an inseparable counterpart of Stokes drift for wave groups ensuring the (irrotational) mass balance holds. We use WKB theory to study the variation of the Lagrangian transport by the return current with depth distinguishing two-dimensional seas, three-dimensional seas, infinite depth and finite depth. We then provide dimensional estimates of the net horizontal Lagrangian transport by the Stokes drift on the one hand and the return flow on the other hand for realistic sea states in all four cases. Finally we propose a simple scaling relationship for the transition depth: the depth above which Lagrangian particles are transported forwards by the Stokes drift and below which such particles are transported backwards by the return current.

  7. The resolved layer of a collisionless, high beta, supercritical, quasi-perpendicular shock wave. II - Dissipative fluid electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Aggson, T. L.; Mangeney, A.; Lacombe, C.; Harvey, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Using the results of Scudder et al. (1986) on the bow shock wave observed by ISEE satellites, a quantitative description is presented of the electrodynamics of ion and electron fluids, and phase-standing wave interaction which manifests itself as a supercritical MHD shock. The cross-shock electrical profile was determined in both the normal incidence frame and in the deHoffman-Teller frame by two different methods, and the results were compared with dc electric field measurements.

  8. Precursor wave structure, prereversal vertical drift, and their relative roles in the development of post sunset equatorial spread-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil; Sobral, José; alam Kherani, Esfhan; Batista, Inez S.; Souza, Jonas

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of large-scale wave structure in the equatorial bottomside F region that are present during daytime as precursor to post sunset development of the spread F/plasma bubble irregularities are investigated in this paper. Digisonde data from three equatorial sites in Brazil (Fortaleza, Sao Luis and Cachimbo) for a period of few months at low to medium/high solar activity phases are analyzed. Small amplitude oscillations in the F layer true heights, representing wave structure in polarization electric field, are identified as upward propagating gravity waves having zonal scale of a few hundred kilometers. Their amplitudes undergo amplification towards sunset, and depending on the amplitude of the prereversal vertical drift (PRE) they may lead to post sunset generation of ESF/plasma bubble irregularities. On days of their larger amplitudes they appear to occur in phase coherence on all days, and correspondingly the PRE vertical drift velocities are larger than on days of the smaller amplitudes of the wave structure that appear at random phase on the different days. The sustenance of these precursor waves structures is supported by the relatively large ratio (approaching unity) of the F region-to- total field line integrated Pedersen conductivities as calculated using the SUPIM simulation of the low latitude ionosphere. This study examines the role of the wave structure relative to that of the prereversal vertical drift in the post sunset spread F irregularity development.

  9. Drift and diffusion of spin and charge density waves in a two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Luyi; Koralek, J. D.; Orenstein, J.; Tibbetts, D. R.; Reno, J. L.; Lilly, M. P.

    2011-03-01

    We use transient grating spectroscopy (TGS) to study the persistent spin helix (PSH) state and electron-hole density wave (EHDW) in a 2D electron gas in the presence of an in-plane electric field parallel to the wavevector of the PSH or EHDW. By directly measuring the phase, we can measure the PSH and EHDW displacement with 10 nm spatial and sub-picosecond time resolution. We obtain both the spin diffusion and mobility and ambipolar diffusion and mobility from the TGS measurements of PSH and EHDW, respectively. The spin transresistivity extracted from the spin diffusion is in excellent agreement with the RPA theory of spin Coulomb drag (SCD). The spin mobility data indicate that SCD may also play a role in the spin wave drifting process. From the ambipolar diffusion and mobility, we obtain the transresistivity of electrons and holes in the same layer, which is much stronger than is typically seen in the conventional Coulomb drag experiments on coupled quantum wells.

  10. Coupled ion acoustic and drift waves in magnetized superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Adnan, Muhammad; Qamar, Anisa; Mahmood, S.

    2014-09-15

    Linear and nonlinear coupled drift-ion acoustic waves are investigated in a nonuniform magnetoplasma having kappa distributed electrons and positrons. In the linear regime, the role of kappa distribution and positron content on the dispersion relation has been highlighted; it is found that strong superthermality (low value of κ) and addition of positrons lowers the phase velocity via decreasing the fundamental scalelengths of the plasmas. In the nonlinear regime, first, coherent nonlinear structure in the form of dipoles and monopoles are obtained and the boundary conditions (boundedness) in the context of superthermality and positron concentrations are discussed. Second, in case of scalar nonlinearity, a Korteweg–de Vries-type equation is obtained, which admit solitary wave solution. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive solitons are formed in the present model. The present work may be useful to understand the low frequency electrostatic modes in inhomogeneous electron positron ion plasmas, which exist in astrophysical plasma situations such as those found in the pulsar magnetosphere.

  11. Rossby and drift wave turbulence and zonal flows: The Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connaughton, Colm; Nazarenko, Sergey; Quinn, Brenda

    2015-12-01

    A detailed study of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions is presented. These simple nonlinear partial differential equations suggested for both Rossby waves in the atmosphere and drift waves in a magnetically-confined plasma, exhibit some remarkable and nontrivial properties, which in their qualitative form, survive in more realistic and complicated models. As such, they form a conceptual basis for understanding the turbulence and zonal flow dynamics in real plasma and geophysical systems. Two idealised scenarios of generation of zonal flows by small-scale turbulence are explored: a modulational instability and turbulent cascades. A detailed study of the generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability reveals that the dynamics of this zonal flow generation mechanism differ widely depending on the initial degree of nonlinearity. The jets in the strongly nonlinear case further roll up into vortex streets and saturate, while for the weaker nonlinearities, the growth of the unstable mode reverses and the system oscillates between a dominant jet, which is slightly inclined to the zonal direction, and a dominant primary wave. A numerical proof is provided for the extra invariant in Rossby and drift wave turbulence-zonostrophy. While the theoretical derivations of this invariant stem from the wave kinetic equation which assumes weak wave amplitudes, it is shown to be relatively well-conserved for higher nonlinearities also. Together with the energy and enstrophy, these three invariants cascade into anisotropic sectors in the k-space as predicted by the Fjørtoft argument. The cascades are characterised by the zonostrophy pushing the energy to the zonal scales. A small scale instability forcing applied to the model has demonstrated the well-known drift wave-zonal flow feedback loop. The drift wave turbulence is generated from this primary instability. The zonal flows are then excited by either one of the generation mechanisms, extracting energy from

  12. Early stages of wind wave and drift current generation under non-stationary wind conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Diaz, Lucia; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Generation and amplification mechanisms of ocean waves are well understood under constant wind speed or limited fetch conditions. Under these situations, the momentum and energy transfers from air to water are also quite well known. However during the wind field evolution over the ocean, we may observe sometime high wind acceleration/deceleration situations (e.g. Mexican Tehuano or Mediterranean Mistral wind systems). The evolution of wave systems under these conditions is not well understood. The purpose of these laboratory experiments is to better understand the early stages of water-waves and surface-drift currents under non-stationary wind conditions and to determine the balance between transfers creating waves and surface currents during non-equilibrium situations. The experiments were conducted in the Institut Pythéas wind-wave facility in Marseille-France. The wave tank is 40 m long, 2.7 m wide and 1 m deep. The air section is 50 m long, 3 m wide and 1.8 m height. We used 11 different resistive wave-gauges located along the tank. The momentum fluxes in the air column were estimated from single and X hot-film anemometer measurements. The sampling frequency for wind velocity and surface displacement measurements was 256 Hz. Water-current measurements were performed with a profiling velocimeter. This device measures the first 3.5 cm of the water column with a frequency rate of 100Hz. During the experiments, the wind intensity was abruptly modified with a constant acceleration and deceleration over time. We observed that wind drag coefficient values for accelerated wind periods are lower than the ones reported in previous studies for constant wind speed (Large and Pond 1981; Ocampo-Torres et al. 2010; Smith 1980; Yelland and Taylor 1996). This is probably because the turbulent boundary layer is not completely developed during the increasing-wind sequence. As it was reported in some theoretical studies (Miles 1957; Phillips 1957; Kahma and Donelan 1988), we

  13. Early stages of wind wave and drift current generation under non-stationary wind conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Diaz, Lucia; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Generation and amplification mechanisms of ocean waves are well understood under constant wind speed or limited fetch conditions. Under these situations, the momentum and energy transfers from air to water are also quite well known. However during the wind field evolution over the ocean, we may observe sometime high wind acceleration/deceleration situations (e.g. Mexican Tehuano or Mediterranean Mistral wind systems). The evolution of wave systems under these conditions is not well understood. The purpose of these laboratory experiments is to better understand the early stages of water-waves and surface-drift currents under non-stationary wind conditions and to determine the balance between transfers creating waves and surface currents during non-equilibrium situations. The experiments were conducted in the Institut Pythéas wind-wave facility in Marseille-France. The wave tank is 40 m long, 2.7 m wide and 1 m deep. The air section is 50 m long, 3 m wide and 1.8 m height. We used 11 different resistive wave-gauges located along the tank. The momentum fluxes in the air column were estimated from single and X hot-film anemometer measurements. The sampling frequency for wind velocity and surface displacement measurements was 256 Hz. Water-current measurements were performed with a profiling velocimeter. This device measures the first 3.5 cm of the water column with a frequency rate of 100Hz. During the experiments, the wind intensity was abruptly modified with a constant acceleration and deceleration over time. We observed that wind drag coefficient values for accelerated wind periods are lower than the ones reported in previous studies for constant wind speed (Large and Pond 1981; Ocampo-Torres et al. 2010; Smith 1980; Yelland and Taylor 1996). This is probably because the turbulent boundary layer is not completely developed during the increasing-wind sequence. As it was reported in some theoretical studies (Miles 1957; Phillips 1957; Kahma and Donelan 1988), we

  14. The Influence of Drift Gas Composition on the Separation Mechanism in Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Insight from Electrodynamic Simulations

    PubMed Central

    May, Jody C.; McLean, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of three different drift gases (helium, nitrogen, and argon) on the separation mechanism in traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry is explored through ion trajectory simulations which include considerations for ion diffusion based on kinetic theory and the electrodynamic traveling wave potential. The model developed for this work is an accurate depiction of a second-generation commercial traveling wave instrument. Three ion systems (cocaine, MDMA, and amphetamine) whose reduced mobility values have previously been measured in different drift gases are represented in the simulation model. The simulation results presented here provide a fundamental understanding of the separation mechanism in traveling wave, which is characterized by three regions of ion motion: (1) ions surfing on a single wave, (2) ions exhibiting intermittent roll-over onto subsequent waves, and (3) ions experiencing a steady state roll-over which repeats every few wave cycles. These regions of ion motion are accessed through changes in the gas pressure, wave amplitude, and wave velocity. Resolving power values extracted from simulated arrival times suggest that momentum transfer in helium gas is generally insufficient to access regions (2) and (3) where ion mobility separations occur. Ion mobility separations by traveling wave are predicted to be effectual for both nitrogen and argon, with slightly lower resolving power values observed for argon as a result of band-broadening due to collisional scattering. For the simulation conditions studied here, the resolving power in traveling wave plateaus between regions (2) and (3), with further increases in wave velocity contributing only minor improvements in separations. PMID:23888124

  15. Complete classification of discrete resonant Rossby/drift wave triads on periodic domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, Miguel D.; Hayat, Umar

    2013-09-01

    We consider the set of Diophantine equations that arise in the context of the partial differential equation called "barotropic vorticity equation" on periodic domains, when nonlinear wave interactions are studied to leading order in the amplitudes. The solutions to this set of Diophantine equations are of interest in atmosphere (Rossby waves) and Tokamak plasmas (drift waves), because they provide the values of the spectral wavevectors that interact resonantly via three-wave interactions. These wavenumbers come in "triads", i.e., groups of three wavevectors. We provide the full solution to the Diophantine equations in the physically sensible limit when the Rossby deformation radius is infinite. The method is completely new, and relies on mapping the unknown variables via rational transformations, first to rational points on elliptic curves and surfaces, and from there to rational points on quadratic forms of "Minkowski" type (such as the familiar space-time in special relativity). Classical methods invented centuries ago by Fermat, Euler, Lagrange, Minkowski, are used to classify all solutions to our original Diophantine equations, thus providing a computational method to generate numerically all the resonant triads in the system. Computationally speaking, our method has a clear advantage over brute-force numerical search: on a 10,0002 grid, the brute-force search would take 15 years using optimised C codes on a cluster, whereas our method takes about 40 min using a laptop. Moreover, the method is extended to generate so-called quasi-resonant triads, which are defined by relaxing the resonant condition on the frequencies, allowing for a small mismatch. Quasi-resonant triads' distribution in wavevector space is robust with respect to physical perturbations, unlike resonant triads' distribution. Therefore, the extended method is really valuable in practical terms. We show that the set of quasi-resonant triads form an intricate network of connected triads, forming

  16. Flow topology and Lagrangian conditional statistics in dissipative drift-wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadoch, Benjamin; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Lagrangian statistics in drift-wave turbulence, modeled by the Hasegawa-Wakatani system and its modified version, are investigated. The later shows the emergence of pronounced zonal flows. Different values of the adiabaticity parameter are considered. The main goal is to characterize the role of coherent structures (vortices and zonal flows) on the Lagrangian statistics of particles. Computationally intensive simulations following ensembles of test particles over hundreds of eddy turnover times are considered in statistically stationary turbulent flows. The flow topology is characterized using the Lagrangian Okubo-Weiss criterion [Kadoch et al., Phys. Rev. E 83 (2011)], and the flow is thus split into topologically different domains. In elliptic and hyperbolic regions, the probability density functions (pdfs) of the residence time have self-similar algebraic decaying tails. However, in the intermediate regions the pdfs do exhibit exponentially decaying tails. Topologically conditioned pdfs of the Lagrangian velocity and acceleration are also computed. The differences between the classical Hasegawa-Wakatani system and its modified version are assessed.

  17. Impact of resonant magnetic perturbations on nonlinearly driven modes in drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, M.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-05-15

    In this work, we study the effects of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on turbulence, flows, and confinement in the framework of resistive drift wave turbulence. We extend the Hasegawa-Wakatani model to include RMP fields. The effect of the RMPs is to induce a linear coupling between the zonal electric field and the zonal density gradient, which drives the system to a state of electron radial force balance for large ({delta}B{sub r}/B{sub 0}). Both the vorticity flux (Reynolds stress) and particle flux are modulated. We derive an extended predator prey model which couples zonal potential and density dynamics to the evolution of turbulence intensity. This model has both turbulence drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. We find states that are similar to the ZF-dominated state of the standard predator-prey model, but for which the power threshold is now a function of the RMP strength. For small RMP amplitude, the energy of zonal flows decreases and the turbulence energy increases with ({delta}B{sub r}/B{sub 0}), corresponding to a damping of zonal flows.

  18. Flow topology, Lagrangian statistics, and transport in resistive drift-wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadoch, B.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Bos, W. J. T.; Schneider, K.

    2012-10-01

    Transport is strongly influenced by coherent structures. In particular, trapping in vortices tends to arrest transport and zonal flows can induce large Lagrangian displacements. It is thus of interest to characterize coherent structures from a Lagrangian perspective. For 2-D flows, the Eulerian Weiss criterion provides a tool to partition the flow into topologically different regions: elliptic (vortex dominated), hyperbolic (deformation dominated), and intermediate (turbulent background). In Ref.footnotetextB. Kadoch, D. del-Castillo-Negrete, W.J.T Bos, and K. Schneider, Phys. Rev. E 83, 036314 (2011). we proposed the Lagrangian Weiss criterion (i.e. the Weiss field computed along particle orbits) and applied it to 2-D Navier-Stokes turbulence. Here we apply this criterion to resistive drift-wave turbulence. The probability density functions (pdfs) of residence time in the topologically different regions are computed for ensembles of Lagrangian tracers. It is shown that in elliptic and hyperbolic regions the pdfs have algebraically decaying tails. The pdf of residence time in elliptic regions is proposed as a measure of particle trapping, and the relationship with waiting time statistics in continuous time random walk models of anomalous transport is explored.

  19. A Hybrid Statistics/Amplitude Approach to the Theory of Interacting Drift Waves and Zonal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jeffrey; Krommes, John

    2012-10-01

    An approach to the theory of drift-wave--zonal-flow systems is adopted in which only the DW statistics but the full ZF amplitude are kept. Any statistical description of turbulence must inevitably face the closure problem. A particular closure, the Stochastic Structural Stability Theory (SSST), has been recently studied in plasmafootnotetextB. F. Farrell and P. J. Ioannou, Phys. Plasmas 16, 112903 (2009). as well as atmospheric-science contexts. First, the predictions of the SSST are examined in the weakly inhomogeneous limit, using the generalized Hasegawa--Mima model as a simple example. It is found that the equations do not admit a complete solution, as the characteristic ZF scale cannot be calculated. To address that deficiency, an analysis is performed of a bifurcation from a DW-only state to a DW--ZF state in the Hasegawa--Wakatani model in order to gain analytical insight into a nonlinear DW--ZF equilibrium, including prediction of the charactistic scale. The calculation permits discussion of the relative importance of eddy shearing and coupling to damped eigenmodes for the saturation of the self-consistently regulated turbulence level.

  20. Shear flow and drift wave turbulence dynamics in a cylindrical plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.; Tynan, G. R.; Holland, C.; Xu, M.; Mueller, S. H.; Yu, J. H.

    2010-03-15

    The experimental observations of the dynamics of the coupled drift wave turbulence (DWT)/sheared zonal flow (ZF) system in a cylindrical plasma device using a combination of Langmuir probe and fast-framing imaging measurements are reported. The results show the presence of an azimuthal ZF that exhibits low frequency (approx250 Hz) fluctuations. The envelope of the higher frequency (above 5 kHz) floating potential fluctuations associated with the DWT, the density gradient, and the turbulent radial particle flux are all modulated out of phase with the strength of the ZF. The divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress is also modulated at the same slow time scale in a phase-coherent manner consistent with a turbulent-driven shear flow sustained against the collisional and viscous damping. The radial turbulence correlation length and cross-field particle transport are reduced during periods of strong flow shear. The results are qualitatively consistent with theoretical expectations for coupled DWT-ZF dynamics.

  1. Effects of drift gas on collision cross sections of a protein standard in linear drift tube and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jurneczko, Ewa; Kalapothakis, Jason; Campuzano, Iain D G; Morris, Michael; Barran, Perdita E

    2012-10-16

    There has been a significant increase in the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to investigate conformations of proteins and protein complexes following electrospray ionization. Investigations which employ traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TW IM-MS) instrumentation rely on the use of calibrants to convert the arrival times of ions to collision cross sections (CCS) providing "hard numbers" of use to structural biology. It is common to use nitrogen as the buffer gas in TW IM-MS instruments and to calibrate by extrapolating from CCS measured in helium via drift tube (DT) IM-MS. In this work, both DT and TW IM-MS instruments are used to investigate the effects of different drift gases (helium, neon, nitrogen, and argon) on the transport of multiply charged ions of the protein myoglobin, frequently used as a standard in TW IM-MS studies. Irrespective of the drift gas used, recorded mass spectra are found to be highly similar. In contrast, the recorded arrival time distributions and the derived CCS differ greatly. At low charge states (7 ≤ z ≤ 11) where the protein is compact, the CCS scale with the polarizability of the gas; this is also the case for higher charge states (12 ≤ z ≤ 22) where the protein is more unfolded for the heavy gases (neon, argon, and nitrogen) but not the case for helium. This is here interpreted as a different conformational landscape being sampled by the lighter gas and potentially attributable to increased field heating by helium. Under nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI) conditions, where myoglobin is sprayed from an aqueous solution buffered to pH 6.8 with 20 mM ammonium acetate, in the DT IM-MS instrument, each buffer gas can yield a different arrival time distribution (ATD) for any given charge state. PMID:22974196

  2. Generation of Large-Scale Zonal Structures by Drift Flute Waves in High-Beta HED Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Essam; Sotnikov, Vladmir; Kindel, Joseph; Onishchenko, O. G.; Leboeuf, J. N.

    2009-05-01

    Our aim is to develop a more general analysis of nonlinear dynamics of drift-flute waves, applicable to arbitrary plasma beta and arbitrary spatial scales in comparison with the ion Larmor radius. This study is of interest for fundamental plasma theory as well as for the interpretation of Z-pinch and laboratory astrophysics experiments. Description of low-frequency waves and in particular drift flute waves in a high beta plasma, generally speaking, requires a kinetic approach, based on the Vlasov-Maxwell set of equations. In the present work we show that the alternative two-fluid description can adequately describe the ion perturbations with arbitrary ratio of the characteristic spatial scales to the ion Larmor radius in so-called Pade approximation. For this purpose reduced two-fluid hydrodynamic equations which describe nonlinear dynamics of the flute waves with arbitrary spatial scales and arbitrary plasma beta are derived. The linear dispersion relation of the flute waves and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are analyzed. A general nonlinear dispersion relation which describes generation of large-scale zonal structures by the flute waves is presented and analyzed.

  3. Fast, purely growing collisionless reconnection as an eigenfunction problem related to but not involving linear whistler waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bellan, Paul M.

    2014-10-15

    If either finite electron inertia or finite resistivity is included in 2D magnetic reconnection, the two-fluid equations become a pair of second-order differential equations coupling the out-of-plane magnetic field and vector potential to each other to form a fourth-order system. The coupling at an X-point is such that out-of-plane even-parity electric and odd-parity magnetic fields feed off each other to produce instability if the scale length on which the equilibrium magnetic field changes is less than the ion skin depth. The instability growth rate is given by an eigenvalue of the fourth-order system determined by boundary and symmetry conditions. The instability is a purely growing mode, not a wave, and has growth rate of the order of the whistler frequency. The spatial profile of both the out-of-plane electric and magnetic eigenfunctions consists of an inner concave region having extent of the order of the electron skin depth, an intermediate convex region having extent of the order of the equilibrium magnetic field scale length, and a concave outer exponentially decaying region. If finite electron inertia and resistivity are not included, the inner concave region does not exist and the coupled pair of equations reduces to a second-order differential equation having non-physical solutions at an X-point.

  4. Physics of collisionless phase mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, D.; Haruki, T.

    2008-11-15

    Previous studies of phase mixing of ion cyclotron (IC), Alfvenic, waves in the collisionless regime have established the generation of parallel electric field and hence acceleration of electrons in the regions of transverse density inhomogeneity. However, outstanding issues were left open. Here we use the 2.5 D, relativistic, fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code and an analytic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) formulation, to establish the following points: (i) Using the generalized Ohm's law we find that the parallel electric field is supported mostly by the electron pressure tensor, with a smaller contribution from the electron inertia term. (ii) The generated parallel electric field and the fraction of accelerated electrons are independent of the IC wave frequency remaining at a level of six orders of magnitude larger than the Dreicer value and approximately 20%, respectively. The generated parallel electric field and the fraction of accelerated electrons increase with the increase of IC wave amplitude. The generated parallel electric field seems to be independent of plasma beta, while the fraction of accelerated electrons strongly increases with the decrease of plasma beta (for plasma beta of 0.0001 the fraction of accelerated electrons can be as large as 47%). (iii) In the collisionless regime IC wave dissipation length (that is defined as the distance over which the wave damps) variation with the driving frequency shows a deviation from the analytical MHD result, which we attribute to a possible frequency dependence of the effective resistivity. (iv) Effective anomalous resistivity, inferred from our numerical simulations, is at least four orders of magnitude larger than the classical Spitzer value.

  5. Gamma-ray bursts and collisionless shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, E.

    2006-12-01

    Particle acceleration in collisionless shocks is believed to be responsible for the production of cosmic-rays over a wide range of energies, from a few GeV to > 1020 eV, as well as for the non-thermal emission of radiation from a wide variety of high energy astrophysical sources. A theory of collisionless shocks based on first principles does not, however, exist. Observations of γ-ray burst (GRB) 'afterglows' provide a unique opportunity for diagnosing the physics of relativistic collisionless shocks. Most GRBs are believed to be associated with explosions of massive stars. Their 'afterglows', delayed low energy emission following the prompt burst of γ-rays, are well accounted for by a model in which afterglow radiation is due to synchrotron emission of electrons accelerated in relativistic collisionless shock waves driven by the explosion into the surrounding plasma. Within the framework of this model, some striking characteristics of collisionless relativistic shocks are implied. These include the generation of downstream magnetic fields with energy density exceeding that of the upstream field by ~8 orders of magnitude, the survival of this strong field at distances ~1010 skin-depths downstream of the shock and the acceleration of particles to a power-law energy spectrum, d log n/d logɛ ap -2, possibly extending to 1020 eV. I review in this talk the phenomenological considerations, based on which these characteristics are inferred, and the challenges posed to our current models of particle acceleration and magnetic field generation in collisionless shocks. Some recent theoretical results derived based on the assumption of a self-similar shock structure are briefly discussed. Invited review presented at the 33rd annual European Physical Society Conference, Rome, 2006.

  6. A simple model for testing the effects of gravity-wave-produced vertical oscillations of scattering irregularities on spaced-antenna, horizontal drift measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meek, C. E.; Reid, I. M.

    1984-01-01

    It has been suggested that the velocities produced by the spaced antenna partial-reflection drift experiment may constitute a measure of the vertical oscillations due to short-period gravity waves rather than the mean horizontal flow. The contention is that the interference between say two scatterers, one of which is traveling upward, and the other down, will create a pattern which sweeps across the ground in the direction (or anti-parallel) of the wave propagation. Since the expected result, viz., spurious drift directions, is seldom, if ever, seen in spaced antenna drift velocities, this speculation is tested in an atmospheric model.

  7. Attribution of ionospheric vertical plasma drift perturbations to large-scale waves and the dependence on solar activity (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Richmond, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we quantify the contribution of individual large-scale waves to ionospheric electrodynamics, and examine the dependence of the ionospheric perturbations on solar activity. We focus on migrating diurnal tide (DW1) plus mean winds, migrating semidiurnal tide (SW2), quasi-stationary planetary wave 1 (QSPW1), and nonmigrating semidiurnal westward wave 1 (SW1) under northern winter conditions, when QSPW1 and SW1 are climatologically strong. From TIME-GCM simulations under solar minimum conditions, we calculate equatorial vertical ExB drifts due to mean winds and DW1, SW2, SW1 and QSPW1. In particular, wind components of both SW2 and SW1 become large at mid to high latitudes in the E-region, and kernel functions obtained from numerical experiments reveal that they can significantly affect the equatorial ion drift, likely through modulating the E-region wind dynamo. The most evident changes of total ionospheric vertical drift when solar activity is increased are seen around dawn and dusk, reflecting the more dominant role of large F-region Pedersen conductivity and of the F-region dynamo under high solar activity. Therefore, the lower atmosphere driving of the ionospheric variability is more evident under solar minimum conditions, not only because variability is more identifiable in a quieter background, but also because the E-region wind dynamo is more significant. These numerical experiments also demonstrate that the amplitudes, phases and latitudinal and vertical structures of large-scale waves are important in quantifying the ionospheric responses.

  8. Simulating the effects of stellarator geometry on gyrokinetic drift-wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertel, Jessica Ann

    Nuclear fusion is a clean, safe form of energy with abundant fuel. In magnetic fusion energy (MFE) experiments, the plasma fuel is confined by magnetic fields at very high temperatures and densities. One fusion reactor design is the non-axisymmetric, torus-shaped stellarator. Its fully-3D fields have advantages over the simpler, better-understood axisymmetric tokamak, including the ability to optimize magnetic configurations for desired properties, such as lower transport (longer confinement time). Turbulence in the plasma can break MFE confinement. While turbulent transport is known to cause a significant amount of heat loss in tokamaks, it is a new area of research in stellarators. Gyrokinetics is a good mathematical model of the drift-wave instabilities that cause turbulence. Multiple gyrokinetic turbulence codes that had great success comparing to tokamak experiments are being converted for use with stellarator geometry. This thesis describes such adaptations of the gyrokinetic turbulence code, GS2. Herein a new computational grid generator and upgrades to GS2 itself are described, tested, and benchmarked against three other gyrokinetic codes. Using GS2, detailed linear studies using the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) geometry were conducted. The first compares stability in two equilibria with different β=(plasma pressure)/(magnetic pressure). Overall, the higher β case was more stable than the lower β case. As high β is important for MFE experiments, this is encouraging. The second compares NCSX linear stability to a tokamak case. NCSX was more stable with a 20% higher critical temperature gradient normalized by the minor radius, suggesting that the fusion power might be enhanced by ˜ 50%. In addition, the first nonlinear, non-axisymmetric GS2 simulations are presented. Finally, linear stability of two locations in a W7-AS plasma were compared. The experimentally-measured parameters used were from a W7-AS shot in which measured heat fluxes

  9. Numerical Studies of Effects of Electrons on Drift-Wave Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilskiy, Igor; Mynick, Harry E.; Parker, Scott E.

    1997-11-01

    In the present work development a collisionless global toroidal code with kinetic electrons is described; it is a continuation of the previous work of Mynick and Parker(H.E.Mynick and S.E.Parker Phys.Plasmas) 2, 2231; ibid. 2, 1217. and Parker, Lee and Santoro( S.E.Parker, W.W.Lee and R.A.Santoro, Phys.Rev.Lett.) 71, 2042 (1993).. The code allows separation of electrons into two subgroups, "trapped" (kinetic) and "passing" (adiabatic); the boundary between the two can be changed continuously. Code uses subcycling of electrons to reduce the computation time. Linear and nonlinear evolution of trapped electron mode, as well as the effects of electrons on the turbulent transport and ITG mode will be described.

  10. Kinetic theory of collisionless tearing at the magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daughton, William; Karimabadi, H.

    2005-03-01

    This paper is the first in a series of three with the aim of addressing one of the controversial issues at the magnetopause, namely the location where reconnection first occurs during periods of a large interplanetary magnetic field By. In this first paper, the linear properties of the collisionless tearing mode are reexamined as a function of the guide field By using a formally exact approach for computing the nonlocal Vlasov stability of a current layer. Three distinct parameter regimes are identified depending on the degree to which electron orbits are modified by the guide field in the central region of the current layer. In the limit of both weak and strong guide field, the fastest-growing tearing mode has a wave vector kx perpendicular to the direction of the current, in agreement with previous theoretical treatments. However, for intermediate values of the guide field where the electrons begin to transition to magnetized orbits, the fastest-growing modes have a finite wave vector ky in the direction of the current. In this newly discovered regime, the so-called drift tearing modes have finite real frequency and propagate in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift with growth rates 10-50% larger than the conventional tearing instability. Maximum growth occurs for a propagation angle in the range θ = tan-1(ky/kx) ≈ 6-10°. These new predictions are confirmed using fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations. The structure of the out-of-plane magnetic field perturbation predicted by nonlocal Vlasov theory is examined as a function of guide field. In the limit of a neutral sheet, the quadrupole structure has a characteristic scale near the electron meandering width and shows significant differences with the predictions of linear Hall MHD. The addition of a guide field strongly distorts the quadrupole structure and compresses the spatial extent. In the strong guide field limit, the width of the out-of-plane magnetic field perturbation is reduced to the

  11. Transition from Collisionless to Collisional MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Prateek Sharma; Gregory W. Hammett; Eliot Quataert

    2003-07-24

    Recent calculations by Quataert et al. (2002) found that the growth rates of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless plasma can differ significantly from those calculated using MHD. This can be important in hot accretion flows around compact objects. In this paper, we study the transition from the collisionless kinetic regime to the collisional MHD regime, mapping out the dependence of the MRI growth rate on collisionality. A kinetic closure scheme for a magnetized plasma is used that includes the effect of collisions via a BGK operator. The transition to MHD occurs as the mean free path becomes short compared to the parallel wavelength 2*/k(sub)||. In the weak magnetic field regime where the Alfven and MRI frequencies w are small compared to the sound wave frequency k(sub)||c(sub)0, the dynamics are still effectively collisionless even if omega << v, so long as the collision frequency v << k(sub)||c(sub)0; for an accretion flow this requires n less than or approximately equal to *(square root of b). The low collisionality regime not only modifies the MRI growth rate, but also introduces collisionless Landau or Barnes damping of long wavelength modes, which may be important for the nonlinear saturation of the MRI.

  12. Long-range correlations induced by the self-regulation of zonal flows and drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Ramisch, M.; Stroth, U.

    2010-11-15

    By means of a unique probe array, the interaction between zonal flows and broad-band drift-wave turbulence has been investigated experimentally in a magnetized toroidal plasma. Homogeneous potential fluctuations on a magnetic flux surface, previously reported as long range correlations, could be traced back to a predator-prey-like interaction between the turbulence and the zonal flow. At higher frequency the nonlocal transfer of energy to the zonal flow is dominant and the low-frequency oscillations are shown to result from the reduced turbulence activity due to this energy loss. This self-regulation process turns out to be enhanced with increased background shear flows.

  13. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators. I. Analytical theory of trapped-particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Proll, J. H. E.; Plunk, G. G.; Max-Planck/Princeton Research Center for Plasma Physics, 17491 Greifswald

    2013-12-15

    This is the first in a series of papers about collisionless, electrostatic micro-instabilities in stellarators, with an emphasis on trapped-particle modes. It is found that, in so-called maximum-J configurations, trapped-particle instabilities are absent in large regions of parameter space. Quasi-isodynamic stellarators have this property (approximately), and the theory predicts that trapped electrons are stabilizing to all eigenmodes with frequencies below the electron bounce frequency. The physical reason is that the bounce-averaged curvature is favorable for all orbits, and that trapped electrons precess in the direction opposite to that in which drift waves propagate, thus precluding wave-particle resonance. These considerations only depend on the electrostatic energy balance and are independent of all geometric properties of the magnetic field other than the maximum-J condition. However, if the aspect ratio is large and the instability phase velocity differs greatly from the electron and ion thermal speeds, it is possible to derive a variational form for the frequency showing that stability prevails in a yet larger part of parameter space than what follows from the energy argument. Collisionless trapped-electron modes should therefore be more stable in quasi-isodynamic stellarators than in tokamaks.

  14. Scattering of radiation in collisionless dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.

    2013-04-15

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves in collisionless dusty plasmas is studied in the framework of a multi-component kinetic model. The investigation focuses on the spectral distribution of the scattered radiation. Pronounced dust signatures are identified in the coherent spectrum due to scattering from the shielding cloud around the dust grains, dust acoustic waves, and dust-ion acoustic waves. The magnitude and shape of the scattered signal near these spectral regions are determined with the aid of analytical expressions and its dependence on the dust parameters is investigated. The use of radiation scattering as a potential diagnostic tool for dust detection is discussed.

  15. Spontaneous magnetic reconnection. Collisionless reconnection and its potential astrophysical relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treumann, R. A.; Baumjohann, W.

    2015-10-01

    low as α ≈ 2. Spontaneous reconnection generates small-scale turbulence. Imposed external turbulence tends to temporarily increase the reconnection rate. Reconnecting ultra-relativistic current sheets decay into large numbers of magnetic flux ropes composed of chains of plasmoids and lepton exhausts. They form highly structured current surfaces, "current carpets". By including synchrotron radiation losses, one favours tearing-mode reconnection over the drift-kink deformation of the current sheet. Lepton acceleration occurs in the reconnection-electric field in multiple encounters with the exhausts and plasmoids. This is a Fermi-like process. It results in power-law tails on the lepton energy distribution. This effect becomes pronounced in ultra-relativistic reconnection where it yields extremely hard lepton power-law energy spectra approaching F(γ )∝ γ ^{-1}, with γ the lepton energy. The synchrotron radiation limit becomes substantially exceeded. Relativistic reconnection is a probable generator of current and magnetic turbulence, and a mechanism that produces high-energy radiation. It is also identified as the ultimate dissipation mechanism of the mechanical energy in collisionless magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascades via lepton-inertial-scale turbulent current filaments. In this case, the volume-filling factor is large. Magnetic turbulence causes strong plasma heating of the entire turbulent volume and violent acceleration via spontaneous lepton-scale reconnection. This may lead to high-energy particle populations filling the whole volume. In this case, it causes non-thermal radiation spectra that span the entire interval from radio waves to gamma rays.

  16. Fundamental mode of ultra-low frequency electrostatic dust-cyclotron surface waves in a magnetized complex plasma with drifting ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lee, Myoung-Jae

    2012-10-01

    The electrostatic dust-cyclotron (EDC) waves in a magnetized dusty plasma was reported that they could be excited by gravity in a collisional plasma [1]. Rosenberg suggested that EDC waves could be excited by ions drifting along the magnetic field in a collisional plasma containing dust grains with large thermal speeds [2]. The existing investigations, however, focus on EDC volume waves in which the boundary effects are not considered. In this work, we attempt to obtain some physical results concerning the fundamental mode of EDC surface wave and the stability of wave by utilizing a kinetic method. The EDC surface wave is assumed to propagate along an external magnetic field at the interface between the plasma and the vacuum. The plasma is comprised of drifting ions flowing along an external magnetic field. To derive the growth rate of surface waves, we employ the specular reflection boundary conditions. The EDC surface wave is found to be unstable when the ion drift velocity is larger than the phase velocity of the wave. In addition, the wave becomes to be more unstable if dust particles carry more negative charges.[4pt] [1] N. D'Angelo, Phys. Lett. A 323, 445 (2004).[0pt] [2] M. Rosenberg, Phys. Scr. 82, 035505 (2010).

  17. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-05-24

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability ismore » exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3×107 s-1.« less

  18. Hysteresis and drift of spiral waves near heterogeneities: From chemical experiments to cardiac simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakouzi, Elias; Totz, Jan Frederik; Zhang, Zhihui; Steinbock, Oliver; Engel, Harald

    2016-02-01

    Dissipative patterns in excitable reaction-diffusion systems can be strongly affected by spatial heterogeneities. Using the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, we show a hysteresis effect in the transition between free and pinned spiral rotation. The latter state involves the rotation around a disk-shaped obstacle with an impermeable and inert boundary. The transition is controlled by changes in light intensity. For permeable heterogeneities of higher excitability, we observe spiral drift along both linear and circular boundaries. Our results confirm recent theoretical predictions and, in the case of spiral drift, are further reproduced by numerical simulations with a modified Oregonator model. Additional simulations with a cardiac model show that orbital motion can also exist in anisotropic and three-dimensional systems.

  19. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability is exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3  ×  107 s‑1.

  20. Hysteresis and drift of spiral waves near heterogeneities: From chemical experiments to cardiac simulations.

    PubMed

    Nakouzi, Elias; Totz, Jan Frederik; Zhang, Zhihui; Steinbock, Oliver; Engel, Harald

    2016-02-01

    Dissipative patterns in excitable reaction-diffusion systems can be strongly affected by spatial heterogeneities. Using the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, we show a hysteresis effect in the transition between free and pinned spiral rotation. The latter state involves the rotation around a disk-shaped obstacle with an impermeable and inert boundary. The transition is controlled by changes in light intensity. For permeable heterogeneities of higher excitability, we observe spiral drift along both linear and circular boundaries. Our results confirm recent theoretical predictions and, in the case of spiral drift, are further reproduced by numerical simulations with a modified Oregonator model. Additional simulations with a cardiac model show that orbital motion can also exist in anisotropic and three-dimensional systems. PMID:26986327

  1. Cosmic ray drift, shock wave acceleration and the anomalous component of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Jokipii, J. R.; Eichler, D.

    1981-01-01

    A model of the anomalous component of the quiet-time cosmic ray flux is presented in which ex-interstellar neutral particles are accelerated continuously in the polar regions of the solar-wind termination shock, and then drift into the equatorial regions of the inner heliosphere. The observed solar-cycle variations, radial gradient, and apparent latitude gradient of the anomalous component are a natural consequence of this model.

  2. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of ion velocity in a DC magnetron microdischarge with self-organized drift wave modes propagating in the direction opposite the E x B electron drift velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Chris; Gascon, Nicolas; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Cappelli, Mark; Ito, Tsuyohito; Stanford Plasma Physics Laboratory Collaboration; Osaka University CenterAtomic; Molecular Technologies Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Evidence is presented of rotating azimuthal wave structures in a planar DC magnetron microdischarge operating in argon and xenon. Plasma emission captured using a high frame rate camera reveals waves of varying azimuthal modes propagating in the negative E x B direction. The dominant stable mode structure depends on discharge voltage. The negative drift direction is attributed to a local field reversal arising from strong density gradients that drive excess ions towards the anode. The transition between modes is shown to be consistent with models of gradient drift-wave dispersion in the presence of such a field reversal when the fluid representation includes ambipolar diffusion along the direction parallel to the magnetic field. Time-average and time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence measurements are carried out to elucidate the anode-bound ion dynamics driven by the field reversal. This research is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  3. Reversible collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2013-10-15

    Reversible magnetic reconnection is demonstrated for the first time by means of gyrokinetic numerical simulations of a collisionless magnetized plasma. Growth of a current-driven instability in a sheared magnetic field is accompanied by magnetic reconnection due to electron inertia effects. Following the instability growth, the collisionless reconnection is accelerated with development of a cross-shaped structure of current density, and then all field lines are reconnected. The fully reconnected state is followed by the secondary reconnection resulting in a weakly turbulent state. A time-reversed simulation starting from the turbulent state manifests that the collisionless reconnection process proceeds inversely leading to the initial state. During the reversed reconnection, the kinetic energy is reconverted into the original magnetic field energy. In order to understand the stability of reversed process, an external perturbation is added to the fully reconnected state, and it is found that the accelerated reconnection is reversible when the deviation of the E × B streamlines due to the perturbation is comparable with or smaller than a current layer width.

  4. Growth and stabilization of drift-tearing modes in weakly collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso\\ad{a}, D.; Ottaviani, M.; Porcelli\\ad{a}, F.

    2002-09-01

    In the limit where the electron drift-wave frequency exceeds the electron-ion collision frequency, drift-tearing modes are found to grow with a linear growth rate independent of resistivity and proportional to the product of the electron inertial skin depth and the ion sound Larmor radius. The stabilization of these modes in collisionless and semi-collisional regimes is investigated. The stabilization mechanism is related to the coupling and propagation of drift-acoustic perturbations away from the reconnecting mode-rational surface. Analytic and numerical solutions of the four-field reduced fluid model in the slab geometry approximation with constant electron temperature and negligible ion temperature are presented. The actual stability threshold can occur at values of the normalized tearing mode stability parameter Δ' as high as 102.\\pacs{52.35.P}} \\fnm{1}{Permanent address: Istituto Nazionale Fisica della Materia, Department of Energetics, Politecnico di Torino, Italy

  5. The microphysics of collisionless shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Lynn Bruce, III

    2010-11-01

    Shock waves in interplanetary (IP) space are of considerable interest due to their potential to damage ground based electronic systems and their ability to energize charged particles. The energization of charged particles at IP shocks has the obvious extrapolation to supernova shock waves, which are thought to be a candidate for generating the most energetic particles in the universe. The observations and theory behind collisionless shock wave evolution suggest that IP shocks should, for the most part, be stable structures which require energy dissipation. In a regular fluid, like our atmosphere, energy dissipation is accomplished through binary particle collisions transferring the loss of bulk flow kinetic energy to heat. Plasmas are mostly collisionless fluids, thus requiring other means by which to dissipate energy. The studies herein were performed using wave and particle data primarily from the Wind spacecraft to investigate the microphysics of IP shock energy dissipation mechanisms. Due to their lower Mach numbers, more simplified geometry, and quasi-perpendicular nature, IP shock waves are an excellent laboratory to study wave-particle related dissipation mechanisms. Utilization of multiple data sets from multiple high time resolution instruments on board the Wind spacecraft, we have performed studies on the transition region microphysics of IP shocks. The work began with a statistical study of high frequency (≥ 1 kHz) waveform capture data during 67 IP shocks with Mach numbers ranging from ∼1-6 found ion-acoustic wave amplitudes correlated with the fast mode Mach number and shock strength. The ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) were estimated to produce anomalous resistivities roughly seven orders of magnitude above classical estimates. Another study was an examination of low frequency waves (0.25 Hz < f < 10 Hz) at five quasi-perpendicular IP shocks found the wave modes to be consistent with oblique precusor whistler waves at four of the events. The strongest

  6. Lower hybrid drift instability with temperature gradient in a perpendicular shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Y. M.; Wong, H. K.; Wu, C. S.

    1983-01-01

    Finite beta effects and an electron temperature gradient are included in the present study of the perpendicular bow shock geometry's lower hybrid instability, where the flute mode that is stable at the shock for constant electron temperature is destabilized in the case of a sufficiently great temperature gradient. Numerical solutions are given for cases in which the ion distribution is either drifting Maxwellian or consists of two Maxwellians, to represent the effect of reflected ions at the shock. A discussion is presented of the implications of results obtained for ion and electron heating and electron acceleration at the bow shock.

  7. Phase change in terahertz waves emitted from differently doped graphite: The role of carrier drift

    SciTech Connect

    Irfan, Muhammad; Yim, Jong-Hyuk; Jho, Young-Dahl; Kim, Changyoung; Wook Lee, Sang

    2013-11-11

    We investigate characteristics of THz waves radiated from differently doped graphite samples excited by femtosecond laser pulses. Between n-type single-crystalline graphite and p-type polycrystalline graphite films, we observe the phase reversal of THz waves regardless of excitation energy variations around K-valley. In addition, variations in other parameters such as excitation fluence and azimuthal angle produce no changes in the phase of THz waves, which correlate well with the opposite dipole polarization between differently doped samples rather than unidirectional diffusive transport.

  8. Coherent vorticity extraction in resistive drift-wave turbulence: Comparison of orthogonal wavelets versus proper orthogonal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futatani, Shimpei; Bos, Wouter J. T.; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Schneider, Kai; Benkadda, Sadruddin; Farge, Marie

    2011-03-01

    We assess two techniques for extracting coherent vortices out of turbulent flows: the wavelet based Coherent Vorticity Extraction (CVE) and the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). The former decomposes the flow field into an orthogonal wavelet representation and subsequent thresholding of the coefficients allows one to split the flow into organized coherent vortices with non-Gaussian statistics and an incoherent random part which is structureless. POD is based on the singular value decomposition and decomposes the flow into basis functions which are optimal with respect to the retained energy for the ensemble average. Both techniques are applied to direct numerical simulation data of two-dimensional drift-wave turbulence governed by Hasegawa-Wakatani equation, considering two limit cases: the quasi-hydrodynamic and the quasi-adiabatic regimes. The results are compared in terms of compression rate, retained energy, retained enstrophy and retained radial flux, together with the enstrophy spectrum and higher order statistics.

  9. Spatiotemporal splitting of global eigenmodes due to cross-field coupling via vortex dynamics in drift wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C; Thakur, S C; Light, A D; Negrete, J; Tynan, G R

    2014-12-31

    Spatiotemporal splitting events of drift wave (DW) eigenmodes due to nonlinear coupling are investigated in a cylindrical helicon plasma device. DW eigenmodes in the radial-azimuthal cross section have been experimentally observed to split at radial locations and recombine into the global eigenmode with a time shorter than the typical DW period (t≪fDW(-1)). The number of splits correlates with the increase of turbulence. The observed dynamics can be theoretically reproduced by a Kuramoto-type model of a network of radially coupled azimuthal eigenmodes. Coupling by E×B-vortex convection cell dynamics and ion gyro radii motion leads to cross-field synchronization and occasional mode splitting events. PMID:25615346

  10. Collisionless reconnection in Jupiter's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbardo, G.

    1991-04-01

    Collisionless reconnection in Jupiter's magnetotail is quantitatively studied for the first time. It is proposed that the same tearing mechanism which works in the earth magnetotail also works in Jupiter's. It is shown that collisionless reconnection may occur around 60 R(J) downtail.

  11. Nonlinear Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, D.; Tassi, E.; Borgogno, D.; Pegoraro, F.

    2008-10-15

    We review some recent results that have been obtained in the investigation of collisionless reconnection in two and three dimensional magnetic configurations with a strong guide field in regimes of interest for laboratory plasmas. First, we adopt a two-field plasma model where two distinct regimes, laminar and turbulent, can be identified. Then, we show that these regimes may combine when we consider a more general four-field model, where perturbation of the magnetic and velocity fields are allowed also along the ignorable coordinate.

  12. Two-dimensional bispectral analysis of drift wave turbulence in a cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.; Inagaki, S.; Yagi, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Shinohara, S.; Terasaka, K.; Kamataki, K.; Arakawa, H.; Kasuya, N.; Itoh, K.

    2010-05-15

    Bispectral analysis and multichannel measurement are becoming attractive investigation tools in plasma fluctuation studies. In the Large Mirror Device-Upgrade, the measurement of fluctuations in the ion saturation-current with a 64-channel poloidal Langmuir probe array was performed. The two-dimensional (2D) (poloidal wave number and frequency) power spectrum showed a number of pronounced peaks and broadband fluctuations in the poloidal wave number-frequency space. We applied 2D bispectral analysis, which considers both the matching conditions of poloidal wave number and frequency, to the spatiotemporal waveform, and confirmed the nonlinear couplings between coherent-coherent, coherent-broadband, and broadband-broadband fluctuation components. More than ten peaks were revealed to have as their origins only three original parent modes generated in the plasma. Comparison between the theoretical estimate and experimental observation for the bicoherence showed good agreement.

  13. Effect of the magnetic field curvature on the generation of zonal flows by drift-Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Kovalishen, E. A.; Shirokov, M. S.; Tsypin, V. S.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2007-05-15

    The generation of zonal flows by drift-Alfven waves is studied with allowance for magnetic curvature effects. The basic plasmadynamic equations relating the electrostatic potential, vector potential, and perturbed plasma density are the vorticity equation, longitudinal Ohm's law, and continuity equation. The basic equations are analyzed by applying a parametric formalism similar to that used in the theory of the generation of convective cells. In contrast to most previous investigations on the subject, consideration is given to primary modes having an arbitrary spectrum rather than to an individual monochromatic wave packet. The parametric approach so modified makes it possible to reveal a new class of instabilities of zonal flows that are analogous to two-stream instabilities in linear theory. It is shown that, in the standard theory of zonal flows, the zonal components of the vector potential and perturbed density are not excited. It is pointed out that zonal flows can be generated both in the case of a magnetic hill and in the case of a magnetic well. In the first case, the instabilities of zonal flows are analogous to negative-mass instabilities in linear theory, and, in the second case, they are analogous to two-stream instabilities.

  14. Regulation of ion drifts and anisotropies by parametrically unstable finite-amplitude Alfvén-cyclotron waves in the fast solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Maneva, Y. G.; Araneda, J. A.; Marsch, E.

    2014-03-10

    We study the preferential heating and differential acceleration of minor ions by dissipation of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) generated by parametric instabilities of a finite-amplitude monochromatic Alfvén-cyclotron pump wave. We consider the associated kinetic effects of Landau damping and nonlinear pitch-angle scattering of protons and α particles in the tenuous plasma of coronal holes and the fast solar wind. Various data collected by Wind spacecraft show signatures for a local transverse heating of the minor ions, presumably by Alfvén-cyclotron wave dissipation, and an unexpected parallel heating by a so far unknown mechanism. Here, we present the results from a set of 1.5 dimensional hybrid simulations in search for a plausible explanation for the observed field-aligned kinetic features in the fast solar wind minor ions. We investigate the origin and regulation of ion relative drifts and temperature anisotropies in low plasma β, fast solar wind conditions. Depending on their initial drifts, both ion species can heat up not only transversely through cyclotron resonance and non-resonant wave-particle interactions, but also strongly in the parallel direction by Landau damping of the daughter IAWs. We discuss the dependence of the relative ion drifts and temperature anisotropies on the plasma β of the individual species and we describe the effect of the pump wave amplitude on the ion heating and acceleration.

  15. The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on ion-temperature-gradient driven drift-wave instabilities in electron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Batool, Nazia; Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2012-08-15

    The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven drift-wave instabilities in the presence of equilibrium density, temperature, and magnetic field gradients are investigated here. By using Braginskii's transport equations for ions and Cairns as well as Kappa distribution for electrons, the coupled mode equations are derived. The modified ITG driven modes are derived, and it is found both analytically as well as numerically that the nonthermal distribution of electrons significantly modify the real frequencies as well as the growth rate of the ITG driven drift wave instability. The growth rate of ion-temperature-gradient driven instability is found to be maximum for Cairns, intermediate for Kappa, and minimum for the Maxwellian distributed electron case. The results of present investigation might be helpful to understand several wave phenomena in space and laboratory plasmas in the presence of nonthermal electrons.

  16. Nonlinearly interacting trapped particle solitons in collisionless plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Debraj; Sharma, Devendra

    2016-02-01

    The formulation of collective waves in collisionless plasmas is complicated by the kinetic effects produced by the resonant particles, capable of responding to the smallest of the amplitude disturbance. The dispersive plasma manifests this response by generating coherent nonlinear structures associated with phase-space vortices, or holes, at very small amplitudes. The nonlinear interaction between solitary electron phase-space holes is studied in the electron acoustic regime of a collisionless plasma using Vlasov simulations. Evolution of the analytic trapped particle solitary solutions is examined, observing them propagate stably, preserve their identity across strong mutual interactions in adiabatic processes, and display close correspondence with observable processes in nature.

  17. Nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Mahmood, S.; Mushtaq, A.

    2008-08-15

    The Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB)-type equation is obtained using the quantum hydrodynamic model in an inhomogeneous electron-positron-ion quantum magnetoplasma with neutral particles in the background. The KdV-type solitary waves, Burgers-type monotonic, and oscillatory shock like solutions are discussed in different limits. The quantum parameter is also dependent on the positron concentration in dense multicomponent plasmas. It is found that both solitary hump and dip are formed and their amplitude and width are dependent on percentage presence of positrons in electron-ion plasmas. The height of the monotonic shock is decreased with the increase of positron concentration and it is independent of the quantum parameter in electron-positron-ion magnetized quantum plasmas. However, the amplitude of the oscillatory shock is dependent on positron concentration and quantum parameter in electron-positron-ion plasmas.

  18. Theory and simulation of a high-frequency magnetic drift wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huba, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The equilibrium of a nonneutral plasma in a toroidal vessel with a toroidal magnetic field is analyzed. In the zero inertia limit it is heuristically shown from force balance considerations that there is an electrostatic hoop force and a force due to diamagnetism along the major radius. The problem of equilibrium is formulated in terms of solutions of a 2D partial difference equation. This equation is solved in the large-aspect-ratio limit and a general expression for the shift of the potential axis is obtained which shows that the shift is approximately epsilon and that it depends solely on the internal capacitance of the cloud. The simulation study is based upon the modified MHD equations and the nonlocal nature of the mode is investigated. Applications to sub-Alfvenic plasma expansions, electromagnetic waves in the earth's magnetosphere, and plasma switches are discussed.

  19. Collisionless Weibel shocks: Full formation mechanism and timing

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.; Stockem, A.; Narayan, R.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-07-15

    Collisionless shocks in plasmas play an important role in space physics (Earth's bow shock) and astrophysics (supernova remnants, relativistic jets, gamma-ray bursts, high energy cosmic rays). While the formation of a fluid shock through the steepening of a large amplitude sound wave has been understood for long, there is currently no detailed picture of the mechanism responsible for the formation of a collisionless shock. We unravel the physical mechanism at work and show that an electromagnetic Weibel shock always forms when two relativistic collisionless, initially unmagnetized, plasma shells encounter. The predicted shock formation time is in good agreement with 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations of counterstreaming pair plasmas. By predicting the shock formation time, experimental setups aiming at producing such shocks can be optimised to favourable conditions.

  20. Coherent vorticity extraction in resistive drift-wave turbulence: Comparison of orthogonal wavelets versus proper orthogonal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Futatani, S.; Bos, W.J.T.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Schneider, Kai; Benkadda, S.; Farge, Marie

    2011-01-01

    We assess two techniques for extracting coherent vortices out of turbulent flows: the wavelet based Coherent Vorticity Extraction (CVE) and the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). The former decomposes the flow field into an orthogonal wavelet representation and subsequent thresholding of the coefficients allows one to split the flow into organized coherent vortices with non-Gaussian statistics and an incoherent random part which is structureless. POD is based on the singular value decomposition and decomposes the flow into basis functions which are optimal with respect to the retained energy for the ensemble average. Both techniques are applied to direct numerical simulation data of two-dimensional drift-wave turbulence governed by Hasegawa Wakatani equation, considering two limit cases: the quasi-hydrodynamic and the quasi-adiabatic regimes. The results are compared in terms of compression rate, retained energy, retained enstrophy and retained radial flux, together with the enstrophy spectrum and higher order statistics. (c) 2010 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS on behalf of Academie des sciences.

  1. Standardized F1: a consistent measure of strength of modulation of visual responses to sine-wave drifting gratings.

    PubMed

    Wypych, M; Wang, C; Nagy, A; Benedek, G; Dreher, B; Waleszczyk, W J

    2012-11-01

    The magnitude of spike-responses of neurons in the mammalian visual system to sine-wave luminance-contrast-modulated drifting gratings is modulated by the temporal frequency of the stimulation. However, there are serious problems with consistency and reliability of the traditionally used methods of assessment of strength of such modulation. Here we propose an intuitive and simple tool for assessment of the strength of modulations in the form of standardized F1 index, zF1. We define zF1 as the ratio of the difference between the F1 (component of amplitude spectrum of the spike-response at temporal frequency of stimulation) and the mean value of spectrum amplitudes to standard deviation along all frequencies in the spectrum. In order to assess the validity of this measure, we have: (1) examined behavior of zF1 using spike-responses to optimized drifting gratings of single neurons recorded from four 'visual' structures (area V1 of primary visual cortex, superior colliculus, suprageniculate nucleus and caudate nucleus) in the brain of commonly used visual mammal - domestic cat; (2) compared the behavior of zF1 with that of classical statistics commonly employed in the analysis of steady-state responses; (3) tested the zF1 index on simulated spike-trains generated with threshold-linear model. Our analyses indicate that zF1 is resistant to distortions due to the low spike count in responses and therefore can be particularly useful in the case of recordings from neurons with low firing rates and/or low net mean responses. While most V1 and a half of caudate neurons exhibit high zF1 indices, the majorities of collicular and suprageniculate neurons exhibit low zF1 indices. We conclude that despite the general shortcomings of measuring strength of modulation inherent in the linear system approach, zF1 can serve as a sensitive and easy to interpret tool for detection of modulation and assessment of its strength in responses of visual neurons. PMID:23000273

  2. Hurricane-induced ocean waves and stokes drift and their impacts on surface transport and dispersion in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcic, Milan; Chen, Shuyi S.; Özgökmen, Tamay M.

    2016-03-01

    Hurricane Isaac induced large surface waves and a significant change in upper ocean circulation in the Gulf of Mexico before making landfall at the Louisiana coast on 29 August 2012. Isaac was observed by 194 surface drifters during the Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD). A coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model was used to forecast hurricane impacts during GLAD. The coupled model and drifter observations provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the impacts of hurricane-induced Stokes drift on ocean surface currents. The Stokes drift induced a cyclonic (anticyclonic) rotational flow on the left (right) side of the hurricane and accounted for up to 20% of the average Lagrangian velocity. In a significant deviation from drifter measurements prior to Isaac, the scale-dependent relative diffusivity is estimated to be 6 times larger during the hurricane, which represents a deviation from Okubo's (1971) canonical results for lateral dispersion in nonhurricane conditions at the ocean surface.

  3. Global gyrokinetic stability of collisionless microtearing modes in large aspect ratio tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, Aditya K.; Ganesh, R.; Chowdhury, J.; Brunner, S.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L.

    2014-08-15

    Linear full radius gyrokinetic calculations show the existence of unstable microtearing modes (MTMs) in purely collisionless, high temperature, large aspect ratio tokamak plasmas. The present study takes into account fully gyrokinetic highly passing ions and electrons. The global 2-D structures of the collisionless mode with full radius coupling of the poloidal modes is obtained and compared with another electromagnetic mode, namely, the Alfvén Ion Temperature Gradient (AITG) mode (or Kinetic Ballooning Mode, KBM) for the same equilibrium profile. Several important characteristics of the modes are brought out and compared, such as a clear signature in the symmetry properties of the two modes, the plasma–β dependence, and radial and poloidal length scales of the electrostatic and magnetic vector potential fluctuations. Extensive parameter scans for this collisionless microtearing mode reveal the scaling of the growth rate with β and the electron temperature gradient η{sub e}. Scans at different β values show an inverse relationship between the η{sub e} threshold and β, leading to a stability diagram, and implying that the mode might exist at moderate to strong temperature gradients for finite β plasmas in large aspect ratio tokamaks. In contrast to small aspect ratio tokamaks where the trapped electron magnetic drift resonance is found to be important, in large aspect ratio tokamaks, a strong destabilization due to the magnetic drift resonance of passing electrons is observed and is identified as a possible collisionless drive mechanism for the collisionless MTM.

  4. On the correct implementation of Fermi-Dirac statistics and electron trapping in nonlinear electrostatic plane wave propagation in collisionless plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamel, Hans; Eliasson, Bengt

    2016-05-01

    Quantum statistics and electron trapping have a decisive influence on the propagation characteristics of coherent stationary electrostatic waves. The description of these strictly nonlinear structures, which are of electron hole type and violate linear Vlasov theory due to the particle trapping at any excitation amplitude, is obtained by a correct reduction of the three-dimensional Fermi-Dirac distribution function to one dimension and by a proper incorporation of trapping. For small but finite amplitudes, the holes become of cnoidal wave type and the electron density is shown to be described by a ϕ ( x ) 1 / 2 rather than a ϕ ( x ) expansion, where ϕ ( x ) is the electrostatic potential. The general coefficients are presented for a degenerate plasma as well as the quantum statistical analogue to these steady state coherent structures, including the shape of ϕ ( x ) and the nonlinear dispersion relation, which describes their phase velocity.

  5. Collisionless reversed magnetic shear trapped electron instability and contribution of sidebands to anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogister, André L.; Singh, Raghvendra

    2005-11-01

    By keeping account of the trapped electron ∇B and curvature drifts, it is found that the spatial decay of the collisionless electron drift wave is governed either by the trapped electron response or by the resonant interaction of ions with the sidebands of the primary oscillation. In the former case, pairs of spatially bounded unstable and damped solutions are obtained for negative magnetic shear (ŝ<0) if, as usual, LTe=1/∂rlnTe<0; there are no bounded solutions if ŝLTe<0. In the latter case, there is either a set of bounded damped solutions if ηi>0 or a set of bounded unstable solutions if ηi<0. The unstable modes have a radiating character and the growth rates are γ ˜(2n+1)√1+2q2 ∣ŝ∣∣LNωe*/qR∣ (n is the Hermite polynomial solution index, q the safety factor, ŝ the magnetic shear parameter, R the major radius, ωe* the electron diamagnetic frequency, LN=1/∂rlnNe, and ηi=LN/LTi).The sidebands are responsible for unusually large ratios Qe/TeΓe, where Qe and Γe are the anomalous electron energy flux and the particle flux. These results may explain the box-type Te profile observed in lower hybrid current drive reversed magnetic shear plasmas on the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak 60 Upgrade (JT-60U) [H. Ninomiya and the JT-60U Team, Phys. Fluids B 4, 2070 (1992)]. It is finally demonstrated that the ballooning hypothesis generally leads to conflicting requirements: it is thus hardly relevant for the electron drift branch! The "radiating" boundary condition that has formerly been imposed on the slab solution is finally discussed.

  6. Dispersion discontinuities of strong collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1970-01-01

    Linear fluid equations are used to estimate wave train properties of strong collisionless shocks. Fast shocks exhibit several dispersion changes with increasing Mach number. For perpendicular propagation into a finite-beta plasma, an ion cyclotron radius trailing wave train exists only for (M sub F)2 is smaller than 2. Oblique fast shocks have a leading ion inertia wave train if M sub A is smaller than root of M(+)/M(-) cos theta/2 and a trailing electron inertia train if M sub A is greater than root of M(+)/M(-) cos theta/2. If the downstream sound speed exceeds the flow speed, linear wave theory predicts a trailing ion acoustic structure which probably resides within the magnetic shock. For a turbulent shock model in which an effective electron-ion collision frequency exceeds the lower hybrid frequency, ions decouple from the magnetic field; the shock wave train now trails with electron inertia and electron gyroradius lengths. Comparisons of this turbulent model and observations on the earth's bow shock are made.

  7. Simultaneous acceleration of protons and electrons at nonrelativistic quasiparallel collisionless shocks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaehong; Caprioli, Damiano; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2015-02-27

    We study diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of protons and electrons at nonrelativistic, high Mach number, quasiparallel, collisionless shocks by means of self-consistent 1D particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, both species are found to develop power-law distributions with the universal spectral index -4 in momentum space, in agreement with the prediction of DSA. We find that scattering of both protons and electrons is mediated by right-handed circularly polarized waves excited by the current of energetic protons via nonresonant hybrid (Bell) instability. Protons are injected into DSA after a few gyrocycles of shock drift acceleration (SDA), while electrons are first preheated via SDA, then energized via a hybrid acceleration process that involves both SDA and Fermi-like acceleration mediated by Bell waves, before eventual injection into DSA. Using the simulations we can measure the electron-proton ratio in accelerated particles, which is of paramount importance for explaining the cosmic ray fluxes measured on Earth and the multiwavelength emission of astrophysical objects such as supernova remnants, radio supernovae, and galaxy clusters. We find the normalization of the electron power law is ≲10^{-2} of the protons for strong nonrelativistic shocks. PMID:25768768

  8. Simultaneous Acceleration of Protons and Electrons at Nonrelativistic Quasiparallel Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehong; Caprioli, Damiano; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2015-02-01

    We study diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of protons and electrons at nonrelativistic, high Mach number, quasiparallel, collisionless shocks by means of self-consistent 1D particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, both species are found to develop power-law distributions with the universal spectral index -4 in momentum space, in agreement with the prediction of DSA. We find that scattering of both protons and electrons is mediated by right-handed circularly polarized waves excited by the current of energetic protons via nonresonant hybrid (Bell) instability. Protons are injected into DSA after a few gyrocycles of shock drift acceleration (SDA), while electrons are first preheated via SDA, then energized via a hybrid acceleration process that involves both SDA and Fermi-like acceleration mediated by Bell waves, before eventual injection into DSA. Using the simulations we can measure the electron-proton ratio in accelerated particles, which is of paramount importance for explaining the cosmic ray fluxes measured on Earth and the multiwavelength emission of astrophysical objects such as supernova remnants, radio supernovae, and galaxy clusters. We find the normalization of the electron power law is ≲1 0-2 of the protons for strong nonrelativistic shocks.

  9. The resolved layer of a collisionless, high beta, supercritical, quasi-perpendicular shock wave. I - Rankine-Hugoniot geometry, currents, and stationarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Aggson, T. L.; Mangeney, A.; Lacombe, C.; Harvey, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Data collected by the ISEE dual-spacecraft mission (on November 7, 1977) on a slowly moving, supercritical, high-beta, quasi-perpendicular bow shock are presented, and the local geometry, spatial scales, and stationarity of this shock wave are assessed in a self-consistent Rankine-Hugoniot-constrained frame of reference. Included are spatial profiles of the ac and dc magnetic and electric fields, electron and proton fluid velocities, current densities, electron and proton number densities, temperatures, pressures, and partial densities of the reflected protons. The observed layer profile is shown to be nearly phase standing and one-dimensional in a Rankine-Hugoniot frame, empirically determined by the magnetofluid parameters outside the layer proper.

  10. Theory and simulation of collisionless parallel shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quest, K. B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a self-consistent theoretical model for collisionless parallel shock structure, based on the hypothesis that shock dissipation and heating can be provided by electromagnetic ion beam-driven instabilities. It is shown that shock formation and plasma heating can result from parallel propagating electromagnetic ion beam-driven instabilities for a wide range of Mach numbers and upstream plasma conditions. The theoretical predictions are compared with recently published observations of quasi-parallel interplanetary shocks. It was found that low Mach number interplanetary shock observations were consistent with the explanation that group-standing waves are providing the dissipation; two high Mach number observations confirmed the theoretically predicted rapid thermalization across the shock.

  11. Weak collisionless shocks in laser-plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, R. A.; Bingham, R.; Trines, R. G. M.; Norreys, P.

    2015-04-01

    We obtain a theory describing laminar shock-like structures in a collisionless plasma and examine the parameter limits, in terms of the ion sound Mach number and the electron/ion temperature ratio, within which these structures exist. The essential feature is the inclusion of finite ion temperature with the result that some ions are reflected from a potential ramp. This destroys the symmetry between upstream and downstream regions that would otherwise give the well-known ion solitary wave solution. We have shown earlier (Cairns et al 2014 Phys. Plasmas 21 022112) that such structures may be relevant to problems such as the existence of strong, localized electric fields observed in laser compressed pellets and laser acceleration of ions. Here we present results on the way in which these structures may produce species separation in fusion targets and suggest that it may be possible to use shock ion acceleration for fast ignition.

  12. Relative drifts and temperature anisotropies of protons and α particles in the expanding solar wind: 2.5D hybrid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Y. G.; Ofman, L.; Viñas, A.

    2015-06-01

    Context. We perform 2.5D hybrid simulations to investigate the origin and evolution of relative drift speeds between protons and α particles in the collisionless turbulent low- tildeβ solar wind plasma. Aims: We study the generation of differential streaming by wave-particle interactions and absorption of turbulent wave spectra. Next we focus on the role of the relative drifts for the turbulent heating and acceleration of ions in the collisionless fast solar wind streams. Methods: The energy source is given by an initial broad-band spectrum of parallel propagating Alfvén-cyclotron waves, which co-exists with the plasma and is self-consistently coupled to the perpendicular ion bulk velocities. We include the effect of a gradual solar wind expansion, which cools and decelerates the minor ions. We here consider for the first time the combined effect of self-consistently initialized dispersive turbulent Alfvénic spectra with differentially streaming protons and α particles in the expanding solar wind outflows within a 2.5D hybrid simulation study. Results: For differential streaming of Vαp < 0.5VA, the selected initial wave spectrum accelerates the minor ions in the non-expanding wind. At Vαp = 0.5VA the relative drift speed remains nearly steady. For ions that stream below this threshold value, the waves act to increase the magnitude of the relative drift speed. Ions that stream faster than the threshold value become subject to a nonlinear streaming instability, and as the system evolves, their bulk velocities decrease. We find that the solar wind expansion strongly affects the relative drift speed and significantly slows down both ion species for all values of the relative drift speeds considered in this study. The initial nonresonant wave spectra interact with the particles, resulting in preferential and anisotropic heating for the minor ions with a prominent increase of their perpendicular temperature, which overcomes the effect of the double

  13. Electromagnetic dust-lower-hybrid and dust-magnetosonic waves and their instabilities in a dusty magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Salimullah, M.; Rahman, M. M.; Zeba, I.; Shah, H. A.; Murtaza, G.; Shukla, P. K.

    2006-12-15

    The electromagnetic waves below the ion-cyclotron frequency have been examined in a collisionless and homogeneous dusty plasma in the presence of a dust beam parallel to the direction of the external magnetic field. The low-frequency mixed electromagnetic dust-lower-hybrid and purely transverse magnetosonic waves become unstable for the sheared flow of dust grains and grow in amplitude when the drift velocity of the dust grains exceeds the parallel phase velocity of the waves. The growth rate depends dominantly upon the thermal velocity and density of the electrons.

  14. Nonlinear theory of collisionless trapped ion modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.; Tang, W.M.

    1996-03-01

    A simplified two field nonlinear model for collisionless trapped-ion-mode turbulence has been derived from nonlinear bounce-averaged drift kinetic equations. The renormalized thermal diffusivity obtained from this analysis exhibits a Bohm-like scaling. A new nonlinearity associated with the neoclassical polarization density is found to introduce an isotope-dependent modification to this Bohm-like diffusivity. The asymptotic balance between the equilibrium variation and the finite banana width induced reduction of the fluctuation potential leads to the result that the radial correlation length decreases with increasing plasma current. Other important conclusions from the present analysis include the predictions that (i) the relative density fluctuation level {delta}n/n{sub 0} is lower than the conventional mixing length estimate, {Delta}r/L{sub n} (ii) the ion temperature fluctuation level {delta}T{sub i}/T{sub i} significantly exceeds the density fluctuation level {delta}n/n{sub 0}; and (iii) the parallel ion velocity fluctuation level {delta}v{sub i}{sub {parallel}}/v{sub Ti} is expected to be negligible.

  15. Initial Results of DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, Magnetic Fields, and Plasma Waves Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Maynard, N.

    2010-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically < 1 mV/m. Although average drift directions show similarities to those previously reported, eastward/outward during day and westward/downward at night, this pattern varies significantly with longitude and is not always present. Daytime vertical drifts near the magnetic equator are largest after sunrise, with smaller average velocities after noon. Little or no pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drift near sunset is observed, attributable to the solar minimum conditions creating a much reduced neutral dynamo at the satellite altitude. The nighttime ionosphere is characterized by larger amplitude, structured electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF oscillations corresponding to a variety of plasma waves

  16. Quantification of the Effect of Pressure Wire Drift on the Diagnostic Performance of Fractional Flow Reserve, Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio, and Whole-Cycle Pd/Pa

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Yousif; Shun-Shin, Matthew J.; Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Petraco, Ricardo; Al-Lamee, Rasha; Mayet, Jamil; Francis, Darrel P.; Sen, Sayan; Davies, Justin E.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Small drifts in intracoronary pressure measurements (±2 mm Hg) can affect stenosis categorization using pressure indices. This has not previously been assessed for fractional flow reserve (FFR), instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR), and whole-cycle distal pressure/proximal pressure (Pd/Pa) indices. Methods and Results—Four hundred forty-seven stenoses were assessed with FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa. Cut point values for significance were predefined as ≤0.8, <0.90, and <0.93, respectively. Pressure wire drift was simulated by offsetting the distal coronary pressure trace by ±2 mm Hg. FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa indices were recalculated and stenosis misclassification quantified. Median (±median absolute deviation) values for FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa were 0.81 (±0.11), 0.90 (±0.07), and 0.93 (±0.06), respectively. For the cut point of FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa, 34.6% (155), 50.1% (224), and 62.2% (278) of values, respectively, lay within ±0.05 U. With ±2 mm Hg pressure wire drift, 21% (94), 25% (110), and 33% (148) of the study population were misclassified with FFR, iFR, and whole-cycle Pd/Pa, respectively. Both FFR and iFR had significantly lower misclassification than whole-cycle Pd/Pa (P<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between the diagnostic performance of FFR and iFR (P=0.125). Conclusions— In a substantial proportion of cases, small amounts of pressure wire drift are enough to cause stenoses to change classification. Whole-cycle Pd/Pa is more vulnerable to such reclassification than FFR and iFR. PMID:27076571

  17. COLLISIONLESS DAMPING AT ELECTRON SCALES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    TenBarge, J. M.; Howes, G. G.; Dorland, W.

    2013-09-10

    The dissipation of turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma is governed by unknown kinetic mechanisms. Two candidates have been suggested to play an important role in the dissipation, collisionless damping via wave-particle interactions and dissipation in small-scale current sheets. High resolution spacecraft measurements of the turbulent magnetic energy spectrum provide important constraints on the dissipation mechanism. The limitations of popular fluid and hybrid numerical schemes for simulation of the dissipation of solar wind turbulence are discussed, and instead a three-dimensional kinetic approach is recommended. We present a three-dimensional nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation of solar wind turbulence at electron scales that quantitatively reproduces the exponential form of the turbulent magnetic energy spectrum measured in the solar wind. A weakened cascade model that accounts for nonlocal interactions and collisionless Landau damping also quantitatively agrees with the observed exponential form. These results establish that a turbulent cascade of kinetic Alfven waves that is terminated by collisionless Landau damping is sufficient to explain the observed magnetic energy spectrum in the dissipation range of solar wind turbulence.

  18. The role of microturbulence on collisionless reconnection. [in magnetospheric plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    1980-01-01

    The linear, non-linear and anomalous transport properties associated with various microinstabilities driven by cross field currents in reconnecting geometries are reviewed. An assessment of their role in collisionless tearing based on analytic theory, computer simulations and experimental evidence, supports the dominant role of lower hybrid waves. The relevance of microturbulence on macroscopic stationary and time dependent models of merging is presented. It is concluded that a fluid-numerical simulation approach that includes (at each space and time step) the effects of anomalous transport in a self consistent manner, similar to the one used for laboratory collisionless shocks, represents the best method for studying and modeling the details of the reconnection process.

  19. Dielectric and permeability effects in collisionless plasmas. [in collisionless plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    Using the unabridged Maxwell equations (including vectors D, E and H) new effects in collisionless plasmas are uncovered. In a steady state, it is found that spatially varying energy density of the electric field (E perpendicular) orthogonal to B produces electric current leading, under certain conditions, to the relationship P perpendicular + B(2)/8 pi-epsilon E perpendicular(2)/8 pi = constant, where epsilon is the dielectric constant of the plasma for fields orthogonal to B. In steady state quasi-two-dimensional flows in plasmas, a general relationship between the components of electric field parallel and perpendicular to B is found. These effects are significant in geophysical and astrophysical plasmas. The general conditions for a steady state in collisionless plasma are deduced. With time variations in a plasma, slow compared to ion-gyroperiod, there is a general current, (j-asterisk), which includes the well-known polarization current, given by J-asterisk = d/dt (E x M) + (P x B) x B B(-2) where M and P are the magnetization and polarization vectors respectively.

  20. Global transition from drift wave dominated regimes to multi-instability plasma dynamics and simultaneous formation of a radial transport barrier in helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty Thakur, Saikat; Cui, Lang; Gosselin, Jordan; Vaezi, Payam; Holland, Chris; Tynan, George

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies in CSDX reported a sharp global transition in the plasma dynamics during the route to turbulence. For B <140 mT, the plasma is dominated by density gradient driven drift waves [DW]. For B >140 mT, a new global equilibrium is achieved with simultaneous existence of three radially separated plasma instabilities: coherent Rayleigh Taylor [RT] modes at the center, DW at the density gradient and turbulent, shear driven Kelvin-Helmholtz [KH] instabilities at the edge. Only the RT modes rotate in the ion diamagnetic drift direction. The radial particle flux is directed outward for small radii and inward for large radii, forming a radial particle transport barrier leading to stiff profiles and increased core density. Simultaneously the core Ar-II light emission increases (×10) forming a very bright blue core. The radial extent of the inner RT mode and the blue core coincides with the radial location of the particle transport barrier. This equilibrium with simultaneous RT-DW-KH instabilities shows very rich plasma dynamics including intermittency, blob formation and propagation, inward particle flux against density gradients etc. We report detailed studies of azimuthal momentum balance and time resolved dynamics leading to the transition using Langmuir probes, fast imaging, spectroscopy, laser induced fluorescence etc.

  1. Theory on excitations of drift Alfvén waves by energetic particles. II. The general fishbone-like dispersion relation

    SciTech Connect

    Zonca, Fulvio; Chen, Liu

    2014-07-15

    The theoretical framework of the general fishbone-like dispersion relation (GFLDR), presented and discussed in the Companion Paper [Phys. Plasmas 21, 072120 (2014)], is applied to cases of practical interest of shear/drift Alfvén waves (SAWs/DAWs) excited by energetic particles (EPs) in toroidal fusion plasmas. These applications demonstrate that the GFLDR provides a unified approach that allows analytical and numerical calculations of stability properties, as well as mode structures and, in general, nonlinear evolutions, based on different models and with different levels of approximation. They also show the crucial importance of kinetic descriptions, accurate geometries and boundary conditions for predicting linear as well as nonlinear SAW/DAW and EP behaviors in burning plasmas. Thus, the GFLDR unified theoretical framework elevates the interpretative capability for both experimental and numerical simulation results.

  2. Linear and non-linear studies of Alfven waves in space. Stationary and dynamic processes in magnetospheric plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Hasegawa, A.

    1990-01-01

    The Final Technical Report on linear and non-linear studies of Alfven waves in space is presented. Areas of research included relaxation of magnetotail plasmas with field-aligned currents; the equilibrium dayside magnetosphere; macroscale particle simulation of kinetic Alfven wave physics; ballooning stability of plasmas with sheared equilibrium flows; theory of the drift-mirror instability; collisionless tearing instability in magnetotail plasmas; and nonadiabatic behavior of the magnetic moment of a charged particle in a dipole magnetic field and the development of stochastic webs.

  3. Surface drift in the upper centimetres of the water column in short fetches and the behaviour of the diffusive sub-layer from experiments in a wind wave flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert; Osuna, Pedro; Robles, Lucia

    2015-04-01

    Ocean surface drift is of great relevance to properly model exchange processes between the ocean and the atmosphere. It is also important to better understand the early stages of surface waves development and their implications in the momentum transfer across the sea surface. In this work we study the the onset of surface drift induced by wind and waves through detailed laboratory measurements in a large wind-wave flume. Momentum transfer through the water surface, waves and surface drift were being measured in the 40m long wind-wave tank at IRPHE, Marseille. In a station in the middle of the tank momentum fluxes were estimated directly through the eddy correlation method to provide reference information for the corresponding surface drift onset recorded at very short fetch. During each experimental run very low wind was set on (about 1m/s) for a certain period and suddenly it was constantly accelerated to reach about 13 m/s (as well as 8 and 5 m/s during different runs) in about 15 sec to as long as 600 sec. The wind was kept constant at that high speed for 2 to 10 min, and then suddenly and constantly decelerate to 0 at the end of each experiment. The 3-d velocity vertical profile is measured with an acoustic sensor (Nortek Vectrino Profiler), with a vertical resolution of 0.1 cm and sampling rate of 100 Hz, over a column of 3.5 cm in length. Under the highest wind conditions a very distinctive shear was detected in the upper 1.5 cm while the strongest surface drift was recorded as about 0.5 cm/s. A rather linear variation of surface drift was observed with depth under cases of low to moderate wind speed. Evolution of the surface drift velocity is analysed and onset behaviour is addressed with particular emphasis in accelerated winds. A strong surface drift is expected to play a major role in the early stages of surface wave spectrum development, which is to be addressed in terms of frequency spectra estimated from a capacitance gauge deployed in the vicinity of

  4. Doppler effect in a solid medium: Spin wave emission by a precessing domain wall drifting in spin current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hong; Chen, Jie; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Yan, Ming

    2016-04-01

    The Doppler effect is a fundamental physical phenomenon observed for waves propagating in vacuum or various media, commonly gaseous or liquid. Here, we report on the occurrence of a Doppler effect in a solid medium. Instead of a real object, a topological soliton, i.e., a magnetic domain wall (DW) traveling in a current-carrying ferromagnetic nanowire, plays the role of the moving wave source. The Larmor precession of the DW in an external field stimulates emission of monochromatic spin waves (SWs) during its motion, which show a significant Doppler effect, comparable to the acoustic one of a train whistle. This process involves two prominent spin-transfer-torque effects simultaneously, the current-driven DW motion and the current-induced SW Doppler shift. The latter gives rise to an interesting feature, i.e., the observed SW Doppler effect appears resulting from a stationary source and a moving observer, contrary to the laboratory frame.

  5. Large-Amplitude Electrostatic Waves Observed at a Supercritical Interplanetary Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Cattell, C. A.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Kersten, K.; Kasper, J. C.; Szabo, A.; Wilber, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first observations at an interplanetary shock of large-amplitude (> 100 mV/m pk-pk) solitary waves and large-amplitude (approx.30 mV/m pk-pk) waves exhibiting characteristics consistent with electron Bernstein waves. The Bernstein-like waves show enhanced power at integer and half-integer harmonics of the cyclotron frequency with a broadened power spectrum at higher frequencies, consistent with the electron cyclotron drift instability. The Bernstein-like waves are obliquely polarized with respect to the magnetic field but parallel to the shock normal direction. Strong particle heating is observed in both the electrons and ions. The observed heating and waveforms are likely due to instabilities driven by the free energy provided by reflected ions at this supercritical interplanetary shock. These results offer new insights into collisionless shock dissipation and wave-particle interactions in the solar wind.

  6. MHD results from a collisionless fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, J. J.

    2002-11-01

    A non-conventional closure ansatz for collisionless MHD has been proposed in Ref.[1]. The truncation of the set of fluid moment equations is suggested by a comparison between the standard non-relativistic set and the non-relativistic limit of the relativistic set derived in Ref.[2]. The resulting model is a closed system of evolution equations in conservation form for the particle, momentum and energy densities, and the energy flux, allowing for pressure anisotropy and parallel heat flux. The static equilibrium condition is the same as in the Chew-Goldberger-Low theory, supplemented by the condition that the parallel energy flux be constant along the magnetic field. We study the linear perturbations about such static equilibria to derive the MHD wave dispersion relations in a homogeneous background and the perturbed potential energy associated with a stability energy principle. [1] J.J. Ramos, 2002 International Sherwood Theory Meeting, Rochester, NY, paper 1D25. [2] R.D. Hazeltine and S.M. Mahajan, Ap. J. 567, 1262 (2002).

  7. Collisionless microtearing modes in hot tokamaks: Effect of trapped electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, Aditya K.; Ganesh, R.; Brunner, S.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L.

    2015-07-15

    Collisionless microtearing modes have recently been found linearly unstable in sharp temperature gradient regions of large aspect ratio tokamaks. The magnetic drift resonance of passing electrons has been found to be sufficient to destabilise these modes above a threshold plasma β. A global gyrokinetic study, including both passing electrons as well as trapped electrons, shows that the non-adiabatic contribution of the trapped electrons provides a resonant destabilization, especially at large toroidal mode numbers, for a given aspect ratio. The global 2D mode structures show important changes to the destabilising electrostatic potential. The β threshold for the onset of the instability is found to be generally downshifted by the inclusion of trapped electrons. A scan in the aspect ratio of the tokamak configuration, from medium to large but finite values, clearly indicates a significant destabilizing contribution from trapped electrons at small aspect ratio, with a diminishing role at larger aspect ratios.

  8. Entropy production rate as a constraint for collisionless fluid closures

    SciTech Connect

    Fleurence, E.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grandgirard, V.; Ottaviani, M.

    2006-11-30

    A novel method is proposed to construct collisionless fluid closures accounting for some kinetic properties. The first dropped fluid moment is assumed to be a linear function of the lower order ones. Optimizing the agreement between the fluid and kinetic entropy production rates is used to constrain the coefficients of the linear development. This procedure is applied to a reduced version of the interchange instability. The closure, involving the absolute value of the wave vector, is non-local in real space. In this case, the linear instability thresholds are the same, and the linear growth rates exhibit similar characteristics. Such a method is applicable to other models and classes of instabilities.

  9. Extending Magnetohydrodynamics to the Slow Dynamics of Collisionless Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.; Hunana, P.

    2012-01-01

    A fluid approach aimed to provide a consistent description of the slow dynamics of a collisionless plasma, is presented. In this regime, both Landau damping and finite Larmor radius effects cannot be ignored. Two models are discussed; one retains the dynamics at sub-ionic scales, while the other is restricted to scales larger than the ion gyroscale. Special attention is paid to the capability of these approaches to accurately reproduce the properties of linear waves that are known to play an important role, for example, in the small-scale dynamics of solar wind turbulence.

  10. Thin current sheets in collisionless plasma: Equilibrium structure, plasma instabilities, and particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyi, L. M.; Malova, H. V.; Artemyev, A. V.; Popov, V. Yu.; Petrukovich, A. A.

    2011-02-15

    The review is devoted to plasma structures with an extremely small transverse size, namely, thin current sheets that have been discovered and investigated by spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetotail in the last few decades. The formation of current sheets is attributed to complicated dynamic processes occurring in a collisionless space plasma during geomagnetic perturbations and near the magnetic reconnection regions. The models that describe thin current structures in the Earth's magnetotail are reviewed. They are based on the assumption of the quasi-adiabatic ion dynamics in a relatively weak magnetic field of the magnetotail neutral sheet, where the ions can become unmagnetized. It is shown that the ion distribution can be represented as a function of the integrals of particle motion-the total energy and quasi-adiabatic invariant. Various modifications of the initial equilibrium are considered that are obtained with allowance for the currents of magnetized electrons, the contribution of oxygen ions, the asymmetry of plasma sources, and the effects related to the non-Maxwellian particle distributions. The theoretical results are compared with the observational data from the Cluster spacecraft mission. Various plasma instabilities developing in thin current sheets are investigated. The evolution of the tearing mode is analyzed, and the parameter range in which the mode can grow are determined. The paradox of complete stabilization of the tearing mode in current sheets with a nonzero normal magnetic field component is thereby resolved based on the quasi-adiabatic model. It is shown that, over a wide range of current sheet parameters and the propagation directions of large-scale unstable waves, various modified drift instabilities-kink and sausage modes-can develop in the system. Based on the concept of a turbulent electromagnetic field excited as a result of the development and saturation of unstable waves, a mechanism for charged particle acceleration in

  11. S-parameter characterization and lumped-element modelling of millimeter-wave single-drift impact-ionization avalanche transit-time diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wogong; Yamamoto, Yuji; Oehme, Michael; Matthies, Klaus; Raju, Ashraful I.; Senthil Srinivasan, V. S.; Körner, Roman; Gollhofer, Martin; Bechler, Stefan; Funk, Hannes; Tillack, Bernd; Kasper, Erich; Schulze, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Five silicon (Si) p++-n--n++ samples were grown at various doping concentrations (1.0 × 1017-2.2 × 1017 cm-3) in an n- layer by using the reduced-pressure CVD technique. By using these samples, 30 × 2 µm2 single-drift (SD) impact-ionization avalanche transit-time (IMPATT) diodes were processed with Si-based monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (SIMMWIC) technology.1 , 2 ) The samples within a small process window exhibited a large negative differential resistance at approximately the avalanche frequency, as confirmed by small-signal S-parameter characterization. A model based on depletion width was given to explain the conditions for the appearance of the negative differential IMPATT resistance, which is the basis of millimeter-wave amplifier and oscillator applications. Furthermore, a measurement-based small-signal lumped-element model was established to describe the IMPATT functionality from the circuit component aspect. This lumped-element model shows a negative differential resistance within a well-defined range in the given element parameters, which can explain the experimental observations.

  12. Drift of Scroll Wave Filaments in an Anisotropic Model of the Left Ventricle of the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Pravdin, Sergei; Dierckx, Hans; Markhasin, Vladimir S.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Scroll waves are three-dimensional vortices which occur in excitable media. Their formation in the heart results in the onset of cardiac arrhythmias, and the dynamics of their filaments determine the arrhythmia type. Most studies of filament dynamics were performed in domains with simple geometries and generic description of the anisotropy of cardiac tissue. Recently, we developed an analytical model of fibre structure and anatomy of the left ventricle (LV) of the human heart. Here, we perform a systematic study of the dynamics of scroll wave filaments for the cases of positive and negative tension in this anatomical model. We study the various possible shapes of LV and different degree of anisotropy of cardiac tissue. We show that, for positive filament tension, the final position of scroll wave filament is mainly determined by the thickness of the myocardial wall but, however, anisotropy attracts the filament to the LV apex. For negative filament tension, the filament buckles, and for most cases, tends to the apex of the heart with no or slight dependency on the thickness of the LV. We discuss the mechanisms of the observed phenomena and their implications for cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26539486

  13. Linear collisionless Landau damping in Hilbert space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zocco, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    The equivalence between the Laplace transform (Landau, J. Phys. USSR 10 (1946), 25) and Hermite transform (Zocco and Schekochihin, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102309 (2011)) solutions of the linear collisionless Landau damping problem is proven.

  14. 3-dimensional Oil Drift Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wettre, C.; Reistad, M.; Hjøllo, B.Å.

    Simulation of oil drift has been an ongoing activity at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute since the 1970's. The Marine Forecasting Centre provides a 24-hour service for the Norwegian Pollution Control Authority and the oil companies operating in the Norwegian sector. The response time is 30 minutes. From 2002 the service is extended to simulation of oil drift from oil spills in deep water, using the DeepBlow model developed by SINTEF Applied Chemistry. The oil drift model can be applied both for instantaneous and continuous releases. The changes in the mass of oil and emulsion as a result of evaporation and emulsion are computed. For oil spill at deep water, hydrate formation and gas dissolution are taken into account. The properties of the oil depend on the oil type, and in the present version 64 different types of oil can be simulated. For accurate oil drift simulations it is important to have the best possible data on the atmospheric and oceanic conditions. The oil drift simulations at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute are always based on the most updated data from numerical models of the atmosphere and the ocean. The drift of the surface oil is computed from the vectorial sum of the surface current from the ocean model and the wave induced Stokes drift computed from wave energy spectra from the wave prediction model. In the new model the current distribution with depth is taken into account when calculating the drift of the dispersed oil droplets. Salinity and temperature profiles from the ocean model are needed in the DeepBlow model. The result of the oil drift simulations can be plotted on sea charts used for navigation, either as trajectory plots or particle plots showing the situation at a given time. The results can also be sent as data files to be included in the user's own GIS system.

  15. First results of the high-resolution multibeam ULF wave experiment at the Ekaterinburg SuperDARN radar: Ionospheric signatures of coupled poloidal Alfvén and drift-compressional modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, Pavel N.; Berngardt, Oleg I.; Klimushkin, Dmitri Yu.; Zolotukhina, Nina A.; Mager, Olga V.

    2015-08-01

    A continuous experiment was carried out at the Ekaterinburg (EKB) stereoradar of the Russian segment of SuperDARN in order to examine the spatio-temporal characteristics of radar-detected magnetospheric ULF waves. The study of magnetospheric oscillations is based on analysis of scattering from field-aligned F-layer irregularities. Their E × B drift Doppler velocity at F-layer heights is associated with the background electric field in the ionosphere. During the experiment one of the radar channels operates in 0-2 beam scanning, with an integration time of 6 s, which corresponds to the total 18-s time resolution at each beam. This allows detecting magnetospheric ULF waves with periods of 40 s and up. Beam 0 is along the 132 magnetic meridian, so the registered velocity oscillations correspond to the wave electric field azimuthal component. Operation of the radar in this mode was started in December 2013. The first ULF wave events observed in the experiment and presented here occurred on 14 December 2013 and 2 January 2014 in the nightside magnetosphere during two geomagnetic disturbances classified as small magnetic storms and associated with high speed streams from coronal holes. Both the ULF events occurred after substorm-like auroral disturbances. The ULF waves observed during these events are classified as Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations. Two oscillation branches were observed, the higher and the lower frequency ones. As the azimuthal wave numbers m increase, the branches converge and merge into a single oscillation branch at some critical azimuthal wave number value m⋆. This ω(m) dependence is characteristic of the coupled Alfvén and drift-compressional waves which according to theory merge if the azimuthal wave number exceeds some critical value. This merged single oscillation branch represents an unstable drift ballooning coupling mode. Thus, the following interpretation of the observed events can be suggested; at m

  16. Collisionless Reconnection and Electron Demagnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, J. D.

    Observable, dimensionless properties of the electron diffusion region of collisionless magnetic reconnection are motivated and benchmarked in two and three dimensional Particle In Cell (PIC) simulations as appropriate for measurements with present state of the art spacecraft. The dimensionless quantities of this paper invariably trace their origin to breaking the magnetization of the thermal electrons. Several observable proxies are also motivated for the rate of frozen flux violation and a parameter \\varLambda _{\\varPhi } that when greater than unity is associated with close proximity to the analogue of the saddle point region of 2D reconnection usually called the electron diffusion region. Analogous regions to the electron diffusion region of 2D reconnection with \\varLambda _{\\varPhi } > 1 have been identified in 3D simulations. 10-20 disjoint diffusion regions are identified and the geometrical patterns of their locations illustrated. First examples of associations between local observables based on electron demagnetization and global diagnostics (like squashing) are also presented. A by product of these studies is the development of a single spacecraft determinations of gradient scales in the plasma.

  17. Collisional versus Collisionless Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Moore; Gelato; Jenkins; Pearce; Quilis

    2000-05-20

    We compare the structure and substructure of dark matter halos in model universes dominated by collisional, strongly self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) and collisionless, weakly interacting dark matter (CDM). While SIDM virialized halos are more nearly spherical than CDM halos, they can be rotationally flattened by as much as 20% in their inner regions. Substructure halos suffer ram-pressure truncation and drag, which are more rapid and severe than their gravitational counterparts tidal stripping and dynamical friction. Lensing constraints on the size of galactic halos in clusters are a factor of 2 smaller than predicted by gravitational stripping, and the recent detection of tidal streams of stars escaping from the satellite galaxy Carina suggests that its tidal radius is close to its optical radius of a few hundred parsecs-an order of magnitude smaller than predicted by CDM models but consistent with SIDM models. The orbits of SIDM satellites suffer significant velocity bias, sigmaSIDM&solm0;sigmaCDM=0.85, and are more circular than CDM satellites, betaSIDM approximately 0.5, in agreement with the inferred orbits of the Galaxy's satellites. In the limit of a short mean free path, SIDM halos have singular isothermal density profiles; thus, in its simplest incarnation SIDM, is inconsistent with galactic rotation curves. PMID:10828999

  18. Surface drift prediction in the Adriatic Sea using hyper-ensemble statistics on atmospheric, ocean and wave models: Uncertainties and probability distribution areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rixen, M.; Ferreira-Coelho, E.; Signell, R.

    2008-01-01

    Despite numerous and regular improvements in underlying models, surface drift prediction in the ocean remains a challenging task because of our yet limited understanding of all processes involved. Hence, deterministic approaches to the problem are often limited by empirical assumptions on underlying physics. Multi-model hyper-ensemble forecasts, which exploit the power of an optimal local combination of available information including ocean, atmospheric and wave models, may show superior forecasting skills when compared to individual models because they allow for local correction and/or bias removal. In this work, we explore in greater detail the potential and limitations of the hyper-ensemble method in the Adriatic Sea, using a comprehensive surface drifter database. The performance of the hyper-ensembles and the individual models are discussed by analyzing associated uncertainties and probability distribution maps. Results suggest that the stochastic method may reduce position errors significantly for 12 to 72??h forecasts and hence compete with pure deterministic approaches. ?? 2007 NATO Undersea Research Centre (NURC).

  19. On plasma rotation induced by waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaoyin; Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.; Qin, Hong; Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 ; Liu, Jian

    2013-10-15

    The momentum conservation for resonant wave-particle interactions, now proven rigorously and for general settings, is applied to explain in simple terms how tokamak plasma is spun up by the wave momentum perpendicular to the dc magnetic field. The perpendicular momentum is passed through resonant particles to the dc field and, giving rise to the radial electric field, is accumulated as a Poynting flux; the bulk plasma is then accelerated up to the electric drift velocity proportional to that flux, independently of collisions. The presence of this collisionless acceleration mechanism permits varying the ratio of the average kinetic momentum absorbed by the resonant-particle and bulk distributions depending on the orientation of the wave vector. Both toroidal and poloidal forces are calculated, and a fluid model is presented that yields the plasma velocity at equilibrium.

  20. On the theory of Langmuir waves in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzelev, M. V.

    2010-04-15

    Nonlinear quantum-mechanical equations are derived for Langmuir waves in an isotropic electron collisionless plasma. A general analysis of dispersion relations is carried out for complex spectra of Langmuir waves and van Kampen waves in a quantum plasma with an arbitrary electron momentum distribution. Quantum nonlinear collisionless Landau damping in Maxwellian and degenerate plasmas is studied. It is shown that collisionless damping of Langmuir waves (including zero sound) occurs in collisionless plasmas due to quantum correction in the Cherenkov absorption condition, which is a purely quantum effect. Solutions to the quantum dispersion equation are obtained for a degenerate plasma.

  1. Diamagnetic boundary layers - A kinetic theory. [for collisionless magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemaire, J.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1976-01-01

    A kinetic theory is presented for boundary layers associated with MHD tangential 'discontinuities' in a collisionless magnetized plasma, such as those observed in the solar wind. The theory consists of finding self-consistent solutions of Vlasov's equation and Maxwell's equation for stationary one-dimensional boundary layers separating two Maxwellian plasma states. Layers in which the current is carried by electrons are found to have a thickness of the order of a few electron gyroradii, but the drift speed of the current-carrying electrons is found to exceed the Alfven speed, and accordingly such layers are not stable. Several types of layers in which the current is carried by protons are discussed; in particular, cases are considered in which the magnetic-field intensity, direction, or both, changed across the layer. In every case, the thickness was of the order of a few proton gyroradii, and the field changed smoothly, although the characteristics depended somewhat on the boundary conditions. The drift speed was always less than the Alfven speed, consistent with stability of such structures. These results are consistent with observations of boundary layers in the solar wind near 1 AU.

  2. Quantified Energy Dissipation Rates in the Terrestrial Bow Shock. 2; Waves and Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Sibeck, D. G.; Breneman, A. W.; Le Contel, O.; Cully, C.; Turner, D. L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Malaspina, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first quantified measure of the energy dissipation rates, due to wave-particle interactions, in the transition region of the Earth's collision-less bow shock using data from the Time History of Events and Macro-Scale Interactions during Sub-Storms spacecraft. Our results show that wave-particle interactions can regulate the global structure and dominate the energy dissipation of collision-less shocks. In every bow shock crossing examined, we observed both low-frequency (less than 10 hertz) and high-frequency (approximately or greater than10 hertz) electromagnetic waves throughout the entire transition region and into the magnetosheath. The low-frequency waves were consistent with magnetosonic-whistler waves. The high-frequency waves were combinations of ion-acoustic waves, electron cyclotron drift instability driven waves, electrostatic solitary waves, and whistler mode waves. The high-frequency waves had the following: (1) peak amplitudes exceeding delta B approximately equal to 10 nanoteslas and delta E approximately equal to 300 millivolts per meter, though more typical values were delta B approximately equal to 0.1-1.0 nanoteslas and delta E approximately equal to 10-50 millivolts per meter (2) Poynting fluxes in excess of 2000 microWm(sup -2) (micro-waves per square meter) (typical values were approximately 1-10 microWm(sup -2) (micro-waves per square meter); (3) resistivities greater than 9000 omega meters; and (4) associated energy dissipation rates greater than 10 microWm(sup -3) (micro-waves per cubic meter). The dissipation rates due to wave-particle interactions exceeded rates necessary to explain the increase in entropy across the shock ramps for approximately 90 percent of the wave burst durations. For approximately 22 percent of these times, the wave-particle interactions needed to only be less than or equal to 0.1 percent efficient to balance the nonlinear wave steepening that produced the shock waves. These results show that wave

  3. Studying astrophysical collisionless shocks with counterstreaming plasmas from high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Ryutov, D. D.; Ross, J. S.; Kugland, N. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Plechaty, C.; Pollaine, S. M.; Remington, B. A.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Morita, T.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D. H.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Pelka, A.; Liang, E.; Woolsey, N.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Grosskopf, M. J.

    2012-03-01

    Collisions of high Mach number flows occur frequently in astrophysics, and the resulting shock waves are responsible for the properties of many astrophysical phenomena, such as supernova remnants, Gamma Ray Bursts and jets from Active Galactic Nuclei. Because of the low density of astrophysical plasmas, the mean free path due to Coulomb collisions is typically very large. Therefore, most shock waves in astrophysics are "collisionless", since they form due to plasma instabilities and self-generated magnetic fields. Laboratory experiments at the laser facilities can achieve the conditions necessary for the formation of collisionless shocks, and will provide a unique avenue for studying the nonlinear physics of collisionless shock waves. We are performing a series of experiments at the Omega and Omega-EP lasers, in Rochester, NY, with the goal of generating collisionless shock conditions by the collision of two high-speed plasma flows resulting from laser ablation of solid targets using ˜1016 W/cm2 laser irradiation. The experiments will aim to answer several questions of relevance to collisionless shock physics: the importance of the electromagnetic filamentation (Weibel) instabilities in shock formation, the self-generation of magnetic fields in shocks, the influence of external magnetic fields on shock formation, and the signatures of particle acceleration in shocks. Our first experiments using Thomson scattering diagnostics studied the plasma state from a single foil and from double foils whose flows collide "head-on". Our data showed that the flow velocity and electron density were 108 cm/s and 1019 cm-3, respectively, where the Coulomb mean free path is much larger than the size of the interaction region. Simulations of our experimental conditions show that weak Weibel mediated current filamentation and magnetic field generation were likely starting to occur. This paper presents the results from these first Omega experiments.

  4. Magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas - Prescribed fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Drake, J. F.; Chen, J.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of the dissipation region during magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasma is investigated by examining a prescribed two-dimensional magnetic x line configuration with an imposed inductive electric field E(y). The calculations represent an extension of recent MHD simulations of steady state reconnection (Biskamp, 1986; Lee and Fu, 1986) to the collisionless kinetic regime. It is shown that the structure of the x line reconnection configuration depends on only two parameters: a normalized inductive field and a parameter R which represents the opening angle of the magnetic x lines.

  5. Numerical Studies of Collisionless Current Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quest, Kevin B.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this proposal was to investigate collisionless current layers using a variety of analytic and numerical tools. The first year of the contract was dedicated to analytical studies, to the porting and adaption of codes being used in this study, and to the numerical simulation of collisionless current layers. The second year entailed the development of multi-dimensional hybrid algorithms as well as the re-examination of the problem of integro-differential equations that occur in the linear stage of plasma instabilities.

  6. Three-dimensional magnetic reconnection under coupling of tearing and lower-hybrid-drift instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    Understanding of the particle acceleration and plasma heating in a current sheet is an important problem in space and astrophysical plasmas. So far the inertia resistivity associated with tearing instability and the current driven instability such as the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) have been discussed as possible candidates for the origin of microscopic process of magnetic energy dissipation. It is known that the inertia resistivity effectively works at the neutral sheet, while the LHDI is mainly excited in the plasma sheet boundary. Then it is commonly understood that the role of the LHDI to the magnetic field dissipation is less important than that of the inertia resistivity. However, the heated electrons together with the activity of lower hybrid drift waves are often observed in the plasma sheet boundary by modern satellite observations, and their impact on the magnetic field dissipation at the neutral sheet might not be necessarily neglected. In addition, the nonlinear coupling between them is not theoretically understood yet. In this talk, we study the coupling of the collisionless reconnection and the LHDI by using a three-dimensional PIC simulation, and discuss that the current driven instabilities dynamically play an important role on magnetic reconnection.

  7. Collisionless Reconnection with Weak Slow Shocks Under Anisotropic MHD Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, K.; Hoshino, M.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection accompanied by a pair of slow-mode shock waves, known as Petschek's theory, has been widely studied as an efficient mechanism to convert magnetically stored energy to thermal and/or kinetic energy in plasmas. Satellite observations in the Earth's magnetotail, on the other hand, report that the detection of slow shocks is rare compared with the theory. As an important step to bridge the gap between the observational fact and the Petschek-type reconnection, we performed one- and two- dimensional collisionless magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of magnetic reconnection paying special attention to the effect of temperature anisotropy. In high-beta plasmas such as a plasma sheet in the magnetotail, it is expected that even weak temperature anisotropy can greatly modify the dynamics. We demonstrate that the slow shocks do exist in the reconnection layer even under the anisotropic temperature. The resultant shocks, however, are weaker than those in isotropic MHD in terms of plasma compression. In addition, the amount of magnetic energy released across the shock is extremely small, that is, the shock is no longer switch-off type. In spite of the weakness of the shocks, the reconnection rates measured by the inflow velocities are kept at the same level as the isotropic cases. Once the slow shock forms, the downstream plasma is heated in highly anisotropic manner, and the firehose-sense anisotropy affects the wave structure in the system. In particular, it is remarkable that the sequential order of propagation of slow shocks and rotational discontinuities reverses depending upon the magnitude of a superposed guide field. Our result is consistent with the rareness of the slow shock detection in the magnetotail, and implies that shocks do not necessarily play an important role. Furthermore, a variety of wave structure of a reconnection layer shown here will help interpretation of observational data in collisionless reconnection.

  8. Radiation-Hydrodynamic Simulation of Experiments With Intense Lasers Generating Collisionless Interpenetrating Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, Michael; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Park, H.; Kugland, N.; Pollaine, S.; Ross, J.; Remington, B.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C.; Meinecke, J.; Reville, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Woolsey, N.

    2012-05-01

    Collisionless shocks, shocks generated by plasma wave interactions in regions where the collisional mean-free-path for ions is long compared to the length scale for instabilities that generate magnetic fields, are found in many astrophysical systems such as supernova remnants and planetary bow shocks. Generating conditions to investigate collisionless shock physics is difficult to achieve in a laboratory setting; however, high-energy-density physics facilities have made this a possibility. Experiments whose goal is to investigate the production and growth of magnetic fields in collisionless shocks in laboratory-scale systems are being carried out on intense lasers, several of which are measuring the plasma properties and magnetic field strength in counter-streaming, collisionless flows generated by laser ablation. This poster reports radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the CRASH code to model the ablative flow of plasma generated in order to assess potential designs, as well as infer properties of collected data from previous experiments. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616, by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548, and by the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0000850.

  9. Drift reduction with drift control adjuvants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Five new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  10. Drift reduction with drift control adjuvants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Four new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  11. Force balance near an X line in a collisionless plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Pridmore-Brown, D. C.

    1990-01-01

    The suggestion by Dungey (1988) that the gyroviscosity associated with gradients of the off-diagonal elements of the electron pressure tensor can balance a reconnection electric field along a magnetic X line in a collisionless plasma is investigated. The detailed balance of forces in the vicinity of an X line is evaluated using a two-dimensional magnetic field model and a simple model for particle motion. The results show that the gyroviscosity can indeed provide the force required to balance a reconnection electric field in that region, so that neither collisions nor wave turbulence are necessary for reconnection. The results also show that there should not be a significant increase in current from electron acceleration very near an X line. Reasonable numerical estimates are obtained for conditions expected in the vicinity of the distant X line in the geomagnetic tail.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamics for collisionless plasmas from the gyrokinetic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. W.

    2016-07-01

    The effort to obtain a set of MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) equations for a magnetized collisionless plasma was started nearly 60 years ago by Chew et al. [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 236(1204), 112-118 (1956)]. Many attempts have been made ever since. Here, we will show the derivation of a set of these equations from the gyrokinetic perspective, which we call it gyrokinetic MHD, and it is different from the conventional ideal MHD. However, this new set of equations still has conservation properties and, in the absence of fluctuations, recovers the usual MHD equilibrium. Furthermore, the resulting equations allow for the plasma pressure balance to be further modified by finite-Larmor-radius effects in regions with steep pressure gradients. The present work is an outgrowth of the paper on "Alfven Waves in Gyrokinetic Plasmas" by Lee and Qin [Phys. Plasmas 10, 3196 (2003)].

  13. Kinetic dissipation and anisotropic heating in a turbulent collisionless plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, T. N.; Shay, M. A.; Cassak, P. A.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2009-03-15

    The kinetic evolution of the Orszag-Tang vortex is studied using collisionless hybrid simulations. In magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) this configuration leads rapidly to broadband turbulence. At large length scales, the evolution of the hybrid simulations is very similar to MHD, with magnetic power spectra displaying scaling similar to a Kolmogorov scaling of -5/3. At small scales, differences from MHD arise, as energy dissipates into heat almost exclusively through the magnetic field. The magnetic energy spectrum of the hybrid simulation shows a break where linear theory predicts that the Hall term in Ohm's law becomes significant, leading to dispersive kinetic Alfven waves. A key result is that protons are heated preferentially in the plane perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, creating a proton temperature anisotropy of the type observed in the corona and solar wind.

  14. On kinetic dissipation in collisionless turbulent plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Tulasi Nandan

    Plasma turbulence is a phenomenon that is present in astrophysical as well as terrestrial plasmas. The earth is embedded in a turbulent plasma, emitting from the sun, called the solar wind. It is important to understand the nature of this plasma in order to understand space weather. A critical unsolved problem is that of the source of dissipation in turbulent plasmas. It is believed to play a central role in the heating of the solar corona which in turn drives the solar wind. The solar wind itself is observed to be highly turbulent and hotter than predicted through adiabatic expansion models. Turbulence and its associated dissipation have been studied extensively through the use of MHD models. However, the solar wind and large regions of the solar corona have very low collisionality, which calls into question the use of simple viscosity and resistivity in most MHD models. A kinetic treatment is needed for a better understanding of turbulent dissipation. This thesis studies the dissipation of collisionless turbulence using direct numerical hybrid simulations of turbulent plasmas. Hybrid simulations use kinetic ions and fluid electrons. Having full kinetic ion physics, the dissipation in these simulations at the ion scales is self consistent and requires no assumptions. We study decaying as well as quasi steady state systems (driven magnetically). Initial studies of the Orszag-Tang vortex [Orszag, JFM, 1979] (which is an initial condition that quickly generates decaying strong turbulence) showed preferential perpendicular heating of protons (with T_perp /T_|| > 1). An energy budget analysis showed that in the turbulent regime, almost all the dissipation occurs through magnetic interactions. We study the energy budget of waves using the k - o spectra (energy in the wavenumber-frequency space). The k - o spectra of this study and subsequent studies of driven turbulent plasmas do not show any significant power in the linear wave modes of the system. This suggests that

  15. Collisionless shock structures of Earth and other planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, Eugene W.; Moses, Stewart L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the closing segment of our multi-spacecraft, multi-instrument study of collisionless shock structure. In this last year of our study, we have necessarily concentrated on subjects that limited time and remaining resources could be expected to bring to reasonable stopping points, if not full conclusions. Our attention has been focused therefore on matters that were either well underway when the year began or that could be expected to yield rapidly completed reports publishable quickly in abbreviated versions. Contemporary publication delays prevent any new initiatives from reaching the literature within the year in the best of circumstances. The topics that fell into these categories were detailed plasma wave (pw) phenomenology in slow shocks in the Earth's distant geomagnetic tail, instantaneous orientations of theta(sub Bn) in quasiparallel (Q(sub parallel)) shock structure, and a comprehensive overview of the relationship between structural ULF waves in the Qll shock environment and waves in the magnetosphere, i.e. geomagnetic ULF pulsations. The remainder of this report describes our freshly completed results, discusses two related investigations of pw waves in the foreshock and magnetosheath, and appends the abstracts of published papers and the texts of papers in press.

  16. Localized enhancements of energetic particles at oblique collisionless shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraschetti, F.; Giacalone, J.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the spatial distribution of charged particles accelerated by non-relativistic oblique fast collisionless shocks using three-dimensional test-particle simulations. We find that the density of low-energy particles exhibits a localized enhancement at the shock, resembling the `spike' measured at interplanetary shocks. In contrast to previous results based on numerical solutions to the focused transport equation, we find a shock spike for any magnetic obliquity, from quasi-perpendicular to parallel. We compare the pitch-angle distribution with respect to the local magnetic field and the momentum distribution far downstream and very near the shock within the spike; our findings are compatible with predictions from the scatter-free shock drift acceleration limit in these regions. The enhancement of low-energy particles measured by Voyager 1 at solar termination shock is comparable with our profiles. Our simulations allow for predictions of suprathermal protons at interplanetary shocks within 10 solar radii to be tested by Solar Probe mission. They also have implications for the interpretation of ions accelerated at supernova remnant shocks.

  17. Electron nongyrotropy in the context of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Aunai, Nicolas; Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Maria

    2013-09-15

    Collisionless magnetized plasmas have the tendency to isotropize their velocity distribution function around the local magnetic field direction, i.e., to be gyrotropic, unless some spatial and/or temporal fluctuations develop at the particle gyroscales. Electron gyroscale inhomogeneities are well known to develop during the magnetic reconnection process. Nongyrotropic electron velocity distribution functions have been observed to play a key role in the dissipative process breaking the field line connectivity. In this paper, we present a new method to quantify the deviation of a particle population from gyrotropy. The method accounts for the full 3D shape of the distribution and its analytical formulation allows fast numerical computation. Regions associated with a significant degree of nongyrotropy are shown, as well as the kinetic origin of the nongyrotropy and the fluid signature it is associated with. Using the result of 2.5D Particle-In-Cell simulations of magnetic reconnection in symmetric and asymmetric configurations, it is found that neither the reconnection site nor the topological boundaries are generally associated with a maximized degree of nongyrotropy. Nongyrotropic regions do not correspond to a specific fluid behavior as equivalent nongyrotropy is found to extend over the electron dissipation region as well as in non-dissipative diamagnetic drift layers. The localization of highly nongyrotropic regions in numerical models and their correlation with other observable quantities can, however, improve the characterization of spatial structures explored by spacecraft missions.

  18. A twenty-moment model for collisionless guide field reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Jonathan; Hakim, Ammar; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2015-11-01

    The integration of kinetic effects in fluid models is an important problem in global simulations of the Earth's magnetosphere and space weather modelling. Here we introduce a new fluid model and closure for collisionless magnetic reconnection and more general applications. It has recently been shown that electron pressure anisotropy is important in setting the structure of the reconnection region, and a closure based on the drift kinetic equation using a distribution of trapped and passing particles has been derived. We extend the model and present a general expression for moments of the distribution function. By evolving the heat flux tensor and closing at the fourth velocity moment, we obtain a self-consistent set of fluid equations, which includes the evolution of the off-diagonal elements of the pressure tensor. The model is implemented in a two-fluid code and the results are compared to PIC simulations of guide field reconnection. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. AGS-1338944, DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  19. Supermagnetosonic Jets behind a Collisionless Quasiparallel Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, H.; Vainio, R.; Laitinen, T. V.; Vaivads, A.; Andreeova, K.; Palmroth, M.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Koskinen, H. E. J.; Lucek, E. A.; Reme, H.

    2009-12-11

    The downstream region of a collisionless quasiparallel shock is structured containing bulk flows with high kinetic energy density from a previously unidentified source. We present Cluster multispacecraft measurements of this type of supermagnetosonic jet as well as of a weak secondary shock front within the sheath, that allow us to propose the following generation mechanism for the jets: The local curvature variations inherent to quasiparallel shocks can create fast, deflected jets accompanied by density variations in the downstream region. If the speed of the jet is super(magneto)sonic in the reference frame of the obstacle, a second shock front forms in the sheath closer to the obstacle. Our results can be applied to collisionless quasiparallel shocks in many plasma environments.

  20. Collisionless tearing instability in magnetotail plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiaogang; Bhattacharjee, A.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    1990-01-01

    The problem of the linear stability of collisionless tearing modes in the earth's magnetotail is revisited. It is found that the collisionless tearing mode is linearly unstable with wavelengths of the order of 10 R(E). It is shown that an important feature neglected in earlier theories is a nonzero equilibrium B(y)-field. The physics of the instability is elucidated in the context of a simple slab model and a sheared parabolic model which is representative of the magnetotail in which all three components of the magnetic field are nonzero. The dispersion equation for the instability is obtained by a boundary-layer analysis. The implications of the theory for recent observations on current disruption and diversion during substorms is discussed.

  1. Expansion techniques for collisionless stellar dynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiron, Yohai

    2016-02-01

    We present ETICS, a collisionless N-body code based on two kinds of series expansions of the Poisson equation, implemented for graphics processing units (GPUs). The code is publicly available and can be used as a standalone program or as a library (an AMUSE plugin is included). One of the two expansion methods available is the self-consistent field (SCF) method, which is a Fourier-like expansion of the density field in some basis set; the other is the multipole expansion (MEX) method, which is a Taylor-like expansion of the Green's function. MEX, which has been advocated in the past, has not gained as much popularity as SCF. Both are particle-field methods and optimized for collisionless galactic dynamics, but while SCF is a ``pure'' expansion, MEX is an expansion in just the angular part; thus, MEX is capable of capturing radial structure easily, while SCF needs a large number of radial terms.

  2. The effect of broad-band Alfven-cyclotron waves spectra on the preferential heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Maneva, Y. G.; Ofman, L.; Vinas, A. F.

    2013-06-13

    In anticipation of results from inner heliospheric missions such as the Solar Orbiter and the Solar Probe we present the results from 1.5D hybrid simulations to study the role of magnetic fluctuations for the heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind. We consider the effects of nonlinear Alfven-cyclotron waves at different frequency regimes. Monochromatic nonlinear Alfven-alpha-cyclotron waves are known to preferentially heat and accelerate He{sup ++} ions in collisionless low beta plasma. In this study we demonstrate that these effects are preserved when higherfrequency monochromatic and broad-band spectra of Alfven-proton-cyclotron waves are considered. Comparison between several nonlinear monochromatic waves shows that the ion temperatures, anisotropies and relative drift are quantitatively affected by the shift in frequency. Including a broad-band wave-spectrum results in a significant reduction of both the parallel and the perpendicular temperature components for the He{sup ++} ions, whereas the proton heating is barely influenced, with the parallel proton temperature only slightly enhanced. The differential streaming is strongly affected by the available wave power in the resonant daughter ion-acoustic waves. Therefore for the same initial wave energy, the relative drift is significantly reduced in the case of initial wave-spectra in comparison to the simulations with monochromatic waves.

  3. Forecast of iceberg ensemble drift

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tahan, M.S.; El-Tahan, H.W.; Venkatesh, S.

    1983-05-01

    The objectives of the study are to gain a better understanding of the characteristics of iceberg motion and the factors controlling iceberg drift, and to develop an iceberg ensemble drift forecast system to be operated by the Canadian Atmospheric Environment Service. An extensive review of field and theoretical studies on iceberg behaviour, and the factors controlling iceberg motion has been carried out. Long term and short term behaviour of icebergs are critically examined. A quantitative assessment of the effects of the factors controlling iceberg motion is presented. The study indicated that wind and currents are the primary driving forces. Coriolis Force and ocean surface slope also have significant effects. As for waves, only the higher waves have a significant effect. Iceberg drift is also affected by iceberg size characteristics. Based on the findings of the study a comprehensive computerized forecast system to predict the drift of iceberg ensembles off Canada's east coast has been designed. The expected accuracy of the forecast system is discussed and recommendations are made for future improvements to the system.

  4. Particle distributions in collisionless magnetic reconnection: An implicit Particle-In-Cell (PIC) description

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D.W.; Francis, G.E.; Max, C.E.

    1990-06-29

    Evidence from magnetospheric and solar flare research supports the belief that collisionless magnetic reconnection can proceed on the Alfven-wave crossing timescale. Reconnection behavior that occurs this rapidly in collisionless plasmas is not well understood because underlying mechanisms depend on the details of the ion and electron distributions in the vicinity of the emerging X-points. We use the direct implicit Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code AVANTI to study the details of these distributions as they evolve in the self-consistent E and B fields of magnetic reconnection. We first consider a simple neutral sheet model. We observe rapid movement of the current-carrying electrons away from the emerging X-point. Later in time an oscillation of the trapped magnetic flux is found, superimposed upon continued linear growth due to plasma inflow at the ion sound speed. The addition of a current-aligned and a normal B field widen the scope of our studies.

  5. Simulation of Experiments Generating Collisionless Shocks With Intense Lasers Using the CRASH Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, M. J.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rutter, E. M.; Park, H. S.; Kugland, N. L.; Pollaine, S.; Ross, J. S.; Remington, B. A.; Ryutov, D.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D. H.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Woosley, N.

    2011-10-01

    Collisionless shocks, shocks generated by plasma wave interactions in regions where the collisional mean-free-path for particles is long compared to the length scale for shock interaction, are found ubiquitously in astrophysics. Experiments to investigate collisionless shocks in a laboratory-scale system are being carried out on intense lasers; measuring the density, temperature, magnetic field, and velocity of counter-streaming flows generated by laser ablation. This poster reports hydrodynamic simulations modeling the ablative flow of plasma generated in order to assess potential designs and infer properties of collected data from previous single foil experiments. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52-08NA28616.

  6. The Collisionless Shock in Hybrid-Vlasov Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfau-Kempf, Y.; Vainio, R. O.; Palmroth, M.; Battarbee, M. C.; Hoilijoki, S.; Ganse, U.; von Alfthan, S.

    2015-12-01

    We will present an overview of the recent numerical results on collisionless shocks obtained from Vlasiator, a hybrid-Vlasov simulation designed to model the Earth's magnetosphere. We will present results on the Earth bow shock under different solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field conditions and compare them with results on planar shocks for similar Mach numbers. As the simulation treats only ions kinetically, we will limit our study to the ion scales and beyond, characterizing the nature of fluctuations and ion distribution functions under different conditions and numerical settings. We will also investigate the role of dimensionality of the system, i.e., compare simulations performed in 2D and 3D in ordinary space (with full 3D in velocity space in both cases). In particular, we will characterize the foreshock ULF waves reproduced by the simulations and compare them with quasi-linear theory and observations of ion foreshocks ahead of the quasi-parallel bow shock and interplanetary shocks. The reasons for the differences in the foreshock characteristics under different modeling approximations will be discussed, in particular concerning the oblique propagation and dispersion relations of the foreshock waves, which are markedly different from quasi-linear theory and in quantitative agreement with spacecraft observations.

  7. Notes on drift theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, R. A.; Moraal, H.; Webb, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that there is a simpler way to derive the average guiding center drift of a distribution of particles than via the so-called single particle analysis. Based on this derivation it is shown that the entire drift formalism can be considerably simplified, and that results for low order anisotropies are more generally valid than is usually appreciated. This drift analysis leads to a natural alternative derivation of the drift velocity along a neutral sheet.

  8. Drift of dislocation tripoles under ultrasound influence.

    PubMed

    Murzaev, R T; Bachurin, D V; Nazarov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of dynamics of different stable dislocation tripoles under influence of monochromatic standing sound wave were performed. The basic conditions necessary for the drift and mutual rearrangements between dislocation structures were investigated. The dependence of the drift velocity of the dislocation tripoles as a function of the frequency and amplitude of the external influence was obtained. The results of the work can be useful in analysis of motion and self-organization of dislocation structure under ultrasound influence. PMID:26278625

  9. Transient chaotic transport in dissipative drift motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyarzabal, R. S.; Szezech, J. D.; Batista, A. M.; de Souza, S. L. T.; Caldas, I. L.; Viana, R. L.; Sanjuán, M. A. F.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate chaotic particle transport in magnetised plasmas with two electrostatic drift waves. Considering dissipation in the drift motion, we verify that the removed KAM surfaces originate periodic attractors with their corresponding basins of attraction. We show that the properties of the basins depend on the dissipation and the space-averaged escape time decays exponentially when the dissipation increases. We find positive finite time Lyapunov exponents in dissipative drift motion, consequently the trajectories exhibit transient chaotic transport. These features indicate how the transient plasma transport depends on the dissipation.

  10. Thin-shell instability in collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Ahmed, H.; Doria, D.; Sarri, G.; Walder, R.; Folini, D.; Bret, A.; Ynnerman, A.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-09-01

    Thin-shell instability is one process which can generate entangled structures in astrophysical plasma on collisional (fluid) scales. It is driven by a spatially varying imbalance between the ram pressure of the inflowing upstream plasma and the downstream's thermal pressure at a nonplanar shock. Here we show by means of a particle-in-cell simulation that an analog process can destabilize a thin shell formed by two interpenetrating, unmagnetized, and collisionless plasma clouds. The amplitude of the shell's spatial modulation grows and saturates after about ten inverse proton plasma frequencies, when the shell consists of connected piecewise linear patches.

  11. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, X. M. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-15

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  12. New Expression for Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    For 2D, symmetric, anti-parallel, collisionless magnetic reconnection, a new expression for the reconnection rate in the electron diffusion region is introduced. It is shown that this expression can be derived in just a few simple steps from a physically intuitive starting point; the derivation is given in its entirety and the validity of each step is confirmed. The predictions of this expression are compared to the results of several long-duration, open-boundary PIC reconnection simulations to demonstrate excellent agreement.

  13. Collisionless Relaxation in Non-Neutral Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Yan; Pakter, Renato; Teles, Tarcisio N.

    2008-02-01

    A theoretical framework is presented which allows us to quantitatively predict the final stationary state achieved by a non-neutral plasma during a process of collisionless relaxation. As a specific application, the theory is used to study relaxation of charged-particle beams. It is shown that a fully matched beam relaxes to the Lynden-Bell distribution. However, when a mismatch is present and the beam oscillates, parametric resonances lead to a core-halo phase separation. The approach developed accounts for both the density and the velocity distributions in the final stationary state.

  14. New expression for collisionless magnetic reconnection rate

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, Alex

    2015-04-15

    For 2D, symmetric, anti-parallel, collisionless magnetic reconnection, new expressions for the reconnection rate in the electron diffusion region are introduced. It is shown that these expressions can be derived in just a few simple steps from a physically intuitive starting point; the derivations are given in their entirety, and the validity of each step is confirmed. The predictions of these expressions are compared to the results of several long-duration, open-boundary particle-in-cell reconnection simulations to demonstrate excellent agreement.

  15. Measuring Collisionless Damping in Heliospheric Plasmas using Field–Particle Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G.

    2016-08-01

    An innovative field–particle correlation technique is proposed that uses single-point measurements of the electromagnetic fields and particle velocity distribution functions to investigate the net transfer of energy from fields to particles associated with the collisionless damping of turbulent fluctuations in weakly collisional plasmas, such as the solar wind. In addition to providing a direct estimate of the local rate of energy transfer between fields and particles, it provides vital new information about the distribution of that energy transfer in velocity space. This velocity-space signature can potentially be used to identify the dominant collisionless mechanism responsible for the damping of turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind. The application of this novel field–particle correlation technique is illustrated using the simplified case of the Landau damping of Langmuir waves in an electrostatic 1D-1V Vlasov–Poisson plasma, showing that the procedure both estimates the local rate of energy transfer from the electrostatic field to the electrons and indicates the resonant nature of this interaction. Modifications of the technique to enable single-point spacecraft measurements of fields and particles to diagnose the collisionless damping of turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind are discussed, yielding a method with the potential to transform our ability to maximize the scientific return from current and upcoming spacecraft missions, such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Solar Probe Plus missions.

  16. Steady, Collisionless Plasma Flow Along a Magnetic Field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissell, R. C.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis describes the mathematical modelling of a one dimensional, steady-state, collisionless plasma in a varying magnetic field. The plasma is enclosed, over a finite volume, between two electrically insulated walls. It originates from an extended source, where the magnetic field is constant, and then enters a simple magnetic mirror where there is no source. Initially, the magnetic field is assumed to be constant everywhere. A cold-ion (L. Tonks and I. Langmuir, Phys. Rev., 34 876 (1929)) and a warm-ion, "non-Maxwellian", kinetic theory model (G. A. Emmert et al, Phys. Fluids, 23 803 (1980)) are described. A kinetic model with a 'Maxwellian' source is formulated and solved. The results differ from those found by Emmert et al; in particular, the boundary electric field is infinite, in contrast to Emmert's finding. It is then compared with a warm-ion fluid model (E. Zawaideh, F. Najmabadi and R. W. Conn, Phys. Fluids, 29 463 (1986)). The plasma density and ion-fluid speed results are in reasonable agreement, but large differences occur in the ion temperature and ion-heat flux because of the inaccuracy of the fluid model's closure condition. The magnetic mirror is then incorporated, and a comparatively simple kinetic theory model of the whole system is developed. It extends the work of Bailey and Emmert (Nuc. Fusion, 24 1439 (1984)) by including an extended source region and trapped ions. The major conclusions are that a shock occurs downstream of the mirror throat and that a radial electric field will occur in any real magnetic mirror system, causing an E times B drift.

  17. Nonlinear Gyroviscous Force in a Collisionless Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Belova, E.V.

    2001-05-23

    Nonlinear gyroviscous forces in a collisionless plasma with temperature variations are calculated from the gyrofluid moments of the gyrokinetic Vlasov equation. The low-frequency gyrokinetic ordering and electrostatic perturbations are assumed, and an additional finite Larmor radius (FLR) expansion is performed. This approach leads naturally to an expression for the gyroviscous force in terms of the gyrocenter distribution function, thus including all resonant effects, and represents a systematic FLR expansion in a general form (no assumption of any closure is made). The expression for the gyroviscous force is also calculated in terms of the particle-fluid moments by making the transformation from the gyrocenter to particle coordinates. The calculated expression represents a modification of the Braginskii gyroviscosity for a collisionless plasma with nonuniform temperature. It is compared with previous calculations based on the traditional fluid approach. As a byproduct of the gyroviscosity calculations, we derive a set of nonlinear reduced gyrofluid (and a corresponding set of particle-fluid) moment equations with FLR corrections, which exhibit a generalized form of the ''gyroviscous cancellation.''

  18. The collisionless magnetoviscous-thermal instability

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Tanim

    2014-05-20

    It is likely that nearly all central galactic massive and supermassive black holes are nonradiative: their accretion luminosities are orders of magnitude below what can be explained by efficient black hole accretion within their ambient environments. These objects, of which Sagittarius A* is the best-known example, are also dilute (mildly collisional to highly collisionless) and optically thin. In order for accretion to occur, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities must develop that not only transport angular momentum, but also gravitational energy generated through matter infall, outward. A class of new magnetohydrodynamical fluid instabilities—the magnetoviscous-thermal instability (MVTI)—was found to transport angular momentum and energy along magnetic field lines through large (fluid) viscosities and thermal conductivities. This paper describes the analog to the MVTI, the collisionless MVTI (CMVTI), that similarly transports energy and angular momentum outward, expected to be important in describing the flow properties of hot, dilute, and radiatively inefficient accretion flows around black holes. We construct a local equilibrium for MHD stability analysis in this differentially rotating disk. We then find and characterize specific instabilities expected to be important in describing their flow properties, and show their qualitative similarities to instabilities derived using the fluid formalism. We conclude with further work needed in modeling this class of accretion flow.

  19. Closure of fluid equations in collisionless magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chust, T.; Belmont, G.

    2006-01-15

    The possibility of using fluid equations in collisionless plasmas is revisited, and the conditions of validity of several possible closure equations are investigated. A new derivation of the well-known 'double-adiabatic' Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) laws is first presented. These laws are shown to demand two different kinds of conditions for ensuring (1) particle gyrotropy and (2) adiabaticity. Both kinds of conditions are investigated in detail. The usual slow and large-scales conditions (hereafter 'sls'), which are shown to be necessary for gyrotropy, are provided in a rigorous form. The role of the fundamental symmetries of the system, especially in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, is also emphasized for determining any 'fluid-type' behavior of a collisionless magnetoplasma. More general closure equations are afterwards proposed, relaxing first the conditions for adiabaticity and then, more speculatively, the sls conditions for gyrotropy. The dependence of these new closure equations on the shape of the velocity distribution functions is discussed, the CGL case being singular since it is shown to be fully independent of this shape.

  20. The effect of external magnetic field on the density distributions and electromagnetic fields in the interaction of high-intensity short laser pulse with collisionless underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodi-Darian, Masoomeh; Ettehadi-Abari, Mehdi; Sedaghat, Mahsa

    2016-03-01

    Laser absorption in the interaction between ultra-intense femtosecond laser and solid density plasma is studied theoretically here in the intensity range I{λ^2} ˜eq 10^{14}{-}10^{16}{{W}}{{{cm}}^{-2}} \\upmu{{{m}}2} . The collisionless effect is found to be significant when the incident laser intensity is less than 10^{16}{{W}}{{{cm}}^{-2}}\\upmu{{{m}}2} . In the current work, the propagation of a high-frequency electromagnetic wave, for underdense collisionless plasma in the presence of an external magnetic field is investigated. When a constant magnetic field parallel to the laser pulse propagation direction is applied, the electrons rotate along the magnetic field lines and generate the electromagnetic part in the wake with a nonzero group velocity. Here, by considering the ponderomotive force in attendance of the external magnetic field and assuming the isothermal collisionless plasma, the nonlinear permittivity of the plasma medium is obtained and the equation of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma is solved. Here, by considering the effect of the ponderomotive force in isothermal collisionless magnetized plasma, it is shown that by increasing the laser pulse intensity, the electrons density profile leads to steepening and the electron bunches of plasma become narrower. Moreover, it is found that the wavelength of electric and magnetic field oscillations increases by increasing the external magnetic field and the density distribution of electrons also grows in comparison to the unmagnetized collisionless plasma.

  1. Collisionless shock formation and the prompt acceleration of solar flare ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, P. J.; Goodrich, C. C.; Vlahos, L.

    1988-01-01

    The formation mechanisms of collisionless shocks in solar flare plasmas are investigated. The priamry flare energy release is assumed to arise in the coronal portion of a flare loop as many small regions or 'hot spots' where the plasma beta locally exceeds unity. One dimensional hybrid numerical simulations show that the expansion of these 'hot spots' in a direction either perpendicular or oblique to the ambient magnetic field gives rise to collisionless shocks in a few Omega(i), where Omega(i) is the local ion cyclotron frequency. For solar parameters, this is less than 1 second. The local shocks are then subsequently able to accelerate particles to 10 MeV in less than 1 second by a combined drift-diffusive process. The formation mechanism may also give rise to energetic ions of 100 keV in the shock vicinity. The presence of these energetic ions is due either to ion heating or ion beam instabilities and they may act as a seed population for further acceleration. The prompt acceleration of ions inferred from the Gamma Ray Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission can thus be explained by this mechanism.

  2. Collisionless microtearing modes in large aspect ratio Tokamaks with weak reversed shear configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Swamy, Aditya; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Brunner, Stephan; Vaclavik, Jan; Villard, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Gyrokinetic simulations have found Collisionless Microtearing Modes (MTM) to be linearly unstable in sharp temperature gradient regions of tokamaks, typically with high magnetic shear. The collisionless MTM is driven by the magnetic drift resonance of passing electrons, aided by the closeness of Mode Rational Surfaces (MRS) arising due to the high shear. Here, the role of global safety factor profile variation on the MTM instability and global mode structure is studied, in particular in weak reverse shear (WRS) configurations in large aspect ratio tokamaks. At lower shear profiles, multiple MTM branches are found with tearing parity as well as mixed parity. The linear growth rates of MTM is found to be weakened and linearly unstable modes are found whose global mode structures of φ~ and Ã∥ exhibit Mixed Parity. For the same equilibrium profiles and parameters, AITG instability is also studied and global mode structures are compared with MTM. The growth rate spectrum is found to extend to shorter/mesoscale wavelengths in WRS. Several other characteristics of MTMs and AITG are recovered in the WRS configuration, such as the dependency on free energy source and on plasma β.

  3. Study of electric and magnetic field fluctuations from lower hybrid drift instability waves in the terrestrial magnetotail with the fully kinetic, semi-implicit, adaptive multi level multi domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Norgren, C.; Newman, D.; Goldman, M.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-05-01

    The newly developed fully kinetic, semi-implicit, adaptive multi-level multi-domain (MLMD) method is used to simulate, at realistic mass ratio, the development of the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) in the terrestrial magnetotail over a large wavenumber range and at a low computational cost. The power spectra of the perpendicular electric field and of the fluctuations of the parallel magnetic field are studied at wavenumbers and times that allow to appreciate the onset of the electrostatic and electromagnetic LHDI branches and of the kink instability. The coupling between electric and magnetic field fluctuations observed by Norgren et al. ["Lower hybrid drift waves: Space observations," Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 055001 (2012)] for high wavenumber LHDI waves in the terrestrial magnetotail is verified. In the MLMD simulations presented, a domain ("coarse grid") is simulated with low resolution. A small fraction of the entire domain is then simulated with higher resolution also ("refined grid") to capture smaller scale, higher frequency processes. Initially, the MLMD method is validated for LHDI simulations. MLMD simulations with different levels of grid refinement are validated against the standard semi-implicit particle in cell simulations of domains corresponding to both the coarse and the refined grid. Precious information regarding the applicability of the MLMD method to turbulence simulations is derived. The power spectra of MLMD simulations done with different levels of refinements are then compared. They consistently show a break in the magnetic field spectra at k⊥di˜30 , with di the ion skin depth and k⊥ the perpendicular wavenumber. The break is observed at early simulated times, Ωcit <6 , with Ωci the ion cyclotron frequency. It is due to the initial decoupling of electric and magnetic field fluctuations at intermediate and low wavenumbers, before the development of the electromagnetic LHDI branch. Evidence of coupling between electric and magnetic

  4. Transient-induced climate drift

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, A.; Reinhold, B.; Saha, S. )

    1993-05-01

    The climate drift of various quantities associated with deep, planetary-scale, equilibrated, transient Rossby waves are estimated for the Southern Hemisphere extratropical summer as revealed by the DERF II (Dynamical Extended Range Forecasting) dataset. It is found that the vertical structures of these waves systematically become too baroclinic during the course of integration. There are two time scales associated with this climate drift. There is one very short time scale, estimated to be of the order of one day, when the waves become more barotropic. It is followed by a period when the wave baroclinicity monotonically increases, and after roughly 10 days the model structures appear to have reached their statistically equilibrated state. In the meantime, the kinetic energy of the transient waves decreases substantially to roughly half the observed value. After this initial drop, however, the transient kinetic energy increases again, and it is not clear if an equilibrium value has been reached after 30 days, which is the limit of the DERF II dataset. This third time scale is not found in the quantities directly associated with the vertical structures per se, but it is hypothesized to be a consequence of these errors. A theory is utilized that in a simplified way takes into account the processes that determine the vertical structure of baroclinic waves as well as their robustness as a means of understanding the processes leading to these errors. The implications from this theory are that the formulation and magnitude of the dissipative and diffusive processes in the model are the most likely problem, but there are other possibilities. 37 refs., 10 figs.

  5. The Impact of Geometrical Constraints on Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Aunai, Nico; Kuznetsova, Masha; Frolov, Rebekah; Black, Carrrie

    2012-01-01

    One of the most often cited features associated with collisionless magnetic reconnection is a Hall-type magnetic field, which leads, in antiparallel geometries, to a quadrupolar magnetic field signature. The combination of this out of plane magnetic field with the reconnection in-plane magnetic field leads to angling of magnetic flux tubes out of the plane defined by the incoming magnetic flux. Because it is propagated by Whistler waves, the quadrupolar field can extend over large distances in relatively short amounts of time - in fact, it will extend to the boundary of any modeling domain. In reality, however, the surrounding plasma and magnetic field geometry, defined, for example, by the overall solar wind flow, will in practice limit the extend over which a flux tube can be angled out of the main plain. This poses the question to what extent geometric constraints limit or control the reconnection process and this is the question investigated in this presentation. The investigation will involve a comparison of calculations, where open boundary conditions are set up to mimic either free or constrained geometries. We will compare momentum transport, the geometry of the reconnection regions, and the acceleration if ions and electrons to provide the current sheet in the outflow jet.

  6. The Final-parsec Problem in the Collisionless Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Eugene; Antonini, Fabio; Merritt, David

    2015-09-01

    A binary supermassive black hole loses energy via ejection of stars in a galactic nucleus, until emission of gravitational waves becomes strong enough to induce rapid coalescence. Evolution via the gravitational slingshot requires that stars be continuously supplied to the binary, and it is known that in spherical galaxies the reservoir of such stars is quickly depleted, leading to stalling of the binary at parsec-scale separations. Recent N-body simulations of galaxy mergers and isolated nonspherical galaxies suggest that this stalling may not occur in less idealized systems. However, it remains unclear to what degree these conclusions are affected by collisional relaxation, which is much stronger in the numerical simulations than in real galaxies. In this study, we present a novel Monte Carlo method that can efficiently deal with both collisional and collisionless dynamics, and with galaxy models having arbitrary shapes. We show that without relaxation, the final-parsec problem may be overcome only in triaxial galaxies. Axisymmetry is not enough, but even a moderate departure from axisymmetry is sufficient to keep the binary shrinking. We find that the binary hardening rate is always substantially lower than the maximum possible, “full-loss-cone” rate, and that it decreases with time, but that stellar-dynamical interactions are nevertheless able to drive the binary to coalescence on a timescale ≲1 Gyr in any triaxial galaxy.

  7. Dike/Drift Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  8. Spatiotemporal evolution of ponderomotive electron heating in axially inhomogeneous collisionless plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Sharma, A.

    2013-07-15

    We investigate the spatiotemporal focusing dynamics of a Gaussian laser pulse in preformed collisionless plasma subjected to an axial nonuniformity in the plasma density. In order to follow up the pulse dynamics, a nonlinear Schrödinger wave equation characterizing the beam spot size in space and time frame has been derived and solved numerically to investigate the propagation characteristics as the pulse advances in the plasma. The effect of inhomogeneity on focusing length and ponderomotive electron heating have been analyzed and illustrated graphically. It is seen that ponderomotive heating is quite sensitive to the inhomogeneity parameters and the energy gain by electrons can be optimized by suitable choice of parameters.

  9. Tempest Simulations of Collisionless Damping of the Geodesic-Acoustic Mode in Edge-Plasma Pedestals

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X. Q.; Xiong, Z.; Nevins, W. M.; Gao, Z.; McKee, G. R.

    2008-05-30

    The fully nonlinear (full-f) four-dimensional TEMPEST gyrokinetic continuum code correctly produces the frequency and collisionless damping of geodesic-acoustic modes (GAMs) and zonal flow, with fully nonlinear Boltzmann electrons for the inverse aspect ratio {epsilon} scan and the tokamak safety factor q scan in homogeneous plasmas. TEMPEST simulations show that the GAMs exist in the edge pedestal for steep density and temperature gradients in the form of outgoing waves. The enhanced GAM damping may explain experimental beam emission spectroscopy measurements on the edge q scaling of the GAM amplitude.

  10. Tempest Simulations of Collisionless Damping of the Geodesic-Acoustic Mode in Edge-Plasma Pedestals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. Q.; Xiong, Z.; Gao, Z.; Nevins, W. M.; McKee, G. R.

    2008-05-01

    The fully nonlinear (full-f) four-dimensional TEMPEST gyrokinetic continuum code correctly produces the frequency and collisionless damping of geodesic-acoustic modes (GAMs) and zonal flow, with fully nonlinear Boltzmann electrons for the inverse aspect ratio γ scan and the tokamak safety factor q scan in homogeneous plasmas. TEMPEST simulations show that the GAMs exist in the edge pedestal for steep density and temperature gradients in the form of outgoing waves. The enhanced GAM damping may explain experimental beam emission spectroscopy measurements on the edge q scaling of the GAM amplitude.

  11. A collisionless plasma thruster plume expansion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Mario; Cichocki, Filippo; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    A two-fluid model of the unmagnetized, collisionless far region expansion of the plasma plume for gridded ion thrusters and Hall effect thrusters is presented. The model is integrated into two semi-analytical solutions valid in the hypersonic case. These solutions are discussed and compared against the results from the (exact) method of characteristics; the relative errors in density and velocity increase slowly axially and radially and are of the order of 10-2-10-3 in the cases studied. The plasma density, ion flux and ambipolar electric field are investigated. A sensitivity analysis of the problem parameters and initial conditions is carried out in order to characterize the far plume divergence angle in the range of interest for space electric propulsion. A qualitative discussion of the physics of the secondary plasma plume is also provided.

  12. The stability of a collisionless cosmological shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Simon D. M.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    The P3 M technique is used here to simulate the evolution of collisionless shells in an Omega = 1 universe. Starting from the spherical similarity solution, a bootstrap technique is used to follow the evolution over very large expansion factors. It is found that the overall structure follows the similarity solution for a long period during which bound clumps grow within the shell. At late times the growth of structure depends on induced velocity perturbations in material outside the shell. If such perturbations are suppressed, structure on the shell becomes self-similar. When induced motions in the background medium are included, the evolution at late times is dominated by large-scale modes as predicted by linear stability analysis. The stable final state appears to consist of one or two massive clumps on the edge of a spherical void. The possible application of these results to the origin of galaxies and large-scale structure is discussed.

  13. Dike/Drift Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    E.S. Gaffney

    2003-10-08

    This report documents the model of events associated with a potential intrusion of magma from a volcanic dike into a drift or drifts in the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. The following topics are included in this report: (1) A discussion of dike propagation, which provides the basis for describing the path that a representative dike, or swarm of dikes, would follow during an event. (2) A discussion of magma flow, which evaluates the interaction at the junction of the propagating dike with the drift and the movement of magmatic products into and down drifts and, potentially, through a drift to the surface by way of access drift or a secondary dike opened up along the drift. (3) A discussion of gas flow and conductive cooling of a magma-filled drift, describing how an adjacent drift that has not been intersected by a dike could be affected by post-intrusion phenomena. Note that a gas flow analysis is also addressed in ''Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Form and Waste Packages'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161810]), and those results are consistent with the results presented in this report.

  14. Free Drifting Buoys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Information was exchanged between people directly involved with the development, use, and/or potential use of free drifting buoys. Tracking systems and techniques, where methods and accuracy of optical, radio, radar, satellite, and sonic tracking of free-drifting buoys were discussed. Deployment and retrieval covering methods currently used or planned in the deployment and retrieval of free-drifting buoys from boats, ships, helicopters, fixed platforms, and fixed-wing aircraft were reported. Simulation, sensors, and data emphasizing the status of water circulation modeling, and sensors useful on free-drifting buoys, and data display and analysis were described.

  15. Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection in Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.; Baumjohann, Wolfgang

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection, the merging of oppositely directed magnetic fields that leads to field reconfiguration, plasma heating, jetting and acceleration, is one of the most celebrated processes in collisionless plasmas. It requires the violation of the frozen-in condition which ties gyrating charged particles to the magnetic field inhibiting diffusion. Ongoing reconnection has been identified in near-Earth space as being responsible for the excitation of substorms, magnetic storms, generation of field aligned currents and their consequences, the wealth of auroral phenomena. Its theoretical understanding is now on the verge of being completed. Reconnection takes place in thin current sheets. Analytical concepts proceeded gradually down to the microscopic scale, the scale of the electron skin depth or inertial length, recognizing that current layers that thin do preferentially undergo spontaneous reconnection. Thick current layers start reconnecting when being forced by plasma inflow to thin. For almost half a century the physical mechanism of reconnection has remained a mystery. Spacecraft in situ observations in combination with sophisticated numerical simulations in two and three dimensions recently clarified the mist, finding that reconnection produces a specific structure of the current layer inside the electron inertial (also called electron diffusion) region around the reconnection site, the X line. Onset of reconnection is attributed to pseudo-viscous contributions of the electron pressure tensor aided by electron inertia and drag, creating a complicated structured electron current sheet, electric fields, and an electron exhaust extended along the current layer. We review the general background theory and recent developments in numerical simulation on collisionless reconnection. It is impossible to cover the entire field of reconnection in a short space-limited review. The presentation necessarily remains cursory, determined by our taste, preferences, and kn

  16. Kinetic model for the collisionless sheath of a collisional plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2016-08-01

    Collisional plasmas typically have mean-free-path still much greater than the Debye length, so the sheath is mostly collisionless. Once the plasma density, temperature, and flow are specified at the sheath entrance, the profile variation of electron and ion density, temperature, flow speed, and conductive heat fluxes inside the sheath is set by collisionless dynamics, and can be predicted by an analytical kinetic model distribution. These predictions are contrasted here with direct kinetic simulations, showing good agreement.

  17. Global scale-invariant dissipation in collisionless plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kiyani, K H; Chapman, S C; Khotyaintsev, Yu V; Dunlop, M W; Sahraoui, F

    2009-08-14

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of the dissipation range of collisionless plasma turbulence is presented using in situ high-frequency magnetic field measurements from the Cluster spacecraft in a stationary interval of fast ambient solar wind. The observations, spanning five decades in temporal scales, show a crossover from multifractal intermittent turbulence in the inertial range to non-Gaussian monoscaling in the dissipation range. This presents a strong observational constraint on theories of dissipation mechanisms in turbulent collisionless plasmas. PMID:19792654

  18. Booktalking: Avoiding Summer Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittingham, Jeff; Rickman, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    Summer drift, otherwise known as loss of reading comprehension skills or reading achievement, has been a well-known and well-documented phenomenon of public education for decades. Studies from the late twentieth century to the present have demonstrated a slowdown in summer drift attributed to specific summer reading programs addressing motivation…

  19. Laboratory Experiments on the Generation of Perpendicular, Magnetized Collisionless Shocks by a Laser-Ablated Piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Derek

    2013-10-01

    Collisionless shocks occur ubiquitously in space plasmas and have been extensively studied insitu by spacecraft, though they are inherently limited in their flexibility. We present laboratory experiments utilizing a highly flexible laser geometry at UCLA to study the generation of magnetized, perpendicular collisionless shocks by a super-Alfvénic laser-ablated piston. Experiments were carried out on the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD), which can create a highly reproducible 20 m long by Ø1 m H or He magnetized (<= 2 kG) ambient plasma. The 100 J Raptor laser was used to ablate perpendicular to the background magnetic field a carbon target embedded in the LAPD plasma. Emission spectroscopy revealed a significant spread between laser debris charge states, consistent with 2D hybrid simulations that show fast-moving, highly ionized debris slipping through the ambient plasma, while slower, lower charge states drive a diamagnetic cavity. The cavity grew to several ion gyroradii and lasted around one gyroperiod, large and long enough to act like a piston by allowing laminar fields at the cavity edge to transfer energy from the debris to the background plasma. This is confirmed by spectroscopy, which shows a reduction in debris velocities relative to a non-magnetic case, and Thomson scattering, which shows an increase in electron densities and temperatures in the ambient plasma. An increase in the intensity of the ambient plasma seen by gated imaging also indicates an energetic population of electrons coincident with the cavity edge, while Stark-broadened ambient lines may indicate strong local electric fields. Magnetic flux probes reveal that the cavity launches whistler waves parallel to the background field, as well as a super-Alfvénic magnetosonic wave along the blowoff axis that has a magnetic field compression comparable to the Alfvenic Mach number, consistent with simulations that suggest a weak collisionless shock was formed. Supported by DOE and DTRA.

  20. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-11-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package corrosion or radionuclide transport.

  1. Collisionless relaxation in beam-plasma systems

    SciTech Connect

    Backhaus, Ekaterina Yu.

    2001-05-01

    This thesis reports the results from the theoretical investigations, both numerical and analytical, of collisionless relaxation phenomena in beam-plasma systems. Many results of this work can also be applied to other lossless systems of plasma physics, beam physics and astrophysics. Different aspects of the physics of collisionless relaxation and its modeling are addressed. A new theoretical framework, named Coupled Moment Equations (CME), is derived and used in numerical and analytical studies of the relaxation of second order moments such as beam size and emittance oscillations. This technique extends the well-known envelope equation formalism, and it can be applied to general systems with nonlinear forces. It is based on a systematic moment expansion of the Vlasov equation. In contrast to the envelope equation, which is derived assuming constant rms beam emittance, the CME model allows the emittance to vary through coupling to higher order moments. The CME model is implemented in slab geometry in the absence of return currents. The CME simulation yields rms beam sizes, velocity spreads and emittances that are in good agreement with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for a wide range of system parameters. The mechanism of relaxation is also considered within the framework of the CME system. It is discovered that the rapid relaxation or beam size oscillations can be attributed to a resonant coupling between different modes of the system. A simple analytical estimate of the relaxation time is developed. The final state of the system reached after the relaxation is complete is investigated. New and accurate analytical results for the second order moments in the phase-mixed state are obtained. Unlike previous results, these connect the final values of the second order moments with the initial beam mismatch. These analytical estimates are in good agreement with the CME model and PIC simulations. Predictions for the final density and temperature are developed that show

  2. Evolution Of Nonlinear Waves in Compressing Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit, I.Y. Dodin, and N.J. Fisch

    2011-05-27

    Through particle-in-cell simulations, the evolution of nonlinear plasma waves is examined in one-dimensional collisionless plasma undergoing mechanical compression. Unlike linear waves, whose wavelength decreases proportionally to the system length L(t), nonlinear waves, such as solitary electron holes, conserve their characteristic size {Delta} during slow compression. This leads to a substantially stronger adiabatic amplification as well as rapid collisionless damping when L approaches {Delta}. On the other hand, cessation of compression halts the wave evolution, yielding a stable mode.

  3. Dodging the Drifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is a portion of a mosaic acquired by the panoramic camera. The picture highlights the light-toned outcrop on the rim of 'Erebus Crater' and large, dark, wind-deposited drifts that have filled the center of the crater. Opportunity took this image on the rover's 608th sol (Oct. 9, 2005). The rover is driving west, avoiding the large drifts and crossing the low ripples and outcrop to the right. After traversing to the north of the large drift on the horizon (near the center of the image), Opportunity will drive south to the western rim of the crater.

  4. Electron acceleration to high energies at quasi-parallel shock waves in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, G.; Classen, H.-T.

    1995-01-01

    In the solar corona shock waves are generated by flares and/or coronal mass ejections. They manifest themselves in solar type 2 radio bursts appearing as emission stripes with a slow drift from high to low frequencies in dynamic radio spectra. Their nonthermal radio emission indicates that electrons are accelerated to suprathermal and/or relativistic velocities at these shocks. As well known by extraterrestrial in-situ measurements supercritical, quasi-parallel, collisionless shocks are accompanied by so-called SLAMS (short large amplitude magnetic field structures). These SLAMS can act as strong magnetic mirrors, at which charged particles can be reflected and accelerated. Thus, thermal electrons gain energy due to multiple reflections between two SLAMS and reach suprathermal and relativistic velocities. This mechanism of accelerating electrons is discussed for circumstances in the solar corona and may be responsible for the so-called 'herringbones' observed in solar type 2 radio bursts.

  5. A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. II. CMEs, Shock Waves, and Drifting Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Chertok, I. M.; Slemzin, V. A.; Filippov, B. P.; Egorov, Y. I.; Fainshtein, V. G.; Afanasyev, A. N.; Prestage, N. P.; Temmer, M.

    2014-04-01

    We continue our study (Grechnev et al., 2013, doi:10.1007/s11207-013-0316-6; Paper I) on the 18 November 2003 geoffective event. To understand possible impact on geospace of coronal transients observed on that day, we investigated their properties from solar near-surface manifestations in extreme ultraviolet, LASCO white-light images, and dynamic radio spectra. We reconcile near-surface activity with the expansion of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and determine their orientation relative to the earthward direction. The kinematic measurements, dynamic radio spectra, and microwave and X-ray light curves all contribute to the overall picture of the complex event and confirm an additional eruption at 08:07 - 08:20 UT close to the solar disk center presumed in Paper I. Unusual characteristics of the ejection appear to match those expected for a source of the 20 November superstorm but make its detection in LASCO images hopeless. On the other hand, none of the CMEs observed by LASCO seem to be a promising candidate for a source of the superstorm being able to produce, at most, a glancing blow on the Earth's magnetosphere. Our analysis confirms free propagation of shock waves revealed in the event and reconciles their kinematics with "EUV waves" and dynamic radio spectra up to decameters.

  6. Nonlinear gyrofluid simulations of collisionless reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, D.; Tassi, E.; Waelbroeck, F. L.

    2010-08-15

    The Hamiltonian gyrofluid model recently derived by Waelbroeck et al. [Phys. Plasmas 16, 032109 (2009)] is used to investigate nonlinear collisionless reconnection with a strong guide field by means of numerical simulations. Finite ion Larmor radius gives rise to a cascade of the electrostatic potential to scales below both the ion gyroradius and the electron skin depth. This cascade is similar to that observed previously for the density and current in models with cold ions. In addition to density cavities, the cascades create electron beams at scales below the ion gyroradius. The presence of finite ion temperature is seen to modify, inside the magnetic island, the distribution of the velocity fields that advect two Lagrangian invariants of the system. As a consequence, the fine structure in the electron density is confined to a layer surrounding the separatrix. Finite ion Larmor radius effects produce also a different partition between the electron thermal, potential, and kinetic energy, with respect to the cold-ion case. Other aspects of the dynamics such as the reconnection rate and the stability against Kelvin-Helmholtz modes are similar to simulations with finite electron compressibility but cold ions.

  7. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma.

    PubMed

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-12

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas. PMID:27035981

  8. Expansion techniques for collisionless stellar dynamical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Meiron, Yohai; Li, Baile; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Spurzem, Rainer

    2014-09-10

    We present graphics processing unit (GPU) implementations of two fast force calculation methods based on series expansions of the Poisson equation. One method is the self-consistent field (SCF) method, which is a Fourier-like expansion of the density field in some basis set; the other method is the multipole expansion (MEX) method, which is a Taylor-like expansion of the Green's function. MEX, which has been advocated in the past, has not gained as much popularity as SCF. Both are particle-field methods and optimized for collisionless galactic dynamics, but while SCF is a 'pure' expansion, MEX is an expansion in just the angular part; thus, MEX is capable of capturing radial structure easily, while SCF needs a large number of radial terms. We show that despite the expansion bias, these methods are more accurate than direct techniques for the same number of particles. The performance of our GPU code, which we call ETICS, is profiled and compared to a CPU implementation. On the tested GPU hardware, a full force calculation for one million particles took ∼0.1 s (depending on expansion cutoff), making simulations with as many as 10{sup 8} particles fast for a comparatively small number of nodes.

  9. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A.; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas.

  10. Electrostatic Potential Across Supercritical Collisionless Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Vaivads, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2013-12-01

    Using multi-spacecraft Cluster observations of the Earth's bow shock we estimate the electrostatic potential across a supercritical quasi-perpendicular collisionless shock. We find the potential values of the order of several kV, which correspond roughly to the kinetic energy of the inflowing solar wind. It is expected that the plasma flow in the de Hoffmann-Teller frame is field-aligned, and thus the potential computed in this frame is the parallel potential experienced by both ions and electrons. Contrary to this expectation, we show that most of the potential computed in the de Hoffmann-Teller frame is contributed by sub-proton scale Hall electric field, E~JxB/ne, which exists due to decoupling of electron and ion motions at such small scales (ions are demagnetized, and electrons are still well magnetized), and therefore the electron motion in such field is perpendicular to B. In order to calculate the parallel potential drop experienced by electrons, one needs to go to the 'electron' Hoffmann-Teller frame at small scales, in which the JxB/ne field is zero. In this 'electron' frame we find much smaller values of the potential drop across the shock of the order of 100 eV, which is comparable to the change of electron temperature across the shock, and is in agreement with theoretical estimates.

  11. Collisionless Plasma Turbulence: Insights from Magnetohydrodynamic and Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations and Observations of the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stawarz, Julia E.

    Turbulence is a ubiquitous phenomenon that occurs throughout the universe, in both neutral fluids and plasmas. For collisionless plasmas, kinetic effects, which alter the nonlinear dynamics and result in small-scale dissipation, are still not well understood in the context of turbulence. This work uses direct numerical simulations (DNS) and observations of Earth's magnetosphere to study plasma turbulence. Long-time relaxation in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is examined using DNS with particular focus on the role of magnetic and cross helicity and symmetries of the initial configurations. When strong symmetries are absent or broken through perturbations, flows evolve towards states predicted by statistical mechanics with an energy minimization principle, which features two main regimes; one magnetic helicity dominated and one with quasi-equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energy. The role of the Hall effect, which contributes to the dynamics of collisionless plasmas, is also explored numerically. At scales below the ion inertial length, a transition to a magnetically dominated state, associated with advection becoming subdominant to dissipation, occurs. Real-space current, vorticity, and electric fields are examined. Strong current structures are associated with alignment between the current and magnetic field, which may be important in collisionless plasmas where field-aligned currents can be unstable. Turbulence within bursty bulk flow braking events, thought to be associated with near-Earth magnetotail reconnection, are then studied using the THEMIS spacecraft. It is proposed that strong field-aligned currents associated with turbulent intermittency destabilize into double layers, providing a collisionless dissipation mechanism for the turbulence. Plasma waves may also radiate from the region, removing energy from the turbulence and potentially depositing it in the aurora. Finally, evidence for turbulence in the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) on the

  12. Drift Mode Calculations in Nonaxisymmetric Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt; L.-P. Ku; W.A. Cooper; W.M. Tang

    1999-07-01

    A fully kinetic assessment of the stability properties of toroidal drift modes has been obtained for nonaxisymmetric (stellarator) geometry, in the electrostatic limit. This calculation is a comprehensive solution of the linearized gyrokinetic equation, using the lowest-order ''ballooning representation'' for high toroidal mode number instabilities, with a model collision operator. Results for toroidal drift waves destabilized by temperature gradients and/or trapped particle dynamics are presented, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equilibria generated as part of a design effort for a quasiaxisymmetric stellarator. Comparisons of these results with those obtained for typical tokamak cases indicate that the basic trends are similar.

  13. Gyrokinetic δ f simulation of collisionless and semi-collisional tearing mode instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Weigang; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott

    2004-11-01

    The evolution of collisionless and semi-collisional tearing mode instabilities is studied using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation model that utilizes the δ f-method with the split-weight scheme to enhance the time step, and a novel algorithm(Y. Chen and S.E. Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 198), 463 (2003) to accurately solve the Ampere's equation for experimentally relevant β values, βfracm_im_e≫ 1. We use the model of drift-kinetic electrons and gyrokinetic ions. Linear simulation results are benchmarked with eigenmode analysis for the case of fixed ions. In small box simulations the ions response can be neglected but for large box simulations the ions response is important because the width of perturbed current is larger than ρ_i.The nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands will be studied and the results will be compared with previous theoretical studiesfootnote J.F. Drake and Y. C. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 39, 453 (1977) on the saturation level and the electron bounce frequency. A collision operator is included in the electron drift kinetic equation to study the simulation in the semi-collisional regime. The algebraical growth stage has been observed and compared quantitatively with theory. Our progress on three-dimensional simulations of tearing mode instabilities will be reported.

  14. Lithium drifted germanium system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fjarlie, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    General characteristics of the lithium-drifted germanium photodiode-Dewar-preamplifier system and particular operating instructions for the device are given. Information is included on solving operational problems.

  15. Shearing Box Simulations of the MRI in a Collisionless Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Prateek; Hammett, Gregory, W.; Quataert, Eliot; Stone, James, M.

    2005-08-31

    We describe local shearing box simulations of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless plasma. Collisionless effects may be important in radiatively inefficient accretion flows, such as near the black hole in the Galactic Center. The MHD version of ZEUS is modified to evolve an anisotropic pressure tensor. A fluid closure approximation is used to calculate heat conduction along magnetic field lines. The anisotropic pressure tensor provides a qualitatively new mechanism for transporting angular momentum in accretion flows (in addition to the Maxwell and Reynolds stresses). We estimate limits on the pressure anisotropy due to pitch angle scattering by kinetic instabilities. Such instabilities provide an effective ''collision'' rate in a collisionless plasma and lead to more MHD-like dynamics. We find that the MRI leads to efficient growth of the magnetic field in a collisionless plasma, with saturation amplitudes comparable to those in MHD. In the saturated state, the anisotropic stress is comparable to the Maxwell stress, implying that the rate of angular momentum transport may be moderately enhanced in a collisionless plasma.

  16. Viscous dissipation and radiative transport in magnetic reconnection of collisionless magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Gunsu; Ji, Jeong-Young; Thatipamula, Shekar; Kstar Team

    2015-11-01

    Viscous dissipation rate of magnetic field energy due to wave-like fluctuations in collisionless magnetized plasma is obtained analytically using the exact integral closure for electron fluid viscosity [Ji, Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014)]. For typical high-temperature tokamak plasma, the viscous resistivity is several orders larger than the Spitzer (collisional) resistivity. For magnetic reconnection, it is also found that the radiative transport (i.e. Poynting flux) of the field energy of Alfven waves [Bellan, Phys. Plasmas 5, 3081 (1998)] is comparable to the viscous dissipation. The viscous dissipation is more effective for shorter wavelength fluctuation. The importance of viscous dissipation is supported by broadband emission and chirping-down phenomena observed in the ion cyclotron harmonic frequency range at the crash onset of edge-localized mode on the KSTAR tokamak. Work supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea and the Asia-Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics.

  17. Drift Scale THM Model

    SciTech Connect

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because a sufficient amount of water must be available within a

  18. Ionospheric vertical drift response at a mid-latitude station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, Daniel; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    2016-07-01

    equinox. In general, the detected values of the observed vertical drift are of lower magnitudes compare to low latitudes. Drift data in midlatitudes seems to be more influenced by the atmospheric waves than data in lower latitudes.

  19. Recent advances in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcelli, F.; Borgogno, D.; Califano, F.; Grasso, D.; Ottaviani, M.; Pegoraro, F.

    2002-12-01

    One of the recurring problems in magnetic reconnection is the identification of the appropriate generalized Ohm's law. In weakly collisional plasmas with a strong magnetic guide field component, a fluid model may be adopted, where electron inertia and the electron pressure gradient play important roles. In the absence of collisions, electron inertia provides the mechanism for magnetic field-line breaking. Electron compressibility alters significantly the structure of the reconnection region and allows for faster reconnection rates, which are consistent with the fast relaxation times of sawtooth oscillations in tokamak plasmas. The Hall term may also become important when the guide field is weak. The very possibility of nonlinear, irreversible magnetic reconnection in the absence of dissipation is addressed. We show that in a collisionless plasma, magnetic islands can grow and reach a saturated state in a coarse-grained sense. Magnetic energy is transferred to kinetic energy in smaller and smaller spatial scale lengths through a phase mixing process. The same model is then applied to the interpretation of driven reconnection events in the vicinity of a magnetic X-line observed in the VTF experiment at MIT. The reconnection is driven by externally induced plasma flows in a background magnetic configuration that has a hyperbolic null in the reconnection plane and a magnetic guide field component perpendicular to that plane. In the limit where the guide field is strong, assuming the external drive to be sufficiently weak for a linear approximation to hold, a dynamic evolution of the system is obtained which does not reach a stationary state. The reconnection process develops in two phases: an initial phase, whose characteristic rate is a fraction of the Alfvén frequency, and a later one, whose rate is determined by the electron collision frequency.

  20. The Drifting Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  1. Collisionless Damping of Laser Wakes in Plasma Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Shvets, G.

    1998-08-01

    Excitation of accelerating modes in transversely inhomogeneous plasma channels is considered as an initial value problem. Discrete eigenmodes are supported by plasma channels with sharp density gradients. These eigenmodes are collisionlessly damped as the gradients are smoothed. Using collisionless Landau damping as the analogy, the existence and damping of these "quasi-modes" is studied by constructing and analytically continuing the causal Green's function of wake excitation into the lower half of the complex frequency plane. Electromagnetic nature of the plasma wakes in the channel makes their excitation nonlocal. This results in the algebraic decay of the fields with time due to phase-mixing of plasma oscillations with spatially-varying fequencies. Characteristic decay rate is given by the mixing time, which corresponds to the dephasing of two plasma fluid elements separated by the collisionless skin depth. For wide channels the exact expressions for the field evolution are derived. Implications for electron acceleration in plasma channels are discussed.

  2. Accessing the new collisionless reconnection regime in laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Joseph; Egedal, Jan; Greess, Samuel; Wallace, John; Clark, Michael; Forest, Cary

    2015-11-01

    The Terrestrial Reconnection Experiment (TREX), the largest dedicated reconnection experiment to date, is currently in operation at the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory (WiPAL). In its inaugural run, TREX demonstrated its ability to operate in what has traditionally been called the collisionless reconnection regime by observing the out-of-plane magnetic field characteristic of Hall reconnection. Additionally, TREX is projected to access even more collisionless parameters in which electron pressure anisotropy develops, greatly influencing the dynamics of the reconnection process beyond two fluid effects. For example, spacecraft observations and kinetic simulations show that large-scale current layers are driven by this pressure anisotropy. In the last year, TREX has undergone upgrades to its plasma heating, reconnection drive, and diagnostic suite in order to study these features exclusive to truly collisionless reconnection. Preliminary results from the newly optimized experimental runs will be presented. Supported in part by DoE grant DE-SC0010463.

  3. Gyrokinetic-ion drift-kinetic-electron simulation of the (m = 2, n = 1) cylindrical tearing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Chowdhury, J.; Maksimovic, N.; Parker, S. E.; Wan, W.

    2016-05-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations of (m =2 ,n =1 ) tearing mode in cylindrical plasmas are carried out with kinetic electrons using the split-weight control-variate algorithm [Y. Chen and S. E. Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 220, 839 (2007)]. Radially, global simulation shows global mode structure in agreement with reduced-magnetohydrodynamic eigenmode calculation. Simulations of the tearing layer are verified with analytic results for the collisionless, semi-collisional, and drift-tearing mode.

  4. Drift Degradation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal stress. (3) The DRKBA

  5. SAA drift: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Romashova, V. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth’s magnetic field connected with magnetic moment changing. These variations affect on the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations approved the existence of the SAA westward drift rate (0.1 1.0 deg/year) and northward drift rate (approximately 0.1 deg/year). In this work, we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) onboard different Earth’s artificial satellites (1972 2003). The fluxes of protons with energy >50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy >500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1 1.0 MeV in the SAA region have been analyzed. The mentioned above experimental data were obtained onboard the orbital stations Salut-6 (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the similar experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact that the SAA drifts westward. Moreover the analysis of fluxes of electrons with energy about hundreds keV (Cosmos-484 (1972) and Active (Interkosmos-24, 1991) satellites) verified not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  6. Plasma drifts deduced from resonance cone asymmetries: II. Evaluation of COREX data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, A.; Rohde, V.; Thiemann, H.; Oyama, K. I.

    The data from the COREX instrument are discussed with respect to non-reciprocities in resonance cones for opposing wave propagation directions. The shift of the maxima has a different symmetry from the case of field aligned drifts. Using a generalized drift model the magnitude and direction of the drift is evaluated. Velocities of the order of up to 38 km/s are found. The drift direction is nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  7. PARTICLE ACCELERATION DURING MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN A COLLISIONLESS ACCRETION DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2013-08-20

    Particle acceleration during the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless accretion disk was investigated by using a particle-in-cell simulation. We discuss the important role that magnetic reconnection plays not only on the saturation of MRI but also on the relativistic particle generation. The plasma pressure anisotropy of p > p{sub ||} induced by the action of MRI dynamo leads to rapid growth in magnetic reconnection, resulting in the fast generation of nonthermal particles with a hard power-law spectrum. This efficient particle acceleration mechanism involved in a collisionless accretion disk may be a possible model to explain the origin of high-energy particles observed around massive black holes.

  8. The link between shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Vu, H. X.; Omelchenko, Y. A.; Scudder, J.; Daughton, W.; Dimmock, A.; Nykyri, K.; Wan, M.; Sibeck, D.; Tatineni, M.; Majumdar, A.; Loring, B.; Geveci, B.

    2014-06-01

    Global hybrid (electron fluid, kinetic ions) and fully kinetic simulations of the magnetosphere have been used to show surprising interconnection between shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection. In particular, collisionless shocks with their reflected ions that can get upstream before retransmission can generate previously unforeseen phenomena in the post shocked flows: (i) formation of reconnecting current sheets and magnetic islands with sizes up to tens of ion inertial length. (ii) Generation of large scale low frequency electromagnetic waves that are compressed and amplified as they cross the shock. These "wavefronts" maintain their integrity for tens of ion cyclotron times but eventually disrupt and dissipate their energy. (iii) Rippling of the shock front, which can in turn lead to formation of fast collimated jets extending to hundreds of ion inertial lengths downstream of the shock. The jets, which have high dynamical pressure, "stir" the downstream region, creating large scale disturbances such as vortices, sunward flows, and can trigger flux ropes along the magnetopause. This phenomenology closes the loop between shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection in ways previously unrealized. These interconnections appear generic for the collisionless plasmas typical of space and are expected even at planar shocks, although they will also occur at curved shocks as occur at planets or around ejecta.

  9. The Link Between Shocks, Turbulence, and Magnetic Reconnection in Collisionless Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Vu, H. X.; Omelchenko, Y. A.; Scudder, J.; Daughton, W.; Dimmock, A.; Nykyri, K.; Wan, M.; Sibeck, D.; Tatineni, M.; Majumdar, A.; Loring, B.; Geveci, B.

    2014-01-01

    Global hybrid (electron fluid, kinetic ions) and fully kinetic simulations of the magnetosphere have been used to show surprising interconnection between shocks, turbulence and magnetic reconnection. In particular collisionless shocks with their reflected ions that can get upstream before retransmission can generate previously unforeseen phenomena in the post shocked flows: (i) formation of reconnecting current sheets and magnetic islands with sizes up to tens of ion inertial length. (ii) Generation of large scale low frequency electromagnetic waves that are compressed and amplified as they cross the shock. These 'wavefronts' maintain their integrity for tens of ion cyclotron times but eventually disrupt and dissipate their energy. (iii) Rippling of the shock front, which can in turn lead to formation of fast collimated jets extending to hundreds of ion inertial lengths downstream of the shock. The jets, which have high dynamical pressure, 'stir' the downstream region, creating large scale disturbances such as vortices, sunward flows, and can trigger flux ropes along the magnetopause. This phenomenology closes the loop between shocks, turbulence and magnetic reconnection in ways previously unrealized. These interconnections appear generic for the collisionless plasmas typical of space, and are expected even at planar shocks, although they will also occur at curved shocks as occur at planets or around ejecta.

  10. The link between shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Karimabadi, H.; Omelchenko, Y. A.; Roytershteyn, V.; Vu, H. X.; Scudder, J.; Daughton, W.; Dimmock, A.; Nykyri, K.; Wan, M.; Sibeck, D.; Tatineni, M.; Majumdar, A.; Loring, B.; Geveci, B.

    2014-06-15

    Global hybrid (electron fluid, kinetic ions) and fully kinetic simulations of the magnetosphere have been used to show surprising interconnection between shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection. In particular, collisionless shocks with their reflected ions that can get upstream before retransmission can generate previously unforeseen phenomena in the post shocked flows: (i) formation of reconnecting current sheets and magnetic islands with sizes up to tens of ion inertial length. (ii) Generation of large scale low frequency electromagnetic waves that are compressed and amplified as they cross the shock. These “wavefronts” maintain their integrity for tens of ion cyclotron times but eventually disrupt and dissipate their energy. (iii) Rippling of the shock front, which can in turn lead to formation of fast collimated jets extending to hundreds of ion inertial lengths downstream of the shock. The jets, which have high dynamical pressure, “stir” the downstream region, creating large scale disturbances such as vortices, sunward flows, and can trigger flux ropes along the magnetopause. This phenomenology closes the loop between shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection in ways previously unrealized. These interconnections appear generic for the collisionless plasmas typical of space and are expected even at planar shocks, although they will also occur at curved shocks as occur at planets or around ejecta.

  11. Heat flux and viscosity of ions in the collisionless solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. L.

    1995-01-01

    Between 1 and 2 solar radii, the Coulomb-collision mean free path for thermal ions exceeds the scale height of the solar atmosphere. The expanding solar plasma becomes collisionless and the kinetics of the solar wind are no longer dominated by thermalizing collisions. The usual Braginskii-type expressions for solar wind ion heat flux and viscosity are no longer valid. However, another microscale still exists in the solar wind, dictated by the gyro-radius of ions in the turbulent embedded solar wind magnetic field. Wave-particle interactions will act to isotropize (but not thermalize) particle distributions, and the relevant microscale for this process is the ion gyro-radius. The ion distribution can be modelled as undergoing isotropizing 'collisions,' with the relevant mean free path scaling with gyro-radius. Here, the author presents the heat flux and viscosity expected for solar wind protons which are relaxing to isotropy on a microscale that scales with gyro-radius. The collisionless viscosity and heat flux have a functional dependence different than their collisional analogs. The collisional expressions for ion viscosity and heat flux drastically overestimate the efficiency of diffusive energy and momentum transport actually operative in the solar wind.

  12. The dispersive Alfven wave in the time-stationary limit with a focus on collisional and warm-plasma effects

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, S. M.; Koepke, M. E.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2008-05-15

    A nonlinear, collisional, two-fluid model of uniform plasma convection across a field-aligned current (FAC) sheet, describing the stationary Alfven (StA) wave, is presented. In a previous work, Knudsen showed that, for cold, collisionless plasma [D. J. Knudsen, J. Geophys. Res. 101, 10761 (1996)], the stationary inertial Alfven (StIA) wave can accelerate electrons parallel to a background magnetic field and cause large, time-independent plasma-density variations having spatial periodicity in the direction of the convective flow over a broad range of spatial scales and energies. Knudsen suggested that these fundamental properties of the StIA wave may play a role in the formation of discrete auroral arcs. Here, Knudsen's model has been generalized for warm, collisional plasma. From this generalization, it is shown that nonzero ion-neutral and electron-ion collisional resistivity significantly alters the perpendicular ac and dc structure of magnetic-field-aligned electron drift, and can either dissipate or enhance the field-aligned electron energy depending on the initial value of field-aligned electron drift velocity. It is also shown that nonzero values of plasma pressure increase the dominant Fourier component of perpendicular wavenumber.

  13. Theoretical Studies of Drift-Alfven and Energetic Particle Physics in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chen

    2005-07-06

    Nonlinear equations for the slow space-time evolution of the radial drift-wave envelope and zonal flow amplitude have been self-consistently derived for a model nonuniform tokamak equilibrium within the coherent four-wave drift wave-zonal flow modulation interaction model of Chen, Lin, and White [Phys. Plasmas 7, 3129 (2000)]. Solutions clearly demonstrate turbulence spreading due to nonlinearly dispersiveness and, consequently, the device-size dependence of the saturated wave intensities and transport coefficients.

  14. Drift solitons and shocks in inhomogeneous quantum magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Mahmood, S.

    2008-03-15

    Linear and nonlinear drift waves are studied in inhomogeneous electron-ion quantum magnetoplasma with neutrals in the background. The Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation is derived by using the quantum hydrodynamic model for nonlinear drift waves with quantum corrections. Both soliton and shock solutions are obtained in different limits. It is noticed that the width of the solitary hump is decreased with the increase in the quantum parameter. However this effect is reversed for the solitary dip case. It is also found that oscillatory shock wave is dependent on the quantum parameter. However, the monotonic shock formation is independent of the quantum parameter.

  15. The Q,G-method in physics of collisionless plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V. I. Ender, A. Ya.

    2015-03-15

    An analytic method for analyzing nonstationary processes in collisionless one-dimensional bounded plasma—the Q,G-method—is proposed. Formulas for the distribution function of charged particles escaping from the boundary and moving without collisions in a nonstationary electric field of arbitrary form are obtained. Specific features of the distribution function are revealed and analyzed.

  16. Scaled Laboratory Collisionless Shock Experiments in the Large Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. E.; Schaeffer, D.; Everson, E.; Bondarenko, A.; Winske, D.; Constantin, C.; Niemann, C.

    2013-12-01

    Collisionless shocks in space plasmas have been investigated since the fifties and are typically studied via in-situ satellite observations, which are limited due to the large structure of collisionless shocks in space environments relative to the satellite observation platform. Scaled, repeatable experiments in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA provide a test bed for studying collisionless shocks in the laboratory, where questions of ion and electron heating and acceleration can be addressed and examined in detail. The experiments are performed by ablating a graphite or plastic target using the Raptor kilojoule-class laser facility at UCLA. The laser provides an on-target energy in the range of 100-500 J that drives a super-Alfvénic (MA > 1) debris plasma across a background magnetic field (200-800 G) into the ambient, magnetized LAPD plasma. Typical plasma parameters in the LAPD consist of a H+ or He+ ambient plasma with a core column (diameter > 20 cm ) density ni ~ 1013 cm-3 and electron temperature Te ~ 10 eV embedded in a larger plasma discharge (diameter ~ 80 cm) of density ni ~ 1012 cm-3 and Te ~ 5 eV. The ambient ion temperature is Ti ~ 1 eV. Experimental results from the latest collisionless shock campaign will be presented and compared with two dimensional hybrid simulations of the experiment. Fielded diagnostics include Thomson scattering, ion spectroscopy, magnetic flux probes, Langmuir probes, and microwave reflectometry.

  17. Continental drift before 1900.

    PubMed

    Rupke, N A

    1970-07-25

    The idea that Francis Bacon and other seventeenth and eighteenth century thinkers first conceived the notion of continental drift does not stand up to close scrutiny. The few authors who expressed the idea viewed the process as a catastrophic event. PMID:16057953

  18. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  20. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M&O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report.

  1. Collisionless Plasma Shocks in Striated Electron Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Guio, P.; Pecseli, H. L.

    2010-02-26

    The existence of low frequency waveguide modes of ion acoustic waves is demonstrated in magnetized plasmas for electron temperatures striated along the magnetic field lines. At higher frequencies, in a band between the ion cyclotron and the ion plasma frequency, radiative modes develop and propagate obliquely to the field away from the striation. Arguments for the subsequent formation and propagation of electrostatic shock are presented and demonstrated numerically. For such plasma conditions, the dissipation mechanism is the 'leakage' of the harmonics generated by the wave steepening.

  2. Current layer cascade in collisionless electron-magnetohydrodynamic reconnection and electron compressibility effects

    SciTech Connect

    Del Sarto, D.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear phase of a magnetic field line reconnection instability in a collisionless two-dimensional cold plasma is investigated in the Hall dominated regime, described by the electron-magnetohydrodynamic equations, which corresponds to the frequency range of whistler waves. It is found that the regular pattern of current density layers that forms in the initial nonlinear phase of the reconnection instability is destroyed by the onset of a Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability and the formation of current jets that develop into vortex rings. These processes can be interpreted in terms of a Hasegawa-Mima-type regime inside the magnetic island and lead to the creation of magnetic vortices. It is shown that electron compressibility, which is related to charge separation, tends to stabilize these processes.

  3. Intense laser driven collision-less shock and ion acceleration in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mima, K.; Jia, Q.; Cai, H. B.; Taguchi, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Sanz, J. R.; Honrubia, J.

    2016-05-01

    The generation of strong magnetic field with a laser driven coil has been demonstrated by many experiments. It is applicable to the magnetized fast ignition (MFI), the collision-less shock in the astrophysics and the ion shock acceleration. In this paper, the longitudinal magnetic field effect on the shock wave driven by the radiation pressure of an intense short pulse laser is investigated by theory and simulations. The transition of a laminar shock (electro static shock) to the turbulent shock (electromagnetic shock) occurs, when the external magnetic field is applied in near relativistic cut-off density plasmas. This transition leads to the enhancement of conversion of the laser energy into high energy ions. The enhancement of the conversion efficiency is important for the ion driven fast ignition and the laser driven neutron source. It is found that the total number of ions reflected by the shock increases by six time when the magnetic field is applied.

  4. Laser-Driven Magnetic Pistons Relevant to the Formation of Magnetized Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everson, Erik; Bondarenko, A.; Schaeffer, D.; Constantin, C.; Vincena, S.; Van Compernolle, B.; Clark, S.; Winske, D.; Niemann, C.

    2013-06-01

    To study the dynamics that lead to magnetized collisionless shock formation, laboratory experiments were performed at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) that utilize the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) and the Phoenix Laboratory Raptor laser to drive sub- and super-Alfvénic laser-plasma explosions through the uniform, magnetized ambient-plasma of the LAPD. The 130 J, 25 ns FWHM, 1053 nm Raptor laser pulse ablates a graphite target that produces a debris-plasma capable of driving diamagnetic cavities ≤55 cm (≤3 c/ωpi) for ≤6 gyro-periods in the low-density (2-5×1012 cm-3), magnetized (200-275 G) Hydrogen (or Helium) plasma of the LAPD. With the deployment of magnetic flux probes, the evolution and growth of the magnetic piston can be measured across the experimental volume, as well as the wave dynamics parallel to the background magnetic field.

  5. Collisionless shocks driven by 800 nm laser pulses generate high-energy carbon ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Shen, B. F. Wang, W. P.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Y. Q.; Liang, X. Y.; Leng, Y. X.; Li, R. X. Xu, Z. Z.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.

    2015-01-15

    We present experimental studies on ion acceleration from diamond-like carbon (DLC) foils irradiated by 800 nm, linearly polarized laser pulses with peak intensity of 1.7 × 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2} to 3.5 × 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2} at oblique incidence. Diamond-like carbon foils are heated by the prepulse of a high-contrast laser pulse and expand to form plasmas of near-critical density caused by thermal effect before the arrival of the main pulse. It is demonstrated that carbon ions are accelerated by a collisionless shock wave in slightly overdense plasma excited by forward-moving hot electrons generated by the main pulse.

  6. Collisionless tearing in a field-reversed sheet pinch assuming nonparallel propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quest, K. B.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of collisionless linear tearing is examined assuming a wave vector with a component normal to the equilibrium field. The geometry is defined and the general form of the linear dispersion equation is calculated. The linear theory results when k is parallel to B are reviewed, and Ampere's law is calculated for the external adiabatic region when k times B does not equal zero, using two-fluid theory. A solution is obtained for the approximate form of the perturbed currents and vector potential assuming quasi-parallel k. The resonant current contributions within the singular layer are calculated, obtaining an estimate of the dispersion equation. The form of the adiabatic currents within the singular layer is calculated, showing that an x-z current system persists even in the limit k perpendicular to B goes to zero. Finally, the perturbed vector potential solutions across the singular layer are matched to obtain the shape of the complete eigenfunction.

  7. Excitation of THz hybrid modes in an elliptical dielectric rod waveguide with a cold collisionless unmagnetized plasma column by an annular electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Z.; Heidari-Semiromi, E.; Safari, S.

    2016-06-01

    The dispersion relation of electromagnetic waves propagating in an elliptical plasma waveguide with a cold collisionless unmagnetized plasma column and a dielectric rod is studied analytically. The frequency spectrum of the hybrid waves and the growth rate for excitation of the waves by a thin annular relativistic elliptical electron beam (TAREEB) is obtained. The effects of relative permittivity constant of dielectric rod, geometrical dimensions, plasma frequency, accelerating voltage, and current density of TAREEB on the growth rate and frequency spectra of the waveguide will be investigated.

  8. Introduction to Drift Wave Turbulence Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Garbet, X.

    2004-03-15

    This tutorial presents the techniques that are used to build a transport model from turbulence simulations. Achievements and limitations are reviewed. The main mechanisms leading to an improved confinement are also addressed. The results of turbulence modelling regarding this issue are assessed.

  9. Unconventional ballooning structures for toroidal drift waves

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Hua-sheng Xiao, Yong

    2015-09-15

    With strong gradients in the pedestal of high confinement mode (H-mode) fusion plasmas, gyrokinetic simulations are carried out for the trapped electron and ion temperature gradient modes. A broad class of unconventional mode structures is found to localize at arbitrary poloidal positions or with multiple peaks. It is found that these unconventional ballooning structures are associated with different eigen states for the most unstable mode. At weak gradient (low confinement mode or L-mode), the most unstable mode is usually in the ground eigen state, which corresponds to a conventional ballooning mode structure peaking in the outboard mid-plane of tokamaks. However, at strong gradient (H-mode), the most unstable mode is usually not the ground eigen state and the ballooning mode structure becomes unconventional. This result implies that the pedestal of H-mode could have better confinement than L-mode.

  10. Unconventional ballooning structures for toroidal drift waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hua-sheng; Xiao, Yong

    2015-09-01

    With strong gradients in the pedestal of high confinement mode (H-mode) fusion plasmas, gyrokinetic simulations are carried out for the trapped electron and ion temperature gradient modes. A broad class of unconventional mode structures is found to localize at arbitrary poloidal positions or with multiple peaks. It is found that these unconventional ballooning structures are associated with different eigen states for the most unstable mode. At weak gradient (low confinement mode or L-mode), the most unstable mode is usually in the ground eigen state, which corresponds to a conventional ballooning mode structure peaking in the outboard mid-plane of tokamaks. However, at strong gradient (H-mode), the most unstable mode is usually not the ground eigen state and the ballooning mode structure becomes unconventional. This result implies that the pedestal of H-mode could have better confinement than L-mode.

  11. A modified WKB formulation for linear eigenmodes of a collisionless self-gravitating disc in the epicyclic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulati, Mamta; Saini, Tarun Deep

    2016-04-01

    The short-wave asymptotics (WKB) of spiral density waves in self-gravitating stellar discs is well suited for the study of the dynamics of tightly-wound wavepackets. But the textbook WKB theory is not well adapted to the study of the linear eigenmodes in a collisionless self-gravitating disc because of the transcendental nature of the dispersion relation. We present a modified WKB theory of spiral density waves, for collisionless discs in the epicyclic limit, in which the perturbed gravitational potential is related to the perturbed surface density by the Poisson integral in Kalnaj's logarithmic spiral form. An integral equation is obtained for the surface density perturbation, which is seen to also reduce to the standard WKB dispersion relation. Although our formulation is general and applies to all discs, we present our analysis only for nearly Keplerian, low-mass, self-gravitating discs revolving around massive central objects, and derive an integral equation governing the slow precessional modes of such discs. For a prograde disc, the integral kernel turns out be real and symmetric, implying that all slow modes are stable. We apply the slow mode integral equation to two unperturbed disc profiles, the Jalali-Tremaine annular discs, and the Kuzmin disc. We determine eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for both m = 1 and m = 2 slow modes for these profiles and discuss their properties. Our results compare well with those of Jalali-Tremaine.

  12. A modified WKB formulation for linear eigenmodes of a collisionless self-gravitating disc in the epicyclic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulati, Mamta; Saini, Tarun Deep

    2016-07-01

    The short-wave asymptotics (WKB) of spiral density waves in self-gravitating stellar discs is well suited for the study of the dynamics of tightly-wound wavepackets. But the textbook WKB theory is not well adapted to the study of the linear eigenmodes in a collisionless self-gravitating disc because of the transcendental nature of the dispersion relation. We present a modified WKB theory of spiral density waves, for collisionless discs in the epicyclic limit, in which the perturbed gravitational potential is related to the perturbed surface density by the Poisson integral in Kalnaj's logarithmic spiral form. An integral equation is obtained for the surface density perturbation, which is seen to also reduce to the standard WKB dispersion relation. Although our formulation is general and applies to all discs, we present our analysis only for nearly Keplerian, low-mass, self-gravitating discs revolving around massive central objects, and derive an integral equation governing the slow precessional modes of such discs. For a prograde disc, the integral kernel turns out be real and symmetric, implying that all slow modes are stable. We apply the slow mode integral equation to two unperturbed disc profiles, the Jalali-Tremaine annular discs, and the Kuzmin disc. We determine eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for both m = 1 and m = 2 slow modes for these profiles and discuss their properties. Our results compare well with those of Jalali-Tremaine.

  13. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  14. Narrowband frequency-drift structures in solar type IV bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Yukio; Ono, Takayuki; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Misawa, Hiroaki; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Katoh, Yuto; Masuda, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2013-12-01

    We have established the Zao Solar Radiospectrograph (ZSR), a new solar radio observation system, at the Zao observatory of Tohoku University, Japan. We observed narrowband fine structures with type IV bursts with ZSR on 2 and 3 November 2008. The observed fine structures are similar to fiber bursts in terms of the drift rates and the existence of emission and absorption stripes. Statistical analysis of the drift rates, however, shows that the observed fine structures are different from the ordinary fiber bursts as regards the sense and the magnitude of their drift rates. First, the observed drift rates include both positive and negative rates, whereas ordinary fiber bursts are usually characterized by negative drift rates. Second, the absolute values of the observed drift rates are tens of MHz s-1, whereas the typical drift rate of fiber bursts at 325 MHz is approximately -9 MHz s-1. In addition, all fine structures analyzed have narrow emission bands of less than 17 MHz. We also show that the observed narrowband emission features with drift rates of approximately 40 MHz s-1 can be interpreted as the propagation of whistler-mode waves, which is the same process as that underlying fiber bursts.

  15. Relativistic tearing and drift-kink instabilities in two-fluid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkov, Maxim V.; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2016-05-01

    The stability of current sheets in collisionless relativistic pair plasma was studied via two-dimensional two-fluid relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations with vanishing internal friction between fluids. In particular, we investigated the linear growth of the tearing and drift-kink modes in the current sheets both with and without the guide field and obtained the growth rates which are very similar to what has been found in the corresponding particle in cell (PIC) simulations. This suggests that the two-fluid simulations can be useful in studying the large-scale dynamics of astrophysical relativistic plasmas in problems involving magnetic reconnection.

  16. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ferreira, Ix-B.; García-Herrera, J.; Villaseñor, L.

    2006-09-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas.

  17. Preferential heating of oxygen 5+ ions by finite-amplitude oblique Alfvén waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Yana G.; Viñas, Adolfo; Araneda, Jaime; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-03-01

    Minor ions in the fast solar wind are known to have higher temperatures and to flow faster than protons in the interplanetary space. In this study we combine previous research on parametric instability theory and 2.5D hybrid simulations to study the onset of preferential heating of Oxygen 5+ ions by large-scale finite-amplitude Alfvén waves in the collisionless fast solar wind. We consider initially non-drifting isotropic multi-species plasma, consisting of isothermal massless fluid electrons, kinetic protons and kinetic Oxygen 5+ ions. The external energy source for the plasma heating and energization are oblique monochromatic Alfvén-cyclotron waves. The waves have been created by rotating the direction of initial parallel pump, which is a solution of the multi-fluid plasma dispersion relation. We consider propagation angles θ ≤ 30°. The obliquely propagating Alfvén pump waves lead to strong diffusion in the ion phase space, resulting in highly anisotropic heavy ion velocity distribution functions and proton beams. We discuss the application of the model to the problems of preferential heating of minor ions in the solar corona and the fast solar wind.

  18. Floating potential and collisionless ion drag force on a spherical grain under weakly magnetized conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patacchini, Leonardo; Hutchinson, Ian H.

    2007-11-01

    The interaction of a spherical object with a collisionless plasma under weakly magnetized conditions is investigated by means of the PIC code SCEPTIC [1]. The key features of this 2D3v electrostatic ion kinetic code are a spherical geometry accurately resolving the collector's edge, and a Boltzmann treatment of the electrons, whose current is calculated using a recently developed empirical formula accounting for their magnetization [2]. By asymmetrically reducing the ion and electron fluxes to the collector, the magnetic field (B) has a strong influence on the floating potential (φf). The non monotonic dependence of φf on B is documented for a wide range of plasma parameters relevant to probes and dust particles. The magnetic field is also shown to reduce the ion focusing effects present in an unmagnetized plasma when the drift velocity is non negligible, thus the electrostatic part of the ion drag force. This effect is compared with the variation of the electron-ion Coulomb collision frequency with the local magnetic field.[1] I.H. Hutchinson PPCF 47, 71-87 (2005)[2] L. Patacchini et al. Phys. Plasma 14, 062111 (2007)

  19. Collisionless current collection by a spherical particle in a flowing, weakly magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patacchini, Leonardo; Hutchinson, Ian H.

    2007-04-01

    Collisionless-plasma current collection by a spherical object such as a dust particle or probe under weakly magnetized conditions (Larmor radius larger than particle radius) is an important, long-studied, but analytically intractable problem. We solve it computationally by means of the hybrid Boltzmann/Particle-in-Cell code SCEPTIC[1] for a wide range of parameters, with finite Debye length. In addition to reducing the ion current, the magnetic field is shown to cancel the ion focusing effects present in an unmagnetized plasma when the drift velocity is comparable to the sound speed. Thus, the magnetic field prevents such phenomena as the reversal of angular flux density asymmetry (greater collection on the downstream side) or the local maximum of the drag force. The floating potential dependence on the ratio of the probe radius to Larmor radius is computed using a newly developed empirical formula for the electron current, which is also documented. [1] I.H. Hutchinson, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 45 (2003)

  20. Collisionless Weibel Shocks and Electron Acceleration in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardaneh, Kazem; Cai, Dongsheng; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Lembége, Bertrand

    2015-09-01

    A study of collisionless external shocks in gamma-ray bursts is presented. The shock structure, electromagnetic field, and process of electron acceleration are assessed by performing a self-consistent 3D particle-in-cell simulation. In accordance with hydrodynamic shock systems, the shock consists of a reverse shock (RS) and forward shock separated by a contact discontinuity. The development and structure are controlled by the ion Weibel instability. The ion filaments are sources of strong transverse electromagnetic fields at both sides of the double shock structure over a length of 30-100 ion skin depths. Electrons are heated up to a maximum energy {ɛ }{ele}≈ \\sqrt{{ɛ }{{b}}}, where ɛ is the energy normalized to the total incoming energy. Jet electrons are trapped in the RS transition region due to the presence of an ambipolar electric field and reflection by the strong transverse magnetic fields in the shocked region. In a process similar to shock surfing acceleration for ions, electrons experience drift motion and acceleration by ion filament transverse electric fields in the plane perpendicular to the shock propagation direction. Ultimately, accelerated jet electrons are convected back into the upstream.

  1. Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Collisionless Driven Reconnection with Open Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimas, Alex; Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji; Kuznetsova, Maria

    2010-01-01

    First results are discussed from an ongoing study of driven collisionless reconnection using a 2 1/2-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation model with open inflow and outflow boundaries. An extended electron diffusion region (EEDR) is defined as that region surrounding a reconnecting neutral line in which the out-of-plane nonideal electric field is positive. It is shown that the boundaries of this region in the directions of the outflow jets are at the positions where the electrons make the transition from unfrozen meandering motion in the current sheet to outward drifting with the magnetic field in the outflow jets; a turning length scale is defined to mark these positions, The initial width of the EEDR in the inflow directions is comparable to the electron bounce width. Later. as shoulders develop to form a two-scale structure. thc EEDR width expands to the ion bounce width scale. The inner portion of the EEDR or the electron diffusion region proper remains at the electron bounce width. Two methods are introduced for predicting the reconnection electric field using the dimensions of the EEDR. These results are interpreted as further evidence that the EEDR is the region that is relevant to understanding the electron role in the neutral line vicinity.

  2. Drift Resonance in High Density Nonneutral Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaup, D. J.

    2005-10-01

    Theoretical studies of the operation of crossed-field electron vacuum devices, such as magnetrons and crossed-field amplifiers (CFA), have usually centered on their initial growth, taking this as an indication of their operating modes. In such an analysis, one solves the equations for the density profile and other features of these devices. However what one actually obtains are only the conditions for the initial operation of the device. Eventually the rf fields will saturate, at which time, an operating device will settle into a stationary operating regime, called the ``saturation stage,'' which is where the device simply delivers rf power. Here there is a different set of physical interactions occuring. The amplitudes have saturated and the ponderomotive forces and nonlinear diffusion of the initiation stage have vanished. In this saturation stage, we now find three new rf modes appearing, in addition to the two modes of the initiation stage. These three new modes have very fast oscillations in the vertical direction: one fast mode corresponds to a plasma drift wave, while the other two fast modes are cyclotron-like modes. In this presentation, we will describe how the fast plasma drift wave interacts with the slow modes at the diocotron resonance. In particular, we will determine the conversion coefficients for the crossing of the drift mode with the slow modes at the diocotron resonance.

  3. Generalized Kinetic Description of Steady-State Collisionless Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Liemohn, M. W.; Krivorutsky, E. N.

    1997-01-01

    We present a general solution to the collisionless Boltzmann (Vlasov) equation for a free-flowing plasma along a magnetic field line using Liouville's theorem, allowing for an arbitrary potential structure including non-monotonicities. The constraints of the existing collisionless kinetic transport models are explored, and the need for a more general approach to the problem of self- consistent potential energy calculations is described. Then a technique that handles an arbitrary potential energy distribution along the field line is presented and discussed. For precipitation of magnetospherically trapped hot plasma, this model yields moment calculations that vary by up to a factor of two for various potential energy structures with the same total potential drop. The differences are much greater for the high-latitude outflow scenario, giving order of magnitude variations depending on the shape of the potential energy distribution.

  4. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    SciTech Connect

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2015-11-17

    We found that the infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We also discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behaviour of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results are used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the Big Flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic, and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.

  5. Magnetized collisionless shock studies using high velocity plasmoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Thomas; Intrator, Thomas; Gao, Kevin

    2012-10-01

    Magnetized collisionless shocks are ubiquitous throughout the cosmos and are observed to accelerate particles to relativistic velocities, amplify magnetic fields, transport energy, and create non-thermal distributions. They exhibit transitional scale lengths much shorter than the collisional mean free path and are mediated by collective interactions rather than Coulomb collisions. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) leverages advances in Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoid formation and acceleration to produce highly supersonic and super-Alfvènic supercritical shocks with pre-existing magnetic field at perpendicular, parallel or oblique angles to the direction of propagation. Adjustable shock speed, density, and magnetic field provide unique access to a range of parameter space relevant to a variety of naturally occurring shocks. This effort examines experimentally, analytically, and numerically the physics of collisionless shock formation, structure, and kinetic effects in a laboratory setting and draw comparisons between experimental data and astronomical observations. Approved for Public Release: LA-UR-12-22886

  6. Collisionless "thermalization" in the sheath of an argon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulette, David; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We performed kinetic Vlasov simulations of the plasma-wall transition for a low-pressure argon discharge without external magnetic fields, using the same plasma parameters as in the experiments of Claire et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 062103 (2006)]. Experimentally, it was found that the ion velocity distribution function is highly asymmetric in the presheath, but, surprisingly, becomes again close to Maxwellian inside the sheath. Here, we show that this "thermalization" can be explained by purely collisionless effects that are akin to the velocity bunching phenomenon observed in charged particles beams. Such collisionless thermalization is also observed in the presheath region close to the sheath entrance, although it is much weaker there and in practice probably swamped by collisional processes (standard or enhanced by instabilities).

  7. Collisionless shock experiments with lasers and observation of Weibel instabilitiesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H.-S.; Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Kugland, N. L.; Kuranz, C. C.; Lamb, D. Q.; Levy, M. C.; Li, C. K.; Meinecke, J.; Morita, T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Pollock, B. B.; Remington, B. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M.; Ross, J. S.; Ryutov, D. D.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Takabe, H.; Turnbull, D. P.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weber, S. V.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2015-05-01

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are common in the universe, occurring in supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, and protostellar jets. They appear in colliding plasma flows when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions is much larger than the system size. It is believed that such shocks could be mediated via the electromagnetic Weibel instability in astrophysical environments without pre-existing magnetic fields. Here, we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers and investigate the dynamics of high-Mach-number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Our recent proton-probe experiments on Omega show the characteristic filamentary structures of the Weibel instability that are electromagnetic in nature with an inferred magnetization level as high as ˜1% [C. M. Huntington et al., "Observation of magnetic field generation via the weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows," Nat. Phys. 11, 173-176 (2015)]. These results imply that electromagnetic instabilities are significant in the interaction of astrophysical conditions.

  8. Simulations of Relativistic Collisionless Shocks: Shock Structure and Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-10

    We discuss 3D simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks in electron-positron pair plasmas using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The shock structure is mainly controlled by the shock's magnetization (''sigma'' parameter). We demonstrate how the structure of the shock varies as a function of sigma for perpendicular shocks. At low magnetizations the shock is mediated mainly by the Weibel instability which generates transient magnetic fields that can exceed the initial field. At larger magnetizations the shock is dominated by magnetic reflections. We demonstrate where the transition occurs and argue that it is impossible to have very low magnetization collisionless shocks in nature (in more than one spatial dimension). We further discuss the acceleration properties of these shocks, and show that higher magnetization perpendicular shocks do not efficiently accelerate nonthermal particles in 3D. Among other astrophysical applications, this may pose a restriction on the structure and composition of gamma-ray bursts and pulsar wind outflows.

  9. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    The infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behavior of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results are used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the big flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.

  10. Exploring the nature of collisionless shocks under laboratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stockem, A.; Fiuza, F.; Bret, A.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-01-01

    Collisionless shocks are pervasive in astrophysics and they are critical to understand cosmic ray acceleration. Laboratory experiments with intense lasers are now opening the way to explore and characterise the underlying microphysics, which determine the acceleration process of collisionless shocks. We determine the shock character – electrostatic or electromagnetic – based on the stability of electrostatic shocks to transverse electromagnetic fluctuations as a function of the electron temperature and flow velocity of the plasma components, and we compare the analytical model with particle-in-cell simulations. By making the connection with the laser parameters driving the plasma flows, we demonstrate that shocks with different and distinct underlying microphysics can be explored in the laboratory with state-of-the-art laser systems. PMID:24488212

  11. Collisionless shock experiments with lasers and observation of Weibel instabilities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Park, H. -S.; Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Kugland, N. L.; Kuranz, C. C.; Lamb, D. Q.; et al

    2015-05-13

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are common in the universe, occurring in supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, and protostellar jets. They appear in colliding plasma flows when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions is much larger than the system size. It is believed that such shocks could be mediated via the electromagnetic Weibel instability in astrophysical environments without preexisting magnetic fields. Here, we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers and investigate the dynamics of high-Mach-number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Our recent proton-probe experiments on Omega show the characteristic filamentary structures of the Weibel instability that are electromagneticmore » in nature with an inferred magnetization level as high as ~1% These results imply that electromagnetic instabilities are significant in the interaction of astrophysical conditions.« less

  12. Collisionless shock formation, spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations, and streaming instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.; Stockem, A.; Fiuza, F.; Silva, L. O.; Narayan, R.

    2013-04-15

    Collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysics and in the lab. Recent numerical simulations and experiments have shown how they can arise from the encounter of two collisionless plasma shells. When the shells interpenetrate, the overlapping region turns unstable, triggering the shock formation. As a first step towards a microscopic understanding of the process, we analyze here in detail the initial instability phase. On the one hand, 2D relativistic Particle-In-Cell simulations are performed where two symmetric initially cold pair plasmas collide. On the other hand, the instabilities at work are analyzed, as well as the field at saturation and the seed field which gets amplified. For mildly relativistic motions and onward, Weibel modes govern the linear phase. We derive an expression for the duration of the linear phase in good agreement with the simulations. This saturation time constitutes indeed a lower-bound for the shock formation time.

  13. Collisionless shock experiments with lasers and observation of Weibel instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H. -S.; Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Kugland, N. L.; Kuranz, C. C.; Lamb, D. Q.; Levy, M. C.; Li, C. K.; Meinecke, J.; Morita, T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Pollock, B. B.; Remington, B. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M.; Ross, J. S.; Ryutov, D. D.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Takabe, H.; Turnbull, D. P.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weber, S. V.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2015-05-13

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are common in the universe, occurring in supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, and protostellar jets. They appear in colliding plasma flows when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions is much larger than the system size. It is believed that such shocks could be mediated via the electromagnetic Weibel instability in astrophysical environments without preexisting magnetic fields. Here, we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers and investigate the dynamics of high-Mach-number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Our recent proton-probe experiments on Omega show the characteristic filamentary structures of the Weibel instability that are electromagnetic in nature with an inferred magnetization level as high as ~1% These results imply that electromagnetic instabilities are significant in the interaction of astrophysical conditions.

  14. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We found that the infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We also discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behaviour of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results aremore » used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the Big Flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic, and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.« less

  15. Collisionless reconnection driven bulk heating of electrons on TREX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Joseph; Egedal, Jan; Greess, Samuel; Wallace, John; Clark, Michael; Forest, Cary

    2015-11-01

    The mechanism for particle heating during magnetic reconnection is an open topic in plasma physics research. Addressing this issue is a major concern for theory, observation, and experiment alike. Recently, a new model has been proposed to explain the bulk heating of electrons during collisionless reconnection, predicting that the heating scales inversely with the plasma beta. The new Terrestrial Reconnection Experiment (TREX) aims to examine this energy partition in a laboratory plasma. By reducing the collisionality in the experiment, the upstream electron pressure should become anisotropic due to adiabatic trapping, making TREX the first reconnection experiment able to access the necessary parameters to study these plasma dynamics. Preliminary analysis from the TREX magnetic flux probe array will be presented, characterizing the electron diffusion region in for collisionless magnetic reconnection. Supported in part by DoE grant DE-SC0010463.

  16. Collisionless pitch-angle scattering of runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Yulei; Qin, Hong

    2016-06-01

    It is discovered that the tokamak field geometry generates a toroidicity induced broadening of the pitch-angle distribution of runaway electrons. This collisionless pitch-angle scattering is much stronger than the collisional scattering and invalidates the gyro-center model for runaway electrons. As a result, the energy limit of runaway electrons is found to be larger than the prediction of the gyro-center model and to depend heavily on the background magnetic field.

  17. Kinetics of the Collisionless Expansion of Spherical Nanoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Peano, F.; Peinetti, F.; Mulas, R.; Coppa, G.; Silva, L.O.

    2006-05-05

    The collisionless expansion of spherical plasmas composed of cold ions and hot electrons is analyzed using a novel kinetic model, with special emphasis on the influence of the electron dynamics. Simple, general laws are found, relating the relevant expansion features to the initial conditions of the plasma, determined from a single dimensionless parameter. A transition is identified in the behavior of the ion energy spectrum, which is monotonic only for high electron temperatures, otherwise exhibiting a local peak far from the cutoff energy.

  18. How to Patch Active Plasma and Collisionless Sheath: Practical Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-08-22

    Most plasmas have a very thin sheath compared with the plasma dimension. This necessitates separate calculations of the plasma and sheath. The Bohm criterion provides the boundary condition for calculation of plasma profiles. To calculate sheath properties, a value of electric field at the plasma-sheath interface has to be specified in addition to the Bohm criterion. The value of the boundary electric field and robust procedure to approximately patch plasma and collisionless sheath with a very good accuracy are reported.

  19. Collisionless Reconnection in an Electron-Positron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bessho, N.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2005-12-09

    Electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of fast collisionless reconnection in a two-dimensional electron-positron plasma (without an equilibrium guide field) are presented. A generalized Ohm's law in which the Hall current cancels out exactly is given. It is suggested that the key to fast reconnection in this plasma is the localization caused by the off-diagonal components of the pressure tensors, which produce an effect analogous to a spatially localized resistivity.

  20. Collisionless reconnection in an electron-positron plasma.

    PubMed

    Bessho, N; Bhattacharjee, A

    2005-12-01

    Electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of fast collisionless reconnection in a two-dimensional electron-positron plasma (without an equilibrium guide field) are presented. A generalized Ohm's law in which the Hall current cancels out exactly is given. It is suggested that the key to fast reconnection in this plasma is the localization caused by the off-diagonal components of the pressure tensors, which produce an effect analogous to a spatially localized resistivity. PMID:16384388

  1. Non-Neutral Drift Resonance in Magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaup, D. J.

    2005-04-01

    We study the features of the RF fields in a magnetron, when the RF amplitude has saturated, in the nonrelativistic, electrostatic limit. In this saturated stage, the linear RF equations can be reduced to a fifth-order set of ordinary differential equations. Two modes of which are fast cyclotron modes, one mode is a fast drift wave, and the other two modes are the usual, well-known, slow magnetron modes. Here, we will study the interaction between the fast drift mode (diocotron mode) and the slow magnetron modes, at the diocotron resonance. We will also show that the fast cyclotron modes can be ignored at this resonance, and thereby can reduce the system to a third- order set of ordinary differential equations. Using multiscale techniques, we will then obtain solutions for the inner and the outer regions at the diocotron resonance, and thereby obtain the conversion and transmission rates between these three modes at the diocotron resonance.

  2. Vlasov simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection without background density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, H.; Grauer, R.

    2008-02-01

    A standard starting point for the simulation of collisionless reconnection is the Harris equilibrium which is made up of a current sheet that separates two regions of opposing magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of collisionless reconnection usually include a homogeneous background density for reasons of numerical stability. While, in some cases, this is a realistic assumption, the background density may introduce new effects both due to the more involved structure of the distribution function or due to the fact that the Alfvèn speed remains finite far away from the current sheet. We present a fully kinetic Vlasov simulation of the perturbed Harris equilibrium using a Vlasov code. Parameters are chosen to match the Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) Magnetic Reconnection Challenge but excluding the background density. This allows to compare with earlier simulations [Schmitz H, Grauer R. Kinetic Vlasov simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection. Phys Plasmas 2006;13:092309] which include the background density. It is found that the absence of a background density causes the reconnection rate to be higher. On the other hand, the time until the onset of reconnection is hardly affected. Again the off diagonal elements of the pressure tensor are found to be important on the X-line but with modified importance for the individual terms.

  3. Linear theory for fast collisionless magnetic reconnection in the lower-hybrid frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, D.; Shukla, P. K.

    2005-05-01

    A linear theory is presented for the interplay between the fast collisionless magnetic reconnection and the lower-hybrid waves that has been observed in recent computer simulations [J. F. Drake, M. Swisdak, C. Cattell et al., Science 299, 873 (2003)]. In plasma configurations with a strong guide field and anisotropic electron temperature, the electron dynamics is described within the framework of standard electron magnetohydrodynamic equations, accounting also for the effects of the electron polarization and ion motions in the presence of perpendicular electric fields. In the linear phase, we find two types of instabilities of a thin current sheet with steep edges, corresponding to its filamentation (or tearing) and bending. Using a surface-wave formalism for the perturbations whose wavelength is larger than the thickness of the current sheet, the corresponding growth rates are calculated as the contributions of singularities in the plasma dispersion function. These are governed by the electron inertia and the linear coupling of the reconnecting magnetic field with local plasma modes propagating in the perpendicular direction that are subject to the Buneman instability. The linear surface wave instability may be particularly important as a secondary instability, dissipating the thin current sheets that develop in the course of the fast reconnection in the shear-Alfvén and kinetic-Alfvén regimes, and providing the anomalous resistivity for the growth of magnetic islands beyond the shear-Alfvén and kinetic-Alfvén scales.

  4. Drift in toroidal configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelidis, E. A.

    1990-12-01

    This paper considers possible mechanisms involved in amplifying the drift velocity of plasma particles, under conditions of toroidal geometry. It is shown that particles constrained to move on an axisymmetric circular spheroidal surface, develop a sinusoidal motion with a characteristic frequency which depends on the energy of the particles, the value of the isoflux surface, and the value of the general momentum. It is also shown that the incorporation of the effects of toroidal geometry in the Lorentz equation produces a nonambipolar charge-dependent particle flux amplified by a factor 2(q/epsilon) squared.

  5. Spaced antenna drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royrvik, O.

    1983-01-01

    It has been suggested that the spaced antenna drift (SAD) technique could be successfully used by VHF radars and that it would be superior to a Doppler-beam-swinging (DBS) technique because it would take advantage of the aspect sensitivity of the scattered signal, and might also benefit from returns from single meteors. It appears, however, that the technique suffers from several limitations. On the basis of one SAD experiment performed at the very large Jicamarca radar, it is concluded that the SAD technique can be compared in accuracy to the DBS technique only if small antenna dimensions are used.

  6. Steady-State Electrostatic Layers From Weibel Instability in Relativistic Collisionless Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Milosavljevic, Milos; Nakar, Ehud; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-08-04

    It is generally accepted that magnetic fields generated in the nonlinear development of the transverse Weibel instability provide effective collisionality in unmagnetized collisionless shocks. Recently, extensive two and three dimensional simulations improved our understanding of the growth and saturation of the instability in colliding plasma shells. However, the steady-state structure of the shock wave transition layers remains poorly understood. We use basic physical considerations and order-of-magnitude arguments to study the steady state structure in relativistic unmagnetized collisionless shocks in pair plasmas. The shock contains an electrostatic layer resulting from the formation of stationary, magnetically-focused current filaments. The filaments form where the cold upstream plasma and the counterstreaming thermal plasma interpenetrate. The filaments are not entirely neutral and strong electrostatic fields are present. Most of the downstream particles cannot cross this layer into the upstream because they are trapped by the electrostatic field. We identify the critical location in the shock transition layer where the electromagnetic field ceases to be static. At this location, the degree of charge separation in the filaments reaches a maximum value, the current inside the filaments comes close to the Alfven limit, and the phase space distribution function starts to isotropize. We argue that the radius of the current filaments upstream of the critical location is about twice the upstream plasma skin depth. Finally, we show that some downstream particles cross the electrostatic layer and run ahead of the shock into the preshock medium without causing instability. These particles may play an important role in particle acceleration.

  7. Fingermark ridge drift.

    PubMed

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification. PMID:26646735

  8. Approximate Stokes Drift Profiles and their use in Ocean Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, Oyvind; Bidlot, Jea-Raymond; Janssen, Peter A. E. M.; Mogensen, Kristian

    2016-04-01

    Deep-water approximations to the Stokes drift velocity profile are explored as alternatives to the monochromatic profile. The alternative profiles investigated rely on the same two quantities required for the monochromatic profile, viz the Stokes transport and the surface Stokes drift velocity. Comparisons against parametric spectra and profiles under wave spectra from the ERA-Interim reanalysis and buoy observations reveal much better agreement than the monochromatic profile even for complex sea states. That the profiles give a closer match and a more correct shear has implications for ocean circulation models since the Coriolis-Stokes force depends on the magnitude and direction of the Stokes drift profile and Langmuir turbulence parameterizations depend sensitively on the shear of the profile. Of the two Stokes drift profiles explored here, the profile based on the Phillips spectrum is by far the best. In particular, the shear near the surface is almost identical to that influenced by the f‑5 tail of spectral wave models. The NEMO general circulation ocean model was recently extended to incorporate the Stokes-Coriolis force along with two other wave-related effects. The ECWMF coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean ensemble forecast system now includes these wave effects in the ocean model component (NEMO).

  9. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    SciTech Connect

    J. Houseworth

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  10. Oblique firehose instability in hot collisionless plasmas - interplay between protons and electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Yana; Lazar, Marian; Vinas, Adolfo; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-04-01

    We solve the linearized kinetic Vlasov-Maxwell dispersion relation for oblique wave propagation in a homogeneous highly anisotropic hot electron-proton plasma. We assume bi-Maxwellian velocity distributions for both species, charge neutrality and current conservation, and consider no differential streaming between the ions and the electrons. We calculate the growth rate of the parallel and oblique proton firehose instabilities for various angles of wave propagation and varios electron plasma properties. We study the transition from stable to unstable scales with increasing electron temperature and temperature anisotropies. We find that for highly anisotropic hot plasma both the oscillatory parallel and the aperiodic oblique proton firehose branches may easily couple to the parallel and oblique electron firehose branches. In other words our work demonstrates the interplay between the proton and electron firehose instabilities, whose scales become fully mixed in hot collisionless plasma when the protons and the electrons are simultaneously anisotropic. In the case of parallel wave propagation both left and right-hand polarized waves are simultaneously excited. As we increase the angle of propagation the electron firehose starts to dominate with excitation of large-amplitude aperiodic fluctuations over a large range of wave-numbers, starting at the protons scales and extending up to the smaller electron scales. Whereas the maximum growth rate of the parallel proton firehose branch remains always at the proton scales, the maximum growth rate for the oblique proton firehose extends down to the electron scales. The observed electron-proton scale mixing can have significant implications for the observed plasma properties and instability thresholds in hot colissionless solar wind streams.

  11. MAGSAT anomaly map and continental drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemouel, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anomaly maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length anomalies. The anomalies were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic anomalies are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the anomalies found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African anomalies. It is also shown that anomalies are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.

  12. Ponderomotive Force and Lower Hybrid Turbulence Effects in Space Plasmas Subjected to Large-Amplitude Low-Frequency Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Khazanov, George; Liemohn, M. W.; Stone, N. H.; Coffey, V. N.

    1997-01-01

    In the auroral region, simultaneous occurrences of upward-flowing ions and field-aligned electrons have been observed by the Viking satellite. The occurrence is strongly correlated with large amplitude low frequency fluctuations of the electric field. Large-amplitude shear Alfven waves have also been observed by sounding rockets in the auroral ionosphere. When such LF waves are propagating in a plasma, a ponderomotive force and other types of waves are produced which may lead to significant effects on the plasma. This force is directed toward decreasing density, providing the electromagnetic lift of the background plasma and an increase of collisionless plasma expansion. We find that even for modest wave strengths, the influence on the outflowing oxygen ions can be dramatic, increasing the high-altitude density by orders of magnitude. It is also demonstrated that large-amplitude low-frequency waves (LFW) may generate lower hybrid waves (LHW) in the auroral zone. The excitation of LHW by a LF wave may lead to the appearance of an additional channel of energy transfer from, for example, Alfven or fast magnetosonic waves, to particles. This process then influences the formation of the plasma distribution function at the expense of acceleration in the tail of the distribution during the collapse of the LHW. The ion energization due to the LHW can be comparable with that produced by the ponderomotive force of the LFW. It is shown that the LH turbulence leads to equalization of the ponderomotive acceleration of the different ion species. The mechanism of LHW excitation due to the oxygen ion relative drift in a plasma subjected to low-frequency waves is used for analysis of Viking satellite data for events in the cusp/cleft region. It is found that, in some cases, such a mechanism leads to LHW energy densities and ion distribution functions close to those observed.

  13. Critical pitch angle for electron acceleration in a collisionless shock layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Y.; Comişel, H.; Motschmann, U.

    2016-07-01

    Collisionless shock waves in space and astrophysical plasmas can accelerate electrons along the shock layer by an electrostatic potential, and scatter or reflect electrons back to the upstream region by the amplified magnetic field or turbulent fluctuations. The notion of the critical pitch angle is introduced for non-adiabatic electron acceleration by balancing the two timescales under a quasi-perpendicular shock wave geometry in which the upstream magnetic field is nearly perpendicular to the shock layer normal direction. An analytic expression of the critical pitch angle is obtained as a function of the electron velocity parallel to the magnetic field, the ratio of the electron gyro- to plasma frequency, the cross-shock potential, the width of the shock transition layer, and the shock angle (which is the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the shock normal direction). For typical non-relativistic solar system applications, the critical pitch angle is predicted to be about 10°. An efficient acceleration is expected below the critical pitch angle.

  14. Collisional and collision-less surface heating in intense laser matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Andreas; Divol, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    We explore the interaction of high-contrast intense sub-100 fs laser pulses with solid density tar- gets, using numerically converged collisional particle-in-cell simulations in one two and three dimen- sions. We observe a competition between two mechanisms that can lead to plasma heating. Inverse bremsstrahlung at solid density on one hand, and electrons scattering off plasma waves on the other, can both heat the skin layer to keV temperatures on a femtosecond time scale, facilitating a heat wave and a source of MeV electrons that penetrate and heat the bulk target. Collision-less effects heat the surface effectively starting at the relativistic intensity threshold, independent of plasma density. Our numerical results show that a high-contrast 1J/100fs laser can drive a solid target into the warm dense matter regime. This system is suitable to ab-initio modeling and experimental probing. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. CURVATURE-DRIFT INSTABILITY FAILS TO GENERATE PULSAR RADIO EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Alexander; Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2010-10-01

    The curvature-drift instability has long been considered as a viable mechanism for pulsar radio emission. We reconsidered this mechanism by finding an explicit solution describing the propagation of short electromagnetic waves in a plasma flow along curved magnetic field lines. We show that even though the waves could be amplified, the amplification factor remains very close to unity; therefore, this mechanism is unable to generate high brightness temperature emission from initial weak fluctuations.

  16. New Measure of the Dissipation Region in Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex; Kuznetsova, Masha

    2012-01-01

    A new measure to identify a small-scale dissipation region in collisionless magnetic reconnection is proposed. The energy transfer from the electromagnetic field to plasmas in the electron s rest frame is formulated as a Lorentz-invariant scalar quantity. The measure is tested by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in typical configurations: symmetric and asymmetric reconnection, with and without the guide field. The innermost region surrounding the reconnection site is accurately located in all cases. We further discuss implications for nonideal MHD dissipation.

  17. New Measure of the Dissipation Region in Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex; Kuznetsova, Masha

    2011-05-13

    A new measure to identify a small-scale dissipation region in collisionless magnetic reconnection is proposed. The energy transfer from the electromagnetic field to plasmas in the electron's rest frame is formulated as a Lorentz-invariant scalar quantity. The measure is tested by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in typical configurations: symmetric and asymmetric reconnection, with and without the guide field. The innermost region surrounding the reconnection site is accurately located in all cases. We further discuss implications for nonideal MHD dissipation.

  18. Generation of collisionless shock in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2015-08-01

    Collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysical environments and are tightly connected with magnetic-field amplification and particle acceleration. The fast progress in high-power laser technology is bringing the study of high Mach number shocks into the realm of laboratory plasmas, where in situ measurements can be made helping us understand the fundamental kinetic processes behind shocks. I will discuss the recent progress in laser-driven shock experiments at state-of-the-art facilities like NIF and Omega and how these results, together with ab initio massively parallel simulations, can impact our understanding of magnetic field amplification and particle acceleration in astrophysical plasmas.

  19. Neoclassical Transport Caused by Collisionless Scattering across an Asymmetric Separatrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.; Driscoll, C. F.; Tsidulko, Yu. A.

    2010-10-29

    Plasma loss due to apparatus asymmetries is a ubiquitous phenomenon in magnetic plasma confinement. When the plasma equilibrium has locally trapped particle populations partitioned by a separatrix from one another and from passing particles, the asymmetry transport is enhanced. The trapped and passing particle populations react differently to the asymmetries, leading to the standard 1/{nu} and {radical}({nu}) transport regimes of superbanana orbit theory as particles collisionally scatter from one orbit type to another. However, when the separatrix is itself asymmetric, particles can collisionlessly transit from trapped to passing and back, leading to enhanced transport.

  20. Intermittent dissipation at kinetic scales in collisionless plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Karimabadi, H; Roytershteyn, V; Shay, M; Wu, P; Daughton, W; Loring, B; Chapman, S C

    2012-11-01

    High resolution kinetic simulations of collisionless plasma driven by shear show the development of turbulence characterized by dynamic coherent sheetlike current density structures spanning a range of scales down to electron scales. We present evidence that these structures are sites for heating and dissipation, and that stronger current structures signify higher dissipation rates. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma, like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due to current sheet formation, leading to the expectation that heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmas may be highly nonuniform and patchy. PMID:23215389

  1. Time-dependent closure relations for relativistic collisionless fluid equations.

    PubMed

    Bendib-Kalache, K; Bendib, A; El Hadj, K Mohammed

    2010-11-01

    Linear fluid equations for relativistic and collisionless plasmas are derived. Closure relations for the fluid equations are analytically computed from the relativistic Vlasov equation in the Fourier space (ω,k), where ω and k are the conjugate variables of time t and space x variables, respectively. The mathematical method used is based on the projection operator techniques and the continued fraction mathematical tools. The generalized heat flux and stress tensor are calculated for arbitrary parameter ω/kc where c is the speed of light, and for arbitrary relativistic parameter z=mc²/T , where m is the particle rest mass and T, the plasma temperature in energy units. PMID:21230596

  2. Reconnection properties in collisionless plasma with open boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, H. E.; Ma, Z. W.; Huang, J.

    2014-07-15

    Collisionless magnetic reconnection in a Harris current sheet with different initial thicknesses is investigated using a 21/2 -D Darwin particle-in-cell simulation with the magnetosonic open boundary condition. It is found that the thicknesses of the ion dissipation region and the reconnection current sheet, when the reconnection rate E{sub r} reaches its first peak, are independent of the initial thickness of the current sheet; while the peak reconnection rate depends on it. The peak reconnection rate increases with decrease of the current sheet thickness as E{sub r}∼a{sup −1/2}, where a is the initial current sheet half-thickness.

  3. Time-dependent closure relations for relativistic collisionless fluid equations

    SciTech Connect

    Bendib-Kalache, K.; Bendib, A.; El Hadj, K. Mohammed

    2010-11-15

    Linear fluid equations for relativistic and collisionless plasmas are derived. Closure relations for the fluid equations are analytically computed from the relativistic Vlasov equation in the Fourier space ({omega},k), where {omega} and k are the conjugate variables of time t and space x variables, respectively. The mathematical method used is based on the projection operator techniques and the continued fraction mathematical tools. The generalized heat flux and stress tensor are calculated for arbitrary parameter {omega}/kc where c is the speed of light, and for arbitrary relativistic parameter z=mc{sup 2}/T, where m is the particle rest mass and T, the plasma temperature in energy units.

  4. A mean field Ohm's law for collisionless plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H. ); Diamond, P.H. )

    1993-11-01

    A mean field Ohm's law valid for collisionless plasmas is derived kinetically. It is shown that contrary to conventional thinking, the resulting hyperresistivity is significantly smaller than its fluid counterpart due to the fact that the turbulent decorrelation rate is linked to the rapid electron ballistic motion rather than the slower nonlinear mixing time. Moreover, the off-diagonal contributions to the parallel electron momentum flux are shown to result in Ohm's law renormalizations that dwarf the current diffusivity and break radial parity symmetry.

  5. A new fast reconnection model in a collisionless regime

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, David

    2008-11-15

    Based on the first principles [i.e., (i) by balancing the magnetic field advection with the term containing electron pressure tensor nongyrotropic components in the generalized Ohm's law; (ii) using the conservation of mass; and (iii) assuming that the weak magnetic field region width, where electron meandering motion supports electron pressure tensor off-diagonal (nongyrotropic) components, is of the order of electron Larmor radius] a simple model of magnetic reconnection in a collisionless regime is formulated. The model is general, resembling its collisional Sweet-Parker analog in that it is not specific to any initial configuration, e.g., Harris-type tearing unstable current sheet, X-point collapse or otherwise. In addition to its importance from the fundamental point of view, the collisionless reconnection model offers a much faster reconnection rate [M{sub c{sup '}}{sub less}=(c/{omega}{sub pe}){sup 2}/(r{sub L,e}L)] than Sweet-Parker's classical one (M{sub sp}=S{sup -1/2}). The width of the diffusion region (current sheet) in the collisionless regime is found to be {delta}{sub c{sup '}}{sub less}=(c/{omega}{sub pe}){sup 2}/r{sub L,e}, which is independent of the global reconnection scale L and is only prescribed by microphysics (electron inertial length, c/{omega}{sub pe}, and electron Larmor radius, r{sub L,e}). Amongst other issues, the fastness of the reconnection rate alleviates, e.g., the problem of interpretation of solar flares by means of reconnection, as for the typical solar coronal parameters the obtained collisionless reconnection time can be a few minutes, as opposed to Sweet-Parker's equivalent value of less than a day. The new theoretical reconnection rate is compared to the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment device experimental data by Yamada et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 052119 (2006)] and Ji et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, 13106 (2008)], and a good agreement is obtained.

  6. Drift mode accelerometry for spaceborne gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John W.

    2015-11-01

    A drift mode accelerometer is a precision instrument for spacecraft that overcomes much of the acceleration noise and readout dynamic range limitations of traditional electrostatic accelerometers. It has the potential of achieving acceleration noise performance similar to that of drag-free systems over a restricted frequency band without the need for external drag-free control or continuous spacecraft propulsion. Like traditional accelerometers, the drift mode accelerometer contains a high-density test mass surrounded by an electrode housing, which can control and sense all six degrees of freedom of the test mass. Unlike traditional accelerometers, the suspension system is operated with a low duty cycle so that the limiting suspension force noise only acts over brief, known time intervals, which can be neglected in the data analysis. The readout is performed using a laser interferometer which is immune to the dynamic range limitations of even the best voltage references typically used to determine the inertial acceleration of electrostatic accelerometers. The drift mode accelerometer is a novel offshoot of the like-named operational mode of the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft, in which its test mass suspension system is cycled on and off to estimate the acceleration noise associated with the front-end electronics. This paper presents the concept of a drift mode accelerometer, describes the operation of such a device, develops models for its performance with respect to non-drag-free satellite geodesy and gravitational wave missions, and discusses plans for testing the performance of a prototype sensor in the laboratory using torsion pendula.

  7. Analytical and numerical treatment of drift-tearing and resistive drift instabilities in plasma slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnov, V. V.; Hegna, C. C.; Sauppe, J. P.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2015-11-01

    We consider modification to linear resistive MHD instability theory in a slab due to two categories of non-MHD effects: (1) electron and ion diamagnetic flows caused by equilibrium pressure gradients and (2) electron and ion decoupling on short scales associated with kinetic Alfven and whistler waves. The relationship between the expected stabilizing response due to the effects (1) and the destabilizing contribution caused by the dispersive waves (2) is investigated. An analytic solution combining the effect of diamagnetic flows and the ion-sound gyroradius contribution is derived using a perturbative approach. Linear numerical simulations using the NIMROD code are performed with cold ions and hot electrons in plasma slab with a doubly periodic box bounded by two perfectly conducting walls. Configurations with magnetic shear are unstable to current-driven drift-tearing instability. A second linearly unstable resistive drift type mode with largely electrostatic perturbations is also observed in simulations. The resistive-drift mode is suppressed by magnetic shear in unbounded domains but can remain unstable in the simulations with finite slab thickness and perfectly conducting wall. Additionally, the growth rate is sensitive to the magnetic shear length. We analyze whether these modes can be unstable in cylindrical configurations with magnetic shear typical for reversed field pinches. The material is based on work supported by the U.S. DOE and NSF.

  8. The effect of microscale random Alfven waves on the propagation of large-scale Alfven waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namikawa, T.; Hamabata, H.

    1983-04-01

    The ponderomotive force generated by random Alfven waves in a collisionless plasma is evaluated taking into account mean magnetic and velocity shear and is expressed as a series involving spatial derivatives of mean magnetic and velocity fields whose coefficients are associated with the helicity spectrum function of random velocity field. The effect of microscale random Alfven waves through ponderomotive and mean electromotive forces generated by them on the propagation of large-scale Alfven waves is also investigated.

  9. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Merlino, Robert L.

    2009-11-10

    A historical overview of some of the early theoretical and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some of the theoretical refinements that have been made, including the effects of collisions, plasma absorption, dust charge fluctuations, particle drifts and strong coupling effects are discussed. Some recent experimental findings and outstanding problems are also presented.

  10. Electron Heat Conduction in the Solar Wind: Transition from Spitzer-Härm to the Collisionless Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, S. D.; Pulupa, M.; Salem, C.; Chen, C. H. K.; Quataert, E.

    2013-06-01

    We use a statistically significant set of measurements to show that the field-aligned electron heat flux q ∥ in the solar wind at 1 AU is consistent with the Spitzer-Härm collisional heat flux q sh for temperature gradient scales larger than a few mean free paths LT >~ 3.5λfp. This represents about 65% of the measured data and corresponds primarily to high β, weakly collisional plasma ("slow solar wind"). In the more collisionless regime λfp/LT >~ 0.28, the electron heat flux is limited to q ∥/q 0 ~ 0.3, independent of mean free path, where q 0 is the "free-streaming" value; the measured q ∥ does not achieve the full q 0. This constraint q ∥/q 0 ~ 0.3 might be attributed to wave-particle interactions, effects of an interplanetary electric potential, or inherent flux limitation. We also show a β e dependence to these results that is consistent with a local radial electron temperature profile Te ~ r -α that is a function of the thermal electron beta α = α(β e ) and that the β dependence of the collisionless regulation constraint is not obviously consistent with a whistler heat flux instability. It may be that the observed saturation of the measured heat flux is a simply a feature of collisional transport. We discuss the results in a broader astrophysical context.

  11. Studies of Zonal Flows Driven by Drift Mode Turbulence in Laboratory and Space Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, R.; Trines, R.; Dunlop, M. W.; Davies, J. A.; Bamford, R. A.; Mendonca, J. T.; Silva, L. O.; Shukla, P. K.; Vaivads, A.; Mori, W. B.; Tynan, G.

    2008-10-15

    The interaction between broadband drift mode turbulence and zonal flows is an important topic associated with transport at plasma boundaries. The generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability of broad band drift waves has resulted in the observation of self organized solitary wave structures at the magnetopause. To understand these structures and their importance to future burning plasmas and space plasmas we have developed a unique numerical simulation code that describes drift wave--zonal flow turbulence. We show that observations by cluster spacecraft confirms the role of drift wave zonal flow turbulence at the Earth's magnetopause and further demonstrates that the magnetopause boundary acts in a s similar manner to transport barriers in tokamak fusion devices. Thus cementing the relationship between the plasma physics of laboratory devices and space plasmas.

  12. Characteristics of a current sheet shear mode in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Keizo

    2016-05-01

    The current study shows the characteristics of the kink-type electromagnetic mode excited in the thin current layer formed around the x-line during the quasi-steady phase of magnetic reconnection. The linear wave analyses are carried out for the realistic current sheet profile which differs significantly from the Harris current sheet. It is found that the peak growth rate is very sensitive to the current sheet width even though the relative drift velocity at the center of the current sheet is fixed. This indicates that the mode is excited by the velocity shear rather than the relative drift velocity. Thus, the mode is termed here a current sheet shear mode. It is also shown that the wavenumber ky has a clear mass ratio dependency as ky λi ∝ (mi /me )1/4, implying the coupling of the ion and electron dynamics, where λi is the ion inertia length.

  13. Magnetized Collisionless Shock Studies Using High Velocity Plasmoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Thomas; Intrator, T.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetized collisionless shocks are ubiquitous throughout the cosmos and are observed to accelerate particles to relativistic velocities, amplify magnetic fields, transport energy, and create non-thermal distributions. They exhibit transitional scale lengths much shorter than the collisional mean free path and are mediated by collective interactions rather than Coulomb collisions. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) leverages advances in Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoid formation and acceleration to produce highly supersonic and super-Alfvénic supercritical shocks with pre-existing magnetic field at perpendicular, parallel or oblique angles to the direction of propagation. Adjustable shock speed, density, and magnetic field provide unique access to a range of parameter space relevant to a variety of naturally occurring shocks. This effort examines experimentally, analytically, and numerically the physics of collisionless shock formation, structure, and kinetic effects in a laboratory setting and draw comparisons between experimental data and astronomical observations. Supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences and National Nuclear Security Administration under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369 Approved for Public Release: LA-UR-12-22886

  14. Magnetized collisionless shock studies using high velocity plasmoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, T.; Intrator, T.; Gao, K.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetized collisionless shocks are ubiquitous throughout the cosmos and are observed to accelerate particles to relativistic velocities, amplify magnetic fields, transport energy, and create non-thermal distributions. They exhibit transitional scale lengths much shorter than the collisional mean free path and are mediated by collective interactions rather than Coulomb collisions. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) leverages advances in Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoid formation and acceleration to produce highly supersonic and super-Alfvènic supercritical shocks with pre-existing magnetic field at perpendicular, parallel or oblique angles to the direction of propagation. Adjustable shock speed, density, and magnetic field provide unique access to a range of parameter space relevant to a variety of naturally occurring shocks. This effort examines experimentally, analytically, and numerically the physics of collisionless shock formation, structure, and kinetic effects in a laboratory setting and draw comparisons between experimental data and astronomical observations. Supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences and National Nuclear Security Administration under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369 Approved for Public Release: LA-UR-12-22886

  15. Laboratory astrophysical collisionless shock experiments on Omega and NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Ross, J. S.; Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Ryutov, D.; Casey, D.; Drake, R. P.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D.; Gregori, G.; Kugland, N. L.; Kuranz, C.; Levy, M. C.; Li, C. K.; Meinecke, J.; Morita, T.; Petrasso, R.; Plechaty, C.; Remington, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Takabe, H.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2016-03-01

    We are performing scaled astrophysics experiments on Omega and on NIF. Laser driven counter-streaming interpenetrating supersonic plasma flows can be studied to understand astrophysical electromagnetic plasma phenomena in a controlled laboratory setting. In our Omega experiments, the counter-streaming flow plasma state is measured using Thomson scattering diagnostics, demonstrating the plasma flows are indeed super-sonic and in the collisionless regime. We observe a surprising additional electron and ion heating from ion drag force in the double flow experiments that are attributed to the ion drag force and electrostatic instabilities. [1] A proton probe is used to image the electric and magnetic fields. We observe unexpected large, stable and reproducible electromagnetic field structures that arise in the counter-streaming flows [2]. The Biermann battery magnetic field generated near the target plane, advected along the flows, and recompressed near the midplane explains the cause of such self-organizing field structures [3]. A D3He implosion proton probe image showed very clear filamentary structures; three-dimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations and simulated proton radiography images indicate that these filamentary structures are generated by Weibel instabilities and that the magnetization level (ratio of magnetic energy over kinetic energy in the system) is ∼0.01 [4]. These findings have very high astrophysical relevance and significant implications. We expect to observe true collisionless shock formation when we use >100 kJ laser energy on NIF.

  16. Collisionless shock experiments with lasers and observation of Weibel instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.-S. Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Levy, M. C.; Pollock, B. B.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S.; Ryutov, D. D.; Turnbull, D. P.; Weber, S. V.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Froula, D. H.; Rosenberg, M.; Gregori, G.; Meinecke, J.; Koenig, M.; Kugland, N. L.; Lamb, D. Q.; Tzeferacos, P.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are common in the universe, occurring in supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, and protostellar jets. They appear in colliding plasma flows when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions is much larger than the system size. It is believed that such shocks could be mediated via the electromagnetic Weibel instability in astrophysical environments without pre-existing magnetic fields. Here, we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers and investigate the dynamics of high-Mach-number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Our recent proton-probe experiments on Omega show the characteristic filamentary structures of the Weibel instability that are electromagnetic in nature with an inferred magnetization level as high as ∼1% [C. M. Huntington et al., “Observation of magnetic field generation via the weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows,” Nat. Phys. 11, 173–176 (2015)]. These results imply that electromagnetic instabilities are significant in the interaction of astrophysical conditions.

  17. Simplex-in-cell technique for collisionless plasma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kates-Harbeck, Julian; Totorica, Samuel; Zrake, Jonathan; Abel, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We extend the simplex-in-cell (SIC) technique recently introduced in the context of collisionless dark matter fluids [1,2] to the case of collisionless plasmas. The six-dimensional phase space distribution function f (x , v) is represented by an ensemble of three-dimensional manifolds, which we refer to as sheets. The electric potential field is obtained by solving the Poisson equation on a uniform mesh, where the charge density is evaluated by a spatial projection of the phase space sheets. The SIC representation of phase space density facilitates robust, high accuracy numerical evolution of the Vlasov-Poisson system using significantly fewer tracer particles than comparable particle-in-cell (PIC) approaches by reducing the numerical shot-noise associated with the latter. We introduce the SIC formulation and describe its implementation in a new code, which we validate using standard test problems including plasma oscillations, Landau damping, and two stream instabilities in one dimension. Merits of the new scheme are shown to include higher accuracy and faster convergence rates in the number of particles. We finally motivate and outline the efficient application of SIC to higher dimensional problems.

  18. Electron Weibel Instability Mediated Laser Driven Electromagnetic Collisionless Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qing; Mima, Kunioki; Cai, Hong-Bo; Taguchi, Toshihiro; Nagatomo, Hideo; He, X. T.

    2015-11-01

    As a fundamental nonlinear structure, collisionless shock is widely studied in astrophysics. Recently, the rapidly-developing laser technology provides a good test-bed to study such shock physics in laboratory. In addition, the laser driven shock ion acceleration is also interested due to its potential applications. We explore the effect of external parallel magnetic field on the collisionless shock formation and resultant particle acceleration by using the 2D3V PIC simulations. We show that unlike the electrostatic shock generated in the unmagnetized plasma, the shock generated in the weakly-magnetized laser-driven plasma is mostly electromagnetic (EM)-like with higher Mach number. The generation mechanism is due to the stronger transverse magnetic field self-generated at the nonlinear stage of the electron Weibel instability which drastically scatters particles and leads to higher energy dissipation. Simulation results also suggest more ions are reflected by this EM shock and results in larger energy transfer rate from the laser to ions, which is of advantage for applications such as neutron production and ion fast ignition.

  19. Outer Belt Radial Transport Signatures in Drift Phase Structure - Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, T. P., III; Kwan, B. P.; Skov, T. M.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Roeder, J. L.; Green, J. C.; Fennell, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    During geomagnetic storms, the Earth's outer radiation belt experiences enhanced radial transport. Different modes of radial transport have different temporal signatures in the particle phase-space density on timescales shorter than a drift period. We use such drift phase structure in time series particle flux observations to identify transport signatures of impulsive and oscillatory drift resonant transport. We perform multiple case studies of geomagnetic storms using particle flux taken near geostationary orbit. We estimate the radial diffusion coefficients from the drift phase structures. We show how these radial diffusion coefficients derived from particle data compare to transport coefficients deduced from wave observations.

  20. Outer Belt Radial Transport Signatures in Drift Phase Structure - Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul; Green, Janet; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Roeder, James; Kwan, Betty; Mulligan Skov, Tamitha

    2016-07-01

    During geomagnetic storms, the Earth's outer radiation belt experiences enhanced radial transport. Different modes of radial transport have different temporal signatures in the particle phase-space density on timescales shorter than a drift period. We use such drift phase structure in time series particle flux observations to identify transport signatures of impulsive and oscillatory drift resonant transport. We perform multiple case studies of geomagnetic storms using particle flux taken near geostationary orbit. We estimate the radial diffusion coefficients from the drift phase structures. We show how these radial diffusion coefficients derived from particle data compare to transport coefficients deduced from wave observations.

  1. Metocean input data for drift models applications: Loustic study

    SciTech Connect

    Michon, P.; Cabioc`h, M.

    1995-12-31

    Real-time monitoring and crisis management of oil slicks or floating structures displacement require a good knowledge of local winds, waves and currents used as input data for operational drift models. Fortunately, thanks to world-wide and all-weather coverage, satellite measurements have recently enabled the introduction of new methods for the remote sensing of the marine environment. Within a French joint industry project, a procedure has been developed using basically satellite measurements combined to metocean models in order to provide marine operators` drift models with reliable wind, wave and current analyses and short term forecasts. Particularly, a model now allows the calculation of the drift current, under the joint action of wind and sea-state, thus radically improving the classical laws. This global procedure either directly uses satellite wind and waves measurements (if available on the study area) or indirectly, as calibration of metocean models results which are brought to the oil slick or floating structure location. The operational use of this procedure is reported here with an example of floating structure drift offshore from the Brittany coasts.

  2. Stabilization of the lower hybrid drift instability by resonant electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Nevins, W.M.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1981-09-16

    The lower hybrid drift instability was studied with a two dimensional electrostatic simulation code. Simulations showed good agreement of the measured local growth rates and frequencies with the results of local theory during the early stage of wave growth. At later times nonlocal effects become important, and a coherent mode structure develops. This normal mode was observed to propagate up the density gradient. At zero plasma beta and zero electron temperature, we found that the lower hybrid drift instability is stabilized by the local current relaxation due to both ion quasilinear diffusion and electron E x B trapping which causes electron heating to occur.

  3. Drift mode calculations for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt; L.-P. Ku; W.M. Tang; H. Sugama; N. Nakajima; K.Y. Watanabe; S. Murakami; H. Yamada; W.A. Cooper

    2000-06-08

    A fully kinetic assessment of the stability properties of toroidal drift modes has been obtained for a case for the Large Helical Device (LHD) [A.Iiyoshi, et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1998, Nucl.Fusion 39, 1245 (1999)]. This calculation retains the important effects in the linearized gyrokinetic equation, using the lowest-order ''ballooning representation'' for high toroidal mode number instabilities in the electrostatic limit. Results for toroidal drift waves destabilized by trapped particle dynamics and ion temperature gradients are presented, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics equilibria reconstructed from experimental measurements. The effects of helically-trapped particles and helical curvature are investigated.

  4. Time-dependent drift Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1983-03-01

    The lowest-order drift equations are given in a canonical magnetic coordinate form for time-dependent magnetic and electric fields. The advantages of the canonical Hamiltonian form are also discussed.

  5. Drift mode in a bounded plasma having two-ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Ali; Sajid, M.; Saleem, H.

    2008-01-15

    The drift wave is investigated in a two-ion species plasma in several different cases. The global drift mode is studied in a plasma bounded in a cylinder having Gaussian density profile corresponding to different poloidal wavenumbers. The frequency of the mode becomes a little larger when it is investigated without including the ion cyclotron wave dynamics. The effect of magnetic shear on the wave propagation along the density gradient is studied in a Cartesian geometry assuming absorbing boundary. It is found that the wave amplitude is reduced when two-ion species are present (with the same concentration) compared to pure electron-ion plasma.

  6. Drift analysis for integer IDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinds, Arianne T.; Reznik, Yuriy A.; Yu, Lu; Ni, Zhibo; Zhang, Cixun

    2007-09-01

    This paper analyzes the drift phenomenon that occurs between video encoders and decoders that employ different implementations of the Inverse Discrete Cosine Transform (IDCT). Our methodology utilizes MPEG-2, MPEG-4 Part 2, and H.263 encoders and decoders to measure drift occurring at low QP values for CIF resolution video sequences. Our analysis is conducted as part of the effort to define specific implementations for the emerging ISO/IEC 23002-2 Fixed-Point 8x8 IDCT and DCT standard. Various IDCT implementations submitted as proposals for the new standard are used to analyze drift. Each of these implementations complies with both the IEEE Standard 1180 and the new MPEG IDCT precision specification ISO/IEC 23002-1. Reference implementations of the IDCT/DCT, and implementations from well-known video encoders/decoders are also employed. Our results indicate that drift is eliminated entirely only when the implementations of the IDCT in both the encoder and decoder match exactly. In this case, the precision of the IDCT has no influence on drift. In cases where the implementations are not identical, then the use of a highly precise IDCT in the decoder will reduce drift in the reconstructed video sequence only to the extent that the IDCT used in the encoder is also precise.

  7. Collisionless shock generation in counter-streaming plasmas produced by a high-power laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakawa, Youichi; Kuramitsu, Y.; Morita, T.; Aoki, H.; Tanji, H.; Shibata, S.; Ide, T.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Shiroshita, A.; Shigemori, K.; Sano, T.; Norimatsu, T.; Kato, T.; Takabe, H.; Waugh, J.; Woolsey, N.; Loupias, B.; Gregory, C.; Koenig, M.

    2009-11-01

    Laboratory experiments to study collisionless shock generation in counter-streaming plasmas have been investigated using Gekko XII HIPER laser system (352 nm (3φ), 500 ps, ˜100 J / beam, one or four beams, < 10^15 W/cm^2) at ILE. Two types of double-plane targets, Jet and Ablation types were used. In the Jet (Ablation) type, 10 μm (60 μm) and 60 μm thick CH planes were placed with the separation of 4.5 mm; beams were irradiated on the 1st CH and a rear-side (an ablation) plasma is formed, and the plasma from the 2nd CH is created by radiation and/or plasmas from the1st CH. The plasmas and shocks were diagnosed transverse to the main laser propagation direction; shadowgraphy and modified Nomarski interferometry using a probe laser with ICCD and streak cameras, and SOP and GOI using a visible (450 nm) self-emission. Counter-streaming plasmas were produced, and shock waves were observed. The width of the transition region is much shorter than ion-ion mean-free-path. A particle-in-cell simulation has predicted generation of an electrostatic shock.

  8. Particle Acceleration and Radiation associated with Magnetic Field Generation from Relativistic Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Hardee, P. E.; Richardson, G. A.; Preece, R. D.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. While some Fermi acceleration may occur at the jet front, the majority of electron acceleration takes place behind the jet front and cannot be characterized as Fermi acceleration. The simulation results show that this instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron s transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  9. Particle Acceleration and Magnetic Field Amplification at Non-relativistic Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprioli, Damiano; Spitkovsky, A.

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the dynamics of non-relativistic, collisionless shocks by using unprecedentedly large 2D and 3D hybrid (kinetic ions - fluid electrons) simulations. We find that, at parallel shocks, ions are efficiently accelerated via first-order Fermi mechanism; the current driven by the energetic particles propagating into the upstream medium excites plasma instabilities that strongly perturb the initial electromagnetic configuration. In particular, the filamentation instability produces tubular, underdense, magnetic-field-depleted cavities, in which accelerated particles are channeled. These structures grow while being advected with the fluid, effectively corrugating the shock surface and triggering turbulent motions in the downstream. The net result is a marked increase of the magnetic field, both ahead and behind the shock, in agreement with the high levels of magnetization inferred at the blast waves of young supernova remnants. We also discuss the dependence of the ion acceleration efficiency on the orientation and on the strength of the upstream magnetic field, finding that ions are preferentially accelerated at parallel, fast shocks (i.e., shocks propagating along the initial magnetic field, with velocities much larger than the Alfvén speed).

  10. Second harmonic generation by self-focusing of intense hollow Gaussian laser beam in collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Gunjan; Rawat, Priyanka; Gauniyal, Rakhi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of self focused hollow Gaussian laser beam (HGLB) (carrying null intensity in center) on the excitation of electron plasma wave (EPW) and second harmonic generation (SHG) has been investigated in collisionless plasma, where relativistic-ponderomotive and only relativistic nonlinearities are operative. The relativistic change of electron mass and the modification of the background electron density due to ponderomotive nonlinearity lead to self-focusing of HGLB in plasma. Paraxial ray theory has been used to derive coupled equations for the self focusing of HGLB in plasma, generation of EPW, and second harmonic. These coupled equations are solved analytically and numerically to study the laser intensity in the plasma, electric field associated with the excited EPW, and the power of SHG. Second harmonic emission is generated due to nonlinear coupling between incident HGLB and EPW satisfying the proper phase matching conditions. The results show that the effect of including the ponderomotive nonlinearity is significant on the generation of EPW and second harmonic. The electric field associated with EPW and the power of SHG are found to be highly sensitive to the order of the hollow Gaussian beam.

  11. PREFERENTIAL ACCELERATION AND PERPENDICULAR HEATING OF MINOR IONS IN A COLLISIONLESS CORONAL HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.

    2009-05-01

    We incorporate the cyclotron-resonant Fermi heating mechanism of Isenberg and Vasquez into an inhomogeneous, collisionless coronal hole model to investigate this kinetic process in the presence of the other known forces on the coronal hole minor ions. The model includes the effects of gravity, charge-separation electric field, and mirroring in the decreasing magnetic field of a super-radially expanding flux tube. The Fermi process, due to the existence of multiple cyclotron resonances for minor ions, acts preferentially since it is not available to thermal protons in the low-beta coronal hole. The minor ions are treated as test particles, and we consider the specific case of O{sup 5+}, which is the principal minor ion observed by the UVCS/Solar and Heliospheric Observatory instrument. We estimate an upper limit to the nonlinearly generated resonant wave power by extrapolating from the observed low-frequency fluctuations, and find that only a small fraction of this power is required to provide the observed minor ion energization. The perpendicular heating provided by this Fermi mechanism accelerates the entire minor ion distribution to high speed with respect to the bulk protons, consistent with the differentially streaming minor ion core distributions which are a distinctive property of the in situ fast solar wind. We conclude that this cyclotron-resonant Fermi process is easily capable of providing the observed preferential acceleration and heating of minor ions in the fast solar wind.

  12. Weibel Filament Decay and Thermalization in Collisionless Shocks and Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Nakar, Ehud

    2006-04-01

    Models for the synchrotron emission of gamma-ray burst afterglows suggest that the magnetic field is generated in the shock wave that forms as relativistic ejecta plow through the circumburst medium. Transverse Weibel instability efficiently generates magnetic fields near equipartition with the postshock energy density. The detailed saturated state of the instability, as seen in particle-in-cell simulations, consists of magnetically self-pinched current filaments. The filaments are parallel to the direction of propagation of the shock and are about a plasma skin depth in radius, forming a quasi-two-dimensional structure. We argue that the Weibel filaments are susceptible to pressure-driven instabilities and use a rudimentary analytical model to illustrate the development of a particular, kinklike unstable mode. The instabilities destroy the quasi-two-dimensional structure of the Weibel filaments. For wavelengths longer than the skin depth, the kinklike mode grows at the rate equal to the speed of light divided by the wavelength. We calculate the transport of collisionless test particles in the filaments experiencing the instability and show that the particles diffuse in energy. This diffusion marks the beginning of thermalization in the shock transition layer and causes initial magnetic field decay as particles escape from the filaments. We discuss the implications of these results for the structure of the shock and the polarization of the afterglow.

  13. Generalized lower-hybrid-drift instability. [of plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsia, J. B.; Chiu, S. M.; Hsia, M. F.; Chou, R. L.; Wu, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of lower-hybrid-drift instability is extended to include a finite value of the component of wave vector parallel to the ambient magnetic field so that the analysis bridges the usual lower-hybrid-drift instability of flute modes and the modified-two-stream instability. The present theory also includes electromagnetic and ambient magnetic field-gradient effects. It is found that in the cold-electron limit the density and magnetic gradients can qualitatively modify the conclusion obtained in the early theory of the modified-two-stream instability. For example, even if the relative drift far exceeds the Alfven speed of the plasma, the instability may still persist. This result is in contrast to that established in the literature. When the electron temperature is finite, the problem is complicated. Numerical solutions are obtained for a number of cases.

  14. Collisionless ion drag force on a spherical grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, I. H.

    2006-02-01

    The ion drag force on a spherical grain situated in a flowing collisionless plasma is obtained from the specialized coordinate electrostatic particle and thermals in cell simulation code (SCEPTIC) (Hutchinson 2002 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44 1953, Hutchinson 2003 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 45 1477, Hutchinson 2005 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 47 71) and compared with recent analytic approximate treatments in the interesting and relevant case when the Debye length is only moderately larger than the sphere radius. There is a substantial complex structure in the results for transonic flows, which is explained in terms of the details of ion orbits. Naturally the prior analytic approximations miss this structure, and as a result they seriously underestimate the drag for speeds near the sound speed. An easy-to-evaluate expression for force is provided that fits the comprehensive results of the code. This expression, with minor modification, also fits the results even for Debye length much smaller than the sphere radius.

  15. Effects of electron inertia in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Andrés, Nahuel Gómez, Daniel; Martin, Luis; Dmitruk, Pablo

    2014-07-15

    We present a study of collisionless magnetic reconnection within the framework of full two-fluid MHD for a completely ionized hydrogen plasma, retaining the effects of the Hall current, electron pressure and electron inertia. We performed 2.5D simulations using a pseudo-spectral code with no dissipative effects. We check that the ideal invariants of the problem are conserved down to round-off errors. Our numerical results confirm that the change in the topology of the magnetic field lines is exclusively due to the presence of electron inertia. The computed reconnection rates remain a fair fraction of the Alfvén velocity, which therefore qualifies as fast reconnection.

  16. Effects of electron inertia in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, Nahuel; Martin, Luis; Dmitruk, Pablo; Gómez, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    We present a study of collisionless magnetic reconnection within the framework of full two-fluid MHD for a completely ionized hydrogen plasma, retaining the effects of the Hall current, electron pressure and electron inertia. We performed 2.5D simulations using a pseudo-spectral code with no dissipative effects. We check that the ideal invariants of the problem are conserved down to round-off errors. Our numerical results confirm that the change in the topology of the magnetic field lines is exclusively due to the presence of electron inertia. The computed reconnection rates remain a fair fraction of the Alfvén velocity, which therefore qualifies as fast reconnection.

  17. Nonlinear Weibel Instability and Turbulence in Strong Collisionless Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, Mikhail M.

    2008-08-31

    This research project was devoted to studies of collisionless shocks, their properties, microphysics and plasma physics of underlying phenomena, such as Weibel instability and generation of small-scale fields at shocks, particle acceleration and transport in the generated random fields, radiation mechanisms from these fields in application to astrophysical phenomena and laboratory experiments (e.g., laser-plasma and beam-plasma interactions, the fast ignition and inertial confinement, etc.). Thus, this study is highly relevant to astrophysical sciences, the inertial confinement program and, in particular, the Fast Ignition concept, etc. It makes valuable contributions to the shock physics, nonlinear plasma theory, as well as to the basic plasma science, in general.

  18. Scaling of magnetic reconnection in relativistic collisionless pair plasmas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Guo, Fan; Daughton, William; Li, Hui; Hesse, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we study the scaling of the inflow speed of collisionless magnetic reconnection in electron-positron plasmas from the nonrelativistic to ultrarelativistic limit. In the antiparallel configuration, the inflow speed increases with the upstream magnetization parameter σ and approaches the speed of light when σ>O(100), leading to an enhanced reconnection rate. In all regimes, the divergence of the pressure tensor is the dominant term responsible for breaking the frozen-in condition at the x line. The observed scaling agrees well with a simple model that accounts for the Lorentz contraction of the plasma passing through the diffusion region. The results demonstrate that the aspect ratio of the diffusion region, modified by the compression factor of proper density, remains ∼0.1 in both the nonrelativistic and relativistic limits. PMID:25793820

  19. Formation of coherent structures in kinetic simulations of collisionless turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss recent large-scale kinetic simulations of collisionless turbulence in two environments, the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosheath. Formation of copious coherent structures is observed in both cases, despite the facts that the geometry, characteristic plasma parameters, and driving mechanisms are drastically different between the two systems. In addition to the traditional planar current sheets, other types of coherent current structures have been observed in 3D fully kinetic simulations with initial conditions relevant to the solar wind. These structures are discussed in detail. In 3D global hybrid simulations of the interaction between solar wind and planetary magnetospheres, the foreshock dynamics driven by reflected ions is shown to have a significant impact on the structure of the bow shock, as well as on the magnetosheath turbulence. A complicated interaction between turbulence, bow shock, and global flow leads to global perturbations in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  20. Scaling of Magnetic Reconnection in Relativistic Collisionless Pair Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Guo, Fan; Daughton, William; Li, Hui; Hesse, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we study the scaling of the inflow speed of collisionless magnetic reconnection in electron-positron plasmas from the non-relativistic to ultra-relativistic limit. In the anti-parallel configuration, the inflow speed increases with the upstream magnetization parameter sigma and approaches the speed of light when sigma is greater than O(100), leading to an enhanced reconnection rate. In all regimes, the divergence of the pressure tensor is the dominant term responsible for breaking the frozen-in condition at the x-line. The observed scaling agrees well with a simple model that accounts for the Lorentz contraction of the plasma passing through the diffusion region. The results demonstrate that the aspect ratio of the diffusion region, modified by the compression factor of proper density, remains approximately 0.1 in both the non-relativistic and relativistic limits.

  1. Landau damping in a collisionless dipolar Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natu, Stefan S.; Wilson, Ryan M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a theory for the Landau damping of low-energy quasiparticles in a collisionless, quasi-two-dimensional dipolar Bose gas and produce expressions for the damping rate in uniform and nonuniform systems. Using simple energy-momentum conservation arguments, we show that in the homogeneous system, the nature of the low-energy dispersion in a dipolar Bose gas severely inhibits Landau damping of long wavelength excitations. For a gas with contact and dipolar interactions, the damping rate for phonons tends to decrease with increasing dipolar interactions; for strong dipole-dipole interactions, phonons are virtually undamped over a broad range of temperature. The damping rate for maxon-roton excitations is found to be significantly larger than the damping rate for phonons.

  2. Electron Force Balance in Steady Collisionless-Driven Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bin; Horiuchi, Ritoku

    2008-11-21

    Steady collisionless-driven reconnection in an open system is investigated by means of full-particle simulations. A long thin electron current sheet extends towards the outflow direction when the system relaxes to a steady state. Although the pressure tensor term along the reconnection electric field contributes to the violation of the electron frozen-in condition, a new force balance in the inflow direction is realized between the Lorentz and electrostatic forces, which is quite different from that in Harris equilibrium. The strong electrostatic field is generated through the combined effect of the Hall term and a driving inflow. This new force balance is more evident in the three-dimensional case due to the growth of an instability along the reconnection electric field. It is also found that the normalized charge density is in proportion to the square of the electron Alfven velocity averaged over the electron dissipation region.

  3. Collisionless reconnection in two-dimensional magnetotail equilibria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.; Coroniti, F. V.; Pellat, R.; Karimabadi, H.

    1991-01-01

    A two-dimensional particle simulation model based on the Darwin approximation to Maxwell's equations for studying collisionless reconnection in the magnetotail has been developed. Simulations of the pure ion tearing mode in a thin current sheet with normal B(z) field component demonstrate that in this limit this mode grows more slowly than expected based on previous analytic estimates. The saturation level of the tearing instability greatly surpasses estimates based on a simple trapping argument. The effect of the normal field component on the evolution of the tearing instability is considered. It is found that a normal field of even a few percent on axis strongly inhibits the growth of the instability.

  4. Perpendicular diffusion of energetic particles in collisionless plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shalchi, A.

    2015-01-15

    A fundamental problem in plasma and astrophysics is the interaction between energetic particles and magnetized plasmas. In the current paper, we focus on particle diffusion across the guide magnetic field. It is shown that the perpendicular diffusion coefficient depends only on the parallel diffusion coefficient and the Kubo number. Therefore, one can find four asymptotic limits depending on the values of these two parameters. These regimes are the quasilinear limit, the Kadomtsev and Pogutse limit, the scaling of Rechester and Rosenbluth, and the scaling found by Zybin and Istomin. In the current article, we focus on the Rechester and Rosenbluth scenario because this was not discovered before in the context of collisionless plasmas. Examples and applications are discussed as well. We show that an energy independent ratio of perpendicular and parallel diffusion coefficients can be found and that this ratio can be very small but also close to unity. This is exactly what one observes in the solar wind.

  5. Stability against phase mixing of collisionless self-gravitating matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjorth, Jens

    1994-03-01

    It is suggested how to define a macroscopic steady state of a collisionless self-gravitating system with Newtonian interactions in terms of H-functions. A new condition for stability is formulated as a consequence thereof: Any single-variable distribution function, f = f(Q), which is a stationary point of some entropy-like functional, must have df/dQ less than or equal to 0 to be stable against phase mixing. For the special class of Osipkov-Merritt models, Q = E + L2/2r2a, this is found to agree with results of published numerical experiments. The stability criterion may have important implications for the equilibria of galaxies and dark-matter halos. One consequence is that stable spherical galaxies apparently have an anisotropy radius, ra, greater than approximately 40% of the half-mass radius. This finding is consistent with dissipationless-collapse simulations.

  6. Toward a transport model of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Masha M.; Hesse, Michael; Winske, Dan

    2000-04-01

    An absence of theoretical justification for the magnitude of resistivity is one of the major limitations of large-scale simulations of magnetic reconnection in collisionless magnetospheric plasma. We took advantage of the results of recent progress in kinetic modeling of collisionless dissipation in the vicinity of the magnetically neutral X point aiming to find ways to represent small-scale kinetic effects in large-scale models. The study was based on a combination of hybrid and particle methods and on analytical analysis. A comprehensive hybrid simulation code which incorporates the leading terms in electron dynamics responsible for breaking the frozen magnetic flux constraint (electron bulk flow inertia and nongyrotropic pressure effects) was utilized. The results of the comprehensive hybrid model were found to be in excellent quantitative agreement with the results of full particle simulations with similar setups. Both simulations demonstrated that the actual reconnection electric field is determined primarily by kinetic quasi-viscous effects and less by electron bulk flow inertia. An analytical expression for the quasi-viscous reconnection electric field averaged over the nongyrotropic region was obtained. Similar behavior of the evaluated quasi-viscous electric field and actual reconnection electric field taken from the simulations was demonstrated. Conventional hybrid simulations with simple nongyrotropic corrections to the electric field where also performed. The model was further reduced for utilization in MHD models. Analytical expressions for the time evolution of the reconnected flux evaluated from the MHD model modified by nongyrotropic corrections appeared to be in very good agreement with the results of comprehensive kinetic simulations. The evaluated averaged quasi-viscous electric field can be substituted into large-scale simulation models.

  7. Suppression of Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection in Asymmetric Current Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Hesse, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we study the suppression of asymmetric reconnection in the limit where the diamagnetic drift speed >> Alfven speed and the magnetic shear angle is moderate. We demonstrate that the slippage between electrons and the magnetic flux mitigates the suppression and can even result in fast reconnection that lacks one of the outflow jets. Through comparing a case where the diamagnetic drift is supported by the temperature gradient with a companion case that has a density gradient instead, we identify a robust suppression mechanism. The drift of the x-line is slowed down locally by the asymmetric nature of the x-line, and then the x-line is run over and swallowed by the faster-moving following flux.

  8. Suppression of collisionless magnetic reconnection in asymmetric current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Hesse, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we study the suppression of asymmetric reconnection in the limit where the diamagnetic drift speed ≫ Alfvén speed and the magnetic shear angle is moderate. We demonstrate that the slippage between electrons and the magnetic flux mitigates the suppression and can even result in fast reconnection that lacks one of the outflow jets. Through comparing a case where the diamagnetic drift is supported by the temperature gradient with a companion case that has a density gradient instead, we identify a robust suppression mechanism. The drift of the x-line is slowed down locally by the asymmetric nature of the x-line, and then the x-line is run over and swallowed by the faster-moving following flux.

  9. Atlas of Dutch drift sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riksen, Michel; Jungerius, Pieter

    2013-04-01

    The Netherlands is well known for its aeolian landscapes. Frequent storms during the High Middle Ages (1000-1300 AD) reactivated Pleistocene coversands and river dunes and are responsible for the formation of the Holocene drift sands at a scale which is unique for Europe. A hypothesized relationship with farmer practices for making plaggensoils has recently been refuted, because drift sand formation began centuries earlier. The coastal dune belt with their parabolic dunes dates from the same period as the drift sand. An estimate of the extent of drift sands can be made from soil maps: drift sands are too young to show much profile development (Regosols). With this method Koster estimated the maximum extent of Holocene drift sands in the Netherlands to be about 800 km2 (Koster 2005). Laser altimetry allows a more precise estimate of the total surface affected by wind from the characteristic relief patterns produced by the Holocene wind, which is different from the smooth surface of cover sand deposits. Laser altimetry has been used before to investigate the mechanism of drift sand formation (Jungerius & Riksen 2010). Most of the surface affected by wind is not active anymore, but the tell-tale rough surface survived ages of different landuse. The total affected surface amounts to 825 km2. It is noteworthy that both methods give comparable results. We recorded a total number of 367 of affected areas of varying shapes, ranging in size from 1.6 ha to a large complex of drif sands of 7,119.5 ha. As is to be expected from their mode of origin, most occurrences are associated with cover sands, and with river dunes along the river Meuse and smaller rivers in other parts of the country. Particularly the final phases of cover sand and river dunes that show more relief as parabolic dunes were affected. There are also small aeolian deposits at the lee side blown from fallow agricultural fields but they are (sub)recent. Most of the relief is irregular, but the larger

  10. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    D. Jolley

    2000-11-09

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses.

  11. SAA drift:experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Kudela, K.; Romashova, V. V.; Drozdov, A. Yu.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth's magnetic field connected with magnetic momentum changing. Besides these variations affects on the trapped belt South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations including Space Shuttle short-time flights approved the existence SAA westward drift with speed 0.1-1.0 (deg/year) and northward drift with speed approximately 0.1 (deg/year). In this work we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in SINP MSU in 1972-2003 from different satellites. There were analyzed the fluxes of protons with energy > 50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy > 500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1-1.0 MeV in SAA area and their maxima location. The data about fluxes were obtained onboard the orbital stations ``Salut-6'' (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the identical experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact of the SAA westward drift. Moreover the same analysis of maximum flux location of electrons with hundreds keV energy (satellites ``Kosmos-484'' (1972), ``Interkosmos-17'' (1977) and ``Activny'' (``Interkosmos-24'', 1991)) confirmed not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  12. Dust waves in rotating planetary magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Saleem, H.

    2005-10-31

    Low frequency electrostatic drift and acoustic waves are studied in rotating dusty plasmas. Linear dispersion relation is found. It is pointed out that rotation of the planet can introduce dust drift waves through Coriolis force in the planetary magnetospheres. This mode can couple with dust acoustic mode. Coriolis force effect may give rise to dipolar vortices in rotating dusty plasmas of planetary magnetospheres.

  13. On the quasi-linear diffusion in collisionless plasmas (to say nothing about Landau damping)

    SciTech Connect

    Hellinger, Petr; Travnicek, Pavel M.

    2012-06-15

    General quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for nonrelativistic collisionless plasmas are derived for unstable modes and analytically continued to damped modes. Properties of the resulting diffusion are investigated and discussed.

  14. General-relativistic approach to the nonlinear evolution of collisionless matter

    SciTech Connect

    Matarrese, S.; Pantano, O. ); Saez, D. )

    1993-02-15

    A new general-relativistic algorithm is developed to study the nonlinear evolution of scalar (density) perturbations of an irrotational collisionless fluid up to shell crossing, under the approximation of neglecting the interaction with tensor (gravitational-wave) perturbations. The dynamics of each fluid element is separately followed in its own inertial rest frame by a system of twelve coupled first-order ordinary differential equations, which can be further reduced to six under very general conditions. Initial conditions are obtained in a cosmological framework, from linear theory, in terms of a single gauge-invariant potential. Physical observables, which are expressed in the Lagrangian form at different times, can be traced back to the Eulerian picture by solving supplementary first-order differential equations for the relative position vectors of neighboring fluid elements. Similarly to the Zel'dovich approximation, in our approach the evolution of each fluid element is completely determined by the local initial conditions and can be independently followed up to the time when it enters a multistream region. Unlike the Zel'dovich approximation, however, our approach is correct also in three dimensions (except for the possible role of gravitational waves). The accuracy of our numerical procedure is tested by integrating the nonlinear evolution of a spherical perturbation in an otherwise spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe and comparing the results with the exact Tolman-Bondi solution for the same initial profile. An exact solution for the planar symmetric case is also given, which turns out to be locally identical to the Zel'dovich solution.

  15. Does the Rate of Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection Depend on the Dissipation Mechanism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aunai, Nicolas; Hesse, Michael; Black, Carrie; Evans, Rebekah; Kuznetsova, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the electron dissipation effect on the reconnection rate is investigated in the general case of asymmetric collisionless magnetic reconnection. Contrary to the standard collisionless reconnection model, it is found that the reconnection rate, and the macroscopic evolution of the reconnecting system, crucially depend on the nature of the dissipation mechanism and that the Hall effect alone is not able to sustain fast reconnection.

  16. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sgalla, R. J. F.

    2015-02-15

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the f ∼ 40 kHz oscillation observed in tokamak TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is λ{sub r} ∼ 25 cm, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs)

  17. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgalla, R. J. F.

    2015-02-01

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the f ˜ 40 kHz oscillation observed in tokamak TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is λr ˜ 25 cm, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs).

  18. The CLAS drift chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Mestayer, M.D.; Carman, D.S.; Asavaphibhop, B.

    1999-04-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on a toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  19. The continental drift convection cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. A.; Behn, Mark D.

    2015-06-01

    Continents on Earth periodically assemble to form supercontinents and then break up again into smaller continental blocks (the Wilson cycle). Previous highly developed numerical models incorporate fixed continents while others indicate that continent movement modulates flow. Our simplified numerical model suggests that continental drift is fundamental. A thermally insulating continent is anchored at its center to mantle flow on an otherwise stress-free surface for infinite Prandtl number cellular convection with constant material properties. Rayleigh numbers exceed 107, while continent widths and chamber lengths approach Earth's values. The Wilson cycle is reproduced by a unique, rugged monopolar "continental drift convection cell." Subduction occurs at the cell's upstream end with cold slabs dipping at an angle beneath the moving continent (as found in many continent/subduction regions on Earth). Drift enhances vertical heat transport up to 30%, especially at the core-mantle boundary, and greatly decreases lateral mantle temperature differences.

  20. Relation of anomalous resistivity and current intensity in turbulent collisionless plasma cascades in the geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Kemel, Koen; Henri, Pierre; Califano, Francesco; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Using the full kinetic implicit PIC code, iPiC3D, we studied the properties of plasma kinetic turbulence, such as would be found at the interface between the solar wind and the Earth magnetosphere at low latitude during northwards periods. In this case, in the presence of a magnetic field oriented mostly perpendicular to the velocity shear, turbulence is fed by the disruption of a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex chain via secondary instabilities, vortex pairing and non-linear interactions. We found that the magnetic energy spectral cascade between ion and electron inertial scales is in agreement with satellite observations and previous numerical simulations; however, in our case the spectrum ends with a peak beyond de due to the occurrence of the lower hybrid drift instability. The electric energy spectrum is influenced by secondary instabilities: anomalous resistivity, fed by the development of the lower hybrid drift instability, steepens the spectral decay and, depending on the alignment of B and the shear vorticity, peaks due to ion-Bernstein waves may dominate the spectrum around di. A key conclusion of the study is that the anomalous resistivity produced by these complex wave and instabilities can indeed very accurately be described in terms of a proportionality with the current. This research used resources of NERSC, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  1. Warm wave breaking of nonlinear plasma waves with arbitrary phase velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2005-11-01

    A warm, relativistic fluid theory of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed to analyze nonlinear plasma waves excited by intense drive beams. The maximum amplitude and wavelength are calculated for nonrelativistic plasma temperatures and arbitrary plasma wave phase velocities. The maximum amplitude is shown to increase in the presence of a laser field. These results set a limit to the achievable gradient in plasma-based accelerators.

  2. Warm wave breaking of nonlinear plasma waves with arbitrary phase velocities.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E; Shadwick, B A

    2005-11-01

    A warm, relativistic fluid theory of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed to analyze nonlinear plasma waves excited by intense drive beams. The maximum amplitude and wavelength are calculated for nonrelativistic plasma temperatures and arbitrary plasma wave phase velocities. The maximum amplitude is shown to increase in the presence of a laser field. These results set a limit to the achievable gradient in plasma-based accelerators. PMID:16383678

  3. Onset of stimulated Raman scattering of a laser in a plasma in the presence of hot drifting electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, D. N. Yadav, Pinki; Avinash, K.; Jang, D. G.; Suk, H.; Hur, M. S.

    2015-05-15

    Stimulated Raman scattering of a laser in plasmas with energetic drifting electrons was investigated by analyzing the growth of interacting waves during the Raman scattering process. The Langmuir wave and scattered electromagnetic sideband wave grow initially and are dampened after attaining a maximum level that indicates a periodic exchange of energy between the pump wave and the daughter waves. The presence of energetic drifting electrons in the laser-produced plasma influences the stimulated Raman scattering process. The plasma wave generated by Raman scattering may be influenced by the energetic electrons, which enhance the growth rate of the instability. Our results show that the presence of energetic (hot) drifting electrons in a plasma has an important effect on the evolution of the interacting waves. This phenomenon is modeled via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the propagation and interaction of the laser under Raman instability.

  4. Drift Hamiltonian in magnetic coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Boozer, A.H.; Hay, R.

    1982-02-01

    A Hamiltonian formulation of the guiding-center drift in arbitrary, steady state, magnetic and electric fields is given. The canonical variables of this formulation are simply related to the magnetic coordinates. The modifications required to treat ergodic magnetic fields using magnetic coordinates are explicitly given in the Hamiltonian formulation.

  5. Does the geoid drift west?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, G. E.; Parker, R. L.; Zumberge, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    In 1970 Hide and Malin noted a correlation of about 0.8 between the geoid and the geomagnetic potential at the Earth's surface when the latter is rotated eastward in longitude by about 160 degrees and the spherical harmonic expansions of both functions are truncated at degree 4. From a century of magnetic observatory data, Hide and Malin inferred an average magnetic westward drift rate of about 0.27 degrees/year. They attributed the magnetic-gravitational correlation to a core event at about 1350 A.D. which impressed the mantle's gravity pattern at long wavelengths onto the core motion and the resulting magnetic field. The impressed pattern was then carried westward 160 degrees by the nsuing magnetic westward drift. An alternative possibility is some sort of steady physical coupling between the magnetic and gravitational fields (perhaps migration of Hide's bumps on the core-mantle interface). This model predicts that the geoid will drift west at the magnetic rate. On a rigid earth, the resulting changes in sea level would be easily observed, but they could be masked by adjustment of the mantle if it has a shell with viscosity considerably less than 10 to the 21 poise. However, steady westward drift of the geoid also predicts secular changes in g, the local acceleration of gravity, at land stations. These changes are now ruled out by recent independent high-accuracy absolute measurements of g made by several workers at various locations in the Northern Hemisphere.

  6. Drift, Violence, and the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besag, Frank P.

    This paper begins by discussing David Matza's concept of "Drift" as a causal factor in violence and delinquent behavior. Matza's theory of delinquency contends that youth are prone to feelings of injustice, neutralization, preparation, and desperation. According to Matza, no one characteristic of the potential delinquent is sufficient, although…

  7. Dynamics and microinstabilities at perpendicular collisionless shock: A comparison of large-scale two-dimensional full particle simulations with different ion to electron mass ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, Takayuki Kidani, Yoshitaka; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2014-02-15

    Large-scale two-dimensional (2D) full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out for studying the relationship between the dynamics of a perpendicular shock and microinstabilities generated at the shock foot. The structure and dynamics of collisionless shocks are generally determined by Alfven Mach number and plasma beta, while microinstabilities at the shock foot are controlled by the ratio of the upstream bulk velocity to the electron thermal velocity and the ratio of the plasma-to-cyclotron frequency. With a fixed Alfven Mach number and plasma beta, the ratio of the upstream bulk velocity to the electron thermal velocity is given as a function of the ion-to-electron mass ratio. The present 2D full PIC simulations with a relatively low Alfven Mach number (M{sub A} ∼ 6) show that the modified two-stream instability is dominant with higher ion-to-electron mass ratios. It is also confirmed that waves propagating downstream are more enhanced at the shock foot near the shock ramp as the mass ratio becomes higher. The result suggests that these waves play a role in the modification of the dynamics of collisionless shocks through the interaction with shock front ripples.

  8. Atomic physics effects on tokamak edge drift-tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.

    1993-03-01

    The effects of ionization and charge exchange on the linear stability of drift-tearing modes are analytically investigated. In particular, the linear instability threshold {Delta}{sup Th}, produced by ion sound wave coupling is modified. In the strongly collisional regime, the ionization breaks up the near cancellation of the perturbed electric field and the pressure gradient along the magnetic field, and increases the threshold. In the semi-collisional regime, both ionization and charge exchange act as drag on the ion parallel velocity, and consequently decrease the threshold by reducing the effectiveness of ion sound wave propagation.

  9. Atomic physics effects on tokamak edge drift-tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.

    1993-03-01

    The effects of ionization and charge exchange on the linear stability of drift-tearing modes are analytically investigated. In particular, the linear instability threshold [Delta][sup Th], produced by ion sound wave coupling is modified. In the strongly collisional regime, the ionization breaks up the near cancellation of the perturbed electric field and the pressure gradient along the magnetic field, and increases the threshold. In the semi-collisional regime, both ionization and charge exchange act as drag on the ion parallel velocity, and consequently decrease the threshold by reducing the effectiveness of ion sound wave propagation.

  10. Observation of ionization-mediated transition from collisionless interpenetration to collisional stagnation during merging of two supersonic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Auna

    2014-10-01

    Colliding plasmas appear in systems ranging from inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmas to astrophysical plasmas such as supernova remnants. These interactions can be in a regime that is neither purely collisional nor purely collisionless, which complicates modeling, and the nature of many colliding plasmas makes their detailed characterization difficult. Experiments studying the head-on collision of two supersonic plasma jets were performed on the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. We present experimental measurements demonstrating a transition from an initially collisionless interaction to a collisional one, due to a rising mean ionization level Z. Jets of an argon/impurity mixture are launched from opposing ports of a 3-m-diameter spherical vacuum chamber, and when they meet have density n ~1014 cm-3, temperature T ~ 2 . 4 eV, Z ~ 1 . 2 , velocity v ~ 45 km/s, and diameter d ~ 30 cm. Laser interferometer measurements show that the two jet fronts interpenetrate as they arrive at chamber center, consistent with calculated inter-jet ion collision lengths, which are long. As they interpenetrate, a rising Z , attributable to frictional heating of electrons by counterstreaming ions, causes a rapid decrease in the inter-jet ion collision length (~Z-4). As the inter-jet ion collision length drops to the scale of the interaction region, the interaction becomes collisional and the jets stagnate, eventually producing collisional shock waves. These measurements offer an opportunity to validate plasma collisionality models for plasmas with complex equation of state. Supported by the LANL LDRD Program; PLX facility construction supported by OFES.

  11. An asymmetric outer retinal response to drifting sawtooth gratings.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Nina; Hugrass, Laila; Jayasuriya, Jude; Crewther, Sheila G; Crewther, David P

    2016-05-01

    Electroretinogram (ERG) studies have demonstrated that the retinal response to temporally modulated fast-ON and fast-OFF sawtooth flicker is asymmetric. The response to spatiotemporal sawtooth stimuli has not yet been investigated. Perceptually, such drifting gratings or diamond plaids shaded in a sawtooth pattern appear brighter when movement produces fast-OFF relative to fast-ON luminance profiles. The neural origins of this illusion remain unclear (although a retinal basis has been suggested). Thus we presented toad eyecups with sequential epochs of sawtooth, sine-wave, and square-wave gratings drifting horizontally across the retina at temporal frequencies of 2.5-20 Hz. All ERGs revealed a sustained direct-current (DC) transtissue potential during drift and a peak at drift offset. The amplitudes of both phenomena increased with temporal frequency. Consistent with the human perceptual experience of sawtooth gratings, the sustained DC potential effect was greater for fast-OFF cf. fast-ON sawtooth. Modeling suggested that the dependence of temporal luminance contrast on stimulus device frame rate contributed to the temporal frequency effects but could not explain the divergence in response amplitudes for the two sawtooth profiles. The difference between fast-ON and fast-OFF sawtooth profiles also remained following pharmacological suppression of postreceptoral activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX), 2-amino-4-phosphonobutric acid (APB), and 2,3 cis-piperidine dicarboxylic acid (PDA). Our results indicate that the DC potential difference originates from asymmetries in the photoreceptoral response to fast-ON and fast-OFF sawtooth profiles, thus pointing to an outer retinal origin for the motion-induced drifting sawtooth brightness illusion. PMID:26888098

  12. Self-organized relaxation in a collisionless gravitating system.

    PubMed

    Sota, Yasuhide; Iguchi, Osamu; Tashiro, Tohru; Morikawa, Masahiro

    2008-05-01

    We propose the self-organized relaxation process which drives a collisionless self-gravitating system to the equilibrium state satisfying local virial (LV) relation. During the violent relaxation process, particles can move widely within the time interval as short as a few free-fall times, because of the effective potential oscillations. Since such particle movement causes further potential oscillations, it is expected that the system approaches the critical state where such particle activities, which we call gravitational fugacity, is independent of the local position as much as possible. Here we demonstrate that gravitational fugacity can be described as the functional of the LV ratio, which means that the LV ratio is a key ingredient estimating the particle activities against gravitational potential. We also demonstrate that the LV relation is attained if the LV ratio exceeds the critical value b=1 everywhere in the bound region during the violent relaxation process. The local region which does not meet this criterion can be trapped into the presaturated state. However, small phase-space perturbation can bring the inactive part into the LV critical state. PMID:18643036

  13. Intrinsic rotation drive by collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Peng, Shuitao; Diamond, P. H.

    2016-04-01

    Both the parallel residual stress and parallel turbulent acceleration driven by electrostatic collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence are calculated analytically using gyrokinetic theory. Quasilinear results show that the parallel residual stress contributes an outward flux of co-current rotation for normal magnetic shear and turbulence intensity profile increasing outward. This may induce intrinsic counter-current rotation or flattening of the co-current rotation profile. The parallel turbulent acceleration driven by CTEM turbulence vanishes, due to the absence of a phase shift between density fluctuation and ion pressure fluctuation. This is different from the case of ion temperature gradient turbulence, for which the turbulent acceleration can provide co-current drive for normal magnetic shear and turbulence intensity profile increasing outward. Its order of magnitude is predicted to be the same as that of the divergence of the residual stress [L. Wang and P. H. Diamond, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 265006 (2013)]. A possible connection of these theoretical results to experimental observations of electron cyclotron heating effects on toroidal rotation is discussed.

  14. COSMIC-RAY-INDUCED FILAMENTATION INSTABILITY IN COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, D.; Spitkovsky, A.

    2013-03-01

    We used unprecedentedly large two-dimensional and three-dimensional hybrid (kinetic ions-fluid electrons) simulations of non-relativistic collisionless strong shocks in order to investigate the effects of self-consistently accelerated ions on the overall shock dynamics. The current driven by suprathermal particles streaming ahead of the shock excites modes transverse to the background magnetic field. The Lorentz force induced by these self-amplified fields tends to excavate tubular, underdense, magnetic-field-depleted cavities that are advected with the fluid and perturb the shock surface, triggering downstream turbulent motions. These motions further amplify the magnetic field, up to factors of 50-100 in knot-like structures. Once downstream, the cavities tend to be filled by hot plasma plumes that compress and stretch the magnetic fields in elongated filaments; this effect is particularly evident if the shock propagates parallel to the background field. Highly magnetized knots and filaments may provide explanations for the rapid X-ray variability observed in RX J1713.7-3946 and for the regular pattern of X-ray bright stripes detected in Tycho's supernova remnant.

  15. Quasi-collisional Magneto-optic Effects in Collisionless Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Brett; Ford, Alex; Medvedev, Mikhail

    2016-03-01

    High-amplitude, chaotic/turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations are ubiquitous in astrophysical plasmas, where they can be excited by various kinetic-streaming and/or anisotropy-driven instabilities, such as the Weibel instability. These fields typically exist on ``sub-Larmor scales'' -- scales smaller than the electron Larmor radius. Electrons moving through such magnetic fields undergo small-angle stochastic deflections of their pitch-angles, thus establishing diffusive transport on long time-scales. We show that this behavior, under certain conditions, is equivalent to Coulomb collisions in collisional plasmas. The magnetic pitch-angle diffusion coefficient, which acts as an effective ``collision'' frequency, may be substantial in these, otherwise, collisionless environments. We show that this effect, colloquially referred to as the plasma ``quasi-collisionality'', may radically alter the expected radiative transport properties of candidate plasmas. We argue that the modified magneto-optic effects in these plasmas provide an attractive, novel radiative diagnostic tool for the exploration and characterization of small-scale magnetic turbulence.

  16. Theory of a cylindrical probe in a collisionless magnetoplasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laframboise, J. G.; Rubinstein, J.

    1976-01-01

    A theory is presented for a cylindrical electrostatic probe in a collisionless plasma in the case where the probe axis is inclined at an angle to a uniform magnetic field. The theory is applicable to electron collection, and under more restrictive conditions, to ion collection. For a probe at space potential, the theory is exact in the limit where probe radius is much less than Debye length. At attracting probe potentials, the theory yields an upper bound and an adiabatic limit for current collection. At repelling probe potentials, it provides a lower bound. The theory is valid if the ratios of probe radius to Debye length and probe radius to mean gyroradius are not simultaneously large enough to produce extrema in the probe sheath potential. The numerical current calculations are based on the approximation that particle orbits are helices near the probe, together with the use of kinetic theory to relate velocity distributions near the probe to those far from it. Probe characteristics are presented for inclination angles from 0 to 90 deg and for probe-radius mean-gyroradius ratios from 0.1 to infinity. For an angle of 0 deg, the end-effect current is calculated separately.

  17. Collisionless spectral-kinetic Simulation of the Multipole Resonance Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrygin, Wladislaw; Szeremley, Daniel; Schilling, Christian; Oberrath, Jens; Eremin, Denis; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2012-10-01

    Plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well established plasma diagnostic method realized in several designs. One of these designs is the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In its idealized - geometrically simplified - version it consists of two dielectrically shielded, hemispherical electrodes to which an RF signal is applied. A numerical tool is under development, which is capable of simulating the dynamics of the plasma surrounding the MRP in electrostatic approximation. In the simulation the potential is separeted in an inner and a vacuum potential. The inner potential is influenced by the charged partilces and is calculated by a specialized Poisson solver. The vacuum potential fulfills Laplace's equetion and consists of the applied voltage of the probe as boundary condition. Both potentials are expanded in spherical harmonics. For a practical particle pusher implementation, the expansion must be appropriately truncated. Compared to a PIC simulation a grid is unnecessary to calculate the force on the particles. This work purpose is a collisionless kinetic simulation, which can be used to investigate kinetic effects on the resonance behavior of the MRP.[4pt] [1] M. Lapke et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 2008, 051502.

  18. Modeling the Lyα Forest in Collisionless Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorini, Daniele; Oñorbe, José; Lukić, Zarija; Hennawi, Joseph F.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmological hydrodynamic simulations can accurately predict the properties of the intergalactic medium (IGM), but only under the condition of retaining the high spatial resolution necessary to resolve density fluctuations in the IGM. This resolution constraint prohibits simulating large volumes, such as those probed by BOSS and future surveys, like DESI and 4MOST. To overcome this limitation, we present “Iteratively Matched Statistics” (IMS), a novel method to accurately model the Lyα forest with collisionless N-body simulations, where the relevant density fluctuations are unresolved. We use a small-box, high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation to obtain the probability distribution function (PDF) and the power spectrum of the real-space Lyα forest flux. These two statistics are iteratively mapped onto a pseudo-flux field of an N-body simulation, which we construct from the matter density. We demonstrate that our method can reproduce the PDF, line of sight and 3D power spectra of the Lyα forest with good accuracy (7%, 4%, and 7% respectively). We quantify the performance of the commonly used Gaussian smoothing technique and show that it has significantly lower accuracy (20%–80%), especially for N-body simulations with achievable mean inter-particle separations in large-volume simulations. In addition, we show that IMS produces reasonable and smooth spectra, making it a powerful tool for modeling the IGM in large cosmological volumes and for producing realistic “mock” skies for Lyα forest surveys.

  19. Kinetic axisymmetric gravitational equilibria in collisionless accretion disk plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Miller, John C.; Tessarotto, Massimo

    2010-07-15

    A theoretical treatment is presented of kinetic equilibria in accretion disks (AD) around compact objects, for cases where the plasma can be considered as collisionless. The plasma is assumed to be axisymmetric and to be acted on by gravitational and electromagnetic fields; in this paper, the particular case is considered where the magnetic field admits a family of toroidal magnetic surfaces, which are locally mutually nested and closed. It is pointed out that there exist asymptotic kinetic equilibria represented by generalized bi-Maxwellian distribution functions and characterized by primarily toroidal differential rotation and temperature anisotropy. It is conjectured that kinetic equilibria of this type can exist which are able to sustain both toroidal and poloidal electric current densities, the latter being produced via finite Larmor-radius effects associated with the temperature anisotropy. This leads to the possibility of existence of a new kinetic effect - referred to here as a 'kinetic dynamo effect - resulting in the self-generation of toroidal magnetic field even by a stationary plasma, without any net radial accretion flow being required. The conditions for these equilibria to occur, their basic theoretical features, and their physical properties are all discussed in detail.

  20. Slow shock formation and temperature anisotropy in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashimori, K.; Hoshino, M.

    2011-12-01

    We perform a two-dimensional simulation by using an electromagnetic hybrid code to study the formation of slow-mode shocks in collisionless magnetic reconnection in low beta plasmas, and we argue that one of important agents of the formation of slow shocks is the ion temperature anisotropy enhanced at the shock downstream region. As magnetic reconnection develops, it is known that the parallel temperature along the magnetic field becomes large in association with the anisotropic PSBL ion beams, and this temperature anisotropy has a tendency to suppress the formation of slow shock. Although preceding studies on magnetic reconnection with kinetic codes have shown such ion temperature anisotropy along the reconnection layer, the direct relation between formation of slow shocks and the ion temperature anisotropy has not been investigated. Based on our simulation result, we found that the slow shock formation is suppressed due to the large temperature anisotropy near the X-type region, but the downstream ion temperature anisotropy relaxes with increasing the distance from the magnetic neutral point. As a result, two pairs of current structures, which are the strong evidence of dissipation of magnetic field in slow shocks, are formed at the distance |x| > 115 λ i from the neutral point.